Science.gov

Sample records for controlled spatial separation

  1. 3-D Separation Control using Spatially-Compact, Pulsed Actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, George T. K.; Glezer, Ari

    2013-11-01

    The dynamics of controlled 3-D transitory attachment of stalled flow over a dynamically pitching 2-D airfoil are investigated in wind tunnel experiments. Pulsed actuation is effected over a spanwise fraction of the separated domain on a time scale that is an order of magnitude shorter than the airfoil's characteristic convective time scale using surface-integrated pulsed, combustion-driven actuator jets. The formation, evolution, and advection of vorticity concentrations over the airfoil and in its near wake are computed from high-resolution, phase-locked PIV measurements of the flow field in multiple cross-stream planes. It is shown that transitory attachment spreads toward the outboard, unactuated flow domains and exceeds the spanwise width of the actuation. The attachment is preceded by the formation of 3-D vortical structures that are advected and shed into the near wake. The effect of the actuation on the variation of the lift and pitching moment during the pitching cycle is altered significantly with its phase delay relative to the airfoil's pitching motion and can significantly mitigate the adverse aerodynamic effects of the dynamic stall. Supported by AFOSR.

  2. Controlling Separation in Turbomachines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Simon; Himmel, Christoph; Power, Bronwyn; Wakelam, Christian; Xu, Liping; Hynes, Tom; Hodson, Howard

    2010-01-01

    Four examples of flow control: 1) Passive control of LP turbine blades (Laminar separation control). 2) Aspiration of a conventional axial compressor blade (Turbulent separation control). 3) Compressor blade designed for aspiration (Turbulent separation control). 4.Control of intakes in crosswinds (Turbulent separation control).

  3. Neural realignment of spatially separated sound components.

    PubMed

    Salminen, Nelli H; Takanen, Marko; Santala, Olli; Alku, Paavo; Pulkki, Ville

    2015-06-01

    Natural auditory scenes often consist of several sound sources overlapping in time, but separated in space. Yet, location is not fully exploited in auditory grouping: spatially separated sounds can get perceptually fused into a single auditory object and this leads to difficulties in the identification and localization of concurrent sounds. Here, the brain mechanisms responsible for grouping across spatial locations were explored in magnetoencephalography (MEG) recordings. The results show that the cortical representation of a vowel spatially separated into two locations reflects the perceived location of the speech sound rather than the physical locations of the individual components. In other words, the auditory scene is neurally rearranged to bring components into spatial alignment when they were deemed to belong to the same object. This renders the original spatial information unavailable at the level of the auditory cortex and may contribute to difficulties in concurrent sound segregation. PMID:26093425

  4. Six Degrees of Auditory Spatial Separation.

    PubMed

    Carlile, Simon; Fox, Alex; Orchard-Mills, Emily; Leung, Johahn; Alais, David

    2016-06-01

    The location of a sound is derived computationally from acoustical cues rather than being inherent in the topography of the input signal, as in vision. Since Lord Rayleigh, the descriptions of that representation have swung between "labeled line" and "opponent process" models. Employing a simple variant of a two-point separation judgment using concurrent speech sounds, we found that spatial discrimination thresholds changed nonmonotonically as a function of the overall separation. Rather than increasing with separation, spatial discrimination thresholds first declined as two-point separation increased before reaching a turning point and increasing thereafter with further separation. This "dipper" function, with a minimum at 6 ° of separation, was seen for regions around the midline as well as for more lateral regions (30 and 45 °). The discrimination thresholds for the binaural localization cues were linear over the same range, so these cannot explain the shape of these functions. These data and a simple computational model indicate that the perception of auditory space involves a local code or multichannel mapping emerging subsequent to the binaural cue coding. PMID:27033087

  5. Spatial Pinning Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frasca, Mattia; Buscarino, Arturo; Rizzo, Alessandro; Fortuna, Luigi

    2012-05-01

    In this Letter, we introduce the concept of spatial pinning control for a network of mobile chaotic agents. In a planar space, N agents move as random walkers and interact according to a time-varying r-disk proximity graph. A control input is applied only to those agents which enter a given area, called control region. The control is effective in driving all the agents to a reference evolution and has better performance than pinning control on a fixed set of agents. We derive analytical conditions on the relative size of the control region and the agent density for the global convergence of the system to the reference evolution and study the system under different regimes inherited by the velocity.

  6. ISOTOPE SEPARATING APPARATUS CONTROL

    DOEpatents

    Barnes, S.W.

    1959-08-25

    An improved isotope separating apparatus of the electromagnetic type, commonly referred to as a calutron, is described. Improvements in detecting and maintaining optimum position and focus of the ion beam are given. The calutron collector is provided with an additional electrode insulated from and positioned between the collecting pockets. The ion beams are properly positioned and focused until the deionizing current which flows from ground to this additional electrode ts a minimum.

  7. Work control in separations facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, L.D.

    1990-01-01

    The topic addressed in this technical review is the development and implementation of a work control program in one of the chemical separations facilities at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, SC. This program will be used as a pilot for the Nuclear Materials Processing Division at the site. The SRS Work Control Pilot program is based on the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) good practices and guidelines for the conduct of maintenance and complies with SRS quality assurance and DOE orders on maintenance management. The program follows a ten-step process for control of maintenance and maintenance-related activities in a chemical separations facility. The program took the existing maintenance planning and scheduling system and upgraded it to comply with all INPO work control and related guidelines for histories, post-maintenance testing and scheduling. The development process of adapting a nuclear-related- based plan to a batch/continuous chemical separations plant was a challenge. There were many opportunities to develop improvements in performance while being creative and realistic in applying reactor maintenance technology to chemical plant maintenance. This pilot program for work control in a nonreactor nuclear facility will provide valuable information for applying a controlled maintenance process to a multiphase chemical operating plant environment.

  8. Work control in separations facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, L.D.

    1990-12-31

    The topic addressed in this technical review is the development and implementation of a work control program in one of the chemical separations facilities at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, SC. This program will be used as a pilot for the Nuclear Materials Processing Division at the site. The SRS Work Control Pilot program is based on the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) good practices and guidelines for the conduct of maintenance and complies with SRS quality assurance and DOE orders on maintenance management. The program follows a ten-step process for control of maintenance and maintenance-related activities in a chemical separations facility. The program took the existing maintenance planning and scheduling system and upgraded it to comply with all INPO work control and related guidelines for histories, post-maintenance testing and scheduling. The development process of adapting a nuclear-related- based plan to a batch/continuous chemical separations plant was a challenge. There were many opportunities to develop improvements in performance while being creative and realistic in applying reactor maintenance technology to chemical plant maintenance. This pilot program for work control in a nonreactor nuclear facility will provide valuable information for applying a controlled maintenance process to a multiphase chemical operating plant environment.

  9. Attosecond beamline with actively stabilized and spatially separated beam paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huppert, M.; Jordan, I.; Wörner, H. J.

    2015-12-01

    We describe a versatile and compact beamline for attosecond spectroscopy. The setup consists of a high-order harmonic source followed by a delay line that spatially separates and then recombines the extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) and residual infrared (IR) pulses. The beamline introduces a controlled and actively stabilized delay between the XUV and IR pulses on the attosecond time scale. A new active-stabilization scheme combining a helium-neon-laser and a white-light interferometer minimizes fluctuations and allows to control delays accurately (26 as rms during 1.5 h) over long time scales. The high-order-harmonic-generation region is imaged via optical systems, independently for XUV and IR, into an interaction volume to perform pump-probe experiments. As a consequence of the spatial separation, the pulses can be independently manipulated in intensity, polarization, and frequency content. The beamline can be combined with a variety of detectors for measuring attosecond dynamics in gases, liquids, and solids.

  10. Attosecond beamline with actively stabilized and spatially separated beam paths.

    PubMed

    Huppert, M; Jordan, I; Wörner, H J

    2015-12-01

    We describe a versatile and compact beamline for attosecond spectroscopy. The setup consists of a high-order harmonic source followed by a delay line that spatially separates and then recombines the extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) and residual infrared (IR) pulses. The beamline introduces a controlled and actively stabilized delay between the XUV and IR pulses on the attosecond time scale. A new active-stabilization scheme combining a helium-neon-laser and a white-light interferometer minimizes fluctuations and allows to control delays accurately (26 as rms during 1.5 h) over long time scales. The high-order-harmonic-generation region is imaged via optical systems, independently for XUV and IR, into an interaction volume to perform pump-probe experiments. As a consequence of the spatial separation, the pulses can be independently manipulated in intensity, polarization, and frequency content. The beamline can be combined with a variety of detectors for measuring attosecond dynamics in gases, liquids, and solids. PMID:26724005

  11. Spatial interference from well-separated split condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Zawadzki, M. E.; Griffin, P. F.; Riis, E.; Arnold, A. S.

    2010-04-15

    We use magnetic levitation and a variable-separation dual optical plug to obtain clear spatial interference between two condensates axially separated by up to 0.25 mm - the largest separation observed with this kind of interferometer. Clear planar fringes are observed using standard (i.e., nontomographic) resonant absorption imaging. The effect of a weak inverted parabola potential on fringe separation is observed and agrees well with theory.

  12. Spatial separation benefit for unaided and aided listening

    PubMed Central

    Ahlstrom, Jayne B.; Horwitz, Amy R.; Dubno, Judy R.

    2013-01-01

    Consonant recognition in noise was measured at a fixed signal-to-noise ratio as a function of low-pass-cutoff frequency and noise location in older adults fit with bilateral hearing aids. To quantify age-related differences, spatial benefit was assessed in younger and older adults with normal hearing. Spatial benefit was similar for all groups suggesting that older adults used interaural difference cues to improve speech recognition in noise equivalently to younger adults. Although amplification was sufficient to increase high-frequency audibility with spatial separation, hearing-aid benefit was minimal, suggesting that factors beyond simple audibility may be responsible for limited hearing-aid benefit. PMID:24121648

  13. Perceiving the coherent movements of spatially-separated features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mowafy, Lyn; Lappin, Joseph S.

    1991-01-01

    When a partially-occluded object is represented in an image, it is defined by a set of spatially-separated features that may be registered at different spatial scales. To understand the image, human vision must organize these fragmented optical features into common and distinct object surfaces. Although the common fate of moving features often is considered a primary source of reliable information for image segmentation, little is known of the visual system's capacity to discriminate the coherent relative movements of spatially-separated features. In a series of experiments, observers viewed elements whose movements were correlated (direction and magnitude) or were uncorrelated. Our results indicate that observers can discriminate the two types of movement about as well as they can detect any movement at all. Moreover, the ability to perceive coherent movements is maintained under a variety of conditions including differences in the elements' spatial frequency content, spatial position and contrast, and temporal phase shifts between the spatially-correlated displacements. These results suggest that coherent relative motion may be a fundamental source of information exploited by vision, despite considerable variability in the spatial and temporal characteristics of the individual features.

  14. Identification and Control of Separated Shear Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shao-Ching; Kim, John

    2002-11-01

    There has been increased interest in applying modern control theory to flow-control problems. For simple flows, such as turbulent channel and boundary layers, several investigators have constructed controllers based on linear optimal control theory, which requires certain information of the system to be controlled. However, for complex flows, such as separated flow past an airfoil, the required system information is not readily available, thus hindering the construction of controllers following the same procedure used for the simple flows. In this study, we use the system identification theory to construct a model of flow system for controller design. The model, as an approximation to the actual system, is based on the input-output relationship of the actual system. The locations of sensors and actuators are determined based on the spatial and temporal correlations of the flow field and practical measurement considerations. The system identification approach has been applied to both simple and complex flows. Linear and nonlinear disturbances to selected flow systems are considered to evaluate the performance of the constructed model. A series of numerical experiments have been performed to assess the validity of using linear approximations for nonlinear complex flows.

  15. Quantum interference with photon pairs created in spatially separated sources

    SciTech Connect

    Riedmatten, H. de; Marcikic, I.; Zbinden, H.; Gisin, N.; Tittel, W.

    2003-02-01

    We report on a quantum interference experiment to probe the coherence between two photons coming from nondegenerate photon pairs at telecom wavelength created in spatially separated sources. The two photons are mixed on a beam splitter and we observe a reduction of up to 84% in the net coincidence count rate when the photons are made indistinguishable. This experiment constitutes an important step towards the realization of quantum teleportation and entanglement swapping with independent sources.

  16. Cyclone separator having boundary layer turbulence control

    DOEpatents

    Krishna, Coimbatore R.; Milau, Julius S.

    1985-01-01

    A cyclone separator including boundary layer turbulence control that is operable to prevent undue build-up of particulate material at selected critical areas on the separator walls, by selectively varying the fluid pressure at those areas to maintain the momentum of the vortex, thereby preventing particulate material from inducing turbulence in the boundary layer of the vortical fluid flow through the separator.

  17. Spatial filters for shape control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindner, Douglas K.; Reichard, Karl M.

    1992-01-01

    Recently there has emerged a new class of sensors, called spatial filters, for structures which respond over a significant gauge length. Examples include piezoelectric laminate PVDF film, modal domain optical fiber sensors, and holographic sensors. These sensors have a unique capability in that they can be fabricated to locally alter their sensitivity to the measurand. In this paper we discuss how these sensors can be used for the implementation of control algorithms for the suppression of acoustic radiation from flexible structures. Based on this relationship between the total power radiated to the far field to the modal velocities of the structure, we show how the sensor placement to optimize the control algorithm to suppress the radiated power.

  18. Simultaneous Multiple-Location Separation Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenblatt, David (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A method of controlling a shear layer for a fluid dynamic body introduces first periodic disturbances into the fluid medium at a first flow separation location. Simultaneously, second periodic disturbances are introduced into the fluid medium at a second flow separation location. A phase difference between the first and second periodic disturbances is adjusted to control flow separation of the shear layer as the fluid medium moves over the fluid dynamic body.

  19. Spatial separation of parental genomes in hybrids of somatic plant cells.

    PubMed

    Gleba, Y Y; Parokonny, A; Kotov, V; Negrutiu, I; Momot, V

    1987-06-01

    Chromosome spatial arrangements on metaphase plates of intergeneric intertribal cell hybrids of Nicotiana chinensis and Atropa belladonna as well as interspecific somatic hybrid plants of Nicotiana plumbaginifolia and Nicotiana sylvestris were analyzed. In the metaphases of the first divisions of protoplast fusion products, chromosomes of the two parents were spatially separated (segmented metaphase). In long-term cultured somatic hybrids, the topology of genome separation pattern in both callus cells and plants showed changes in form from "segmental" to "radial." Growing the hybrid cells in the presence of colchicine resulted in random chromosome arrangement both in cells directly exposed to different colchicine concentrations and in colchicine-treated cells grown in colchicine-free media. The degree of genome separation calculated for different cell clones remained constant during in vitro propagation of cells but was significantly lower for subclones derived from colchicine-treated cells. Therefore, it is concluded that spatial chromosome arrangement in metaphase is epigenetically controlled. PMID:16593838

  20. Implementing of Quantum Cloning with Spatially Separated Quantum Dot Spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Jing-Ji; Yeon, Kyu-Hwang; Du, Xin; Lv, Jia; Wang, Ming; Wang, Hong-Fu; Zhang, Shou

    2016-07-01

    We propose some schemes for implementing optimal symmetric (asymmetric) 1 → 2 universal quantum cloning, optimal symmetric (asymmetric) 1 → 2 phase-covariant cloning, optimal symmetric 1 → 3 economical phase-covariant cloning and optimal symmetric 1 → 3 economical real state cloning with spatially separated quantum dot spins by choosing the single-qubit rotation angles appropriately. The decoherences of the spontaneous emission of QDs, cavity decay and fiber loss are suppressed since the effective long-distance off-resonant interaction between two distant QDs is mediated by the vacuum fields of the fiber and cavity, and during the whole process no system is excited.

  1. Implementing of Quantum Cloning with Spatially Separated Quantum Dot Spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Jing-Ji; Yeon, Kyu-Hwang; Du, Xin; Lv, Jia; Wang, Ming; Wang, Hong-Fu; Zhang, Shou

    2016-02-01

    We propose some schemes for implementing optimal symmetric (asymmetric) 1 → 2 universal quantum cloning, optimal symmetric (asymmetric) 1 → 2 phase-covariant cloning, optimal symmetric 1 → 3 economical phase-covariant cloning and optimal symmetric 1 → 3 economical real state cloning with spatially separated quantum dot spins by choosing the single-qubit rotation angles appropriately. The decoherences of the spontaneous emission of QDs, cavity decay and fiber loss are suppressed since the effective long-distance off-resonant interaction between two distant QDs is mediated by the vacuum fields of the fiber and cavity, and during the whole process no system is excited.

  2. Resonant indirect exchange via spatially separated two-dimensional channel

    SciTech Connect

    Rozhansky, I. V.; Krainov, I. V.; Averkiev, N. S.; Aronzon, B. A.; Davydov, A. B.; Kugel, K. I.; Tripathi, V.; Lähderanta, E.

    2015-06-22

    We apply the resonant indirect exchange interaction theory to explain the ferromagnetic properties of the hybrid heterostructure consisting of a InGaAs-based quantum well (QW) sandwiched between GaAs barriers with spatially separated Mn δ-layer. The experimentally obtained dependence of the Curie temperature on the QW depth exhibits a peak related to the region of resonant indirect exchange. We suggest the theoretical explanation and a fit to this dependence as a result of the two contributions to ferromagnetism—the intralayer contribution and the resonant exchange contribution provided by the QW.

  3. Plasmons in spatially separated double-layer graphene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagheri, Mehran; Bahrami, Mousa

    2014-05-01

    Motivated by innovative progresses in designing multi-layer graphene nanostructured materials in the laboratory, we theoretically investigate the Dirac plasmon modes of a spatially separated double-layer graphene nanoribbon system, made up of a vertically offset armchair and metallic graphene nanoribbon pair. We find striking features of the collective excitations in this novel Coulomb correlated system, where both nanoribbons are supposed to be either intrinsic (undoped/ungated) or extrinsic (doped/gated). In the former, it is shown the low-energy acoustical and the high-energy optical plasmon modes are tunable only by the inter-ribbon charge separation. In the later, the aforementioned plasmon branches are modified by the added doping factor. As a result, our model could be useful to examine the existence of a linear Landau-undamped low-energy acoustical plasmon mode tuned via the inter-ribbon charge separation as well as doping. This study might also be utilized for devising novel quantum optical waveguides based on the Coulomb coupled graphene nanoribbons.

  4. Plasmons in spatially separated double-layer graphene nanoribbons

    SciTech Connect

    Bagheri, Mehran; Bahrami, Mousa

    2014-05-07

    Motivated by innovative progresses in designing multi-layer graphene nanostructured materials in the laboratory, we theoretically investigate the Dirac plasmon modes of a spatially separated double-layer graphene nanoribbon system, made up of a vertically offset armchair and metallic graphene nanoribbon pair. We find striking features of the collective excitations in this novel Coulomb correlated system, where both nanoribbons are supposed to be either intrinsic (undoped/ungated) or extrinsic (doped/gated). In the former, it is shown the low-energy acoustical and the high-energy optical plasmon modes are tunable only by the inter-ribbon charge separation. In the later, the aforementioned plasmon branches are modified by the added doping factor. As a result, our model could be useful to examine the existence of a linear Landau-undamped low-energy acoustical plasmon mode tuned via the inter-ribbon charge separation as well as doping. This study might also be utilized for devising novel quantum optical waveguides based on the Coulomb coupled graphene nanoribbons.

  5. Managing Flap Vortices via Separation Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenblatt, David

    2006-01-01

    A pilot study was conducted on a flapped semi-span model to investigate the concept and viability of near-wake vortex management by means of boundary layer separation control. Passive control was achieved using a simple fairing and active control was achieved via zero mass-flux blowing slots. Vortex sheet strength, estimated by integrating surface pressures, was used to predict vortex characteristics based on inviscid rollup relations and vortices trailing the flaps were mapped using a seven-hole probe. Separation control was found to have a marked effect on vortex location, strength, tangential velocity, axial velocity and size over a wide range of angles of attack and control conditions. In general, the vortex trends were well predicted by the inviscid rollup relations. Manipulation of the separated flow near the flap edges exerted significant control over either outboard or inboard edge vortices while producing small lift and moment excursions. Unsteady surface pressures indicated that dynamic separation and attachment control can be exploited to perturb vortices at wavelengths shorter than a typical wingspan. In summary, separation control has the potential for application to time-independent or time-dependent wake alleviation schemes, where the latter can be deployed to minimize adverse effects on ride-quality and dynamic structural loading.

  6. Excitonic condensation in spatially separated one-dimensional systems

    SciTech Connect

    Abergel, D. S. L.

    2015-05-25

    We show theoretically that excitons can form from spatially separated one-dimensional ground state populations of electrons and holes, and that the resulting excitons can form a quasicondensate. We describe a mean-field Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory in the low carrier density regime and then focus on the core-shell nanowire giving estimates of the size of the excitonic gap for InAs/GaSb wires and as a function of all the experimentally relevant parameters. We find that optimal conditions for pairing include small overlap of the electron and hole bands, large effective mass of the carriers, and low dielectric constant of the surrounding media. Therefore, one-dimensional systems provide an attractive platform for the experimental detection of excitonic quasicondensation in zero magnetic field.

  7. Daily access to sucrose impairs aspects of spatial memory tasks reliant on pattern separation and neural proliferation in rats.

    PubMed

    Reichelt, Amy C; Morris, Margaret J; Westbrook, Reginald Frederick

    2016-07-01

    High sugar diets reduce hippocampal neurogenesis, which is required for minimizing interference between memories, a process that involves "pattern separation." We provided rats with 2 h daily access to a sucrose solution for 28 d and assessed their performance on a spatial memory task. Sucrose consuming rats discriminated between objects in novel and familiar locations when there was a large spatial separation between the objects, but not when the separation was smaller. Neuroproliferation markers in the dentate gyrus of the sucrose-consuming rats were reduced relative to controls. Thus, sucrose consumption impaired aspects of spatial memory and reduced hippocampal neuroproliferation. PMID:27317199

  8. Spatial adiabatic passage via interaction-induced band separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benseny, Albert; Gillet, Jérémie; Busch, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    The development of advanced quantum technologies and the quest for a deeper understanding of many-particle quantum mechanics requires control over the quantum state of interacting particles to a high degree of fidelity. However, the quickly increasing density of the spectrum, together with the appearance of crossings in time-dependent processes, makes any effort to control the system hard and resource intensive. Here we show that in trapped systems regimes can exist in which isolated energy bands appear that allow one to easily generalize known single-particle techniques. We demonstrate this for the well-known spatial adiabatic passage effect, which can control the center-of-mass state of atoms with high fidelity.

  9. Control of vortical separation on conical bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mourtos, Nikos J.; Roberts, Leonard

    1987-01-01

    In a variety of aeronautical applications, the flow around conical bodies at incidence is of interest. Such applications include, but are not limited to, highly maneuverable aircraft with delta wings, the aerospace plane and nose portions of spike inlets. The theoretical model used has three parts. First, the single line vortex model is used within the framework of slender body theory, to compute the outer inviscid field for specified separation lines. Next, the three dimensional boundary layer is represented by a momentum equation for the cross flow, analogous to that for a plane boundary layer; a von Karman Pohlhausen approximation is applied to solve this equation. The cross flow separation for both laminar and turbulent layers is determined by matching the pressure at the upper and lower separation points. This iterative procedure yields a unique solution for the separation lines and consequently for the position of the vortices and the vortex lift on the body. Lastly, control of separation is achieved by blowing tangentially from a slot located along a cone generator. It is found that for very small blowing coefficients, the separation can be postponed or suppressedy completely.

  10. Control and Identification of a Separated Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shao-Ching; Kim, John; Gibson, Steve

    2004-11-01

    There has been increased interest in applying modern control theory to flow-control problems. For simple flows, such as turbulent channel and boundary layers, several investigators have successfully designed controllers based on linear optimal control theory. However, applying the same procedure to complex flows is hindered since certain required information of the flow is not readily available. In this study, we use system identification theory to construct an approximate linear model from input-output data for a separated boundary layer on a flat plate exposed to an adverse pressure gradient. The subspace system identification method yields a more accurate system model than the ARX method we had used previously. A linear quadratic Gaussian (LQG) synthesis was used to design an optimal controller to reduce the separation bubble size. Effects of the controller were investigated by comparing the controlled flow field to the uncontrolled one, and that controlled by a conventional open-loop scheme. A number of issues regarding model reduction, model stability, and the choice of cost function, will also be presented.

  11. Fast CNOT gate between two spatially separated atoms via shortcuts to adiabatic passage.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yan; Song, Chong; Ji, Xin; Zhang, Shou

    2015-09-01

    Quantum logic gate is indispensable to quantum computation. One of the important qubit operations is the quantum controlled-not (CNOT) gate that performs a NOT operation on a target qubit depending on the state of the control qubit. In this paper we present a scheme to realize the quantum CNOT gate between two spatially separated atoms via shortcuts to adiabatic passage. The influence of various decoherence processes on the fidelity is discussed. The strict numerical simulation results show that the fidelity for the CNOT gate is relatively high. PMID:26368473

  12. Separation Control Using Miniature Vortex Generator Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, John K.; Xu, Cheng

    1998-11-01

    Vortex generator jets are jets which emerge from pitched and skewed holes in the wall bounding a turbulent flow. They have been shown to develop persistent longitudinal vortices when the hole size is comparable to the boundary layer thickness. This experiment used much smaller jets with diameters around a twentieth of the boundary layer thickness. The jets were arranged to produce arrays of co-rotating longitudinal vortices. By changing the hole spacing, the vortices could be made to either remain separate or amalgamate into much larger vortices. The amalgamated vortices produced strong disturbances similar to those produced by a vane-type vortex generator with height comparable to the boundary layer thickness. These disturbances persisted more than 1000 hole diameters downstream. The separation control capabilities were tested in an adverse pressure gradient boundary layer which separated and then reattached forming a closed bubble. The miniature vortex generator jets could control the length of the separated region eventually eliminating it entirely at sufficiently high jet speeds.

  13. Measurement of wavefront distortions by the method of aperture sounding with spatially separated channels

    SciTech Connect

    Prilepskiy, Boris V; Alikhanov, Alexey N; Berchenko, Evgeniy A; Kiselev, Vladimir Yu; Narusbek, Ernest A; Filatov, Aleksander S

    2005-08-31

    Features of the formation of signals in wavefront sensors with the single-frequency light wave phase modulation and spatial separation of control channels are considered. Analysis is performed for sensors in which phase modulation is governed by a controlled element located in the pupil of the optical system of a sensor or in the focal plane of the objective of this system. Peculiarities of the signal formation for a tilted wavefront are considered separately for internal points of the exit pupil in the case of light wave phase modulation in the pupil. It is shown that a signal at the modulation frequency in these wavefront sensors for points located far from the pupil boundaries is determined by the wavefront curvature. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  14. Separation Control using Lorentz Force Actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johari, H.; Tucker, A.; Thomas, S.

    2003-11-01

    To assess the feasibility of Lorentz force actuators for separation control, flow visualization experiments were conducted in a low-speed water tunnel. Salt was added to the tunnel to yield an electrical conductivity of one half of seawater. The setup consisted of a 1.3 m long flat plate followed by a 15^o ramp. The boundary layer was tripped near the flat plate leading edge, resulting in a fully turbulent 2D boundary layer. The Lorentz force actuator had 3 mm wide surface mounted electrodes and permanent magnets. The actuator, which was placed just upstream of the ramp, could be used to produce forces in the streamwise or spanwise direction. To reduce electrolysis and subsequent corrosion, the input power was modulated thus producing pulsatile forcing. The Reynolds number based on the freestream velocity and ramp length was ˜ 10^4. The flow separated shortly after the ramp and vortex shedding at a dimensionless frequency of ˜ 2 was observed. Although both streamwise and spanwise forcing were successful in reducing the separated region, the latter was much more effective. The spanwise forcing was most effective at frequencies 10 to 20 times the natural shedding frequency, whereas the streamwise forcing was effective at frequencies closer to the natural shedding frequency. The effectiveness of spanwise forcing is attributed to the generation of streamwise vorticity. Forcing in the direction opposite to the freestream resulted in complete separation at the start of the ramp.

  15. Formation metrology and control for large separated optics space telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mettler, E.; Quadrelli, M.; Breckenridge, W.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we present formation flying performance analysis initial results for a representative large space telescope composed of separated optical elements [Mett 02]. A virtual-structure construct (an equivalent rigid body) is created by unique metrology and control that combines both centralized and decentralized methods. The formation may be in orbit at GEO for super-resolution Earth observation, as in the case of Figure 1, or it may be in an Earth-trailing orbit for astrophysics, Figure 2. Extended applications are envisioned for exo-solar planet interferometric imaging by a formation of very large separated optics telescopes, Figure 3. Space telescopes, with such large apertures and f/10 to f/100 optics, are not feasible if connected by massive metering structures. Instead, the new virtual-structure paradigm of information and control connectivity between the formation elements provides the necessary spatial rigidity and alignment precision for the telescope.

  16. Passive separation control by acoustic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, S. L.; Spedding, G. R.

    2013-10-01

    At transitional Reynolds numbers, the laminar boundary layer separation and possible reattachment on a smooth airfoil, or wing section, are notoriously sensitive to small variations in geometry or in the fluid environment. We report here on the results of a pilot study that adds to this list of sensitivities. The presence of small holes in the suction surface of an Eppler 387 wing has a transformative effect upon the aerodynamics, by changing the mean chordwise separation line location. These changes are not simply a consequence of the presence of the small cavities, which by themselves have no effect. Acoustic resonance in the backing cavities generates tones that interact with intrinsic flow instabilities. Possible consequences for passive flow control strategies are discussed together with potential problems in measurements through pressure taps in such flow regimes.

  17. Spatial Control of Condensation using Chemical Micropatterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Kevin; Hansen, Ryan; Nath, Saurabh; Retterer, Scott; Collier, Patrick; Boreyko, Jonathan; Nature-Inspired Fluids; Interfaces Team; CenterNanophase Materials Sciences Team

    2015-11-01

    Surfaces exhibiting wettability patterns can spatially control the nucleation of condensation to enable enhanced fog harvesting and phase-change heat transfer. To date, studies of patterned condensation have utilized a combination of chemical and topographical features, making it difficult to isolate the effects of intrinsic wettability versus surface roughness on spatially controlling the condensate. Here, we fabricate chemical micropatterns consisting of hydrophilic silicon oxide and a smooth hydrophobic silane monolayer to isolate the effects of changes in intrinsic wettability on the spatial control of condensation. Complete spatial control, defined as every nucleation and growth event occurring exclusively on the hydrophilic features, was observed even for supercooled droplets at high water vapor supersaturation. However, this complete spatial control was found to break down beyond a critical spacing that depended upon the extent of supersaturation. The average diameter of condensate was found to be smaller for the chemically micropatterned surfaces compared to a uniformly hydrophobic surface. Control of inter-droplet spacing between supercooled condensate through chemical patterning can be employed to minimize the growth of inter-droplet frost on cold surfaces.

  18. CONTROL SYSTEM FOR ISOTOPE SEPARATING APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Barnes, S.W.

    1960-01-26

    A method is described for controlling the position of the ion beams in a calutron used for isotope separation. The U/sup 238/ beams is centered over the U/sup 235/ receiving pocket, the operator monitoring the beam until a maximum reading is achieved on the meter connected to that pocket. Then both beams are simultaneously shifted by a preselected amount to move the U/sup 235/ beam over the U/sup 235/ pocket. A slotted door is placed over the entrance to that pocket during the U/sup 238/ beam centering to reduce the contamination to the pocket, while allowing enough beam to pass for monitoring purposes.

  19. Virtual Human Analogs to Rodent Spatial Pattern Separation and Completion Memory Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paleja, Meera; Girard, Todd A.; Christensen, Bruce K.

    2011-01-01

    Spatial pattern separation (SPS) and spatial pattern completion (SPC) have played an increasingly important role in computational and rodent literatures as processes underlying associative memory. SPS and SPC are complementary processes, allowing the formation of unique representations and the reconstruction of complete spatial environments based…

  20. Simultaneous and spatially separated detection of multiple orbital angular momentum states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tudor, R.; Mihailescu, M.; Kusko, C.; Paun, I. A.; Nan, A. E.; Kusko, M.

    2016-06-01

    We present a method for spatially separated detection of multiple orbital angular momentum (OAM) states, simultaneous. The starting point is the generation of axially superposed Laguerre-Gauss beams, carrying multiple OAM states using a single computer generated hologram. The information contained in the OAM superposition is transferred to the first diffraction order and is detected at the receiver with a reading mask, which contains two perpendicular superposed fork-like holograms, ensuring the spatial separation of the OAM states. The dynamic of the process is studied in terms of the number of generated OAM states and the constructive parameters values. The experimental investigations use an optical arrangement based on a spatial light modulator in the transmitter unit and an amplitude mask in the receiver unit. This proof of concept experiment demonstrates the possibility of simultaneously detection of multiple OAM states in points located at different coordinates, controlled through the design of the holograms and shows the capability of our proposed method to increase the capacity of free-space optical communication channels.

  1. Tangential synthetic jets for separation control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmaeili Monir, H.; Tadjfar, M.; Bakhtian, A.

    2014-02-01

    A numerical study of separation control has been made to investigate aerodynamic characteristics of a NACA23012 airfoil with a tangential synthetic jet. Simulations are carried out at the chord Reynolds number of Re=2.19×106. The present approach relies on solving the Unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) equations. The turbulence model used in the present computation is the Spalart-Allmaras one-equation model. All computations are performed with a finite volume based code. Stall characteristics are significantly improved by controlling the formation of separation vortices in the flow. We placed the synthetic jet at the 12% chord, xj=0.12c, where we expected the separation to occur. Two distinct jet oscillating frequencies: Fj+=0.159 and Fj+=1 were considered. We studied the effect of blowing ratio, Vj/U∞, where it was varied from 0 to 5. The inclined angle of the synthetic jet was varied from αj=0° up to αj=83°. For the non-zero inclined angles, the local maximum in the aerodynamic performance, Cl/Cd, of 6.89 was found for the inclined angle of about 43°. In the present method, by means of creating a dent on the airfoil, linear momentum is transferred to the flow system in tangential direction to the airfoil surface. Thus the absolute maximum of 11.19 was found for the tangential synthetic jet at the inclined angle of the jet of 0°. The mechanisms involved for a tangential jet appear to behave linearly, as by multiplying the activation frequency of the jet by a factor produces the same multiplication factor in the resulting frequency in the flow. However, the mechanisms involved in the non-zero inclined angle cases behave nonlinearly when the activation frequency is multiplied.

  2. Evidence of Separable Spatial Representations in a Virtual Navigation Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gramann, Klaus; Muller, Hermann J.; Eick, Eva-Maria; Schonebeck, Bernd

    2005-01-01

    Three experiments investigated spatial orientation in a virtual navigation task. Subjects had to adjust a homing vector indicating their end position relative to the origin of the path. It was demonstrated that sparse visual flow was sufficient for accurate path integration. Moreover, subjects were found to prefer a distinct egocentric or…

  3. Impulsive Injection for Compressor Stator Separation Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culley, Dennis E.; Braunscheidel, Edward P.; Bright, Michelle M.

    2005-01-01

    Flow control using impulsive injection from the suction surface of a stator vane has been applied in a low speed axial compressor. Impulsive injection is shown to significantly reduce separation relative to steady injection for vanes that were induced to separate by an increase in vane stagger angle of 4 degrees. Injected flow was applied to the airfoil suction surface using spanwise slots pitched in the streamwise direction. Injection was limited to the near-hub region, from 10 to 36 percent of span, to affect the dominant loss due to hub leakage flow. Actuation was provided externally using high-speed solenoid valves closely coupled to the vane tip. Variations in injected mass, frequency, and duty cycle are explored. The local corrected total pressure loss across the vane at the lower span region was reduced by over 20 percent. Additionally, low momentum fluid migrating from the hub region toward the tip was effectively suppressed resulting in an overall benefit which reduced corrected area averaged loss through the passage by 4 percent. The injection mass fraction used for impulsive actuation was typically less than 0.1 percent of the compressor through flow.

  4. Amplitude Scaling of Active Separation Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stalnov, Oksana; Seifert, Avraham

    2010-01-01

    Three existing and two new excitation magnitude scaling options for active separation control at Reynolds numbers below one Million. The physical background for the scaling options was discussed and their relevance was evaluated using two different sets of experimental data. For F+ approx. 1, 2D excitation: a) The traditional VR and C(mu) - do not scale the data. b) Only the Re*C(mu) is valid. This conclusion is also limited for positive lift increment.. For F+ > 10, 3D excitation, the Re corrected C(mu), the St corrected velocity ratio and the vorticity flux coefficient, all scale the amplitudes equally well. Therefore, the Reynolds weighted C(mu) is the preferred choice, relevant to both excitation modes. Incidence also considered, using Ue from local Cp.

  5. Excitation of two spatially separated Bose-Einstein condensates of magnons

    SciTech Connect

    Dzyapko, O.; Demidov, V. E.; Buchmeier, M.; Demokritov, S. O.; Stockhoff, T.; Schmitz, G.; Melkov, G. A.

    2009-08-01

    We have studied experimentally the spatial properties and the dynamics of magnon Bose-Einstein condensates created in ferromagnetic films by a parametric pumping with different spatial configurations. Using the specific character of dynamic fields produced by pumping resonators of different shapes, we were able to realize the regime, in which two spatially separated condensates of magnons are formed. Our experiments show that while the separation between the condensates is determined by the size of the resonator, their spatial width can be changed by varying the power of the pumping signal.

  6. Metasurface Spatial Processor for Electromagnetic Remote Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achouri, Karim; Lavigne, Guillaume; Salem, Mohamed A.; Caloz, Christophe

    2016-05-01

    We introduce the concept of metasurface spatial processor, whose transmission is remotely and coherently controlled by the superposition of an incident wave and a control wave through the metasurface. The conceptual operation of this device is analogous to both that of a transistor and a Mach-Zehnder interferometer, while offering much more diversity in terms of electromagnetic transformations. We demonstrate two metasurfaces, that perform the operation of electromagnetic switching and amplification.

  7. Spatial evolutionary spectrum for DOA estimation and blind signal separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayhan, A. S.; Amin, Moeness G.

    1999-11-01

    In this paper, we use the concept of evolutionary spectrum to solve key problems in array processing. We present Cross-power Evolutionary Periodogram for direction finding and blind separation of nonstationary signals. We model nonstationary signals received by each sensor in the array as a sum of complex sinusoids with time-varying amplitudes. These amplitudes carry information about the direction of arrival which may also be time-varying. We first estimate the time-varying amplitudes, then use the results for the estimation of evolutionary cross-power distributions of the sensor data. Next, using cross-power estimates at time-frequency samples of interest, we estimate the directions of arrival using one of the existing high resolution direction finding methods. If the directions are time-varying, we select time-frequency points around the time of interest. By carrying out the estimation at different times, we obtain the directions as a function of time. If the sources are stationary, then we can use all time-frequency points of interest for the estimation of fixed directions. We also use whitening and subspace methods to find the mixing matrix and separate the signals received by the array. Simulation examples illustrating the performances of the proposed algorithms are presented.

  8. Entanglement generation and quantum information transfer between spatially-separated qubits in different cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chui-Ping; Su, Qi-Ping; Nori, Franco

    2013-11-01

    The generation and control of quantum states of spatially-separated qubits distributed in different cavities constitute fundamental tasks in cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED). An interesting question in this context is how to prepare entanglement and realize quantum information transfer between qubits located at different cavities, which are important in large-scale quantum information processing. In this paper, we consider a physical system consisting of two cavities and three qubits. Two of the qubits are placed in two different cavities while the remaining one acts as a coupler, which is used to connect the two cavities. We propose an approach for generating quantum entanglement and implementing quantum information transfer between the two spatially-separated inter-cavity qubits. The quantum operations involved in this proposal are performed by a virtual photon process; thus the cavity decay is greatly suppressed during operations. In addition, to complete these tasks, only one coupler qubit and one operation step are needed. Moreover, there is no need to apply classical pulses, so that the engineering complexity is much reduced and the operation procedure is greatly simplified. Finally, our numerical results illustrate that high-fidelity implementation of this proposal using superconducting phase qubits and one-dimensional transmission line resonators is feasible for current circuit QED implementations. This proposal can also be applied to other types of superconducting qubits, including flux and charge qubits.

  9. Spatial constraints control cell proliferation in tissues

    PubMed Central

    Streichan, Sebastian J.; Hoerner, Christian R.; Schneidt, Tatjana; Holzer, Daniela; Hufnagel, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Control of cell proliferation is a fundamental aspect of tissue formation in development and regeneration. Cells experience various spatial and mechanical constraints depending on their environmental context in the body, but we do not fully understand if and how such constraints influence cell cycle progression and thereby proliferation patterns in tissues. Here, we study the impact of mechanical manipulations on the cell cycle of individual cells within a mammalian model epithelium. By monitoring the response to experimentally applied forces, we find a checkpoint at the G1–S boundary that, in response to spatial constraints, controls cell cycle progression. This checkpoint prevents cells from entering S phase if the available space remains below a characteristic threshold because of crowding. Stretching the tissue results in fast cell cycle reactivation, whereas compression rapidly leads to cell cycle arrest. Our kinetic analysis of this response shows that cells have no memory of past constraints and allows us to formulate a biophysical model that predicts tissue growth in response to changes in spatial constraints in the environment. This characteristic biomechanical cell cycle response likely serves as a fundamental control mechanism to maintain tissue integrity and to ensure control of tissue growth during development and regeneration. PMID:24706777

  10. Individual Differences in Spatial Pattern Separation Performance Associated with Healthy Aging in Humans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stark, Shauna M.; Yassa, Michael A.; Stark, Craig E. L.

    2010-01-01

    Rodent studies have suggested that "pattern separation," the ability to distinguish among similar experiences, is diminished in a subset of aged rats. We extended these findings to the human using a task designed to assess spatial pattern separation behavior (determining at time of test whether pairs of pictures shown during the study were in the…

  11. Numerical modeling of active separation control by synthetic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aram, Shawn

    Zero-Net Mass-Flux (ZNMF) actuators or synthetic jet actuators are versatile micro scale devices with numerous applications in the field of fluid mechanics. The primary focus of the current work is to use time-accurate simulations to study the interaction of these jets with cross flows and to optimize their performance for the control of boundary layer separation. This study consists of four parts. In the first part, a class of phenomenology-based models is proposed to reproduce the flow associated with synthetic jets in grazing flows and simplify the task of ZNMF-based flow control simulations. The proposed models have a non-uniform jet velocity profile with only two spatial degrees of freedom and a uniform slip velocity on the slot-flow boundary. A comparison of key integral quantities associated with the momentum, energy and vorticity fluxes shows that the models with a non-uniform jet velocity during the expulsion phase and uniform jet velocity during the ingestion phase can predict these quantities with good accuracy, whereas a simple plug flow model with a zero slip and uniform jet velocity under-predicts these three quantities during the expulsion phase. Based on our initial analysis, three of the simplest models are selected for further study, including an assessment of their performance for a canonical separated flow at different forcing frequencies. A key finding is that a simple plug-flow type model can predict incorrect trends for separation reduction with the jet frequency. A preliminary attempt is also made to provide empirical closure to these models. The effect of synthetic jets orientation on its interaction with a zero pressure gradient laminar boundary layer is explored in the second part. A rectangular slot is chosen in this study and streamwise and spanwise orientations of this slot are examined. The orientation of the slot is found to have a significant impact on its interaction with the boundary layer. The dominant feature in the streamwise

  12. Reconstruction algorithms for compressive hyperspectral imaging systems with separable spatial and spectral operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oiknine, Yaniv; August, Yitzhak; Stern, Adrian

    2014-09-01

    Recently we introduced a hyperspectral compressive sensing scheme that uses separable projections in the spatial and spectral domains. The separable encoding schemes facilitates the optical implementation, reduces the computational burden dramatically, and storage requirements. Owing to these benefits we have been able to encode the hyperspectral cube in all three dimensions. In this work we present a comparison between various reconstructions methods applied to the hyperspectral data captured with our separable compressive sensing systems.

  13. Feeling better: Separate pathways for targeted enhancement of spatial and temporal touch

    PubMed Central

    Yau, Jeffrey M.; Celnik, Pablo; Hsiao, Steven S.; Desmond, John E.

    2013-01-01

    We perceive spatial form and temporal frequency by touch. Although distinct somatosensory neurons represent spatial and temporal information, these neural populations are intermixed throughout the somatosensory system. Here, we show that spatial and temporal touch can be dissociated and separately enhanced via cortical pathways that are normally associated with vision and audition. In Experiments 1 and 2, we found that anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) applied over visual cortex, but not auditory cortex, enhances tactile perception of spatial orientation. In Experiments 3 and 4, we found that anodal tDCS over auditory cortex, but not visual cortex, enhances tactile perception of temporal frequency. This double-dissociation reveals separate cortical pathways that selectively support spatial and temporal channels. These results bolster the emerging view that sensory areas process multiple modalities and suggest that supramodal domains may be more fundamental to cortical organizational. PMID:24390826

  14. Separate Mechanisms Recruited by Exogenous and Endogenous Spatial Cues: Evidence from a Spatial Stroop Paradigm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Funes, Maria Jesus; Lupianez, Juan; Milliken, Bruce

    2007-01-01

    The present experiments tested whether endogenous and exogenous cues produce separate effects on target processing. In Experiment 1, participants discriminated whether an arrow presented left or right of fixation pointed to the left or right. For 1 group, the arrow was preceded by a peripheral noninformative cue. For the other group, the arrow was…

  15. Spatial and Temporal Control of Surfactant Systems

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoyang; Abbott, Nicholas L.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews some recent progress on approaches leading to spatial and temporal control of surfactant systems. The approaches revolve around the use of redox-active and light-sensitive surfactants. Perspectives are presented on experiments that have realized approaches for active control of interfacial properties of aqueous surfactant systems, reversible control of microstructures and nanostructures formed within bulk solutions, and in situ manipulation of the interactions of surfactants with polymers, DNA and proteins. A particular focus of this review is devoted to studies of amphiphiles that contain the redox-active group ferrocene – reversible control of the oxidation state of ferrocene leads to changes in the charge/hydrophobicity of these amphiphiles, resulting in substantial changes in their self-assembly. Light-sensitive surfactants containing azobenzene, which undergo changes in shape/polarity upon illumination with light, are a second focus of this review. Examples of both redox-active and light-sensitive surfactants that lead to large (> 20mN/m) and spatially localized (~mm) changes in surface tensions on a time scale of seconds are presented. Systems that permit reversible transformations of bulk solution nanostructures – such as micelle-to-vesicle transitions or monomer-to-micelle transitions – are also described. The broad potential utility of these emerging classes of amphiphiles are illustrated by the ability to drive changes in functional properties of surfactant systems, such as rheological properties and reversible solubilization of oils, as well as the ability to control interactions of surfactants with biomolecules to modulate their transport into cells. PMID:19665723

  16. Interaction Mechanisms of Cavitation Bubbles Induced by Spatially and Temporally Separated fs-Laser Pulses

    PubMed Central

    Tinne, Nadine; Kaune, Brigitte; Krüger, Alexander; Ripken, Tammo

    2014-01-01

    The emerging use of femtosecond lasers with high repetition rates in the MHz regime together with limited scan speed implies possible mutual optical and dynamical interaction effects of the individual cutting spots. In order to get more insight into the dynamics a time-resolved photographic analysis of the interaction of cavitation bubbles is presented. Particularly, we investigated the influence of fs-laser pulses and their resulting bubble dynamics with various spatial as well as temporal separations. Different time courses of characteristic interaction effects between the cavitation bubbles were observed depending on pulse energy and spatio-temporal pulse separation. These ranged from merely no interaction to the phenomena of strong water jet formation. Afterwards, the mechanisms are discussed regarding their impact on the medical application of effective tissue cutting lateral to the laser beam direction with best possible axial precision: the mechanical forces of photodisruption as well as the occurring water jet should have low axial extend and a preferably lateral priority. Furthermore, the overall efficiency of energy conversion into controlled mechanical impact should be maximized compared to the transmitted pulse energy and unwanted long range mechanical side effects, e.g. shock waves, axial jet components. In conclusion, these experimental results are of great importance for the prospective optimization of the ophthalmic surgical process with high-repetition rate fs-lasers. PMID:25502697

  17. Perceptually controlled doping for audio source separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahé, Gaël; Nadalin, Everton Z.; Suyama, Ricardo; Romano, João MT

    2014-12-01

    The separation of an underdetermined audio mixture can be performed through sparse component analysis (SCA) that relies however on the strong hypothesis that source signals are sparse in some domain. To overcome this difficulty in the case where the original sources are available before the mixing process, the informed source separation (ISS) embeds in the mixture a watermark, which information can help a further separation. Though powerful, this technique is generally specific to a particular mixing setup and may be compromised by an additional bitrate compression stage. Thus, instead of watermarking, we propose a `doping' method that makes the time-frequency representation of each source more sparse, while preserving its audio quality. This method is based on an iterative decrease of the distance between the distribution of the signal and a target sparse distribution, under a perceptual constraint. We aim to show that the proposed approach is robust to audio coding and that the use of the sparsified signals improves the source separation, in comparison with the original sources. In this work, the analysis is made only in instantaneous mixtures and focused on voice sources.

  18. Modeling of mode locking in a laser with spatially separate gain media.

    PubMed

    Oldenbeuving, R M; Lee, C J; Van Voorst, P D; Offerhaus, H L; Boller, K-

    2010-10-25

    We present a novel laser mode locking scheme and discuss its unusual properties and feasibility using a theoretical model. A large set of single-frequency continuous-wave lasers oscillate by amplification in spatially separated gain media. They are mutually phase-locked by nonlinear feedback from a common saturable absorber. As a result, ultra-short pulses are generated. The new scheme offers three significant benefits: the light that is amplified in each medium is continuous-wave, thereby avoiding issues related to group-velocity dispersion and nonlinear effects that can perturb the pulse shape. The set of frequencies on which the laser oscillates, and therefore the pulse repetition rate, is controlled by the geometry of resonator-internal optical elements, not by the cavity length. Finally, the bandwidth of the laser can be controlled by switching gain modules on and off. This scheme offers a route to mode-locked lasers with high average output power, repetition rates that can be scaled into the THz range, and a bandwidth that can be dynamically controlled. The approach is particularly suited for implementation using semiconductor diode laser arrays. PMID:21164639

  19. Utilization of separate surface control systems on general aviation aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roskam, J.

    1977-01-01

    The application of separate surface control systems to general aviation aircraft is discussed. Block diagrams of a conventional control system with autopilot tie-in and of a separate surface control system are presented, and the advantages and disadvantages of the two systems are compared. Theoretical descriptions of pilot-in-the-loop operation and operation in the autopilot mode are presented. The application of separate surface stability augmentation in yaw dampers, wing levelers, and static longitudinal stability augmentation is examined. The state-of-the-art of separate control surface technology is summarized.

  20. Control of flow separation in a turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Minjeong; Choi, Sangho; Choi, Haecheon

    2015-11-01

    Towards the development of successful control methods for separation delay in a turbulent boundary layer, we adopt a model flow field, in which a turbulent separation occurs above a flat plate (Na and Moin 1998 JFM), and apply controls to this flow for reducing the size of the separation bubble and investigating the interaction between the forcing and flow near the separation bubble. We provide a single-frequency forcing with zero net mass flow rate at the upstream of the separation bubble. At low forcing frequencies, spanwise vortices are generated and travel downstream, bringing high momentum toward the wall and reducing the size of the separation bubble. Also, these vortices cause the separation and reattachment points to travel downstream. On the other hand, at high forcing frequencies, the size of the separation bubble becomes smaller and larger in time, respectively, due to the pressure gradient alternating favorably and adversely in time. Supported by NRF-2011-0028032 and 2014048162.

  1. On the control of a canonical separated flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, John C.

    Flow separation is generally an undesirable phenomenon that produces adverse effects to ideal aerodynamic performance. Control of ow separation is a complex problem and thus a popular area of research. A common obstacle is the lack of understanding of the complex fluid mechanics in cases of ow separation, evident by the substantial amount of ow control achieved through trial-and-error methods. The purpose of this work is to better understand the nature of separation for improved active control methods, which includes closed-loop control via reduced order methods. Control of a canonical separation problem, with the key features of separated flow, is achieved at a chord Reynolds number of 105. Separation is created on a at plate model, void of curvature that would otherwise include effects particular to the type of aerodynamic body. The characteristics of the imposed separation are evaluated with the intent of having a nominally two-dimensional separation, with the same essential flow characteristics of a more traditionally stalled airfoil. Results provide a reduced-order estimation technique that is used to identify global, dynamic modes through experimental measurements. Reattachment of the baseline separation is first achieved in open-loop control via ZNMF actuation. Efficient reattachment is reached by targeting the identified characteristic flow frequencies, which is able to reattach the separated flow with less than a quarter of the control effort as a comparison case with high-frequency forcing. The baseline and control results are used to identify a reduced-order model suitable for closed-loop control, with benefits of set-point tracking and full boundary layer attachment with minimum control effort.

  2. Experimental realization of spatially separated entanglement with continuous variables using laser pulse trains.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yun; Okubo, Ryuhi; Hirano, Mayumi; Eto, Yujiro; Hirano, Takuya

    2015-01-01

    Spatially separated entanglement is demonstrated by interfering two high-repetition squeezed pulse trains. The entanglement correlation of the quadrature amplitudes between individual pulses is interrogated. It is characterized in terms of the sufficient inseparability criterion with an optimum result of in the frequency domain and in the time domain. The quantum correlation is also observed when the two measurement stations are separated by a physical distance of 4.5 m, which is sufficiently large to demonstrate the space-like separation, after accounting for the measurement time. PMID:26278478

  3. Unit Performance, Situational Factors, and Employee Attitudes in Spatially Separated Work Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Lyman W.; And Others

    This study investigated relationships between work unit performance, employee attitudes, and situational characteristics among 411 female clerical workers in 37 branch banks. The work units were characterized by spatial separation and performance of similar functions. Two independent dimensions of performance were empirically identified and their…

  4. The spatial isomorphism problem for close separable nuclear C*-algebras

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Erik; Sinclair, Allan M.; Smith, Roger R.; White, Stuart A.; Winter, Wilhelm

    2010-01-01

    The Kadison–Kastler problem asks whether close C*-algebras on a Hilbert space must be spatially isomorphic. We establish this when one of the algebras is separable and nuclear. We also apply our methods to the study of near inclusions of C*-algebras. PMID:20080723

  5. Spatial control of rabies on heterogeneous landscapes.

    PubMed

    Russell, Colin A; Real, Leslie A; Smith, David L

    2006-01-01

    Rabies control in terrestrial wildlife reservoirs relies heavily on an oral rabies vaccine (ORV). In addition to direct ORV delivery to protect wildlife in natural habitats, vaccine corridors have been constructed to control the spread; these corridors are often developed around natural barriers, such as rivers, to enhance the effectiveness of vaccine deployment. However, the question of how to optimally deploy ORV around a river (or other natural barrier) to best exploit the barrier for rabies control has not been addressed using mathematical models. Given an advancing epidemic wave, should the vaccine be distributed on both sides of barrier, behind the barrier, or in front of it? Here, we introduce a new mathematical model for the dynamics of raccoon rabies on a spatially heterogeneous landscape that is both simple and realistic. We demonstrate that the vaccine should always be deployed behind a barrier to minimize the recurrence of subsequent epidemics. Although the oral rabies vaccine is sufficient to induce herd immunity inside the vaccinated area, it simultaneously creates a demographic refuge. When that refuge is in front of a natural barrier, seasonal dispersal from the vaccine corridor into an endemic region sustains epidemic oscillations of raccoon rabies. When the vaccine barrier creates a refuge behind the river, the low permeability of the barrier to host movement limits dispersal of the host population from the protected populations into the rabies endemic area and limits subsequent rabies epidemics. PMID:17183654

  6. Multi-Antenna Data Collector for Smart Metering Networks with Integrated Source Separation by Spatial Filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quednau, Philipp; Trommer, Ralph; Schmidt, Lorenz-Peter

    2016-03-01

    Wireless transmission systems in smart metering networks share the advantage of lower installation costs due to the expandability of separate infrastructure but suffer from transmission problems. In this paper the issue of interference of wireless transmitted smart meter data with third party systems and data from other meters is investigated and an approach for solving the problem is presented. A multi-channel wireless m-bus receiver was developed to separate the desired data from unwanted interferers by spatial filtering. The according algorithms are presented and the influence of different antenna types on the spatial filtering is investigated. The performance of the spatial filtering is evaluated by extensive measurements in a realistic surrounding with several hundreds of active wireless m-bus transponders. These measurements correspond to the future environment for data-collectors as they took place in rural and urban areas with smart gas meters equipped with wireless m-bus transponders installed in almost all surrounding buildings.

  7. Active-Adaptive Control of Inlet Separation Using Supersonic Microjets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvi, Farrukh S.

    2007-01-01

    Flow separation in internal and external flows generally results in a significant degradation in aircraft performance. For internal flows, such as inlets and transmission ducts in aircraft propulsion systems, separation is undesirable as it reduces the overall system performance. The aim of this research has been to understand the nature of separation and more importantly, to explore techniques to actively control it. In this research, we extended our investigation of active separation control (under a previous NASA grant) where we explored the use of microjets for the control of boundary layer separation. The geometry used for the initial study was a simple diverging Stratford ramp, equipped with arrays of microjets. These early results clearly show that the activation of microjets eliminated flow separation. Furthermore, the velocity-field measurements, using PIV, also demonstrate that the gain in momentum due to the elimination of separation is at least an order of magnitude larger (two orders of magnitude larger in most cases) than the momentum injected by the microjets and is accomplished with very little mass flow through the microjets. Based on our initial promising results this research was continued under the present grant, using a more flexible model. This model allows for the magnitude and extent of separation as well as the microjet parameters to be independently varied. The results, using this model were even more encouraging and demonstrated that microjet control completely eliminated significant regions of flow separation over a wide range of conditions with almost negligible mass flow. Detailed studies of the flowfield and its response to microjets were further examined using 3-component PIV and unsteady pressure measurements, among others. As the results presented this report will show, microjets were successfully used to control the separation of a much larger extent and magnitude than demonstrated in our earlier experiments. In fact, using the

  8. Source attribution of air pollution by spatial scale separation using high spatial density networks of low cost air quality sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimann, I.; Bright, V. B.; McLeod, M. W.; Mead, M. I.; Popoola, O. A. M.; Stewart, G. B.; Jones, R. L.

    2015-07-01

    To carry out detailed source attribution for air quality assessment it is necessary to distinguish pollutant contributions that arise from local emissions from those attributable to non-local or regional emission sources. Frequently this requires the use of complex models and inversion methods, prior knowledge or assumptions regarding the pollution environment. In this paper we demonstrate how high spatial density and fast response measurements from low-cost sensor networks may facilitate this separation. A purely measurement-based approach to extract underlying pollution levels (baselines) from the measurements is presented exploiting the different relative frequencies of local and background pollution variations. This paper shows that if high spatial and temporal coverage of air quality measurements are available, the different contributions to the total pollution levels, namely the regional signal as well as near and far field local sources, can be quantified. The advantage of using high spatial resolution observations, as can be provided by low-cost sensor networks, lies in the fact that no prior assumptions about pollution levels at individual deployment sites are required. The methodology we present here, utilising measurements of carbon monoxide (CO), has wide applicability, including additional gas phase species and measurements obtained using reference networks. While similar studies have been performed, this is the first study using networks at this density, or using low cost sensor networks.

  9. Imaging single photons in non-separable states of polarization and spatial-mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xinru; Galvez, Enrique J.

    2014-10-01

    Non-separable superpositions of polarization and spatial mode of a single photon produce a state that has a polarization that depends on the transverse position, and contains all states of polarization represented on the Poincaré sphere. We have done measurements of the space-dependent state of polarization of single photons prepared in distinct 2×2 (qubit-qubit) and 2×3 (qubit-qutrit) non-separable superpositions of Laguerre-Gauss spatial and polarization states. Detection was done by polarimetry of the light projected at distinct locations in the transverse plane. The polarization patterns had a C-point polarization singularity (lemon, star or monstar) at the center of the transverse wavefunction.

  10. Spatial separation in a thermal mixture of ultracold {sup 174}Yb and {sup 87}Rb atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Baumer, F.; Muenchow, F.; Goerlitz, A.; Maxwell, S. E.; Julienne, P. S.; Tiesinga, E.

    2011-04-15

    We report on the observation of unusually strong interactions in a thermal mixture of ultracold atoms which cause a significant modification of the spatial distribution. A mixture of {sup 87}Rb and {sup 174}Yb with a temperature of a few {mu}K is prepared in a hybrid trap consisting of a bichromatic optical potential superimposed on a magnetic trap. For suitable trap parameters and temperatures, a spatial separation of the two species is observed. We infer that the separation is driven by a large interaction strength between {sup 174}Yb and {sup 87}Rb accompanied by a large three-body recombination rate. Based on this assumption we have developed a diffusion model which reproduces our observations.

  11. Control of volume resistivity in inorganic organic separators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W.; Manzo, M. A.

    1979-01-01

    Control of resistivity in NASA inorganic-organic separators is achieved by incorporating small percentages of high surface area, fine particle silica with other ingredients in the separator coating. The volume resistivity is predictable from the surface area of filler particles in the coating. The approach is applied to two polymer- plasticizer -filler coating systems, where the filler content of each is below the generally acknowledged critical pigment volume concentration of the coating. Application of these coating systems to 0.0254 cm thick (10-mil) fuel cell grade asbestos sheet produces inexpensive, flexible, microporous separators that perform as well as the original inorganic-organic concept, the Astropower separator.

  12. Management of Vortices Trailing Flapped Wings via Separation Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenblatt, David

    2005-01-01

    A pilot study was conducted on a flapped semi-span model to investigate the concept and viability of near-wake vortex management via separation control. Passive control was achieved by means of a simple fairing and active control was achieved via zero mass-flux blowing slots. Vortex sheet strength, estimated by integrating surface pressure ports, was used to predict vortex characteristics by means of inviscid rollup relations. Furthermore, vortices trailing the flaps were mapped using a seven-hole probe. Separation control was found to have a marked effect on vortex location, strength, tangential velocity, axial velocity and size over a wide range of angles of attack and control conditions. In general, the vortex trends were well predicted by the inviscid rollup relations. Manipulation of the separated flow near the flap edges exerted significant control over both outboard and inboard edge vortices while producing negligible lift excursions. Dynamic separation and attachment control was found to be an effective means for dynamically perturbing the vortex from arbitrarily long wavelengths down to wavelengths less than a typical wingspan. In summary, separation control has the potential for application to time-independent or time-dependent wake alleviation schemes, where the latter can be deployed to minimize adverse effects on ride-quality and dynamic structural loading.

  13. Controls on the spatial distribution of oceanic δ13CDIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, P. B.; Edwards, N. R.; Müller, S. A.; Oliver, K. I. C.; Death, R. M.; Ridgwell, A.

    2012-08-01

    We describe the design and evaluation of a large ensemble of coupled climate-carbon cycle simulations with the Earth-system model of intermediate complexity GENIE. This ensemble has been designed for application to a range of carbon cycle questions including utilizing carbon isotope (δ13C) proxy records to help constrain the state at the last glacial. Here we evaluate the ensemble by applying it to a transient experiment over the recent industrial era (1858 to 2008 AD). We employ singular vector decomposition and principal component emulation to investigate the spatial modes of ensemble-variability of oceanic dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) δ13C, considering both the spun-up pre-industrial state and the transient change due to the 13C Suess Effect. These analyses allow us to separate the natural and anthropogenic controls on the δ13CDIC distribution. We apply the same dimensionally reduced emulation techniques to consider the drivers of the spatial uncertainty in anthropogenic DIC. We show that the sources of uncertainty governing the uptake of anthropogenic δ13CDIC and DIC are quite distinct. Uncertainty in anthropogenic δ13C uptake is dominated by uncertainties in air-sea gas exchange, which explains 63% of modelled variance. This mode of variability is absent from the ensemble variability in CO2 uptake, which is rather driven by uncertainties in ocean parameters that control mixing of intermediate and surface waters. Although the need to account for air-sea gas exchange is well known, these results suggest that, to leading order, uncertainties in the 13C Suess effect and anthropogenic CO2 ocean-uptake are governed by different processes. This illustrates the difficulties in reconstructing one from the other and furthermore highlights the need for improved spatial coverage of both δ13CDIC and DIC observations to better constrain the ocean sink of anthropogenic CO2.

  14. Liquid crystal-enabled electro-osmosis through spatial charge separation in distorted regions as a novel mechanism of electrokinetics

    PubMed Central

    Lazo, Israel; Peng, Chenhui; Xiang, Jie; Shiyanovskii, Sergij V.; Lavrentovich, Oleg D.

    2014-01-01

    Electrically controlled dynamics of fluids and particles at microscales is a fascinating area of research with applications ranging from microfluidics and sensing to sorting of biomolecules. The driving mechanisms are electric forces acting on spatially separated charges in an isotropic medium such as water. Here, we demonstrate that anisotropic conductivity of liquid crystals enables new mechanism of highly efficient electro-osmosis rooted in space charging of regions with distorted orientation. The electric field acts on these distortion-separated charges to induce liquid crystal-enabled electro-osmosis. Their velocities grow with the square of the field, which allows one to use an alternating current field to drive steady flows and to avoid electrode damage. Ionic currents in liquid crystals that have been traditionally considered as an undesirable feature in displays, offer a broad platform for versatile applications such as liquid crystal-enabled electrokinetics, micropumping and mixing. PMID:25255307

  15. Level measurement and control strategies for subsea separators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjertaker, Bjorn T.; Johansen, Geir A.; Jackson, Peter

    2001-07-01

    Level monitoring instrumentation is an essential part of hydrocarbon processing facilities, and has, together with separator technology, been widely addressed over the last decade. Key issues are production capacity, product enhancement, and well-flow control. The reliability and accuracy of the level instrumentation, and its ability to monitor all the interface layers of the separator, including the thickness of the foam and the oil-water emulsion, are particularly important when considering the level instrumentation as the main sensing element in the automatic control of the separator vessel. Lately, industry focus has been placed on optimal automatic control to improve the quality of the production output, and to minimize the use of expensive and environmentally undesirable separation enhancing chemicals. Recent developments in hydrocarbon production include subsea separation stations, where the constraints placed on the reliability and accuracy of the level instrumentation are especially demanding. This paper presents level interface monitoring developments based on electrical, ultrasonic, thermal, and nucleonic physical principles for three-phase hydrocarbon separators, and introduces the notion of tomometry, meaning multi-point cross-sectional metering aiming to acquire information on the cross-sectional flow-component distribution in the process vessel intended for control purposes.

  16. Debris control design achievements of the booster separation motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. W.; Chase, C. A.

    1985-01-01

    The stringent debris control requirements imposed on the design of the Space Shuttle booster separation motor are described along with the verification program implemented to ensure compliance with debris control objectives. The principal areas emphasized in the design and development of the Booster Separation Motor (BSM) relative to debris control were the propellant formulation and nozzle closures which protect the motors from aerodynamic heating and moisture. A description of the motor design requirements, the propellant formulation and verification program, and the nozzle closures design and verification are presented.

  17. Who plans for health improvement? SEA, HIA and the separation of spatial planning and health planning

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, Alan; Cave, Ben; Ballantyne, Rob

    2013-09-15

    This study examines whether there is active planning for health improvement in the English spatial planning system and how this varies across two regions using a combination of telephone surveys and focus group interviews in 2005 and 2010. The spatial planning profession was found to be ill-equipped to consider the health and well-being implications of its actions, whilst health professionals are rarely engaged and have limited understanding and aspirations when it comes to influencing spatial planning. Strategic Environmental Assessment was not considered to be successful in integrating health into spatial plans, given it was the responsibility of planners lacking the capacity to do so. For their part, health professionals have insufficient knowledge and understanding of planning and how to engage with it to be able to plan for health gains rather than simply respond to health impacts. HIA practice is patchy and generally undertaken by health professionals outside the statutory planning framework. Thus, whilst appropriate assessment tools exist, they currently lack a coherent context within which they can function effectively and the implementation of the Kiev protocol requiring the engagement of health professionals in SEA is not to likely improve the consideration of health in planning while there continues to be separation of functions between professions and lack of understanding of the other profession. -- Highlights: ► Health professionals have limited aspirations for health improvement through the planning system. ► Spatial planners are ill-equipped to understand the health and well-being implications of their activities. ► SEA and HIA currently do not embed health consideration in planning decisions. ► The separation of health and planning functions is problematic for the effective conduct of SEA and/or HIA.

  18. Initial Development of a Spatially Separated Speech-in-Noise and Localization Training Program

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, Richard S.; Witt, Shelley A.; Dunn, Camille C.; Wang, Wenjun

    2010-01-01

    Objective This article describes the initial development of a novel approach for training hearing-impaired listeners to improve their ability to understand speech in the presence of background noise and to also improve their ability to localize sounds. Design Most people with hearing loss, even those well fit with hearing devices, still experience significant problems understanding speech in noise. Prior research suggests that at least some subjects can experience improved speech understanding with training. However, all training systems that we are aware of have one basic, critical limitation. They do not provide spatial separation of the speech and noise, therefore ignoring the potential benefits of training binaural hearing. In this paper we describe our initial experience with a home-based training system that includes spatially separated speech-in-noise and localization training. Results Throughout the development of this system patient input, training and preliminary pilot data from individuals with bilateral cochlear implants were utilized. Positive feedback from subjective reports indicated that some individuals were engaged in the treatment, and formal testing showed benefit. Feedback and practical issues resulted from the reduction of an eight-loudspeaker to a two-loudspeaker system. Conclusions These preliminary findings suggest we have successfully developed a viable spatial hearing training system that can improve binaural hearing in noise and localization. Applications include, but are not limited to, hearing with hearing aids and cochlear implants. PMID:20701836

  19. Separation of spatial and temporal structure of auroral particle precipitation (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudouridis, A.; Spence, H.

    2013-12-01

    Knowledge of the dominant temporal and spatial scales of auroral features is instrumental in understanding the various mechanisms responsible for auroral particle precipitation. Single spacecraft data suffer from temporal/spatial ambiguity. In an effort to separate the temporal and spatial variations of the aurora, we use electron and ion precipitation data from two co-orbiting satellites, F6 and F8 of the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP). The two spacecraft have almost identical polar orbits with a small difference in period. As a result the time difference between the two measurements varies with time. We use two statistical tools in order to determine the most probable lifetimes and spatial dimensions of the prevalent auroral features, Cross Correlation Analysis (CCA) and Cross Spectral Analysis (CSA). The CCA is applied to the magnetic latitude series of electron and ion, integral number and energy fluxes measured by the two DMSP spacecraft. As one spacecraft overtakes the other, the variable time lag between the two measurements results in different cross correlation of the two series. We explore the dependence of this variation on the time lag between the satellites. We find that the electron precipitation exhibits a decreasing correlation between the two spacecraft with increasing time lag, whereas there is only a small similar effect for the ion precipitation data. For the CSA we compute the so-called coherence function as a function of frequency (or inverse wavelength), and hence size of the auroral features. The coherence function is a measure of the stability of auroral features of different sizes. We investigate its variation as a function of the time separation between the two DMSP spacecraft measurements. We show that the coherence function of both electrons and ions remains high for up to 1.5 min spacecraft separations for all features larger than about 100 km in width. For smaller features the coherence is lower even for time lags of

  20. Shark Skin Bristling as a Passive Mechanism for Separation Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheelus, Jennifer; Lang, Amy; Jones, Emily

    2011-11-01

    The skin of fast-swimming sharks is proposed to have mechanisms to reduce drag and delay flow separation. The skin of fast-swimming and agile sharks is covered with small teeth-like denticles on the order of 0.2 mm. The shortfin mako is one of the fastest and most agile ocean predators creating the need to minimize its pressure drag by controlling flow separation. Biological studies of the shortfin mako skin have shown the passive bristling angle of their denticles to exceed 50 degrees in areas on the flank corresponding to the locations likely to experience separation first. It is proposed that reversing flow, as occurs at the onset of separation in a turbulent boundary layer, would activate denticle bristling and hinder local separation from leading to global separation over the shark. This study focuses on the denticle reaction to various reversed flow conditions using a pulsating jet. Mako shark skin was subjected to numerous reversed flow velocities to determine the bristling onset velocity. Digital Particle Image Velocimetry (DPIV) and digital video were used to determine the flow conditions and denticle behavior. The effect of reversed flow velocity on denticle bristling and its relation to separation control will be discussed. Research funded by NSF (award 0932352).

  1. The different effects of maternal separation on spatial learning and reversal learning in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiong; Li, Man; Du, Wei; Shao, Feng; Wang, Weiwen

    2015-03-01

    Early postnatal maternal separation (MS) can play an important role in the development of psychopathologies during ontogeny. In the present study, we investigated the effects of repeated MS (4h per day from postnatal day (PND) 1 to 21) on locomotor activity and anxiety behavior in open field, spatial learning and reversal learning in Morris water maze of male and female juvenile (PND 21), adolescent (PND 35) and early adult (PND 56) Wistar rats. The results indicated that MS increased locomotor activity of rats across all ages and reduced anxiety behavior of adolescent rats in open field test. MS also increased swim distance in spatial learning and decreased escape latency in reversal learning in adolescent and early adult rats. Additionally, for socially reared rats, there was increased spontaneous locomotion with age, decreased reversal learning ability with age. The present study provides novel insights into the consequences of MS and demonstrates unique age-dependent changes at the behavioral levels. PMID:25479401

  2. Spatial location priors for Gaussian model based reverberant audio source separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duong, Ngoc QK; Vincent, Emmanuel; Gribonval, Rémi

    2013-12-01

    We consider the Gaussian framework for reverberant audio source separation, where the sources are modeled in the time-frequency domain by their short-term power spectra and their spatial covariance matrices. We propose two alternative probabilistic priors over the spatial covariance matrices which are consistent with the theory of statistical room acoustics and we derive expectation-maximization algorithms for maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimation. We argue that these algorithms provide a statistically principled solution to the permutation problem and to the risk of overfitting resulting from conventional maximum likelihood (ML) estimation. We show experimentally that in a semi-informed scenario where the source positions and certain room characteristics are known, the MAP algorithms outperform their ML counterparts. This opens the way to rigorous statistical treatment of this family of models in other scenarios in the future.

  3. Space Shuttle separate-surface control-system study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, L. W.; Montgomery, R. C.

    1984-01-01

    A control system concept is presented that produces proportional control of yaw moment for the space shuttle from early entry to Mach 2 with only software modifications of the vehicle. It uses separate deflections of the inboard and outboard elevon surfaces and is evaluated, by determining the maximum static yawing moment available by considering the deflection limits of the elevon surfaces. A proportional moment slightly in excess of that produced by the most effective reaction control system (RCS) jet for yaw control can be obtained. In addition to the static moment study, a control law is designed which is intended to produce desired flying qualities.

  4. Chemistry with spatial control using particles and streams†

    PubMed Central

    Kalinin, Yevgeniy V.; Murali, Adithya

    2012-01-01

    Spatial control of chemical reactions, with micro- and nanometer scale resolution, has important consequences for one pot synthesis, engineering complex reactions, developmental biology, cellular biochemistry and emergent behavior. We review synthetic methods to engineer this spatial control using chemical diffusion from spherical particles, shells and polyhedra. We discuss systems that enable both isotropic and anisotropic chemical release from isolated and arrayed particles to create inhomogeneous and spatially patterned chemical fields. In addition to such finite chemical sources, we also discuss spatial control enabled with laminar flow in 2D and 3D microfluidic networks. Throughout the paper, we highlight applications of spatially controlled chemistry in chemical kinetics, reaction-diffusion systems, chemotaxis and morphogenesis. PMID:23145348

  5. Biexcitons formed from spatially separated electrons and holes in quasi-zero-dimensional semiconductor nanosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Pokutnyi, S. I.

    2013-12-15

    A theory of biexcitons (formed from spatially separated electron and holes) in nanosystems that consist of zinc-selenide quantum dots synthesized in borosilicate glassy matrices is developed. The dependences of the total energy and the binding energy of the singlet ground biexciton state in such a system on the spacing between the quantum-dot surfaces and the quantum-dot radius are derived by the variational method. It is shown that biexciton formation is of the threshold character and possible in nanosystems, in which the spacing between the quantum-dot surfaces is larger than a certain critical spacing.

  6. Spatial Electron-hole Separation in a One Dimensional Hybrid Organic-Inorganic Lead Iodide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savory, Christopher N.; Palgrave, Robert G.; Bronstein, Hugo; Scanlon, David O.

    2016-02-01

    The increasing efficiency of the inorganic-organic hybrid halides has revolutionised photovoltaic research. Despite this rapid progress, the significant issues of poor stability and toxicity have yet to be suitably overcome. In this article, we use Density Functional Theory to examine (Pb2I6) · (H2DPNDI) · (H2O) · (NMP), an alternative lead-based hybrid inorganic-organic solar absorber based on a photoactive organic cation. Our results demonstrate that optical properties suitable for photovoltaic applications, in addition to spatial electron-hole separation, are possible but efficient charge transport may be a limiting factor.

  7. Spatial Electron-hole Separation in a One Dimensional Hybrid Organic-Inorganic Lead Iodide.

    PubMed

    Savory, Christopher N; Palgrave, Robert G; Bronstein, Hugo; Scanlon, David O

    2016-01-01

    The increasing efficiency of the inorganic-organic hybrid halides has revolutionised photovoltaic research. Despite this rapid progress, the significant issues of poor stability and toxicity have yet to be suitably overcome. In this article, we use Density Functional Theory to examine (Pb2I6) · (H2DPNDI) · (H2O) · (NMP), an alternative lead-based hybrid inorganic-organic solar absorber based on a photoactive organic cation. Our results demonstrate that optical properties suitable for photovoltaic applications, in addition to spatial electron-hole separation, are possible but efficient charge transport may be a limiting factor. PMID:26858147

  8. Spatial pattern separation of chemicals and frequency-independent components by terahertz spectroscopic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Yuuki; Kawase, Kodo; Ikari, Tomofumi; Ito, Hiromasa; Ishikawa, Youichi; Minamide, Hiroaki

    2003-10-01

    We separated the component spatial patterns of frequency-dependent absorption in chemicals and frequency-independent components such as plastic, paper, and measurement noise in terahertz (THz) spectroscopic images, using known spectral curves. Our measurement system, which uses a widely tunable coherent THz-wave parametric oscillator source, can image at a specific frequency in the range 1-2 THz. The component patterns of chemicals can easily be extracted by use of the frequency-independent components. This method could be successfully used for nondestructive inspection for the detection of illegal drugs and devices of bioterrorism concealed, e.g., inside mail and packages.

  9. Spatial Electron-hole Separation in a One Dimensional Hybrid Organic–Inorganic Lead Iodide

    PubMed Central

    Savory, Christopher N.; Palgrave, Robert G.; Bronstein, Hugo; Scanlon, David O.

    2016-01-01

    The increasing efficiency of the inorganic-organic hybrid halides has revolutionised photovoltaic research. Despite this rapid progress, the significant issues of poor stability and toxicity have yet to be suitably overcome. In this article, we use Density Functional Theory to examine (Pb2I6) · (H2DPNDI) · (H2O) · (NMP), an alternative lead-based hybrid inorganic-organic solar absorber based on a photoactive organic cation. Our results demonstrate that optical properties suitable for photovoltaic applications, in addition to spatial electron-hole separation, are possible but efficient charge transport may be a limiting factor. PMID:26858147

  10. Control of flow separation in airfoil/wing design applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gally, Thomas A.

    1994-01-01

    Existing aerodynamic design methods have generally concentrated on the optimization of airfoil or wing shapes to produce a minimum drag while satisfying some basic constraints such as lift, pitching moment, or thickness. Since the minimization of drag almost always precludes the existence of separated flow, the evaluation and validation of these design methods for their robustness and accuracy when separated flow is present has not been aggressively pursued. However, two new applications for these design tools may be expected to include separated flow and the issues of aerodynamic design with this feature must be addressed. The first application of the aerodynamic design tools is the design of airfoils or wings to provide an optimal performance over a wide range of flight conditions (multipoint design). While the definition of 'optimal performance' in the multipoint setting is currently being hashed out, it is recognized that given a wide enough range of flight conditions, it will not be possible to ensure a minimum drag constraint at all conditions, and in fact some amount of separated flow (presumably small) may have to be allowed at the more demanding flight conditions. Thus a multipoint design method must be tolerant of the existence of separated flow and may include some controls upon its extent. The second application is in the design of wings with extended high speed buffet boundaries of their flight envelopes. Buffet occurs on a wing when regions of flow separation have grown to the extent that their time varying pressures induce possible destructive effects upon the wing structure or adversely effect either the aircraft controllability or the passenger comfort. A conservative approach to the expansion of the buffet flight boundary is to simply expand the flight envelope of nonseparated flow under the assumption that buffet will also thus be alleviated. However, having the ability to design a wing with separated flow and thus to control the location, extent

  11. Controls on the spatial distribution of oceanic δ13CDIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, P. B.; Edwards, N. R.; Müller, S. A.; Oliver, K. I. C.; Death, R. M.; Ridgwell, A.

    2013-03-01

    We describe the design and evaluation of a large ensemble of coupled climate-carbon cycle simulations with the Earth system model of intermediate complexity GENIE. This ensemble has been designed for application to a range of carbon cycle questions, including the causes of late-Quaternary fluctuations in atmospheric CO2. Here we evaluate the ensemble by applying it to a transient experiment over the recent industrial era (1858 to 2008 AD). We employ singular vector decomposition and principal component emulation to investigate the spatial modes of ensemble variability of oceanic dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) δ13C, considering both the spun-up pre-industrial state and the transient change. These analyses allow us to separate the natural (pre-industrial) and anthropogenic controls on the δ13CDIC distribution. We apply the same dimensionally-reduced emulation techniques to consider the drivers of the spatial uncertainty in anthropogenic DIC. We show that the sources of uncertainty related to the uptake of anthropogenic δ13CDIC and DIC are quite distinct. Uncertainty in anthropogenic δ13C uptake is controlled by air-sea gas exchange, which explains 63% of modelled variance. This mode of variability is largely absent from the ensemble variability in CO2 uptake, which is rather driven by uncertainties in thermocline ventilation rates. Although the need to account for air-sea gas exchange is well known, these results suggest that, to leading order, uncertainties in the ocean uptake of anthropogenic 13C and CO2 are governed by very different processes. This illustrates the difficulties in reconstructing one from the other, and furthermore highlights the need for careful targeting of both δ13CDIC and DIC observations to better constrain the ocean sink of anthropogenic CO2.

  12. Closed-loop Separation Control Using Oscillatory Flow Excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allan, Brian G.; Juang, Jer-Nan; Raney, David L.; Seifert, Avi; Pack, latunia G.; Brown, Donald E.

    2000-01-01

    Design and implementation of a digital feedback controller for a flow control experiment was performed. The experiment was conducted in a cryogenic pressurized wind tunnel on a generic separated configuration at a chord Reynolds number of 16 million and a Mach number of 0.25. The model simulates the upper surface of a 20% thick airfoil at zero angle-of-attack. A moderate favorable pressure gradient, up to 55% of the chord, is followed by a severe adverse pressure gradient which is relaxed towards the trailing edge. The turbulent separation bubble, behind the adverse pressure gradient, is then reduced by introducing oscillatory flow excitation just upstream of the point of flow separation. The degree of reduction in the separation region can be controlled by the amplitude of the oscillatory excitation. A feedback controller was designed to track a given trajectory for the desired degree of flow reattachment and to improve the transient behavior of the flow system. Closed-loop experiments demonstrated that the feedback controller was able to track step input commands and improve the transient behavior of the open-loop response.

  13. Low-Pressure Turbine Separation Control: Comparison With Experimental Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Vijay K.

    2002-01-01

    The present work details a computational study, using the Glenn HT code, that analyzes the use of vortex generator jets (VGJs) to control separation on a low-pressure turbine (LPT) blade at low Reynolds numbers. The computational results are also compared with the experimental data for steady VGJs. It is found that the code determines the proper location of the separation point on the suction surface of the baseline blade (without any VGJ) for Reynolds numbers of 50,000 or less. Also, the code finds that the separated region on the suction surface of the blade vanishes with the use of VGJs. However, the separated region and the wake characteristics are not well predicted. The wake width is generally over-predicted while the wake depth is under-predicted.

  14. Reticulated Nanoporous Polymers by Controlled Polymerization-Induced Microphase Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Myungeun; Hillmyer, Marc A.

    2013-04-08

    Materials with percolating mesopores are attractive for applications such as catalysis, nanotemplating, and separations. Polymeric frameworks are particularly appealing because the chemical composition and the surface chemistry are readily tunable. We report on the preparation of robust nanoporous polymers with percolating pores in the 4- to 8-nanometer range from a microphase-separated bicontinuous precursor. We combined polymerization-induced phase separation with in situ block polymer formation from a mixture of multifunctional monomers and a chemically etchable polymer containing a terminal chain transfer agent. This marriage results in microphase separation of the mixture into continuous domains of the etchable polymer and the emergent cross-linked polymer. Precise control over pore size distribution and mechanical integrity renders these materials particularly suited for various advanced applications.

  15. Robot Control Based On Spatial-Operator Algebra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, Guillermo; Kreutz, Kenneth K.; Jain, Abhinandan

    1992-01-01

    Method for mathematical modeling and control of robotic manipulators based on spatial-operator algebra providing concise representation and simple, high-level theoretical frame-work for solution of kinematical and dynamical problems involving complicated temporal and spatial relationships. Recursive algorithms derived immediately from abstract spatial-operator expressions by inspection. Transition from abstract formulation through abstract solution to detailed implementation of specific algorithms to compute solution greatly simplified. Complicated dynamical problems like two cooperating robot arms solved more easily.

  16. Active Control of Flow Separation Over an Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ravindran, S. S.

    1999-01-01

    Designing an aircraft without conventional control surfaces is of interest to aerospace community. In this direction, smart actuator devices such as synthetic jets have been proposed to provide aircraft maneuverability instead of control surfaces. In this article, a numerical study is performed to investigate the effects of unsteady suction and blowing on airfoils. The unsteady suction and blowing is introduced at the leading edge of the airfoil in the form of tangential jet. Numerical solutions are obtained using Reynolds-Averaged viscous compressible Navier-Stokes equations. Unsteady suction and blowing is investigated as a means of separation control to obtain lift on airfoils. The effect of blowing coefficients on lift and drag is investigated. The numerical simulations are compared with experiments from the Tel-Aviv University (TAU). These results indicate that unsteady suction and blowing can be used as a means of separation control to generate lift on airfoils.

  17. Binding energy of excitons formed from spatially separated electrons and holes in insulating quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Pokutnyi, S. I.; Kulchin, Yu. N.; Dzyuba, V. P.

    2015-10-15

    It is found that the binding energy of the ground state of an exciton formed from an electron and a hole spatially separated from each other (the hole is moving within a quantum dot, and the electron is localized above the spherical (quantum dot)–(insulating matrix) interface) in a nanosystem containing insulating Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} quantum dots is substantially increased (by nearly two orders of magnitude) compared to the exciton binding energy in an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} single crystal. It is established that, in the band gap of an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticle, a band of exciton states (formed from spatially separated electrons and holes) appears. It is shown that there exists the possibility of experimentally detecting the ground and excited exciton states in the band gap of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles at room temperature from the absorption spectrum of the nanosystem.

  18. Part Ia: Spatial separation on McGurk effect applying three-dimensional sounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riederer, Klaus A. J.

    2003-10-01

    The dependence of sound direction on the McGurk effect [McGurk and McDonald, Nature (London) 264, 746-748 (1976)] is less known. Jones and Munhall [Canadian Acoust. 25, 13-19 (1997)] concluded with no spatial separation dependence, applying 30° horizontally spaced loudspeakers. Current dual study investigated the full 360° horizontal space applying head-related transfer functions (HRTFs) from a Cortex dummy head [Riederer, J. Audio Eng. Soc. (Abstracts) 46, 1036 (1998), preprint 4846]. Dry acoustic /ipi/ and /iti/ recorded from a professional speaker were convolved with HRTFs, measured at azimuths 0°, +/-40°, +/-90°, +/-130°, and 180°, headphones (Sennheiser HD580) equalized. DVcam-recorded visual /ipi/, /iti/ (and black screen) were randomly presented synchronously with the 3-D sounds using Presentation 0.20 [http://nbs.neuro-bs.com]. Totally 1024 incongruent audiovisual stimuli were perceived by eight 20-30-year-old normal hearing (<=20 dBHL) native subjects (2 female) as follows. Visual /ipi/ + auditory /iti/: /ipi/ 59.96%, /iti/ 15.63%, and /ipti/ 24.02% visual /iti/ + auditory /ipi/: 66.02%, 22.07%, and 11.52%, respectfully. No significant dependence of spatial separation was found for the McGurk effect, except for reaction times. The obtained fusions were atypically weak, probably because visual /iti/ was less pronounced than visual /ipi/. [Work supported by Graduate School of Electronics, Telecommunication and Automation.

  19. Separation Control in a Multistage Compressor Using Impulsive Surface Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wundrow, David W.; Braunscheidel, Edward P.; Culley, Dennis E.; Bright, Michelle M.

    2006-01-01

    Control of flow separation using impulsive surface injection is investigated within the multistage environment of a low speed axial-flow compressor. Measured wake profiles behind a set of embedded stator vanes treated with suction-surface injection indicate significant reduction in flow separation at a variety of injection-pulse repetition rates and durations. The corresponding total pressure losses across the vanes reveal a bank of repetition rates at each pulse duration where the separation control remains nearly complete. This persistence allows for demands on the injected-mass delivery system to be economized while still achieving effective flow control. The response of the stator-vane boundary layers to infrequently applied short injection pulses is described in terms of the periodic excitation of turbulent strips whose growth and propagation characteristics dictate the lower bound on the band of optimal pulse repetition rates. The eventual falloff in separation control at higher repetition rates is linked to a competition between the benefits of pulse-induced mixing and the aggravation caused by the periodic introduction of low-momentum fluid. Use of these observations for impulsive actuator design is discussed and their impact on modeling the time-average effect of impulsive surface injection for multistage steady-flow simulation is considered.

  20. Fluid Mechanics of Wing Adaptation for Separation Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandrasekhara, M. S.; Wilder, M. C.; Carr, L. W.; Davis, Sanford S. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The unsteady fluid mechanics associated with use of a dynamically deforming leading edge airfoil for achieving compressible flow separation control has been experimentally studied. Changing the leading edge curvature at rapid rates dramatically alters the flow vorticity dynamics which is responsible for the many effects observed in the flow.

  1. SNARC Struggles: Instant Control over Spatial-Numerical Associations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfister, Roland; Schroeder, Philipp A.; Kunde, Wilfried

    2013-01-01

    Numbers and space are tightly linked--a phenomenon that is referred to as the spatial-numerical association of response codes (SNARC) effect (Dehaene, Bossini, & Giraux, 1993). The present study investigates how quickly and flexibly the behavioral impact of such spatial-numerical associations can be controlled. Participants performed a parity…

  2. Spatially controlled, in situ synthesis of polymers

    DOEpatents

    Caneba, Gerard T.; Tirumala, Vijaya Raghavan; Mancini, Derrick C.; Wang, Hsien-Hau

    2005-03-22

    An in situ polymer microstructure formation method. The monomer mixture is polymerized in a solvent/precipitant through exposure to ionizing radiation in the absence any chemical mediators. If an exposure mask is employed to block out certain regions of the radiation cross section, then a patterned microstructure is formed. The polymerization mechanism is based on the so-called free-radical retrograde-precipitation polymerization process, in which polymerization occurs while the system is phase separating above the lower critical solution temperature. This method was extended to produce a crosslinked line grid-pattern of poly (N-isopropylacrylamide), which has been known to have thermoreversible properties.

  3. Concurrent emotional pictures modulate temporal order judgments of spatially separated audio-tactile stimuli.

    PubMed

    Jia, Lina; Shi, Zhuanghua; Zang, Xuelian; Müller, Hermann J

    2013-11-01

    Although attention can be captured toward high-arousal stimuli, little is known about how perceiving emotion in one modality influences the temporal processing of non-emotional stimuli in other modalities. We addressed this issue by presenting observers spatially uninformative emotional pictures while they performed an audio-tactile temporal-order judgment (TOJ) task. In Experiment 1, audio-tactile stimuli were presented at the same location straight ahead of the participants, who had to judge "which modality came first?". In Experiments 2 and 3, the audio-tactile stimuli were delivered one to the left and the other to the right side, and participants had to judge "which side came first?". We found both negative and positive high-arousal pictures to significantly bias TOJs towards the tactile and away from the auditory event when the audio-tactile stimuli were spatially separated; by contrast, there was no such bias when the audio-tactile stimuli originated from the same location. To further examine whether this bias is attributable to the emotional meanings conveyed by the pictures or to their high arousal effect, we compared and contrasted the influences of near-body threat vs. remote threat (emotional) pictures on audio-tactile TOJs in Experiment 3. The bias manifested only in the near-body threat condition. Taken together, the findings indicate that visual stimuli conveying meanings of near-body interaction activate a sensorimotor functional link prioritizing the processing of tactile over auditory signals when these signals are spatially separated. In contrast, audio-tactile signals from the same location engender strong crossmodal integration, thus counteracting modality-based attentional shifts induced by the emotional pictures. PMID:24041776

  4. Interaction dynamics of temporal and spatial separated cavitation bubbles in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinne, N.; Ripken, T.; Lubatschowski, H.

    2010-02-01

    The LASIK procedure is a well established laser based treatment in ophthalmology. Nowadays it includes a cutting of the corneal tissue bases on ultra short pulses which are focused below the tissue surface to create an optical breakdown and hence a dissection of the tissue. The energy of the laser pulse is absorbed by non-linear processes that result in an expansion of a cavitation bubble and rupturing of the tissue. Due to a reduction of the duration of treatment the current development of ultra short laser systems points to higher repetition rates. This in turn results in a probable interaction between different cavitation bubbles of adjacent optical breakdowns. While the interaction of one single laser pulse with biological tissue is analyzed reasonably well experimentally and theoretically, the interaction of several spatial and temporal following pulses is scarcely determined yet. We present a high-speed photography analysis of cavitation bubble interaction for two spatial separated laser-induced optical breakdowns varying the laser pulse energy as well as the spatial distance. Depending on a change of these parameters different kinds of interactions such as a flattening and deformation of bubble shape, asymmetric water streams and jet formation were observed. The results of this research can be used to comprehend and optimize the cutting effect of ultra short pulse laser systems with high repetition rates (> 1 MHz).

  5. Flow Separation Control Over a Ramp Using Sweeping Jet Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koklu, Mehti; Owens, Lewis R.

    2014-01-01

    Flow separation control on an adverse-pressure-gradient ramp model was investigated using various flow-control methods in the NASA Langley 15-Inch Wind Tunnel. The primary flow-control method studied used a sweeping jet actuator system to compare with more classic flow-control techniques such as micro-vortex generators, steady blowing, and steady- and unsteady-vortex generating jets. Surface pressure measurements and a new oilflow visualization technique were used to characterize the effects of these flow-control actuators. The sweeping jet actuators were run in three different modes to produce steady-straight, steady-angled, and unsteady-oscillating jets. It was observed that all of these flow-control methods are effective in controlling the separated flows on the ramp model. The steady-straight jet energizes the boundary layer by momentum addition and was found to be the least effective method for a fixed momentum coefficient. The steady-angled jets achieved better performance than the steady-straight jets because they generate streamwise vortices that energize the boundary layer by mixing high-momentum fluid with near wall low-momentum fluid. The unsteady-oscillating jets achieved the best performance by increasing the pressure recovery and reducing the downstream flow separation. Surface flow visualizations indicated that two out-of-phase counter-rotating vortices are generated per sweeping jet actuator, while one vortex is generated per vortex-generating jets. The extra vortex resulted in increased coverage, more pressure recovery, and reduced flow separation.

  6. Demonstration of Separation Control Using Glow-Discharge Plasma Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.; Ashpis, David E.

    2003-01-01

    Active flow control of boundary-layer separation using glow-discharge plasma actuators is studied experimentally. Separation is induced on a flat plate installed in a closed-circuit wind tunnel by a shaped insert on the opposite wall. The flow conditions represent flow over the suction surface of a modem low-pressure-turbine airfoil. The Reynolds number, based on wetted plate length and nominal exit velocity, is varied from 50,000 to 300,000, covering cruise to takeoff conditions. Low (0.2%) and high (2.5%) free-stream turbulence intensities are set using passive grids. A spanwise-oriented phased-plasma-array actuator, fabricated on a printed circuit board, is surface-flush-mounted upstream of the separation point and can provide forcing in a wide frequency range. Static surface pressure measurements and hot-wire anemometry of the base and controlled flows are performed and indicate that the glow-discharge plasma actuator is an effective device for separation control.

  7. Computation of a controlled store separation from a cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwood, Christopher A.

    1993-01-01

    Coupling of the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations, rigid-body dynamics, and a pitch attitude control law is demonstrated in two- and three-dimensions. The application problem was the separation of a canard-controlled store from an open-flow rectangular cavity bay at a freestream Mach number of 1.2. The transient flowfield was computed using a diagonal scheme in an overset mesh framework, with the resultant aerodynamic loads used as the forcing functions in the nonlinear dynamics equations. The proportional and rate gyro sensitivities were computed a priori using pole placement techniques for the linearized dynamical equations. These fixed gain values were used in the controller for the nonlinear simulation. Reasonable comparison between the full and linearized equations for a perturbed two-dimensional missile was found. Also in two-dimensions, a controlled store was found to possess improved separation characteristics over a canard-fixed store. In three-dimensions, trajectory comparisons with wind-tunnel data for the canard-fixed case will be made. In addition, it will be determined if a canard-controlled store is an effective means of improving cavity store separation characteristics.

  8. Mechanisms of spatial attention control in frontal and parietal cortex.

    PubMed

    Szczepanski, Sara M; Konen, Christina S; Kastner, Sabine

    2010-01-01

    Theories of spatial attentional control have been largely based upon studies of patients suffering from visuospatial neglect, resulting from circumscribed lesions of frontal and posterior parietal cortex. In the intact brain, the control of spatial attention has been related to a distributed frontoparietal attention network. Little is known about the nature of the control mechanisms exerted by this network. Here, we used a novel region-of-interest approach to relate activations of the attention network to recently described topographic areas in frontal cortex [frontal eye field (FEF), PreCC/IFS (precentral cortex/inferior frontal sulcus)] and parietal cortex [intraparietal sulcus areas (IPS1-IPS5) and an area in the superior parietal lobule (SPL1)] to examine their spatial attention signals. We found that attention signals in most topographic areas were spatially specific, with stronger responses when attention was directed to the contralateral than to the ipsilateral visual field. Importantly, two hemispheric asymmetries were found. First, a region in only right, but not left SPL1 carried spatial attention signals. Second, left FEF and left posterior parietal cortex (IPS1/2) generated stronger contralateral biasing signals than their counterparts in the right hemisphere. These findings are the first to characterize spatial attention signals in topographic frontal and parietal cortex and provide a neural basis in support of an interhemispheric competition account of spatial attentional control. PMID:20053897

  9. Boiling on spatially controlled heterogeneous surfaces: Wettability patterns on microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, HangJin; Yu, Dong In; Noh, Hyunwoo; Park, Hyun Sun; Kim, Moo Hwan

    2015-05-01

    We investigated nucleate boiling heat transfer with precisely controlled wetting patterns and micro-posts, to gain insights into the impact of surface heterogeneity. To create heterogeneous wetting patterns, self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) were spatially patterned. Even at a contact angle <90°, bubble nucleation and bubble frequency were accelerated on SAM patterns, since this contact angle is larger than that found on plain surfaces. Micro-posts were also fabricated on the surface, which interrupted the expansion of generated bubbles. This surface structuring induced smaller bubbles and higher bubble frequency than the plain surface. The resistance provided by surface structures to bubble expansion broke the interface between the vapor mushroom and the heating surface, and water could therefore be continuously supplied through these spaces at high heat flux. To induce synergistic effects with wetting patterns and surface structures on boiling, we fabricated SAM patterns onto the heads of micro-posts. On this combined surface, bubble nucleation was induced from the head of the micro-posts, and bubble growth was influenced by both the SAM pattern and the micro-post structures. In particular, separation of the vapor path on the SAM patterns and the liquid path between micro-post structures resulted in high heat transfer performance without critical heat flux deterioration.

  10. Dynamics of Active Separation Control at High Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pack, LaTunia G.; Seifert, Avi

    2000-01-01

    A series of active flow control experiments were recently conducted at high Reynolds numbers on a generic separated configuration. The model simulates the upper surface of a 20% thick Glauert-Goldschmied type airfoil at zero angle of attack. The flow is fully turbulent since the tunnel sidewall boundary layer flows over the model. The main motivation for the experiments is to generate a comprehensive data base for validation of unsteady numerical simulation as a first step in the development of a CFD design tool, without which it would not be possible to effectively utilize the great potential of unsteady flow control. This paper focuses on the dynamics of several key features of the baseline as well as the controlled flow. It was found that the thickness of the upstream boundary layer has a negligible effect on the flow dynamics. It is speculated that separation is caused mainly by the highly convex surface while viscous effects are less important. The two-dimensional separated flow contains unsteady waves centered on a reduced frequency of 0.8, while in the three dimensional separated flow, frequencies around a reduced frequency of 0.3 and 1 are active. Several scenarios of resonant wave interaction take place at the separated shear-layer and in the pressure recovery region. The unstable reduced frequency bands for periodic excitation are centered on 1.5 and 5, but these reduced frequencies are based on the length of the baseline bubble that shortens due to the excitation. The conventional swept wing-scaling works well for the coherent wave features. Reproduction of these dynamic effects by a numerical simulation would provide benchmark validation.

  11. Active Flow Effectors for Noise and Separation Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L.

    2011-01-01

    New flow effector technology for separation control and enhanced mixing is based upon shape memory alloy hybrid composite (SMAHC) technology. The technology allows for variable shape control of aircraft structures through actively deformable surfaces. The flow effectors are made by embedding shape memory alloy actuator material in a composite structure. When thermally actuated, the flow effector def1ects into or out of the flow in a prescribed manner to enhance mixing or induce separation for a variety of applications, including aeroacoustic noise reduction, drag reduction, and f1ight control. The active flow effectors were developed for noise reduction as an alternative to fixed-configuration effectors, such as static chevrons, that cannot be optimized for airframe installation effects or variable operating conditions and cannot be retracted for off-design or fail-safe conditions. Benefits include: Increased vehicle control, overall efficiency, and reduced noise throughout all f1ight regimes, Reduced flow noise, Reduced drag, Simplicity of design and fabrication, Simplicity of control through direct current stimulation, autonomous re sponse to environmental heating, fast re sponse, and a high degree of geometric stability. The concept involves embedding prestrained SMA actuators on one side of the chevron neutral axis in order to generate a thermal moment and def1ect the structure out of plane when heated. The force developed in the host structure during def1ection and the aerodynamic load is used for returning the structure to the retracted position. The chevron design is highly scalable and versatile, and easily affords active and/or autonomous (environmental) control. The technology offers wide-ranging market applications, including aerospace, automotive, and any application that requires flow separation or noise control.

  12. Optimal Control Modification for Time-Scale Separated Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.

    2012-01-01

    Recently a new optimal control modification has been introduced that can achieve robust adaptation with a large adaptive gain without incurring high-frequency oscillations as with the standard model-reference adaptive control. This modification is based on an optimal control formulation to minimize the L2 norm of the tracking error. The optimal control modification adaptive law results in a stable adaptation in the presence of a large adaptive gain. This study examines the optimal control modification adaptive law in the context of a system with a time scale separation resulting from a fast plant with a slow actuator. A singular perturbation analysis is performed to derive a modification to the adaptive law by transforming the original system into a reduced-order system in slow time. A model matching conditions in the transformed time coordinate results in an increase in the actuator command that effectively compensate for the slow actuator dynamics. Simulations demonstrate effectiveness of the method.

  13. Experimental and Mathematical Models for Small Aqueous Closed Ecosystems with Spatially Separated Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisman, T. I.; Pechurkin, N. S.; Babkin, A. V.; Somova, L. A.; Sarangova, A. B.

    1999-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical models of closed ``autotroph-heteretroph'' (chlorella-yeast, chlorella- protozoa) ecosystems with spatially separated components have been created and studied. The chart of flows and interaction of components of gas-closed ``chlorella-yeast'' system have formed the basis describe mathematically the functioning of the given system, experimental results have been found to agree with computer solution of the problem in terms of quality. Investigation of the experimental model of the ``producer-consumer'' trophic chain demonstrated the role of protozoa in nitrogen turnover. ``Production-decomposition'' and ``production-grazing-decomposition'' cycle models has been theoretically analyzed and compared. The predator has been shown to be a more intensive mineralizer than the reducer component.

  14. Steady-state entanglement of spatially separated qubits via quantum bath engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aron, Camille; Kulkarni, Manas; Tureci, Hakan

    2015-03-01

    We propose a scheme for driving a dimer of spatially separated qubits into a maximally entangled non-equilibrium steady state. A photon-mediated retarded interaction between the qubits is realized by coupling them to two tunnel-coupled leaky cavities where each cavity is driven by a coherent microwave tone. The proposed cooling mechanism relies on striking the right balance between the unitary and driven-dissipative dynamics of the qubit subsystem. We map the dimer to an effective transverse-field XY model coupled to a non-equilibrium bath that can be suitably engineered through the choice of drive frequencies and amplitudes. We show that both singlet and triplet states can be obtained with remarkable fidelities. The proposed protocol can be implemented with a superconducting circuit architecture that was recently experimentally realized and paves the way to achieving large-scale entangled systems that are arbitrarily long lived.

  15. Steady-state entanglement of spatially separated qubits via quantum bath engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aron, Camille; Kulkarni, Manas; Türeci, Hakan E.

    2014-12-01

    We propose a scheme for driving a dimer of spatially separated qubits into a maximally entangled nonequilibrium steady state. A photon-mediated retarded interaction between the qubits is realized by coupling them to two tunnel-coupled leaky cavities where each cavity is driven by a coherent microwave tone. The proposed cooling mechanism relies on striking the right balance between the unitary and driven-dissipative dynamics of the qubit subsystem. We map the dimer to an effective transverse-field isotropic X Y model coupled to a nonequilibrium bath that can be suitably engineered through the choice of drive frequencies and amplitudes. We show that both singlet and triplet states can be obtained with remarkable fidelities. The proposed protocol can be implemented with a superconducting circuit architecture that was recently experimentally realized and paves the way to achieving large-scale entangled systems that are arbitrarily long lived.

  16. The use of gas separation membranes for pollution control

    SciTech Connect

    Logsdon, B.W.; Stull, D.; Pellegrino, J.

    1993-04-01

    Rocky Flats is considering the use of a fluidized bed oxidation unit (FBU) for the destruction of mixed waste. Public concerns about the health effects of such destruction have been intense. In order to allay such concerns and minimize the possible health impacts of the proposed mixed waste destruction, RFP has been investigating novel methods of air pollution control. Among the most promising of these techniques is the use of gas separation membranes, which is described in this report.

  17. Extended high-frequency bandwidth improves reception of speech in spatially separated masking speech

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Suzanne Carr; Freed, Daniel J.; Nilsson, Michael; Moore, Brian C.J.; Puria, Sunil

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The hypothesis that extending the audible frequency bandwidth beyond the range currently implemented in most hearing aids can improve speech understanding was tested for normal-hearing and hearing-impaired participants using target sentences and spatially separated masking speech. Design The Hearing in Noise Test (HINT) speech corpus was re-recorded and four masking talkers were recorded at a sample rate of 44.1 kHz. All talkers were male native speakers of American English. Reception threshold for Sentences (RTS) were measured in two spatial configurations. In the asymmetric configuration, the target was presented from −45° azimuth and two colocated masking talkers were presented from +45° azimuth. In the diffuse configuration, the target was presented from 0° azimuth and four masking talkers were each presented from a different azimuth: +45°, +135°, −135°, and −45°. The new speech sentences, masking materials and configurations, collectively termed the ‘Hearing in Speech Test (HIST)’, were presented using lowpass filter cutoff frequencies of 4, 6, 8, and 10 kHz. For the normal-hearing participants, stimuli were presented in the sound field using loudspeakers. For the hearing-impaired participants, the spatial configurations were simulated using earphones, and a multi-band wide dynamic range compressor with a modified CAM2 fitting algorithm was used to compensate for each participant’s hearing loss. Results For the normal-hearing participants (N=24, mean age 40 years), the RTS improved significantly by 3.0 dB when the bandwidth was increased from 4 to 10 kHz, and a significant improvement of 1.3 dB was obtained from extending the bandwidth from 6 to 10 kHz, in both spatial configurations. Hearing-impaired participants (N=25, mean age 71 years) also showed a significant improvement in RTS with extended bandwidth, but the effect was smaller than for the normal-hearing participants. The mean decrease in RTS when the bandwidth was

  18. Manipulating forces by interactive separation and circulation control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagib, Hassan; Reinhard, Paul; Rozier, Paul

    2011-11-01

    Steady, unsteady and intermittent suction and blowing from localized or distributed slots are used to reveal the physical mechanisms and their interaction in order to manipulate (enhance or reduce) the forces on various aerodynamic bodies and surfaces. Performance under ideal inviscid conditions is used as a standard of performance to compare the outcomes to. While high-lift airfoils were part of the focus, flow over humps which lead to large separation zones was also investigated. Surface pressure measurements, wake surveys and surface visualization were utilized over a wide range of operating conditions in the NDF at IIT. Velocities ranged from 20 to 110 m/s (0 . 06 < M < 0 . 31), corresponding to chord Reynolds numbers from 500 , 000 to 3 , 700 , 000 , and included a full range of airfoil angles of attack with flap deflections from 10 to 55 degrees and various leading edge configurations. Steady suction control was more effective at eliminating the large separation bubble created by the model, requiring a pressure ratio between the applied force and inviscid force of approximately unity, whereas blowing required a two to one ratio. Pulsed suction was superior and enhanced by the operating frequency or duty cycle. Separation control (SC) was modified by the presence of circulation control (CC). Steady-blowing SC near the leading edge reduced the effect of blown-flap CC, whereas steady-suction SC increased the performance gain.

  19. Design and evaluation of microfluidic devices for two-dimensional spatial separations.

    PubMed

    Davydova, Ekaterina; Wouters, Sam; Deridder, Sander; Desmet, Gert; Eeltink, Sebastiaan; Schoenmakers, Peter J

    2016-02-19

    Various designs of chips for comprehensive two-dimensional spatial liquid chromatography were investigated. The performance of these chips was initially evaluated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). A bifurcating distributor with an angle of 140° between branches was implemented in order to achieve a homogeneous velocity field. The cross-sectional area of the channels of the flow distributor was fixed at 0.5 × 0.5 mm, which allows a robust micromilling technique to be used for chip manufacturing. Experiments were performed with chips featuring purposely introduced imperfections in the structure of the bifurcating flow distributor to study its capacity of overcoming potential local clogging. Split peaks were observed when 75% of one of the flow channels was obstructed, in line with the CFD predictions. The main bottlenecks for the performance of the spatial two-dimensional chips were identified, viz. sample injected in the first dimension diverging into the flow distributor and channel discretization (i.e., remixing of first-dimension separation peaks because of finite number of second-dimension channels). Solutions to the former problem were studied by applying a flow resistance in the vertical segments that formed the outlets of the flow distributor and by simulating the presence of constrictions. It was found that a flow resistance of 1.0×10(11) m(-2) reduced the amount of sample diverging into the flow distributor by a factor of 10. The presence of a constriction of 90% of the segment area and 50% of the segment length decreased the diverging flow by a factor of 5. The influence of the linear velocity was significant. Solutions to the channel discretization problem were sought by investigating different designs of spatial two-dimensional chips. PMID:26810803

  20. Using Pitch, Amplitude Modulation, and Spatial Cues for Separation of Harmonic Instruments from Stereo Music Recordings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodruff, John; Pardo, Bryan

    2006-12-01

    Recent work in blind source separation applied to anechoic mixtures of speech allows for improved reconstruction of sources that rarely overlap in a time-frequency representation. While the assumption that speech mixtures do not overlap significantly in time-frequency is reasonable, music mixtures rarely meet this constraint, requiring new approaches. We introduce a method that uses spatial cues from anechoic, stereo music recordings and assumptions regarding the structure of musical source signals to effectively separate mixtures of tonal music. We discuss existing techniques to create partial source signal estimates from regions of the mixture where source signals do not overlap significantly. We use these partial signals within a new demixing framework, in which we estimate harmonic masks for each source, allowing the determination of the number of active sources in important time-frequency frames of the mixture. We then propose a method for distributing energy from time-frequency frames of the mixture to multiple source signals. This allows dealing with mixtures that contain time-frequency frames in which multiple harmonic sources are active without requiring knowledge of source characteristics.

  1. Control of Systems With Slow Actuators Using Time Scale Separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stepanyan, Vehram; Nguyen, Nhan

    2009-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of controlling a nonlinear plant with a slow actuator using singular perturbation method. For the known plant-actuator cascaded system the proposed scheme achieves tracking of a given reference model with considerably less control demand than would otherwise result when using conventional design techniques. This is the consequence of excluding the small parameter from the actuator dynamics via time scale separation. The resulting tracking error is within the order of this small parameter. For the unknown system the adaptive counterpart is developed based on the prediction model, which is driven towards the reference model by the control design. It is proven that the prediction model tracks the reference model with an error proportional to the small parameter, while the prediction error converges to zero. The resulting closed-loop system with all prediction models and adaptive laws remains stable. The benefits of the approach are demonstrated in simulation studies and compared to conventional control approaches.

  2. Optimal Control of Airfoil Flow Separation using Fluidic Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahrabi, Arireza F.

    This thesis deals with the control of flow separation around a symmetric airfoils with the aid of multiple synthetic jet actuators (SJAs). CFD simulation methods have been implemented to uncover the flow separation regimes and associated properties such as frequencies and momentum ratio. In the first part of the study, the SJA was studied thoroughly. Large Eddy Simulations (LES) were performed for one individual cavity; the time history of SJA of the outlet velocity profile and the net momentum imparted to the flow were analyzed. The studied SJA is asymmetrical and operates with the aid of a piezoelectric (PZT) ceramic circular plate actuator. A three-dimensional mesh for the computational domain of the SJA and the surrounding volume was developed and was used to evaluate the details of the airflow conditions inside the SJA as well as at the outlet. The vibration of the PZT ceramic actuator was used as a boundary condition in the computational model to drive the SJA. Particular attention was given to developing a predictive model of the SJA outlet velocity. Results showed that the SJA velocity output is correlated to the PZT ceramic plate vibration, especially for the first frequency mode. SJAs are a particular class of zero net mass flux (ZNMF) fluidic devices with net imparted momentum to the flow. The net momentum imparted to the flow in the separated region is such that positive enhancement during AFC operations is achieved. Flows around the NACA 0015 airfoil were simulated for a range of operating conditions. Attention was given to the active open and closed loop control solutions for an airfoil with SJA at different angles of attack and flap angles. A large number of simulations using RANS & LES models were performed to study the effects of the momentum ratio (Cμ) in the range of 0 to 11% and of the non-dimensional frequency, F+, in the range of 0 to 2 for the control of flow separation at a practical angle of attack and flap angle. The optimum value of C

  3. Unconscious inhibition separates two forms of cognitive control

    PubMed Central

    Boy, Frederic; Husain, Masud; Sumner, Petroc

    2010-01-01

    In the human brain, cognitive-control processes are generally considered distinct from the unconscious mechanisms elicited by subliminal priming. Here, we show that cognitive control engaged in situations of response conflict interacts with the negative (inhibitory) phase of subliminal priming. Thus, cognitive control may surprisingly share common processes with nonconscious brain mechanisms. In contrast, our findings reveal that subliminal inhibition does not, however, interact with control adaptation—the supposed modulation of current control settings by previous experience of conflict. Therefore, although influential models have grouped immediate cognitive control and control adaptation together as products of the same conflict detection and control network, their relationship to subliminal inhibition separates them. Overall, these results suggest that the important distinction lies not between cognitive or top-down processes on the one hand and nonconscious priming mechanisms on the other hand but between responsive (poststimulus) mechanisms that deal with sensorimotor activation after it has occurred and preparatory (prestimulus) mechanisms that are modulated before stimulus arrival. PMID:20534462

  4. Control of flow separation and mixing by aerodynamic excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, Edward J.; Abbott, John M.

    1990-01-01

    The recent research progress in the control of shear flows using unsteady aerodynamic excitation conducted at the NASA Lewis Research Center is reviewed. The program is of fundamental nature concentrating on the physics of the unsteady aerodynamic processes. This field of research is a fairly new development with great promise in the areas of enhanced mixing and flow separation control. Enhanced mixing research reported in this paper include influence of core turbulence, forced pairing of coherent structures, and saturation of mixing enhancement. Separation flow control studies included are for a two-dimensional diffuser, conical diffusers, and single airfoils. Ultimate applications of this research include aircraft engine inlet flow control at high angle of attack, wide angle diffusers, highly loaded airfoils as in turbomachinery, and ejector/suppressor nozzles for the supersonic transport. An argument involving the Coanda Effect is made here that all of the above mentioned application areas really only involve forms of shear layer mixing enhancement. The program also includes the development of practical excitation devices which might be used in aircraft applications.

  5. Control of flow separation and mixing by aerodynamic excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, Edward J.; Abbott, John M.

    1990-01-01

    The recent research in the control of shear flows using unsteady aerodynamic excitation conducted at the NASA Lewis Research Center is reviewed. The program is of a fundamental nature, concentrating on the physics of the unsteady aerodynamic processes. This field of research is a fairly new development with great promise in the areas of enhanced mixing and flow separation control. Enhanced mixing research includes influence of core turbulence, forced pairing of coherent structures, and saturation of mixing enhancement. Separation flow control studies included are for a two-dimensional diffuser, conical diffusers, and single airfoils. Ultimate applications include aircraft engine inlet flow control at high angle of attack, wide angle diffusers, highly loaded airfoils as in turbomachinery, and ejector/suppressor nozzles for the supersonic transport. An argument involving the Coanda Effect is made that all of the above mentioned application areas really only involve forms of shear layer mixing enhancement. The program also includes the development of practical excitation devices which might be used in aircraft applications.

  6. Plasma actuators for separation control on stationary and oscillating airfoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Post, Martiqua L.

    Given the importance of separation control associated with retreating blade stall on helicopters, the primary objective of this work was to develop a plasma actuator flow control device for its use in controlling leading-edge separation on stationary and oscillating airfoils. The plasma actuator consists of two copper electrodes separated by a dielectric insulator. When the voltage supplied to the electrodes is sufficiently high, the surrounding air ionizes forms plasma in the regions of high electrical field potential. The ionized air, in the presence of an electric field gradient, results in a body force on the flow. The effect of plasma actuator was experimentally investigated and characterized through a systematic set of experiments. It was then applied to NACA 66 3018 and NACA 0015 airfoils for the purpose of leading-edge separation control. The effectiveness of the actuator was documented through surface pressure measurements on the airfoil, mean wake velocity profiles, and flow visualization records. For the stationary airfoil, the actuator prevented flow separation for angles of attack up to 22°, which was 8° past the static stall angle. This resulted in as much as a 300% improvement in the lift-to-drag ratio. For the oscillating airfoil, the measurements were phase-conditioned to the oscillation motion. Three cases with the plasma actuator were investigated: steady actuation, unsteady plasma actuation, and so-called "smart" actuation in which the actuator is activated during portions of the oscillatory cycle. All of the cases exhibited a higher cycle-integrated lift and an improvement in the lift cycle hysteresis. The steady plasma actuation increased the lift over most of the cycle, except at the peak angle of attack where it was found to suppress the dynamic stall vortex. Because of this, the sharp drop in the lift coefficient past the maximum angle of attack was eliminated. The unsteady plasma actuation produced significant improvements in the lift

  7. Separation Control Over A Wall-Mounted Hump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenblatt, D.; Paschal, K. B.; Schaeffler, N. W.; Washburn, A. E.; Harris, J.; Yao, C. S.

    2007-01-01

    Separation control by means of steady suction or zero efflux oscillatory jets is known to be effective in a wide variety of flows under different flow conditions. Control is effective when applied in a nominally two-dimensional manner, for example, at the leading-edge of a wing or at the shoulder of a deflected flap. Despite intuitive understanding of the flow, at present there is no accepted theoretical model that can adequately explain or describe the observed effects of the leading parameters such as reduced suction-rate, or frequency and momentum input. This difficulty stems partly from the turbulent nature of the flows combined with superimposed coherent structures, which are usually driven by at least one instability mechanism. The ever increasing technological importance of these flows has spurned an urgent need to develop turbulence models with a predictive capability. Present attempts to develop such models are hampered in one way or another by incomplete data sets, uncertain or undocumented inflow and boundary conditions, or inadequate flow-field measurements. This paper attempts to address these issues by conducting an experimental investigation of a lowspeed separated flow over a wall-mounted hump model. The model geometry was designed by Seifert & Pack, who measured static and dynamic pressures on the model for a wide range of Reynolds and Mach numbers and control conditions. This paper describes the present experimental setup, as well as the types and range of data acquired. Sample data is presented and future work is discussed.

  8. Spatial Mode Control of High-Order Harmonics

    SciTech Connect

    Mercer, I.; Mevel, E.; Zerne, R.; LHuillier, A.; Antoine, P.; Wahlstroem, C.

    1996-08-01

    We demonstrate that the spatial mode of high-order harmonics can be continuously controlled. The control is achieved by spatially modulating the degree of elliptical polarization of the fundamental field using birefringent optics. A highly sensitive relationship between the efficiency of harmonic generation and the degree of laser elliptical polarization leads to atoms emitting harmonics only in regions of linear polarization. The harmonics are emitted as annular beams whose angles of divergence can be continuously varied. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  9. A spatial operator algebra for manipulator modeling and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, G.; Jain, A.; Kreutz-Delgado, K.

    1991-01-01

    A recently developed spatial operator algebra for manipulator modeling, control, and trajectory design is discussed. The elements of this algebra are linear operators whose domain and range spaces consist of forces, moments, velocities, and accelerations. The effect of these operators is equivalent to a spatial recursion along the span of a manipulator. Inversion of operators can be efficiently obtained via techniques of recursive filtering and smoothing. The operator algebra provides a high-level framework for describing the dynamic and kinematic behavior of a manipulator and for control and trajectory design algorithms. The interpretation of expressions within the algebraic framework leads to enhanced conceptual and physical understanding of manipulator dynamics and kinematics.

  10. Control of separation and quantitative analysis by GC-FTIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semmoud, A.; Huvenne, Jean P.; Legrand, P.

    1992-03-01

    Software for 3-D representations of the 'Absorbance-Wavenumber-Retention time' is used to control the quality of the GC separation. Spectral information given by the FTIR detection allows the user to be sure that a chromatographic peak is 'pure.' The analysis of peppermint essential oil is presented as an example. This assurance is absolutely required for quantitative applications. In these conditions, we have worked out a quantitative analysis of caffeine. Correlation coefficients between integrated absorbance measurements and concentration of caffeine are discussed at two steps of the data treatment.

  11. Passive Flow Separation Control Mechanism Inspired by Shark Skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oakley, India; Lang, Amy

    2015-11-01

    The following experimental work seeks to examine shark scales as passive flow-actuated separation control mechanisms. It is hypothesized that the actuation of these scales can in fact reduce pressure drag by inhibiting flow reversal and thereby prevent flow separation. In order to examine this mechanism at a fundamental level, three-dimensional sharkskin scales were simplified and modeled as two-dimensional flaps. To further simplify the experiment, the flaps were observed within a laminar boundary layer. The laminar boundary layer was grown over a long flat plate that was placed inside a water tunnel. A rotating cylinder was also used to induce an unsteady, increasing adverse pressure gradient, which generated a reversing flow. In order to visualize the potential actuation of the two-dimensional flaps DPIV (digital particle image velocimetry) was utilized. Three main objectives for this work included, the actuation of the two-dimensional flaps, the resistance to a reversed flow as a result of flap actuation and the prevention of flow separation. However once the experiment was conducted the flaps did not perform as previously hypothesized. The adverse pressure gradient induced by the rotating cylinder did not produce a reversing flow powerful enough to actuate the flaps. NSF REU Site Award 1358991.

  12. Spatially separated charge densities of electrons and holes in organic-inorganic halide perovskites

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Dan; Liang, Chunjun E-mail: zhqhe@bjtu.edu.cn; Zhang, Huimin; You, Fangtian; He, Zhiqun E-mail: zhqhe@bjtu.edu.cn; Zhang, Chunxiu

    2015-02-21

    Solution-processable methylammonium lead trihalide perovskites exhibit remarkable high-absorption and low-loss properties for solar energy conversion. Calculation from density functional theory indicates the presence of non-equivalent halogen atoms in the unit cell because of the specific orientation of the organic cation. Considering the 〈100〉 orientation as an example, I{sub 1}, one of the halogen atoms, differs from the other iodine atoms (I{sub 2} and I{sub 3}) in terms of its interaction with the organic cation. The valance-band-maximum (VBM) and conduction-band-minimum (CBM) states are derived mainly from 5p orbital of I{sub 1} atom and 6p orbital of Pb atom, respectively. The spatially separated charge densities of the electrons and holes justify the low recombination rate of the pure iodide perovskite. Chlorine substitution further strengthens the unique position of the I{sub 1} atom, leading to more localized charge density around the I{sub 1} atom and less charge density around the other atoms at the VBM state. The less overlap of charge densities between the VBM and CBM states explains the relatively lower carrier recombination rate of the iodine-chlorine mixed perovskite. Chlorine substitution significantly reduces the effective mass at a direction perpendicular to the Pb-Cl bond and organic axis, enhancing the carrier transport property of the mixed perovskite in this direction.

  13. Achieving three-dimensional entanglement between two spatially separated atoms by using the quantum Zeno effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Siping; Li, Jiahua; Yu, Rong; Wu, Ying

    2013-06-01

    Based on the quantum Zeno effect [B. Misra and E. C. G. Sudarshan, J. Math. Phys.JMAPAQ0022-248810.1063/1.523304 18, 756 (1977)], we propose a scheme to achieve three-dimensional (3D) entanglement between two distant five-level atoms. In our scheme, the two atoms are trapped individually in two spatially-separated double-mode cavities connected by an optical fiber. It is found that the effective quantum Zeno dynamics of the composite cavity-fiber-cavity coupled system gives rise to the deterministic creation of the 3D entangled state with high fidelity. Moreover, only one step operation is required to complete the generation of the 3D entangled state. The numerical simulations clearly show that the proposed scheme is robust against the deviation of the system parameters and insensitive to various decoherence factors, including atomic spontaneous emissions, cavity decays and fiber photon leakages. We justify our scheme by considering the experimental feasibility within the currently available technology.

  14. Blow-up and control of marginally separated boundary layers.

    PubMed

    Braun, Stefan; Kluwick, Alfred

    2005-05-15

    Interactive solutions for steady two-dimensional laminar marginally separated boundary layers are known to exist up to a critical value Gamma(c) of the controlling parameter (e.g. the angle of attack of a slender airfoil) Gamma only. Here, we investigate three-dimensional unsteady perturbations of such boundary layers, assuming that the basic flow is almost critical, i.e. in the limit Gamma(c)-Gamma-->0. It is then shown that the interactive equations governing such perturbations simplify significantly, allowing, among others, a systematic study of the blow-up phenomenon observed in earlier investigations and the optimization of devices used in boundary-layer control. PMID:16105768

  15. Feedback control of solid oxide fuel cell spatial temperature variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fardadi, Mahshid; Mueller, Fabian; Jabbari, Faryar

    A high performance feedback controller has been developed to minimize SOFC spatial temperature variation following significant load perturbations. For thermal management, spatial temperature variation along SOFC cannot be avoided. However, results indicate that feedback control can be used to manipulate the fuel cell air flow and inlet fuel cell air temperature to maintain a nearly constant SOFC electrode electrolyte assembly temperature profile. For example temperature variations of less than 5 K are obtained for load perturbations of ±25% from nominal. These results are obtained using a centralized control strategy to regulate a distributed temperature profile and manage actuator interactions. The controller is based on H-infinity synthesis using a physical based dynamic model of a single co-flow SOFC repeat cell. The model of the fuel cell spatial temperature response needed for control synthesis was linearized and reduced from nonlinear model of the fuel cell assembly. A single 11 state feedback linear system tested in the full nonlinear model was found to be effective and stable over a wide fuel cell operating envelope (0.82-0.6 V). Overall, simulation of the advanced controller resulted in small and smooth monotonic temperature response to rapid and large load perturbations. This indicates that future SOFC systems can be designed and controlled to have superb load following characteristic with less than previously expected thermal stresses.

  16. Laminar separation control effects of shortfin mako shark skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradshaw, Michael Thomas

    Shark skin is investigated as a means of laminar flow separation control due to its preferential flow direction as well as the potential for scales to erect and obstruct low-momentum backflow resulting from an adverse pressure gradient acting on the boundary layer. In this study, the effect of the scales on flow reversal is observed in laminar flow conditions. This is achieved by comparing the flow over a pectoral fin from a shortfin mako shark to that over the same fin that is painted to neutralize the effect of the scales on the flow. The effect of the scales on flow reversal is also observed by comparing the flow over a smooth PVC cylinder to that over the same cylinder with samples of mako shark skin affixed to the entire circumference of the cylinder. These samples were taken from the flank region of the shark because the scales at this location have been shown to have the greatest angle of erection compared to the scales on the rest of the shark's body. Scales at this location have an average crown length of 220 microm with a maximum bristling angle of proximately 50 degrees. Because these scales have the highest bristling angle, they have the best potential for separation control. All data was taken using time-resolved Digital Particle Image Velocimetry. The flow over the pectoral fin was analyzed at multiple angles of attack. It was found that the shark skin had the effect of decreasing the size of the separated region over both the pectoral fin and the cylinder as well as decreasing the magnitudes of the reversing flow found in these regions. For all Reynolds numbers tested, drag reduction over 28% was found when applying the sharkskin to the cylinder.

  17. Dynamics of the Kuramoto equation with spatially distributed control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashchenko, Ilia; Kaschenko, Sergey

    2016-05-01

    We consider the scalar complex equation with spatially distributed control. Its dynamical properties are studied by asymptotic methods when the control coefficient is either sufficiently large or sufficiently small and the function of distribution is either almost symmetric or significantly nonsymmetric relative to zero. In all cases we reduce original equation to quasinormal form - the family of special parabolic equations, which do not contain big and small parameters, which nonlocal dynamics determines the behaviour of solutions of the original equation.

  18. Separation of spatial-temporal patterns ('climatic modes') by combined analysis of really measured and generated numerically vector time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigin, A. M.; Mukhin, D.; Volodin, E. M.; Gavrilov, A.; Loskutov, E. M.

    2013-12-01

    The new method of decomposition of the Earth's climate system into well separated spatial-temporal patterns ('climatic modes') is discussed. The method is based on: (i) generalization of the MSSA (Multichannel Singular Spectral Analysis) [1] for expanding vector (space-distributed) time series in basis of spatial-temporal empirical orthogonal functions (STEOF), which makes allowance delayed correlations of the processes recorded in spatially separated points; (ii) expanding both real SST data, and longer by several times SST data generated numerically, in STEOF basis; (iii) use of the numerically produced STEOF basis for exclusion of 'too slow' (and thus not represented correctly) processes from real data. The application of the method allows by means of vector time series generated numerically by the INM RAS Coupled Climate Model [2] to separate from real SST anomalies data [3] two climatic modes possessing by noticeably different time scales: 3-5 and 9-11 years. Relations of separated modes to ENSO and PDO are investigated. Possible applications of spatial-temporal climatic patterns concept to prognosis of climate system evolution is discussed. 1. Ghil, M., R. M. Allen, M. D. Dettinger, K. Ide, D. Kondrashov, et al. (2002) "Advanced spectral methods for climatic time series", Rev. Geophys. 40(1), 3.1-3.41. 2. http://83.149.207.89/GCM_DATA_PLOTTING/GCM_INM_DATA_XY_en.htm 3. http://iridl.ldeo.columbia.edu/SOURCES/.KAPLAN/.EXTENDED/.v2/.ssta/

  19. Daily Access to Sucrose Impairs Aspects of Spatial Memory Tasks Reliant on Pattern Separation and Neural Proliferation in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reichelt, Amy C.; Morris, Margaret J.; Westbrook, Reginald Frederick

    2016-01-01

    High sugar diets reduce hippocampal neurogenesis, which is required for minimizing interference between memories, a process that involves "pattern separation." We provided rats with 2 h daily access to a sucrose solution for 28 d and assessed their performance on a spatial memory task. Sucrose consuming rats discriminated between objects…

  20. Graphene-enabled electrically controlled terahertz spatial light modulators.

    PubMed

    Kakenov, Nurbek; Takan, Taylan; Ozkan, Vedat Ali; Balcı, Osman; Polat, Emre O; Altan, Hakan; Kocabas, Coskun

    2015-05-01

    In this Letter, we demonstrate a broadband terahertz (THz) spatial light modulator using 5×5 arrays of large area graphene supercapacitors. Our approach relies on controlling spatial charge distribution on a passive matrix array of patterned graphene electrodes. By changing the voltage bias applied to the rows and columns, we were able to pattern the THz transmittance through the device with high modulation depth and low operation voltage. We anticipate that the simplicity of the device architecture with high contrast THz modulation over a broad spectral range could provide new tools for THz imaging and communication systems. PMID:25927764

  1. Spatial operator approach to flexible multibody system dynamics and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, G.

    1991-01-01

    The inverse and forward dynamics problems for flexible multibody systems were solved using the techniques of spatially recursive Kalman filtering and smoothing. These algorithms are easily developed using a set of identities associated with mass matrix factorization and inversion. These identities are easily derived using the spatial operator algebra developed by the author. Current work is aimed at computational experiments with the described algorithms and at modelling for control design of limber manipulator systems. It is also aimed at handling and manipulation of flexible objects.

  2. Evaluating vortex generator jet experiments for turbulent flow separation control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Stillfried, F.; Kékesi, T.; Wallin, S.; Johansson, A. V.

    2011-12-01

    Separating turbulent boundary-layers can be energized by streamwise vortices from vortex generators (VG) that increase the near wall momentum as well as the overall mixing of the flow so that flow separation can be delayed or even prevented. In general, two different types of VGs exist: passive vane VGs (VVG) and active VG jets (VGJ). Even though VGs are already successfully used in engineering applications, it is still time-consuming and computationally expensive to include them in a numerical analysis. Fully resolved VGs in a computational mesh lead to a very high number of grid points and thus, computational costs. In addition, computational parameter studies for such flow control devices take much time to set-up. Therefore, much of the research work is still carried out experimentally. KTH Stockholm develops a novel VGJ model that makes it possible to only include the physical influence in terms of the additional stresses that originate from the VGJs without the need to locally refine the computational mesh. Such a modelling strategy enables fast VGJ parameter variations and optimization studies are easliy made possible. For that, VGJ experiments are evaluated in this contribution and results are used for developing a statistical VGJ model.

  3. Plasmid Transfer between Spatially Separated Donor and Recipient Bacteria in Earthworm-Containing Soil Microcosms

    PubMed Central

    Daane, L. L.; Molina, J.; Sadowsky, M. J.

    1997-01-01

    Most gene transfer studies have been performed with relatively homogeneous soil systems in the absence of soil macrobiota, including invertebrates. In this study we examined the influence of earthworm activity (burrowing, casting, and feeding) on transfer of plasmid pJP4 between spatially separated donor (Alcaligenes eutrophus) and recipient (Pseudomonas fluorescens) bacteria in nonsterile soil columns. A model system was designed such that the activity of earthworms would act to mediate cell contact and gene transfer. Three different earthworm species (Aporrectodea trapezoides, Lumbricus rubellus, and Lumbricus terrestris), representing each of the major ecological categories (endogeic, epigeic, and anecic), were evaluated. Inoculated soil microcosms, with and without added earthworms, were analyzed for donor, recipient, and transconjugant bacteria at 5-cm-depth intervals by using selective plating techniques. Transconjugants were confirmed by colony hybridization with a mer gene probe. The presence of earthworms significantly increased dispersal of the donor and recipient strains. In situ gene transfer of plasmid pJP4 from A. eutrophus to P. fluorescens was detected only in earthworm-containing microcosms, at a frequency of (symbl)10(sup2) transconjugants per g of soil. The depth of recovery was dependent on the burrowing behavior of each earthworm species; however, there was no significant difference in the total number of transconjugants among the earthworm species. Donor and recipient bacteria were recovered from earthworm feces (casts) of all three earthworm species, with numbers up to 10(sup6) and 10(sup4) bacteria per g of cast, respectively. A. trapezoides egg capsules (cocoons) formed in the inoculated soil microcosms contained up to 10(sup7) donor and 10(sup6) recipient bacteria per g of cocoon. No transconjugant bacteria, however, were recovered from these microhabitats. To our knowledge, this is the first report of gene transfer between physically

  4. Placement and characterization of pairs of luminescent molecules in spatially separated regions of nanostructured thin films.

    PubMed

    Minoofar, Payam N; Hernandez, Raquel; Chia, Shinye; Dunn, Bruce; Zink, Jeffrey I; Franville, Anne-Christine

    2002-12-01

    Methods of making mesostructured sol-gel silicate thin films containing two different molecules deliberately placed in two different spatially separated regions in a one-step, one-pot preparation are developed and demonstrated. When the structure-directing agent is the surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, the structure is 2-D hexagonal with lattice spacings between 31.6 and 42.1 angstroms depending on the dopant molecules and their concentrations. The three general strategies that are used to place the molecules are philicity (like dissolves like), bonding, and bifunctionality. These strategies take advantage of the different chemical and physical properties of the regions of the films. These regions are the inorganic silicate framework, the hydrophobic organic interior of the micelles, and the ionic interface between them. Luminescent molecules that possess the physical and chemical properties appropriate for the desired strategies are chosen. Lanthanide and ruthenium complexes with condensable trialkoxysilane groups are incorporated into the silicate framework. 1,4-Naphthoquinone, pyrene, rhodamine 6G and coumarin 540A, and lanthanides with no condensable trialkoxysilanes occupy the hydrophobic core of micelles by virtue of their hydrophobicity. The locations of the molecules are determined by luminescence spectroscopy and by luminescence lifetime measurements. In all cases, the long-range order templated into the thin film is verified by X-ray diffraction. The simultaneous placement of two molecules in the structured film and the maintenance of long-range order require a delicate balance among film preparation methodology, design of the molecules to be incorporated in specific regions, and concentrations of all of the species. PMID:12452713

  5. A spatial operator algebra for manipulator modeling and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, G.; Kreutz, K.; Milman, M.

    1988-01-01

    A powerful new spatial operator algebra for modeling, control, and trajectory design of manipulators is discussed along with its implementation in the Ada programming language. Applications of this algebra to robotics include an operator representation of the manipulator Jacobian matrix; the robot dynamical equations formulated in terms of the spatial algebra, showing the complete equivalence between the recursive Newton-Euler formulations to robot dynamics; the operator factorization and inversion of the manipulator mass matrix which immediately results in O(N) recursive forward dynamics algorithms; the joint accelerations of a manipulator due to a tip contact force; the recursive computation of the equivalent mass matrix as seen at the tip of a manipulator; and recursive forward dynamics of a closed chain system. Finally, additional applications and current research involving the use of the spatial operator algebra are discussed in general terms.

  6. On the use of a spatial cue as prior information for stereo sound source separation based on spatially weighted non-negative tensor factorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsufuji, Yuki; Roebel, Axel

    2014-12-01

    This paper proposes a new method to enhance the performance of non-negative tensor factorization (NTF), one of the most prevalent source separation techniques nowadays. The enhancement is mainly achieved by introducing weights on bin-wise NTF cost functions, which differentiates NTF target components from other components so that the target should be approximated more precisely than others. Assuming sources are distributed sparsely in a 2-D sound field, the target components approximating a target source are exclusively selected by a user, or from accompanying images by means of providing a spatial cue to an NTF framework. The spatial cue is given in a similar format to the well-known binaural feature, inter-channel level difference (IID). This helps incorporate the spatial cue into the system, since the similar features of this format can be easily calculated from every spectrogram bin. The weighting functions are designed taking into account the distance between the spatial cue and the calculated features. Namely, the largest values are assigned to the spectrogram bins where the features present the highest similarity to the spatial cue, and the value decreases in proportion to the distance between them. The method is evaluated in terms of separation quality, comparing the proposed algorithm to the conventional NTF technique, PARAFAC-NTF, as well as other source separation techniques. The evaluation results measured by the metric signal-to-distortion ratio (SDR), signal-to-interference ratio (SIR), and signal-to-artifact ratio (SAR) demonstrate the effectiveness of the new method, improved primarily by the weighting function and the initialization based on IID, while demonstrating a decrease in computational costs, a significant problem with NTF.

  7. A spatial operator algebra for manipulator modeling and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, G.; Kreutz, K.; Jain, A.

    1989-01-01

    A spatial operator algebra for modeling the control and trajectory design of manipulation is discussed, with emphasis on its analytical formulation and implementation in the Ada programming language. The elements of this algebra are linear operators whose domain and range spaces consist of forces, moments, velocities, and accelerations. The effect of these operators is equivalent to a spatial recursion along the span of the manipulator. Inversion is obtained using techniques of recursive filtering and smoothing. The operator alegbra provides a high-level framework for describing the dynamic and kinematic behavior of a manipulator and control and trajectory design algorithms. Implementable recursive algorithms can be immediately derived from the abstract operator expressions by inspection, thus greatly simplifying the transition from an abstract problem formulation and solution to the detailed mechanization of a specific algorithm.

  8. Semiconductor diode laser having an intracavity spatial phase controller for beam control and switching

    DOEpatents

    Hohimer, J.P.

    1994-06-07

    A high-power broad-area semiconductor laser having a intracavity spatial phase controller is disclosed. The integrated intracavity spatial phase controller is easily formed by patterning an electrical contact metallization layer when fabricating the semiconductor laser. This spatial phase controller changes the normally broad far-field emission beam of such a laser into a single-lobed near-diffraction-limited beam at pulsed output powers of over 400 mW. Two operating modes, a thermal and a gain operating mode, exist for the phase controller, allowing for steering and switching the beam as the modes of operation are switched, and the emission beam may be scanned, for example, over a range of 1.4 degrees or switched by 8 degrees. More than one spatial phase controller may be integrated into the laser structure. 6 figs.

  9. Semiconductor diode laser having an intracavity spatial phase controller for beam control and switching

    DOEpatents

    Hohimer, John P.

    1994-01-01

    A high-power broad-area semiconductor laser having a intracavity spatial phase controller is disclosed. The integrated intracavity spatial phase controller is easily formed by patterning an electrical contact metallization layer when fabricating the semiconductor laser. This spatial phase controller changes the normally broad far-field emission beam of such a laser into a single-lobed near-diffraction-limited beam at pulsed output powers of over 400 mW. Two operating modes, a thermal and a gain operating mode, exist for the phase controller, allowing for steering and switching the beam as the modes of operation are switched, and the emission beam may be scanned, for example, over a range of 1.4 degrees or switched by 8 degrees. More than one spatial phase controller may be integrated into the laser structure.

  10. Semiconductor diode laser having an intracavity spatial phase controller for beam control and switching

    SciTech Connect

    Hohimer, J.P.

    1992-12-31

    A high-power broad-area semiconductor laser having a intracavity spatial phase controller is disclosed. The integrated intracavity spatial phase controller is easily formed by patterning an electrical contact metallization layer when fabricating the semiconductor laser. This spatial phase controller changes the normally broad far-field emission bean, of such a laser into a single-lobed near-diffraction-limited beam at pulsed output powers of over 400 mW. Two operating modes, a thermal and a gain operating mode, exist for the phase controller, allowing for steering and switching the beam as the modes of operation are switched, and the emission beam may be scanned, for example, over a range of 1.4 degrees or switched by 8 degrees. More than one spatial phase controller may be integrated into the laser structure.

  11. Offline comparison of spatial filters for two-dimensional movement control with noninvasive field potentials.

    PubMed

    Foldes, S T; Taylor, D M

    2011-08-01

    Paralyzed individuals can control the movement of an assistive device using changes in electroencephalographic (EEG) power resulting from attempted movements. Simultaneous, proportional control of two-dimensional (2D) device movements can be achieved with the concurrent modulation of brain activity that is associated with the attempted movement and rest of two independent body parts. Movement control may be improved by spatial filtering methods that recombine raw EEGs to form new signals with more focused information about the underlying brain activity. This study compared spatial filters offline for improving simultaneous proportional 2D movement commands from EEGs. Filtering options evaluated were common average referencing, Laplacian, independent component analysis, principle component analysis, and two novel ways of applying common spatial pattern (CSP) analysis. CSP analysis is a supervised algorithm that optimally recombines EEGs collected under two known conditions. Both CSP options resulted in more accurate movement prediction than the other filtering options. CSP was particularly advantageous when separating EEGs associated with neighboring or overlapping areas on the motor homunculus. Finally, CSP performed well using smaller subsets of filtered signals, thus making CSP practical and efficient for simultaneous 2D control. A 2D online cursor control example using CSP filtering is included to show CSP's utility. PMID:21712569

  12. Offline comparison of spatial filters for two-dimensional movement control with noninvasive field potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foldes, S. T.; Taylor, D. M.

    2011-08-01

    Paralyzed individuals can control the movement of an assistive device using changes in electroencephalographic (EEG) power resulting from attempted movements. Simultaneous, proportional control of two-dimensional (2D) device movements can be achieved with the concurrent modulation of brain activity that is associated with the attempted movement and rest of two independent body parts. Movement control may be improved by spatial filtering methods that recombine raw EEGs to form new signals with more focused information about the underlying brain activity. This study compared spatial filters offline for improving simultaneous proportional 2D movement commands from EEGs. Filtering options evaluated were common average referencing, Laplacian, independent component analysis, principle component analysis, and two novel ways of applying common spatial pattern (CSP) analysis. CSP analysis is a supervised algorithm that optimally recombines EEGs collected under two known conditions. Both CSP options resulted in more accurate movement prediction than the other filtering options. CSP was particularly advantageous when separating EEGs associated with neighboring or overlapping areas on the motor homunculus. Finally, CSP performed well using smaller subsets of filtered signals, thus making CSP practical and efficient for simultaneous 2D control. A 2D online cursor control example using CSP filtering is included to show CSP's utility.

  13. Amoeba-based computing for traveling salesman problem: long-term correlations between spatially separated individual cells of Physarum polycephalum.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Liping; Aono, Masashi; Kim, Song-Ju; Hara, Masahiko

    2013-04-01

    A single-celled, multi-nucleated amoeboid organism, a plasmodium of the true slime mold Physarum polycephalum, can perform sophisticated computing by exhibiting complex spatiotemporal oscillatory dynamics while deforming its amorphous body. We previously devised an "amoeba-based computer (ABC)" to quantitatively evaluate the optimization capability of the amoeboid organism in searching for a solution to the traveling salesman problem (TSP) under optical feedback control. In ABC, the organism changes its shape to find a high quality solution (a relatively shorter TSP route) by alternately expanding and contracting its pseudopod-like branches that exhibit local photoavoidance behavior. The quality of the solution serves as a measure of the optimality of which the organism maximizes its global body area (nutrient absorption) while minimizing the risk of being illuminated (exposure to aversive stimuli). ABC found a high quality solution for the 8-city TSP with a high probability. However, it remains unclear whether intracellular communication among the branches of the organism is essential for computing. In this study, we conducted a series of control experiments using two individual cells (two single-celled organisms) to perform parallel searches in the absence of intercellular communication. We found that ABC drastically lost its ability to find a solution when it used two independent individuals. However, interestingly, when two individuals were prepared by dividing one individual, they found a solution for a few tens of minutes. That is, the two divided individuals remained correlated even though they were spatially separated. These results suggest the presence of a long-term memory in the intrinsic dynamics of this organism and its significance in performing sophisticated computing. PMID:23438635

  14. High resolution Hall measurements across the VO2 metal-insulator transition reveal impact of spatial phase separation

    PubMed Central

    Yamin, Tony; Strelniker, Yakov M.; Sharoni, Amos

    2016-01-01

    Many strongly correlated transition metal oxides exhibit a metal-insulator transition (MIT), the manipulation of which is essential for their application as active device elements. However, such manipulation is hindered by lack of microscopic understanding of mechanisms involved in these transitions. A prototypical example is VO2, where previous studies indicated that the MIT resistance change correlate with changes in carrier density and mobility. We studied the MIT using Hall measurements with unprecedented resolution and accuracy, simultaneously with resistance measurements. Contrast to prior reports, we find that the MIT is not correlated with a change in mobility, but rather, is a macroscopic manifestation of the spatial phase separation which accompanies the MIT. Our results demonstrate that, surprisingly, properties of the nano-scale spatially-separated metallic and semiconducting domains actually retain their bulk properties. This study highlights the importance of taking into account local fluctuations and correlations when interpreting transport measurements in highly correlated systems. PMID:26783076

  15. High resolution Hall measurements across the VO2 metal-insulator transition reveal impact of spatial phase separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamin, Tony; Strelniker, Yakov M.; Sharoni, Amos

    2016-01-01

    Many strongly correlated transition metal oxides exhibit a metal-insulator transition (MIT), the manipulation of which is essential for their application as active device elements. However, such manipulation is hindered by lack of microscopic understanding of mechanisms involved in these transitions. A prototypical example is VO2, where previous studies indicated that the MIT resistance change correlate with changes in carrier density and mobility. We studied the MIT using Hall measurements with unprecedented resolution and accuracy, simultaneously with resistance measurements. Contrast to prior reports, we find that the MIT is not correlated with a change in mobility, but rather, is a macroscopic manifestation of the spatial phase separation which accompanies the MIT. Our results demonstrate that, surprisingly, properties of the nano-scale spatially-separated metallic and semiconducting domains actually retain their bulk properties. This study highlights the importance of taking into account local fluctuations and correlations when interpreting transport measurements in highly correlated systems.

  16. Spatial and Temporal Control of Fungal Natural Product Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Fang Yun; Keller, Nancy P.

    2014-01-01

    Despite their oftentimes-elusive ecological role, fungal natural products have, for better or worse, impacted our daily lives tremendously owing to their diverse and potent bioactive properties. This Janus-faced nature of fungal natural products inevitably ushered in a field of research dedicated towards understanding the ecology, organisms, genes, enzymes, and biosynthetic pathways that give rise to this arsenal of diverse and complex chemistry. Ongoing research in fungal secondary metabolism has not only increased our appreciation for fungal natural products as an asset but also sheds light on the pivotal role that these once-regarded “metabolic wastes” play in fungal biology, defense, and stress response in addition to their potential contributions towards human mycoses. Full orchestration of secondary metabolism requires not only the seamless coordination between temporal and spatial control of SM-associated machineries (e.g. enzymes, cofactors, intermediates, and end-products) but also integration of these machineries into primary metabolic processes and established cellular mechanisms. An intriguing, but little known aspect of microbial natural product synthesis lies in the spatial organization of both pathway intermediates and enzymes responsible for the production of these compounds. In this highlight, we summarize some major breakthroughs in understanding the genes and regulation of fungal natural product synthesis and introduce the current state of knowledge on the spatial and temporal control of fungal natural product synthesis. PMID:25142354

  17. Bioinspired Composites with Spatial and Orientational Control of Reinforcement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demiroers, Ahmet; Studart, Andre; Complex Materials Team

    Living organisms combine soft and hard components to fabricate composite materials with out-standing mechanical properties. The optimum design and assembly of the anisotropic components reinforce the material in specific directions against multidirectional external loads. Although nature does it quite readily, it is still a challenge for material scientists to control the orientation and position of the colloidal components in a matrix. Here, we use external electric and magnetic fields to achieve positional and orientational control over colloid-polymer composites to fabricate mechanically robust materials to capture some of the essential features of natural systems. We first investigated the assembly of spherical micron-sized colloids using dielectrophoresis, as these particles provided an easily accessible and instructive length scale for performing initial experiments. We used dielectrophoresis for spatial control of reinforcing anisotropic components and magnetic fields to provide control over the orientation of these reinforcing constituents. The obtained composites with different orientational and spatial reinforcement showed enhanced mechanical properties, such as wear resistance, which exhibits similarities to tooth enamel. SNSF Ambizione Grant PZ00P2_148040.

  18. Spatial organization of cortical and spinal neurons controlling motor behavior

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Ariel J; Lewallen, Kathryn A; Pfaff, Samuel L

    2013-01-01

    A major task of the central nervous system (CNS) is to control behavioral actions, which necessitates a precise regulation of muscle activity. The final components of the circuitry controlling muscles are the motorneurons, which settle into pools in the ventral horn of the spinal cord in positions that mirror the musculature organization within the body. This ‘musculotopic’ motor-map then becomes the internal CNS reference for the neuronal circuits that control motor commands. This review describes recent progress in defining the neuroanatomical organization of the higher-order motor circuits in the cortex and spinal cord, and our current understanding of the integrative features that contribute to complex motor behaviors. We highlight emerging evidence that cortical and spinal motor command centers are loosely organized with respect to the musculotopic spatial-map, but these centers also incorporate organizational features that associate with the function of different muscle groups during commonly enacted behaviors. PMID:22841417

  19. Spatial patterns and predictors of trophic control in marine ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Boyce, Daniel G; Frank, Kenneth T; Worm, Boris; Leggett, William C

    2015-10-01

    A key question in ecology is under which conditions ecosystem structure tends to be controlled by resource availability vs. consumer pressure. Several hypotheses derived from theory, experiments and observational field studies have been advanced, yet a unified explanation remains elusive. Here, we identify common predictors of trophic control in a synthetic analysis of 52 observational field studies conducted within marine ecosystems across the Northern Hemisphere and published between 1951 and 2014. Spatial regression analysis of 45 candidate variables revealed temperature to be the dominant predictor, with unimodal effects on trophic control operating both directly (r(2) = 0.32; P < 0.0001) and indirectly through influences on turnover rate and quality of primary production, biodiversity and omnivory. These findings indicate that temperature is an overarching determinant of the trophic dynamics of marine ecosystems, and that variation in ocean temperature will affect the trophic structure of marine ecosystems through both direct and indirect mechanisms. PMID:26252155

  20. Impulsive spatial control of invading pests by generalist predators.

    PubMed

    Aniţa, Sebastian; Casas, Jérôme; Suppo, Christelle

    2014-09-01

    We model the conditions for pest eradication in a reaction-diffusion system made of a prey and a generalist predator through spatial impulsive control within a bounded domain. The motivating example is the control of the invasive horse chestnut leafminer moth through the yearly destruction of leaves in autumn, in which both the pest and its parasitoids overwinter. The model is made of two integro-partial differential equations, the integral portion describing the within-year immigration from the whole domain. The problem of pest eradication is strongly related to some appropriate eigenvalue problems. Basic properties of the principal eigenvalues of these problems are derived by using of Krein-Rutman's theorem and of comparison results for parabolic equations with non-local terms. Spatial control of the pest can be achieved, if one of these principal eigenvalues is large enough, at an exponential rate. This is true without and with parasitoids, the latter case being of course more rapid. We discuss the possible implementation of these results to the leafminer invasion problem and discuss complementary methods. PMID:23788257

  1. Separating spatial search and efficiency rates as components of predation risk.

    PubMed

    DeCesare, Nicholas J

    2012-11-22

    Predation risk is an important driver of ecosystems, and local spatial variation in risk can have population-level consequences by affecting multiple components of the predation process. I use resource selection and proportional hazard time-to-event modelling to assess the spatial drivers of two key components of risk--the search rate (i.e. aggregative response) and predation efficiency rate (i.e. functional response)--imposed by wolves (Canis lupus) in a multi-prey system. In my study area, both components of risk increased according to topographic variation, but anthropogenic features affected only the search rate. Predicted models of the cumulative hazard, or risk of a kill, underlying wolf search paths validated well with broad-scale variation in kill rates, suggesting that spatial hazard models provide a means of scaling up from local heterogeneity in predation risk to population-level dynamics in predator-prey systems. Additionally, I estimated an integrated model of relative spatial predation risk as the product of the search and efficiency rates, combining the distinct contributions of spatial heterogeneity to each component of risk. PMID:22977145

  2. Photonic lantern adaptive spatial mode control in LMA fiber amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Montoya, Juan; Aleshire, Chris; Hwang, Christopher; Fontaine, Nicolas K; Velázquez-Benítez, Amado; Martz, Dale H; Fan, T Y; Ripin, Dan

    2016-02-22

    We demonstrate adaptive-spatial mode control (ASMC) in few-moded double-clad large mode area (LMA) fiber amplifiers by using an all-fiber-based photonic lantern. Three single-mode fiber inputs are used to adaptively inject the appropriate superposition of input modes in a multimode gain fiber to achieve the desired mode at the output. By actively adjusting the relative phase of the single-mode inputs, near-unity coherent combination resulting in a single fundamental mode at the output is achieved. PMID:26906999

  3. Dielectric barrier plasma dynamics for active control of separated flows

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Subrata; Singh, K.P.; Gaitonde, Datta V.

    2006-03-20

    The dynamics of separation mitigation with asymmetric dielectric barrier discharges is explored by considering the gas flow past a flat plate at an angle of attack. A self-consistent model utilizing motion of electrons, ions, and neutrals is employed to couple the electric force field to the momentum of the fluid. The charge separation and concomitant electric field yield a time-averaged body force which is oriented predominantly downstream, with a smaller transverse component towards the wall. This induces a wall-jet-like feature that effectively eliminates the separation bubble. The impact of several geometric and electrical operating parameters is elucidated.

  4. Fundamental study of phosphor separation by controlling magnetic force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Kohei; Mishima, Fumihito; Akiyama, Yoko; Nishijima, Shigehiro

    2013-11-01

    The phosphor wastes consist of phosphors with different emission colors, green (LAP), red (YOX), blue (BAM) and white (HP). It is required to recover and reuse the rare earth phosphors with high market value. In this study, we tried to separate the phosphor using the magnetic separation by HTS bulk magnet utilizing the differences of magnetic susceptibility by the type of phosphors. We succeeded in the successive separation of HP with low market value from YOX and BAM including the rare earth using the magnetic Archimedes method. In this method, vertical and radial components of the magnetic force were used.

  5. SEPARATING SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL SOURCES OF VARIATION FOR MODEL TESTING IN PRECISION AGRICULTURE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Applying crop simulation models to precision agriculture appears to be a matter of developing spatial suites of input parameters and running a model for each set. Extensive modeling literature has reported independent tests in multiple combinations of variety, soils, and climate, which has been gene...

  6. Multicollinearity in spatial genetics: separating the wheat from the chaff using commonality analyses.

    PubMed

    Prunier, J G; Colyn, M; Legendre, X; Nimon, K F; Flamand, M C

    2015-01-01

    Direct gradient analyses in spatial genetics provide unique opportunities to describe the inherent complexity of genetic variation in wildlife species and are the object of many methodological developments. However, multicollinearity among explanatory variables is a systemic issue in multivariate regression analyses and is likely to cause serious difficulties in properly interpreting results of direct gradient analyses, with the risk of erroneous conclusions, misdirected research and inefficient or counterproductive conservation measures. Using simulated data sets along with linear and logistic regressions on distance matrices, we illustrate how commonality analysis (CA), a detailed variance-partitioning procedure that was recently introduced in the field of ecology, can be used to deal with nonindependence among spatial predictors. By decomposing model fit indices into unique and common (or shared) variance components, CA allows identifying the location and magnitude of multicollinearity, revealing spurious correlations and thus thoroughly improving the interpretation of multivariate regressions. Despite a few inherent limitations, especially in the case of resistance model optimization, this review highlights the great potential of CA to account for complex multicollinearity patterns in spatial genetics and identifies future applications and lines of research. We strongly urge spatial geneticists to systematically investigate commonalities when performing direct gradient analyses. PMID:25495950

  7. Temporal Evolution of Spatial Computations for Visuomotor Control.

    PubMed

    Franklin, David W; Reichenbach, Alexandra; Franklin, Sae; Diedrichsen, Jörn

    2016-02-24

    Goal-directed reaching movements are guided by visual feedback from both target and hand. The classical view is that the brain extracts information about target and hand positions from a visual scene, calculates a difference vector between them, and uses this estimate to control the movement. Here we show that during fast feedback control, this computation is not immediate, but evolves dynamically over time. Immediately after a change in the visual scene, the motor system generates independent responses to the errors in hand and target location. Only about 200 ms later, the changes in target and hand positions are combined appropriately in the response, slowly converging to the true difference vector. Therefore, our results provide evidence for the temporal evolution of spatial computations in the human visuomotor system, in which the accurate difference vector computation is first estimated by a fast approximation. PMID:26911681

  8. Spatial control of flowering by DELLA proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Galvão, Vinicius C; Horrer, Daniel; Küttner, Frank; Schmid, Markus

    2012-11-01

    The transition from vegetative to reproductive development is a central event in the plant life cycle. To time the induction of flowering correctly, plants integrate environmental and endogenous signals such as photoperiod, temperature and hormonal status. The hormone gibberellic acid (GA) has long been known to regulate flowering. However, the spatial contribution of GA signaling in flowering time control is poorly understood. Here we have analyzed the effect of tissue-specific misexpression of wild-type and GA-insensitive (dellaΔ17) DELLA proteins on the floral transition in Arabidopsis thaliana. We demonstrate that under long days, GA affects the floral transition by promoting the expression of flowering time integrator genes such as FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) and TWIN SISTER OF FT (TSF) in leaves independently of CONSTANS (CO) and GIGANTEA (GI). In addition, GA signaling promotes flowering independently of photoperiod through the regulation of SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN-LIKE (SPL) genes in both the leaves and at the shoot meristem. Our data suggest that GA regulates flowering by controlling the spatial expression of floral regulatory genes throughout the plant in a day-length-specific manner. PMID:22992955

  9. Controls of Soil Spatial Variability in a Dry Tropical Forest.

    PubMed

    Pulla, Sandeep; Riotte, Jean; Suresh, H S; Dattaraja, H S; Sukumar, Raman

    2016-01-01

    We examined the roles of lithology, topography, vegetation and fire in generating local-scale (<1 km2) soil spatial variability in a seasonally dry tropical forest (SDTF) in southern India. For this, we mapped soil (available nutrients, Al, total C, pH, moisture and texture in the top 10 cm), rock outcrops, topography, all native woody plants ≥1 cm diameter at breast height (DBH), and spatial variation in fire frequency (times burnt during the 17 years preceding soil sampling) in a permanent 50-ha plot. Unlike classic catenas, lower elevation soils had lesser moisture, plant-available Ca, Cu, Mn, Mg, Zn, B, clay and total C. The distribution of plant-available Ca, Cu, Mn and Mg appeared to largely be determined by the whole-rock chemical composition differences between amphibolites and hornblende-biotite gneisses. Amphibolites were associated with summit positions, while gneisses dominated lower elevations, an observation that concurs with other studies in the region which suggest that hillslope-scale topography has been shaped by differential weathering of lithologies. Neither NO3(-)-N nor NH4(+)-N was explained by the basal area of trees belonging to Fabaceae, a family associated with N-fixing species, and no long-term effects of fire on soil parameters were detected. Local-scale lithological variation is an important first-order control over soil variability at the hillslope scale in this SDTF, by both direct influence on nutrient stocks and indirect influence via control of local relief. PMID:27100088

  10. A spatial operator algebra for manipulator modeling and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, G.; Kreutz, Kenneth; Jain, Abhinandan

    1989-01-01

    A recently developed spatial operator algebra, useful for modeling, control, and trajectory design of manipulators is discussed. The elements of this algebra are linear operators whose domain and range spaces consist of forces, moments, velocities, and accelerations. The effect of these operators is equivalent to a spatial recursion along the span of a manipulator. Inversion of operators can be efficiently obtained via techniques of recursive filtering and smoothing. The operator algebra provides a high level framework for describing the dynamic and kinematic behavior of a manipulator and control and trajectory design algorithms. The interpretation of expressions within the algebraic framework leads to enhanced conceptual and physical understanding of manipulator dynamics and kinematics. Furthermore, implementable recursive algorithms can be immediately derived from the abstract operator expressions by inspection. Thus, the transition from an abstract problem formulation and solution to the detailed mechanizaton of specific algorithms is greatly simplified. The analytical formulation of the operator algebra, as well as its implementation in the Ada programming language are discussed.

  11. Live imaging reveals spatial separation of parental chromatin until the four-cell stage in Caenorhabditis elegans embryos.

    PubMed

    Bolková, Jitka; Lanctôt, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The parental genomes are initially spatially separated in each pronucleus after fertilization. Here we have used green-to-red photoconversion of Dendra2-H2B-labeled pronuclei to distinguish maternal and paternal chromatin domains and to track their spatial distribution in living Caenorhabditis elegans embryos starting shortly after fertilization. Intermingling of the parental chromatin did not occur until after the division of the AB and P1 blastomeres, at the 4-cell stage. Unexpectedly, we observed that the intermingling of chromatin did not take place during mitosis or during chromatin decondensation, but rather ∼ 3-5 minutes into the cell cycle. Furthermore, unlike what has been observed in mammalian cells, the relative spatial positioning of chromatin domains remained largely unchanged during prometaphase in the early C. elegans embryo. Live imaging of photoconverted chromatin also allowed us to detect a reproducible 180° rotation of the nuclei during cytokinesis of the one-cell embryo. Imaging of fluorescently-labeled P granules and polar bodies showed that the entire embryo rotates during the first cell division. To our knowledge, we report here the first live observation of the initial separation and subsequent mixing of parental chromatin domains during embryogenesis. PMID:26934289

  12. First spatial separation of a heavy ion isomeric beam with a multiple-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickel, T.; Plaß, W. R.; Ayet San Andres, S.; Ebert, J.; Geissel, H.; Haettner, E.; Hornung, C.; Miskun, I.; Pietri, S.; Purushothaman, S.; Reiter, M. P.; Rink, A.-K.; Scheidenberger, C.; Weick, H.; Dendooven, P.; Diwisch, M.; Greiner, F.; Heiße, F.; Knöbel, R.; Lippert, W.; Moore, I. D.; Pohjalainen, I.; Prochazka, A.; Ranjan, M.; Takechi, M.; Winfield, J. S.; Xu, X.

    2015-05-01

    211Po ions in the ground and isomeric states were produced via 238U projectile fragmentation at 1000 MeV/u. The 211Po ions were spatially separated in flight from the primary beam and other reaction products by the fragment separator FRS. The ions were energy-bunched, slowed-down and thermalized in a gas-filled cryogenic stopping cell (CSC). They were then extracted from the CSC and injected into a high-resolution multiple-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometer (MR-TOF-MS). The excitation energy of the isomer and, for the first time, the isomeric-to-ground state ratio were determined from the measured mass spectrum. In the subsequent experimental step, the isomers were spatially separated from the ions in the ground state by an ion deflector and finally collected with a silicon detector for decay spectroscopy. This pioneering experimental result opens up unique perspectives for isomer-resolved studies. With this versatile experimental method new isomers with half-lives longer than a few milliseconds can be discovered and their decay properties can be measured with highest sensitivity and selectivity. These experiments can be extended to studies with isomeric beams in nuclear reactions.

  13. Separating Spatial and Temporal Variations of the Aurora Using Two Nearly Colocated Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spence, Harlan E.

    2001-01-01

    This final report describes the efforts accomplished during the grant's period of performance, covering the period of 1 May 1997 to 30 April 2001, of a NASA Supporting Research and Technology Program grant under the Ionospheric, Thermospheric, and Mesospheric Physics component of the Sun-Earth Connections program. We have met and exceeded the goals set forth in the proposed research objectives. Referred publications have appeared in the scientific literature and several others are in the review process. In addition, numerous invited and contributed presentations of these studies were presented at national and international meetings during the performance period. One graduate student completed his PhD and won two AGU Best Student Paper awards based on research funded by this grant. These studies are summarized below. The science goal delineated in the initial proposal was "to systematically explore the temporal and spatial characteristics of the aurora in a way heretofore impossible, using data from two coplanar DMSP spacecraft." We accomplished this goal through a series of related studies. One study used these unique data to establish the role of Ps6 waves in coupling between the magnetosphere and the auroral ionosphere (omega bands) during the recovery phase of a magnetic storm; the published paper demonstrated the causal relationships between geospace processes occurring in different regions and established a simple conceptual model based on the fortuitous constellation of observations. In the second string of papers, we used these data to explore velocity-dispersed ions (VDIS) in and near the cusp, to test region identification models, and to look at space/time structure of auroral precipitation. On the first topic, the unique DMSP data revealed a remarkable double VDIS with a latitudinal overlap. This could only be explained in terms of a unified reconnection geometry that builds on several earlier unrelated models. The paper outlining this discovery has drawn

  14. Structure having spatially separated photo-excitable electron-hole pairs and method of manufacturing same

    DOEpatents

    Liang, Yong [Richland, WA; Daschbach, John L [Richland, WA; Su, Yali [Richland, WA; Chambers, Scott A [Kennewick, WA

    2003-03-18

    A method for producing quantum dots. The method includes cleaning an oxide substrate and separately cleaning a metal source. The substrate is then heated and exposed to the source in an oxygen environment. This causes metal oxide quantum dots to form on the surface of the substrate.

  15. Structure having spatially separated photo-excitable electron-hole pairs and method of manufacturing same

    DOEpatents

    Liang, Yong; Daschbach, John L.; Su, Yali; Chambers, Scott A.

    2006-08-22

    A method for producing quantum dots. The method includes cleaning an oxide substrate and separately cleaning a metal source. The substrate is then heated and exposed to the source in an oxygen environment. This causes metal oxide quantum dots to form on the surface of the substrate.

  16. 33 CFR 239.7 - Separation of flood control works from urban drainage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Separation of flood control works... COVERED FLOOD CONTROL CHANNELS § 239.7 Separation of flood control works from urban drainage. Covered channels are likely to be considered in boundary areas demarking urban drainage and flood...

  17. Continuous flow system for controlling phases separation near λ transition

    SciTech Connect

    Chorowski, M.; Poliński, J.; Kempiński, W.; Trybuła, Z.; Łoś, Sz.; Chołast, K.; Kociemba, A.

    2014-01-29

    As demands on 3He are increasing and conventional 3He production through tritium decay is decreasing, alternative 3He production methods are becoming economically viable. One such possibility is to use entropy filters for extraction of the 3He isotope from natural gas. According to the phase diagram of the 3He, its solidification is impossible by only lowering of the temperature. Hence during the cooling process at stable pressure we can reach λ-point and pass to the special phase - He II. The total density of HeII is a sum of the two phases: normal the superfluid ones. It is possible to separate these two phases with an entropy filter - the barrier for the classically-behaving normal phase. This barrier can also be used to separate the two main isotopes of He: 4He and 3He, because at temperatures close to the 4He-λ-point the 3He isotope is part of the normal phase. The paper presents continuous flow schemes of different separation methods of 3He from helium commodity coming from natural gas cryogenic processing. An overall thermodynamic efficiency of the 3He/4He separation process is presented. A simplified model of continuous flow HeI -HeII recuperative heat exchanger is given. Ceramic and carbon porous plugs have been tested in entropy filter applications.

  18. Bell's inequality violation for entangled generalized Bernoulli states in two spatially separate cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Lo Franco, R.; Compagno, G.; Messina, A.; Napoli, A.

    2005-11-15

    We consider the entanglement of orthogonal generalized Bernoulli states in two separate single-mode high-Q cavities. The expectation values and the correlations of the electric field in the cavities are obtained. We then define, in each cavity, a dichotomic operator expressible in terms of the field states which can be, in principle, experimentally measured by a probe atom that 'reads' the field. Using the quantum correlations of couples of these operators, we construct a Bell's inequality which is shown to be violated for a wide range of the degree of entanglement and which can be tested in a simple way. Thus the cavity fields directly show quantum nonlocal properties. A scheme is also sketched to generate entangled orthogonal generalized Bernoulli states in the two separate cavities.

  19. Tsetse Fly Control in Kenya's Spatially and Temporally Dynamic Control Reservoirs: A Cost Analysis

    PubMed Central

    McCord, Paul F.; Messina, Joseph P.; Campbell, David J.; Grady, Sue C.

    2011-01-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) and animal African trypanosomiasis (AAT) are significant health concerns throughout much of sub-Saharan Africa. Funding for tsetse fly control operations has decreased since the 1970s, which has in turn limited the success of campaigns to control the disease vector. To maximize the effectiveness of the limited financial resources available for tsetse control, this study develops and analyzes spatially and temporally dynamic tsetse distribution maps of Glossina subgenus Morsitans populations in Kenya from January 2002 to December 2010, produced using the Tsetse Ecological Distribution Model. These species distribution maps reveal seasonal variations in fly distributions. Such variations allow for the identification of “control reservoirs” where fly distributions are spatially constrained by fluctuations in suitable habitat and tsetse population characteristics. Following identification of the control reservoirs, a tsetse management operation is simulated in the control reservoirs using capital and labor control inputs from previous studies. Finally, a cost analysis, following specific economic guidelines from existing tsetse control analyses, is conducted to calculate the total cost of a nationwide control campaign of the reservoirs compared to the cost of a nationwide campaign conducted at the maximum spatial extent of the fly distributions from January 2002 to December 2010. The total cost of tsetse management within the reservoirs sums to $14,212,647, while the nationwide campaign at the maximum spatial extent amounts to $33,721,516. This savings of $19,508,869 represents the importance of identifying seasonally dynamic control reservoirs when conducting a tsetse management campaign, and, in the process, offers an economical means of fly control and disease management for future program planning. PMID:22581989

  20. Spatially Separated Photosystem II and a Silicon Photoelectrochemical Cell for Overall Water Splitting: A Natural-Artificial Photosynthetic Hybrid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wangyin; Wang, Hong; Zhu, Qingjun; Qin, Wei; Han, Guangye; Shen, Jian-Ren; Zong, Xu; Li, Can

    2016-08-01

    Integrating natural and artificial photosynthetic platforms is an important approach to developing solar-driven hybrid systems with exceptional function over the individual components. A natural-artificial photosynthetic hybrid platform is formed by wiring photosystem II (PSII) and a platinum-decorated silicon photoelectrochemical (PEC) cell in a tandem manner based on a photocatalytic-PEC Z-scheme design. Although the individual components cannot achieve overall water splitting, the hybrid platform demonstrated the capability of unassisted solar-driven overall water splitting. Moreover, H2 and O2 evolution can be separated in this system, which is ascribed to the functionality afforded by the unconventional Z-scheme design. Furthermore, the tandem configuration and the spatial separation between PSII and artificial components provide more opportunities to develop efficient natural-artificial hybrid photosynthesis systems. PMID:27345863

  1. [Spatial and temporal control of ultrasonic fields via optoacoustic holography].

    PubMed

    Gspan, Stefan; Meyer, Alex; Bernet, Stefan; Ritsch-Marte, Monika

    2004-01-01

    The present paper presents a new method for generating ultrasound, based on the interaction of laser-induced ultrasound generation and ultrasonic holography. An ultrasonic field generated in a water tank via the optoacoustic effect is spatially and temporally controlled: In order to produce defined ultrasonic frequencies in the MHz range, the laser pulses incident on a light-absorbing layer are modulated in time using an electro-optic modulator (EOM). Additionally, a high-resolution liquid crystal spatial light modulator (SLM) is used to imprint a pre-calculated phase front to the laser beam. A computer-generated binary hologram is also displayed at the SLM. The expanded laser beam projects the corresponding pattern to the plane absorptive layer in the water tank. The projection of specific patterns for the generation of ultrasonic beams resembles the use of, diffractive optical elements" in optics. Optical ultrasound generation with holographic steering is a flexible tool with promising numerous new applications in medical and technical ultrasound diagnostics. PMID:15462419

  2. Coupling spatial segregation with synthetic circuits to control bacterial survival.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shuqiang; Lee, Anna Jisu; Tsoi, Ryan; Wu, Feilun; Zhang, Ying; Leong, Kam W; You, Lingchong

    2016-02-01

    Engineered bacteria have great potential for medical and environmental applications. Fulfilling this potential requires controllability over engineered behaviors and scalability of the engineered systems. Here, we present a platform technology, microbial swarmbot, which employs spatial arrangement to control the growth dynamics of engineered bacteria. As a proof of principle, we demonstrated a safeguard strategy to prevent unintended bacterial proliferation. In particular, we adopted several synthetic gene circuits to program collective survival in Escherichia coli: the engineered bacteria could only survive when present at sufficiently high population densities. When encapsulated by permeable membranes, these bacteria can sense the local environment and respond accordingly. The cells inside the microbial swarmbot capsules will survive due to their high densities. Those escaping from a capsule, however, will be killed due to a decrease in their densities. We demonstrate that this design concept is modular and readily generalizable. Our work lays the foundation for engineering integrated and programmable control of hybrid biological-material systems for diverse applications. PMID:26925805

  3. Controls of Soil Spatial Variability in a Dry Tropical Forest

    PubMed Central

    Pulla, Sandeep; Riotte, Jean; Suresh, H. S.; Dattaraja, H. S.; Sukumar, Raman

    2016-01-01

    We examined the roles of lithology, topography, vegetation and fire in generating local-scale (<1 km2) soil spatial variability in a seasonally dry tropical forest (SDTF) in southern India. For this, we mapped soil (available nutrients, Al, total C, pH, moisture and texture in the top 10cm), rock outcrops, topography, all native woody plants ≥1 cm diameter at breast height (DBH), and spatial variation in fire frequency (times burnt during the 17 years preceding soil sampling) in a permanent 50-ha plot. Unlike classic catenas, lower elevation soils had lesser moisture, plant-available Ca, Cu, Mn, Mg, Zn, B, clay and total C. The distribution of plant-available Ca, Cu, Mn and Mg appeared to largely be determined by the whole-rock chemical composition differences between amphibolites and hornblende-biotite gneisses. Amphibolites were associated with summit positions, while gneisses dominated lower elevations, an observation that concurs with other studies in the region which suggest that hillslope-scale topography has been shaped by differential weathering of lithologies. Neither NO3−-N nor NH4+-N was explained by the basal area of trees belonging to Fabaceae, a family associated with N-fixing species, and no long-term effects of fire on soil parameters were detected. Local-scale lithological variation is an important first-order control over soil variability at the hillslope scale in this SDTF, by both direct influence on nutrient stocks and indirect influence via control of local relief. PMID:27100088

  4. Energized outer membrane and spatial separation of metabolic processes in the hyperthermophilic Archaeon Ignicoccus hospitalis

    PubMed Central

    Küper, Ulf; Meyer, Carolin; Müller, Volker; Rachel, Reinhard; Huber, Harald

    2010-01-01

    ATP synthase catalyzes ATP synthesis at the expense of an electrochemical ion gradient across a membrane that can be generated by different exergonic reactions. Sulfur reduction is the main energy-yielding reaction in the hyperthermophilic strictly anaerobic Crenarchaeon Ignicoccus hospitalis. This organism is unusual in having an inner and an outer membrane that are separated by a huge intermembrane compartment. Here we show, on the basis of immuno-EM analyses of ultrathin sections and immunofluorescence experiments with whole I. hospitalis cells, that the ATP synthase and H2:sulfur oxidoreductase complexes of this organism are located in the outer membrane. These two enzyme complexes are mandatory for the generation of an electrochemical gradient and for ATP synthesis. Thus, among all prokaryotes possessing two membranes in their cell envelope (including Planctomycetes, Gram-negative bacteria), I. hospitalis is a unique organism, with an energized outer membrane and ATP synthesis within the periplasmic space. In addition, DAPI staining and EM analyses showed that DNA and ribosomes are localized in the cytoplasm, leading to the conclusion that in I. hospitalis energy conservation is separated from information processing and protein biosynthesis. This raises questions regarding the function of the two membranes, the interaction between these compartments, and the general definition of a cytoplasmic membrane. PMID:20133662

  5. Superresolution microscopy reveals spatial separation of UCP4 and F0F1-ATP synthase in neuronal mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Klotzsch, Enrico; Smorodchenko, Alina; Löfler, Lukas; Moldzio, Rudolf; Parkinson, Elena; Schütz, Gerhard J.; Pohl, Elena E.

    2015-01-01

    Because different proteins compete for the proton gradient across the inner mitochondrial membrane, an efficient mechanism is required for allocation of associated chemical potential to the distinct demands, such as ATP production, thermogenesis, regulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), etc. Here, we used the superresolution technique dSTORM (direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy) to visualize several mitochondrial proteins in primary mouse neurons and test the hypothesis that uncoupling protein 4 (UCP4) and F0F1-ATP synthase are spatially separated to eliminate competition for the proton motive force. We found that UCP4, F0F1-ATP synthase, and the mitochondrial marker voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) have various expression levels in different mitochondria, supporting the hypothesis of mitochondrial heterogeneity. Our experimental results further revealed that UCP4 is preferentially localized in close vicinity to VDAC, presumably at the inner boundary membrane, whereas F0F1-ATP synthase is more centrally located at the cristae membrane. The data suggest that UCP4 cannot compete for protons because of its spatial separation from both the proton pumps and the ATP synthase. Thus, mitochondrial morphology precludes UCP4 from acting as an uncoupler of oxidative phosphorylation but is consistent with the view that UCP4 may dissipate the excessive proton gradient, which is usually associated with ROS production. PMID:25535394

  6. Spatial Integration under Contextual Control in a Virtual Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molet, Mikael; Gambet, Boris; Bugallo, Mehdi; Miller, Ralph R.

    2012-01-01

    The role of context was examined in the selection and integration of independently learned spatial relationships. Using a dynamic 3D virtual environment, participants learned one spatial relationship between landmarks A and B which was established in one virtual context (e.g., A is left of B) and a different spatial relationship which was…

  7. Temporal Evolution of Spatial Computations for Visuomotor Control

    PubMed Central

    Reichenbach, Alexandra; Franklin, Sae; Diedrichsen, Jörn

    2016-01-01

    Goal-directed reaching movements are guided by visual feedback from both target and hand. The classical view is that the brain extracts information about target and hand positions from a visual scene, calculates a difference vector between them, and uses this estimate to control the movement. Here we show that during fast feedback control, this computation is not immediate, but evolves dynamically over time. Immediately after a change in the visual scene, the motor system generates independent responses to the errors in hand and target location. Only about 200 ms later, the changes in target and hand positions are combined appropriately in the response, slowly converging to the true difference vector. Therefore, our results provide evidence for the temporal evolution of spatial computations in the human visuomotor system, in which the accurate difference vector computation is first estimated by a fast approximation. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The dominant view regarding the neural control of reaching is that the visuomotor system controls movement based on the difference vector—the difference between the positions of the hand and target. We directly test this theory by measuring the responses to visual perturbations over a large range of possible variations in both target and hand displacements. By modeling the nonlinearity of the feedback response, we were able to reveal the temporal evolution of the underlying computations. The visuomotor system first uses an approximation to the difference vector computation, simply combining the nonlinear responses to cursor and target displacements, only arriving at the correct difference vector calculation 200 ms later. PMID:26911681

  8. Evidence of short spatial variability of the equatorial electrojet at close longitudinal separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekhar, N. Phani; Arora, Kusumita; Nagarajan, Nandini

    2014-12-01

    The characteristics of longitudinal variability of equatorial electrojet (EEJ) and counter electrojet (CEJ), presented in this study, are based on concurrent observations from a hitherto unsampled region of the world to examine the (1) degree of correlation between hourly means and monthly averaged hourly means of ground observations with equatorial electrojet climatological model (EEJM-2.0), (2) day-to-day longitudinal variability of EEJ strength between the pairs of sites, and (3) longitudinal variability in occurrences of counter electrojet. The analyses are based on the data obtained from an observatory and three new remote sites in the northern Indian Ocean at a longitudinal separation of approximately 15°: Hyderabad (HYB) and Vencode (VEN) at 77° E and Port Blair (PBR) and Campbell Bay (CBY) at 93° E, for a period of 4 months during Lloyd's D-season (November 2011 to February 2012) and comparison with the EEJM-2.0 based on CHAMP satellite data. At both longitudes, the overall correlation of monthly mean hourly values (i.e., from 05:00 to 19:00 LT) between the observed EEJ strength and modeled current density from EEJM-2.0 is good ( r > 0.8). However, a significant lack of correlation is witnessed on day-to-day peak values (i.e., 12:00 LT) between the observed variations and the model at both sites. Further, a comparison of noontime peaks between the two sites shows a considerable day-to-day variability. A large number of CEJs (43 events) are recorded during the study: at CBY (15 events) and VEN (28 events). Analyses of the CEJ events highlight the variability of CEJ phenomena in terms of amplitude, dates, and time of occurrence over 15° longitude separation. The local nature of perturbations causing CEJ is evident; the possible factors are being non-migrating eastward and westward propagating diurnal tides and local meteorological phenomena associated with upper mesospheric temperature, wind, and density variations.

  9. Control of laminar separation over airfoils by acoustic excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, K. B. M. Q.; Mckinzie, D. J.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of acoustic excitation in reducing laminar separation over two-dimensional airfoils at low angles of attack is investigated experimentally. Airfoils of two different cross sections, each with two different chord lengths, are studied in the chord Reynolds number range of 25,000 is less than R sub c is less than 100,000. While keeping the amplitude of the excitation induced velocity perturbation a constant, it is found that the most effective frequency scales as U (sup 3/2)(sub infinity). The parameter St/R (sup 1/2)(sub c), corresponding to the most effective f sub p for all the cases studied, falls in the range of 0.02 to 0.03, St being the Strouhal number based on the chord.

  10. Perceptual and Cognitive Load Interact to Control the Spatial Focus of Attention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linnell, Karina J.; Caparos, Serge

    2011-01-01

    Caparos and Linnell (2009, 2010) used a variable-separation flanker paradigm to show that (a) when cognitive load is low, increasing perceptual load causes spatial attention to focus and (b) when perceptual load is high, decreasing cognitive load causes spatial attention to focus. Here, we tested whether the effects of perceptual and cognitive…

  11. Pilot and Controller Evaluations of Separation Function Allocation in Air Traffic Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wing, David; Prevot, Thomas; Morey, Susan; Lewis, Timothy; Martin, Lynne; Johnson, Sally; Cabrall, Christopher; Como, Sean; Homola, Jeffrey; Sheth-Chandra, Manasi; Mercer, Joey

    2013-01-01

    Two human-in-the-loop simulation experiments were conducted in coordinated fashion to investigate the allocation of separation assurance functions between ground and air and between humans and automation. The experiments modeled a mixed-operations concept in which aircraft receiving ground-based separation services shared the airspace with aircraft providing their own separation service (i.e., self-separation). Ground-based separation was provided by air traffic controllers without automation tools, with tools, or by ground-based automation with controllers in a managing role. Airborne self-separation was provided by airline pilots using self-separation automation enabled by airborne surveillance technology. The two experiments, one pilot-focused and the other controller-focused, addressed selected key issues of mixed operations, assuming the starting point of current-day operations and modeling an emergence of NextGen technologies and procedures. In the controller-focused experiment, the impact of mixed operations on controller performance was assessed at four stages of NextGen implementation. In the pilot-focused experiment, the limits to which pilots with automation tools could take full responsibility for separation from ground-controlled aircraft were tested. Results indicate that the presence of self-separating aircraft had little impact on the controllers' ability to provide separation services for ground-controlled aircraft. Overall performance was best in the most automated environment in which all aircraft were data communications equipped, ground-based separation was highly automated, and self-separating aircraft had access to trajectory intent information for all aircraft. In this environment, safe, efficient, and highly acceptable operations could be achieved for twice today's peak airspace throughput. In less automated environments, reduced trajectory intent exchange and manual air traffic control limited the safely achievable airspace throughput and

  12. A Belief-Based Model of Air Traffic Controllers Performing Separation Assurance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landry, S.J.

    2009-01-01

    A model of an air traffic controller performing a separation assurance task was produced. The model was designed to be simple to use and deploy in a simulator, but still provide realistic behavior. The model is based upon an evaluation of the safety function of the controller for separation assurance, and utilizes fast and frugal heuristics and belief networks to establish a knowledge set for the controller model. Based on this knowledge set, the controller acts to keep aircraft separated. Validation results are provided to demonstrate the model s performance.

  13. Targeted Intracellular Delivery of Proteins with Spatial and Temporal Control

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    While a host of methods exist to deliver genetic materials or small molecules to cells, very few are available for protein delivery to the cytosol. We describe a modular, light-activated nanocarrier that transports proteins into cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis and delivers the cargo to the cytosol by light triggered endosomal escape. The platform is based on hollow gold nanoshells (HGN) with polyhistidine tagged proteins attached through an avidity-enhanced, nickel chelation linking layer; here, we used green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a model deliverable cargo. Endosomal uptake of the GFP loaded nanocarrier was mediated by a C-end Rule (CendR) internalizing peptide fused to the GFP. Focused femtosecond pulsed-laser excitation triggered protein release from the nanocarrier and endosome disruption, and the released protein was capable of targeting the nucleoli, a model intracellular organelle. We further demonstrate the generality of the approach by loading and releasing Sox2 and p53. This method for targeting of individual cells, with resolution similar to microinjection, provides spatial and temporal control over protein delivery. PMID:25490248

  14. Temporal and spatial control of gene expression in horticultural crops.

    PubMed

    Dutt, Manjul; Dhekney, Sadanand A; Soriano, Leonardo; Kandel, Raju; Grosser, Jude W

    2014-01-01

    Biotechnology provides plant breeders an additional tool to improve various traits desired by growers and consumers of horticultural crops. It also provides genetic solutions to major problems affecting horticultural crops and can be a means for rapid improvement of a cultivar. With the availability of a number of horticultural genome sequences, it has become relatively easier to utilize these resources to identify DNA sequences for both basic and applied research. Promoters play a key role in plant gene expression and the regulation of gene expression. In recent years, rapid progress has been made on the isolation and evaluation of plant-derived promoters and their use in horticultural crops, as more and more species become amenable to genetic transformation. Our understanding of the tools and techniques of horticultural plant biotechnology has now evolved from a discovery phase to an implementation phase. The availability of a large number of promoters derived from horticultural plants opens up the field for utilization of native sequences and improving crops using precision breeding. In this review, we look at the temporal and spatial control of gene expression in horticultural crops and the usage of a variety of promoters either isolated from horticultural crops or used in horticultural crop improvement. PMID:26504550

  15. Temporal and spatial control of gene expression in horticultural crops

    PubMed Central

    Dutt, Manjul; Dhekney, Sadanand A; Soriano, Leonardo; Kandel, Raju; Grosser, Jude W

    2014-01-01

    Biotechnology provides plant breeders an additional tool to improve various traits desired by growers and consumers of horticultural crops. It also provides genetic solutions to major problems affecting horticultural crops and can be a means for rapid improvement of a cultivar. With the availability of a number of horticultural genome sequences, it has become relatively easier to utilize these resources to identify DNA sequences for both basic and applied research. Promoters play a key role in plant gene expression and the regulation of gene expression. In recent years, rapid progress has been made on the isolation and evaluation of plant-derived promoters and their use in horticultural crops, as more and more species become amenable to genetic transformation. Our understanding of the tools and techniques of horticultural plant biotechnology has now evolved from a discovery phase to an implementation phase. The availability of a large number of promoters derived from horticultural plants opens up the field for utilization of native sequences and improving crops using precision breeding. In this review, we look at the temporal and spatial control of gene expression in horticultural crops and the usage of a variety of promoters either isolated from horticultural crops or used in horticultural crop improvement. PMID:26504550

  16. Evidence for two spatially separated UV continuum emitting regions in the Cloverleaf broad absorption line quasar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sluse, D.; Hutsemékers, D.; Anguita, T.; Braibant, L.; Riaud, P.

    2015-10-01

    Testing the standard Shakura-Sunyaev model of accretion is a challenging task because the central region of quasars where accretion takes place is unresolved with telescopes. The analysis of microlensing in gravitationally lensed quasars is one of the few techniques that can test this model, yielding to the measurement of the size and of temperature profile of the accretion disc. We present spectroscopic observations of the gravitationally lensed broad absorption line quasar H1413+117, which reveal partial microlensing of the continuum emission that appears to originate from two separated regions: a microlensed region, corresponding the compact accretion disc; and a non-microlensed region, more extended and contributing to at least 30% of the total UV-continuum flux. Because this extended continuum is occulted by the broad absorption line clouds, it is not associated with the host galaxy, but rather with light scattered in the neighbourhood of the central engine. We measure the amplitude of microlensing of the compact continuum over the rest-frame wavelength range 1000-7000 Å. Following a Bayesian scheme, we confront our measurements to microlensing simulations of an accretion disc with a temperature varying as T ∝ R-1/ν. We find a most likely source half-light radius of R1/2 = 0.61 × 1016cm (i.e., 0.002 pc) at 0.18 μm, and a most-likely index of ν = 0.4. The standard disc (ν = 4/3) model is not ruled out by our data, and is found within the 95% confidence interval associated with our measurements. We demonstrate that, for H1413+117, the existence of an extended continuum in addition to the disc emission only has a small impact on the inferred disc parameters, and is unlikely to solve the tension between the microlensing source size and standard disc sizes, as previously reported in the literature. Based on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the Paranal Observatory (Chile). ESO program ID: 386.B-0337.Appendices A and B are available in electronic form

  17. A fuzzy controlled three-phase centrifuge for waste separation

    SciTech Connect

    Parkinson, W.J.; Smith, R.E.; Miller, N.

    1998-02-01

    The three-phase centrifuge technology discussed in this paper was developed by Neal Miller, president of Centech, Inc. The three-phase centrifuge is an excellent device for cleaning up oil field and refinery wastes which are typically composed of hydrocarbons, water, and solids. The technology is unique. It turns the waste into salable oil, reusable water, and landfill-able solids. No secondary waste is produced. The problem is that only the inventor can set up and run the equipment well enough to provide an optimal cleanup. Demand for this device has far exceeded a one man operation. There is now a need for several centrifuges to be operated at different locations at the same time. This has produced a demand for an intelligent control system, one that could replace a highly skilled operator, or at least supplement the skills of a less experienced operator. The control problem is ideally suited to fuzzy logic, since the centrifuge is a highly complicated machine operated entirely by the skill and experience of the operator. A fuzzy control system was designed for and used with the centrifuge.

  18. Optimizing and controlling earthmoving operations using spatial technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alshibani, Adel

    This thesis presents a model designed for optimizing, tracking, and controlling earthmoving operations. The proposed model utilizes, Genetic Algorithm (GA), Linear Programming (LP), and spatial technologies including Global Positioning Systems (GPS) and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to support the management functions of the developed model. The model assists engineers and contractors in selecting near optimum crew formations in planning phase and during construction, using GA and LP supported by the Pathfinder Algorithm developed in a GIS environment. GA is used in conjunction with a set of rules developed to accelerate the optimization process and to avoid generating and evaluating hypothetical and unrealistic crew formations. LP is used to determine quantities of earth to be moved from different borrow pits and to be placed at different landfill sites to meet project constraints and to minimize the cost of these earthmoving operations. On the one hand, GPS is used for onsite data collection and for tracking construction equipment in near real-time. On the other hand, GIS is employed to automate data acquisition and to analyze the collected spatial data. The model is also capable of reconfiguring crew formations dynamically during the construction phase while site operations are in progress. The optimization of the crew formation considers: (1) construction time, (2) construction direct cost, or (3) construction total cost. The model is also capable of generating crew formations to meet, as close as possible, specified time and/or cost constraints. In addition, the model supports tracking and reporting of project progress utilizing the earned-value concept and the project ratio method with modifications that allow for more accurate forecasting of project time and cost at set future dates and at completion. The model is capable of generating graphical and tabular reports. The developed model has been implemented in prototype software, using Object

  19. Unexpected observation of spatially separated Kondo scattering and ferromagnetism in Ta alloyed anatase TiO2 thin films

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, T. P.; Gopinadhan, K.; Motapothula, M.; Saha, S.; Huang, Z.; Dhar, S.; Patra, A.; Lu, W. M.; Telesio, F.; Pallecchi, I.; Ariando; Marré, D.; Venkatesan, T.

    2015-01-01

    We report the observation of spatially separated Kondo scattering and ferromagnetism in anatase Ta0.06Ti0.94O2 thin films as a function of thickness (10–200 nm). The Kondo behavior observed in thicker films is suppressed on decreasing thickness and vanishes below ~25 nm. In 200 nm film, transport data could be fitted to a renormalization group theory for Kondo scattering though the carrier density in this system is lower by two orders of magnitude, the magnetic entity concentration is larger by a similar magnitude and there is strong electronic correlation compared to a conventional system such as Cu with magnetic impurities. However, ferromagnetism is observed at all thicknesses with magnetic moment per unit thickness decreasing beyond 10 nm film thickness. The simultaneous presence of Kondo and ferromagnetism is explained by the spatial variation of defects from the interface to surface which results in a dominantly ferromagnetic region closer to substrate-film interface while the Kondo scattering is dominant near the surface and decreasing towards the interface. This material system enables us to study the effect of neighboring presence of two competing magnetic phenomena and the possibility for tuning them. PMID:26265554

  20. Prokaryotes in Subsoil—Evidence for a Strong Spatial Separation of Different Phyla by Analysing Co-occurrence Networks

    PubMed Central

    Uksa, Marie; Schloter, Michael; Endesfelder, David; Kublik, Susanne; Engel, Marion; Kautz, Timo; Köpke, Ulrich; Fischer, Doreen

    2015-01-01

    Microbial communities in soil provide a wide range of ecosystem services. On the small scale, nutrient rich hotspots in soil developed from the activities of animals or plants are important drivers for the composition of microbial communities and their functional patterns. However, in subsoil, the spatial heterogeneity of microbes with differing lifestyles has been rarely considered so far. In this study, the phylogenetic composition of the bacterial and archaeal microbiome based on 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing was investigated in the soil compartments bulk soil, drilosphere, and rhizosphere in top- and in the subsoil of an agricultural field. With co-occurrence network analysis, the spatial separation of typically oligotrophic and copiotrophic microbes was assessed. Four bacterial clusters were identified and attributed to bulk topsoil, bulk subsoil, drilosphere, and rhizosphere. The bacterial phyla Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes, representing mostly copiotrophic bacteria, were affiliated mainly to the rhizosphere and drilosphere—both in topsoil and subsoil. Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Gemmatimonadetes, Planctomycetes, and Verrucomicrobia, bacterial phyla which harbor many oligotrophic bacteria, were the most abundant groups in bulk subsoil. The bacterial core microbiome in this soil was estimated to cover 7.6% of the bacterial sequencing reads including both oligotrophic and copiotrophic bacteria. In contrast the archaeal core microbiome includes 56% of the overall archaeal diversity. Thus, the spatial variability of nutrient quality and quantity strongly shapes the bacterial community composition and their interaction in subsoil, whereas archaea build a stable backbone of the soil prokaryotes due to their low variability in the different soil compartments. PMID:26635741

  1. Control and reduction of unsteady pressure loads in separated shock wave turbulent boundary layer interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolling, David S.; Barter, John W.

    1995-01-01

    The focus was on developing means of controlling and reducing unsteady pressure loads in separated shock wave turbulent boundary layer interactions. Section 1 describes how vortex generators can be used to effectively reduce loads in compression ramp interaction, while Section 2 focuses on the effects of 'boundary-layer separators' on the same interaction.

  2. Mineral separation and recycle in a Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballou, E. V.

    1982-01-01

    The background of the mineral nutrition needs of plants are examined along with the applicability of mineral control and separation to a controlled ecological life support system (CELSS). Steps that may be taken in a program to analytically define and experimentally test key mineral control concepts in the nutritional and waste processing loops of a CELSS are delineated.

  3. Toward spatial control of gold nanorod surface functionalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eller, Jonathan R.

    Gold nanorods (GNRs) show much promise for applications in biological, optoelectronic and energy applications. The resonant generation of a localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) at the GNR surface results in interesting optical properties and unique interactions with molecules. Combined with their biocompatibility, ease of synthesis and facile surface functionalization, these anisotropic metal particles are excellent scaffolds for the study of the interactions between nanoscale surfaces and their chemical/biological environments. Regardless of the application, however, GNR utility will not be fully realized until the chemical nature of the surface is understood and controlled. GNRs can enhance various photophysical properties of molecules. In the case of two-photon absorption (TPA), cross-section enhancements have been shown to increase with strong distance-dependence. Here, a dual approach for the conjugation of a TPA chromophore to GNRs is presented, relying on layer-by- layer (LbL) polymer wrapping and direct thiol coating of the same parent chromophore structure. Together, these approaches allow for estimated chromophore-particle distances from <1nm to more than 15 nm. Composites were confirmed using conventional nanoparticle characterization methods. Imaging of GNR polymer shells indicated anisotropic composite structures, as confirmed by both conventional and cryo-TEM. Optical characterizations were performed using two-photon excited fluorescence and Z-scan techniques, to probe the TPA enhancement. The intrinsic nonlinear optical properties of GNRs is shown to contribute strongly to these measurements, suggesting the utility of these materials for bi-modal imaging platforms. GNR properties, like their shape, are anisotropic. The LSPR-induced near- fields are heterogeneously distributed on the nanorod surface, with the tips being much "hotter" than the sides. To understand and utilize fully the spatially- dependent interactions of GNRs with their

  4. Closed Loop Active Flow Separation Detection and Control in a Multistage Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bright, Michelle M.; Culley, Dennis E.; Braunscheidel, Edward P.; Welch, Gerard E.

    2005-01-01

    Active closed loop flow control was successfully demonstrated on a full annulus of stator vanes in a low speed axial compressor. Two independent methods of detecting separated flow conditions on the vane suction surface were developed. The first technique detects changes in static pressure along the vane suction surface, while the second method monitors variation in the potential field of the downstream rotor. Both methods may feasibly be used in future engines employing embedded flow control technology. In response to the detection of separated conditions, injection along the suction surface of each vane was used. Injected mass flow on the suction surface of stator vanes is known to reduce separation and the resulting limitation on static pressure rise due to lowered diffusion in the vane passage. A control algorithm was developed which provided a proportional response of the injected mass flow to the degree of separation, thereby minimizing the performance penalty on the compressor system.

  5. Spatially Explicit Analyses of Anopheline Mosquitoes Indoor Resting Density: Implications for Malaria Control

    PubMed Central

    Kamdem, Colince; Fouet, Caroline; Etouna, Joachim; Etoa, François-Xavier; Simard, Frédéric; Besansky, Nora J.; Costantini, Carlo

    2012-01-01

    Background The question of sampling and spatial aggregation of malaria vectors is central to vector control efforts and estimates of transmission. Spatial patterns of anopheline populations are complex because mosquitoes' habitats and behaviors are strongly heterogeneous. Analyses of spatially referenced counts provide a powerful approach to delineate complex distribution patterns, and contributions of these methods in the study and control of malaria vectors must be carefully evaluated. Methodology/Principal Findings We used correlograms, directional variograms, Local Indicators of Spatial Association (LISA) and the Spatial Analysis by Distance IndicEs (SADIE) to examine spatial patterns of Indoor Resting Densities (IRD) in two dominant malaria vectors sampled with a 5×5 km grid over a 2500 km2 area in the forest domain of Cameroon. SADIE analyses revealed that the distribution of Anopheles gambiae was different from regular or random, whereas there was no evidence of spatial pattern in Anopheles funestus (Ia = 1.644, Pa<0.05 and Ia = 1.464, Pa>0.05, respectively). Correlograms and variograms showed significant spatial autocorrelations at small distance lags, and indicated the presence of large clusters of similar values of abundance in An. gambiae while An. funestus was characterized by smaller clusters. The examination of spatial patterns at a finer spatial scale with SADIE and LISA identified several patches of higher than average IRD (hot spots) and clusters of lower than average IRD (cold spots) for the two species. Significant changes occurred in the overall spatial pattern, spatial trends and clusters when IRDs were aggregated at the house level rather than the locality level. All spatial analyses unveiled scale-dependent patterns that could not be identified by traditional aggregation indices. Conclusions/Significance Our study illustrates the importance of spatial analyses in unraveling the complex spatial patterns of malaria vectors, and

  6. Long-range coupling of electron-hole pairs in spatially separated organic donor-acceptor layers

    PubMed Central

    Nakanotani, Hajime; Furukawa, Taro; Morimoto, Kei; Adachi, Chihaya

    2016-01-01

    Understanding exciton behavior in organic semiconductor molecules is crucial for the development of organic semiconductor-based excitonic devices such as organic light-emitting diodes and organic solar cells, and the tightly bound electron-hole pair forming an exciton is normally assumed to be localized on an organic semiconducting molecule. We report the observation of long-range coupling of electron-hole pairs in spatially separated electron-donating and electron-accepting molecules across a 10-nanometers-thick spacer layer. We found that the exciton energy can be tuned over 100 megaelectron volts and the fraction of delayed fluorescence can be increased by adjusting the spacer-layer thickness. Furthermore, increasing the spacer-layer thickness produced an organic light-emitting diode with an electroluminescence efficiency nearly eight times higher than that of a device without a spacer layer. Our results demonstrate the first example of a long-range coupled charge-transfer state between electron-donating and electron-accepting molecules in a working device. PMID:26933691

  7. Large-Eddy Simulations of Plasma Control for Separated Supersonic Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisek, Nicholas; Poggie, Jonathan

    2012-11-01

    The Navier-Stokes equations were solved using a high-fidelity time-implicit numerical scheme and an implicit large-eddy simulation approach to investigate plasma-based flow control for supersonic flow over a compression ramp. The configuration includes a flat-plate region to develop an equilibrium turbulent boundary-layer at Mach 2.25, which was validated against a set of experimental measurements. The fully turbulent boundary-layer flow traveled over a 24° ramp and produced an unsteady shock-induced separation. A control strategy to suppress the separation through a magnetically-driven gliding-arc actuator was explored. The size, strength, and placement of the actuator were developed based on recent experiments. Three control scenarios were examined: steady control, pulsing with a 50% duty cycle, and Joule heating. The results show the control mechanism reduced the time-mean separation length for all three situations. The case without pulsing and Joule heating was the most effective, with a reduction in the separation length by more than 75%. The controller was also found to significantly reduce the low-frequency content of the turbulent kinetic energy spectra within the separated region and reduce the total kinetic energy downstream of reattachment. Funded in part by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, under a laboratory task monitored by Dr. J. Schmisseur, AFOSR/RSA. The computational resources were supported by a grant of supercomputer time from the U.S. Department of Defense.

  8. Parental Psychological Control and Dysfunctional Separation--Individuation: A Tale of Two Different Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kins, Evie; Soenens, Bart; Beyers, Wim

    2012-01-01

    This study examined associations between psychologically controlling parenting and two possible manifestations of problematic separation--individuation (i.e., dysfunctional dependence and dysfunctional independence). To explain these associations, it has been argued that psychological control is an inherently independence-stifling parenting…

  9. 33 CFR 239.7 - Separation of flood control works from urban drainage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... from urban drainage. 239.7 Section 239.7 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT... COVERED FLOOD CONTROL CHANNELS § 239.7 Separation of flood control works from urban drainage. Covered channels are likely to be considered in boundary areas demarking urban drainage and flood...

  10. 33 CFR 239.7 - Separation of flood control works from urban drainage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... from urban drainage. 239.7 Section 239.7 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT... COVERED FLOOD CONTROL CHANNELS § 239.7 Separation of flood control works from urban drainage. Covered channels are likely to be considered in boundary areas demarking urban drainage and flood...

  11. 33 CFR 239.7 - Separation of flood control works from urban drainage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... from urban drainage. 239.7 Section 239.7 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT... COVERED FLOOD CONTROL CHANNELS § 239.7 Separation of flood control works from urban drainage. Covered channels are likely to be considered in boundary areas demarking urban drainage and flood...

  12. 33 CFR 239.7 - Separation of flood control works from urban drainage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... from urban drainage. 239.7 Section 239.7 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT... COVERED FLOOD CONTROL CHANNELS § 239.7 Separation of flood control works from urban drainage. Covered channels are likely to be considered in boundary areas demarking urban drainage and flood...

  13. A Separation Control CFD Validation Test Case. Part 1; Baseline and Steady Suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenblatt, David; Paschal, Keith B.; Yao, Chung-Sheng; Harris, jerome; Schaeffler, Norman W.; Washburn, Anthony E.

    2004-01-01

    Low speed flow separation over a wall-mounted hump, and its control using steady suction, were studied experimentally in order to generate a data set for a workshop aimed at validating CFD turbulence models. The baseline and controlled data sets comprised static and dynamic surface pressure measurements, flow field measurements using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and wall shear stress obtained via oil-film interferometry. In addition to the specific test cases studied, surface pressures for a wide variety of conditions were reported for different Reynolds numbers and suction rates. Stereoscopic PIV and oil-film flow visualization indicated that the baseline separated flow field was mainly two-dimensional. With the application of control, some three-dimensionality was evident in the spanwise variation of pressure recovery, reattachment location and spanwise pressure fluctuations. Part 2 of this paper, under preparation for the AIAA Meeting in Reno 2005, considers separation control by means of zero-efflux oscillatory blowing.

  14. A Separation Control CFD Validation Test Case. Part 1; Baseline and Steady Suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenblatt, David; Paschal, Keith B.; Yao, Chung-Sheng; Harris, Jerome; Schaeffler, Norman W.; Washburn, Anthony E.

    2004-01-01

    Low speed flow separation over a wall-mounted hump, and its control using steady suction, were studied experimentally in order to generate a data set for a workshop aimed at validating CFD turbulence models. The baseline and controlled data sets comprised static and dynamic surface pressure measurements, flow field measurements using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and wall shear stress obtained via oil-film interferometry. In addition to the specific test cases studied, surface pressures for a wide variety of conditions were reported for different Reynolds numbers and suction rates. Stereoscopic PIV and oil-film flow visualization indicated that the baseline separated flow field was mainly two- dimensional. With the application of control, some three-dimensionality was evident in the spanwise variation of pressure recovery, reattachment location and spanwise pressure fluctuations. Part 2 of this paper, under preparation for the AIAA Meeting in Reno 2005, considers separation control by means of zero-efflux oscillatory blowing.

  15. Injection slot location for boundary-layer control in shock-induced separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viswanath, P. R.; Sankaran, L.; Sagdeo, P. M.; Narasimha, R.; Prabhu, A.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the effect of tangential air injection, when the injection slot is located inside of what would otherwise have been the dead air zone in a separated flow, in controlling shock-induced turbulent boundary layer separation is presented. The experiments were carried out at a free-stream Mach number of 2.5 in the separated flow induced by a compression corner with a 20 deg angle. The observations made were wall static pressures, pitot profiles, and schlieren visualizations of the flow. The results show that the present location for injection is more effective in suppressing boundary-layer separation than the more conventional one, where the slot is located upstream of where separation would occur in the absence of injection.

  16. Abiotic and biotic controls of spatial pattern at alpine treeline

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Malanson, George P.; Xiao, Ningchuan; Alftine, K.J.; Bekker, Mathew; Butler, David R.; Brown, Daniel G.; Cairns, David M.; Fagre, Daniel; Walsh, Stephen J.

    2000-01-01

    At alpine treeline, trees and krummholz forms affect the environment in ways that increase their growth and reproduction. We assess the way in which these positive feedbacks combine in spatial patterns to alter the environment in the neighborhood of existing plants. The research is significant because areas of alpine tundra are susceptible to encroachment by woody species as climate changes. Moreover, understanding the general processes of plant invasion is important. The importance of spatial pattern has been recognized, but the spatial pattern of positive feedbacks per se has not been explored in depth. We present a linked set of models of vegetation change at an alpine forest-tundra ecotone. Our aim is to create models that are as simple as possible in order to test specific hypotheses. We present results from a model of the resource averaging hypothesis and the positive feedback switch hypothesis of treelines. We compare the patterns generated by the models to patterns observed in fine scale remotely sensed data.

  17. Glow Discharge Plasma Demonstrated for Separation Control in the Low-Pressure Turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashpis, David e.; Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2004-01-01

    Flow separation in the low-pressure turbine (LPT) is a major barrier that limits further improvements of aerodynamic designs of turbine airfoils. The separation is responsible for performance degradation, and it prevents the design of highly loaded airfoils. The separation can be delayed, reduced, or eliminated completely if flow control techniques are used. Successful flow control technology will enable breakthrough improvements in gas turbine performance and design. The focus of this research project was the development and experimental demonstration of active separation control using glow discharge plasma (GDP) actuators in flow conditions simulating the LPT. The separation delay was shown to be successful, laying the foundation for further development of the technologies to practical application in the LPT. In a fluid mechanics context, the term "flow control" means a technology by which a very small input results in a very large effect on the flow. In this project, the interest is to eliminate or delay flow separation on LPT airfoils by using an active flow control approach, in which disturbances are dynamically inserted into the flow, they interact with the flow, and they delay separation. The disturbances can be inserted using a localized, externally powered, actuating device, examples are acoustic, pneumatic, or mechanical devices that generate vibrations, flow oscillations, or pulses. A variety of flow control devices have been demonstrated in recent years in the context of the external aerodynamics of aircraft wings and airframes, where the incoming flow is quiescent or of a very low turbulence level. However, the flow conditions in the LPT are significantly different because there are high levels of disturbances in the incoming flow that are characterized by high free-stream turbulence intensity. In addition, the Reynolds number, which characterizes the viscous forces in the flow and is related to the flow speed, is very low in the LPT passages.

  18. Generation of a multi-qubit W entangled state through spatially separated semiconductor quantum-dot-molecules in cavity-quantum electrodynamics arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Siping; Yu, Rong; Li, Jiahua; Wu, Ying

    2014-04-07

    Generating entangled states attract tremendous interest as the most vivid manifestation of nonlocality of quantum mechanics and also for emerging applications in quantum information processing (QIP). Here, we propose theoretically a scheme for the deterministic generation of a three-qubit W sate with three semiconductor quantum-dot-molecules (QDMs) trapped in spatially separated cavities connected by optical fibers. The proposed scheme takes full advantage of the voltage-controlled tunnelling effects in QDMs, which induces the quantum coherence and further controls the generation of the W entangled state. The influences of the system parameters and various decoherence processes including spontaneous decay and photon leakage on the fidelity of the W state are discussed in details. Numerical results indicate that our scheme is not only robust against these decoherence factors but also insensitive to the deviation of the system parameters from the ideal conditions. Furthermore, the present scheme can be directly extended to realize an N-qubit W state. Also, this scheme can be generically transferred to other physical systems, including circuit quantum electrodynamics and photonic crystal cavities. The results obtained here may be useful in real experiments for realizing QIP in a solid-state platform.

  19. Controllable Phase Separation by Boc-Modified Lipophilic Acid as a Multifunctional Extractant.

    PubMed

    Tao, Kai; Adler-Abramovich, Lihi; Gazit, Ehud

    2015-01-01

    While phase separation of immiscible liquid-liquid systems has become increasingly significant in diverse areas, the irreversible nature limits their further application in controllable extraction-concentration or capture-release fields. There is a need for the development of simple, efficient and reversible methods for numerous research and industrial extraction and separation applications. We envisioned Boc-modified lipophilic acids as a simple model for such use based on the studies of the multi-phase transitions of Boc-modified supramolecular polymeric systems. Here, we demonstrate that in the presence of Boc-7-aminoheptanoic acid (Boc-7), phase separation occurs in mixtures of miscible organic solvent and water. The separation behavior was confirmed by differential colorimetric development in aqueous and organic phases using methyl orange staining assays. Component substitution experiments verified that the phase separation results from the subtle balance between the aggregation and the solvation forces of Boc-7, and is reversible by adjusting the solution pH. Owing to the intrinsic hydrophobic properties of the organic phase and the hydrogen bonding-forming ability of the carboxyl group of Boc-7, the phase separation system captures and releases Sudan Red, fluorescein, and streptavidin in a controllable manner. Consequently, a reversible and simple phase separation system can be designed as a multifunctional extractant. PMID:26627307

  20. Controllable Phase Separation by Boc-Modified Lipophilic Acid as a Multifunctional Extractant

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Kai; Adler-Abramovich, Lihi; Gazit, Ehud

    2015-01-01

    While phase separation of immiscible liquid-liquid systems has become increasingly significant in diverse areas, the irreversible nature limits their further application in controllable extraction-concentration or capture-release fields. There is a need for the development of simple, efficient and reversible methods for numerous research and industrial extraction and separation applications. We envisioned Boc-modified lipophilic acids as a simple model for such use based on the studies of the multi-phase transitions of Boc-modified supramolecular polymeric systems. Here, we demonstrate that in the presence of Boc-7-aminoheptanoic acid (Boc-7), phase separation occurs in mixtures of miscible organic solvent and water. The separation behavior was confirmed by differential colorimetric development in aqueous and organic phases using methyl orange staining assays. Component substitution experiments verified that the phase separation results from the subtle balance between the aggregation and the solvation forces of Boc-7, and is reversible by adjusting the solution pH. Owing to the intrinsic hydrophobic properties of the organic phase and the hydrogen bonding-forming ability of the carboxyl group of Boc-7, the phase separation system captures and releases Sudan Red, fluorescein, and streptavidin in a controllable manner. Consequently, a reversible and simple phase separation system can be designed as a multifunctional extractant. PMID:26627307

  1. Controllable Phase Separation by Boc-Modified Lipophilic Acid as a Multifunctional Extractant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Kai; Adler-Abramovich, Lihi; Gazit, Ehud

    2015-12-01

    While phase separation of immiscible liquid-liquid systems has become increasingly significant in diverse areas, the irreversible nature limits their further application in controllable extraction-concentration or capture-release fields. There is a need for the development of simple, efficient and reversible methods for numerous research and industrial extraction and separation applications. We envisioned Boc-modified lipophilic acids as a simple model for such use based on the studies of the multi-phase transitions of Boc-modified supramolecular polymeric systems. Here, we demonstrate that in the presence of Boc-7-aminoheptanoic acid (Boc-7), phase separation occurs in mixtures of miscible organic solvent and water. The separation behavior was confirmed by differential colorimetric development in aqueous and organic phases using methyl orange staining assays. Component substitution experiments verified that the phase separation results from the subtle balance between the aggregation and the solvation forces of Boc-7, and is reversible by adjusting the solution pH. Owing to the intrinsic hydrophobic properties of the organic phase and the hydrogen bonding-forming ability of the carboxyl group of Boc-7, the phase separation system captures and releases Sudan Red, fluorescein, and streptavidin in a controllable manner. Consequently, a reversible and simple phase separation system can be designed as a multifunctional extractant.

  2. Multi-interface Level Sensors and New Development in Monitoring and Control of Oil Separators

    PubMed Central

    Bukhari, Syed Faisal Ahmed; Yang, Wuqiang

    2006-01-01

    In the oil industry, huge saving may be made if suitable multi-interface level measurement systems are employed for effectively monitoring crude oil separators and efficient control of their operation. A number of techniques, e.g. externally mounted displacers, differential pressure transmitters and capacitance rod devices, have been developed to measure the separation process with gas, oil, water and other components. Because of the unavailability of suitable multi-interface level measurement systems, oil separators are currently operated by the trial-and-error approach. In this paper some conventional techniques, which have been used for level measurement in industry, and new development are discussed.

  3. A Matter of Balance: Motor Control is Related to Children's Spatial and Proportional Reasoning Skills.

    PubMed

    Frick, Andrea; Möhring, Wenke

    2015-01-01

    Recent research has shown close links between spatial and mathematical thinking and between spatial abilities and motor skills. However, longitudinal research examining the relations between motor, spatial, and mathematical skills is rare, and the nature of these relations remains unclear. The present study thus investigated the relation between children's motor control and their spatial and proportional reasoning. We measured 6-year-olds' spatial scaling (i.e., the ability to reason about different-sized spaces), their mental transformation skills, and their ability to balance on one leg as an index for motor control. One year later (N = 126), we tested the same children's understanding of proportions. We also assessed several control variables (verbal IQ and socio-economic status) as well as inhibitory control, visuo-spatial and verbal working memory. Stepwise hierarchical regressions showed that, after accounting for effects of control variables, children's balance skills significantly increased the explained variance in their spatial performance and proportional reasoning. Our results suggest specific relations between balance skills and spatial as well as proportional reasoning skills that cannot be explained by general differences in executive functioning or intelligence. PMID:26793157

  4. Controlling the spatial arrangement of organic magnetic anions adsorbed on epitaxial graphene on Ru(0001).

    PubMed

    Stradi, Daniele; Garnica, Manuela; Díaz, Cristina; Calleja, Fabián; Barja, Sara; Martín, Nazario; Alcamí, Manuel; Vazquez de Parga, Amadeo L; Miranda, Rodolfo; Martín, Fernando

    2014-12-21

    Achieving control over the self-organization of functional molecules on graphene is critical for the development of graphene technology in organic electronic and spintronic. Here, by using a scanning tunneling microscope (STM), we show that the electron acceptor molecule 7,7',8,8'-tetracyano-p-quinodimethane (TCNQ) and its fluorinated derivative 2,3,5,6-tetrafluoro-7,7',8,8'-tetracyano-p-quinodimethane (F4-TCNQ), co-deposited on the surface of epitaxial graphene on Ru(0001), transform spontaneously into their corresponding magnetic anions and self-organize in two remarkably different structures. TCNQ forms densely packed linear magnetic arrays, while F4-TCNQ molecules remain as isolated non interacting magnets. With the help of density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we trace back the origin of this behavior in the competition between the intermolecular repulsion experienced by the individual charged anions, which tends to separate the molecules, and the delocalization of the electrons transferred from the surface to the molecules, which promotes the formation of molecular oligomers. Our results demonstrate that it is possible to control the spatial arrangement of organic magnetic anions co-adsorbed on a surface by means of chemical substitution, paving the way for the design of two-dimensional fully organic magnetic structures on graphene and on other surfaces. PMID:25382549

  5. Glow Discharge Plasma Active Control of Separation at Low Pressure Turbine Conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.; Ashpis, David E.

    2002-11-01

    Active flow control of boundary-layer separation using glow-discharge plasma actuators is studied experimentally. Separation is induced on a flat plate installed in a closed-circuit wind tunnel by a shaped insert on the opposite wall. The flow conditions represent flow over the suction surface of a modern low-pressure-turbine airfoil. The Reynolds number, based on wetted plate length and nominal exit velocity, is varied from 50,000 to 300,000, covering cruise to takeoff conditions. Low (0.2%) and high (2.5%) free-stream turbulence intensities are set using passive grids. The base flow includes closed separation bubbles and non-reattaching separated flow, and is thoroughly documented using single-wire constant-temperature anemometry and static surface pressure measurements. A spanwise-oriented phased-plasma-array actuator, fabricated on a printed circuit board, is surface-flush-mounted upstream of the separation point and can provide forcing in a wide frequency range. Static surface pressure measurements and hot-wire anemometry of the controlled flow are performed and indicate that the glow-discharge plasma actuator is an effective device for separation control.

  6. Thinking in spatial terms: decoupling spatial representation from sensorimotor control in monkey posterior parietal areas 7a and LIP

    PubMed Central

    Chafee, Matthew V.; Crowe, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Perhaps the simplest and most complete description of the cerebral cortex is that it is a sensorimotor controller whose primary purpose is to represent stimuli and movements, and adaptively control the mapping between them. However, in order to think, the cerebral cortex has to generate patterns of neuronal activity that encode abstract, generalized information independently of ongoing sensorimotor events. A critical question confronting cognitive systems neuroscience at present therefore is how neural signals encoding abstract information emerge within the sensorimotor control networks of the brain. In this review, we approach that question in the context of the neural representation of space in posterior parietal cortex of non-human primates. We describe evidence indicating that parietal cortex generates a hierarchy of spatial representations with three basic levels: including (1) sensorimotor signals that are tightly coupled to stimuli or movements, (2) sensorimotor signals modified in strength or timing to mediate cognition (examples include attention, working memory, and decision-processing), as well as (3) signals that encode frankly abstract spatial information (such as spatial relationships or categories) generalizing across a wide diversity of specific stimulus conditions. Here we summarize the evidence for this hierarchy, and consider data showing that signals at higher levels derive from signals at lower levels. That in turn could help characterize neural mechanisms that derive a capacity for abstraction from sensorimotor experience. PMID:23355813

  7. Numerical modeling of separated flows in three-dimensional diffusers and application of synthetic jets for separation control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasheninnikov, S. Yu.; Pudovikov, D. E.; Torohov, S. A.

    2012-01-01

    Solving the problem of creating an environmentally friendly "green plane" implies development and implementation of several actions aimed at increasing airplane performance and reducing environmental contamination. One possible way to solve this problem is to reduce the powerplant weight, in particular, by decreasing its length. The airplane engine flowpath comprises transition ducts: those between the low- and high-pressure compressors, between the compressor and combustor, and between the high- and low-pressure turbines. In a modern high-bypass turbofan, the flowpath varies in the streamwise direction. Shorter transition ducts have greater curvature. Because of this, intensive separation may occur, which leads to increased losses in the flowpath and to significant growth of nonuniformity of flow parameters. Vast experience of numerical and experimental studies of unsteady separated flows has been accumulated by now. In many cases, however, these investigations are performed in a two-dimensional (2D) formulation, which is primarily caused by the high cost of three-dimensional (3D) unsteady calculations. The numerical and experimental work [1] shows that flows in diffuser ducts can have an essentially unsteady 3D structure. This is valid even for ducts modeling 2D configurations. This paper describes the results of a numerical study of the flow structure and its features in model S-shaped transition ducts, as well as the results of using a synthetic jet generator for flow control and for reduction of total pressure losses. Three-dimensional flows are numerically modeled by the unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) / RANS methods. The calculations show that the use of the synthetic jet generator can lead to duct loss reduction by 45%.

  8. Control of Polymer Phase Separation by Roughness Transfer Printing for 2D Microlens Arrays.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinyue; Gao, Naiwei; He, Yonglin; Liao, Shenglong; Zhang, Shiming; Wang, Yapei

    2016-07-01

    Great efforts have been devoted to the control of phase separation between blended polymers in terms of the advantages for engineering functional topologies. A simple and straightforward pathway through roughness transfer printing (RTP) is proposed to realize the control of polymer phase separation. The additional roughness difference, which is introduced by trace agarose transferred from a hydrogel stamp, offers a great effect on the rate of nucleation and coalescence orientation of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) protrusions grown from a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) network. Using a particular topography of agarose stamp and a proper growth time in toluene atmosphere, a 2D microlens array with high uniformity is obtained that shows great potential for optical applications. Moreover, the control of polymer phase separation was successfully extended to the collection and identification of fingerprints with a high degree of replication. PMID:27254465

  9. Experimental implementation of automatic 'cycle to cycle' control of a chiral simulated moving bed separation.

    PubMed

    Amanullah, Mohammad; Grossmann, Cristian; Mazzotti, Marco; Morari, Manfred; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2007-09-21

    In the absence of a suitable controller, currently simulated moving beds (SMBs) are operated suboptimally to cope with system uncertainties and to guarantee robustness of operation. Recently, we have developed a 'cycle to cycle' optimizing controller that not only makes use of minimal system information, i.e. only the Henry constants and average bed voidage, but also optimizes the process performance and taps the full economic potential of the SMB technology. The experimental implementation of the 'cycle to cycle' optimizing controller had been carried out for achiral separation. For chiral separation however, application of any online controller has not been possible because an appropriate online monitoring system has not been available. This work reports and discusses the first experimental implementation of the 'cycle to cycle' optimizing control for chiral separations. A mixture of guaifenesin enantiomers is separated on Chiralcel OD columns with ethanol as mobile phase in a eight-column four sections laboratory SMB unit. The results show that the controller, although using minimal information about the retention of the two enantiomers, is able to meet product and process specifications, can optimize the process performance, and is capable of rejecting disturbances that may occur during the operation of the SMB plant. PMID:17707852

  10. Active control of Boundary Layer Separation & Flow Distortion in Adverse Pressure Gradient Flows via Supersonic Microjets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvi, Farrukh S.; Gorton, Susan (Technical Monitor)

    2005-01-01

    Inlets to aircraft propulsion systems must supply flow to the compressor with minimal pressure loss, flow distortion or unsteadiness. Flow separation in internal flows such as inlets and ducts in aircraft propulsion systems and external flows such as over aircraft wings, is undesirable as it reduces the overall system performance. The aim of this research has been to understand the nature of separation and more importantly, to explore techniques to actively control this flow separation. In particular, the use of supersonic microjets as a means of controlling boundary layer separation was explored. The geometry used for the early part of this study was a simple diverging Stratford ramp, equipped with arrays of supersonic microjets. Initial results, based on the mean surface pressure distribution, surface flow visualization and Planar Laser Scattering (PLS) indicated a reverse flow region. We implemented supersonic microjets to control this separation and flow visualization results appeared to suggest that microjets have a favorable effect, at least to a certain extent. However, the details of the separated flow field were difficult to determine based on surface pressure distribution, surface flow patterns and PLS alone. It was also difficult to clearly determine the exact influence of the supersonic microjets on this flow. In the latter part of this study, the properties of this flow-field and the effect of supersonic microjets on its behavior were investigated in further detail using 2-component (planar) Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The results clearly show that the activation of microjets eliminated flow separation and resulted in a significant increase in the momentum of the fluid near the ramp surface. Also notable is the fact that the gain in momentum due to the elimination of flow separation is at least an order of magnitude larger (two orders of magnitude larger in most cases) than the momentum injected by the microjets and is accomplished with very

  11. Cobalt Ferrite Bearing Nitrogen-Doped Reduced Graphene Oxide Layers Spatially Separated with Microporous Carbon as Efficient Oxygen Reduction Electrocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Kashyap, Varchaswal; Singh, Santosh K; Kurungot, Sreekumar

    2016-08-17

    The present work discloses how high-quality dispersion of fine particles of cobalt ferrite (CF) could be attained on nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxide (CF/N-rGO) and how this material in association with a microporous carbon phase could deliver significantly enhanced activity toward electrochemical oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Our study indicates that the microporous carbon phase plays a critical role in spatially separating the layers of CF/N-rGO and in creating a favorable atmosphere to ensure the seamless distribution of the reactants to the active sites located on CF/N-rGO. In terms of the ORR current density, the heat-treated hybrid catalyst at 150 °C (CF/N-rGO-150) is found to be clearly outperforming (7.4 ± 0.5 mA/cm(2)) the state-of-the-art 20 wt % Pt-supported carbon catalyst (PtC) (5.4 ± 0.5 mA/cm(2)). The mass activity and stability of CF-N-rGO-150 are distinctly superior to PtC even after 5000 electrochemical cycles. As a realistic system level exploration of the catalyst, testing of a primary zinc-air battery could be demonstrated using CF/N-rGO-150 as the cathode catalyst. The battery is giving a galvanostatic discharge time of 15 h at a discharge current density of 20 mA/cm(2) and a specific capacity of ∼630 mAh g(-1) in 6 M KOH by using a Zn foil as the anode. Distinctly, the battery performance of this system is found to be superior to that of PtC in less concentrated KOH solution as the electrolyte. PMID:27464229

  12. Spatial separation of replisome arrest sites influences homologous recombination quality at a Tus/Ter-mediated replication fork barrier.

    PubMed

    Willis, Nicholas A; Scully, Ralph

    2016-07-17

    The Escherichia coli replication fork arrest complex Tus/Ter mediates site-specific replication fork arrest and homologous recombination (HR) on a mammalian chromosome, inducing both conservative "short tract" gene conversion (STGC) and error-prone "long tract" gene conversion (LTGC) products. We showed previously that bidirectional fork arrest is required for the generation of STGC products at Tus/Ter-stalled replication forks and that the HR mediators BRCA1, BRCA2 and Rad51 mediate STGC but suppress LTGC at Tus/Ter-arrested forks. Here, we report the impact of Ter array length on Tus/Ter-induced HR, comparing HR reporters containing arrays of 6, 9, 15 or 21 Ter sites-each targeted to the ROSA26 locus of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. Increasing Ter copy number within the array beyond 6 did not affect the magnitude of Tus/Ter-induced HR but biased HR in favor of LTGC. A "lock"-defective Tus mutant, F140A, known to exhibit higher affinity than wild type (wt)Tus for duplex Ter, reproduced these effects. In contrast, increasing Ter copy number within the array reduced HR induced by the I-SceI homing endonuclease, but produced no consistent bias toward LTGC. Thus, the mechanisms governing HR at Tus/Ter-arrested replication forks are distinct from those governing HR at an enzyme-induced chromosomal double strand break (DSB). We propose that increased spatial separation of the 2 arrested forks encountering an extended Tus/Ter barrier impairs the coordination of DNA ends generated by the processing of the stalled forks, thereby favoring aberrant LTGC over conservative STGC. PMID:27136113

  13. Entangled microwaves as a resource for entangling spatially separate solid-state qubits: Superconducting qubits, nitrogen-vacancy centers, and magnetic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, Angela Viviana; Rodríguez, Ferney Javier; Quiroga, Luis; García-Ripoll, Juan José

    2016-06-01

    Quantum correlations present in a broadband two-line squeezed microwave state can induce entanglement in a spatially separated bipartite system consisting of either two single qubits or two-qubit ensembles. By using an appropriate master equation for a bipartite quantum system in contact with two separate but entangled baths, the generating entanglement process in spatially separated quantum systems is thoroughly characterized. Decoherence thermal effects on the entanglement transfer are also discussed. Our results provide evidence that this entanglement transfer by dissipation is feasible, yielding to a steady-state amount of entanglement in the bipartite quantum system which can be optimized for a wide range of realistic physical systems that include state-of-the-art experiments with nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond, superconducting qubits, or even magnetic molecules embedded in a crystalline matrix.

  14. Spatially-explicit hydrologic controls on benthic invertebrate habitat suitability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceola, Serena; Bertuzzo, Enrico; Singer, Gabriel; Battin, Tom; Montanari, Alberto; Rinaldo, Andrea

    2014-05-01

    Streamflow variability is a major determinant of basin-scale distribution of benthic invertebrates. Here we present a probabilistic approach for a spatially explicit quantitative assessment of benthic invertebrate abundance as derived from near-bed flow variability throughout an entire stream network. We consider aquatic invertebrates as these are widely employed as sensitive indicators of fluvial ecosystem health and human-induced perturbations. Moving from the analytical characterization of site-specific probability distribution functions of streamflow and bottom shear stress, we achieve a spatial extension to a stream network ranging up to 5th order. Bottom shear stress distributions, coupled with habitat suitability curves derived from field studies, are then used to produce maps of invertebrate habitat suitability based on shear stress conditions. The proposed framework allows to inspect the possible impacts of human-induced perturbations of streamflow variability on river ecology. We apply our approach to an Austrian river network, for which rainfall and streamflow time series, river network hydraulic properties and local information on invertebrate abundance for a limited number of sites are available. This allows a comparison between observed species density versus modeled habitat suitability based on shear stress. Although the proposed strategy neglects ecological determinants other than hydraulic ones and thus represents an ecological minimal model, it allows derivation of important implications of water resource management and fluvial ecosystem protection for basin-scale distribution patterns of organisms.

  15. Flight test evaluation of a separate surface attitude command control system on a Beech 99 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gee, S. W.; Jenks, G. E.; Roskam, J.; Stone, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    A joint NASA/university/industry program was conducted to flight evaluate a potentially low cost separate surface implementation of attitude command in a Beech 99 airplane. Saturation of the separate surfaces was the primary cause of many problems during development. Six experienced professional pilots made simulated instrument flight evaluations in light-to-moderate turbulence. They were favorably impressed with the system, particularly with the elimination of control force transients that accompanied configuration changes. For ride quality, quantitative data showed that the attitude command control system resulted in all cases of airplane motion being removed from the uncomfortable ride region.

  16. Sweep and Compressibility Effects on Active Separation Control at High Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seifert, Avi; Pack, LaTunia G.

    2000-01-01

    This paper explores the effects of compressibility, sweep and excitation location on active separation control at high Reynolds numbers. The model, which was tested in a cryogenic pressurized wind tunnel, simulates the upper surface of a 20% thick Glauert Goldschmied type airfoil at zero angle of attack. The flow is fully turbulent since the tunnel sidewall boundary layer flows over the model. Without control, the flow separates at the highly convex area and a large turbulent separation bubble is formed. Periodic excitation is applied to gradually eliminate the separation bubble. Two alternative blowing slot locations as well as the effect of compressibility, sweep and steady suction or blowing were studied. During the test the Reynolds numbers ranged from 2 to 40 million and Mach numbers ranged from 0.2 to 0.7. Sweep angles were 0 and 30 deg. It was found that excitation must be introduced slightly upstream of the separation region regardless of the sweep angle at low Mach number. Introduction of excitation upstream of the shock wave is more effective than at its foot. Compressibility reduces the ability of steady mass transfer and periodic excitation to control the separation bubble but excitation has an effect on the integral parameters, which is similar to that observed in low Mach numbers. The conventional swept flow scaling is valid for fully and even partially attached flow, but different scaling is required for the separated 3D flow. The effectiveness of the active control is not reduced by sweep. Detailed flow field dynamics are described in the accompanying paper.

  17. Hydrogels with Spatially and Temporally Controlled Properties to Control Cellular Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdick, Jason

    2011-03-01

    Stem cells (e.g., mesenchymal stem cells, MSCs) respond to many cues from their microenvironment, which may include chemical signals, mechanics, and topography. Importantly, these cues may be incorporated into scaffolding to control stem cell differentiation and optimize their ability to produce tissues in regenerative medicine. Despite the significant amount of work in this area, the materials have been primarily static and uniform. To this end, we have developed a sequential crosslinking process that relies on our ability to crosslinked functional biopolymers (e.g., methacrylated hyaluronic acid, HA) in two steps, namely a Michael-type addition reaction to partially consume reactive groups and then a light-initiated free-radical polymerization to further crosslink the material. With light exposure during the second step comes control over the material in space (via masks and lasers) and time (via intermittent light exposure). We are applying this technique for numerous applications. For example, when the HA hydrogels are crosslinked with MMP degradable peptides with thiol termini during the first step, a material that can be degraded by cells is obtained. However, cell-mediated degradation is obstructed with the introduction of kinetic chains during the second step, leading to spatially controlled cell degradability. Due to the influence of cellular spreading on MSC differentiation, we have controlled cell fates by controlling their spread ability, for instance towards osteoblasts in spread areas and adipocytes when cell remained rounded. We are also using the process of stiffening with time to investigate mechanically induced differentiation, particularly in materials with evolving mechanics. Overall, these advanced HA hydrogels provide us the opportunity to investigate diverse and controlled material properties on MSC interactions.

  18. Preprophase bands, phragmoplasts, and spatial control of cytokinesis.

    PubMed

    Gunning, B E; Wick, S M

    1985-01-01

    Features of preprophase bands (PPBs) of microtubules (MTs), and the spatial relationship between phragmosomes, PPB sites, and developing phragmoplasts during cytokinesis, are reviewed, setting new observations in the context of current knowledge. PPBs in onion root tip cells are present by the beginning of the G2 period of the cell cycle. They are at first wide, but later become more compact, narrower bands. MTs traverse the cytoplasm between the band at the cell cortex and the nuclear envelope. This whole assemblage of nucleus, PPB and intervening MTs remains together when the cell is ruptured during preparation for examination by immunofluorescence microscopy. Double bands are occasionally seen in early stages of PPB development, perhaps as a consequence of double induction from neighbouring cells. Calmodulin is not present in PPBs at a higher concentration than in the general cytoplasm, but it is more abundant in parts of the spindle and in the phragmoplast. The PPB MTs disappear at prophase, but nevertheless the new cell plate fuses with the parental cell walls at the PPB site. This spatial relationship can be disrupted by treatment with CIPC. Another experimental disruption of the relationship, accomplished by making minute wounds in the PPB site of mitotic cells in Tradescantia stamen hairs, is described. In other experiments on these cells the phragmoplast is shown to become tethered to the PPB site when the cell plate is half to three-quarters developed, although the telophase nuclei are free to move. Rhodamine-labelled phalloidin reveals putative F-actin in the phragmoplast of Tradescantia, but not in the gap between the extending phragmoplast and the PPB site. Rhodamine-labelled phalloidin also stains cytoplasmic strands that exist when cytoplasmic streaming occurs before and after (but not during) mitosis. Cytochalasin B treatment blocks incorporation of actin into the phragmoplast, which, however, can still develop, though usually abnormally. The F

  19. Influence of fat-water separation and spatial resolution on automated volumetric MRI measurements of fibroglandular breast tissue.

    PubMed

    Wengert, Georg J; Pinker-Domenig, Katja; Helbich, Thomas H; Vogl, Wolf-Dieter; Clauser, Paola; Bickel, Hubert; Marino, Maria-Adele; Magometschnigg, Heinrich F; Baltzer, Pascal A

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of fat-water separation and spatial resolution in MRI on the results of automated quantitative measurements of fibroglandular breast tissue (FGT). Ten healthy volunteers (age range, 28-71 years; mean, 39.9 years) were included in this Institutional Review Board-approved prospective study. All measurements were performed on a 1.5-T scanner (Siemens, AvantoFit) using an 18-channel breast coil. The protocols included isotropic (Di) [TR/TE1 /TE2  = 6.00 ms/2.45 ms/2.67 ms; flip angle, 6.0°; 256 slices; matrix, 360 × 360; 1 mm isotropic; field of view, 360°; acquisition time (TA) = 3 min 38 s] and anisotropic (Da) (TR/TE1 /TE2  = 10.00 ms/2.39 ms/4.77 ms; flip angle, 24.9°; 80 slices; matrix 360 × 360; voxel size, 0.7 × 0.7 × 2.0 mm(3) ; field of view, 360°; TA = 1 min 25 s) T1 three-dimensional (3D) fast low-angle shot (FLASH) Dixon sequences, and a T1 3D FLASH sequence with the same resolution (T1 ) without (TR/TE = 11.00 ms/4.76 ms; flip angle, 25.0°; 80 slices; matrix, 360 × 360; voxel size, 0.7 × 0.7 × 2.0 mm(3) ; field of view, 360°; TA = 50 s) and with (TR/TE = 29.00 ms/4.76 ms; flip angle, 25.0°; 80 slices; matrix, 360 × 360; voxel size, 0.7 × 0.7 × 2.0 mm(3) ; field of view, 360°; TA = 2 min 35 s) fat saturation. Repeating volunteer measurements after 20 min and repositioning were used to assess reproducibility. An automated and quantitative volumetric breast density measurement system was used for FGT calculation. FGT with Di, Da and T1 measured 4.6-63.0% (mean, 30.6%), 3.2-65.3% (mean, 32.5%) and 1.7-66.5% (mean, 33.7%), respectively. The highest correlation between different MRI sequences was found with the Di and Da sequences (R(2)  = 0.976). Coefficients of variation (CVs) for FGT calculation were higher in T1 (CV = 21.5%) compared with Dixon (Di, CV = 5

  20. On TADs and LADs: Spatial Control Over Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Sandoval, Adriana; Gasser, Susan M

    2016-08-01

    The combinatorial action of transcription factors drives cell-type-specific gene expression patterns. However, transcription factor binding and gene regulation occur in the context of chromatin, which modulates DNA accessibility. High-resolution chromatin interaction maps have defined units of chromatin that are in spatial proximity, called topologically associated domains (TADs). TADs can be further classified based on expression activity, replication timing, or the histone marks or non-histone proteins associated with them. Independently, other chromatin domains have been defined by their likelihood to interact with non-DNA structures, such as the nuclear lamina. Lamina-associated domains (LADs) correlate with low gene expression and late replication timing. TADs and LADs have recently been evaluated with respect to cell-type-specific gene expression. The results shed light on the relevance of these forms of chromatin organization for transcriptional regulation, and address specifically how chromatin sequestration influences cell fate decisions during organismal development. PMID:27312344

  1. Spatial steadiness of individual disorder modes upon controlled spectral tuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caselli, Niccolò; Riboli, Francesco; Intonti, Francesca; La China, Federico; Biccari, Francesco; Gerardino, Annamaria; Gurioli, Massimo

    2016-07-01

    Recent innovative applications in disordered photonics would strongly benefit from the possibility to achieve spectral tuning of the individual disorder localized photonic modes without affecting their spatial distributions. Here, we design and fabricate a two-dimensional disordered photonic system, made of a GaAs slab patterned with randomly distributed circular air scattering centers, supporting localized light modes with very small modal volume. The photoluminescence of InAs quantum dots embedded in the slab is used as a probe for near field experiments and gives direct access to the electric field intensity distribution of the localized random modes. We demonstrate that laser assisted oxidation of the GaAs slab performed by near field illumination can be used for a gentle tuning of the individual random modes without modifying the subtle balance leading to light localization given by multiple scattering.

  2. Closed-loop separation control over a sharp edge ramp using genetic programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debien, Antoine; von Krbek, Kai A. F. F.; Mazellier, Nicolas; Duriez, Thomas; Cordier, Laurent; Noack, Bernd R.; Abel, Markus W.; Kourta, Azeddine

    2016-03-01

    We experimentally perform open and closed-loop control of a separating turbulent boundary layer downstream from a sharp edge ramp. The turbulent boundary layer just above the separation point has a Reynolds number Re_{θ }≈ 3500 based on momentum thickness. The goal of the control is to mitigate separation and early re-attachment. The forcing employs a spanwise array of active vortex generators. The flow state is monitored with skin-friction sensors downstream of the actuators. The feedback control law is obtained using model-free genetic programming control (GPC) (Gautier et al. in J Fluid Mech 770:442-457, 2015). The resulting flow is assessed using the momentum coefficient, pressure distribution and skin friction over the ramp and stereo PIV. The PIV yields vector field statistics, e.g. shear layer growth, the back-flow area and vortex region. GPC is benchmarked against the best periodic forcing. While open-loop control achieves separation reduction by locking-on the shedding mode, GPC gives rise to similar benefits by accelerating the shear layer growth. Moreover, GPC uses less actuation energy.

  3. Control of volume resistivity in inorganic-organic separators. [for alkaline batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W.; Manzo, M. A.

    1980-01-01

    Control of resistivity in NASA inorganic-organic separators is achieved by incorporating small percentages of high surface area, fine-particle silica with other ingredients in the separator coating. The volume resistivity appears to be predictable from coating composition, that is, from the surface area of filler particles in the coating. The approach has been applied to two polymer-'plasticizer'-filler coating systems, where the filler content of each is below the generally acknowledged critical pigment volume concentration of the coating. Application of these coating systems to 0.0254 cm thick (10 mil) fuel-cell grade asbestos sheet produces inexpensive, flexible, microporous separators that perform at least as well as the original inorganic-organic concept, the Astropower separator.

  4. Movable shark scales act as a passive dynamic micro-roughness to control flow separation.

    PubMed

    Lang, Amy W; Bradshaw, Michael T; Smith, Jonathon A; Wheelus, Jennifer N; Motta, Philip J; Habegger, Maria L; Hueter, Robert E

    2014-09-01

    Shark scales on fast-swimming sharks have been shown to be movable to angles in excess of 50°, and we hypothesize that this characteristic gives this shark skin a preferred flow direction. During the onset of separation, flow reversal is initiated close to the surface. However, the movable scales would be actuated by the reversed flow thereby causing a greater resistance to any further flow reversal and this mechanism would disrupt the process leading to eventual flow separation. Here we report for the first time experimental evidence of the separation control capability of real shark skin through water tunnel testing. Using skin samples from a shortfin mako Isurus oxyrinchus, we tested a pectoral fin and flank skin attached to a NACA 4412 hydrofoil and separation control was observed in the presence of movable shark scales under certain conditions in both cases. We hypothesize that the scales provide a passive, flow-actuated mechanism acting as a dynamic micro-roughness to control flow separation. PMID:25046552

  5. Spatial Periodic Forcing Can Displace Patterns It Is Intended to Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mau, Yair; Hagberg, Aric; Meron, Ehud

    2012-07-01

    Spatial periodic forcing of pattern-forming systems is an important, but lightly studied, method of controlling patterns. It can be used to control the amplitude and wave number of one-dimensional periodic patterns, to stabilize unstable patterns, and to induce them below instability onset. We show that, although in one spatial dimension the forcing acts to reinforce the patterns, in two dimensions it acts to destabilize or displace them by inducing two-dimensional rectangular and oblique patterns.

  6. Professional mathematicians differ from controls in their spatial-numerical associations.

    PubMed

    Cipora, Krzysztof; Hohol, Mateusz; Nuerk, Hans-Christoph; Willmes, Klaus; Brożek, Bartosz; Kucharzyk, Bartłomiej; Nęcka, Edward

    2016-07-01

    While mathematically impaired individuals have been shown to have deficits in all kinds of basic numerical representations, among them spatial-numerical associations, little is known about individuals with exceptionally high math expertise. They might have a more abstract magnitude representation or more flexible spatial associations, so that no automatic left/small and right/large spatial-numerical association is elicited. To pursue this question, we examined the Spatial Numerical Association of Response Codes (SNARC) effect in professional mathematicians which was compared to two control groups: Professionals who use advanced math in their work but are not mathematicians (mostly engineers), and matched controls. Contrarily to both control groups, Mathematicians did not reveal a SNARC effect. The group differences could not be accounted for by differences in mean response speed, response variance or intelligence or a general tendency not to show spatial-numerical associations. We propose that professional mathematicians possess more abstract and/or spatially very flexible numerical representations and therefore do not exhibit or do have a largely reduced default left-to-right spatial-numerical orientation as indexed by the SNARC effect, but we also discuss other possible accounts. We argue that this comparison with professional mathematicians also tells us about the nature of spatial-numerical associations in persons with much less mathematical expertise or knowledge. PMID:26063316

  7. Performance improvement of gas liquid cylindrical cyclone separators using passive control system

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S.; Mohan, R.; Shoham, O.; Kouba, G.

    1998-12-31

    The performance of Gas Liquid Cylindrical Cyclone (GLCC) separators can be improved by reducing or eliminating liquid carry-over into the gas stream or gas carry-under through liquid stream, utilizing suitable liquid level control. In this study, a new passive control system has been developed for the GLCC, in which the control is achieved by utilizing only the liquid flow energy. Passive control system is highly desirable for remote, unmanned location operated with no external power source. Salient features of this design are presented here. Detailed experimental and modeling studies have been conducted to evaluate the improvement in the GLCC operational envelope for liquid carry-over with the passive control system. The results demonstrate that a passive control system is feasible for operation in normal slug flow conditions. The result of this study could also form the basis for future development of active control systems using classical control approach.

  8. Dielectric-barrier-discharge vortex generators: characterisation and optimisation for flow separation control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jukes, Timothy N.; Choi, Kwing-So

    2012-02-01

    We investigated the use of dielectric-barrier-discharge plasma actuators as vortex generators for flow separation control applications. Plasma actuators were placed at a yaw angle to the oncoming flow, so that they produced a spanwise wall jet. Through interaction with the oncoming boundary layer, this created a streamwise longitudinal vortex. In this experimental investigation, the effect of yaw angle, actuator length and plasma-induced velocity ratio was studied. Particular attention was given to the vortex formation mechanism and its development downstream. The DBD plasma actuators were then applied in the form of co-rotating and counter-rotating vortex arrays to control flow separation over a trailing-edge ramp. It was found that the vortex generators were successful in reducing the separation region, even at plasma-to-free-stream velocity ratios of less than 10%.

  9. Spatially Controlled Fe Isotope Variations at Torres del Paine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajos, N.; Lundstrom, C.

    2013-12-01

    Recent advances in mass-spectrometry have identified systematic trends of non-traditional stable isotope variation in igneous rocks with differentiation index. We present new Fe isotope data for the Torres del Paine igneous complex in southern Chile. The multi-composition pluton consists of a 1 km vertical exposure of homogenous granite overlying a contemporaneous and possibly cogenetic 0.5 km mafic gabbro suite. Whereas previous isotopic investigations do little to address variations across important magmatic contacts, this study focuses on a first-of-its-kind spatially dependent non-traditional stable isotope investigation of an igneous pluton. Samples were collected at Torres del Paine in spatially significant transects, focusing on major contacts between country rock, granite and mafic units. Results collected by bracketed double spike MC-ICP-MS (2s precision of ×0.03) show an increase in δ56Fe towards the high silica margins of the pluton with values as high as δ56Fe 0.36. Additionally, the data show a decrease in δ56Fe toward the mafic center of the pluton with δ56Fe values ranging from δ56Fe -0.05 to 0.18. Samples collected on the contact between the granite and mafic complex show intermediate values of δ56Fe= 0.18(×) 0.03. Country rock samples in contact with granite show an isotopically light signature of δ56Fe=0.04 (×) 0.03. Analysis of 50 samples in total show a trend of increasing δ56Fe with SiO2 content. The process responsible for Fe isotope variations remains debated but is suggested to reflect four mechanisms: (1) crustal assimilation, (2) fractional crystallization, (3) late stage fluid exsolution [1] and (4) thermal migration [3]. Preliminary results show that mechanisms #1 and #2 would produce isotopic signatures opposite of those seen at Torres del Paine and other plutonic rocks. Isotopically light Torres country rock samples reveal that assimilation of rocks would not produce the isotopically heavy granites seen at Torres. Based on

  10. Experimental parametric study of jet vortex generators for flow separation control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selby, Gregory

    1991-01-01

    A parametric wind-tunnel study was performed with jet vortex generators to determine their effectiveness in controlling flow separation associated with low-speed turbulence flow over a two-dimensional rearward-facing ramp. Results indicate that flow-separation control can be accomplished, with the level of control achieved being a function of jet speed, jet orientation (with respect to the free-stream direction), and orifice pattern (double row of jets vs. single row). Compared to slot blowing, jet vortex generators can provide an equivalent level of flow control over a larger spanwise region (for constant jet flow area and speed). Dye flow visualization tests in a water tunnel indicated that the most effective jet vortex generator configurations produced streamwise co-rotating vortices.