Science.gov

Sample records for controlled spatial separation

  1. 3-D Separation Control using Spatially-Compact, Pulsed Actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, George T. K.; Glezer, Ari

    2013-11-01

    The dynamics of controlled 3-D transitory attachment of stalled flow over a dynamically pitching 2-D airfoil are investigated in wind tunnel experiments. Pulsed actuation is effected over a spanwise fraction of the separated domain on a time scale that is an order of magnitude shorter than the airfoil's characteristic convective time scale using surface-integrated pulsed, combustion-driven actuator jets. The formation, evolution, and advection of vorticity concentrations over the airfoil and in its near wake are computed from high-resolution, phase-locked PIV measurements of the flow field in multiple cross-stream planes. It is shown that transitory attachment spreads toward the outboard, unactuated flow domains and exceeds the spanwise width of the actuation. The attachment is preceded by the formation of 3-D vortical structures that are advected and shed into the near wake. The effect of the actuation on the variation of the lift and pitching moment during the pitching cycle is altered significantly with its phase delay relative to the airfoil's pitching motion and can significantly mitigate the adverse aerodynamic effects of the dynamic stall. Supported by AFOSR.

  2. Controlling Separation in Turbomachines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Simon; Himmel, Christoph; Power, Bronwyn; Wakelam, Christian; Xu, Liping; Hynes, Tom; Hodson, Howard

    2010-01-01

    Four examples of flow control: 1) Passive control of LP turbine blades (Laminar separation control). 2) Aspiration of a conventional axial compressor blade (Turbulent separation control). 3) Compressor blade designed for aspiration (Turbulent separation control). 4.Control of intakes in crosswinds (Turbulent separation control).

  3. Neural realignment of spatially separated sound components.

    PubMed

    Salminen, Nelli H; Takanen, Marko; Santala, Olli; Alku, Paavo; Pulkki, Ville

    2015-06-01

    Natural auditory scenes often consist of several sound sources overlapping in time, but separated in space. Yet, location is not fully exploited in auditory grouping: spatially separated sounds can get perceptually fused into a single auditory object and this leads to difficulties in the identification and localization of concurrent sounds. Here, the brain mechanisms responsible for grouping across spatial locations were explored in magnetoencephalography (MEG) recordings. The results show that the cortical representation of a vowel spatially separated into two locations reflects the perceived location of the speech sound rather than the physical locations of the individual components. In other words, the auditory scene is neurally rearranged to bring components into spatial alignment when they were deemed to belong to the same object. This renders the original spatial information unavailable at the level of the auditory cortex and may contribute to difficulties in concurrent sound segregation. PMID:26093425

  4. Six Degrees of Auditory Spatial Separation.

    PubMed

    Carlile, Simon; Fox, Alex; Orchard-Mills, Emily; Leung, Johahn; Alais, David

    2016-06-01

    The location of a sound is derived computationally from acoustical cues rather than being inherent in the topography of the input signal, as in vision. Since Lord Rayleigh, the descriptions of that representation have swung between "labeled line" and "opponent process" models. Employing a simple variant of a two-point separation judgment using concurrent speech sounds, we found that spatial discrimination thresholds changed nonmonotonically as a function of the overall separation. Rather than increasing with separation, spatial discrimination thresholds first declined as two-point separation increased before reaching a turning point and increasing thereafter with further separation. This "dipper" function, with a minimum at 6 ° of separation, was seen for regions around the midline as well as for more lateral regions (30 and 45 °). The discrimination thresholds for the binaural localization cues were linear over the same range, so these cannot explain the shape of these functions. These data and a simple computational model indicate that the perception of auditory space involves a local code or multichannel mapping emerging subsequent to the binaural cue coding. PMID:27033087

  5. Spatial Pinning Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frasca, Mattia; Buscarino, Arturo; Rizzo, Alessandro; Fortuna, Luigi

    2012-05-01

    In this Letter, we introduce the concept of spatial pinning control for a network of mobile chaotic agents. In a planar space, N agents move as random walkers and interact according to a time-varying r-disk proximity graph. A control input is applied only to those agents which enter a given area, called control region. The control is effective in driving all the agents to a reference evolution and has better performance than pinning control on a fixed set of agents. We derive analytical conditions on the relative size of the control region and the agent density for the global convergence of the system to the reference evolution and study the system under different regimes inherited by the velocity.

  6. ISOTOPE SEPARATING APPARATUS CONTROL

    DOEpatents

    Barnes, S.W.

    1959-08-25

    An improved isotope separating apparatus of the electromagnetic type, commonly referred to as a calutron, is described. Improvements in detecting and maintaining optimum position and focus of the ion beam are given. The calutron collector is provided with an additional electrode insulated from and positioned between the collecting pockets. The ion beams are properly positioned and focused until the deionizing current which flows from ground to this additional electrode ts a minimum.

  7. Work control in separations facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, L.D.

    1990-01-01

    The topic addressed in this technical review is the development and implementation of a work control program in one of the chemical separations facilities at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, SC. This program will be used as a pilot for the Nuclear Materials Processing Division at the site. The SRS Work Control Pilot program is based on the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) good practices and guidelines for the conduct of maintenance and complies with SRS quality assurance and DOE orders on maintenance management. The program follows a ten-step process for control of maintenance and maintenance-related activities in a chemical separations facility. The program took the existing maintenance planning and scheduling system and upgraded it to comply with all INPO work control and related guidelines for histories, post-maintenance testing and scheduling. The development process of adapting a nuclear-related- based plan to a batch/continuous chemical separations plant was a challenge. There were many opportunities to develop improvements in performance while being creative and realistic in applying reactor maintenance technology to chemical plant maintenance. This pilot program for work control in a nonreactor nuclear facility will provide valuable information for applying a controlled maintenance process to a multiphase chemical operating plant environment.

  8. Work control in separations facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, L.D.

    1990-12-31

    The topic addressed in this technical review is the development and implementation of a work control program in one of the chemical separations facilities at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, SC. This program will be used as a pilot for the Nuclear Materials Processing Division at the site. The SRS Work Control Pilot program is based on the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) good practices and guidelines for the conduct of maintenance and complies with SRS quality assurance and DOE orders on maintenance management. The program follows a ten-step process for control of maintenance and maintenance-related activities in a chemical separations facility. The program took the existing maintenance planning and scheduling system and upgraded it to comply with all INPO work control and related guidelines for histories, post-maintenance testing and scheduling. The development process of adapting a nuclear-related- based plan to a batch/continuous chemical separations plant was a challenge. There were many opportunities to develop improvements in performance while being creative and realistic in applying reactor maintenance technology to chemical plant maintenance. This pilot program for work control in a nonreactor nuclear facility will provide valuable information for applying a controlled maintenance process to a multiphase chemical operating plant environment.

  9. Attosecond beamline with actively stabilized and spatially separated beam paths.

    PubMed

    Huppert, M; Jordan, I; Wörner, H J

    2015-12-01

    We describe a versatile and compact beamline for attosecond spectroscopy. The setup consists of a high-order harmonic source followed by a delay line that spatially separates and then recombines the extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) and residual infrared (IR) pulses. The beamline introduces a controlled and actively stabilized delay between the XUV and IR pulses on the attosecond time scale. A new active-stabilization scheme combining a helium-neon-laser and a white-light interferometer minimizes fluctuations and allows to control delays accurately (26 as rms during 1.5 h) over long time scales. The high-order-harmonic-generation region is imaged via optical systems, independently for XUV and IR, into an interaction volume to perform pump-probe experiments. As a consequence of the spatial separation, the pulses can be independently manipulated in intensity, polarization, and frequency content. The beamline can be combined with a variety of detectors for measuring attosecond dynamics in gases, liquids, and solids. PMID:26724005

  10. Attosecond beamline with actively stabilized and spatially separated beam paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huppert, M.; Jordan, I.; Wörner, H. J.

    2015-12-01

    We describe a versatile and compact beamline for attosecond spectroscopy. The setup consists of a high-order harmonic source followed by a delay line that spatially separates and then recombines the extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) and residual infrared (IR) pulses. The beamline introduces a controlled and actively stabilized delay between the XUV and IR pulses on the attosecond time scale. A new active-stabilization scheme combining a helium-neon-laser and a white-light interferometer minimizes fluctuations and allows to control delays accurately (26 as rms during 1.5 h) over long time scales. The high-order-harmonic-generation region is imaged via optical systems, independently for XUV and IR, into an interaction volume to perform pump-probe experiments. As a consequence of the spatial separation, the pulses can be independently manipulated in intensity, polarization, and frequency content. The beamline can be combined with a variety of detectors for measuring attosecond dynamics in gases, liquids, and solids.

  11. Spatial interference from well-separated split condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Zawadzki, M. E.; Griffin, P. F.; Riis, E.; Arnold, A. S.

    2010-04-15

    We use magnetic levitation and a variable-separation dual optical plug to obtain clear spatial interference between two condensates axially separated by up to 0.25 mm - the largest separation observed with this kind of interferometer. Clear planar fringes are observed using standard (i.e., nontomographic) resonant absorption imaging. The effect of a weak inverted parabola potential on fringe separation is observed and agrees well with theory.

  12. Spatial separation benefit for unaided and aided listening

    PubMed Central

    Ahlstrom, Jayne B.; Horwitz, Amy R.; Dubno, Judy R.

    2013-01-01

    Consonant recognition in noise was measured at a fixed signal-to-noise ratio as a function of low-pass-cutoff frequency and noise location in older adults fit with bilateral hearing aids. To quantify age-related differences, spatial benefit was assessed in younger and older adults with normal hearing. Spatial benefit was similar for all groups suggesting that older adults used interaural difference cues to improve speech recognition in noise equivalently to younger adults. Although amplification was sufficient to increase high-frequency audibility with spatial separation, hearing-aid benefit was minimal, suggesting that factors beyond simple audibility may be responsible for limited hearing-aid benefit. PMID:24121648

  13. Perceiving the coherent movements of spatially-separated features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mowafy, Lyn; Lappin, Joseph S.

    1991-01-01

    When a partially-occluded object is represented in an image, it is defined by a set of spatially-separated features that may be registered at different spatial scales. To understand the image, human vision must organize these fragmented optical features into common and distinct object surfaces. Although the common fate of moving features often is considered a primary source of reliable information for image segmentation, little is known of the visual system's capacity to discriminate the coherent relative movements of spatially-separated features. In a series of experiments, observers viewed elements whose movements were correlated (direction and magnitude) or were uncorrelated. Our results indicate that observers can discriminate the two types of movement about as well as they can detect any movement at all. Moreover, the ability to perceive coherent movements is maintained under a variety of conditions including differences in the elements' spatial frequency content, spatial position and contrast, and temporal phase shifts between the spatially-correlated displacements. These results suggest that coherent relative motion may be a fundamental source of information exploited by vision, despite considerable variability in the spatial and temporal characteristics of the individual features.

  14. Identification and Control of Separated Shear Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shao-Ching; Kim, John

    2002-11-01

    There has been increased interest in applying modern control theory to flow-control problems. For simple flows, such as turbulent channel and boundary layers, several investigators have constructed controllers based on linear optimal control theory, which requires certain information of the system to be controlled. However, for complex flows, such as separated flow past an airfoil, the required system information is not readily available, thus hindering the construction of controllers following the same procedure used for the simple flows. In this study, we use the system identification theory to construct a model of flow system for controller design. The model, as an approximation to the actual system, is based on the input-output relationship of the actual system. The locations of sensors and actuators are determined based on the spatial and temporal correlations of the flow field and practical measurement considerations. The system identification approach has been applied to both simple and complex flows. Linear and nonlinear disturbances to selected flow systems are considered to evaluate the performance of the constructed model. A series of numerical experiments have been performed to assess the validity of using linear approximations for nonlinear complex flows.

  15. Quantum interference with photon pairs created in spatially separated sources

    SciTech Connect

    Riedmatten, H. de; Marcikic, I.; Zbinden, H.; Gisin, N.; Tittel, W.

    2003-02-01

    We report on a quantum interference experiment to probe the coherence between two photons coming from nondegenerate photon pairs at telecom wavelength created in spatially separated sources. The two photons are mixed on a beam splitter and we observe a reduction of up to 84% in the net coincidence count rate when the photons are made indistinguishable. This experiment constitutes an important step towards the realization of quantum teleportation and entanglement swapping with independent sources.

  16. Cyclone separator having boundary layer turbulence control

    DOEpatents

    Krishna, Coimbatore R.; Milau, Julius S.

    1985-01-01

    A cyclone separator including boundary layer turbulence control that is operable to prevent undue build-up of particulate material at selected critical areas on the separator walls, by selectively varying the fluid pressure at those areas to maintain the momentum of the vortex, thereby preventing particulate material from inducing turbulence in the boundary layer of the vortical fluid flow through the separator.

  17. Simultaneous Multiple-Location Separation Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenblatt, David (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A method of controlling a shear layer for a fluid dynamic body introduces first periodic disturbances into the fluid medium at a first flow separation location. Simultaneously, second periodic disturbances are introduced into the fluid medium at a second flow separation location. A phase difference between the first and second periodic disturbances is adjusted to control flow separation of the shear layer as the fluid medium moves over the fluid dynamic body.

  18. Spatial filters for shape control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindner, Douglas K.; Reichard, Karl M.

    1992-01-01

    Recently there has emerged a new class of sensors, called spatial filters, for structures which respond over a significant gauge length. Examples include piezoelectric laminate PVDF film, modal domain optical fiber sensors, and holographic sensors. These sensors have a unique capability in that they can be fabricated to locally alter their sensitivity to the measurand. In this paper we discuss how these sensors can be used for the implementation of control algorithms for the suppression of acoustic radiation from flexible structures. Based on this relationship between the total power radiated to the far field to the modal velocities of the structure, we show how the sensor placement to optimize the control algorithm to suppress the radiated power.

  19. Spatial separation of parental genomes in hybrids of somatic plant cells.

    PubMed

    Gleba, Y Y; Parokonny, A; Kotov, V; Negrutiu, I; Momot, V

    1987-06-01

    Chromosome spatial arrangements on metaphase plates of intergeneric intertribal cell hybrids of Nicotiana chinensis and Atropa belladonna as well as interspecific somatic hybrid plants of Nicotiana plumbaginifolia and Nicotiana sylvestris were analyzed. In the metaphases of the first divisions of protoplast fusion products, chromosomes of the two parents were spatially separated (segmented metaphase). In long-term cultured somatic hybrids, the topology of genome separation pattern in both callus cells and plants showed changes in form from "segmental" to "radial." Growing the hybrid cells in the presence of colchicine resulted in random chromosome arrangement both in cells directly exposed to different colchicine concentrations and in colchicine-treated cells grown in colchicine-free media. The degree of genome separation calculated for different cell clones remained constant during in vitro propagation of cells but was significantly lower for subclones derived from colchicine-treated cells. Therefore, it is concluded that spatial chromosome arrangement in metaphase is epigenetically controlled. PMID:16593838

  20. Implementing of Quantum Cloning with Spatially Separated Quantum Dot Spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Jing-Ji; Yeon, Kyu-Hwang; Du, Xin; Lv, Jia; Wang, Ming; Wang, Hong-Fu; Zhang, Shou

    2016-07-01

    We propose some schemes for implementing optimal symmetric (asymmetric) 1 → 2 universal quantum cloning, optimal symmetric (asymmetric) 1 → 2 phase-covariant cloning, optimal symmetric 1 → 3 economical phase-covariant cloning and optimal symmetric 1 → 3 economical real state cloning with spatially separated quantum dot spins by choosing the single-qubit rotation angles appropriately. The decoherences of the spontaneous emission of QDs, cavity decay and fiber loss are suppressed since the effective long-distance off-resonant interaction between two distant QDs is mediated by the vacuum fields of the fiber and cavity, and during the whole process no system is excited.

  1. Implementing of Quantum Cloning with Spatially Separated Quantum Dot Spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Jing-Ji; Yeon, Kyu-Hwang; Du, Xin; Lv, Jia; Wang, Ming; Wang, Hong-Fu; Zhang, Shou

    2016-02-01

    We propose some schemes for implementing optimal symmetric (asymmetric) 1 → 2 universal quantum cloning, optimal symmetric (asymmetric) 1 → 2 phase-covariant cloning, optimal symmetric 1 → 3 economical phase-covariant cloning and optimal symmetric 1 → 3 economical real state cloning with spatially separated quantum dot spins by choosing the single-qubit rotation angles appropriately. The decoherences of the spontaneous emission of QDs, cavity decay and fiber loss are suppressed since the effective long-distance off-resonant interaction between two distant QDs is mediated by the vacuum fields of the fiber and cavity, and during the whole process no system is excited.

  2. Resonant indirect exchange via spatially separated two-dimensional channel

    SciTech Connect

    Rozhansky, I. V.; Krainov, I. V.; Averkiev, N. S.; Aronzon, B. A.; Davydov, A. B.; Kugel, K. I.; Tripathi, V.; Lähderanta, E.

    2015-06-22

    We apply the resonant indirect exchange interaction theory to explain the ferromagnetic properties of the hybrid heterostructure consisting of a InGaAs-based quantum well (QW) sandwiched between GaAs barriers with spatially separated Mn δ-layer. The experimentally obtained dependence of the Curie temperature on the QW depth exhibits a peak related to the region of resonant indirect exchange. We suggest the theoretical explanation and a fit to this dependence as a result of the two contributions to ferromagnetism—the intralayer contribution and the resonant exchange contribution provided by the QW.

  3. Plasmons in spatially separated double-layer graphene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagheri, Mehran; Bahrami, Mousa

    2014-05-01

    Motivated by innovative progresses in designing multi-layer graphene nanostructured materials in the laboratory, we theoretically investigate the Dirac plasmon modes of a spatially separated double-layer graphene nanoribbon system, made up of a vertically offset armchair and metallic graphene nanoribbon pair. We find striking features of the collective excitations in this novel Coulomb correlated system, where both nanoribbons are supposed to be either intrinsic (undoped/ungated) or extrinsic (doped/gated). In the former, it is shown the low-energy acoustical and the high-energy optical plasmon modes are tunable only by the inter-ribbon charge separation. In the later, the aforementioned plasmon branches are modified by the added doping factor. As a result, our model could be useful to examine the existence of a linear Landau-undamped low-energy acoustical plasmon mode tuned via the inter-ribbon charge separation as well as doping. This study might also be utilized for devising novel quantum optical waveguides based on the Coulomb coupled graphene nanoribbons.

  4. Plasmons in spatially separated double-layer graphene nanoribbons

    SciTech Connect

    Bagheri, Mehran; Bahrami, Mousa

    2014-05-07

    Motivated by innovative progresses in designing multi-layer graphene nanostructured materials in the laboratory, we theoretically investigate the Dirac plasmon modes of a spatially separated double-layer graphene nanoribbon system, made up of a vertically offset armchair and metallic graphene nanoribbon pair. We find striking features of the collective excitations in this novel Coulomb correlated system, where both nanoribbons are supposed to be either intrinsic (undoped/ungated) or extrinsic (doped/gated). In the former, it is shown the low-energy acoustical and the high-energy optical plasmon modes are tunable only by the inter-ribbon charge separation. In the later, the aforementioned plasmon branches are modified by the added doping factor. As a result, our model could be useful to examine the existence of a linear Landau-undamped low-energy acoustical plasmon mode tuned via the inter-ribbon charge separation as well as doping. This study might also be utilized for devising novel quantum optical waveguides based on the Coulomb coupled graphene nanoribbons.

  5. Managing Flap Vortices via Separation Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenblatt, David

    2006-01-01

    A pilot study was conducted on a flapped semi-span model to investigate the concept and viability of near-wake vortex management by means of boundary layer separation control. Passive control was achieved using a simple fairing and active control was achieved via zero mass-flux blowing slots. Vortex sheet strength, estimated by integrating surface pressures, was used to predict vortex characteristics based on inviscid rollup relations and vortices trailing the flaps were mapped using a seven-hole probe. Separation control was found to have a marked effect on vortex location, strength, tangential velocity, axial velocity and size over a wide range of angles of attack and control conditions. In general, the vortex trends were well predicted by the inviscid rollup relations. Manipulation of the separated flow near the flap edges exerted significant control over either outboard or inboard edge vortices while producing small lift and moment excursions. Unsteady surface pressures indicated that dynamic separation and attachment control can be exploited to perturb vortices at wavelengths shorter than a typical wingspan. In summary, separation control has the potential for application to time-independent or time-dependent wake alleviation schemes, where the latter can be deployed to minimize adverse effects on ride-quality and dynamic structural loading.

  6. Excitonic condensation in spatially separated one-dimensional systems

    SciTech Connect

    Abergel, D. S. L.

    2015-05-25

    We show theoretically that excitons can form from spatially separated one-dimensional ground state populations of electrons and holes, and that the resulting excitons can form a quasicondensate. We describe a mean-field Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory in the low carrier density regime and then focus on the core-shell nanowire giving estimates of the size of the excitonic gap for InAs/GaSb wires and as a function of all the experimentally relevant parameters. We find that optimal conditions for pairing include small overlap of the electron and hole bands, large effective mass of the carriers, and low dielectric constant of the surrounding media. Therefore, one-dimensional systems provide an attractive platform for the experimental detection of excitonic quasicondensation in zero magnetic field.

  7. Daily access to sucrose impairs aspects of spatial memory tasks reliant on pattern separation and neural proliferation in rats.

    PubMed

    Reichelt, Amy C; Morris, Margaret J; Westbrook, Reginald Frederick

    2016-07-01

    High sugar diets reduce hippocampal neurogenesis, which is required for minimizing interference between memories, a process that involves "pattern separation." We provided rats with 2 h daily access to a sucrose solution for 28 d and assessed their performance on a spatial memory task. Sucrose consuming rats discriminated between objects in novel and familiar locations when there was a large spatial separation between the objects, but not when the separation was smaller. Neuroproliferation markers in the dentate gyrus of the sucrose-consuming rats were reduced relative to controls. Thus, sucrose consumption impaired aspects of spatial memory and reduced hippocampal neuroproliferation. PMID:27317199

  8. Spatial adiabatic passage via interaction-induced band separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benseny, Albert; Gillet, Jérémie; Busch, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    The development of advanced quantum technologies and the quest for a deeper understanding of many-particle quantum mechanics requires control over the quantum state of interacting particles to a high degree of fidelity. However, the quickly increasing density of the spectrum, together with the appearance of crossings in time-dependent processes, makes any effort to control the system hard and resource intensive. Here we show that in trapped systems regimes can exist in which isolated energy bands appear that allow one to easily generalize known single-particle techniques. We demonstrate this for the well-known spatial adiabatic passage effect, which can control the center-of-mass state of atoms with high fidelity.

  9. Control of vortical separation on conical bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mourtos, Nikos J.; Roberts, Leonard

    1987-01-01

    In a variety of aeronautical applications, the flow around conical bodies at incidence is of interest. Such applications include, but are not limited to, highly maneuverable aircraft with delta wings, the aerospace plane and nose portions of spike inlets. The theoretical model used has three parts. First, the single line vortex model is used within the framework of slender body theory, to compute the outer inviscid field for specified separation lines. Next, the three dimensional boundary layer is represented by a momentum equation for the cross flow, analogous to that for a plane boundary layer; a von Karman Pohlhausen approximation is applied to solve this equation. The cross flow separation for both laminar and turbulent layers is determined by matching the pressure at the upper and lower separation points. This iterative procedure yields a unique solution for the separation lines and consequently for the position of the vortices and the vortex lift on the body. Lastly, control of separation is achieved by blowing tangentially from a slot located along a cone generator. It is found that for very small blowing coefficients, the separation can be postponed or suppressedy completely.

  10. Control and Identification of a Separated Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shao-Ching; Kim, John; Gibson, Steve

    2004-11-01

    There has been increased interest in applying modern control theory to flow-control problems. For simple flows, such as turbulent channel and boundary layers, several investigators have successfully designed controllers based on linear optimal control theory. However, applying the same procedure to complex flows is hindered since certain required information of the flow is not readily available. In this study, we use system identification theory to construct an approximate linear model from input-output data for a separated boundary layer on a flat plate exposed to an adverse pressure gradient. The subspace system identification method yields a more accurate system model than the ARX method we had used previously. A linear quadratic Gaussian (LQG) synthesis was used to design an optimal controller to reduce the separation bubble size. Effects of the controller were investigated by comparing the controlled flow field to the uncontrolled one, and that controlled by a conventional open-loop scheme. A number of issues regarding model reduction, model stability, and the choice of cost function, will also be presented.

  11. Fast CNOT gate between two spatially separated atoms via shortcuts to adiabatic passage.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yan; Song, Chong; Ji, Xin; Zhang, Shou

    2015-09-01

    Quantum logic gate is indispensable to quantum computation. One of the important qubit operations is the quantum controlled-not (CNOT) gate that performs a NOT operation on a target qubit depending on the state of the control qubit. In this paper we present a scheme to realize the quantum CNOT gate between two spatially separated atoms via shortcuts to adiabatic passage. The influence of various decoherence processes on the fidelity is discussed. The strict numerical simulation results show that the fidelity for the CNOT gate is relatively high. PMID:26368473

  12. Separation Control Using Miniature Vortex Generator Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, John K.; Xu, Cheng

    1998-11-01

    Vortex generator jets are jets which emerge from pitched and skewed holes in the wall bounding a turbulent flow. They have been shown to develop persistent longitudinal vortices when the hole size is comparable to the boundary layer thickness. This experiment used much smaller jets with diameters around a twentieth of the boundary layer thickness. The jets were arranged to produce arrays of co-rotating longitudinal vortices. By changing the hole spacing, the vortices could be made to either remain separate or amalgamate into much larger vortices. The amalgamated vortices produced strong disturbances similar to those produced by a vane-type vortex generator with height comparable to the boundary layer thickness. These disturbances persisted more than 1000 hole diameters downstream. The separation control capabilities were tested in an adverse pressure gradient boundary layer which separated and then reattached forming a closed bubble. The miniature vortex generator jets could control the length of the separated region eventually eliminating it entirely at sufficiently high jet speeds.

  13. Measurement of wavefront distortions by the method of aperture sounding with spatially separated channels

    SciTech Connect

    Prilepskiy, Boris V; Alikhanov, Alexey N; Berchenko, Evgeniy A; Kiselev, Vladimir Yu; Narusbek, Ernest A; Filatov, Aleksander S

    2005-08-31

    Features of the formation of signals in wavefront sensors with the single-frequency light wave phase modulation and spatial separation of control channels are considered. Analysis is performed for sensors in which phase modulation is governed by a controlled element located in the pupil of the optical system of a sensor or in the focal plane of the objective of this system. Peculiarities of the signal formation for a tilted wavefront are considered separately for internal points of the exit pupil in the case of light wave phase modulation in the pupil. It is shown that a signal at the modulation frequency in these wavefront sensors for points located far from the pupil boundaries is determined by the wavefront curvature. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  14. Separation Control using Lorentz Force Actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johari, H.; Tucker, A.; Thomas, S.

    2003-11-01

    To assess the feasibility of Lorentz force actuators for separation control, flow visualization experiments were conducted in a low-speed water tunnel. Salt was added to the tunnel to yield an electrical conductivity of one half of seawater. The setup consisted of a 1.3 m long flat plate followed by a 15^o ramp. The boundary layer was tripped near the flat plate leading edge, resulting in a fully turbulent 2D boundary layer. The Lorentz force actuator had 3 mm wide surface mounted electrodes and permanent magnets. The actuator, which was placed just upstream of the ramp, could be used to produce forces in the streamwise or spanwise direction. To reduce electrolysis and subsequent corrosion, the input power was modulated thus producing pulsatile forcing. The Reynolds number based on the freestream velocity and ramp length was ˜ 10^4. The flow separated shortly after the ramp and vortex shedding at a dimensionless frequency of ˜ 2 was observed. Although both streamwise and spanwise forcing were successful in reducing the separated region, the latter was much more effective. The spanwise forcing was most effective at frequencies 10 to 20 times the natural shedding frequency, whereas the streamwise forcing was effective at frequencies closer to the natural shedding frequency. The effectiveness of spanwise forcing is attributed to the generation of streamwise vorticity. Forcing in the direction opposite to the freestream resulted in complete separation at the start of the ramp.

  15. Formation metrology and control for large separated optics space telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mettler, E.; Quadrelli, M.; Breckenridge, W.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we present formation flying performance analysis initial results for a representative large space telescope composed of separated optical elements [Mett 02]. A virtual-structure construct (an equivalent rigid body) is created by unique metrology and control that combines both centralized and decentralized methods. The formation may be in orbit at GEO for super-resolution Earth observation, as in the case of Figure 1, or it may be in an Earth-trailing orbit for astrophysics, Figure 2. Extended applications are envisioned for exo-solar planet interferometric imaging by a formation of very large separated optics telescopes, Figure 3. Space telescopes, with such large apertures and f/10 to f/100 optics, are not feasible if connected by massive metering structures. Instead, the new virtual-structure paradigm of information and control connectivity between the formation elements provides the necessary spatial rigidity and alignment precision for the telescope.

  16. Passive separation control by acoustic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, S. L.; Spedding, G. R.

    2013-10-01

    At transitional Reynolds numbers, the laminar boundary layer separation and possible reattachment on a smooth airfoil, or wing section, are notoriously sensitive to small variations in geometry or in the fluid environment. We report here on the results of a pilot study that adds to this list of sensitivities. The presence of small holes in the suction surface of an Eppler 387 wing has a transformative effect upon the aerodynamics, by changing the mean chordwise separation line location. These changes are not simply a consequence of the presence of the small cavities, which by themselves have no effect. Acoustic resonance in the backing cavities generates tones that interact with intrinsic flow instabilities. Possible consequences for passive flow control strategies are discussed together with potential problems in measurements through pressure taps in such flow regimes.

  17. Spatial Control of Condensation using Chemical Micropatterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Kevin; Hansen, Ryan; Nath, Saurabh; Retterer, Scott; Collier, Patrick; Boreyko, Jonathan; Nature-Inspired Fluids; Interfaces Team; CenterNanophase Materials Sciences Team

    2015-11-01

    Surfaces exhibiting wettability patterns can spatially control the nucleation of condensation to enable enhanced fog harvesting and phase-change heat transfer. To date, studies of patterned condensation have utilized a combination of chemical and topographical features, making it difficult to isolate the effects of intrinsic wettability versus surface roughness on spatially controlling the condensate. Here, we fabricate chemical micropatterns consisting of hydrophilic silicon oxide and a smooth hydrophobic silane monolayer to isolate the effects of changes in intrinsic wettability on the spatial control of condensation. Complete spatial control, defined as every nucleation and growth event occurring exclusively on the hydrophilic features, was observed even for supercooled droplets at high water vapor supersaturation. However, this complete spatial control was found to break down beyond a critical spacing that depended upon the extent of supersaturation. The average diameter of condensate was found to be smaller for the chemically micropatterned surfaces compared to a uniformly hydrophobic surface. Control of inter-droplet spacing between supercooled condensate through chemical patterning can be employed to minimize the growth of inter-droplet frost on cold surfaces.

  18. CONTROL SYSTEM FOR ISOTOPE SEPARATING APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Barnes, S.W.

    1960-01-26

    A method is described for controlling the position of the ion beams in a calutron used for isotope separation. The U/sup 238/ beams is centered over the U/sup 235/ receiving pocket, the operator monitoring the beam until a maximum reading is achieved on the meter connected to that pocket. Then both beams are simultaneously shifted by a preselected amount to move the U/sup 235/ beam over the U/sup 235/ pocket. A slotted door is placed over the entrance to that pocket during the U/sup 238/ beam centering to reduce the contamination to the pocket, while allowing enough beam to pass for monitoring purposes.

  19. Virtual Human Analogs to Rodent Spatial Pattern Separation and Completion Memory Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paleja, Meera; Girard, Todd A.; Christensen, Bruce K.

    2011-01-01

    Spatial pattern separation (SPS) and spatial pattern completion (SPC) have played an increasingly important role in computational and rodent literatures as processes underlying associative memory. SPS and SPC are complementary processes, allowing the formation of unique representations and the reconstruction of complete spatial environments based…

  20. Simultaneous and spatially separated detection of multiple orbital angular momentum states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tudor, R.; Mihailescu, M.; Kusko, C.; Paun, I. A.; Nan, A. E.; Kusko, M.

    2016-06-01

    We present a method for spatially separated detection of multiple orbital angular momentum (OAM) states, simultaneous. The starting point is the generation of axially superposed Laguerre-Gauss beams, carrying multiple OAM states using a single computer generated hologram. The information contained in the OAM superposition is transferred to the first diffraction order and is detected at the receiver with a reading mask, which contains two perpendicular superposed fork-like holograms, ensuring the spatial separation of the OAM states. The dynamic of the process is studied in terms of the number of generated OAM states and the constructive parameters values. The experimental investigations use an optical arrangement based on a spatial light modulator in the transmitter unit and an amplitude mask in the receiver unit. This proof of concept experiment demonstrates the possibility of simultaneously detection of multiple OAM states in points located at different coordinates, controlled through the design of the holograms and shows the capability of our proposed method to increase the capacity of free-space optical communication channels.

  1. Tangential synthetic jets for separation control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmaeili Monir, H.; Tadjfar, M.; Bakhtian, A.

    2014-02-01

    A numerical study of separation control has been made to investigate aerodynamic characteristics of a NACA23012 airfoil with a tangential synthetic jet. Simulations are carried out at the chord Reynolds number of Re=2.19×106. The present approach relies on solving the Unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) equations. The turbulence model used in the present computation is the Spalart-Allmaras one-equation model. All computations are performed with a finite volume based code. Stall characteristics are significantly improved by controlling the formation of separation vortices in the flow. We placed the synthetic jet at the 12% chord, xj=0.12c, where we expected the separation to occur. Two distinct jet oscillating frequencies: Fj+=0.159 and Fj+=1 were considered. We studied the effect of blowing ratio, Vj/U∞, where it was varied from 0 to 5. The inclined angle of the synthetic jet was varied from αj=0° up to αj=83°. For the non-zero inclined angles, the local maximum in the aerodynamic performance, Cl/Cd, of 6.89 was found for the inclined angle of about 43°. In the present method, by means of creating a dent on the airfoil, linear momentum is transferred to the flow system in tangential direction to the airfoil surface. Thus the absolute maximum of 11.19 was found for the tangential synthetic jet at the inclined angle of the jet of 0°. The mechanisms involved for a tangential jet appear to behave linearly, as by multiplying the activation frequency of the jet by a factor produces the same multiplication factor in the resulting frequency in the flow. However, the mechanisms involved in the non-zero inclined angle cases behave nonlinearly when the activation frequency is multiplied.

  2. Evidence of Separable Spatial Representations in a Virtual Navigation Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gramann, Klaus; Muller, Hermann J.; Eick, Eva-Maria; Schonebeck, Bernd

    2005-01-01

    Three experiments investigated spatial orientation in a virtual navigation task. Subjects had to adjust a homing vector indicating their end position relative to the origin of the path. It was demonstrated that sparse visual flow was sufficient for accurate path integration. Moreover, subjects were found to prefer a distinct egocentric or…

  3. Impulsive Injection for Compressor Stator Separation Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culley, Dennis E.; Braunscheidel, Edward P.; Bright, Michelle M.

    2005-01-01

    Flow control using impulsive injection from the suction surface of a stator vane has been applied in a low speed axial compressor. Impulsive injection is shown to significantly reduce separation relative to steady injection for vanes that were induced to separate by an increase in vane stagger angle of 4 degrees. Injected flow was applied to the airfoil suction surface using spanwise slots pitched in the streamwise direction. Injection was limited to the near-hub region, from 10 to 36 percent of span, to affect the dominant loss due to hub leakage flow. Actuation was provided externally using high-speed solenoid valves closely coupled to the vane tip. Variations in injected mass, frequency, and duty cycle are explored. The local corrected total pressure loss across the vane at the lower span region was reduced by over 20 percent. Additionally, low momentum fluid migrating from the hub region toward the tip was effectively suppressed resulting in an overall benefit which reduced corrected area averaged loss through the passage by 4 percent. The injection mass fraction used for impulsive actuation was typically less than 0.1 percent of the compressor through flow.

  4. Amplitude Scaling of Active Separation Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stalnov, Oksana; Seifert, Avraham

    2010-01-01

    Three existing and two new excitation magnitude scaling options for active separation control at Reynolds numbers below one Million. The physical background for the scaling options was discussed and their relevance was evaluated using two different sets of experimental data. For F+ approx. 1, 2D excitation: a) The traditional VR and C(mu) - do not scale the data. b) Only the Re*C(mu) is valid. This conclusion is also limited for positive lift increment.. For F+ > 10, 3D excitation, the Re corrected C(mu), the St corrected velocity ratio and the vorticity flux coefficient, all scale the amplitudes equally well. Therefore, the Reynolds weighted C(mu) is the preferred choice, relevant to both excitation modes. Incidence also considered, using Ue from local Cp.

  5. Excitation of two spatially separated Bose-Einstein condensates of magnons

    SciTech Connect

    Dzyapko, O.; Demidov, V. E.; Buchmeier, M.; Demokritov, S. O.; Stockhoff, T.; Schmitz, G.; Melkov, G. A.

    2009-08-01

    We have studied experimentally the spatial properties and the dynamics of magnon Bose-Einstein condensates created in ferromagnetic films by a parametric pumping with different spatial configurations. Using the specific character of dynamic fields produced by pumping resonators of different shapes, we were able to realize the regime, in which two spatially separated condensates of magnons are formed. Our experiments show that while the separation between the condensates is determined by the size of the resonator, their spatial width can be changed by varying the power of the pumping signal.

  6. Metasurface Spatial Processor for Electromagnetic Remote Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achouri, Karim; Lavigne, Guillaume; Salem, Mohamed A.; Caloz, Christophe

    2016-05-01

    We introduce the concept of metasurface spatial processor, whose transmission is remotely and coherently controlled by the superposition of an incident wave and a control wave through the metasurface. The conceptual operation of this device is analogous to both that of a transistor and a Mach-Zehnder interferometer, while offering much more diversity in terms of electromagnetic transformations. We demonstrate two metasurfaces, that perform the operation of electromagnetic switching and amplification.

  7. Spatial evolutionary spectrum for DOA estimation and blind signal separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayhan, A. S.; Amin, Moeness G.

    1999-11-01

    In this paper, we use the concept of evolutionary spectrum to solve key problems in array processing. We present Cross-power Evolutionary Periodogram for direction finding and blind separation of nonstationary signals. We model nonstationary signals received by each sensor in the array as a sum of complex sinusoids with time-varying amplitudes. These amplitudes carry information about the direction of arrival which may also be time-varying. We first estimate the time-varying amplitudes, then use the results for the estimation of evolutionary cross-power distributions of the sensor data. Next, using cross-power estimates at time-frequency samples of interest, we estimate the directions of arrival using one of the existing high resolution direction finding methods. If the directions are time-varying, we select time-frequency points around the time of interest. By carrying out the estimation at different times, we obtain the directions as a function of time. If the sources are stationary, then we can use all time-frequency points of interest for the estimation of fixed directions. We also use whitening and subspace methods to find the mixing matrix and separate the signals received by the array. Simulation examples illustrating the performances of the proposed algorithms are presented.

  8. Entanglement generation and quantum information transfer between spatially-separated qubits in different cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chui-Ping; Su, Qi-Ping; Nori, Franco

    2013-11-01

    The generation and control of quantum states of spatially-separated qubits distributed in different cavities constitute fundamental tasks in cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED). An interesting question in this context is how to prepare entanglement and realize quantum information transfer between qubits located at different cavities, which are important in large-scale quantum information processing. In this paper, we consider a physical system consisting of two cavities and three qubits. Two of the qubits are placed in two different cavities while the remaining one acts as a coupler, which is used to connect the two cavities. We propose an approach for generating quantum entanglement and implementing quantum information transfer between the two spatially-separated inter-cavity qubits. The quantum operations involved in this proposal are performed by a virtual photon process; thus the cavity decay is greatly suppressed during operations. In addition, to complete these tasks, only one coupler qubit and one operation step are needed. Moreover, there is no need to apply classical pulses, so that the engineering complexity is much reduced and the operation procedure is greatly simplified. Finally, our numerical results illustrate that high-fidelity implementation of this proposal using superconducting phase qubits and one-dimensional transmission line resonators is feasible for current circuit QED implementations. This proposal can also be applied to other types of superconducting qubits, including flux and charge qubits.

  9. Spatial constraints control cell proliferation in tissues

    PubMed Central

    Streichan, Sebastian J.; Hoerner, Christian R.; Schneidt, Tatjana; Holzer, Daniela; Hufnagel, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Control of cell proliferation is a fundamental aspect of tissue formation in development and regeneration. Cells experience various spatial and mechanical constraints depending on their environmental context in the body, but we do not fully understand if and how such constraints influence cell cycle progression and thereby proliferation patterns in tissues. Here, we study the impact of mechanical manipulations on the cell cycle of individual cells within a mammalian model epithelium. By monitoring the response to experimentally applied forces, we find a checkpoint at the G1–S boundary that, in response to spatial constraints, controls cell cycle progression. This checkpoint prevents cells from entering S phase if the available space remains below a characteristic threshold because of crowding. Stretching the tissue results in fast cell cycle reactivation, whereas compression rapidly leads to cell cycle arrest. Our kinetic analysis of this response shows that cells have no memory of past constraints and allows us to formulate a biophysical model that predicts tissue growth in response to changes in spatial constraints in the environment. This characteristic biomechanical cell cycle response likely serves as a fundamental control mechanism to maintain tissue integrity and to ensure control of tissue growth during development and regeneration. PMID:24706777

  10. Individual Differences in Spatial Pattern Separation Performance Associated with Healthy Aging in Humans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stark, Shauna M.; Yassa, Michael A.; Stark, Craig E. L.

    2010-01-01

    Rodent studies have suggested that "pattern separation," the ability to distinguish among similar experiences, is diminished in a subset of aged rats. We extended these findings to the human using a task designed to assess spatial pattern separation behavior (determining at time of test whether pairs of pictures shown during the study were in the…

  11. Numerical modeling of active separation control by synthetic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aram, Shawn

    Zero-Net Mass-Flux (ZNMF) actuators or synthetic jet actuators are versatile micro scale devices with numerous applications in the field of fluid mechanics. The primary focus of the current work is to use time-accurate simulations to study the interaction of these jets with cross flows and to optimize their performance for the control of boundary layer separation. This study consists of four parts. In the first part, a class of phenomenology-based models is proposed to reproduce the flow associated with synthetic jets in grazing flows and simplify the task of ZNMF-based flow control simulations. The proposed models have a non-uniform jet velocity profile with only two spatial degrees of freedom and a uniform slip velocity on the slot-flow boundary. A comparison of key integral quantities associated with the momentum, energy and vorticity fluxes shows that the models with a non-uniform jet velocity during the expulsion phase and uniform jet velocity during the ingestion phase can predict these quantities with good accuracy, whereas a simple plug flow model with a zero slip and uniform jet velocity under-predicts these three quantities during the expulsion phase. Based on our initial analysis, three of the simplest models are selected for further study, including an assessment of their performance for a canonical separated flow at different forcing frequencies. A key finding is that a simple plug-flow type model can predict incorrect trends for separation reduction with the jet frequency. A preliminary attempt is also made to provide empirical closure to these models. The effect of synthetic jets orientation on its interaction with a zero pressure gradient laminar boundary layer is explored in the second part. A rectangular slot is chosen in this study and streamwise and spanwise orientations of this slot are examined. The orientation of the slot is found to have a significant impact on its interaction with the boundary layer. The dominant feature in the streamwise

  12. Reconstruction algorithms for compressive hyperspectral imaging systems with separable spatial and spectral operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oiknine, Yaniv; August, Yitzhak; Stern, Adrian

    2014-09-01

    Recently we introduced a hyperspectral compressive sensing scheme that uses separable projections in the spatial and spectral domains. The separable encoding schemes facilitates the optical implementation, reduces the computational burden dramatically, and storage requirements. Owing to these benefits we have been able to encode the hyperspectral cube in all three dimensions. In this work we present a comparison between various reconstructions methods applied to the hyperspectral data captured with our separable compressive sensing systems.

  13. Feeling better: Separate pathways for targeted enhancement of spatial and temporal touch

    PubMed Central

    Yau, Jeffrey M.; Celnik, Pablo; Hsiao, Steven S.; Desmond, John E.

    2013-01-01

    We perceive spatial form and temporal frequency by touch. Although distinct somatosensory neurons represent spatial and temporal information, these neural populations are intermixed throughout the somatosensory system. Here, we show that spatial and temporal touch can be dissociated and separately enhanced via cortical pathways that are normally associated with vision and audition. In Experiments 1 and 2, we found that anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) applied over visual cortex, but not auditory cortex, enhances tactile perception of spatial orientation. In Experiments 3 and 4, we found that anodal tDCS over auditory cortex, but not visual cortex, enhances tactile perception of temporal frequency. This double-dissociation reveals separate cortical pathways that selectively support spatial and temporal channels. These results bolster the emerging view that sensory areas process multiple modalities and suggest that supramodal domains may be more fundamental to cortical organizational. PMID:24390826

  14. Separate Mechanisms Recruited by Exogenous and Endogenous Spatial Cues: Evidence from a Spatial Stroop Paradigm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Funes, Maria Jesus; Lupianez, Juan; Milliken, Bruce

    2007-01-01

    The present experiments tested whether endogenous and exogenous cues produce separate effects on target processing. In Experiment 1, participants discriminated whether an arrow presented left or right of fixation pointed to the left or right. For 1 group, the arrow was preceded by a peripheral noninformative cue. For the other group, the arrow was…

  15. Interaction Mechanisms of Cavitation Bubbles Induced by Spatially and Temporally Separated fs-Laser Pulses

    PubMed Central

    Tinne, Nadine; Kaune, Brigitte; Krüger, Alexander; Ripken, Tammo

    2014-01-01

    The emerging use of femtosecond lasers with high repetition rates in the MHz regime together with limited scan speed implies possible mutual optical and dynamical interaction effects of the individual cutting spots. In order to get more insight into the dynamics a time-resolved photographic analysis of the interaction of cavitation bubbles is presented. Particularly, we investigated the influence of fs-laser pulses and their resulting bubble dynamics with various spatial as well as temporal separations. Different time courses of characteristic interaction effects between the cavitation bubbles were observed depending on pulse energy and spatio-temporal pulse separation. These ranged from merely no interaction to the phenomena of strong water jet formation. Afterwards, the mechanisms are discussed regarding their impact on the medical application of effective tissue cutting lateral to the laser beam direction with best possible axial precision: the mechanical forces of photodisruption as well as the occurring water jet should have low axial extend and a preferably lateral priority. Furthermore, the overall efficiency of energy conversion into controlled mechanical impact should be maximized compared to the transmitted pulse energy and unwanted long range mechanical side effects, e.g. shock waves, axial jet components. In conclusion, these experimental results are of great importance for the prospective optimization of the ophthalmic surgical process with high-repetition rate fs-lasers. PMID:25502697

  16. Spatial and Temporal Control of Surfactant Systems

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoyang; Abbott, Nicholas L.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews some recent progress on approaches leading to spatial and temporal control of surfactant systems. The approaches revolve around the use of redox-active and light-sensitive surfactants. Perspectives are presented on experiments that have realized approaches for active control of interfacial properties of aqueous surfactant systems, reversible control of microstructures and nanostructures formed within bulk solutions, and in situ manipulation of the interactions of surfactants with polymers, DNA and proteins. A particular focus of this review is devoted to studies of amphiphiles that contain the redox-active group ferrocene – reversible control of the oxidation state of ferrocene leads to changes in the charge/hydrophobicity of these amphiphiles, resulting in substantial changes in their self-assembly. Light-sensitive surfactants containing azobenzene, which undergo changes in shape/polarity upon illumination with light, are a second focus of this review. Examples of both redox-active and light-sensitive surfactants that lead to large (> 20mN/m) and spatially localized (~mm) changes in surface tensions on a time scale of seconds are presented. Systems that permit reversible transformations of bulk solution nanostructures – such as micelle-to-vesicle transitions or monomer-to-micelle transitions – are also described. The broad potential utility of these emerging classes of amphiphiles are illustrated by the ability to drive changes in functional properties of surfactant systems, such as rheological properties and reversible solubilization of oils, as well as the ability to control interactions of surfactants with biomolecules to modulate their transport into cells. PMID:19665723

  17. Perceptually controlled doping for audio source separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahé, Gaël; Nadalin, Everton Z.; Suyama, Ricardo; Romano, João MT

    2014-12-01

    The separation of an underdetermined audio mixture can be performed through sparse component analysis (SCA) that relies however on the strong hypothesis that source signals are sparse in some domain. To overcome this difficulty in the case where the original sources are available before the mixing process, the informed source separation (ISS) embeds in the mixture a watermark, which information can help a further separation. Though powerful, this technique is generally specific to a particular mixing setup and may be compromised by an additional bitrate compression stage. Thus, instead of watermarking, we propose a `doping' method that makes the time-frequency representation of each source more sparse, while preserving its audio quality. This method is based on an iterative decrease of the distance between the distribution of the signal and a target sparse distribution, under a perceptual constraint. We aim to show that the proposed approach is robust to audio coding and that the use of the sparsified signals improves the source separation, in comparison with the original sources. In this work, the analysis is made only in instantaneous mixtures and focused on voice sources.

  18. Modeling of mode locking in a laser with spatially separate gain media.

    PubMed

    Oldenbeuving, R M; Lee, C J; Van Voorst, P D; Offerhaus, H L; Boller, K-

    2010-10-25

    We present a novel laser mode locking scheme and discuss its unusual properties and feasibility using a theoretical model. A large set of single-frequency continuous-wave lasers oscillate by amplification in spatially separated gain media. They are mutually phase-locked by nonlinear feedback from a common saturable absorber. As a result, ultra-short pulses are generated. The new scheme offers three significant benefits: the light that is amplified in each medium is continuous-wave, thereby avoiding issues related to group-velocity dispersion and nonlinear effects that can perturb the pulse shape. The set of frequencies on which the laser oscillates, and therefore the pulse repetition rate, is controlled by the geometry of resonator-internal optical elements, not by the cavity length. Finally, the bandwidth of the laser can be controlled by switching gain modules on and off. This scheme offers a route to mode-locked lasers with high average output power, repetition rates that can be scaled into the THz range, and a bandwidth that can be dynamically controlled. The approach is particularly suited for implementation using semiconductor diode laser arrays. PMID:21164639

  19. Utilization of separate surface control systems on general aviation aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roskam, J.

    1977-01-01

    The application of separate surface control systems to general aviation aircraft is discussed. Block diagrams of a conventional control system with autopilot tie-in and of a separate surface control system are presented, and the advantages and disadvantages of the two systems are compared. Theoretical descriptions of pilot-in-the-loop operation and operation in the autopilot mode are presented. The application of separate surface stability augmentation in yaw dampers, wing levelers, and static longitudinal stability augmentation is examined. The state-of-the-art of separate control surface technology is summarized.

  20. Control of flow separation in a turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Minjeong; Choi, Sangho; Choi, Haecheon

    2015-11-01

    Towards the development of successful control methods for separation delay in a turbulent boundary layer, we adopt a model flow field, in which a turbulent separation occurs above a flat plate (Na and Moin 1998 JFM), and apply controls to this flow for reducing the size of the separation bubble and investigating the interaction between the forcing and flow near the separation bubble. We provide a single-frequency forcing with zero net mass flow rate at the upstream of the separation bubble. At low forcing frequencies, spanwise vortices are generated and travel downstream, bringing high momentum toward the wall and reducing the size of the separation bubble. Also, these vortices cause the separation and reattachment points to travel downstream. On the other hand, at high forcing frequencies, the size of the separation bubble becomes smaller and larger in time, respectively, due to the pressure gradient alternating favorably and adversely in time. Supported by NRF-2011-0028032 and 2014048162.

  1. On the control of a canonical separated flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, John C.

    Flow separation is generally an undesirable phenomenon that produces adverse effects to ideal aerodynamic performance. Control of ow separation is a complex problem and thus a popular area of research. A common obstacle is the lack of understanding of the complex fluid mechanics in cases of ow separation, evident by the substantial amount of ow control achieved through trial-and-error methods. The purpose of this work is to better understand the nature of separation for improved active control methods, which includes closed-loop control via reduced order methods. Control of a canonical separation problem, with the key features of separated flow, is achieved at a chord Reynolds number of 105. Separation is created on a at plate model, void of curvature that would otherwise include effects particular to the type of aerodynamic body. The characteristics of the imposed separation are evaluated with the intent of having a nominally two-dimensional separation, with the same essential flow characteristics of a more traditionally stalled airfoil. Results provide a reduced-order estimation technique that is used to identify global, dynamic modes through experimental measurements. Reattachment of the baseline separation is first achieved in open-loop control via ZNMF actuation. Efficient reattachment is reached by targeting the identified characteristic flow frequencies, which is able to reattach the separated flow with less than a quarter of the control effort as a comparison case with high-frequency forcing. The baseline and control results are used to identify a reduced-order model suitable for closed-loop control, with benefits of set-point tracking and full boundary layer attachment with minimum control effort.

  2. Experimental realization of spatially separated entanglement with continuous variables using laser pulse trains.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yun; Okubo, Ryuhi; Hirano, Mayumi; Eto, Yujiro; Hirano, Takuya

    2015-01-01

    Spatially separated entanglement is demonstrated by interfering two high-repetition squeezed pulse trains. The entanglement correlation of the quadrature amplitudes between individual pulses is interrogated. It is characterized in terms of the sufficient inseparability criterion with an optimum result of in the frequency domain and in the time domain. The quantum correlation is also observed when the two measurement stations are separated by a physical distance of 4.5 m, which is sufficiently large to demonstrate the space-like separation, after accounting for the measurement time. PMID:26278478

  3. Unit Performance, Situational Factors, and Employee Attitudes in Spatially Separated Work Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Lyman W.; And Others

    This study investigated relationships between work unit performance, employee attitudes, and situational characteristics among 411 female clerical workers in 37 branch banks. The work units were characterized by spatial separation and performance of similar functions. Two independent dimensions of performance were empirically identified and their…

  4. The spatial isomorphism problem for close separable nuclear C*-algebras

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Erik; Sinclair, Allan M.; Smith, Roger R.; White, Stuart A.; Winter, Wilhelm

    2010-01-01

    The Kadison–Kastler problem asks whether close C*-algebras on a Hilbert space must be spatially isomorphic. We establish this when one of the algebras is separable and nuclear. We also apply our methods to the study of near inclusions of C*-algebras. PMID:20080723

  5. Spatial control of rabies on heterogeneous landscapes.

    PubMed

    Russell, Colin A; Real, Leslie A; Smith, David L

    2006-01-01

    Rabies control in terrestrial wildlife reservoirs relies heavily on an oral rabies vaccine (ORV). In addition to direct ORV delivery to protect wildlife in natural habitats, vaccine corridors have been constructed to control the spread; these corridors are often developed around natural barriers, such as rivers, to enhance the effectiveness of vaccine deployment. However, the question of how to optimally deploy ORV around a river (or other natural barrier) to best exploit the barrier for rabies control has not been addressed using mathematical models. Given an advancing epidemic wave, should the vaccine be distributed on both sides of barrier, behind the barrier, or in front of it? Here, we introduce a new mathematical model for the dynamics of raccoon rabies on a spatially heterogeneous landscape that is both simple and realistic. We demonstrate that the vaccine should always be deployed behind a barrier to minimize the recurrence of subsequent epidemics. Although the oral rabies vaccine is sufficient to induce herd immunity inside the vaccinated area, it simultaneously creates a demographic refuge. When that refuge is in front of a natural barrier, seasonal dispersal from the vaccine corridor into an endemic region sustains epidemic oscillations of raccoon rabies. When the vaccine barrier creates a refuge behind the river, the low permeability of the barrier to host movement limits dispersal of the host population from the protected populations into the rabies endemic area and limits subsequent rabies epidemics. PMID:17183654

  6. Multi-Antenna Data Collector for Smart Metering Networks with Integrated Source Separation by Spatial Filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quednau, Philipp; Trommer, Ralph; Schmidt, Lorenz-Peter

    2016-03-01

    Wireless transmission systems in smart metering networks share the advantage of lower installation costs due to the expandability of separate infrastructure but suffer from transmission problems. In this paper the issue of interference of wireless transmitted smart meter data with third party systems and data from other meters is investigated and an approach for solving the problem is presented. A multi-channel wireless m-bus receiver was developed to separate the desired data from unwanted interferers by spatial filtering. The according algorithms are presented and the influence of different antenna types on the spatial filtering is investigated. The performance of the spatial filtering is evaluated by extensive measurements in a realistic surrounding with several hundreds of active wireless m-bus transponders. These measurements correspond to the future environment for data-collectors as they took place in rural and urban areas with smart gas meters equipped with wireless m-bus transponders installed in almost all surrounding buildings.

  7. Active-Adaptive Control of Inlet Separation Using Supersonic Microjets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvi, Farrukh S.

    2007-01-01

    Flow separation in internal and external flows generally results in a significant degradation in aircraft performance. For internal flows, such as inlets and transmission ducts in aircraft propulsion systems, separation is undesirable as it reduces the overall system performance. The aim of this research has been to understand the nature of separation and more importantly, to explore techniques to actively control it. In this research, we extended our investigation of active separation control (under a previous NASA grant) where we explored the use of microjets for the control of boundary layer separation. The geometry used for the initial study was a simple diverging Stratford ramp, equipped with arrays of microjets. These early results clearly show that the activation of microjets eliminated flow separation. Furthermore, the velocity-field measurements, using PIV, also demonstrate that the gain in momentum due to the elimination of separation is at least an order of magnitude larger (two orders of magnitude larger in most cases) than the momentum injected by the microjets and is accomplished with very little mass flow through the microjets. Based on our initial promising results this research was continued under the present grant, using a more flexible model. This model allows for the magnitude and extent of separation as well as the microjet parameters to be independently varied. The results, using this model were even more encouraging and demonstrated that microjet control completely eliminated significant regions of flow separation over a wide range of conditions with almost negligible mass flow. Detailed studies of the flowfield and its response to microjets were further examined using 3-component PIV and unsteady pressure measurements, among others. As the results presented this report will show, microjets were successfully used to control the separation of a much larger extent and magnitude than demonstrated in our earlier experiments. In fact, using the

  8. Source attribution of air pollution by spatial scale separation using high spatial density networks of low cost air quality sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimann, I.; Bright, V. B.; McLeod, M. W.; Mead, M. I.; Popoola, O. A. M.; Stewart, G. B.; Jones, R. L.

    2015-07-01

    To carry out detailed source attribution for air quality assessment it is necessary to distinguish pollutant contributions that arise from local emissions from those attributable to non-local or regional emission sources. Frequently this requires the use of complex models and inversion methods, prior knowledge or assumptions regarding the pollution environment. In this paper we demonstrate how high spatial density and fast response measurements from low-cost sensor networks may facilitate this separation. A purely measurement-based approach to extract underlying pollution levels (baselines) from the measurements is presented exploiting the different relative frequencies of local and background pollution variations. This paper shows that if high spatial and temporal coverage of air quality measurements are available, the different contributions to the total pollution levels, namely the regional signal as well as near and far field local sources, can be quantified. The advantage of using high spatial resolution observations, as can be provided by low-cost sensor networks, lies in the fact that no prior assumptions about pollution levels at individual deployment sites are required. The methodology we present here, utilising measurements of carbon monoxide (CO), has wide applicability, including additional gas phase species and measurements obtained using reference networks. While similar studies have been performed, this is the first study using networks at this density, or using low cost sensor networks.

  9. Imaging single photons in non-separable states of polarization and spatial-mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xinru; Galvez, Enrique J.

    2014-10-01

    Non-separable superpositions of polarization and spatial mode of a single photon produce a state that has a polarization that depends on the transverse position, and contains all states of polarization represented on the Poincaré sphere. We have done measurements of the space-dependent state of polarization of single photons prepared in distinct 2×2 (qubit-qubit) and 2×3 (qubit-qutrit) non-separable superpositions of Laguerre-Gauss spatial and polarization states. Detection was done by polarimetry of the light projected at distinct locations in the transverse plane. The polarization patterns had a C-point polarization singularity (lemon, star or monstar) at the center of the transverse wavefunction.

  10. Spatial separation in a thermal mixture of ultracold {sup 174}Yb and {sup 87}Rb atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Baumer, F.; Muenchow, F.; Goerlitz, A.; Maxwell, S. E.; Julienne, P. S.; Tiesinga, E.

    2011-04-15

    We report on the observation of unusually strong interactions in a thermal mixture of ultracold atoms which cause a significant modification of the spatial distribution. A mixture of {sup 87}Rb and {sup 174}Yb with a temperature of a few {mu}K is prepared in a hybrid trap consisting of a bichromatic optical potential superimposed on a magnetic trap. For suitable trap parameters and temperatures, a spatial separation of the two species is observed. We infer that the separation is driven by a large interaction strength between {sup 174}Yb and {sup 87}Rb accompanied by a large three-body recombination rate. Based on this assumption we have developed a diffusion model which reproduces our observations.

  11. Control of volume resistivity in inorganic organic separators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W.; Manzo, M. A.

    1979-01-01

    Control of resistivity in NASA inorganic-organic separators is achieved by incorporating small percentages of high surface area, fine particle silica with other ingredients in the separator coating. The volume resistivity is predictable from the surface area of filler particles in the coating. The approach is applied to two polymer- plasticizer -filler coating systems, where the filler content of each is below the generally acknowledged critical pigment volume concentration of the coating. Application of these coating systems to 0.0254 cm thick (10-mil) fuel cell grade asbestos sheet produces inexpensive, flexible, microporous separators that perform as well as the original inorganic-organic concept, the Astropower separator.

  12. Management of Vortices Trailing Flapped Wings via Separation Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenblatt, David

    2005-01-01

    A pilot study was conducted on a flapped semi-span model to investigate the concept and viability of near-wake vortex management via separation control. Passive control was achieved by means of a simple fairing and active control was achieved via zero mass-flux blowing slots. Vortex sheet strength, estimated by integrating surface pressure ports, was used to predict vortex characteristics by means of inviscid rollup relations. Furthermore, vortices trailing the flaps were mapped using a seven-hole probe. Separation control was found to have a marked effect on vortex location, strength, tangential velocity, axial velocity and size over a wide range of angles of attack and control conditions. In general, the vortex trends were well predicted by the inviscid rollup relations. Manipulation of the separated flow near the flap edges exerted significant control over both outboard and inboard edge vortices while producing negligible lift excursions. Dynamic separation and attachment control was found to be an effective means for dynamically perturbing the vortex from arbitrarily long wavelengths down to wavelengths less than a typical wingspan. In summary, separation control has the potential for application to time-independent or time-dependent wake alleviation schemes, where the latter can be deployed to minimize adverse effects on ride-quality and dynamic structural loading.

  13. Controls on the spatial distribution of oceanic δ13CDIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, P. B.; Edwards, N. R.; Müller, S. A.; Oliver, K. I. C.; Death, R. M.; Ridgwell, A.

    2012-08-01

    We describe the design and evaluation of a large ensemble of coupled climate-carbon cycle simulations with the Earth-system model of intermediate complexity GENIE. This ensemble has been designed for application to a range of carbon cycle questions including utilizing carbon isotope (δ13C) proxy records to help constrain the state at the last glacial. Here we evaluate the ensemble by applying it to a transient experiment over the recent industrial era (1858 to 2008 AD). We employ singular vector decomposition and principal component emulation to investigate the spatial modes of ensemble-variability of oceanic dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) δ13C, considering both the spun-up pre-industrial state and the transient change due to the 13C Suess Effect. These analyses allow us to separate the natural and anthropogenic controls on the δ13CDIC distribution. We apply the same dimensionally reduced emulation techniques to consider the drivers of the spatial uncertainty in anthropogenic DIC. We show that the sources of uncertainty governing the uptake of anthropogenic δ13CDIC and DIC are quite distinct. Uncertainty in anthropogenic δ13C uptake is dominated by uncertainties in air-sea gas exchange, which explains 63% of modelled variance. This mode of variability is absent from the ensemble variability in CO2 uptake, which is rather driven by uncertainties in ocean parameters that control mixing of intermediate and surface waters. Although the need to account for air-sea gas exchange is well known, these results suggest that, to leading order, uncertainties in the 13C Suess effect and anthropogenic CO2 ocean-uptake are governed by different processes. This illustrates the difficulties in reconstructing one from the other and furthermore highlights the need for improved spatial coverage of both δ13CDIC and DIC observations to better constrain the ocean sink of anthropogenic CO2.

  14. Liquid crystal-enabled electro-osmosis through spatial charge separation in distorted regions as a novel mechanism of electrokinetics

    PubMed Central

    Lazo, Israel; Peng, Chenhui; Xiang, Jie; Shiyanovskii, Sergij V.; Lavrentovich, Oleg D.

    2014-01-01

    Electrically controlled dynamics of fluids and particles at microscales is a fascinating area of research with applications ranging from microfluidics and sensing to sorting of biomolecules. The driving mechanisms are electric forces acting on spatially separated charges in an isotropic medium such as water. Here, we demonstrate that anisotropic conductivity of liquid crystals enables new mechanism of highly efficient electro-osmosis rooted in space charging of regions with distorted orientation. The electric field acts on these distortion-separated charges to induce liquid crystal-enabled electro-osmosis. Their velocities grow with the square of the field, which allows one to use an alternating current field to drive steady flows and to avoid electrode damage. Ionic currents in liquid crystals that have been traditionally considered as an undesirable feature in displays, offer a broad platform for versatile applications such as liquid crystal-enabled electrokinetics, micropumping and mixing. PMID:25255307

  15. Level measurement and control strategies for subsea separators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjertaker, Bjorn T.; Johansen, Geir A.; Jackson, Peter

    2001-07-01

    Level monitoring instrumentation is an essential part of hydrocarbon processing facilities, and has, together with separator technology, been widely addressed over the last decade. Key issues are production capacity, product enhancement, and well-flow control. The reliability and accuracy of the level instrumentation, and its ability to monitor all the interface layers of the separator, including the thickness of the foam and the oil-water emulsion, are particularly important when considering the level instrumentation as the main sensing element in the automatic control of the separator vessel. Lately, industry focus has been placed on optimal automatic control to improve the quality of the production output, and to minimize the use of expensive and environmentally undesirable separation enhancing chemicals. Recent developments in hydrocarbon production include subsea separation stations, where the constraints placed on the reliability and accuracy of the level instrumentation are especially demanding. This paper presents level interface monitoring developments based on electrical, ultrasonic, thermal, and nucleonic physical principles for three-phase hydrocarbon separators, and introduces the notion of tomometry, meaning multi-point cross-sectional metering aiming to acquire information on the cross-sectional flow-component distribution in the process vessel intended for control purposes.

  16. Debris control design achievements of the booster separation motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. W.; Chase, C. A.

    1985-01-01

    The stringent debris control requirements imposed on the design of the Space Shuttle booster separation motor are described along with the verification program implemented to ensure compliance with debris control objectives. The principal areas emphasized in the design and development of the Booster Separation Motor (BSM) relative to debris control were the propellant formulation and nozzle closures which protect the motors from aerodynamic heating and moisture. A description of the motor design requirements, the propellant formulation and verification program, and the nozzle closures design and verification are presented.

  17. Who plans for health improvement? SEA, HIA and the separation of spatial planning and health planning

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, Alan; Cave, Ben; Ballantyne, Rob

    2013-09-15

    This study examines whether there is active planning for health improvement in the English spatial planning system and how this varies across two regions using a combination of telephone surveys and focus group interviews in 2005 and 2010. The spatial planning profession was found to be ill-equipped to consider the health and well-being implications of its actions, whilst health professionals are rarely engaged and have limited understanding and aspirations when it comes to influencing spatial planning. Strategic Environmental Assessment was not considered to be successful in integrating health into spatial plans, given it was the responsibility of planners lacking the capacity to do so. For their part, health professionals have insufficient knowledge and understanding of planning and how to engage with it to be able to plan for health gains rather than simply respond to health impacts. HIA practice is patchy and generally undertaken by health professionals outside the statutory planning framework. Thus, whilst appropriate assessment tools exist, they currently lack a coherent context within which they can function effectively and the implementation of the Kiev protocol requiring the engagement of health professionals in SEA is not to likely improve the consideration of health in planning while there continues to be separation of functions between professions and lack of understanding of the other profession. -- Highlights: ► Health professionals have limited aspirations for health improvement through the planning system. ► Spatial planners are ill-equipped to understand the health and well-being implications of their activities. ► SEA and HIA currently do not embed health consideration in planning decisions. ► The separation of health and planning functions is problematic for the effective conduct of SEA and/or HIA.

  18. Initial Development of a Spatially Separated Speech-in-Noise and Localization Training Program

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, Richard S.; Witt, Shelley A.; Dunn, Camille C.; Wang, Wenjun

    2010-01-01

    Objective This article describes the initial development of a novel approach for training hearing-impaired listeners to improve their ability to understand speech in the presence of background noise and to also improve their ability to localize sounds. Design Most people with hearing loss, even those well fit with hearing devices, still experience significant problems understanding speech in noise. Prior research suggests that at least some subjects can experience improved speech understanding with training. However, all training systems that we are aware of have one basic, critical limitation. They do not provide spatial separation of the speech and noise, therefore ignoring the potential benefits of training binaural hearing. In this paper we describe our initial experience with a home-based training system that includes spatially separated speech-in-noise and localization training. Results Throughout the development of this system patient input, training and preliminary pilot data from individuals with bilateral cochlear implants were utilized. Positive feedback from subjective reports indicated that some individuals were engaged in the treatment, and formal testing showed benefit. Feedback and practical issues resulted from the reduction of an eight-loudspeaker to a two-loudspeaker system. Conclusions These preliminary findings suggest we have successfully developed a viable spatial hearing training system that can improve binaural hearing in noise and localization. Applications include, but are not limited to, hearing with hearing aids and cochlear implants. PMID:20701836

  19. Separation of spatial and temporal structure of auroral particle precipitation (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudouridis, A.; Spence, H.

    2013-12-01

    Knowledge of the dominant temporal and spatial scales of auroral features is instrumental in understanding the various mechanisms responsible for auroral particle precipitation. Single spacecraft data suffer from temporal/spatial ambiguity. In an effort to separate the temporal and spatial variations of the aurora, we use electron and ion precipitation data from two co-orbiting satellites, F6 and F8 of the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP). The two spacecraft have almost identical polar orbits with a small difference in period. As a result the time difference between the two measurements varies with time. We use two statistical tools in order to determine the most probable lifetimes and spatial dimensions of the prevalent auroral features, Cross Correlation Analysis (CCA) and Cross Spectral Analysis (CSA). The CCA is applied to the magnetic latitude series of electron and ion, integral number and energy fluxes measured by the two DMSP spacecraft. As one spacecraft overtakes the other, the variable time lag between the two measurements results in different cross correlation of the two series. We explore the dependence of this variation on the time lag between the satellites. We find that the electron precipitation exhibits a decreasing correlation between the two spacecraft with increasing time lag, whereas there is only a small similar effect for the ion precipitation data. For the CSA we compute the so-called coherence function as a function of frequency (or inverse wavelength), and hence size of the auroral features. The coherence function is a measure of the stability of auroral features of different sizes. We investigate its variation as a function of the time separation between the two DMSP spacecraft measurements. We show that the coherence function of both electrons and ions remains high for up to 1.5 min spacecraft separations for all features larger than about 100 km in width. For smaller features the coherence is lower even for time lags of

  20. Shark Skin Bristling as a Passive Mechanism for Separation Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheelus, Jennifer; Lang, Amy; Jones, Emily

    2011-11-01

    The skin of fast-swimming sharks is proposed to have mechanisms to reduce drag and delay flow separation. The skin of fast-swimming and agile sharks is covered with small teeth-like denticles on the order of 0.2 mm. The shortfin mako is one of the fastest and most agile ocean predators creating the need to minimize its pressure drag by controlling flow separation. Biological studies of the shortfin mako skin have shown the passive bristling angle of their denticles to exceed 50 degrees in areas on the flank corresponding to the locations likely to experience separation first. It is proposed that reversing flow, as occurs at the onset of separation in a turbulent boundary layer, would activate denticle bristling and hinder local separation from leading to global separation over the shark. This study focuses on the denticle reaction to various reversed flow conditions using a pulsating jet. Mako shark skin was subjected to numerous reversed flow velocities to determine the bristling onset velocity. Digital Particle Image Velocimetry (DPIV) and digital video were used to determine the flow conditions and denticle behavior. The effect of reversed flow velocity on denticle bristling and its relation to separation control will be discussed. Research funded by NSF (award 0932352).

  1. The different effects of maternal separation on spatial learning and reversal learning in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiong; Li, Man; Du, Wei; Shao, Feng; Wang, Weiwen

    2015-03-01

    Early postnatal maternal separation (MS) can play an important role in the development of psychopathologies during ontogeny. In the present study, we investigated the effects of repeated MS (4h per day from postnatal day (PND) 1 to 21) on locomotor activity and anxiety behavior in open field, spatial learning and reversal learning in Morris water maze of male and female juvenile (PND 21), adolescent (PND 35) and early adult (PND 56) Wistar rats. The results indicated that MS increased locomotor activity of rats across all ages and reduced anxiety behavior of adolescent rats in open field test. MS also increased swim distance in spatial learning and decreased escape latency in reversal learning in adolescent and early adult rats. Additionally, for socially reared rats, there was increased spontaneous locomotion with age, decreased reversal learning ability with age. The present study provides novel insights into the consequences of MS and demonstrates unique age-dependent changes at the behavioral levels. PMID:25479401

  2. Spatial location priors for Gaussian model based reverberant audio source separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duong, Ngoc QK; Vincent, Emmanuel; Gribonval, Rémi

    2013-12-01

    We consider the Gaussian framework for reverberant audio source separation, where the sources are modeled in the time-frequency domain by their short-term power spectra and their spatial covariance matrices. We propose two alternative probabilistic priors over the spatial covariance matrices which are consistent with the theory of statistical room acoustics and we derive expectation-maximization algorithms for maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimation. We argue that these algorithms provide a statistically principled solution to the permutation problem and to the risk of overfitting resulting from conventional maximum likelihood (ML) estimation. We show experimentally that in a semi-informed scenario where the source positions and certain room characteristics are known, the MAP algorithms outperform their ML counterparts. This opens the way to rigorous statistical treatment of this family of models in other scenarios in the future.

  3. Space Shuttle separate-surface control-system study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, L. W.; Montgomery, R. C.

    1984-01-01

    A control system concept is presented that produces proportional control of yaw moment for the space shuttle from early entry to Mach 2 with only software modifications of the vehicle. It uses separate deflections of the inboard and outboard elevon surfaces and is evaluated, by determining the maximum static yawing moment available by considering the deflection limits of the elevon surfaces. A proportional moment slightly in excess of that produced by the most effective reaction control system (RCS) jet for yaw control can be obtained. In addition to the static moment study, a control law is designed which is intended to produce desired flying qualities.

  4. Chemistry with spatial control using particles and streams†

    PubMed Central

    Kalinin, Yevgeniy V.; Murali, Adithya

    2012-01-01

    Spatial control of chemical reactions, with micro- and nanometer scale resolution, has important consequences for one pot synthesis, engineering complex reactions, developmental biology, cellular biochemistry and emergent behavior. We review synthetic methods to engineer this spatial control using chemical diffusion from spherical particles, shells and polyhedra. We discuss systems that enable both isotropic and anisotropic chemical release from isolated and arrayed particles to create inhomogeneous and spatially patterned chemical fields. In addition to such finite chemical sources, we also discuss spatial control enabled with laminar flow in 2D and 3D microfluidic networks. Throughout the paper, we highlight applications of spatially controlled chemistry in chemical kinetics, reaction-diffusion systems, chemotaxis and morphogenesis. PMID:23145348

  5. Biexcitons formed from spatially separated electrons and holes in quasi-zero-dimensional semiconductor nanosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Pokutnyi, S. I.

    2013-12-15

    A theory of biexcitons (formed from spatially separated electron and holes) in nanosystems that consist of zinc-selenide quantum dots synthesized in borosilicate glassy matrices is developed. The dependences of the total energy and the binding energy of the singlet ground biexciton state in such a system on the spacing between the quantum-dot surfaces and the quantum-dot radius are derived by the variational method. It is shown that biexciton formation is of the threshold character and possible in nanosystems, in which the spacing between the quantum-dot surfaces is larger than a certain critical spacing.

  6. Spatial Electron-hole Separation in a One Dimensional Hybrid Organic-Inorganic Lead Iodide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savory, Christopher N.; Palgrave, Robert G.; Bronstein, Hugo; Scanlon, David O.

    2016-02-01

    The increasing efficiency of the inorganic-organic hybrid halides has revolutionised photovoltaic research. Despite this rapid progress, the significant issues of poor stability and toxicity have yet to be suitably overcome. In this article, we use Density Functional Theory to examine (Pb2I6) · (H2DPNDI) · (H2O) · (NMP), an alternative lead-based hybrid inorganic-organic solar absorber based on a photoactive organic cation. Our results demonstrate that optical properties suitable for photovoltaic applications, in addition to spatial electron-hole separation, are possible but efficient charge transport may be a limiting factor.

  7. Spatial Electron-hole Separation in a One Dimensional Hybrid Organic-Inorganic Lead Iodide.

    PubMed

    Savory, Christopher N; Palgrave, Robert G; Bronstein, Hugo; Scanlon, David O

    2016-01-01

    The increasing efficiency of the inorganic-organic hybrid halides has revolutionised photovoltaic research. Despite this rapid progress, the significant issues of poor stability and toxicity have yet to be suitably overcome. In this article, we use Density Functional Theory to examine (Pb2I6) · (H2DPNDI) · (H2O) · (NMP), an alternative lead-based hybrid inorganic-organic solar absorber based on a photoactive organic cation. Our results demonstrate that optical properties suitable for photovoltaic applications, in addition to spatial electron-hole separation, are possible but efficient charge transport may be a limiting factor. PMID:26858147

  8. Spatial pattern separation of chemicals and frequency-independent components by terahertz spectroscopic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Yuuki; Kawase, Kodo; Ikari, Tomofumi; Ito, Hiromasa; Ishikawa, Youichi; Minamide, Hiroaki

    2003-10-01

    We separated the component spatial patterns of frequency-dependent absorption in chemicals and frequency-independent components such as plastic, paper, and measurement noise in terahertz (THz) spectroscopic images, using known spectral curves. Our measurement system, which uses a widely tunable coherent THz-wave parametric oscillator source, can image at a specific frequency in the range 1-2 THz. The component patterns of chemicals can easily be extracted by use of the frequency-independent components. This method could be successfully used for nondestructive inspection for the detection of illegal drugs and devices of bioterrorism concealed, e.g., inside mail and packages.

  9. Spatial Electron-hole Separation in a One Dimensional Hybrid Organic–Inorganic Lead Iodide

    PubMed Central

    Savory, Christopher N.; Palgrave, Robert G.; Bronstein, Hugo; Scanlon, David O.

    2016-01-01

    The increasing efficiency of the inorganic-organic hybrid halides has revolutionised photovoltaic research. Despite this rapid progress, the significant issues of poor stability and toxicity have yet to be suitably overcome. In this article, we use Density Functional Theory to examine (Pb2I6) · (H2DPNDI) · (H2O) · (NMP), an alternative lead-based hybrid inorganic-organic solar absorber based on a photoactive organic cation. Our results demonstrate that optical properties suitable for photovoltaic applications, in addition to spatial electron-hole separation, are possible but efficient charge transport may be a limiting factor. PMID:26858147

  10. Control of flow separation in airfoil/wing design applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gally, Thomas A.

    1994-01-01

    Existing aerodynamic design methods have generally concentrated on the optimization of airfoil or wing shapes to produce a minimum drag while satisfying some basic constraints such as lift, pitching moment, or thickness. Since the minimization of drag almost always precludes the existence of separated flow, the evaluation and validation of these design methods for their robustness and accuracy when separated flow is present has not been aggressively pursued. However, two new applications for these design tools may be expected to include separated flow and the issues of aerodynamic design with this feature must be addressed. The first application of the aerodynamic design tools is the design of airfoils or wings to provide an optimal performance over a wide range of flight conditions (multipoint design). While the definition of 'optimal performance' in the multipoint setting is currently being hashed out, it is recognized that given a wide enough range of flight conditions, it will not be possible to ensure a minimum drag constraint at all conditions, and in fact some amount of separated flow (presumably small) may have to be allowed at the more demanding flight conditions. Thus a multipoint design method must be tolerant of the existence of separated flow and may include some controls upon its extent. The second application is in the design of wings with extended high speed buffet boundaries of their flight envelopes. Buffet occurs on a wing when regions of flow separation have grown to the extent that their time varying pressures induce possible destructive effects upon the wing structure or adversely effect either the aircraft controllability or the passenger comfort. A conservative approach to the expansion of the buffet flight boundary is to simply expand the flight envelope of nonseparated flow under the assumption that buffet will also thus be alleviated. However, having the ability to design a wing with separated flow and thus to control the location, extent

  11. Controls on the spatial distribution of oceanic δ13CDIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, P. B.; Edwards, N. R.; Müller, S. A.; Oliver, K. I. C.; Death, R. M.; Ridgwell, A.

    2013-03-01

    We describe the design and evaluation of a large ensemble of coupled climate-carbon cycle simulations with the Earth system model of intermediate complexity GENIE. This ensemble has been designed for application to a range of carbon cycle questions, including the causes of late-Quaternary fluctuations in atmospheric CO2. Here we evaluate the ensemble by applying it to a transient experiment over the recent industrial era (1858 to 2008 AD). We employ singular vector decomposition and principal component emulation to investigate the spatial modes of ensemble variability of oceanic dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) δ13C, considering both the spun-up pre-industrial state and the transient change. These analyses allow us to separate the natural (pre-industrial) and anthropogenic controls on the δ13CDIC distribution. We apply the same dimensionally-reduced emulation techniques to consider the drivers of the spatial uncertainty in anthropogenic DIC. We show that the sources of uncertainty related to the uptake of anthropogenic δ13CDIC and DIC are quite distinct. Uncertainty in anthropogenic δ13C uptake is controlled by air-sea gas exchange, which explains 63% of modelled variance. This mode of variability is largely absent from the ensemble variability in CO2 uptake, which is rather driven by uncertainties in thermocline ventilation rates. Although the need to account for air-sea gas exchange is well known, these results suggest that, to leading order, uncertainties in the ocean uptake of anthropogenic 13C and CO2 are governed by very different processes. This illustrates the difficulties in reconstructing one from the other, and furthermore highlights the need for careful targeting of both δ13CDIC and DIC observations to better constrain the ocean sink of anthropogenic CO2.

  12. Closed-loop Separation Control Using Oscillatory Flow Excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allan, Brian G.; Juang, Jer-Nan; Raney, David L.; Seifert, Avi; Pack, latunia G.; Brown, Donald E.

    2000-01-01

    Design and implementation of a digital feedback controller for a flow control experiment was performed. The experiment was conducted in a cryogenic pressurized wind tunnel on a generic separated configuration at a chord Reynolds number of 16 million and a Mach number of 0.25. The model simulates the upper surface of a 20% thick airfoil at zero angle-of-attack. A moderate favorable pressure gradient, up to 55% of the chord, is followed by a severe adverse pressure gradient which is relaxed towards the trailing edge. The turbulent separation bubble, behind the adverse pressure gradient, is then reduced by introducing oscillatory flow excitation just upstream of the point of flow separation. The degree of reduction in the separation region can be controlled by the amplitude of the oscillatory excitation. A feedback controller was designed to track a given trajectory for the desired degree of flow reattachment and to improve the transient behavior of the flow system. Closed-loop experiments demonstrated that the feedback controller was able to track step input commands and improve the transient behavior of the open-loop response.

  13. Low-Pressure Turbine Separation Control: Comparison With Experimental Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Vijay K.

    2002-01-01

    The present work details a computational study, using the Glenn HT code, that analyzes the use of vortex generator jets (VGJs) to control separation on a low-pressure turbine (LPT) blade at low Reynolds numbers. The computational results are also compared with the experimental data for steady VGJs. It is found that the code determines the proper location of the separation point on the suction surface of the baseline blade (without any VGJ) for Reynolds numbers of 50,000 or less. Also, the code finds that the separated region on the suction surface of the blade vanishes with the use of VGJs. However, the separated region and the wake characteristics are not well predicted. The wake width is generally over-predicted while the wake depth is under-predicted.

  14. Reticulated Nanoporous Polymers by Controlled Polymerization-Induced Microphase Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Myungeun; Hillmyer, Marc A.

    2013-04-08

    Materials with percolating mesopores are attractive for applications such as catalysis, nanotemplating, and separations. Polymeric frameworks are particularly appealing because the chemical composition and the surface chemistry are readily tunable. We report on the preparation of robust nanoporous polymers with percolating pores in the 4- to 8-nanometer range from a microphase-separated bicontinuous precursor. We combined polymerization-induced phase separation with in situ block polymer formation from a mixture of multifunctional monomers and a chemically etchable polymer containing a terminal chain transfer agent. This marriage results in microphase separation of the mixture into continuous domains of the etchable polymer and the emergent cross-linked polymer. Precise control over pore size distribution and mechanical integrity renders these materials particularly suited for various advanced applications.

  15. Robot Control Based On Spatial-Operator Algebra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, Guillermo; Kreutz, Kenneth K.; Jain, Abhinandan

    1992-01-01

    Method for mathematical modeling and control of robotic manipulators based on spatial-operator algebra providing concise representation and simple, high-level theoretical frame-work for solution of kinematical and dynamical problems involving complicated temporal and spatial relationships. Recursive algorithms derived immediately from abstract spatial-operator expressions by inspection. Transition from abstract formulation through abstract solution to detailed implementation of specific algorithms to compute solution greatly simplified. Complicated dynamical problems like two cooperating robot arms solved more easily.

  16. Active Control of Flow Separation Over an Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ravindran, S. S.

    1999-01-01

    Designing an aircraft without conventional control surfaces is of interest to aerospace community. In this direction, smart actuator devices such as synthetic jets have been proposed to provide aircraft maneuverability instead of control surfaces. In this article, a numerical study is performed to investigate the effects of unsteady suction and blowing on airfoils. The unsteady suction and blowing is introduced at the leading edge of the airfoil in the form of tangential jet. Numerical solutions are obtained using Reynolds-Averaged viscous compressible Navier-Stokes equations. Unsteady suction and blowing is investigated as a means of separation control to obtain lift on airfoils. The effect of blowing coefficients on lift and drag is investigated. The numerical simulations are compared with experiments from the Tel-Aviv University (TAU). These results indicate that unsteady suction and blowing can be used as a means of separation control to generate lift on airfoils.

  17. Binding energy of excitons formed from spatially separated electrons and holes in insulating quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Pokutnyi, S. I.; Kulchin, Yu. N.; Dzyuba, V. P.

    2015-10-15

    It is found that the binding energy of the ground state of an exciton formed from an electron and a hole spatially separated from each other (the hole is moving within a quantum dot, and the electron is localized above the spherical (quantum dot)–(insulating matrix) interface) in a nanosystem containing insulating Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} quantum dots is substantially increased (by nearly two orders of magnitude) compared to the exciton binding energy in an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} single crystal. It is established that, in the band gap of an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticle, a band of exciton states (formed from spatially separated electrons and holes) appears. It is shown that there exists the possibility of experimentally detecting the ground and excited exciton states in the band gap of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles at room temperature from the absorption spectrum of the nanosystem.

  18. Part Ia: Spatial separation on McGurk effect applying three-dimensional sounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riederer, Klaus A. J.

    2003-10-01

    The dependence of sound direction on the McGurk effect [McGurk and McDonald, Nature (London) 264, 746-748 (1976)] is less known. Jones and Munhall [Canadian Acoust. 25, 13-19 (1997)] concluded with no spatial separation dependence, applying 30° horizontally spaced loudspeakers. Current dual study investigated the full 360° horizontal space applying head-related transfer functions (HRTFs) from a Cortex dummy head [Riederer, J. Audio Eng. Soc. (Abstracts) 46, 1036 (1998), preprint 4846]. Dry acoustic /ipi/ and /iti/ recorded from a professional speaker were convolved with HRTFs, measured at azimuths 0°, +/-40°, +/-90°, +/-130°, and 180°, headphones (Sennheiser HD580) equalized. DVcam-recorded visual /ipi/, /iti/ (and black screen) were randomly presented synchronously with the 3-D sounds using Presentation 0.20 [http://nbs.neuro-bs.com]. Totally 1024 incongruent audiovisual stimuli were perceived by eight 20-30-year-old normal hearing (<=20 dBHL) native subjects (2 female) as follows. Visual /ipi/ + auditory /iti/: /ipi/ 59.96%, /iti/ 15.63%, and /ipti/ 24.02% visual /iti/ + auditory /ipi/: 66.02%, 22.07%, and 11.52%, respectfully. No significant dependence of spatial separation was found for the McGurk effect, except for reaction times. The obtained fusions were atypically weak, probably because visual /iti/ was less pronounced than visual /ipi/. [Work supported by Graduate School of Electronics, Telecommunication and Automation.

  19. Separation Control in a Multistage Compressor Using Impulsive Surface Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wundrow, David W.; Braunscheidel, Edward P.; Culley, Dennis E.; Bright, Michelle M.

    2006-01-01

    Control of flow separation using impulsive surface injection is investigated within the multistage environment of a low speed axial-flow compressor. Measured wake profiles behind a set of embedded stator vanes treated with suction-surface injection indicate significant reduction in flow separation at a variety of injection-pulse repetition rates and durations. The corresponding total pressure losses across the vanes reveal a bank of repetition rates at each pulse duration where the separation control remains nearly complete. This persistence allows for demands on the injected-mass delivery system to be economized while still achieving effective flow control. The response of the stator-vane boundary layers to infrequently applied short injection pulses is described in terms of the periodic excitation of turbulent strips whose growth and propagation characteristics dictate the lower bound on the band of optimal pulse repetition rates. The eventual falloff in separation control at higher repetition rates is linked to a competition between the benefits of pulse-induced mixing and the aggravation caused by the periodic introduction of low-momentum fluid. Use of these observations for impulsive actuator design is discussed and their impact on modeling the time-average effect of impulsive surface injection for multistage steady-flow simulation is considered.

  20. Fluid Mechanics of Wing Adaptation for Separation Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandrasekhara, M. S.; Wilder, M. C.; Carr, L. W.; Davis, Sanford S. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The unsteady fluid mechanics associated with use of a dynamically deforming leading edge airfoil for achieving compressible flow separation control has been experimentally studied. Changing the leading edge curvature at rapid rates dramatically alters the flow vorticity dynamics which is responsible for the many effects observed in the flow.

  1. SNARC Struggles: Instant Control over Spatial-Numerical Associations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfister, Roland; Schroeder, Philipp A.; Kunde, Wilfried

    2013-01-01

    Numbers and space are tightly linked--a phenomenon that is referred to as the spatial-numerical association of response codes (SNARC) effect (Dehaene, Bossini, & Giraux, 1993). The present study investigates how quickly and flexibly the behavioral impact of such spatial-numerical associations can be controlled. Participants performed a parity…

  2. Spatially controlled, in situ synthesis of polymers

    DOEpatents

    Caneba, Gerard T.; Tirumala, Vijaya Raghavan; Mancini, Derrick C.; Wang, Hsien-Hau

    2005-03-22

    An in situ polymer microstructure formation method. The monomer mixture is polymerized in a solvent/precipitant through exposure to ionizing radiation in the absence any chemical mediators. If an exposure mask is employed to block out certain regions of the radiation cross section, then a patterned microstructure is formed. The polymerization mechanism is based on the so-called free-radical retrograde-precipitation polymerization process, in which polymerization occurs while the system is phase separating above the lower critical solution temperature. This method was extended to produce a crosslinked line grid-pattern of poly (N-isopropylacrylamide), which has been known to have thermoreversible properties.

  3. Concurrent emotional pictures modulate temporal order judgments of spatially separated audio-tactile stimuli.

    PubMed

    Jia, Lina; Shi, Zhuanghua; Zang, Xuelian; Müller, Hermann J

    2013-11-01

    Although attention can be captured toward high-arousal stimuli, little is known about how perceiving emotion in one modality influences the temporal processing of non-emotional stimuli in other modalities. We addressed this issue by presenting observers spatially uninformative emotional pictures while they performed an audio-tactile temporal-order judgment (TOJ) task. In Experiment 1, audio-tactile stimuli were presented at the same location straight ahead of the participants, who had to judge "which modality came first?". In Experiments 2 and 3, the audio-tactile stimuli were delivered one to the left and the other to the right side, and participants had to judge "which side came first?". We found both negative and positive high-arousal pictures to significantly bias TOJs towards the tactile and away from the auditory event when the audio-tactile stimuli were spatially separated; by contrast, there was no such bias when the audio-tactile stimuli originated from the same location. To further examine whether this bias is attributable to the emotional meanings conveyed by the pictures or to their high arousal effect, we compared and contrasted the influences of near-body threat vs. remote threat (emotional) pictures on audio-tactile TOJs in Experiment 3. The bias manifested only in the near-body threat condition. Taken together, the findings indicate that visual stimuli conveying meanings of near-body interaction activate a sensorimotor functional link prioritizing the processing of tactile over auditory signals when these signals are spatially separated. In contrast, audio-tactile signals from the same location engender strong crossmodal integration, thus counteracting modality-based attentional shifts induced by the emotional pictures. PMID:24041776

  4. Interaction dynamics of temporal and spatial separated cavitation bubbles in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinne, N.; Ripken, T.; Lubatschowski, H.

    2010-02-01

    The LASIK procedure is a well established laser based treatment in ophthalmology. Nowadays it includes a cutting of the corneal tissue bases on ultra short pulses which are focused below the tissue surface to create an optical breakdown and hence a dissection of the tissue. The energy of the laser pulse is absorbed by non-linear processes that result in an expansion of a cavitation bubble and rupturing of the tissue. Due to a reduction of the duration of treatment the current development of ultra short laser systems points to higher repetition rates. This in turn results in a probable interaction between different cavitation bubbles of adjacent optical breakdowns. While the interaction of one single laser pulse with biological tissue is analyzed reasonably well experimentally and theoretically, the interaction of several spatial and temporal following pulses is scarcely determined yet. We present a high-speed photography analysis of cavitation bubble interaction for two spatial separated laser-induced optical breakdowns varying the laser pulse energy as well as the spatial distance. Depending on a change of these parameters different kinds of interactions such as a flattening and deformation of bubble shape, asymmetric water streams and jet formation were observed. The results of this research can be used to comprehend and optimize the cutting effect of ultra short pulse laser systems with high repetition rates (> 1 MHz).

  5. Flow Separation Control Over a Ramp Using Sweeping Jet Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koklu, Mehti; Owens, Lewis R.

    2014-01-01

    Flow separation control on an adverse-pressure-gradient ramp model was investigated using various flow-control methods in the NASA Langley 15-Inch Wind Tunnel. The primary flow-control method studied used a sweeping jet actuator system to compare with more classic flow-control techniques such as micro-vortex generators, steady blowing, and steady- and unsteady-vortex generating jets. Surface pressure measurements and a new oilflow visualization technique were used to characterize the effects of these flow-control actuators. The sweeping jet actuators were run in three different modes to produce steady-straight, steady-angled, and unsteady-oscillating jets. It was observed that all of these flow-control methods are effective in controlling the separated flows on the ramp model. The steady-straight jet energizes the boundary layer by momentum addition and was found to be the least effective method for a fixed momentum coefficient. The steady-angled jets achieved better performance than the steady-straight jets because they generate streamwise vortices that energize the boundary layer by mixing high-momentum fluid with near wall low-momentum fluid. The unsteady-oscillating jets achieved the best performance by increasing the pressure recovery and reducing the downstream flow separation. Surface flow visualizations indicated that two out-of-phase counter-rotating vortices are generated per sweeping jet actuator, while one vortex is generated per vortex-generating jets. The extra vortex resulted in increased coverage, more pressure recovery, and reduced flow separation.

  6. Demonstration of Separation Control Using Glow-Discharge Plasma Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.; Ashpis, David E.

    2003-01-01

    Active flow control of boundary-layer separation using glow-discharge plasma actuators is studied experimentally. Separation is induced on a flat plate installed in a closed-circuit wind tunnel by a shaped insert on the opposite wall. The flow conditions represent flow over the suction surface of a modem low-pressure-turbine airfoil. The Reynolds number, based on wetted plate length and nominal exit velocity, is varied from 50,000 to 300,000, covering cruise to takeoff conditions. Low (0.2%) and high (2.5%) free-stream turbulence intensities are set using passive grids. A spanwise-oriented phased-plasma-array actuator, fabricated on a printed circuit board, is surface-flush-mounted upstream of the separation point and can provide forcing in a wide frequency range. Static surface pressure measurements and hot-wire anemometry of the base and controlled flows are performed and indicate that the glow-discharge plasma actuator is an effective device for separation control.

  7. Computation of a controlled store separation from a cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwood, Christopher A.

    1993-01-01

    Coupling of the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations, rigid-body dynamics, and a pitch attitude control law is demonstrated in two- and three-dimensions. The application problem was the separation of a canard-controlled store from an open-flow rectangular cavity bay at a freestream Mach number of 1.2. The transient flowfield was computed using a diagonal scheme in an overset mesh framework, with the resultant aerodynamic loads used as the forcing functions in the nonlinear dynamics equations. The proportional and rate gyro sensitivities were computed a priori using pole placement techniques for the linearized dynamical equations. These fixed gain values were used in the controller for the nonlinear simulation. Reasonable comparison between the full and linearized equations for a perturbed two-dimensional missile was found. Also in two-dimensions, a controlled store was found to possess improved separation characteristics over a canard-fixed store. In three-dimensions, trajectory comparisons with wind-tunnel data for the canard-fixed case will be made. In addition, it will be determined if a canard-controlled store is an effective means of improving cavity store separation characteristics.

  8. Mechanisms of spatial attention control in frontal and parietal cortex.

    PubMed

    Szczepanski, Sara M; Konen, Christina S; Kastner, Sabine

    2010-01-01

    Theories of spatial attentional control have been largely based upon studies of patients suffering from visuospatial neglect, resulting from circumscribed lesions of frontal and posterior parietal cortex. In the intact brain, the control of spatial attention has been related to a distributed frontoparietal attention network. Little is known about the nature of the control mechanisms exerted by this network. Here, we used a novel region-of-interest approach to relate activations of the attention network to recently described topographic areas in frontal cortex [frontal eye field (FEF), PreCC/IFS (precentral cortex/inferior frontal sulcus)] and parietal cortex [intraparietal sulcus areas (IPS1-IPS5) and an area in the superior parietal lobule (SPL1)] to examine their spatial attention signals. We found that attention signals in most topographic areas were spatially specific, with stronger responses when attention was directed to the contralateral than to the ipsilateral visual field. Importantly, two hemispheric asymmetries were found. First, a region in only right, but not left SPL1 carried spatial attention signals. Second, left FEF and left posterior parietal cortex (IPS1/2) generated stronger contralateral biasing signals than their counterparts in the right hemisphere. These findings are the first to characterize spatial attention signals in topographic frontal and parietal cortex and provide a neural basis in support of an interhemispheric competition account of spatial attentional control. PMID:20053897

  9. Boiling on spatially controlled heterogeneous surfaces: Wettability patterns on microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, HangJin; Yu, Dong In; Noh, Hyunwoo; Park, Hyun Sun; Kim, Moo Hwan

    2015-05-01

    We investigated nucleate boiling heat transfer with precisely controlled wetting patterns and micro-posts, to gain insights into the impact of surface heterogeneity. To create heterogeneous wetting patterns, self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) were spatially patterned. Even at a contact angle <90°, bubble nucleation and bubble frequency were accelerated on SAM patterns, since this contact angle is larger than that found on plain surfaces. Micro-posts were also fabricated on the surface, which interrupted the expansion of generated bubbles. This surface structuring induced smaller bubbles and higher bubble frequency than the plain surface. The resistance provided by surface structures to bubble expansion broke the interface between the vapor mushroom and the heating surface, and water could therefore be continuously supplied through these spaces at high heat flux. To induce synergistic effects with wetting patterns and surface structures on boiling, we fabricated SAM patterns onto the heads of micro-posts. On this combined surface, bubble nucleation was induced from the head of the micro-posts, and bubble growth was influenced by both the SAM pattern and the micro-post structures. In particular, separation of the vapor path on the SAM patterns and the liquid path between micro-post structures resulted in high heat transfer performance without critical heat flux deterioration.

  10. Dynamics of Active Separation Control at High Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pack, LaTunia G.; Seifert, Avi

    2000-01-01

    A series of active flow control experiments were recently conducted at high Reynolds numbers on a generic separated configuration. The model simulates the upper surface of a 20% thick Glauert-Goldschmied type airfoil at zero angle of attack. The flow is fully turbulent since the tunnel sidewall boundary layer flows over the model. The main motivation for the experiments is to generate a comprehensive data base for validation of unsteady numerical simulation as a first step in the development of a CFD design tool, without which it would not be possible to effectively utilize the great potential of unsteady flow control. This paper focuses on the dynamics of several key features of the baseline as well as the controlled flow. It was found that the thickness of the upstream boundary layer has a negligible effect on the flow dynamics. It is speculated that separation is caused mainly by the highly convex surface while viscous effects are less important. The two-dimensional separated flow contains unsteady waves centered on a reduced frequency of 0.8, while in the three dimensional separated flow, frequencies around a reduced frequency of 0.3 and 1 are active. Several scenarios of resonant wave interaction take place at the separated shear-layer and in the pressure recovery region. The unstable reduced frequency bands for periodic excitation are centered on 1.5 and 5, but these reduced frequencies are based on the length of the baseline bubble that shortens due to the excitation. The conventional swept wing-scaling works well for the coherent wave features. Reproduction of these dynamic effects by a numerical simulation would provide benchmark validation.

  11. Active Flow Effectors for Noise and Separation Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L.

    2011-01-01

    New flow effector technology for separation control and enhanced mixing is based upon shape memory alloy hybrid composite (SMAHC) technology. The technology allows for variable shape control of aircraft structures through actively deformable surfaces. The flow effectors are made by embedding shape memory alloy actuator material in a composite structure. When thermally actuated, the flow effector def1ects into or out of the flow in a prescribed manner to enhance mixing or induce separation for a variety of applications, including aeroacoustic noise reduction, drag reduction, and f1ight control. The active flow effectors were developed for noise reduction as an alternative to fixed-configuration effectors, such as static chevrons, that cannot be optimized for airframe installation effects or variable operating conditions and cannot be retracted for off-design or fail-safe conditions. Benefits include: Increased vehicle control, overall efficiency, and reduced noise throughout all f1ight regimes, Reduced flow noise, Reduced drag, Simplicity of design and fabrication, Simplicity of control through direct current stimulation, autonomous re sponse to environmental heating, fast re sponse, and a high degree of geometric stability. The concept involves embedding prestrained SMA actuators on one side of the chevron neutral axis in order to generate a thermal moment and def1ect the structure out of plane when heated. The force developed in the host structure during def1ection and the aerodynamic load is used for returning the structure to the retracted position. The chevron design is highly scalable and versatile, and easily affords active and/or autonomous (environmental) control. The technology offers wide-ranging market applications, including aerospace, automotive, and any application that requires flow separation or noise control.

  12. Optimal Control Modification for Time-Scale Separated Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.

    2012-01-01

    Recently a new optimal control modification has been introduced that can achieve robust adaptation with a large adaptive gain without incurring high-frequency oscillations as with the standard model-reference adaptive control. This modification is based on an optimal control formulation to minimize the L2 norm of the tracking error. The optimal control modification adaptive law results in a stable adaptation in the presence of a large adaptive gain. This study examines the optimal control modification adaptive law in the context of a system with a time scale separation resulting from a fast plant with a slow actuator. A singular perturbation analysis is performed to derive a modification to the adaptive law by transforming the original system into a reduced-order system in slow time. A model matching conditions in the transformed time coordinate results in an increase in the actuator command that effectively compensate for the slow actuator dynamics. Simulations demonstrate effectiveness of the method.

  13. Steady-state entanglement of spatially separated qubits via quantum bath engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aron, Camille; Kulkarni, Manas; Tureci, Hakan

    2015-03-01

    We propose a scheme for driving a dimer of spatially separated qubits into a maximally entangled non-equilibrium steady state. A photon-mediated retarded interaction between the qubits is realized by coupling them to two tunnel-coupled leaky cavities where each cavity is driven by a coherent microwave tone. The proposed cooling mechanism relies on striking the right balance between the unitary and driven-dissipative dynamics of the qubit subsystem. We map the dimer to an effective transverse-field XY model coupled to a non-equilibrium bath that can be suitably engineered through the choice of drive frequencies and amplitudes. We show that both singlet and triplet states can be obtained with remarkable fidelities. The proposed protocol can be implemented with a superconducting circuit architecture that was recently experimentally realized and paves the way to achieving large-scale entangled systems that are arbitrarily long lived.

  14. Steady-state entanglement of spatially separated qubits via quantum bath engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aron, Camille; Kulkarni, Manas; Türeci, Hakan E.

    2014-12-01

    We propose a scheme for driving a dimer of spatially separated qubits into a maximally entangled nonequilibrium steady state. A photon-mediated retarded interaction between the qubits is realized by coupling them to two tunnel-coupled leaky cavities where each cavity is driven by a coherent microwave tone. The proposed cooling mechanism relies on striking the right balance between the unitary and driven-dissipative dynamics of the qubit subsystem. We map the dimer to an effective transverse-field isotropic X Y model coupled to a nonequilibrium bath that can be suitably engineered through the choice of drive frequencies and amplitudes. We show that both singlet and triplet states can be obtained with remarkable fidelities. The proposed protocol can be implemented with a superconducting circuit architecture that was recently experimentally realized and paves the way to achieving large-scale entangled systems that are arbitrarily long lived.

  15. Experimental and Mathematical Models for Small Aqueous Closed Ecosystems with Spatially Separated Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisman, T. I.; Pechurkin, N. S.; Babkin, A. V.; Somova, L. A.; Sarangova, A. B.

    1999-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical models of closed ``autotroph-heteretroph'' (chlorella-yeast, chlorella- protozoa) ecosystems with spatially separated components have been created and studied. The chart of flows and interaction of components of gas-closed ``chlorella-yeast'' system have formed the basis describe mathematically the functioning of the given system, experimental results have been found to agree with computer solution of the problem in terms of quality. Investigation of the experimental model of the ``producer-consumer'' trophic chain demonstrated the role of protozoa in nitrogen turnover. ``Production-decomposition'' and ``production-grazing-decomposition'' cycle models has been theoretically analyzed and compared. The predator has been shown to be a more intensive mineralizer than the reducer component.

  16. The use of gas separation membranes for pollution control

    SciTech Connect

    Logsdon, B.W.; Stull, D.; Pellegrino, J.

    1993-04-01

    Rocky Flats is considering the use of a fluidized bed oxidation unit (FBU) for the destruction of mixed waste. Public concerns about the health effects of such destruction have been intense. In order to allay such concerns and minimize the possible health impacts of the proposed mixed waste destruction, RFP has been investigating novel methods of air pollution control. Among the most promising of these techniques is the use of gas separation membranes, which is described in this report.

  17. Extended high-frequency bandwidth improves reception of speech in spatially separated masking speech

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Suzanne Carr; Freed, Daniel J.; Nilsson, Michael; Moore, Brian C.J.; Puria, Sunil

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The hypothesis that extending the audible frequency bandwidth beyond the range currently implemented in most hearing aids can improve speech understanding was tested for normal-hearing and hearing-impaired participants using target sentences and spatially separated masking speech. Design The Hearing in Noise Test (HINT) speech corpus was re-recorded and four masking talkers were recorded at a sample rate of 44.1 kHz. All talkers were male native speakers of American English. Reception threshold for Sentences (RTS) were measured in two spatial configurations. In the asymmetric configuration, the target was presented from −45° azimuth and two colocated masking talkers were presented from +45° azimuth. In the diffuse configuration, the target was presented from 0° azimuth and four masking talkers were each presented from a different azimuth: +45°, +135°, −135°, and −45°. The new speech sentences, masking materials and configurations, collectively termed the ‘Hearing in Speech Test (HIST)’, were presented using lowpass filter cutoff frequencies of 4, 6, 8, and 10 kHz. For the normal-hearing participants, stimuli were presented in the sound field using loudspeakers. For the hearing-impaired participants, the spatial configurations were simulated using earphones, and a multi-band wide dynamic range compressor with a modified CAM2 fitting algorithm was used to compensate for each participant’s hearing loss. Results For the normal-hearing participants (N=24, mean age 40 years), the RTS improved significantly by 3.0 dB when the bandwidth was increased from 4 to 10 kHz, and a significant improvement of 1.3 dB was obtained from extending the bandwidth from 6 to 10 kHz, in both spatial configurations. Hearing-impaired participants (N=25, mean age 71 years) also showed a significant improvement in RTS with extended bandwidth, but the effect was smaller than for the normal-hearing participants. The mean decrease in RTS when the bandwidth was

  18. Manipulating forces by interactive separation and circulation control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagib, Hassan; Reinhard, Paul; Rozier, Paul

    2011-11-01

    Steady, unsteady and intermittent suction and blowing from localized or distributed slots are used to reveal the physical mechanisms and their interaction in order to manipulate (enhance or reduce) the forces on various aerodynamic bodies and surfaces. Performance under ideal inviscid conditions is used as a standard of performance to compare the outcomes to. While high-lift airfoils were part of the focus, flow over humps which lead to large separation zones was also investigated. Surface pressure measurements, wake surveys and surface visualization were utilized over a wide range of operating conditions in the NDF at IIT. Velocities ranged from 20 to 110 m/s (0 . 06 < M < 0 . 31), corresponding to chord Reynolds numbers from 500 , 000 to 3 , 700 , 000 , and included a full range of airfoil angles of attack with flap deflections from 10 to 55 degrees and various leading edge configurations. Steady suction control was more effective at eliminating the large separation bubble created by the model, requiring a pressure ratio between the applied force and inviscid force of approximately unity, whereas blowing required a two to one ratio. Pulsed suction was superior and enhanced by the operating frequency or duty cycle. Separation control (SC) was modified by the presence of circulation control (CC). Steady-blowing SC near the leading edge reduced the effect of blown-flap CC, whereas steady-suction SC increased the performance gain.

  19. Design and evaluation of microfluidic devices for two-dimensional spatial separations.

    PubMed

    Davydova, Ekaterina; Wouters, Sam; Deridder, Sander; Desmet, Gert; Eeltink, Sebastiaan; Schoenmakers, Peter J

    2016-02-19

    Various designs of chips for comprehensive two-dimensional spatial liquid chromatography were investigated. The performance of these chips was initially evaluated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). A bifurcating distributor with an angle of 140° between branches was implemented in order to achieve a homogeneous velocity field. The cross-sectional area of the channels of the flow distributor was fixed at 0.5 × 0.5 mm, which allows a robust micromilling technique to be used for chip manufacturing. Experiments were performed with chips featuring purposely introduced imperfections in the structure of the bifurcating flow distributor to study its capacity of overcoming potential local clogging. Split peaks were observed when 75% of one of the flow channels was obstructed, in line with the CFD predictions. The main bottlenecks for the performance of the spatial two-dimensional chips were identified, viz. sample injected in the first dimension diverging into the flow distributor and channel discretization (i.e., remixing of first-dimension separation peaks because of finite number of second-dimension channels). Solutions to the former problem were studied by applying a flow resistance in the vertical segments that formed the outlets of the flow distributor and by simulating the presence of constrictions. It was found that a flow resistance of 1.0×10(11) m(-2) reduced the amount of sample diverging into the flow distributor by a factor of 10. The presence of a constriction of 90% of the segment area and 50% of the segment length decreased the diverging flow by a factor of 5. The influence of the linear velocity was significant. Solutions to the channel discretization problem were sought by investigating different designs of spatial two-dimensional chips. PMID:26810803

  20. Using Pitch, Amplitude Modulation, and Spatial Cues for Separation of Harmonic Instruments from Stereo Music Recordings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodruff, John; Pardo, Bryan

    2006-12-01

    Recent work in blind source separation applied to anechoic mixtures of speech allows for improved reconstruction of sources that rarely overlap in a time-frequency representation. While the assumption that speech mixtures do not overlap significantly in time-frequency is reasonable, music mixtures rarely meet this constraint, requiring new approaches. We introduce a method that uses spatial cues from anechoic, stereo music recordings and assumptions regarding the structure of musical source signals to effectively separate mixtures of tonal music. We discuss existing techniques to create partial source signal estimates from regions of the mixture where source signals do not overlap significantly. We use these partial signals within a new demixing framework, in which we estimate harmonic masks for each source, allowing the determination of the number of active sources in important time-frequency frames of the mixture. We then propose a method for distributing energy from time-frequency frames of the mixture to multiple source signals. This allows dealing with mixtures that contain time-frequency frames in which multiple harmonic sources are active without requiring knowledge of source characteristics.

  1. Control of Systems With Slow Actuators Using Time Scale Separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stepanyan, Vehram; Nguyen, Nhan

    2009-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of controlling a nonlinear plant with a slow actuator using singular perturbation method. For the known plant-actuator cascaded system the proposed scheme achieves tracking of a given reference model with considerably less control demand than would otherwise result when using conventional design techniques. This is the consequence of excluding the small parameter from the actuator dynamics via time scale separation. The resulting tracking error is within the order of this small parameter. For the unknown system the adaptive counterpart is developed based on the prediction model, which is driven towards the reference model by the control design. It is proven that the prediction model tracks the reference model with an error proportional to the small parameter, while the prediction error converges to zero. The resulting closed-loop system with all prediction models and adaptive laws remains stable. The benefits of the approach are demonstrated in simulation studies and compared to conventional control approaches.

  2. Optimal Control of Airfoil Flow Separation using Fluidic Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahrabi, Arireza F.

    This thesis deals with the control of flow separation around a symmetric airfoils with the aid of multiple synthetic jet actuators (SJAs). CFD simulation methods have been implemented to uncover the flow separation regimes and associated properties such as frequencies and momentum ratio. In the first part of the study, the SJA was studied thoroughly. Large Eddy Simulations (LES) were performed for one individual cavity; the time history of SJA of the outlet velocity profile and the net momentum imparted to the flow were analyzed. The studied SJA is asymmetrical and operates with the aid of a piezoelectric (PZT) ceramic circular plate actuator. A three-dimensional mesh for the computational domain of the SJA and the surrounding volume was developed and was used to evaluate the details of the airflow conditions inside the SJA as well as at the outlet. The vibration of the PZT ceramic actuator was used as a boundary condition in the computational model to drive the SJA. Particular attention was given to developing a predictive model of the SJA outlet velocity. Results showed that the SJA velocity output is correlated to the PZT ceramic plate vibration, especially for the first frequency mode. SJAs are a particular class of zero net mass flux (ZNMF) fluidic devices with net imparted momentum to the flow. The net momentum imparted to the flow in the separated region is such that positive enhancement during AFC operations is achieved. Flows around the NACA 0015 airfoil were simulated for a range of operating conditions. Attention was given to the active open and closed loop control solutions for an airfoil with SJA at different angles of attack and flap angles. A large number of simulations using RANS & LES models were performed to study the effects of the momentum ratio (Cμ) in the range of 0 to 11% and of the non-dimensional frequency, F+, in the range of 0 to 2 for the control of flow separation at a practical angle of attack and flap angle. The optimum value of C

  3. Unconscious inhibition separates two forms of cognitive control

    PubMed Central

    Boy, Frederic; Husain, Masud; Sumner, Petroc

    2010-01-01

    In the human brain, cognitive-control processes are generally considered distinct from the unconscious mechanisms elicited by subliminal priming. Here, we show that cognitive control engaged in situations of response conflict interacts with the negative (inhibitory) phase of subliminal priming. Thus, cognitive control may surprisingly share common processes with nonconscious brain mechanisms. In contrast, our findings reveal that subliminal inhibition does not, however, interact with control adaptation—the supposed modulation of current control settings by previous experience of conflict. Therefore, although influential models have grouped immediate cognitive control and control adaptation together as products of the same conflict detection and control network, their relationship to subliminal inhibition separates them. Overall, these results suggest that the important distinction lies not between cognitive or top-down processes on the one hand and nonconscious priming mechanisms on the other hand but between responsive (poststimulus) mechanisms that deal with sensorimotor activation after it has occurred and preparatory (prestimulus) mechanisms that are modulated before stimulus arrival. PMID:20534462

  4. Plasma actuators for separation control on stationary and oscillating airfoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Post, Martiqua L.

    Given the importance of separation control associated with retreating blade stall on helicopters, the primary objective of this work was to develop a plasma actuator flow control device for its use in controlling leading-edge separation on stationary and oscillating airfoils. The plasma actuator consists of two copper electrodes separated by a dielectric insulator. When the voltage supplied to the electrodes is sufficiently high, the surrounding air ionizes forms plasma in the regions of high electrical field potential. The ionized air, in the presence of an electric field gradient, results in a body force on the flow. The effect of plasma actuator was experimentally investigated and characterized through a systematic set of experiments. It was then applied to NACA 66 3018 and NACA 0015 airfoils for the purpose of leading-edge separation control. The effectiveness of the actuator was documented through surface pressure measurements on the airfoil, mean wake velocity profiles, and flow visualization records. For the stationary airfoil, the actuator prevented flow separation for angles of attack up to 22°, which was 8° past the static stall angle. This resulted in as much as a 300% improvement in the lift-to-drag ratio. For the oscillating airfoil, the measurements were phase-conditioned to the oscillation motion. Three cases with the plasma actuator were investigated: steady actuation, unsteady plasma actuation, and so-called "smart" actuation in which the actuator is activated during portions of the oscillatory cycle. All of the cases exhibited a higher cycle-integrated lift and an improvement in the lift cycle hysteresis. The steady plasma actuation increased the lift over most of the cycle, except at the peak angle of attack where it was found to suppress the dynamic stall vortex. Because of this, the sharp drop in the lift coefficient past the maximum angle of attack was eliminated. The unsteady plasma actuation produced significant improvements in the lift

  5. Control of flow separation and mixing by aerodynamic excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, Edward J.; Abbott, John M.

    1990-01-01

    The recent research progress in the control of shear flows using unsteady aerodynamic excitation conducted at the NASA Lewis Research Center is reviewed. The program is of fundamental nature concentrating on the physics of the unsteady aerodynamic processes. This field of research is a fairly new development with great promise in the areas of enhanced mixing and flow separation control. Enhanced mixing research reported in this paper include influence of core turbulence, forced pairing of coherent structures, and saturation of mixing enhancement. Separation flow control studies included are for a two-dimensional diffuser, conical diffusers, and single airfoils. Ultimate applications of this research include aircraft engine inlet flow control at high angle of attack, wide angle diffusers, highly loaded airfoils as in turbomachinery, and ejector/suppressor nozzles for the supersonic transport. An argument involving the Coanda Effect is made here that all of the above mentioned application areas really only involve forms of shear layer mixing enhancement. The program also includes the development of practical excitation devices which might be used in aircraft applications.

  6. Control of flow separation and mixing by aerodynamic excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, Edward J.; Abbott, John M.

    1990-01-01

    The recent research in the control of shear flows using unsteady aerodynamic excitation conducted at the NASA Lewis Research Center is reviewed. The program is of a fundamental nature, concentrating on the physics of the unsteady aerodynamic processes. This field of research is a fairly new development with great promise in the areas of enhanced mixing and flow separation control. Enhanced mixing research includes influence of core turbulence, forced pairing of coherent structures, and saturation of mixing enhancement. Separation flow control studies included are for a two-dimensional diffuser, conical diffusers, and single airfoils. Ultimate applications include aircraft engine inlet flow control at high angle of attack, wide angle diffusers, highly loaded airfoils as in turbomachinery, and ejector/suppressor nozzles for the supersonic transport. An argument involving the Coanda Effect is made that all of the above mentioned application areas really only involve forms of shear layer mixing enhancement. The program also includes the development of practical excitation devices which might be used in aircraft applications.

  7. Separation Control Over A Wall-Mounted Hump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenblatt, D.; Paschal, K. B.; Schaeffler, N. W.; Washburn, A. E.; Harris, J.; Yao, C. S.

    2007-01-01

    Separation control by means of steady suction or zero efflux oscillatory jets is known to be effective in a wide variety of flows under different flow conditions. Control is effective when applied in a nominally two-dimensional manner, for example, at the leading-edge of a wing or at the shoulder of a deflected flap. Despite intuitive understanding of the flow, at present there is no accepted theoretical model that can adequately explain or describe the observed effects of the leading parameters such as reduced suction-rate, or frequency and momentum input. This difficulty stems partly from the turbulent nature of the flows combined with superimposed coherent structures, which are usually driven by at least one instability mechanism. The ever increasing technological importance of these flows has spurned an urgent need to develop turbulence models with a predictive capability. Present attempts to develop such models are hampered in one way or another by incomplete data sets, uncertain or undocumented inflow and boundary conditions, or inadequate flow-field measurements. This paper attempts to address these issues by conducting an experimental investigation of a lowspeed separated flow over a wall-mounted hump model. The model geometry was designed by Seifert & Pack, who measured static and dynamic pressures on the model for a wide range of Reynolds and Mach numbers and control conditions. This paper describes the present experimental setup, as well as the types and range of data acquired. Sample data is presented and future work is discussed.

  8. Spatial Mode Control of High-Order Harmonics

    SciTech Connect

    Mercer, I.; Mevel, E.; Zerne, R.; LHuillier, A.; Antoine, P.; Wahlstroem, C.

    1996-08-01

    We demonstrate that the spatial mode of high-order harmonics can be continuously controlled. The control is achieved by spatially modulating the degree of elliptical polarization of the fundamental field using birefringent optics. A highly sensitive relationship between the efficiency of harmonic generation and the degree of laser elliptical polarization leads to atoms emitting harmonics only in regions of linear polarization. The harmonics are emitted as annular beams whose angles of divergence can be continuously varied. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  9. A spatial operator algebra for manipulator modeling and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, G.; Jain, A.; Kreutz-Delgado, K.

    1991-01-01

    A recently developed spatial operator algebra for manipulator modeling, control, and trajectory design is discussed. The elements of this algebra are linear operators whose domain and range spaces consist of forces, moments, velocities, and accelerations. The effect of these operators is equivalent to a spatial recursion along the span of a manipulator. Inversion of operators can be efficiently obtained via techniques of recursive filtering and smoothing. The operator algebra provides a high-level framework for describing the dynamic and kinematic behavior of a manipulator and for control and trajectory design algorithms. The interpretation of expressions within the algebraic framework leads to enhanced conceptual and physical understanding of manipulator dynamics and kinematics.

  10. Control of separation and quantitative analysis by GC-FTIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semmoud, A.; Huvenne, Jean P.; Legrand, P.

    1992-03-01

    Software for 3-D representations of the 'Absorbance-Wavenumber-Retention time' is used to control the quality of the GC separation. Spectral information given by the FTIR detection allows the user to be sure that a chromatographic peak is 'pure.' The analysis of peppermint essential oil is presented as an example. This assurance is absolutely required for quantitative applications. In these conditions, we have worked out a quantitative analysis of caffeine. Correlation coefficients between integrated absorbance measurements and concentration of caffeine are discussed at two steps of the data treatment.

  11. Passive Flow Separation Control Mechanism Inspired by Shark Skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oakley, India; Lang, Amy

    2015-11-01

    The following experimental work seeks to examine shark scales as passive flow-actuated separation control mechanisms. It is hypothesized that the actuation of these scales can in fact reduce pressure drag by inhibiting flow reversal and thereby prevent flow separation. In order to examine this mechanism at a fundamental level, three-dimensional sharkskin scales were simplified and modeled as two-dimensional flaps. To further simplify the experiment, the flaps were observed within a laminar boundary layer. The laminar boundary layer was grown over a long flat plate that was placed inside a water tunnel. A rotating cylinder was also used to induce an unsteady, increasing adverse pressure gradient, which generated a reversing flow. In order to visualize the potential actuation of the two-dimensional flaps DPIV (digital particle image velocimetry) was utilized. Three main objectives for this work included, the actuation of the two-dimensional flaps, the resistance to a reversed flow as a result of flap actuation and the prevention of flow separation. However once the experiment was conducted the flaps did not perform as previously hypothesized. The adverse pressure gradient induced by the rotating cylinder did not produce a reversing flow powerful enough to actuate the flaps. NSF REU Site Award 1358991.

  12. Spatially separated charge densities of electrons and holes in organic-inorganic halide perovskites

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Dan; Liang, Chunjun E-mail: zhqhe@bjtu.edu.cn; Zhang, Huimin; You, Fangtian; He, Zhiqun E-mail: zhqhe@bjtu.edu.cn; Zhang, Chunxiu

    2015-02-21

    Solution-processable methylammonium lead trihalide perovskites exhibit remarkable high-absorption and low-loss properties for solar energy conversion. Calculation from density functional theory indicates the presence of non-equivalent halogen atoms in the unit cell because of the specific orientation of the organic cation. Considering the 〈100〉 orientation as an example, I{sub 1}, one of the halogen atoms, differs from the other iodine atoms (I{sub 2} and I{sub 3}) in terms of its interaction with the organic cation. The valance-band-maximum (VBM) and conduction-band-minimum (CBM) states are derived mainly from 5p orbital of I{sub 1} atom and 6p orbital of Pb atom, respectively. The spatially separated charge densities of the electrons and holes justify the low recombination rate of the pure iodide perovskite. Chlorine substitution further strengthens the unique position of the I{sub 1} atom, leading to more localized charge density around the I{sub 1} atom and less charge density around the other atoms at the VBM state. The less overlap of charge densities between the VBM and CBM states explains the relatively lower carrier recombination rate of the iodine-chlorine mixed perovskite. Chlorine substitution significantly reduces the effective mass at a direction perpendicular to the Pb-Cl bond and organic axis, enhancing the carrier transport property of the mixed perovskite in this direction.

  13. Achieving three-dimensional entanglement between two spatially separated atoms by using the quantum Zeno effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Siping; Li, Jiahua; Yu, Rong; Wu, Ying

    2013-06-01

    Based on the quantum Zeno effect [B. Misra and E. C. G. Sudarshan, J. Math. Phys.JMAPAQ0022-248810.1063/1.523304 18, 756 (1977)], we propose a scheme to achieve three-dimensional (3D) entanglement between two distant five-level atoms. In our scheme, the two atoms are trapped individually in two spatially-separated double-mode cavities connected by an optical fiber. It is found that the effective quantum Zeno dynamics of the composite cavity-fiber-cavity coupled system gives rise to the deterministic creation of the 3D entangled state with high fidelity. Moreover, only one step operation is required to complete the generation of the 3D entangled state. The numerical simulations clearly show that the proposed scheme is robust against the deviation of the system parameters and insensitive to various decoherence factors, including atomic spontaneous emissions, cavity decays and fiber photon leakages. We justify our scheme by considering the experimental feasibility within the currently available technology.

  14. Blow-up and control of marginally separated boundary layers.

    PubMed

    Braun, Stefan; Kluwick, Alfred

    2005-05-15

    Interactive solutions for steady two-dimensional laminar marginally separated boundary layers are known to exist up to a critical value Gamma(c) of the controlling parameter (e.g. the angle of attack of a slender airfoil) Gamma only. Here, we investigate three-dimensional unsteady perturbations of such boundary layers, assuming that the basic flow is almost critical, i.e. in the limit Gamma(c)-Gamma-->0. It is then shown that the interactive equations governing such perturbations simplify significantly, allowing, among others, a systematic study of the blow-up phenomenon observed in earlier investigations and the optimization of devices used in boundary-layer control. PMID:16105768

  15. Laminar separation control effects of shortfin mako shark skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradshaw, Michael Thomas

    Shark skin is investigated as a means of laminar flow separation control due to its preferential flow direction as well as the potential for scales to erect and obstruct low-momentum backflow resulting from an adverse pressure gradient acting on the boundary layer. In this study, the effect of the scales on flow reversal is observed in laminar flow conditions. This is achieved by comparing the flow over a pectoral fin from a shortfin mako shark to that over the same fin that is painted to neutralize the effect of the scales on the flow. The effect of the scales on flow reversal is also observed by comparing the flow over a smooth PVC cylinder to that over the same cylinder with samples of mako shark skin affixed to the entire circumference of the cylinder. These samples were taken from the flank region of the shark because the scales at this location have been shown to have the greatest angle of erection compared to the scales on the rest of the shark's body. Scales at this location have an average crown length of 220 microm with a maximum bristling angle of proximately 50 degrees. Because these scales have the highest bristling angle, they have the best potential for separation control. All data was taken using time-resolved Digital Particle Image Velocimetry. The flow over the pectoral fin was analyzed at multiple angles of attack. It was found that the shark skin had the effect of decreasing the size of the separated region over both the pectoral fin and the cylinder as well as decreasing the magnitudes of the reversing flow found in these regions. For all Reynolds numbers tested, drag reduction over 28% was found when applying the sharkskin to the cylinder.

  16. Feedback control of solid oxide fuel cell spatial temperature variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fardadi, Mahshid; Mueller, Fabian; Jabbari, Faryar

    A high performance feedback controller has been developed to minimize SOFC spatial temperature variation following significant load perturbations. For thermal management, spatial temperature variation along SOFC cannot be avoided. However, results indicate that feedback control can be used to manipulate the fuel cell air flow and inlet fuel cell air temperature to maintain a nearly constant SOFC electrode electrolyte assembly temperature profile. For example temperature variations of less than 5 K are obtained for load perturbations of ±25% from nominal. These results are obtained using a centralized control strategy to regulate a distributed temperature profile and manage actuator interactions. The controller is based on H-infinity synthesis using a physical based dynamic model of a single co-flow SOFC repeat cell. The model of the fuel cell spatial temperature response needed for control synthesis was linearized and reduced from nonlinear model of the fuel cell assembly. A single 11 state feedback linear system tested in the full nonlinear model was found to be effective and stable over a wide fuel cell operating envelope (0.82-0.6 V). Overall, simulation of the advanced controller resulted in small and smooth monotonic temperature response to rapid and large load perturbations. This indicates that future SOFC systems can be designed and controlled to have superb load following characteristic with less than previously expected thermal stresses.

  17. Dynamics of the Kuramoto equation with spatially distributed control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashchenko, Ilia; Kaschenko, Sergey

    2016-05-01

    We consider the scalar complex equation with spatially distributed control. Its dynamical properties are studied by asymptotic methods when the control coefficient is either sufficiently large or sufficiently small and the function of distribution is either almost symmetric or significantly nonsymmetric relative to zero. In all cases we reduce original equation to quasinormal form - the family of special parabolic equations, which do not contain big and small parameters, which nonlocal dynamics determines the behaviour of solutions of the original equation.

  18. Separation of spatial-temporal patterns ('climatic modes') by combined analysis of really measured and generated numerically vector time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigin, A. M.; Mukhin, D.; Volodin, E. M.; Gavrilov, A.; Loskutov, E. M.

    2013-12-01

    The new method of decomposition of the Earth's climate system into well separated spatial-temporal patterns ('climatic modes') is discussed. The method is based on: (i) generalization of the MSSA (Multichannel Singular Spectral Analysis) [1] for expanding vector (space-distributed) time series in basis of spatial-temporal empirical orthogonal functions (STEOF), which makes allowance delayed correlations of the processes recorded in spatially separated points; (ii) expanding both real SST data, and longer by several times SST data generated numerically, in STEOF basis; (iii) use of the numerically produced STEOF basis for exclusion of 'too slow' (and thus not represented correctly) processes from real data. The application of the method allows by means of vector time series generated numerically by the INM RAS Coupled Climate Model [2] to separate from real SST anomalies data [3] two climatic modes possessing by noticeably different time scales: 3-5 and 9-11 years. Relations of separated modes to ENSO and PDO are investigated. Possible applications of spatial-temporal climatic patterns concept to prognosis of climate system evolution is discussed. 1. Ghil, M., R. M. Allen, M. D. Dettinger, K. Ide, D. Kondrashov, et al. (2002) "Advanced spectral methods for climatic time series", Rev. Geophys. 40(1), 3.1-3.41. 2. http://83.149.207.89/GCM_DATA_PLOTTING/GCM_INM_DATA_XY_en.htm 3. http://iridl.ldeo.columbia.edu/SOURCES/.KAPLAN/.EXTENDED/.v2/.ssta/

  19. Daily Access to Sucrose Impairs Aspects of Spatial Memory Tasks Reliant on Pattern Separation and Neural Proliferation in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reichelt, Amy C.; Morris, Margaret J.; Westbrook, Reginald Frederick

    2016-01-01

    High sugar diets reduce hippocampal neurogenesis, which is required for minimizing interference between memories, a process that involves "pattern separation." We provided rats with 2 h daily access to a sucrose solution for 28 d and assessed their performance on a spatial memory task. Sucrose consuming rats discriminated between objects…

  20. Graphene-enabled electrically controlled terahertz spatial light modulators.

    PubMed

    Kakenov, Nurbek; Takan, Taylan; Ozkan, Vedat Ali; Balcı, Osman; Polat, Emre O; Altan, Hakan; Kocabas, Coskun

    2015-05-01

    In this Letter, we demonstrate a broadband terahertz (THz) spatial light modulator using 5×5 arrays of large area graphene supercapacitors. Our approach relies on controlling spatial charge distribution on a passive matrix array of patterned graphene electrodes. By changing the voltage bias applied to the rows and columns, we were able to pattern the THz transmittance through the device with high modulation depth and low operation voltage. We anticipate that the simplicity of the device architecture with high contrast THz modulation over a broad spectral range could provide new tools for THz imaging and communication systems. PMID:25927764

  1. Spatial operator approach to flexible multibody system dynamics and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, G.

    1991-01-01

    The inverse and forward dynamics problems for flexible multibody systems were solved using the techniques of spatially recursive Kalman filtering and smoothing. These algorithms are easily developed using a set of identities associated with mass matrix factorization and inversion. These identities are easily derived using the spatial operator algebra developed by the author. Current work is aimed at computational experiments with the described algorithms and at modelling for control design of limber manipulator systems. It is also aimed at handling and manipulation of flexible objects.

  2. Evaluating vortex generator jet experiments for turbulent flow separation control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Stillfried, F.; Kékesi, T.; Wallin, S.; Johansson, A. V.

    2011-12-01

    Separating turbulent boundary-layers can be energized by streamwise vortices from vortex generators (VG) that increase the near wall momentum as well as the overall mixing of the flow so that flow separation can be delayed or even prevented. In general, two different types of VGs exist: passive vane VGs (VVG) and active VG jets (VGJ). Even though VGs are already successfully used in engineering applications, it is still time-consuming and computationally expensive to include them in a numerical analysis. Fully resolved VGs in a computational mesh lead to a very high number of grid points and thus, computational costs. In addition, computational parameter studies for such flow control devices take much time to set-up. Therefore, much of the research work is still carried out experimentally. KTH Stockholm develops a novel VGJ model that makes it possible to only include the physical influence in terms of the additional stresses that originate from the VGJs without the need to locally refine the computational mesh. Such a modelling strategy enables fast VGJ parameter variations and optimization studies are easliy made possible. For that, VGJ experiments are evaluated in this contribution and results are used for developing a statistical VGJ model.

  3. Plasmid Transfer between Spatially Separated Donor and Recipient Bacteria in Earthworm-Containing Soil Microcosms

    PubMed Central

    Daane, L. L.; Molina, J.; Sadowsky, M. J.

    1997-01-01

    Most gene transfer studies have been performed with relatively homogeneous soil systems in the absence of soil macrobiota, including invertebrates. In this study we examined the influence of earthworm activity (burrowing, casting, and feeding) on transfer of plasmid pJP4 between spatially separated donor (Alcaligenes eutrophus) and recipient (Pseudomonas fluorescens) bacteria in nonsterile soil columns. A model system was designed such that the activity of earthworms would act to mediate cell contact and gene transfer. Three different earthworm species (Aporrectodea trapezoides, Lumbricus rubellus, and Lumbricus terrestris), representing each of the major ecological categories (endogeic, epigeic, and anecic), were evaluated. Inoculated soil microcosms, with and without added earthworms, were analyzed for donor, recipient, and transconjugant bacteria at 5-cm-depth intervals by using selective plating techniques. Transconjugants were confirmed by colony hybridization with a mer gene probe. The presence of earthworms significantly increased dispersal of the donor and recipient strains. In situ gene transfer of plasmid pJP4 from A. eutrophus to P. fluorescens was detected only in earthworm-containing microcosms, at a frequency of (symbl)10(sup2) transconjugants per g of soil. The depth of recovery was dependent on the burrowing behavior of each earthworm species; however, there was no significant difference in the total number of transconjugants among the earthworm species. Donor and recipient bacteria were recovered from earthworm feces (casts) of all three earthworm species, with numbers up to 10(sup6) and 10(sup4) bacteria per g of cast, respectively. A. trapezoides egg capsules (cocoons) formed in the inoculated soil microcosms contained up to 10(sup7) donor and 10(sup6) recipient bacteria per g of cocoon. No transconjugant bacteria, however, were recovered from these microhabitats. To our knowledge, this is the first report of gene transfer between physically

  4. Placement and characterization of pairs of luminescent molecules in spatially separated regions of nanostructured thin films.

    PubMed

    Minoofar, Payam N; Hernandez, Raquel; Chia, Shinye; Dunn, Bruce; Zink, Jeffrey I; Franville, Anne-Christine

    2002-12-01

    Methods of making mesostructured sol-gel silicate thin films containing two different molecules deliberately placed in two different spatially separated regions in a one-step, one-pot preparation are developed and demonstrated. When the structure-directing agent is the surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, the structure is 2-D hexagonal with lattice spacings between 31.6 and 42.1 angstroms depending on the dopant molecules and their concentrations. The three general strategies that are used to place the molecules are philicity (like dissolves like), bonding, and bifunctionality. These strategies take advantage of the different chemical and physical properties of the regions of the films. These regions are the inorganic silicate framework, the hydrophobic organic interior of the micelles, and the ionic interface between them. Luminescent molecules that possess the physical and chemical properties appropriate for the desired strategies are chosen. Lanthanide and ruthenium complexes with condensable trialkoxysilane groups are incorporated into the silicate framework. 1,4-Naphthoquinone, pyrene, rhodamine 6G and coumarin 540A, and lanthanides with no condensable trialkoxysilanes occupy the hydrophobic core of micelles by virtue of their hydrophobicity. The locations of the molecules are determined by luminescence spectroscopy and by luminescence lifetime measurements. In all cases, the long-range order templated into the thin film is verified by X-ray diffraction. The simultaneous placement of two molecules in the structured film and the maintenance of long-range order require a delicate balance among film preparation methodology, design of the molecules to be incorporated in specific regions, and concentrations of all of the species. PMID:12452713

  5. A spatial operator algebra for manipulator modeling and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, G.; Kreutz, K.; Milman, M.

    1988-01-01

    A powerful new spatial operator algebra for modeling, control, and trajectory design of manipulators is discussed along with its implementation in the Ada programming language. Applications of this algebra to robotics include an operator representation of the manipulator Jacobian matrix; the robot dynamical equations formulated in terms of the spatial algebra, showing the complete equivalence between the recursive Newton-Euler formulations to robot dynamics; the operator factorization and inversion of the manipulator mass matrix which immediately results in O(N) recursive forward dynamics algorithms; the joint accelerations of a manipulator due to a tip contact force; the recursive computation of the equivalent mass matrix as seen at the tip of a manipulator; and recursive forward dynamics of a closed chain system. Finally, additional applications and current research involving the use of the spatial operator algebra are discussed in general terms.

  6. On the use of a spatial cue as prior information for stereo sound source separation based on spatially weighted non-negative tensor factorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsufuji, Yuki; Roebel, Axel

    2014-12-01

    This paper proposes a new method to enhance the performance of non-negative tensor factorization (NTF), one of the most prevalent source separation techniques nowadays. The enhancement is mainly achieved by introducing weights on bin-wise NTF cost functions, which differentiates NTF target components from other components so that the target should be approximated more precisely than others. Assuming sources are distributed sparsely in a 2-D sound field, the target components approximating a target source are exclusively selected by a user, or from accompanying images by means of providing a spatial cue to an NTF framework. The spatial cue is given in a similar format to the well-known binaural feature, inter-channel level difference (IID). This helps incorporate the spatial cue into the system, since the similar features of this format can be easily calculated from every spectrogram bin. The weighting functions are designed taking into account the distance between the spatial cue and the calculated features. Namely, the largest values are assigned to the spectrogram bins where the features present the highest similarity to the spatial cue, and the value decreases in proportion to the distance between them. The method is evaluated in terms of separation quality, comparing the proposed algorithm to the conventional NTF technique, PARAFAC-NTF, as well as other source separation techniques. The evaluation results measured by the metric signal-to-distortion ratio (SDR), signal-to-interference ratio (SIR), and signal-to-artifact ratio (SAR) demonstrate the effectiveness of the new method, improved primarily by the weighting function and the initialization based on IID, while demonstrating a decrease in computational costs, a significant problem with NTF.

  7. A spatial operator algebra for manipulator modeling and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, G.; Kreutz, K.; Jain, A.

    1989-01-01

    A spatial operator algebra for modeling the control and trajectory design of manipulation is discussed, with emphasis on its analytical formulation and implementation in the Ada programming language. The elements of this algebra are linear operators whose domain and range spaces consist of forces, moments, velocities, and accelerations. The effect of these operators is equivalent to a spatial recursion along the span of the manipulator. Inversion is obtained using techniques of recursive filtering and smoothing. The operator alegbra provides a high-level framework for describing the dynamic and kinematic behavior of a manipulator and control and trajectory design algorithms. Implementable recursive algorithms can be immediately derived from the abstract operator expressions by inspection, thus greatly simplifying the transition from an abstract problem formulation and solution to the detailed mechanization of a specific algorithm.

  8. Semiconductor diode laser having an intracavity spatial phase controller for beam control and switching

    DOEpatents

    Hohimer, J.P.

    1994-06-07

    A high-power broad-area semiconductor laser having a intracavity spatial phase controller is disclosed. The integrated intracavity spatial phase controller is easily formed by patterning an electrical contact metallization layer when fabricating the semiconductor laser. This spatial phase controller changes the normally broad far-field emission beam of such a laser into a single-lobed near-diffraction-limited beam at pulsed output powers of over 400 mW. Two operating modes, a thermal and a gain operating mode, exist for the phase controller, allowing for steering and switching the beam as the modes of operation are switched, and the emission beam may be scanned, for example, over a range of 1.4 degrees or switched by 8 degrees. More than one spatial phase controller may be integrated into the laser structure. 6 figs.

  9. Semiconductor diode laser having an intracavity spatial phase controller for beam control and switching

    DOEpatents

    Hohimer, John P.

    1994-01-01

    A high-power broad-area semiconductor laser having a intracavity spatial phase controller is disclosed. The integrated intracavity spatial phase controller is easily formed by patterning an electrical contact metallization layer when fabricating the semiconductor laser. This spatial phase controller changes the normally broad far-field emission beam of such a laser into a single-lobed near-diffraction-limited beam at pulsed output powers of over 400 mW. Two operating modes, a thermal and a gain operating mode, exist for the phase controller, allowing for steering and switching the beam as the modes of operation are switched, and the emission beam may be scanned, for example, over a range of 1.4 degrees or switched by 8 degrees. More than one spatial phase controller may be integrated into the laser structure.

  10. Semiconductor diode laser having an intracavity spatial phase controller for beam control and switching

    SciTech Connect

    Hohimer, J.P.

    1992-12-31

    A high-power broad-area semiconductor laser having a intracavity spatial phase controller is disclosed. The integrated intracavity spatial phase controller is easily formed by patterning an electrical contact metallization layer when fabricating the semiconductor laser. This spatial phase controller changes the normally broad far-field emission bean, of such a laser into a single-lobed near-diffraction-limited beam at pulsed output powers of over 400 mW. Two operating modes, a thermal and a gain operating mode, exist for the phase controller, allowing for steering and switching the beam as the modes of operation are switched, and the emission beam may be scanned, for example, over a range of 1.4 degrees or switched by 8 degrees. More than one spatial phase controller may be integrated into the laser structure.

  11. Offline comparison of spatial filters for two-dimensional movement control with noninvasive field potentials.

    PubMed

    Foldes, S T; Taylor, D M

    2011-08-01

    Paralyzed individuals can control the movement of an assistive device using changes in electroencephalographic (EEG) power resulting from attempted movements. Simultaneous, proportional control of two-dimensional (2D) device movements can be achieved with the concurrent modulation of brain activity that is associated with the attempted movement and rest of two independent body parts. Movement control may be improved by spatial filtering methods that recombine raw EEGs to form new signals with more focused information about the underlying brain activity. This study compared spatial filters offline for improving simultaneous proportional 2D movement commands from EEGs. Filtering options evaluated were common average referencing, Laplacian, independent component analysis, principle component analysis, and two novel ways of applying common spatial pattern (CSP) analysis. CSP analysis is a supervised algorithm that optimally recombines EEGs collected under two known conditions. Both CSP options resulted in more accurate movement prediction than the other filtering options. CSP was particularly advantageous when separating EEGs associated with neighboring or overlapping areas on the motor homunculus. Finally, CSP performed well using smaller subsets of filtered signals, thus making CSP practical and efficient for simultaneous 2D control. A 2D online cursor control example using CSP filtering is included to show CSP's utility. PMID:21712569

  12. Offline comparison of spatial filters for two-dimensional movement control with noninvasive field potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foldes, S. T.; Taylor, D. M.

    2011-08-01

    Paralyzed individuals can control the movement of an assistive device using changes in electroencephalographic (EEG) power resulting from attempted movements. Simultaneous, proportional control of two-dimensional (2D) device movements can be achieved with the concurrent modulation of brain activity that is associated with the attempted movement and rest of two independent body parts. Movement control may be improved by spatial filtering methods that recombine raw EEGs to form new signals with more focused information about the underlying brain activity. This study compared spatial filters offline for improving simultaneous proportional 2D movement commands from EEGs. Filtering options evaluated were common average referencing, Laplacian, independent component analysis, principle component analysis, and two novel ways of applying common spatial pattern (CSP) analysis. CSP analysis is a supervised algorithm that optimally recombines EEGs collected under two known conditions. Both CSP options resulted in more accurate movement prediction than the other filtering options. CSP was particularly advantageous when separating EEGs associated with neighboring or overlapping areas on the motor homunculus. Finally, CSP performed well using smaller subsets of filtered signals, thus making CSP practical and efficient for simultaneous 2D control. A 2D online cursor control example using CSP filtering is included to show CSP's utility.

  13. Amoeba-based computing for traveling salesman problem: long-term correlations between spatially separated individual cells of Physarum polycephalum.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Liping; Aono, Masashi; Kim, Song-Ju; Hara, Masahiko

    2013-04-01

    A single-celled, multi-nucleated amoeboid organism, a plasmodium of the true slime mold Physarum polycephalum, can perform sophisticated computing by exhibiting complex spatiotemporal oscillatory dynamics while deforming its amorphous body. We previously devised an "amoeba-based computer (ABC)" to quantitatively evaluate the optimization capability of the amoeboid organism in searching for a solution to the traveling salesman problem (TSP) under optical feedback control. In ABC, the organism changes its shape to find a high quality solution (a relatively shorter TSP route) by alternately expanding and contracting its pseudopod-like branches that exhibit local photoavoidance behavior. The quality of the solution serves as a measure of the optimality of which the organism maximizes its global body area (nutrient absorption) while minimizing the risk of being illuminated (exposure to aversive stimuli). ABC found a high quality solution for the 8-city TSP with a high probability. However, it remains unclear whether intracellular communication among the branches of the organism is essential for computing. In this study, we conducted a series of control experiments using two individual cells (two single-celled organisms) to perform parallel searches in the absence of intercellular communication. We found that ABC drastically lost its ability to find a solution when it used two independent individuals. However, interestingly, when two individuals were prepared by dividing one individual, they found a solution for a few tens of minutes. That is, the two divided individuals remained correlated even though they were spatially separated. These results suggest the presence of a long-term memory in the intrinsic dynamics of this organism and its significance in performing sophisticated computing. PMID:23438635

  14. High resolution Hall measurements across the VO2 metal-insulator transition reveal impact of spatial phase separation

    PubMed Central

    Yamin, Tony; Strelniker, Yakov M.; Sharoni, Amos

    2016-01-01

    Many strongly correlated transition metal oxides exhibit a metal-insulator transition (MIT), the manipulation of which is essential for their application as active device elements. However, such manipulation is hindered by lack of microscopic understanding of mechanisms involved in these transitions. A prototypical example is VO2, where previous studies indicated that the MIT resistance change correlate with changes in carrier density and mobility. We studied the MIT using Hall measurements with unprecedented resolution and accuracy, simultaneously with resistance measurements. Contrast to prior reports, we find that the MIT is not correlated with a change in mobility, but rather, is a macroscopic manifestation of the spatial phase separation which accompanies the MIT. Our results demonstrate that, surprisingly, properties of the nano-scale spatially-separated metallic and semiconducting domains actually retain their bulk properties. This study highlights the importance of taking into account local fluctuations and correlations when interpreting transport measurements in highly correlated systems. PMID:26783076

  15. High resolution Hall measurements across the VO2 metal-insulator transition reveal impact of spatial phase separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamin, Tony; Strelniker, Yakov M.; Sharoni, Amos

    2016-01-01

    Many strongly correlated transition metal oxides exhibit a metal-insulator transition (MIT), the manipulation of which is essential for their application as active device elements. However, such manipulation is hindered by lack of microscopic understanding of mechanisms involved in these transitions. A prototypical example is VO2, where previous studies indicated that the MIT resistance change correlate with changes in carrier density and mobility. We studied the MIT using Hall measurements with unprecedented resolution and accuracy, simultaneously with resistance measurements. Contrast to prior reports, we find that the MIT is not correlated with a change in mobility, but rather, is a macroscopic manifestation of the spatial phase separation which accompanies the MIT. Our results demonstrate that, surprisingly, properties of the nano-scale spatially-separated metallic and semiconducting domains actually retain their bulk properties. This study highlights the importance of taking into account local fluctuations and correlations when interpreting transport measurements in highly correlated systems.

  16. Spatial and Temporal Control of Fungal Natural Product Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Fang Yun; Keller, Nancy P.

    2014-01-01

    Despite their oftentimes-elusive ecological role, fungal natural products have, for better or worse, impacted our daily lives tremendously owing to their diverse and potent bioactive properties. This Janus-faced nature of fungal natural products inevitably ushered in a field of research dedicated towards understanding the ecology, organisms, genes, enzymes, and biosynthetic pathways that give rise to this arsenal of diverse and complex chemistry. Ongoing research in fungal secondary metabolism has not only increased our appreciation for fungal natural products as an asset but also sheds light on the pivotal role that these once-regarded “metabolic wastes” play in fungal biology, defense, and stress response in addition to their potential contributions towards human mycoses. Full orchestration of secondary metabolism requires not only the seamless coordination between temporal and spatial control of SM-associated machineries (e.g. enzymes, cofactors, intermediates, and end-products) but also integration of these machineries into primary metabolic processes and established cellular mechanisms. An intriguing, but little known aspect of microbial natural product synthesis lies in the spatial organization of both pathway intermediates and enzymes responsible for the production of these compounds. In this highlight, we summarize some major breakthroughs in understanding the genes and regulation of fungal natural product synthesis and introduce the current state of knowledge on the spatial and temporal control of fungal natural product synthesis. PMID:25142354

  17. Bioinspired Composites with Spatial and Orientational Control of Reinforcement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demiroers, Ahmet; Studart, Andre; Complex Materials Team

    Living organisms combine soft and hard components to fabricate composite materials with out-standing mechanical properties. The optimum design and assembly of the anisotropic components reinforce the material in specific directions against multidirectional external loads. Although nature does it quite readily, it is still a challenge for material scientists to control the orientation and position of the colloidal components in a matrix. Here, we use external electric and magnetic fields to achieve positional and orientational control over colloid-polymer composites to fabricate mechanically robust materials to capture some of the essential features of natural systems. We first investigated the assembly of spherical micron-sized colloids using dielectrophoresis, as these particles provided an easily accessible and instructive length scale for performing initial experiments. We used dielectrophoresis for spatial control of reinforcing anisotropic components and magnetic fields to provide control over the orientation of these reinforcing constituents. The obtained composites with different orientational and spatial reinforcement showed enhanced mechanical properties, such as wear resistance, which exhibits similarities to tooth enamel. SNSF Ambizione Grant PZ00P2_148040.

  18. Spatial organization of cortical and spinal neurons controlling motor behavior

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Ariel J; Lewallen, Kathryn A; Pfaff, Samuel L

    2013-01-01

    A major task of the central nervous system (CNS) is to control behavioral actions, which necessitates a precise regulation of muscle activity. The final components of the circuitry controlling muscles are the motorneurons, which settle into pools in the ventral horn of the spinal cord in positions that mirror the musculature organization within the body. This ‘musculotopic’ motor-map then becomes the internal CNS reference for the neuronal circuits that control motor commands. This review describes recent progress in defining the neuroanatomical organization of the higher-order motor circuits in the cortex and spinal cord, and our current understanding of the integrative features that contribute to complex motor behaviors. We highlight emerging evidence that cortical and spinal motor command centers are loosely organized with respect to the musculotopic spatial-map, but these centers also incorporate organizational features that associate with the function of different muscle groups during commonly enacted behaviors. PMID:22841417

  19. Spatial patterns and predictors of trophic control in marine ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Boyce, Daniel G; Frank, Kenneth T; Worm, Boris; Leggett, William C

    2015-10-01

    A key question in ecology is under which conditions ecosystem structure tends to be controlled by resource availability vs. consumer pressure. Several hypotheses derived from theory, experiments and observational field studies have been advanced, yet a unified explanation remains elusive. Here, we identify common predictors of trophic control in a synthetic analysis of 52 observational field studies conducted within marine ecosystems across the Northern Hemisphere and published between 1951 and 2014. Spatial regression analysis of 45 candidate variables revealed temperature to be the dominant predictor, with unimodal effects on trophic control operating both directly (r(2) = 0.32; P < 0.0001) and indirectly through influences on turnover rate and quality of primary production, biodiversity and omnivory. These findings indicate that temperature is an overarching determinant of the trophic dynamics of marine ecosystems, and that variation in ocean temperature will affect the trophic structure of marine ecosystems through both direct and indirect mechanisms. PMID:26252155

  20. Impulsive spatial control of invading pests by generalist predators.

    PubMed

    Aniţa, Sebastian; Casas, Jérôme; Suppo, Christelle

    2014-09-01

    We model the conditions for pest eradication in a reaction-diffusion system made of a prey and a generalist predator through spatial impulsive control within a bounded domain. The motivating example is the control of the invasive horse chestnut leafminer moth through the yearly destruction of leaves in autumn, in which both the pest and its parasitoids overwinter. The model is made of two integro-partial differential equations, the integral portion describing the within-year immigration from the whole domain. The problem of pest eradication is strongly related to some appropriate eigenvalue problems. Basic properties of the principal eigenvalues of these problems are derived by using of Krein-Rutman's theorem and of comparison results for parabolic equations with non-local terms. Spatial control of the pest can be achieved, if one of these principal eigenvalues is large enough, at an exponential rate. This is true without and with parasitoids, the latter case being of course more rapid. We discuss the possible implementation of these results to the leafminer invasion problem and discuss complementary methods. PMID:23788257

  1. Separating spatial search and efficiency rates as components of predation risk.

    PubMed

    DeCesare, Nicholas J

    2012-11-22

    Predation risk is an important driver of ecosystems, and local spatial variation in risk can have population-level consequences by affecting multiple components of the predation process. I use resource selection and proportional hazard time-to-event modelling to assess the spatial drivers of two key components of risk--the search rate (i.e. aggregative response) and predation efficiency rate (i.e. functional response)--imposed by wolves (Canis lupus) in a multi-prey system. In my study area, both components of risk increased according to topographic variation, but anthropogenic features affected only the search rate. Predicted models of the cumulative hazard, or risk of a kill, underlying wolf search paths validated well with broad-scale variation in kill rates, suggesting that spatial hazard models provide a means of scaling up from local heterogeneity in predation risk to population-level dynamics in predator-prey systems. Additionally, I estimated an integrated model of relative spatial predation risk as the product of the search and efficiency rates, combining the distinct contributions of spatial heterogeneity to each component of risk. PMID:22977145

  2. Dielectric barrier plasma dynamics for active control of separated flows

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Subrata; Singh, K.P.; Gaitonde, Datta V.

    2006-03-20

    The dynamics of separation mitigation with asymmetric dielectric barrier discharges is explored by considering the gas flow past a flat plate at an angle of attack. A self-consistent model utilizing motion of electrons, ions, and neutrals is employed to couple the electric force field to the momentum of the fluid. The charge separation and concomitant electric field yield a time-averaged body force which is oriented predominantly downstream, with a smaller transverse component towards the wall. This induces a wall-jet-like feature that effectively eliminates the separation bubble. The impact of several geometric and electrical operating parameters is elucidated.

  3. Fundamental study of phosphor separation by controlling magnetic force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Kohei; Mishima, Fumihito; Akiyama, Yoko; Nishijima, Shigehiro

    2013-11-01

    The phosphor wastes consist of phosphors with different emission colors, green (LAP), red (YOX), blue (BAM) and white (HP). It is required to recover and reuse the rare earth phosphors with high market value. In this study, we tried to separate the phosphor using the magnetic separation by HTS bulk magnet utilizing the differences of magnetic susceptibility by the type of phosphors. We succeeded in the successive separation of HP with low market value from YOX and BAM including the rare earth using the magnetic Archimedes method. In this method, vertical and radial components of the magnetic force were used.

  4. Photonic lantern adaptive spatial mode control in LMA fiber amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Montoya, Juan; Aleshire, Chris; Hwang, Christopher; Fontaine, Nicolas K; Velázquez-Benítez, Amado; Martz, Dale H; Fan, T Y; Ripin, Dan

    2016-02-22

    We demonstrate adaptive-spatial mode control (ASMC) in few-moded double-clad large mode area (LMA) fiber amplifiers by using an all-fiber-based photonic lantern. Three single-mode fiber inputs are used to adaptively inject the appropriate superposition of input modes in a multimode gain fiber to achieve the desired mode at the output. By actively adjusting the relative phase of the single-mode inputs, near-unity coherent combination resulting in a single fundamental mode at the output is achieved. PMID:26906999

  5. SEPARATING SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL SOURCES OF VARIATION FOR MODEL TESTING IN PRECISION AGRICULTURE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Applying crop simulation models to precision agriculture appears to be a matter of developing spatial suites of input parameters and running a model for each set. Extensive modeling literature has reported independent tests in multiple combinations of variety, soils, and climate, which has been gene...

  6. Multicollinearity in spatial genetics: separating the wheat from the chaff using commonality analyses.

    PubMed

    Prunier, J G; Colyn, M; Legendre, X; Nimon, K F; Flamand, M C

    2015-01-01

    Direct gradient analyses in spatial genetics provide unique opportunities to describe the inherent complexity of genetic variation in wildlife species and are the object of many methodological developments. However, multicollinearity among explanatory variables is a systemic issue in multivariate regression analyses and is likely to cause serious difficulties in properly interpreting results of direct gradient analyses, with the risk of erroneous conclusions, misdirected research and inefficient or counterproductive conservation measures. Using simulated data sets along with linear and logistic regressions on distance matrices, we illustrate how commonality analysis (CA), a detailed variance-partitioning procedure that was recently introduced in the field of ecology, can be used to deal with nonindependence among spatial predictors. By decomposing model fit indices into unique and common (or shared) variance components, CA allows identifying the location and magnitude of multicollinearity, revealing spurious correlations and thus thoroughly improving the interpretation of multivariate regressions. Despite a few inherent limitations, especially in the case of resistance model optimization, this review highlights the great potential of CA to account for complex multicollinearity patterns in spatial genetics and identifies future applications and lines of research. We strongly urge spatial geneticists to systematically investigate commonalities when performing direct gradient analyses. PMID:25495950

  7. Temporal Evolution of Spatial Computations for Visuomotor Control.

    PubMed

    Franklin, David W; Reichenbach, Alexandra; Franklin, Sae; Diedrichsen, Jörn

    2016-02-24

    Goal-directed reaching movements are guided by visual feedback from both target and hand. The classical view is that the brain extracts information about target and hand positions from a visual scene, calculates a difference vector between them, and uses this estimate to control the movement. Here we show that during fast feedback control, this computation is not immediate, but evolves dynamically over time. Immediately after a change in the visual scene, the motor system generates independent responses to the errors in hand and target location. Only about 200 ms later, the changes in target and hand positions are combined appropriately in the response, slowly converging to the true difference vector. Therefore, our results provide evidence for the temporal evolution of spatial computations in the human visuomotor system, in which the accurate difference vector computation is first estimated by a fast approximation. PMID:26911681

  8. Spatial control of flowering by DELLA proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Galvão, Vinicius C; Horrer, Daniel; Küttner, Frank; Schmid, Markus

    2012-11-01

    The transition from vegetative to reproductive development is a central event in the plant life cycle. To time the induction of flowering correctly, plants integrate environmental and endogenous signals such as photoperiod, temperature and hormonal status. The hormone gibberellic acid (GA) has long been known to regulate flowering. However, the spatial contribution of GA signaling in flowering time control is poorly understood. Here we have analyzed the effect of tissue-specific misexpression of wild-type and GA-insensitive (dellaΔ17) DELLA proteins on the floral transition in Arabidopsis thaliana. We demonstrate that under long days, GA affects the floral transition by promoting the expression of flowering time integrator genes such as FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) and TWIN SISTER OF FT (TSF) in leaves independently of CONSTANS (CO) and GIGANTEA (GI). In addition, GA signaling promotes flowering independently of photoperiod through the regulation of SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN-LIKE (SPL) genes in both the leaves and at the shoot meristem. Our data suggest that GA regulates flowering by controlling the spatial expression of floral regulatory genes throughout the plant in a day-length-specific manner. PMID:22992955

  9. A spatial operator algebra for manipulator modeling and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, G.; Kreutz, Kenneth; Jain, Abhinandan

    1989-01-01

    A recently developed spatial operator algebra, useful for modeling, control, and trajectory design of manipulators is discussed. The elements of this algebra are linear operators whose domain and range spaces consist of forces, moments, velocities, and accelerations. The effect of these operators is equivalent to a spatial recursion along the span of a manipulator. Inversion of operators can be efficiently obtained via techniques of recursive filtering and smoothing. The operator algebra provides a high level framework for describing the dynamic and kinematic behavior of a manipulator and control and trajectory design algorithms. The interpretation of expressions within the algebraic framework leads to enhanced conceptual and physical understanding of manipulator dynamics and kinematics. Furthermore, implementable recursive algorithms can be immediately derived from the abstract operator expressions by inspection. Thus, the transition from an abstract problem formulation and solution to the detailed mechanizaton of specific algorithms is greatly simplified. The analytical formulation of the operator algebra, as well as its implementation in the Ada programming language are discussed.

  10. Controls of Soil Spatial Variability in a Dry Tropical Forest.

    PubMed

    Pulla, Sandeep; Riotte, Jean; Suresh, H S; Dattaraja, H S; Sukumar, Raman

    2016-01-01

    We examined the roles of lithology, topography, vegetation and fire in generating local-scale (<1 km2) soil spatial variability in a seasonally dry tropical forest (SDTF) in southern India. For this, we mapped soil (available nutrients, Al, total C, pH, moisture and texture in the top 10 cm), rock outcrops, topography, all native woody plants ≥1 cm diameter at breast height (DBH), and spatial variation in fire frequency (times burnt during the 17 years preceding soil sampling) in a permanent 50-ha plot. Unlike classic catenas, lower elevation soils had lesser moisture, plant-available Ca, Cu, Mn, Mg, Zn, B, clay and total C. The distribution of plant-available Ca, Cu, Mn and Mg appeared to largely be determined by the whole-rock chemical composition differences between amphibolites and hornblende-biotite gneisses. Amphibolites were associated with summit positions, while gneisses dominated lower elevations, an observation that concurs with other studies in the region which suggest that hillslope-scale topography has been shaped by differential weathering of lithologies. Neither NO3(-)-N nor NH4(+)-N was explained by the basal area of trees belonging to Fabaceae, a family associated with N-fixing species, and no long-term effects of fire on soil parameters were detected. Local-scale lithological variation is an important first-order control over soil variability at the hillslope scale in this SDTF, by both direct influence on nutrient stocks and indirect influence via control of local relief. PMID:27100088

  11. Live imaging reveals spatial separation of parental chromatin until the four-cell stage in Caenorhabditis elegans embryos.

    PubMed

    Bolková, Jitka; Lanctôt, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The parental genomes are initially spatially separated in each pronucleus after fertilization. Here we have used green-to-red photoconversion of Dendra2-H2B-labeled pronuclei to distinguish maternal and paternal chromatin domains and to track their spatial distribution in living Caenorhabditis elegans embryos starting shortly after fertilization. Intermingling of the parental chromatin did not occur until after the division of the AB and P1 blastomeres, at the 4-cell stage. Unexpectedly, we observed that the intermingling of chromatin did not take place during mitosis or during chromatin decondensation, but rather ∼ 3-5 minutes into the cell cycle. Furthermore, unlike what has been observed in mammalian cells, the relative spatial positioning of chromatin domains remained largely unchanged during prometaphase in the early C. elegans embryo. Live imaging of photoconverted chromatin also allowed us to detect a reproducible 180° rotation of the nuclei during cytokinesis of the one-cell embryo. Imaging of fluorescently-labeled P granules and polar bodies showed that the entire embryo rotates during the first cell division. To our knowledge, we report here the first live observation of the initial separation and subsequent mixing of parental chromatin domains during embryogenesis. PMID:26934289

  12. Separating Spatial and Temporal Variations of the Aurora Using Two Nearly Colocated Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spence, Harlan E.

    2001-01-01

    This final report describes the efforts accomplished during the grant's period of performance, covering the period of 1 May 1997 to 30 April 2001, of a NASA Supporting Research and Technology Program grant under the Ionospheric, Thermospheric, and Mesospheric Physics component of the Sun-Earth Connections program. We have met and exceeded the goals set forth in the proposed research objectives. Referred publications have appeared in the scientific literature and several others are in the review process. In addition, numerous invited and contributed presentations of these studies were presented at national and international meetings during the performance period. One graduate student completed his PhD and won two AGU Best Student Paper awards based on research funded by this grant. These studies are summarized below. The science goal delineated in the initial proposal was "to systematically explore the temporal and spatial characteristics of the aurora in a way heretofore impossible, using data from two coplanar DMSP spacecraft." We accomplished this goal through a series of related studies. One study used these unique data to establish the role of Ps6 waves in coupling between the magnetosphere and the auroral ionosphere (omega bands) during the recovery phase of a magnetic storm; the published paper demonstrated the causal relationships between geospace processes occurring in different regions and established a simple conceptual model based on the fortuitous constellation of observations. In the second string of papers, we used these data to explore velocity-dispersed ions (VDIS) in and near the cusp, to test region identification models, and to look at space/time structure of auroral precipitation. On the first topic, the unique DMSP data revealed a remarkable double VDIS with a latitudinal overlap. This could only be explained in terms of a unified reconnection geometry that builds on several earlier unrelated models. The paper outlining this discovery has drawn

  13. First spatial separation of a heavy ion isomeric beam with a multiple-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickel, T.; Plaß, W. R.; Ayet San Andres, S.; Ebert, J.; Geissel, H.; Haettner, E.; Hornung, C.; Miskun, I.; Pietri, S.; Purushothaman, S.; Reiter, M. P.; Rink, A.-K.; Scheidenberger, C.; Weick, H.; Dendooven, P.; Diwisch, M.; Greiner, F.; Heiße, F.; Knöbel, R.; Lippert, W.; Moore, I. D.; Pohjalainen, I.; Prochazka, A.; Ranjan, M.; Takechi, M.; Winfield, J. S.; Xu, X.

    2015-05-01

    211Po ions in the ground and isomeric states were produced via 238U projectile fragmentation at 1000 MeV/u. The 211Po ions were spatially separated in flight from the primary beam and other reaction products by the fragment separator FRS. The ions were energy-bunched, slowed-down and thermalized in a gas-filled cryogenic stopping cell (CSC). They were then extracted from the CSC and injected into a high-resolution multiple-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometer (MR-TOF-MS). The excitation energy of the isomer and, for the first time, the isomeric-to-ground state ratio were determined from the measured mass spectrum. In the subsequent experimental step, the isomers were spatially separated from the ions in the ground state by an ion deflector and finally collected with a silicon detector for decay spectroscopy. This pioneering experimental result opens up unique perspectives for isomer-resolved studies. With this versatile experimental method new isomers with half-lives longer than a few milliseconds can be discovered and their decay properties can be measured with highest sensitivity and selectivity. These experiments can be extended to studies with isomeric beams in nuclear reactions.

  14. Structure having spatially separated photo-excitable electron-hole pairs and method of manufacturing same

    DOEpatents

    Liang, Yong [Richland, WA; Daschbach, John L [Richland, WA; Su, Yali [Richland, WA; Chambers, Scott A [Kennewick, WA

    2003-03-18

    A method for producing quantum dots. The method includes cleaning an oxide substrate and separately cleaning a metal source. The substrate is then heated and exposed to the source in an oxygen environment. This causes metal oxide quantum dots to form on the surface of the substrate.

  15. Structure having spatially separated photo-excitable electron-hole pairs and method of manufacturing same

    DOEpatents

    Liang, Yong; Daschbach, John L.; Su, Yali; Chambers, Scott A.

    2006-08-22

    A method for producing quantum dots. The method includes cleaning an oxide substrate and separately cleaning a metal source. The substrate is then heated and exposed to the source in an oxygen environment. This causes metal oxide quantum dots to form on the surface of the substrate.

  16. 33 CFR 239.7 - Separation of flood control works from urban drainage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Separation of flood control works... COVERED FLOOD CONTROL CHANNELS § 239.7 Separation of flood control works from urban drainage. Covered channels are likely to be considered in boundary areas demarking urban drainage and flood...

  17. Continuous flow system for controlling phases separation near λ transition

    SciTech Connect

    Chorowski, M.; Poliński, J.; Kempiński, W.; Trybuła, Z.; Łoś, Sz.; Chołast, K.; Kociemba, A.

    2014-01-29

    As demands on 3He are increasing and conventional 3He production through tritium decay is decreasing, alternative 3He production methods are becoming economically viable. One such possibility is to use entropy filters for extraction of the 3He isotope from natural gas. According to the phase diagram of the 3He, its solidification is impossible by only lowering of the temperature. Hence during the cooling process at stable pressure we can reach λ-point and pass to the special phase - He II. The total density of HeII is a sum of the two phases: normal the superfluid ones. It is possible to separate these two phases with an entropy filter - the barrier for the classically-behaving normal phase. This barrier can also be used to separate the two main isotopes of He: 4He and 3He, because at temperatures close to the 4He-λ-point the 3He isotope is part of the normal phase. The paper presents continuous flow schemes of different separation methods of 3He from helium commodity coming from natural gas cryogenic processing. An overall thermodynamic efficiency of the 3He/4He separation process is presented. A simplified model of continuous flow HeI -HeII recuperative heat exchanger is given. Ceramic and carbon porous plugs have been tested in entropy filter applications.

  18. Bell's inequality violation for entangled generalized Bernoulli states in two spatially separate cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Lo Franco, R.; Compagno, G.; Messina, A.; Napoli, A.

    2005-11-15

    We consider the entanglement of orthogonal generalized Bernoulli states in two separate single-mode high-Q cavities. The expectation values and the correlations of the electric field in the cavities are obtained. We then define, in each cavity, a dichotomic operator expressible in terms of the field states which can be, in principle, experimentally measured by a probe atom that 'reads' the field. Using the quantum correlations of couples of these operators, we construct a Bell's inequality which is shown to be violated for a wide range of the degree of entanglement and which can be tested in a simple way. Thus the cavity fields directly show quantum nonlocal properties. A scheme is also sketched to generate entangled orthogonal generalized Bernoulli states in the two separate cavities.

  19. Spatially Separated Photosystem II and a Silicon Photoelectrochemical Cell for Overall Water Splitting: A Natural-Artificial Photosynthetic Hybrid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wangyin; Wang, Hong; Zhu, Qingjun; Qin, Wei; Han, Guangye; Shen, Jian-Ren; Zong, Xu; Li, Can

    2016-08-01

    Integrating natural and artificial photosynthetic platforms is an important approach to developing solar-driven hybrid systems with exceptional function over the individual components. A natural-artificial photosynthetic hybrid platform is formed by wiring photosystem II (PSII) and a platinum-decorated silicon photoelectrochemical (PEC) cell in a tandem manner based on a photocatalytic-PEC Z-scheme design. Although the individual components cannot achieve overall water splitting, the hybrid platform demonstrated the capability of unassisted solar-driven overall water splitting. Moreover, H2 and O2 evolution can be separated in this system, which is ascribed to the functionality afforded by the unconventional Z-scheme design. Furthermore, the tandem configuration and the spatial separation between PSII and artificial components provide more opportunities to develop efficient natural-artificial hybrid photosynthesis systems. PMID:27345863

  20. Tsetse Fly Control in Kenya's Spatially and Temporally Dynamic Control Reservoirs: A Cost Analysis

    PubMed Central

    McCord, Paul F.; Messina, Joseph P.; Campbell, David J.; Grady, Sue C.

    2011-01-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) and animal African trypanosomiasis (AAT) are significant health concerns throughout much of sub-Saharan Africa. Funding for tsetse fly control operations has decreased since the 1970s, which has in turn limited the success of campaigns to control the disease vector. To maximize the effectiveness of the limited financial resources available for tsetse control, this study develops and analyzes spatially and temporally dynamic tsetse distribution maps of Glossina subgenus Morsitans populations in Kenya from January 2002 to December 2010, produced using the Tsetse Ecological Distribution Model. These species distribution maps reveal seasonal variations in fly distributions. Such variations allow for the identification of “control reservoirs” where fly distributions are spatially constrained by fluctuations in suitable habitat and tsetse population characteristics. Following identification of the control reservoirs, a tsetse management operation is simulated in the control reservoirs using capital and labor control inputs from previous studies. Finally, a cost analysis, following specific economic guidelines from existing tsetse control analyses, is conducted to calculate the total cost of a nationwide control campaign of the reservoirs compared to the cost of a nationwide campaign conducted at the maximum spatial extent of the fly distributions from January 2002 to December 2010. The total cost of tsetse management within the reservoirs sums to $14,212,647, while the nationwide campaign at the maximum spatial extent amounts to $33,721,516. This savings of $19,508,869 represents the importance of identifying seasonally dynamic control reservoirs when conducting a tsetse management campaign, and, in the process, offers an economical means of fly control and disease management for future program planning. PMID:22581989

  1. [Spatial and temporal control of ultrasonic fields via optoacoustic holography].

    PubMed

    Gspan, Stefan; Meyer, Alex; Bernet, Stefan; Ritsch-Marte, Monika

    2004-01-01

    The present paper presents a new method for generating ultrasound, based on the interaction of laser-induced ultrasound generation and ultrasonic holography. An ultrasonic field generated in a water tank via the optoacoustic effect is spatially and temporally controlled: In order to produce defined ultrasonic frequencies in the MHz range, the laser pulses incident on a light-absorbing layer are modulated in time using an electro-optic modulator (EOM). Additionally, a high-resolution liquid crystal spatial light modulator (SLM) is used to imprint a pre-calculated phase front to the laser beam. A computer-generated binary hologram is also displayed at the SLM. The expanded laser beam projects the corresponding pattern to the plane absorptive layer in the water tank. The projection of specific patterns for the generation of ultrasonic beams resembles the use of, diffractive optical elements" in optics. Optical ultrasound generation with holographic steering is a flexible tool with promising numerous new applications in medical and technical ultrasound diagnostics. PMID:15462419

  2. Coupling spatial segregation with synthetic circuits to control bacterial survival.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shuqiang; Lee, Anna Jisu; Tsoi, Ryan; Wu, Feilun; Zhang, Ying; Leong, Kam W; You, Lingchong

    2016-02-01

    Engineered bacteria have great potential for medical and environmental applications. Fulfilling this potential requires controllability over engineered behaviors and scalability of the engineered systems. Here, we present a platform technology, microbial swarmbot, which employs spatial arrangement to control the growth dynamics of engineered bacteria. As a proof of principle, we demonstrated a safeguard strategy to prevent unintended bacterial proliferation. In particular, we adopted several synthetic gene circuits to program collective survival in Escherichia coli: the engineered bacteria could only survive when present at sufficiently high population densities. When encapsulated by permeable membranes, these bacteria can sense the local environment and respond accordingly. The cells inside the microbial swarmbot capsules will survive due to their high densities. Those escaping from a capsule, however, will be killed due to a decrease in their densities. We demonstrate that this design concept is modular and readily generalizable. Our work lays the foundation for engineering integrated and programmable control of hybrid biological-material systems for diverse applications. PMID:26925805

  3. Controls of Soil Spatial Variability in a Dry Tropical Forest

    PubMed Central

    Pulla, Sandeep; Riotte, Jean; Suresh, H. S.; Dattaraja, H. S.; Sukumar, Raman

    2016-01-01

    We examined the roles of lithology, topography, vegetation and fire in generating local-scale (<1 km2) soil spatial variability in a seasonally dry tropical forest (SDTF) in southern India. For this, we mapped soil (available nutrients, Al, total C, pH, moisture and texture in the top 10cm), rock outcrops, topography, all native woody plants ≥1 cm diameter at breast height (DBH), and spatial variation in fire frequency (times burnt during the 17 years preceding soil sampling) in a permanent 50-ha plot. Unlike classic catenas, lower elevation soils had lesser moisture, plant-available Ca, Cu, Mn, Mg, Zn, B, clay and total C. The distribution of plant-available Ca, Cu, Mn and Mg appeared to largely be determined by the whole-rock chemical composition differences between amphibolites and hornblende-biotite gneisses. Amphibolites were associated with summit positions, while gneisses dominated lower elevations, an observation that concurs with other studies in the region which suggest that hillslope-scale topography has been shaped by differential weathering of lithologies. Neither NO3−-N nor NH4+-N was explained by the basal area of trees belonging to Fabaceae, a family associated with N-fixing species, and no long-term effects of fire on soil parameters were detected. Local-scale lithological variation is an important first-order control over soil variability at the hillslope scale in this SDTF, by both direct influence on nutrient stocks and indirect influence via control of local relief. PMID:27100088

  4. Energized outer membrane and spatial separation of metabolic processes in the hyperthermophilic Archaeon Ignicoccus hospitalis

    PubMed Central

    Küper, Ulf; Meyer, Carolin; Müller, Volker; Rachel, Reinhard; Huber, Harald

    2010-01-01

    ATP synthase catalyzes ATP synthesis at the expense of an electrochemical ion gradient across a membrane that can be generated by different exergonic reactions. Sulfur reduction is the main energy-yielding reaction in the hyperthermophilic strictly anaerobic Crenarchaeon Ignicoccus hospitalis. This organism is unusual in having an inner and an outer membrane that are separated by a huge intermembrane compartment. Here we show, on the basis of immuno-EM analyses of ultrathin sections and immunofluorescence experiments with whole I. hospitalis cells, that the ATP synthase and H2:sulfur oxidoreductase complexes of this organism are located in the outer membrane. These two enzyme complexes are mandatory for the generation of an electrochemical gradient and for ATP synthesis. Thus, among all prokaryotes possessing two membranes in their cell envelope (including Planctomycetes, Gram-negative bacteria), I. hospitalis is a unique organism, with an energized outer membrane and ATP synthesis within the periplasmic space. In addition, DAPI staining and EM analyses showed that DNA and ribosomes are localized in the cytoplasm, leading to the conclusion that in I. hospitalis energy conservation is separated from information processing and protein biosynthesis. This raises questions regarding the function of the two membranes, the interaction between these compartments, and the general definition of a cytoplasmic membrane. PMID:20133662

  5. Superresolution microscopy reveals spatial separation of UCP4 and F0F1-ATP synthase in neuronal mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Klotzsch, Enrico; Smorodchenko, Alina; Löfler, Lukas; Moldzio, Rudolf; Parkinson, Elena; Schütz, Gerhard J.; Pohl, Elena E.

    2015-01-01

    Because different proteins compete for the proton gradient across the inner mitochondrial membrane, an efficient mechanism is required for allocation of associated chemical potential to the distinct demands, such as ATP production, thermogenesis, regulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), etc. Here, we used the superresolution technique dSTORM (direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy) to visualize several mitochondrial proteins in primary mouse neurons and test the hypothesis that uncoupling protein 4 (UCP4) and F0F1-ATP synthase are spatially separated to eliminate competition for the proton motive force. We found that UCP4, F0F1-ATP synthase, and the mitochondrial marker voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) have various expression levels in different mitochondria, supporting the hypothesis of mitochondrial heterogeneity. Our experimental results further revealed that UCP4 is preferentially localized in close vicinity to VDAC, presumably at the inner boundary membrane, whereas F0F1-ATP synthase is more centrally located at the cristae membrane. The data suggest that UCP4 cannot compete for protons because of its spatial separation from both the proton pumps and the ATP synthase. Thus, mitochondrial morphology precludes UCP4 from acting as an uncoupler of oxidative phosphorylation but is consistent with the view that UCP4 may dissipate the excessive proton gradient, which is usually associated with ROS production. PMID:25535394

  6. Spatial Integration under Contextual Control in a Virtual Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molet, Mikael; Gambet, Boris; Bugallo, Mehdi; Miller, Ralph R.

    2012-01-01

    The role of context was examined in the selection and integration of independently learned spatial relationships. Using a dynamic 3D virtual environment, participants learned one spatial relationship between landmarks A and B which was established in one virtual context (e.g., A is left of B) and a different spatial relationship which was…

  7. Temporal Evolution of Spatial Computations for Visuomotor Control

    PubMed Central

    Reichenbach, Alexandra; Franklin, Sae; Diedrichsen, Jörn

    2016-01-01

    Goal-directed reaching movements are guided by visual feedback from both target and hand. The classical view is that the brain extracts information about target and hand positions from a visual scene, calculates a difference vector between them, and uses this estimate to control the movement. Here we show that during fast feedback control, this computation is not immediate, but evolves dynamically over time. Immediately after a change in the visual scene, the motor system generates independent responses to the errors in hand and target location. Only about 200 ms later, the changes in target and hand positions are combined appropriately in the response, slowly converging to the true difference vector. Therefore, our results provide evidence for the temporal evolution of spatial computations in the human visuomotor system, in which the accurate difference vector computation is first estimated by a fast approximation. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The dominant view regarding the neural control of reaching is that the visuomotor system controls movement based on the difference vector—the difference between the positions of the hand and target. We directly test this theory by measuring the responses to visual perturbations over a large range of possible variations in both target and hand displacements. By modeling the nonlinearity of the feedback response, we were able to reveal the temporal evolution of the underlying computations. The visuomotor system first uses an approximation to the difference vector computation, simply combining the nonlinear responses to cursor and target displacements, only arriving at the correct difference vector calculation 200 ms later. PMID:26911681

  8. Evidence of short spatial variability of the equatorial electrojet at close longitudinal separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekhar, N. Phani; Arora, Kusumita; Nagarajan, Nandini

    2014-12-01

    The characteristics of longitudinal variability of equatorial electrojet (EEJ) and counter electrojet (CEJ), presented in this study, are based on concurrent observations from a hitherto unsampled region of the world to examine the (1) degree of correlation between hourly means and monthly averaged hourly means of ground observations with equatorial electrojet climatological model (EEJM-2.0), (2) day-to-day longitudinal variability of EEJ strength between the pairs of sites, and (3) longitudinal variability in occurrences of counter electrojet. The analyses are based on the data obtained from an observatory and three new remote sites in the northern Indian Ocean at a longitudinal separation of approximately 15°: Hyderabad (HYB) and Vencode (VEN) at 77° E and Port Blair (PBR) and Campbell Bay (CBY) at 93° E, for a period of 4 months during Lloyd's D-season (November 2011 to February 2012) and comparison with the EEJM-2.0 based on CHAMP satellite data. At both longitudes, the overall correlation of monthly mean hourly values (i.e., from 05:00 to 19:00 LT) between the observed EEJ strength and modeled current density from EEJM-2.0 is good ( r > 0.8). However, a significant lack of correlation is witnessed on day-to-day peak values (i.e., 12:00 LT) between the observed variations and the model at both sites. Further, a comparison of noontime peaks between the two sites shows a considerable day-to-day variability. A large number of CEJs (43 events) are recorded during the study: at CBY (15 events) and VEN (28 events). Analyses of the CEJ events highlight the variability of CEJ phenomena in terms of amplitude, dates, and time of occurrence over 15° longitude separation. The local nature of perturbations causing CEJ is evident; the possible factors are being non-migrating eastward and westward propagating diurnal tides and local meteorological phenomena associated with upper mesospheric temperature, wind, and density variations.

  9. Control of laminar separation over airfoils by acoustic excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, K. B. M. Q.; Mckinzie, D. J.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of acoustic excitation in reducing laminar separation over two-dimensional airfoils at low angles of attack is investigated experimentally. Airfoils of two different cross sections, each with two different chord lengths, are studied in the chord Reynolds number range of 25,000 is less than R sub c is less than 100,000. While keeping the amplitude of the excitation induced velocity perturbation a constant, it is found that the most effective frequency scales as U (sup 3/2)(sub infinity). The parameter St/R (sup 1/2)(sub c), corresponding to the most effective f sub p for all the cases studied, falls in the range of 0.02 to 0.03, St being the Strouhal number based on the chord.

  10. Perceptual and Cognitive Load Interact to Control the Spatial Focus of Attention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linnell, Karina J.; Caparos, Serge

    2011-01-01

    Caparos and Linnell (2009, 2010) used a variable-separation flanker paradigm to show that (a) when cognitive load is low, increasing perceptual load causes spatial attention to focus and (b) when perceptual load is high, decreasing cognitive load causes spatial attention to focus. Here, we tested whether the effects of perceptual and cognitive…

  11. Pilot and Controller Evaluations of Separation Function Allocation in Air Traffic Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wing, David; Prevot, Thomas; Morey, Susan; Lewis, Timothy; Martin, Lynne; Johnson, Sally; Cabrall, Christopher; Como, Sean; Homola, Jeffrey; Sheth-Chandra, Manasi; Mercer, Joey

    2013-01-01

    Two human-in-the-loop simulation experiments were conducted in coordinated fashion to investigate the allocation of separation assurance functions between ground and air and between humans and automation. The experiments modeled a mixed-operations concept in which aircraft receiving ground-based separation services shared the airspace with aircraft providing their own separation service (i.e., self-separation). Ground-based separation was provided by air traffic controllers without automation tools, with tools, or by ground-based automation with controllers in a managing role. Airborne self-separation was provided by airline pilots using self-separation automation enabled by airborne surveillance technology. The two experiments, one pilot-focused and the other controller-focused, addressed selected key issues of mixed operations, assuming the starting point of current-day operations and modeling an emergence of NextGen technologies and procedures. In the controller-focused experiment, the impact of mixed operations on controller performance was assessed at four stages of NextGen implementation. In the pilot-focused experiment, the limits to which pilots with automation tools could take full responsibility for separation from ground-controlled aircraft were tested. Results indicate that the presence of self-separating aircraft had little impact on the controllers' ability to provide separation services for ground-controlled aircraft. Overall performance was best in the most automated environment in which all aircraft were data communications equipped, ground-based separation was highly automated, and self-separating aircraft had access to trajectory intent information for all aircraft. In this environment, safe, efficient, and highly acceptable operations could be achieved for twice today's peak airspace throughput. In less automated environments, reduced trajectory intent exchange and manual air traffic control limited the safely achievable airspace throughput and

  12. A Belief-Based Model of Air Traffic Controllers Performing Separation Assurance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landry, S.J.

    2009-01-01

    A model of an air traffic controller performing a separation assurance task was produced. The model was designed to be simple to use and deploy in a simulator, but still provide realistic behavior. The model is based upon an evaluation of the safety function of the controller for separation assurance, and utilizes fast and frugal heuristics and belief networks to establish a knowledge set for the controller model. Based on this knowledge set, the controller acts to keep aircraft separated. Validation results are provided to demonstrate the model s performance.

  13. Temporal and spatial control of gene expression in horticultural crops.

    PubMed

    Dutt, Manjul; Dhekney, Sadanand A; Soriano, Leonardo; Kandel, Raju; Grosser, Jude W

    2014-01-01

    Biotechnology provides plant breeders an additional tool to improve various traits desired by growers and consumers of horticultural crops. It also provides genetic solutions to major problems affecting horticultural crops and can be a means for rapid improvement of a cultivar. With the availability of a number of horticultural genome sequences, it has become relatively easier to utilize these resources to identify DNA sequences for both basic and applied research. Promoters play a key role in plant gene expression and the regulation of gene expression. In recent years, rapid progress has been made on the isolation and evaluation of plant-derived promoters and their use in horticultural crops, as more and more species become amenable to genetic transformation. Our understanding of the tools and techniques of horticultural plant biotechnology has now evolved from a discovery phase to an implementation phase. The availability of a large number of promoters derived from horticultural plants opens up the field for utilization of native sequences and improving crops using precision breeding. In this review, we look at the temporal and spatial control of gene expression in horticultural crops and the usage of a variety of promoters either isolated from horticultural crops or used in horticultural crop improvement. PMID:26504550

  14. Temporal and spatial control of gene expression in horticultural crops

    PubMed Central

    Dutt, Manjul; Dhekney, Sadanand A; Soriano, Leonardo; Kandel, Raju; Grosser, Jude W

    2014-01-01

    Biotechnology provides plant breeders an additional tool to improve various traits desired by growers and consumers of horticultural crops. It also provides genetic solutions to major problems affecting horticultural crops and can be a means for rapid improvement of a cultivar. With the availability of a number of horticultural genome sequences, it has become relatively easier to utilize these resources to identify DNA sequences for both basic and applied research. Promoters play a key role in plant gene expression and the regulation of gene expression. In recent years, rapid progress has been made on the isolation and evaluation of plant-derived promoters and their use in horticultural crops, as more and more species become amenable to genetic transformation. Our understanding of the tools and techniques of horticultural plant biotechnology has now evolved from a discovery phase to an implementation phase. The availability of a large number of promoters derived from horticultural plants opens up the field for utilization of native sequences and improving crops using precision breeding. In this review, we look at the temporal and spatial control of gene expression in horticultural crops and the usage of a variety of promoters either isolated from horticultural crops or used in horticultural crop improvement. PMID:26504550

  15. Targeted Intracellular Delivery of Proteins with Spatial and Temporal Control

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    While a host of methods exist to deliver genetic materials or small molecules to cells, very few are available for protein delivery to the cytosol. We describe a modular, light-activated nanocarrier that transports proteins into cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis and delivers the cargo to the cytosol by light triggered endosomal escape. The platform is based on hollow gold nanoshells (HGN) with polyhistidine tagged proteins attached through an avidity-enhanced, nickel chelation linking layer; here, we used green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a model deliverable cargo. Endosomal uptake of the GFP loaded nanocarrier was mediated by a C-end Rule (CendR) internalizing peptide fused to the GFP. Focused femtosecond pulsed-laser excitation triggered protein release from the nanocarrier and endosome disruption, and the released protein was capable of targeting the nucleoli, a model intracellular organelle. We further demonstrate the generality of the approach by loading and releasing Sox2 and p53. This method for targeting of individual cells, with resolution similar to microinjection, provides spatial and temporal control over protein delivery. PMID:25490248

  16. Evidence for two spatially separated UV continuum emitting regions in the Cloverleaf broad absorption line quasar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sluse, D.; Hutsemékers, D.; Anguita, T.; Braibant, L.; Riaud, P.

    2015-10-01

    Testing the standard Shakura-Sunyaev model of accretion is a challenging task because the central region of quasars where accretion takes place is unresolved with telescopes. The analysis of microlensing in gravitationally lensed quasars is one of the few techniques that can test this model, yielding to the measurement of the size and of temperature profile of the accretion disc. We present spectroscopic observations of the gravitationally lensed broad absorption line quasar H1413+117, which reveal partial microlensing of the continuum emission that appears to originate from two separated regions: a microlensed region, corresponding the compact accretion disc; and a non-microlensed region, more extended and contributing to at least 30% of the total UV-continuum flux. Because this extended continuum is occulted by the broad absorption line clouds, it is not associated with the host galaxy, but rather with light scattered in the neighbourhood of the central engine. We measure the amplitude of microlensing of the compact continuum over the rest-frame wavelength range 1000-7000 Å. Following a Bayesian scheme, we confront our measurements to microlensing simulations of an accretion disc with a temperature varying as T ∝ R-1/ν. We find a most likely source half-light radius of R1/2 = 0.61 × 1016cm (i.e., 0.002 pc) at 0.18 μm, and a most-likely index of ν = 0.4. The standard disc (ν = 4/3) model is not ruled out by our data, and is found within the 95% confidence interval associated with our measurements. We demonstrate that, for H1413+117, the existence of an extended continuum in addition to the disc emission only has a small impact on the inferred disc parameters, and is unlikely to solve the tension between the microlensing source size and standard disc sizes, as previously reported in the literature. Based on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the Paranal Observatory (Chile). ESO program ID: 386.B-0337.Appendices A and B are available in electronic form

  17. A fuzzy controlled three-phase centrifuge for waste separation

    SciTech Connect

    Parkinson, W.J.; Smith, R.E.; Miller, N.

    1998-02-01

    The three-phase centrifuge technology discussed in this paper was developed by Neal Miller, president of Centech, Inc. The three-phase centrifuge is an excellent device for cleaning up oil field and refinery wastes which are typically composed of hydrocarbons, water, and solids. The technology is unique. It turns the waste into salable oil, reusable water, and landfill-able solids. No secondary waste is produced. The problem is that only the inventor can set up and run the equipment well enough to provide an optimal cleanup. Demand for this device has far exceeded a one man operation. There is now a need for several centrifuges to be operated at different locations at the same time. This has produced a demand for an intelligent control system, one that could replace a highly skilled operator, or at least supplement the skills of a less experienced operator. The control problem is ideally suited to fuzzy logic, since the centrifuge is a highly complicated machine operated entirely by the skill and experience of the operator. A fuzzy control system was designed for and used with the centrifuge.

  18. Optimizing and controlling earthmoving operations using spatial technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alshibani, Adel

    This thesis presents a model designed for optimizing, tracking, and controlling earthmoving operations. The proposed model utilizes, Genetic Algorithm (GA), Linear Programming (LP), and spatial technologies including Global Positioning Systems (GPS) and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to support the management functions of the developed model. The model assists engineers and contractors in selecting near optimum crew formations in planning phase and during construction, using GA and LP supported by the Pathfinder Algorithm developed in a GIS environment. GA is used in conjunction with a set of rules developed to accelerate the optimization process and to avoid generating and evaluating hypothetical and unrealistic crew formations. LP is used to determine quantities of earth to be moved from different borrow pits and to be placed at different landfill sites to meet project constraints and to minimize the cost of these earthmoving operations. On the one hand, GPS is used for onsite data collection and for tracking construction equipment in near real-time. On the other hand, GIS is employed to automate data acquisition and to analyze the collected spatial data. The model is also capable of reconfiguring crew formations dynamically during the construction phase while site operations are in progress. The optimization of the crew formation considers: (1) construction time, (2) construction direct cost, or (3) construction total cost. The model is also capable of generating crew formations to meet, as close as possible, specified time and/or cost constraints. In addition, the model supports tracking and reporting of project progress utilizing the earned-value concept and the project ratio method with modifications that allow for more accurate forecasting of project time and cost at set future dates and at completion. The model is capable of generating graphical and tabular reports. The developed model has been implemented in prototype software, using Object

  19. Unexpected observation of spatially separated Kondo scattering and ferromagnetism in Ta alloyed anatase TiO2 thin films

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, T. P.; Gopinadhan, K.; Motapothula, M.; Saha, S.; Huang, Z.; Dhar, S.; Patra, A.; Lu, W. M.; Telesio, F.; Pallecchi, I.; Ariando; Marré, D.; Venkatesan, T.

    2015-01-01

    We report the observation of spatially separated Kondo scattering and ferromagnetism in anatase Ta0.06Ti0.94O2 thin films as a function of thickness (10–200 nm). The Kondo behavior observed in thicker films is suppressed on decreasing thickness and vanishes below ~25 nm. In 200 nm film, transport data could be fitted to a renormalization group theory for Kondo scattering though the carrier density in this system is lower by two orders of magnitude, the magnetic entity concentration is larger by a similar magnitude and there is strong electronic correlation compared to a conventional system such as Cu with magnetic impurities. However, ferromagnetism is observed at all thicknesses with magnetic moment per unit thickness decreasing beyond 10 nm film thickness. The simultaneous presence of Kondo and ferromagnetism is explained by the spatial variation of defects from the interface to surface which results in a dominantly ferromagnetic region closer to substrate-film interface while the Kondo scattering is dominant near the surface and decreasing towards the interface. This material system enables us to study the effect of neighboring presence of two competing magnetic phenomena and the possibility for tuning them. PMID:26265554

  20. Prokaryotes in Subsoil—Evidence for a Strong Spatial Separation of Different Phyla by Analysing Co-occurrence Networks

    PubMed Central

    Uksa, Marie; Schloter, Michael; Endesfelder, David; Kublik, Susanne; Engel, Marion; Kautz, Timo; Köpke, Ulrich; Fischer, Doreen

    2015-01-01

    Microbial communities in soil provide a wide range of ecosystem services. On the small scale, nutrient rich hotspots in soil developed from the activities of animals or plants are important drivers for the composition of microbial communities and their functional patterns. However, in subsoil, the spatial heterogeneity of microbes with differing lifestyles has been rarely considered so far. In this study, the phylogenetic composition of the bacterial and archaeal microbiome based on 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing was investigated in the soil compartments bulk soil, drilosphere, and rhizosphere in top- and in the subsoil of an agricultural field. With co-occurrence network analysis, the spatial separation of typically oligotrophic and copiotrophic microbes was assessed. Four bacterial clusters were identified and attributed to bulk topsoil, bulk subsoil, drilosphere, and rhizosphere. The bacterial phyla Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes, representing mostly copiotrophic bacteria, were affiliated mainly to the rhizosphere and drilosphere—both in topsoil and subsoil. Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Gemmatimonadetes, Planctomycetes, and Verrucomicrobia, bacterial phyla which harbor many oligotrophic bacteria, were the most abundant groups in bulk subsoil. The bacterial core microbiome in this soil was estimated to cover 7.6% of the bacterial sequencing reads including both oligotrophic and copiotrophic bacteria. In contrast the archaeal core microbiome includes 56% of the overall archaeal diversity. Thus, the spatial variability of nutrient quality and quantity strongly shapes the bacterial community composition and their interaction in subsoil, whereas archaea build a stable backbone of the soil prokaryotes due to their low variability in the different soil compartments. PMID:26635741

  1. Control and reduction of unsteady pressure loads in separated shock wave turbulent boundary layer interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolling, David S.; Barter, John W.

    1995-01-01

    The focus was on developing means of controlling and reducing unsteady pressure loads in separated shock wave turbulent boundary layer interactions. Section 1 describes how vortex generators can be used to effectively reduce loads in compression ramp interaction, while Section 2 focuses on the effects of 'boundary-layer separators' on the same interaction.

  2. Mineral separation and recycle in a Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballou, E. V.

    1982-01-01

    The background of the mineral nutrition needs of plants are examined along with the applicability of mineral control and separation to a controlled ecological life support system (CELSS). Steps that may be taken in a program to analytically define and experimentally test key mineral control concepts in the nutritional and waste processing loops of a CELSS are delineated.

  3. Toward spatial control of gold nanorod surface functionalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eller, Jonathan R.

    Gold nanorods (GNRs) show much promise for applications in biological, optoelectronic and energy applications. The resonant generation of a localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) at the GNR surface results in interesting optical properties and unique interactions with molecules. Combined with their biocompatibility, ease of synthesis and facile surface functionalization, these anisotropic metal particles are excellent scaffolds for the study of the interactions between nanoscale surfaces and their chemical/biological environments. Regardless of the application, however, GNR utility will not be fully realized until the chemical nature of the surface is understood and controlled. GNRs can enhance various photophysical properties of molecules. In the case of two-photon absorption (TPA), cross-section enhancements have been shown to increase with strong distance-dependence. Here, a dual approach for the conjugation of a TPA chromophore to GNRs is presented, relying on layer-by- layer (LbL) polymer wrapping and direct thiol coating of the same parent chromophore structure. Together, these approaches allow for estimated chromophore-particle distances from <1nm to more than 15 nm. Composites were confirmed using conventional nanoparticle characterization methods. Imaging of GNR polymer shells indicated anisotropic composite structures, as confirmed by both conventional and cryo-TEM. Optical characterizations were performed using two-photon excited fluorescence and Z-scan techniques, to probe the TPA enhancement. The intrinsic nonlinear optical properties of GNRs is shown to contribute strongly to these measurements, suggesting the utility of these materials for bi-modal imaging platforms. GNR properties, like their shape, are anisotropic. The LSPR-induced near- fields are heterogeneously distributed on the nanorod surface, with the tips being much "hotter" than the sides. To understand and utilize fully the spatially- dependent interactions of GNRs with their

  4. Closed Loop Active Flow Separation Detection and Control in a Multistage Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bright, Michelle M.; Culley, Dennis E.; Braunscheidel, Edward P.; Welch, Gerard E.

    2005-01-01

    Active closed loop flow control was successfully demonstrated on a full annulus of stator vanes in a low speed axial compressor. Two independent methods of detecting separated flow conditions on the vane suction surface were developed. The first technique detects changes in static pressure along the vane suction surface, while the second method monitors variation in the potential field of the downstream rotor. Both methods may feasibly be used in future engines employing embedded flow control technology. In response to the detection of separated conditions, injection along the suction surface of each vane was used. Injected mass flow on the suction surface of stator vanes is known to reduce separation and the resulting limitation on static pressure rise due to lowered diffusion in the vane passage. A control algorithm was developed which provided a proportional response of the injected mass flow to the degree of separation, thereby minimizing the performance penalty on the compressor system.

  5. Spatially Explicit Analyses of Anopheline Mosquitoes Indoor Resting Density: Implications for Malaria Control

    PubMed Central

    Kamdem, Colince; Fouet, Caroline; Etouna, Joachim; Etoa, François-Xavier; Simard, Frédéric; Besansky, Nora J.; Costantini, Carlo

    2012-01-01

    Background The question of sampling and spatial aggregation of malaria vectors is central to vector control efforts and estimates of transmission. Spatial patterns of anopheline populations are complex because mosquitoes' habitats and behaviors are strongly heterogeneous. Analyses of spatially referenced counts provide a powerful approach to delineate complex distribution patterns, and contributions of these methods in the study and control of malaria vectors must be carefully evaluated. Methodology/Principal Findings We used correlograms, directional variograms, Local Indicators of Spatial Association (LISA) and the Spatial Analysis by Distance IndicEs (SADIE) to examine spatial patterns of Indoor Resting Densities (IRD) in two dominant malaria vectors sampled with a 5×5 km grid over a 2500 km2 area in the forest domain of Cameroon. SADIE analyses revealed that the distribution of Anopheles gambiae was different from regular or random, whereas there was no evidence of spatial pattern in Anopheles funestus (Ia = 1.644, Pa<0.05 and Ia = 1.464, Pa>0.05, respectively). Correlograms and variograms showed significant spatial autocorrelations at small distance lags, and indicated the presence of large clusters of similar values of abundance in An. gambiae while An. funestus was characterized by smaller clusters. The examination of spatial patterns at a finer spatial scale with SADIE and LISA identified several patches of higher than average IRD (hot spots) and clusters of lower than average IRD (cold spots) for the two species. Significant changes occurred in the overall spatial pattern, spatial trends and clusters when IRDs were aggregated at the house level rather than the locality level. All spatial analyses unveiled scale-dependent patterns that could not be identified by traditional aggregation indices. Conclusions/Significance Our study illustrates the importance of spatial analyses in unraveling the complex spatial patterns of malaria vectors, and

  6. Long-range coupling of electron-hole pairs in spatially separated organic donor-acceptor layers

    PubMed Central

    Nakanotani, Hajime; Furukawa, Taro; Morimoto, Kei; Adachi, Chihaya

    2016-01-01

    Understanding exciton behavior in organic semiconductor molecules is crucial for the development of organic semiconductor-based excitonic devices such as organic light-emitting diodes and organic solar cells, and the tightly bound electron-hole pair forming an exciton is normally assumed to be localized on an organic semiconducting molecule. We report the observation of long-range coupling of electron-hole pairs in spatially separated electron-donating and electron-accepting molecules across a 10-nanometers-thick spacer layer. We found that the exciton energy can be tuned over 100 megaelectron volts and the fraction of delayed fluorescence can be increased by adjusting the spacer-layer thickness. Furthermore, increasing the spacer-layer thickness produced an organic light-emitting diode with an electroluminescence efficiency nearly eight times higher than that of a device without a spacer layer. Our results demonstrate the first example of a long-range coupled charge-transfer state between electron-donating and electron-accepting molecules in a working device. PMID:26933691

  7. Large-Eddy Simulations of Plasma Control for Separated Supersonic Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisek, Nicholas; Poggie, Jonathan

    2012-11-01

    The Navier-Stokes equations were solved using a high-fidelity time-implicit numerical scheme and an implicit large-eddy simulation approach to investigate plasma-based flow control for supersonic flow over a compression ramp. The configuration includes a flat-plate region to develop an equilibrium turbulent boundary-layer at Mach 2.25, which was validated against a set of experimental measurements. The fully turbulent boundary-layer flow traveled over a 24° ramp and produced an unsteady shock-induced separation. A control strategy to suppress the separation through a magnetically-driven gliding-arc actuator was explored. The size, strength, and placement of the actuator were developed based on recent experiments. Three control scenarios were examined: steady control, pulsing with a 50% duty cycle, and Joule heating. The results show the control mechanism reduced the time-mean separation length for all three situations. The case without pulsing and Joule heating was the most effective, with a reduction in the separation length by more than 75%. The controller was also found to significantly reduce the low-frequency content of the turbulent kinetic energy spectra within the separated region and reduce the total kinetic energy downstream of reattachment. Funded in part by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, under a laboratory task monitored by Dr. J. Schmisseur, AFOSR/RSA. The computational resources were supported by a grant of supercomputer time from the U.S. Department of Defense.

  8. 33 CFR 239.7 - Separation of flood control works from urban drainage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... from urban drainage. 239.7 Section 239.7 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT... COVERED FLOOD CONTROL CHANNELS § 239.7 Separation of flood control works from urban drainage. Covered channels are likely to be considered in boundary areas demarking urban drainage and flood...

  9. 33 CFR 239.7 - Separation of flood control works from urban drainage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... from urban drainage. 239.7 Section 239.7 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT... COVERED FLOOD CONTROL CHANNELS § 239.7 Separation of flood control works from urban drainage. Covered channels are likely to be considered in boundary areas demarking urban drainage and flood...

  10. 33 CFR 239.7 - Separation of flood control works from urban drainage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... from urban drainage. 239.7 Section 239.7 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT... COVERED FLOOD CONTROL CHANNELS § 239.7 Separation of flood control works from urban drainage. Covered channels are likely to be considered in boundary areas demarking urban drainage and flood...

  11. 33 CFR 239.7 - Separation of flood control works from urban drainage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... from urban drainage. 239.7 Section 239.7 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT... COVERED FLOOD CONTROL CHANNELS § 239.7 Separation of flood control works from urban drainage. Covered channels are likely to be considered in boundary areas demarking urban drainage and flood...

  12. Parental Psychological Control and Dysfunctional Separation--Individuation: A Tale of Two Different Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kins, Evie; Soenens, Bart; Beyers, Wim

    2012-01-01

    This study examined associations between psychologically controlling parenting and two possible manifestations of problematic separation--individuation (i.e., dysfunctional dependence and dysfunctional independence). To explain these associations, it has been argued that psychological control is an inherently independence-stifling parenting…

  13. A Separation Control CFD Validation Test Case. Part 1; Baseline and Steady Suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenblatt, David; Paschal, Keith B.; Yao, Chung-Sheng; Harris, Jerome; Schaeffler, Norman W.; Washburn, Anthony E.

    2004-01-01

    Low speed flow separation over a wall-mounted hump, and its control using steady suction, were studied experimentally in order to generate a data set for a workshop aimed at validating CFD turbulence models. The baseline and controlled data sets comprised static and dynamic surface pressure measurements, flow field measurements using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and wall shear stress obtained via oil-film interferometry. In addition to the specific test cases studied, surface pressures for a wide variety of conditions were reported for different Reynolds numbers and suction rates. Stereoscopic PIV and oil-film flow visualization indicated that the baseline separated flow field was mainly two- dimensional. With the application of control, some three-dimensionality was evident in the spanwise variation of pressure recovery, reattachment location and spanwise pressure fluctuations. Part 2 of this paper, under preparation for the AIAA Meeting in Reno 2005, considers separation control by means of zero-efflux oscillatory blowing.

  14. A Separation Control CFD Validation Test Case. Part 1; Baseline and Steady Suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenblatt, David; Paschal, Keith B.; Yao, Chung-Sheng; Harris, jerome; Schaeffler, Norman W.; Washburn, Anthony E.

    2004-01-01

    Low speed flow separation over a wall-mounted hump, and its control using steady suction, were studied experimentally in order to generate a data set for a workshop aimed at validating CFD turbulence models. The baseline and controlled data sets comprised static and dynamic surface pressure measurements, flow field measurements using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and wall shear stress obtained via oil-film interferometry. In addition to the specific test cases studied, surface pressures for a wide variety of conditions were reported for different Reynolds numbers and suction rates. Stereoscopic PIV and oil-film flow visualization indicated that the baseline separated flow field was mainly two-dimensional. With the application of control, some three-dimensionality was evident in the spanwise variation of pressure recovery, reattachment location and spanwise pressure fluctuations. Part 2 of this paper, under preparation for the AIAA Meeting in Reno 2005, considers separation control by means of zero-efflux oscillatory blowing.

  15. Injection slot location for boundary-layer control in shock-induced separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viswanath, P. R.; Sankaran, L.; Sagdeo, P. M.; Narasimha, R.; Prabhu, A.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the effect of tangential air injection, when the injection slot is located inside of what would otherwise have been the dead air zone in a separated flow, in controlling shock-induced turbulent boundary layer separation is presented. The experiments were carried out at a free-stream Mach number of 2.5 in the separated flow induced by a compression corner with a 20 deg angle. The observations made were wall static pressures, pitot profiles, and schlieren visualizations of the flow. The results show that the present location for injection is more effective in suppressing boundary-layer separation than the more conventional one, where the slot is located upstream of where separation would occur in the absence of injection.

  16. Glow Discharge Plasma Demonstrated for Separation Control in the Low-Pressure Turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashpis, David e.; Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2004-01-01

    Flow separation in the low-pressure turbine (LPT) is a major barrier that limits further improvements of aerodynamic designs of turbine airfoils. The separation is responsible for performance degradation, and it prevents the design of highly loaded airfoils. The separation can be delayed, reduced, or eliminated completely if flow control techniques are used. Successful flow control technology will enable breakthrough improvements in gas turbine performance and design. The focus of this research project was the development and experimental demonstration of active separation control using glow discharge plasma (GDP) actuators in flow conditions simulating the LPT. The separation delay was shown to be successful, laying the foundation for further development of the technologies to practical application in the LPT. In a fluid mechanics context, the term "flow control" means a technology by which a very small input results in a very large effect on the flow. In this project, the interest is to eliminate or delay flow separation on LPT airfoils by using an active flow control approach, in which disturbances are dynamically inserted into the flow, they interact with the flow, and they delay separation. The disturbances can be inserted using a localized, externally powered, actuating device, examples are acoustic, pneumatic, or mechanical devices that generate vibrations, flow oscillations, or pulses. A variety of flow control devices have been demonstrated in recent years in the context of the external aerodynamics of aircraft wings and airframes, where the incoming flow is quiescent or of a very low turbulence level. However, the flow conditions in the LPT are significantly different because there are high levels of disturbances in the incoming flow that are characterized by high free-stream turbulence intensity. In addition, the Reynolds number, which characterizes the viscous forces in the flow and is related to the flow speed, is very low in the LPT passages.

  17. Abiotic and biotic controls of spatial pattern at alpine treeline

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Malanson, George P.; Xiao, Ningchuan; Alftine, K.J.; Bekker, Mathew; Butler, David R.; Brown, Daniel G.; Cairns, David M.; Fagre, Daniel; Walsh, Stephen J.

    2000-01-01

    At alpine treeline, trees and krummholz forms affect the environment in ways that increase their growth and reproduction. We assess the way in which these positive feedbacks combine in spatial patterns to alter the environment in the neighborhood of existing plants. The research is significant because areas of alpine tundra are susceptible to encroachment by woody species as climate changes. Moreover, understanding the general processes of plant invasion is important. The importance of spatial pattern has been recognized, but the spatial pattern of positive feedbacks per se has not been explored in depth. We present a linked set of models of vegetation change at an alpine forest-tundra ecotone. Our aim is to create models that are as simple as possible in order to test specific hypotheses. We present results from a model of the resource averaging hypothesis and the positive feedback switch hypothesis of treelines. We compare the patterns generated by the models to patterns observed in fine scale remotely sensed data.

  18. Generation of a multi-qubit W entangled state through spatially separated semiconductor quantum-dot-molecules in cavity-quantum electrodynamics arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Siping; Yu, Rong; Li, Jiahua; Wu, Ying

    2014-04-07

    Generating entangled states attract tremendous interest as the most vivid manifestation of nonlocality of quantum mechanics and also for emerging applications in quantum information processing (QIP). Here, we propose theoretically a scheme for the deterministic generation of a three-qubit W sate with three semiconductor quantum-dot-molecules (QDMs) trapped in spatially separated cavities connected by optical fibers. The proposed scheme takes full advantage of the voltage-controlled tunnelling effects in QDMs, which induces the quantum coherence and further controls the generation of the W entangled state. The influences of the system parameters and various decoherence processes including spontaneous decay and photon leakage on the fidelity of the W state are discussed in details. Numerical results indicate that our scheme is not only robust against these decoherence factors but also insensitive to the deviation of the system parameters from the ideal conditions. Furthermore, the present scheme can be directly extended to realize an N-qubit W state. Also, this scheme can be generically transferred to other physical systems, including circuit quantum electrodynamics and photonic crystal cavities. The results obtained here may be useful in real experiments for realizing QIP in a solid-state platform.

  19. Controllable Phase Separation by Boc-Modified Lipophilic Acid as a Multifunctional Extractant.

    PubMed

    Tao, Kai; Adler-Abramovich, Lihi; Gazit, Ehud

    2015-01-01

    While phase separation of immiscible liquid-liquid systems has become increasingly significant in diverse areas, the irreversible nature limits their further application in controllable extraction-concentration or capture-release fields. There is a need for the development of simple, efficient and reversible methods for numerous research and industrial extraction and separation applications. We envisioned Boc-modified lipophilic acids as a simple model for such use based on the studies of the multi-phase transitions of Boc-modified supramolecular polymeric systems. Here, we demonstrate that in the presence of Boc-7-aminoheptanoic acid (Boc-7), phase separation occurs in mixtures of miscible organic solvent and water. The separation behavior was confirmed by differential colorimetric development in aqueous and organic phases using methyl orange staining assays. Component substitution experiments verified that the phase separation results from the subtle balance between the aggregation and the solvation forces of Boc-7, and is reversible by adjusting the solution pH. Owing to the intrinsic hydrophobic properties of the organic phase and the hydrogen bonding-forming ability of the carboxyl group of Boc-7, the phase separation system captures and releases Sudan Red, fluorescein, and streptavidin in a controllable manner. Consequently, a reversible and simple phase separation system can be designed as a multifunctional extractant. PMID:26627307

  20. Controllable Phase Separation by Boc-Modified Lipophilic Acid as a Multifunctional Extractant

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Kai; Adler-Abramovich, Lihi; Gazit, Ehud

    2015-01-01

    While phase separation of immiscible liquid-liquid systems has become increasingly significant in diverse areas, the irreversible nature limits their further application in controllable extraction-concentration or capture-release fields. There is a need for the development of simple, efficient and reversible methods for numerous research and industrial extraction and separation applications. We envisioned Boc-modified lipophilic acids as a simple model for such use based on the studies of the multi-phase transitions of Boc-modified supramolecular polymeric systems. Here, we demonstrate that in the presence of Boc-7-aminoheptanoic acid (Boc-7), phase separation occurs in mixtures of miscible organic solvent and water. The separation behavior was confirmed by differential colorimetric development in aqueous and organic phases using methyl orange staining assays. Component substitution experiments verified that the phase separation results from the subtle balance between the aggregation and the solvation forces of Boc-7, and is reversible by adjusting the solution pH. Owing to the intrinsic hydrophobic properties of the organic phase and the hydrogen bonding-forming ability of the carboxyl group of Boc-7, the phase separation system captures and releases Sudan Red, fluorescein, and streptavidin in a controllable manner. Consequently, a reversible and simple phase separation system can be designed as a multifunctional extractant. PMID:26627307

  1. Controllable Phase Separation by Boc-Modified Lipophilic Acid as a Multifunctional Extractant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Kai; Adler-Abramovich, Lihi; Gazit, Ehud

    2015-12-01

    While phase separation of immiscible liquid-liquid systems has become increasingly significant in diverse areas, the irreversible nature limits their further application in controllable extraction-concentration or capture-release fields. There is a need for the development of simple, efficient and reversible methods for numerous research and industrial extraction and separation applications. We envisioned Boc-modified lipophilic acids as a simple model for such use based on the studies of the multi-phase transitions of Boc-modified supramolecular polymeric systems. Here, we demonstrate that in the presence of Boc-7-aminoheptanoic acid (Boc-7), phase separation occurs in mixtures of miscible organic solvent and water. The separation behavior was confirmed by differential colorimetric development in aqueous and organic phases using methyl orange staining assays. Component substitution experiments verified that the phase separation results from the subtle balance between the aggregation and the solvation forces of Boc-7, and is reversible by adjusting the solution pH. Owing to the intrinsic hydrophobic properties of the organic phase and the hydrogen bonding-forming ability of the carboxyl group of Boc-7, the phase separation system captures and releases Sudan Red, fluorescein, and streptavidin in a controllable manner. Consequently, a reversible and simple phase separation system can be designed as a multifunctional extractant.

  2. Multi-interface Level Sensors and New Development in Monitoring and Control of Oil Separators

    PubMed Central

    Bukhari, Syed Faisal Ahmed; Yang, Wuqiang

    2006-01-01

    In the oil industry, huge saving may be made if suitable multi-interface level measurement systems are employed for effectively monitoring crude oil separators and efficient control of their operation. A number of techniques, e.g. externally mounted displacers, differential pressure transmitters and capacitance rod devices, have been developed to measure the separation process with gas, oil, water and other components. Because of the unavailability of suitable multi-interface level measurement systems, oil separators are currently operated by the trial-and-error approach. In this paper some conventional techniques, which have been used for level measurement in industry, and new development are discussed.

  3. A Matter of Balance: Motor Control is Related to Children's Spatial and Proportional Reasoning Skills.

    PubMed

    Frick, Andrea; Möhring, Wenke

    2015-01-01

    Recent research has shown close links between spatial and mathematical thinking and between spatial abilities and motor skills. However, longitudinal research examining the relations between motor, spatial, and mathematical skills is rare, and the nature of these relations remains unclear. The present study thus investigated the relation between children's motor control and their spatial and proportional reasoning. We measured 6-year-olds' spatial scaling (i.e., the ability to reason about different-sized spaces), their mental transformation skills, and their ability to balance on one leg as an index for motor control. One year later (N = 126), we tested the same children's understanding of proportions. We also assessed several control variables (verbal IQ and socio-economic status) as well as inhibitory control, visuo-spatial and verbal working memory. Stepwise hierarchical regressions showed that, after accounting for effects of control variables, children's balance skills significantly increased the explained variance in their spatial performance and proportional reasoning. Our results suggest specific relations between balance skills and spatial as well as proportional reasoning skills that cannot be explained by general differences in executive functioning or intelligence. PMID:26793157

  4. Glow Discharge Plasma Active Control of Separation at Low Pressure Turbine Conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.; Ashpis, David E.

    2002-11-01

    Active flow control of boundary-layer separation using glow-discharge plasma actuators is studied experimentally. Separation is induced on a flat plate installed in a closed-circuit wind tunnel by a shaped insert on the opposite wall. The flow conditions represent flow over the suction surface of a modern low-pressure-turbine airfoil. The Reynolds number, based on wetted plate length and nominal exit velocity, is varied from 50,000 to 300,000, covering cruise to takeoff conditions. Low (0.2%) and high (2.5%) free-stream turbulence intensities are set using passive grids. The base flow includes closed separation bubbles and non-reattaching separated flow, and is thoroughly documented using single-wire constant-temperature anemometry and static surface pressure measurements. A spanwise-oriented phased-plasma-array actuator, fabricated on a printed circuit board, is surface-flush-mounted upstream of the separation point and can provide forcing in a wide frequency range. Static surface pressure measurements and hot-wire anemometry of the controlled flow are performed and indicate that the glow-discharge plasma actuator is an effective device for separation control.

  5. Controlling the spatial arrangement of organic magnetic anions adsorbed on epitaxial graphene on Ru(0001).

    PubMed

    Stradi, Daniele; Garnica, Manuela; Díaz, Cristina; Calleja, Fabián; Barja, Sara; Martín, Nazario; Alcamí, Manuel; Vazquez de Parga, Amadeo L; Miranda, Rodolfo; Martín, Fernando

    2014-12-21

    Achieving control over the self-organization of functional molecules on graphene is critical for the development of graphene technology in organic electronic and spintronic. Here, by using a scanning tunneling microscope (STM), we show that the electron acceptor molecule 7,7',8,8'-tetracyano-p-quinodimethane (TCNQ) and its fluorinated derivative 2,3,5,6-tetrafluoro-7,7',8,8'-tetracyano-p-quinodimethane (F4-TCNQ), co-deposited on the surface of epitaxial graphene on Ru(0001), transform spontaneously into their corresponding magnetic anions and self-organize in two remarkably different structures. TCNQ forms densely packed linear magnetic arrays, while F4-TCNQ molecules remain as isolated non interacting magnets. With the help of density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we trace back the origin of this behavior in the competition between the intermolecular repulsion experienced by the individual charged anions, which tends to separate the molecules, and the delocalization of the electrons transferred from the surface to the molecules, which promotes the formation of molecular oligomers. Our results demonstrate that it is possible to control the spatial arrangement of organic magnetic anions co-adsorbed on a surface by means of chemical substitution, paving the way for the design of two-dimensional fully organic magnetic structures on graphene and on other surfaces. PMID:25382549

  6. Numerical modeling of separated flows in three-dimensional diffusers and application of synthetic jets for separation control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasheninnikov, S. Yu.; Pudovikov, D. E.; Torohov, S. A.

    2012-01-01

    Solving the problem of creating an environmentally friendly "green plane" implies development and implementation of several actions aimed at increasing airplane performance and reducing environmental contamination. One possible way to solve this problem is to reduce the powerplant weight, in particular, by decreasing its length. The airplane engine flowpath comprises transition ducts: those between the low- and high-pressure compressors, between the compressor and combustor, and between the high- and low-pressure turbines. In a modern high-bypass turbofan, the flowpath varies in the streamwise direction. Shorter transition ducts have greater curvature. Because of this, intensive separation may occur, which leads to increased losses in the flowpath and to significant growth of nonuniformity of flow parameters. Vast experience of numerical and experimental studies of unsteady separated flows has been accumulated by now. In many cases, however, these investigations are performed in a two-dimensional (2D) formulation, which is primarily caused by the high cost of three-dimensional (3D) unsteady calculations. The numerical and experimental work [1] shows that flows in diffuser ducts can have an essentially unsteady 3D structure. This is valid even for ducts modeling 2D configurations. This paper describes the results of a numerical study of the flow structure and its features in model S-shaped transition ducts, as well as the results of using a synthetic jet generator for flow control and for reduction of total pressure losses. Three-dimensional flows are numerically modeled by the unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) / RANS methods. The calculations show that the use of the synthetic jet generator can lead to duct loss reduction by 45%.

  7. Thinking in spatial terms: decoupling spatial representation from sensorimotor control in monkey posterior parietal areas 7a and LIP

    PubMed Central

    Chafee, Matthew V.; Crowe, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Perhaps the simplest and most complete description of the cerebral cortex is that it is a sensorimotor controller whose primary purpose is to represent stimuli and movements, and adaptively control the mapping between them. However, in order to think, the cerebral cortex has to generate patterns of neuronal activity that encode abstract, generalized information independently of ongoing sensorimotor events. A critical question confronting cognitive systems neuroscience at present therefore is how neural signals encoding abstract information emerge within the sensorimotor control networks of the brain. In this review, we approach that question in the context of the neural representation of space in posterior parietal cortex of non-human primates. We describe evidence indicating that parietal cortex generates a hierarchy of spatial representations with three basic levels: including (1) sensorimotor signals that are tightly coupled to stimuli or movements, (2) sensorimotor signals modified in strength or timing to mediate cognition (examples include attention, working memory, and decision-processing), as well as (3) signals that encode frankly abstract spatial information (such as spatial relationships or categories) generalizing across a wide diversity of specific stimulus conditions. Here we summarize the evidence for this hierarchy, and consider data showing that signals at higher levels derive from signals at lower levels. That in turn could help characterize neural mechanisms that derive a capacity for abstraction from sensorimotor experience. PMID:23355813

  8. Control of Polymer Phase Separation by Roughness Transfer Printing for 2D Microlens Arrays.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinyue; Gao, Naiwei; He, Yonglin; Liao, Shenglong; Zhang, Shiming; Wang, Yapei

    2016-07-01

    Great efforts have been devoted to the control of phase separation between blended polymers in terms of the advantages for engineering functional topologies. A simple and straightforward pathway through roughness transfer printing (RTP) is proposed to realize the control of polymer phase separation. The additional roughness difference, which is introduced by trace agarose transferred from a hydrogel stamp, offers a great effect on the rate of nucleation and coalescence orientation of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) protrusions grown from a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) network. Using a particular topography of agarose stamp and a proper growth time in toluene atmosphere, a 2D microlens array with high uniformity is obtained that shows great potential for optical applications. Moreover, the control of polymer phase separation was successfully extended to the collection and identification of fingerprints with a high degree of replication. PMID:27254465

  9. Experimental implementation of automatic 'cycle to cycle' control of a chiral simulated moving bed separation.

    PubMed

    Amanullah, Mohammad; Grossmann, Cristian; Mazzotti, Marco; Morari, Manfred; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2007-09-21

    In the absence of a suitable controller, currently simulated moving beds (SMBs) are operated suboptimally to cope with system uncertainties and to guarantee robustness of operation. Recently, we have developed a 'cycle to cycle' optimizing controller that not only makes use of minimal system information, i.e. only the Henry constants and average bed voidage, but also optimizes the process performance and taps the full economic potential of the SMB technology. The experimental implementation of the 'cycle to cycle' optimizing controller had been carried out for achiral separation. For chiral separation however, application of any online controller has not been possible because an appropriate online monitoring system has not been available. This work reports and discusses the first experimental implementation of the 'cycle to cycle' optimizing control for chiral separations. A mixture of guaifenesin enantiomers is separated on Chiralcel OD columns with ethanol as mobile phase in a eight-column four sections laboratory SMB unit. The results show that the controller, although using minimal information about the retention of the two enantiomers, is able to meet product and process specifications, can optimize the process performance, and is capable of rejecting disturbances that may occur during the operation of the SMB plant. PMID:17707852

  10. Active control of Boundary Layer Separation & Flow Distortion in Adverse Pressure Gradient Flows via Supersonic Microjets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvi, Farrukh S.; Gorton, Susan (Technical Monitor)

    2005-01-01

    Inlets to aircraft propulsion systems must supply flow to the compressor with minimal pressure loss, flow distortion or unsteadiness. Flow separation in internal flows such as inlets and ducts in aircraft propulsion systems and external flows such as over aircraft wings, is undesirable as it reduces the overall system performance. The aim of this research has been to understand the nature of separation and more importantly, to explore techniques to actively control this flow separation. In particular, the use of supersonic microjets as a means of controlling boundary layer separation was explored. The geometry used for the early part of this study was a simple diverging Stratford ramp, equipped with arrays of supersonic microjets. Initial results, based on the mean surface pressure distribution, surface flow visualization and Planar Laser Scattering (PLS) indicated a reverse flow region. We implemented supersonic microjets to control this separation and flow visualization results appeared to suggest that microjets have a favorable effect, at least to a certain extent. However, the details of the separated flow field were difficult to determine based on surface pressure distribution, surface flow patterns and PLS alone. It was also difficult to clearly determine the exact influence of the supersonic microjets on this flow. In the latter part of this study, the properties of this flow-field and the effect of supersonic microjets on its behavior were investigated in further detail using 2-component (planar) Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The results clearly show that the activation of microjets eliminated flow separation and resulted in a significant increase in the momentum of the fluid near the ramp surface. Also notable is the fact that the gain in momentum due to the elimination of flow separation is at least an order of magnitude larger (two orders of magnitude larger in most cases) than the momentum injected by the microjets and is accomplished with very

  11. Cobalt Ferrite Bearing Nitrogen-Doped Reduced Graphene Oxide Layers Spatially Separated with Microporous Carbon as Efficient Oxygen Reduction Electrocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Kashyap, Varchaswal; Singh, Santosh K; Kurungot, Sreekumar

    2016-08-17

    The present work discloses how high-quality dispersion of fine particles of cobalt ferrite (CF) could be attained on nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxide (CF/N-rGO) and how this material in association with a microporous carbon phase could deliver significantly enhanced activity toward electrochemical oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Our study indicates that the microporous carbon phase plays a critical role in spatially separating the layers of CF/N-rGO and in creating a favorable atmosphere to ensure the seamless distribution of the reactants to the active sites located on CF/N-rGO. In terms of the ORR current density, the heat-treated hybrid catalyst at 150 °C (CF/N-rGO-150) is found to be clearly outperforming (7.4 ± 0.5 mA/cm(2)) the state-of-the-art 20 wt % Pt-supported carbon catalyst (PtC) (5.4 ± 0.5 mA/cm(2)). The mass activity and stability of CF-N-rGO-150 are distinctly superior to PtC even after 5000 electrochemical cycles. As a realistic system level exploration of the catalyst, testing of a primary zinc-air battery could be demonstrated using CF/N-rGO-150 as the cathode catalyst. The battery is giving a galvanostatic discharge time of 15 h at a discharge current density of 20 mA/cm(2) and a specific capacity of ∼630 mAh g(-1) in 6 M KOH by using a Zn foil as the anode. Distinctly, the battery performance of this system is found to be superior to that of PtC in less concentrated KOH solution as the electrolyte. PMID:27464229

  12. Spatial separation of replisome arrest sites influences homologous recombination quality at a Tus/Ter-mediated replication fork barrier.

    PubMed

    Willis, Nicholas A; Scully, Ralph

    2016-07-17

    The Escherichia coli replication fork arrest complex Tus/Ter mediates site-specific replication fork arrest and homologous recombination (HR) on a mammalian chromosome, inducing both conservative "short tract" gene conversion (STGC) and error-prone "long tract" gene conversion (LTGC) products. We showed previously that bidirectional fork arrest is required for the generation of STGC products at Tus/Ter-stalled replication forks and that the HR mediators BRCA1, BRCA2 and Rad51 mediate STGC but suppress LTGC at Tus/Ter-arrested forks. Here, we report the impact of Ter array length on Tus/Ter-induced HR, comparing HR reporters containing arrays of 6, 9, 15 or 21 Ter sites-each targeted to the ROSA26 locus of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. Increasing Ter copy number within the array beyond 6 did not affect the magnitude of Tus/Ter-induced HR but biased HR in favor of LTGC. A "lock"-defective Tus mutant, F140A, known to exhibit higher affinity than wild type (wt)Tus for duplex Ter, reproduced these effects. In contrast, increasing Ter copy number within the array reduced HR induced by the I-SceI homing endonuclease, but produced no consistent bias toward LTGC. Thus, the mechanisms governing HR at Tus/Ter-arrested replication forks are distinct from those governing HR at an enzyme-induced chromosomal double strand break (DSB). We propose that increased spatial separation of the 2 arrested forks encountering an extended Tus/Ter barrier impairs the coordination of DNA ends generated by the processing of the stalled forks, thereby favoring aberrant LTGC over conservative STGC. PMID:27136113

  13. Entangled microwaves as a resource for entangling spatially separate solid-state qubits: Superconducting qubits, nitrogen-vacancy centers, and magnetic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, Angela Viviana; Rodríguez, Ferney Javier; Quiroga, Luis; García-Ripoll, Juan José

    2016-06-01

    Quantum correlations present in a broadband two-line squeezed microwave state can induce entanglement in a spatially separated bipartite system consisting of either two single qubits or two-qubit ensembles. By using an appropriate master equation for a bipartite quantum system in contact with two separate but entangled baths, the generating entanglement process in spatially separated quantum systems is thoroughly characterized. Decoherence thermal effects on the entanglement transfer are also discussed. Our results provide evidence that this entanglement transfer by dissipation is feasible, yielding to a steady-state amount of entanglement in the bipartite quantum system which can be optimized for a wide range of realistic physical systems that include state-of-the-art experiments with nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond, superconducting qubits, or even magnetic molecules embedded in a crystalline matrix.

  14. Spatially-explicit hydrologic controls on benthic invertebrate habitat suitability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceola, Serena; Bertuzzo, Enrico; Singer, Gabriel; Battin, Tom; Montanari, Alberto; Rinaldo, Andrea

    2014-05-01

    Streamflow variability is a major determinant of basin-scale distribution of benthic invertebrates. Here we present a probabilistic approach for a spatially explicit quantitative assessment of benthic invertebrate abundance as derived from near-bed flow variability throughout an entire stream network. We consider aquatic invertebrates as these are widely employed as sensitive indicators of fluvial ecosystem health and human-induced perturbations. Moving from the analytical characterization of site-specific probability distribution functions of streamflow and bottom shear stress, we achieve a spatial extension to a stream network ranging up to 5th order. Bottom shear stress distributions, coupled with habitat suitability curves derived from field studies, are then used to produce maps of invertebrate habitat suitability based on shear stress conditions. The proposed framework allows to inspect the possible impacts of human-induced perturbations of streamflow variability on river ecology. We apply our approach to an Austrian river network, for which rainfall and streamflow time series, river network hydraulic properties and local information on invertebrate abundance for a limited number of sites are available. This allows a comparison between observed species density versus modeled habitat suitability based on shear stress. Although the proposed strategy neglects ecological determinants other than hydraulic ones and thus represents an ecological minimal model, it allows derivation of important implications of water resource management and fluvial ecosystem protection for basin-scale distribution patterns of organisms.

  15. Flight test evaluation of a separate surface attitude command control system on a Beech 99 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gee, S. W.; Jenks, G. E.; Roskam, J.; Stone, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    A joint NASA/university/industry program was conducted to flight evaluate a potentially low cost separate surface implementation of attitude command in a Beech 99 airplane. Saturation of the separate surfaces was the primary cause of many problems during development. Six experienced professional pilots made simulated instrument flight evaluations in light-to-moderate turbulence. They were favorably impressed with the system, particularly with the elimination of control force transients that accompanied configuration changes. For ride quality, quantitative data showed that the attitude command control system resulted in all cases of airplane motion being removed from the uncomfortable ride region.

  16. Sweep and Compressibility Effects on Active Separation Control at High Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seifert, Avi; Pack, LaTunia G.

    2000-01-01

    This paper explores the effects of compressibility, sweep and excitation location on active separation control at high Reynolds numbers. The model, which was tested in a cryogenic pressurized wind tunnel, simulates the upper surface of a 20% thick Glauert Goldschmied type airfoil at zero angle of attack. The flow is fully turbulent since the tunnel sidewall boundary layer flows over the model. Without control, the flow separates at the highly convex area and a large turbulent separation bubble is formed. Periodic excitation is applied to gradually eliminate the separation bubble. Two alternative blowing slot locations as well as the effect of compressibility, sweep and steady suction or blowing were studied. During the test the Reynolds numbers ranged from 2 to 40 million and Mach numbers ranged from 0.2 to 0.7. Sweep angles were 0 and 30 deg. It was found that excitation must be introduced slightly upstream of the separation region regardless of the sweep angle at low Mach number. Introduction of excitation upstream of the shock wave is more effective than at its foot. Compressibility reduces the ability of steady mass transfer and periodic excitation to control the separation bubble but excitation has an effect on the integral parameters, which is similar to that observed in low Mach numbers. The conventional swept flow scaling is valid for fully and even partially attached flow, but different scaling is required for the separated 3D flow. The effectiveness of the active control is not reduced by sweep. Detailed flow field dynamics are described in the accompanying paper.

  17. Hydrogels with Spatially and Temporally Controlled Properties to Control Cellular Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdick, Jason

    2011-03-01

    Stem cells (e.g., mesenchymal stem cells, MSCs) respond to many cues from their microenvironment, which may include chemical signals, mechanics, and topography. Importantly, these cues may be incorporated into scaffolding to control stem cell differentiation and optimize their ability to produce tissues in regenerative medicine. Despite the significant amount of work in this area, the materials have been primarily static and uniform. To this end, we have developed a sequential crosslinking process that relies on our ability to crosslinked functional biopolymers (e.g., methacrylated hyaluronic acid, HA) in two steps, namely a Michael-type addition reaction to partially consume reactive groups and then a light-initiated free-radical polymerization to further crosslink the material. With light exposure during the second step comes control over the material in space (via masks and lasers) and time (via intermittent light exposure). We are applying this technique for numerous applications. For example, when the HA hydrogels are crosslinked with MMP degradable peptides with thiol termini during the first step, a material that can be degraded by cells is obtained. However, cell-mediated degradation is obstructed with the introduction of kinetic chains during the second step, leading to spatially controlled cell degradability. Due to the influence of cellular spreading on MSC differentiation, we have controlled cell fates by controlling their spread ability, for instance towards osteoblasts in spread areas and adipocytes when cell remained rounded. We are also using the process of stiffening with time to investigate mechanically induced differentiation, particularly in materials with evolving mechanics. Overall, these advanced HA hydrogels provide us the opportunity to investigate diverse and controlled material properties on MSC interactions.

  18. Influence of fat-water separation and spatial resolution on automated volumetric MRI measurements of fibroglandular breast tissue.

    PubMed

    Wengert, Georg J; Pinker-Domenig, Katja; Helbich, Thomas H; Vogl, Wolf-Dieter; Clauser, Paola; Bickel, Hubert; Marino, Maria-Adele; Magometschnigg, Heinrich F; Baltzer, Pascal A

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of fat-water separation and spatial resolution in MRI on the results of automated quantitative measurements of fibroglandular breast tissue (FGT). Ten healthy volunteers (age range, 28-71 years; mean, 39.9 years) were included in this Institutional Review Board-approved prospective study. All measurements were performed on a 1.5-T scanner (Siemens, AvantoFit) using an 18-channel breast coil. The protocols included isotropic (Di) [TR/TE1 /TE2  = 6.00 ms/2.45 ms/2.67 ms; flip angle, 6.0°; 256 slices; matrix, 360 × 360; 1 mm isotropic; field of view, 360°; acquisition time (TA) = 3 min 38 s] and anisotropic (Da) (TR/TE1 /TE2  = 10.00 ms/2.39 ms/4.77 ms; flip angle, 24.9°; 80 slices; matrix 360 × 360; voxel size, 0.7 × 0.7 × 2.0 mm(3) ; field of view, 360°; TA = 1 min 25 s) T1 three-dimensional (3D) fast low-angle shot (FLASH) Dixon sequences, and a T1 3D FLASH sequence with the same resolution (T1 ) without (TR/TE = 11.00 ms/4.76 ms; flip angle, 25.0°; 80 slices; matrix, 360 × 360; voxel size, 0.7 × 0.7 × 2.0 mm(3) ; field of view, 360°; TA = 50 s) and with (TR/TE = 29.00 ms/4.76 ms; flip angle, 25.0°; 80 slices; matrix, 360 × 360; voxel size, 0.7 × 0.7 × 2.0 mm(3) ; field of view, 360°; TA = 2 min 35 s) fat saturation. Repeating volunteer measurements after 20 min and repositioning were used to assess reproducibility. An automated and quantitative volumetric breast density measurement system was used for FGT calculation. FGT with Di, Da and T1 measured 4.6-63.0% (mean, 30.6%), 3.2-65.3% (mean, 32.5%) and 1.7-66.5% (mean, 33.7%), respectively. The highest correlation between different MRI sequences was found with the Di and Da sequences (R(2)  = 0.976). Coefficients of variation (CVs) for FGT calculation were higher in T1 (CV = 21.5%) compared with Dixon (Di, CV = 5

  19. Preprophase bands, phragmoplasts, and spatial control of cytokinesis.

    PubMed

    Gunning, B E; Wick, S M

    1985-01-01

    Features of preprophase bands (PPBs) of microtubules (MTs), and the spatial relationship between phragmosomes, PPB sites, and developing phragmoplasts during cytokinesis, are reviewed, setting new observations in the context of current knowledge. PPBs in onion root tip cells are present by the beginning of the G2 period of the cell cycle. They are at first wide, but later become more compact, narrower bands. MTs traverse the cytoplasm between the band at the cell cortex and the nuclear envelope. This whole assemblage of nucleus, PPB and intervening MTs remains together when the cell is ruptured during preparation for examination by immunofluorescence microscopy. Double bands are occasionally seen in early stages of PPB development, perhaps as a consequence of double induction from neighbouring cells. Calmodulin is not present in PPBs at a higher concentration than in the general cytoplasm, but it is more abundant in parts of the spindle and in the phragmoplast. The PPB MTs disappear at prophase, but nevertheless the new cell plate fuses with the parental cell walls at the PPB site. This spatial relationship can be disrupted by treatment with CIPC. Another experimental disruption of the relationship, accomplished by making minute wounds in the PPB site of mitotic cells in Tradescantia stamen hairs, is described. In other experiments on these cells the phragmoplast is shown to become tethered to the PPB site when the cell plate is half to three-quarters developed, although the telophase nuclei are free to move. Rhodamine-labelled phalloidin reveals putative F-actin in the phragmoplast of Tradescantia, but not in the gap between the extending phragmoplast and the PPB site. Rhodamine-labelled phalloidin also stains cytoplasmic strands that exist when cytoplasmic streaming occurs before and after (but not during) mitosis. Cytochalasin B treatment blocks incorporation of actin into the phragmoplast, which, however, can still develop, though usually abnormally. The F

  20. Closed-loop separation control over a sharp edge ramp using genetic programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debien, Antoine; von Krbek, Kai A. F. F.; Mazellier, Nicolas; Duriez, Thomas; Cordier, Laurent; Noack, Bernd R.; Abel, Markus W.; Kourta, Azeddine

    2016-03-01

    We experimentally perform open and closed-loop control of a separating turbulent boundary layer downstream from a sharp edge ramp. The turbulent boundary layer just above the separation point has a Reynolds number Re_{θ }≈ 3500 based on momentum thickness. The goal of the control is to mitigate separation and early re-attachment. The forcing employs a spanwise array of active vortex generators. The flow state is monitored with skin-friction sensors downstream of the actuators. The feedback control law is obtained using model-free genetic programming control (GPC) (Gautier et al. in J Fluid Mech 770:442-457, 2015). The resulting flow is assessed using the momentum coefficient, pressure distribution and skin friction over the ramp and stereo PIV. The PIV yields vector field statistics, e.g. shear layer growth, the back-flow area and vortex region. GPC is benchmarked against the best periodic forcing. While open-loop control achieves separation reduction by locking-on the shedding mode, GPC gives rise to similar benefits by accelerating the shear layer growth. Moreover, GPC uses less actuation energy.

  1. On TADs and LADs: Spatial Control Over Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Sandoval, Adriana; Gasser, Susan M

    2016-08-01

    The combinatorial action of transcription factors drives cell-type-specific gene expression patterns. However, transcription factor binding and gene regulation occur in the context of chromatin, which modulates DNA accessibility. High-resolution chromatin interaction maps have defined units of chromatin that are in spatial proximity, called topologically associated domains (TADs). TADs can be further classified based on expression activity, replication timing, or the histone marks or non-histone proteins associated with them. Independently, other chromatin domains have been defined by their likelihood to interact with non-DNA structures, such as the nuclear lamina. Lamina-associated domains (LADs) correlate with low gene expression and late replication timing. TADs and LADs have recently been evaluated with respect to cell-type-specific gene expression. The results shed light on the relevance of these forms of chromatin organization for transcriptional regulation, and address specifically how chromatin sequestration influences cell fate decisions during organismal development. PMID:27312344

  2. Spatial steadiness of individual disorder modes upon controlled spectral tuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caselli, Niccolò; Riboli, Francesco; Intonti, Francesca; La China, Federico; Biccari, Francesco; Gerardino, Annamaria; Gurioli, Massimo

    2016-07-01

    Recent innovative applications in disordered photonics would strongly benefit from the possibility to achieve spectral tuning of the individual disorder localized photonic modes without affecting their spatial distributions. Here, we design and fabricate a two-dimensional disordered photonic system, made of a GaAs slab patterned with randomly distributed circular air scattering centers, supporting localized light modes with very small modal volume. The photoluminescence of InAs quantum dots embedded in the slab is used as a probe for near field experiments and gives direct access to the electric field intensity distribution of the localized random modes. We demonstrate that laser assisted oxidation of the GaAs slab performed by near field illumination can be used for a gentle tuning of the individual random modes without modifying the subtle balance leading to light localization given by multiple scattering.

  3. Control of volume resistivity in inorganic-organic separators. [for alkaline batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W.; Manzo, M. A.

    1980-01-01

    Control of resistivity in NASA inorganic-organic separators is achieved by incorporating small percentages of high surface area, fine-particle silica with other ingredients in the separator coating. The volume resistivity appears to be predictable from coating composition, that is, from the surface area of filler particles in the coating. The approach has been applied to two polymer-'plasticizer'-filler coating systems, where the filler content of each is below the generally acknowledged critical pigment volume concentration of the coating. Application of these coating systems to 0.0254 cm thick (10 mil) fuel-cell grade asbestos sheet produces inexpensive, flexible, microporous separators that perform at least as well as the original inorganic-organic concept, the Astropower separator.

  4. Movable shark scales act as a passive dynamic micro-roughness to control flow separation.

    PubMed

    Lang, Amy W; Bradshaw, Michael T; Smith, Jonathon A; Wheelus, Jennifer N; Motta, Philip J; Habegger, Maria L; Hueter, Robert E

    2014-09-01

    Shark scales on fast-swimming sharks have been shown to be movable to angles in excess of 50°, and we hypothesize that this characteristic gives this shark skin a preferred flow direction. During the onset of separation, flow reversal is initiated close to the surface. However, the movable scales would be actuated by the reversed flow thereby causing a greater resistance to any further flow reversal and this mechanism would disrupt the process leading to eventual flow separation. Here we report for the first time experimental evidence of the separation control capability of real shark skin through water tunnel testing. Using skin samples from a shortfin mako Isurus oxyrinchus, we tested a pectoral fin and flank skin attached to a NACA 4412 hydrofoil and separation control was observed in the presence of movable shark scales under certain conditions in both cases. We hypothesize that the scales provide a passive, flow-actuated mechanism acting as a dynamic micro-roughness to control flow separation. PMID:25046552

  5. Performance improvement of gas liquid cylindrical cyclone separators using passive control system

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S.; Mohan, R.; Shoham, O.; Kouba, G.

    1998-12-31

    The performance of Gas Liquid Cylindrical Cyclone (GLCC) separators can be improved by reducing or eliminating liquid carry-over into the gas stream or gas carry-under through liquid stream, utilizing suitable liquid level control. In this study, a new passive control system has been developed for the GLCC, in which the control is achieved by utilizing only the liquid flow energy. Passive control system is highly desirable for remote, unmanned location operated with no external power source. Salient features of this design are presented here. Detailed experimental and modeling studies have been conducted to evaluate the improvement in the GLCC operational envelope for liquid carry-over with the passive control system. The results demonstrate that a passive control system is feasible for operation in normal slug flow conditions. The result of this study could also form the basis for future development of active control systems using classical control approach.

  6. Spatial Periodic Forcing Can Displace Patterns It Is Intended to Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mau, Yair; Hagberg, Aric; Meron, Ehud

    2012-07-01

    Spatial periodic forcing of pattern-forming systems is an important, but lightly studied, method of controlling patterns. It can be used to control the amplitude and wave number of one-dimensional periodic patterns, to stabilize unstable patterns, and to induce them below instability onset. We show that, although in one spatial dimension the forcing acts to reinforce the patterns, in two dimensions it acts to destabilize or displace them by inducing two-dimensional rectangular and oblique patterns.

  7. Professional mathematicians differ from controls in their spatial-numerical associations.

    PubMed

    Cipora, Krzysztof; Hohol, Mateusz; Nuerk, Hans-Christoph; Willmes, Klaus; Brożek, Bartosz; Kucharzyk, Bartłomiej; Nęcka, Edward

    2016-07-01

    While mathematically impaired individuals have been shown to have deficits in all kinds of basic numerical representations, among them spatial-numerical associations, little is known about individuals with exceptionally high math expertise. They might have a more abstract magnitude representation or more flexible spatial associations, so that no automatic left/small and right/large spatial-numerical association is elicited. To pursue this question, we examined the Spatial Numerical Association of Response Codes (SNARC) effect in professional mathematicians which was compared to two control groups: Professionals who use advanced math in their work but are not mathematicians (mostly engineers), and matched controls. Contrarily to both control groups, Mathematicians did not reveal a SNARC effect. The group differences could not be accounted for by differences in mean response speed, response variance or intelligence or a general tendency not to show spatial-numerical associations. We propose that professional mathematicians possess more abstract and/or spatially very flexible numerical representations and therefore do not exhibit or do have a largely reduced default left-to-right spatial-numerical orientation as indexed by the SNARC effect, but we also discuss other possible accounts. We argue that this comparison with professional mathematicians also tells us about the nature of spatial-numerical associations in persons with much less mathematical expertise or knowledge. PMID:26063316

  8. Dielectric-barrier-discharge vortex generators: characterisation and optimisation for flow separation control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jukes, Timothy N.; Choi, Kwing-So

    2012-02-01

    We investigated the use of dielectric-barrier-discharge plasma actuators as vortex generators for flow separation control applications. Plasma actuators were placed at a yaw angle to the oncoming flow, so that they produced a spanwise wall jet. Through interaction with the oncoming boundary layer, this created a streamwise longitudinal vortex. In this experimental investigation, the effect of yaw angle, actuator length and plasma-induced velocity ratio was studied. Particular attention was given to the vortex formation mechanism and its development downstream. The DBD plasma actuators were then applied in the form of co-rotating and counter-rotating vortex arrays to control flow separation over a trailing-edge ramp. It was found that the vortex generators were successful in reducing the separation region, even at plasma-to-free-stream velocity ratios of less than 10%.

  9. Experimental parametric study of jet vortex generators for flow separation control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selby, Gregory

    1991-01-01

    A parametric wind-tunnel study was performed with jet vortex generators to determine their effectiveness in controlling flow separation associated with low-speed turbulence flow over a two-dimensional rearward-facing ramp. Results indicate that flow-separation control can be accomplished, with the level of control achieved being a function of jet speed, jet orientation (with respect to the free-stream direction), and orifice pattern (double row of jets vs. single row). Compared to slot blowing, jet vortex generators can provide an equivalent level of flow control over a larger spanwise region (for constant jet flow area and speed). Dye flow visualization tests in a water tunnel indicated that the most effective jet vortex generator configurations produced streamwise co-rotating vortices.

  10. Spatially Controlled Fe Isotope Variations at Torres del Paine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajos, N.; Lundstrom, C.

    2013-12-01

    Recent advances in mass-spectrometry have identified systematic trends of non-traditional stable isotope variation in igneous rocks with differentiation index. We present new Fe isotope data for the Torres del Paine igneous complex in southern Chile. The multi-composition pluton consists of a 1 km vertical exposure of homogenous granite overlying a contemporaneous and possibly cogenetic 0.5 km mafic gabbro suite. Whereas previous isotopic investigations do little to address variations across important magmatic contacts, this study focuses on a first-of-its-kind spatially dependent non-traditional stable isotope investigation of an igneous pluton. Samples were collected at Torres del Paine in spatially significant transects, focusing on major contacts between country rock, granite and mafic units. Results collected by bracketed double spike MC-ICP-MS (2s precision of ×0.03) show an increase in δ56Fe towards the high silica margins of the pluton with values as high as δ56Fe 0.36. Additionally, the data show a decrease in δ56Fe toward the mafic center of the pluton with δ56Fe values ranging from δ56Fe -0.05 to 0.18. Samples collected on the contact between the granite and mafic complex show intermediate values of δ56Fe= 0.18(×) 0.03. Country rock samples in contact with granite show an isotopically light signature of δ56Fe=0.04 (×) 0.03. Analysis of 50 samples in total show a trend of increasing δ56Fe with SiO2 content. The process responsible for Fe isotope variations remains debated but is suggested to reflect four mechanisms: (1) crustal assimilation, (2) fractional crystallization, (3) late stage fluid exsolution [1] and (4) thermal migration [3]. Preliminary results show that mechanisms #1 and #2 would produce isotopic signatures opposite of those seen at Torres del Paine and other plutonic rocks. Isotopically light Torres country rock samples reveal that assimilation of rocks would not produce the isotopically heavy granites seen at Torres. Based on

  11. Movement Precision and Amplitude as Separate Factors in the Control of Movement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerr, Robert

    The purpose of this study was to assess Welford's dual controlling factor interpretation of Fitts' Law--describing movement time as being a linear function of movement distance (or amplitude) and the required precision of the movement (or target width). Welford's amplification of the theory postulates that two separate processes ought to be…

  12. Scaling impacts on environmental controls and spatial heterogeneity of soil organic carbon stocks

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mishra, U.; Riley, W. J.

    2015-01-27

    The spatial heterogeneity of land surfaces affects energy, moisture, and greenhouse gas exchanges with the atmosphere. However, representing heterogeneity of terrestrial hydrological and biogeochemical processes in earth system models (ESMs) remains a critical scientific challenge. We report the impact of spatial scaling on environmental controls, spatial structure, and statistical properties of soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks across the US state of Alaska. We used soil profile observations and environmental factors such as topography, climate, land cover types, and surficial geology to predict the SOC stocks at a 50 m spatial scale. These spatially heterogeneous estimates provide a dataset with reasonablemore » fidelity to the observations at a sufficiently high resolution to examine the environmental controls on the spatial structure of SOC stocks. We upscaled both the predicted SOC stocks and environmental variables from finer to coarser spatial scales (s = 100, 200, 500 m, 1, 2, 5, 10 km) and generated various statistical properties of SOC stock estimates. We found different environmental factors to be statistically significant predictors at different spatial scales. Only elevation, temperature, potential evapotranspiration, and scrub land cover types were significant predictors at all scales. The strengths of control (the median value of geographically weighted regression coefficients) of these four environmental variables on SOC stocks decreased with increasing scale and were accurately represented using mathematical functions (R2 = 0.83–0.97). The spatial structure of SOC stocks across Alaska changed with spatial scale. Although the variance (sill) and unstructured variability (nugget) of the calculated variograms of SOC stocks decreased exponentially with scale, the correlation length (range) remained relatively constant across scale. The variance of predicted SOC stocks decreased with spatial scale over the range of 50 to ~ 500 m, and remained

  13. Scaling impacts on environmental controls and spatial heterogeneity of soil organic carbon stocks

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mishra, U.; Riley, W. J.

    2015-07-02

    The spatial heterogeneity of land surfaces affects energy, moisture, and greenhouse gas exchanges with the atmosphere. However, representing the heterogeneity of terrestrial hydrological and biogeochemical processes in Earth system models (ESMs) remains a critical scientific challenge. We report the impact of spatial scaling on environmental controls, spatial structure, and statistical properties of soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks across the US state of Alaska. We used soil profile observations and environmental factors such as topography, climate, land cover types, and surficial geology to predict the SOC stocks at a 50 m spatial scale. These spatially heterogeneous estimates provide a data setmore » with reasonable fidelity to the observations at a sufficiently high resolution to examine the environmental controls on the spatial structure of SOC stocks. We upscaled both the predicted SOC stocks and environmental variables from finer to coarser spatial scales (s = 100, 200, and 500 m and 1, 2, 5, and 10 km) and generated various statistical properties of SOC stock estimates. We found different environmental factors to be statistically significant predictors at different spatial scales. Only elevation, temperature, potential evapotranspiration, and scrub land cover types were significant predictors at all scales. The strengths of control (the median value of geographically weighted regression coefficients) of these four environmental variables on SOC stocks decreased with increasing scale and were accurately represented using mathematical functions (R2 = 0.83–0.97). The spatial structure of SOC stocks across Alaska changed with spatial scale. Although the variance (sill) and unstructured variability (nugget) of the calculated variograms of SOC stocks decreased exponentially with scale, the correlation length (range) remained relatively constant across scale. The variance of predicted SOC stocks decreased with spatial scale over the range of 50 m to ~ 500 m

  14. Cognitive processing load during listening is reduced more by decreasing voice similarity than by increasing spatial separation between target and masker speech

    PubMed Central

    Zekveld, Adriana A.; Rudner, Mary; Kramer, Sophia E.; Lyzenga, Johannes; Rönnberg, Jerker

    2014-01-01

    We investigated changes in speech recognition and cognitive processing load due to the masking release attributable to decreasing similarity between target and masker speech. This was achieved by using masker voices with either the same (female) gender as the target speech or different gender (male) and/or by spatially separating the target and masker speech using HRTFs. We assessed the relation between the signal-to-noise ratio required for 50% sentence intelligibility, the pupil response and cognitive abilities. We hypothesized that the pupil response, a measure of cognitive processing load, would be larger for co-located maskers and for same-gender compared to different-gender maskers. We further expected that better cognitive abilities would be associated with better speech perception and larger pupil responses as the allocation of larger capacity may result in more intense mental processing. In line with previous studies, the performance benefit from different-gender compared to same-gender maskers was larger for co-located masker signals. The performance benefit of spatially-separated maskers was larger for same-gender maskers. The pupil response was larger for same-gender than for different-gender maskers, but was not reduced by spatial separation. We observed associations between better perception performance and better working memory, better information updating, and better executive abilities when applying no corrections for multiple comparisons. The pupil response was not associated with cognitive abilities. Thus, although both gender and location differences between target and masker facilitate speech perception, only gender differences lower cognitive processing load. Presenting a more dissimilar masker may facilitate target-masker separation at a later (cognitive) processing stage than increasing the spatial separation between the target and masker. The pupil response provides information about speech perception that complements intelligibility data

  15. Laminar and turbulent boundary layer separation control of Mako shark skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afroz, Farhana

    The Shortfin Mako shark (Isurus oxyrinchus) is one of the fastest swimmers in nature. They have an incredible turning agility and are estimated to achieve speeds as high as ten body lengths per second. Shark skin is known to contain flexible denticles or scales, capable of being actuated by the flow whereby a unique boundary layer control (BLC) method could reduce drag. It is hypothesized that shark scales bristle when the flow is reversed, and this bristling may serve to control flow separation by (1) inhibiting the localized flow reversal near the wall and (2) inducing mixing within the boundary layer by cavities formed between the scales that increases the momentum of the flow near the wall. To test this hypothesis, samples of Mako shark skin have been studied under various amounts of adverse pressure gradient (APG). These samples were collected from the flank region of a Shortfin Mako shark where the scales have the greatest potential for separation control due to the highest bristling angles. An easy technique for inducing boundary layer separation has been developed where an APG can be generated and varied using a rotating cylinder. Both the experimental and numerical studies showed that the amount of APG can be varied as a function of cylinder rotation speed or cylinder gap height for a wide range of Reynolds numbers. This method of generating an APG is used effectively for inducing both laminar and turbulent boundary layer separation over a flat plate. Laminar and turbulent boundary layer separation studies conducted over a smooth plate have been compared with the same setup repeated over shark skin. The time-averaged DPIV results showed that shark scale bristling controlled both laminar and turbulent boundary layer separation to a measurable extent. It shows that the shark scales cause an early transition to turbulence and reduce the degree of laminar separation. For turbulent separation, reverse flow near the wall and inside the boundary layer is

  16. Active Flow Separation Control of a Stator Vane Using Surface Injection in a Multistage Compressor Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culley, Dennis E.; Bright, Michelle M.; Prahst, Patricia S.; Strazisar, Anthony J.

    2003-01-01

    Micro-flow control actuation embedded in a stator vane was used to successfully control separation and improve near stall performance in a multistage compressor rig at NASA Glenn. Using specially designed stator vanes configured with internal actuation to deliver pulsating air through slots along the suction surface, a research study was performed to identify performance benefits using this microflow control approach. Pressure profiles and unsteady pressure measurements along the blade surface and at the shroud provided a dynamic look at the compressor during microflow air injection. These pressure measurements lead to a tracking algorithm to identify the onset of separation. The testing included steady air injection at various slot locations along the vane. The research also examined the benefit of pulsed injection and actively controlled air injection along the stator vane. Two types of actuation schemes were studied, including an embedded actuator for on-blade control. Successful application of an online detection and flow control scheme will be discussed. Testing showed dramatic performance benefit for flow reattachment and subsequent improvement in diffusion through the use of pulsed controlled injection. The paper will discuss the experimental setup, the blade configurations, and preliminary CFD results which guided the slot location along the blade. The paper will also show the pressure profiles and unsteady pressure measurements used to track flow control enhancement, and will conclude with the tracking algorithm for adjusting the control.

  17. Research of beam control system component simulation and separation method of the kinematics coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Yufang; Xie, Xiaogang; Zhang, Jianzhu; An, Jianzhu; Zhang, Feizhou

    2015-02-01

    EasyLaser is component-based laser system simulation software. Beam control system simulation is a main part of EasyLaser, which can be used for systems with multi-optical paths, multi-wavelength beams, and multi-controllers. A new numerical method about general kinematics separation is proposed for beam control system simulation. It provides axis rotation conversion relationships due to orientation data of apparatus of system, such as gimal, sensor and optical mirror. It gives their coupling and uncoupling matrixes in kinematics and controller model. The matrixes could change every iterative time automatically during the dynamic tracking process. The main advantage of the method is more suitable to solve the problems that the gimbal movement and geometry optical transmission are considered simultaneously. By using the method, sensor images and undershoot data are updated automatically. And further the kinematic driver or controller signals are separated automatically. Therefore the tracking and beam control can be designed without consideration of the system kinematical composition. Then the beam control system simulation has the virtues of generality, flexibility, and usability. No matter what kinds of gimbal and optical path, designer needs only to consider tracking and beam control aspects. In addition, a union beam control example for atmosphere transmission correction is given. It includes tracking tilt mirror and adaptive optics system. Simulation results show that the low-frequency fluctuation is restrained effectively and the high-frequency fluctuation is corrected obviously.

  18. Vane Separation Control in a Linear Cascade with Area Expansion using AC DBD Plasma Actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleven, Christopher; Corke, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    Experiments are presented on the use of AC dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuators to prevent flow separation on vanes in a linear cascade with area expansion. The inlet Mach number to the cascade ranged from 0.3 to 0.5, and the vane chord Reynolds numbers ranged from 0 . 9 ×106 to 1 . 5 ×106 . Three cascade designs with different amounts of area expansion, providing different degrees of adverse pressure gradients, were examined. Surface flow visualization revealed a 3-D separation bubble with strong recirculation that formed on the suction side of the vanes. The pattern agreed well with CFD simulations. Plasma actuators were placed on the suction sides of the vanes, just upstream of the flow separation location. Quantitative measurements were performed in the wakes of the vanes using a 5-hole Pitot probe. The measurements were used to determine the effect of the plasma actuator separation control on the pressure loss coefficient, and flow turning angle through the cascades. Overall, the plasma actuators separation control increased the velocity magnitude and dynamic pressure in the passage between the vanes, resulted in a more spanwise-uniform flow turning angle in the vane passage, and significantly lowered the loss coefficient compared to the baseline.

  19. Kinetic crystallization separation process of the inositol isomers by controlling metastable zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konuki, Kaname; Hirasawa, Izumi

    2013-06-01

    D-chiro-inositol (DCI) is prepared by the immobilized enzyme reaction which uses myo-inositol (MI) as the substrate and the conversion rate is about 13%. The aim of this study was to develop a separation method for high purity DCI crystals from a reaction solution including low purity DCI only by the crystallization process. We succeeded in separating DCI crystals of 96% purity by water cooling crystallization, but it was presumed that scale-up was difficult. Although we tried anti-solvent crystallization similar to water cooling crystallization, high purity DCI crystals were not obtained. Therefore, we proposed the crystallization separation process by controlling metastable zones. The purity of a desired compound is controlled by this process, because solid-liquid separation is achieved before crystallization of compound in metastable zone. By the crystallization using this method, the DCI crystals of 97% purity were obtained. Although the yield per batch is about 50%, the actual yield is improved as the last mother liquor returns into the process of the following batch. When this process was repeated, the purity and the yield of DCI were reproduced and the robustness of this process was proved. It is expected that scale-up of this process will be successful, and this purification method could be applicable to similar systems such as separation of isomers and analogs.

  20. Separations in steels subjected to controlled rolling, followed by accelerated cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farber, V. M.; Khotinov, V. A.; Belikov, S. V.; Selivanova, O. V.; Lezhnin, N. V.; Morozova, A. N.; Karabonalov, M. S.; Zhilyakov, A. Yu.

    2016-04-01

    Zones on the fracture surfaces of Charpy specimens and profiles of the fractures of these specimens are examined using impact-bending tests carried out in the temperature range of +20 to-90°C and fractography. The specimens were cut out of hot-rolled plates produced from 05G2B super-low-carbon steels that contained Ti, Nb, V, and Cu microadditives using controlled rolling, followed by accelerated cooling. A detailed analysis of separations, including a study of the morphology, number, area of separations, and the surrounding stress-relaxation zones, and the structure of the walls, has allowed us to identify the mechanisms of the origination and growth of the separations. It has been found that the correlated changes in the length, width, and depth of the separations are accompanied by the formation and expansion of the stress-relaxation zones around the separations. The rate of expansion of the area of these zones is higher than that of the area of the separations, which favors the macroplastic fracture of the specimens.

  1. Separation Control at Flight Reynolds Numbers: Lessons Learned and Future Directions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seifert, Avi; Pack, LaTunia G.

    2000-01-01

    Active separation control, using periodic excitation, was studied experimentally at high Reynolds numbers. The effects of compressibility, mild sweep, location o excitation slot and steady momentum transfer on the efficacy of the method were identified. Tests conducted at chord Reynolds numbers as high as 40 x 10(exp 6) demonstrated that active control using oscillatory flow excitation can effectively delay flow separation from and reattach separated flow to aerodynamic surfaces at flight conditions. The effective frequencies generate one to four vortices over the controlled region at all times, regardless of the Reynolds number. The vortices are initially amplified by the separated shear-layer, and after initiating reattachment, the strength of the vortices decay as they are convected downstream. Large amplitude, low frequency vortices break down to smaller ones upon introduction at the excitation slot. The effects of steady mass transfer were compared to those of periodic excitation. It was found that steady blowing is significantly inferior to periodic excitation in terms o performance benefits and that the response to steady blowing is abrupt, and therefore undesirable from a control point of view. Steady suction and periodic excitation are comparable in effectiveness and both exhibit a gradual response to changes in the magnitude of the control input. The combination of weak steady suction and periodic excitation is extremely effective while the addition of steady blowing could be detrimental. Compressibility effects are weak as long as separation is not caused by a shock-wave/boundary-layer interaction The undesirable effects of the shock-induced separation could be alleviated by the introduction of periodic excitation upstream of the shock wave, inside the region of supersonic flow. The effects of mild sweep were also studied and periodic excitation was found to be very effective in reattaching three-dimensional separated flow. Scaling laws that correlate 2D

  2. Evaluation and control of spatial frequency errors in reflective telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuejun; Zeng, Xuefeng; Hu, Haixiang; Zheng, Ligong

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, the influence on the image quality of manufacturing residual errors was studied. By analyzing the statistical distribution characteristics of the residual errors and their effects on PSF and MTF, we divided those errors into low, middle and high frequency domains using the unit "cycles per aperture". Two types of mid-frequency errors, algorithm intrinsic and tool path induced were analyzed. Control methods in current deterministic polishing process, such as MRF or IBF were presented.

  3. Nanoscale tissue engineering: spatial control over cell-materials interactions

    PubMed Central

    Wheeldon, Ian; Farhadi, Arash; Bick, Alexander G.; Jabbari, Esmaiel; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2011-01-01

    Cells interact with the surrounding environment by making tens to hundreds of thousands of nanoscale interactions with extracellular signals and features. The goal of nanoscale tissue engineering is to harness the interactions through nanoscale biomaterials engineering in order to study and direct cellular behaviors. Here, we review the nanoscale tissue engineering technologies for both two- and three-dimensional studies (2- and 3D), and provide a holistic overview of the field. Techniques that can control the average spacing and clustering of cell adhesion ligands are well established and have been highly successful in describing cell adhesion and migration in 2D. Extension of these engineering tools to 3D biomaterials has created many new hydrogel and nanofiber scaffolds technologies that are being used to design in vitro experiments with more physiologically relevant conditions. Researchers are beginning to study complex cell functions in 3D, however, there is a need for biomaterials systems that provide fine control over the nanoscale presentation of bioactive ligands in 3D. Additionally, there is a need for 2- and 3D techniques that can control the nanoscale presentation of multiple bioactive ligands and the temporal changes in cellular microenvironment. PMID:21451238

  4. Shark Skin Bristling: A Passive Flow-Actuated Separation Control Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Amy; Smith, Jonathon; Bradshaw, Michael; Wheelus, Jennifer; Motta, Philip; Habegger, Maria; Davis, Jessica; Hueter, Robert

    2012-11-01

    A collaborative experimental effort between biologists and engineers has proven the separation control capability of shark skin, with a specific focus on the shortfin mako (Isurus oxyrinchus) known for its high speed and agility. Biological measurements of the denticles, or scales, as a function of body location (DOI:10.1002/jmor.20047) will be presented together with data on bristling angle of scales and the morphological implications. Results show key regions of high bristling capability to correspond with those most prone to flow separation; these include the tail, flank regions aft of the gills, and on pectoral fins with scale flexibility increasing towards the trailing edge. Fresh shark skin samples were also tested in a water tunnel facility using DPIV and evidence of flow separation control was observed under laminar and tripped boundary layer conditions. It was concluded that the experiments conducted in the Re ~ 105 range resulted in sufficiently strong backflow induced close to the surface such that the shear threshold to induce bristling on the real skin sample was achieved since flow control at lower Re was not as evident. It is hypothesized that backflow initiated close to the wall in a region of adverse pressure gradient induces localized scale bristling thereby interrupting the subsequent flow development that leads to global flow separation from the surface and increased drag. Funding from NSF CBET grant 0932352 and US DOD AMRDEC.

  5. Effects of boundary-layer separation controllers on a desktop fume hood.

    PubMed

    Huang, Rong Fung; Chen, Jia-Kun; Hsu, Ching Min; Hung, Shuo-Fu

    2016-10-01

    A desktop fume hood installed with an innovative design of flow boundary-layer separation controllers on the leading edges of the side plates, work surface, and corners was developed and characterized for its flow and containment leakage characteristics. The geometric features of the developed desktop fume hood included a rearward offset suction slot, two side plates, two side-plate boundary-layer separation controllers on the leading edges of the side plates, a slanted surface on the leading edge of the work surface, and two small triangular plates on the upper left and right corners of the hood face. The flow characteristics were examined using the laser-assisted smoke flow visualization technique. The containment leakages were measured by the tracer gas (sulphur hexafluoride) detection method on the hood face plane with a mannequin installed in front of the hood. The results of flow visualization showed that the smoke dispersions induced by the boundary-layer separations on the leading edges of the side plates and work surface, as well as the three-dimensional complex flows on the upper-left and -right corners of the hood face, were effectively alleviated by the boundary-layer separation controllers. The results of the tracer gas detection method with a mannequin standing in front of the hood showed that the leakage levels were negligibly small (≤0.003 ppm) at low face velocities (≥0.19 m/s). PMID:27104797

  6. Flight test evaluation of a separate surface attitude command control system on a Beech 99 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gee, S. W.; Jenks, G. E.; Roskam, J.; Stone, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    A joint NASA/university/industry program was conducted to flight evaluate a potentially low cost separate surface implementation of attitude command in a Beech 99 airplane. Saturation of the separate surfaces was the primary cause of many problems during development. Six experienced professional pilots who made simulated instrument flight evaluations experienced improvements in airplane handling qualities in the presence of turbulence and a reduction in pilot workload. For ride quality, quantitative data show that the attitude command control system results in all cases of airplane motion being removed from the uncomfortable ride region.

  7. Control of Separation and Diameter of Ag Nanorods through Self-organized Seeds.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Paul R; Stagon, Stephen P; Huang, Hanchen

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a mechanism of controlling the diameter and separation of metallic nanorods from physical vapor deposition through self-organized seeds and experimentally demonstrates the feasibility using Ag as the prototype metal, In as the seed, and Si the substrate. Being non-wetting on Si substrates, deposited In atoms self-organize into islands. Subsequently deposited Ag atoms attach to In islands, rather than to Si substrates, due to preferential bonding and geometrical shadowing. The experimental results show that self-organized In seeds of 5 nm nominal thickness give rise to the best separation and the smallest diameter of Ag nanorods. PMID:26585104

  8. Control of Separation and Diameter of Ag Nanorods through Self-organized Seeds

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Paul R.; Stagon, Stephen P.; Huang, Hanchen

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a mechanism of controlling the diameter and separation of metallic nanorods from physical vapor deposition through self-organized seeds and experimentally demonstrates the feasibility using Ag as the prototype metal, In as the seed, and Si the substrate. Being non-wetting on Si substrates, deposited In atoms self-organize into islands. Subsequently deposited Ag atoms attach to In islands, rather than to Si substrates, due to preferential bonding and geometrical shadowing. The experimental results show that self-organized In seeds of 5 nm nominal thickness give rise to the best separation and the smallest diameter of Ag nanorods. PMID:26585104

  9. Controlling phase separation of binary Bose-Einstein condensates via mixed-spin-channel Feshbach resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Tojo, Satoshi; Taguchi, Yoshihisa; Masuyama, Yuta; Hayashi, Taro; Hirano, Takuya; Saito, Hiroki

    2010-09-15

    We investigate controlled phase separation of a binary Bose-Einstein condensate in the proximity of a mixed-spin-channel Feshbach resonance in the |F=1,m{sub F}=+1> and |F=2,m{sub F}=-1> states of {sup 87}Rb at a magnetic field of 9.10 G. Phase separation occurs on the lower-magnetic-field side of the Feshbach resonance while the two components overlap on the higher-magnetic-field side. The Feshbach resonance curve of the scattering length is obtained from the shape of the atomic cloud by comparison with the numerical analysis of coupled Gross-Pitaevskii equations.

  10. Enhanced water vapor separation by temperature-controlled aligned-multiwalled carbon nanotube membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Wonjae; Yun, Jongju; Khan, Fakhre Alam; Baik, Seunghyun

    2015-08-01

    Here we present a new strategy of selectively rejecting water vapor while allowing fast transport of dry gases using temperature-controlled aligned-multiwalled carbon nanotubes (aligned-MWNTs). The mechanism is based on the water vapor condensation at the entry region of nanotubes followed by removing aggregated water droplets at the tip of the superhydrophobic aligned-MWNTs. The first condensation step could be dramatically enhanced by decreasing the nanotube temperature. The permeate-side relative humidity was as low as ~17% and the helium-water vapor separation factor was as high as 4.62 when a helium-water vapor mixture with a relative humidity of 100% was supplied to the aligned-MWNTs. The flow through the interstitial space of the aligned-MWNTs allowed the permeability of single dry gases an order of magnitude higher than the Knudsen prediction regardless of membrane temperature. The water vapor separation performance of hydrophobic polytetrafluoroethylene membranes could also be significantly enhanced at low temperatures. This work combines the membrane-based separation technology with temperature control to enhance water vapor separation performance.Here we present a new strategy of selectively rejecting water vapor while allowing fast transport of dry gases using temperature-controlled aligned-multiwalled carbon nanotubes (aligned-MWNTs). The mechanism is based on the water vapor condensation at the entry region of nanotubes followed by removing aggregated water droplets at the tip of the superhydrophobic aligned-MWNTs. The first condensation step could be dramatically enhanced by decreasing the nanotube temperature. The permeate-side relative humidity was as low as ~17% and the helium-water vapor separation factor was as high as 4.62 when a helium-water vapor mixture with a relative humidity of 100% was supplied to the aligned-MWNTs. The flow through the interstitial space of the aligned-MWNTs allowed the permeability of single dry gases an order of

  11. Proceedings of the 2004 Workshop on CFD Validation of Synthetic Jets and Turbulent Separation Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumsey, Christopher L. (Compiler)

    2007-01-01

    The papers presented here are from the Langley Research Center Workshop on Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Validation of Synthetic Jets and Turbulent Separation Control (nicknamed "CFDVAL2004"), held March 2004 in Williamsburg, Virginia. The goal of the workshop was to bring together an international group of CFD practitioners to assess the current capabilities of different classes of turbulent flow solution methodologies to predict flow fields induced by synthetic jets and separation control geometries. The workshop consisted of three flow-control test cases of varying complexity, and participants could contribute to any number of the cases. Along with their workshop submissions, each participant included a short write-up describing their method for computing the particular case(s). These write-ups are presented as received from the authors with no editing. Descriptions of each of the test cases and experiments are also included.

  12. Active Control of Separation From the Flap of a Supercritical Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, La Tunia Pack; Yao, Chung-Sheng; Seifert, Avi

    2003-01-01

    Active flow control in the form of periodic zero-mass-flux excitation was applied at several regions on the leading edge and trailing edge flaps of a simplified high-lift system t o delay flow separation. The NASA Energy Efficient Transport (EET) supercritical airfoil was equipped with a 15% chord simply hinged leading edge flap and a 25% chord simply hinged trailing edge flap. Detailed flow features were measured in an attempt to identify optimal actuator placement. The measurements included steady and unsteady model and tunnel wall pressures, wake surveys, arrays of surface hot-films, flow visualization, and particle image velocimetry (PIV). The current paper describes the application of active separation control at several locations on the deflected trailing edge flap. High frequency (F(+) approx.= 10) and low frequency amplitude modulation (F(+)AM approx.= 1) of the high frequency excitation were used for control. Preliminary efforts to combine leading and trailing edge flap excitations are also reported.

  13. ELECTROMAGNETISM, OPTICS, ACOUSTICS, HEAT TRANSFER, CLASSICAL MECHANICS, AND FLUID DYNAMICS: Entanglement Properties Between Two Spatially Separated Atoms with Cascade Configuration in Free Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Guo-Hui; Zhang, Jun-Feng; Miao, Xiang-Yang; Zhou, Ling

    2010-03-01

    We investigate the entanglement properties between two identical atoms with cascade configuration through the retarded dipole-dipole interaction in free space when their spatial separation is on the order of radiation wavelength or less. We analyze the function of Hamiltonian induced by dipole-dipole interaction. By solving master equation, we show that the spontaneous emission induce entanglement and destroy entanglement too. We also show the long life time of entanglement within cascade configuration.

  14. Optical separation and controllable delivery of cells from particle and cell mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuchao; Xin, Hongbao; Cheng, Chang; Zhang, Yao; Li, Baojun

    2015-11-01

    Cell separation and delivery have recently gained significant attention in biological and biochemical studies. In thiswork, an optical method for separation and controllable delivery of cells by using an abruptly tapered fiber probe is reported. By launching a laser beam at the wavelength of 980 nm into the fiber, a mixture of cells with sizes of ~5 and ~3 μm and poly(methyl methacrylate) particles with size of 5 μm are separated into three chains along the direction of propagation of light. The cell and particle chains are delivered in three dimensions over 600 μm distance. Experimental results are interpreted by numerical simulations. Optical forces and forward migration velocities of different particles and cells are calculated and discussed.

  15. Phase separation as a strategy toward controlling dilution effects in macrocyclic Glaser-Hay couplings.

    PubMed

    Bédard, Anne-Catherine; Collins, Shawn K

    2011-12-14

    Macrocycles are abundant in numerous chemical applications, however the traditional strategy for the preparation of these compounds remains cumbersome and environmentally damaging; involving tedious reaction set-ups and extremely dilute reaction media. The development of a macrocyclization strategy conducted at high concentrations is described which exploits phase separation of the catalyst and substrate, as a strategy to control dilution effects. Sequestering a copper catalyst in a highly polar and/or hydrophilic phase can be achieved using a hydrophilic ligand, T-PEG(1900), a PEGylated TMEDA derivative. Similarly, phase separation is possible when suitable copper complexes are soluble in PEG(400), a green and efficient solvent which can be utilized in biphasic mixtures for promoting macrocyclization at high concentrations. The latter phase separation technique can be exploited for the synthesis of a wide range of industrially relevant macrocycles with varying ring sizes and functional groups. PMID:22029394

  16. Flow Separation Control on A Full-Scale Vertical Tail Model Using Sweeping Jet Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andino, Marlyn Y.; Lin, John C.; Washburn, Anthony E.; Whalen, Edward A.; Graff, Emilio C.; Wygnanski, Israel J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes test results of a joint NASA/Boeing research effort to advance Active Flow Control (AFC) technology to enhance aerodynamic efficiency. A full-scale Boeing 757 vertical tail model equipped with sweeping jets AFC was tested at the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center. The flow separation control optimization was performed at 100 knots, a maximum rudder deflection of 30deg, and sideslip angles of 0deg and -7.5deg. Greater than 20% increments in side force were achieved at the two sideslip angles with a 31-actuator AFC configuration. Flow physics and flow separation control associated with the AFC are presented in detail. AFC caused significant increases in suction pressure on the actuator side and associated side force enhancement. The momentum coefficient (C sub mu) is shown to be a useful parameter to use for scaling-up sweeping jet AFC from sub-scale tests to full-scale applications. Reducing the number of actuators at a constant total C(sub mu) of approximately 0.5% and tripling the actuator spacing did not significantly affect the flow separation control effectiveness.

  17. Active Flow Separation Control on a NACA 0015 Wing Using Fluidic Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, Latunia P.

    2014-01-01

    Results are presented from a recent set of wind tunnel experiments using sweeping jet actuators to control ow separation on the 30% chord trailing edge ap of a 30 deg. swept wing model with an aspect ratio (AR) of 4.35. Two sweeping jet actuator locations were examined, one on the flap shoulder and one on the trailing edge flap. The parameters that were varied included actuator momentum, freestream velocity, and trailing edge flap deflection (Delta f ) angle. The primary focus of this set of experiments was to determine the mass flow and momentum requirements for controlling separation on the flap, especially at large flap deflection angles which would be characteristic of a high lift system. Surface pressure data, force and moment data, and stereoscopic particle image velocimetry (PIV) data were acquired to evaluate the performance benefits due to applying active flow control. Improvements in lift over the majority of the wing span were obtained using sweeping jet actuator control. High momentum coefficient, Cu, levels were needed when using the actuators on the ap because they were located downstream of separation. Actuators on the flap shoulder performed slightly better but actuator size, orientation, and spacing still need to be optimized.

  18. Crystal Morphology Control By Melt Phase Separation in Biodegradable Polymer Blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akpalu, Y. A.; Meredith, J. C.; Amis, E. J.

    2001-03-01

    The effect of lower critical solution temperature (LCST) phase separation on the crystallization of poly(ɛ-caprolactone) PCL in PCL/poly(D,L-lactide) (PDLA) blends is studied by simultaneous small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and wide-angle x-ray scattering (WAXS). Phase separation is induced by controlled temperature jumps into the LCST (two-phase) region, which is above the melting temperature (60 ^oC) of PCL and the glass transition temperature (50 ^oC) of PDLA. We have followed the nanoscale structural changes (< 100 nm) during subsequent crystallization at 45 ^oC of critical (0.36 PCL) and off-critical (0.50 PCL) blend compositions in both one-phase and two-phase melts. The spherulite morphology (1-100 μm) is examined with optical microscopy. When crystallization follows LCST phase separation, the shape, size and distribution of the spherulites depends on the extent of melt phase separation. In our x-ray measurements, the WAXS crystallinity of PCL is less than 40 % for the temperature range of interest. We perform a correlation function and intensity model analysis of our SAXS data to obtain morphological variables that characterize the intraspherulitic morphology. These morphological variables are relatively constant during crystallization and are also independent of melt phase separation. On the other hand, the ultimate crystallinity, the crystallization rate and the intraspherulitic concentration of PDLA depend on the extent of melt phase separation. In 0.36 PCL the ultimate crystallinity can be reduced by 50 %. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first use of simultaneous SAXS/WAXS to investigate the effect on melt phase separation and blending on the crystal morphology independently.

  19. The separation of the East Australian Current: A Lagrangian approach to potential vorticity and upstream control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ypma, S. L.; van Sebille, E.; Kiss, A. E.; Spence, P.

    2016-01-01

    The East Australian Current (EAC) is the western boundary current flowing along the east coast of Australia separating from the coast at approximately 34°S. After the separation two main pathways can be distinguished, the eastward flowing Tasman Front and the extension of the EAC flowing southward. The area south of the separation latitude is eddy-rich and the separation latitude of the EAC is variable. Little is known of the properties of the water masses that separate at the bifurcation of the EAC. This paper presents new insights from the Lagrangian perspective, where the water masses that veer east and those that continue south are tracked in an eddy-permitting numerical model. The transport along the two pathways is computed, and a 1:3 ratio between transport in the EAC extension and transport in the Tasman Front is found. The results show that the "fate" of the particles is to first order already determined by the particle distribution within the EAC current upstream of the separation latitude, where 85% of the particles following the EAC extension originate from below 460 m and 90% of the particles following the Tasman Front originate from the top 460 m depth at 28°S. The separation and pathways are controlled by the structure of the isopycnals in this region. Analysis of anomalies in potential vorticity show that in the region where the two water masses overlap, the fate of the water depends on the presence of anticyclonic eddies that push isopycnals down and therefore enable particles to travel further south.

  20. Characterization and Control of Separated Entrance Flow in a Branched Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, C. J.; Vukasinovic, B.; Glezer, A.

    2015-11-01

    The evolution of the flow downstream of the inlet of a rectangular channel that is branched along the entire span of the side wall of a primary channel of the same height is investigated experimentally in an air facility. Of particular interest is the formation and scaling of a separated flow domain downstream of the entrance plane into the secondary channel and its interaction with the flow surfaces at speeds up to M = 0 . 4 . The separation is actively controlled using a spanwise array of fluidic actuators on the primary channel's surface upstream of the inlet plane of the secondary duct. The effects of the actuation on the evolution of the separation and attachment of the vorticity layer between upstream surface of the primary duct and the surface of the secondary duct downstream of the branched inlet in the presence of a strong confined adverse pressure gradient are investigated using particle image velocimetry coupled with detailed static surface pressure distributions. The effects of the controlled separation within the secondary channel on the global flow within the primary duct and on flow split between primary and secondary channels are assessed, and it is demonstrated that actuation can effect significant changes in the flow fractions between the channels. Copyright 2015 Boeing. All rights reserved.

  1. Separation-Compliant, Optimal Routing and Control of Scheduled Arrivals in a Terminal Airspace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadovsky, Alexander V.; Davis, Damek; Isaacson, Douglas R.

    2013-01-01

    We address the problem of navigating a set (fleet) of aircraft in an aerial route network so as to bring each aircraft to its destination at a specified time and with minimal distance separation assured between all aircraft at all times. The speed range, initial position, required destination, and required time of arrival at destination for each aircraft are assumed provided. Each aircraft's movement is governed by a controlled differential equation (state equation). The problem consists in choosing for each aircraft a path in the route network and a control strategy so as to meet the constraints and reach the destination at the required time. The main contribution of the paper is a model that allows to recast this problem as a decoupled collection of problems in classical optimal control and is easily generalized to the case when inertia cannot be neglected. Some qualitative insight into solution behavior is obtained using the Pontryagin Maximum Principle. Sample numerical solutions are computed using a numerical optimal control solver. The proposed model is first step toward increasing the fidelity of continuous time control models of air traffic in a terminal airspace. The Pontryagin Maximum Principle implies the polygonal shape of those portions of the state trajectories away from those states in which one or more aircraft pair are at minimal separation. The model also confirms the intuition that, the narrower the allowed speed ranges of the aircraft, the smaller the space of optimal solutions, and that an instance of the optimal control problem may not have a solution at all (i.e., no control strategy that meets the separation requirement and other constraints).

  2. Similar Mechanisms of Movement Control in Target- and Effect-Directed Actions toward Spatial Goals?

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Andrea M.; Rieger, Martina

    2012-01-01

    Previous research has shown that actions conducted toward temporal targets and temporal effects are controlled in a similar way. To investigate whether these findings also apply to spatially restricted movements we analyzed movement kinematics of continuous reversal movements toward given spatial targets and toward self-produced spatial effects in two experiments. In Experiment 1 target- and effect-directed movements were investigated in three different goal constellations. A spatial target/effect was always presented/produced on one movement side, on the other side either (a) no target/effect, (b) the same target/effect, or (c) a more difficult target/effect was presented/produced. Results showed that both target-directed and effect-directed movements have a typical spatial kinematic pattern and that both can be equally well described by linear functions as suggested by Fitts’ Law. However, effect-directed movements have longer movement times. In Experiment 2 participants performed target-directed movements to the one side and effect-directed movements to the other side of a reversal movement. More pronounced spatial kinematics were observed in effect-directed than in target-directed movements. Together, the results suggest that actions conducted toward spatial targets and spatial effects are controlled in a similar manner. Gradual differences in the kinematic patterns may arise because effects are cognitively more demanding. They may therefore be represented less accurately than targets. However, there was no indication of qualitative differences in the cognitive representations of effects and targets. This strengthens our assumption that both targets and effects play a comparable role in action control: they can both be viewed as goals of an action. Thus, ideomotor theories of action control should incorporate action targets as goals similar to action effects. PMID:23230426

  3. Optimal Control Modification Adaptive Law for Time-Scale Separated Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.

    2010-01-01

    Recently a new optimal control modification has been introduced that can achieve robust adaptation with a large adaptive gain without incurring high-frequency oscillations as with the standard model-reference adaptive control. This modification is based on an optimal control formulation to minimize the L2 norm of the tracking error. The optimal control modification adaptive law results in a stable adaptation in the presence of a large adaptive gain. This study examines the optimal control modification adaptive law in the context of a system with a time scale separation resulting from a fast plant with a slow actuator. A singular perturbation analysis is performed to derive a modification to the adaptive law by transforming the original system into a reduced-order system in slow time. A model matching conditions in the transformed time coordinate results in an increase in the actuator command that effectively compensate for the slow actuator dynamics. Simulations demonstrate effectiveness of the method.

  4. Actuator fault tolerant multi-controller scheme using set separation based diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seron, María M.; De Doná, José A.

    2010-11-01

    We present a fault tolerant control strategy based on a new principle for actuator fault diagnosis. The scheme employs a standard bank of observers which match the different fault situations that can occur in the plant. Each of these observers has an associated estimation error with distinctive dynamics when an estimator matches the current fault situation of the plant. Based on the information from each observer, a fault detection and isolation (FDI) module is able to reconfigure the control loop by selecting the appropriate control law from a bank of controllers, each of them designed to stabilise and achieve reference tracking for one of the given fault models. The main contribution of this article is to propose a new FDI principle which exploits the separation of sets that characterise healthy system operation from sets that characterise transitions from healthy to faulty behaviour. The new principle allows to provide pre-checkable conditions for guaranteed fault tolerance of the overall multi-controller scheme.

  5. Spatially-based quality control for daily precipitation datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrano-Notivoli, Roberto; de Luis, Martín; Beguería, Santiago; Ángel Saz, Miguel

    2016-04-01

    There are many reasons why wrong data can appear in original precipitation datasets but their common characteristic is that all of them do not correspond to the natural variability of the climate variable. For this reason, is necessary a comprehensive analysis of the data of each station in each day, to be certain that the final dataset will be consistent and reliable. Most of quality control techniques applied over daily precipitation are based on the comparison of each observed value with the rest of values in same series or in reference series built from its nearest stations. These methods are inherited from monthly precipitation studies, but in daily scale the variability is bigger and the methods have to be different. A common character shared by all of these approaches is that they made reconstructions based on the best-correlated reference series, which could be a biased decision because, for example, a extreme precipitation occurred in one day in more than one station could be flagged as erroneous. We propose a method based on the specific conditions of the day and location to determine the reliability of each observation. This method keeps the local variance of the variable and the time-structure independence. To do that, individually for each daily value, we first compute the probability of precipitation occurrence through a multivariate logistic regression using the 10 nearest observations in a binomial mode (0=dry; 1=wet), this produces a binomial prediction (PB) between 0 and 1. Then, we compute a prediction of precipitation magnitude (PM) with the raw data of the same 10 nearest observations. Through these predictions we explore the original data in each day and location by five criteria: 1) Suspect data; 2) Suspect zero; 3) Suspect outlier; 4) Suspect wet and 5) Suspect dry. Tests over different datasets addressed that flagged data depend mainly on the number of available data and the homogeneous distribution of them.

  6. Insertion of interlayers in efficient polymer-based organic solar cells for control of phase separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taima, Tetsuya; Tanaka, Jun; Kuwabara, Takayuki; Takahashi, Kohshin

    2016-02-01

    To improve the solar cell performance of polymer-based organic solar cells, the control of phase separation in the bulk heterojunction (BHJ) layer is important. In the case of a thienothiophene-benzodithiophene-based polymer (PTB7)-based solar cell, 1,8-diiodoctane (DIO) is added into the chlorobenzene solvent. However, it is well known that DIO addition causes degradation in long-term operation. Here, we try to improve the performance of the PTB7-based BHJ solar cell by controlling the phase separation in the BHJ layer through the insertion of an inorganic semiconducting copper iodide (CuI) interlayer between the BHJ layer and indium tin oxide. The power conversion efficiency of the PTB7-based solar cell is improved from 3.5 to 3.9% upon inserting the CuI interlayer without DIO addition.

  7. Numerical Study of Control of Flow Separation Over a Ramp with Nanosecond Plasma Actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, J. G.; Khoo, B. C.; Cui, Y. D.; Zhao, Z. J.; Li, J.

    2016-06-01

    The nanosecond plasma discharge actuator driven by high voltage pulse with typical rise and decay time of several to tens of nanoseconds is emerging as a promising active flow control means in recent years and is being studied intensively. The characterization study reveals that the discharge induced shock wave propagates through ambient air and introduces highly transient perturbation to the flow. On the other hand, the residual heat remaining in the discharge volume may trigger the instability of external flow. In this study, this type of actuator is used to suppress flow separation over a ramp model. Numerical simulation is carried out to investigate the interaction of the discharge induced disturbance with the external flow. It is found that the flow separation region over the ramp can be reduced significantly. Our work may provide some insights into the understanding of the control mechanism of nanosecond pulse actuator.

  8. Spatial separation of photogenerated electrons and holes among {010} and {110} crystal facets of BiVO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Rengui; Zhang, Fuxiang; Wang, Donge; Yang, Jingxiu; Li, Mingrun; Zhu, Jian; Zhou, Xin; Han, Hongxian; Li, Can

    2013-02-01

    Charge separation is crucial for increasing the activity of semiconductor-based photocatalysts, especially in water splitting reactions. Here we show, using monoclinic bismuth vanadate crystal as a model photocatalyst, that efficient charge separation can be achieved on different crystal facets, as evidenced by the reduction reaction with photogenerated electrons and oxidation reaction with photogenerated holes, which take place separately on the {010} and {110} facets under photo-irradiation. Based on this finding, the reduction and oxidation cocatalysts are selectively deposited on the {010} and {110} facets respectively, resulting in much higher activity in both photocatalytic and photoelectrocatalytic water oxidation reactions, compared with the photocatalyst with randomly distributed cocatalysts. These results show that the photogenrated electrons and holes can be separated between the different facets of semiconductor crystals. This finding may be useful in semiconductor physics and chemistry to construct highly efficient solar energy conversion systems.

  9. Simulation and simulator development of a separate surface attitude command control system for light aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roskam, J.

    1976-01-01

    A detailed description is presented of the simulation philosophy and process used in the development of a Separate Surface Attitude Command control system (SSAC) for a Beech Model 99 Airliner. The intent of this system is to provide complete three axes stability augmentation at low cost and without the need for system redundancy. The system, although aimed at the general aviation market, also has applications to certain military airplanes as well as to miniature submarines.

  10. Aspects regarding at 13C isotope separation column control using Petri nets system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boca, M. L.; Ciortea, M. E.

    2015-11-01

    This paper is intended to show that Petri nets can be also applicable in the chemical industry. It used linear programming, modeling underlying Petri nets, especially discrete event systems for isotopic separation, the purpose of considering and control events in real-time through graphical representations. In this paper it is simulate the control of 13C Isotope Separation column using Petri nets. The major problem with 13C comes from the difficulty of obtaining it and raising its natural fraction. Carbon isotopes can be obtained using many methods, one of them being the cryogenic distillation of carbon monoxide. Some few aspects regarding operating conditions and the construction of such cryogenic plants are known today, and even less information are available as far as the separation process modeling and control are concerned. In fact, the efficient control of the carbon monoxide distillation process represents a necessity for large-scale 13C production. Referring to a classic distillation process, some models for carbon isotope separation have been proposed, some based on mass, component and energy balance equations, some on the nonlinear wave theory or the Cohen equations. For modeling the system it was used Petri nets because in this case it is deal with discrete event systems. In use of the non-timed and with auxiliary times Petri model, the transport stream was divided into sections and these sections will be analyzed successively. Because of the complexity of the system and the large amount of calculations required it was not possible to analyze the system as a unitary whole. A first attempt to model the system as a unitary whole led to the blocking of the model during simulation, because of the large processing times.

  11. Recent Observations on Shortfin Mako Scale Flexibility as a Mechanism for Separation Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Amy; Motta, Philip; Habegger, Maria; Jones, Emily; Hueter, Robert

    2010-11-01

    Recent results obtained from examining the skin of the shortfin mako (Isurus oxyrinchus) suggest that scale flexibility may provide a passive, flow actuated mechanism for controlling flow separation. The shortfin mako is considered to be one of the fastest and most agile marine predators. High contragility, or the ability to change direction while already in a turn, requires minimal form drag and thus control of flow separation on body regions aft of the point of maximum girth. Recent biological observations have found that the shortfin mako has highly flexible scales, or denticles, particularly on the sides of the body downstream of the gills; in these regions scale crowns can be easily manipulated to angles in excess of 60 degrees. Histological data of the skin provides preliminary evidence that this flexibility is achieved due, in part, to a reduction in the size of the base of the scale where it is anchored into the skin. Experimental measurements of maximum angle of denticle bristling observed as a function of body location will be presented and a probable mechanism leading to separation control will be discussed.

  12. Flow Separation Control for Low-Pressure Turbine Blade using Vortex Generator Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasliwal, Amit

    2005-11-01

    Numerical study of flow separation control is conducted employing Vortex-Generator Jets. This strategy is first tested for the flow past a cylinder at Reynolds number (Re) of 13,400, and then applied to flow in a low-pressure turbine (LPT) cascade for the PAK-B blade geometry at Re = 25,000. A fourth-order accurate compact-difference scheme is used along with sixth-order filtering (C4F6). FDL3DI, a research code developed at WPAFB, is used as the flow solver. A blowing ratio of 2.0 with a skew angle of 90^o and a pitch angle of 30^o is employed in the simulations for the aforementioned configurations. The control jets are pulsed with F^+ = 1.0 for the case of the cylinder, and with F^+ = 2.33 for the LPT case. The results show a significant decrease in drag on the cylinder after the jets are turned on. The total-pressure loss is calculated in the wake region, at x/D = 3.0, and a reduction of 10% is observed. For the LPT case, the implemented flow separation control strategy totally eliminates the separation and leads to 27.5% reduction in wake total-pressure loss.

  13. Transitioning Resolution Responsibility between the Controller and Automation Team in Simulated NextGen Separation Assurance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabrall, C.; Gomez, A.; Homola, J.; Hunt, S..; Martin, L.; Merccer, J.; Prevott, T.

    2013-01-01

    As part of an ongoing research effort on separation assurance and functional allocation in NextGen, a controller- in-the-loop study with ground-based automation was conducted at NASA Ames' Airspace Operations Laboratory in August 2012 to investigate the potential impact of introducing self-separating aircraft in progressively advanced NextGen timeframes. From this larger study, the current exploratory analysis of controller-automation interaction styles focuses on the last and most far-term time frame. Measurements were recorded that firstly verified the continued operational validity of this iteration of the ground-based functional allocation automation concept in forecast traffic densities up to 2x that of current day high altitude en-route sectors. Additionally, with greater levels of fully automated conflict detection and resolution as well as the introduction of intervention functionality, objective and subjective analyses showed a range of passive to active controller- automation interaction styles between the participants. Not only did the controllers work with the automation to meet their safety and capacity goals in the simulated future NextGen timeframe, they did so in different ways and with different attitudes of trust/use of the automation. Taken as a whole, the results showed that the prototyped controller-automation functional allocation framework was very flexible and successful overall.

  14. A Time Scale Separation Method for the Coordination of Voltage Controls for SVC and SVR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yorino, Naoto; Miki, Takahiro; Yamato, Yuuki; Zoka, Yoshifumi; Sasaki, Hiroshi

    A time scale separation (TSS) method is proposed for the coordination of voltage controls of different time scales. The method is applied to a design of voltage regulator for static var compensator (SVC) which will be used with a step voltage regulator (SVR) in a distribution system. A simple filter, an input filter to the conventional SVC, is developed for the coordination with SVR controllers. The proposed filter can also be used as an input filter to AVR of the dispersed generators for the coordination controls with the conventional tap control devices. Effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated through numerical simulations in a distribution system having a large disturbance source of a wind power generator.

  15. An instrument to control parallel plate separation for nanoscale flow control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, J.; Ma, H.; Lang, J.; Slocum, A.

    2003-11-01

    The handling of extremely small samples of gases and liquids has long been a subject of research among biologists, chemists, and engineers. A few scientific instruments, notably the surface force apparatus, have been used extensively to investigate very short-range molecular phenomena. This article describes the design, fabrication, and characterization of an easily manufactured, gas and liquid flow control device called the Nanogate. The Nanogate controls liquid flows under very high planar confinement, wherein the liquid film is, in one dimension, on the scale of nanometers, but is on the scale of hundreds of microns in its other dimensions. The liquid film is confined between a silica (Pyrex) surface with a typical roughness of Ra≈6 nm and a gold-covered silicon surface with a typical roughness of Ra≈2 nm. During the manufacturing process, the Pyrex flows and conforms to the gold-covered silicon surface, improving the mating properties of the two surfaces. The fluid film thickness can be controlled within 2 Å, from sub-10 nm up to 1 μm. Control of helium gas flow rates in the 10-9 atm cm3/s range, and sub-nl/s flow rates of water and methanol have been predicted and experimentally verified.

  16. Spatial separation from family in the mobile young of a biparental fish: risks and dynamics of returning home

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee-Jenkins, Stacey S. Y.; Jeswiet, Sarah B.; Godin, Jean-Guy J.

    2014-01-01

    In species with extended parental care, mobile dependent young are potentially more vulnerable to predators when they stray and become separated from their parents. We would expect that the likelihood of, and latency time for, a separated young to safely return to its `family unit' (i.e. parents and brood mates) to be, respectively, inversely and positively related to the initial distance of separation and potentially mediated by its age or body size. Using the biparental convict cichlid fish ( Amatitlania siquia), we tested these predictions by capturing individual young and displacing them at varying distances from their family unit in both the field and laboratory. As expected, displaced fish were less likely, and took longer, to return to their family with increasing separation distance from the family unit. The body length of displaced young mediated these relationships and their antipredator behaviour; larger young refuged more than smaller ones and were also less likely to be eaten by predators. These results suggest that selection should favour strong affiliative behaviour in mobile young animals towards their brood mates and protective parents because straying from the family unit leads to increased exposure to predation and a reduced likelihood of returning home with increasing separation distance.

  17. Boundary layer and separation control on wings at low Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shanling

    Results on boundary layer and separation control through acoustic excitation at low Re numbers are reported. The Eppler 387 profile is specifically chosen because of its pre-stall hysteresis and bi-stable state behavior in the transitional Re regime, which is a result of flow separation and reattachment. External acoustic forcing on the wing yields large improvements (more than 70%) in lift-to-drag ratio and flow reattachment at forcing frequencies that correlate with the measured anti-resonances in the wind tunnel. The optimum St/Re1/2 range for Re = 60,000 matches the proposed optimum range in the literature, but there is less agreement for Re = 40,000, which suggests that correct St scaling has not been determined. The correlation of aerodynamic improvements to wind tunnel resonances implies that external acoustic forcing is facility-dependent, which inhibits practical application. Therefore, internal acoustic excitation for the same wing profile is also pursued. Internal acoustic forcing is designed to be accomplished by embedding small speakers inside a custom-designed wing that contains many internal cavities and small holes in the suction surface. However, initial testing of this semi-porous wing model shows that the presence of the small holes in the suction surface completely transforms the aerodynamic performance by changing the mean chordwise separation location and causing an originally separated, low-lift state flow to reattach into a high-lift state. The aerodynamic improvements are not caused by the geometry of the small holes themselves, but rather by Helmholtz resonance that occurs in the cavities, which generate tones that closely match the intrinsic flow instabilities. Essentially, opening and closing holes in the suction surface of a wing, perhaps by digital control, can be used as a means of passive separation control. Given the similarity of wing-embedded pressure tap systems to Helmholtz resonators, particular attention must be given to the

  18. Beam control and diagnostic functions in the NIF transport spatial filter

    SciTech Connect

    Holdener, F.R.; Ables, E.; Bliss, E.S.

    1996-10-01

    Beam control and diagnostic systems are required to align the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser prior to a shot as well as to provide diagnostics on 192 beam lines at shot time. A design that allows each beam`s large spatial filter lenses to also serve as objective lenses for beam control and diagnostic sensor packages helps to accomplish the task at a reasonable cost. However, this approach also causes a high concentration of small optics near the pinhole plane of the transport spatial filter (TSF) at the output of each beam. This paper describes the optomechanical design in and near the central vacuum vessel of the TSF.

  19. Separation control using plasma actuators: application to a free turbulent jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labergue, A.; Moreau, E.; Zouzou, N.; Touchard, G.

    2007-02-01

    This experimental work deals with active airflow control using non-thermal surface plasma actuators in the case of a rectangular cross section turbulent jet. A wide-angle diffuser composed of two adjustable hinged baseplates is linked at the jet exit. Two types of actuators are considered: the DC corona discharge and the dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). In both cases, an ionic wind with a velocity of several m s-1 is generated tangentially to the wall surface. Thus, this induced aerodynamic effect is applied in order to create the separation along the lower hinged baseplate. The effects of both actuators on the flow separation are measured by means of particle image velocimetry for velocity up to 30 m s-1. The main results show that the DBD seems more efficient than the DC corona discharge but the effect decreases with the jet velocity. However, in increasing the discharge frequency up to 1500 Hz, it is possible to separate a 30 m s-1 jet. Finally, by reducing the actuators' length in the spanwise direction, results lead to a visualization of the three-dimensional effects on the separation along the lower hinged baseplate.

  20. An Experimental Study of Flow Separation Control by Shortfin Mako Shark Skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afroz, Farhana; Lang, Amy; Motta, Philip; Habegger, Maria

    2013-11-01

    The shortfin mako shark (Isurus oxyrinchus) is a fast swimmer and has incredible turning agility. Shark skin is covered with flexible scales and this bristling capability may result in a unique Boundary Layer Control (BLC) method to reduce drag. It is hypothesized that scales bristle when the flow above it is reversed, and between the bristled scales embedded micro-vortices form in the cavities which induce boundary layer mixing and aid in delaying flow separation. To testify this hypothesis, samples of mako shark skin have been tested in a water tunnel under various strengths of adverse pressure gradient (APG). Laminar and turbulent separation over shark skin was studied experimentally using Time-Resolved Digital Particle Image Velocimetry (TR-DPIV) system, where the APG was generated and varied using a rotating cylinder. Then shark skin results were compared with that of a flat plate data for a given amount of APG. The study reveals that shark skin is capable of controlling both laminar and turbulent flow separation. Support under NSF grant 0932352 is gratefully acknowledged. First author Farhana Afroz was also supported by a scholarship through the Alabama EPSCoR Graduate Research Scholars Program.

  1. Visualization of vortex generator jets for conical diffuser separation control using PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yonghui; Fan, Tao; Zhang, Di

    2008-11-01

    Vortex generator jets (VGJs) have been recognized as an effective active control method for the flow separation. To investigate its mechanism in conical diffuser, PIV was used to study the interaction of VGJs with freestream in this study. A conical diffuser model, with divergence angle of 14° was used. The jet holes were drilled with pitch angle of 30° and skew angle of 90°. At several streamwise locations, two-dimensional traverses were set up to obtain the velocity distribution and vorticity in the interaction region of vortex. PIV measurements provide a global depiction of the interaction of boundary layer transition and separation in this unsteady environment. It is shown that vortical flows generated by VGJs significantly fluctuate velocity profiles. The steady jets create vortices that swept the low momentum fluid up from the boundary layer while transporting high momentum freestream fluid towards the wall, which provides the ingredients for flow control. It is also revealed that the longitudinal vortices are generated in the boundary layer by shear stress and friction from jets, which increase cross-stream mixing of streamwise momentum and then suppress separation in conical diffuser. Some new phenomena and rules presented would offer valuable information for further study.

  2. A frequency-control particle separation device based on resultant effects of electroosmosis and dielectrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shiang-Chi; Tung, Yi-Chung; Lin, Chih-Ting

    2016-08-01

    Particle separation plays an important role in microfluidic sample preparation for various biomedical applications. In this paper, we report a particle manipulation and separation scheme using a microfluidic device based on low-volume/low-voltage electrokinetic frequency modulation. Utilizing a circular micro-electrode array, both electroosmosis and dielectrophoresis can be contributed to manipulate particles in the device by controlling the frequency of applied sinusoidal travelling wave signals. Theoretical simulations based on finite-element methods are employed to establish fundamental understanding of the developed scheme. For experimental demonstration, polystyrene beads (6 μm in diameter) and human promyelocytic leukaemia cells (HL-60) are used to validate the frequency-modulation effect. Furthermore, different diameter polystyrene beads (6 μm and 10 μm in diameter) are mixed to show potentials of precise particle separations (˜90% efficiency) by the reported frequency-controlled electrokinetic device. The developed technique can be exploited as an actuation scheme and particle manipulation method for microfluidic sample preparations of low ionic concentration samples.

  3. Building spatially-structured biofilms with single-cell control using laser trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodesney, Christopher; Hutchison, Jaime; Kaushik, Karishma; Le, Henry; Hurwitz, Daniel; Irie, Yasuhiko; Gordon, Vernita

    2015-03-01

    Biofilms are sessile communities of microbes adhered to each other and to an interface. Biofilm infections are notoriously difficult to eradicate, and this arises in part from phenotypic changes due to the spatial structure of the biofilm. Spatial structure controls the microenvironment and intercellular associations, which in turn controls gene expression, virulence, and antibiotic resistance. There are few tools available for elucidating the role of spatial structure in biofilms. We present a method for controlling the positions of bacteria on a surface using optical trapping without impinging cell viability. Initial positions propagate into the developing biofilm, creating spatial structure. The native growth, motility, and surface adhesion of positioned cells are preserved, as shown for model organisms Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. We demonstrate statistically-significant effects of spatial structure on the growth of monoculture P. aeruginosa biofilms and for co-culture biofilms of P. aeruginosa and S. aureus. Because the laser trap we use is very basic and the other equipment required is inexpensive and standard, we believe that our technique will be a widely-usable tool for biological and physical collaborators at many types of institutions.

  4. GluN2A-/- Mice Lack Bidirectional Synaptic Plasticity in the Dentate Gyrus and Perform Poorly on Spatial Pattern Separation Tasks.

    PubMed

    Kannangara, Timal S; Eadie, Brennan D; Bostrom, Crystal A; Morch, Kristin; Brocardo, Patricia S; Christie, Brian R

    2015-08-01

    The different secondary subunits of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor each convey unique biophysical properties to the receptor complex, and may be key in determining the functional role played by NMDA receptors. In the hippocampus, the GluN2A and GluN2B subunits are particularly abundant; however, their exact roles in synaptic plasticity and behavior remain controversial. Here, we show that mice carrying a deletion for the GluN2A subunit (GluN2A(-/-)) demonstrate a severely compromised NMDA to AMPA receptor current ratio in granule cells from the dentate gyrus (DG), while granule cell morphology is unaltered. This deficit is accompanied by significant impairments in both LTP and LTD in the DG, whereas only minor impairments are observed in the CA1. In accordance with these hippocampal region-specific deficits, GluN2A(-/-) mice show impaired performance on the DG-associated task of spatial pattern separation. In contrast, GluN2A(-/-) mice show no deficit in temporal pattern separation, a process associated with CA1 functioning. Thus, our results establish the GluN2A subunit as a significant contributor to both bidirectional synaptic plasticity and spatial pattern separation in the DG. PMID:24554729

  5. Fabrication of microchannels by space-selective control of phase separation in glass.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yongze; Chen, Yeqin; Chen, Jiejie; Lv, Shichao; Feng, Xu; Qi, Yuzhong; Qiu, Jianrong; Zhou, Shifeng

    2016-07-15

    Microchannels have important scientific applications in many fields, because they enable precise control, manipulation, and analysis of fluid on a micrometer scale. Herein, we demonstrate an effective strategy for fabrication of microchannels, based on the space-selective phase separation in glass induced by a femtosecond laser. The proposed method shows its abilities in fabrication of three-dimensional microchannels with ∼5  mm length scale and a uniform cross section. Moreover, we also achieve the modulation of the morphology on the inner surface of microchannels by using objective lenses with various numerical-apertures. The physical mechanism of the phase separation and microstructure evolution is discussed. Our method provides new opportunities to fabricate microchannels with complex structures and multifunctional integration. PMID:27420538

  6. Formation of Asymmetrical Structured Silica Controlled by a Phase Separation Process and Implication for Biosilicification

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jia-Yuan; Yao, Qi-Zhi; Li, Xi-Ming; Zhou, Gen-Tao; Fu, Sheng-Quan

    2013-01-01

    Biogenetic silica displays intricate patterns assembling from nano- to microsize level and interesting non-spherical structures differentiating in specific directions. Several model systems have been proposed to explain the formation of biosilica nanostructures. Of them, phase separation based on the physicochemical properties of organic amines was considered to be responsible for the pattern formation of biosilica. In this paper, using tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS, Si(OCH2CH3)4) as silica precursor, phospholipid (PL) and dodecylamine (DA) were introduced to initiate phase separation of organic components and influence silica precipitation. Morphology, structure and composition of the mineralized products were characterized using a range of techniques including field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA), infrared spectra (IR), and nitrogen physisorption. The results demonstrate that the phase separation process of the organic components leads to the formation of asymmetrically non-spherical silica structures, and the aspect ratios of the asymmetrical structures can be well controlled by varying the concentration of PL and DA. On the basis of the time-dependent experiments, a tentative mechanism is also proposed to illustrate the asymmetrical morphogenesis. Therefore, our results imply that in addition to explaining the hierarchical porous nanopatterning of biosilica, the phase separation process may also be responsible for the growth differentiation of siliceous structures in specific directions. Because organic amine (e.g., long-chair polyamines), phospholipids (e.g., silicalemma) and the phase separation process are associated with the biosilicification of diatoms, our results may provide a new insight into the mechanism of biosilicification. PMID:23585878

  7. Formation of asymmetrical structured silica controlled by a phase separation process and implication for biosilicification.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jia-Yuan; Yao, Qi-Zhi; Li, Xi-Ming; Zhou, Gen-Tao; Fu, Sheng-Quan

    2013-01-01

    Biogenetic silica displays intricate patterns assembling from nano- to microsize level and interesting non-spherical structures differentiating in specific directions. Several model systems have been proposed to explain the formation of biosilica nanostructures. Of them, phase separation based on the physicochemical properties of organic amines was considered to be responsible for the pattern formation of biosilica. In this paper, using tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS, Si(OCH2CH3)4) as silica precursor, phospholipid (PL) and dodecylamine (DA) were introduced to initiate phase separation of organic components and influence silica precipitation. Morphology, structure and composition of the mineralized products were characterized using a range of techniques including field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA), infrared spectra (IR), and nitrogen physisorption. The results demonstrate that the phase separation process of the organic components leads to the formation of asymmetrically non-spherical silica structures, and the aspect ratios of the asymmetrical structures can be well controlled by varying the concentration of PL and DA. On the basis of the time-dependent experiments, a tentative mechanism is also proposed to illustrate the asymmetrical morphogenesis. Therefore, our results imply that in addition to explaining the hierarchical porous nanopatterning of biosilica, the phase separation process may also be responsible for the growth differentiation of siliceous structures in specific directions. Because organic amine (e.g., long-chair polyamines), phospholipids (e.g., silicalemma) and the phase separation process are associated with the biosilicification of diatoms, our results may provide a new insight into the mechanism of biosilicification. PMID:23585878

  8. Control of unsteady separated flow associated with the dynamic stall of airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilder, M. C.

    1994-01-01

    A unique active flow-control device is proposed for the control of unsteady separated flow associated with the dynamic stall of airfoils. The device is an adaptive-geometry leading-edge which will allow controlled, dynamic modification of the leading-edge profile of an airfoil while the airfoil is executing an angle-of-attack pitch-up maneuver. A carbon-fiber composite skin has been bench tested, and a wind tunnel model is under construction. A baseline parameter study of compressible dynamic stall was performed for flow over an NACA 0012 airfoil. Parameters included Mach number, pitch rate, pitch history, and boundary layer tripping. Dynamic stall data were recorded via point-diffraction interferometry and the interferograms were analyzed with in-house developed image processing software. A new high-speed phase-locked photographic image recording system was developed for real-time documentation of dynamic stall.

  9. BCAUS Project description and consideration of separation of data and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, Joy L.; Weaver, Steven J.

    1989-01-01

    The commonly stated truths that data may be segregated from program control in generic expert system shells and that such tools support straightforward knowledge representation were examined. The ideal of separation of data from program control in expert systems is difficult to realize for a variety of reasons. One approach to achieving this goal is to integrate hybrid collections of specialized shells and tools instead of producing custom systems built with a single all purpose expert system tool. Aspects of these issues are examined in the context of a specific diagnostic expert system application, the Backup Control Mode Analysis and Utility System (BCAUS), being developed for the Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) spacecraft. The project and the knowledge gained in working on the project are described.

  10. Wavelet diagnostics of the flow control of unsteady separation on a 2D Wind Turbine Airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Zhe; Lewalle, Jacques; Wang, Guannan; Glauser, Mark

    2013-11-01

    We investigated the aerodynamic characteristics of a 2D wind turbine airfoil. Unsteadiness was associated with the wake of a cylinder upstream of the airfoil. The experiments were conducted in both the baseline case, and with active closed-loop control on the suction surface of the airfoil. The data consisted of surface pressure time series. Continuous wavelet analysis gave the phase, band-pass filtered signals and envelope of harmonics of the fundamental shedding frequency. Coherence of pairs of signals was also used to map the flow characteristics. For the baseline and controlled case, we will report on the relation between phase of the leading edge fluctuations, unsteady flow separation and lift and drag coefficients. Our goal is to develop a more effective controller. The experiment was funded by DoE through University of Minnesota Wind Energy Consortium. Thanks for the support from the MAE department of Syracuse University.

  11. Spatially controlled electro-stimulated DNA adsorption and desorption for biochip applications.

    PubMed

    Hook, Andrew L; Thissen, Helmut; Hayes, Jason P; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2006-05-15

    The manipulation of biomolecules at solid/liquid interfaces is important for the enhanced performance of a number of biomedical devices, including biochips. This study focuses on the spatial control of surface interactions of DNA as well as the electro-stimulated adsorption and desorption of DNA by appropriate surface modification of highly doped p-type silicon. Surface modification by plasma polymerisation of allylamine resulted in a surface that supported DNA adsorption and sustained cell attachment. Subsequent high-density grafting of poly(ethylene oxide) formed a low fouling layer resistant to biomolecule adsorption and cell attachment. Spatially controlled excimer laser ablation of the surface produced patterns of re-exposed plasma polymer with high-resolution. On patterned surfaces, preferential electro-stimulated adsorption of DNA to the allylamine plasma polymer surface and subsequent desorption by the application of a negative bias was observed. Furthermore, the concept presented here was investigated for use in transfection chips. Cell culture experiments with human embryonic kidney cells, using the expression of green fluorescent protein as a reporter, demonstrated efficient and controlled transfection of cells. Electro-stimulated desorption of DNA was shown to yield significantly enhanced solid phase transfection efficiencies to values of up to 30%. The ability to spatially control DNA adsorption combined with the ability to control the binding and release of DNA by application of a controlled voltage enables an advanced level of control over DNA bioactivity on solid substrates and lends itself to biochip applications. PMID:16303297

  12. Randomized control trial of computer-based rehabilitation of spatial neglect syndrome: the RESPONSE trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Spatial neglect is a frequent and debilitating consequence of acquired brain injury and currently has no widely accepted standard of care. While previous interventions for spatial neglect have targeted patients’ overt spatial deficits (e.g., reduced contralesional visual scanning), far fewer have directly targeted patients’ non-spatial deficits (e.g., sustained attention deficits). Considering that non-spatial deficits have shown to be highly predictive of long-term disability, we developed a novel computer based training program that targets both sustained (tonic) and moment-to-moment (phasic) aspects of non-spatial attention (Tonic and Phasic Alertness Training, TAPAT). Preliminary studies demonstrate that TAPAT is safe and effective in improving both spatial and non-spatial attention deficits in the post-acute recovery phase in neglect patients. The purpose of the current trial (referred to as the REmediation of SPatial Neglect or RESPONSE trial) is to compare TAPAT to an active control training condition, include a larger sample of patients, and assess both cognitive and functional outcomes. Methods/Design We will employ a multi-site, longitudinal, blinded randomized controlled trial (RCT) design with a target sample of 114 patients with spatial neglect. Patients will either perform, at their home, the experimental TAPAT training program or an active control computer games condition for thirty minutes/day, five days a week, over three months. Patients will be assessed on a battery of cognitive and functional outcomes on three occasions: a) immediately before training, b) within forty-eight hours post completion of total training, and c) after a three-month no-contact period post completion of total training, to assess the longevity of potential training effects. Discussion The strengths of this protocol are that it tests an innovative, in-home administered treatment that targets a fundamental deficit in neglect, employs highly sensitive computer

  13. Vibrations and spatial patterns in biomimetic surfaces: using the shark-skin effect to control blood clotting.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Rahul; Maani, Nazanin; Rayz, Vitaliy L; Nosonovsky, Michael

    2016-08-01

    We study the effect of small-amplitude fast vibrations and small-amplitude spatial patterns on various systems involving wetting and liquid flow, such as superhydrophobic surfaces, membranes and flow pipes. First, we introduce a mathematical method of averaging the effect of small spatial and temporal patterns and substituting them with an effective force. Such an effective force can change the equilibrium state of a system as well as a phase state, leading to surface texture-induced and vibration-induced phase control. Vibration and patterns can effectively jam holes in vessels with liquid, separate multi-phase flow, change membrane properties, result in propulsion and locomotion and lead to many other multi-scale, nonlinear effects including the shark-skin effect. We discuss the application of such effects to blood flow for novel biomedical 'haemophobic' applications which can prevent blood clotting and thrombosis by controlling the surface pattern at a wall of a vessel (e.g. a catheter or stent).This article is part of the themed issue 'Bioinspired hierarchically structured surfaces for green science'. PMID:27354733

  14. Characterization of Spatial Repellent, Contact Irritant and Toxicant Chemical Actions of Standard Vector Control Compounds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A previously described modular high-throughput screening system (HITTS) was used to characterize the spatial repellent, contact irritant and toxicant chemical actions of 14 compounds with a history of use in vector control. The response of F1-F4 Aedes aegypti to various concentrations of four organo...

  15. The effect of large aspect ratio wing yaw on active separation control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tewes, Philipp; Taubert, Lutz; Wygnanski, Israel

    2014-11-01

    The applicability of the boundary layer independence principle to turbulent boundary layers developing on infinitely yawed wings, suggested that active separation control might be carried out differently to the two presumably independent developing boundary layers. At low incidence or flap deflection the control of the spanwise component of the flow is effective provided the aggregate number of actuators is small. In this case the actuator jets provide jet-curtains that virtually eliminate the spanwise flow component of the flow in their vicinity. At higher incidence or flap deflection, the focus of the active separation control has to shift to the chordwise component that has to overcome a high adverse pressure gradient. The idea was proven experimentally on a flapped wing based on a NACA 0012 airfoil that could be swept back and forward while being suspended from a ceiling of a wind tunnel connected to a six-component balance. The experiments were carried out at Reynolds numbers varying between 300,000 and 500,000. The project was supported in part by a grant from AFOSR.

  16. Summary of the 2004 CFD Validation Workshop on Synthetic Jets and Turbulent Separation Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumsey, C. L.; Gatski, T. B.; Sellers, W. L., III; Vatsa, V. N.; Viken, S. A.

    2004-01-01

    A CFD validation workshop for synthetic jets and turbulent separation control (CFDVAL2004) was held in Williamsburg, Virginia in March 2004. Three cases were investigated: synthetic jet into quiescent air, synthetic jet into a turbulent boundary layer crossflow, and flow over a hump model with no-flow-control, steady suction, and oscillatory control. This paper is a summary of the CFD results from the workshop. Although some detailed results are shown, mostly a broad viewpoint is taken, and the CFD state-of-the-art for predicting these types of flows is evaluated from a general point of view. Overall, for synthetic jets, CFD can only qualitatively predict the flow physics, but there is some uncertainty regarding how to best model the unsteady boundary conditions from the experiment consistently. As a result. there is wide variation among CFD results. For the hump flow, CFD as a whole is capable of predicting many of the particulars of this flow provided that tunnel blockage is accounted for, but the length of the separated region compared to experimental results is consistently overpredicted.

  17. Control of flow around a circular cylinder by bleed near the separation points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xu-Dong; Feng, Li-Hao

    2015-12-01

    The flow around a circular cylinder under bleed control is experimentally investigated in a water tunnel. The bleed jets are issued from the narrow slots directed from the front stagnation point to the positions near the upper and lower separation points. The Reynolds numbers based on the cylinder diameter are Re = 400, 780, and 1470, while the widths of the bleed slot are selected as w/D = 0.05, 0.1, and 0.2. The bleed jet interacts with the boundary layer, postponing the separation point to be near the downstream edge of the slot. It further modifies the wake shear layer, which moves away from the centerline. Thus, the recirculation bubble downstream of the circular cylinder is enlarged and the near wake width are increased, resulting in an increased vortex formation length and a decreased vortex shedding frequency. Such changes of the flow field increase with the bleed width. The vortex dynamics is also analyzed, showing that the wake pattern could be modified by the bleed control. The wake vortex is converted into a bistable mode at w/D = 0.1 and 0.2, Re = 780 and 1470, where the symmetric and asymmetric modes are both observed, while all the control cases at Re = 400 still show the asymmetric mode.

  18. Investigating the Complexity of Transitioning Separation Assurance Tools into NextGen Air Traffic Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gomez, Ashley Nicole; Martin, Lynne Hazel; Homola, Jeffrey; Morey, Susan; Cabrall, Christopher; Mercer, Joey; Prevot, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    In a study, that introduced ground-based separation assurance automation through a series of envisioned transitional phases of concept maturity, it was found that subjective responses to scales of workload, situation awareness, and acceptability in a post run questionnaire revealed as-predicted results for three of the four study conditions but not for the third, Moderate condition. The trend continued for losses of separation (LOS) where the number of LOS events were far greater than expected in the Moderate condition. To offer an account of why the Moderate condition was perceived to be more difficult to manage than predicted, researchers examined the increase in amount and complexity of traffic, increase in communication load, and increased complexities as a result of the simulation's mix of aircraft equipage. Further analysis compared the tools presented through the phases, finding that controllers took advantage of the informational properties of the tools presented but shied away from using their decision support capabilities. Taking into account similar findings from other studies, it is suggested that the Moderate condition represented the first step into a "shared control" environment, which requires the controller to use the automation as a decision making partner rather than just a provider of information. Viewed in this light, the combination of tools offered in the Moderate condition was reviewed and some tradeoffs that may offset the identified complexities were suggested.

  19. Summary of the 2004 CFD Validation Workshop on Synthetic Jets and Turbulent Separation Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumsey, C. L.; Gatski, T. B.; Sellers, W. L., III; Vatsa, V. N.; Viken, S. A.

    2006-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) validation workshop for synthetic jets and turbulent separation control (CFDVAL2004) was held in Williamsburg, Virginia in March 2004. Three cases were investigated: synthetic jet into quiescent air, synthetic jet into a turbulent boundary layer crossflow, and flow over a hump model with no-flow-control, steady suction, and oscillatory control. This paper is a summary of the CFD results from the workshop. Although some detailed results are shown, mostly a broad viewpoint is taken, and the CFD state-of-the-art for predicting these types of flows is evaluated from a general point of view. Overall, for synthetic jets, CFD can only qualitatively predict the flow physics, but there is some uncertainty regarding how to best model the unsteady boundary conditions from the experiment consistently. As a result, there is wide variation among CFD results. For the hump flow, CFD as a whole is capable of predicting many of the particulars of this flow provided that tunnel blockage is accounted for, but the length of the separated region compared to experimental results is consistently overpredicted.

  20. Control of Chemical Effects in the Separation Process of a Differential Mobility / Mass Spectrometer System

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Bradley B.; Coy, Stephen L.; Krylov, Evgeny V.; Nazarov, Erkinjon G.

    2013-01-01

    Differential mobility spectrometry (DMS) separates ions on the basis of the difference in their migration rates under high versus low electric fields. Several models describing the physical nature of this field mobility dependence have been proposed but emerging as a dominant effect is the clusterization model sometimes referred to as the dynamic cluster-decluster model. DMS resolution and peak capacity is strongly influenced by the addition of modifiers which results in the formation and dissociation of clusters. This process increases selectivity due to the unique chemical interactions that occur between an ion and neutral gas phase molecules. It is thus imperative to bring the parameters influencing the chemical interactions under control and find ways to exploit them in order to improve the analytical utility of the device. In this paper we describe three important areas that need consideration in order to stabilize and capitalize on the chemical processes that dominate a DMS separation. The first involves means of controlling the dynamic equilibrium of the clustering reactions with high concentrations of specific reagents. The second area involves a means to deal with the unwanted heterogeneous cluster ion populations emitted from the electrospray ionization process that degrade resolution and sensitivity. The third involves fine control of parameters that affect the fundamental collision processes, temperature and pressure. PMID:20065515

  1. Effects of relative density on microwave heating of various carbon powder compacts microwave-metallic multi-particle coupling using spatially separated magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashimura, K.; Hasegawa, N.; Suzuki, S.; Hayashi, M.; Mitani, T.; Shinohara, N.; Nagata, K.

    2013-01-01

    We have investigated the microwave heating characteristics of non-magnetic conductive multi-particle systems using spatially separated electric and magnetic fields (Emax and Hmax, respectively) to determine the effects of the multi-particle structure on microwave heating. Pure carbon, carbon black, and artificial graphite multi-particle systems exhibited peak microwave absorption at specific relative densities only under Hmax. These absorptions can be categorized into two types: one originates from coupling between metal spheres, while the other originates from a heterogeneous distribution of particles.

  2. High-resolution wavefront control using liquid crystal spatial light modulators

    SciTech Connect

    Bauman, B J; Brase, J M; Brown, C G; Cooke, J B; Kartz, M W; Olivier, S S; Pennington, D M; Silva, D A

    1999-07-20

    Liquid crystal spatial light modulator technology appropriate for high-resolution wavefront control has recently become commercially available. Some of these devices have several hundred thousand controllable degrees of freedom, more than two orders of magnitude greater than the largest conventional deformable mirror. We will present results of experiments to characterize the optical properties of these devices and to utilize them to correct aberrations in an optical system. We will also present application scenarios for these devices in high-power laser systems.

  3. Qos Management in Real-Time Spatial Big Data Using Feedback Control Scheduling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamdi, S.; Bouazizi, E.; Faiz, S.

    2015-08-01

    Geographic Information System (GIS) is a computer system designed to capture, store, manipulate, analyze, manage, and present all types of spatial data. Spatial data, whether captured through remote sensors or large scale simulations has always been big and heterogenous. The issue of real-time and heterogeneity have been extremely important for taking effective decision. Thus, heterogeneous real-time spatial data management has become a very active research domain. Existing research has principally focused on querying of real-time spatial data and their updates. But the unpredictability of access to data maintain the behavior of the real-time GIS unstable. In this paper, we propose the use of the real-time Spatial Big Data and we define a new architecture called FCSA-RTSBD (Feedback Control Scheduling Architecture for Real-Time Spatial Big Data). The main objectives of this architecture are the following: take in account the heterogeneity of data, guarantee the data freshness, enhance the deadline miss ratio even in the presence of conflicts and unpredictable workloads and finally satisfy the requirements of users by the improving of the quality of service (QoS).

  4. Factors Controlling Redox Speciation of Plutonium and Neptunium in Extraction Separation Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Paulenova, Alena; Vandegrift, III, George F.

    2013-09-24

    The objective of the project was to examine the factors controlling redox speciation of plutonium and neptunium in UREX+ extraction in terms of redox potentials, redox mechanism, kinetics and thermodynamics. Researchers employed redox-speciation extractions schemes in parallel to the spectroscopic experiments. The resulting distribution of redox species w studied uring spectroscopic, electrochemical, and spectro-electrochemical methods. This work reulted in collection of data on redox stability and distribution of redox couples in the nitric acid/nitrate electrolyte and the development of redox buffers to stabilize the desired oxidation state of separated radionuclides. The effects of temperature and concentrations on the redox behavior of neptunium were evaluated.

  5. Optimization of spatial light distribution through genetic algorithms for vision systems applied to quality control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellini, P.; Cecchini, S.; Stroppa, L.; Paone, N.

    2015-02-01

    The paper presents an adaptive illumination system for image quality enhancement in vision-based quality control systems. In particular, a spatial modulation of illumination intensity is proposed in order to improve image quality, thus compensating for different target scattering properties, local reflections and fluctuations of ambient light. The desired spatial modulation of illumination is obtained by a digital light projector, used to illuminate the scene with an arbitrary spatial distribution of light intensity, designed to improve feature extraction in the region of interest. The spatial distribution of illumination is optimized by running a genetic algorithm. An image quality estimator is used to close the feedback loop and to stop iterations once the desired image quality is reached. The technique proves particularly valuable for optimizing the spatial illumination distribution in the region of interest, with the remarkable capability of the genetic algorithm to adapt the light distribution to very different target reflectivity and ambient conditions. The final objective of the proposed technique is the improvement of the matching score in the recognition of parts through matching algorithms, hence of the diagnosis of machine vision-based quality inspections. The procedure has been validated both by a numerical model and by an experimental test, referring to a significant problem of quality control for the washing machine manufacturing industry: the recognition of a metallic clamp. Its applicability to other domains is also presented, specifically for the visual inspection of shoes with retro-reflective tape and T-shirts with paillettes.

  6. Super-smooth optical fabrication controlling high-spatial frequency surface irregularity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Hoyo, Javier; Kim, Dae Wook; Burge, James H.

    2013-09-01

    Modern advanced optical systems often require challenging high spatial frequency surface error control during their optical fabrication processes. While the large scale surface figure error can be controlled by directed material removal processes such as small tool figuring, surface finish (<<1mm scales) is controlled with the polishing process. For large aspheric optical systems, surface shape irregularities of a few millimeters in scale may cause serious performance degradation in terms of scattered light background noise and high contrast imaging capability. The conventional surface micro roughness concept in Root Mean Square (RMS) over a very high spatial frequency range (e.g. RMS of 0.5 by 0.5 mm local surface map with 500 by 500 pixels) is not sufficient to describe or specify these surface characteristics. For various experimental polishing conditions, we investigate the process control for high frequency surface errors with periods up to ~2-3mm. The Power Spectral Density of the finished optical surfaces has been measured and analyzed to relate various computer controlled optical surfacing parameters (e.g. polishing interface materials) with the high spatial frequency errors on the surface. The experiment-based optimal polishing conditions and processes producing a super smooth optical surface while controlling surface irregularity at the millimeter range are presented.

  7. Spatially explicit control of invasive species using a reaction-diffusion model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bonneau, Mathieu; Johnson, Fred A.; Romagosa, Christina M.

    2016-01-01

    Invasive species, which can be responsible for severe economic and environmental damages, must often be managed over a wide area with limited resources, and the optimal allocation of effort in space and time can be challenging. If the spatial range of the invasive species is large, control actions might be applied only on some parcels of land, for example because of property type, accessibility, or limited human resources. Selecting the locations for control is critical and can significantly impact management efficiency. To help make decisions concerning the spatial allocation of control actions, we propose a simulation based approach, where the spatial distribution of the invader is approximated by a reaction–diffusion model. We extend the classic Fisher equation to incorporate the effect of control both in the diffusion and local growth of the invader. The modified reaction–diffusion model that we propose accounts for the effect of control, not only on the controlled locations, but on neighboring locations, which are based on the theoretical speed of the invasion front. Based on simulated examples, we show the superiority of our model compared to the state-of-the-art approach. We illustrate the use of this model for the management of Burmese pythons in the Everglades (Florida, USA). Thanks to the generality of the modified reaction–diffusion model, this framework is potentially suitable for a wide class of management problems and provides a tool for managers to predict the effects of different management strategies.

  8. Direct numerical simulation of spatially developing turbulent boundary layers with opposition control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Qian-Jin; Huang, Wei-Xi; Xu, Chun-Xiao; Cui, Gui-Xiang

    2015-04-01

    Opposition control of spatially developing turbulent boundary layers for skin friction drag reduction is studied by direct numerical simulations. The boundary layer extends 800θ0 in the streamwise (x) direction, with θ0 denoting the momentum thickness at the flow inlet. The Reynolds number, based on the external flow velocity and the momentum thickness, ranges from 300 to 860. Opposition control applied in different streamwise ranges, i.e. 200\\lt x/{{θ }0}\\lt 350 and 200\\lt x/{{θ }0}\\lt 550, as well as the uncontrolled case, are simulated. Statistical results and instantaneous flow fields are presented, with special attention paid to the spatial evolution properties of the boundary layer flow with control and the underlying mechanism. It is observed that a long spatial transient region after the control start and a long recovery region after the control end are present in the streamwise direction. A maximum drag reduction rate of about 22% is obtained as the transient region is passed, and an overshoot in the local skin friction coefficient (Cf) occurs in the recovery region. A new identity is derived for dynamical decomposition of Cf. Reduction of Cf by opposition control and overshoot of Cf in the recovery region are explained by quantifying the contributions from the viscous shear stress term, the Reynolds shear stress term, the mean convection term and other terms.

  9. Spatial controls on groundwater response dynamics in a snowmelt-dominated montane catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, R. S.; Moore, R. D.; Weiler, M.; Jost, G.

    2014-05-01

    The role of spatial variability in water inputs on runoff dynamics has generally not received as much research attention as topography and soils; however, the influence of topography and forest cover on snow surface energy exchanges can result in asynchronous snowmelt throughout a catchment, complicating the space-time patterns of runoff generation. This study investigates temporal variation in the relative importance of spatial controls on the occurrence, duration, and timing of shallow groundwater response, utilizing a highly distributed monitoring network in a snowmelt-dominated montane catchment in western Canada. The study findings indicate that deep-soil hydraulic conductivity is a first-order control on the spatial distribution of sites that generate shallow groundwater response versus sites that experience only deep percolation. Upslope contributing area and slope gradient are first-order controls on the duration of groundwater response during peak-flow, recession-flow, and low-flow periods. Shallow runoff response areas expand and contract throughout these periods and follow the general spatial patterns of topographic convergence. However, spatial controls on the timing, intensity, and quantity of snowmelt and controls on vertical versus lateral flux partitioning in the soil overwhelm the influence of topographic convergence on runoff patterns during early spring freshet periods. The study findings suggest that various topographic indices and topography-based rainfall runoff models would not likely be good predictors of runoff patterns in snowmelt-dominated montane catchments during early phases of the spring freshet, but would increase in importance as the freshet and post-freshet periods proceed.

  10. Urban heat island influence on refraction index fluctuations from the data of spatially separated GPS-GLONASS receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khutorov, Vladislav; Khutorova, Olga; Teptin, German

    2015-11-01

    In this paper we show results of troposphere fluctuation analysis and its influence on GPS phase observations. The main object of investigation is a time and spatial correlations between GPS observables induced by the atmospheric mesoscale process in troposphere. We can estimate space structure of atmospheric parameters, using the data from network based on Global Navigation Satellite System receivers. We used mathematical means of turbulence theory and wavelet analysis. The results show a significant effect on GPS signals caused by the mesoscale troposphere process and urban conditions.

  11. Control of Crystallization to Promote Microphase Separation in Fully Conjugated Block Copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Youngmin; Le, Thinh P.; Seibers, Zach; Kilbey, S. Michael, II; Wang, Qing; Gomez, Enrique D.

    Donor -acceptor fully conjugated block copolymers, where donor and acceptor conjugated polymers are covalently bonded together, are interesting as single-component active-layer materials for photovoltaics because it can adopt mesoscale microphase separated structures with length scales comparable to the exciton diffusion length. Nevertheless, due to the strong crystallization of poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT), morphologies of fully conjugated block copolymers containing P3HT are predominantly driven by crystallization as opposed to microphase separation. We control the crystallization in block copolymers to promote microphase separation in fully conjugated block copolymers through the addition of small amounts of 3-octylthiophene to the polymerization of P3HT. Poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl- r-3-octylthiophene-2,5-diyl)-block-poly((9,9-dioctylfluorene-2,7-diyl)-alt-(4,7-di(thiophene-2-yl)-2,1,3-benzothiadiazole)-5',5''-diyl) (P3HT- b-PFTBT) copolymers were prepared by Grignard metathesis for the alkylthiophene block followed by chain extension through a Suzuki-Miyaura polycondensation. We compare the crystallization, self-assembly and performance in devices of P3HT-b-PFTBT with a few mole percent of 3-octylthiophene in the P3HT block. Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831.

  12. Controlling Phase Separation of Tough Interpenetrating Polymer Networks via Addition of Amphiphilic Block Copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohde, Brian; Krishnamoorti, Ramanan; Robertson, Megan

    Interpenetrating polymer networks (IPNs) offer a unique way to combine the mechanical properties of two thermoset systems. Often used to create a material that possesses both high toughness and tensile properties, here we use polydicyclopentadiene, cured via ring opening metathesis polymerization, to contribute high toughness and diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A cured via anhydride chemistry to contribute high tensile strength and modulus. As the uncompatibilized system reacts in the presence of one another, mesoscopic phase separation occurs and dictates the overall efficacy of combining mechanical properties. To control phase separation and drive the system towards more mechanically robust nanostructed IPNs, amphiphilic block copolymers of polybutadiene- b-polyethylene oxide, where one block possesses strong affinity to polyDCPD and the other the DGEBA, were added to the system. Here we present a systematic study of the influence of block copolymer composition in the overall blend on degree of phase separation and morphology using a combination of small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. The resultant mechanical properties are then explored in an effort to link mechanical properties to blend morphology.

  13. Upgrading of PVC rich wastes by magnetic density separation and hyperspectral imaging quality control.

    PubMed

    Luciani, Valentina; Bonifazi, Giuseppe; Rem, Peter; Serranti, Silvia

    2015-11-01

    Polyvinylchloride (PVC) is one of the most produced polymers in Europe, with a share of 11% in terms of mass (8 milliontons) of total polymer consumption, but in 2010 only 5% of the total PVC production came from recycled materials, where other polymer recycling achieves a level of 15% on average. In order to find an innovative process to extract PVC from window frames waste, a combination of two innovative technologies was tested: magnetic density separation (MDS) and hyperspectral imaging (HSI). By its nature, MDS is a flexible high precision density separation technology that is applicable to any mixture of polymers and contaminants with non-overlapping densities. As PVC has a very distinctive high density, this technology was tested to obtain high-grade PVC pre-concentrates from window frame waste. HSI was used to perform a quality control of the products obtained by MDS showing that PVC was clearly discriminated from unwanted rubber particles of different colors. The results showed that the combined application of MDS and HSI techniques allowed to separate and to check the purity of PVC from window frame waste. PMID:25458764

  14. Controlling turbulent boundary layer separation using biologically inspired 2D transverse grooves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Amy; Jones, Emily; Afroz, Farhana

    2013-11-01

    It is theorized that the presence of grooves, such as the sinusoidal ones found on dolphin skin or the cavities that form between bristled shark skin scales, can lead to induced boundary layer mixing and result in the control of turbulent boundary layer separation. To test this hypothesis, a series of water tunnel experiments using DPIV studied the characteristics of a flat plate turbulent boundary layer whereby a rotating cylinder was used to induce an adverse pressure gradient and resulting flow separation. The experiments were repeated with the use of a plate covered with two types of grooves, rectangular and sinusoidal, with a spacing of 2 mm in size. Flow similarity of the cavity flow was preserved between the experiments and flow over bristled shark skin scales. Both geometries resulted in a reduction of flow separation as measured by backflow coefficient. In addition, Reynolds stress profiles showed that as the pressure gradient was increased, the sinusoidal geometry outperformed the rectangular grooves in terms of increased mixing close to the wall. The sinusoidal plate also generated a lower momentum deficit within the boundary layer which would indicate a smaller drag penalty. Support from NSF grant CBET 0932352 and a UA Graduate Council Fellowship is gratefully acknowledged.

  15. Polystyrene/methacrylate microphase separated semi-interpenetrating polymer networks with controlled morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Moeller, M.; Graaf, L.A. de

    1993-12-31

    Semi-interpenetrating polymer networks with on forehand controllable morphology could be obtained using a three-step process, separating morphology formation and polymerization/crosslinking. This is opposite to conventional synthesis routes, where morphology is formed due to polymerization and crosslinking. Morphology was formed by spinodal liquid/liquid demixing of a solution of atactic polystyrene in a methacrylate monomer, which was arrested by thermoreversible gelation (vitrification) of the polymer-rich phase at a desired stage. After low-temperature UV-polymerization and crosslinking of the methacrylate, the phase separated structure was preserved at room temperature. The morphology was found to be determined by the viscosity of the solution (polymer molecular weight and concentration) and by the efficiency of quenching (quench temperature, sample geometry). Domains of 0.03-0.06 m could be achieved, due to vitrification of the summits of concentration fluctuations of spinodal demixing in its initial stage. Thereby, domains were separated a distance (n times) the wavelength of spinodal demixing.

  16. Controlling Phase Separation of Interpenetrating Polymer Networks by Addition of Block Copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohde, Brian; Krishnamoorti, Ramanan; Robertson, Megan

    2015-03-01

    Interpenetrating polymer networks (IPNs) offer a unique way to produce mechanically superior thermoset blends relative to the neat components. In this study, IPNs were prepared consisting of polydicyclopentadiene (polyDCPD), contributing high fracture toughness, and an epoxy resin (the diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A cured with nadic methyl anhydride), contributing high tensile strength and modulus. In the absence of compatibilization, the simultaneous curing of the networks leads to a macroscopically phase separated blend that exhibits poor mechanical behavior. To control phase separation and drive the system towards more mechanically robust nanostructured IPNs, block copolymers were designed to compatibilize this system, where one block possesses affinity to polyDCPD (polynorbornene in this study) and the other block possesses affinity to DGEBA (poly(ɛ-caprolactone) in this study). The influence of the block copolymer composition on the degree of phase separation and interfacial adhesion in the IPN was studied using a combination of small-angle scattering and imaging techniques. The resultant mechanical properties were explored and structure-property relationships were developed in this blend system.

  17. Electrically controlled spatial-polarization switch based on patterned photoalignment of nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Melnikova, Elena A; Tolstik, Alexei L; Rushnova, Irina I; Kabanova, Olga S; Muravsky, Alexander A

    2016-08-10

    A switching scheme for two orthogonal modes of laser radiation that is based on the total internal reflection effect realized at the interface of two liquid crystal regions with orthogonal director orientations is proposed. To create the photorefractive interface within the bulk of a liquid crystal, an original technique based on self-alignment of azo dye photoalignment and absorbing electrode patterns has been developed. Spatial separation of the orthogonally polarized light beams and their switching (when the positions of reflected and transmitted light beams are switched) due to the voltage applied has been experimentally realized. PMID:27534500

  18. Effects of Elevated Free-Stream Turbulence on Active Control of a Separation Bubble

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashpis, D. (Technical Monitor); Halfon, E.; Nishri, B.; Seifert, A.; Wygnanski, I.

    2004-01-01

    The Effects of elevated free-stream turbulence (FST) on the natural and periodically excited separation bubbles were studied experimentally, due to the relevance of this flow to low-pressure turbine blades at low Reynolds numbers. A bubble was formed at the leading edge of a flat plate and the FST level was altered by placing a grid across the flow at different locations upstream of the plate. The mixing across the separated shear-layer, forming the free boundary of the bubble, increased due to the elevated FST and due to nominally two-dimensional periodic excitation, both flattening and shortening the bubble. Periodic excitation at frequencies that were at least an order of magnitude lower than those associated with the initial shear-layer instability, were very effective at low FST, because the amplitudes of the excitation frequency and its harmonic were amplified over the bubble. High frequency excitation (F+ 3, based on the length of the baseline low FST bubble) had a major effect close to the separation location, while farther downstream the excited fluctuations rapidly decayed in the reattachment region. Low frequency excitation, that generated waves comparable to the length of the unperturbed bubble (F+ 1) were less effective and their magnitude decayed at a slower rate downstream of reattachment. An increase in the level of the FST reduced the net effect of the periodic excitation on the mixing enhancement and subsequent reattachment process, probably due to a destructive interference between the nominally 2D excitation and the random (in space and time) FST, reducing the spanwise coherence and therefore the effectiveness of the current control strategy. However, even at the reduced effectiveness of 2D periodic excitation at elevated FST, it accelerated the reattachment process and the recovery rate of the reattached boundary layer, enhancing the boundary layer resistance to repeat separation and reducing its momentum loss further downstream.

  19. Electrically-Controllable Spin Spatial Splitter in a Novel Magnetic Nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Li-Hua; Ma, Wen-Yue; Liu, Gui-Xiang

    2016-08-01

    Based on a novel magnetic nanostructure with zero average magnetic field, a spin spatial splitter was recently proposed. This paper reports on how to effectively manipulate this device using a transverse electrical field with an applied bias. With the help of the stationary phase method, the lateral displacement and its spin polarization are calculated for the electron across this device. Both magnitude and sign of spin polarization are found to vary sensitively with this applied electric field. Thus, this device can be controlled conveniently by electric means, and can consequently serve as an electrically-tunable spin spatial splitter for spintronics applications.

  20. Extremum Seeking Adaptive Separation Control on a Wing with Plasma Synthetic Jet Actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawara, Kakuji; Kojima, Ryota; Matsumoto, Shoji; Shingin, Hidenori

    Plasma synthetic jet actuator (PSJA) is a flow control device which has structure that insulator is tucked with electrode pair. It generates electrohydrodynamic (EHD) effect and induces a flow. The experiment was held to investigate the effect of flow control using extremum seeking with PSJA placed on the surface of NACA0012 wing installed in the wind tunnel. Frequency of the input signal to PSJA is modulated to maximize the effect of PSJA in flow control. The wake velocity fluctuation is one of indexes on separation control effect. The wake velocity is minimized over the input frequency by employing extremum seeking. The seeking algorithm calculates the correlation of the modulation frequency and wake velocity fluctuation. The modulation signal frequency where the correlation changes from negative to positive minimizes the wake velocity fluctuation. To detect a local minimum of the wake velocity fluctuation by extremum seeking, it is necessary to change the modulation signal frequency with time. Sine and square waves change the modulation signal frequency to PSJA. The wind tunnel speed was changed as an external factor. The experimental results show that the modulation signal frequency can track the optimum value when the wind tunnel speed is changed. This paper shows that adaptive flow control to optimize the modulation signal frequency with PSJA using extremum seeking enables to suppress turbulence on the flow field of wings.

  1. Applications of Spatial Technology in Schistosomiasis Control Programme in The People's Republic of China.

    PubMed

    Wang, X-Y; He, J; Yang, K; Liang, S

    2016-01-01

    Schistosomiasis, as the important parasitic disease, has caused serious threats to human health globally. The People's Republic of China has acquired significant achievements based on large-scale interventions and innovational technology. The spatial technology was introduced in 1980s and widely used in the study and control of schistosomiasis in The People's Republic of China. This chapter reviews the progress and application of spatial technology in schistosomiasis control by analysing the spatiotemporal pattern of and the impact of ecological changes on schistosomiasis transmission, which have provided the information to design and select the control strategy, and assisted the establishment of the monitoring and early warning system in The People's Republic of China, especially in the marshland and mountainous regions. PMID:27137446

  2. Control of unsteady separated flow associated with the dynamic pitching of airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmed, Sajeer

    1991-01-01

    Although studies have been done to understand the dependence of parameters for the occurrence of deep stall, studies to control the flow for sustaining lift for a longer time has been little. To sustain the lift for a longer time, an understanding of the development of the flow over the airfoil is essential. Studies at high speed are required to study how the flow behavior is dictated by the effects of compressibility. When the airfoil is pitched up in ramp motion or during the upstroke of an oscillatory cycle, the flow development on the upper surface of the airfoil and the formation of the vortex dictates the increase in lift behavior. Vortex shedding past the training edge decreases the lift. It is not clear what is the mechanism associated with the unsteady separation and vortex formation in present unsteady environment. To develop any flow control device, to suppress the vortex formation or delay separation, it is important that this mechanism be properly understood. The research activities directed toward understanding these questions are presented and the results are summarized.

  3. Active Control of Separation From the Flap of a Supercritical Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, LaTunia Pack; Yao, Chung-Sheng; Seifert, Avi

    2006-01-01

    Zero-mass-flux periodic excitation was applied at several regions on a simplified high-lift system to delay the occurrence of flow separation. The NASA Energy Efficient Transport (EET) supercritical airfoil was equipped with a 15% chord simply hinged leading edge flap and a 25% chord simply hinged trailing edge flap. Detailed flow features were measured in an attempt to identify optimal actuator placement. The measurements included steady and unsteady model and tunnel wall pressures, wake surveys, arrays of surface hot-films, flow visualization, and particle image velocimetry (PIV). The current paper describes the application of active separation control at several locations on the deflected trailing edge flap. High frequency (F(+) approximately equal to 10) and low frequency amplitude modulation (F(+) sub AM approximately equal to 1) of the high frequency excitation were used for control. It was noted that the same performance gains were obtained with amplitude modulation and required only 30% of the momentum input required by pure sine excitation.

  4. The Effects of Sweeping Jet Actuator Parameters on Flow Separation Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koklu, Mehti

    2015-01-01

    A parametric experimental study was performed with sweeping jet actuators (fluidic oscillators) to determine their effectiveness in controlling flow separation on an adverse pressure gradient ramp. Actuator parameters that were investigated include blowing coefficients, operation mode, pitch and spreading angles, streamwise location, aspect ratio, and scale. Surface pressure measurements and surface oil flow visualization were used to characterize the effects of these parameters on the actuator performance. 2D Particle Image Velocimetry measurements of the flow field over the ramp and hot-wire measurements of the actuator's jet flow were also obtained for selective cases. In addition, the sweeping jet actuators were compared to other well-known flow control techniques such as micro-vortex generators, steady blowing, and steady vortex-generating jets. The results confirm that the sweeping jet actuators are more effective than steady blowing and steady vortex-generating jets. The results also suggest that an actuator with a larger spreading angle placed closer to the location where the flow separates provides better performance. For the cases tested, an actuator with an aspect ratio, which is the width/depth of the actuator throat, of 2 was found to be optimal. For a fixed momentum coefficient, decreasing the aspect ratio to 1 produced weaker vortices while increasing the aspect ratio to 4 reduced coverage area. Although scaling down the actuator (based on the throat dimensions) from 0.25 inch x 0.125 inch to 0.15 inch x 0.075 inch resulted in similar flow control performance, scaling down the actuator further to 0.075 inch x 0.0375 inch reduced the actuator efficiency by reducing the coverage area and the amount of mixing in the near-wall region. The results of this study provide insight that can be used to design and select the optimal sweeping jet actuator configuration for flow control applications.

  5. Separating physical and biological controls on evapotranspiration fluctuations in a teak plantation subjected to monsoonal rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igarashi, Y.; Katul, G. G.; Kumagai, T.; Yoshifuji, N.; Sato, T.; Tanaka, N.; Tanaka, K.; Fujinami, H.; Chatchai, T.; Suzuki, M.

    2014-12-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET), especially in the mainland of the Indochina peninsula, can impact and is impacted by the Asian monsoonal (AM) system, thereby prompting interest in its long-term variability. To separate physical and biological factors controlling ET variability in a tropical deciduous forest under the AM influence, 7-year eddy-covariance and ancillary measurements were collected and analyzed. The 7-year mean rainfall (Pr) and ET along with their standard deviations were 1335 ± 256 and 1027 ± 77.9 mm (about 77% of Pr), respectively, suggesting close coupling between these two hydrologic fluxes. However, other physical and biological drivers de-couple seasonal and annual variations of ET from Pr. To explore them, a big-leaf model complemented by perturbation analysis was employed. The big-leaf model agreed well with measured ET at daily to multi-year time scales, lending confidence in its skill to separate biological from physical controls on ET. Using this formulation, both first-order and second-order Taylor series expansion of total ET derivatives were applied to the big-leaf model and compare with measured changes in ET (dET). Higher-order and joint-terms in the second-order expansion were necessary for matching measured and analyzed dET. Vapor pressure deficit (D) was the primary external physical controlling driver on ET. The leaf area index (LAI) and bulk stomatal conductance (gs) were shown to be the main significant biological drivers on the transpiration component of ET. It can be surmised that rainfall variability controls long-term ET through physical (mainly D) and biological (mainly LAI and gs) in this ecosystem.

  6. A Solvothermal Route Decorated on Different Substrates: Controllable Separation of an Oil/Water Mixture to a Stabilized Nanoscale Emulsion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weifeng; Liu, Na; Cao, Yingze; Chen, Yuning; Xu, Liangxin; Lin, Xin; Feng, Lin

    2015-12-01

    A facile solvothermal route is developed to fabricate polydivinylbenzene (PDVB) and decorate the polymer onto porous substrates. "Controllable" separation can be realized by selecting substrates with different pore sizes. The PDVB-modified mesh shows superhydrophobicity/superoleophilicity, and can be used for oil/seawater mixture separation, while the PDVB-modified membrane exhibits high hydrophobicity/superoleophilicity, and is able to separate surfactant stabilized nanoscale water-in-oil emulsions. PMID:26489016

  7. Spatial Separation of Charge Carriers in In2O3-x(OH)y Nanocrystal Superstructures for Enhanced Gas-Phase Photocatalytic Activity.

    PubMed

    He, Le; Wood, Thomas E; Wu, Bo; Dong, Yuchan; Hoch, Laura B; Reyes, Laura M; Wang, Di; Kübel, Christian; Qian, Chenxi; Jia, Jia; Liao, Kristine; O'Brien, Paul G; Sandhel, Amit; Loh, Joel Y Y; Szymanski, Paul; Kherani, Nazir P; Sum, Tze Chien; Mims, Charles A; Ozin, Geoffrey A

    2016-05-24

    The development of strategies for increasing the lifetime of photoexcited charge carriers in nanostructured metal oxide semiconductors is important for enhancing their photocatalytic activity. Intensive efforts have been made in tailoring the properties of the nanostructured photocatalysts through different ways, mainly including band-structure engineering, doping, catalyst-support interaction, and loading cocatalysts. In liquid-phase photocatalytic dye degradation and water splitting, it was recently found that nanocrystal superstructure based semiconductors exhibited improved spatial separation of photoexcited charge carriers and enhanced photocatalytic performance. Nevertheless, it remains unknown whether this strategy is applicable in gas-phase photocatalysis. Using porous indium oxide nanorods in catalyzing the reverse water-gas shift reaction as a model system, we demonstrate here that assembling semiconductor nanocrystals into superstructures can also promote gas-phase photocatalytic processes. Transient absorption studies prove that the improved activity is a result of prolonged photoexcited charge carrier lifetimes due to the charge transfer within the nanocrystal network comprising the nanorods. Our study reveals that the spatial charge separation within the nanocrystal networks could also benefit gas-phase photocatalysis and sheds light on the design principles of efficient nanocrystal superstructure based photocatalysts. PMID:27159793

  8. Physical and biogeochemical spatial scales of variability in the East Australian Current separation zone from shelf glider measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeffer, A.; Roughan, M.; Jones, E.; White, D.

    2015-12-01

    In contrast to physical processes, biogeochemical processes are inherently patchy in the ocean, which affects both the observational sampling strategy and the representativeness of sparse measurements in data assimilating models. In situ observations from multiple glider deployments are analyzed to characterize spatial scales of variability in both physical and biogeochemical properties, using an empirical statistical model. We find that decorrelation ranges are strongly dependent on the balance between local dynamics and mesoscale forcing. The shortest horizontal (5-10 km) and vertical (45 m) decorrelation ranges are for chlorophyll a fluorescence. Whereas those variables that are a function of regional ocean and atmosphere dynamics (temperature and dissolved oxygen) result in anisotropic patterns with longer ranges along (28-37 km) than across the shelf (8-19 km). Variables affected by coastal processes (salinity and colored dissolved organic matter) have an isotropic range similar to the baroclinic Rossby radius (10-15 km).

  9. Physical and biogeochemical spatial scales of variability in the East Australian Current separation from shelf glider measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeffer, Amandine; Roughan, Moninya; Jones, Emlyn M.; White, Dana

    2016-03-01

    In contrast to physical processes, biogeochemical processes are inherently patchy in the ocean, which affects both the observational sampling strategy and the representativeness of sparse measurements in data assimilating models. In situ observations from multiple glider deployments are analysed to characterize spatial scales of variability in both physical and biogeochemical properties, using an empirical statistical model. We find that decorrelation ranges are strongly dependent on the balance between local dynamics and mesoscale forcing. The shortest horizontal (5-10 km) and vertical (45 m) decorrelation ranges are for chlorophyll a fluorescence, whereas those variables that are a function of regional ocean and atmosphere dynamics (temperature and dissolved oxygen) result in anisotropic patterns with longer ranges along (28-37 km) than across the shelf (8-19 km). Variables affected by coastal processes (salinity and coloured dissolved organic matter) have an isotropic range similar to the baroclinic Rossby radius (10-15 km).

  10. Interference between postural control and spatial vs. non-spatial auditory reaction time tasks in older adults.

    PubMed

    Fuhrman, Susan I; Redfern, Mark S; Jennings, J Richard; Furman, Joseph M

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated whether spatial aspects of an information processing task influence dual-task interference. Two groups (Older/Young) of healthy adults participated in dual-task experiments. Two auditory information processing tasks included a frequency discrimination choice reaction time task (non-spatial task) and a lateralization choice reaction time task (spatial task). Postural tasks included combinations of standing with eyes open or eyes closed on either a fixed floor or a sway-referenced floor. Reaction times and postural sway via center of pressure were recorded. Baseline measures of reaction time and sway were subtracted from the corresponding dual-task results to calculate reaction time task costs and postural task costs. Reaction time task cost increased with eye closure (p = 0.01), sway-referenced flooring (p < 0.0001), and the spatial task (p = 0.04). Additionally, a significant (p = 0.05) task x vision x age interaction indicated that older subjects had a significant vision X task interaction whereas young subjects did not. However, when analyzed by age group, the young group showed minimal differences in interference for the spatial and non-spatial tasks with eyes open, but showed increased interference on the spatial relative to non-spatial task with eyes closed. On the contrary, older subjects demonstrated increased interference on the spatial relative to the non-spatial task with eyes open, but not with eyes closed. These findings suggest that visual-spatial interference may occur in older subjects when vision is used to maintain posture. PMID:26410669

  11. Colloidal silica nanoparticle-assisted structural control of cellulose nanofiber paper separators for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeong-Hoon; Kim, Jung-Hwan; Choi, Eun-Sun; Yu, Hyung Kyun; Kim, Jong Hun; Wu, Qinglin; Chun, Sang-Jin; Lee, Sun-Young; Lee, Sang-Young

    2013-11-01

    Porous structure-tuned cellulose nanofiber paper separators (designated as S-CNP separators) are demonstrated as a promising alternative to commercial polyolefin separators for use in lithium-ion batteries. A new architectural strategy based on colloidal silica (SiO2) nanoparticle-assisted structural control is presented to overcome the difficulty in forming controllable porous structure of pure cellulose nanofiber paper separators (designated as CNP separators) from densely-packed cellulose nanofibers (CNFs). The new S-CNP separators proposed herein incorporate SiO2 nanoparticles as a CNF-disassembling agent (i.e., as non-conductive spacer particles). This structural uniqueness allows loose packing of CNFs, thereby facilitating the evolution of more porous structure. The unusual porous structure of S-CNP separators can be fine-tuned by varying SiO2 contents in the CNF suspension. Notably, the S-CNP separator (fabricated with 5 wt.% SiO2 content) exhibits the highest ionic conduction due to the well-balanced combination of nanoporous structure and separator thickness, thus contributing to excellent cell performance. This study underlines that the colloidal SiO2 nanoparticle-directed structural tuning of CNPs offers a promising route for the fabrication of advanced paper separators with optimized attributes and functionality.

  12. Fine scale spatial variability of microbial pesticide degradation in soil: scales, controlling factors, and implications

    PubMed Central

    Dechesne, Arnaud; Badawi, Nora; Aamand, Jens; Smets, Barth F.

    2014-01-01

    Pesticide biodegradation is a soil microbial function of critical importance for modern agriculture and its environmental impact. While it was once assumed that this activity was homogeneously distributed at the field scale, mounting evidence indicates that this is rarely the case. Here, we critically examine the literature on spatial variability of pesticide biodegradation in agricultural soil. We discuss the motivations, methods, and main findings of the primary literature. We found significant diversity in the approaches used to describe and quantify spatial heterogeneity, which complicates inter-studies comparisons. However, it is clear that the presence and activity of pesticide degraders is often highly spatially variable with coefficients of variation often exceeding 50% and frequently displays non-random spatial patterns. A few controlling factors have tentatively been identified across pesticide classes: they include some soil characteristics (pH) and some agricultural management practices (pesticide application, tillage), while other potential controlling factors have more conflicting effects depending on the site or the pesticide. Evidence demonstrating the importance of spatial heterogeneity on the fate of pesticides in soil has been difficult to obtain but modeling and experimental systems that do not include soil's full complexity reveal that this heterogeneity must be considered to improve prediction of pesticide biodegradation rates or of leaching risks. Overall, studying the spatial heterogeneity of pesticide biodegradation is a relatively new field at the interface of agronomy, microbial ecology, and geosciences and a wealth of novel data is being collected from these different disciplinary perspectives. We make suggestions on possible avenues to take full advantage of these investigations for a better understanding and prediction of the fate of pesticides in soil. PMID:25538691

  13. Spatial analysis of mutual fault/fracture and slope controls on rocksliding in Darjeeling Himalaya, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Saibal; Carranza, Emmanuel John M.

    2010-10-01

    In this paper, the Fry analysis was applied to study the spatial patterns (in terms of trends) of rockslides; proportion analysis was applied to study the spatial associations between rockslides and slope aspects; and distance distribution analysis was applied to study the spatial associations of rockslides with different sets of faults/fractures based on trends. In a study area in the Darjeeling district (India), the results of applications of these spatial analytical techniques support a proposition of mutual fault/fracture and slope controls on rocksliding. In different parts of the study area, deep-seated rockslides are associated with (a) NE-trending faults/fractures and SSE-facing slopes, (b) NW-trending faults/fractures and ENE-facing slopes, and (c) NNE-trending faults/fractures and SE- or ENE-facing slopes; whereas shallow translational rockslides are associated with (a) NNE-trending faults/fractures and SE-, NW-, WNW- or WSW-facing slopes, (b) WNW-trending faults/fractures and SW-facing slopes, (c) NNW-trending faults/fractures and ESE- or SW-facing slopes, and (d) NW-trending faults/fractures with SW-facing slopes. Creating and integrating spatial evidence layers representing mutual fault/fracture and slope controls on rocksliding can be achieved satisfactorily via application of evidential belief functions. A predictive map of rockslide susceptibility derived by using slope aspects, slope inclinations and proximity to the faults/fractures that are spatially associated with rockslides is superior to that derives by using slope aspects, slope inclinations and proximity to all faults/fractures. The proposed analytical methods are suitable for first-pass regional-scale assessment of rockslide susceptibility.

  14. Ecological Complexity in a Coffee Agroecosystem: Spatial Heterogeneity, Population Persistence and Biological Control

    PubMed Central

    Liere, Heidi; Jackson, Doug; Vandermeer, John

    2012-01-01

    Background Spatial heterogeneity is essential for the persistence of many inherently unstable systems such as predator-prey and parasitoid-host interactions. Since biological interactions themselves can create heterogeneity in space, the heterogeneity necessary for the persistence of an unstable system could be the result of local interactions involving elements of the unstable system itself. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we report on a predatory ladybird beetle whose natural history suggests that the beetle requires the patchy distribution of the mutualism between its prey, the green coffee scale, and the arboreal ant, Azteca instabilis. Based on known ecological interactions and the natural history of the system, we constructed a spatially-explicit model and showed that the clustered spatial pattern of ant nests facilitates the persistence of the beetle populations. Furthermore, we show that the dynamics of the beetle consuming the scale insects can cause the clustered distribution of the mutualistic ants in the first place. Conclusions/Significance From a theoretical point of view, our model represents a novel situation in which a predator indirectly causes a spatial pattern of an organism other than its prey, and in doing so facilitates its own persistence. From a practical point of view, it is noteworthy that one of the elements in the system is a persistent pest of coffee, an important world commodity. This pest, we argue, is kept within limits of control through a complex web of ecological interactions that involves the emergent spatial pattern. PMID:23029061

  15. A Resonant Pulse Detonation Actuator for High-Speed Boundary Layer Separation Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, B. T.; Cutler, A. D.; Drummond, J. P.; Jones, S. B.

    2004-01-01

    A variety of different types of actuators have been previously investigated as flow control devices. Potential applications include the control of boundary layer separation in external flows, as well as jet engine inlet and diffuser flow control. The operating principles for such devices are typically based on either mechanical deflection of control surfaces (which include MEMS flap devices), mass injection (which includes combustion driven jet actuators), or through the use of synthetic jets (diaphragm devices which produce a pulsating jet with no net mass flow). This paper introduces some of the initial flow visualization work related to the development of a relatively new type of combustion-driven jet actuator that has been proposed based on a pulse detonation principle. The device is designed to utilize localized detonation of a premixed fuel (Hydrogen)-air mixture to periodically inject a jet of gas transversely into the primary flow. Initial testing with airflow successfully demonstrated resonant conditions within the range of acoustic frequencies expected for the design. Schlieren visualization of the pulsating air jet structure revealed axially symmetric vortex flow, along with the formation of shocks. Flow visualization of the first successful sustained oscillation condition is also demonstrated for one configuration of the current test section. Future testing will explore in more detail the onset of resonant combustion and the approach to conditions of sustained resonant detonation.

  16. Control of unsteady separated flow associated with the dynamic stall of airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilder, M. C.

    1995-01-01

    An effort to understand and control the unsteady separated flow associated with the dynamic stall of airfoils was funded for three years through the NASA cooperative agreement program. As part of this effort a substantial data base was compiled detailing the effects various parameters have on the development of the dynamic stall flow field. Parameters studied include Mach number, pitch rate, and pitch history, as well as Reynolds number (through two different model chord lengths) and the condition of the boundary layer at the leading edge of the airfoil (through application of surface roughness). It was found for free stream Mach numbers as low as 0.4 that a region of supersonic flow forms on the leading edge of the suction surface of the airfoil at moderate angles of attack. The shocks which form in this supersonic region induce boundary-layer separation and advance the dynamic stall process. Under such conditions a supercritical airfoil profile is called for to produce a flow field having a weaker leading-edge pressure gradient and no leading-edge shocks. An airfoil having an adaptive-geometry, or dynamically deformable leading edge (DDLE), is under development as a unique active flow-control device. The DDLE, formed of carbon-fiber composite and fiberglass, can be flexed between a NACA 0012 profile and a supercritical profile in a controllable fashion while the airfoil is executing an angle-of-attack pitch-up maneuver. The dynamic stall data were recorded using point diffraction interferometry (PDI), a noninvasive measurement technique. A new high-speed cinematography system was developed for recording interferometric images. The system is capable of phase-locking with the pitching airfoil motion for real-time documentation of the development of the dynamic stall flow field. Computer-aided image analysis algorithms were developed for fast and accurate reduction of the images, improving interpretation of the results.

  17. SVR learning-based spatiotemporal fuzzy logic controller for nonlinear spatially distributed dynamic systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xian-Xia; Jiang, Ye; Li, Han-Xiong; Li, Shao-Yuan

    2013-10-01

    A data-driven 3-D fuzzy-logic controller (3-D FLC) design methodology based on support vector regression (SVR) learning is developed for nonlinear spatially distributed dynamic systems. Initially, the spatial information expression and processing as well as the fuzzy linguistic expression and rule inference of a 3-D FLC are integrated into spatial fuzzy basis functions (SFBFs), and then the 3-D FLC can be depicted by a three-layer network structure. By relating SFBFs of the 3-D FLC directly to spatial kernel functions of an SVR, an equivalence relationship of the 3-D FLC and the SVR is established, which means that the 3-D FLC can be designed with the help of the SVR learning. Subsequently, for an easy implementation, a systematic SVR learning-based 3-D FLC design scheme is formulated. In addition, the universal approximation capability of the proposed 3-D FLC is presented. Finally, the control of a nonlinear catalytic packed-bed reactor is considered as an application to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed 3-D FLC. PMID:24808600

  18. Dynamic nuclear polarization and optimal control spatial-selective 13C MRI and MRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinding, Mads S.; Laustsen, Christoffer; Maximov, Ivan I.; Søgaard, Lise Vejby; Ardenkjær-Larsen, Jan H.; Nielsen, Niels Chr.

    2013-02-01

    Aimed at 13C metabolic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) applications, we demonstrate that dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) may be combined with optimal control 2D spatial selection to simultaneously obtain high sensitivity and well-defined spatial restriction. This is achieved through the development of spatial-selective single-shot spiral-readout MRI and MRS experiments combined with dynamic nuclear polarization hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate on a 4.7 T pre-clinical MR scanner. The method stands out from related techniques by facilitating anatomic shaped region-of-interest (ROI) single metabolite signals available for higher image resolution or single-peak spectra. The 2D spatial-selective rf pulses were designed using a novel Krotov-based optimal control approach capable of iteratively fast providing successful pulse sequences in the absence of qualified initial guesses. The technique may be important for early detection of abnormal metabolism, monitoring disease progression, and drug research.

  19. Spatial regulation of controlled bioactive factor delivery for bone tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Samorezov, Julia E.; Alsberg, Eben

    2015-01-01

    Limitations of current treatment options for critical size bone defects create a significant clinical need for tissue engineered bone strategies. This review describes how control over the spatiotemporal delivery of growth factors, nucleic acids, and drugs and small molecules may aid in recapitulating signals present in bone development and healing, regenerating interfaces of bone with other connective tissues, and enhancing vascularization of tissue engineered bone. State-of-the-art technologies used to create spatially controlled patterns of bioactive factors on the surfaces of materials, to build up 3D materials with patterns of signal presentation within their bulk, and to pattern bioactive factor delivery after scaffold fabrication are presented, highlighting their applications in bone tissue engineering. As these techniques improve in areas such as spatial resolution and speed of patterning, they will continue to grow in value as model systems for understanding cell responses to spatially regulated bioactive factor signal presentation in vitro, and as strategies to investigate the capacity of the defined spatial arrangement of these signals to drive bone regeneration in vivo. PMID:25445719

  20. Open-loop control of noise amplification in a separated boundary layer flow

    SciTech Connect

    Boujo, E. Gallaire, F.; Ehrenstein, U.

    2013-12-15

    Linear optimal gains are computed for the subcritical two-dimensional separated boundary-layer flow past a bump. Very large optimal gain values are found, making it possible for small-amplitude noise to be strongly amplified and to destabilize the flow. The optimal forcing is located close to the summit of the bump, while the optimal response is the largest in the shear layer. The largest amplification occurs at frequencies corresponding to eigenvalues which first become unstable at higher Reynolds number. Nonlinear direct numerical simulations show that a low level of noise is indeed sufficient to trigger random flow unsteadiness, characterized here by large-scale vortex shedding. Next, a variational technique is used to compute efficiently the sensitivity of optimal gains to steady control (through source of momentum in the flow, or blowing/suction at the wall). A systematic analysis at several frequencies identifies the bump summit as the most sensitive region for control with wall actuation. Based on these results, a simple open-loop control strategy is designed, with steady wall suction at the bump summit. Linear calculations on controlled base flows confirm that optimal gains can be drastically reduced at all frequencies. Nonlinear direct numerical simulations also show that this control allows the flow to withstand a higher level of stochastic noise without becoming nonlinearly unstable, thereby postponing bypass transition. In the supercritical regime, sensitivity analysis of eigenvalues supports the choice of this control design. Full restabilization of the flow is obtained, as evidenced by direct numerical simulations and linear stability analysis.

  1. Open-loop control of noise amplification in a separated boundary layer flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boujo, E.; Ehrenstein, U.; Gallaire, F.

    2013-12-01

    Linear optimal gains are computed for the subcritical two-dimensional separated boundary-layer flow past a bump. Very large optimal gain values are found, making it possible for small-amplitude noise to be strongly amplified and to destabilize the flow. The optimal forcing is located close to the summit of the bump, while the optimal response is the largest in the shear layer. The largest amplification occurs at frequencies corresponding to eigenvalues which first become unstable at higher Reynolds number. Nonlinear direct numerical simulations show that a low level of noise is indeed sufficient to trigger random flow unsteadiness, characterized here by large-scale vortex shedding. Next, a variational technique is used to compute efficiently the sensitivity of optimal gains to steady control (through source of momentum in the flow, or blowing/suction at the wall). A systematic analysis at several frequencies identifies the bump summit as the most sensitive region for control with wall actuation. Based on these results, a simple open-loop control strategy is designed, with steady wall suction at the bump summit. Linear calculations on controlled base flows confirm that optimal gains can be drastically reduced at all frequencies. Nonlinear direct numerical simulations also show that this control allows the flow to withstand a higher level of stochastic noise without becoming nonlinearly unstable, thereby postponing bypass transition. In the supercritical regime, sensitivity analysis of eigenvalues supports the choice of this control design. Full restabilization of the flow is obtained, as evidenced by direct numerical simulations and linear stability analysis.

  2. Development and control of kilo-pixel MEMS deformable mirrors and spatial light modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perreault, Julie Ann

    This dissertation describes the development of kilo-pixel micro-electro-mechanical optical-quality surface-micromachined deformable mirrors and spatial light modulators along with scalable control electronics. These silicon-based deformable mirrors have the potential to modulate spatial and temporal features of an optical wavefront with applications in imaging, beam-forming, and optical communication systems. Techniques to improve the manufacturing, quality, and capability of these mirrors are detailed. The new mirror system was characterized and a scalable control system was developed to coordinate and control a large array of mirrors. Three types of kilo-pixel deformable mirrors were created: continuous membrane, segmented membrane, and a hybrid stress-relieved membrane mirrors. This new class of mirrors, deformed using electrostatically actuated surface-normal actuators, have an aperature of 10 mm, a stroke of 2 mum, position repeatability of 3 nm, surface roughness of 12 nm, reflectivity of 91%, and a bandwidth in air of 7 kHz. A custom fabrication process was developed in tandem with a new mirror design to address design and layout issues including packaging, residual stress, reliability, yield, fill factor, and surface topography. A chemo-mechanical polishing process improved the surface quality of the mirrors by decreasing surface roughness from an RMS value of 46nm to 12nm. A gold coating process increased reflectivity from 42% to greater than 91% without introducing a significant amount of stress in the mirror membrane. An alternative actuator design and layout was also developed that achieved an increased stroke of 6 mum, with the potential for even longer stroke with stress reduction. The long stroke capability was realized through introduction of split electrodes, actuation membrane cuts, and a double stacked anchor architecture. A computer-driven electronic system was developed to aid in the electro-mechanical testing of these deformable mirrors. Quasi

  3. Focused Laser Induced Spatially Controllable p-n junction in Graphene Field-Effect Transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young; Bae, Myung-Ho; Shu, Jung-Tak; Kim, Young; Ahn, Joung; Chun, Seung-Hyun; Park, Yun

    2013-03-01

    Tunable local doping on graphene is an important issue for future graphene-based electronics. Here we investigate a local doping effect by a focused laser irradiation and demonstrate a spatially controllable p-n junction in graphene field-effect transistor. Scanning photocurrent microscopy with varying back-gate voltages reveals the local charge trap in gate oxide near the laser-irradiated region. This is manifested by itself as double peaks in resistance as a function of gate voltage in graphene device, where the region between the double peaks corresponds to the p-n junction. Irradiation of a focused laser on graphene device suggests a new pave to spatially control the doping level, position and size of doped segment on graphene channel in a nondestructive way without high electrical bias, local gate electrode and chemical process. Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science

  4. Hydrogel Adhesion with Wrinkle Formation by Spatial Control of Polymer Networks.

    PubMed

    Kato, Masatoshi; Tsuboi, Yasuyuki; Kikuchi, Akihiko; Asoh, Taka-Aki

    2016-06-01

    We prepared a novel wrinkled adhesive interface of hydrogels for strong adhesion via spatial control of polymer networks, including the density, distribution, and mobility of interactive units. A wrinkle structure was formed by the elasticity mismatch of hydrogels and adhesive polyion complex layers when electrophoresis was carried out between cationic and anionic semi-IPNs. The wrinkling wavelength of interfaces was controlled by Young's modulus of hydrogels. The role of wrinkle structure in adhesion was investigated by the measurement of the adhesive strength of hydrogels which were adhered under the compression, resulting in the disappearance of the wrinkle structure by compression that induced a decrease in adhesive strength. These results indicate that strong hydrogel adhesion was achieved by both the spatial design of interactive units and wrinkle formation. PMID:27187544

  5. Force interaction of high pressure glow discharge with fluid flow for active separation control

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Subrata; Gaitonde, Datta V.

    2006-02-15

    Radio frequency based discharges at atmospheric pressures are the focus of increased interest in aerodynamics because of the wide range of potential applications including, specifically, actuation in flows at moderate speeds. Recent literature describing promising experimental observations, especially on separation control, has spurred efforts in the development of parallel theoretical modeling to lift limitations in the current understanding of the actuation mechanism. The present effort demonstrates higher fidelity first-principle models in a multidimensional finite-element framework to predict surface discharge-induced momentum exchange. The complete problem of a dielectric barrier discharge at high pressure with axially displaced electrodes is simulated in a self-consistent manner. Model predictions for charge densities, the electric field, and gas velocity distributions are shown to mimic trends reported in the experimental literature. Results show that a residual of electrons remains deposited on the dielectric surface downstream of the exposed powered electrode for the entire duration of the cycle and causes a net electric force in the direction from the electrode to the downstream surface. For the first time, results document the mitigation process of a separation bubble formed due to flow past a flat plate inclined at 12 degree sign angle of attack. This effort sets the basis for extending the formulation further to include polyphase power input in multidimensional settings, and to apply the simulation method to flows past common aerodynamic configurations.

  6. Phase separation of lipid microdomains controlled by polymerized lipid bilayer matrices.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Takashi; Tatsu, Yoshiro; Morigaki, Kenichi

    2010-03-16

    We developed a micropatterned model biological membrane on a solid substrate that can induce phase separation of lipid microdomains in a designed geometry. Micropatterned lipid bilayers were generated by the photolithographic polymerization of a diacetylene phospholipid, 1,2-bis(10,12-tricosadiynoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DiynePC). By changing the UV dose for the photopolymerization, we could modulate the coverage of the surface by the polymeric bilayer domains. After removing nonpolymerized DiynePC, natural phospholipid membranes were incorporated into the micropatterned polymeric bilayer matrix by a self-assembly process (vesicle fusion). As we incorporated a ternary lipid mixture of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC), sphingomyelin (SM), and cholesterol (Chol) (1:1:1), liquid ordered domains (Lo: rich in SM and Chol) were accumulated in the polymer free regions, whereas liquid disordered domains (Ld: rich in DOPC) preferentially participated into the partially polymeric bilayer regions. It was postulated that Ld domains preferentially came in contact with the polymeric bilayer boundaries because of their lower elastic moduli and a smaller thickness mismatch at the boundary. The effect of polymeric bilayer matrix to hinder the size growth of Lo domains should also be playing an important role. The controlled phase separation should open new possibilities to locally concentrate membrane proteins and other nanometer-sized materials on the substrate by associating them with the lipid microdomains. PMID:20020734

  7. Optimum Duty Cycle of Unsteady Plasma Aerodynamic Actuation for NACA0015 Airfoil Stall Separation Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Min; Yang, Bo; Peng, Tianxiang; Lei, Mingkai

    2016-06-01

    Unsteady dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma aerodynamic actuation technology is employed to suppress airfoil stall separation and the technical parameters are explored with wind tunnel experiments on an NACA0015 airfoil by measuring the surface pressure distribution of the airfoil. The performance of the DBD aerodynamic actuation for airfoil stall separation suppression is evaluated under DBD voltages from 2000 V to 4000 V and the duty cycles varied in the range of 0.1 to 1.0. It is found that higher lift coefficients and lower threshold voltages are achieved under the unsteady DBD aerodynamic actuation with the duty cycles less than 0.5 as compared to that of the steady plasma actuation at the same free-stream speeds and attack angles, indicating a better flow control performance. By comparing the lift coefficients and the threshold voltages, an optimum duty cycle is determined as 0.25 by which the maximum lift coefficient and the minimum threshold voltage are obtained at the same free-stream speed and attack angle. The non-uniform DBD discharge with stronger discharge in the positive half cycle due to electrons deposition on the dielectric slabs and the suppression of opposite momentum transfer due to the intermittent discharge with cutoff of the negative half cycle are responsible for the observed optimum duty cycle. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 21276036), Liaoning Provincial Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 2015020123) and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China (No. 3132015154)

  8. Numerical study of three-dimensional separation and flow control at a wing/body junction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ash, Robert L.; Lakshmanan, Balakrishnan

    1989-01-01

    The problem of three-dimensional separation and flow control at a wing/body junction has been investigated numerically using a three-dimensional Navier-Stokes code. The numerical code employs an algebraic grid generation technique for generating the grid for unmodified junction and an elliptic grid generation technique for filleted fin junction. The results for laminar flow past a blunt fin/flat plate junction demonstrate that after grid refinement, the computations agree with experiment and reveal a strong dependency of the number of vortices at the junction on Mach number and Reynolds number. The numerical results for pressure distribution, particle paths and limiting streamlines for turbulent flow past a swept fin show a decrease in the peak pressure and in the extent of the separated flow region compared to the laminar case. The results for a filleted juncture indicate that the streamline patterns lose much of their vortical character with proper filleting. Fillets with a radius of three and one-half times the fin leading edge diameter or two times the incoming boundary layer thickness, significantly weaken the usual necklace interaction vortex for the Mach number and Reynolds number considered in the present study.

  9. Spatial variation in the molecular tilt orientational order within the solid domains of phase-separated, mixed dialkylphosphatidylcholine monolayers.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Jacqueline; Badia, Antonella

    2008-03-01

    The miscibility of the solid-phase-forming distearoylphosphatidylcholine (DSPC) and the fluid-phase-forming dilauroylphosphatidylcholine (DLPC) at the air/water interface was investigated by the Langmuir film balance. Surface pressure-area isotherms suggest that mixtures containing 25.0-62.5-mol% DLPC (range of composition investigated) are phase-separated. The lateral structure of the DSPC/DLPC monolayers was imaged by Brewster angle microscopy (BAM) as a function of the surface pressure. Quasi-circular condensed domains appeared at pressures between 0 and 0.5mN m(-1), and these structures were already fully developed at approximately 1mN m(-1). Further compression of the monolayers above 1mN m(-1) merely brought the domains closer together. The mixed monolayers consisted of solid domains of DSPC, approximately 3-20 micro in size, in a fluid matrix of DLPC. BAM and the phase contrast mode of intermittent-contact atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed that the quasi-circular DSPC domains are divided into segments of different reflectivities (BAM) or phase shift (AFM) that arise from abrupt changes in the long-range orientational order of the tilted hydrocarbon chains. The DSPC domains in DSPC/DLPC internally exhibited star and cardioid textures that were heretofore only reported for single-component lipid monolayers in the phase coexistence region. PMID:18206112

  10. Separated flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellers, W. L., III; Dunham, R. E., Jr.; Goodman, W. L.; Howard, F. G.; Margason, R. J.; Rudy, D. H.; Rumsey, C. L.; Stough, H. P., III; Thomas, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    A brief overview of flow separation phenomena is provided. Langley has many active research programs in flow separation related areas. Three cases are presented which describe specific examples of flow separation research. In each example, a description of the fundamental fluid physics and the complexity of the flow field is presented along with a method of either reducing or controlling the extent of separation. The following examples are discussed: flow over a smooth surface with an adverse pressure gradient; flow over a surface with a geometric discontinuity; and flow with shock-boundary layer interactions. These results will show that improvements are being made in the understanding of flow separation and its control.

  11. High-Q polymer resonators with spatially controlled photo-functionalization for biosensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Torsten; Mai, Martin; Grossmann, Tobias; Wienhold, Tobias; Hauser, Mario; Mappes, Timo; Kalt, Heinz

    2013-03-01

    We demonstrate the applicability of polymeric whispering gallery mode resonators fabricated on silicon as biosensors. Optical measurements on the passive resonators in the visible spectral range yield Q-factors as high as 1.3×107. Local, covalent surface functionalization, is achieved by spatially controlled UV-exposure of a derivative of the photoreactive crosslinker benzophenone. Protein detection is shown using the specific binding of the biotin-streptavidin system.

  12. Visualization of flow separation and control by vortex generators on an single flap in landing configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Součková, Natálie; Kuklová, Jana; Popelka, Lukáš; Matějka, Milan

    2012-04-01

    This paper focuses on a suppression of the flow separation, which occurs on a deflected flap, by means of vortex generators (VG's). An airfoil NACA 63A421 with a simple flap and vane-type vortex generators were used. The investigation was carried out by using experimental and numerical methods. The data from the numerical simulation of the flapped airfoil without VG's control were used for the vortex generator design. Two sizes, two different shapes and various spacing of the vortex generators were tested. The flow past the airfoil was visualized through three methods, namely tuft filaments technique, oil and thermo camera visualization. The experiments were performed in closed circuit wind tunnels with closed and open test sections. The lift curves for both cases without and with vortex generators were acquired for a lift coefficient improvement determination. The improvement was achieved for several cases by means all of the applied methods.

  13. A Karman-Vortex Generator for passive separation control in a conical diffuser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, YuFei; Chen, HaiXin; Fu, Song

    2012-05-01

    Flow separation in a conical diffuser with large divergence angle (29.14°) and large area ratio (3.533) is eliminated by a novel passive flow control device called Karman-Vortex Generator (KVG). The effect of the KVG is verified and investigated by the URANS, DES and DDES methods based on the SST model. CFD results show that the performance coefficient of the diffuser can be doubled by the KVG, and the total pressure recovery coefficient can be improved by about 1.2%. DES and DDES results show that the KVG can introduce a Karman-vortex street frequency in the diffuser. This frequency decays rapidly, and could not be detected in the ending plane of the expansion section. Different KVG configurations with different locations and dimensions are numerically simulated and compared. Some suggestions are provided.

  14. Morphology-Patterned Anisotropic Wetting Surface for Fluid Control and Gas-Liquid Separation in Microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuli; Yu, Nianzuo; Wang, Tieqiang; Ge, Peng; Ye, Shunsheng; Xue, Peihong; Liu, Wendong; Shen, Huaizhong; Zhang, Junhu; Yang, Bai

    2016-05-25

    This article shows morphology-patterned stripes as a new platform for directing flow guidance of the fluid in microfluidic devices. Anisotropic (even unidirectional) spreading behavior due to anisotropic wetting of the underlying surface is observed after integrating morphology-patterned stripes with a Y-shaped microchannel. The anisotropic wetting flow of the fluid is influenced by the applied pressure, dimensions of the patterns, including the period and depth of the structure, and size of the channels. Fluids with different surface tensions show different flowing anisotropy in our microdevice. Moreover, the morphology-patterned surfaces could be used as a microvalve, and gas-water separation in the microchannel was realized using the unidirectional flow of water. Therefore, benefiting from their good performance and simple fabrication process, morphology-patterned surfaces are good candidates to be applied in controlling the fluid behavior in microfluidics. PMID:27128986

  15. The effects of actuation frequency on the separation control over an airfoil using a synthetic jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Y.; Okada, K.; Nonomura, T.; Fujii, K.

    2015-06-01

    The simulation of separation control using a synthetic jet (SJ) is conducted around an NACA (National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics) 0015 airfoil by large-eddy simulation (LES) with a compact difference scheme. The synthetic jet is installed at the leading edge of the airfoil and the effects of an actuation frequency F+ (normalized by chord length and velocity of freestream) are observed. The lift-drag coefficient is recovered the most for F+ = 6. The relationship between momentum addition by turbulent mixing and large vortex structures is investigated using a phase-averaging procedure based on F+. The Reynolds shear stress is decomposed into periodic and turbulent components where the turbulent components are found to be dominant on the airfoil. The strong turbulent components appear near the large vortex structures that are observed in phase- and span-averaged flow fields.

  16. Investigation of flow separation control by nanosecond pulsed dielectric barrier discharge actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grech, N.; Leyland, P.; Peschke, Ph.; Ott, P.

    2015-06-01

    The ability of nanosecond pulsed dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) actuators to control flow separation was investigated on a NACA (National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics) 0015 profile for velocities up to 24 m/s (Re = 230,000). The optimal location for the actuator was determined from oil flow experiments. Moderate voltage levels were applied (3 and 6 kV) and the actuator was operated at frequencies ranging from 0.058 to 10 kHz in pulse and burst modes. The peak effectiveness of the actuator occurred at reduced frequency values of around 1. Plasma influence was observed at all tested angles of attack (up to 26°) and the stall angle was delayed by 8°.

  17. [Experimental research of oil vapor pollution control for gas station with membrane separation technology].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ling; Chen, Jia-Qing; Zhang, Bao-Sheng; Wang, Jian-Hong

    2011-12-01

    Two kinds of membranes modules, vapor retained glassy membrane based on PEEK hollow fiber membrane modules and vapor permeated rubbery membrane system based on GMT plate-and-frame membrane modules, were used to control the oil vapor pollution during the course of receiving and transferring gasoline in oil station. The efficiencies of the membrane module and the membrane system of them were evaluated and compared respectively in the facilities which were developed by ourselves. It was found that both the two kinds of membranes modules had high efficiency for the separation of VOCs-air mixed gases, and the outlet vapor after treatment all can meet the national standard. When the vapor-enriched gas was returned to the oil tank to simulate the continuously cycle test, the concentration of VOCs in the outlet was also below 25 g x m(-3). PMID:22468544

  18. CFD Simulation of the Space Shuttle Launch Vehicle with Booster Separation Motor and Reaction Control Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gea, L. M.; Vicker, D.

    2006-01-01

    The primary objective of this paper is to demonstrate the capability of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to simulate a very complicated flow field encountered during the space shuttle ascent. The flow field features nozzle plumes from booster separation motor (BSM) and reaction control system (RCS) jets with a supersonic incoming cross flow at speed of Mach 4. The overset Navier-Stokes code OVERFLOW, was used to simulate the flow field surrounding the entire space shuttle launch vehicle (SSLV) with high geometric fidelity. The variable gamma option was chosen due to the high temperature nature of nozzle flows and different plume species. CFD predicted Mach contours are in good agreement with the schlieren photos from wind tunnel test. Flow fields are discussed in detail and the results are used to support the debris analysis for the space shuttle Return To Flight (RTF) task.

  19. Anticipatory control and spatial cognition in locomotion and navigation through typical development and in cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Belmonti, Vittorio; Cioni, Giovanni; Berthoz, Alain

    2016-03-01

    Behavioural evidence, summarized in this narrative review, supports a developmental model of locomotor control based on increasing neural integration of spatial reference frames. Two consistent adult locomotor behaviours are head stabilization and head anticipation: the head is stabilized to gravity and leads walking direction. This cephalocaudal orienting organization aligns gaze and vestibula with a reference frame centred on the upcoming walking direction, allowing anticipatory control on body kinematics, but is not fully developed until adolescence. Walking trajectories and those of hand movements share many aspects, including power laws coupling velocity to curvature, and minimized spatial variability. In fact, the adult brain can code trajectory geometry in an allocentric reference frame, irrespective of the end effector, regulating body kinematics thereafter. Locomotor trajectory formation, like head anticipation, matures in early adolescence, indicating common neurocomputational substrates. These late-developing control mechanisms can be distinguished from biomechanical problems in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Children's performance on a novel navigation test, the Magic Carpet, indicates that typical navigation development consists of the increasing integration of egocentric and allocentric reference frames. In CP, right-brain impairment seems to reduce navigation performance due to a maladaptive left-brain sequential egocentric strategy. Spatial integration should be considered more in rehabilitation. PMID:27027604

  20. Temporal changes of spatial soil moisture patterns: controlling factors explained with a multidisciplinary approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martini, Edoardo; Wollschläger, Ute; Kögler, Simon; Behrens, Thorsten; Dietrich, Peter; Reinstorf, Frido; Schmidt, Karsten; Weiler, Markus; Werban, Ulrike; Zacharias, Steffen

    2016-04-01

    Characterizing the spatial patterns of soil moisture is critical for hydrological and meteorological models, as soil moisture is a key variable that controls matter and energy fluxes and soil-vegetation-atmosphere exchange processes. Deriving detailed process understanding at the hillslope scale is not trivial, because of the temporal variability of local soil moisture dynamics. Nevertheless, it remains a challenge to provide adequate information on the temporal variability of soil moisture and its controlling factors. Recent advances in wireless sensor technology allow monitoring of soil moisture dynamics with high temporal resolution at varying scales. In addition, mobile geophysical methods such as electromagnetic induction (EMI) have been widely used for mapping soil water content at the field scale with high spatial resolution, as being related to soil apparent electrical conductivity (ECa). The objective of this study was to characterize the spatial and temporal pattern of soil moisture at the hillslope scale and to infer the controlling hydrological processes, integrating well established and innovative sensing techniques, as well as new statistical methods. We combined soil hydrological and pedological expertise with geophysical measurements and methods from digital soil mapping for designing a wireless soil moisture monitoring network. For a hillslope site within the Schäfertal catchment (Central Germany), soil water dynamics were observed during 14 months, and soil ECa was mapped on seven occasions whithin this period of time using an EM38-DD device. Using the Spearman rank correlation coefficient, we described the temporal persistence of a dry and a wet characteristic state of soil moisture as well as the switching mechanisms, inferring the local properties that control the observed spatial patterns and the hydrological processes driving the transitions. Based on this, we evaluated the use of EMI for mapping the spatial pattern of soil moisture under

  1. Enhanced Design of Turbo-jet LPT by Separation Control Using Phased Plasma Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashpis, David (Technical Monitor); Corke, Thomas C.; Thomas, Flint O.

    2003-01-01

    This work deals with the documentation and control of flow separation that occurs over turbine blades in the low-pressure turbine stage at low Reynolds numbers that exist at high altitude cruise. We utilize a specially constructed linear cascade that is designed to study the flow field over a generic LPT cascade consisting of Pratt & Whitney 'Pak B' shaped blades. This facility was constructed under a previous one-year NASA Glenn RC initiative. The center blade in the cascade is instrumented to measure the surface pressure coefficient distribution. Optical access allows two-component LDV measurement for boundary layer profiles. Experimental conditions have been chosen to give a range of chord Reynolds numbers from 10 to 100K, and a range of free-stream turbulence levels from u'/U(sub infinity)= 0.08 to 3 percent. The surface pressure measurements were used to define a region of separation and reattachment that depend on the free-stream conditions. The location of separation was found to be relatively insensitive to the experimental conditions. However, reattachment location was very sensitive to the turbulence level and Reynolds number. Excellent agreement was found between the measured pressure distributions and predictions from Euler and RANS simulations. Two-component LDV measurements are presently underway to document the mean and fluctuating velocity components in the boundary layer over the center blade for the range of experimental conditions. The fabrication of the plasma actuator is underway. These are designed to produce either streamwise vortices, or a downstream-directed wall jet. A precursor experiment for the former approach was performed with an array of vortex generators placed just upstream of the separation line. These led to reattachment except for the lowest Reynolds number. Progress has also been made on the proposed concept for a laterally moving wake. This involved constructing a smaller wind tunnel and molding an array of symmetric airfoils

  2. ETS1 and ETS2 in p53 regulation: spatial separation of ETS binding sites (EBS) modulate protein: DNA interaction.

    PubMed

    Venanzoni, M C; Robinson, L R; Hodge, D R; Kola, I; Seth, A

    1996-03-21

    p53 is an extensively studied tumor suppressor gene implicated in the genesis of a large number of varied tumors. However, the pathways of regulation for the wild-type p53 gene and its product are as yet unknown. In situ hybridization analyses of ETS1 and ETS2 expression during mouse embryogenesis, have shown a pattern similar to that of p53 gene expression. Significantly, we have identified several ETS-binding sites (EBS) in the promoter regions of the human and mouse p53 genes. In the human promoter two of these EBS are present in the form of a palindrome, with the two EBS cores being separated by four nucleotides. This report shows that the EBS palindrome of the human p53 promoter has a high affinity for ETS1 and ETS2 and that such binding interaction intracellularly is able to activate the transcription of a CAT reporter gene by 5-10-fold using COS cells. To investigate whether the spacing between the two EBS cores influences the DNA binding activity, we synthesized oligonucleotides with increasing distances (4,12,16, and 20 bases respectively) between the two EBS cores of the palindrome. We observed an inverse correlation between an increasing distance in the two EBS cores of the palindrome and the ETS1 and ETS2 DNA binding activity respectively. Interestingly, optimal DNA binding activity was observed when the distance between the two EBS cores was four bases, identical to that which occurs in the natural promoter. Furthermore we show that the p53 mRNA is expressed at higher levels in NIH3T3 cells overexpressing ETS2 gene product, suggesting that the ETS2 transcription factor is a likely candidate for regulating the expression of p53 in vivo. PMID:8649821

  3. Controlling chaos in spatially extended beam-plasma system by the continuous delayed feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Hramov, Alexander E.; Koronovskii, Alexey A.; Rempen, Irene S.

    2006-03-15

    In this paper we discuss the control of complex spatio-temporal dynamics in a spatially extended nonlinear system (fluid model of Pierce diode) based on the concepts of controlling chaos in the systems with few degrees of freedom. A presented method is connected with stabilization of unstable homogeneous equilibrium state and the unstable spatio-temporal periodical states analogous to unstable periodic orbits of chaotic dynamics of the systems with few degrees of freedom. We show that this method is effective and allows to achieve desired regular dynamics chosen from a number of possible in the considered system.

  4. Spatial Control of Condensation and Freezing on Superhydrophobic Surfaces with Hydrophilic Patches

    SciTech Connect

    Mishchenko, Lidiya; Khan, M.; Aizenberg, Joanna; Hatton, Benjamin

    2013-09-25

    Certain natural organisms use micro-patterned surface chemistry, or ice-nucleating species, to control water condensation and ice nucleation for survival under extreme conditions. As an analogy to these biological approaches, it is shown that functionalized, hydrophilic polymers and particles deposited on the tips of superhydrophobic posts induce precise topographical control over water condensation and freezing at the micrometer scale. A bottom-up deposition process is used to take advantage of the limited contact area of a non-wetting aqueous solution on a superhydrophobic surface. Hydrophilic polymer deposition on the tips of these geometrical structures allows spatial control over the nucleation, growth, and coalescence of micrometer-scale water droplets. The hydrophilic tips nucleate water droplets with extremely uniform nucleation and growth rates, uniform sizes, an increased stability against coalescence, and asymmetric droplet morphologies. Furthermore, control of freezing behavior is also demonstrated via deposition of ice-nucleating AgI nanoparticles on the tips of these structures. The combination of the hydrophilic polymer and AgI particles on the tips was used to achieve templating of ice nucleation at the micrometer scale. Preliminary results indicate that control over ice crystal size, spatial symmetry, and position might be possible with this method. This type of approach can serve as a platform for systematically analyzing micrometer-scale condensation and freezing phenomena, and as a model for natural systems.

  5. Spatial Control of Condensation and Freezing on Superhydrophobic Surfaces with Hydrophilic Patches

    SciTech Connect

    Mishchenko, L; Khan, M; Aizenberg, J; Hatton, BD

    2013-07-03

    Certain natural organisms use micro-patterned surface chemistry, or ice-nucleating species, to control water condensation and ice nucleation for survival under extreme conditions. As an analogy to these biological approaches, it is shown that functionalized, hydrophilic polymers and particles deposited on the tips of superhydrophobic posts induce precise topographical control over water condensation and freezing at the micrometer scale. A bottom-up deposition process is used to take advantage of the limited contact area of a non-wetting aqueous solution on a superhydrophobic surface. Hydrophilic polymer deposition on the tips of these geometrical structures allows spatial control over the nucleation, growth, and coalescence of micrometer-scale water droplets. The hydrophilic tips nucleate water droplets with extremely uniform nucleation and growth rates, uniform sizes, an increased stability against coalescence, and asymmetric droplet morphologies. Control of freezing behavior is also demonstrated via deposition of ice-nucleating AgI nanoparticles on the tips of these structures. This combination of the hydrophilic polymer and AgI particles on the tips was used to achieve templating of ice nucleation at the micrometer scale. Preliminary results indicate that control over ice crystal size, spatial symmetry, and position might be possible with this method. This type of approach can serve as a platform for systematically analyzing micrometer-scale condensation and freezing phenomena, and as a model for natural systems.

  6. Spatial Control of Gene Expression within a Scaffold by Localized Inducer Release

    PubMed Central

    Baraniak, Priya R.; Nelson, Devin M.; Leeson, Cory E.; Katakam, Anand K.; Friz, Jennifer L.; Cress, Dean E.; Hong, Yi; Guan, Jianjun; Wagner, William R.

    2011-01-01

    Gene expression can be controlled in genetically modified cells by employing an inducer/promoter system where presence of the inducer molecule regulates the timing and level of gene expression. By applying the principles of controlled release, it should be possible to control gene expression on a biomaterial surface by the presence or absence of inducer release from the underlying material matrix, thus avoiding alternative techniques that rely upon uptake of relatively labile DNA from material surfaces. To evaluate this concept, a modified ecdysone-responsive gene expression system was transfected into B16 murine cells and the ability of an inducer ligand, which was released from elastomeric poly(ester urethane) urea (PEUU), to initiate gene expression was studied. The synthetic inducer ligand was first loaded into PEUU to demonstrate extended release of the bioactive molecule at various loading densities over a one year period in vitro. Patterning films of PEUU variably-loaded with inducer resulted in spatially controlled cell expression of the gene product (green fluorescent protein, GFP). In porous scaffolds made from PEUU by salt leaching, where the central region was exclusively loaded with inducer, cells expressed GFP predominately in the loaded central regions whereas expression was minimal in outer regions where ligand was omitted. This scaffold system may ultimately provide a means to precisely control progenitor cell commitment in a spatially-defined manner in vivo for soft tissue repair and regeneration. PMID:21269687

  7. Effects of Artificial Gravity and Bed Rest on Spatial Orientation and Balance Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paloski, William H.; Moore, S. T.; Feiveson, A. H.; Taylor, L. C.

    2007-01-01

    While the vestibular system should be well-adapted to bed rest (a condition it experiences approximately 8/24 hrs each day), questions remain regarding the degree to which repeated exposures to the unusual gravito-inertial force environment of a short-radius centrifuge might affect central processing of vestibular information used in spatial orientation and balance control. Should these functions be impaired by intermittent AG, its feasibility as a counter-measure would be diminished. We, therefore, examined the effects of AG on spatial orientation and balance control in 15 male volunteers before and after 21 days of 6 HDT bed rest (BR). Eight of the subjects were treated with daily 1hr AG exposures (2.5g at the feet; 1.0g at the heart) aboard a short radius (3m) centrifuge, while the other seven served as controls (C). Spatial orientation was assessed by measures of ocular counter-rolling (OCR; rotation of the eye about the line of sight, an otolith-mediated reflex) and subjective visual vertical (SVV; perception of the spatial upright). Both OCR and SVV measurements were made with the subject upright, lying on their left sides, and lying on their right sides. OCR was measured from binocular eye orientation recordings made while the subjects fixated for 10s on a point target directly in front of the face at a distance of 1 m. SVV was assessed by asking subjects (in the dark) to adjust to upright (using a handheld controller) the orientation of a luminous bar randomly perturbed (15) to either side of the vertical meridian. Balance control performance was assessed using a computerized dynamic posturography (CDP) protocol similar to that currently required for all returning crew members. During each session, the subjects completed a combination of trials of sensory organization test (SOT) 2 (eyes closed, fixed platform) and SOT 5 (eyes closed, sway-referenced platform) with and without static and dynamic pitch plane head movements (plus or minus 20 deg., dynamic

  8. A system for optically controlling neural circuits with very high spatial and temporal resolution

    PubMed Central

    Pandarinath, Chethan; Carlson, Eric T.; Nirenberg, Sheila

    2015-01-01

    Optogenetics offers a powerful new approach for controlling neural circuits. It has a vast array of applications in both basic and clinical science. For basic science, it opens the door to unraveling circuit operations, since one can perturb specific circuit components with high spatial (single cell) and high temporal (millisecond) resolution. For clinical applications, it allows new kinds of selective treatments, because it provides a method to inactivate or activate specific components in a malfunctioning circuit and bring it back into a normal operating range [1–3]. To harness the power of optogenetics, though, one needs stimulating tools that work with the same high spatial and temporal resolution as the molecules themselves, the channelrhodopsins. To date, most stimulating tools require a tradeoff between spatial and temporal precision and are prohibitively expensive to integrate into a stimulating/recording setup in a laboratory or a device in a clinical setting [4, 5]. Here we describe a Digital Light Processing (DLP)-based system capable of extremely high temporal resolution (sub-millisecond), without sacrificing spatial resolution. Furthermore, it is constructed using off-the-shelf components, making it feasible for a broad range of biology and bioengineering labs. Using transgenic mice that express channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2), we demonstrate the system’s capability for stimulating channelrhodopsin-expressing neurons in tissue with single cell and sub-millisecond precision. PMID:25699292

  9. Dielectric metasurfaces for complete control of phase and polarization with subwavelength spatial resolution and high transmission.

    PubMed

    Arbabi, Amir; Horie, Yu; Bagheri, Mahmood; Faraon, Andrei

    2015-11-01

    Metasurfaces are planar structures that locally modify the polarization, phase and amplitude of light in reflection or transmission, thus enabling lithographically patterned flat optical components with functionalities controlled by design. Transmissive metasurfaces are especially important, as most optical systems used in practice operate in transmission. Several types of transmissive metasurface have been realized, but with either low transmission efficiencies or limited control over polarization and phase. Here, we show a metasurface platform based on high-contrast dielectric elliptical nanoposts that provides complete control of polarization and phase with subwavelength spatial resolution and an experimentally measured efficiency ranging from 72% to 97%, depending on the exact design. Such complete control enables the realization of most free-space transmissive optical elements such as lenses, phase plates, wave plates, polarizers, beamsplitters, as well as polarization-switchable phase holograms and arbitrary vector beam generators using the same metamaterial platform. PMID:26322944

  10. Experimental active structural acoustic control of simply supported plates using a weighted sum of spatial gradients.

    PubMed

    Hendricks, Daniel R; Johnson, William R; Sommerfeldt, Scott D; Blotter, Jonathan D

    2014-11-01

    A limitation currently facing active structural acoustic control (ASAC) researchers is that an ideal minimization quantity for use in the control algorithms has not been developed. A novel parameter termed the "weighted sum of spatial gradients" (WSSG) was recently developed for use in ASAC and shown to effectively attenuate acoustic radiation from a vibrating flat simply supported plate in computer simulations. This paper extends this research from computer simulations and provides experimental test results. The results presented show that WSSG is a viable control quantity and provides better results than the volume velocity approach. The paper also investigates several of the challenges presented by the use of WSSG. These include determining a method to measure WSSG experimentally, an analysis of the influence of noise on WSSG control results and complications presented when degenerate modes exist. Results are shown and discussed for several experimental configurations. PMID:25373961

  11. Experimental closed-loop control of separated-flow over a plain flap using extremum seeking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabert, Timothée; Dandois, Julien; Garnier, Éric

    2016-03-01

    The lift coefficient of a configuration made of a flat plate with a trailing-edge plain flap is maximized at post-stall conditions by driving automatically the forcing frequency of a fluidic control system to an optimal value. The flap is equipped with pulsed blowing slots whose actuation frequency can be varied at constant actuation amplitude. The post-stall flow over the deflected flap is fully separated and organized around the natural vortex shedding at St=0.2. It appears to be sensitive to the forcing frequency so that the lift coefficient is maximized if actuation is precisely the Strouhal number. Since this frequency depends on the flap deflection angle and the upstream velocity, an extremum seeking algorithm is implemented in order to drive the forcing frequency and thus guarantees that lift remains maximum whatever the geometric configuration is. Finally, a fuzzy-logic regulator is synthesized and integrated into the extremum seeking control scheme in order to speed up the convergence while maintaining stability and accuracy.

  12. Study of the Application of Separation Control by Unsteady Excitation to Civil Transport Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLean, J. D.; Crouch, J. D.; Stoner, R. C.; Sakurai, S.; Seidel, G. E.; Feifel, W. M.; Rush, H. M.

    1999-01-01

    This study provides a preliminary assessment of the potential benefits of applying unsteady separation control to transport aircraft. Estimates are given for some of the costs associated with a specific application to high-lift systems. High-leverage areas for future research were identified during the course of the study. The study was conducted in three phases. Phase 1 consisted of a coarse screening of potential applications within the aerodynamics discipline. Potential benefits were identified and in some cases quantified in a preliminary way. Phase 2 concentrated on the application to the wing high-lift system, deemed to have the greatest potential benefit for commercial transports. A team of experts, including other disciplines (i.e. hydraulic, mechanical, and electrical systems, structures, configurations, manufacturing, and finance), assessed the feasibility, benefits, and costs to arrive at estimates of net benefits. In both phases of the study, areas of concern and areas for future research were identified. In phase 3 of this study, the high-leverage areas for future research were prioritized as a guide for future efforts aimed at the application of active flow control to commercial transport aircraft.

  13. Static Enforcement of Static Separation-of-Duty Policies in Usage Control Authorization Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jianfeng; Li, Ruixuan; Hu, Jinwei; Xu, Dewu

    Separation-of-Duty (SoD) is a fundamental security principle for prevention of fraud and errors in computer security. It has been studied extensively in traditional access control models. However, the research of SoD policy in the recently proposed usage control (UCON) model has not been well studied. This paper formulates and studies the fundamental problem of static enforcement of static SoD (SSoD) policies in the context of UCONA, a sub-model of UCON only considering authorizations. Firstly, we define a set-based specification of SSoD policies, and the safety checking problem for SSoD in UCONA. Secondly, we study the problem of determining whether an SSoD policy is enforceable. Thirdly, we show that it is intractable (coNP-complete) to direct statically enforce SSoD policies in UCONA, while checking whether a UCONA state satisfies a set of static mutually exclusive attribute (SMEA) constraints is efficient, which provides a justification for using SMEA constraints to enforce SSoD policies. Finally, we introduce a indirect static enforcement for SSoD policies in UCONA. We show how to generate the least restrictive SMEA constraints for enforcing SSoD policies in UCONA, by using the attribute-level SSoD requirement as an intermediate step. The results are fundamental to understanding SSoD policies in UCON.

  14. Stencil Micropatterning for Spatial Control of Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Fate Heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jun; Sahni, Geetika; Toh, Yi-Chin

    2016-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have the intrinsic ability to differentiate and self-organize into distinct tissue patterns, although this requires the presentation of spatial environmental cues, i.e., biochemical and mechanical gradients. Cell micropatterning technologies potentially offer the means to spatially control stem cell microenvironments and organize the resultant differentiation fates. Here, we describe stencil micropatterning as a simple and robust method to generate hPSC micropatterns for controlling hPSC differentiation patterns. hPSC micropatterns are specified by the geometries of the cell stencil through-holes, which physically confine the locations where the underlying extracellular matrix and hPSCs can access and attach to the substrate. This confers the unique capability of stencil micropatterning to work with a variety of culture substrates and extracellular matrices for optimal hPSC culture. We present the detailed steps of stencil micropatterning to successfully generate hPSC micropatterns, which can be used to investigate how spatial polarization of cell adhesion results in cell fate heterogeneity. PMID:27032943

  15. Real-time 2D spatially selective MRI experiments: Comparative analysis of optimal control design methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maximov, Ivan I.; Vinding, Mads S.; Tse, Desmond H. Y.; Nielsen, Niels Chr.; Shah, N. Jon

    2015-05-01

    There is an increasing need for development of advanced radio-frequency (RF) pulse techniques in modern magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems driven by recent advancements in ultra-high magnetic field systems, new parallel transmit/receive coil designs, and accessible powerful computational facilities. 2D spatially selective RF pulses are an example of advanced pulses that have many applications of clinical relevance, e.g., reduced field of view imaging, and MR spectroscopy. The 2D spatially selective RF pulses are mostly generated and optimised with numerical methods that can handle vast controls and multiple constraints. With this study we aim at demonstrating that numerical, optimal control (OC) algorithms are efficient for the design of 2D spatially selective MRI experiments, when robustness towards e.g. field inhomogeneity is in focus. We have chosen three popular OC algorithms; two which are gradient-based, concurrent methods using first- and second-order derivatives, respectively; and a third that belongs to the sequential, monotonically convergent family. We used two experimental models: a water phantom, and an in vivo human head. Taking into consideration the challenging experimental setup, our analysis suggests the use of the sequential, monotonic approach and the second-order gradient-based approach as computational speed, experimental robustness, and image quality is key. All algorithms used in this work were implemented in the MATLAB environment and are freely available to the MRI community.

  16. Real-time 2D spatially selective MRI experiments: Comparative analysis of optimal control design methods.

    PubMed

    Maximov, Ivan I; Vinding, Mads S; Tse, Desmond H Y; Nielsen, Niels Chr; Shah, N Jon

    2015-05-01

    There is an increasing need for development of advanced radio-frequency (RF) pulse techniques in modern magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems driven by recent advancements in ultra-high magnetic field systems, new parallel transmit/receive coil designs, and accessible powerful computational facilities. 2D spatially selective RF pulses are an example of advanced pulses that have many applications of clinical relevance, e.g., reduced field of view imaging, and MR spectroscopy. The 2D spatially selective RF pulses are mostly generated and optimised with numerical methods that can handle vast controls and multiple constraints. With this study we aim at demonstrating that numerical, optimal control (OC) algorithms are efficient for the design of 2D spatially selective MRI experiments, when robustness towards e.g. field inhomogeneity is in focus. We have chosen three popular OC algorithms; two which are gradient-based, concurrent methods using first- and second-order derivatives, respectively; and a third that belongs to the sequential, monotonically convergent family. We used two experimental models: a water phantom, and an in vivo human head. Taking into consideration the challenging experimental setup, our analysis suggests the use of the sequential, monotonic approach and the second-order gradient-based approach as computational speed, experimental robustness, and image quality is key. All algorithms used in this work were implemented in the MATLAB environment and are freely available to the MRI community. PMID:25863895

  17. Modelling of electrokinetic phenomena involving confined polymers: Applications to DNA separation and electroosmotic flow control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tessier, Frederic

    Microfluidic and nanofluidic technology is revolutionizing experimental practices in analytical chemistry, molecular biology and medicine. Indeed, the development of systems of small dimensions for the processing of fluids heralds the miniaturization of traditional, cumbersome laboratory equipment onto robust, portable and efficient microchip devices (similar to the electronic microchips found in computers). Moreover, the conjunction of scale between the smallest man-made device and the largest macromolecules evolved by Nature is fertile ground for the blooming of our knowledge about the key processes of life. In fact, the conjunction is threefold, because modern computational resources also allow us to contemplate a rather explicit modelling of physical systems between the nanoscale and the microscale. In the five articles comprising this thesis, we present the results of computer simulations that address specific questions concerning the operation of two different model systems relevant to the development of small-scale fluidic devices for the manipulation and analysis of biomolecules. First, we use a Bond-Fluctuation Monte Carlo approach to study the electrophoretic drift of macromolecules across an entropic trap array built for the length separation of long, double-stranded DNA molecules. We show that the motion of the molecules is consistent with a simple balance between electric and entropic forces, in terms of a single characteristic parameter. We also extract detailed information on polymer deformation during migration, predict the separation of topoisomers, and investigate innovative ratchet driving regimes. Secondly, we present theoretical derivations, numerical calculations and Molecular Dynamics simulation results for an electrolyte confined in a capillary of nanoscopic dimensions. In particular, we study the effectiveness of neutral grafted polymer chains in reducing the magnitude of electroosmotic flow (fluid flow induced by an external electric field

  18. Micro vortex generator control of axisymmetric high-speed laminar boundary layer separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estruch-Samper, D.; Vanstone, L.; Hillier, R.; Ganapathisubramani, B.

    2015-09-01

    Interest in the development of micro vortex generators (MVGs) to control high-speed flow separation has grown in the last decade. In contrast to conventional vortex generators, MVGs are fully submerged in the boundary layer and have the potential of inducing surface flow mixing with marginal drag penalty when suitably designed. Also, they do not result in undesired reduced mass flow such as with suction methods. The flow mechanisms at the location of MVGs are not yet fully understood, and optimal designs are difficult to establish given that both numerical predictions and experiments are particularly challenged for short element heights, yet optimal MVGs are generally expected to be at least shorter than half the local boundary layer thickness. The present work aims at investigating experimentally the fundamental flow physics concerning an individual MVG element (of `canonical' or simplified geometry) at a range of near-wall heights. A fully laminar base flow is considered so as to isolate the effect of incoming turbulence as well as the more complex physics that may occur when specific and/or multiple elements are used. Tests were performed in a gun tunnel at a freestream Mach number of 8.9 and Reynolds number of /m, and the basic test model consisted of a blunt-nosed cylinder which produced an axisymmetric laminar boundary layer with an edge Mach number of 3.4 and Reynolds number of /m at the MVG location. A laminar shock-wave/boundary layer interaction with separation was induced by a flare located further downstream on the model. Measurements consisted of time-resolved surface heat transfer obtained in the axial direction immediately downstream of the MVG and along the interaction, together with simultaneous high-speed schlieren imaging. The height () of the MVG element used in a `diamond' configuration (square planform with one vertex facing the flow) was adjusted between tests ranging from = 0.03 to 0.58, where the local undisturbed boundary layer thickness

  19. Femtosecond laser microchannels fabrication based on electrons dynamics control using temporally or spatially shaped pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Xueliang; Hu, Jie; Li, Xiaowei; Xia, Bo; Liu, Pengjun; Lu, Yongfeng; Jiang, Lan

    2014-11-01

    With ultrashort pulse durations and ultrahigh power densities, femtosecond laser presents unique advantages of high precision and high quality fabrication of microchannels in transparent materials. In our study, by shaping femtosecond laser pulse energy distribution in temporal or spatial domains, localized transient electrons dynamics and the subsequent processes, such as phase changes, can be controlled, leading to the dramatic increases in the capability of femtosecond laser microchannels fabrication. The temporally shaped femtosecond laser pulse trains can significantly enhance the material removal rate in both water-assisted femtosecond laser drilling and femtosecond laser irradiation followed by chemical etching. Besides, high-aspect-ratio and small-diameter microchannels are drilled by spatially shaped femtosecond laser pulses.

  20. Controlling high harmonics generation by spatial shaping of high-energy femtosecond beam.

    PubMed

    Dubrouil, A; Mairesse, Y; Fabre, B; Descamps, D; Petit, S; Mével, E; Constant, E

    2011-07-01

    We demonstrate controlled high-order harmonic generation in gas using high-energy femtosecond pulses (50 fs-50 mJ on target) by performing spatial shaping of the terrawatt fundamental laser beam. We have developed a two optical paths mirror that can withstand high power and shape the pump beam into a quasi-flat-top profile (super Gaussian) near focus. We observe clear signatures of the spatial shaping on the harmonic beam in terms of profile, divergence, level of signal, and spectrum. The harmonic generation in neon with a quasi-flat-top beam results in a broadband extreme UV beam with extremely low divergence (~340 μrad). PMID:21725453

  1. Statistical properties in Young's interference pattern formed with a radially polarized beam with controllable spatial coherence.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shijun; Wang, Fei; Chen, Yahong; Li, Zhenhua; Cai, Yangjian

    2014-11-17

    Experimental generation of a radially polarized (RP) beam with controllable spatial coherence (i.e., partially coherent RP beam) was reported recently [Appl. Phys. Lett. 100, 051108 (2012)]. In this paper, we carry out theoretical and experimental studies of the statistical properties in Young's two-slit interference pattern formed with a partially coherent RP beam. An approximate analytical expression for the cross-spectral density matrix of a partially coherent RP beam in the observation plane is obtained, and it is found that the statistical properties, such as the intensity, the degree of coherence and the degree of polarization, are strongly affected by the spatial coherence of the incident beam. Our experimental results are consistent with the theoretical predictions, and may be useful in some applications, where light field with special statistical properties are required. PMID:25402110

  2. Separate and Combined Effects of Cue-Controlled Relaxation and Cognitive Restructuring in the Treatment of Musical Performance Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweeney, Gladys Acevedo; Horan, John J.

    1982-01-01

    Music students with reactive and adaptive anxieties participated in a musical performance anxiety reduction program. Cue-controlled relaxation (CCR) and cognitive restructuring (CR) were examined separately and in combination in comparison with a standard treatment control condition. The CCR and CR treatments were each effective in reducing state…

  3. A dual-plate ITO-ITO generator-collector microtrench sensor: surface activation, spatial separation and suppression of irreversible oxygen and ascorbate interference.

    PubMed

    Hasnat, Mohammad A; Gross, Andrew J; Dale, Sara E C; Barnes, Edward O; Compton, Richard G; Marken, Frank

    2014-02-01

    Generator-collector electrode systems are based on two independent working electrodes with overlapping diffusion fields where chemically reversible redox processes (oxidation and reduction) are coupled to give amplified current signals. A generator-collector trench electrode system prepared from two tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) electrodes placed vis-à-vis with a 22 μm inter-electrode gap is employed here as a sensor in aqueous media. The reversible 2-electron anthraquinone-2-sulfonate redox system is demonstrated to give well-defined collector responses even in the presence of oxygen due to the irreversible nature of the oxygen reduction. For the oxidation of dopamine on ITO, novel "Piranha-activation" effects are observed and chemically reversible generator-collector feedback conditions are achieved at pH 7, by selecting a more negative collector potential, again eliminating possible oxygen interference. Finally, dopamine oxidation in the presence of ascorbate is demonstrated with the irreversible oxidation of ascorbate at the "mouth" of the trench electrode and chemically reversible oxidation of dopamine in the trench "interior". This spatial separation of chemically reversible and irreversible processes within and outside the trench is discussed as a potential in situ microscale sensing and separation tool. PMID:24317451

  4. A Matter of Balance: Motor Control is Related to Children’s Spatial and Proportional Reasoning Skills

    PubMed Central

    Frick, Andrea; Möhring, Wenke

    2016-01-01

    Recent research has shown close links between spatial and mathematical thinking and between spatial abilities and motor skills. However, longitudinal research examining the relations between motor, spatial, and mathematical skills is rare, and the nature of these relations remains unclear. The present study thus investigated the relation between children’s motor control and their spatial and proportional reasoning. We measured 6-year-olds’ spatial scaling (i.e., the ability to reason about different-sized spaces), their mental transformation skills, and their ability to balance on one leg as an index for motor control. One year later (N = 126), we tested the same children’s understanding of proportions. We also assessed several control variables (verbal IQ and socio-economic status) as well as inhibitory control, visuo-spatial and verbal working memory. Stepwise hierarchical regressions showed that, after accounting for effects of control variables, children’s balance skills significantly increased the explained variance in their spatial performance and proportional reasoning. Our results suggest specific relations between balance skills and spatial as well as proportional reasoning skills that cannot be explained by general differences in executive functioning or intelligence. PMID:26793157

  5. Controls on Nitrate Spatial Variability in Paine Run Catchment of Shenandoah National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingram, S. M.; Scanlon, T. M.

    2007-12-01

    This research examines the catchment-scale controls on in-stream nitrate concentrations by (1) quantifying nitrate spatial variability in a headwater catchment and (2) determining the biophysical processes underlying this variability. The Shenandoah Watershed Study (SWAS) established thirty-eight stream sampling sites in the Paine Run catchment to collect field data on stream chemistry, discharge and transient storage. An evaluation of SWAS data at these sites from the early 1990s to 2007 reveals spatial and temporal variability in nitrate concentrations following the gypsy moth defoliation. We observed high in-stream nitrate concentrations with elevation and an apparent dilution at lower elevations. Main topographic descriptors related to the spatial distribution of nitrate, elevation and contributing area, are associated with differing biophysical factors such as soil residence time, bacterial denitrification, vegetation and mineralization. Previous studies have demonstrated that the physical properties of hyporheic zones can strongly influence denitrification rates. We examined this in the Paine Run catchment with tracer tests to evaluate dilution effects and predict stream outflow and inflow from hyporheic zones responsible for denitrification. We then looked for biophysical processes responsible for higher nitrate levels at higher elevation by using the OTIS model for transient storage to evaluate hyporhiec zones in Paine Run. We also established a method to evaluate soil parameters for depth and permeability. By identifying the controls on nitrate inputs, transport and denitrification, we isolated a set of criteria applied to a quantitative model for nitrate spatial variability. This research has important implications for defining nutrient availability both within the stream network and at the outlet of forested headwater catchments.

  6. Evapotranspiration Controls Imposed by Soil Moisture: A Spatial Analysis across the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigden, A. J.; Tuttle, S. E.; Salvucci, G.

    2014-12-01

    We spatially analyze the control over evapotranspiration (ET) imposed by soil moisture across the United States using daily estimates of satellite-derived soil moisture and data-driven ET over a nine-year period (June 2002-June 2011) at 305 locations. The soil moisture data are developed using 0.25-degree resolution satellite observations from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for the Earth Observing System (AMSR-E), where the 9-year time series for each 0.25-degree pixel was selected from three potential algorithms (VUA-NASA, U. Montana, & NASA) based on the maximum mutual information between soil moisture and precipitation (Tuttle & Salvucci (2014), Remote Sens Environ, 114: 207-222). The ET data are developed independent of soil moisture using an emergent relationship between the diurnal cycle of the relative humidity profile and ET. The emergent relation is that the vertical variance of the relative humidity profile is less than what would occur for increased or decreased ET rates, suggesting that land-atmosphere feedback processes minimize this variance (Salvucci and Gentine (2013), PNAS, 110(16): 6287-6291). The key advantage of using this approach to estimate ET is that no measurements of surface limiting factors (soil moisture, leaf area, canopy conductance) are required; instead, ET is estimated from meteorological data measured at 305 common weather stations that are approximately uniformly distributed across the United States. The combination of these two independent datasets allows for a unique spatial analysis of the control on ET imposed by the availability of soil moisture. We fit evaporation efficiency curves across the United States at each of the 305 sites during the summertime (May-June-July-August-September). Spatial patterns are visualized by mapping optimal curve fitting coefficients across the Unites States. An analysis of efficiency curves and their spatial patterns will be presented.

  7. Longitudinal spin separation of light and its performance in three-dimensionally controllable spin-dependent focal shift.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sheng; Li, Peng; Zhang, Yi; Gan, Xuetao; Wang, Meirong; Zhao, Jianlin

    2016-01-01

    Spin Hall effect of light, which is normally explored as a transverse spin-dependent separation of a light beam, has attracted enormous research interests. However, it seems there is no indication for the existence of the longitudinal spin separation of light. In this paper, we propose and experimentally realize the spin separation along the propagation direction by modulating the Pancharatnam-Berry (PB) phase. Due to the spin-dependent divergence and convergence determined by the PB phase, a focused Gaussian beam could split into two opposite spin states, and focuses at different distances, representing the longitudinal spin separation. By combining this longitudinal spin separation with the transverse one, we experimentally achieve the controllable spin-dependent focal shift in three dimensional space. This work provides new insight on steering the spin photons, and is expected to explore novel applications of optical trapping, manipulating, and micromachining with higher degree of freedom. PMID:26882995

  8. Longitudinal spin separation of light and its performance in three-dimensionally controllable spin-dependent focal shift

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Sheng; Li, Peng; Zhang, Yi; Gan, Xuetao; Wang, Meirong; Zhao, Jianlin

    2016-01-01

    Spin Hall effect of light, which is normally explored as a transverse spin-dependent separation of a light beam, has attracted enormous research interests. However, it seems there is no indication for the existence of the longitudinal spin separation of light. In this paper, we propose and experimentally realize the spin separation along the propagation direction by modulating the Pancharatnam-Berry (PB) phase. Due to the spin-dependent divergence and convergence determined by the PB phase, a focused Gaussian beam could split into two opposite spin states, and focuses at different distances, representing the longitudinal spin separation. By combining this longitudinal spin separation with the transverse one, we experimentally achieve the controllable spin-dependent focal shift in three dimensional space. This work provides new insight on steering the spin photons, and is expected to explore novel applications of optical trapping, manipulating, and micromachining with higher degree of freedom. PMID:26882995

  9. High-fidelity spatial addressing of 43Ca+ qubits using near-field microwave control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prado Lopes Aude Craik, Diana; Linke, Norbert; Allcock, David; Sepiol, Martin; Harty, Thomas; Ballance, Christopher; Stacey, Derek; Steane, Andrew; Lucas, David

    2016-05-01

    Individual addressing of qubits is essential for scalable quantum computation. Spatial addressing allows unlimited numbers of qubits to share the same frequency, whilst enabling arbitrary parallel operations. We present the latest experimental results obtained using a two-zone microfabricated surface trap designed to perform spatial, near-field microwave addressing of long-lived 43Ca+ ``atomic clock'' qubits held in separate trap zones (each of which feature four integrated microwave electrodes). Microwave near fields generated by multi-electrode chip ion traps are often difficult to faithfully simulate and a simple method of characterizing and testing trap chips before placement under ultra-high vacuum would significantly speed up trap design optimization. We describe a printed circuit board antenna for use in mapping microwave near-fields generated by ion-trap electrodes. The antenna is designed to measure fields down to 100 μ m away from trap electrodes and to be impedance matched at a desired spot frequency for an improved signal to noise ratio in field measurements. This work is supported by the US Army Research Office, EPSRC (UK) and the UK National Quantum Technologies Programme.

  10. Active control of massively separated high-speed/base flows with electric arc plasma actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeBlauw, Bradley G.

    The current project was undertaken to evaluate the effects of electric arc plasma actuators on high-speed separated flows. Two underlying goals motivated these experiments. The first goal was to provide a flow control technique that will result in enhanced flight performance for supersonic vehicles by altering the near-wake characteristics. The second goal was to gain a broader and more sophisticated understanding of these complex, supersonic, massively-separated, compressible, and turbulent flow fields. The attainment of the proposed objectives was facilitated through energy deposition from multiple electric-arc plasma discharges near the base corner separation point. The control authority of electric arc plasma actuators on a supersonic axisymmetric base flow was evaluated for several actuator geometries, frequencies, forcing modes, duty cycles/on-times, and currents. Initially, an electric arc plasma actuator power supply and control system were constructed to generate the arcs. Experiments were performed to evaluate the operational characteristics, electromagnetic emission, and fluidic effect of the actuators in quiescent ambient air. The maximum velocity induced by the arc when formed in a 5 mm x 1.6 mm x 2 mm deep cavity was about 40 m/s. During breakdown, the electromagnetic emission exhibited a rise and fall in intensity over a period of about 340 ns. After breakdown, the emission stabilized to a near-constant distribution. It was also observed that the plasma formed into two different modes: "high-voltage" and "low-voltage". It is believed that the plasma may be switching between an arc discharge and a glow discharge for these different modes. The two types of plasma do not appear to cause substantial differences on the induced fluidic effects of the actuator. In general, the characterization study provided a greater fundamental understanding of the operation of the actuators, as well as data for computational model comparison. Preliminary investigations

  11. Controls on the spatial variability of supraglacial channel morphology and network characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, L.

    2015-12-01

    Supraglacial streams are widespread and ubiquitous features of glacial ice surfaces around the world. They play an important role in the spatial and temporal distribution of meltwater on a glacier, moderating the flux of meltwater to the bed. They are themselves unique fluvial features in which erosion and deposition is achieved through thermal erosion of ice rather than alluvial substrate. As such, they are of both glaciological and fluvial geomorphological interest for both practical and theoretical reasons. However, little is known about their characteristics through space and time, or how these characteristics reflect external driving forces. This research aims to address these gaps by characterizing the spatial variability of supraglacial stream morphology across a range of glacier types and environmental conditions and identifying forcings that control channel form. Topographic data was analyzed from a range of glacier surface types including icesheets, pocket alpine glaciers, and outlet valley glaciers spanning a range of latitudes and elevations, comprising glaciers from Greenland, British Columbia, Alaska, Iceland and Sweden. Channels were extracted from the topographic data using an automated approach based on identifying topographic depressions at different size scales, in which the method was tested relative to manually digitized stream networks. Channel geomorphology was subsequently characterized according to planimetric and drainage network geometries. Resulting morphometric characteristics were analyzed with regards to endo and exogenic environmental forcings such as ice topography and characteristics and climatic forcings to identify the primary controls on supraglacial channel morphology and the response of these channels with respect to these controls.

  12. Bacterial Community Succession During in situ Uranium Bioremediation: Spatial Similarities Along Controlled Flow Paths

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Chiachi; Wu, Weimin; Gentry, Terry J.; Carley, Jack; Corbin, Gail A.; Carroll, Sue L.; Watson, David B.; Jardine, Phil M.; Zhou, Jizhong; Criddle, Craig S.; Fields, Matthew W.

    2009-05-22

    Bacterial community succession was investigated in a field-scale subsurface reactor formed by a series of wells that received weekly ethanol additions to re-circulating groundwater. Ethanol additions stimulated denitrification, metal reduction, sulfate reduction, and U(VI) reduction to sparingly soluble U(IV). Clone libraries of SSU rRNA gene sequences from groundwater samples enabled tracking of spatial and temporal changes over a 1.5 y period. Analyses showed that the communities changed in a manner consistent with geochemical variations that occurred along temporal and spatial scales. Canonical correspondence analysis revealed that the levels of nitrate, uranium, sulfide, sulfate, and ethanol strongly correlated with particular bacterial populations. As sulfate and U(VI) levels declined, sequences representative of sulfate-reducers and metal-reducers were detected at high levels. Ultimately, sequences associated with sulfate-reducing populations predominated, and sulfate levels declined as U(VI) remained at low levels. When engineering controls were compared to the population variation via canonical ordination, changes could be related to dissolved oxygen control and ethanol addition. The data also indicated that the indigenous populations responded differently to stimulation for bio-reduction; however, the two bio-stimulated communities became more similar after different transitions in an idiosyncratic manner. The strong associations between particular environmental variables and certain populations provide insight into the establishment of practical and successful remediation strategies in radionuclide-contaminated environments with respect to engineering controls and microbial ecology.

  13. Spatially controlled optogenetic light stimulation and recording platform via imaging fiber bundles (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suárez, Javier I.; Sengupta, Parijat; Mun, Jonathan; Iyer, Rajashekar; Rhodes, Justin; Gillette, Martha U.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2016-03-01

    Current methods for light delivery in in vivo optogenetic applications are typically accomplished via a single multimode fiber that diffuses light over a large area of the brain, and relies on the spatial distribution of transfected light-sensitive neurons for targeted control. In our investigations, an imaging fiber bundle (Schott) containing 4,500 individual fibers, each with a diameter of 7.5 µm, and an overall outer bundle diameter of 530 µm, served as a conduit for light delivery and optical recording/imaging. The use of this fiber bundle, in contrast to a single multimode fiber, allows for individually-addressable fibers, spatial selectivity at the stimulus site, more precise control of light delivery, and full field-of-view imaging and/or optical recordings of individual neurons in local neural circuits. An objective coupled the two continuous wave diode laser sources (561nm/488nm) (Coherent) for stimulation and imaging into the fiber bundle while a set of galvanometer-scanning mirrors was used to couple the light stimulus to distinct fibers within the proximal end of the imaging fiber bundle. In our study, C1V1(E122T/E162T)-TS-p2A-mCherry (Karl Deisseroth, Stanford) and GCaMP6s transgenic mice (Jackson Labs) were utilized for this all-optical approach. The results of our investigation demonstrate that imaging fiber bundles provide a new level of spatial selectivity and control of light delivery to specific neurons, as well as function as a conduit for optical imaging and recording at the in vivo site of stimulation, in contrast to the use of single multimode fibers that diffusely illuminate neural tissue and lack in vivo imaging capabilities.

  14. Active Control of Separation from the Slat Shoulder of a Supercritical Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pack, LaTunia G.; Schaeffler, Norman W.; Yao, Chung-Sheng; Seifert, Avi

    2002-01-01

    Active flow control in the form of zero-mass-flux excitation was applied at the slat shoulder of a simplified high-lift airfoil to delay flow separation. The NASA Energy Efficient Transport (EET) supercritical airfoil was equipped with a 15% chord simply hinged leading edge slat and a 25% chord simply hinged trailing edge flap. The cruise configuration data was successfully reproduced, repeating previous experiments. The effects of flap and slat deflection angles on the performance of the airfoil integral parameters were quantified. Detailed flow features were measured as well, in an attempt to identify optimal actuator placement. The measurements included: steady and unsteady model and tunnel wall pressures, wake surveys, arrays of surface hot-films, flow visualization and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). High frequency periodic excitation was applied to delay the occurrence of slat stall and improve the maximum lift by 10 to 15%. Low frequency amplitude modulation was used to reduce the oscillatory momentum coefficient by roughly 50% with similar aerodynamic performance.

  15. Superhydrophobic film fabricated by controlled microphase separation of PEO-PLA mixture and its transparence property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pi, Pihui; Mu, Wei; Fei, George; Deng, Yulin

    2013-05-01

    Instead of block copolymers that have been widely used in controlling thin film morphology, a mixture of two homopolymers has been used in this study to create desired nano- to microporous structure. By further modifying the nano-sized porous structured surface, a superhydrophobic surface was obtained. Experimentally, a chloroform solution containing a mixture of polylactic acid (PLA) and polyethylene oxide (PEO) was first coated on glass slides. Because of the dissimilarity of PLA and PEO, a microphase separation happened and the PEO formed microdomains in the coating layer during the film drying. Because PEO is water soluble but PLA is water-insoluble, the PEO microdomains could be washed out with water but PLA remained, resulted in a porous and rough PLA film. By two or three layer coating and washing, nano-sized roughness was obtained. A thin layer of fluorinated acrylic resin was further deposited on the rough surface. Because of the synergistic effect of surface roughness and hydrophobic, a superhydrophobicicity layer was obtained.

  16. What Controls the Rate of Ultrafast Charge Transfer and Charge Separation Efficiency in Organic Photovoltaic Blends.

    PubMed

    Jakowetz, Andreas C; Böhm, Marcus L; Zhang, Jiangbin; Sadhanala, Aditya; Huettner, Sven; Bakulin, Artem A; Rao, Akshay; Friend, Richard H

    2016-09-14

    In solar energy harvesting devices based on molecular semiconductors, such as organic photovoltaics (OPVs) and artificial photosynthetic systems, Frenkel excitons must be dissociated via charge transfer at heterojunctions to yield free charges. What controls the rate and efficiency of charge transfer and charge separation is an important question, as it determines the overall power conversion efficiency (PCE) of these systems. In bulk heterojunctions between polymer donor and fullerene acceptors, which provide a model system to understand the fundamental dynamics of electron transfer in molecular systems, it has been established that the first step of photoinduced electron transfer can be fast, of order 100 fs. But here we report the first study which correlates differences in the electron transfer rate with electronic structure and morphology, achieved with sub-20 fs time resolution pump-probe spectroscopy. We vary both the fullerene substitution and donor/fullerene ratio which allow us to control both aggregate size and the energetic driving force for charge transfer. We observe a range of electron transfer times from polymer to fullerene, from 240 fs to as short as 37 fs. Using ultrafast electro-optical pump-push-photocurrent spectroscopy, we find the yield of free versus bound charges to be weakly dependent on the energetic driving force, but to be very strongly dependent on fullerene aggregate size and packing. Our results point toward the importance of state accessibility and charge delocalization and suggest that energetic offsets between donor and acceptor levels are not an important criterion for efficient charge generation. This provides design rules for next-generation materials to minimize losses related to driving energy and boost PCE. PMID:27538341

  17. Separate elements control DJ and VDJ rearrangement in a transgenic recombination substrate.

    PubMed Central

    Ferrier, P; Krippl, B; Blackwell, T K; Furley, A J; Suh, H; Winoto, A; Cook, W D; Hood, L; Costantini, F; Alt, F W

    1990-01-01

    We describe transgenic mice that carry an antigen receptor gene minilocus comprised of germline T cell receptor (TCR) beta variable gene elements (V, D and J) linked to an immunoglobulin (Ig) C mu constant region gene with or without a DNA segment containing the Ig heavy chain transcriptional enhancer (E mu). Transgenic constructs lacking the E mu-containing segment did not undergo detectable rearrangement in any tissue of six independent transgenic lines. In contrast, transgenic constructs containing this DNA segment underwent rearrangement at high frequency in lymphoid tissues, but not other tissues, of four independent lines. Analyses of purified B and T cells, as well as B and T cell lines, from transgenic animals demonstrated that the E mu-containing segment within the construct allowed partial TCR gene assembly (D to J) in both B and T cells. However, complete TCR gene rearrangement within the construct (V to DJ) occurred only in T cells. Therefore, we have demonstrated elements that can control two separate aspects of TCR beta VDJ rearrangement within this construct. One lies within the E mu-containing DNA segment and represents a dominant, cis-acting element that initiates lymphoid cell-specific D beta to J beta rearrangement; various considerations suggest this activity may be related to that of the E mu element. The second element provides T cell-specific control of complete (V beta to DJ beta) variable region gene assembly; it correlates in activity with expression of the unrearranged V beta segment. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:2153073

  18. Sensor-based control in eddy current separation of incinerator bottom ash.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Md Abdur; Bakker, M C M

    2013-06-01

    A sensor unit was placed online in the particle stream produced by an eddy current separator (ECS) to investigate its functionality in non-ferrous metals recovery. The targeted feed was the 1-6mm size fraction bottom ash from a municipal waste incinerator. The sensor unit was attached to the ECS splitter, where it counted in real-time metal and mineral particles and accurately measured the grade of the stream in the metals product. Influence of segregation (e.g. due to particle size or density) on the metals concentrate were detected and studied using the sensor data collected at different splitter distances. Tests were performed in the laboratory and in a bottom ash processing plant with two different types of ECS and two sources of bottom ash with different moisture content. The measured metal grades matched the manual analyses with errors 0%, 1.5% and 3.1% for moist, dry and very wet feed, respectively. For very wet feed the ECS metals recovery dropped, which was observed from the strongly reduced particle counts and the large changes in cumulative particle properties. The measured sample proved representative for the whole metals concentrate if it is collected at a representative position within the metals particle trajectory fan produced by the ECS. ECS-performance proved sensitively dependent on splitter distance, since a 10mm shift may result in 10% change in metal recovery and 18% change in grade. The main functionalities of the sensor unit are determined as online quality control and facilitation of automatic control over the ECS splitter distance. These functionalities translate in significant improvements in ECS metals recovery which in turn is linked to economic benefits, increased recycling rate of scrap metals and a further reduction of the ecological drawbacks of incinerator bottom ash. PMID:23490354

  19. Turbulent separated shear flow control by surface plasma actuator: experimental optimization by genetic algorithm approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benard, N.; Pons-Prats, J.; Periaux, J.; Bugeda, G.; Braud, P.; Bonnet, J. P.; Moreau, E.

    2016-02-01

    The potential benefits of active flow control are no more debated. Among many others applications, flow control provides an effective mean for manipulating turbulent separated flows. Here, a nonthermal surface plasma discharge (dielectric barrier discharge) is installed at the step corner of a backward-facing step ( U 0 = 15 m/s, Re h = 30,000, Re θ = 1650). Wall pressure sensors are used to estimate the reattaching location downstream of the step (objective function #1) and also to measure the wall pressure fluctuation coefficients (objective function #2). An autonomous multi-variable optimization by genetic algorithm is implemented in an experiment for optimizing simultaneously the voltage amplitude, the burst frequency and the duty cycle of the high-voltage signal producing the surface plasma discharge. The single-objective optimization problems concern alternatively the minimization of the objective function #1 and the maximization of the objective function #2. The present paper demonstrates that when coupled with the plasma actuator and the wall pressure sensors, the genetic algorithm can find the optimum forcing conditions in only a few generations. At the end of the iterative search process, the minimum reattaching position is achieved by forcing the flow at the shear layer mode where a large spreading rate is obtained by increasing the periodicity of the vortex street and by enhancing the vortex pairing process. The objective function #2 is maximized for an actuation at half the shear layer mode. In this specific forcing mode, time-resolved PIV shows that the vortex pairing is reduced and that the strong fluctuations of the wall pressure coefficients result from the periodic passages of flow structures whose size corresponds to the height of the step model.

  20. Control of domain wall thickness by spatial modulation of uniaxial anisotropy and exchange stiffness parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, Hiroko; Imamura, Hiroshi

    2015-03-01

    The effect of spatial modulation of the uniaxial anisotropy (K) and exchange stiffness (A) parameters on the domain wall thickness was theoretically studied. We derived the Euler-Lagrange equation and the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation considering the modulation of K and A, and showed that the modulation of A gives rise to an additional term consisting of the first derivatives of A and the magnetization unit vector. Owing to this term, the modulation of A is more effective to modify the domain wall thickness than K. The condition for domain wall pinning by controlling its thickness through the modulation of K and A was also obtained.

  1. 2D spatially controlled polymer micro patterning for cellular behavior studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinca, V.; Palla-Papavlu, A.; Paraico, I.; Lippert, T.; Wokaun, A.; Dinescu, M.

    2011-04-01

    A simple and effective method to functionalize glass surfaces that enable polymer micropatterning and subsequent spatially controlled adhesion of cells is reported in this paper. The method involves the application of laser induced forward transfer (LIFT) to achieve polymer patterning in a single step onto cell repellent substrates (i.e. polyethyleneglycol (PEG)). This approach was used to produce micron-size polyethyleneimine (PEI)-patterns alternating with cell-repellent areas. The focus of this work is the ability of SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells to orient, migrate, and produce organized cellular arrangements on laser generated PEI patterns.

  2. Image Processing and control of a programmable spatial light modulator for optic damage protection

    SciTech Connect

    Awwal, A; Leach, R; Brunton, G; Tse, E; Matone, J; Heebner, J

    2010-12-06

    The heart of the National Ignition Facility is a megajoule-class laser system consisting of 192 beams used to drive inertial confinement fusion reactions. A recently installed system of programmable, liquid-crystal-based spatial light modulators adds the capability of arbitrarily shaping the spatial beam profiles in order to enhance operational flexibility. Its primary intended use is for introducing 'blocker' obscurations shadowing isolated flaws on downstream optical elements that would otherwise be damaged by high fluence laser illumination. Because an improperly shaped blocker pattern can lead to equipment damage, both the position and shape of the obscurations must be carefully verified prior to high-fluence operations. An automatic alignment algorithm is used to perform detection and estimation of the imposed blocker centroid positions compared to their intended locations. Furthermore, in order to minimize the spatially-varying nonlinear response of the device, a calibration of the local magnification is performed at multiple sub-image locations. In this paper, we describe the control and associated image processing of this device that helps to enhance the safety and longevity of the overall system.

  3. Spatial Data Quality Control Procedure applied to the Okavango Basin Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butchart-Kuhlmann, Daniel

    2014-05-01

    Spatial data is a powerful form of information, capable of providing information of great interest and tremendous use to a variety of users. However, much like other data representing the 'real world', precision and accuracy must be high for the results of data analysis to be deemed reliable and thus applicable to real world projects and undertakings. The spatial data quality control (QC) procedure presented here was developed as the topic of a Master's thesis, in the sphere of and using data from the Okavango Basin Information System (OBIS), itself a part of The Future Okavango (TFO) project. The aim of the QC procedure was to form the basis of a method through which to determine the quality of spatial data relevant for application to hydrological, solute, and erosion transport modelling using the Jena Adaptable Modelling System (JAMS). As such, the quality of all data present in OBIS classified under the topics of elevation, geoscientific information, or inland waters, was evaluated. Since the initial data quality has been evaluated, efforts are underway to correct the errors found, thus improving the quality of the dataset.

  4. Centrifugal separation of antiprotons and electrons.

    PubMed

    Gabrielse, G; Kolthammer, W S; McConnell, R; Richerme, P; Wrubel, J; Kalra, R; Novitski, E; Grzonka, D; Oelert, W; Sefzick, T; Zielinski, M; Borbely, J S; Fitzakerley, D; George, M C; Hessels, E A; Storry, C H; Weel, M; Müllers, A; Walz, J; Speck, A

    2010-11-19

    Centrifugal separation of antiprotons and electrons is observed, the first such demonstration with particles that cannot be laser cooled or optically imaged. The spatial separation takes place during the electron cooling of trapped antiprotons, the only method available to produce cryogenic antiprotons for precision tests of fundamental symmetries and for cold antihydrogen studies. The centrifugal separation suggests a new approach for isolating low energy antiprotons and for producing a controlled mixture of antiprotons and electrons. PMID:21231298

  5. Centrifugal Separation of Antiprotons and Electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Gabrielse, G.; Kolthammer, W. S.; McConnell, R.; Richerme, P.; Wrubel, J.; Kalra, R.; Novitski, E.; Grzonka, D.; Oelert, W.; Zielinski, M.; Sefzick, T.; Borbely, J. S.; Fitzakerley, D.; George, M. C.; Hessels, E. A.; Storry, C. H.; Weel, M.; Muellers, A.; Walz, J.; Speck, A.

    2010-11-19

    Centrifugal separation of antiprotons and electrons is observed, the first such demonstration with particles that cannot be laser cooled or optically imaged. The spatial separation takes place during the electron cooling of trapped antiprotons, the only method available to produce cryogenic antiprotons for precision tests of fundamental symmetries and for cold antihydrogen studies. The centrifugal separation suggests a new approach for isolating low energy antiprotons and for producing a controlled mixture of antiprotons and electrons.

  6. Debris spatial density dependence on control volume resolution in the geosynchronous environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, H. G.; Swinerd, G. G.; Martin, C. E.; Smith, D. A. J.

    The debris environment of the Earth can be characterised using spatial density within the cells, or bins, of a spherical control volume, which has dimensions of geocentric radius (altitude), declination and right ascension. The characterisation of the debris environment in this way allows model predictions and measurement data from the USSTRATCOM catalogue, radar and returned surfaces to be compared. In addition, the volume-centred approach enables semi-deterministic models to compute debris fluxes relative to given target spacecraft orbits, provided the volume cells are of sufficiently high resolution. In this way semi-deterministic models employ the spatial density representation of the debris environment to predict future collision events and the future environment. The determination of debris spatial density for discrete sectors of near-Earth space is an integral part of the semi-deterministic models, IDES (Integrated Debris Evolution Suite), LEGEND (LEO-to-GEO Environment Debris model) and DAMAGE (Debris Analysis and Monitoring Architecture for the Geosynchronous Environment). Comparative model studies for the Inter-Agency Space Debris Coordination Committee (IADC) utilise an agreed baseline incorporating the sizes of control volume cells but the sensitivity to the choice of these sizes has not been previously explored due to the computational expense involved. The results of two such sensitivity studies performed using DAMAGE are presented in this paper. DAMAGE characterized the current debris environment by simulating the debris source (launch and fragmentations only) and sink processes for objects larger than 10 cm from the beginning of the space age to May 2001. The simulated environment in the altitude range 35,000 km to 36,800 km was found to be generally consistent with the equivalent historical evolution performed using IDES and the two-line element (TLE) catalogue. Results from the sensitivity studies suggest that computed spatial densities are stable

  7. Learning of Temporal and Spatial Movement Aspects: A Comparison of Four Types of Haptic Control and Concurrent Visual Feedback.

    PubMed

    Rauter, Georg; Sigrist, Roland; Riener, Robert; Wolf, Peter

    2015-01-01

    In literature, the effectiveness of haptics for motor learning is controversially discussed. Haptics is believed to be effective for motor learning in general; however, different types of haptic control enhance different movement aspects. Thus, in dependence on the movement aspects of interest, one type of haptic control may be effective whereas another one is not. Therefore, in the current work, it was investigated if and how different types of haptic controllers affect learning of spatial and temporal movement aspects. In particular, haptic controllers that enforce active participation of the participants were expected to improve spatial aspects. Only haptic controllers that provide feedback about the task's velocity profile were expected to improve temporal aspects. In a study on learning a complex trunk-arm rowing task, the effect of training with four different types of haptic control was investigated: position control, path control, adaptive path control, and reactive path control. A fifth group (control) trained with visual concurrent augmented feedback. As hypothesized, the position controller was most effective for learning of temporal movement aspects, while the path controller was most effective in teaching spatial movement aspects of the rowing task. Visual feedback was also effective for learning temporal and spatial movement aspects. PMID:25974949

  8. Adaptive optimal control of highly dissipative nonlinear spatially distributed processes with neuro-dynamic programming.

    PubMed

    Luo, Biao; Wu, Huai-Ning; Li, Han-Xiong

    2015-04-01

    Highly dissipative nonlinear partial differential equations (PDEs) are widely employed to describe the system dynamics of industrial spatially distributed processes (SDPs). In this paper, we consider the optimal control problem of the general highly dissipative SDPs, and propose an adaptive optimal control approach based on neuro-dynamic programming (NDP). Initially, Karhunen-Loève decomposition is employed to compute empirical eigenfunctions (EEFs) of the SDP based on the method of snapshots. These EEFs together with singular perturbation technique are then used to obtain a finite-dimensional slow subsystem of ordinary differential equations that accurately describes the dominant dynamics of the PDE system. Subsequently, the optimal control problem is reformulated on the basis of the slow subsystem, which is further converted to solve a Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman (HJB) equation. HJB equation is a nonlinear PDE that has proven to be impossible to solve analytically. Thus, an adaptive optimal control method is developed via NDP that solves the HJB equation online using neural network (NN) for approximating the value function; and an online NN weight tuning law is proposed without requiring an initial stabilizing control policy. Moreover, by involving the NN estimation error, we prove that the original closed-loop PDE system with the adaptive optimal control policy is semiglobally uniformly ultimately bounded. Finally, the developed method is tested on a nonlinear diffusion-convection-reaction process and applied to a temperature cooling fin of high-speed aerospace vehicle, and the achieved results show its effectiveness. PMID:25794375

  9. Formation of binary phase gratings in photopolymer-liquid crystal composites by a surface-controlled anisotropic phase separation

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jae-Hong; Khoo, Iam Choon; Yu, Chang-Jae; Jung, Min-Sik; Lee, Sin-Doo

    2005-01-10

    We report on formation of binary phase gratings in photopolymer-liquid crystal (PLC) composites using a surface-controlled phase separation method. The binary nature of the PLC phase gratings is produced by employing a single step photo-ablation through an amplitude photomask which precisely controls the interfacial interactions between the LC and the photopolymer on the alignment layer. A subsequent illumination of the ultraviolet light onto the whole PLC promotes an anisotropic phase separation resulting in the formation of distinct binary patterns for the PLC structure. The electrically tunable diffraction properties of the binary phase gratings are presented.

  10. The Role of Spatially Controlled Cell Proliferation in Limb Bud Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Boehm, Bernd; Westerberg, Henrik; Lesnicar-Pucko, Gaja; Raja, Sahdia; Rautschka, Michael; Cotterell, James; Swoger, Jim; Sharpe, James

    2010-01-01

    Although the vertebrate limb bud has been studied for decades as a model system for spatial pattern formation and cell specification, the cellular basis of its distally oriented elongation has been a relatively neglected topic by comparison. The conventional view is that a gradient of isotropic proliferation exists along the limb, with high proliferation rates at the distal tip and lower rates towards the body, and that this gradient is the driving force behind outgrowth. Here we test this hypothesis by combining quantitative empirical data sets with computer modelling to assess the potential role of spatially controlled proliferation rates in the process of directional limb bud outgrowth. In particular, we generate two new empirical data sets for the mouse hind limb—a numerical description of shape change and a quantitative 3D map of cell cycle times—and combine these with a new 3D finite element model of tissue growth. By developing a parameter optimization approach (which explores spatial patterns of tissue growth) our computer simulations reveal that the observed distribution of proliferation rates plays no significant role in controlling the distally extending limb shape, and suggests that directional cell activities are likely to be the driving force behind limb bud outgrowth. This theoretical prediction prompted us to search for evidence of directional cell orientations in the limb bud mesenchyme, and we thus discovered a striking highly branched and extended cell shape composed of dynamically extending and retracting filopodia, a distally oriented bias in Golgi position, and also a bias in the orientation of cell division. We therefore provide both theoretical and empirical evidence that limb bud elongation is achieved by directional cell activities, rather than a PD gradient of proliferation rates. PMID:20644711

  11. Spatial control of calcineurin in response to heat shock in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Higa, Mari; Kita, Ayako; Hagihara, Kanako; Kitai, Yuki; Doi, Akira; Nagasoko, Rie; Satoh, Ryosuke; Sugiura, Reiko

    2015-02-01

    In fission yeast, Ppb1, the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase calcineurin regulates multiple biological processes, such as cytokinesis, Ca2+-homeostasis, membrane trafficking and cell wall integrity. Calcineurin dephosphorylates the Prz1 transcription factor, leading to its nuclear translocation and gene expression under the control of CDRE (calcineurin-dependent response element). Although the calcineurin-mediated spatial control of downstream transcription factors has been intensively studied in many organisms, less is known about the spatial regulation of calcineurin on stresses. Here, we show that heat shock stimulates calcineurin-dependent nuclear translocation of Prz1 and CDRE-dependent gene expression. Notably, calcineurin exhibited a dramatic change in subcellular localization, translocating from diffuse cytoplasmic to dot-like structures on heat shock. The calcineurin dots colocalized with Dcp2 or Pabp, the constituent of P-bodies or stress granules, respectively, thus suggesting that calcineurin is a component of RNA granules under heat shock. Importantly, the calcineurin inhibitor FK506 markedly inhibited the accumulation of calcineurin granules, whereas the constitutively active calcineurin strongly accumulated in the granules on heat shock, suggesting that phosphatase activity is important for calcineurin localization. Notably, the depletion of calcineurin induced a rapid appearance of Nrd1- and Pabp-positive RNA granules. The possible roles of calcineurin in response to heat shock will be discussed. PMID:25529221

  12. Detecting defective electrical components in heterogeneous infra-red images by spatial control charts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamshidieini, Bahman; Fazaee, Reza

    2016-05-01

    Distribution network components connect machines and other loads to electrical sources. If resistance or current of any component is more than specified range, its temperature may exceed the operational limit which can cause major problems. Therefore, these defects should be found and eliminated according to their severity. Although infra-red cameras have been used for inspection of electrical components, maintenance prioritization of distribution cubicles is mostly based on personal perception and lack of training data prevents engineers from developing image processing methods. New research on the spatial control chart encouraged us to use statistical approaches instead of the pattern recognition for the image processing. In the present study, a new scanning pattern which can tolerate heavy autocorrelation among adjacent pixels within infra-red image was developed and for the first time combination of kernel smoothing, spatial control charts and local robust regression were used for finding defects within heterogeneous infra-red images of old distribution cubicles. This method does not need training data and this advantage is crucially important when the training data is not available.

  13. Spatial control of cell fate using synthetic surfaces to potentiate TGF-β signaling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lingyin; Klim, Joseph R.; Derda, Ratmir; Courtney, Adam H.; Kiessling, Laura L.

    2011-01-01

    In organisms, cell-fate decisions result from external cues presented by the extracellular microenvironment or the niche. In principle, synthetic niches can be engineered to give rise to patterned cell signaling, an advance that would transform the fields of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Biomaterials that display adhesive motifs are critical steps in this direction, but promoting localized signaling remains a major obstacle. We sought to exert precise spatial control over activation of TGF-β signaling. TGF-β signaling, which plays fundamental roles in development, tissue homeostasis, and cancer, is initiated by receptor oligomerization. We therefore hypothesized that preorganizing the transmembrane receptors would potentiate local TGF-β signaling. To generate surfaces that would nucleate the signaling complex, we employed defined self-assembled monolayers that present peptide ligands to TGF-β receptors. These displays of nondiffusible ligands do not compete with the growth factor but rather sensitize bound cells to subpicomolar concentrations of endogenous TGF-β. Cells adhering to the surfaces undergo TGF-β-mediated growth arrest and the epithelial to mesenchymal transition. Gene expression profiles reveal that the surfaces selectively regulate TGF-β responsive genes. This strategy provides access to tailored surfaces that can deliver signals with spatial control. PMID:21719709

  14. What tors tell us about controls on bedrock jointing and spatial variability in regolith formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroeven, Arjen; Goodfellow, Bradley; Skelton, Alasdair; Martel, Steve; Jansson, Krister; Hättestrand, Clas

    2013-04-01

    Tors are striking features of many granitic landscapes that offer windows into processes of regolith formation that otherwise frequently remain inaccessible. In this study, we combine measurements of tor volumes, joint spacing, feldspar, quartz and biotite crystal lengths, and ground surface convexities with geochemical analyses to determine petrological and structural controls on differential weathering and the formation of granitic regolith and tors in the Cairngorm Mountains, Scotland. Our results show that the tors have formed in spatially defined kernels of widely jointed, relatively coarse grained granite surrounded by finer grained, more densely jointed granite, in which regolith mantles have developed. It further appears that this wide joint spacing was largely established by slow cooling of intruded melts, thereby revealing a control on bedrock joint spacing, and subsequent rates of regolith formation, that is little recognized in geomorphology. Sheet jointing is variably developed in the Cairngorms tors, with better developed sheet jointing on relatively high convexity surfaces. This variability strongly influences tor morphologies and indicates that the regional compressive stresses necessary for the formation of sheet jointing were of lower magnitude than in locations where sheet jointing displays less spatial variability, such as in the Sierra Nevada mountains of California. Although the source of this compressive stress remains uncertain, the presence of sheet jointing reaffirms that the Cairngorm tors have likely emerged from a thin regolith. This important implication of sheet jointing has been previously unrecognized in the tor literature and probably also applies to sheeted tors elsewhere. The location of tors in coarse grained granites, characterized by wide joint spacing but high matrix effective porosity, and regolith on finer grained granites, characterized by more closely spaced joints and lower matrix effective porosity, highlights the

  15. Time-resolved and spatially-resolved infrared spectroscopic observation of seeded nucleation controlling geopolymer gel formation.

    PubMed

    Hajimohammadi, Ailar; Provis, John L; van Deventer, Jannie S J

    2011-05-15

    The effect of seeded nucleation on the formation and structural evolution of one-part ("just add water") geopolymer gels is investigated. Gel-forming systems are seeded with each of three different oxide nanoparticles, and seeding is shown to have an important role in controlling the silica release rate from the solid geothermal silica precursor, and in the development of physical properties of the gels. Nucleation accelerates the chemical changes taking place during geopolymer formation. The nature of the seeds affects the structure of the growing gel by affecting the extent of phase separation, identified by the presence of a distinct silica-rich gel in addition to the main, more alumina-rich gel phase. Synchrotron radiation-based infrared microscopy (SR-FTIR) shows the effect of nucleation on the heterogeneous nanostructure and microstructure of geopolymer gels, and is combined with data obtained by time-resolved FTIR analysis to provide a more holistic view of the reaction processes at a level of detail that has not previously been available. While spatially averaged (ATR-FTIR) infrared results show similar spectra for seeded and unseeded samples which have been cured for more than 3 weeks, SR-FTIR results show marked differences in gel structure as a result of seeding. PMID:21397245

  16. Proposed use of spatial mortality assessments as part of the pesticide evaluation scheme for vector control

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The WHO Pesticide Evaluation Scheme to evaluate the efficacy of insecticides does not include the testing of a lethal effect at a distance. A tool was developed to evaluate the spatial mortality of an insecticide product against adult mosquitoes at a distance under laboratory and field conditions. Operational implications are discussed. Methods Insecticide paint, Inesfly 5A IGR™, containing two organophosphates (OPs): chlorpyrifos and diazinon, and one insect growth regulator (IGR): pyriproxyfen, was the product tested. Laboratory tests were performed using “distance boxes” with surfaces treated with one layer of control or insecticide paint at a dose of 1 kg/6 sq m. Field tests were conducted up to 12 months in six experimental huts randomly allocated to control or one or two layers of insecticide paint at 1 kg/6 sq m. All distance tests were performed using reference-susceptible strains of Anopheles gambiae and Culex quinquefasciatus left overnight at a distance of 1 m from control or treated surfaces. Results After an overnight exposition at distances of 1 m, field and laboratory evaluations at 0 months after treatment (T0) yielded 100% mortality rates on surfaces treated with one layer at 1 kg/6 sq m against susceptible strains of An. gambiae and Cx. quinquefasciatus. Testing for long-term efficacy in the field gave mortality rates of 96-100% after an overnight exposition at a distance of 1 m for up to 12 months in huts where a larger volume was treated (walls and ceilings) with one or two layers of insecticide paint. Conclusion A comprehensive evaluation of the full profile of insecticide products, both upon contact and spatially, may help rationalize vector control efforts more efficiently. Treating a large enough volume may extend a product’s mortality efficacy in the long-term, which contact tests would fail to assess. It is hereby proposed to explore the development of cost effective methods to assess spatial mortality and to

  17. Factors controlling spatial distribution patterns of biocrusts in a heterogeneous and topographically complex semiarid area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamizo, Sonia; Rodríguez-Caballero, Emilio; Roncero, Beatriz; Raúl Román, José; Cantón, Yolanda

    2016-04-01

    Biocrusts are widespread soil components in drylands all over the world. They are known to play key roles in the functioning of these regions by fixing carbon and nitrogen, regulating hydrological processes, and preventing from water and wind erosion, thus reducing the loss of soil resources and increasing soil fertility. The rate and magnitude of services provided by biocrusts greatly depend on their composition and developmental stage. Late-successional biocrusts such as lichens and mosses have higher carbon and nitrogen fixation rates, and confer greater protection against erosion and the loss of sediments and nutrients than early-successional algae and cyanobacteria biocrusts. Knowledge of spatial distribution patterns of different biocrust types and the factors that control their distribution is important to assess ecosystem services provided by biocrusts at large spatial scales and to improve modelling of biogeochemical processes and water and carbon balance in drylands. Some of the factors that condition biocrust cover and composition are incoming solar radiation, terrain attributes, vegetation distribution patterns, microclimatic variables and soil properties such as soil pH, texture, soil organic matter, soil nutrients and gypsum and CaCO3 content. However, the factors that govern biocrust distribution may vary from one site to another depending on site characteristics. In this study, we examined the influence of abiotic attributes on the spatial distribution of biocrust types in a complex heterogeneous badland system (Tabernas, SE Spain) where biocrust cover up to 50% of the soil surface. From the analysis of relationships between terrain attributes and proportional abundance of biocrust types, it was found that topography exerted a main control on the spatial distribution of biocrust types in this area. SW-facing slopes were dominated by physical soil crusts and were practically devoid of vegetation and biocrusts. Biocrusts mainly occupied the pediments

  18. Mechanisms for laminar separated-flow control using dielectric-barrier-discharge plasma actuator at low Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Makoto; Nonomura, Taku; Okada, Koichi; Asada, Kengo; Aono, Hikaru; Yakeno, Aiko; Abe, Yoshiaki; Fujii, Kozo

    2015-11-01

    Large-eddy simulations have been conducted to investigate the mechanisms of separated-flow control using a dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuator at a low Reynolds number. In the present study, the mechanisms are classified according to the means of momentum injection to the boundary layer. The separated flow around the NACA 0015 airfoil at a Reynolds number of 63 000 is used as the base flow for separation control. Both normal and burst mode actuations are adopted in separation control. The burst frequency non-dimensionalized by the freestream velocity and the chord length (F+) is varied from 0.25 to 25, and we discuss the control mechanism through the comparison of the aerodynamic performance and controlled flow-fields in each normal and burst case. Lift and drag coefficients are significantly improved for the cases of F+ = 1, 5, and 15 due to flow reattachment associated with a laminar-separation bubble. Frequency and linear stability analyses indicate that the F+ = 5 and 15 cases effectively excite the natural unstable frequency at the separated shear layer, which is caused by the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. This excitation results in earlier flow reattachment due to earlier turbulent transition. Furthermore, the Reynolds stress decomposition is conducted in order to identify the means of momentum entrainment resulted from large-scale spanwise vortical structure or small-scale turbulent vortices. For the cases with flow reattachment, the large-scale spanwise vortices, which shed from the separated shear layer through plasma actuation, significantly increase the periodic component of the Reynolds stress near the leading edge. These large-scale vortices collapse to small-scale turbulent vortices, and the turbulent component of the Reynolds stress increases around the large-scale vortices. In these cases, although the combination of momentum entrainment by both Reynolds stress components results in flow reattachment, the dominant component is identified as

  19. Performance of a linear robust control strategy on a nonlinear model of spatially developing flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauga, Eric; Bewley, Thomas R.

    2004-08-01

    This paper investigates the control of self-excited oscillations in spatially developing flow systems such as jets and wakes using {mathcal H}_{infty} control theory on a complex Ginzburg Landau (CGL) model. The coefficients used in this one-dimensional equation, which serves as a simple model of the evolution of hydrodynamic instability waves, are those selected by Roussopoulos & Monkewitz (Physica D 1996, vol. 97, p. 264) to model the behaviour of the near-wake of a circular cylinder. Based on noisy measurements at a point sensor typically located inside the cylinder wake, the compensator uses a linear {mathcal H}_{infty} filter based on the CGL model to construct a state estimate. This estimate is then used to compute linear {mathcal H}_{infty} control feedback at a point actuator location, which is typically located upstream of the sensor. The goal of the control scheme is to stabilize the system by minimizing a weighted average of the ‘system response’ and the ‘control effort’ while rigorously bounding the response of the controlled linear system to external disturbances. The application of such modern control and estimation rules stabilizes the linear CGL system at Reynolds numbers far above the critical Reynolds number Re_c {≈} 47 at which linear global instability appears in the uncontrolled system. In so doing, many unstable modes of the uncontrolled CGL system are linearly stabilized by the single actuator/sensor pair and the model-based feedback control strategy. Further, the linear performance of the closed-loop system, in terms of the relevant transfer function norms quantifying the linear response of the controlled system to external disturbances, is substantially improved beyond that possible with the simple proportional measurement feedback proposed in previous studies. Above Re {≈} 84, the {mathcal H}_{infty} control designs significantly outperform the corresponding {mathcal H}_2 control designs in terms of their ability to stabilize

  20. Separate mechanisms for magnitude and order processing in the spatial-numerical association of response codes (SNARC) effect: The strange case of musical note values.

    PubMed

    Prpic, Valter; Fumarola, Antonia; De Tommaso, Matteo; Luccio, Riccardo; Murgia, Mauro; Agostini, Tiziano

    2016-08-01

    The spatial-numerical association of response codes (SNARC) effect is considered an evidence of the association between numbers and space, with faster left key-press responses to small numbers and faster right key-press responses to large numbers. We examined whether visually presented note values produce a SNARC-like effect. Differently from numbers, note values are represented as a decreasing left-to-right progression, allowing us to disambiguate the contribution of order and magnitude in determining the direction of the effect. Musicians with formal education performed a note value comparison in Experiment 1 (direct task), a line orientation judgment in Experiment 2 (indirect task), and a detection task in Experiment 3 (indirect task). When note values were task relevant (direct task), participants responded faster to large note values with the left key-press, and vice versa. Conversely, when note values were task irrelevant (indirect tasks), the direction of this association was reversed. This evidence suggests the existence of separate mechanisms underlying the SNARC effect. Namely, an Order-Related Mechanism (ORM) and a Magnitude-Related Mechanism (MRM) that are revealed by different task demands. Indeed, according to a new model we proposed, ordinal and magnitude related information appears to be preferentially involved in direct and indirect tasks, respectively. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26950384

  1. Spatial separation of photo-generated electron-hole pairs in BiOBr/BiOI bilayer to facilitate water splitting

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Zhen-Kun; Yin, Wen-Jin; Le Zhang; Wen, Bo; Zhang, Deng-Yu; Liu, Li-Min; Lau, Woon-Ming

    2016-01-01

    The electronic structures and photocatalytic properties of bismuth oxyhalide bilayers (BiOX1/BiOX2, X1 and X2 are Cl, Br, I) are studied by density functional theory. Briefly, their compositionally tunable bandgaps range from 1.85 to 3.41 eV, suitable for sun-light absorption, and all bilayers have band-alignments good for photocatalytic water-splitting. Among them, heterogeneous BiOBr/BiOI bilayer is the best as it has the smallest bandgap. More importantly, photo-excitation of BiOBr/BiOI leads to electron supply to the conduction band minimum with localized states belonging mainly to bismuth of BiOBr where the H+/H2 half-reaction of water-splitting can be sustained. Meanwhile, holes generated by such photo-excitation are mainly derived from the iodine states of BiOI in the valence band maximum; thus, the O2/H2O half-reaction of water splitting is facilitated on BiOI. Detailed band-structure analysis also indicates that this intriguing spatial separation of photo-generated electron-hole pairs and the two half-reactions of water splitting are good for a wide photo-excitation spectrum from 2–5 eV; as such, BiOBr/BiOI bilayer can be an efficient photocatalyst for water-splitting, particularly with further optimization of its optical absorptivity. PMID:27585548

  2. Spatial separation of photo-generated electron-hole pairs in BiOBr/BiOI bilayer to facilitate water splitting.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhen-Kun; Yin, Wen-Jin; Le Zhang; Wen, Bo; Zhang, Deng-Yu; Liu, Li-Min; Lau, Woon-Ming

    2016-01-01

    The electronic structures and photocatalytic properties of bismuth oxyhalide bilayers (BiOX1/BiOX2, X1 and X2 are Cl, Br, I) are studied by density functional theory. Briefly, their compositionally tunable bandgaps range from 1.85 to 3.41 eV, suitable for sun-light absorption, and all bilayers have band-alignments good for photocatalytic water-splitting. Among them, heterogeneous BiOBr/BiOI bilayer is the best as it has the smallest bandgap. More importantly, photo-excitation of BiOBr/BiOI leads to electron supply to the conduction band minimum with localized states belonging mainly to bismuth of BiOBr where the H(+)/H2 half-reaction of water-splitting can be sustained. Meanwhile, holes generated by such photo-excitation are mainly derived from the iodine states of BiOI in the valence band maximum; thus, the O2/H2O half-reaction of water splitting is facilitated on BiOI. Detailed band-structure analysis also indicates that this intriguing spatial separation of photo-generated electron-hole pairs and the two half-reactions of water splitting are good for a wide photo-excitation spectrum from 2-5 eV; as such, BiOBr/BiOI bilayer can be an efficient photocatalyst for water-splitting, particularly with further optimization of its optical absorptivity. PMID:27585548

  3. Evaluation of a novel noncontact spectrally and spatially resolved reflectance setup with continuously variable source-detector separation using silicone phantoms.

    PubMed

    Andree, Stefan; Reble, Carina; Helfmann, Jurgen; Gersonde, Ingo; Illing, Gerd

    2010-01-01

    We present a new variant of a noncontact, oblique incidence spatially resolved reflectance setup. The continuously variable source detector separation enables adaptation to high and low albedo samples. Absorption (μ(a)) and reduced scattering coefficients (μ(') (s)) are determined in the wavelength range of 400-1000 nm using a lookup table, calculated by a Monte Carlo simulation of the light transport. The method is characterized by an silicone phantom study covering a wide parameter range 0.01 mm(-1) ≤ μ(a) ≤ 2.5 mm(-1) and 0.2 mm(-1) ≤ μ(') (s) ≤ 10 mm(-1), which includes the optical parameters of tissue in the visible and near infrared. The influence of the incident angle and the detection aperture on the simulated remission was examined. Using perpendicular incidence and 90-deg detection aperture in the Monte Carlo simulation in contrast to the experimental situation with 30-deg incidence and 4.6-deg detection aperture is shown to be valid for the parameter range μ(') (s) > 1 mm(-1) and μ(a) < 1.2 mm(-1). A Mie calculation is presented, showing that a decreasing reduced scattering coefficient for increasing absorption can be the consequence of real physics instead of cross talk. PMID:21198213

  4. Control of a Separation bubble at Low Reynolds Numbers Using Electro-Active Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell'Orso, Haley; Chang, Lucia; Zaremski, Sarah; Demauro, Edward; Leong, Chia; Amitay, Michael

    2013-11-01

    An experimental investigation was performed to study the effects of electro-active polymers (EAPs) on a 3-dimensional separation bubble on a two-dimensional NACA0009 airfoil at a Reynolds number of 20,000 and an angle of attack 5 deg. A single row of EAPs was placed at 20% chord and activated at 1500V and 50Hz, corresponding to the Kelvin-Helmholtz frequency of the separated mixing layer. Stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry data were collected in the vicinity of the EAPs for three cases: baseline (no EAP present), EAP present but not actuated, and EAP present and actuated. Data demonstrated that the presence of the EAP slightly reduced the magnitude of the separation bubble. When the EAPs were actuated at the chosen frequency and voltage, the separation bubble was almost completely mitigated.

  5. In Search of the Sources of Psychologically Controlling Parenting: The Role of Parental Separation Anxiety and Parental Maladaptive Perfectionism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soenens, Bart; Vansteenkiste, Maarten; Duriez, Bart; Goossens, Luc

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated the role of two dimensions of parental separation anxiety--Anxiety about Adolescent Distancing (AAD) and Comfort with Secure Base Role (CSBR)--and parental maladaptive perfectionism in the prediction of psychologically controlling parenting. In a sample of middle adolescents and their parents (N=677), it was found that…

  6. Photocatalytic reforming of glucose under visible light over morphology controlled Cu2O: efficient charge separation by crystal facet engineering.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Longzhou; Shi, Jinwen; Liu, Maochang; Jing, Dengwei; Guo, Liejin

    2014-01-01

    Multifaceted Cu2O with controlled crystal facet exposure was synthesized via a facile one-step method. It was found that photogenerated electrons prefer to accumulate on high index planes, while holes tend to migrate to {100} facets of a Cu2O polyhedron, leading to efficient charge separation and enhanced photocatalytic reforming of glucose. PMID:24217641

  7. Control of Shock-Induced Boundary Layer Separation by using Pulsed Plasma Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, Benton R.; Clemens, Noel T.; Micka, Daniel

    2012-11-01

    Shock-induced turbulent boundary layer separation can have many detrimental effects in supersonic flow including flow instability, fatigue of structural panels, and unstart in supersonic inlets. Pulsed plasma jets (or ``spark jets''), which are characterized by high bandwidth and the ability to direct momentum into the flow, are one promising method of reducing shock-induced separation. The current study is focused on investigating the efficacy of plasma jets to reduce the separated flow induced by a compression ramp in a Mach 3 flow. Three different 3-jet actuator configurations are tested: 20° pitched, 45° pitched, and 22° pitched and 45° skewed. The jets are pulsed at frequencies between 2 kHz and 4 kHz with duty cycles between 5 and 15%. The shock wave is generated using a 20° compression ramp, and the location of the shock-induced separation is visualized using surface oil streak visualization as well as particle image velocimetry. The results of the study show that of the three configurations, the plasma jets pitched at 20° from the streamwise direction cause the greatest reduction in separation, and when pulsed at a frequency of 3.2 kHz and 12% duty cycle can reduce the size of the separation region by up to 40%. This work is supported by AFRL under SBIR contract.

  8. Regional scale characterization of the topographic control on soil organic carbon spatial distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, François; Bogaert, Patrick; van Wesemael, Bas

    2013-04-01

    The influence of geomorphology on the spatial distribution of soil organic carbon (SOC) has been studied for a large range of scales and conditions. The larger SOC stocks found in dry valleys and concave footslopes of the Belgian loam belt have been explained jointly by the transfer of sediments along the slope and the reduced decomposition rate of buried organic matter. While erosion effect on SOC has been simulated at the hillslope scale, it is generally not considered in SOC inventories and prediction models at regional scale. However, more precise large scales inventories are demanded by the carbon modelling community. The goal of this paper is to characterize the relative importance of geomorphology on the SOC horizontal and vertical variability across whole agricultural region. The large historic dataset of soil horizons Aardewerk together with 147 recently sampled profiles was exploited for cost efficiency reasons. Mean profiles for different soil properties classes were compared. Various topographic indices were computed from a digital elevation model, and their potential to predict SOC content at different depth was quantified using multiple regression and terrain morphologic classification. Both dataset were able to show differences in mean SOC profile among soil properties classes, but only the new profiles dataset shows a clear relationship between SOC content and topographic indices. The various errors in then historic data set (e.g., positioning errors) may explain these limitations. This study thus brings in evidence the major control of topography on SOC vertical distribution in a region where observed heterogeneities for other commonly involved factors are limited. However, the large amount of unexplained variability still limits the usefulness of SOC content spatial prediction and should be addressed by alternative spatial methods.

  9. Retinoic acid signaling spatially restricts osteoblasts and controls ray-interray organization during zebrafish fin regeneration.

    PubMed

    Blum, Nicola; Begemann, Gerrit

    2015-09-01

    The zebrafish caudal fin consists of repeated units of bony rays separated by soft interray tissue, an organization that must be faithfully re-established during fin regeneration. How and why regenerating rays respect ray-interray boundaries, thus extending only the existing bone, has remained unresolved. Here, we demonstrate that a retinoic acid (RA)-degrading niche is established by Cyp26a1 in the proximal basal epidermal layer that orchestrates ray-interray organization by spatially restricting osteoblasts. Disruption of this niche causes preosteoblasts to ignore ray-interray boundaries and to invade neighboring interrays where they form ectopic bone. Concomitantly, non-osteoblastic blastema cells and regenerating blood vessels spread into the interrays, resulting in overall disruption of ray-interray organization and irreversible inhibition of fin regeneration. The cyp26a1-expressing niche plays another important role during subsequent regenerative outgrowth, where it facilitates the Shha-promoted proliferation of osteoblasts. Finally, we show that the previously observed distal shift of ray bifurcations in regenerating fins upon RA treatment or amputation close to the bifurcation can be explained by inappropriate preosteoblast alignment and does not necessarily require putative changes in proximodistal information. Our findings uncover a mechanism regulating preosteoblast alignment and maintenance of ray-interray boundaries during fin regeneration. PMID:26253402

  10. Acetaminophen Versus Liquefied Ibuprofen for Control of Pain During Separation in Orthodontic Patients: A Randomized Triple Blinded Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Hosseinzadeh Nik, Tahereh; Shahsavari, Negin; Ghadirian, Hannaneh; Ostad, Seyed Nasser

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this randomized clinical study was to investigate the effectiveness of acetaminophen 650 mg or liquefied ibuprofen 400 mg in pain control of orthodontic patients during separation with an elastic separator. A total of 101 patients with specific inclusion criteria were divided randomly into three groups (acetaminophen, liquefied ibuprofen, and placebo). They were instructed to take their drugs one hour before separator placement and every six hours afterward (five doses in total). They recorded their discomfort on visual analog scales immediately after separator placement, 2 hours later, 6 hours later, at bedtime, and 24 hours after separator placement. Repeated measure analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to compare the mean pain scores between the three groups. Data were collected from 89 patients. The pain increased with time in all groups. Pain scores were statistically lower in the analgesic groups compared with the placebo group (P.value<0.001), but no statistically significant difference was found in mean pain scores between the two drug groups (acetaminophen and liquefied ibuprofen) (P.value=1). Acetaminophen and liquefied ibuprofen have similar potential in pain reduction during separation. PMID:27424011

  11. Inkjet-Based Biopatterning of Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 to Spatially Control Calvarial Bone Formation

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Eric D.; DeCesare, Gary E.; Usas, Arvydas; Lensie, Emily L.; Bykowski, Michael R.; Huard, Johnny; Weiss, Lee E.; Losee, Joseph E.; Campbell, Phil G.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate spatial control of osteoblast differentiation in vitro and bone formation in vivo using inkjet bioprinting technology and to create three-dimensional persistent bio-ink patterns of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) and its modifiers immobilized within microporous scaffolds. Semicircular patterns of BMP-2 were printed within circular DermaMatrix™ human allograft scaffold constructs. The contralateral halves of the constructs were unprinted or printed with BMP-2 modifiers, including the BMP-2 inhibitor, noggin. Printed bio-ink pattern retention was validated using fluorescent or 125I-labeled bio-inks. Mouse C2C12 progenitor cells cultured on patterned constructs differentiated in a dose-dependent fashion toward an osteoblastic fate in register to BMP-2 patterns. The fidelity of spatial restriction of osteoblastic differentiation at the boundary between neighboring BMP-2 and noggin patterns improved in comparison with patterns without noggin. Acellular DermaMatrix constructs similarly patterned with BMP-2 and noggin were then implanted into a mouse calvarial defect model. Patterns of bone formation in vivo were comparable with patterned responses of osteoblastic differentiation in vitro. These results demonstrate that three-dimensional biopatterning of a growth factor and growth factor modifier within a construct can direct cell differentiation in vitro and tissue formation in vivo in register to printed patterns. PMID:20028232

  12. Metamaterials for Remote Generation of Spatially Controllable Two Dimensional Array of Microplasma

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Pramod K.; Hopwood, Jeffrey; Sonkusale, Sameer

    2014-01-01

    Since the initial demonstration of negative refraction and cloaking using metamaterials, there has been enormous interest and progress in making practical devices based on metamaterials such as electrically small antennas, absorbers, modulators, detectors etc that span over a wide range of electromagnetic spectrum covering microwave, terahertz, infrared (IR) and optical wavelengths. We present metamaterial as an active substrate where each unit cell serves as an element for generation of plasma, the fourth state of matter. Sub-wavelength localization of incident electromagnetic wave energy, one of the most interesting properties of metamaterials is employed here for generating high electric field to ignite and sustain microscale plasmas. Frequency selective nature of the metamaterial unit cells make it possible to generate spatially localized microplasma in a large array using multiple resonators. A dual resonator topology is shown for the demonstration. Since microwave energy couples to the metamaterial through free space, the proposed approach is naturally wireless. Such spatially controllable microplasma arrays provide a fundamentally new material system for future investigations in novel applications, e.g. nonlinear metamaterials. PMID:25098976

  13. Metamaterials for remote generation of spatially controllable two dimensional array of microplasma.

    PubMed

    Singh, Pramod K; Hopwood, Jeffrey; Sonkusale, Sameer

    2014-01-01

    Since the initial demonstration of negative refraction and cloaking using metamaterials, there has been enormous interest and progress in making practical devices based on metamaterials such as electrically small antennas, absorbers, modulators, detectors etc that span over a wide range of electromagnetic spectrum covering microwave, terahertz, infrared (IR) and optical wavelengths. We present metamaterial as an active substrate where each unit cell serves as an element for generation of plasma, the fourth state of matter. Sub-wavelength localization of incident electromagnetic wave energy, one of the most interesting properties of metamaterials is employed here for generating high electric field to ignite and sustain microscale plasmas. Frequency selective nature of the metamaterial unit cells make it possible to generate spatially localized microplasma in a large array using multiple resonators. A dual resonator topology is shown for the demonstration. Since microwave energy couples to the metamaterial through free space, the proposed approach is naturally wireless. Such spatially controllable microplasma arrays provide a fundamentally new material system for future investigations in novel applications, e.g. nonlinear metamaterials. PMID:25098976

  14. Control of unsteady shock-induced turbulent boundary layer separation upstream of blunt fins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleifges, K.; Dolling, D. S.

    1993-01-01

    Fluctuating wall pressure measurements have been made on centerline upstream of blunt fins in a Mach 5 turbulent boundary layer. Standard time series analysis and conditional sampling algorithms have been used to examine the effects of leading edge sweepback, leading edge shape, and fin root modifications on the fluctuating pressures. Leading edge sweep considerably reduces the mean and rms pressure loading at the fin root, the extent of the region of unsteady separation shock motion, and the separation length. The frequency of pressure fluctuations in the intermittent region increases with leading edge sweepback, while the spectral content of pressure fluctuations in the separated region is virtually unchanged by leading edge sweep. A swept hemicylindrically blunted root fillet reduces the centerline upstream influence and intermittent region length by 50 percent, and reduces the mean and rms pressure loading at the fin root by about 75 percent and 95 percent respectively. Experiments using hemicylindrical, wedge shaped and flat leading edges show that while separated flow scales increase with increasing 'bluntness', intermittent region length and root loading decrease, and separation shock frequency increases.

  15. Spatial control of chemical processes on nanostructures through nano-localized water heating

    PubMed Central

    Jack, Calum; Karimullah, Affar S.; Tullius, Ryan; Khorashad, Larousse Khosravi; Rodier, Marion; Fitzpatrick, Brian; Barron, Laurence D.; Gadegaard, Nikolaj; Lapthorn, Adrian J.; Rotello, Vincent M.; Cooke, Graeme; Govorov, Alexander O.; Kadodwala, Malcolm

    2016-01-01

    Optimal performance of nanophotonic devices, including sensors and solar cells, requires maximizing the interaction between light and matter. This efficiency is optimized when active moieties are localized in areas where electromagnetic (EM) fields are confined. Confinement of matter in these ‘hotspots' has previously been accomplished through inefficient ‘top-down' methods. Here we report a rapid ‘bottom-up' approach to functionalize selective regions of plasmonic nanostructures that uses nano-localized heating of the surrounding water induced by pulsed laser irradiation. This localized heating is exploited in a chemical protection/deprotection strategy to allow selective regions of a nanostructure to be chemically modified. As an exemplar, we use the strategy to enhance the biosensing capabilities of a chiral plasmonic substrate. This novel spatially selective functionalization strategy provides new opportunities for efficient high-throughput control of chemistry on the nanoscale over macroscopic areas for device fabrication. PMID:26961708

  16. Spatial control of chemical processes on nanostructures through nano-localized water heating.

    PubMed

    Jack, Calum; Karimullah, Affar S; Tullius, Ryan; Khorashad, Larousse Khosravi; Rodier, Marion; Fitzpatrick, Brian; Barron, Laurence D; Gadegaard, Nikolaj; Lapthorn, Adrian J; Rotello, Vincent M; Cooke, Graeme; Govorov, Alexander O; Kadodwala, Malcolm

    2016-01-01

    Optimal performance of nanophotonic devices, including sensors and solar cells, requires maximizing the interaction between light and matter. This efficiency is optimized when active moieties are localized in areas where electromagnetic (EM) fields are confined. Confinement of matter in these 'hotspots' has previously been accomplished through inefficient 'top-down' methods. Here we report a rapid 'bottom-up' approach to functionalize selective regions of plasmonic nanostructures that uses nano-localized heating of the surrounding water induced by pulsed laser irradiation. This localized heating is exploited in a chemical protection/deprotection strategy to allow selective regions of a nanostructure to be chemically modified. As an exemplar, we use the strategy to enhance the biosensing capabilities of a chiral plasmonic substrate. This novel spatially selective functionalization strategy provides new opportunities for efficient high-throughput control of chemistry on the nanoscale over macroscopic areas for device fabrication. PMID:26961708

  17. Spatial control over cell attachment by partial solvent entrapment of poly lysine in microfluidic channels

    PubMed Central

    Baman, Nicki K; Schneider, Galen B; Terry, Treniece L; Zaharias, Rebecca; Salem, Aliasger K

    2006-01-01

    We demonstrate spatial control over cell attachment on biodegradable surfaces by flowing cell adhesive poly (D-lysine) (PDL) in a trifluoroethanol (TFE)–water mixture through microfluidic channels placed on a biodegradable poly (lactic acid)–poly (ethylene glycol) (PLA–PEG) substrate. The partial solvent mixture swells the PLA–PEG within the confines of the microfluidic channels allowing PDL to diffuse on to the surface gel layer. When excess water is flowed through the channels substituting the TFE–water mixture, the swollen PLA surface collapses, entrapping PDL polymer. Results using preosteoblast human palatal mesenchymal cells (HEPM) indicate that this new procedure can be used for facile attachment of cells in localized regions. The PEG component of the PLA–PEG copolymer prevents cells from binding to the nonpatterned regions. PMID:17722538

  18. Spatial control of the energy metabolism of yeast cells through electrolytic generation of oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warnke, Christian; Mair, Thomas; Witte, Hartmut; Reiher, Antje; Hauser, Marcus J. B.; Krost, Alois

    2009-12-01

    The metabolic dynamics of yeast cells is controlled by electric pulses delivered through a spatially extended yeast cell/Au electrode interface. Concomitant with voltage pulses, oxygen is generated electrolytically at the electrode surface and delivered to the cells. The generation of oxygen was investigated in dependence of the applied voltage, width of the voltage pulses and temperature of the electrolytic solution. The local oxygen pulses at the electrodes lead to a transient activation of the aerobic energy metabolism of the yeast cells causing a perturbation in their energy balance. The effect of these local perturbations on the temporal dynamics of glycolysis in yeast cells is quantified in dependence of the energy state of cells.

  19. Spatial control of chemical processes on nanostructures through nano-localized water heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jack, Calum; Karimullah, Affar S.; Tullius, Ryan; Khorashad, Larousse Khosravi; Rodier, Marion; Fitzpatrick, Brian; Barron, Laurence D.; Gadegaard, Nikolaj; Lapthorn, Adrian J.; Rotello, Vincent M.; Cooke, Graeme; Govorov, Alexander O.; Kadodwala, Malcolm

    2016-03-01

    Optimal performance of nanophotonic devices, including sensors and solar cells, requires maximizing the interaction between light and matter. This efficiency is optimized when active moieties are localized in areas where electromagnetic (EM) fields are confined. Confinement of matter in these `hotspots' has previously been accomplished through inefficient `top-down' methods. Here we report a rapid `bottom-up' approach to functionalize selective regions of plasmonic nanostructures that uses nano-localized heating of the surrounding water induced by pulsed laser irradiation. This localized heating is exploited in a chemical protection/deprotection strategy to allow selective regions of a nanostructure to be chemically modified. As an exemplar, we use the strategy to enhance the biosensing capabilities of a chiral plasmonic substrate. This novel spatially selective functionalization strategy provides new opportunities for efficient high-throughput control of chemistry on the nanoscale over macroscopic areas for device fabrication.

  20. Spatial control of chromosomal location in a live cell with functionalized magnetic particles.

    PubMed

    Hong, Juhee; Purwar, Prashant; Cha, Misun; Lee, Junghoon

    2015-12-01

    Long-range chromosomal travel is a phenomenon unique to cell division. Methods for non-invasive, artificial manipulation of chromosomes, such as optical or magnetic tweezers, have difficulty in producing the motion of whole chromosomes in live cells. Here, we report the spatial control of chromosomes over 10 μm in a live mouse oocyte using magnetic particles driven by an external magnetic field. Selective capture of the chromosomes was achieved using antibodies specific for histone H1 in the chromosome that were conjugated to magnetic particles (H1-BMPs). When an external magnetic field was applied, the chromosomes captured by the H1-BMPs traveled through the cytosol and accumulated near the cell membrane though the movement of the chromosomes captured by H1-BMPs was strongly disturbed by the distribution of the cytoskeleton (e.g. actin filaments). Being non-invasive in nature, our approach will enable new opportunities in the remote manipulation of subcellular elements. PMID:26524004

  1. Spatial, High-Accuracy, Positioning-Encoding Sensor (SHAPES) for large space system control applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclauchlan, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    The Spatial, High-Accuracy, Position-Encoding Sensor is a controls sensor suitable for the determination of the static shape and vibrational motion of large space structures and similar systems and for the determination of position and velocity in rendezvous and docking. It uses a combination of electro-optical techniques to measure the three-dimensional coordinates distributed over the structure at reading rates high compared to the rates at which the coordinates are changing. The technical approach is that of measuring the distance to and the direction of points on the structure from a single sensor head. Many points can be measured simultaneously from a single head without significantly increasing the complexity of the system.

  2. Cholinergic control of gamma power in the midbrain spatial attention network.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Astra S; Goddard, C Alex; Huguenard, John R; Knudsen, Eric I

    2015-01-14

    The modulation of gamma power (25-90 Hz) is associated with attention and has been observed across species and brain areas. However, mechanisms that control these modulations are poorly understood. The midbrain spatial attention network in birds generates high-amplitude gamma oscillations in the local field potential that are thought to represent the highest priority location for attention. Here we explore, in midbrain slices from chickens, mechanisms that regulate the power of these oscillations, using high-resolution techniques including intracellular recordings from neurons targeted by calcium imaging. The results identify a specific subtype of neuron, expressing non-α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, that directly drives inhibition in the gamma-generating circuit and switches the network into a primed state capable of producing high-amplitude oscillations. The special properties of this mechanism enable rapid, persistent changes in gamma power. The brain may employ this mechanism wherever rapid modulations of gamma power are critical to information processing. PMID:25589769

  3. Spatial position control of nanofeatures assisted by nanoporous templates fabricated by block copolymer based lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong Hyun; Lee, Dong-Eun

    2015-03-01

    Herein, we demonstrated a unique method to control spatial arrangement of nanostructures by using topographically patterned substrates. The thin films of block copolymers (BCPs) were firstly prepared on a thin layer of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA). Then to induce ordering of the BCPs, the thin films were solvent-annealed in organic solvent vapors. The BCP thin films were then utilized as a mask to fabricate ordered PVA nanopores by reactive ion etching. Different types of BCP micelles were sequentially spin-coated on the nanoporous PVA film. Interestingly, the BCP micelles having hydrophobic surface could immediately be self-assembled due to synergetic effects of surface energy difference and height contrast of the PVA film during evaporation of a suspension solvent. In addition, by combining topographically patterned substrates, long-rage lateral ordering of BCP micelles depending on inter-distance and diameter of the PVA nanopores were effectively achieved over whole surface area.

  4. A directional array approach for the measurement of rotor noise source distributions with controlled spatial resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, T. F.; Marcolini, M. A.; Pope, D. S.

    1987-01-01

    A special array system has been designed to examine noise source distributions over a helicopter rotor model. The particular measurement environment is for a rotor operating in the open jet of an anechoic wind tunnel. An out-of-flow directional microphone element array is used with a directivity pattern whose major directional lobe projects on the rotor disk. If significant contributions from extraneous tunnel noise sources in the direction of the side lobes are excluded, the dominant output from the array would be that noise emitted from the projected area on the rotor disk. The design incorporates an array element signal blending features which serves to control the spatial resolution of the size of the directional lobes. (Without blending, the resolution and side lobe size are very strong functions of frequency, which severely limits the array's usefulness).

  5. Few-mode erbium-doped fiber amplifier with photonic lantern for pump spatial mode control.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Galmiche, G; Sanjabi Eznaveh, Z; Antonio-Lopez, J E; Velazquez Benitez, A M; Rodriguez Asomoza, J; Sanchez Mondragon, J J; Gonnet, C; Sillard, P; Li, G; Schülzgen, A; Okonkwo, C M; Amezcua Correa, R

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate a few-mode erbium-doped fiber amplifier employing a mode-selective photonic lantern for controlling the modal content of the pump light. Amplification of six spatial modes in a 5 m long erbium-doped fiber to ∼6.2  dBm average power is obtained while maintaining high modal fidelity. Through mode-selective forward pumping of the two degenerate LP21 modes operating at 976 nm, differential modal gains of <1  dB between all modes and signal gains of ∼16  dB at 1550 nm are achieved. In addition, low differential modal gain for near-full C-band operation is demonstrated. PMID:27244421

  6. Spatially controlled simultaneous patterning of multiple growth factors in three-dimensional hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wylie, Ryan G.; Ahsan, Shoeb; Aizawa, Yukie; Maxwell, Karen L.; Morshead, Cindi M.; Shoichet, Molly S.

    2011-10-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) protein-patterned scaffolds provide a more biomimetic environment for cell culture than traditional two-dimensional surfaces, but simultaneous 3D protein patterning has proved difficult. We developed a method to spatially control the immobilization of different growth factors in distinct volumes in 3D hydrogels, and to specifically guide differentiation of stem/progenitor cells therein. Stem-cell differentiation factors sonic hedgehog (SHH) and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) were simultaneously immobilized using orthogonal physical binding pairs, barnase-barstar and streptavidin-biotin, respectively. Barnase and streptavidin were sequentially immobilized using two-photon chemistry for subsequent concurrent complexation with fusion proteins barstar-SHH and biotin-CNTF, resulting in bioactive 3D patterned hydrogels. The technique should be broadly applicable to the patterning of a wide range of proteins.

  7. Cholinergic Control of Gamma Power in the Midbrain Spatial Attention Network

    PubMed Central

    Goddard, C. Alex; Huguenard, John R.; Knudsen, Eric I.

    2015-01-01

    The modulation of gamma power (25–90 Hz) is associated with attention and has been observed across species and brain areas. However, mechanisms that control these modulations are poorly understood. The midbrain spatial attention network in birds generates high-amplitude gamma oscillations in the local field potential that are thought to represent the highest priority location for attention. Here we explore, in midbrain slices from chickens, mechanisms that regulate the power of these oscillations, using high-resolution techniques including intracellular recordings from neurons targeted by calcium imaging. The results identify a specific subtype of neuron, expressing non-α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, that directly drives inhibition in the gamma-generating circuit and switches the network into a primed state capable of producing high-amplitude oscillations. The special properties of this mechanism enable rapid, persistent changes in gamma power. The brain may employ this mechanism wherever rapid modulations of gamma power are critical to information processing. PMID:25589769

  8. Interaction of the mixed yeast culture in the autotroph-heterotroph system with a closed gas cycle and spatially separated components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisman, T.; Somova, L.

    The study considers the experimental model of the "autotroph-heterotroph" system with a closed gas cycle, in which the heterotrophic link is a mixed yeast population. The autotrophic link is represented by the algae Chlorella vulgaris and the heterotrophic link by the yeasts Candida utilis and Candida guilliermondii. The controls are separate links of Chlorella and yeasts isolated from the atmosphere. It has been shown that the outcome of the competition in the heterotrophic link depends on the strategy of the yeast population towards the substrate and oxygen. The C. utilis population quickly utilizes the substrate as it is an R-strategist and is less sensitive to oxygen deficiency. The C. guilliermondii population consumes low concentrations of the substrate because it is a K-strategist, but it is more sensitive to oxygen deficiency. That is why, in the "autotroph-heterotroph" system with a closed gas cycle, after a considerable amount of the substrate has been consumed, the C. guilliermondii population becomes more competitive that the C. utilis population. In the culture of a separate yeast link, isolated from the atmosphere, the C. utilis population finds itself in more favorable conditions due to oxygen deficiency. The system with a complex heterotrophic component exists longer than the system whose heterotrophic component is represented by one yeast species. This is accounted for by the positive metabolite interaction of yeasts and a more complete utilization of the substrate by a mixed culture of yeasts featuring different strategies towards the substrate.

  9. Modeling, fabrication and plasma actuator coupling of flexible pressure sensors for flow separation detection and control in aeronautical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francioso, L.; De Pascali, C.; Pescini, E.; De Giorgi, M. G.; Siciliano, P.

    2016-06-01

    Preventing the flow separation could enhance the performance of propulsion systems and future civil aircraft. To this end, a fast detection of boundary layer separation is mandatory for a sustainable and successful application of active flow control devices, such as plasma actuators. The present work reports on the design, fabrication and functional tests of low-cost capacitive pressure sensors coupled with dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuators to detect and then control flow separation. Finite element method (FEM) simulations were used to obtain information on the deflection and the stress distribution in different-shaped floating membranes. The sensor sensitivity as a function of the pressure load was also calculated by experimental tests. The results of the calibration of different capacitive pressure sensors are reported in this work, together with functional tests in a wind tunnel equipped with a curved wall plate on which a DBD plasma actuator was mounted to control the flow separation. The flow behavior was experimentally investigated by particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements. Statistical and spectral analysis, applied to the output signals of the pressure sensor placed downstream of the profile leading edge, demonstrated that the sensor is able to discriminate different ionic wind velocity and turbulence conditions. The sensor sensitivity in the 0–100 Pa range was experimentally measured and it ranged between 0.0030 and 0.0046 pF Pa‑1 for the best devices.

  10. Control of boundary layer separation and the wake of an airfoil using ns-DBD plasma actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashcraft, Timothy

    The efficacy of nanosecond pulse driven dielectric barrier discharge (ns-DBD) plasma actuators for boundary layer separation and wake control is investigated experimentally. A single ns-DBD plasma actuator is placed at the leading edge of a NACA 0012 airfoil model. Both baseline and controlled flow fields are studied using static pressure measurements, Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and Constant Temperature Anemometry (CTA). Experiments are primarily performed at Re = 0.74 x 106 and alpha = 18°. CP, PIV and CTA data show that a forcing frequency of F+ = 1.14 is optimal for separation control. CTA surveys of the wake at x/c = 7 indicate three approximate regimes of behavior. Forcing in the range 0.92< F+ < 1.52 results in the best conditions for separation control over the airfoil, but has no dominant signature in the wake at x/c = 7. Excitation in the range of 0.23 < F+ < 0.92 produces a single dominant frequency in the wake while F+ < 0.23 shows behavior representing a possible impulse response or nonlinear effects. PIV data confirm these observations in all three regimes. Cross-correlations of CTA data are also employed to evaluate the two-dimensionality of the excited wake. The initial results presented here are part of an ongoing effort to use active flow control (AFC), in the form of ns-DBDs, as an enabling technology for the study of unsteady aerodynamics and vortex-body interactions.

  11. Vortex generators for control of shock-induced separation. Part 3: Examples of applications of vortex generators to aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-12-01

    ESDU 93026 illustrates by case studies the use of the information in Parts 1 and 2 on the use of vortex generators to control shock-induced separation. The examples are the control of internal noise by the application of vortex generators on the forward cabin roof of a business aircraft (Gulfstream III), the control of separation associated with a three-shock pattern near the tip of a highly swept and tapered model wing in a wind-tunnel, and the improvement of the buffet maneuver boundary on a straight wing interceptor aircraft of the fifties. In each case the geometric details of the arrays of vortex generators tested are provided, the results obtained are described, and the aerodynamic principles involved that influence those results are assessed.

  12. High throughput assembly of spatially controlled 3D cell clusters on a micro/nanoplatform.

    PubMed

    Gallego-Perez, Daniel; Higuita-Castro, Natalia; Sharma, Sadhana; Reen, Rashmeet K; Palmer, Andre F; Gooch, Keith J; Lee, L James; Lannutti, John J; Hansford, Derek J

    2010-03-21

    Guided assembly of microscale tissue subunits (i.e. 3D cell clusters/aggregates) has found applications in cell therapy/tissue engineering, cell and developmental biology, and drug discovery. As cluster size and geometry are known to influence cellular responses, the ability to spatially control cluster formation in a high throughput manner could be advantageous for many biomedical applications. In this work, a micro- and nanofabricated platform was developed for this purpose, consisting of a soft-lithographically fabricated array of through-thickness microwells structurally bonded to a sheet of electrospun fibers. The microwells and fibers were manufactured from several polymers of biomedical interest. Human hepatocytes were used as model cells to demonstrate the ability of the platform to allow controlled cluster formation. In addition, the ability of the device to support studies on semi-controlled heterotypic interactions was demonstrated by co-culturing hepatocytes and fibroblasts. Preliminary experiments with other cells of interest (pancreatic cells, embryonic stem cells, and cardiomyocytes) were also conducted. Our platform possesses several advantages over previously developed microwell arrays: a more in vivo-like topographical stimulation of cells; better nutrient/waste exchange through the underlying nanofiber mat; and easy integration into standard two-chamber cell culture well systems. PMID:20221567

  13. An electrophysiological investigation of preparatory attentional control in a spatial Stroop task.

    PubMed

    Stern, Emily R; Mangels, Jennifer A

    2006-06-01

    Top-down attentional control is required when subjects must attend to one of multiple conflicting stimulus features, such as in the Stroop task. Performance may be improved when such control is implemented in advance of stimulus presentation, yet few studies have examined this issue. Our investigation employed a spatial Stroop task with a manual response, allowing us to focus on the effects of preparatory attention on verbal processing when it is the less automatic attribute. A letter cue (P or W) presented for 2200 msec instructed subjects to respond on the basis of the position or meaning of a word (up, down, left, right) placed in an incongruent position relative to center. Event-related potentials recorded during pre- and poststimulus periods were analyzed as a function of reaction time to the target stimulus (fast vs. slow) in order to differentiate neural activity associated with more or less successful implementation of control. During the prestimulus period, fast responses to subsequent targets were associated with enhanced slow-wave activity over right frontal and bilateral central-parietal regions. During the poststimulus period, fast word trials were uniquely associated with an enhanced inferior temporal negativity (ITN) from 200 to 600 msec. More importantly, a correlation between frontal prestimulus activity and the poststimulus ITN suggested that frontal preparatory activity played a role in facilitating conceptual processing of the verbal stimulus when it arrived, providing an important link between preparatory attention and mechanisms that improve performance in the face of conflict. PMID:16839306

  14. Spatially-Distributed Cost-Effectiveness Analysis Framework to Control Phosphorus from Agricultural Diffuse Pollution.

    PubMed

    Geng, Runzhe; Wang, Xiaoyan; Sharpley, Andrew N; Meng, Fande

    2015-01-01

    Best management practices (BMPs) for agricultural diffuse pollution control are implemented at the field or small-watershed scale. However, the benefits of BMP implementation on receiving water quality at multiple spatial is an ongoing challenge. In this paper, we introduce an integrated approach that combines risk assessment (i.e., Phosphorus (P) index), model simulation techniques (Hydrological Simulation Program-FORTRAN), and a BMP placement tool at various scales to identify the optimal location for implementing multiple BMPs and estimate BMP effectiveness after implementation. A statistically significant decrease in nutrient discharge from watersheds is proposed to evaluate the effectiveness of BMPs, strategically targeted within watersheds. Specifically, we estimate two types of cost-effectiveness curves (total pollution reduction and proportion of watersheds improved) for four allocation approaches. Selection of a ''best approach" depends on the relative importance of the two types of effectiveness, which involves a value judgment based on the random/aggregated degree of BMP distribution among and within sub-watersheds. A statistical optimization framework is developed and evaluated in Chaohe River Watershed located in the northern mountain area of Beijing. Results show that BMP implementation significantly (p >0.001) decrease P loss from the watershed. Remedial strategies where BMPs were targeted to areas of high risk of P loss, deceased P loads compared with strategies where BMPs were randomly located across watersheds. Sensitivity analysis indicated that aggregated BMP placement in particular watershed is the most cost-effective scenario to decrease P loss. The optimization approach outlined in this paper is a spatially hierarchical method for targeting nonpoint source controls across a range of scales from field to farm, to watersheds, to regions. Further, model estimates showed targeting at multiple scales is necessary to optimize program efficiency

  15. Spatially-Distributed Cost–Effectiveness Analysis Framework to Control Phosphorus from Agricultural Diffuse Pollution

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Runzhe; Wang, Xiaoyan; Sharpley, Andrew N.; Meng, Fande

    2015-01-01

    Best management practices (BMPs) for agricultural diffuse pollution control are implemented at the field or small-watershed scale. However, the benefits of BMP implementation on receiving water quality at multiple spatial is an ongoing challenge. In this paper, we introduce an integrated approach that combines risk assessment (i.e., Phosphorus (P) index), model simulation techniques (Hydrological Simulation Program–FORTRAN), and a BMP placement tool at various scales to identify the optimal location for implementing multiple BMPs and estimate BMP effectiveness after implementation. A statistically significant decrease in nutrient discharge from watersheds is proposed to evaluate the effectiveness of BMPs, strategically targeted within watersheds. Specifically, we estimate two types of cost-effectiveness curves (total pollution reduction and proportion of watersheds improved) for four allocation approaches. Selection of a ‘‘best approach” depends on the relative importance of the two types of effectiveness, which involves a value judgment based on the random/aggregated degree of BMP distribution among and within sub-watersheds. A statistical optimization framework is developed and evaluated in Chaohe River Watershed located in the northern mountain area of Beijing. Results show that BMP implementation significantly (p >0.001) decrease P loss from the watershed. Remedial strategies where BMPs were targeted to areas of high risk of P loss, deceased P loads compared with strategies where BMPs were randomly located across watersheds. Sensitivity analysis indicated that aggregated BMP placement in particular watershed is the most cost-effective scenario to decrease P loss. The optimization approach outlined in this paper is a spatially hierarchical method for targeting nonpoint source controls across a range of scales from field to farm, to watersheds, to regions. Further, model estimates showed targeting at multiple scales is necessary to optimize program

  16. Improving understanding of controls on spatial variability in methane fluxes in Arctic tundra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Scott J.; Sloan, Victoria; Phoenix, Gareth; Wagner, Robert; Oechel, Walter; Zona, Donatella

    2015-04-01

    The Arctic is experiencing rapid climate change relative to the rest of the globe, and this increase in temperature has feedback effects across hydrological and thermal regimes, plant community distribution and carbon stocks within tundra soils. Arctic wetlands account for a significant amount of methane emissions from natural ecosystems to the atmosphere and with further permafrost degradation under a warming climate, these emissions are expected to increase. Methane (CH4) is an extremely important component of the global carbon cycle with a global warming potential 28.5 times greater than carbon dioxide over a 100 year time scale (IPCC, 2013). In order to validate carbon cycle models, modelling methane at broader landscape scales is needed. To date direct measurements of methane have been sporadic in time and space which, while capturing some key controls on the spatial heterogeneity, make it difficult to accurately upscale methane emissions to the landscape and regional scales. This study investigates what is controlling the spatial heterogeneity of methane fluxes across Arctic tundra. We combined over 300 portable chamber observations from 13 micro-topographic positions (with multiple vegetation types) across three locations spanning a 300km latitudinal gradient in Northern Alaska from Barrow to Ivotuk with synchronous measurements of environmental (soil temperature, soil moisture, water table, active layer thaw depth, pH) and vegetation (plant community composition, height, sedge tiller counts) variables to evaluate key controls on methane fluxes. To assess the diurnal variation in CH4 fluxes, we also performed automated chamber measurements in one study site (Barrow) location. Multiple statistical approaches (regression tree and multiple linear regression) were used to identify key controlling variables and their interactions. Methane emissions across all sites ranged from -0.08 to 15.3 mg C-CH4 m-2 hr-1. As expected, soil moisture was the main control

  17. A Fuzzy Logic Based Controller for the Automated Alignment of a Laser-beam-smoothing Spatial Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krasowski, M. J.; Dickens, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    A fuzzy logic based controller for a laser-beam-smoothing spatial filter is described. It is demonstrated that a human operator's alignment actions can easily be described by a system of fuzzy rules of inference. The final configuration uses inexpensive, off-the-shelf hardware and allows for a compact, readily implemented embedded control system.

  18. Separation of a mixture of particles into its individual components with the aid of the magneto-Archimedes separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirota, Noriyuki; Chiba, Hayatoshi; Okada, Hidehiko; Ando, Tsutomu

    2015-04-01

    The magneto-Archimedes separation allows for separating mixtures of feeble magnetic materials into its components based on the difference of their densities and magnetic susceptibilities. So far, this technique was applied for the separation of relatively large particles of several millimeters in diameter. Here we apply this technique experimentally to the simultaneous quantitative analysis of multiple micrometer-sized particles in a fluid. It was confirmed that the magneto-Archimedes separation can be applied for the separation of mixture of microspheres larger than 20 μm. Further high performance separation efficiency is expected with the optimization of separation conditions including the control of the spatial distribution of the magnetic field.

  19. Entrainment and Control of Bacterial Populations: An in Silico Study over a Spatially Extended Agent Based Model.

    PubMed

    Mina, Petros; Tsaneva-Atanasova, Krasimira; Bernardo, Mario di

    2016-07-15

    We extend a spatially explicit agent based model (ABM) developed previously to investigate entrainment and control of the emergent behavior of a population of synchronized oscillating cells in a microfluidic chamber. Unlike most of the work in models of control of cellular systems which focus on temporal changes, we model individual cells with spatial dependencies which may contribute to certain behavioral responses. We use the model to investigate the response of both open loop and closed loop strategies, such as proportional control (P-control), proportional-integral control (PI-control) and proportional-integral-derivative control (PID-control), to heterogeinities and growth in the cell population, variations of the control parameters and spatial effects such as diffusion in the spatially explicit setting of a microfluidic chamber setup. We show that, as expected from the theory of phase locking in dynamical systems, open loop control can only entrain the cell population in a subset of forcing periods, with a wide variety of dynamical behaviors obtained outside these regions of entrainment. Closed-loop control is shown instead to guarantee entrainment in a much wider region of control parameter space although presenting limitations when the population size increases over a certain threshold. In silico tracking experiments are also performed to validate the ability of classical control approaches to achieve other reference behaviors such as a desired constant output or a linearly varying one. All simulations are carried out in BSim, an advanced agent-based simulator of microbial population which is here extended ad hoc to include the effects of control strategies acting onto the population. PMID:27110835

  20. Happiness increases verbal and spatial working memory capacity where sadness does not: Emotion, working memory and executive control.

    PubMed

    Storbeck, Justin; Maswood, Raeya

    2016-08-01

    The effects of emotion on working memory and executive control are often studied in isolation. Positive mood enhances verbal and impairs spatial working memory, whereas negative mood enhances spatial and impairs verbal working memory. Moreover, positive mood enhances executive control, whereas negative mood has little influence. We examined how emotion influences verbal and spatial working memory capacity, which requires executive control to coordinate between holding information in working memory and completing a secondary task. We predicted that positive mood would improve both verbal and spatial working memory capacity because of its influence on executive control. Positive, negative and neutral moods were induced followed by completing a verbal (Experiment 1) or spatial (Experiment 2) working memory operation span task to assess working memory capacity. Positive mood enhanced working memory capacity irrespective of the working memory domain, whereas negative mood had no influence on performance. Thus, positive mood was more successful holding information in working memory while processing task-irrelevant information, suggesting that the influence mood has on executive control supersedes the independent effects mood has on domain-specific working memory. PMID:25947579

  1. Spatial separation of the processing and MHC class I loading compartments for cross-presentation of the tumor-associated antigen HER2/neu by human dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Baleeiro, Renato B; Rietscher, René; Diedrich, Andrea; Czaplewska, Justyna A; Lehr, Claus-Michael; Scherließ, Regina; Hanefeld, Andrea; Gottschaldt, Michael; Walden, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Cross-presentation is the process by which professional antigen presenting cells (APCs) (B cells, dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages) present endocytosed antigens (Ags) via MHC-I to CD8+ T cells. This process is crucial for induction of adaptive immune responses against tumors and infected cells. The pathways and cellular compartments involved in cross-presentation are unresolved and controversial. Among the cells with cross-presenting capacity, DCs are the most efficient, which was proposed to depend on prevention of endosomal acidification to block degradation of the epitopes. Contrary to this view, we show in this report that some cargoes induce strong endosomal acidification following uptake by human DCs, while others not. Moreover, processing of the tumor-associated antigen HER2/neu delivered in nanoparticles (NP) for cross-presentation of the epitope HER2/neu369–377 on HLA-A2 depended on endosomal acidification and cathepsin activity as well as proteasomes, and newly synthesized HLA class I. However, the HLA-A*0201/HER2/neu369–377 complexes were not found in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) nor in endolysosomes but in hitherto not described vesicles. The data thus indicate spatial separation of antigen processing and loading of MHC-I for cross-presentation: antigen processing occurs in the uptake compartment and the cytosol whereas MHC-I loading with peptide takes place in a distinct subcellular compartment. The findings further elucidate the cellular pathways involved in the cross-presentation of a full-length, clinically relevant tumor-associated antigen by human DCs, and the impact of the vaccine formulation on antigen processing and CD8+ T cell induction. PMID:26985398

  2. Synthetic Vortex Generator Jets Used to Control Separation on Low-Pressure Turbine Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashpis, David E.; Volino, Ralph J.

    2005-01-01

    Low-pressure turbine (LPT) airfoils are subject to increasingly stronger pressure gradients as designers impose higher loading in an effort to improve efficiency and lower cost by reducing the number of airfoils in an engine. When the adverse pressure gradient on the suction side of these airfoils becomes strong enough, the boundary layer will separate. Separation bubbles, particularly those that fail to reattach, can result in a significant loss of lift and a subsequent degradation of engine efficiency. The problem is particularly relevant in aircraft engines. Airfoils optimized to produce maximum power under takeoff conditions may still experience boundary layer separation at cruise conditions because of the thinner air and lower Reynolds numbers at altitude. Component efficiency can drop significantly between takeoff and cruise conditions. The decrease is about 2 percent in large commercial transport engines, and it could be as large as 7 percent in smaller engines operating at higher altitudes. Therefore, it is very beneficial to eliminate, or at least reduce, the separation bubble.

  3. APPLICATION OF HIGH-GRADIENT MAGNETIC SEPARATION TO FINE PARTICLE CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an assessment of the potential use of high-gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) as a means of collecting gas stream particulates. The assessment included both experiments and analyses of theoretical models. Phase I included evaluations of theoretical ex...

  4. Nanolithographic control of the spatial organization of cellular adhesion receptors at the single-molecule level

    PubMed Central

    Schvartzman, Mark; Palma, Matteo; Sable, Julia; Abramson, Justin; Hu, Xian; Sheetz, Michael P.; Wind, Shalom J.

    2011-01-01

    The ability to control the placement of individual molecules promises to enable a wide range of applications and is a key challenge in nanoscience and nanotechnology. Many biological interactions, in particular, are sensitive to the precise geometric arrangement of proteins. We have developed a technique which combines molecular-scale nanolithography with site-selective biochemistry to create biomimetic arrays of individual protein binding sites. The binding sites can be arranged in heterogeneous patterns of virtually any possible geometry with a nearly unlimited number of degrees of freedom. We have used these arrays to explore how the geometric organization of the extracellular matrix (ECM) binding ligand RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp) affects cell adhesion and spreading. Systematic variation of spacing, density and cluster size of individual integrin binding sites was used to elicit different cell behavior. Cell spreading assays on arrays of different geometric arrangements revealed a dramatic increase in spreading efficiency when at least 4 liganded sites were spaced within 60 nm or less, with no dependence on global density. This points to the existence of a minimal matrix adhesion unit for fibronectin defined in space and stoichiometry. Developing an understanding of the ECM geometries that activate specific cellular functional complexes is a critical step toward controlling cell behavior. Potential practical applications range from new therapeutic treatments to the rational design of tissue scaffolds that can optimize healing without scarring. More broadly, spatial control at the single-molecule level can elucidate factors controlling individual molecular interactions and can enable synthesis of new systems based on molecular-scale architectures. PMID:21319842

  5. Childhood autism in India: A case-control study using tract-based spatial statistics analysis

    PubMed Central

    Assis, Zarina Abdul; Bagepally, Bhavani Shankara; Saini, Jitender; Srinath, Shoba; Bharath, Rose Dawn; Naidu, Purushotham R.; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Context: Autism is a serious behavioral disorder among young children that now occurs at epidemic rates in developing countries like India. We have used tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) measures to investigate the microstructure of primary neurocircuitry involved in autistic spectral disorders as compared to the typically developed children. Objective: To evaluate the various white matter tracts in Indian autistic children as compared to the controls using TBSS. Materials and Methods: Prospective, case-control, voxel-based, whole-brain DTI analysis using TBSS was performed. The study included 19 autistic children (mean age 8.7 years ± 3.84, 16 males and 3 females) and 34 controls (mean age 12.38 ± 3.76, all males). Fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), radial diffusivity (RD), and axial diffusivity (AD) values were used as outcome variables. Results: Compared to the control group, TBSS demonstrated multiple areas of markedly reduced FA involving multiple long white matter tracts, entire corpus callosum, bilateral posterior thalami, and bilateral optic tracts (OTs). Notably, there were no voxels where FA was significantly increased in the autism group. Increased RD was also noted in these regions, suggesting underlying myelination defect. The MD was elevated in many of the projections and association fibers and notably in the OTs. There were no significant changes in the AD in these regions, indicating no significant axonal injury. There was no significant correlation between the FA values and Childhood Autism Rating Scale. Conclusion: This is a first of a kind study evaluating DTI findings in autistic children in India. In our study, DTI has shown a significant fault with the underlying intricate brain wiring system in autism. OT abnormality is a novel finding and needs further research. PMID:26600581

  6. DNA as a Powerful Tool for Morphology Control, Spatial Positioning, and Dynamic Assembly of Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Conspectus Several properties of nanomaterials, such as morphologies (e.g., shapes and surface structures) and distance dependent properties (e.g., plasmonic and quantum confinement effects), make nanomaterials uniquely qualified as potential choices for future applications from catalysis to biomedicine. To realize the full potential of these nanomaterials, it is important to demonstrate fine control of the morphology of individual nanoparticles, as well as precise spatial control of the position, orientation, and distances between multiple nanoparticles. In addition, dynamic control of nanomaterial assembly in response to multiple stimuli, with minimal or no error, and the reversibility of the assemblies are also required. In this Account, we summarize recent progress of using DNA as a powerful programmable tool to realize the above goals. First, inspired by the discovery of genetic codes in biology, we have discovered DNA sequence combinations to control different morphologies of nanoparticles during their growth process and have shown that these effects are synergistic or competitive, depending on the sequence combination. The DNA, which guides the growth of the nanomaterial, is stable and retains its biorecognition ability. Second, by taking advantage of different reactivities of phosphorothioate and phosphodiester backbone, we have placed phosphorothioate at selective positions on different DNA nanostructures including DNA tetrahedrons. Bifunctional linkers have been used to conjugate phosphorothioate on one end and bind nanoparticles or proteins on the other end. In doing so, precise control of distances between two or more nanoparticles or proteins with nanometer resolution can be achieved. Furthermore, by developing facile methods to functionalize two hemispheres of Janus nanoparticles with two different DNA sequences regioselectively, we have demonstrated directional control of nanomaterial assembly, where DNA strands with specific hybridization serve as

  7. Factors controlling gully erosion at different spatial and temporal scales in rangelands of SW Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez Gutiérrez, Á.; Schnabel, S.; Lavado Contador, J. F.; Pulido Fernández, M.

    2009-04-01

    Mediterranean climate with Atlantic influences. Results showed that at the catchment scale, and for a short period (1-10 years), rainfall and soil moisture were the most important factors controlling gully erosion rates. In fact, gully erosion was highly related with the rainfall amount (r=0,90), with the number of times event discharge exceeded 1000 cubic meters (r=0,76) and with the number of times peak discharge exceeded 100 l/s (r=0,72). However, when the temporal scale was extended to several decades (from 1945 to 2006), land use and vegetation cover (specially the extension of cultivated area and livestock density) proved to be the most important factors determining the area affected by gullying. With respect to the spatial variation of gullying at the regional scale, the model results indicate lithology as being the most important variable, followed by vegetation structure and summer rainfall. This model was able to explain a large portion of the spatial distribution of gullies at the regional scale. Concluding, at different spatial and temporal scales the importance of factors which determine gully erosion intensity, extension and rates varies notably. At the short-term rainfall and runoff dynamics and the moisture content of the sediments are the dominant factors, whereas at the medium-term land use and vegetation cover become more important. At the regional scale lithology and vegetation turned out to be the dominant factors in determining the location of areas susceptible to gully erosion in rangelands of Extremadura.

  8. Spatial quality control bypasses cell-based limitations on proteostasis to promote prion curing

    PubMed Central

    Klaips, Courtney L; Hochstrasser, Megan L; Langlois, Christine R; Serio, Tricia R

    2014-01-01

    The proteostasis network has evolved to support protein folding under normal conditions and to expand this capacity in response to proteotoxic stresses. Nevertheless, many pathogenic states are associated with protein misfolding, revealing in vivo limitations on quality control mechanisms. One contributor to these limitations is the physical characteristics of misfolded proteins, as exemplified by amyloids, which are largely resistant to clearance. However, other limitations imposed by the cellular environment are poorly understood. To identify cell-based restrictions on proteostasis capacity, we determined the mechanism by which thermal stress cures the [PSI+]/Sup35 prion. Remarkably, Sup35 amyloid is disassembled at elevated temperatures by the molecular chaperone Hsp104. This process requires Hsp104 engagement with heat-induced non-prion aggregates in late cell-cycle stage cells, which promotes its asymmetric retention and thereby effective activity. Thus, cell division imposes a potent limitation on proteostasis capacity that can be bypassed by the spatial engagement of a quality control factor. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04288.001 PMID:25490068

  9. Spatial-temporal control of interferences of multiple tunneling photoelectron wave packets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Min; Geng, Ji-Wei; Liu, Ming-Ming; Zheng, Xu; Peng, Liang-You; Gong, Qihuang; Liu, Yunquan

    2015-07-01

    We theoretically study the control of the interferences of multiple tunneling photoelectron wave packets in both temporal and spatial domains by an orthogonally polarized two-color laser pulse. Profound carpetlike and stripelike interference patterns can be turned on or off in the momentum spectra using a weak streaking field at half the frequency of a strong fundamental field. The modulations of the interference patterns with respect to the relative phase between the two frequency components are well recaptured by both a semiclassical interference model and an ab initio simulation with numerically solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. We highlight the importance of the ionic Coulomb potential on the photoelectron angular distributions of atoms in the orthogonally polarized two-color pulses. It is shown that the interference induced by the forward rescattering trajectories is enhanced while the contribution of the direct trajectories is suppressed. This study offers alternative routes toward probing and controlling the ultrafast ionization dynamics of atoms and molecules.

  10. Spatial sequestration and detoxification of Huntingtin by the ribosome quality control complex

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Junsheng; Hao, Xinxin; Cao, Xiuling; Liu, Beidong; Nyström, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a neurological disorder caused by polyglutamine expansions in mutated Huntingtin (mHtt) proteins, rendering them prone to form inclusion bodies (IB). We report that in yeast, such IB formation is a factor-dependent process subjected to age-related decline. A genome-wide, high-content imaging approach, identified the E3 ubiquitin ligase, Ltn1 of the ribosome quality control complex (RQC) as a key factor required for IB formation, ubiquitination, and detoxification of model mHtt. The failure of ltn1∆ cells to manage mHtt was traced to another RQC component, Tae2, and inappropriate control of heat shock transcription factor, Hsf1, activity. Moreover, super-resolution microscopy revealed that mHtt toxicity in RQC-deficient cells was accompanied by multiple mHtt aggregates altering actin cytoskeletal structures and retarding endocytosis. The data demonstrates that spatial sequestration of mHtt into IBs is policed by the RQC-Hsf1 regulatory system and that such compartmentalization, rather than ubiquitination, is key to mHtt detoxification. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11792.001 PMID:27033550

  11. Spatial control of lipid droplet proteins by the ERAD ubiquitin ligase Doa10.

    PubMed

    Ruggiano, Annamaria; Mora, Gabriel; Buxó, Laura; Carvalho, Pedro

    2016-08-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) plays a central role in the biogenesis of most membrane proteins. Among these are proteins localized to the surface of lipid droplets (LDs), fat storage organelles delimited by a phospholipid monolayer. The LD monolayer is often continuous with the membrane of the ER allowing certain membrane proteins to diffuse between the two organelles. In these connected organelles, how some proteins concentrate specifically at the surface of LDs is not known. Here, we show that the ERAD ubiquitin ligase Doa10 controls the levels of some LD proteins. Their degradation is dependent on the localization to the ER and appears independent of the folding state. Moreover, we show that by degrading the ER pool of these LD proteins, ERAD contributes to restrict their localization to LDs. The signals for LD targeting and Doa10-mediated degradation overlap, indicating that these are competing events. This spatial control of protein localization is a novel function of ERAD that might contribute to generate functional diversity in a continuous membrane system. PMID:27357570

  12. Use of detrended correspondence analysis to evaluate factors controlling spatial distribution of benthic insects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leland, H.V.; Carter, J.L.; Fend, S.V.

    1986-01-01

    Detrended correspondence analysis (DCA) was evaluated for its effectiveness in displaying factors controlling the spatial distribution of benthic insects in an oligotrophic stream where an experimental gradient (copper) that selectively affects population abundances was imposed. DCA proved to be highly sensitive to differences among samples and consistently provided ecologically meaningful species ordinations. Seasonality of taxa was the major gradient displayed by DCA prior to copper exposure when data for all sampling dates were included. Sensitivity of taxa to copper was a more important factor affecting community structure than was seasonality during periods of continuous exposure to copper (2.5 to 15 ??g l-1 CuT; approximately 12 to 75 ng l-1 Cu2+. When pre-dose data for each sampling date were ordinated independently, substratum composition and biological interactions were the major gradients displayed in species ordinations. During periods of exposure, sensitivity of taxa to copper was the primary gradient. This gradient also reflected a generally greater sensitivity to copper of herbivorous than of detritivorous or predatory benthic insects. DCA revealed the persistence, eleven months after dosing ceased, of differences in community structure between the control and high treatment (5 and 10 ??g l-1 CuT) sections. Differences between sections were not evident on this sampling date from total biomass or total density (numerical) estimates. ?? 1986 Dr W. Junk Publishers.

  13. Precise spatial control of cavitation erosion in a vessel phantom by using an ultrasonic standing wave.

    PubMed

    Shi, Aiwei; Huang, Peixuan; Guo, Shifang; Zhao, Lu; Jia, Yingjie; Zong, Yujin; Wan, Mingxi

    2016-07-01

    In atherosclerotic inducement in animal models, the conventionally used balloon injury is invasive, produces excessive vessel injuries at unpredictable locations and is inconvenient in arterioles. Fortunately, cavitation erosion, which plays an important role in therapeutic ultrasound in blood vessels, has the potential to induce atherosclerosis noninvasively at predictable sites. In this study, precise spatial control of cavitation erosion for superficial lesions in a vessel phantom was realised by using an ultrasonic standing wave (USW) with the participation of cavitation nuclei and medium-intensity ultrasound pulses. The superficial vessel erosions were restricted between adjacent pressure nodes, which were 0.87 mm apart in the USW field of 1 MHz. The erosion positions could be shifted along the vessel by nodal modulation under a submillimetre-scale accuracy without moving the ultrasound transducers. Moreover, the cavitation erosion of the proximal or distal wall could be determined by the types of cavitation nuclei and their corresponding cavitation pulses, i.e., phase-change microbubbles with cavitation pulses of 5 MHz and SonoVue microbubbles with cavitation pulses of 1 MHz. Effects of acoustic parameters of the cavitation pulses on the cavitation erosions were investigated. The flow conditions in the experiments were considered and discussed. Compared to only using travelling waves, the proposed method in this paper improves the controllability of the cavitation erosion and reduces the erosion depth, providing a more suitable approach for vessel endothelial injury while avoiding haemorrhage. PMID:26964937

  14. Advanced BMP Gene Therapies for Temporal and Spatial Control of Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, C.G.; Martín-Saavedra, F.M.; Vilaboa, N.; Franceschi, R.T.

    2013-01-01

    Spatial and temporal patterns of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling are crucial to the assembly of appropriately positioned and shaped bones of the face and head. This review advances the hypothesis that reconstitution of such patterns with cutting-edge gene therapies will transform the clinical management of craniofacial bone defects attributed to trauma, disease, or surgical resection. Gradients in BMP signaling within developing limbs and orofacial primordia regulate proliferation and differentiation of mesenchymal progenitors. Similarly, vascular and mesenchymal cells express BMPs in various places and at various times during normal fracture healing. In non-healing fractures of long bones, BMP signaling is severely attenuated. Devices that release recombinant BMPs promote healing of bone in spinal fusions and, in some cases, of open fractures, but cannot control the timing and localization of BMP release. Gene therapies with regulated expression systems may provide substantial improvements in efficacy and safety compared with protein-based therapies. Synthetic gene switches, activated by pharmacologics or light or hyperthermic stimuli, provide several avenues for the non-invasive regulation of the expression of BMP transgenes in both time and space. Through new gene therapy platforms such as these, active control over BMP signaling can be achieved to accelerate bone regeneration. PMID:23539558

  15. Spatial Control Of Functional Properties Via Octahedral Modulations In Complex Oxide Superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, E. J.; Colby, Robert J.; Wang, Q.; Karapetrova, E.; Schleputz, C. M.; Fitzsimmons, M. R.; May, Steven J.

    2014-12-15

    The design of distortions and rotations of the corner-connected BO6 octahedra across interfaces has emerged as an exciting platform to control electronic or ferroic behavior in ABO3 perovskite heterostructures. Here, we investigate isovalent manganite superlattices, [(La0.7Sr0.3MnO3)n/(Eu0.7Sr0.3MnO3)n]×m, as a route to spatial control over electronic bandwidth and ferromagnetism through the creation of octahedral superstructures. Electron energy loss spectroscopy confirms a uniform Mn valence state throughout the superlattices. In contrast, the presence of modulations of the MnO6 octahedral rotations along the growth direction commensurate with the superlattice period is revealed by scanning transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction. We show that the Curie temperatures of the constituent materials can be systematically engineered via the octahedral superstructures leading to a modulated magnetization in samples where the superlattice period is larger than the interfacial octahedral coupling length scale, while a single magnetic transition is observed in the short period superlattices.

  16. Control of the spatial distribution and crystal orientation of self-organized Au nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yasukawa, Yukiko; Liu, Xiaoxi; Shirsath, Sagar E; Suematsu, Hisayuki; Kotaki, Yukio; Nemoto, Yoshihiro; Takeguchi, Masaki; Morisako, Akimitsu

    2016-09-23

    Ordered, two-dimensional, self-organized Au nanoparticles were fabricated using radiofrequency (RF) magnetron sputtering. The particles were uniformly spherical in shape and ultrafine in size (3-7 nm) and showed an ultrahigh density in the order of ∼10(12) inch(-2). A custom-developed sputtering apparatus that employs low sputtering power density and a minimized sputtering time (1 min) was used to markedly simplify the preparation conditions for Au nanoparticle fabrication. The spatial distribution of Au nanoparticles was rigorously controlled by placing a Ta interfacial layer between the Au nanoparticles and substrate as well as by post-annealing samples in an Ar atmosphere after the formation of Au nanoparticles. The interfacial layer and the post-annealing step caused approximately 40% of the Au nanoparticles on the substrate surface to orient in the (111) direction. This method was shown to produce ultrafine Au nanoparticles showing an ultrahigh surface density. The crystal orientation of the nanoparticles can be precisely controlled with respect to the substrate surface. Therefore, this technique promises to deliver tunable nanostructures for applications in the field of high-performance electronic devices. PMID:27528598

  17. Spatial patterns and controls of soil chemical weathering rates along a transient hillslope

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yoo, K.; Mudd, S.M.; Sanderman, J.; Amundson, Ronald; Blum, A.

    2009-01-01

    Hillslopes have been intensively studied by both geomorphologists and soil scientists. Whereas geomorphologists have focused on the physical soil production and transport on hillslopes, soil scientists have been concerned with the topographic variation of soil geochemical properties. We combined these differing approaches and quantified soil chemical weathering rates along a grass covered hillslope in Coastal California. The hillslope is comprised of both erosional and depositional sections. In the upper eroding section, soil production is balanced by physical erosion and chemical weathering. The hillslope then transitions to a depositional slope where soil accumulates due to a historical reduction of channel incision at the hillslope's base. Measurements of hillslope morphology and soil thickness were combined with the elemental composition of the soil and saprolite, and interpreted through a process-based model that accounts for both chemical weathering and sediment transport. Chemical weathering of the minerals as they moved downslope via sediment transport imparted spatial variation in the geochemical properties of the soil. Inverse modeling of the field and laboratory data revealed that the long-term soil chemical weathering rates peak at 5 g m- 2 yr- 1 at the downslope end of the eroding section and decrease to 1.5 g m- 2 yr- 1 within the depositional section. In the eroding section, soil chemical weathering rates appear to be primarily controlled by the rate of mineral supply via colluvial input from upslope. In the depositional slope, geochemical equilibrium between soil water and minerals appeared to limit the chemical weathering rate. Soil chemical weathering was responsible for removing 6% of the soil production in the eroding section and 5% of colluvial influx in the depositional slope. These were among the lowest weathering rates reported for actively eroding watersheds, which was attributed to the parent material with low amount of weatherable

  18. Spatial and temporal structure within moisture measurements of a stormwater control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kertesz, Ruben; Rhea, Lee; Murray, Daniel J.

    2014-08-01

    This study develops novel geostatistical methods to investigate the spatial relationship between individual soil moisture sensors placed within native soil and #57 crushed stone aggregate subbase. The subbase sensors are beneath a 0.06 ha (0.15 acre) pervious concrete parking lot in Cincinnati, OH, USA. The parking lot treats runon from a 0.198 ha (0.49 acre) asphalt area. A geostatistical characterization of moisture (measured as permittivity) in the subbase beneath pervious concrete indicates that significant spatial correlation is either not present or only present at very short distances (<2.5 m). A two-stage para-statistical model relating antecedent storm moisture to apparent pervious concrete infiltration was developed to identify temporal trends in the data and to detect the clogging processes with relatively simple parameterization. The results suggest that either the placement of the sensors is not sufficient to detect clogging or that clogging is not problematic for the study period. Suggestions are provided to improve future research installations, based upon the findings here. Subbase moisture analysis results are compared with native soil moisture results. Seasonal trends are more pronounced in the native soil than in the subbase. The statistical analyses are applicable to multiple Storm Control Measures (SCM), Best Management Practices (BMP), agriculture, and soil environments. Other studies can determine the statistical power of their sensor installation using the methods applied here, which are flexible enough for multiple applications. Furthermore, data reduction methods presented serve to easily elucidate short-term moisture responses due to rainfall. A quantile response pattern is provided for sensors installed in both subbase and soil.

  19. Benthic sulfate reduction along the Chesapeake Bay central channel. I. Spatial trends and controls

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marvin-DiPasquale, M. C.; Capone, D.G.

    1998-01-01

    Factors controlling the spatial distribution of benthic sulfate reduction (SR) were investigated at 3 stations [upper (UB), mid (MB) and lower bay (LB)] along the Chesapeake Bay (eastern USA) central channel from early spring through late fall, 1989 to 1994. Annual rates of 0 to 12 cm depth-integrated SR were 0.96, 9.62 and 6.33 mol S m-2 yr-1 for UB, MB and LB, respectively, as calculated from 35SO42- incubations. SR was carbon limited at UB, LB, and at the sediment surface at MB, and SO42- limited at depth at MB. Temperature explained 33 to 68% of the variability in annual rates, with an apparent influence on SR which increased in the seaward direction in surface sediments. We speculate that the enhanced response of SR to temperature in LB surface sediments was linked to seasonal variations in macrofaunal activity associated with temperature. Estimates of reduced-S burial indicated that only 4 to 8% of sulfur reduced annually was buried as Fe-S minerals at MB and LB, with the remainder presumably being reoxidized. In contrast, >50% of the sulfur reduced annually was buried at UB, due to comparatively low SR rates and the high concentration of reactive iron in the oligohaline region. SR mineralized 18 to 32% of the annual primary production. Our results indicate that organic quality may be more important than the absolute quantity of organic loading in dictating the magnitude of benthic SR rates along an estuarine gradient. Spatial trends in SR reflected the combined influence of deposited organic matter quality and quantity, SO42- availability, the presence or absence of benthic macrofauna, overlying water dissolved O2 conditions, reduced-S reoxidation dynamics, and iron-sulfide mineral formation.

  20. Thermal Characterization of Defects in Aircraft Structures Via Spatially Controlled Heat Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cramer, K. Elliott; Winfree, William P.

    1997-01-01

    Recent advances in thermal imaging technology have spawned a number of new thermal NDE techniques that provide quantitative information about flaws in aircraft structures. Thermography has a number of advantages as an inspection technique. It is a totally noncontacting, nondestructive, imaging technology capable of inspecting a large area in a matter of a few seconds. The development of fast, inexpensive image processors have aided in the attractiveness of thermography as an NDE technique. These image processors have increased the signal to noise ratio of thermography and facilitated significant advances in post-processing. The resulting digital images enable archival records for comparison with later inspections thus providing a means of monitoring the evolution of damage in a particular structure. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Langley Research Center has developed a thermal NDE technique designed to image a number of potential flaws in aircraft structures. The technique involves injecting a small, spatially controlled heat flux into the outer surface of an aircraft. Images of fatigue cracking, bond integrity and material loss due to corrosion are generated from measurements of the induced surface temperature variations. This paper will present a discussion of the development of the thermal imaging system as well as the techniques used to analyze the resulting thermal images. Spatial tailoring of the heat coupled with the analysis techniques represent a significant improvement in the delectability of flaws over conventional thermal imaging. Results of laboratory experiments on fabricated crack, disbond and material loss samples will be presented to demonstrate the capabilities of the technique. An integral part of the development of this technology is the use of analytic and computational modeling. The experimental results will be compared with these models to demonstrate the utility of such an approach.