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Sample records for controlling arterial-lymphatic conduits

  1. Controlling Wavebreaking in a Viscous Fluid Conduit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Dalton; Maiden, Michelle; Hoefer, Mark

    2015-11-01

    This poster will present a new technique in the experimental investigation of dispersive hydrodynamics. In shallow water flows, internal ocean waves, superfluids, and optical media, wave breaking can be resolved by a dispersive shock wave (DSW). In this work, an experimental method to control the location of DSW formation (gradient catastrophe) is explained. The central idea is to convert an initial value problem (Riemann problem) into an equivalent boundary value problem. The system to which this technique is applied is a fluid conduit resulting from high viscosity contrast between a buoyant interior and heavier exterior fluid. The conduit cross-sectional area is modeled by a nonlinear, conservative, dispersive, third order partial differential equation. Using this model, the aim is to predict the breaking location of a DSW by controlling one boundary condition. An analytical expression for this boundary condition is derived by solving the dispersionless equation backward in time from the desired step via the method of characteristics. This is used in experiment to generate an injection rate profile for a high precision piston pump. This translates to the desired conduit shape. Varying the jump height and desired breaking location indicates good control of DSW formation. This result can be improved by deriving a conduit profile by numerical simulation of the full model equation. Controlling the breaking location of a DSW allows for the investigation of dynamics independent of the boundary. Support provided by NSF CAREER DMS-1255422 , NSF EXTREEMS.

  2. CONDUIT: A New Multidisciplinary Integration Environment for Flight Control Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, Mark B.; Colbourne, Jason D.; Morel, Mark R.; Biezad, Daniel J.; Levine, William S.; Moldoveanu, Veronica

    1997-01-01

    A state-of-the-art computational facility for aircraft flight control design, evaluation, and integration called CONDUIT (Control Designer's Unified Interface) has been developed. This paper describes the CONDUIT tool and case study applications to complex rotary- and fixed-wing fly-by-wire flight control problems. Control system analysis and design optimization methods are presented, including definition of design specifications and system models within CONDUIT, and the multi-objective function optimization (CONSOL-OPTCAD) used to tune the selected design parameters. Design examples are based on flight test programs for which extensive data are available for validation. CONDUIT is used to analyze baseline control laws against pertinent military handling qualities and control system specifications. In both case studies, CONDUIT successfully exploits trade-offs between forward loop and feedback dynamics to significantly improve the expected handling, qualities and minimize the required actuator authority. The CONDUIT system provides a new environment for integrated control system analysis and design, and has potential for significantly reducing the time and cost of control system flight test optimization.

  3. Apparatus for controlling fluid flow in a conduit wall

    DOEpatents

    Glass, S. Jill; Nicolaysen, Scott D.; Beauchamp, Edwin K.

    2003-05-13

    A frangible rupture disk and mounting apparatus for use in blocking fluid flow, generally in a fluid conducting conduit such as a well casing, a well tubing string or other conduits within subterranean boreholes. The disk can also be utilized in above-surface pipes or tanks where temporary and controllable fluid blockage is required. The frangible rupture disk is made from a pre-stressed glass with controllable rupture properties wherein the strength distribution has a standard deviation less than approximately 5% from the mean strength. The frangible rupture disk has controllable operating pressures and rupture pressures.

  4. System and method for bidirectional flow and controlling fluid flow in a conduit

    DOEpatents

    Ortiz, Marcos German

    1999-01-01

    A system for measuring bidirectional flow, including backflow, of fluid in a conduit. The system utilizes a structural mechanism to create a pressure differential in the conduit. Pressure sensors are positioned upstream from the mechanism, at the mechanism, and downstream from the mechanism. Data from the pressure sensors are transmitted to a microprocessor or computer, and pressure differential detected between the pressure sensors is then used to calculate the backflow. Control signals may then be generated by the microprocessor or computer to shut off valves located in the conduit, upon the occurrence of backflow, or to control flow, total material dispersed, etc. in the conduit.

  5. System and method for bidirectional flow and controlling fluid flow in a conduit

    DOEpatents

    Ortiz, M.G.

    1999-03-23

    A system for measuring bidirectional flow, including backflow, of fluid in a conduit is disclosed. The system utilizes a structural mechanism to create a pressure differential in the conduit. Pressure sensors are positioned upstream from the mechanism, at the mechanism, and downstream from the mechanism. Data from the pressure sensors are transmitted to a microprocessor or computer, and pressure differential detected between the pressure sensors is then used to calculate the backflow. Control signals may then be generated by the microprocessor or computer to shut off valves located in the conduit, upon the occurrence of backflow, or to control flow, total material dispersed, etc. in the conduit. 3 figs.

  6. Apparatus for selective disengagement of a fluid transmission conduit and for control of fluid transmission from a well zone

    SciTech Connect

    Mcstravick, D. M.; Roberts, W. M.

    1981-06-02

    An apparatus is provided for the selective disengagement of a fluid transmission conduit which is insertable through a second conduit for communication to a zone within a well bore, and for control of fluid transmission from the zone upon disengagement of the fluid transmission conduit. The apparatus defines a sealing means, usually a packer assembly, which communicates with the interior of the fluid transmission conduit for isolating an annular area between the fluid transmission conduit and the second conduit and above the zone. Valve means carried by the fluid transmission conduit and communicating with the sealing means is manipulatable between open and closed positions for selective isolation of fluid flow through the sealing means to the fluid transmission conduit. Conduit disengaging means are defined above the valve means for communication with and carriage by the fluid transmission conduit, the conduit disengaging means being responsive to manipulation of the fluid transmission conduit after manipulation of the valve means to closed position for disengagement of the fluid transmission conduit.

  7. The Development of the CONDUIT Advanced Control System Design and Evaluation Interface with a Case Study Application to an Advanced Fly by Wire Helicopter Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colbourne, Jason

    1999-01-01

    This report details the development and use of CONDUIT (Control Designer's Unified Interface). CONDUIT is a design tool created at Ames Research Center for the purpose of evaluating and optimizing aircraft control systems against handling qualities. Three detailed design problems addressing the RASCAL UH-60A Black Hawk are included in this report to show the application of CONDUIT to helicopter control system design.

  8. Controls on the explosivity of scoria cone eruptions: Magma segregation at conduit junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pioli, L.; Azzopardi, B. J.; Cashman, K. V.

    2009-10-01

    Violent strombolian (transitional) eruptions are common in mafic arc settings and are characterized by simultaneous explosive activity from scoria cone vents and lava effusion from lateral vents. This dual activity requires magma from the feeder conduit to split into vertical and lateral branches somewhere near the base of the scoria cone. Additionally, if the flow is separated, gas and liquid (+ crystals) components of the magma may be partitioned unevenly between the two branches. Because flow separation requires bubbles to move independently of the liquid over time scales of magma ascent separation is promoted by low magma viscosities and by high magma H 2O content (i.e. sufficiently deep bubble nucleation to allow organization of the gas and liquid phases during magma ascent). Numerical modeling shows that magma and gas distribution between vertical and horizontal branches of a T-junction is controlled by the mass flow rate and the geometry of the system, as well as by magma viscosity. Specifically, we find that mass eruption rates (MERs) between 10 3 and 10 5 kg/s allow the gas phase to concentrate within the central conduit, significantly increasing explosivity of the eruption. Lower MERs produce either strombolian or effusive eruption styles, while MER > 10 5 kg/s prohibit both gas segregation and lateral magma transport, creating explosive eruptions that are not accompanied by effusive activity. These bracketing MER constraints on eruptive transitions are consistent with field observations from recent eruptions of hydrous mafic magmas.

  9. Detection of conduit-controlled ground-water flow in northwestern Puerto Rico using aerial photograph interpretation and geophysical methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodríguez-Martínez, Jesús; Richards, Ronald T.

    2000-01-01

    The development potential of ground-water resources in the karst limestone of northwestern Puerto Rico, in an area extending from the Río Camuy to Aguadilla, is uncertain as a result of limited knowledge of the location of areas where a high density of cavities (interconnected fractures, conduits, and other dissolution features) might suggest the occurrence of high water yields. The presence in northwestern Puerto Rico of numerous coastal submarine springs, cavernous porosity in some of the wells, and rivers with entrenched and underground paths, indicate that it is probable that water-bearing, subterranean interconnected cavities occur in the area between the Río Camuy and Aguadilla. The number of exploratory wells needed to determine the location of these conduits or zones of enhanced secondary porosity could be substantially reduced if more information were available about the location of these subterranean features, greatly reducing the drilling costs associated with a trial-and-error exploratory process. A 3-year study was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Puerto Rico Aqueduct and Sewer Authority, to detect the presence of cavities that might suggest the occurrence of conduit-controlled groundwater flow. Aerial photographs, geologic and topographic maps, and field reconnaissance were used to identify such linear terrain features as ridges, entrenched canyons, and fracture traces. Natural potential and gravity geophysical methods were also used. The following sites were selected for the aerial photograph interpretation and geophysical testing: Caimital Bajo uplands and former Ramey Air Force Base in Aguadilla; Quebrada de los Cedros between Aguadilla and Isabela; the University of Puerto Rico Agricultural Experiment Station, Otilio dairy farm, and Pozo Brujo in Isabela; the Monte Encantado area in Moca and Isabela; and the Rio Camuy cave system in Hatillo and Camuy. In general, the degree of success varied with site and the

  10. Subglacial conduits in sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewitt, Ian

    2016-04-01

    Much of the current understanding of subglacial hydrology is based on the R-channel type model, in which turbulent dissipation and melting causes a roughly semi-circular incision upwards into the ice. The prevalence of such R-channels beneath the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets is poorly known. Beneath sediment-based ice, distributed water flow may prevail, or some form of conduits may still form due to a combination of upwards melting as well as downwards erosion into the subglacial sediments (often referred to as a canal). This study examines the dynamics of such conduits, and implications for large-scale subglacial drainage. Although a relatively standard set of equations has developed to model the evolution and efficiency of R-channels, models of sediment-floored conduits are much less well established; previous models assume steady state, or make ad hoc assumptions about the balance of processes controlling the channel walls. In this study I suggest a (relatively) simple model analogous to that for an R-channel. The model requires consideration of the energy balance that results in melting of the ice roof, and also the erosion, deposition, and creep of the sediments. Implications for the evolution of large-scale drainage systems over subglacial sediment will be discussed, for subglacial floods in Antarctica, and for subglacial erosion and landform development.

  11. Numerical Study of a Groundwater Flow Cycling Controlled By Seawater Intrusion within Karst Conduit Networks Using Modflow-CFP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Z.; Hu, B. X.; Davis, H.

    2014-12-01

    A groundwater flow cycling process between a submarine spring and an inland fresh water spring has been simulated using the latest research version of MODFLOW-CFP (Conduit Flow Process). Spring Creek Springs and Wakulla Spring, which are located in a marine estuary and 18 km inland, respectively, are two major groundwater discharge spots of Woodville Karst Plain (WKP), North Florida, USA. The two springs are found to be connected with karst conduits networks. Rising sea level may put seawater into the Spring Creek Springs and block groundwater discharge, which, in turn, increases freshwater discharge at Wakulla Spring. Three repeating phases in a karst spring flow cycle were proposed from low rainfall period to heavy rainfall period, and back to low rainfall period. During low rainfall periods, seawater flowed back into the conduits at Spring Creek Spring and freshwater was diverted to Wakulla Spring. After heavy rainfall, seawater was pushed back from Spring Creek Spring conduits. A MODFLOW model for WKP was modified to numerically study the groundwater flow cycling and seawater intrusion for three years. Conduit network distribution, high speed groundwater flow and exchange between conduits and matrix domain were simulated through the MODFLOW-CFP model. Rainfall, springs and creeks discharge data were used to calibrate the model. Simulation results catch very well with measurements, and numerically presented the three-phase groundwater cycling. In additional, simulation results were also supported by temperature data measured in conduits, which reflect precipitation recharge to groundwater, and indicate conduit flow direction. Key Words: Karst, Seawater Instrusion, MODFLOW-CFP, Groundwater Cycling

  12. Fluid mechanic phenomena relating to flow control in conduits and pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayazit, Yilmaz

    The attainment of controlled homogenized fluid flow is a major issue in the efficient utilization of internal flows for applications as diverse as heat exchange, electrostatic filtration, water purification, particle conveyance, swirl control, and waste disposal. Among the candidate methodologies for accomplishing the homogenization task, perforated plates provide exceptional versatility and adaptability. The principle that underlies perforated plate flow control is the tendency of a flowing fluid to seek the path of least resistance. This tendency is coupled with the capability of the fluid to "see" what lies ahead, enabling it to adjust its trajectory. That capability is due to streamwise diffusion, which transfers information both upstream and downstream. In contrast, advection is a one-way information transfer mechanism, the direction of transfer coinciding with the direction of fluid motion. The degree of homogenization afforded by perforated plates depends on several geometrical and operating parameters. The geometrical parameters include: (a) plate porosity, (b) plate thickness, (c) aperture diameter, (d) pattern of aperture deployment, and (e) distance between apertures. With respect to operating parameters, those investigated here encompass (f) fluid velocity, (g) flow regime, and (h) angle of attack. Nondimensionalization diminished the total number of parameters to five. Numerical simulation was employed to solve the three-dimensional flow covering a Reynolds number range from 0.01 to 25,000. Results extracted from the solutions included dimensionless pressure drop, downstream distance for disturbance decay, vector diagrams and streamlines, and flow regime boundaries. A paradox where the pressure drop for a thin plate exceeded that for a thick plate was rationalized. The pressure drop characteristics of a perforated plate are akin to those for a porous medium. The Darcy-Forchheimer pressure drop model was extended into the turbulent flow regime for the

  13. Controlled release of vascular endothelial growth factor using poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid microspheres: In vitro characterization and application in polycaprolactone fumarate nerve conduits

    PubMed Central

    Rui, Jing; Dadsetan, Mahrokh; Runge, M. Brett; Spinner, Robert J.; Yaszemski, Michael J.; Windebank, Anthony J.; Wang, Huan

    2014-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent angiogenic stimulator. Controlled release of such stimulators may enhance and guide the vascularization process, and when applied in a nerve conduit may play a role in nerve regeneration. We report the fabrication and in vitro characterization of VEGF encapsulating poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) microspheres and the in vivo application of nerve conduits supplemented with VEGF-containing microspheres. PLGA microspheres containing VEGF were prepared by the double emulsion-solvent evaporation technique. This yielded 83.16% of the microspheres with a diameter < 53 µm. VEGF content measured by ELISA indicated 93.79 ±10.64% encapsulation efficiency. Release kinetics were characterized by an initial burst release of 67.6±8.25% within the first 24 hours, followed by consistent release of approximately 0.34% per day for 4 weeks. Bioactivity of the released VEGF was tested by human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) proliferation assay. VEGF released at all time points enhanced HUVEC proliferation confirming that VEGF retained its bioactivity through the 4-week time period. When the microsphere delivery system was placed in a biosynthetic nerve scaffold, robust nerve regeneration was observed. This study established a novel system for controlled release of growth factors and enables in vivo studies of nerve conduits conditioned with this system. PMID:22019759

  14. Cystolitholapaxy in Ileal Conduit

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Jesse; Giuliano, Katherine; Sopko, Nikolai; Gandhi, Nilay; Jayram, Gautam; Matlaga, Brian R.

    2015-01-01

    Urolithiasis is a common complication of surgically treated bladder exstrophy. We report the case of a 43-year-old woman with a history of exstrophy, cystectomy, and ileal conduit urinary diversion presenting with a large calculus at the stomal neck of her conduit in the absence of a structural defect. PMID:26793546

  15. Structural controls on karstic conduits in a collisional orogen (Sierra de las Nieves, Betic Cordillera, S Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedrera, A.; Luque-Espinar, J. A.; Martos-Rosillo, S.; Pardo-Igúzquiza, E.; Durán-Valsero, J. J.; Martínez-Moreno, F.; Guardiola-Albert, C.

    2015-06-01

    We characterize the fracture pattern, including both meso-scale joints and macro-scale faults, within the central sector of Sierra de las Nieves (Betic Cordillera, S Spain), which contains one of the largest karstification systems in Europe. Structural data were compared with the direction pattern of the karstic conduit network of the largest caves. Carbonate rocks were deformed in a collisional setting and exposed at the surface since the early Miocene. Normal and normal-oblique faults trending NW-SE to WNW-ESE are the most prominent brittle structures, having formed coevally with shorter NE-SW normal to normal-dextral after the main thrusting phase. In addition, two main open joint sets striking NW-SE and NE-SW developed on a broad scale. Orthogonal normal faults and open joints suggest an extensional setting characterized by horizontal minimum (S3) and intermediate (S2) stress axes of similar magnitudes that intermittently shifted their positions during the middle-to-late Miocene. Vertical water flow coming from direct recharge sectors tends to infiltrate across these high-dipping faults, mainly concentrating at fault intersections, thus favoring sub-vertical conduit formation within the vadose zone. Horizontal paleo-phreatic levels are perched linked to the recent uplift undergone by the sector, giving us the opportunity to analyze the incidence of fractures at the phreatic zone. Joint sets determine the hydraulic anisotropy within the former phreatic levels. Because our study illustrates the primary role of diverse tectonic structures during massive multiphase cave development above and below the water table, it could contribute to better constraining of the models of karstic conduit formation.

  16. Multicriteria Gain Tuning for Rotorcraft Flight Controls (also entitled The Development of the Conduit Advanced Control System Design and Evaluation Interface with a Case Study Application Fly by Wire Helicopter Design)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biezad, Daniel

    1997-01-01

    Handling qualities analysis and control law design would seem to be naturally complimenting components of aircraft flight control system design, however these two closely coupled disciplines are often not well integrated in practice. Handling qualities engineers and control system engineers may work in separate groups within an aircraft company. Flight control system engineers and handling quality specialists may come from different backgrounds and schooling and are often not aware of the other group's research. Thus while the handling qualities specifications represent desired aircraft response characteristics, these are rarely incorporated directly in the control system design process. Instead modem control system design techniques are based on servo-loop robustness specifications, and simple representations of the desired control response. Comprehensive handling qualities analysis is often left until the end of the design cycle and performed as a check of the completed design for satisfactory performance. This can lead to costly redesign or less than satisfactory aircraft handling qualities when the flight testing phase is reached. The desire to integrate the fields of handling qualities and flight,control systems led to the development of the CONDUIT system. This tool facilitates control system designs that achieve desired handling quality requirements and servo-loop specifications in a single design process. With CONDUIT, the control system engineer is now able to directly design and control systems to meet the complete handling specifications. CONDUIT allows the designer to retain a preferred control law structure, but then tunes the system parameters to meet the handling quality requirements.

  17. The Mesencephalic Reticular Formation as a Conduit for Primate Collicular Gaze Control: Tectal Inputs to Neurons Targeting the Spinal Cord and Medulla

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, Eddie; Warren, Susan; May, Paul J.

    2009-01-01

    The superior colliculus (SC), which directs orienting movements of both the eyes and head, is reciprocally connected to the mesencephalic reticular formation (MRF), suggesting the latter is involved in gaze control. The MRF has been provisionally subdivided to include a rostral portion, which subserves vertical gaze, and a caudal portion, which subserves horizontal gaze. Both regions contain cells projecting downstream that may provide a conduit for tectal signals targeting the gaze control centers which direct head movements. We determined the distribution of cells targeting the cervical spinal cord and rostral medullary reticular formation (MdRF), and investigated whether these MRF neurons receive input from the SC by the use of dual tracer techniques in Macaca fascicularis monkeys. Either biotinylated dextran amine or Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin was injected into the SC. Wheat germ agglutinin conjugated horseradish peroxidase was placed into the ipsilateral cervical spinal cord or medial MdRF to retrogradely label MRF neurons. A small number of medially located cells in the rostral and caudal MRF were labeled following spinal cord injections, and greater numbers were labeled in the same region following MdRF injections. In both cases, anterogradely labeled tectoreticular terminals were observed in close association with retrogradely labeled neurons. These close associations between tectoreticular terminals and neurons with descending projections suggest the presence of a trans-MRF pathway that provides a conduit for tectal control over head orienting movements. The medial location of these reticulospinal and reticuloreticular neurons suggests this MRF region may be specialized for head movement control. PMID:19645020

  18. Transverse colon conduit diversion

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, J.D.; Buchsbaum, H.J.

    1986-05-01

    The versatility and other advantages of the transverse colon conduit for urinary diversion have been described and implemented in 50 patients. Because most patients considered for this procedure will be at high risk because of a history of significant pelvic irradiation, underlying malignancy, poor renal function, fistula, and so forth, the technical details of surgery and patient selection cannot be minimized. The transverse colon segment is indicated for primary supravesical diversion as well as for salvage of problems related to ileal conduits. Adenocarcinoma of the colon is an unlikely long-term complication of this form of diversion because the fecal stream is absent. Now that the transverse colon conduit has been used for more than 10 years, meaningful comparisons with ileal segments should soon be available.

  19. Nuclear Magnetic Conduits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desantis, Rich

    2008-10-01

    Point charges are not conduits of magnetism. Vacuum gaps between charges prevent superconductivity. Magnetism occurs w/o charge velocity. A changing magnetic field can add magnetism, w/o magnetism's centripetal force adding speed. Voltage is not charge repulsion energy. Passing electrons through a stationary electron's field cannot reduce its field. Passing the external electrons through a charged capacitor's field discharges the capacitor. Chemical bonds extend between atoms. A superconductive magnet contains a superconductive molecule, the length of its wire. Superconductivity dictates that chemical bonding material is non-vacuum and non-point charge. Its unit is an electron/proton fusion called an ABION. Unpaired abions attract all other unpaired abions within or between atoms. Paired abions have reduced attraction for other abions. Helium is inert because its abions are paired. A lithium atom includes an unpaired abion. Superconductive abions are nuclear magnetic conduits. Equality of transference numbers in electrochemistry is evidence of conduits. In fuel cells and semiconductors, paired voltage-induced redox reactions convert lines of abions into conduits. This temporarily converts bulk insulators to conductors.

  20. Conduit purging device and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilks, Michael T. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A device for purging gas comprises a conduit assembly defining an interior volume. The conduit assembly comprises a first conduit portion having an open first end and an open second end and a second conduit portion having an open first end and a closed second end. The open second end of the first conduit portion is disposed proximate to the open first end of the second conduit portion to define a weld region. The device further comprises a supply element supplying a gas to the interior volume at a substantially constant rate and a vent element venting the gas from the interior volume at a rate that maintains the gas in the interior volume within a pressure range suitable to hold a weld bead in the weld region in equilibrium during formation of a weld to join the first conduit portion and the second conduit portion.

  1. Seal between metal and ceramic conduits

    DOEpatents

    Underwood, Richard Paul; Tentarelli, Stephen Clyde

    2015-02-03

    A seal between a ceramic conduit and a metal conduit of an ion transport membrane device consisting of a sealing surface of ceramic conduit, a sealing surface of ceramic conduit, a single gasket body, and a single compliant interlayer.

  2. Flexible cryogenic conduit

    DOEpatents

    Brindza, Paul Daniel; Wines, Robin Renee; Takacs, James Joseph

    1999-01-01

    A flexible and relatively low cost cryogenic conduit is described. The flexible cryogenic conduit of the present invention comprises a first inner corrugated tube with single braided serving, a second outer corrugated tube with single braided serving concentric with the inner corrugated tube, and arranged outwardly about the periphery of the inner corrugated tube and between the inner and outer corrugated tubes: a superinsulation layer; a one half lap layer of polyester ribbon; a one half lap layer of copper ribbon; a spirally wound refrigeration tube; a second one half lap layer of copper ribbon; a second one half lap layer of polyester ribbon; a second superinsulation layer; a third one half lap layer of polyester ribbon; and a spirally wound stretchable and compressible filament.

  3. Flexible cryogenic conduit

    SciTech Connect

    Brindza, P.D.; Wines, R.R.; Takacs, J.J.

    1999-12-21

    A flexible and relatively low cost cryogenic conduit is described. The flexible cryogenic conduit of the present invention comprises a first inner corrugated tube with single braided serving, a second outer corrugated tube with single braided serving concentric with the inner corrugated tube, and arranged outwardly about the periphery of the inner corrugated tube and between the inner and outer corrugated tubes: a superinsulation layer; a one half lap layer of polyester ribbon; a one half lap layer of copper ribbon; a spirally wound refrigeration tube; a second one half lap layer of copper ribbon; a second one half lap layer of polyester ribbon; a second superinsulation layer; a third one half lap layer of polyester ribbon; and a spirally wound stretchable and compressible filament.

  4. A Controlled Design of Aligned and Random Nanofibers for 3D Bi-functionalized Nerve Conduits Fabricated via a Novel Electrospinning Set-up.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong In; Hwang, Tae In; Aguilar, Ludwig Erik; Park, Chan Hee; Kim, Cheol Sang

    2016-01-01

    Scaffolds made of aligned nanofibers are favorable for nerve regeneration due to their superior nerve cell attachment and proliferation. However, it is challenging not only to produce a neat mat or a conduit form with aligned nanofibers but also to use these for surgical applications as a nerve guide conduit due to their insufficient mechanical strength. Furthermore, no studies have been reported on the fabrication of aligned nanofibers and randomly-oriented nanofibers on the same mat. In this study, we have successfully produced a mat with both aligned and randomly-oriented nanofibers by using a novel electrospinning set up. A new conduit with a highly-aligned electrospun mat is produced with this modified electrospinning method, and this proposed conduit with favorable features, such as selective permeability, hydrophilicity and nerve growth directional steering, were fabricated as nerve guide conduits (NGCs). The inner surface of the nerve conduit is covered with highly aligned electrospun nanofibers and is able to enhance the proliferation of neural cells. The central part of the tube is double-coated with randomly-oriented nanofibers over the aligned nanofibers, strengthening the weak mechanical strength of the aligned nanofibers. PMID:27021221

  5. A Controlled Design of Aligned and Random Nanofibers for 3D Bi-functionalized Nerve Conduits Fabricated via a Novel Electrospinning Set-up

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong In; Hwang, Tae In; Aguilar, Ludwig Erik; Park, Chan Hee; Kim, Cheol Sang

    2016-01-01

    Scaffolds made of aligned nanofibers are favorable for nerve regeneration due to their superior nerve cell attachment and proliferation. However, it is challenging not only to produce a neat mat or a conduit form with aligned nanofibers but also to use these for surgical applications as a nerve guide conduit due to their insufficient mechanical strength. Furthermore, no studies have been reported on the fabrication of aligned nanofibers and randomly-oriented nanofibers on the same mat. In this study, we have successfully produced a mat with both aligned and randomly-oriented nanofibers by using a novel electrospinning set up. A new conduit with a highly-aligned electrospun mat is produced with this modified electrospinning method, and this proposed conduit with favorable features, such as selective permeability, hydrophilicity and nerve growth directional steering, were fabricated as nerve guide conduits (NGCs). The inner surface of the nerve conduit is covered with highly aligned electrospun nanofibers and is able to enhance the proliferation of neural cells. The central part of the tube is double-coated with randomly-oriented nanofibers over the aligned nanofibers, strengthening the weak mechanical strength of the aligned nanofibers. PMID:27021221

  6. Portable conduit retention apparatus for releasably retaining a conduit therein

    DOEpatents

    Metzger, R.H.

    1998-07-07

    Portable conduit retention apparatus is described for releasably retaining a conduit therein. The apparatus releasably retains the conduit out of the way of nearby personnel and equipment. The apparatus includes a portable support frame defining a slot therein having an open mouth portion in communication with the slot for receiving the conduit through the open mouth portion and into the slot. A retention bar is pivotally connected to the support frame adjacent the mouth portion for releasably retaining the conduit in the slot. The retention bar freely pivots to a first position, so that the mouth portion is unblocked in order that the conduit is received through the mouth portion and into the slot. In addition, the retention bar freely pivots to a second position, so that the mouth portion is blocked in order that the conduit is retained in the slot. The conduit is released from the slot by pivoting the retention bar to the first position to unblock the mouth portion and thereafter manipulating the conduit from the slot and through the mouth portion. The apparatus may further include a mounting member attached to the support frame for mounting the apparatus on a vertical support surface. Another embodiment of the apparatus includes a shoe assembly of predetermined weight removably connected to the support frame for resting the apparatus on a floor in such a manner that the apparatus is substantially stationary on the floor. 6 figs.

  7. Portable conduit retention apparatus for releasably retaining a conduit therein

    DOEpatents

    Metzger, Richard H.

    1998-01-01

    Portable conduit retention apparatus for releasably retaining a conduit therein. The apparatus releasably retains the conduit out of the way of nearby personnel and equipment. The apparatus includes a portable support frame defining a slot therein having an open mouth portion in communication with the slot for receiving the conduit through the open mouth portion and into the slot. A retention bar is pivotally connected to the support frame adjacent the mouth portion for releasably retaining the conduit in the slot. The retention bar freely pivots to a first position, so that the mouth portion is unblocked in order that the conduit is received through the mouth portion and into the slot. In addition, the retention bar freely pivots to a second position, so that the mouth portion is blocked in order that the conduit is retained in the slot. The conduit is released from the slot by pivoting the retention bar to the first position to unblock the mouth portion and thereafter manipulating the conduit from the slot and through the mouth portion. The apparatus may further include a mounting member attached to the support frame for mounting the apparatus on a vertical support surface. Another embodiment of the apparatus includes a shoe assembly of predetermined weight removably connected to the support frame for resting the apparatus on a floor in such a manner that the apparatus is substantially stationary on the floor.

  8. Conduit Coating Abrasion Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Mary K.

    2013-01-01

    During my summer internship at NASA I have been working alongside the team members of the RESTORE project. Engineers working on the RESTORE project are creating ·a device that can go into space and service satellites that no longer work due to gas shortage or other technical difficulties. In order to complete the task of refueling the satellite a hose needs to be used and covered with a material that can withstand effects of space. The conduit coating abrasion test will help the researchers figure out what type of thermal coating to use on the hose that will be refueling the satellites. The objective of the project is to determine whether or not the conduit coating will withstand the effects of space. For the RESTORE project I will help with various aspects of the testing that needed to be done in order to determine which type of conduit should be used for refueling the satellite. During my time on the project I will be assisting with wiring a relay board that connected to the test set up by soldering, configuring wires and testing for continuity. Prior to the testing I will work on creating the testing site and help write the procedure for the test. The testing will take place over a span of two weeks and lead to an informative conclusion. Working alongside various RESTORE team members I will assist with the project's documentation and records. All in all, throughout my internship at NASA I hope to learn a number of valuable skills and be a part of a hard working team of engineers.

  9. Design of barrier coatings on kink-resistant peripheral nerve conduits.

    PubMed

    Clements, Basak Acan; Bushman, Jared; Murthy, N Sanjeeva; Ezra, Mindy; Pastore, Christopher M; Kohn, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report on the design of braided peripheral nerve conduits with barrier coatings. Braiding of extruded polymer fibers generates nerve conduits with excellent mechanical properties, high flexibility, and significant kink-resistance. However, braiding also results in variable levels of porosity in the conduit wall, which can lead to the infiltration of fibrous tissue into the interior of the conduit. This problem can be controlled by the application of secondary barrier coatings. Using a critical size defect in a rat sciatic nerve model, the importance of controlling the porosity of the nerve conduit walls was explored. Braided conduits without barrier coatings allowed cellular infiltration that limited nerve recovery. Several types of secondary barrier coatings were tested in animal studies, including (1) electrospinning a layer of polymer fibers onto the surface of the conduit and (2) coating the conduit with a cross-linked hyaluronic acid-based hydrogel. Sixteen weeks after implantation, hyaluronic acid-coated conduits had higher axonal density, displayed higher muscle weight, and better electrophysiological signal recovery than uncoated conduits or conduits having an electrospun layer of polymer fibers. This study indicates that braiding is a promising method of fabrication to improve the mechanical properties of peripheral nerve conduits and demonstrates the need to control the porosity of the conduit wall to optimize functional nerve recovery. PMID:26977288

  10. Design of barrier coatings on kink-resistant peripheral nerve conduits

    PubMed Central

    Clements, Basak Acan; Bushman, Jared; Murthy, N Sanjeeva; Ezra, Mindy; Pastore, Christopher M; Kohn, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report on the design of braided peripheral nerve conduits with barrier coatings. Braiding of extruded polymer fibers generates nerve conduits with excellent mechanical properties, high flexibility, and significant kink-resistance. However, braiding also results in variable levels of porosity in the conduit wall, which can lead to the infiltration of fibrous tissue into the interior of the conduit. This problem can be controlled by the application of secondary barrier coatings. Using a critical size defect in a rat sciatic nerve model, the importance of controlling the porosity of the nerve conduit walls was explored. Braided conduits without barrier coatings allowed cellular infiltration that limited nerve recovery. Several types of secondary barrier coatings were tested in animal studies, including (1) electrospinning a layer of polymer fibers onto the surface of the conduit and (2) coating the conduit with a cross-linked hyaluronic acid-based hydrogel. Sixteen weeks after implantation, hyaluronic acid-coated conduits had higher axonal density, displayed higher muscle weight, and better electrophysiological signal recovery than uncoated conduits or conduits having an electrospun layer of polymer fibers. This study indicates that braiding is a promising method of fabrication to improve the mechanical properties of peripheral nerve conduits and demonstrates the need to control the porosity of the conduit wall to optimize functional nerve recovery. PMID:26977288

  11. Numerical study of groundwater flow cycling controlled by seawater/freshwater interaction in a coastal karst aquifer through conduit network using CFPv2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zexuan; Hu, Bill X.; Davis, Hal; Kish, Stephen

    2015-11-01

    In this study, a groundwater flow cycling in a karst springshed and an interaction between two springs, Spring Creek Springs and Wakulla Springs, through a subground conduit network are numerically simulated using CFPv2, the latest research version of MODFLOW-CFP (Conduit Flow Process). The Spring Creek Springs and Wakulla Springs, located in a marine estuary and 11 miles inland, respectively, are two major groundwater discharge spots in the Woodville Karst Plain (WKP), North Florida, USA. A three-phase conceptual model of groundwater flow cycling between the two springs and surface water recharge from a major surface creek (Lost Creek) was proposed in various rainfall conditions. A high permeable subground karst conduit network connecting the two springs was found by tracer tests and cave diving. Flow rate of discharge, salinity, sea level and tide height at Spring Creek Springs could significantly affect groundwater discharge and water stage at Wakulla Springs simultaneously. Based on the conceptual model, a numerical hybrid discrete-continuum groundwater flow model is developed using CFPv2 and calibrated by field measurements. Non-laminar flows in conduits and flow exchange between conduits and porous medium are implemented in the hybrid coupling numerical model. Time-variable salinity and equivalent freshwater head boundary conditions at the submarine spring as well as changing recharges have significant impacts on seawater/freshwater interaction and springs' discharges. The developed numerical model is used to simulate the dynamic hydrological process and quantitatively represent the three-phase conceptual model from June 2007 to June 2010. Simulated results of two springs' discharges match reasonably well to measurements with correlation coefficients 0.891 and 0.866 at Spring Creeks Springs and Wakulla Springs, respectively. The impacts of sea level rise on regional groundwater flow field and relationship between the inland springs and submarine springs are

  12. Numerical study of groundwater flow cycling controlled by seawater/freshwater interaction in a coastal karst aquifer through conduit network using CFPv2.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zexuan; Hu, Bill X; Davis, Hal; Kish, Stephen

    2015-11-01

    In this study, a groundwater flow cycling in a karst springshed and an interaction between two springs, Spring Creek Springs and Wakulla Springs, through a subground conduit network are numerically simulated using CFPv2, the latest research version of MODFLOW-CFP (Conduit Flow Process). The Spring Creek Springs and Wakulla Springs, located in a marine estuary and 11 miles inland, respectively, are two major groundwater discharge spots in the Woodville Karst Plain (WKP), North Florida, USA. A three-phase conceptual model of groundwater flow cycling between the two springs and surface water recharge from a major surface creek (Lost Creek) was proposed in various rainfall conditions. A high permeable subground karst conduit network connecting the two springs was found by tracer tests and cave diving. Flow rate of discharge, salinity, sea level and tide height at Spring Creek Springs could significantly affect groundwater discharge and water stage at Wakulla Springs simultaneously. Based on the conceptual model, a numerical hybrid discrete-continuum groundwater flow model is developed using CFPv2 and calibrated by field measurements. Non-laminar flows in conduits and flow exchange between conduits and porous medium are implemented in the hybrid coupling numerical model. Time-variable salinity and equivalent freshwater head boundary conditions at the submarine spring as well as changing recharges have significant impacts on seawater/freshwater interaction and springs' discharges. The developed numerical model is used to simulate the dynamic hydrological process and quantitatively represent the three-phase conceptual model from June 2007 to June 2010. Simulated results of two springs' discharges match reasonably well to measurements with correlation coefficients 0.891 and 0.866 at Spring Creeks Springs and Wakulla Springs, respectively. The impacts of sea level rise on regional groundwater flow field and relationship between the inland springs and submarine springs are

  13. Synergistic effects of micropatterned biodegradable conduits and Schwann cells on sciatic nerve regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutkowski, Gregory E.; Miller, Cheryl A.; Jeftinija, Srdija; Mallapragada, Surya K.

    2004-09-01

    This paper describes a novel biodegradable conduit that provides a combination of physical, chemical and biological cues at the cellular level to facilitate peripheral nerve regeneration. The conduit consists of a porous poly(D,L-lactic acid) (PDLLA) tubular support structure with a micropatterned inner lumen. Schwann cells were pre-seeded into the lumen to provide additional trophic support. Conduits with micropatterned inner lumens pre-seeded with Schwann cells (MS) were fabricated and compared with three types of conduits used as controls: M (conduits with micropatterned inner lumens without pre-seeded Schwann cells), NS (conduits without micropatterned inner lumens pre-seeded with Schwann cells) and N (conduits without micropatterned inner lumens, without pre-seeded Schwann cells). The conduits were implanted in rats with 1 cm sciatic nerve transections and the regeneration and functional recovery were compared in the four different cases. The number or size of regenerated axons did not vary significantly among the different conduits. The time of recovery, and the sciatic function index, however, were significantly enhanced using the MS conduits, based on qualitative observations as well as quantitative measurements using walking track analysis. This demonstrates that biodegradable micropatterned conduits pre-seeded with Schwann cells that provide a combination of physical, chemical and biological guidance cues for regenerating axons at the cellular level offer a better alternative for repairing sciatic nerve transactions than conventional biodegradable conduits.

  14. A Tunable Magnetic Domain Wall Conduit Regulating Nanoparticle Diffusion.

    PubMed

    Tierno, Pietro; Johansen, Tom H; Sancho, José M

    2016-08-10

    We demonstrate a general and robust method to confine on a plane strongly diffusing nanoparticles in water by using size tunable magnetic channels. These virtual conduits are realized with pairs of movable Bloch walls located within an epitaxially grown ferrite garnet film. We show that once inside the magnetic conduit the particles experience an effective local parabolic potential in the transverse direction, while freely diffusing along the conduit. The stiffness of the magnetic potential is determined as a function of field amplitude that varies the width of the magnetic channel. Precise control of the degree of confinement is demonstrated by tuning the applied field. The magnetic conduit is then used to realize single files of nonpassing particles and to induce periodic condensation of an ensemble of particles into parallel stripes in a completely controllable and reversible manner. PMID:27434042

  15. Frictional processes in volcanic conduits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavallee, Y.; Kendrick, J. E.; Petrakova, L.; Mitchell, T. M.; Heap, M. J.; Hirose, T.; Di Toro, G.; Hess, K.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2012-12-01

    The ascent of high-viscosity magma in upper conduits proceeds via the development of shear zones, which commonly fracture, producing fault surfaces that control the last hundreds of meters of ascent by frictional slip. Frictional slip in conduits may occur along magma-rock, rock-rock and magma-magma interfaces, with or without the presence of gouge material. During slip, frictional work is converted to heat, which may result in strong geochemical disequilibria as well as rheological variations, with important consequences on the dynamics of magma ascent. Here, we present a thermo-mechanical study on the ability of volcanic rocks (with different proportions of interstitial glass, crystals and vesicles) to sustain friction, and in some cases to melt, using a high-velocity rotary apparatus. The friction experiments were conducted at a range of slip velocities (1.3 mm/s to 1.3 m/s) along a (fault) plane subjected to different normal stresses (0.5-10 MPa). We observe that the behaviour of volcanic rocks during slip events varies remarkably. Frictional slip along dense crystal-rich rocks is characterized by the occurrence of comminution, commonly followed by melting. In contrast, slip along dense glass rocks rarely proceeds along a discrete plane - a glass subjected to slip tends to shatter as temperature enters the glass transition interval. Alternatively, glass can be slipped against a crystalline material. In the case of porous material, slip generally results in rapid abrasion of the porous material, producing a high amount of ash particles. The inability of the material to preserve its slip surface inhibits the generation of significant heat. Finally, during experiments in which ash gouge occupies the slip zone, friction generates a modest amount of heat and does not induce significant comminution along the slip plane. Mechanically, the frictional coefficients of the tested volcanic material vary significantly, depending whether the material may sustain slip (and

  16. Peripheral nerve conduits: technology update

    PubMed Central

    Arslantunali, D; Dursun, T; Yucel, D; Hasirci, N; Hasirci, V

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury is a worldwide clinical problem which could lead to loss of neuronal communication along sensory and motor nerves between the central nervous system (CNS) and the peripheral organs and impairs the quality of life of a patient. The primary requirement for the treatment of complete lesions is a tension-free, end-to-end repair. When end-to-end repair is not possible, peripheral nerve grafts or nerve conduits are used. The limited availability of autografts, and drawbacks of the allografts and xenografts like immunological reactions, forced the researchers to investigate and develop alternative approaches, mainly nerve conduits. In this review, recent information on the various types of conduit materials (made of biological and synthetic polymers) and designs (tubular, fibrous, and matrix type) are being presented. PMID:25489251

  17. Further Development, Support and Enhancement of CONDUIT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veronica, Moldoveanu; Levine, William S.

    1999-01-01

    From the first airplanes steered by handles, wheels, and pedals to today's advanced aircraft, there has been a century of revolutionary inventions, all of them contributing to flight quality. The stability and controllability of aircraft as they appear to a pilot are called flying or handling qualities. Many years after the first airplanes flew, flying qualities were identified and ranked from desirable to unsatisfactory. Later on engineers developed design methods to satisfy these practical criteria. CONDUIT, which stands for Control Designer's Unified Interface, is a modern software package that provides a methodology for optimization of flight control systems in order to improve the flying qualities. CONDUIT is dependent on an the optimization engine called CONSOL-OPTCAD (C-O). C-O performs multicriterion parametric optimization. C-O was successfully tested on a variety of control problems. The optimization-based computational system, C-O, requires a particular control system description as a MATLAB file and possesses the ability to modify the vector of design parameters in an attempt to satisfy performance objectives and constraints specified by the designer, in a C-type file. After the first optimization attempts on the UH-60A control system, an early interface system, named GIFCORCODE (Graphical Interface for CONSOL-OPTCAD for Rotorcraft Controller Design) was created.

  18. 26 CFR 1.881-3 - Conduit financing arrangements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... solely from ownership of a controlling interest in the issuer in cases where the control does not arise... approve any guarantee of a financing transaction or to exercise general supervision and control over the... 26 Internal Revenue 9 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Conduit financing arrangements. 1.881-3...

  19. 30 CFR 18.39 - Hose conduit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... MINING PRODUCTS ELECTRIC MOTOR-DRIVEN MINE EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES Construction and Design Requirements § 18.39 Hose conduit. Hose conduit shall be provided for mechanical protection of all machine...

  20. 30 CFR 18.39 - Hose conduit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... MINING PRODUCTS ELECTRIC MOTOR-DRIVEN MINE EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES Construction and Design Requirements § 18.39 Hose conduit. Hose conduit shall be provided for mechanical protection of all machine...

  1. 30 CFR 18.39 - Hose conduit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... MINING PRODUCTS ELECTRIC MOTOR-DRIVEN MINE EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES Construction and Design Requirements § 18.39 Hose conduit. Hose conduit shall be provided for mechanical protection of all machine...

  2. 30 CFR 18.39 - Hose conduit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... MINING PRODUCTS ELECTRIC MOTOR-DRIVEN MINE EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES Construction and Design Requirements § 18.39 Hose conduit. Hose conduit shall be provided for mechanical protection of all machine...

  3. 30 CFR 18.39 - Hose conduit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... MINING PRODUCTS ELECTRIC MOTOR-DRIVEN MINE EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES Construction and Design Requirements § 18.39 Hose conduit. Hose conduit shall be provided for mechanical protection of all machine...

  4. Gas slug ascent through rheologically stratified conduits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capponi, Antonio; James, Mike R.; Lane, Steve J.

    2016-04-01

    Textural and petrological evidence has indicated the presence of viscous, degassed magma layers at the top of the conduit at Stromboli. This layer acts as a plug through which gas slugs burst and it is thought to have a role in controlling the eruptive dynamics. Here, we present the results of laboratory experiments which detail the range of slug flow configurations that can develop in a rheologically stratified conduit. A gas slug can burst (1) after being fully accommodated within the plug volume, (2) whilst its base is still in the underlying low-viscosity liquid or (3) within a low-viscosity layer dynamically emplaced above the plug during the slug ascent. We illustrate the relevance of the same flow configurations at volcanic-scale through a new experimentally-validated 1D model and 3D computational fluid dynamic simulations. Applied to Stromboli, our results show that gas volume, plug thickness, plug viscosity and conduit radius control the transition between each configuration; in contrast, the configuration distribution seems insensitive to the viscosity of magma beneath the plug, which acts mainly to deliver the slug into the plug. Each identified flow configuration encompasses a variety of processes including dynamic narrowing and widening of the conduit, generation of instabilities along the falling liquid film, transient blockages of the slug path and slug break-up. All these complexities, in turn, lead to variations in the slug overpressure, mirrored by changes in infrasonic signatures which are also associated to different eruptive styles. Acoustic amplitudes are strongly dependent on the flow configuration in which the slugs burst, with both acoustic peak amplitudes and waveform shapes reflecting different burst dynamics. When compared to infrasonic signals from Stromboli, the similarity between real signals and laboratory waveforms suggests that the burst of a slug through a plug may represent a viable first-order mechanism for the generation of

  5. Urinary conduits in gynecologic oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Hancock, K.C.; Copeland, L.J.; Gershenson, D.M.; Saul, P.B.; Wharton, J.T.; Rutledge, F.N.

    1986-05-01

    Over an 11-year period (1971 to 1981), 212 urinary conduit surgeries were performed by the Department of Gynecology at the University of Texas, M. D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute at Houston. The urinary diversions were performed as part of the pelvic exenteration operation in 154 patients, for radiation injury in 48 patients, and for palliation of disease recurrence in ten patients. Ninety-three percent had prior pelvic radiotherapy. Various segments of the gastrointestinal tract were used, including the ileum (102), sigmoid colon (99), transverse colon (four), jejunum (four), and others (three). Fifty percent of abnormal preoperative intravenous pyelograms reverted to normal after urinary diversion. Revision of the stoma was required in 6%. Other complications included infection (18%), renal loss (17%), and urinary leaks and fistulae (3%). The overall perioperative mortality was 7%, decreasing from 11% in the first five years to 3% during the last six years. Ureteral stents were routinely used. When selecting a segment of bowel for a urinary conduit, both tissue quality and mobility are important. Mortality and morbidity of urinary conduit surgery continues to decrease with experience.

  6. Epineurium-mimicking chitosan conduits for peripheral nervous tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Nawrotek, Katarzyna; Tylman, Michał; Rudnicka, Karolina; Gatkowska, Justyna; Wieczorek, Marek

    2016-11-01

    In this investigation, we report on a fabrication method of epineurium-mimicking tubular conduits based on electrodeposition from chitosan solution. The pre-enrichment of electrodeposition solution with hyaluronic acid and/or collagen components results in structures which structural, morphological, and physicochemical properties can be controlled. In order to determine the optimal composition of the initial chitosan solution resulting in conduits meeting the requirements imposed on peripheral nerve implants, we perform chemical, physical, and biological studies. Both the molecular weight of hyaluronic acid and the concentration of additives are found to be crucial for the final mechanical as well as biological performance of conduits. Because, the obtained structures show biocompatibility when contacting with a mouse hippocampal cell line (mHippoE-18), we further plan to test their application potential on an animal model. PMID:27516256

  7. 32. ISOMETRIC VIEW OF PIPING PLAN, SHOWING PATH OF CONDUIT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. ISOMETRIC VIEW OF PIPING PLAN, SHOWING PATH OF CONDUIT FROM CONTROL BUNKER TO SHIELDING TANK. F.C. TORKELSON DRAWING NUMBER 842-ARVFS-701-P-1. INEL INDEX CODE NUMBER: 075 0701 60 851 151977. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Advanced Reentry Vehicle Fusing System, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  8. Method and apparatus for inspecting conduits

    SciTech Connect

    Spisak, M.J.; Nance, R.A.

    1997-01-07

    An apparatus and method for ultrasonic inspection of a conduit are provided. The method involves directing a first ultrasonic pulse at a particular area of the conduit at a first angle, receiving the reflected sound from the first ultrasonic pulse, substantially simultaneously or subsequently in very close time proximity directing a second ultrasonic pulse at said area of the conduit from a substantially different angle than said first angle, receiving the reflected sound from the second ultrasonic pulse, and comparing the received sounds to determine if there is a defect in that area of the conduit. The apparatus of the invention is suitable for carrying out the above-described method. The method and apparatus of the present invention provide the ability to distinguish between sounds reflected by defects in a conduit and sounds reflected by harmless deposits associated with the conduit. 3 figs.

  9. Method and apparatus for inspecting conduits

    DOEpatents

    Spisak, Michael J.; Nance, Roy A.

    1997-01-01

    An apparatus and method for ultrasonic inspection of a conduit are provided. The method involves directing a first ultrasonic pulse at a particular area of the conduit at a first angle, receiving the reflected sound from the first ultrasonic pulse, substantially simultaneously or subsequently in very close time proximity directing a second ultrasonic pulse at said area of the conduit from a substantially different angle than said first angle, receiving the reflected sound from the second ultrasonic pulse, and comparing the received sounds to determine if there is a defect in that area of the conduit. The apparatus of the invention is suitable for carrying out the above-described method. The method and apparatus of the present invention provide the ability to distinguish between sounds reflected by defects in a conduit and sounds reflected by harmless deposits associated with the conduit.

  10. Understanding Volcanic Conduit Dynamics: from Experimental Fragmentation to Volcanic Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arciniega-Ceballos, A.; Alatorre-Ibarguengoitia, M. A.; Scheu, B.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2011-12-01

    The investigation of conduit dynamics at high pressure, under controlled laboratory conditions is a powerful tool to understand the physics behind volcanic processes before an eruption. In this work, we analyze the characteristics of the seismic response of an "experimental volcano" focusing on the dynamics of the conduit behavior during the fragmentation process of volcanic rocks. The "experimental volcano" is represented by a shock tube apparatus, which consists of a low-pressure voluminous tank (3 x 0.40 m), for sample recovery; and a high-pressure pipe-like conduit (16.5 x 2,5 cm), which represents the volcanic source mechanism, where rock samples are pressurized and fragmented. These two serial steel pipes are connected and sealed by a set of diaphragms that bear pressures in a range of 4 to 20 MPa. The history of the overall process of an explosion consists of four steps: 1) the slow pressurization of the pipe-like conduit filled with solid pumice and gas, 2) the sudden removal of the diaphragms, 3) the rapid decompression of the system and 4) the ejection of the gas-particle mixture. Each step imprints distinctive features on the microseismic records, reflecting the conduit dynamics during the explosion. In this work we show how features such as waveform characteristics, the three components of the force system acting on the conduit, the independent components of the moment tensor, the volumetric change of the source mechanism, the arrival time of the shock wave and its velocity, are quantified from the experimental microseismic data. Knowing these features, each step of the eruptive process, the conduit conditions and the source mechanism characteristics can be determined. The procedure applied in this experimental approach allows the use of seismic field data to estimate volcanic conduit conditions before an eruption takes place. We state on the hypothesis that the physics behind the pressurization and depressurization process of any conduit is the same

  11. 47 CFR 32.2441 - Conduit systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Conduit systems. 32.2441 Section 32.2441 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES UNIFORM SYSTEM OF ACCOUNTS FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions for Balance Sheet Accounts § 32.2441 Conduit systems....

  12. 59 FR- Real Estate Mortgage Investment Conduits

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1994-04-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 1 RIN 1545-AS54 Real Estate Mortgage Investment Conduits AGENCY... interest rates for regular interests in real estate mortgage investment conduits, or REMICs. A portion...

  13. Electrical Conduit Distributes Weld Gas Evenly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambrisco, D. P.

    1983-01-01

    Purge-gas distributor, made from flexible electrical conduit by drilling small holes along its length, provides even gas flow for welding. Flexible conduit adjusts to accomodate almost any shape and is used for gas coverage in other applications that previously needed formed and drilled solid tubing.

  14. 47 CFR 32.2441 - Conduit systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Conduit systems. 32.2441 Section 32.2441 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES UNIFORM SYSTEM OF ACCOUNTS FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions for Balance Sheet Accounts § 32.2441 Conduit systems....

  15. Device and method for measuring multi-phase fluid flow in a conduit using an elbow flow meter

    DOEpatents

    Ortiz, Marcos G.; Boucher, Timothy J.

    1997-01-01

    A system for measuring fluid flow in a conduit. The system utilizes pressure transducers disposed generally in line upstream and downstream of the flow of fluid in a bend in the conduit. Data from the pressure transducers is transmitted to a microprocessor or computer. The pressure differential measured by the pressure transducers is then used to calculate the fluid flow rate in the conduit. Control signals may then be generated by the microprocessor or computer to control flow, total fluid dispersed, (in, for example, an irrigation system), area of dispersal or other desired effect based on the fluid flow in the conduit.

  16. Device and method for measuring multi-phase fluid flow in a conduit using an elbow flow meter

    DOEpatents

    Ortiz, M.G.; Boucher, T.J.

    1997-06-24

    A system is described for measuring fluid flow in a conduit. The system utilizes pressure transducers disposed generally in line upstream and downstream of the flow of fluid in a bend in the conduit. Data from the pressure transducers is transmitted to a microprocessor or computer. The pressure differential measured by the pressure transducers is then used to calculate the fluid flow rate in the conduit. Control signals may then be generated by the microprocessor or computer to control flow, total fluid dispersed, (in, for example, an irrigation system), area of dispersal or other desired effect based on the fluid flow in the conduit. 2 figs.

  17. Volcanic conduit failure as a trigger to magma fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavallée, Y.; Benson, P. M.; Heap, M. J.; Flaws, A.; Hess, K.-U.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2012-01-01

    In the assessment of volcanic risk, it is often assumed that magma ascending at a slow rate will erupt effusively, whereas magma ascending at fast rate will lead to an explosive eruption. Mechanistically viewed, this assessment is supported by the notion that the viscoelastic nature of magma (i.e., the ability of magma to relax at an applied strain rate), linked via the gradient of flow pressure (related to discharge rate), controls the eruption style. In such an analysis, the physical interactions between the magma and the conduit wall are commonly, to a first order, neglected. Yet, during ascent, magma must force its way through the volcanic edifice/structure, whose presence and form may greatly affect the stress field through which the magma is trying to ascend. Here, we demonstrate that fracturing of the conduit wall via flow pressure releases an elastic shock resulting in fracturing of the viscous magma itself. We find that magma fragmentation occurred at strain rates seven orders of magnitude slower than theoretically anticipated from the applied axial strain rate. Our conclusion, that the discharge rate cannot provide a reliable indication of ascending magma rheology without knowledge of conduit wall stability, has important ramifications for volcanic hazard assessment. New numerical simulations are now needed in order to integrate magma/conduit interaction into eruption models.

  18. Engineering a multimodal nerve conduit for repair of injured peripheral nerve.

    PubMed

    Quigley, A F; Bulluss, K J; Kyratzis, I L B; Gilmore, K; Mysore, T; Schirmer, K S U; Kennedy, E L; O'Shea, M; Truong, Y B; Edwards, S L; Peeters, G; Herwig, P; Razal, J M; Campbell, T E; Lowes, K N; Higgins, M J; Moulton, S E; Murphy, M A; Cook, M J; Clark, G M; Wallace, G G; Kapsa, R M I

    2013-02-01

    Injury to nerve tissue in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) results in long-term impairment of limb function, dysaesthesia and pain, often with associated psychological effects. Whilst minor injuries can be left to regenerate without intervention and short gaps up to 2 cm can be sutured, larger or more severe injuries commonly require autogenous nerve grafts harvested from elsewhere in the body (usually sensory nerves). Functional recovery is often suboptimal and associated with loss of sensation from the tissue innervated by the harvested nerve. The challenges that persist with nerve repair have resulted in development of nerve guides or conduits from non-neural biological tissues and various polymers to improve the prognosis for the repair of damaged nerves in the PNS. This study describes the design and fabrication of a multimodal controlled pore size nerve regeneration conduit using polylactic acid (PLA) and (PLA):poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) fibers within a neurotrophin-enriched alginate hydrogel. The nerve repair conduit design consists of two types of PLGA fibers selected specifically for promotion of axonal outgrowth and Schwann cell growth (75:25 for axons; 85:15 for Schwann cells). These aligned fibers are contained within the lumen of a knitted PLA sheath coated with electrospun PLA nanofibers to control pore size. The PLGA guidance fibers within the nerve repair conduit lumen are supported within an alginate hydrogel impregnated with neurotrophic factors (NT-3 or BDNF with LIF, SMDF and MGF-1) to provide neuroprotection, stimulation of axonal growth and Schwann cell migration. The conduit was used to promote repair of transected sciatic nerve in rats over a period of 4 weeks. Over this period, it was observed that over-grooming and self-mutilation (autotomy) of the limb implanted with the conduit was significantly reduced in rats implanted with the full-configuration conduit compared to rats implanted with conduits containing only an alginate

  19. Engineering a multimodal nerve conduit for repair of injured peripheral nerve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quigley, A. F.; Bulluss, K. J.; Kyratzis, I. L. B.; Gilmore, K.; Mysore, T.; Schirmer, K. S. U.; Kennedy, E. L.; O'Shea, M.; Truong, Y. B.; Edwards, S. L.; Peeters, G.; Herwig, P.; Razal, J. M.; Campbell, T. E.; Lowes, K. N.; Higgins, M. J.; Moulton, S. E.; Murphy, M. A.; Cook, M. J.; Clark, G. M.; Wallace, G. G.; Kapsa, R. M. I.

    2013-02-01

    Injury to nerve tissue in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) results in long-term impairment of limb function, dysaesthesia and pain, often with associated psychological effects. Whilst minor injuries can be left to regenerate without intervention and short gaps up to 2 cm can be sutured, larger or more severe injuries commonly require autogenous nerve grafts harvested from elsewhere in the body (usually sensory nerves). Functional recovery is often suboptimal and associated with loss of sensation from the tissue innervated by the harvested nerve. The challenges that persist with nerve repair have resulted in development of nerve guides or conduits from non-neural biological tissues and various polymers to improve the prognosis for the repair of damaged nerves in the PNS. This study describes the design and fabrication of a multimodal controlled pore size nerve regeneration conduit using polylactic acid (PLA) and (PLA):poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) fibers within a neurotrophin-enriched alginate hydrogel. The nerve repair conduit design consists of two types of PLGA fibers selected specifically for promotion of axonal outgrowth and Schwann cell growth (75:25 for axons; 85:15 for Schwann cells). These aligned fibers are contained within the lumen of a knitted PLA sheath coated with electrospun PLA nanofibers to control pore size. The PLGA guidance fibers within the nerve repair conduit lumen are supported within an alginate hydrogel impregnated with neurotrophic factors (NT-3 or BDNF with LIF, SMDF and MGF-1) to provide neuroprotection, stimulation of axonal growth and Schwann cell migration. The conduit was used to promote repair of transected sciatic nerve in rats over a period of 4 weeks. Over this period, it was observed that over-grooming and self-mutilation (autotomy) of the limb implanted with the conduit was significantly reduced in rats implanted with the full-configuration conduit compared to rats implanted with conduits containing only an alginate

  20. Stochastic simulation of karst conduit networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardo-Igúzquiza, Eulogio; Dowd, Peter A.; Xu, Chaoshui; Durán-Valsero, Juan José

    2012-01-01

    Karst aquifers have very high spatial heterogeneity. Essentially, they comprise a system of pipes (i.e., the network of conduits) superimposed on rock porosity and on a network of stratigraphic surfaces and fractures. This heterogeneity strongly influences the hydraulic behavior of the karst and it must be reproduced in any realistic numerical model of the karst system that is used as input to flow and transport modeling. However, the directly observed karst conduits are only a small part of the complete karst conduit system and knowledge of the complete conduit geometry and topology remains spatially limited and uncertain. Thus, there is a special interest in the stochastic simulation of networks of conduits that can be combined with fracture and rock porosity models to provide a realistic numerical model of the karst system. Furthermore, the simulated model may be of interest per se and other uses could be envisaged. The purpose of this paper is to present an efficient method for conditional and non-conditional stochastic simulation of karst conduit networks. The method comprises two stages: generation of conduit geometry and generation of topology. The approach adopted is a combination of a resampling method for generating conduit geometries from templates and a modified diffusion-limited aggregation method for generating the network topology. The authors show that the 3D karst conduit networks generated by the proposed method are statistically similar to observed karst conduit networks or to a hypothesized network model. The statistical similarity is in the sense of reproducing the tortuosity index of conduits, the fractal dimension of the network, the direction rose of directions, the Z-histogram and Ripley's K-function of the bifurcation points (which differs from a random allocation of those bifurcation points). The proposed method (1) is very flexible, (2) incorporates any experimental data (conditioning information) and (3) can easily be modified when

  1. Bubble Rise and Break-Up in Volcanic Conduits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldati, A.; Cashman, K. V.; Rust, A.; Rosi, M.

    2013-12-01

    The continual passive degassing occurring at open-vent mafic volcanoes is often punctuated by bursts of active degassing. The latter are generally thought to be the result of slug flow: large, conduit-filling bubbles periodically rising up the feeder conduit and bursting at the magma-air interface. Existing models of volcanic degassing systems make the simplifying assumption that the conduit is cylindrical; however, while this may be true at shallow levels, a flaring probably connects it to a dyke-like geometry at depth. The overall goal of this research is to assess the influence of conduit geometry on the speed and stability of bubbles rising in open-vent systems, and ultimately to devise a model to infer conduit shape from emerging bubbles size. In order to do that an analogue experimental approach was used. All of the experiments were two-phase (melt+volatiles); the analogue materials of choice were golden syrup-water mixtures ranging in viscosity from 10-1 to 104 Pa*s and air. Two experimental apparatuses were used: a bi-dimensional and a tri-dimensional one. The bi-dimensional set-up is a cell made of two flat transparent PVC plates (44x23cm) 10mm or 5mm apart (the front one having a hole at the bottom permitting bubble injection) containing a variety of parallelepipeds apt to outline different plumbing system geometries. The tri-dimensional one consists of a cylindrical tube (r=1,5cm; l=7cm) allowing bubble injection through the bottom rubber tap and terminating into a square tank (l=22cm). Results indicate that conduit geometry directly controls the slug rise velocity and the surrounding liquid descending speed, which in turn control the slug stability. Small enough bubbles simply deform as they go through the flaring, while bigger ones split into two daughter bubbles. A regime diagram has been constructed, illustrating the bubble break-up threshold dependence on the flare geometry and initial slug size, the two main controlling factors. The phenomenon of

  2. Pumped Storage and Potential Hydropower from Conduits

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2015-02-25

    Th is Congressional Report, Pumped Storage Hydropower and Potential Hydropower from Conduits, addresses the technical flexibility that existing pumped storage facilities can provide to support intermittent renewable energy generation. This study considered potential upgrades or retrofit of these facilities, the technical potential of existing and new pumped storage facilities to provide grid reliability benefits, and the range of conduit hydropower opportunities available in the United States.

  3. Phase distribution in complex geometry conduits

    SciTech Connect

    Lahey, R.T. Jr.; Lopez de Bertodano, M.; Jones, O.C. Jr.

    1992-12-31

    Some of the most important and challenging problems in two-phase flow today have to do with the understanding and prediction of multidimensional phenomena, in particular, lateral phase distribution in both simple and complex geometry conduits. A prior review paper summarized the state-of-the-art in the understanding of phase distribution phenomena, and the ability to perform mechanistic multidimensional predictions. The purpose of this paper is to update that review, with particular emphasis on complex geometry conduit predictive capabilities.

  4. Fluid-Rock Dynamic Interaction in Magmatic Conduits: Modelling Transients Using an Analytical Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arciniega-Ceballos, Alejandra; Scheu, Bettina; Sanchez-Sesma, Francisco; Dingwell, Donald

    2014-05-01

    We compute transients fluid-rock dynamic interaction in a fluid driven axisymmetric conduit embedded in an infinite, homogeneous elastic space. Both fluid and solid are dynamically coupled fulfilling continuity of velocities and radial stresses at the conduit's wall. The calculation model considers the viscosity as a key parameter leading to non-linear scheme. A pressure transient at a point of the conduit, that perturbs a steady flow of incompressible viscous fluid, produces the interaction between the fluid and motion at the conduit's walls. The fluid motion induces the elastic response of the conduit forcing it to oscillate radially. The fluid-filled conduit dynamics is governed by three second-order, ordinary non-linear differential equations, which are solved numerically by applying a fifth-order Runge-Kutta scheme. Boundary conditions satisfy the Bernoulli's principle allowing coupling several pipe segments which may present smooth variation in fluid properties. The nature of the source involves different pressure excitations functions including those measuring during simulations of gas burst and fragmentation of volcanic rocks under controlled laboratory conditions. Far-field velocity synthetics radiated by motion of the conduit's walls and fluid flows ascending to the surface, display characteristic waveforms and frequency content that are similar to those of long-period signals and tremor observed at active volcanoes. Results suggest that transient fluid flow induced oscillations may explain long-period and tremor signals. Advantages and limitations of this approach are discussed.

  5. Contegra conduit: current outcomes and concerns.

    PubMed

    Raja, Shahzad G

    2006-09-01

    A variety of congenital cardiac anomalies with severe right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) obstruction or RVOT interruption require surgical reconstruction from the infundibulum up to the pulmonary artery bifurcation or even into the branches of the pulmonary arteries. Ideally, the conduit or valve required for such reconstruction has to be formed of autologous tissue that grows, resists infection, lasts for the life span of the patient and is readily available in all sizes. Such conduits, however, are not available and although several alternatives have been used, none of which are without potential drawbacks. Contegra valved bovine internal jugular vein conduit (Medtronic Inc., MN, USA) has recently emerged as a promising option for pediatric RVOT reconstruction and has been advocated for its 'off-the-shelf' availability in sizes ranging from 12 to 22 mm, surgical pliability and encouraging short- and mid-term success in experimental animal, as well as clinical studies. This review focuses on the current outcomes of Contegra conduit and highlights some of the major concerns related to the use of this conduit and strategies to tackle these concerns. PMID:17081094

  6. Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell and Vein Conduit on Sciatic Nerve Repair in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Seyed Foroutan, Kamal; Khodarahmi, Ali; Alavi, Hootan; Pedram, Sepehr; Baghaban Eslaminejad, Mohamad Reza; Bordbar, Sima

    2015-01-01

    Background: Peripheral nerve repair with sufficient functional recovery is an important issue in reconstructive surgery. Stem cells have attracted extensive research interest in recent years. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to compare the vein conduit technique, with and without the addition of mesenchymal stem cells in gap-less nerve injury repair in rats. Materials and Methods: In this study, 36 Wistar rats were randomly allocated to three groups: In the first group, nerve repair was performed with simple neurorrhaphy (control group), in the second group, nerve repair was done with vein conduit over site (vein conduit group) and in the third group, bone marrow stem cells were instilled into the vein conduit (stem cell group) after nerve repair with vein conduit over site. Six weeks after the intervention, the sciatic function index, electrophysiological study and histological examination were performed. Results: All animals tolerated the surgical procedures and survived well. The sciatic function index and latency were significantly improved in the vein conduit (P = 0.04 and 0.03, respectively) and stem cell group (P = 0.02 and 0.03, respectively) compared with the control group. No significant difference was observed in sciatic function and latency between the vein conduit and stem-cell groups. Moreover, histological analysis showed no significant difference in regenerative density between these two groups. Conclusions: The results of this study showed that the meticulous microsurgical nerve repair, which was performed using the vein tubulization induced significantly better sciatic nerve regeneration. However, the addition of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell to vein conduit failed to promote any significant changes in regeneration outcome. PMID:25825699

  7. Variability of permeability with diameter of conduit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adegoke, J. A.; Olowofela, J. A.

    2008-05-01

    An entry length is always observed before laminar flow is achieved in fluid flowing in a conduit. This depends on the Reynolds number of the flow and the degree of smoothness of the conduit. This work examined this region and the point where laminar flow commences in the context of flow through conduit packed with porous material like beads, of known porosity. Using some theoretical assumptions, it is demonstrated that permeability varies from zero at wall-fluid boundary to maximum at mid-stream, creating a permeability profile similar to the velocity profile. An equation was obtained to establish this. We also found that peak values of permeability increase with increasing porosity, and therefore entry length increases with increasing porosity with all other parameters kept constant. A plot of peak permeability versus porosity revealed that they are linearly related.

  8. Autograft Substitutes: Conduits and Processed Nerve Allografts.

    PubMed

    Safa, Bauback; Buncke, Gregory

    2016-05-01

    Manufactured conduits and allografts are viable alternatives to direct suture repair and nerve autograft. Manufactured tubes should have gaps less than 10 mm, and ideally should be considered as an aid to the coaptation. Processed nerve allograft has utility as a substitute for either conduit or autograft in sensory nerve repairs. There is also a growing body of evidence supporting their utility in major peripheral nerve repairs, gap repairs up to 70 mm in length, as an alternative source of tissue to bolster the diameter of a cable graft, and for the management of neuromas in non-reconstructable injuries. PMID:27094886

  9. Frictional melting and stick-slip behavior in volcanic conduits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, Jackie Evan; Lavallee, Yan; Hirose, Takehiro; di Toro, Giulio; Hornby, Adrian Jakob; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Dingwell, Donald Bruce

    2013-04-01

    Dome-building eruptions have catastrophic potential, with dome collapse leading to devastating pyroclastic flows with almost no precursory warning. During dome growth, the driving forces of the buoyant magma may be superseded by controls along conduit margins; where brittle fracture and sliding can lead to formation of lubricating cataclasite and gouge. Under extreme friction, pseudotachylyte may form at the conduit margin. Understanding the conduit margin processes is vital to understanding the continuation of an eruption and we postulate that pseudotachylyte generation could be the underlying cause of stick-slip motion and associated seismic "drumbeats", which are so commonly observed at dome-building volcanoes. This view is supported by field evidence in the form of pseudotachylytes identified in lava dome products at Soufrière Hills (Montserrat) and Mount St. Helens (USA). Both eruptions were characterised by repetitive, periodic seismicity and lava spine extrusion of highly viscous magma. High velocity rotary shear (HVR) experiments demonstrate the propensity for melting of the andesitic and dacitic material (from Soufrière Hills and Mount St. Helens respectively) at upper conduit stress conditions (<10 MPa). Starting from room temperature, frictional melting of the magmas occurs in under 1 s (<< 1 m) at 1.5 m/s (a speed that is achievable during stick-slip motion). At lower velocities melting occurs comparatively later due to dissipation of heat from the slip zone (e.g. 8-15 m at 0.1 m/s). Hence, given the ease with which melting is achieved in volcanic rocks, and considering the high ambient temperatures in volcanic conduits, frictional melting may thus be an inevitable consequence of viscous magma ascent. The shear resistance of the slip zone during the experiment is also monitored. Frictional melting induces a higher resistance to sliding than rock on rock, and viscous processes control the slip zone properties. Variable-rate HVR experiments which mimic

  10. True aneurysmal dilatation of a contegra conduit after right ventricular outflow tract reconstruction: a novel mechanism of conduit failure.

    PubMed

    Bautista-Hernandez, Victor; Kaza, Aditya K; Benavidez, Oscar J; Pigula, Frank A

    2008-12-01

    Valved conduits are frequently used in congenital heart surgery to establish continuity between the right ventricle and the pulmonary arteries. The Contegra bovine jugular vein (Medtronic Inc, Minneapolis, MN) is a conduit that incorporates a tri-leaflet valve and affords off-the-shelf availability, good handling characteristics, and excellent hemodynamics. However, complications related to the use of this device have been reported, with conduit failure occurring mainly as a consequence of stenosis, conduit thrombosis, and valve regurgitation. We present a case of aneurysmal conduit failure of a 14-mm Contegra conduit used to reconstruct the right ventricular outflow tract. PMID:19022025

  11. 59 FR- Real Estate Mortgage Investment Conduits

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1994-04-20

    ... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 1 RIN 1545-AS55 Real Estate Mortgage Investment Conduits AGENCY... temporary regulations relating to the qualification of an interest as a regular interest in a real estate... in the Federal Register on December 24, 1992, (57 FR 61293). Section 671 of the Tax Reform Act...

  12. Acoustic signal propagation characterization of conduit networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Muhammad Safeer

    Analysis of acoustic signal propagation in conduit networks has been an important area of research in acoustics. One major aspect of analyzing conduit networks as acoustic channels is that a propagating signal suffers frequency dependent attenuation due to thermo-viscous boundary layer effects and the presence of impedance mismatches such as side branches. The signal attenuation due to side branches is strongly influenced by their numbers and dimensions such as diameter and length. Newly developed applications for condition based monitoring of underground conduit networks involve measurement of acoustic signal attenuation through tests in the field. In many cases the exact installation layout of the field measurement location may not be accessible or actual installation may differ from the documented layout. The lack of exact knowledge of numbers and lengths of side branches, therefore, introduces uncertainty in the measurements of attenuation and contributes to the random variable error between measured results and those predicted from theoretical models. There are other random processes in and around conduit networks in the field that also affect the propagation of an acoustic signal. These random processes include but are not limited to the presence of strong temperature and humidity gradients within the conduits, blockages of variable sizes and types, effects of aging such as cracks, bends, sags and holes, ambient noise variations and presence of variable layer of water. It is reasonable to consider that the random processes contributing to the error in the measured attenuation are independent and arbitrarily distributed. The error, contributed by a large number of independent sources of arbitrary probability distributions, is best described by an approximately normal probability distribution in accordance with the central limit theorem. Using an analytical approach to model the attenuating effect of each of the random variable sources can be very complex and

  13. Assessment of conduit artery vasomotion using photoplethysmography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanders, Karlis; Grabovskis, Andris; Marcinkevics, Zbignevs; Aivars, Juris Imants

    2013-11-01

    Vasomotion is a spontaneous oscillation of vascular tone. The phenomenon has been observed in small arterioles and capillaries as well as in the large conduit arteries. The layer of smooth muscle cells that surrounds a blood vessel can spontaneously and periodically change its tension and thereby the arterial wall stiffness also changes. As the understanding of the phenomenon is still rather obscure, researchers would benefit from a low-cost and reliable investigation technique such as photoplethysmography (PPG). PPG is an optical blood pulsation measurement technique that can offer substantial information about the arterial stiffness. The aims of this pilot study were to evaluate the usefulness of the PPG technique in the research of vasomotion and to investigate vasomotion in the relatively large conduit arteries. Continuous 15 minute long measurements of posterior tibial artery wall stiffness were taken. Artery diameter, electrocardiogram, blood pressure and respiration were also simultaneously registered. Fast Fourier Transform power spectra were calculated to identify unique stiffness oscillations that did not correspond to fluctuations in the systemic parameters and thus would indicate vasomotion. We concluded that photoplethysmography is a convenient method for the research of the vasomotion in large arteries. Local stiffness parameter b/a is more accurate to use and easier to measure than the pulse wave velocity which describes stiffness of a segment of an artery. Conduit arteries might exhibit a low amplitude high frequency vasomotion ( 9 to 27 cycles per minute). Low frequency vasomotion is problematic to distinguish from the passive oscillations imposed by the arterial pressure.

  14. High temperature lined conduits, elbows and tees

    DOEpatents

    De Feo, Angelo; Drewniany, Edward

    1982-01-01

    A high temperature lined conduit comprising, a liner, a flexible insulating refractory blanket around and in contact with the liner, a pipe member around the blanket and spaced therefrom, and castable rigid refractory material between the pipe member and the blanket. Anchors are connected to the inside diameter of the pipe and extend into the castable material. The liner includes male and female slip joint ends for permitting thermal expansion of the liner with respect to the castable material and the pipe member. Elbows and tees of the lined conduit comprise an elbow liner wrapped with insulating refractory blanket material around which is disposed a spaced elbow pipe member with castable refractory material between the blanket material and the elbow pipe member. A reinforcing band is connected to the elbow liner at an intermediate location thereon from which extend a plurality of hollow tubes or pins which extend into the castable material to anchor the lined elbow and permit thermal expansion. A method of fabricating the high temperature lined conduit, elbows and tees is also disclosed which utilizes a polyethylene layer over the refractory blanket after it has been compressed to maintain the refractory blanket in a compressed condition until the castable material is in place. Hot gases are then directed through the interior of the liner for evaporating the polyethylene and setting the castable material which permits the compressed blanket to come into close contact with the castable material.

  15. DEFORMATION OF SCORIA CONE BY CONDUIT PRESSURIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    E.S. Gaffney; B. Damjanac; D. Krier; G. Valentine

    2005-08-26

    A simplified mechanical model is used to simulate the deformation of a scoria cone due to pressurization of magma in a feeder conduit. The scoria cone is modeled as consisting of a cone of stabilized scoria with an axial region of loose scoria (height h{sub 1}), all overlying a vertically oriented cylindrical conduit intruded into rhyolite tuff country rock. For our analyses, the conduit is filled with basalt magma, usually with the upper length (h{sub 2}) solidified. The style of deformation of the cone depends on both h{sub 1} and h{sub 2}. If magma is prevented from hydrofracturing out of the conduit (as, for example, might be the case if the magma is surrounded by a solidified, but plastically deformable layer acting as a gasket backed up by the brittle country rock) pressures in the magma can build to 10s of MPa. When h{sub 1} is 100 m, not unusual for a small isolated basaltic cinder cone, the magma pressure needed to destabilize the cone when molten magma extends all the way to the original ground surface (h{sub 2} = 0) is only about one-third of the pressure when the upper part of the conduit is solidified (h{sub 2} = 25m). In the former case, almost the entire upper third of the cone is at failure in tension when the configuration becomes unstable. In the latter case, small portions of the surface of the cone are failing in tension when instability occurs, but a large volume in the central core of the cone is failing in shear or compressions. These results may provide insight into the status of volcanic plumbing, either past or present, beneath scoria cones. Field observations at the Lathrop Wells volcano in southern Nevada identify structures at the outer edge just below the crater rim that appear to be inward-dipping listric normal faults. This may indicate that, near the end of its active stage, the cone was close to failing in this fashion. A companion paper suggests that such a failure could have been quite energetic had it occurred.

  16. Deformation of Scoria Cone by Conduit Pressurization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaffney, E. S.; Damjanac, B.; Krier, D.; Valentine, G.

    2005-12-01

    A simplified mechanical model is used to simulate the deformation of a scoria cone due to pressurization of magma in a feeder conduit. The scoria cone is modelled as consisting of a cone of stabilized scoria with an axial region of loose scoria (height h1), all overlying a vertically oriented cylindrical conduit intruded into rhyolite tuff country rock. For our analyses, the conduit is filled with basalt magma, usually with the upper length (h2) solidified. The style of deformation of the cone depends on both h1 and h2. If magma is prevented from hydrofracturing out of the conduit (as, for example, might be the case if the magma is surrounded by a solidified, but plastically deformable layer acting as a gasket backed up by the brittle country rock) pressures in the magma can build to 10s of MPa. When h1 is 100 m, not unusual for a small isolated basaltic cinder cone, the magma pressure needed to destabilize the cone when molten magma extends all the way to the original ground surface (h2 = 0) is only about one-third of the pressure when the upper part of the conduit is solidified (h2 = 25m). In the former case, almost the entire upper third of the cone is at failure in tension when the configuration becomes unstable. In the latter case, small portions of the surface of the cone are failing in tension when instability occurs, but a large volume in the central core of the cone is failing in shear or compression. These results may provide insight into the status of volcanic plumbing, either past or present, beneath scoria cones. Field observations at the Lathrop Wells volcano in southern Nevada identify structures at the outer edge just below the crater rim that appear to be inward-dipping listric normal faults. This may indicate that, near the end of its active stage, the cone was close to failing in this fashion. Such a failure could have been quite energetic had it occurred.

  17. An Arterial Conduit is Not a Risk Factor for Survival Following Orthotopic Liver Transplantation: An Analysis of 20 Years of Liver Transplantation in Innsbruck.

    PubMed

    Denecke, Christian; Weiss, Sascha; Biebl, Matthias; Fritz, Josef; Dziodzio, Tomasz; Aigner, Felix; Sucher, Robert; Brandl, Andreas; Bösmüller, Claudia; Pratschke, Johann; Öllinger, Robert

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND In adult liver transplantation, arterial conduits have been associated with increased risk for vascular complications and inferior outcome. MATERIAL AND METHODS Complication rates and outcomes of adult patients undergoing liver transplantation in our center between 1990 and 2012 were analyzed retrospectively. Characteristics, transplantation-related factors, and survival rates of patients with conduit grafts (n=43) were compared to patients with a standard arterial anastomosis (n=904) by univariate and multivariate analysis. RESULTS Patients in the conduit group were younger but had a significantly higher proportion of high-urgency and re-transplantations. While patient survival was comparable between the groups, graft survival was inferior for patients with a conduit (1-year, 5-year, and 10-year survival, control vs. conduit group: 87.3%, 78.8% and 71.5% vs. 72.4%, 63.8%, and 41.8%, respectively, p=0.008). In univariate analysis, an arterial conduit was associated with more arterial and biliary complications. However, an arterial conduit was not an independent risk factor for graft or patient survival in a Cox regression analysis. CONCLUSIONS An arterial conduit is associated with more vascular complications, yet a conduit per se does not influence graft survival. The inferior outcome may reflect the complex situation of the sicker liver transplant patients needing a non-standard arterial anastomosis. PMID:27215293

  18. [Occupational dust exposure and prevalence of respiratory symptoms among conduit repair workers].

    PubMed

    Kumagai, S; Kurumatani, N; Nakachi, S; Nakagiri, S; Hara, K

    1993-11-01

    The amount of water supply in Japan was 16 billion ton as of 1989. Water from rivers and other sources is purified, sterilized and then supplied to the residents through conduits. When conduits are accidentally damaged, they must be repaired by the workers of the Waterworks Bureau of the local government. In this task, the workers are exposed to airborne dust which develops while digging and filling the ground and cutting the conduit and the concrete covering the road. The purpose of the present study was to estimate the airborne dust exposure level among the workers and to investigate its effect on their respiratory organs. First, we measured the total dust exposure concentration of 20 conduit repair workers and the total dust concentration in 10 office rooms. Second, we conducted a self-administered questionnaire survey to estimate the prevalence of respiratory symptoms among the employees of 119 Waterworks Bureaus. The subjects of the analysis were 322 conduit repair workers and as their controls 345 clerical/engineering workers. The results can be summarized as follows: 1) The average daily total dust exposure while repairing conduits ranged from 0.27 to 5.05 mg/m3 (mean = 0.91 mg/m3), while that while exchanging water meters from 0.23 to 0.52 mg/m3 (mean 0.41 mg/m3). These values were 4.6 and 2.1 fold higher than the total dust concentration in office rooms (mean = 0.20 mg/m3). 2) With the use of fluorescent X-ray method, iron and aluminum were detected in all samples collected while repairing conduits and the intensity of X-ray increased with increase in weight of collected dust. Iron exposure concentration ranged from 0.006 to 0.095 mg/m3, which is much higher than the levels in the air in urban areas. Iron and aluminum could not be detected by fluorescent X-ray method in most of the samples collected in office rooms. These findings indicate that the main element in the dust collected while repairing conduits is soil, while that in office rooms is tobacco

  19. Small scale high resolution LiDAR measurements of a subglacial conduit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mankoff, K. D.; Gulley, J.

    2012-04-01

    We present direct measurements of surface roughness in a sub-glacial conduit system underneath the Rieperbreen Glacier, Svalbard, Norway. Data was collected with a low-cost (129 USD) Microsoft Kinect video game device used as a LIDAR sensor. Surface roughness is a primary control on water flow in rivers, channels, and cave conduit systems and understanding the effects of surface roughness on water flow has been problematic due to lack of direct measurements of roughness in natural systems. We use the ice scallop dimensions to derive flow velocity and explore implications of the changing roughness parameters as the cave grows and shrinks.

  20. Biomaterials for the Development of Peripheral Nerve Guidance Conduits

    PubMed Central

    Nectow, Alexander R.; Marra, Kacey G.

    2012-01-01

    Currently, surgical treatments for peripheral nerve injury are less than satisfactory. The gold standard of treatment for peripheral nerve gaps >5 mm is the autologous nerve graft; however, this treatment is associated with a variety of clinical complications, such as donor site morbidity, limited availability, nerve site mismatch, and the formation of neuromas. Despite many recent advances in the field, clinical studies implementing the use of artificial nerve guides have yielded results that are yet to surpass those of autografts. Thus, the development of a nerve guidance conduit, which could match the effectiveness of the autologous nerve graft, would be beneficial to the field of peripheral nerve surgery. Design strategies to improve surgical outcomes have included the development of biopolymers and synthetic polymers as primary scaffolds with tailored mechanical and physical properties, luminal “fillers” such as laminin and fibronectin as secondary internal scaffolds, surface micropatterning, stem cell inclusion, and controlled release of neurotrophic factors. The current article highlights approaches to peripheral nerve repair through a channel or conduit, implementing chemical and physical growth and guidance cues to direct that repair process. PMID:21812591

  1. Alpha-lipoic acid loaded in chitosan conduit enhances sciatic nerve regeneration in rat

    PubMed Central

    Azizi, Saeed; Heshmatian, Behnam; Amini, Keyvan; Raisi, Abbas; Azimzadeh, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): To investigate the effect of topical administration of alpha-lipoic acid into chitosan conduit on peripheral nerve regeneration using a rat sciatic nerve transection model. Materials and Methods: Forty five Wistar rats were divided into three experimental groups randomly. A 10-mm gap of sciatic nerve was bridged with a chitosan conduit following surgical preparation and anesthesia. In treatment group, the conduit was filled with 30 µl alpha-lipoic acid (10 mg/kg/bw).It was filled with 30 µl phosphate buffered saline solution in control group. In Sham group sciatic nerve was just exposed. Results: The recovery of nerve function was faster in treatment group than in control, at 4 and 8 weeks after surgery (P-value<0.05). Conduction velocity was better in treatment group than in control group at 4 and 12 weeks (P-value<0.05). Recovery index was higher in treatment group than the control group, 8 weeks after surgery (P-value <0.05). Greater nerve fiber diameter, axon diameter, and myelin sheath thickness were observed in treatment group compared to control group at 8 and 12 weeks after surgery (P-value<0.05). The immunoreactivity of regenerated axons and myelin sheath in treatment group were far more similar to sham group. Conclusion: Alpha-lipoic acid when loaded in a chitosan conduit could improve transected sciatic nerve regeneration in rat. PMID:25945234

  2. System and method measuring fluid flow in a conduit

    DOEpatents

    Ortiz, M.G.; Kidd, T.G.

    1999-05-18

    A system is described for measuring fluid mass flow in a conduit in which there exists a pressure differential in the fluid between at least two spaced-apart locations in the conduit. The system includes a first pressure transducer disposed in the side of the conduit at a first location for measuring pressure of fluid at that location, a second or more pressure transducers disposed in the side of the conduit at a second location, for making multiple measurements of pressure of fluid in the conduit at that location, and a computer for computing the average pressure of the multiple measurements at the second location and for computing flow rate of fluid in the conduit from the pressure measurement by the first pressure transducer and from the average pressure calculation of the multiple measurements. 3 figs.

  3. System and method measuring fluid flow in a conduit

    DOEpatents

    Ortiz, Marcos German; Kidd, Terrel G.

    1999-01-01

    A system for measuring fluid mass flow in a conduit in which there exists a pressure differential in the fluid between at least two spaced-apart locations in the conduit. The system includes a first pressure transducer disposed in the side of the conduit at a first location for measuring pressure of fluid at that location, a second or more pressure transducers disposed in the side of the conduit at a second location, for making multiple measurements of pressure of fluid in the conduit at that location, and a computer for computing the average pressure of the multiple measurements at the second location and for computing flow rate of fluid in the conduit from the pressure measurement by the first pressure transducer and from the average pressure calculation of the multiple measurements.

  4. Collagen incorporation within electrospun conduits reduces lipid oxidation and impacts conduit mechanics.

    PubMed

    Birthare, Karamveer; Shojaee, Mozhgan; Jones, Carlos Gross; Brenner, James R; Bashur, Chris A

    2016-01-01

    Modulating the host response, including the accumulation of oxidized lipid species, is important for improving tissue engineered vascular graft (TEVG) viability. Accumulation of oxidized lipids promotes smooth muscle cell (SMC) hyper-proliferation and inhibits endothelial cell migration, which can lead to several of the current challenges for small-diameter TEVGs. Generating biomaterials that reduce lipid oxidation is important for graft survival and this assessment can provide a reliable correlation to clinical situations. In this study, we determined the collagen to poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) ratio required to limit the production of pro-inflammatory species, while maintaining the required mechanical strength for the graft. Electrospun conduits were prepared from 0%, 10%, and 25% blends of collagen/PCL (w/w) and implanted in the rat peritoneal cavity for four weeks. The results showed that adding collagen to the PCL conduits reduced the accumulation of oxidized lipid species within the implanted conduits. In addition, the ratio of collagen had a significant impact on the recruited cell phenotype and construct mechanics. All conduits exhibited greater than 44% yield strain and sufficient tensile strength post-implantation. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that incorporating collagen into synthetic electrospun scaffolds, both 10% and 25% blend conditions, appears to limit the pro-inflammatory characteristics after in vivo implantation. PMID:27099237

  5. Fatal spontaneous dissection of a Contegra conduit in a child.

    PubMed

    Weldin, Joshua D; Kapur, Raj P; Lewin, Mark B; McMullan, David Michael

    2015-03-01

    The Contegra bovine jugular vein conduit (Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN) is one of the most widely used grafts for surgical reconstruction of the right ventricular outflow tract in both pediatric and adult patients with congenital heart disease. In this report, we describe a case of acute dissection of a neointimal peel in a Contegra conduit resulting in conduit stenosis and death of a child. PMID:25742831

  6. Process length scales and longitudinal damping in karst conduits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covington, M. D.; Luhmann, A. J.; Wicks, C. M.; Saar, M. O.

    2012-03-01

    Simple mathematical models often allow an intuitive grasp of the function of physical systems. We develop a mathematical framework to investigate reactive or dissipative transport processes within karst conduits. Specifically, we note that for processes that occur within a characteristic timescale, advection along the conduit produces a characteristic process length scale. We calculate characteristic length scales for the propagation of thermal and electrical conductivity signals along karst conduits. These process lengths provide a quantitative connection between karst conduit geometry and the signals observed at a karst spring. We show that water input from the porous/fractured matrix is also characterized by a length scale and derive an approximation that accounts for the influence of matrix flow on the transmission of signals through the aquifer. The single conduit model is then extended to account for conduits with changing geometries and conduit flow networks, demonstrating how these concepts can be applied in more realistic conduit geometries. We introduce a recharge density function, ϕR, which determines the capability of an aquifer to damp a given signal, and cast previous explanations of spring variability within this framework. Process lengths are a general feature of karst conduits and surface streams, and we conclude with a discussion of other potential applications of this conceptual and mathematical framework.

  7. Use of Vein Conduit and Isolated Nerve Graft in Peripheral Nerve Repair: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Imran; Akhtar, Md. Sohaib

    2014-01-01

    Aims and Objectives. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of vein conduit in nerve repair compared with isolated nerve graft. Materials and Methods. This retrospective study was conducted at author's centre and included a total of 40 patients. All the patients had nerve defect of more than 3 cm and underwent nerve repair using nerve graft from sural nerve. In 20 cases, vein conduit (study group) was used whereas no conduit was used in other 20 cases. Patients were followed up for 2 years at the intervals of 3 months. Results. Patients had varying degree of recovery. Sensations reached to all the digits at 1 year in study groups compared to 18 months in control group. At the end of second year, 84% patients of the study group achieved 2-point discrimination of <10 mm compared to 60% only in control group. In terms of motor recovery, 82% patients achieved satisfactory hand function in study group compared to 56% in control group (P < .05). Conclusions. It was concluded that the use of vein conduit in peripheral nerve repair is more effective method than isolated nerve graft providing good sensory and motor recovery. PMID:25405029

  8. Viscous Fluid Conduits as a Prototypical Nonlinear Dispersive Wave Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowman, Nicholas K.

    This thesis is devoted to the comprehensive characterization of slowly modulated, nonlinear waves in dispersive media for physically-relevant systems using a threefold approach: analytical, long-time asymptotics, careful numerical simulations, and quantitative laboratory experiments. In particular, we use this interdisciplinary approach to establish a two-fluid, interfacial fluid flow setting known as viscous fluid conduits as an ideal platform for the experimental study of truly one dimensional, unidirectional solitary waves and dispersively regularized shock waves (DSWs). Starting from the full set of fluid equations for mass and linear momentum conservation, we use a multiple-scales, perturbation approach to derive a scalar, nonlinear, dispersive wave equation for the leading order interfacial dynamics of the system. Using a generalized form of the approximate model equation, we use numerical simulations and an analytical, nonlinear wave averaging technique, Whitham-El modulation theory, to derive the key physical features of interacting large amplitude solitary waves and DSWs. We then present the results of quantitative, experimental investigations into large amplitude solitary wave interactions and DSWs. Overtaking interactions of large amplitude solitary waves are shown to exhibit nearly elastic collisions and universal interaction geometries according to the Lax categories for KdV solitons, and to be in excellent agreement with the dynamics described by the approximate asymptotic model. The dispersive shock wave experiments presented here represent the most extensive comparison to date between theory and data of the key wavetrain parameters predicted by modulation theory. We observe strong agreement. Based on the work in this thesis, viscous fluid conduits provide a well-understood, controlled, table-top environment in which to study universal properties of dispersive hydrodynamics. Motivated by the study of wave propagation in the conduit system, we

  9. Endocarditis of bovine jugular vein conduit due to Q fever.

    PubMed

    Stefanidis, Constantin; Benahmed-Mostafa, Aziz; Sanoussi, Ahmed; Quiriny, Marie; Demanet, Hélène; Theunissen, Caroline; Wauthy, Pierre

    2011-06-01

    Contegra (Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN) conduits are routinely used in cases of right ventricular outflow tract reconstruction during congenital heart surgery. We report two cases of Q fever endocarditis involving Contegra conduits. Surgical treatment and distinct aspects of both unusual cases are described. PMID:21620004

  10. 69 FR 48431 - Real Estate Mortgage Investment Conduits

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2004-08-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 1 RIN 1545-BC71 Real Estate Mortgage Investment Conduits AGENCY... disputes regarding the ownership of residual interests in a Real Estate Mortgage Investment Conduit...

  11. 67 FR 47451 - Real Estate Mortgage Investment Conduits

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2002-07-19

    ... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Parts 1 and 602 RIN 1545-AW98 Real Estate Mortgage Investment Conduits... contains final regulations relating to safe harbor transfers of noneconomic residual interests in real estate mortgage investment conduits (REMICs). The final regulations provide additional limitations on...

  12. 59 FR- Real Estate Mortgage Investment Conduits; Hearing Cancellation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1994-07-15

    ... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 1 RIN 1545-AS54 Real Estate Mortgage Investment Conduits; Hearing... on proposed regulations relating to real estate mortgage investment conduits. DATES: The public... rulemaking and public hearing appearing in the Federal Register for Wednesday, April 20, 1994, (59 FR...

  13. 60 FR 42785 - Real Estate Mortgage Investment Conduits

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1995-08-17

    ... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 1 RIN 1545-AS54 Real Estate Mortgage Investment Conduits AGENCY... payments on regular interests in real estate mortgage investment conduits (or REMICs). This action is... Register (59 FR 18746). A notice of proposed rulemaking (FI-10-94), published in the Federal Register...

  14. 70 FR 9218 - Real Estate Mortgage Investment Conduits

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2005-02-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 1 RIN 1545-BC71 Real Estate Mortgage Investment Conduits AGENCY... the ownership of residual interests in a Real Estate Mortgage Investment Conduit (REMIC)....

  15. 26 CFR 1.881-3 - Conduit financing arrangements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 9 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Conduit financing arrangements. 1.881-3 Section 1.881-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Foreign Corporations § 1.881-3 Conduit financing arrangements. (a) General rules and definitions—(1) Purpose...

  16. 26 CFR 1.7701(l)-1 - Conduit financing arrangements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Conduit financing arrangements. 1.7701(l)-1 Section 1.7701(l)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES General Actuarial Valuations § 1.7701(l)-1 Conduit...

  17. 26 CFR 1.881-3 - Conduit financing arrangements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 9 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Conduit financing arrangements. 1.881-3 Section 1.881-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Foreign Corporations § 1.881-3 Conduit financing arrangements. (a) General rules and definitions—(1) Purpose...

  18. How to quantify conduits in wood?

    PubMed

    Scholz, Alexander; Klepsch, Matthias; Karimi, Zohreh; Jansen, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Vessels and tracheids represent the most important xylem cells with respect to long distance water transport in plants. Wood anatomical studies frequently provide several quantitative details of these cells, such as vessel diameter, vessel density, vessel element length, and tracheid length, while important information on the three dimensional structure of the hydraulic network is not considered. This paper aims to provide an overview of various techniques, although there is no standard protocol to quantify conduits due to high anatomical variation and a wide range of techniques available. Despite recent progress in image analysis programs and automated methods for measuring cell dimensions, density, and spatial distribution, various characters remain time-consuming and tedious. Quantification of vessels and tracheids is not only important to better understand functional adaptations of tracheary elements to environment parameters, but will also be essential for linking wood anatomy with other fields such as wood development, xylem physiology, palaeobotany, and dendrochronology. PMID:23507674

  19. Intraatrial conduit repair in Scimitar syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tsuchida, K; Anzai, N; Hashimoto, A; Fukushima, Y; Yamada, M

    1987-12-01

    A 26-year-old woman with partial anomalous pulmonary venous drainage into the right atrium (Scimitar syndrome) was successfully operated upon by incorporating an intra-atrial conduit. The single right pulmonary vein present was connected to the right atrial inferior vena cava junction. The atrial septum was extremely deviated to the left, and the left atrium was located entirely on the left of the spine. A small patent foramen ovale was found. The distance between the orifice of the right pulmonary vein and the enlarged atrial septal defect was too great to use an intracardiac patch, so a 14 mm woven Dacron graft, 6 cm long, was interposed between them. The patient is doing well 21 months following the operation. PMID:3677828

  20. Gas slug rise in open versus plugged basaltic conduits: the transition from Strombolian to sustained volcanic eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llewellin, Ed; Mathias, Simon; Del Bello, Elisabetta; Lane, Steve; Taddeucci, Jacopo

    2010-05-01

    Strombolian eruptions are characterized by low-energy explosive activity, which may repeat, at fairly regular intervals, for long periods of time. Explosions at the vent are thought to result from the arrival of discrete slugs of magmatic gas that have risen through the magmatic plumbing system. We develop a one dimensional, analytical model of gas slug rise in a volcanic conduit which we use to investigate the controls on the dynamics of Strombolian eruptions. We consider a partially-filled, cylindrical conduit containing degassed magma, that is initially in magma-static equilibrium with a constant pressure magma reservoir at depth. We introduce a slug of gas at the base of the conduit and consider the temporal evolution of the pressure distribution in the conduit, and the motion of the magma above and below the slug, as the slug rises, decompresses, and expands isothermally. We validate our model against published data for gas slugs rising and decompressing in a vertical pipe [James et al., 2008, Geological Society of London, Special Publications 307, 147-167] by imposing the condition of zero magma-flux at the base of the conduit, and constant pressure at the top; we find excellent agreement. If we impose the more geologically-sound condition of constant pressure at the base of the conduit, we can consider two scenarios of volcanological relevance: 1) Vent plugged with cooler, more-viscous magma. In this case, as the slug rises and expands beneath the plug, it pushes the degassed magma below it down the conduit, consequently, magma re-enters the chamber from the base of the conduit. The slug reaches the viscous plug at the top of the conduit with a significant over-pressure; this may be sufficient to disrupt the plug, causing a Strombolian explosion, or the gas may percolate away. Fresh magma then moves up from the chamber, into the conduit to restore magma-static equilibrium. 2) Open vent. As the slug rises and expands, the volume of magma held in the falling

  1. First gas flux measurements of conduit permeability decrease prior to Strombolian eruption at Stromboli volcano (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamburello, Giancarlo; Aiuppa, Alessandro; Lo Coco, Eleonora; Delle Donne, Dario; Ripepe, Maurizio; Bitetto, Marcello; D'Aleo, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    Strombolian eruptions can be described in terms of growth, coalescence, and rise of a gas pocket (aka slug) bursting at the surface of a vent. This model overlooks that the transition to explosive regimes is mostly controlled by the permeability in the upper part of a volcanic conduit. We report here on the first gas flux measurements of Strombolian explosions from a vent that exhibited a significant decrease of passive degassing tens of second prior to the onset of the explosion. This particular explosive activity took place during the July 2014 lava overflows, when the magma level inside the conduit rose up to the crater terrace. The amount of gas that accumulated before the eruption is incredibly similar to the amount of gas ejected during the explosion. This similarity suggests a mechanism of decrease of the shallow conduit permeability and a subsequent accumulation of gas behind a cap of cold magma. The accumulated gas is then released when the over-pressure can open a leak on the cap of cold magma. Our unprecedented results offer key and novel insights into the explosive degassing dynamics within the shallow conduit systems of this open-vent volcano and probably at many other basaltic volcanoes.

  2. 98. (Credit BLV) Detail of gravity, flow conduit intake at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    98. (Credit BLV) Detail of gravity, flow conduit intake at cross Lake dam Cribbing supports extra suction intake installed in 1930. - McNeil Street Pumping Station, McNeil Street & Cross Bayou, Shreveport, Caddo Parish, LA

  3. 24. UPSTREAM VIEW OF A PORTION OF THE CLOSED CONDUIT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. UPSTREAM VIEW OF A PORTION OF THE CLOSED CONDUIT SECTION OF OUTLET WORKS.... Volume XVI, No. 15, August 16, 1939. - Prado Dam, Outlet Works, Santa Ana River near junction of State Highways 71 & 91, Corona, Riverside County, CA

  4. 7. PRESSURE CONDUIT ACROSS SCHOOL HOUSE WASH ON THE POWER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. PRESSURE CONDUIT ACROSS SCHOOL HOUSE WASH ON THE POWER CANAL Photographer: Walter J. Lubken, February 21, 1906 - Roosevelt Power Canal & Diversion Dam, Parallels Salt River, Roosevelt, Gila County, AZ

  5. 11. INTERIOR DETAIL, BASEMENT, SHOWING CONDUITS LEADING UNDERGROUND TO SWITCHES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. INTERIOR DETAIL, BASEMENT, SHOWING CONDUITS LEADING UNDERGROUND TO SWITCHES AND SIGNALS - Baltimore & Potomac Interlocking Tower, Adjacent to AMTRAK railroad tracks in block bounded by Howard Street, Jones Falls Expressway, Maryland Avenue & Falls Road, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  6. 79. COVERED CONDUIT ACROSS ANTELOPE VALLEY WITH WIND FARM IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    79. COVERED CONDUIT ACROSS ANTELOPE VALLEY WITH WIND FARM IN DISTANCE - Los Angeles Aqueduct, From Lee Vining Intake (Mammoth Lakes) to Van Norman Reservoir Complex (San Fernando Valley), Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  7. Superconducting cable-in-conduit low resistance splice

    DOEpatents

    Artman, Thomas A.

    2003-06-24

    A low resistance splice connects two cable-in-conduit superconductors to each other. Dividing collars for arranging sub-cable units from each conduit are provided, along with clamping collars for mating each sub-cable wire assembly to form mated assemblies. The mated assemblies ideally can be accomplished by way of splicing collar. The mated assemblies are cooled by way of a flow of coolant, preferably helium. A method for implementing such a splicing is also described.

  8. Impact of Cyclic Stretch on Induced Elastogenesis Within Collagenous Conduits

    PubMed Central

    Venkataraman, Lavanya; Bashur, Chris A.

    2014-01-01

    In vitro tissue engineering of vascular conduits requires a synergy between several external factors, including biochemical supplementation and mechanotranductive stimulation. The goal of this study was to improve adult human vascular smooth muscle cell orientation and elastic matrix synthesis within 3D tubular collagen gel constructs. We used a combination of elastogenic factors (EFs) previously tested in our lab, along with cyclic circumferential strains at low amplitude (2.5%) delivered at a range of frequencies (0.5, 1.5, and 3 Hz). After 21 days of culture, the constructs were analyzed for elastic matrix outcomes, activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)-2 and −9, cell densities and phenotype, and mechanical properties of constructs. While cell densities remained unaffected by the addition of stretch, contractile phenotypic markers were elevated in all stretched constructs relative to control. Constructs cultured with EFs stretched at 1.5 Hz exhibited the maximum elastin mRNA expression and total matrix elastin (over sixfold vs. the static EFs control). MMP-2 content was comparable in all treatment conditions, but MMP-9 levels were elevated at the higher frequencies (1.5 and 3 Hz). Minimal circumferential orientation was achieved and the mechanical properties remained comparable among the treatment conditions. Overall, constructs treated with EFs and stretched at 1.5 Hz exhibited the most elastogenic outcomes. PMID:24313750

  9. Comminution and frictional melting in volcanic conduits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavallee, Y.; Mitchell, T. M.; Heap, M. J.; Kendrick, J. E.; kennedy, B.; Ashwell, P. A.; Hirose, T.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2011-12-01

    Shearing and faulting at active volcanoes may differ to tectonic faulting due to their distinct temperature conditions above those of the Earth's geotherm. In particular, the ascent of high-viscosity magma/rocks in upper conduits leads to shear/fault zones, with/without gouge formation and sometimes frictional melting; yet, details of the deformation and fracture mechanisms in these magma/rocks with different crystallinities reveal a different synopsis. For instance, the extrusion of lava domes proceeds endogenously or exogenically - a distinction generally understood as a shift in magma rheology to brittle failure, without consideration of the subsequent slip process. Exogenic growth and formation of a spine follow the dynamic rupture of the lava and the dome carapace, and suffer slip along the fault surface. Here, we present experimental investigations of the ability of volcanic rocks (with different glass/crystal and vesicle ratios) to sustain friction, and in cases melt, using a high-velocity rotary apparatus. During high-velocity rotary shear test, we find that slip of along andesite and basalt rocks generate heat which leads to frictional melting at temperature of ca. 1000 C, conciding to a total slip of 10-40 m (for slip initiating at room temperature). In contrast, slip along dense obsidian rocks or porous rocks cannot sustain slip along a discrete plane. Alternatively, obsidian can be slipped against a crystalline material. The width of the slip zone decreases in the presence of crystals. The findings suggest that the comminution of crystals is a requirement to the development of a localised slip zone. In absence of crystals, obsidian (and crystal-free magma) shatter catastrophically. We discuss the implication of our findings to the cases of tectonic faults, stability of volcanic edifices and evolution of lava dome eruptions.

  10. Artificial urinary conduit construction using tissue engineering methods

    PubMed Central

    Pokrywczyńska, Marta; Drewa, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Incontinent urinary diversion using an ileal conduit is the most popular method used by urologists after bladder cystectomy resulting from muscle invasive bladder cancer. The use of gastrointestinal tissue is related to a series of complications with the necessity of surgical procedure extension which increases the time of surgery. Regenerative medicine together with tissue engineering techniques gives hope for artificial urinary conduit construction de novo without affecting the ileum. Material and methods In this review we analyzed history of urinary diversion together with current attempts in urinary conduit construction using tissue engineering methods. Based on literature and our own experience we presented future perspectives related to the artificial urinary conduit construction. Results A small number of papers in the field of tissue engineered urinary conduit construction indicates that this topic requires more attention. Three main factors can be distinguished to resolve this topic: proper scaffold construction along with proper regeneration of both the urothelium and smooth muscle layers. Conclusions Artificial urinary conduit has a great chance to become the first commercially available product in urology constructed by regenerative medicine methods. PMID:25914849

  11. Convergent tapering of xylem conduits in different woody species.

    PubMed

    Anfodillo, Tommaso; Carraro, Vinicio; Carrer, Marco; Fior, Claudio; Rossi, Sergio

    2006-01-01

    A recent theoretical model (the West, Brown and Enquist, WBE model) hypothesized that plants have evolved a network of xylem conduits with a tapered structure (narrower conduits distally) which should minimize the cost of water transport from roots to leaves. Specific measurements are required to test the model predictions. We sampled both angiosperms and gymnosperms (50 trees) growing in different environments with heights ranging from 0.5 to 44.4 m, measuring variations of the xylem-conduit diameter from tree top to stem base. In all trees measured, mean hydraulically weighted conduit diameters (Dh) at the tree top were narrower than those at the stem base. In actively growing trees, the longitudinal variation of Dh showed a degree of tapering in agreement with WBE predictions, while trees close to their maximum height showed slightly lower conduit tapering. Comparing different species, a very good correlation was observed between degree of xylem tapering and tree height (r2 = 0.88; P < 0.0001) independently of any other variable (age, site, altitude, etc.). As predicted by WBE, sampled trees seemed to converge towards similar xylem conduit tapering. However, trees approaching their maximum height had a nonoptimal tapering which appeared insufficient to compensate for the progressive increase in tree height. PMID:16411931

  12. The Use of the Ex Vivo Chandler Loop Apparatus to Assess the Biocompatibility of Modified Polymeric Blood Conduits

    PubMed Central

    Slee, Joshua B.; Alferiev, Ivan S.; Levy, Robert J.; Stachelek, Stanley J.

    2014-01-01

    The foreign body reaction occurs when a synthetic surface is introduced to the body. It is characterized by adsorption of blood proteins and the subsequent attachment and activation of platelets, monocyte/macrophage adhesion, and inflammatory cell signaling events, leading to post-procedural complications. The Chandler Loop Apparatus is an experimental system that allows researchers to study the molecular and cellular interactions that occur when large volumes of blood are perfused over polymeric conduits. To that end, this apparatus has been used as an ex vivo model allowing the assessment of the anti-inflammatory properties of various polymer surface modifications. Our laboratory has shown that blood conduits, covalently modified via photoactivation chemistry with recombinant CD47, can confer biocompatibility to polymeric surfaces. Appending CD47 to polymeric surfaces could be an effective means to promote the efficacy of polymeric blood conduits. Herein is the methodology detailing the photoactivation chemistry used to append recombinant CD47 to clinically relevant polymeric blood conduits and the use of the Chandler Loop as an ex vivo experimental model to examine blood interactions with the CD47 modified and control conduits. PMID:25178087

  13. Aneurysmal dilatation without distal obstruction: a rare complication of valved bovine jugular vein conduit.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Ahmad Usaid; Abbaker, Abd-Elmoneim A; Sivalingam, Sivakumar; Latiff, Haifa A

    2014-04-01

    Valved bovine jugular vein (Contegra) conduit is considered a suitable choice for pediatric population with congenital heart defect requiring right ventricle to main pulmonary artery connection. Intermediate follow-up studies have shown the propensity of developing distal conduit stenosis and valve thrombosis. We present a rare case of aneurysmal dilatation of the conduit leading to valve failure requiring conduit explantation. PMID:24668992

  14. Temperature limited heater with a conduit substantially electrically isolated from the formation

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Sandberg, Chester Ledlie

    2009-07-14

    A system for heating a hydrocarbon containing formation is described. A conduit may be located in an opening in the formation. The conduit includes ferromagnetic material. An electrical conductor is positioned inside the conduit, and is electrically coupled to the conduit at or near an end portion of the conduit so that the electrical conductor and the conduit are electrically coupled in series. Electrical current flows in the electrical conductor in a substantially opposite direction to electrical current flow in the conduit during application of electrical current to the system. The flow of electrons is substantially confined to the inside of the conduit by the electromagnetic field generated from electrical current flow in the electrical conductor so that the outside surface of the conduit is at or near substantially zero potential at 25.degree. C. The conduit may generate heat and heat the formation during application of electrical current.

  15. Inhibition of calpains fails to improve regeneration through a peripheral nerve conduit.

    PubMed

    Hausner, Thomas; Marvaldi, Letizia; Márton, Gábor; Pajer, Krisztián; Hopf, Rudolf; Schmidhammer, Robert; Hausott, Barbara; Redl, Heinz; Nógrádi, Antal; Klimaschewski, Lars

    2014-04-30

    Intramuscular injection of the calpain inhibitor leupeptin promotes peripheral nerve regeneration in primates (Badalamente et al., 1989 [13]), and direct positive effects of leupeptin on axon outgrowth were observed in vitro (Hausott et al., 2012 [12]). In this study, we applied leupeptin (2mg/ml) directly to collagen-filled nerve conduits in the rat sciatic nerve transection model. Analysis of myelinated axons and retrogradely labeled motoneurons as well as functional 'CatWalk' video analysis did not reveal significant differences between vehicle controls and leupeptin treated animals. Therefore, leupeptin does not improve nerve regeneration via protease inhibition in regrowing axons or in surrounding Schwann cells following a single application to a peripheral nerve conduit suggesting indirect effects on motor endplate integrity if applied systemically. PMID:24631569

  16. A conduit dilation model of methane venting from lake sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scandella, Benjamin P.; Varadharajan, Charuleka; Hemond, Harold F.; Ruppel, Carolyn; Juanes, Ruben

    2011-03-01

    Methane is a potent greenhouse gas, but its effects on Earth's climate remain poorly constrained, in part due to uncertainties in global methane fluxes to the atmosphere. An important source of atmospheric methane is the methane generated in organic-rich sediments underlying surface water bodies, including lakes, wetlands, and the ocean. The fraction of the methane that reaches the atmosphere depends critically on the mode and spatiotemporal characteristics of free-gas venting from the underlying sediments. Here we propose that methane transport in lake sediments is controlled by dynamic conduits, which dilate and release gas as the falling hydrostatic pressure reduces the effective stress below the tensile strength of the sediments. We test our model against a four-month record of hydrostatic load and methane flux in Upper Mystic Lake, Mass., USA, and show that it captures the complex episodicity of methane ebullition. Our quantitative conceptualization opens the door to integrated modeling of methane transport to constrain global methane release from lakes and other shallow-water, organic-rich sediment systems, and to assess its climate feedbacks.

  17. A conduit dilation model of methane venting from lake sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scandella, B.P.; Varadharajan, C.; Hemond, Harold F.; Ruppel, C.; Juanes, R.

    2011-01-01

    Methane is a potent greenhouse gas, but its effects on Earth's climate remain poorly constrained, in part due to uncertainties in global methane fluxes to the atmosphere. An important source of atmospheric methane is the methane generated in organic-rich sediments underlying surface water bodies, including lakes, wetlands, and the ocean. The fraction of the methane that reaches the atmosphere depends critically on the mode and spatiotemporal characteristics of free-gas venting from the underlying sediments. Here we propose that methane transport in lake sediments is controlled by dynamic conduits, which dilate and release gas as the falling hydrostatic pressure reduces the effective stress below the tensile strength of the sediments. We test our model against a four-month record of hydrostatic load and methane flux in Upper Mystic Lake, Mass., USA, and show that it captures the complex episodicity of methane ebullition. Our quantitative conceptualization opens the door to integrated modeling of methane transport to constrain global methane release from lakes and other shallow-water, organic-rich sediment systems, and to assess its climate feedbacks.

  18. Thermomechanical milling of accessory lithics in volcanic conduits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Michelle E.; Russell, James K.; Porritt, Lucy A.

    2013-09-01

    Accessory lithic clasts recovered from pyroclastic deposits commonly result from the failure of conduit wall rocks, and represent an underutilized resource for constraining conduit processes during explosive volcanic eruptions. The morphological features of lithic clasts provide distinctive 'textural fingerprints' of processes that have reshaped them during transport in the conduit. Here, we present the first study focused on accessory lithic clast morphology and show how the shapes and surfaces of these accessory pyroclasts can inform on conduit processes. We use two main types of accessory lithic clasts from pyroclastic fallout deposits of the 2360 B.P. subplinian eruption of Mount Meager, British Columbia, as a case study: (i) rough and subangular dacite clasts, and (ii) variably rounded and smoothed monzogranite clasts. The quantitative morphological data collected on these lithics include: mass, volume, density, 2-D image analysis of convexity (C), and 3-D laser scans for sphericity (Ψ) and smoothness (S). Shaping and comminution (i.e. milling) of clasts within the conduit are ascribed to three processes: (1) disruptive fragmentation due to high-energy impacts between clasts or between clasts and conduit walls, (2) ash-blasting of clasts suspended within the volcanic flux, and (3) thermal effects. We use a simplified conduit eruption model to predict ash-blasting velocities and lithic residence times as a function of clast size and source depth, thereby constraining the lithic milling processes. The extent of shape and surface modification (i.e. rounding and honing) is directly proportional to clast residence times within the conduit prior to evacuation. We postulate that the shallow-seated dacite clasts remain subangular and rough due to short (<2 min) residence times, whereas monzogranite clasts are much more rounded and smoothed due to deeper source depths and consequently longer residence times (up to ˜1 h). Larger monzogranite clasts are smoother than

  19. Nanofiber-reinforced biological conduit in cardiac surgery: preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Guhathakurta, Soma; Galla, Satish; Ramesh, Balasundari; Venugopal, Jayarama Reddy; Ramakrishna, Seeram; Cherian, Kotturathu Mammen

    2011-06-01

    Several options are available for right ventricular outflow tract reconstruction, including commercially available bovine jugular vein and cryo-preserved homografts. Homograft non-availability and the problems of commercially available conduits led us to develop indigenously processed bovine jugular vein conduits with competent valves. They were made completely acellular and strengthened by non-conventional cross-linking without disturbing the extracellular matrix, which improved the luminal surface characteristics for hemocompatibility. Biocompatibility in vitro and in vivo, along with thermal stability, matrix stability, and mechanical strength have been evaluated. Sixty-nine patients received these conduits for right ventricular outflow tract reconstruction. Seven conduits dilated and 4 required replacement. To counteract dilatation, biodegradable polymeric nanofibers in various combinations and in isolation (collagen, polycaprolactone, polylactic acid) were characterized and used to reinforce the conduit circumferentially. Physical validation by mechanical testing, scanning electron microscopy, and in-vitro cytotoxicity was conducted. Thermal stability, spectroscopy studies of the polymer, and preclinical studies of the coated bovine jugular vein in animals are in progress. The feasibility studies have been completed, and the final polymer selection depends on evaluation of the functional superiority of the coated bovine jugular vein. PMID:21885543

  20. Conductive PPY/PDLLA conduit for peripheral nerve regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Haixing; Holzwarth, Jeremy M.; Yan, Yuhua; Xu, Peihu; Zheng, Hua; Yin, Yixia; Li, Shipu; Ma, Peter X.

    2013-01-01

    The significant drawbacks and lack of success associated with current methods to treat critically sized nerve defects have led to increased interest in neural tissue engineering. Conducting polymers show great promise due to their electrical properties, and in the case of polypyrrole (PPY), its cell compatibility as well. Thus, the goal of this study is to synthesize a conducting composite nerve conduit with PPY and poly(D, L-lactic acid) (PDLLA), assess its ability to support the differentiation of rat pheochromocytoma 12 (PC12) cells in vitro, and determine its ability to promote nerve regeneration in vivo. Different amounts of PPY (5%, 10%, and 15%) are used to synthesize the conduits resulting in different conductivities (5.65, 10.40, and 15.56 ms/cm, respectively). When PC12 cells are seeded on these conduits and stimulated with 100 mV for 2 h, there is a marked increase in both the percentage of neurite-bearing cells and the median neurite length as the content of PPY increased. More importantly, when the PPY/PDLLA nerve conduit was used to repair a rat sciatic nerve defect it performed similarly to the gold standard autologous graft. These promising results illustrate the potential that this PPY/PDLLA conducting composite conduit has for neural tissue engineering. PMID:24138830

  1. In Vitro Study of Directly Bioprinted Perfusable Vasculature Conduits

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yahui; Yu, Yin; Akkouch, Adil; Dababneh, Amer; Dolati, Farzaneh

    2014-01-01

    The ability to create three dimensional (3D) thick tissues is still a major tissue engineering challenge. It requires the development of a suitable vascular supply for an efficient media exchange. An integrated vasculature network is particularly needed when building thick functional tissues and/or organs with high metabolic activities, such as the heart, liver and pancreas. In this work, human umbilical vein smooth muscle cells (HUVSMCs) were encapsulated in sodium alginate and printed in the form of vasculature conduits using a coaxial deposition system. Detailed investigations were performed to understand the dehydration, swelling and degradation characteristics of printed conduits. In addition, because perfusional, permeable and mechanical properties are unique characteristics of natural blood vessels, for printed conduits these properties were also explored in this work. The results show that cells encapsulated in conduits had good proliferation activities and that their viability increased during prolonged in vitro culture. Deposition of smooth muscle matrix and collagen was observed around the peripheral and luminal surface in long-term cultured cellular vascular conduit through histology studies. PMID:25574378

  2. Sciatic nerve repair using adhesive bonding and a modified conduit

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xiangdang; Cai, Hongfei; Hao, Yongyu; Sun, Geng; Song, Yaoyao; Chen, Wen

    2014-01-01

    When repairing nerves with adhesives, most researchers place glue directly on the nerve stumps, but this method does not fix the nerve ends well and allows glue to easily invade the nerve ends. In this study, we established a rat model of completely transected sciatic nerve injury and repaired it using a modified 1 cm-length conduit with inner diameter of 1.5 mm. Each end of the cylindrical conduit contains a short linear channel, while the enclosed central tube protects the nerve ends well. Nerves were repaired with 2-octyl-cyanoacrylate and suture, which complement the function of the modified conduit. The results demonstrated that for the same conduit, the average operation time using the adhesive method was much shorter than with the suture method. No significant differences were found between the two groups in sciatic function index, motor evoked potential latency, motor evoked potential amplitude, muscular recovery rate, number of medullated nerve fibers, axon diameter, or medullary sheath thickness. Thus, the adhesive method for repairing nerves using a modified conduit is feasible and effective, and reduces the operation time while providing an equivalent repair effect. PMID:25206861

  3. Chitosan conduits combined with nerve growth factor microspheres repair facial nerve defects

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huawei; Wen, Weisheng; Hu, Min; Bi, Wenting; Chen, Lijie; Liu, Sanxia; Chen, Peng; Tan, Xinying

    2013-01-01

    Microspheres containing nerve growth factor for sustained release were prepared by a compound method, and implanted into chitosan conduits to repair 10-mm defects on the right buccal branches of the facial nerve in rabbits. In addition, chitosan conduits combined with nerve growth factor or normal saline, as well as autologous nerve, were used as controls. At 90 days post-surgery, the muscular atrophy on the right upper lip was more evident in the nerve growth factor and normal sa-line groups than in the nerve growth factor-microspheres and autologous nerve groups. physiological analysis revealed that the nerve conduction velocity and amplitude were significantly higher in the nerve growth factor-microspheres and autologous nerve groups than in the nerve growth factor and normal saline groups. Moreover, histological observation illustrated that the di-ameter, number, alignment and myelin sheath thickness of myelinated nerves derived from rabbits were higher in the nerve growth factor-microspheres and autologous nerve groups than in the nerve growth factor and normal saline groups. These findings indicate that chitosan nerve conduits bined with microspheres for sustained release of nerve growth factor can significantly improve facial nerve defect repair in rabbits. PMID:25206635

  4. Chitosan conduits combined with nerve growth factor microspheres repair facial nerve defects.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huawei; Wen, Weisheng; Hu, Min; Bi, Wenting; Chen, Lijie; Liu, Sanxia; Chen, Peng; Tan, Xinying

    2013-11-25

    Microspheres containing nerve growth factor for sustained release were prepared by a compound method, and implanted into chitosan conduits to repair 10-mm defects on the right buccal branches of the facial nerve in rabbits. In addition, chitosan conduits combined with nerve growth factor or normal saline, as well as autologous nerve, were used as controls. At 90 days post-surgery, the muscular atrophy on the right upper lip was more evident in the nerve growth factor and normal sa-line groups than in the nerve growth factor-microspheres and autologous nerve groups. physiological analysis revealed that the nerve conduction velocity and amplitude were significantly higher in the nerve growth factor-microspheres and autologous nerve groups than in the nerve growth factor and normal saline groups. Moreover, histological observation illustrated that the di-ameter, number, alignment and myelin sheath thickness of myelinated nerves derived from rabbits were higher in the nerve growth factor-microspheres and autologous nerve groups than in the nerve growth factor and normal saline groups. These findings indicate that chitosan nerve conduits bined with microspheres for sustained release of nerve growth factor can significantly improve facial nerve defect repair in rabbits. PMID:25206635

  5. Impact of the lithographic discontinuities on the karst conduit development - insights from modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrus, Karine; Szymczak, Piotr

    2016-04-01

    Karst formation is controlled by the processes of the fluid flow and reactant transport coupled to the chemical erosion of the limestone rock [1]. The coupling between these processes can lead to a number of different instabilities, resulting in the formation of dissolutional voids, caverns and conduits. Arguably the simplest systems of this kind are solution pipes, in which gravitationally driven water movement carves vertical conduits in limestone rocks. In the homogeneous rocks these conduits are often cylindrical, with almost a constant diameter along their length. However, in a stratified medium, the morphology of the pipes changes. For example, if a number of less porous layers is introduced in an otherwise homogeneous medium, then the pipes are observed to narrow as they cross the layers and then widen up to form bulbous caverns as they emerge from the layer [1]. In this communication, we investigate these effects more closely, considering different kind of lithographic discontinuities to be present in the system: the layers of increased/decreased porosity and/or permeability as well as the solubility which is different from the rest of the system. Using a Darcy-scale numerical model we analyze the effects these layers have on the shape and growth of solution pipes and compare the results on the piping morphologies observed in nature. Finally we comment on the possible relevance of these results to the cave-formation phenomena and the inception horizon concept [3]. References: 1.Howard A. D., The development of karst features, Bull. Natl. Spel. Soc. 25, 45-65 (1963) 2. Petrus, K. and Szymczak, P., Influence of layering on the formation and growth of solution pipes. Frontiers in Physics (submitted) 3.Filipponi , M., Jeannin, P. and Tacher, L., Evidence of inception horizons in karst conduit networks, Geomorphology, 106, 86-99 (2009)

  6. Geodynamic modeling of the capture and release of a plume conduit by a migrating mid-ocean ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, P. S.

    2011-12-01

    plates over the relatively stationary, long-lived conduits of mantle plumes. However, paleomagnetic data from the Hawaii-Emperor Seamount Chain suggests that the Hawaiian hotspot moved rapidly (~40 mm/yr) between 81 - 47 Ma [Tarduno et al., 2003]. Recently, Tarduno et al. [2009] suggested that this period of rapid motion might be the surface expression of a plume conduit returning to a largely vertical orientation after having been captured and tilted as the result of being "run over" by migrating mid-ocean ridge. I report on a series of analog geodynamic experiments designed to characterize the evolution of a plume conduit as a mid-ocean ridge migrates over. Experiments were conducted in a clear acrylic tank (100 cm x 70 cm x 50 cm) filled with commercial grade high-fructose corn syrup. Plate-driven flow is modeled by dragging two sheets of Mylar film (driven by independent DC motors) in opposite directions over the surface of the fluid. Ridge migration is achieved by moving the point at which the mylar sheets diverge using a separate motor drive. Buoyant plume flow is generated using a small electrical heater placed at the bottom of the tank. Plate velocities and ridge migration rate are controlled and plume temperature monitored using LabView software. Experiments are recorded using digital video which is then analyzed using digital image analysis software to track the position and shape of the plume conduit throughout the course of the experiment. The intersection of the plume conduit with the surface of the fluid is taken as an analog for the locus of hotspot volcanism and tracked as a function of time to obtain a hotspot migration rate. Results show that the plume conduit experiences significant tilting immediately following the passage of the migrating ridge.

  7. MRSA endocarditis of bovine Contegra valved conduit: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Different techniques are used for the right ventricular outflow tract reconstruction, including homo- or porcine xenografts, which have several limitations. Contegra, a bovine jugular vein graft, is an interesting alternative to overcome these limitations. It consists of a bovine jugular vein with a naturally integrated valve in it. Isolated pulmonary valve endocarditis is extremely rare. Case presentation We report the case of a 20 years old male patient with acute endocarditis of bovine Contegra valved conduit, four years after right ventricular outflow tract reconstruction and atrial septal defect correction, associated with acute glomerulonephritis, renal failure and severe anemia, secondary to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection (MRSA). Conclusion We present a complex patient with acute endocarditis of bovine Contegra valved conduit. We believe that the presentation of this case should encourage the researchers for the discussing of the implantation of this conduit and the prevention of endocarditis in these patients. PMID:19146664

  8. Endoscopic Treatment of Stump Leakage Related to the Ileal Conduit

    PubMed Central

    Odemis, Bulent; Oztas, Erkin; Akpinar, Muhammet Yener; Olcucuoglu, Erkan; Kayacetin, Ertugrul

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Ileal conduit with leakage from either the anastomotic site or the stump is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. The standard treatment of stump leakage is surgery. Case Presentation: A 60-year-old male patient was admitted to our hospital with complaint of hematuria and bladder carcinoma was diagnosed. After performing radical cystectomy and ileal conduit, he developed fever with abdominal pain within the first week of surgery. Stump leakage was diagnosed by endoscopic examination performed through a gastroscope. After two over-the-scope clips (OTSCs) were applied to the stump, vinyl mesh was inserted into the space between the OTSCs. Later, cyanoacrylat and lipiodol were repelled on the OTSCs and vinyl mesh. Subsequently, stump leakage was resolved. Conclusion: This is the first case of stump leakage related to ileal conduit that has been treated endoscopically, according to the current literature. PMID:27579432

  9. Superior vena cava reconstruction using bovine jugular vein conduit.

    PubMed

    Lü, Wei Dong; Yu, Feng Lei; Wu, Zhong Shi

    2007-11-01

    The glutaraldehyde-treated bovine jugular vein conduit (BJVC) is a xenograft conduit initially used for right ventricular outflow tract reconstruction and has never been used for reconstruction of superior vena cava (SVC). In September 2003, a patient with SVC obstruction underwent SVC reconstruction using BJVC. He has been alive for 42 months and free from signs and symptoms of SVC obstruction except that metastasis was found in the vertebrae. The radionuclide venography showed the graft tube was patent and only slight stenosis was found in the proximal anastomosis. The initial result supports BJVC as an acceptable alternative for SVC reconstruction. PMID:17768061

  10. Modeling Reactive Transport in Coupled Groundwater-Conduit Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiessl, S. M.; Sauter, M.; Zheng, C.; Viswanathan, H. S.

    2002-05-01

    Modeling reactive transport in coupled groundwater-conduit systems requires consideration of two transport time scales in the flow and transport models. Consider for example a subsurface mine consisting of a network of highly conductive shafts, drifts or ventilation raises (i.e., conduits) within the considerably less permeable ore material (i.e., matrix). In the conduits, potential contaminants can travel much more rapidly than in the background aquifer (matrix). Since conduits cannot necessarily be regarded as a continuum, double continuum models are only of limited use for simulation of contaminant transport in such coupled groundwater-conduit systems. This study utilizes a "hybrid" flow and transport model in which contaminants can in essence be transported at a slower time scale in the matrix and at a faster time scale in the conduits. The hybrid flow model uses an approach developed by Clemens et al. (1996), which is based on the modelling of flow in a discrete pipe network, coupled to a continuum representing the low-permeability inter-conduit matrix blocks. Laminar or turbulent flow can be simulated in the different pipes depending on the flow conditions in the model domain. The three-dimensional finite-difference groundwater flow model MODFLOW (Harbaugh and McDonald, 1996) is used to simulate flow in the continuum. Contaminant transport within the matrix is simulated with a continuum approach using the three-dimensional multi-species solute transport model MT3DMS (Zheng and Wang, 1999), while that in the conduit system is simulated with a one-dimensional advective transport model. As a first step for reactive transport modeling in such systems, only equilibrium reactions among multiple species are considered by coupling the hybrid transport model to a geochemical speciation package. An idealized mine network developed by Viswanathan and Sauter (2001) is used as a test problem in this study. The numerical experiment is based on reference date collected from

  11. Past, Present, and Future of Nerve Conduits in the Treatment of Peripheral Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Muheremu, Aikeremujiang; Ao, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    With significant advances in the research and application of nerve conduits, they have been used to repair peripheral nerve injury for several decades. Nerve conduits range from biological tubes to synthetic tubes, and from nondegradable tubes to biodegradable tubes. Researchers have explored hollow tubes, tubes filled with scaffolds containing neurotrophic factors, and those seeded with Schwann cells or stem cells. The therapeutic effect of nerve conduits is improving with increasing choice of conduit material, new construction of conduits, and the inclusion of neurotrophic factors and support cells in the conduits. Improvements in functional outcomes are expected when these are optimized for use in clinical practice. PMID:26491662

  12. Rationale, Study Design and Sample Characteristics of a Randomized Controlled Trial of Directly Administered Antiretroviral Therapy for HIV-infected Prisoners Transitioning to the Community - A Potential Conduit to Improved HIV Treatment Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Tehrani, Ali S. Saber; Springer, Sandra A.; Qiu, Jingjun; Herme, Maua; Wickersham, Jeffrey; Altice, Frederick L.

    2012-01-01

    Background HIV-infected prisoners experience poor HIV treatment outcomes post-release. Directly administered antiretroviral therapy (DAART) is a CDC-designated, evidence-based adherence intervention for drug users, yet untested among released prisoners. Methods Sentenced HIV-infected prisoners on antiretroviral therapy (ART) and returning to New Haven or Hartford, Connecticut were recruited and randomized 2:1 to a controlled trial (RCT) of 6 months of DAART versus self-administered therapy (SAT); all subjects received case management services. Subjects meeting DSM-IV criteria for opioid dependence were offered immediate medication-assisted treatment. Trained outreach workers provided DAART once-daily, seven days per week, including behavioral skills training during the last intervention month. Both study groups were assessed for 6 months after the intervention period. Assessments occurred within 90 days pre-release (baseline), day of release, and then monthly for 12 months. Viral load (VL) and CD4 testing was conducted baseline and quarterly; genotypic resistance testing was conducted at baseline, 6 and 12 months. The primary outcome was pre-defined as viral suppression (VL<400 copies/mL) at 6 months. Results Between 2004 and 2009, 279 participants were screened, of which 202 met eligibility criteria and 154 were ultimately enrolled in the study; 103 subjects were randomized to DAART and 51 to SAT. Subjects were mostly male (81.2%), people of color (87.0%), had an alcohol use disorder (39.7%), had underlying depression (54.2%), were virally suppressed (78.8%) and mean CD4=390.7 cells/mL. Conclusions Outcomes from this RCT will contribute greatly to HIV treatment outcomes after release from prison, a period associated with adverse HIV and other medical consequences. PMID:22101218

  13. 50. ROCK DROP AND FISH WHEEL, CONDUIT NO. 1 SPILLWAY, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    50. ROCK DROP AND FISH WHEEL, CONDUIT NO. 1 SPILLWAY, FLUME NO. 17, EXHIBIT L, SANTA ANA RIVER NO. 1 PROJECT, APR. 30, 1945. SCE drawing no. 523192 (sheet no. 2; for filing with the Federal Power Commission). - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  14. Mid-term experience with valved bovine jugular vein conduits.

    PubMed

    Pawelec-Wojtalik, Malgorzata; Mrówczyński, Wojciech; Wodziński, Andrzej; Wojtalik, Michal; Henschke, Jacek; Sharma, Girish K

    2005-12-01

    From June 1999 to January 2004, 43 children underwent implantation of a valved bovine jugular vein conduit and correction of complex congenital heart defects. Median age was 1.98 years (range, 11 days - 13.3 years). There were 7 early deaths (16.3%) unrelated to conduit failure or thrombosis. Median follow-up of 36 survivors was 24 months (range, 1-48 months, quartile range, 12-48 months), total follow-up was 78 patient-years. There were 3 late deaths (8.3%) due to infection, pulmonary thromboembolism, and sudden cardiac arrest after re-operation to repair a right ventricular outflow tract aneurysm. There were 2 conduit explantations due to dysfunction and suspected endocarditis. Three patients underwent balloon dilatation of distal stenoses. The mean peak gradient through the pulmonary anastomosis was 15 mm Hg (range, 3-42 mm Hg) among patients free from re-intervention. No severe valve regurgitation was observed. Freedom from re-intervention was 72% at 48 months. This conduit remains a good alternative to homografts. Causes of distal stenosis must be clarified, guidelines for prophylactic anticoagulation must be created, and the role of percutaneous balloon dilatation established. PMID:16304226

  15. 14. PROJECT PLAN, INTAKE PIER, RAW WATER CONDUITS, PUMPING STATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. PROJECT PLAN, INTAKE PIER, RAW WATER CONDUITS, PUMPING STATION FORCE MAINS, TREATED WATER PIPELINES, AND FILTRATION PLANT, SHEET 1 OF 117, 1920. - Sacramento River Water Treatment Plant Intake Pier & Access Bridge, Spanning Sacramento River approximately 175 feet west of eastern levee on river; roughly .5 mile downstream from confluence of Sacramento & American Rivers, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  16. 20. COMPLETION OF INTAKE CONDUITS, PLANS, PROFILES, AND DETAILS, SHEET ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. COMPLETION OF INTAKE CONDUITS, PLANS, PROFILES, AND DETAILS, SHEET 115 OF 117, 1922. - Sacramento River Water Treatment Plant Intake Pier & Access Bridge, Spanning Sacramento River approximately 175 feet west of eastern levee on river; roughly .5 mile downstream from confluence of Sacramento & American Rivers, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  17. 21. COMPLETION OF INTAKE CONDUITS REVISED, PIPE SECTIONS AND PLANS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. COMPLETION OF INTAKE CONDUITS REVISED, PIPE SECTIONS AND PLANS, SHEET 117 OF 117, 1922. - Sacramento River Water Treatment Plant Intake Pier & Access Bridge, Spanning Sacramento River approximately 175 feet west of eastern levee on river; roughly .5 mile downstream from confluence of Sacramento & American Rivers, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  18. 19. INTAKE CONDUITS, PROFILE, SECTIONS, AND DETAILS, SHEET 10 OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. INTAKE CONDUITS, PROFILE, SECTIONS, AND DETAILS, SHEET 10 OF 117, 1920. - Sacramento River Water Treatment Plant Intake Pier & Access Bridge, Spanning Sacramento River approximately 175 feet west of eastern levee on river; roughly .5 mile downstream from confluence of Sacramento & American Rivers, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  19. Evaluation of the MODFLOW-2005 Conduit Flow Process.

    PubMed

    Hill, Melissa E; Stewart, Mark T; Martin, Angel

    2010-01-01

    The recent development of the Conduit Flow Process (CFP) by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) provides hydrogeologic modelers with a new tool that incorporates the non-Darcian, multiporosity components of flow characteristic of karst aquifers. CFP introduces new parameters extending beyond those of traditional Darcian groundwater flow codes. We characterize a karst aquifer to collect data useful for evaluating this new tool at a test site in west-central Florida, where the spatial distribution and cross-sectional area of the conduit network are available. Specifically, we characterize: (1) the potential for Darcian/non-Darcian flow using estimates of specific discharge vs. observed hydraulic gradients, and (2) the temporal variation for the direction and magnitude of fluid exchange between the matrix and conduit network during extreme hydrologic events. We evaluate the performance of CFP Mode 1 using a site-scale dual-porosity model and compare its performance with a comparable laminar equivalent continuum model (ECM) using MODFLOW-2005. Based on our preliminary analyses, hydraulic conductivity coupled with conduit wall conductance improved the match between observed and simulated discharges by 12% to 40% over turbulent flow alone (less than 1%). PMID:20113361

  20. Structure of a bacterial cell surface decaheme electron conduit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Some bacterial species are able to utilize extracellular mineral forms of iron and manganese as respiratory electron acceptors. In Shewanella oneidensis this involves decaheme cytochromes that are located on the bacterial cell surface at the termini of trans-outer-membrane electron transfer conduits...

  1. Aorto-conduit fistula developing four years after esophagectomy.

    PubMed

    Strong, S; Higgs, S; Streets, C; Titcomb, D; Barham, P; Blazeby, J; Hollowood, A

    2012-01-01

    A 71 year old lady was treated for a squamous cell carcinoma of the oesophagus with neo-adjuvant chemotherapy followed by a two phase Ivor-Lewis oesophagectomy with two field lymphadenectomy. She presented four years later with life threatening bleeding from a fistula between the thoracic aorta and the gastric conduit, which was treated successfully with a thoracic aortic stent. PMID:24960784

  2. 26 CFR 1.7701(l)-1 - Conduit financing arrangements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Conduit financing arrangements. 1.7701(l)-1 Section 1.7701(l)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) General Actuarial Valuations § 1.7701(l)-1...

  3. 26 CFR 1.7701(l)-1 - Conduit financing arrangements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Conduit financing arrangements. 1.7701(l)-1 Section 1.7701(l)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) General Actuarial Valuations § 1.7701(l)-1...

  4. 26 CFR 1.7701(l)-1 - Conduit financing arrangements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Conduit financing arrangements. 1.7701(l)-1 Section 1.7701(l)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) General Actuarial Valuations § 1.7701(l)-1...

  5. 26 CFR 1.7701(l)-1 - Conduit financing arrangements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Conduit financing arrangements. 1.7701(l)-1 Section 1.7701(l)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) General Actuarial Valuations § 1.7701(l)-1...

  6. 59 FR- Government National Mortgage Association; Real Estate Mortgage Investment Conduit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1994-05-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT Government National Mortgage Association; Real Estate Mortgage Investment Conduit... of which will elect to be treated as a Real Estate Mortgage Investment Conduit (``REMIC'')....

  7. AC loss characteristics of simulated CIC-type conductors having plastic conduit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojo, Y.; Sekine, N.; Tada, S.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Obama, J.; Takao, T.; Miyagi, D.; Yamanaka, A.

    2003-10-01

    When alternating current superconducting coils having cable-in-conduit conductors are fabricated, non-metallic conduit materials are necessary to avoid eddy current losses in the conduits. Using two kinds of non-metallic tapes made of glass fiber reinforced plastics (GFRPs) and Dyneema fiber reinforced plastics (DFRPs), we made the conductors with the GFRP conduits and DFRP conduits, and experimentally studied the total losses of the conductors. The measured results showed that the total loss of the conductor with the GFRP conduit was smaller than that with the DFRP conduit at the same value of the void ratio, the transport current, the external magnetic field, and so on. When the void ratios become high, the superconducting bundle cable can easily move in the conduit. Hence the measured total losses increased with the void ratios of the conductors.

  8. A new antithrombogenic RV-PA valved conduit.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Y; Noishiki, Y; Soma, T; Ishii, M; Yamamoto, K; Takahashi, K; Mo, M; Kosuge, T; Kondo, J; Matsumoto, A

    1994-01-01

    A new antithrombogenic right ventricular (RV)-pulmonary artery (PA) valved conduit was developed using a bovine jugular vein containing a natural valve. To maintain the natural and mechanical properties of the venous tissue, a hydrophilic cross-linking reagent, glycerol polyglycidyl ether polyepoxy compound (PC) was used instead of glutaraldehyde (GA). Moreover, to induce antithrombogenicity, heparin was bonded to the inner surface of the bovine jugular vein cross-linked with PC. Conduits of 18 to 20 mm inner diameter (ID) were implanted between the RV and PA in nine dogs weighing 7-17 kg, with the native main PA being ligated proximally. The handling and suturing of the graft was easy and adaptable, and the anastomosis was completed with excellent coaptation and no blood leakage at the suture lines. All animals were chronic survivors, but one animal died of hematemesis on the 438th postoperative day. Grafts were explanted from 182 to 385 days after implantation. The luminal surface of the conduits were white, glistening, and smooth with good coaptation of the cusps, without calcification or degenerative changes except for one cusp that showed a minimal deformation with a small thrombus. Macroscopic and microscopic observation showed that there were no thrombi at the anastomotic lines, but small thrombi on the luminal surface of the conduits near the cusps and in some cusps. Endothelium-like cells were noticed on the luminal surface of the graft, except in the area near the cusps, and on one cusp at 196 days after surgery. These results indicated that the new RV-PA valved conduit provided adequate antithrombogenicity by temporary slow heparin release, followed later by endothelialization of the graft in a low pressure system at 1 year after implantation. PMID:8555607

  9. Draining mafic magma from conduits during Strombolian eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadsworth, F. B.; Kennedy, B.; Branney, M. J.; Vasseur, J.; von Aulock, F. W.; Lavallée, Y.; Kueppers, U.

    2014-12-01

    During and following eruption, mafic magmas can readily drain downward in conduits, dykes and lakes producing complex and coincident up-flow and down-flow textures. This process can occur at the top of the plumbing system if the magma outgases as slugs or through porous foam, causing the uppermost magma surface to descend and the magma to densify. In this scenario the draining volume is limited by the gas volume outgassed. Additionally, magma can undergo wholesale backflow when the pressure at the base of the conduit or feeder dyke exceeds the driving pressure in the chamber beneath. This second scenario will continue until pressure equilibrium is established. These two scenarios may occur coincidently as local draining of uppermost conduit magma by outgassing can lead to wholesale backflow because the densification of magma is an effective way to modify the vertical pressure profile in a conduit. In the rare case where conduits are preserved in cross section, the textural record of draining is often complex and great care should be taken in interpreting bimodal kinematic trends in detail. Lateral cooling into country rock leads to lateral profiles of physical and flow properties and, ultimately, outgassing potential, and exploration of such profiles elucidates the complexity involved. We present evidence from Red Crater volcano, New Zealand, and La Palma, Canary Islands, where we show that at least one draining phase followed initial ascent and eruption. We provide a rheological model approach to understand gravitational draining velocities and therefore, the timescales of up- and down-flow cycles predicted. These timescales can be compared with observed geophysical signals at monitored mafic volcanoes worldwide. Finally, we discuss the implications of shallow magma draining for edifice stability, eruption longevity and magma-groundwater interaction.

  10. Results and analysis of the hot-spot temperature experiment for a cable-in-conduit conductor with thick conduit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedlak, Kamil; Bruzzone, Pierluigi

    2015-12-01

    In the design of future DEMO fusion reactor a long time constant (∼23 s) is required for an emergency current dump in the toroidal field (TF) coils, e.g. in case of a quench detection. This requirement is driven mainly by imposing a limit on forces on mechanical structures, namely on the vacuum vessel. As a consequence, the superconducting cable-in-conduit conductors (CICC) of the TF coil have to withstand heat dissipation lasting tens of seconds at the section where the quench started. During that time, the heat will be partially absorbed by the (massive) steel conduit and electrical insulation, thus reducing the hot-spot temperature estimated strictly from the enthalpy of the strand bundle. A dedicated experiment has been set up at CRPP to investigate the radial heat propagation and the hot-spot temperature in a CICC with a 10 mm thick steel conduit and a 2 mm thick glass epoxy outer electrical insulation. The medium size, ∅ = 18 mm, NbTi CICC was powered by the operating current of up to 10 kA. The temperature profile was monitored by 10 temperature sensors. The current dump conditions, namely the decay time constant and the quench detection delay, were varied. The experimental results show that the thick conduit significantly contributes to the overall enthalpy balance, and consequently reduces the amount of copper required for the quench protection in superconducting cables for fusion reactors.

  11. Acute dissection of a Contegra conduit: a rare mechanism of failure.

    PubMed

    Kavarana, Minoo N; Dorfman, Adam L; Agarwal, Prachi P; Bove, Edward L

    2010-09-01

    The Contegra (Medtronic Inc, Minneapolis, MN) bovine jugular vein conduit has been used with increasing frequency in congenital heart disease for the reconstruction of the right ventricular outflow tract. In this report, we describe a mechanism for conduit failure secondary to an acute dissection of the inner neointimal peel from the conduit wall. PMID:20732536

  12. Satellite radar data reveal short-term pre-explosive displacements and a complex conduit system at Volcán de Colima, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salzer, Jacqueline; Nikkhoo, Mehdi; Walter, Thomas; Sudhaus, Henriette; Reyes-Dávila, Gabriel; Bretón, Mauricio; Arambula, Raúl

    2014-06-01

    The geometry of the volcanic conduit is a main parameter controlling the dynamics and the style of volcanic eruptions and their precursors, but also one of the main unknowns. Pre-eruptive signals that originate in the upper conduit region include seismicity and deformation of different types and scales. However, the locality of the source of these signals and thus the conduit geometry often remain unconstrained at steep sloped and explosive volcanoes due to the sparse instrumental coverage in the summit region and difficult access. Here we infer the shallow conduit system geometry of Volcán de Colima, Mexico, based on ground displacements detected in high resolution satellite radar data up to seven hours prior to an explosion in January 2013. We use Boundary Element Method modeling to reproduce the data synthetically and constrain the parameters of the deformation source, in combination with an analysis of photographs of the summit. We favour a two-source model, indicative of distinct regions of pressurization at very shallow levels. The location of the upper pressurization source coincides with that of post-explosive extrusion; we therefore attribute the displacements to transient (elastic) pre-explosive pressurization of the conduit system. Our results highlight the geometrical complexity of shallow conduit systems at explosive volcanoes and its effect on the distribution of pre-eruptive deformation signals. An apparent absence of such signals at many explosive volcanoes may relate to its small temporal and spatial extent, partly controlled by upper conduit structures. Modern satellite radar instruments allow observations at high spatial and temporal resolution that may be the key for detecting and improving our understanding of the generation of precursors at explosive volcanoes.

  13. Cryovolcanic Conduit Evolution and Eruption on Icy Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, K. L.

    2014-12-01

    In silicate volcanism, such as on Earth or Io, eruptions typically result from fracture formation caused by interaction of tectonic stresses with inflating, pressurized magma sources, leading to transport of melt through an evolving conduit. On icy satellites the paradigm may be similar, resulting from some combination of tidal stresses and expansion of freezing water within, or near the base of, an ice shell. Such a fracture will result in eruption if mass continuity can be established, with buoyancy aided by exsolution and expansion of dissolved volatiles. After onset, conduit shape evolves due to: (1) shear-stresses or frictional erosional; (2) wallrock "bursting" due to massive wall stresses; (3) wall melting or condensation of particles due to heat transfer; or (4) changes in applied stresses. Preliminary thermodynamic and fluid mechanical analysis suggests some initial cooling during ascent resulting from exsolution and expansion of volatiles, thermally buffered by freezing, Conduit contraction may occur, and so evolution towards a deep, gas-filled plume chamber is difficult to accommodate without evoking a co-incidental process. Conduit flaring occurs near the surface where velocities are greatest, enhancing erosion. Here, viscous dissipative heating exceeds adiabatic cooling, and so some boiling (a few wt%) may occur. In contrast with silicate volcanism, decompression to below the triple point will occur within conduit, vent or jet, resulting in rapid freezing and boiling of the remaining water at a 6.8:1 ratio. Subsequent isentropic or adiabatic expansion within erupting jets may result in a few percent net of condensation or sublimation. These effects combined lead to ~4:1-7:1 solid:vapor ratios in the jet for most eruption conditions. These figures are consistent with the ~6:1 inferred in Enceladus' jets, supporting the hypothesis that the Enceladus plume draws from a subsurface body of liquids through a conduit. Similar results are anticipated if

  14. Tension layer winding of cable-in-conduit conductor

    SciTech Connect

    Devernoe, A.; Ciancetta, G.; King, M.; Parizh, M.; Painter, T.; Miller, J.

    1996-07-01

    A 710 mm i.d. by 440 mm long, 6 layer Cable-in-Conduit (CIC) coil was precision tension layer wound with Incoloy 908 jacketed conductor to model winding technology that will be used for the Nb{sub 3}Sn outsert coils of the 45 Tesla Hybrid Magnet Project at the US National High Magnetic Field Laboratory. This paper reports on the set up of a new winding facility with unique capabilities for insulating and winding long length CIC conductor and on special procedures which were developed to wind and support layer to layer transitions and to safely form conductor into and out of the winding. Analytical methods used to predict conduit keystoning, springback and back tensioning requirements before winding are reported in comparison to results obtained during winding and actual winding build-up dimensions on a layer by layer basis in comparison to design requirements.

  15. Pyroclastic conduits of the late Cenozoic collapse calderas from Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, T.; Iwahashi, A.; Takahashi, T.; Nagahashi, Y.

    2006-12-01

    There are many late Cenozoic calderas in Japan. Many of the late Cenozoic calderas are the large-scale collapse calderas of the piston-cylinder type, and consist of collapsed volcanic basin surrounded by arcuate ring faults or array of vents and the surrounding pyroclastic flow deposits. Yoshida (1984) reported intrusive breccia dikes between the subsided block and wall rocks of the Ishizuchi cauldron, SW Japan. The intrusive breccias consist of tuff and tuff breccias containing many kinds of rock fragments. Contacts with surrounding rocks are sharp. Some breccia dikes along the marginal ring fracture zone of the cauldron, which are composed of welded pyroclastic rocks, probably fill vents from which the surrounding pyroclastic flow deposits were discharged. The matrix of the intrusive breccia is welded ash and/or clastic powder. Fragments vary in size from millimeters to several meters. Local continuity of structures from one fragment to another indicates that the brecciation was not a consequence of explosive action; these are interpreted as intrusive breccias produced by fluidization processes, probably associated with pyroclastic explosions. These breccias were intruded upward to their present positions as part of a fluidization system. Intrusive breccia and tuff within the ring fault complex contain a eutaxitic foliation oriented nearly parallel to contacts. This feature is thought to result from inwardly directed pressures exerted by the dike walls during caldera collapse following eruption of the pyroclastic flows. The eutaxitic foliation indicates that the intrusive breccia and tuff were emplaced as a fluidized system of gas, solid particles, and probably liquid droplets. Mt. Taiheizan is located 20km northeast of Akita, NE Japan. There is the late Miocene to early Pliocene Nibetsu cauldron on Mt. Taiheizan. Recent study revealed the details of a contemporary arcute pyroclastic conduit consisting of felsic tuff. This Hirasawa felsic tuff dyke is about 5 km

  16. Single-friction-surface triboelectric generator with human body conduit

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Bo; Cheng, Xiaoliang; Zhang, Xiaosheng; Han, Mengdi; Liu, Wen; Zhang, Haixia

    2014-03-10

    We present a transparent single-friction-surface triboelectric generator (STEG) employing human body as the conduit, making the applications of STEG in portable electronics much more practical and leading to a significant output improvement. The STEG with micro-patterned polydimethylsiloxane surface achieved an output voltage of over 200 V with a current density of 4.7 μA/cm{sup 2}. With human body conduit, the output current increased by 39% and the amount of charge that transferred increased by 34% compared to the results with grounded electrode. A larger increment of 210% and 81% was obtained in the case of STEG with a large-size flat polyethylene terephthalate surface.

  17. Impulsive Wave Propagation within Magmatic Conduits with Axial Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Negri Leiva, R. S.; Arciniega-Ceballos, A.; Scheu, B.; Dingwell, D. B.; Sanchez-Sesma, F. J.

    2013-12-01

    We implemented Trefftz's method to simulate wave propagation in a fluid-solid system aimed to represent a magmatic conduit. Assuming axial symmetry, a set of multipoles is used to build a complete system of wave functions for both the solid and the fluid. These functions are solutions of the elastodynamic equations that govern the motions in the fluid and the solid, respectively. The conduit can be closed or open and the exterior elastic domain may be unlimited or with an exterior boundary. In order to find the functions coefficients, boundary conditions (null shear and continuity of pressures and normal velocities) are satisfied in the least squares sense. The impulsive nature of the source is considered using Fourier analysis. Despite the simplicity of the formulation our results display a rich variety of behaviors. In fact, for a uniform infinite cylinder we reproduced the analytical solution. Moreover, this approach allows establishing some important effects of conduit geometry, including changes of sections. Lateral effects and bump resonances are well resolved. We compared our numerical calculations with results obtained from experimental simulations of volcanic explosions in which rapid depressurization induces fragmentation of volcanic rocks. These experiments are performed within a shock-tube apparatus at room temperature and various pressures using Argon (Ar) gas, particles and pumice samples of different porosities, from Popocatepetl volcano. The mechanical system is well characterized and the dynamics of the explosive process is monitored with high precision piezoelectric sensors located at the pipe surface. The combination of analytical and experimental approaches is very useful to understand the seismic wave field of volcanic conduit dynamics.

  18. Investigating degassing dynamics into the shallow conduit through decompression experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spina, Laura; Scheu, Bettina; Cimarelli, Corrado; Dingwell, Donald

    2014-05-01

    The history of bubbles' growth and interaction, as well as their spatial distribution in the shallow conduit, is deeply interconnected with the style of the eruptions. According to the fundamental role played by volatiles in the eruptive process, more effort is required in determining how the key factors of volcanic systems (i.e., magma properties, decompression rate) influence the dynamics of degassing. Therefore, our aim is to provide, through the analysis of decompression experiments on analogue materials, insights on such relations. We performed several decompression experiments with a shock-tube apparatus, and using silicon oil as laboratory-analogue for the magmatic melt. The sample was placed in a transparent autoclave, saturated with Argon for an established amount of time under a fixed pressure (up to a maximum of 10 MPa). Successively it was decompressed to atmospheric conditions, by releasing gas through a control valve. The dynamics of gas exsolution processes were recorded by using pressure sensors and a high speed camera. A range of viscosity values (1, 10, 100, 1000 Pa s) was investigated, for the same decompression path. Furthermore, some experiments were carried out with the addition of glass beads, as analogue to crystals, to the pure liquid. The height of the expanding column was monitored, in conjunction with images recorded during the experiments, and the growth rate of bubbles was measured at different times and depth. Finally, bubble size distribution has been evaluated at various stages for some experiments, in order to achieve a spatial map of the ongoing degassing phenomena. Results allowed us to define different regimes occurring during the decompression, whose features and characteristics are strongly affected by fluid viscosity. Indeed, several degassing phases were observed, from bubbly fluid to the eventual buildup of a more or less "foamy" phase, which ultimately experiences periodical oscillations around an average equilibrium level

  19. Effect of Artificial Nerve Conduit Vascularization on Peripheral Nerve in a Necrotic Bed

    PubMed Central

    Iijima, Yuki; Murayama, Akira; Takeshita, Katsushi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Several types of artificial nerve conduit have been used for bridging peripheral nerve gaps as an alternative to autologous nerves. However, their efficacy in repairing nerve injuries accompanied by surrounding tissue damage remains unclear. We fabricated a novel nerve conduit vascularized by superficial inferior epigastric (SIE) vessels and evaluated whether it could promote axonal regeneration in a necrotic bed. Methods: A 15-mm nerve conduit was implanted beneath the SIE vessels in the groin of a rat to supply it with blood vessels 2 weeks before nerve reconstruction. We removed a 13-mm segment of the sciatic nerve and then pressed a heated iron against the dorsal thigh muscle to produce a burn. The defects were immediately repaired with an autograft (n = 10), nerve conduit graft (n = 8), or vascularized nerve conduit graft (n = 8). Recovery of motor function was examined for 18 weeks after surgery. The regenerated nerves were electrophysiologically and histologically evaluated. Results: The vascularity of the nerve conduit implanted beneath the SIE vessels was confirmed histologically 2 weeks after implantation. Between 14 and 18 weeks after surgery, motor function of the vascularized conduit group was significantly better than that of the nonvascularized conduit group. Electrophysiological and histological evaluations revealed that although the improvement did not reach the level of reinnervation achieved by an autograft, the vascularized nerve conduit improved axonal regeneration more than did the conduit alone. Conclusion: Vascularization of artificial nerve conduits accelerated peripheral nerve regeneration, but further research is required to improve the quality of nerve regeneration. PMID:27257595

  20. Parastomal hernias after radical cystectomy and ileal conduit diversion

    PubMed Central

    Donahue, Timothy F.

    2016-01-01

    Parastomal hernia, defined as an "incisional hernia related to an abdominal wall stoma", is a frequent complication after conduit urinary diversion that can negatively impact quality of life and present a clinically significant problem for many patients. Parastomal hernia (PH) rates may be as high as 65% and while many patients are asymptomatic, in some series up to 30% of patients require surgical intervention due to pain, leakage, ostomy appliance problems, urinary obstruction, and rarely bowel obstruction or strangulation. Local tissue repair, stoma relocation, and mesh repairs have been performed to correct PH, however, long-term results have been disappointing with recurrence rates of 30%–76% reported after these techniques. Due to high recurrence rates and the potential morbidity of PH repair, efforts have been made to prevent PH development at the time of the initial surgery. Randomized trials of circumstomal prophylactic mesh placement at the time of colostomy and ileostomy stoma formation have shown significant reductions in PH rates with acceptably low complication profiles. We have placed prophylactic mesh at the time of ileal conduit creation in patients at high risk for PH development and found it to be safe and effective in reducing the PH rates over the short-term. In this review, we describe the clinical and radiographic definitions of PH, the clinical impact and risk factors associated with its development, and the use of prophylactic mesh placement for patients undergoing ileal conduit urinary diversion with the intent of reducing PH rates. PMID:27437533

  1. Methods of measuring pumpage through closed-conduit irrigation systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kjelstrom, L.C.

    1991-01-01

    Methods of measuring volumes of water withdrawn from the Snake River and its tributaries and pumped through closed-conduit irrigation systems were needed for equitable management of and resolution of conflicts over water use. On the basis of evaluations and field tests by researchers from the University of Idaho, Water Resources Research Institute, Moscow, Idaho, an impeller meter was selected to monitor pumpage through closed-conduit systems. In 1988, impeller meters were installed at 20 pumping stations along the Snake River between the Upper Salmon Falls and C.J. Strike Dams. Impeller-derived pumpage data were adjusted if they differed substantially from ultrasonic flow-meter- or current-meter-derived values. Comparisons of pumpage data obtained by ultrasonic flow-meter and current-meter measurements indicated that the ultrasonic flow meter was a reliable means to check operation of impeller meters. The equipment generally performed satisfactorily, and reliable pumpage data could be obtained using impeller meters in closed-conduit irrigation systems. Many pumping stations that divert water from the Snake River for irrigation remain unmeasured; however, regression analyses indicate that total pumpage can be reasonably estimated on the basis of electrical power consumption data, an approximation of total head at a pumping station, and a derived coefficient.

  2. Parastomal hernias after radical cystectomy and ileal conduit diversion.

    PubMed

    Donahue, Timothy F; Bochner, Bernard H

    2016-07-01

    Parastomal hernia, defined as an "incisional hernia related to an abdominal wall stoma", is a frequent complication after conduit urinary diversion that can negatively impact quality of life and present a clinically significant problem for many patients. Parastomal hernia (PH) rates may be as high as 65% and while many patients are asymptomatic, in some series up to 30% of patients require surgical intervention due to pain, leakage, ostomy appliance problems, urinary obstruction, and rarely bowel obstruction or strangulation. Local tissue repair, stoma relocation, and mesh repairs have been performed to correct PH, however, long-term results have been disappointing with recurrence rates of 30%-76% reported after these techniques. Due to high recurrence rates and the potential morbidity of PH repair, efforts have been made to prevent PH development at the time of the initial surgery. Randomized trials of circumstomal prophylactic mesh placement at the time of colostomy and ileostomy stoma formation have shown significant reductions in PH rates with acceptably low complication profiles. We have placed prophylactic mesh at the time of ileal conduit creation in patients at high risk for PH development and found it to be safe and effective in reducing the PH rates over the short-term. In this review, we describe the clinical and radiographic definitions of PH, the clinical impact and risk factors associated with its development, and the use of prophylactic mesh placement for patients undergoing ileal conduit urinary diversion with the intent of reducing PH rates. PMID:27437533

  3. Inferring conduit process from population studies of cinder cone craters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bemis, Karen G.

    2014-05-01

    One of the most observable aspects of magma conduits is of course their exit to the Earth's surface: the volcanic crater. The craters resulting from small mostly-monogenetic volcanic eruptions vary in considerable in size and shape, even after accounting for variation in size. Presumably, these variations tell us something about the state of the conduit at least in the ending stages of eruption. But what? This work explores the statistical properties of crater populations in Guatemala and elsewhere and speculates on the conduit processes that may explain the complex behavior. Crater depths are strongly correlated with cone slopes even when normalized by cone diameter, which suggests the importance of the impact of the volatile content (which may influence slope through fragmentation and the resulting grain size) and the duration of eruption (which may influence whether the cone is built to its maximum slope) despite erosion acting to reduce observed crater depths (cone slopes are known to decrease with erosion but cone diameters increase).

  4. Peripheral nerve regeneration with conduits: use of vein tubes

    PubMed Central

    Sabongi, Rodrigo Guerra; Fernandes, Marcela; dos Santos, João Baptista Gomes

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of peripheral nerve injuries remains a challenge to modern medicine due to the complexity of the neurobiological nerve regenerating process. There is a greater challenge when the transected nerve ends are not amenable to primary end-to-end tensionless neurorraphy. When facing a segmental nerve defect, great effort has been made to develop an alternative to the autologous nerve graft in order to circumvent morbidity at donor site, such as neuroma formation, scarring and permanent loss of function. Tubolization techniques have been developed to bridge nerve gaps and have been extensively studied in numerous experimental and clinical trials. The use of a conduit intends to act as a vehicle for moderation and modulation of the cellular and molecular ambience for nerve regeneration. Among several conduits, vein tubes were validated for clinical application with improving outcomes over the years. This article aims to address the investigation and treatment of segmental nerve injury and draw the current panorama on the use of vein tubes as an autogenous nerve conduit. PMID:26170802

  5. A Review of Bioactive Release from Nerve Conduits as a Neurotherapeutic Strategy for Neuronal Growth in Peripheral Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Choonara, Yahya E.; Bijukumar, Divya; du Toit, Lisa C.

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral nerve regeneration strategies employ the use of polymeric engineered nerve conduits encompassed with components of a delivery system. This allows for the controlled and sustained release of neurotrophic growth factors for the enhancement of the innate regenerative capacity of the injured nerves. This review article focuses on the delivery of neurotrophic factors (NTFs) and the importance of the parameters that control release kinetics in the delivery of optimal quantities of NTFs for improved therapeutic effect and prevention of dose dumping. Studies utilizing various controlled-release strategies, in attempt to obtain ideal release kinetics, have been reviewed in this paper. Release strategies discussed include affinity-based models, crosslinking techniques, and layer-by-layer technologies. Currently available synthetic hollow nerve conduits, an alternative to the nerve autografts, have proven to be successful in the bridging and regeneration of primarily the short transected nerve gaps in several patient cases. However, current research emphasizes on the development of more advanced nerve conduits able to simulate the effectiveness of the autograft which includes, in particular, the ability to deliver growth factors. PMID:25143934

  6. Effects of magma and conduit conditions on transitions between effusive and explosive activity: a numerical modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, B. B.; De'Michieli Vitturi, M.; Clarke, A. B.; Voight, B.

    2013-12-01

    Transitions between effusive and explosive eruptions, common at silicic volcanoes, can occur between distinct eruptive episodes or can occur as changes between effusive and explosive phases within a single episode. The precise causes of these transitions are difficult to determine due to the multitude of mechanisms and variables that can influence fragmentation thresholds. Numerical modeling of magma ascent within a volcanic conduit allows the influence of key variables to be extensively tested. We study the effect of different variables on the mass eruption rate at the vent using a conservative, 1-D, two-phase, steady-state model that allows for lateral gas loss at shallow depths. Several fragmentation criteria are also tested. We are able to generate a number of regime diagrams for a variety of magma and conduit conditions that constrain transitions from effusive to explosive episodes. We show that a transition to explosive activity can occur without changes in the bulk chemistry, crystal volume fraction, or gas mass fraction of the magma. Eruptive style can be controlled by the pressure gradient within the conduit caused by either overpressure in the chamber or varying lava dome size at the vent. Specific results are sensitive to both magma temperature and conduit geometry. It is important that these variables are well constrained when applying this model to different volcanic systems. We apply our model to the recent activity at Merapi Volcano in Indonesia. We constrain model input and output parameters using current petrologic, seismic, and geodetic studies of the Merapi system, and vary critical parameters over reasonable ranges as documented in the literature. Our model is able to reproduce eruption rates observed during both the 2006 effusive and 2010 explosive/effusive eruptions. Our modeling suggests that a combination of chamber overpressure, increased volatile content, and decreased crystal content due to the voluminous injection of new magma into the

  7. Linking conduit and surface activity at Arenal volcano using broadband seismometers and Doppler radar: do we need a new conduit model?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valade, S.; Donnadieu, F. R.; Lesage, P.; Mora Fernandez, M.; Harris, A. J.; Alvarado, G. E.

    2010-12-01

    We carried out a cross-correlation of broadband seismic data and ground-based Doppler radar data obtained at Arenal (Costa Rica) in February 2005. Our aim was to gain insight into the subsurface source processes (i.e., fragmentation mechanisms operating in the shallow conduit system) and the subsequent pyroclastic emissions (i.e., plume mass loading and ascent dynamics) that characterize the transitory, mildly explosive activity at Arenal. Study of the radar and seismic waveforms revealed a non-systematic relationship between them, both exhibiting a large variety of behaviors and features, but no clear patterns could be distinguished. Pyroclastic emissions recorded by the radar also did not have a unique seismic signature: 44% of radar signals were found in association with explosion-type seismic events, 43% during episodes of tremor, and 13% during aseismic intervals. Over longer time-scales, radar event amplitudes showed no correlation with the seismic energy release rate (RSEM), nor with RSAM, nor with repose time intervals. Energy proxies obtained from coeval radar (plume energy) and seismic (explosion energy) data show significant scattering, indicating that the ratio of the seismic/radar energy was highly variable. Plume mass-loading and exit velocity thus seems only weakly correlated to the seismic energy generated by the explosion, suggesting that the seismic energy might not be a good indicator of the intensity of explosions at Arenal. The occurrence of radar echoes in different range gates indicates that several vents were active, which is consistent with the clarinet-model for tremor generation at Arenal (Lesage et al., 2006), in which fractures in the plug act as valves that control degassing, with multiple conduits explaining the occurrence of different sets of harmonic frequencies in seismic data. Fragmentation is best explained by pressure build-up below a plug obstructing the conduit. This, when a resistance threshold is overcome, fails and yields

  8. Fistula formation between the external iliac artery and ileal conduit following a radical cystoprostatectomy: a rare complication with prewarning signs of haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Sukha, Anisha; Smyth, Niamh

    2015-01-01

    A 76-year-old man was admitted with bleeding per-urostomy following a collapse at home. Three weeks prior to the admission, he had undergone a radical cystoprostatectomy and formation of ileal-conduit for an extensive bladder carcinoma. A CT angiogram revealed a possible small source of bleeding within the ileal-conduit itself, which settled with conservative management. However, prior to discharge he developed profuse fresh bleeding from the urostomy, which could not be controlled. The patient underwent an emergency endoscopy of the conduit and laparotomy, which revealed a fistula between the right external iliac artery and the proximal end of the ileal-conduit. The right iliac artery was ligated and an emergency left-to-right femoral-femoral crossover bypass was performed. The right ureter was stented and rediverted through the ileal-conduit and the left ureter was stented at a later date. He unfortunately had a stormy postoperative recovery with further episodes of per-urostomy bleeding and no identified source. PMID:25819824

  9. Aneurysmal dilatation of the Contegra bovine jugular vein conduit after reconstruction of the right ventricular outflow tract.

    PubMed

    Delmo-Walter, Eva Maria; Alexi-Meskishvili, Vladimir; Abdul-Khaliq, Hashim; Meyer, Rudolf; Hetzer, Roland

    2007-02-01

    An aneurysm of a 14-mm Contegra bovine conduit 5 years after a total repair of tetralogy of Fallot was confirmed by echocardiography, angiography, and magnetic resonance tomography. The conduit was replaced. Histologic examination of the explanted conduit revealed an acellular homogenous material with occasional elastic fibers, fragile, diffuse and complex collagenization throughout the conduit and mild foreign body reaction. Pannus formed over the top of all commissures and on the conduit wall, with extensive mineralization. Close follow-up is seen as mandatory for early detection of the bovine vein conduit aneurysm, particularly in patients in whom small-sized conduits are implanted. PMID:17258016

  10. Construction of nerve guide conduits from cellulose/soy protein composite membranes combined with Schwann cells and pyrroloquinoline quinone for the repair of peripheral nerve defect

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Lihua; Gan, Li; Liu, Yongming; Tian, Weiqun; Tong, Zan; Wang, Xiong; Huselstein, Celine; Chen, Yun

    2015-02-20

    Regeneration and functional reconstruction of peripheral nerve defects remained a significant clinical challenge. Nerve guide conduits, with seed cells or neurotrophic factors (NTFs), had been widely used to improve the repair and regeneration of injured peripheral nerve. Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) was an antioxidant that can stimulate nerve growth factors (NGFs) synthesis and accelerate the Schwann cells (SCs) proliferation and growth. In present study, three kinds of nerve guide conduits were constructed: one from cellulose/SPI hollow tube (CSC), another from CSC combined with SCs (CSSC), and the third one from CSSC combined with PQQ (CSSPC), respectively. And then they were applied to bridge and repair the sciatic nerve defect in rats, using autograft as control. Effects of different nerve guide conduits on the nerve regeneration were comparatively evaluated by general analysis, sciatic function index (SFI) and histological analysis (HE and TEM). Newly-formed regenerative nerve fibers were observed and running through the transparent nerve guide conduits 12 weeks after surgery. SFI results indicated that the reconstruction of motor function in CSSPC group was better than that in CSSC and CSC groups. HE images from the cross-sections and longitudinal-sections of the harvested regenerative nerve indicated that regenerative nerve fibers had been formed and accompanied with new blood vessels and matrix materials in the conduits. TEM images also showed that lots of fresh myelinated and non-myelinated nerve fibers had been formed. Parts of vacuolar, swollen and abnormal axons occurred in CSC and CSSC groups, while the vacuolization and swell of axons was the least serious in CSSPC group. These results indicated that CSSPC group had the most ability to repair and reconstruct the nerve structure and functions due to the comprehensive contributions from hollow CSC tube, SCs and PQQ. As a result, the CSSPC may have the potential for the applications as nerve guide

  11. Calcification resistance for photooxidatively crosslinked acellular bovine jugular vein conduits in right-side heart implantation.

    PubMed

    Lü, Wei-Dong; Wang, An-Ping; Wu, Zhong-Shi; Zhang, Ming; Hu, Tie-Hui; Lei, Guang-Yan; Hu, Ye-Rong

    2012-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of decellularization plus photooxidative crosslinking and ethanol pretreatment on bioprosthetic tissue calcification. Photooxidatively crosslinked acellular (PCA) bovine jugular vein conduits (BJVCs) and their photooxidized controls (n = 5 each) were sterilized in a graded concentration of ethanol solutions for 4 h, and used to reconstruct dog right ventricular outflow tracts. At 1-year implantation, echocardiography showed similar hemodynamic performance, but obvious calcification for the photooxidized BJVC walls. Further histological examination showed intense calcium deposition colocalized with slightly degraded elastic fibers in the photooxidized BJVC walls, with sparsely distributed punctate calcification in the valves and other areas of walls. But PCA BJVCs had apparent degradation of elastic fibers in the walls, with only sparsely distributed punctate calcification in the walls and valves. Content assay demonstrated comparable calcium content for the two groups at preimplantation, whereas less calcium for the PCA group in the walls and similar calcium in the valvular leaflets compared with the photooxidized group at 1-year retrieval. Elastin content assay presented the conduit walls of PCA group had less elastin content at preimplantation, but similar content at 1-year retrieval compared with the photooxidized group. Phospholipid analysis showed phospholipid extraction by ethanol for the PCA group was more efficacious than the photooxidized group. These results indicate that PCA BJVCs resist calcification in right-side heart implantation owing to decellularization, further photooxidative crosslinking, and subsequent phospholipid extraction by ethanol at preimplantation. PMID:22615255

  12. Stability and protection of cable-in-conduit superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Dresner, L.

    1981-01-01

    Two common ways to cool large superconducting magnets are pool cooling with boiling helium and forced circulation of supercritical helium through hollow conductors. The following three areas of concern are discussed: (1) the substantial void volume inside the conduit may allow some strand motion under the action of the Lorentz force; (2) the helium must be circulated through the conductor, and the pump work dissipated at cryogenic temperatures increases the refrigeration load; and (3) if the conductor quenches, the helium trapped in the long, narrow conductor may briefly experience very high pressure. (MOW)

  13. Biomechanics and biocompatibility of the perfect conduit-can we build one?

    PubMed

    Byrom, Michael J; Ng, Martin K C; Bannon, Paul G

    2013-07-01

    No currently available conduit meets the criteria for an ideal coronary artery bypass graft. The perfect conduit would combine the availability and complication-free harvest of a synthetic vessel with the long-term patency performance of the internal mammary artery. However, current polymer conduits suffer from inelastic mechanical properties and especially poor surface biocompatibility, resulting in early loss of patency as a coronary graft. Approaches to manufacture an improved conduit using new polymers or polymer surfaces, acellular matrices, or cellular constructs have to date failed to achieve a commercially successful alternative. Elastin, by mimicking the native extracellular environment as well as providing elasticity, provides the 'missing link' in vascular conduit design and brings new hope for realization of the perfect conduit. PMID:23977620

  14. Tensile and fatigue qualification testing of ITER-CS conduit alloy JK2LB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, R. P.; McRae, D. M.; Han, K.; Martovetsky, N. N.

    2015-12-01

    The ITER Central Solenoid (CS) coils utilize cable-in-conduit conductor (CICC) and the conduit alloy is JK2LB. The production grade conduit alloy (and it's welds) must meet strict requirements for strength, toughness, fatigue crack resistance, and fabricability. The conduit alloy must retain good mechanical properties after additional fabrication steps such as welding, coil winding strain and exposure to the Nb3Sn superconductor's reaction heat treatment. Here we present data from cryogenic tensile, fracture toughness, fatigue crack growth rate, and axial fatigue tests of JK2LB alloy and conduit butt welds, before and after the exposure to the reaction heat treatment. The tests of specimens removed directly from the conduit provide confirmation of the materials properties and the effect of the cold work and aging. The 4 K fatigue performance is extremely important to the reliability of the CS and is covered both by axial cyclic fatigue tests and the fatigue crack growth rate measurements.

  15. Imaging of platelets in right-sided extracardiac conduits in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, K.C.; Wahner, H.W.; Dewanjee, M.K.; Fuster, V.; Puga, F.J.; Danielson, G.K.; Chesebro, J.H.; Feldt, R.H.

    1982-04-01

    As a connection between the systemic venous ventricle and the pulmonary artery, valved Dacron extracardiac conduits have remarkably influenced the surgical approach to many complex congenital heart defects. Obstruction of the conduit, however, can reduce the long-term effectiveness of this corrective procedure. In addition to stenosis of the porcine valve, formation of thick fibrous neointima plays a major role in the pathogenesis of conduit obstruction. The purpose of this study was to determine whether platelet deposition could be demonstrated in these conduits by external imaging with In-111-labeled autologous platelets. After injection of labeled platelets either immediately after operation or on the fifth to eighth post-operative day, imaging was performed by standard procedures. Eight of nine patients had platelet accumulation in the conduit, and treatment with aspirin and dipyridamole caused no recognizable change in platelet deposition. This study demonstrates the feasibility of imaging platelet deposition in Dacron conduits and shows that the pattern of deposition varies with time.

  16. Imaging of platelets in right-sided extracardiac conduits in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, K.C.; Wahner, H.W.; Dewanjee, M.K.; Fuster, V.; Puga, F.J.; Danielson, G.K.; Chesebro, J.H.; Feldt, R.H.

    1982-04-01

    As a connection between the systemic venous ventricle and the pulmonary artery, valved Dacron extracardiac conduits have remarkably influenced the surgical approach to many complex congenital heart defects. Obstruction of the conduit, however, can reduce the long-term effectiveness of this corrective procedure. In addition to stenosis of the porcine valve, formation of thick fibrous neointima plays a major role in the pathogenesis of conduit obstruction. The purpose of this study was to determine whether platelet deposition could be demonstrated in these conduits by external imaging with /sup 111/In-labeled autologous platelets. After injection of labeled platelets either immediately after operation or on the fifth to eighth postoperative day, imaging was performed by standard procedures. Eight of nine patients had platelet accumulation in the conduit, and treatment with aspirin and dipyridamole caused no recognizable change in platelet deposition. This study demonstrates the feasibility of imaging platelet deposition in Dacron conduits and shows that the pattern of deposition varies with time.

  17. Device and method for measuring fluid flow in a conduit having a gradual bend

    DOEpatents

    Ortiz, M.G.; Boucher, T.J.

    1998-11-10

    A system is described for measuring fluid flow in a conduit having a gradual bend or arc, and a straight section. The system includes pressure transducers, one or more disposed in the conduit on the outside of the arc, and one disposed in the conduit in a straight section thereof. The pressure transducers measure the pressure of fluid in the conduit at the locations of the pressure transducers and this information is used by a computational device to calculate fluid flow rate in the conduit. For multi-phase fluid, the density of the fluid is measured by another pair of pressure transducers, one of which is located in the conduit elevationally above the other. The computation device then uses the density measurement along with the fluid pressure measurements, to calculate fluid flow. 1 fig.

  18. Device and method for measuring fluid flow in a conduit having a gradual bend

    DOEpatents

    Ortiz, Marcos German; Boucher, Timothy J

    1998-01-01

    A system for measuring fluid flow in a conduit having a gradual bend or arc, and a straight section. The system includes pressure transducers, one or more disposed in the conduit on the outside of the arc, and one disposed in the conduit in a straight section thereof. The pressure transducers measure the pressure of fluid in the conduit at the locations of the pressure transducers and this information is used by a computational device to calculate fluid flow rate in the conduit. For multi-phase fluid, the density of the fluid is measured by another pair of pressure transducers, one of which is located in the conduit elevationally above the other. The computation device then uses the density measurement along with the fluid pressure measurements, to calculate fluid flow.

  19. Development and evaluation of a pliable biological valved conduit. Part II: Functional and hemodynamic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Sung, H W; Witzel, T H; Hata, C; Tu, R; Shen, S H; Lin, D; Noishiki, Y; Tomizawa, Y; Quijano, R C

    1993-04-01

    Many congenital cardiac malformations may require a valved conduit for the reconstruction of the right ventricular outflow tract. In spite of many endeavors made in the last 25 years, the clinical results of right ventricular outflow tract reconstruction with currently available valved conduits are still not satisfactory. Specific problems encountered clinically include suboptimal hemodynamic performance, conduit kinking or compression, and fibrous peeling from the luminal surface. To address these deficiencies, we undertook the development of a biological valved conduit: a bovine external jugular vein graft with a retained native valve cross-linked with a diglycidyl ether (DE). This study, using a canine model, was to evaluate the functional and hemodynamic performance of this newly developed valved conduit. Three 14 mm conduits, implanted as bypass grafts, right ventricle to pulmonary artery, were evaluated. The evaluation was conducted with a noninvasive color Doppler flow mapping system at pre-implantation, immediately post implantation, one- and three-months post implantation, and prior to retrieval (five-months post implantation). The two-dimensional tomographic inspection of the leaflet motion at various periods post implantation showed that the valvular leaflets in the DE treated conduit was quite pliable. No cardiac failure or valvular dysfunction was observed in any of the studied cases. The color Doppler flow mapping study demonstrated that the valve in the DE treated conduit was competent, with no conduit kinking or compression observed in any of the three cases. The spectral Doppler velocity study evidenced that the transvalvular pressure gradients of the DE treated conduit were minimal as compared to those of the currently available conduits. In conclusion, from the functional and hemodynamic performance points of view, this newly developed valved conduit is superior to those currently available. PMID:8325697

  20. An experimental study of apico-aortic valved conduit (AAVC) for surgical treatment of aortic stenosis in dogs.

    PubMed

    Hirao, Hidehiro; Inoue, Tomoki; Hoshi, Katsuichiro; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Shimamura, Shunsuke; Shimizu, Miki; Tanaka, Ryou; Takashima, Kazuaki; Mori, Yuichi; Noishiki, Yasuharu; Yamane, Yoshihisa

    2005-04-01

    A new valved conduit was developed using a canine aortic valve. The bioprosthetic valve was fixed with glutaraldehyde and epoxy compound (Denacol-EX313/810). A vascular graft composed of ultra-fine polyester fiber (10 mm in diameter, 200 mm in length) was used. Four dogs underwent apico-aortic valved conduit (AAVC) implantation and aortic banding (bypass group, BG), while another 4 dogs underwent aortic banding without AAVC implantation (control group, CG). Cardiac catheterization and angiocardiography were performed for assessment of hemodynamics 2 weeks and 6 months after surgery. Left ventricular systolic pressure, left ventricular end-diastolic pressure and the left ventricular-aortic pressure gradient differed significantly (P<0.01) between the BG and CG dogs. Left ventricular angiocardiography showed patency of the valved conduit in all the BG dogs. Echocardiography was performed before and 2, 4 and 6 months after surgery, and showed that while pressure overload caused concentric myocardial hypertrophy in the CG dogs, the left ventricle dilated eccentrically in the BG dogs. Furthermore, relief of left ventricular pressure overload by AAVC was maintained. PMID:15876784

  1. 3D-engineering of Cellularized Conduits for Peripheral Nerve Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yu; Wu, Yao; Gou, Zhiyuan; Tao, Jie; Zhang, Jiumeng; Liu, Qianqi; Kang, Tianyi; Jiang, Shu; Huang, Siqing; He, Jiankang; Chen, Shaochen; Du, Yanan; Gou, Maling

    2016-01-01

    Tissue engineered conduits have great promise for bridging peripheral nerve defects by providing physical guiding and biological cues. A flexible method for integrating support cells into a conduit with desired architectures is wanted. Here, a 3D-printing technology is adopted to prepare a bio-conduit with designer structures for peripheral nerve regeneration. This bio-conduit is consisted of a cryopolymerized gelatin methacryloyl (cryoGelMA) gel cellularized with adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs). By modeling using 3D-printed "lock and key" moulds, the cryoGelMA gel is structured into conduits with different geometries, such as the designed multichannel or bifurcating and the personalized structures. The cryoGelMA conduit is degradable and could be completely degraded in 2-4 months in vivo. The cryoGelMA scaffold supports the attachment, proliferation and survival of the seeded ASCs, and up-regulates the expression of their neurotrophic factors mRNA in vitro. After implanted in a rat model, the bio-conduit is capable of supporting the re-innervation across a 10 mm sciatic nerve gap, with results close to that of the autografts in terms of functional and histological assessments. The study describes an indirect 3D-printing technology for fabricating cellularized designer conduits for peripheral nerve regeneration, and could lead to the development of future nerve bio-conduits for clinical use. PMID:27572698

  2. Environmental tracers as indicators of karst conduits in groundwater in South Dakota, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Long, A.J.; Sawyer, J.F.; Putnam, L.D.

    2008-01-01

    Environmental tracers sampled from the carbonate Madison aquifer on the eastern flank of the Black Hills, South Dakota, USA indicated the approximate locations of four major karst conduits. Contamination issues are a major concern because these conduits are characterized by direct connections to sinking streams, high groundwater velocities, and proximity to public water supplies. Objectives of the study were to estimate approximate conduit locations and assess possible anthropogenic influences associated with conduits. Anomalies of young groundwater based on chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), tritium, and electrical conductivity (EC) indicated fast moving, focused flow and thus the likely presence of conduits. ??18O was useful for determining sources of recharge for each conduit, and nitrate was a useful tracer for assessing flow paths for anthropogenic influences. Two of the four conduits terminate at or near a large spring complex. CFC apparent ages ranged from 15 years near conduits to >50 years in other areas. Nitrate-N concentrations >0.4 mg/L in groundwater were associated with each of the four conduits compared with concentrations ranging from <0.1 to 0.4 mg/L in other areas. These higher nitrate-N concentrations probably do not result from sinking streams but rather from other areas of infiltration. ?? Springer-Verlag 2007.

  3. 3D-engineering of Cellularized Conduits for Peripheral Nerve Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yu; Wu, Yao; Gou, Zhiyuan; Tao, Jie; Zhang, Jiumeng; Liu, Qianqi; Kang, Tianyi; Jiang, Shu; Huang, Siqing; He, Jiankang; Chen, Shaochen; Du, Yanan; Gou, Maling

    2016-01-01

    Tissue engineered conduits have great promise for bridging peripheral nerve defects by providing physical guiding and biological cues. A flexible method for integrating support cells into a conduit with desired architectures is wanted. Here, a 3D-printing technology is adopted to prepare a bio-conduit with designer structures for peripheral nerve regeneration. This bio-conduit is consisted of a cryopolymerized gelatin methacryloyl (cryoGelMA) gel cellularized with adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs). By modeling using 3D-printed “lock and key” moulds, the cryoGelMA gel is structured into conduits with different geometries, such as the designed multichannel or bifurcating and the personalized structures. The cryoGelMA conduit is degradable and could be completely degraded in 2-4 months in vivo. The cryoGelMA scaffold supports the attachment, proliferation and survival of the seeded ASCs, and up-regulates the expression of their neurotrophic factors mRNA in vitro. After implanted in a rat model, the bio-conduit is capable of supporting the re-innervation across a 10 mm sciatic nerve gap, with results close to that of the autografts in terms of functional and histological assessments. The study describes an indirect 3D-printing technology for fabricating cellularized designer conduits for peripheral nerve regeneration, and could lead to the development of future nerve bio-conduits for clinical use. PMID:27572698

  4. A silk sericin/silicone nerve guidance conduit promotes regeneration of a transected sciatic nerve.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hongjian; Yang, Wen; Chen, Jianghai; Zhang, Jinxiang; Lu, Xiaochen; Zhao, Xiaobo; Huang, Kun; Li, Huili; Chang, Panpan; Wang, Zheng; Wang, Lin

    2015-10-28

    Peripheral nerve gap defects lead to significant loss of sensory or motor function. Tissue engineering has become an important alternative to nerve repair. Sericin, a major component of silk, is a natural protein whose value in tissue engineering has just begun to be explored. Here, the first time use of sericin in vivo is reported as a long-term implant for peripheral nerve regeneration. A sericin nerve guidance conduit is designed and fabricated. This conduit is highly porous with mechanical strength matching peripheral nerve tissue. It supports Schwann cell proliferation and is capable of up-regulating the transcription of glial cell derived neurotrophic factor and nerve growth factor in Schwann cells. The sericin conduit wrapped with a silicone conduit (sericin/silicone double conduits) is used for bridging repair of a 5 mm gap in a rat sciatic nerve transection model. The sericin/silicone double conduits achieve functional recovery comparable to that of autologous nerve grafting as evidenced by drastically improved nerve function and morphology. Importantly, this improvement is mainly attributed to the sericin conduit as the silicone conduit alone only produces marginal functional recovery. This sericin/silicone-double-conduit strategy offers an efficient and valuable alternative to autologous nerve grafting for repairing damaged peripheral nerve. PMID:26332703

  5. Treatment of colon conduit redundancy in a child with esophageal atresia.

    PubMed

    Glasser, James G; Reddy, P Prithvi; Adkins, E Stanton

    2006-03-01

    We recently revised a redundant colon conduit in a boy who was born with isolated esophageal atresia. In view of the paucity of reports dealing with correction of this common complication of esophageal replacement, it seemed appropriate to report our experience. Because of effective medical therapy of acid peptic disease, patients who formerly required conduit replacement may now be candidates for revision; however, the medical literature does not specify when conduit revision, as opposed to conduit replacement, is indicated; also, no guidance is provided regarding what constitutes effective operative revision. Innovative techniques that stretch and elongate the atretic esophagus will likely lessen the use of conduits in esophageal atresia; nevertheless, colon conduits are useful in many other clinical situations and will remain an essential part of the armamentarium of pediatric, general, and thoracic surgeons. This report highlights the DeMeester and Tannuri technique, whereby a colon conduit is prepared like a Roux limb. The mesentery is divided only once; the conduit's blood supply is not severed from the distal mesocolon. This innovation improves a conduit's blood supply and lessens its attendant complications. Lastly, we describe a muscle splitting, posterolateral thoracotomy technique that is simpler than the alternatives and is useful in a variety of clinical situations. PMID:16553129

  6. Causes and consequences of conduit wall permeability changes during explosive eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rust, Alison; Hanson, Jonathan

    2015-04-01

    Magmatic volatiles, and in some cases external water, drive explosive volcanic eruptions and so the permeability of magma and conduit wall rocks can modulate the style and intensity of eruptions. Both modelling of eruption dynamics and field studies of lithic clasts indicate that fragmentation levels during explosive silicic eruptions commonly reach depths of kilometres. An important consequence is that substantial deviations from lithostatic pressure are sustained in the conduit during eruption, which, according to finite element modelling, are sufficient to damage a substantial volume of rock around the conduit. Underpressured regions will be susceptible to conduit erosion, widening the conduit; field data provide constraints on erosion rates and erosion depths where subsurface stratigraphy is known. Damage to wall rocks will also increase the rock permeability adjacent to the conduit, which could significantly affect magmatic degassing during and between eruptions. The degree to which external water can interact with magma in the conduit will also depend on wall rock permeability and spatial and temporal variations in pressure. When a major magmatic eruption ceases, deep magma is likely to ascend to fill the lower conduit, and the upper conduit may partially collapse forming vertically extensive breccia. Subvolcanic rocks exposed by exploration and mining of porphyry copper deposits (PCDs) and associated alteration and breccias may provide further field constraints on these models. Although syn- and post-mineralization explosive eruptions likely ruin potential PCDs, earlier eruptions might make space for vertical shallow intrusions and help establish permeable regions conducive to focussing of magmatic fluids required for PCD generation.

  7. Construction of nerve guide conduits from cellulose/soy protein composite membranes combined with Schwann cells and pyrroloquinoline quinone for the repair of peripheral nerve defect.

    PubMed

    Luo, Lihua; Gan, Li; Liu, Yongming; Tian, Weiqun; Tong, Zan; Wang, Xiong; Huselstein, Celine; Chen, Yun

    2015-02-20

    Regeneration and functional reconstruction of peripheral nerve defects remained a significant clinical challenge. Nerve guide conduits, with seed cells or neurotrophic factors (NTFs), had been widely used to improve the repair and regeneration of injured peripheral nerve. Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) was an antioxidant that can stimulate nerve growth factors (NGFs) synthesis and accelerate the Schwann cells (SCs) proliferation and growth. In present study, three kinds of nerve guide conduits were constructed: one from cellulose/SPI hollow tube (CSC), another from CSC combined with SCs (CSSC), and the third one from CSSC combined with PQQ (CSSPC), respectively. And then they were applied to bridge and repair the sciatic nerve defect in rats, using autograft as control. Effects of different nerve guide conduits on the nerve regeneration were comparatively evaluated by general analysis, sciatic function index (SFI) and histological analysis (HE and TEM). Newly-formed regenerative nerve fibers were observed and running through the transparent nerve guide conduits 12 weeks after surgery. SFI results indicated that the reconstruction of motor function in CSSPC group was better than that in CSSC and CSC groups. HE images from the cross-sections and longitudinal-sections of the harvested regenerative nerve indicated that regenerative nerve fibers had been formed and accompanied with new blood vessels and matrix materials in the conduits. TEM images also showed that lots of fresh myelinated and non-myelinated nerve fibers had been formed. Parts of vacuolar, swollen and abnormal axons occurred in CSC and CSSC groups, while the vacuolization and swell of axons was the least serious in CSSPC group. These results indicated that CSSPC group had the most ability to repair and reconstruct the nerve structure and functions due to the comprehensive contributions from hollow CSC tube, SCs and PQQ. As a result, the CSSPC may have the potential for the applications as nerve guide

  8. Conduit for high temperature transfer of molten semiconductor crystalline material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiegl, George (Inventor); Torbet, Walter (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A conduit for high temperature transfer of molten semiconductor crystalline material consists of a composite structure incorporating a quartz transfer tube as the innermost member, with an outer thermally insulating layer designed to serve the dual purposes of minimizing heat losses from the quartz tube and maintaining mechanical strength and rigidity of the conduit at the elevated temperatures encountered. The composite structure ensures that the molten semiconductor material only comes in contact with a material (quartz) with which it is compatible, while the outer layer structure reinforces the quartz tube, which becomes somewhat soft at molten semiconductor temperatures. To further aid in preventing cooling of the molten semiconductor, a distributed, electric resistance heater is in contact with the surface of the quartz tube over most of its length. The quartz tube has short end portions which extend through the surface of the semiconductor melt and which are lef bare of the thermal insulation. The heater is designed to provide an increased heat input per unit area in the region adjacent these end portions.

  9. Acoustic resonance in the combustion conduits of a steam locomotive

    SciTech Connect

    Ziada, S.; Oengoeren, A.; Vogel, H.H.

    1996-12-01

    The sound emission of a modern, oil fired steam rack locomotive increased sharply when the locomotive speed exceeded the design value of 12 km/hr. The results of pressure and noise measurements, together with an acoustical model of the combustion conduits indicated that the acoustic resonance modes of the combustion conduits are excited by the pressure pulsations generated by the exhaust from the steam cylinders at multiples of the piston frequency. Additionally, when the acoustic resonance is initiated, the resulting pulsations trigger the flame instability of the oil burners which, in turn, enhances the resonance. By means of the acoustical model, a Helmholtz resonator has been designed and optimized to reduce the acoustic response such that it does not excite the flame instability. A second set of measurements, after installing the resonator, has shown a reduction in the noise level by an amount exceeding 21 dBA. The paper focuses upon the identification of the excitation source and the implementation of the countermeasure which are of interest to other applications involving combustion oscillations.

  10. Development of a new lacrimal drainage conduit using POSS nanocomposite.

    PubMed

    Chaloupka, Karla; Motwani, Meghna; Seifalian, Alexander Marcus

    2011-01-01

    Lacrimal surgery in cases of severely obstructed or missing canalicular ducts is highly challenging. In these cases, the placement of a bypass tube is currently the only option to restore the drainage of tears into the nose and reduce the symptomatic watery eye. Different approaches to achieve functional drainage have been tried using blood vessels or artificial implants. The implantation of the rigid Lester Jones tube is, since its introduction in the late 1960s, the gold standard. The functional success is satisfactory. However, complication rates are high and remain, even with many modifications of the original design, a major problem. These complications include mainly the displacement and blockage of the tube, requiring regular checkups, as well as irritation of the surrounding tissue including the nose and the eye. The objective of this study was to develop a new lacrimal duct conduit (LDC) to restore structural and functional integrity of the lacrimal drainage system. The conduit is constructed with a novel polymer, polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane-poly(carbonate-urea)urethane (POSS-PCU), that offers biocompatibility. We exploit nanotopography to evade the problems associated with current applications. A number of extrusion techniques were investigated for this purpose: ultrasonic atomization spraying, electrohydrodynamic atomization spraying/spinning, extrusion-coagulation, and high-pressure coagulation by autoclave and casting. Finally, the coagulation and cast technique were selected to construct an LDC superior to its predecessors, and its advantages highlighted. PMID:21995539

  11. Documentation of a Conduit Flow Process (CFP) for MODFLOW-2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shoemaker, W. Barclay; Kuniansky, Eve L.; Birk, Steffen; Bauer, Sebastian; Swain, Eric D.

    2007-01-01

    This report documents the Conduit Flow Process (CFP) for the modular finite-difference ground-water flow model, MODFLOW-2005. The CFP has the ability to simulate turbulent ground-water flow conditions by: (1) coupling the traditional ground-water flow equation with formulations for a discrete network of cylindrical pipes (Mode 1), (2) inserting a high-conductivity flow layer that can switch between laminar and turbulent flow (Mode 2), or (3) simultaneously coupling a discrete pipe network while inserting a high-conductivity flow layer that can switch between laminar and turbulent flow (Mode 3). Conduit flow pipes (Mode 1) may represent dissolution or biological burrowing features in carbonate aquifers, voids in fractured rock, and (or) lava tubes in basaltic aquifers and can be fully or partially saturated under laminar or turbulent flow conditions. Preferential flow layers (Mode 2) may represent: (1) a porous media where turbulent flow is suspected to occur under the observed hydraulic gradients; (2) a single secondary porosity subsurface feature, such as a well-defined laterally extensive underground cave; or (3) a horizontal preferential flow layer consisting of many interconnected voids. In this second case, the input data are effective parameters, such as a very high hydraulic conductivity, representing multiple features. Data preparation is more complex for CFP Mode 1 (CFPM1) than for CFP Mode 2 (CFPM2). Specifically for CFPM1, conduit pipe locations, lengths, diameters, tortuosity, internal roughness, critical Reynolds numbers (NRe), and exchange conductances are required. CFPM1, however, solves the pipe network equations in a matrix that is independent of the porous media equation matrix, which may mitigate numerical instability associated with solution of dual flow components within the same matrix. CFPM2 requires less hydraulic information and knowledge about the specific location and hydraulic properties of conduits, and turbulent flow is approximated by

  12. Conduit dynamics in transitional rhyolitic activity recorded by tuffisite vein textures from the 2008-2009 Chaitén eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saubin, Elodie; Tuffen, Hugh; Gurioli, Lucia; Owen, Jacqueline; Castro, Jonathan; Berlo, Kim; McGowan, Ellen; Schipper, C.; Wehbe, Katia

    2016-05-01

    The mechanisms of hazardous silicic eruptions are controlled by complex, poorly-understood conduit processes. Observations of recent Chilean rhyolite eruptions have revealed the importance of hybrid activity, involving simultaneous explosive and effusive emissions from a common vent. Such behaviour hinges upon the ability of gas to decouple from magma in the shallow conduit. Tuffisite veins are increasingly suspected to be a key facilitator of outgassing, as they repeatedly provide a transient permeable escape route for volcanic gases. Intersection of foam domains by tuffisite veins appears critical to efficient outgassing. However, knowledge is currently lacking into textural heterogeneities within shallow conduits, their relationship with tuffisite vein propagation, and the implications for fragmentation and degassing processes. Similarly, the magmatic vesiculation response to upper conduit pressure perturbations, such as those related to the slip of dense magma plugs, remains largely undefined. Here we provide a detailed characterization of an exceptionally large tuffisite vein within a rhyolitic obsidian bomb ejected during transitional explosive-effusive activity at Chaitén, Chile in May 2008. Vein textures and chemistry provide a time-integrated record of the invasion of a dense upper conduit plug by deeper fragmented magma. Quantitative textural analysis reveals diverse vesiculation histories of various juvenile clast types. Using vesicle size distributions, bubble number densities, zones of diffusive water depletion, and glass H2O concentrations, we propose a multi-step degassing/fragmentation history, spanning deep degassing to explosive bomb ejection. Rapid decompression events of ~3-4 MPa are associated with fragmentation of foam and dense magma at ~200-350 metres depth in the conduit, permitting vertical gas and pyroclast mobility over hundreds of metres. Permeable pathway occlusion in the dense conduit plug by pyroclast accumulation and sintering

  13. Quench detection by fluid dynamic means in cable-in-conduit superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Dresner, L.

    1987-06-01

    The tight confinement of the helium in cable-in-conduit superconductors creates protection problems because of the substantial pressure rise that can occur during a quench. But the same pressure rise offers the useful possibility of a non-electrical means of detecting incipient quenches by monitoring the outflow from the various hydraulic paths of the magnet. If the method is to work, the signal must be large enough to be detected unambiguously at an early enough time, and the signal must not depend too strongly on the length, Joule power density, or rate of growth of the initial normal zone (because these things are not entirely within our control). This paper explores by calculation the degree to which these conditions can be met. The Westinghouse coil for the Large Coil Task (LCT) is used as the basis for illustrative examples. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  14. Valved bovine jugular venous conduits for right ventricular to pulmonary artery reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Scavo, V A; Turrentine, M W; Aufiero, T X; Sharp, T G; Brown, J W

    1999-01-01

    Various valved and nonvalved external right ventricle (RV) to pulmonary artery (PA) conduits have been used to palliate congenital heart anomalies. The ideal conduit has not been found. Reasons for conduit failures include stenosis, thrombosis, calcification of the valve or graft wall, and development of an obstructive peel. We evaluated valved and nonvalved conduits constructed from a glutaraldehyde preserved segment of bovine jugular vein. Bovine jugular conduits (n = 31), 10-13 mm in diameter, were implanted into weight-matched adult mongrel dogs using a standard closed heart technique. Valved conduits (VC, n = 17) were stented at the valve annulus with a Gore-Tex ring, whereas the nonvalved conduits (NC, n = 14) were stented at their midpoint. The proximal PA was tightly banded to 3 mm with a ligature. Cardiac output (CO) and hemodynamic gradients were measured at the time of insertion and 8 months postoperatively. Pulmonary artery angiograms were used to assess bovine jugular conduit regurgitation. All xenografts were evaluated by gross and histologic exam. Two dogs had conduits placed but died for reasons unrelated to the conduit before evaluation. Valved conduit leaflets showed thickening, insignificant thrombus deposition in the base of one or more cusps, and a mild degree of regurgitation as assessed by angiograms. Examination of the NC showed mild conduit thickening and a moderate-to-severe degree of regurgitation as assessed by angiograms. There was a significant difference observed in pulmonary outflow gradients between the VC (11 +/- 2 mm Hg) and NC (17 +/- 2 mm Hg) (p < 0.05), although neither group developed a hemodynamically significant gradient. On gross examination, VC ventricles displayed significantly less evidence of volume and pressure overload compared with the NC ventricle. Valved conduits demonstrated significantly less obstruction and regurgitation. The potential clinical advantages of bovine jugular conduits are their availability

  15. Manufacture of porous biodegradable polymer conduits by an extrusion process for guided tissue regeneration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Widmer, M. S.; Gupta, P. K.; Lu, L.; Meszlenyi, R. K.; Evans, G. R.; Brandt, K.; Savel, T.; Gurlek, A.; Patrick, C. W. Jr; Mikos, A. G.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    We have fabricated porous, biodegradable tubular conduits for guided tissue regeneration using a combined solvent casting and extrusion technique. The biodegradable polymers used in this study were poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA). A polymer/salt composite was first prepared by a solvent casting process. After drying, the composite was extruded to form a tubular construct. The salt particles in the construct were then leached out leaving a conduit with an open-pore structure. PLGA was studied as a model polymer to analyze the effects of salt weight fraction, salt particle size, and processing temperature on porosity and pore size of the extruded conduits. The porosity and pore size were found to increase with increasing salt weight fraction. Increasing the salt particle size increased the pore diameter but did not affect the porosity. High extrusion temperatures decreased the pore diameter without altering the porosity. Greater decrease in molecular weight was observed for conduits manufactured at higher temperatures. The mechanical properties of both PLGA and PLLA conduits were tested after degradation in vitro for up to 8 weeks. The modulus and failure strength of PLLA conduits were approximately 10 times higher than those of PLGA conduits. Failure strain was similar for both conduits. After degradation for 8 weeks, the molecular weights of the PLGA and PLLA conduits decreased to 38% and 43% of the initial values, respectively. However, both conduits maintained their shape and did not collapse. The PLGA also remained amorphous throughout the time course, while the crystallinity of PLLA increased from 5.2% to 11.5%. The potential of seeding the conduits with cells for transplantation or with biodegradable polymer microparticles for drug delivery was also tested with dyed microspheres. These porous tubular structures hold great promise for the regeneration of tissues which require tubular scaffolds such as peripheral nerve

  16. 26 CFR 1.58-2 - General rules for conduit entities; partnerships and partners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... TREASURY INCOME TAX INCOME TAXES Tax Preference Regulations § 1.58-2 General rules for conduit entities... under which items of tax preference of an estate, trust, electing small business corporation, common... as the “conduit entity”) are treated as items of tax preference of the beneficiaries,...

  17. 65 FR 5807 - Financial Asset Securitization Investment Trusts; Real Estate Mortgage Investment Conduits

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2000-02-07

    ... Investment Trusts; Real Estate Mortgage Investment Conduits AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury... regulations relating to real estate mortgage investment conduits (REMICs). This document provides notice of a... by a non-exempt domestic C corporation (other than a RIC, real estate investment trust (REIT),...

  18. 78 FR 61985 - City of Astoria, Oregon; Notice of Preliminary Determination of a Qualifying Conduit Hydropower...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-09

    ... Conduit Hydropower Facility and Soliciting Comments and Motions To Intervene On September 24, 2013, City of Astoria, Oregon (Astoria) filed a notice of intent to construct a qualifying conduit hydropower facility, pursuant to section 30 of the Federal Power Act, as amended by section 4 of the...

  19. 78 FR 61986 - City of Santa Barbara, California; Notice of Preliminary Determination of a Qualifying Conduit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-09

    ... Qualifying Conduit Hydropower Facility and Soliciting Comments and Motions To Intervene On September 24, 2013... hydropower facility, pursuant to section 30 of the Federal Power Act, as amended by section 4 of the Hydropower Regulatory Efficiency Act of 2013 (HREA). The Gibraltar Conduit Hydroelectric Project would...

  20. 78 FR 56872 - City of Barre, Vermont; Notice of Preliminary Determination of a Qualifying Conduit Hydropower...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-16

    ... Conduit Hydropower Facility and Soliciting Comments and Motions To Intervene On August 29, 2013, City of Barre, Vermont filed a notice of intent to construct a qualifying conduit hydropower facility, pursuant to section 30 of the Federal Power Act, as amended by section 4 of the Hydropower...

  1. 78 FR 69847 - North Side Canal Company; Notice of Preliminary Determination of a Qualifying Conduit Hydropower...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-21

    ... Qualifying Conduit Hydropower Facility and Soliciting Comments and Motions To Intervene On November 5, 2013, North Side Canal Company, filed a notice of intent to construct a qualifying conduit hydropower facility, pursuant to section 30 of the Federal Power Act, as amended by section 4 of the Hydropower...

  2. A one-dimensional heat-transport model for conduit flow in karst aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Long, A.J.; Gilcrease, P.C.

    2009-01-01

    A one-dimensional heat-transport model for conduit flow in karst aquifers is presented as an alternative to two or three-dimensional distributed-parameter models, which are data intensive and require knowledge of conduit locations. This model can be applied for cases where water temperature in a well or spring receives all or part of its water from a phreatic conduit. Heat transport in the conduit is simulated by using a physically-based heat-transport equation that accounts for inflow of diffuse flow from smaller openings and fissures in the surrounding aquifer during periods of low recharge. Additional diffuse flow that is within the zone of influence of the well or spring but has not interacted with the conduit is accounted for with a binary mixing equation to proportion these different water sources. The estimation of this proportion through inverse modeling is useful for the assessment of contaminant vulnerability and well-head or spring protection. The model was applied to 7 months of continuous temperature data for a sinking stream that recharges a conduit and a pumped well open to the Madison aquifer in western South Dakota. The simulated conduit-flow fraction to the well ranged from 2% to 31% of total flow, and simulated conduit velocity ranged from 44 to 353 m/d.

  3. Analysis of transport connectivity in karstic aquifers spanned by 3D conduit networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronayne, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    Karst aquifers are characterized by interconnected conduits that behave as structural pathways for groundwater and solutes. This modeling study assesses the influence of conduit network geometry on solute transport behavior within karst systems. Synthetic karst aquifers containing 3D conduit networks were considered. Networks of varying complexity were generated using a directed percolation model. Flow and transport simulations were conducted for each synthetic aquifer by modeling the conduits as discretized high-permeability features within a uniform matrix material. Transport connectivity and dispersive properties were evaluated using statistical moments of the solute arrival time distribution at the downgradient conduit outlet (karst spring). In addition, a new connectivity metric that quantifies solute residence time within conduits was considered. Results show that a more complex network leads to enhanced mixing between the conduit and matrix domains, which has the effect of reducing transport connectivity. This modeling study illustrates how typically available transport data (e.g., solute breakthrough curves at the conduit outlet) may reveal information about the internal network structure, thus providing guidance for future inverse modeling.

  4. Experimental investigations of aeration efficiency in high-head gated circular conduits.

    PubMed

    Cihat Tuna, M; Ozkan, Fahri; Baylar, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    The primary purpose of water aeration is to increase the oxygen saturation of the water. This can be achieved by using hydraulic structures because of substantial air bubble entrainment at these structures. Closed conduit aeration is a particular instance of this. While there has been a great deal of research on air-demand ratio within closed conduit, very little research has specifically addressed aeration efficiency of closed conduit. In the present work an experimental study was conducted to investigate the aeration efficiency of high-head gated circular conduits. Results showed that high-head gated circular conduits were effective for oxygen transfer. The effects of Froude number and ratio of the water cross-sectional flow area to the conduit cross-sectional area on aeration efficiency were particularly significant, whereas the effect of conduit length was only moderate. Further, a design formula for the aeration efficiency was presented relating the aeration efficiency to ratio of water cross-sectional flow area to conduit cross-sectional area and Froude number. The obtained results will be useful in future modeling processes and aid the practicing engineer in predicting aeration efficiency for design purposes. PMID:24647194

  5. 30 CFR 75.700 - Grounding metallic sheaths, armors, and conduits enclosing power conductors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Grounding metallic sheaths, armors, and conduits enclosing power conductors. 75.700 Section 75.700 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH... Grounding § 75.700 Grounding metallic sheaths, armors, and conduits enclosing power conductors. All...

  6. 30 CFR 75.700 - Grounding metallic sheaths, armors, and conduits enclosing power conductors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Grounding metallic sheaths, armors, and conduits enclosing power conductors. 75.700 Section 75.700 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH... Grounding § 75.700 Grounding metallic sheaths, armors, and conduits enclosing power conductors. All...

  7. Palliative urinary conduit diversion in cases of intolerable urinary discomfort

    SciTech Connect

    Lyndrup, J.; Sorensen, B.L.

    1983-12-01

    Fifteen patients with incurable gynecological cancers, all primary radiation treated and all having severe urinary discomfort due to urinary tract injuries were retrospectively examined after urinary conduit diversion. All have been followed-up until termination or until all survivors had lived for 6 months after the operation. Twelve of the 15 were discharged from the hospital, 10 of whom survived the first 6 months. Of those discharged 82% of the cumulated sum of postoperative observations days was spent out of the hospital. At the end of the observation period nine patients had been supplied with a colostomy as well, thus having double stomas. All six patients still alive declared in retrospect that given the choice again, they would still be willing to undergo the operation.

  8. [Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair Via Internal Iliac Artery Conduit].

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Taro; Tobe, Satoshi; Sugiyama, Hironobu; Ijyuin, Shinichi; Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Yamaguchi, Masato; Oka, Takanori; Misato, Takuya; Tsunemi, Kotaro; Tanimura, Nobuhiro

    2016-09-01

    A 77-year-old man with a history of stent implantation in the right common iliac artery(CIA) and the left external iliac artery(EIA) was admitted to our hospital for a rapid growth of an aneurysm( max 53 mm) at Th11 level of the descending aorta. Although thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) was required, there were many problems about access rout. The infrarenal abdominal aorta and the left EIA were severely calcified, and the lumens of the right CIA stent(5.3 mm) and the left EIA stent( 4.3 mm) were small in size. Besides, the left CIA was short(13 mm). Therefore, TEVAR was performed by retrograde approach from the left internal iliac artery( IIA) with a tube graft conduit in the hybrid operation room. IIA is a useful option for an access rout in endovascular aortic repair. PMID:27586313

  9. Experimental Research on Differentiation-Inducing Growth of Nerve Lateral Bud by HUC-MSCs Chitosan Composite Conduit.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Qiang; Zhang, Xuepu; Wu, Yuexin

    2015-11-01

    This study is intended to explore the role of human umbilical-cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (HUC-MSCs) in nerve end-to-side anastomosis, as well as in the induction and promotion of growth of nerve lateral bud. The chitosan nerve conduit was prepared based on the biological characteristics of chitosan, and the nerve conduit was filled with HUC-MSCs, and was used to bridge the nerve end-to-side anastomotic stoma. The experimental animals were randomly assigned into three groups (10 in each group), and the nerve end-to-side anastomosis was conducted: (1) group A (control group): traditional tibial nerve-common peroneal nerve end-to-side anastomosis; (2) group B (experimental group 1): tibial nerve-common peroneal nerve end-to-side anastomotic stoma bridged with chitosan nerve conduit; (3) group C (experimental group 2): tibial nerve-common peroneal nerve end-to-side anastomotic stoma bridged by chitosan nerve conduit filled with HUC-MSCs. General morphological observation, nerve electrophysiology, and anti-S-100 immunohistochemistry were performed. All experimental animals survived, and no infections were found at operative incisions. The nerve continuity was in good condition through visual observation when sampling, which is mild adhesion to the surrounding tissue and easy to be separated. 12 W HUC-MSCs chitosan composite nerve conduits were degraded completely after operation. Electrophysiological test showed that the nerve conduction velocity (NCV) in group C was significantly higher than that in group A or group B (p < 0.01). There were no significant differences between NCVs of group A and group B. Toluidine blue staining and transmission electron microscope showed that the number of the medullated fibers and the myelin sheath thickness in group C were larger than those in group A or B. There were no significant differences between the numbers of the medullated fibers and between the myelin sheath thicknesses of groups A and B. By means of anti-S-100

  10. Large-scale tests of insulated conduit for the ITER CS coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, R. P.; Walsh, R. P.; Schutz, J. B.

    Compression-fatigue tests at 77 K were conducted on test modules of insulated Incoloy 908 conduit. To replicate the operating conditions for the ITER central solenoid (CS) full-scale coil, fatigue loads up to 3.6 MN were applied for 10 5 cycles; no mechanical breakdowns occurred. The conduits were insulated with a preimpregnated resin system, a tetraglycidyl diaminodiphenyl methane (TGDM) epoxy cured with DDS aromatic amine. The conduits were joined by vacuum-pressure impregnation with a diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-F epoxy/anhydride-cured resin system. In the 4×4 stacked-conduit test modules, the layer insulation (a high-pressure laminate of TGDM epoxy cured with DDS aromatic amine) was inserted. Periodically during the tests, breakdown voltage was measured across the conduits of both turn and layer insulation; throughout the test, breakdown voltages were at least 46 kV. The addition of a barrier increased structural and electrical reliability.

  11. Effect of the conduit material on CICC performance under high cycling loads

    SciTech Connect

    Martovetsky, N N; Bruzzone, P; Stepanov, B; Wesche, R; Gung, C; Minervini, J V; Takayasu, M; Goodrich, L F; Ekin, J W; Nijhuis, A

    2004-09-01

    Recent ITER Model Coils and CRPP tests on Nb3Sn Cable in Conduit Conductors (CICC) showed a significant and unexpected increase in the broadness of the transition to the normal state, resulting in degradation of superconducting properties. To investigate these phenomena two CICC samples were built with identical 144 strand cables but different conduit materials. One sample had titanium conduit with low coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), the other had stainless steel conduit. The purpose of this experiment was to study changes in strand properties in the cable (n-value, I{sub c}, T{sub cs}), the effect of cycling and high electromagnetic load and the effect of the conduit on the CICC performance.

  12. Distributed measurement of flow rate in conduits using heated fiber optic distributed temperature sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, Raúl; Zubelzu, Sergio; Rodríguez-Sinobas, Leonor; Juana, Luis

    2016-04-01

    In some cases flow varies along conduits, such as in irrigated land drainage pipes and channels, irrigation laterals and others. Detailed knowledge of flow rate along the conduit makes possible analytical evaluation of water distribution and collection systems performance. Flow rate can change continuously in some systems, like in drainage pipes and channels, or abruptly, like in conduits bifurcations or emitter insertions. A heat pulse along the conduit makes possible to get flow rate from continuity and heat balance equations. Due to the great value of specific heat of water, temperature changes along conduit are smaller than the noise that involves the measurement process. This work presents a methodology that, dealing with the noise of distributed temperature measurements, leads to flow rate determination along pressurized pipes or open channel flows.

  13. Peripheral nerve reconstruction with epsilon-caprolactone conduits seeded with vasoactive intestinal peptide gene-transfected mesenchymal stem cells in a rat model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Cortés, P.; Toledo-Romero, M. A.; Delgado, M.; Sánchez-González, C. E.; Martin, F.; Galindo-Moreno, P.; O'Valle, F.

    2014-08-01

    Objective. Attempts have been made to improve nerve conduits in peripheral nerve reconstruction. We investigated the potential therapeutic effect of a vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), a neuropeptide with neuroprotective, trophic and developmental regulatory actions, in peripheral nerve regeneration in a severe model of nerve injury that was repaired with nerve conduits. Approach. The sciatic nerve of each male Wistar rat was transected unilaterally at 10 mm and then repaired with Dl-lactic-ɛ-caprolactone conduits. The rats were treated locally with saline, with the VIP, with adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs) or with ASCs that were transduced with the VIP-expressing lentivirus. The rats with the transected nerve, with no repairs, were used as untreated controls. At 12 weeks post-surgery, we assessed their limb function by measuring the ankle stance angle and the percentage of their muscle mass reduction, and we evaluated the histopathology, immunohistochemistry and morphometry of the myelinated fibers. Main results. The rats that received a single injection of VIP-expressing ASCs showed a significant functional recovery in the ankle stance angle (p = 0.049) and a higher number of myelinated fibers in the middle and distal segments of the operated nerve versus the other groups (p = 0.046). Significance. These results suggest that utilization of a cellular substrate, plus a VIP source, is a promising method for enhancing nerve regeneration using Dl-lactic-ɛ-caprolactone conduits and that this method represents a potential useful clinical approach to repairing peripheral nerve damage.

  14. Dynamics within geyser conduits, and sensitivity to environmental perturbations: insights from a periodic geyser in the El Tatio Geyser Field, Atacama Desert, Chile

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Munoz-Saez, Carolina; Manga, Michael; Hurwitz, Shaul; Rudolph, Maxwell L.; Namiki, Atsuko; Wang, Chi-Yuen

    2015-01-01

    Despite more than 200 years of scientific study, the internal dynamics of geyser systems remain poorly characterized. As a consequence, there remain fundamental questions about what processes initiate and terminate eruptions, and where eruptions begin. Over a one-week period in October 2012, we collected down-hole measurements of pressure and temperature in the conduit of an exceptionally regular geyser (132 s/cycle) located in the Chilean desert. We identified four stages in the geyser cycle: (1) recharge of water into the conduit after an eruption, driven by the pressure difference between water in the conduit and in a deeper reservoir; (2) a pre-eruptive stage that follows the recharge and is dominated by addition of steam from below; (3) the eruption, which occurs by rapid boiling of a large mass of water at the top of the water column, and decompression that propagates boiling conditions downward; (4) a relaxation stage during which pressure and temperature decrease until conditions preceding the recharge stage are restored. Eruptions are triggered by the episodic addition of steam coming from depth, suggesting that the dynamics of the eruptions are dominated by geometrical and thermodynamic complexities in the conduit and reservoir. Further evidence favoring the dominance of internal processes in controlling periodicity is also provided by the absence of responses of the geyser to environmental perturbations (air pressure, temperature and probably also Earth tides).

  15. Dynamics within geyser conduits, and sensitivity to environmental perturbations: Insights from a periodic geyser in the El Tatio geyser field, Atacama Desert, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz-Saez, Carolina; Manga, Michael; Hurwitz, Shaul; Rudolph, Maxwell L.; Namiki, Atsuko; Wang, Chi-Yuen

    2015-02-01

    Despite more than 200 years of scientific study, the internal dynamics of geyser systems remain poorly characterized. As a consequence, there remain fundamental questions about what processes initiate and terminate eruptions, and where eruptions begin. Over a one-week period in October 2012, we collected down-hole measurements of pressure and temperature in the conduit of an exceptionally regular geyser (132 s/cycle) located in the Chilean desert. We identified four stages in the geyser cycle: (1) recharge of water into the conduit after an eruption, driven by the pressure difference between water in the conduit and in a deeper reservoir; (2) a pre-eruptive stage that follows the recharge and is dominated by addition of steam from below; (3) the eruption, which occurs by rapid boiling of a large mass of water at the top of the water column, and decompression that propagates boiling conditions downward; and (4) a relaxation stage during which pressure and temperature decrease until conditions preceding the recharge stage are restored. Eruptions are triggered by the episodic addition of steam coming from depth, suggesting that the dynamics of the eruptions are dominated by geometrical and thermodynamic complexities in the conduit and reservoir. Further evidence favoring the dominance of internal processes in controlling periodicity is also provided by the absence of responses of the geyser to environmental perturbations (air pressure, temperature and probably also Earth tides).

  16. 26 CFR 1.67-3T - Allocation of expenses by real estate mortgage investment conduits (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... investment conduits (temporary). 1.67-3T Section 1.67-3T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... mortgage investment conduits (temporary). (a) Allocation of allocable investment expenses—(1) In general. A real estate mortgage investment conduit or REMIC (as defined in section 860D) shall allocate to each...

  17. 26 CFR 1.67-3T - Allocation of expenses by real estate mortgage investment conduits (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... investment conduits (temporary). 1.67-3T Section 1.67-3T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... mortgage investment conduits (temporary). (a) Allocation of allocable investment expenses—(1) In general. A real estate mortgage investment conduit or REMIC (as defined in section 860D) shall allocate to each...

  18. Apicoaortic conduit and cerebral perfusion in mixed aortic valve disease: a computational analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fragomeni, Gionata; Rossi, Michele; Condemi, Francesca; Mazzitelli, Rosario; Serraino, Giuseppe Filiberto; Renzulli, Attilio

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The revival of the apicoaortic conduit has attracted new interest in this alternative treatment for severe aortic stenosis unsuitable for conventional valve replacement. However, doubts still exist about the perfusion of the epiaortic vessels after apicoaortic conduit implantation, especially when severe aortic stenosis is associated with aortic valve insufficiency. The aim of the study was to evaluate the perfusion of the epiaortic vessels (innominate artery, left carodit artery and left subclavian artery) in cases of mixed aortic valve disease before and after apicoaortic conduit implantation. METHODS Starting from the data of a real patient with severe aortic stenosis and mild aortic insufficiency who underwent apicoaortic conduit implantation, we created a computational model where severe aortic valve stenosis was associated with different grades of aortic insufficiency (mild, medium and moderate). RESULTS A total of six combinations were analysed. In all simulations, the more severe the concomitant aortic insufficiency, the more the flow through the epiaortic vessels was diminished. After apicoaortic conduit implantation, there was an absolute augmentation of the median output in each epiaortic vessel compared with the same combination of mixed aortic valve disease before implantation. Interestingly, retrograde flow from the conduit in the descending aorta was minimal and did not contribute to the improved output of the epiaortic vessels. CONCLUSIONS The computational analysis suggested a protective effect, rather than steal phenomenon, of the apicoaortic conduit towards the cerebral perfusion, even in cases of mixed aortic valve disease. PMID:23962852

  19. A novel bioactive nerve conduit for the repair of peripheral nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bin-bin; Yin, Yi-xia; Yan, Qiong-jiao; Wang, Xin-yu; Li, Shi-pu

    2016-01-01

    The use of a nerve conduit provides an opportunity to regulate cytokines, growth factors and neurotrophins in peripheral nerve regeneration and avoid autograft defects. We constructed a poly-D-L-lactide (PDLLA)-based nerve conduit that was modified using poly{(lactic acid)-co-[(glycolic acid)-alt-(L-lysine)]} and β-tricalcium phosphate. The effectiveness of this bioactive PDLLA-based nerve conduit was compared to that of PDLLA-only conduit in the nerve regeneration following a 10-mm sciatic nerve injury in rats. We observed the nerve morphology in the early period of regeneration, 35 days post injury, using hematoxylin-eosin and methylene blue staining. Compared with the PDLLA conduit, the nerve fibers in the PDLLA-based bioactive nerve conduit were thicker and more regular in size. Muscle fibers in the soleus muscle had greater diameters in the PDLLA bioactive group than in the PDLLA only group. The PDLLA-based bioactive nerve conduit is a promising strategy for repair after sciatic nerve injury. PMID:26981105

  20. Current status of the Contegra conduit for pediatric right ventricular outflow tract reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Raja, Shahzad G; Rasool, Faisal; Yousufuddin, Shaik; Danton, Mark D; MacArthur, Kenneth J; Pollock, James C S

    2005-09-01

    Reconstruction of the right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) is needed in a wide variety of congenital heart diseases at the time of primary repair, or later for replacement of existing valves or conduits. Ideally, the conduit or valve needed for such reconstruction should be formed of autologous tissue that grows, resists infection, lasts for the life span of the patient, and is readily available in all sizes. Such a conduit is not available, though several alternatives have been used, none of which is without potential drawbacks. One alternative--the Contegra bovine jugular vein conduit (Medtronic, Inc., Minneapolis, MN, USA)--was introduced in 1999 and has gained widespread application, with increasing enthusiasm for its use. The Contegra conduit consists of a bovine jugular vein with an incorporated trileaflet valve. The conduit tissue is extremely pliable and offers optimal conditions for surgical handling. Moreover, the proximal tubular segment allows construction of the proximal anastomosis to the right ventricle, without the use of additional material. Increasingly, experience with the Contegra conduit is being published; hence, a literature search was conducted to evaluate available evidence on current use of the device in pediatric RVOT reconstruction. PMID:16245500

  1. Imaging mud fluid conduits of the Gunshuiping mud volcano with Electric Resistivity Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Ling-Rong; Lin, Ting-Li; Chang, Ping-Yu

    2016-04-01

    We conducted the resistivity survey at the Gunshuiping mud volcano and produced a 3D model in order to delineate the mud-fluid conduits in the mud volcano system. The Gunshuiping mud volcano is located in a 175-m × 90-m plateau in Southwest of Taiwan. There are three main mud-volcano craters: craters 1, 2 and 3. Crater 3 is active and the others are inactive. We conducted thirteen survey lines using the Wenner configuration to obtain the resistivity profile images. The lengths of the lines are about 155 m and 60 m, which can resolve the resistivity image down to 30 m and 10 m in depth, respectively. The results appeared that there is a vertical structure under the crater 3, and we suggest that it is the mud-fluid conduit. There is a chamber at depth between 3 and 14 m, and we interpret it is the temporary storage of mud fluid during the erupting process. Beneath the craters 1 and 2, there is a near-surface, horizontal conduit connecting the craters 1 and 2. At depth between 15 and 25 m, the vertical conduit beneath the crater 3 and the horizontal conduit beneath the craters 1 and 2 are connected. The resistivity images clearly delineate the conduit underneath the craters and suggest that the crater 3 is the main erupting conduit, which is consistent with the surface features, in the Gunshuiping mud volcano system.

  2. Relative Importance of Karst-Conduit Hyporheic Zones Co-occuring at Different Spatial Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, K.; Wilson, J. L.

    2014-12-01

    Hyporheic zones at the margin of karst conduits occur at different spatial scales, from those associated with the smallest scales (cm) of conduit-wall topography (e.g., scallops) to large-scale (100 m) conduit sinuosity, and to even larger conduit network patterns. Hyporheic flows are believed to influence the processing of nutrients and dissolved organic carbon from the conduit flow, the evolution of karst-water chemistry, the reaction and sequestration of contaminants, and speleogenesis. Multiple spatial scales of hyporheic interaction lead to a wide distribution of hyporheic flow path lengths, residence times, and opportunities for both abiotic and microbially-mediated reactions of various kinetics. Using mathematical modeling we examine hyporheic flows for a single karst conduit with two different scales of flow disturbance: wall topography at the sub-meter scale and sinuosity at the scale of 10's of meters. By varying the amplitude of each disturbance we examine changes in hyporheic flow magnitude, paths, residence times, and other metrics. We test the hypothesis that while sinuosity-driven hyporheic flow occupies the greatest volume of karst matrix rock, with the longest residence times, the much smaller volume of topographically-driven hyporheic flow is more important because it turns over far more conduit flow and does so with much shorter and possibly more important residence times.

  3. Multi-chamber controllable heat pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shlosinger, A. P. (Inventor)

    1970-01-01

    A temperature controllable heat pipe switching device is reported. It includes separate evaporating and condensing chambers interconnected by separate vapor flow and liquid return conduits. The vapor flow conduit can be opened or closed to the flow of vapor, whereas the liquid return conduit blocks vapor flow at all times. When the vapor flow path is open, the device has high thermal conductivity, and when the vapor flow path is blocked the device has low thermal conductivity.

  4. Forgotten DJ Stent with a Large Calculus at Its Distal End in an Ileal Conduit Diversion

    PubMed Central

    Puri, Anurag; Priyadarshi, Vinod; Raizada, Nivedita; Pal, Dilip Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Calculus formation in an ileal conduit following cystectomy is a known complication. Encrustation and formation of calculus may also occur over a DJ stent retained for a long period; but this is never reported in patients with conduit diversion because of close surveillance of these patients. Here we report first case of a large calculus encrusted over a forgotten DJ stent within an ileal conduit in a man who had undergone urinary diversion following radical cystectomy for carcinoma urinary bladder 8 years earlier. PMID:25215257

  5. Structure of a Bacterial Cell Surface Decaheme Electron Conduit

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, Thomas A.; Edwards, Marcus; Gates, Andrew J.; Hall, Andrea; White, Gaye; Bradley, Justin; Reardon, Catherine L.; Shi, Liang; Beliaev, Alex S.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Wang, Zheming; Watmough, Nicholas; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Butt, Julea N.; Richardson, David J.

    2011-05-23

    Some bacterial species are able to utilize extracellular mineral forms of iron and manganese as respiratory electron acceptors. In Shewanella oneidensis this involves deca-heme cytochromes that are located on the bacterial cell surface at the termini of trans-outermembrane (OM) electron transfer conduits. The cell surface cytochromes can potentially play multiple roles in mediating electron transfer directly to insoluble electron sinks, catalyzing electron exchange with flavin electron shuttles or participating in extracellular inter-cytochrome electron exchange along ‘nanowire’ appendages. We present a 3.2 Å crystal structure of one of these deca-heme cytochromes, MtrF, that allows the spatial organization of the ten hemes to be visualized for the first time. The hemes are organized across four domains in a unique crossed conformation, in which a staggered 65 Å octa-heme chain transects the length of the protein and is bisected by a planar 45 Å tetra-heme chain that connects two extended Greek key split β-barrel domains. The structure provides molecular insight into how reduction of insoluble substrate (e.g. minerals), soluble substrates (e.g. flavins) and cytochrome redox partners might be possible in tandem at different termini of a trifurcated electron transport chain on the cell surface.

  6. Instability and freezing in a solidifying melt conduit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes-Cerfon, Miranda C.; Whitehead, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    Previous works have shown that when liquid flows in a pipe whose boundary temperature is below freezing, a tubular drainage conduit forms surrounded by solidified material that freezes shut under the appropriate combination of forcing conditions. We conduct laboratory experiments with wax in which the tube freezes shut below a certain value of flux from a pump. As the flux is gradually decreased to this value, the total pressure drop across the length of the tube first decreases to a minimum value and then rises before freezing. Previous theoretical models of a tube driven by a constant pressure drop suggest that once the pressure minimum is reached, the states for a lower flux should be unstable and the tube should therefore freeze-up. In our experiments, flux and pressure drop were coupled, and this motivates us to extend the theory for low Reynolds number flow through a tube with solidification to incorporate a simple pressure-drop-flux relationship. Our model predicts a steady-state relationship between flux and pressure drop that has a minimum pressure as the flux is varied. The stability properties of these steady states depend on the boundary conditions: for a fixed flux, they are all stable, whereas for fixed pressure drop, only those with a flux larger than that at the pressure drop minimum are stable. For a mixed pressure-flux condition, the stability threshold of the steady states lies between these two end members. This provides a possible mechanism for the experimental observations.

  7. Mapping the Hawaiian plume conduit with converted seismic waves

    PubMed

    Li; Kind; Priestley; Sobolev; Tilmann; Yuan; Weber

    2000-06-22

    The volcanic edifice of the Hawaiian islands and seamounts, as well as the surrounding area of shallow sea floor known as the Hawaiian swell, are believed to result from the passage of the oceanic lithosphere over a mantle hotspot. Although geochemical and gravity observations indicate the existence of a mantle thermal plume beneath Hawaii, no direct seismic evidence for such a plume in the upper mantle has yet been found. Here we present an analysis of compressional-to-shear (P-to-S) converted seismic phases, recorded on seismograph stations on the Hawaiian islands, that indicate a zone of very low shear-wave velocity (< 4 km s(-1)) starting at 130-140 km depth beneath the central part of the island of Hawaii and extending deeper into the upper mantle. We also find that the upper-mantle transition zone (410-660 km depth) appears to be thinned by up to 40-50 km to the south-southwest of the island of Hawaii. We interpret these observations as localized effects of the Hawaiian plume conduit in the asthenosphere and mantle transition zone with excess temperature of approximately 300 degrees C. Large variations in the transition-zone thickness suggest a lower-mantle origin of the Hawaiian plume similar to the Iceland plume, but our results indicate a 100 degrees C higher temperature for the Hawaiian plume. PMID:10879532

  8. Impact of aging on conduit artery retrograde and oscillatory shear at rest and during exercise: role of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Padilla, Jaume; Simmons, Grant H; Fadel, Paul J; Laughlin, M Harold; Joyner, Michael J; Casey, Darren P

    2011-03-01

    Aging has been recently associated with increased retrograde and oscillatory shear in peripheral conduit arteries, a hemodynamic environment that favors a proatherogenic endothelial cell phenotype. We evaluated whether nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability in resistance vessels contributes to age-related differences in shear rate patterns in upstream conduit arteries at rest and during rhythmic muscle contraction. Younger (n=11, age 26 ± 2 years) and older (n=11, age 61 ± 2 years) healthy subjects received intra-arterial saline (control) and the NO synthase inhibitor N(G)-Monomethyl-L-arginine. Brachial artery diameter and velocities were measured via Doppler ultrasound at rest and during a 5-minute bout of rhythmic forearm exercise. At rest, older subjects exhibited greater brachial artery retrograde and oscillatory shear (-13.2 ± 3.0 s(-1) and 0.11 ± .0.02 arbitrary units, respectively) compared with young subjects (-4.8 ± 2.3 s(-1) and 0.04 ± 0.02 arbitrary units, respectively; both P<0.05). NO synthase inhibition in the forearm circulation of young, but not of older, subjects increased retrograde and oscillatory shear (both P<0.05), such that differences between young and old at rest were abolished (both P>0.05). From rest to steady-state exercise, older subjects decreased retrograde and oscillatory shear (both P<0.05) to the extent that no exercise-related differences were found between groups (both P>0.05). Inhibition of NO synthase in the forearm circulation did not affect retrograde and oscillatory shear during exercise in either group (all P>0.05). These data demonstrate for the first time that reduced NO bioavailability in the resistance vessels contributes, in part, to age-related discrepancies in resting shear patterns, thus identifying a potential mechanism for increased risk of atherosclerotic disease in conduit arteries. PMID:21263118

  9. Unusual method of creation of a transcatheter fenestration in an extracardiac conduit Fontan circulation.

    PubMed

    Singhi, Anil K; Kothandum, Sivakumar

    2016-01-01

    Failing Fontan physiology in univentricular hearts manifest with protein-losing enteropathy, plastic bronchitis, low cardiac output, and recurrent effusions. Transcatheter creation of fenestration in a failing Fontan may be useful in alleviating the symptoms by improving the cardiac output. It is traditionally achieved by puncturing through the conduit from femoral or jugular venous access. In the absence of good venous path, transhepatic access provides a direct route for needle puncture of the conduit. If marked intimal ingrowth into the conduit results in increasing rigidity and makes the conduit nonyielding, alternative approaches may be needed. A successful creation of pulmonary artery to atrial roof communication through the potential space of transverse sinus using a covered stent is presented. PMID:27625527

  10. Unusual method of creation of a transcatheter fenestration in an extracardiac conduit Fontan circulation

    PubMed Central

    Singhi, Anil K; Kothandum, Sivakumar

    2016-01-01

    Failing Fontan physiology in univentricular hearts manifest with protein-losing enteropathy, plastic bronchitis, low cardiac output, and recurrent effusions. Transcatheter creation of fenestration in a failing Fontan may be useful in alleviating the symptoms by improving the cardiac output. It is traditionally achieved by puncturing through the conduit from femoral or jugular venous access. In the absence of good venous path, transhepatic access provides a direct route for needle puncture of the conduit. If marked intimal ingrowth into the conduit results in increasing rigidity and makes the conduit nonyielding, alternative approaches may be needed. A successful creation of pulmonary artery to atrial roof communication through the potential space of transverse sinus using a covered stent is presented.

  11. Development of bending characteristics for the TPX TF magnet coil cable-in-conduit conductor

    SciTech Connect

    Grut, K.E.; Holbrook, R.L.; Hook, E.; Antaya, T.A.

    1996-12-31

    The conductor for the toroidal field (TF) magnet coils for the Tokamak Physics experiment (TPX) is an assembly of stranded Nb{sub 3}Sn superconductor sheathed by an Incoloy 908 conduit. The coil shape, when coupled with stiffness of the cable-in-conduit conductor (CICC) is such that conventional magnet winding techniques cannot be utilized. Therefore a bending and forming method will be employed in the TF coils. The cable will be reacted after bending because the reaction process hardens the conduit and also lowers the strain the cable can withstand without performance degradation. The Incoloy 908 conduit also work hardens quickly, necessitating the production of the required coil shape in one step without correction. This paper discusses the limiting processes for forming the TPX TF magnet geometry, the methods utilized in establishing the CICC bending characteristics and the methods employed to account for material springback so that a coil can be manufactured accurately and efficiently.

  12. Efficacy of nanofibrous conduits in repair of long-segment sciatic nerve defects

    PubMed Central

    Biazar, Esmaeil; Keshel, Saeed Heidari; Pouya, Majid

    2013-01-01

    Our previous studies have histomorphologically confirmed that nanofibrous poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) conduit can be used to repair 30-mm-long sciatic nerve defects. However, the repair effects on rat behaviors remain poorly understood. In this study, we used nanofibrous poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) conduit and autologous sciatic nerve to bridge 30-mm-long rat sciatic nerve gaps. Within 4 months after surgery, rat sciatic nerve functional recovery was evaluated per month by behavioral analyses, including toe out angle, toe spread analysis, walking track analysis, extensor postural thrust, swimming test, open-field analysis and nociceptive function. Results showed that rat sciatic nerve functional recovery was similar after nanofibrous poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) conduit and autologous nerve grafting. These findings suggest that nanofibrous poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) conduit is suitable in use for repair of long-segment sciatic nerve defects. PMID:25206560

  13. Can one identify karst conduit networks geometry and properties from hydraulic and tracer test data?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borghi, Andrea; Renard, Philippe; Cornaton, Fabien

    2016-04-01

    Karst aquifers are characterized by extreme heterogeneity due to the presence of karst conduits embedded in a fractured matrix having a much lower hydraulic conductivity. The resulting contrast in the physical properties of the system implies that the system reacts very rapidly to some changes in the boundary conditions and that numerical models are extremely sensitive to small modifications in properties or positions of the conduits. Furthermore, one major issue in all those models is that the location and size of the conduits is generally unknown. For all those reasons, estimating karst network geometry and their properties by solving an inverse problem is a particularly difficult problem. In this paper, two numerical experiments are described. In the first one, 18,000 flow and transport simulations have been computed and used in a systematic manner to assess statistically if one can retrieve the parameters of a model (geometry and radius of the conduits, hydraulic conductivity of the conduits) from head and tracer data. When two tracer test data sets are available, the solution of the inverse problems indicate with high certainty that there are indeed two conduits and not more. The radius of the conduits are usually well identified but not the properties of the matrix. If more conduits are present in the system, but only two tracer test data sets are available, the inverse problem is still able to identify the true solution as the most probable but it also indicates that the data are insufficient to conclude with high certainty. In the second experiment, a more complex model (including non linear flow equations in conduits) is considered. In this example, gradient-based optimization techniques are proved to be efficient for estimating the radius of the conduits and the hydraulic conductivity of the matrix in a promising and efficient manner. These results suggest that, despite the numerical difficulties, inverse methods should be used to constrain numerical

  14. Deep Crustal Magma Conduits, Diabase Internal Structure, and Coupled Hydrothermal Processes in Mesozoic Basins of Eastern North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, M. P.; Ingerov, A.; Daniels, D. L.; Carr, P. M.; Elliott, G.; Fox, L.; Pierce, H. A.; Sutphin, D. M.

    2004-05-01

    Integrated geophysical, geological, and hydrological studies of the Culpeper (VA) and Gettysburg (PA) basins have shown fundamental new relationships among the internal structure of their plutonic rocks and have constrained the structural controls on paleo- and contemporary subsurface fluid flow within their ancient rift zone intrusive centers. Deep sub-basin igneous structure and the cross-sectional structure of the Culpeper basin. Magnetotelluric (MT) measurements along two basin-crossing transects have been inverted to reveal the basin cross-sectional structure and the structure of the primary conduit that transported tholeiitic magma through the crust during the Lower Jurassic. In cross-section, the basin deepens abruptly east of the Bull Run and Catoctin mountains, reaching a maximum depth of 2.5 to 2.75 km. The basin then shallows gradually towards the east. Basin rocks span the range 25 to 8,000 Ohm-m and range from fluid-saturated siltstones to unsaturated diabase, respectively. The crustal conduit for the Belmont diabase sheet has been resolved to 20 km depth. At that depth, it is characterized by a vertical region of relatively low resistivity (150 to 4,000 Ohm-m) embedded in relatively resistive (~10,000+ Ohm-m) crystalline Proterozoic rocks. At 4--5 km depth, the conduit width is ~2 km, flaring outward to a mean width of 6 km at 20 km depth. The conduit is inferred to be a laminate-like resistivity ``composite,'' with a central core resistivity of ~150 Ohm-m grading outwards through zones of 103, 2×103, and finally 4×103 Ohm-m near the outer margins. Based on the phase equilibria of ultramafic rocks and the petrology of diabase, the conduit is inferred to be olivine gabbro +/- dunite, and to be compositionally-zoned from core to margin. In general, the resistivity structure of the conduit is bilaterally-symmetric. Intra-basin igneous structure of the Gettysburg basin. The structure and geometry of the diabase sheets, lopoliths, and dikes of the

  15. The Contegra valved bovine conduit: a biomaterial for the surgical treatment of congenital heart defects.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shi-Min

    2012-12-01

    Contegra, a bovine jugular vein graft, has been widely used as a preferable biomaterial in the surgical treatment of congenital heart defects, especially as a conduit for the right ventricular outflow tract reconstruction. This article aims to make a comprehensive review on the clinical outcomes of Contegra. Reports of Contegra published since 2002 were comprehensively retrieved, collected and analyzed. There were 1718 Contegra, applied in 1705 patients. The sizes of the conduits were 8-22 mm. The patients aged from newborn to 74.5 years, prevailed by pediatrics. The primary diagnosis was congenital heart defects in all cases, with Tetralogy of Fallot, truncus arteriosus and pulmonary atresia being the first three diagnoses, representing 25.6%, 16.7%, and 13.1%, respectively. Contegra was used as a tube graft in the pulmonary position in 1635 (95.9%) patients, as a monocuspid patch in 12 (0.7%), as a graft in the position of the pulmonary valve or a monocusps in 40 (2.3%), and as an inferior vena cava-pulmonary artery conduit in the Fontan procedure in 18 (1.1%) patients, respectively. Conduit reimplantation was performed in 141 (8.3%) patients 33.8 ± 37 (8.6-106.8) months after the initial conduit insertion. Conduit plasty was necessary in 6 (0.4%), and reintervention in 83 (4.9%) patients. Indications for conduit reimplantation included severe stenosis of the distal anastomosis, pseudoaneurysm of the proximal anastomosis and severe conduit regurgitation. As for the good performance, availability and longevity, Contegra is a biomaterial suitable for the right ventricular outflow tract reconstruction and for patch repair for ventricular septal defect, but not apt for Fontan procedure. PMID:23152287

  16. Numerical Calculation of LP Seismic Signals Modeling the Fluid-Rock Interaction in Simulated Volcanic Conduits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arciniega-Ceballos, Alejandra; Corona-Romero, Pedro; Sanchez-Sesma, Francisco

    2010-05-01

    We present an investigation of the fluid-solid dynamic interaction of a fluid-driven cylindrical conduit embedded within an infinite, homogeneous elastic space with physical properties similar to those encountered in volcanic environments. In our model, a pressure transient is applied at the bottom of the conduit, which perturbs the steady flow of incompressible viscous fluid, driven by a pressure gradient. The model includes radial variation of a cylindrical fluid-filled conduit driven by changes in the flow velocity of a Newtonian fluid and a pressure gradient. Both fluid and solid are dynamically coupled by the continuity of radial velocities and shear and radial stresses at the conduit wall. The conduit dynamics are governed by three ordinary non-linear differential equations of second order, which are solved numerically by applying a fifth-order Runge-Kutta scheme. Our model allows for any number of pipe segments of different sizes coupled in series, thus representing an extended source region, which closely mimics the geometry of realistic volcanic conduits. Various examples of fluid-filled pipe-systems, starting from the simplest penny-shape geometries up to conduits of hundreds of meters in length, are presented. The values assumed for the fluid density and viscosity are in the mean range of basaltic and andesitic composition. Far-field velocity synthetics radiated by the motion of the conduit and fluid flows ascending to the surface display characteristic waveforms and frequency contents that closely resemble those of long-period (LP) signals observed at active volcanoes.

  17. Effects of dynamically variable saturation and matrix-conduit coupling of flow in karst aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reimann, T.; Geyer, T.; Shoemaker, W.B.; Liedl, R.; Sauter, M.

    2011-01-01

    Well-developed karst aquifers consist of highly conductive conduits and a relatively low permeability fractured and/or porous rock matrix and therefore behave as a dual-hydraulic system. Groundwater flow within highly permeable strata is rapid and transient and depends on local flow conditions, i.e., pressurized or nonpressurized flow. The characterization of karst aquifers is a necessary and challenging task because information about hydraulic and spatial conduit properties is poorly defined or unknown. To investigate karst aquifers, hydraulic stresses such as large recharge events can be simulated with hybrid (coupled discrete continuum) models. Since existing hybrid models are simplifications of the system dynamics, a new karst model (ModBraC) is presented that accounts for unsteady and nonuniform discrete flow in variably saturated conduits employing the Saint-Venant equations. Model performance tests indicate that ModBraC is able to simulate (1) unsteady and nonuniform flow in variably filled conduits, (2) draining and refilling of conduits with stable transition between free-surface and pressurized flow and correct storage representation, (3) water exchange between matrix and variably filled conduits, and (4) discharge routing through branched and intermeshed conduit networks. Subsequently, ModBraC is applied to an idealized catchment to investigate the significance of free-surface flow representation. A parameter study is conducted with two different initial conditions: (1) pressurized flow and (2) free-surface flow. If free-surface flow prevails, the systems is characterized by (1) a time lag for signal transmission, (2) a typical spring discharge pattern representing the transition from pressurized to free-surface flow, and (3) a reduced conduit-matrix interaction during free-surface flow. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  18. Fault textures in volcanic conduits: evidence for seismic trigger mechanisms during silicic eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuffen, Hugh; Dingwell, Don

    2005-04-01

    It is proposed that fault textures in two dissected rhyolitic conduits in Iceland preserve evidence for shallow seismogenic faulting within rising magma during the emplacement of highly viscous lava flows. Detailed field and petrographic analysis of such textures may shed light on the origin of long-period and hybrid volcanic earthquakes at active volcanoes. There is evidence at each conduit investigated for multiple seismogenic cycles, each of which involved four distinct evolutionary phases. In phase 1, shear fracture of unrelaxed magma was triggered by shear stress accumulation during viscous flow, forming the angular fracture networks that initiated faulting cycles. Transient pressure gradients were generated as the fractures opened, which led to fluidisation and clastic deposition of fine-grained particles that were derived from the fracture walls by abrasion. Fracture networks then progressively coalesced and rotated during subsequent slip (phase 2), developing into cataclasite zones with evidence for multiple localised slip events, fluidisation and grain size reduction. Phase 2 textures closely resemble those formed on seismogenic tectonic faults characterised by friction-controlled stick-slip behaviour. Increasing cohesion of cataclasites then led to aseismic, distributed ductile deformation (phase 3) and generated deformed cataclasite zones, which are enriched in metallic oxide microlites and resemble glassy pseudotachylite. Continued annealing and deformation eventually erased all structures in the cataclasite and formed microlite-rich flow bands in obsidian (phase 4). Overall, the mixed brittle-ductile textures formed in the magma appear similar to those formed in lower crustal rocks close to the brittle-ductile transition, with the rheological response mediated by strain-rate variations and frictional heating. Fault processes in highly viscous magma are compared with those elsewhere in the crust, and this comparison is used to appraise existing models

  19. The Himalayas: barrier and conduit for gene flow.

    PubMed

    Gayden, Tenzin; Perez, Annabel; Persad, Patrice J; Bukhari, Areej; Chennakrishnaiah, Shilpa; Simms, Tanya; Maloney, Trisha; Rodriguez, Kristina; Herrera, Rene J

    2013-06-01

    The Himalayan mountain range is strategically located at the crossroads of the major cultural centers in Asia, the Middle East and Europe. Although previous Y-chromosome studies indicate that the Himalayas served as a natural barrier for gene flow from the south to the Tibetan plateau, this region is believed to have played an important role as a corridor for human migrations between East and West Eurasia along the ancient Silk Road. To evaluate the effects of the Himalayan mountain range in shaping the maternal lineages of populations residing on either side of the cordillera, we analyzed mitochondrial DNA variation in 344 samples from three Nepalese collections (Newar, Kathmandu and Tamang) and a general population of Tibet. Our results revealed a predominantly East Asian-specific component in Tibet and Tamang, whereas Newar and Kathmandu are both characterized by a combination of East and South Central Asian lineages. Interestingly, Newar and Kathmandu harbor several deep-rooted Indian lineages, including M2, R5, and U2, whose coalescent times from this study (U2, >40 kya) and previous reports (M2 and R5, >50 kya) suggest that Nepal was inhabited during the initial peopling of South Central Asia. Comparisons with our previous Y-chromosome data indicate sex-biased migrations in Tamang and a founder effect and/or genetic drift in Tamang and Newar. Altogether, our results confirm that while the Himalayas acted as a geographic barrier for human movement from the Indian subcontinent to the Tibetan highland, it also served as a conduit for gene flow between Central and East Asia. PMID:23580401

  20. Fluid dynamics of active heterogeneities in a mantle plume conduit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farnetani, C. G.; Limare, A.; Hofmann, A. W.

    2015-12-01

    Laboratory experiments and numerical simulations indicate that the flow of a purely thermal plume preserves the azimuthal zonation of the source region, thus providing a framework to attribute a deep origin to the isotopic zonation of Hawaiian lavas. However, previous studies were limited to passive heterogeneities not affecting the flow. We go beyond this simplification by considering active heterogeneities which are compositionally denser, or more viscous, and we address the following questions: (1) How do active heterogeneities modify the axially symmetric velocity field of the plume conduit? (2) Under which conditions is the azimuthal zonation of the source region no longer preserved in the plume stem? (3) How do active heterogeneities deform during upwelling and what is their shape once at sublithospheric depths? We conducted both laboratory experiments, using a Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) to calculate the velocity field, and high resolution three-dimensional simulations where millions of tracers keep track of the heterogeneous fluid. For compositionally denser heterogeneities we cover a range of buoyancy ratios 0

  1. Current distribution in Cable-In-Conduit Conductors

    SciTech Connect

    Ferri, M.A.

    1994-05-01

    A numerical study of the current distribution in Cable-In-Conduit Conductors (CICC`s) experiencing linearly ramping transport currents and transverse magnetic fields was conducted for both infinitely long, periodic cables and finite length cables terminated in low resistance joints. The goal of the study was to gain insight into the phenomenon known as Ramp Rate Limitation, an as yet unexplained correspondence between maximum attainable current and the ramp time taken to reach that current in CICC superconducting magnets. A discrete geometric model of a 27 strand multiply twisted CICC was developed to effectively represent the flux linkages, mutual inductances, and resistive contact points between the strands of an experimentally tested cable. The results of the numerical study showed that for fully periodic cables, the current imbalances due to ramping magnetic fields and ramping transport currents are negligible in the range of experimentally explored operating conditions. For finite length, joint terminated cables, however, significant imbalances can exist. Unfortunately, quantitative results are limited by a lack of knowledge of the transverse resistance between strands in the joints. Nonetheless, general results are presented showing the dependency of the imbalance on cable length, ramp time, and joint resistance for both ramping transverse magnet fields and ramping transport currents. At the conclusion of the study, it is suggested that calculated current imbalances in a finite length cable could cause certain strands to prematurely ``quench`` -- become non-superconducting --thus leading to an instability for the entire cable. This numerically predicted ``current imbalance instability`` is compared to the experimentally observed Ramp Rate Limitation for the 27 strand CICC sample.

  2. Total arterial coronary revascularization-patient selection, stenoses, conduits, targets.

    PubMed

    Tatoulis, James

    2013-07-01

    Graft patency determines prognosis in coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Numerous reports over the past 20 years have documented superior patencies and prognosis when multiple arterial grafts are used, yet less than 10% of CABG have multiple arterial grafts. Several conduits have been proposed, with varying degrees of success. Saphenous vein grafts (SVG) begin to fail with intimal hypertrophy and then atheroma after 5 years, with patency rates of 50% to 60% at 10 years, and <30% at 15 years. In contrast, left internal thoracic artery (LITA) patency is >95% at 10 years and >90% at 20 years. The radial artery is extremely versatile and can reach all territories, but is muscular and vulnerable to spasm and competitive flow. Similarly, the right gastroepiploic artery is also muscular, and is best suited to the posterior descending coronary artery, especially in reoperations and is also affected by competitive flow. In addition, bilateral internal thoracic artery grafting (BITA) grafts and total arterial revascularization (TACR) can be performed with identical perioperative mortality (1%) and perioperative morbidity to LITA + SVG. Importantly, survival is superior-85% to 90% at 10 years versus 75% to 80% respectively. BITA/TACR patients also suffer fewer late cardiac events and reoperations, with superior results for older patients, those requiring urgent surgery, diabetics, patients with renal dysfunction and in reoperations. Contraindications to BITA include obesity, insulin dependent diabetics, and severe chronic obstructive airways disease. As such, arterial grafts have better patencies and clinical results. BITA/TACR is often underutilized, but can be achieved in the majority of patients. Opportunities exist to enhance BITA/TACR use in CABG to the potential benefit of our patients. PMID:23977629

  3. A nerve guidance conduit with topographical and biochemical cues: potential application using human neural stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Phillip M.; Laughter, Melissa R.; Lee, David J.; Lee, Young M.; Freed, Curt R.; Park, Daewon

    2015-06-01

    Despite major advances in the pathophysiological understanding of peripheral nerve damage, the treatment of nerve injuries still remains an unmet medical need. Nerve guidance conduits present a promising treatment option by providing a growth-permissive environment that 1) promotes neuronal cell survival and axon growth and 2) directs axonal extension. To this end, we designed an electrospun nerve guidance conduit using a blend of polyurea and poly-caprolactone with both biochemical and topographical cues. Biochemical cues were integrated into the conduit by functionalizing the polyurea with RGD to improve cell attachment. Topographical cues that resemble natural nerve tissue were incorporated by introducing intraluminal microchannels aligned with nanofibers. We determined that electrospinning the polymer solution across a two electrode system with dissolvable sucrose fibers produced a polymer conduit with the appropriate biomimetic properties. Human neural stem cells were cultured on the conduit to evaluate its ability to promote neuronal growth and axonal extension. The nerve guidance conduit was shown to enhance cell survival, migration, and guide neurite extension.

  4. A Biosynthetic Nerve Guide Conduit Based on Silk/SWNT/Fibronectin Nanocomposite for Peripheral Nerve Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Mottaghitalab, Fatemeh; Farokhi, Mehdi; Zaminy, Arash; Kokabi, Mehrdad; Soleimani, Masoud; Mirahmadi, Fereshteh

    2013-01-01

    As a contribution to the functionality of nerve guide conduits (NGCs) in nerve tissue engineering, here we report a conduit processing technique through introduction and evaluation of topographical, physical and chemical cues. Porous structure of NGCs based on freeze-dried silk/single walled carbon nanotubes (SF/SWNTs) has shown a uniform chemical and physical structure with suitable electrical conductivity. Moreover, fibronectin (FN) containing nanofibers within the structure of SF/SWNT conduits produced through electrospinning process have shown aligned fashion with appropriate porosity and diameter. Moreover, fibronectin remained its bioactivity and influenced the adhesion and growth of U373 cell lines. The conduits were then implanted to 10 mm left sciatic nerve defects in rats. The histological assessment has shown that nerve regeneration has taken places in proximal region of implanted nerve after 5 weeks following surgery. Furthermore, nerve conduction velocities (NCV) and more myelinated axons were observed in SF/SWNT and SF/SWNT/FN groups after 5 weeks post implantation, indicating a functional recovery for the injured nerves. With immunohistochemistry, the higher S-100 expression of Schwann cells in SF/SWNT/FN conduits in comparison to other groups was confirmed. In conclusion, an oriented conduit of biocompatible SF/SWNT/FN has been fabricated with acceptable structure that is particularly applicable in nerve grafts. PMID:24098649

  5. In vitro evaluation of carbon-nanotube-reinforced bioprintable vascular conduits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolati, Farzaneh; Yu, Yin; Zhang, Yahui; De Jesus, Aribet M.; Sander, Edward A.; Ozbolat, Ibrahim T.

    2014-04-01

    Vascularization of thick engineered tissue and organ constructs like the heart, liver, pancreas or kidney remains a major challenge in tissue engineering. Vascularization is needed to supply oxygen and nutrients and remove waste in living tissues and organs through a network that should possess high perfusion ability and significant mechanical strength and elasticity. In this paper, we introduce a fabrication process to print vascular conduits directly, where conduits were reinforced with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to enhance their mechanical properties and bioprintability. In vitro evaluation of printed conduits encapsulated in human coronary artery smooth muscle cells was performed to characterize the effects of CNT reinforcement on the mechanical, perfusion and biological performance of the conduits. Perfusion and permeability, cell viability, extracellular matrix formation and tissue histology were assessed and discussed, and it was concluded that CNT-reinforced vascular conduits provided a foundation for mechanically appealing constructs where CNTs could be replaced with natural protein nanofibers for further integration of these conduits in large-scale tissue fabrication.

  6. Comparison of a karst groundwater model with and without discrete conduit flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saller, Stephen P.; Ronayne, Michael J.; Long, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    Karst aquifers exhibit a dual flow system characterized by interacting conduit and matrix domains. This study evaluated the coupled continuum pipe-flow framework for modeling karst groundwater flow in the Madison aquifer of western South Dakota (USA). Coupled conduit and matrix flow was simulated within a regional finite-difference model over a 10-year transient period. An existing equivalent porous medium (EPM) model was modified to include major conduit networks whose locations were constrained by dye-tracing data and environmental tracer analysis. Model calibration data included measured hydraulic heads at observation wells and estimates of discharge at four karst springs. Relative to the EPM model, the match to observation well hydraulic heads was substantially improved with the addition of conduits. The inclusion of conduit flow allowed for a simpler hydraulic conductivity distribution in the matrix continuum. Two of the high-conductivity zones in the EPM model, which were required to indirectly simulate the effects of conduits, were eliminated from the new model. This work demonstrates the utility of the coupled continuum pipe-flow method and illustrates how karst aquifer model parameterization is dependent on the physical processes that are simulated.

  7. In vitro evaluation of carbon-nanotube-reinforced bioprintable vascular conduits.

    PubMed

    Dolati, Farzaneh; Yu, Yin; Zhang, Yahui; De Jesus, Aribet M; Sander, Edward A; Ozbolat, Ibrahim T

    2014-04-11

    Vascularization of thick engineered tissue and organ constructs like the heart, liver, pancreas or kidney remains a major challenge in tissue engineering. Vascularization is needed to supply oxygen and nutrients and remove waste in living tissues and organs through a network that should possess high perfusion ability and significant mechanical strength and elasticity. In this paper, we introduce a fabrication process to print vascular conduits directly, where conduits were reinforced with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to enhance their mechanical properties and bioprintability. In vitro evaluation of printed conduits encapsulated in human coronary artery smooth muscle cells was performed to characterize the effects of CNT reinforcement on the mechanical, perfusion and biological performance of the conduits. Perfusion and permeability, cell viability, extracellular matrix formation and tissue histology were assessed and discussed, and it was concluded that CNT-reinforced vascular conduits provided a foundation for mechanically appealing constructs where CNTs could be replaced with natural protein nanofibers for further integration of these conduits in large-scale tissue fabrication. PMID:24632802

  8. Fracture Toughness Measurements and Assessment of Thin Walled Conduit Alloys in a Cicc Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, R. P.; Han, K.; Toplosky, V. J.

    2008-03-01

    The Series-Connected Hybrid Magnets under construction at the NHMFL use Cable-in-Conduct-Conductor (CICC) technology. The 4 K mechanical properties of the conduit are extremely important to the performance and reliability of the magnets. We have measured tensile and fracture toughness of two candidate conduit alloys (Haynes 242 and modified 316LN) in various metallurgical states, with emphasis on the final state of production. To assess the material in its final production state, non-standard specimens are removed directly from the round-corner rectangular conduit and tested after exposure to a simulated Nb3Sn reaction heat treatment. Non-standard middle-tension (MT) fracture toughness specimens enable toughness evaluation of the base metal, welds and weld/base transitional region in the as-fabricated conduit with final dimensions not suitable for conventional fracture toughness specimens. Although fracture toughness tests of the thin walled conduit fail to meet ASTM test validity requirements they provide a qualitative evaluation and estimate of the fracture toughness of the conduit and the welds.

  9. FRACTURE TOUGHNESS MEASUREMENTS AND ASSESSMENT OF THIN WALLED CONDUIT ALLOYS IN A CICC APPLICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, R. P.; Han, K.; Toplosky, V. J.

    2008-03-03

    The Series-Connected Hybrid Magnets under construction at the NHMFL use Cable-in-Conduct-Conductor (CICC) technology. The 4 K mechanical properties of the conduit are extremely important to the performance and reliability of the magnets. We have measured tensile and fracture toughness of two candidate conduit alloys (Haynes 242 and modified 316LN) in various metallurgical states, with emphasis on the final state of production. To assess the material in its final production state, non-standard specimens are removed directly from the round-corner rectangular conduit and tested after exposure to a simulated Nb{sub 3}Sn reaction heat treatment. Non-standard middle-tension (MT) fracture toughness specimens enable toughness evaluation of the base metal, welds and weld/base transitional region in the as-fabricated conduit with final dimensions not suitable for conventional fracture toughness specimens. Although fracture toughness tests of the thin walled conduit fail to meet ASTM test validity requirements they provide a qualitative evaluation and estimate of the fracture toughness of the conduit and the welds.

  10. In Vitro Evaluation of Carbon-Nanotube-Reinforced Bioprintable Vascular Conduits

    PubMed Central

    Dolati, Farzaneh; Yu, Yin; Zhang, Yahui; De Jesus, Aribet M; Sander, Edward A.; Ozbolat, Ibrahim T.

    2014-01-01

    Vascularization of thick engineered tissue and organ constructs like the heart, liver, pancreas or kidney remains a major challenge in tissue engineering. Vascularization is needed to supply oxygen and nutrients and remove waste in living tissues and organs through a network that should possess high perfusion ability and significant mechanical strength and elasticity. In this paper, we introduce a fabrication process to print vascular conduits directly, where conduits were reinforced with carbon-nanotubes (CNTs) to enhance their mechanical properties and bioprintability. In vitro evaluation of printed conduits encapsulated in human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (HCASMCs) was performed to characterize the effects of CNT reinforcement on the mechanical, perfusion and biological performance of the conduits. Perfusion and permeability, cell viability, extracellular matrix formation and tissue histology were assessed and discussed, and it was concluded that CNT-reinforced vascular conduits provided a foundation for mechanically appealing constructs where CNTs could be replaced with natural protein nanofibers for further integration of these conduits in large-scale tissue fabrication. PMID:24632802

  11. Conduit evolution during the Avellinio Plinian eruption (Vesuvius): insights from fieldwork, lithic grain size distributions and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Jonathan; Rust, Alison; Phillips, Jeremy; Sulpizio, Roberto; Engwell, Samantha; Costa, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    Large-scale explosive eruptions are modulated by a combination of magmatic and conduit processes, including changes in the geometry of the conduit as host rocks are eroded from the conduit walls and vent region. This study of deposits 1-45 km from source of the main, quasi-steady Plinian phases of the 3949 ± 10 yBP Avellino eruption of Vesuvius (EU2 and EU3) demonstrates the potential for measurements of lithics and xenoliths to constrain subsurface eruption processes. The lithics comprise volcanic rocks derived from the upper ˜2700 m of the conduit, carbonates from the lower conduit and magma reservoir wall rocks. The lithics (free clasts) are thought to be incorporated into the erupting mixture by conduit wall implosion around and above the fragmentation depth as well as shallow vent spalling, whilst xenoliths are interpreted to result from viscous shear stresses applied to the conduit walls pre-fragmentation. The lithology of xenoliths indicates that they are sourced from relatively deep in the conduit, and their scarcity indicates that there is only minor conduit erosion below magma fragmentation during the Plinian eruptions. In contrast total lithic volumes calculated for EU2 and EU3 are 0.002 and 0.02 km3, respectively, which corresponds to 8 % and 18 % of the total erupted volume. Lava lithics dominate, making up 69 and 74 % of the total lithic volume for EU2 and EU3, respectively. The majority of conduit erosion occurred above the fragmentation depth, in the upper few kilometers of the conduit, and scales approximately with the increase in mass discharge rate between the two phases. Individual component (total lithic, carbonate, lava) Lithic Total Grain Size Distributions (L-TGSDs) provide insights into rock failure mechanisms. The fractal dimensions of the majority of the L-TGSDs are approximately 2 (grain size in φ against log2 no. of grains), inferred to be the result of conduit implosion modified by initial rock characteristics. The lava lithics from

  12. Use new PLGL-RGD-NGF nerve conduits for promoting peripheral nerve regeneration

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Nerve conduits provide a promising strategy for peripheral nerve injury repair. However, the efficiency of nerve conduits to enhance nerve regeneration and functional recovery is often inferior to that of autografts. Nerve conduits require additional factors such as cell adhesion molecules and neurotrophic factors to provide a more conducive microenvironment for nerve regeneration. Methods In the present study, poly{(lactic acid)-co-[(glycolic acid)-alt-(L-lysine)]} (PLGL) was modified by grafting Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Gly (RGD peptide) and nerve growth factor (NGF) for fabricating new PLGL-RGD-NGF nerve conduits to promote nerve regeneration and functional recovery. PLGL-RGD-NGF nerve conduits were tested in the rat sciatic nerve transection model. Rat sciatic nerves were cut off to form a 10 mm defect and repaired with the nerve conduits. All of the 32 Wistar rats were randomly divided into 4 groups: group PLGL-RGD-NGF, group PLGL-RGD, group PLGL and group autograft. At 3 months after surgery, the regenerated rat sciatic nerve was evaluated by footprint analysis, electrophysiology, and histologic assessment. Experimental data were processed using the statistical software SPSS 10.0. Results The sciatic function index value of groups PLGL-RGD-NGF and autograft was significantly higher than those of groups PLGL-RGD and PLGL. The nerve conduction velocities of groups PLGL-RGD-NGF and autograft were significantly faster than those of groups PLGL-RGD and PLGL. The regenerated nerves of groups PLGL-RGD-NGF and autograft were more mature than those of groups PLGL-RGD and PLGL. There was no significant difference between groups PLGL-RGD-NGF and autograft. Conclusions PLGL-RGD-NGF nerve conduits are more effective in regenerating nerves than both PLGL-RGD nerve conduits and PLGL nerve conduits. The effect is as good as that of an autograft. This work established the platform for further development of the use of PLGL-RGD-NGF nerve conduits for clinical nerve repair

  13. Carbonate mineral dissolution and the impacts of flood water exchange between conduit and matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spellman, P.; Screaton, E.; Gulley, J. D.; Martin, J. B.

    2012-12-01

    Studies of flow and dissolution in karst aquifers have traditionally focused on conduits, and contributions from matrix sources have been generally ignored. This conceptual model works for limestone that has been deeply buried and had its matrix permeability obliterated by cementation (telogenetic) so that most aquifer recharge occurs by conduits. In limestone that has not been deeply buried (eogenetic), however, high matrix permeability is preserved, resulting in greater degrees of interaction between conduit and matrix porosity than occurs in telogenetic limestone. Interactions between conduit and matrix porosity, and how these interactions affect flow and dissolution within aquifers, is particularly important in karst aquifers subject to dynamic changes in head gradients between conduits and aquifers. These exchanges are particularly prevalent in transitional areas between confined and unconfined aquifer conditions. In such transitional areas, allogenic runoff from confining units can increase river stages on adjacent unconfined aquifers faster than infiltration of local rainfall can increase groundwater heads. As a result, normal hydraulic gradients between the aquifer and rivers are reversed, causing river water to flow into springs. Simultaneously, rapid increases in conduit hydraulic head will also reverse gradients between the conduit and the aquifer, driving exchange from the conduit to the matrix. Because allogenic runoff is highly undersaturated with respect to calcite after storm events, dissolution resulting from this exchange can be extensive. The magnitude of dissolution that occurs is a function of the calcite saturation state of the allogenic runoff, the surface area of the limestone in contact with the water, and the time that water remains in contact with the limestone. In eogenetic aquifers, the magnitude of dissolution that occurs during spring reversals should be higher than in telogenetic aquifers because of their elevated matrix

  14. Geophysical Methods for Locating Karst Conduits in Cane Run Watershed, Central Kentucky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, J.; Paylor, R.; Currens, J. C.; Dinger, J. S.

    2009-12-01

    Cane Run watershed in central Kentucky was listed by the Kentucky Division of Water as one of four focus watersheds for clean-up under the State’s nonpoint-source pollution program. This watershed is degraded by pathogens, nutrients, siltation, and organic enrichment. The sources of pollution include both municipal point sources and nonpoint agricultural and nonagricultural sources. The relative contribution of different parts of the watershed to the contamination is not well understood, however. The geology of Cane Run watershed consists of Ordovician thin-bedded limestone with sparse interbeds of shale. The landscape is dominated by karst features such as sinkholes and springs. Cane Run only flows during times of significant rainfall, usually in the spring of the year. The remainder of the year, most water is recharged to a karst conduit system that leads from Lexington, Ky to Royal Spring, as demonstrated by groundwater tracing. Royal Spring is the major water supply for Georgetown in Scott County, Ky. We attempted to locate the karst conduit so that groundwater flowing through the conduit could be monitored. These monitoring data are essential for assessing the effectiveness of remediation plans. In 2008, based on geology, karst features, and hydrogeology, an initial round of electrical-resistivity and spontaneous-potential geophysical surveys were conducted to help pinpoint the location of the conduit at three sites. Fifteen exploratory boreholes were drilled on the basis of the geophysical results. The boreholes confirmed the geophysical surveys had located minor mud-filled conduits that were interpreted as tributaries to the main conduit. Another round of 2D and 3D electrical resistivity surveys were conducted in 2009 to search for the main conduit. The analysis of this round of surveys resulted in one promising site that is suspected to be in close proximity to the conduit. A time-lapse 2D electrical resistivity survey in conjunction with calcium chlorite

  15. A 600-m Jacketing Line of Cable-in-conduit Conductor (CICC) and the First 600-m Dummy Cable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Si-yue; Wu, Jie-feng; Chen, Xing-qian; Zhang, Pin; He, Wei; Wang, Hai-jing; Xu, Xue-fu; Yi, Zian; Gao, Da-ming

    2002-02-01

    A cable-in-conduit conductor (CICC) production line was designed and constructed in Institute of Plasma Physics of Chinese Academy of Sciences (IPPCAS) by the end of 2000. It can produce a length of 600 meters and three kinds of sections of 20.8±0.1 × 20.8±0.1, 20.4±0.1 × 20.4±0.1 and 18.6 ± 0.1 × 18.6 ± 0.1 mm2. If the rollers of the shaping machine are changed, it can also produce other sizes of CICCs. So-called inserting-cable technology is adopted in this production line, where the procedures consist of tube pre-treatment (cleaning, pressure and leakage testing, end cutting), conduits butt-welding, six kinds of quality checking (endoscopy, dye penetration, pressure control, leakage testing, ultrasonic inspection and x-ray testing), cable inserting, shaping (compacting & squaring), pre-bending & winding and final checking. Now all the instruments and facilities required for these technologies have been installed and got ready. Some key technologies have been explored and good results obtained. Some short samples were produced and a 600 meters long sample was made out in August, 2001.

  16. The effect of shear on permeability in a volcanic conduit: a case study at Unzen volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashworth, James; Lavallée, Yan; Wallace, Paul; Lamur, Anthony; Kendrick, Jackie; Miwa, Takahiro

    2016-04-01

    The efficiency of outgassing at volcanoes is a function of permeability, and exerts a major influence on the type of eruptive behaviour exhibited. Understanding how shear affects the permeability profile across volcanic conduits is therefore a key part of understanding volcanic processes and the associated hazards. During the final months of the 1990-1995 eruption of Unzen volcano in southern Japan, extrusion of a dacite spine followed a period of endogenous dome growth. Many of the resulting formations are relatively accessible, allowing for the study of a variety of associated deformation phenomena. One of these formations, a ~6 m wide block, is a section of the extruded spine, that forms the basis for this study on shallow conduit processes. It displays a textural gradation from highly sheared rock to rock with negligible deformation, and is bounded at the high shear end by an agglutinated block of gouge that is thought to represent the conduit margin. A multi-faceted approach was taken to investigate the variation of permeability across the spine and its implications for processes occurring within the conduit. The permeability was measured at several points along the exposed surface of the spine transect using a field permeameter. Sample blocks from four of these locations were collected and tested in the lab using a hydrostatic pressure vessel water-flow permeameter and categorized as: gouge; highest shear; moderate shear; negligible shear. Each block was tested in three orthogonal axes: one perpendicular to observed shear; and two in the plane of shear. For each of these rocks, permeability and porosity measurements were made at a wide range of effective pressures (5 to 100 MPa), using a controlled upstream/downstream pore pressure gradient of 0.5 MPa (at an average pore pressure of 1.25 MPa). Thin sections of each sample were also taken prepared and analysed to describe the primary microstructures controlling the permeability of the rock. Textural analysis

  17. [Surgical treatment of a patient with giant false aneurysm of xenopericardial conduit of the ascending aorta].

    PubMed

    Charchian, É R; Skvortsov, A A

    2015-01-01

    The article deals with a clinical case report concerning successful secondary surgical intervention for a giant pseudoaneurysm of the xenopericardial conduit of the ascending aorta in a patient with type A chronic aortic dissection, with a history previously endured prosthetic repair of the ascending aorta and aortic valve for acute dissection. The patient underwent was subjected to repeat prosthetic repair of the aortic valve and ascending aorta according to the Cabrol's technique. The postoperative period was uneventful. The function of the aortic valve prosthesis after surgery was satisfactory. The control multispiral computed tomography showed that reconstruction zone was without deformities, with the ostia of coronary arteries patent. On day 15 postoperatively the patient was discharged from hospital to undergo rehabilitation with recommendations concerning the subsequent stage of surgical treatment. The conclusion was drawn that despite life-threatening disease and an extensive scope of reconstruction correctly chosen surgical policy makes it possible to adequately carry out the necessary operation with a good outcome. PMID:25757183

  18. Trees are important conduits for emission of methane from temperate and tropical wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauci, Vincent; Pangala, Sunitha; Gowing, David; Hornibrook, Edward

    2013-04-01

    Methane produced in wetland soil generally is thought to be emitted to the atmosphere primarily via diffusion through pore water, release of gas bubbles (i.e., ebullition), and gas phase diffusion through the aerenchyma of herbaceous plants. The role of trees as a conduit for methane export from soil to the atmosphere has received limited attention despite evidence from mesocosm experiments showing that seedlings and saplings of wetland trees have a significant capacity to transport soil-produced gases. Notably ~60% of global wetlands are forested. We present in situ measurements of methane flux from a temperate carr (swamp) composed of alder (Alnus glutinosa) and birch (Betula pubescens) situated in the United Kingdom and a tropical forested peat swamp located in Borneo. The in situ data are complemented by a mesocosm experiment in which methane emissions were measured from alder saplings subjected to two water-regime treatments. In both the in situ and mesocosm studies, emissions from trees are compared to methane flux from the ground surface, the latter occurring via pore water diffusion, ebullition or the aerenchyma of herbaceous plants. We show that tree stem emissions are controlled by a number of factors including tree species, soil pore-water concentration and stem lenticel density. Our results demonstrate that the omission of tree-mediated methane fluxes from measurement campaigns conducted in forested wetland can significantly underestimate total ecosystem flux of methane.

  19. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Clinical Practice Guidelines on Arterial Conduits for Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting.

    PubMed

    Aldea, Gabriel S; Bakaeen, Faisal G; Pal, Jay; Fremes, Stephen; Head, Stuart J; Sabik, Joseph; Rosengart, Todd; Kappetein, A Pieter; Thourani, Vinod H; Firestone, Scott; Mitchell, John D

    2016-02-01

    Internal thoracic arteries (ITAs) should be used to bypass the left anterior descending (LAD) artery when bypass of the LAD is indicated (class of recommendation [COR] I, level of evidence [LOE] B). As an adjunct to left internal thoracic artery (LITA), a second arterial graft (right ITA or radial artery [RA]) should be considered in appropriate patients (COR IIa, LOE B). Use of bilateral ITAs (BITAs) should be considered in patients who do not have an excessive risk of sternal complications (COR IIa, LOE B). To reduce the risk of sternal infection with BITA, skeletonized grafts should be considered (COR IIa, LOE B), smoking cessation is recommended (COR I, LOE C), glycemic control should be considered (COR IIa, LOE B), and enhanced sternal stabilization may be considered (COR IIb, LOE C). As an adjunct to LITA to LAD (or in patients with inadequate LITA grafts), use of a RA graft is reasonable when grafting coronary targets with severe stenoses (COR IIa, LOE: B). When RA grafts are used, it is reasonable to use pharmacologic agents to reduce acute intraoperative and perioperative spasm (COR IIa, LOE C). The right gastroepiploic artery may be considered in patients with poor conduit options or as an adjunct to more complete arterial revascularization (COR IIb, LOE B). Use of arterial grafts (specific targets, number, and type) should be a part of the discussion of the heart team in determining the optimal approach for each patient (COR I, LOE C). PMID:26680310

  20. Device and method for measuring multi-phase fluid flow in a conduit having an abrupt gradual bend

    DOEpatents

    Ortiz, M.G.

    1998-02-10

    A system is described for measuring fluid flow in a conduit having an abrupt bend. The system includes pressure transducers, one disposed in the conduit at the inside of the bend and one or more disposed in the conduit at the outside of the bend but spaced a distance therefrom. The pressure transducers measure the pressure of fluid in the conduit at the locations of the pressure transducers and this information is used by a computational device to calculate fluid flow rate in the conduit. For multi-phase fluid, the density of the fluid is measured by another pair of pressure transducers, one of which is located in the conduit elevationally above the other. The computation device then uses the density measurement along with the fluid pressure measurements, to calculate fluid flow. 1 fig.

  1. Device and method for measuring multi-phase fluid flow in a conduit having an abrupt gradual bend

    DOEpatents

    Ortiz, Marcos German

    1998-01-01

    A system for measuring fluid flow in a conduit having an abrupt bend. The system includes pressure transducers, one disposed in the conduit at the inside of the bend and one or more disposed in the conduit at the outside of the bend but spaced a distance therefrom. The pressure transducers measure the pressure of fluid in the conduit at the locations of the pressure transducers and this information is used by a computational device to calculate fluid flow rate in the conduit. For multi-phase fluid, the density of the fluid is measured by another pair of pressure transducers, one of which is located in the conduit elevationally above the other. The computation device then uses the density measurement along with the fluid pressure measurements, to calculate fluid flow.

  2. Valved Conduit with Glutaraldehyde-Fixed Bovine Pericardium Treated by Anticalcification Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hong-Gook; Kim, Gi Beom; Jeong, Saeromi; Kim, Yong Jin

    2014-01-01

    Background A preclinical study was conducted for evaluating a valved conduit manufactured with a glutaraldehyde (GA)-fixed bovine pericardium treated using an anticalcification protocol. Methods Bovine pericardia were decellularized, fixed with GA in an organic solvent, and detoxified. We prepared a valved conduit using these bovine pericardia and a specially designed mold. The valved conduit was placed under in vitro circulation by using a mock circulation model, and the durability under mechanical stress was evaluated for 2 months. The valved conduit was implanted into the right ventricular outflow tract of a goat, and the hemodynamic, radiologic, histopathologic, and biochemical results were obtained for 6 months after the implantation. Results The in vitro mock circulation demonstrated that valve motion was good and that the valved conduit had good gross and microscopic findings. The evaluation of echocardiography and cardiac catheterization demonstrated the good hemodynamic status and function of the pulmonary xenograft valve 6 months after the implantation. According to specimen radiography and a histopathologic examination, the durability of the xenografts was well preserved without calcification at 6 months after the implantation. The calcium and inorganic phosphorus concentrations of the explanted xenografts were low at 6 months after the implantation. Conclusion This study demonstrated that our synergistic employment of multiple anticalcification therapies has promising safety and efficacy in the future clinical study. PMID:25207241

  3. A novel electrospun nerve conduit enhanced by carbon nanotubes for peripheral nerve regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Wenwen; Jiang, Xinquan; Cai, Ming; Zhao, Wen; Ye, Dongxia; Zhou, Yong; Zhu, Chao; Zhang, Xiuli; Lu, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Zhiyuan

    2014-04-01

    For artificial nerve conduits, great improvements have been achieved in mimicking the structures and components of autologous nerves. However, there are still some problems in conduit construction, especially in terms of mechanical properties, biomimetic surface tomography, electrical conductivity and sustained release of neurotrophic factors or cells. In this study, we designed and fabricated a novel electrospun nerve conduit enhanced by multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) on the basis of a collagen/poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (collagen/PCL) fibrous scaffold. Our aim was to provide further knowledge about the mechanical effects and efficacy of MWNTs on nerve conduits as well as the biocompatibility and toxicology of MWNTs when applied in vivo. The results showed that as one component, carboxyl MWNTs could greatly alter the composite scaffold’s hydrophilicity, mechanical properties and degradability. The electrospun fibers enhanced by MWNTs could support Schwann cell adhesion and elongation as a substrate in vitro. In vivo animal studies demonstrated that the MWNT-enhanced collagen/PCL conduit could effectively promote nerve regeneration of sciatic nerve defect in rats and prevent muscle atrophy without invoking body rejection or serious chronic inflammation. All of these results showed that this MWNT-enhanced scaffold possesses good biocompatibility and MWNTs might be excellent candidates as engineered nanocarriers for further neurotrophic factor delivery research.

  4. A modular, plasmin-sensitive, clickable poly(ethylene glycol)-heparin-laminin microsphere system for establishing growth factor gradients in nerve guidance conduits.

    PubMed

    Roam, Jacob L; Yan, Ying; Nguyen, Peter K; Kinstlinger, Ian S; Leuchter, Michael K; Hunter, Daniel A; Wood, Matthew D; Elbert, Donald L

    2015-12-01

    Peripheral nerve regeneration is a complex problem that, despite many advancements and innovations, still has sub-optimal outcomes. Compared to biologically derived acellular nerve grafts and autografts, completely synthetic nerve guidance conduits (NGC), which allow for precise engineering of their properties, are promising but still far from optimal. We have developed an almost entirely synthetic NGC that allows control of soluble growth factor delivery kinetics, cell-initiated degradability and cell attachment. We have focused on the spatial patterning of glial-cell derived human neurotrophic factor (GDNF), which promotes motor axon extension. The base scaffolds consisted of heparin-containing poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) microspheres. The modular microsphere format greatly simplifies the formation of concentration gradients of reversibly bound GDNF. To facilitate axon extension, we engineered the microspheres with tunable plasmin degradability. 'Click' cross-linking chemistries were also added to allow scaffold formation without risk of covalently coupling the growth factor to the scaffold. Cell adhesion was promoted by covalently bound laminin. GDNF that was released from these microspheres was confirmed to retain its activity. Graded scaffolds were formed inside silicone conduits using 3D-printed holders. The fully formed NGC's contained plasmin-degradable PEG/heparin scaffolds that developed linear gradients in reversibly bound GDNF. The NGC's were implanted into rats with severed sciatic nerves to confirm in vivo degradability and lack of a major foreign body response. The NGC's also promoted robust axonal regeneration into the conduit. PMID:26352518

  5. Extension of in-situ stress test analysis to rapid hole evacuation at Yucca Mountain due to a network of open conduits

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, J.B.

    1994-01-01

    Yucca Mountain is underlain by tuffaceous rocks that are highly fractured and jointed. During drilling of bore-holes at Yucca Mountain there were numerous occurrences of lost circulation when whole mud was taken by the formation. This evidence suggests that parts of Yucca Mountain are controlled hydrologicaly by a network of open conduits along the existing joints and fractures. Also at Yucca Mountain, stress tests have been performed in-situ by charging a small section along the boreholes with an excess pressure head of water. For many of these tests, the initial drop in water head was so rapid that within seconds up to hundreds of meters of fall had occurred. The opening of fractures as the excess head increases has previously been proposed as an important factor in explaining the shape of the stress test curves at lower pressures. We propose that such induced hydraulic fractures, under increasing water heads, can grow to a length sufficient to intersect the existing network of open joints and fractures. We extend our previous model to incorporate flow out along these open conduits and examine the initial rapid drop in terms of these extended models. We show that this rapid evacuation model fits the observed data from many slug tests in wells in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain. This result is confirmation of the drilling evidence that a network of open conduits exists at various depths below the water table and over a large geographic region around Yucca Mountain.

  6. The interior of a volcanic summit: TerraSAR-X interferometry reveals complex conduit system at Volcán de Colima, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salzer, Jacqueline T.; Nikkhoo, Mehdi; Walter, Thomas R.; Reyes-Dávila, Gabriel; Bretón, Mauricio; Arambula-Mendoza, Raul

    2014-05-01

    The dimensions and shape of the volcanic conduit is one of the main parameters controlling the dynamics and style volcanic eruptions and their precursors, but also one of the main unknowns. Different types of pre-eruptive signals originate from this region, such as changes in the gas composition, earthquakes, tremors and long periodic seismicity, as well as deformation on different scales, all of which strictly depend on the source geometry. However, vulnerability of near-summit stations during explosive eruptions leads to a sparse spatial resolution and hence poor a knowledge of the shallow source process and its parameters. Such incomplete observations also increase the difficulty of identifying episodes of unrest that will lead to eruption. At Volcán de Colima, Mexico, the plumbing of the shallow conduit system caused detectable and characteristic volcano deformation during the days prior to the renewal of the volcanic activity in 2013, which was initiated by an explosion. Here we present a model of the shallow conduit system at Colima, based on pre-explosive summit deformation detected in high resolution satellite radar and camera observations. The radar data are interferometrically processed to provide displacement maps up to 7 hours before the explosion, and are synthetically well reproduced using a boundary element method. This allows constraining a complex, possibly curved ascent path, with at least two hydraulically connected pressurized regions at shallow levels beneath the dome. The locations of the sources coincide with the later path of magma ascent. Our results highlight the geometrical complexity of the shallow conduit system at Colima, which can condionally become detectable when being plumbed prior to explosive eruptions. The small temporal and spatial extent of the deformation signal may explain why many volcano eruptions occur without precursory deformation activity.

  7. Inverse Dipolar Magnetic Anomaly Over the Volcanic Cone Linked to Reverse Polarity Magnetizations in Lavas and Tuffs - Implications for the Conduit System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fucugauchi, J. U.; Perez-Cruz, L. L.; Trigo-Huesca, A.

    2012-12-01

    A combined magnetics and paleomagnetic study of Toluquilla monogenetic volcano and associated lavas and tuffs from Valsequillo basin in Central Mexico provides evidence on a magnetic link between lavas, ash tuffs and the underground volcanic conduit system. Paleomagnetic analyses show that lavas and ash tuffs carry reverse polarity magnetizations, which correlate with the inversely polarized dipolar magnetic anomaly over the volcano. The magnetizations in the lava and tuff show similar southward declinations and upward inclinations, supporting petrological inferences that the tuff was emplaced while still hot and indicating a temporal correlation for lava and tuff emplacement. Conduit geometry is one of the important controlling factors in eruptive dynamics of basaltic volcanoes. However volcanic conduits are often not, or only partly, exposed. Modeling of the dipolar anomaly gives a reverse polarity source magnetization associated with a vertical prismatic body with southward declination and upward inclination, which correlates with the reverse polarity magnetizations in the lava and tuff. The study documents a direct correlation of the paleomagnetic records with the underground magmatic conduit system of the monogenetic volcano. Time scale for cooling of the volcanic plumbing system involves a longer period than the one for the tuff and lava, suggesting that magnetization for the source of dipolar anomaly may represent a long time average as compared to the spot readings in the lava and tuff. The reverse polarity magnetizations in lava and tuff and in the underground source body for the magnetic anomaly are interpreted in terms of eruptive activity of Toluquilla volcano at about 1.3 Ma during the Matuyama reverse polarity C1r.2r chron.

  8. Physical nanoscale conduit-mediated communication between tumour cells and the endothelium modulates endothelial phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Connor, Yamicia; Tekleab, Sarah; Nandakumar, Shyama; Walls, Cherelle; Tekleab, Yonatan; Husain, Amjad; Gadish, Or; Sabbisetti, Venkata; Kaushik, Shelly; Sehrawat, Seema; Kulkarni, Ashish; Dvorak, Harold; Zetter, Bruce; R. Edelman, Elazer; Sengupta, Shiladitya

    2015-01-01

    Metastasis is a major cause of mortality and remains a hurdle in the search for a cure for cancer. Not much is known about metastatic cancer cells and endothelial cross-talk, which occurs at multiple stages during metastasis. Here we report a dynamic regulation of the endothelium by cancer cells through the formation of nanoscale intercellular membrane bridges, which act as physical conduits for transfer of microRNAs. The communication between the tumour cell and the endothelium upregulates markers associated with pathological endothelium, which is reversed by pharmacological inhibition of these nanoscale conduits. These results lead us to define the notion of ‘metastatic hijack': cancer cell-induced transformation of healthy endothelium into pathological endothelium via horizontal communication through the nanoscale conduits. Pharmacological perturbation of these nanoscale membrane bridges decreases metastatic foci in vivo. Targeting these nanoscale membrane bridges may potentially emerge as a new therapeutic opportunity in the management of metastatic cancer. PMID:26669454

  9. Impact of conduit geometry on the performance of typical particulate microchip packings.

    PubMed

    Jung, Stephanie; Höltzel, Alexandra; Ehlert, Steffen; Mora, Jose-Angel; Kraiczek, Karsten; Dittmann, Monika; Rozing, Gerard P; Tallarek, Ulrich

    2009-12-15

    This work investigates the impact of conduit geometry on the chromatographic performance of typical particulate microchip packings. For this purpose, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)/UV-microchips with separation channels of quadratic, trapezoidal, or Gaussian cross section were fabricated by direct laser ablation and lamination of multiple polyimide layers and then slurry-packed with either 3 or 5 microm spherical porous C8-silica particles under optimized packing conditions. Experimentally determined plate height curves for the empty microchannels are compared with dispersion coefficients from theoretical calculations. Packing densities and plate height curves for the various microchip packings are presented and conclusively explained. The 3 microm packings display a high packing density irrespective of their conduit geometries, and their performance reflects the dispersion behavior of the empty channels. Dispersion in 5 microm packings correlates with the achieved packing densities, which are limited by the number and accessibility of corners in a given conduit shape. PMID:19916548

  10. Descent of low-Bond-number liquid-metal diapirs with trailing conduits during core formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rains, C.; Weeraratne, D. S.

    2012-12-01

    Formation of the early Earth involved violent impacts and meteorite bombardment which partially or fully melted surface materials, facilitating separation of iron metal from silicates. Geochemical constraints on core formation times indicate that this liquid metal must have been transported to the center of the Earth within 30 Ma. Among the mechanisms that have been proposed, metal-silicate plumes resulting from Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities of a liquid-metal pond at the bottom of a magma ocean provide the fastest rates of delivery to the core. Recent studies have shown that these rapidly descending plumes develop trailing conduits that fill with the overlying melted silicate material. However, while large plumes descend quickly, they do not provide enough time or surface area for metal-silicate equilibration to be achieved throughout the mantle. Instead, small metal drops descending in the wake of larger diapirs or in conduits of their own making may have been crucial in the equilibration process that resulted in the excess siderophile mantle abundance. We investigate the instability and descent of liquid-metal drops through a highly viscous layer using three-component laboratory fluid experiments representing the Earth's proto-mantle (layer 2) covered by a magma ocean (layer 1), and a liquid iron pond (layer 3) initially resting at their interface. Silicate materials are represented by dehydrated (layer 2), or diluted (layer 1) glucose and salt solutions. Liquid gallium represents the iron metal phase. We scale our experiments to the Earth's mantle through the use of Bond numbers to characterize drops and diapirs, and a non-dimensional length scale λ, which we define as the ratio of radius to height, to characterize conduits. Previous laboratory work using liquid gallium has investigated high-Bond-number diapirs (B = 13 - 66) and conduits of λ ~ 0.2, analogous to large plumes in the Earth. Here, we focus on low Bond numbers (B ~ 4), and small λ ~ .05 to

  11. Program CICC flow and heat transfer in cable-in-conduit conductors

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, R.L. )

    1989-11-20

    Computer program CICC has been written for use in the thermo-fluids design of superconducting magnets for tokamak reactors, which use forced-flow, helium-cooled, cable-in-conduit conductors (CICC). In addition to background heat loads that vary with space and time, these superconductors can develop normal zones that generate electrical resistance heat. Program CICC models the transient thermodynamic and fluid-dynamic system response to background heating and normal-zone propagation in the superconductor. The computational algorithm described in this paper couples a one-dimensional, compressible pipe-flow model (including flow choking) with two-dimensional, axisymmetric heat-conduction models of the superconductor cable, the conduit, and the epoxy-conduit insulation. National Institute of Standards and Technology helium properties are used. The model is verified by comparison with measured temperature and pressure profiles from thermal expulsion experiments. 10 refs., 9 figs.

  12. Physical nanoscale conduit-mediated communication between tumour cells and the endothelium modulates endothelial phenotype.

    PubMed

    Connor, Yamicia; Tekleab, Sarah; Nandakumar, Shyama; Walls, Cherelle; Tekleab, Yonatan; Husain, Amjad; Gadish, Or; Sabbisetti, Venkata; Kaushik, Shelly; Sehrawat, Seema; Kulkarni, Ashish; Dvorak, Harold; Zetter, Bruce; R Edelman, Elazer; Sengupta, Shiladitya

    2015-01-01

    Metastasis is a major cause of mortality and remains a hurdle in the search for a cure for cancer. Not much is known about metastatic cancer cells and endothelial cross-talk, which occurs at multiple stages during metastasis. Here we report a dynamic regulation of the endothelium by cancer cells through the formation of nanoscale intercellular membrane bridges, which act as physical conduits for transfer of microRNAs. The communication between the tumour cell and the endothelium upregulates markers associated with pathological endothelium, which is reversed by pharmacological inhibition of these nanoscale conduits. These results lead us to define the notion of 'metastatic hijack': cancer cell-induced transformation of healthy endothelium into pathological endothelium via horizontal communication through the nanoscale conduits. Pharmacological perturbation of these nanoscale membrane bridges decreases metastatic foci in vivo. Targeting these nanoscale membrane bridges may potentially emerge as a new therapeutic opportunity in the management of metastatic cancer. PMID:26669454

  13. Bridging peripheral nerves using a deacetyl chitin conduit combined with short-term electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhongli; Li, Xin; Zuo, Songjie; Xin, Jie; Zhang, Peixun

    2014-05-15

    Previous studies have demonstrated that deacetyl chitin conduit nerve bridging or electrical stimulation can effectively promote the regeneration of the injured peripheral nerve. We hypothesized that the combination of these two approaches could result in enhanced regeneration. Rats with right sciatic nerve injury were subjected to deacetyl chitin conduit bridging combined with electrical stimulation (0.1 ms, 3 V, 20 Hz, for 1 hour). At 6 and 12 weeks after treatment, nerve conduction velocity, myelinated axon number, fiber diameter, axon diameter and the thickness of the myelin sheath in the stimulation group were better than in the non-stimulation group. The results indicate that deacetyl chitin conduit bridging combined with temporary electrical stimulation can promote peripheral nerve repair. PMID:25206762

  14. Experimental composite guidance conduits for peripheral nerve repair: an evaluation of ion release.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X F; Coughlan, A; O'Shea, H; Towler, M R; Kehoe, S; Boyd, D

    2012-08-01

    Poly (lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) - Pluronic F127 - glass composites have demonstrated excellent potential, from the perspective of controlled mechanical properties and cytocompatibility, for peripheral nerve regeneration. In addition to controlling the mechanical properties and cytotoxicity for such composite devices, the glass component may mediate specific responses upon implantation via degradation in the physiological environment and release of constituent elements. However, research focused on quantifying the release levels of such therapeutic ions from these experimental medical devices has been limited. To redress the balance, this paper explores the ion release profiles for Si(4+), Ca(2+), Na(+), Zn(2+), and Ce(4+) from experimental composite nerve guidance conduits (CNGC) comprising PLGA (at 12.5, and 20 wt.%), F127 (at 0, 2.5 and 5 wt.%) and various loadings of Si-Ca-Na-Zn-Ce glass (at 20 and 40 wt.%) for incubation periods of up to 28 days. The concentration of each ion, at various time points, was determined using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry (Perkin Elmer Optima 3000). It was observed that the Si(4+), Na(+), Ca(2+), Zn(2+) release from CNGCs in this study ranged from 0.22 to 6.477 ppm, 2.307 to 3.277 ppm, 40 to 119 ppm, and 45 to 51 ppm, respectively. The Ce(4+) concentrations were under the minimum detection limits for the ICP instrument utilized. The results indicate that the ion release levels may be appropriate to mediate therapeutic effects with respect to peripheral nerve regeneration. The data generated in this paper provides requisite evidence to optimize composition for pre-clinical evaluation of the experimental composite. PMID:24364973

  15. Ascent and decompression of viscous vesicular magma in a volcanic conduit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massol, HéLèNe; Jaupart, Claude; Pepper, Darrell W.

    2001-01-01

    During eruption, lava domes and flows may become unstable and generate dangerous explosions. Fossil lava-filled eruption conduits and ancient lava flows are often characterized by complex internal variations of gas content. These observations indicate a need for accurate predictions of the distribution of gas content and bubble pressure in an eruption conduit. Bubbly magma behaves as a compressible viscous liquid involving three different pressures: those of the gas and magma phases, and that of the exterior. To solve for these three different pressures, one must account for expansion in all directions and hence for both horizontal and vertical velocity components. We present a new two-dimensional finite element numerical code to solve for the flow of bubbly magma. Even with small dissolved water concentrations, gas overpressures may reach values larger than 1 MPa at a volcanic vent. For constant viscosity the magnitude of gas overpressure does not depend on magma viscosity and increases with the conduit radius and magma chamber pressure. In the conduit and at the vent, there are large horizontal variations of gas pressure and hence of exsolved water content. Such variations depend on decompression rate and are sensitive to the "exit" boundary conditions for the flow. For zero horizontal shear stress at the vent, relevant to lava flows spreading horizontally at the surface, the largest gas overpressures, and hence the smallest exsolved gas contents, are achieved at the conduit walls. For zero horizontal velocity at the vent, corresponding to a plug-like eruption through a preexisting lava dome or to spine growth, gas overpressures are largest at the center of the vent. The magnitude of gas overpressure is sensitive to changes of magma viscosity induced by degassing and to shallow expansion conditions in conduits with depth-dependent radii.

  16. Radical resection of the superior vena cava using the Contegra bovine jugular vein conduit.

    PubMed

    Belcher, Elizabeth; Dusmet, Michael; Petrou, Mario

    2010-02-01

    Radical resection of the superior vena cava poses a challenge for the cardiothoracic surgeon. The Contegra graft (Medtronic Inc, Minneapolis, MN), a biologic conduit comprising the valved segment of the bovine jugular vein, is established as a right ventricular to pulmonary artery conduit for right ventricular outflow tract repair in the pediatric population. We describe the use of the Contegra graft to facilitate radical resection and reconstruction of the superior vena cava in 2 patients, with demonstrable patency of grafts at 12 months and 7 months postoperatively. PMID:20103366

  17. Havery Mudd 2014-2015 Computer Science Conduit Clinic Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Aspesi, G; Bai, J; Deese, R; Shin, L

    2015-05-12

    Conduit, a new open-source library developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories, provides a C++ application programming interface (API) to describe and access scientific data. Conduit’s primary use is for inmemory data exchange in high performance computing (HPC) applications. Our team tested and improved Conduit to make it more appealing to potential adopters in the HPC community. We extended Conduit’s capabilities by prototyping four libraries: one for parallel communication using MPI, one for I/O functionality, one for aggregating performance data, and one for data visualization.

  18. Pressure distribution along the AGS vacuum chambers with new types of pump out conduits

    SciTech Connect

    Nayak, S.; Mapes, M.; Smart, L.; Weiss, D.

    2015-10-28

    The AGS HEBT and ring vacuum system is monitored by the discharge current of the magnet ion pumps, which is proportional to the pressure at the inlet port of these ion pumps. The discharge current is measured and suitably calibrated to indicate the ion pump pressure. In order to calculate the vacuum chamber pressure from the ion pump pressure, a detailed analysis is essential to compute their difference in different scenarios. Such analysis has been carried out numerically in the past for the system with the older type of pump out conduits, and similar analysis using FEM in ANSYS is presented in this paper with the newer type of pump out conduit.

  19. Wave Propagation in Axi-Symmetrical Magmatic Conduits Due to an Internal Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Negri, R. S.; Sanchez-Sesma, F. J.; Arciniega-Ceballos, A.

    2014-12-01

    The classical Trefftz's method is implemented to simulate wave propagation in and around axi-symmetrical magmatic conduits. In this fluid-solid system the fluid (magma) is confined by an elastic unbounded medium that represents the surrounding rock. Our aim is to associate wave behavior with mechanical and geometrical conduit characteristics. The source is assumed to be at a point along the conduit centered axis medium are constructed in both cases as linear combinations of particular solutions.Within the fluid such solutions are spherical standing waves that are smooth at the origins. In the elastic solid region the field is constructed with monopoles and dipoles for the P waves and spheroidal dipoles for SV waves. The particular solutions satisfy the elastodynamic equations that govern the wave motion at those media and are associated to origins (selected points) distributed along the conduit axis. For the surrounding rock the solutions are sources that satisfy Sommerfeld's radiation condition. These sets of solutions are assumed to be complete. This conjecture is exact in 2D acoustic problems. The conduit can be closed or open at the ends and the surrounding elastic domain is unbounded. In order to find the coefficients of Trefftz's wave expansions, boundary conditions at the fluid-solid interface (null shear and continuity of pressures and normal velocities) are satisfied in the least squares sense. The solution is obtained in the frequency domain and the source time function can be introduced using Fourier analysis.Regardless the low order of the formulation our results display a rich variety of behaviors. For a uniform infinite cylinder we reproduced the exact analytical solution. In addition, this approach allows identifying some important effects of the conduit geometry, including changes of sections. Lateral and longitudinal resonances of irregular axi-symmetric conduits are well resolved. The stiffness of the solid domain with respect to the fluid

  20. Biological conduits combining bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and extracellular matrix to treat long-segment sciatic nerve defects

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Li, Zheng-wei; Luo, Min; Li, Ya-jun; Zhang, Ke-qiang

    2015-01-01

    The transplantation of polylactic glycolic acid conduits combining bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and extracellular matrix gel for the repair of sciatic nerve injury is effective in some respects, but few data comparing the biomechanical factors related to the sciatic nerve are available. In the present study, rabbit models of 10-mm sciatic nerve defects were prepared. The rabbit models were repaired with autologous nerve, a polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, or a polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells + extracellular matrix gel. After 24 weeks, mechanical testing was performed to determine the stress relaxation and creep parameters. Following sciatic nerve injury, the magnitudes of the stress decrease and strain increase at 7,200 seconds were largest in the polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells + extracellular matrix gel group, followed by the polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells group, and then the autologous nerve group. Hematoxylin-eosin staining demonstrated that compared with the polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells group and the autologous nerve group, a more complete sciatic nerve regeneration was found, including good myelination, regularly arranged nerve fibers, and a completely degraded and resorbed conduit, in the polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells + extracellular matrix gel group. These results indicate that bridging 10-mm sciatic nerve defects with a polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells + extracellular matrix gel construct increases the stress relaxation under a constant strain, reducing anastomotic tension. Large elongations under a constant physiological load can limit the anastomotic opening and shift, which is beneficial for the regeneration and functional reconstruction of sciatic nerve. Better regeneration was

  1. Hydraulic balancing of a control component within a nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Marinos, D.; Ripfel, H.C.F.

    1975-10-14

    A reactor control component includes an inner conduit, for instance containing neutron absorber elements, adapted for longitudinal movement within an outer guide duct. A transverse partition partially encloses one end of the conduit and meets a transverse wall within the guide duct when the conduit is fully inserted into the reactor core. A tube piece extends from the transverse partition and is coaxially aligned to be received within a tubular receptacle which extends from the transverse wall. The tube piece and receptacle cooperate in engagement to restrict the flow and pressure of coolant beneath the transverse partition and thereby minimize upward forces tending to expel the inner conduit.

  2. The evolution of periodic seismicity, waveform similarity, and conduit processes during unrest episodes at Tungurahua volcano, Ecuador, in 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Andrew; Hernandez, Stephen; Gaunt, Elizabeth; Mothes, Patricia; Hidalgo, Silvana; Ruiz, Mario

    2016-04-01

    November with juvenile magma was quickly followed by a resumption of periodic low-frequency seismicity. The changes in the seismicity of Tungurahua in 2015 suggest a significant change in the magma-conduit system. Elevated periodicity may indicate the presence of a slowly upward moving plug at a depth of 1-2km below the summit crater, likely associated with the unusually long repose period since the last major vulcanian episode in October 2014. Evolution in the periodicity and type of seismic signals within and between unrest episodes will be controlled by a combination of the gas flux and permeability, and a balance between thermo-mechanical plug degradation and time-dependent healing processes. These factors are also likely to determine the nature of future eruptive activity.

  3. 26 CFR 1.6081-7 - Automatic extension of time to file Real Estate Mortgage Investment Conduit (REMIC) income tax...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Automatic extension of time to file Real Estate... Time for Filing Returns § 1.6081-7 Automatic extension of time to file Real Estate Mortgage Investment Conduit (REMIC) income tax return. (a) In general. A Real Estate Mortgage Investment Conduit...

  4. 17β-Estradiol Attenuates Conduit Pulmonary Artery Mechanical Property Changes With Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Liu, Aiping; Tian, Lian; Golob, Mark; Eickhoff, Jens C; Boston, Madison; Chesler, Naomi C

    2015-11-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), a rapidly fatal vascular disease, strikes women more often than men. Paradoxically, female PAH patients have better prognosis and survival rates than males. The female sex hormone 17β-estradiol has been linked to the better outcome of PAH in females; however, the mechanisms by which 17β-estradiol alters PAH progression and outcomes remain unclear. Because proximal pulmonary arterial (PA) stiffness, one hallmark of PAH, is a powerful predictor of mortality and morbidity, we hypothesized that 17β-estradiol attenuates PAH-induced changes in mechanical properties in conduit proximal PAs, which imparts hemodynamic and energetic benefits to right ventricular function. To test this hypothesis, female mice were ovariectomized and treated with 17β-estradiol or placebo. PAH was induced in mice using SU5416 and chronic hypoxia. Extra-lobar left PAs were isolated and mechanically tested ex vivo to study both static and frequency-dependent mechanical behaviors in the presence or absence of smooth muscle cell activation. Our static mechanical test showed significant stiffening of large PAs with PAH (P<0.05). 17β-Estradiol restored PA compliance to control levels. The dynamic mechanical test demonstrated that 17β-estradiol protected the arterial wall from the PAH-induced frequency-dependent decline in dynamic stiffness and loss of viscosity with PAH (P<0.05). As demonstrated by the in vivo measurement of PA hemodynamics via right ventricular catheterization, modulation by 17β-estradiol of mechanical proximal PAs reduced pulsatile loading, which contributed to improved ventricular-vascular coupling. This study provides a mechanical mechanism for delayed disease progression and better outcome in female PAH patients and underscores the therapeutic potential of 17β-estradiol in PAH. PMID:26418020

  5. Modified technique for heterotopic implantation of a right ventricular outflow tract conduit.

    PubMed

    Dave, Hitendu; Dodge-Khatami, Ali; Kadner, Alexander; Prêtre, René

    2006-06-01

    This article describes a modified technique of side-to-side proximal connection of a conduit during heterotopic implantation in the right ventricular outflow tract. It results in a better geometry of the right ventricular outflow and avoids distortion of the valve annulus, especially when the newer generation of straight xenografts are used. PMID:16731190

  6. Coxiella burnetii infection of a bovine jugular vein conduit in a child.

    PubMed

    Tasher, Diana; Stein, Michal; Raucher-Sternfeld, Alona; Somekh, Eli

    2012-06-01

    We report a case of an 11-year-old girl with Coxiella burnetii infection of a bovine jugular vein conduit which is an extremely rare manifestation of Q fever. The role of surgery in the management of C. burnetii endovascular infection and the use of serology are discussed. PMID:22349674

  7. A new RV-PA conduit with a natural valve made of bovine jugular vein.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Y

    1992-01-01

    A new RV-PA conduit with a natural valve was developed using bovine jugular vein. To maintain the natural, mechanical properties of the veins, a hydrophilic cross-linking reagent, a glycerol polyglycidyl ether polyepoxy compound (PC) was used. The treatment has already been proven in the field of vascular grafts to be able to reduce antigenicity, biodegradability, and degenerative changes such as calcification, to induce antithrombogenicity with hydrogenicity, and to improve affinity to host cells. Bovine jugular veins were cross-linked with the reagent and were implanted as a conduit into the RV-PA position in six dogs. The main PA was ligated after implantation. One animal died due to bleeding 2 days after implantation; the other animals were healthy and allowed to survive until they were sacrificed. The graft was very soft and as pliable as native tissue, and was as strong as a heart valve. Post-operative catheterization and angiography showed adequate function of the valve. Macroscopic and microscopic observations revealed the antithrombogenicity of the graft in this animal study. These results indicated that this newly developed biologic valved conduit has a high probability of overcoming many problems observed in existing RV-PA conduits. PMID:1457862

  8. 26 CFR 1.67-3 - Allocation of expenses by real estate mortgage investment conduits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Allocation of expenses by real estate mortgage investment conduits. 1.67-3 Section 1.67-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Gross Income, and Taxable Income § 1.67-3 Allocation of expenses by real estate mortgage...

  9. 76 FR 53678 - Calleguas Municipal Water District Notice of Surrender of Exemption (Conduit)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-29

    ... Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Calleguas Municipal Water District Notice of Surrender of Exemption (Conduit) Pursuant to section 4.95(a) of the Commission's regulations,\\1\\ Calleguas Municipal Water... exemption for Project No. 11651 on June 7, 1999. Calleguas Municipal Water District, 87 FERC ] 62,256...

  10. Comparison of divided sciatic nerve growth within dermis, venous and nerve graft conduit in rat

    PubMed Central

    Fatemi, Mohammad Javad; Foroutan, Kamal Seyed; Ashtiani, Abass Kazemi; Mansoori, Maryam Jafari; Vaghardoost, Reza; Pedram, Sepehr; Hosseinpolli, Aidin; Rajabi, Fatemeh; Mousavi, Seyed Jaber

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Considering the common origin of skin and peripheral nervous system, a tube of dermal layer of skin hypothetically can be an ideal conduit for nerve reconstruction. An experimental study performed to evaluate the nerve regeneration of efficacy into a dermal tube. METHODS: Sixty male Wistar rats were used. A 10 mm gap was produced in right sciatic nerves. In group A the autogenous nerve grafts were used to bridge the defects. In group B vein conduit were use to reconstruct the gaps. In group C dermal tube were used to bridge the defects. Morphologic studies were carried out after 3 month. RESULTS: The density of nerve fibers was significantly higher in autogenous nerve graft group. The efficacy of nerve growth into the dermal tube group was significantly poor in comparison to other groups. CONCLUSIONS: In the present study, dermis was used as the nerve conduit for the first time. This study indicates that the dermal tube is not a suitable conduit for nerve regeneration till further studies to resolve the problems before clinical application. PMID:21526083

  11. 26 CFR 1.67-3 - Allocation of expenses by real estate mortgage investment conduits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Allocation of expenses by real estate mortgage investment conduits. 1.67-3 Section 1.67-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Gross Income, and Taxable Income § 1.67-3 Allocation of expenses by real estate mortgage...

  12. 26 CFR 1.67-3 - Allocation of expenses by real estate mortgage investment conduits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Allocation of expenses by real estate mortgage investment conduits. 1.67-3 Section 1.67-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Gross Income, and Taxable Income § 1.67-3 Allocation of expenses by real estate mortgage...

  13. 26 CFR 1.67-3 - Allocation of expenses by real estate mortgage investment conduits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Allocation of expenses by real estate mortgage investment conduits. 1.67-3 Section 1.67-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Gross Income, and Taxable Income § 1.67-3 Allocation of expenses by real estate mortgage...

  14. 78 FR 61958 - San Juan County Historical Society; Notice of Preliminary Determination of A Qualifying Conduit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-08

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission San Juan County Historical Society; Notice of Preliminary Determination of A..., San Juan County Historical Society filed a notice of intent to construct a qualifying conduit... Historical Society, P.O. Box 154, Silverton, CO 81433, Phone No. (970) 387-5488. FERC Contact: Robert...

  15. Language as Fluid: A Description of the Conduit Metaphor in Japanese.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nomura, Masuhiro

    1993-01-01

    The question of how 'communication' is metaphorized in Japanese is examined and this metaphorization is contrasted with Reddy's (1979) conduit metaphor. A claim is made that there is a strong tendency for Japanese to conceptualize 'word' as 'fluid' and to fuse 'word' and 'meaning.' English, which unlike Japanese, has overt count/mass and…

  16. 26 CFR 1.67-3 - Allocation of expenses by real estate mortgage investment conduits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Allocation of expenses by real estate mortgage investment conduits. 1.67-3 Section 1.67-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Gross Income, and Taxable Income § 1.67-3 Allocation of expenses by real estate mortgage...

  17. 78 FR 62324 - Village of Oak Lawn, Illinois; Notice of Preliminary Determination of a Qualifying Conduit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-16

    ... Qualifying Conduit Hydropower Facility and Soliciting Comments and Motions To Intervene On September 30, 2013... hydropower facility, pursuant to section 30 of the Federal Power Act, as amended by section 4 of the Hydropower Regulatory Efficiency Act of 2013 (HREA). The 250 kW Charles J. Reich Pumping Storage...

  18. Jean Vigo's "Zéro De Conduite" and the Spaces of Revolt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanobbergen, Bruno; Grosvenor, Ian; Simon, Frank

    2014-01-01

    In this article we will contribute to the contemporary theoretical debate about film by considering, from a history-of-education perspective, the film "Zéro de conduite" by Jean Vigo (1905--1934). This film is classified under the umbrella of "poetic realism": a product of "cinéma de gauche" and an avant-gardist,…

  19. A New Equation Solver for Modeling Turbulent Flow in Coupled Matrix-Conduit Flow Models.

    PubMed

    Hubinger, Bernhard; Birk, Steffen; Hergarten, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    Karst aquifers represent dual flow systems consisting of a highly conductive conduit system embedded in a less permeable rock matrix. Hybrid models iteratively coupling both flow systems generally consume much time, especially because of the nonlinearity of turbulent conduit flow. To reduce calculation times compared to those of existing approaches, a new iterative equation solver for the conduit system is developed based on an approximated Newton-Raphson expression and a Gauß-Seidel or successive over-relaxation scheme with a single iteration step at the innermost level. It is implemented and tested in the research code CAVE but should be easily adaptable to similar models such as the Conduit Flow Process for MODFLOW-2005. It substantially reduces the computational effort as demonstrated by steady-state benchmark scenarios as well as by transient karst genesis simulations. Water balance errors are found to be acceptable in most of the test cases. However, the performance and accuracy may deteriorate under unfavorable conditions such as sudden, strong changes of the flow field at some stages of the karst genesis simulations. PMID:26821785

  20. Modifications to the Conduit Flow Process Mode 2 for MODFLOW-2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reimann, T.; Birk, S.; Rehrl, C.; Shoemaker, W.B.

    2012-01-01

    As a result of rock dissolution processes, karst aquifers exhibit highly conductive features such as caves and conduits. Within these structures, groundwater flow can become turbulent and therefore be described by nonlinear gradient functions. Some numerical groundwater flow models explicitly account for pipe hydraulics by coupling the continuum model with a pipe network that represents the conduit system. In contrast, the Conduit Flow Process Mode 2 (CFPM2) for MODFLOW-2005 approximates turbulent flow by reducing the hydraulic conductivity within the existing linear head gradient of the MODFLOW continuum model. This approach reduces the practical as well as numerical efforts for simulating turbulence. The original formulation was for large pore aquifers where the onset of turbulence is at low Reynolds numbers (1 to 100) and not for conduits or pipes. In addition, the existing code requires multiple time steps for convergence due to iterative adjustment of the hydraulic conductivity. Modifications to the existing CFPM2 were made by implementing a generalized power function with a user-defined exponent. This allows for matching turbulence in porous media or pipes and eliminates the time steps required for iterative adjustment of hydraulic conductivity. The modified CFPM2 successfully replicated simple benchmark test problems. ?? 2011 The Author(s). Ground Water ?? 2011, National Ground Water Association.

  1. Modifications to the Conduit Flow Process Mode 2 for MODFLOW-2005.

    PubMed

    Reimann, Thomas; Birk, Steffen; Rehrl, Christoph; Shoemaker, W Barclay

    2012-01-01

    As a result of rock dissolution processes, karst aquifers exhibit highly conductive features such as caves and conduits. Within these structures, groundwater flow can become turbulent and therefore be described by nonlinear gradient functions. Some numerical groundwater flow models explicitly account for pipe hydraulics by coupling the continuum model with a pipe network that represents the conduit system. In contrast, the Conduit Flow Process Mode 2 (CFPM2) for MODFLOW-2005 approximates turbulent flow by reducing the hydraulic conductivity within the existing linear head gradient of the MODFLOW continuum model. This approach reduces the practical as well as numerical efforts for simulating turbulence. The original formulation was for large pore aquifers where the onset of turbulence is at low Reynolds numbers (1 to 100) and not for conduits or pipes. In addition, the existing code requires multiple time steps for convergence due to iterative adjustment of the hydraulic conductivity. Modifications to the existing CFPM2 were made by implementing a generalized power function with a user-defined exponent. This allows for matching turbulence in porous media or pipes and eliminates the time steps required for iterative adjustment of hydraulic conductivity. The modified CFPM2 successfully replicated simple benchmark test problems. PMID:21371024

  2. Novel use of biodegradable casein conduits for guided peripheral nerve regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Hsiang, Shih-Wei; Tsai, Chin-Chuan; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Ho, Tin-Yun; Yao, Chun-Hsu; Chen, Yueh-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in nerve repair technology have focused on finding more biocompatible, non-toxic materials to imitate natural peripheral nerve components. In this study, casein protein cross-linked with naturally occurring genipin (genipin-cross-linked casein (GCC)) was used for the first time to make a biodegradable conduit for peripheral nerve repair. The GCC conduit was dark blue in appearance with a concentric and round lumen. Water uptake, contact angle and mechanical tests indicated that the conduit had a high stability in water and did not collapse and cramped with a sufficiently high level of mechanical properties. Cytotoxic testing and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labelling assay showed that the GCC was non-toxic and non-apoptotic, which could maintain the survival and outgrowth of Schwann cells. Non-invasive real-time nuclear factor-κB bioluminescence imaging accompanied by histochemical assessment showed that the GCC was highly biocompatible after subcutaneous implantation in transgenic mice. Effectiveness of the GCC conduit as a guidance channel was examined as it was used to repair a 10 mm gap in the rat sciatic nerve. Electrophysiology, labelling of calcitonin gene-related peptide in the lumbar spinal cord, and histology analysis all showed a rapid morphological and functional recovery for the disrupted nerves. Therefore, we conclude that the GCC can offer great nerve regeneration characteristics and can be a promising material for the successful repair of peripheral nerve defects. PMID:21525148

  3. Nanofibrous nerve conduits for repair of 30-mm-long sciatic nerve defects

    PubMed Central

    Biazar, Esmaeil; Keshel, Saeed Heidari; Pouya, Majid; Rad, Hadi; Nava, Melody Omrani; Azarbakhsh, Mohammad; Hooshmand, Shirin

    2013-01-01

    It has been confirmed that nanofibrous poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) nerve conduit can promote peripheral nerve regeneration in rats. However, its efficiency in repair of over 30-mm-long sciatic nerve defects needs to be assessed. In this study, we used a nanofibrous poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) nerve conduit to bridge a 30-mm-long gap in the rat sciatic nerve. At 4 months after nerve conduit implantation, regenerated nerves were cally observed and histologically assessed. In the nanofibrous graft, the rat sciatic nerve trunk had been reconstructed by restoration of nerve continuity and formation of myelinated nerve fiber. There were Schwann cells and glial cells in the regenerated nerves. Masson's trichrome staining showed that there were no pathological changes in the size and structure of gastrocnemius muscle cells on the operated side of rats. These findings suggest that nanofibrous poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) nerve conduit is suitable for repair of long-segment sciatic nerve defects. PMID:25206536

  4. 78 FR 61987 - Corbett Water District; Notice of Preliminary Determination of a Qualifying Conduit Hydropower...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Corbett Water District; Notice of Preliminary Determination of a Qualifying Conduit Hydropower Facility and Soliciting Comments and Motions To Intervene On September 23, 2013, Corbett Water District filed a notice...

  5. 30 CFR 77.700 - Grounding metallic sheaths, armors, and conduits enclosing power conductors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Grounding metallic sheaths, armors, and conduits enclosing power conductors. 77.700 Section 77.700 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH... AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Grounding § 77.700 Grounding metallic sheaths,...

  6. 30 CFR 77.700 - Grounding metallic sheaths, armors, and conduits enclosing power conductors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Grounding metallic sheaths, armors, and conduits enclosing power conductors. 77.700 Section 77.700 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH... AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Grounding § 77.700 Grounding metallic sheaths,...

  7. Nerve growth factor released from a novel PLGA nerve conduit can improve axon growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Keng-Min; Shea, Jill; Gale, Bruce K.; Sant, Himanshu; Larrabee, Patti; Agarwal, Jay

    2016-04-01

    Nerve injury can occur due to penetrating wounds, compression, traumatic stretch, and cold exposure. Despite prompt repair, outcomes are dismal. In an attempt to help resolve this challenge, in this work, a poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) nerve conduit with associated biodegradable drug reservoir was designed, fabricated, and tested. Unlike current nerve conduits, this device is capable of fitting various clinical scenarios by delivering different drugs without reengineering the whole system. To demonstrate the potential of this device for nerve repair, a series of experiments were performed using nerve growth factor (NGF). First, an NGF dosage curve was developed to determine the minimum NGF concentration for optimal axonal outgrowth on chick dorsal root ganglia (DRG) cells. Next, PLGA devices loaded with NGF were evaluated for sustained drug release and axon growth enhancement with the released drug. A 20 d in vitro release test was conducted and the nerve conduit showed the ability to meet and maintain the minimum NGF requirement determined previously. Bioactivity assays of the released NGF showed that drug released from the device between the 15th and 20th day could still promote axon growth (76.6-95.7 μm) in chick DRG cells, which is in the range of maximum growth. These novel drug delivery conduits show the ability to deliver NGF at a dosage that efficiently promotes ex vivo axon growth and have the potential for in vivo application to help bridge peripheral nerve gaps.

  8. Transient and asymptotic dispersion in confined sphere packings with cylindrical and non-cylindrical conduit geometries.

    PubMed

    Khirevich, Siarhei; Höltzel, Alexandra; Tallarek, Ulrich

    2011-06-28

    We study the time and length scales of hydrodynamic dispersion in confined monodisperse sphere packings as a function of the conduit geometry. By a modified Jodrey-Tory algorithm, we generated packings at a bed porosity (interstitial void fraction) of ε=0.40 in conduits with circular, rectangular, or semicircular cross section of area 100πd(p)(2) (where d(p) is the sphere diameter) and dimensions of about 20d(p) (cylinder diameter) by 6553.6d(p) (length), 25d(p) by 12.5d(p) (rectangle sides) by 8192d(p) or 14.1d(p) (radius of semicircle) by 8192d(p), respectively. The fluid-flow velocity field in the generated packings was calculated by the lattice Boltzmann method for Péclet numbers of up to 500, and convective-diffusive mass transport of 4×10(6) inert tracers was modelled with a random-walk particle-tracking technique. We present lateral porosity and velocity distributions for all packings and monitor the time evolution of longitudinal dispersion up to the asymptotic (long-time) limit. The characteristic length scales for asymptotic behaviour are explained from the symmetry of each conduit's velocity field. Finally, we quantify the influence of the confinement and of a specific conduit geometry on the velocity dependence of the asymptotic dispersion coefficients. PMID:21576163

  9. The Conduit and Whirlpooling: A New Theory of Knowledge Constitution and Dispersion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nzegwu, Azuka

    2010-01-01

    There is a new epistemological approach for exploring knowledge constitution and dispersal in a dynamic Web ecosystem. The approach has three pivots. The first presents virtual whirlpools as knowledge systems. The second introduces the creator of the system as the Conduit. The third formulates a theory of knowledge that involves the collective…

  10. A Simplified 1-D Model for Calculating CO2 Leakage through Conduits

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Oldenburg, C.M.

    2011-02-15

    In geological CO{sub 2} storage projects, a cap rock is generally needed to prevent CO{sub 2} from leaking out of the storage formation. However, the injected CO{sub 2} may still encounter some discrete flow paths such as a conductive well or fault (here referred to as conduits) through the cap rock allowing escape of CO{sub 2} from the storage formation. As CO{sub 2} migrates upward, it may migrate into the surrounding formations. The amount of mass that is lost to the formation is called attenuation. This report describes a simplified model to calculate the CO{sub 2} mass flux at different locations of the conduit and the amount of attenuation to the surrounding formations. From the comparison among the three model results, we can conclude that the steady-state conduit model (SSCM) provides a more accurate solution than the PMC at a given discretization. When there is not a large difference between the permeability of the surrounding formation and the permeability of the conduits, and there is leak-off at the bottom formation (the formation immediately above the CO{sub 2} plume), a fine discretization is needed for an accurate solution. Based on this comparison, we propose to use the SSCM in the rapid prototype for now given it does not produce spurious oscillations, and is already in FORTRAN and therefore can be easily made into a dll for use in GoldSim.

  11. Percutaneous Transthoracic Computed Tomography-Guided AICD Insertion in a Patient with Extracardiac Fontan Conduit

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Darra T. Moynagh, Michael R.; Walsh, Kevin P.; Noelke, Lars; Murray, John G.

    2011-02-15

    Percutaneous pulmonary venous atrial puncture was performed under computed tomography guidance to successfully place an automated implantable cardiac defibrillator into a 26-year-old patient with extracardiac Fontan conduit who had presented with two out-of-hospital cardiac arrests. The procedure avoided the need for lead placement at thoracotomy.

  12. 3D bioprinting of heterogeneous aortic valve conduits with alginate/gelatin hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Duan, Bin; Hockaday, Laura A; Kang, Kevin H; Butcher, Jonathan T

    2013-05-01

    Heart valve disease is a serious and growing public health problem for which prosthetic replacement is most commonly indicated. Current prosthetic devices are inadequate for younger adults and growing children. Tissue engineered living aortic valve conduits have potential for remodeling, regeneration, and growth, but fabricating natural anatomical complexity with cellular heterogeneity remain challenging. In the current study, we implement 3D bioprinting to fabricate living alginate/gelatin hydrogel valve conduits with anatomical architecture and direct incorporation of dual cell types in a regionally constrained manner. Encapsulated aortic root sinus smooth muscle cells (SMC) and aortic valve leaflet interstitial cells (VIC) were viable within alginate/gelatin hydrogel discs over 7 days in culture. Acellular 3D printed hydrogels exhibited reduced modulus, ultimate strength, and peak strain reducing slightly over 7-day culture, while the tensile biomechanics of cell-laden hydrogels were maintained. Aortic valve conduits were successfully bioprinted with direct encapsulation of SMC in the valve root and VIC in the leaflets. Both cell types were viable (81.4 ± 3.4% for SMC and 83.2 ± 4.0% for VIC) within 3D printed tissues. Encapsulated SMC expressed elevated alpha-smooth muscle actin, while VIC expressed elevated vimentin. These results demonstrate that anatomically complex, heterogeneously encapsulated aortic valve hydrogel conduits can be fabricated with 3D bioprinting. PMID:23015540

  13. 78 FR 69662 - Browns Valley Irrigation District; Notice of Preliminary Determination of a Qualifying Conduit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-20

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Browns Valley Irrigation District; Notice of Preliminary Determination of a..., Browns Valley Irrigation District (BVID) filed a notice of intent to construct a qualifying conduit... to Tennessee Creek for downstream irrigation purposes. The project would be located in Yuba...

  14. 78 FR 62351 - North Side Canal Company; Notice of Preliminary Determination of a Qualifying Conduit Hydropower...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission North Side Canal Company; Notice of Preliminary Determination of a Qualifying Conduit Hydropower Facility and Soliciting Comments and Motions To Intervene On October 3, 2013, North Side Canal Company, filed a notice...

  15. ETR, TRA642. BEFORE BASEMENT FLOOR IS PLACED, WORKERS LAY CONDUIT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ETR, TRA-642. BEFORE BASEMENT FLOOR IS PLACED, WORKERS LAY CONDUIT RUNS THAT WILL LIE BELOW IT. INL NEGATIVE NO. 56-541. Jack L. Anderson, Photographer, 2/15/1956 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  16. 26 CFR 1.881-4 - Recordkeeping requirements concerning conduit financing arrangements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... financing arrangements. 1.881-4 Section 1.881-4 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... requirements concerning conduit financing arrangements. (a) Scope. This section provides rules for the maintenance of records concerning certain financing arrangements to which the provisions of § 1.881-3...

  17. Rheology contrast in the shallow conduit and eruption dynamics at Stromboli: insights from analogue experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capponi, Antonio; Lane, Stephen J.; James, Mike R.

    2014-05-01

    Strombolian eruptions result from the bursting of large individual gas pockets (slugs) in a low-viscosity magma. Scaled experimental investigations of the processes involved have generally been carried out in single Newtonian liquids, and have explored the dynamics of slug expansion, burst and their control on the generation of geophysical signals. Such studies provide a thorough first order investigation of the mechanisms involved, but little attention has been given so far to the processes of slug expansion and burst in more complex fluids. Observations at Stromboli show that obstructions in the conduit (due to, e.g., partial wall collapse or fall back in the vent of ejecta) can generate a viscous impedance within the upper portion of magma, leading to more violent eruptions. Petrological and textural data also suggest the presence of different magma rheologies due to degassing driven crystallisation. Here we use laboratory experiments to investigate the role of a vertical contrast in magma rheology on the dynamics of slug expansion and burst, and the resulting geophysical signals. The analogue materials used are silicon oil (μ = 0.1 Pa*s) capped with castor oil (μ = 1 Pa*s) to give a viscosity contrast of 10. Vertical pressure gradient is scaled by reducing the pressure at the top of the experimental apparatus with a vacuum pump. Pressure variations are measured at the top and bottom of the apparatus and correlated with high-speed imagery of the experiments and the results compared with control experiments using single liquid. The thickness of the viscous plug was varied along with the gas volumes and the gas pressure at the liquid surface (1 kPa, 3 kPa and 300 Pa). Our results show that the thickness of the viscous plug strongly controls slug expansion and systematically changes the magnitude of the associated pressure transients, favouring a more impulsive and energetic pressure release compared with the control experiments. The intrusion of slugs in the

  18. [Estimation of asbestos exposure among workers repairing asbestos cement pipes used for conduits].

    PubMed

    Kumagai, S; Nakachi, S; Kurumatani, N; Nakagiri, S; Kataoka, A

    1993-05-01

    Asbestos cement pipes (ACPs) containing 15 to 20% chrysotile or crocidolite have been used for underground conduits. Even today 16.2% of all conduits in Japan are ACPs, though the production of ACPs was suspended in 1985. When such a conduit is accidentally damaged the workers belonging to the Waterworks Bureau of a local government cut off the damaged conduit using a high-speed disk cutter and replace it with a new conduit. This operation develops a cloud of dust and the workers involved run the risk of asbestos exposure. It was the aim of the present study to estimate asbestos exposure levels among these workers. First, in the experiment, we established the typical working conditions and requested an experienced worker to cut an ACP using a high-speed disc cutter in a hole dug in the ground as he routinely does. The experiment was repeated three times. During a bout of each experiment, dust was sampled at several points both inside and outside the hole. Second, a self-administered questionnaire survey was conducted to obtain information from the workers regarding their working conditions in cutting ACPs. The subjects of the survey were 1,048 men belonging to conduit repair sections of the Waterworks Bureau of 119 local governments. The results obtained can be summarized as follows. 1) Each bout of cutting ACPs required about five minutes. The concentration of asbestos fibers longer than 5 microns with 3:1 aspect ratio ranged from 48 to 170 fibers/ml (92 fibers/ml on an average) inside and 1.7 to 15 fibers/ml outside the hole. The concentration inside the hole exceeded the ceiling limit (10 fibers/ml) recommended for asbestos by the Japanese Association of Industrial Health. A concentration of 92 fibers/ml is equivalent to 0.96 fibers/ml as 8-h time-weighted average. 2) The number of subjects with experience of cutting ACPs was 849 (81.0%). The average length of service in conduit repair section was 14.2 yr. Based on the information obtained from each subject

  19. The role of shear heating in obsidian formation within volcanic conduits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curry, A. C.

    2013-12-01

    While most volcanic rocks contain a significant amount of crystals (15-35 vol%), obsidian is unusual because it contains < 2 vol% phenocrysts. The few phenocrysts in obsidian are evidence for some crystallization, but the relative paucity reflects conditions in which crystallization is inhibited. The causes of these conditions in obsidian magmas are poorly understood. One way to inhibit crystallization and resorb crystals is to increase temperature. Shear heating is a potentially important source of heat in high-silica rhyolites due to their high viscosity, yet it is seldom accounted for in the thermal budgets of ascending magmas. This study combines mineralogical analysis of obsidian with numerical models of ascending, high-silica magma in order to examine an alternate hypothesis for obsidian formation in which shear heating inhibits crystallization and resorbs crystals. Using the finite-element solver COMSOL Multiphysics, this study models a planar dike 5 m wide and 1 km long. Temperatures increase up to 300 K above initial magma temperatures at conduit edges, which enable velocities and fluxes above Poiseuille solutions. These temperature increases are 150-200 K higher than those found by existing numerical models that account for shear heating in volcanic conduits. Based on velocities in the outer edge of the conduit, residence times of crystals in hotter magma range from 6 minutes to 58 days in a 1 km conduit; longer conduits increase residence time. Furthermore, complex conduit geometry can cause separation of laminar flow lines which would distribute hotter magma to other parts of the conduit. Longer residence times and higher temperatures favor crystal resorption. Modal analyses of obsidian in this study reflect a regional lack of quartz and sanidine phenocrysts in eastern California obsidian. This regional lack is unpredicted by the dominant hypotheses of obsidian formation and unexpected based on the mineralogy of other high-silica rhyolites. Phenocryst

  20. Long-term acclimatization of hydraulic properties, xylem conduit size, wall strength and cavitation resistance in Phaseolus vulgaris in response to different environmental effects.

    PubMed

    Holste, Ellen K; Jerke, Megan J; Matzner, Steven L

    2006-05-01

    Phaseolus vulgaris grown under various environmental conditions was used to assess long-term acclimatization of xylem structural characteristics and hydraulic properties. Conduit diameter tended to be reduced and 'wood' density (of 'woody' stems) increased under low moisture ('dry'), increased soil porosity ('porous soil') and low phosphorus ('low P') treatments. Dry and low P had the largest percentage of small vessels. Dry, low light ('shade') and porous soil treatments decreased P50 (50% loss in conductivity) by 0.15-0.25 MPa (greater cavitation resistance) compared with 'controls'. By contrast, low P increased P50 by 0.30 MPa (less cavitation resistance) compared with porous soil (the control for low P). Changes in cavitation resistance were independent of conduit diameter. By contrast, changes in cavitation resistance were correlated with wood density for the control, dry and porous soil treatments, but did not appear to be a function of wood density for the shade and low P treatments. In a separate experiment comparing control and porous soil plants, stem hydraulic conductivity (kh), specific conductivity (ks), leaf specific conductivity (LSC), total pot water loss, plant biomass and leaf area were all greater for control plants compared to porous soil plants. Porous soil plants, however, demonstrated higher midday stomatal conductance to water vapour (gs), apparently because they experienced proportionally less midday xylem cavitation. PMID:17087467

  1. Gas evolution in eruptive conduits: Combining insights from high temperature and pressure decompression experiments with steady-state flow modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mangan, M.; Mastin, L.; Sisson, T.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we examine the consequences of bubble nucleation mechanism on eruptive degassing of rhyolite magma. We use the results of published high temperature and pressure decompression experiments as input to a modified version of CONFLOW, the numerical model of Mastin and Ghiorso [(2000) U.S.G.S. Open-File Rep. 00-209, 53 pp.] and Mastin [(2002) Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst. 3, 10.1029/2001GC000192] for steady, two-phase flow in vertical conduits. Synthesis of the available experimental data shows that heterogeneous nucleation is triggered at ??P 120-150 MPa, and leads to disequilibrium degassing at extreme H2O supersaturation. In this latter case, nucleation is an ongoing process controlled by changing supersaturation conditions. Exponential bubble size distributions are often produced with number densities of 106-109 bubbles/cm3. Our numerical analysis adopts an end-member approach that specifically compares equilibrium degassing with delayed, disequilibrium degassing characteristic of homogeneously-nucleating systems. The disequilibrium simulations show that delaying nucleation until ??P =150 MPa restricts degassing to within ???1500 m of the surface. Fragmentation occurs at similar porosity in both the disequilibrium and equilibrium modes (???80 vol%), but at the distinct depths of ???500 m and ???2300 m, respectively. The vesiculation delay leads to higher pressures at equivalent depths in the conduit, and the mass flux and exit pressure are each higher by a factor of ???2.0. Residual water contents in the melt reaching the vent are between 0.5 and 1.0 wt%, roughly twice that of the equilibrium model. ?? 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Weight Loss Alone Improves Conduit and Resistance Artery Endothelial Function in Young and Older Overweight/Obese Adults

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Gary L.; Beske, Stacy D.; Lawson, Brooke R.; Southall, Kara L.; Benay, Francoise J.; Donato, Anthony J.; Seals, Douglas R.

    2010-01-01

    Obesity is associated with vascular endothelial dysfunction, as indicated by impaired endothelium-dependent dilation (EDD). Presently there is no direct evidence that energy intake restricted weight loss alone improves conduit or resistance artery EDD, the mechanisms involved, or if improvements differ with patient age. A total of 40 overweight or obese (body mass index ≥ 25<40 kg/m2) non-diabetic men and women aged 21–69 years completed 12 weeks of reduced energy intake (n=26, 15M) or attention control (n=14, 9M) and 4 weeks of weight maintenance (randomized trial). Energy intake restriction reduced estimated total energy intake (33%), body weight (10.5%), total and abdominal body fat, plasma leptin, oxidized LDL, and improved some metabolic risk factors. Brachial artery flow mediated dilation (FMD) was increased by 30% (6.0 ± 0.7 vs. 7.9 ± 0.7 % Δ, P=0.01, n=17). Peak forearm blood flow during intra-brachial artery infusion of acetylcholine was increased by 26% (16.8 ± 1.4 vs. 21.1± 1.9 ml/100ml/min, P<0.05, n=15); this was inversely related to the reduction in abdominal visceral:subcutaneous fat ratio (r=−0.46, P<0.05) and was abolished by inhibition of nitric oxide synthesis with Ng-monomethyl L-arginine. Improvements in EDD were not related to age: mean increases in subjects >50 years were similar to or greater than those <50. Energy intake restricted weight loss alone is an effective intervention for improving peripheral conduit and resistance artery endothelial function in young and older overweight/obese adults. The improvements in resistance artery function are mediated by an increase in nitric oxide bioavailability and are related to reductions in abdominal visceral fat. PMID:18504322

  3. Widening of xylem conduits in a conifer tree depends on the longer time of cell expansion downwards along the stem

    PubMed Central

    Anfodillo, Tommaso; Deslauriers, Annie; Menardi, Roberto; Tedoldi, Laura; Petit, Giai; Rossi, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    The diameter of vascular conduits increases towards the stem base. It has been suggested that this profile is an efficient anatomical feature for reducing the hydraulic resistance when trees grow taller. However, the mechanism that controls the cell diameter along the plant is not fully understood. The timing of cell differentiation along the stem was investigated. Cambial activity and cell differentiation were investigated in a Picea abies tree (11.5 m in height) collecting microsamples at nine different heights (from 1 to 9 m) along the stem with a 4 d time interval. Wood sections (8–12 μm thick) were stained and observed under a light microscope with polarized light to differentiate the developing xylem cells. Cell wall lignification was detected using cresyl violet acetate. The first enlarging cells appeared almost simultaneously along the tree axis indicating that cambium activation is not height-dependent. A significant increase in the duration of the cell expansion phase was observed towards the tree base: at 9 m from the ground, xylem cells expanded for 7 d, at 6 m for 14 d, and at 3 m for 19 d. The duration of the expansion phase is positively correlated with the lumen area of the tracheids (r2=0.68, P < 0.01) at the same height. By contrast, thickness of the cell wall of the earlywood did not show any trend with height. The lumen area of the conduits down the stem appeared linearly dependent on time during which differentiating cells remained in the expansion phase. However, the inductive signal of such long-distance patterned differentiation remains to be identified. PMID:22016427

  4. Fabrication of Off-the-Shelf Multilumen Poly(Ethylene Glycol) Nerve Guidance Conduits Using Stereolithography.

    PubMed

    Arcaute, Karina; Mann, Brenda K; Wicker, Ryan B

    2011-01-01

    A manufacturing process for fabricating off-the-shelf multilumen poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-based nerve guidance conduits (NGCs) was developed that included the use of stereolithography (SL). A rapid fabrication strategy for complex 3D scaffolds incorporated postprocessing with lyophilization and sterilization to preserve the scaffold, creating an implantable product with improved suturability. SL is easily adaptable to changes in scaffold design, is compatible with various materials and cells, and can be expanded for mass manufacture. The fabricated conduits were characterized using optical and scanning electron microscopy, and measurements of swelling ratio, dimensional swelling factor, resistance to compression, and coefficient of friction were performed. Water absorption curves showed that the conduits after lyophilization and sterilization return easily and rapidly to a swollen state when placed in an aqueous solution, successfully maintaining their original overall structure as required for implantation. Postprocessed conduits at the swollen state were less slippery and therefore easier to handle than those without postprocessing. Suture pullout experiments showed that NGCs fabricated with a higher concentration of PEG were better able to resist suture pullout. NGCs having a multilumen design demonstrated a better resistance to compression than a single-lumen design with an equivalent surface area, as well as a greater force required to collapse the design. Conduits fabricated with a higher PEG concentration were shown to have compressive resistances comparable to those of commercially available NGCs. The use of SL with PEG and the manufacturing process developed here shows promise for improving the current state of the art in peripheral nerve repair strategies. PMID:20673135

  5. Flowmeter for determining average rate of flow of liquid in a conduit

    DOEpatents

    Kennerly, John M.; Lindner, Gordon M.; Rowe, John C.

    1982-01-01

    This invention is a compact, precise, and relatively simple device for use in determining the average rate of flow of a liquid through a conduit. The liquid may be turbulent and contain bubbles of gas. In a preferred embodiment, the flowmeter includes an electrical circuit and a flow vessel which is connected as a segment of the conduit conveying the liquid. The vessel is provided with a valved outlet and is partitioned by a vertical baffle into coaxial chambers whose upper regions are vented to permit the escape of gas. The inner chamber receives turbulent downflowing liquid from the conduit and is sized to operate at a lower pressure than the conduit, thus promoting evolution of gas from the liquid. Lower zones of the two chambers are interconnected so that the downflowing liquid establishes liquid levels in both chambers. The liquid level in the outer chamber is comparatively calm, being to a large extent isolated from the turbulence in the inner chamber once the liquid in the outer chamber has risen above the liquid-introduction zone for that chamber. Lower and upper probes are provided in the outer chamber for sensing the liquid level therein at points above its liquid-introduction zone. An electrical circuit is connected to the probes to display the time required for the liquid level in the outer chamber to successively contact the lower and upper probes. The average rate of flow through the conduit can be determined from the above-mentioned time and the vessel volume filled by the liquid during that time.

  6. Flowmeter for determining average rate of flow of liquid in a conduit

    DOEpatents

    Kennerly, J.M.; Lindner, G.M.; Rowe, J.C.

    1981-04-30

    This invention is a compact, precise, and relatively simple device for use in determining the average rate of flow of a liquid through a conduit. The liquid may be turbulent and contain bubbles of gas. In a preferred embodiment, the flowmeter includes an electrical circuit and a flow vessel which is connected as a segment of the conduit conveying the liquid. The vessel is provided with a valved outlet and is partitioned by a vertical baffle into coaxial chambers whose upper regions are vented to permit the escape of gas. The inner chamber receives turbulent downflowing liquid from the conduit and is sized to operate at a lower pressure than the conduit, thus promoting evolution of gas from the liquid. Lower zones of the two chambers are interconnected so that the downflowing liquid establishes liquid levels in both chambers. The liquid level in the outer chamber is comparatively calm, being to a large extent isolated from the turbulence in the inner chamber once the liquid in the outer chamber has risen above the liquid-introduction zone for that chamber. Lower and upper probes are provided in the outer chamber for sensing the liquid level therein at points above its liquid-introduction zone. An electrical circuit is connected to the probes to display the time required for the liquid level in the outer chamber to successively contact the lower and upper probes. The average rate of flow through the conduit can be determined from the above-mentioned time and the vessel volume filled by the liquid during that time.

  7. Welding of pyroclastic conduit infill: A mechanism for cyclical explosive eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolzenburg, S.; Russell, J. K.

    2014-07-01

    Vulcanian-style eruptions are small- to moderate-sized, singular to cyclical events commonly having volcanic explosivity indices of 1-3. They produce pyroclastic flows, disperse tephra over considerable areas, and can occur as precursors to larger (e.g., Plinian) eruptions. The fallout deposits of the 2360 B.P. eruption of Mount Meager, BC, Canada, contain bread-crusted blocks of welded breccia as accessory lithics. They display a range of compaction/welding intensity and provide a remarkable opportunity to constrain the nature and timescales of mechanical processes operating within explosive volcanic conduits during repose periods between eruptive cycles. We address the deformation and porosity/permeability reduction within natural pyroclastic deposits infilling volcanic conduits. We measure the porosity, permeability, and ultrasonic wave velocities for a suite of samples and quantify the strain recorded by pumice clasts. We explore the correlations between the physical properties and deformation fabric. Based on these correlations, we reconstruct the deformation history within the conduit, model the permeability reduction timescales, and outline the implications for the repressurization of the volcanic conduit. Our results highlight a profound directionality in the measured physical properties of these samples related to the deformation-induced fabric. Gas permeability varies drastically with increasing strain and decreasing porosity along the compaction direction of the fabric but varies little along the elongation direction of the fabric. The deformation fabric records a combination of compaction within the conduit and postcompaction stretching associated with subsequent eruption. Model timescales of these processes are in good agreement with repose periods of cyclic vulcanian eruptions.

  8. Tile drainage as karst: Conduit flow and diffuse flow in a tile-drained watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilling, Keith E.; Helmers, Matthew

    2008-02-01

    SummaryThe similarity of tiled-drained watersheds to karst drainage basins can be used to improve understanding of watershed-scale nutrient losses from subsurface tile drainage networks. In this study, short-term variations in discharge and chemistry were examined from a tile outlet collecting subsurface tile flow from a 963 ha agricultural watershed. Study objectives were to apply analytical techniques from karst springs to tile discharge to evaluate water sources and estimate the loads of agricultural pollutants discharged from the tile with conduit, intermediate and diffuse flow regimes. A two-member mixing model using nitrate, chloride and specific conductance was used to distinguish rainwater versus groundwater inputs. Results indicated that groundwater comprised 75% of the discharge for a three-day storm period and rainwater was primarily concentrated during the hydrograph peak. A contrasting pattern of solute concentrations and export loads was observed in tile flow. During base flow periods, tile flow consisted of diffuse flow from groundwater sources and contained elevated levels of nitrate, chloride and specific conductance. During storm events, suspended solids and pollutants adhered to soil surfaces (phosphorus, ammonium and organic nitrogen) were concentrated and discharged during the rapid, conduit flow portion of the hydrograph. During a three-day period, conduit flow occurred for 5.6% of the time but accounted for 16.5% of the total flow. Nitrate and chloride were delivered primarily with diffuse flow (more than 70%), whereas 80-94% of total suspended sediment, phosphorus and ammonium were exported with conduit and intermediate flow regimes. Understanding the water sources contributing to tile drainage and the manner by which pollutant discharge occurs from these systems (conduit, intermediate or diffuse flow) may be useful for designing, implementing and evaluating non-point source reduction strategies in tile-drained landscapes.

  9. Management of superior vena cava obstruction syndrome due to thrombosis of a Contegra conduit used to re-establish the innominate vein-to-right atrium continuity.

    PubMed

    Xu, Gang; Alexiou, Christos; Tofeig, Magdi; Spyt, Tomasz J

    2007-08-01

    Following intraoperative superior vena cava injury, venous drainage of the head, neck and upper extremities can be re-established with bovine jugular vein (Contegra) conduits. Inadequate anticoagulation, however, may lead to conduit thrombosis and superior vena cava obstruction syndrome. This can be successfully treated with percutaneous dilatation and stenting of the failed conduit. PMID:17669924

  10. Characterisation and modelling of conduit restricted karst aquifers - Example of the Auja spring, Jordan Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Sebastian; Geyer, Tobias; Guttman, Joseph; Marei, Amer; Ries, Fabian; Sauter, Martin

    2014-04-01

    The conduit system of mature karstified carbonate aquifers is typically characterised by a high hydraulic conductivity and does not impose a major flow constriction on catchment discharge. As a result, discharge at karst springs is usually flashy and displays pronounced peaks following recharge events. In contrast, some karst springs reported in literature display a discharge maximum, attributed to reaching the finite discharge capacity of the conduit system (flow threshold). This phenomenon also often leads to a non-standard recession behaviour, a so called “convex recession”, i.e. an increase in the recession coefficient during flow recession, which in turn might be used as an indicator for conduit restricted aquifers. The main objective of the study is the characterisation and modelling of those hydrogeologically challenging aquifers. The applied approach consists of a combination of hydrometric monitoring, a spring hydrograph recession and event analysis, as well as the setup and calibration of a non-linear reservoir model. It is demonstrated for the Auja spring, the largest freshwater spring in the Lower Jordan Valley. The semi-arid environment with its short but intensive precipitation events and an extended dry season leads to sharp input signals and undisturbed recession periods. The spring displays complex recession behaviour, exhibiting exponential (coefficient α) and linear (coefficient β) recession periods. Numerous different recession coefficients α were observed: ∼0.2 to 0.8 d-1 (presumably main conduit system), 0.004 d-1 (fractured matrix), 0.0009 d-1 (plateau caused by flow threshold being exceeded), plus many intermediate values. The reasons for this observed behaviour are the outflow threshold at 0.47 m3 s-1 and a variable conduit-matrix cross-flow in the aquifer. Despite system complexity, and hence the necessity of incorporating features such as a flow threshold, conduit-matrix cross-flow, and a spatially variable soil/epikarst field

  11. Temporal instabilities in volcanic conduit flow due to internal gravity waves and non-equilibrium degassing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlstrom, L.; Dunham, E. M.

    2013-12-01

    Volcanic conduits are strongly stratified multiphase mixtures of magma, bubbles and crystals exhibiting vertical gradients in density and pressure that drive flow. We examine the behavior of perturbations to this stratification in a model of multiphase flow through a cylindrical conduit using analytic and numerical linear stability analysis. Magma is idealized as a mixture of gas and liquid phases, accounting for compressibility of both phases, viscosity of the mixture, and a finite exsolution time for mass exchange between the phases. Short time variations in conduit flow variables are characterized by three modes of wave motion. Two modes correspond to sound waves that travel up and down the conduit, while the third is an internal gravity wave arising from restoring forces due to differences in density. When perturbed downward, a fluid parcel in the stratified magma is surrounded by more dense fluid and feels an upward restoring force from buoyancy. That restoring force can be reduced by compression of the fluid parcel by the greater pressures at depth that act to increase its density. These three modes of wave motion are characterized by several competing timescales. The timescale for viscous damping τ D sets the decay time of flow perturbations and the damping of sound waves and internal gravity waves propagating through the magma. The timescale of gravity wave oscillation, τ G (inverse of buoyancy frequency N), measures adjustment of perturbations to density and pressure differences in the vertically stratified magma. Finally, a timescale for volatile diffusion τ V measures adjustment of the gas phase mass fraction to its equilibrium solubility value. We examine perturbations to a magmastatic base state and to a base state of steady flow. Initial analytic results with frozen coefficients for a magmastatic and vertically unbounded conduit suggest that when τ V > τ G and τ D > τ G, τ V, the base state is unstable to harmonic perturbations in flow

  12. Textural evolution of a conduit margin witnessing the unusual explosivity of a basaltic Plinian eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schauroth, J.; Wadsworth, F.; Vasseur, J.; kennedy, B.; Schipper, C.; Kueppers, U.; Scheu, B.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2013-12-01

    Basaltic Plinian eruptions are a rare phenomenon and are poorly understood. Here we investigate these unusual high-explosivity eruptions with detailed textural observations of their products. We have analysed marginal textures of a feeding conduit of the AD 1886 Tarawera fissure eruption through which a gas-ash-suspension was erupting for ~4-5 hours and examined strain markers of simple shear and evidence of heating. We quantified vesicle size distributions and vesicle orientations in the rhyolitic country rock of the Wahanga dome in contact with the mafic dyke. Shape anisotropy and density increases toward the margin, corresponding to a decrease in 2D vesicularity. Similarly, the margin-parallel deformation is manifested in cleaved and plastically deformed biotite crystals. The aspect ratio of biotite phenocrysts in the rhyolitic country rock increases toward the margin. In the undeformed country rock average aspect ratios are ~1-2, whereas in the marginal zone of 1-2 mm thickness values increase to >50. In the marginal zone an accumulation of low angles spanned by the conduit wall and the long axis of biotite phenocrysts is observed. Rotation of phenocrysts near the margin might be produced by simple shear from coupling of the erupting gas-ash-suspension. We measured major element profiles in the interstitial groundmass glass toward the conduit margin by EMPA. Proximal depletion of Na2O and enrichment of K2O suggest that the eruption was at high temperature for time sufficient for ~1 mm of concentration-gradient diffusion of mobile elements. The changes in porosity, texture and chemistry take place in a ~1-1.5 mm thick deformed zone. Lattice Boltzmann simulations of margin perpendicular fluid flow through the pore network in this zone rendered by xray computed micro tomography of this zone shows a reduction in permeability by 2 orders of magnitude from ~10-11.5 to ~10-13 m2. Textural changes of conduit walls that experienced mafic Plinian eruptions have rarely

  13. Shallow conduit processes during the 1158 AD explosive eruption of Hekla volcano, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janebo, Maria; Houghton, Bruce; Thordarson, Thor; Larsen, Gudrun

    2015-04-01

    Hekla is one of the most frequently active silicic volcanic systems in the world, with multiple pre-historic large Plinian eruptions and 18 historical subplinian-Plinian eruptions. The common view is that the Plinian phases of the largest Hekla eruptions are all relatively homogeneous in style. Of the historical eruptions, only two were silicic: a Plinian eruption in 1104 and a smaller, less well characterized, eruption in 1158. We examine the dynamics of the 1158 eruption in detail with focus on the modulating role of shallow conduit processes. Grain size analysis, componentry, and density were used to characterize gradual and abrupt changes during the course of the eruption and quantitative vesicularity analysis was used to constrain the influence of bubble nucleation and coalescence. The 1158 eruption was a relatively steady, dry eruption with a more powerful opening phase followed by a lower intensity, waning phase accompanied by destabilization and collapse of the conduit walls. The juvenile pyroclasts are comprised of three types of microvesicular ragged pumice: white, grey, and banded. The abundance of grey pumice decreases as the eruption reaches maximum intensity, and then increases again during the waning phase of the eruption. The white pumices are more vesicular than the grey pumice, and the banded pumices have vesicularities that span predictably the range of the two end-members. The macroscopic differences between the white and grey pumice are accompanied by differences on a microscopic scale, most notably in a decrease in vesicle number density (VND) and a broadening of the vesicle size distribution, as well as increased crystal content. VND values of 0.5 to 1 E+6 mm-3 are similar to those recorded for the more powerful and sustained Plinian phases of the Novarupta 1912 and Taupo 181 eruptions in our laboratory. The 1158 pumice clasts display complex textures with adjacent domains of contrasting texture, alluding to complex nucleation, growth and

  14. Challenges of using electrical resistivity method to locate karst conduits-A field case in the Inner Bluegrass Region, Kentucky

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhu, J.; Currens, J.C.; Dinger, J.S.

    2011-01-01

    Conduits serve as major pathways for groundwater flow in karst aquifers. Locating them from the surface, however, is one of the most challenging tasks in karst research. Geophysical methods are often deployed to help locate voids by mapping variations of physical properties of the subsurface. Conduits can cause significant contrasts of some physical properties that can be detected; other subsurface features such as water-bearing fractures often yield similar contrasts, which are difficult to distinguish from the effects of the conduits. This study used electrical resistivity method to search for an unmapped karst conduit that recharges Royal Spring in the Inner Bluegrass karst region, Kentucky, USA. Three types of resistivity techniques (surface 2D survey, quasi-3D survey, and time-lapse survey) were used to map and characterize resistivity anomalies. Some of the major anomalies were selected as drilling targets to verify the existence of the conduits. Drilling near an anomaly identified by an electrical resistivity profile resulted in successful penetration of a major water-filled conduit. The drilling results also suggest that, in this study area, low resistivity anomalies in general are associated with water-bearing features. However, differences in the anomaly signals between the water-filled conduit and other water-bearing features such as water-filled fracture zones were undistinguishable. The electrical resistivity method is useful in conduit detection by providing potential drilling targets. Knowledge of geology and hydrogeology about the site and professional judgment also played important roles in locating the major conduit. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  15. Downsized Contegra graft as a right ventricle-to-pulmonary artery conduit in the setting of mediastinitis.

    PubMed

    MacIver, Robroy H; Permut, Lester C; McMullan, David M

    2013-09-01

    Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) grafts are commonly used for construction of the right ventricle-to-pulmonary artery conduit in the modified Norwood procedure. Dehiscence of a PTFE conduit in the setting of purulent mediastinitis presents a challenging clinical problem because of limited availability of appropriately sized replacement vascular homografts. The Contegra bovine jugular vein graft is an alternative to placing another PTFE graft in an infected space when a homograft of appropriate size is not available. We describe the use of a downsized Contegra conduit to replace an infected PTFE right ventricle-to-pulmonary artery graft in a neonate with life-threatening purulent mediastinitis. PMID:23992706

  16. Robot-Assisted Laparoscopic Partial Colpectomy and Intracorporeal Ileal Conduit Urinary Diversion (Bricker) for Cervical Adenocarcinoma Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Uzan, Jennifer; Cornou, Caroline; Bensaid, Chérazade; Audenet, François; Ngô, Charlotte; Bats, Anne-Sophie; Lecuru, Fabrice

    2015-01-01

    Ileal conduit urinary diversion (Bricker) is a standard surgical open procedure. The Da Vinci robot allowed precision for this surgical procedure, especially for intracorporeal suturing. Meanwhile, few reports of robot-assisted laparoscopic ileal conduit diversion (Bricker) are described in the literature. We report the case of a 69-year-old patient with a vaginal recurrence of cervical adenocarcinoma associated with vesicovaginal fistula treated by robot-assisted laparoscopic partial colpectomy and ileal conduit urinary diversion (Bricker). The robot-assisted laparoscopic procedure followed all surgical steps of the open procedure. Postoperative period was free of complications. PMID:26634161

  17. IET control building (TAN620). control room. facing north. control consoles ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    IET control building (TAN-620). control room. facing north. control consoles have been removed. Openings in floor were communication and control conduits. Periscope controls at center left (see also HAER No. ID-33-E-20). INEEL negative no. HD-21-3-1 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  18. Crab burrows as conduits for groundwater-surface water exchange in Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahl, Mason O.; Tarek, M. H.; Yeo, Darren C. J.; Badruzzaman, A. B. M.; Harvey, Charles F.

    2014-12-01

    Groundwater recharge affects water budgets and groundwater quality on the deltas and floodplains of South and Southeast Asia. Rain and flooding rivers recharge groundwater during the monsoon; irrigated rice fields and surface water bodies recharge aquifers during the dry season. Groundwater throughout the region is severely contaminated by arsenic, and recent research suggests that quantifying and characterizing recharge is important to understand whether recharge flushes or mobilizes arsenic from aquifers. At a field site in Bangladesh, we found that burrows of terrestrial crabs short-circuit low-permeability surface sediments, providing the primary conduit for recharge. We combine field observations along with a model that couples isotope and water balances to quantify the effect of crab burrows on aquifer recharge. Given the wide distribution of burrowing crabs and the surficial geology, we suggest that crab burrows provide widespread conduits for groundwater recharge.

  19. Three-dimensional structure of fluid conduits sustaining an active deep marine cold seep

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hornbach, M.J.; Ruppel, C.; Van Dover, C.L.

    2007-01-01

    Cold seeps in deep marine settings emit fluids to the overlying ocean and are often associated with such seafloor flux indicators as chemosynthetic biota, pockmarks, and authigenic carbonate rocks. Despite evidence for spatiotemporal variability in the rate, locus, and composition of cold seep fluid emissions, the shallow subseafloor plumbing systems have never been clearly imaged in three dimensions. Using a novel, high-resolution approach, we produce the first three-dimensional image of possible fluid conduits beneath a cold seep at a study site within the Blake Ridge gas hydrate province. Complex, dendritic features diverge upward toward the seafloor from feeder conduits at depth and could potentially draw flow laterally by up to 103 m from the known seafloor seep, a pattern similar to that suggested for some hydrothermal vents. The biodiversity, community structure, and succession dynamics of chemosynthetic communities at cold seeps may largely reflect these complexities of subseafloor fluid flow.

  20. Tricuspid valve replacement with a melody stented bovine jugular vein conduit.

    PubMed

    Hermsen, Joshua L; Permut, Lester C; McQuinn, Tim C; Jones, Thomas K; Chen, Jonathan M; McMullan, David Michael

    2014-11-01

    Atrioventricular valve replacement options are limited in infants and small children. The Melody stented bovine jugular vein conduit is being used with increasing frequency for percutaneous pulmonary valve replacement. The Melody valve can be serially dilated over time to accommodate the somatic growth of pediatric patients. We report the initial experience of using the Melody valve as a surgical tricuspid valve replacement in an infant. PMID:25441796

  1. Physical mechanisms that lead to large-scale gas accumulation in a volcanic conduit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collombet, Marielle; Burgisser, Alain

    2016-04-01

    The eruption of viscous magma at the Earth's surface often gives rise to abrupt regime changes. The transition from the gentle effusion of a lava dome to brief but powerful explosions is a common regime change. This transition is often preceded by the sealing of the shallow part of the volcanic conduit and the accumulation of volatile-rich magma underneath, a situation that collects the energy to be brutally released during the subsequent explosion. While conduit sealing is well-documented, volatile accumulation has proven harder to characterize. We use a 2D conduit flow model including gas loss within the magma and into the wallrock to find steady-state magma flow configurations in the effusive regime. Model outputs yield a strongly heterogeneous distribution of the gas volume fraction underneath a dense, impermeable magma cap. Gas accumulates in inclined structures hundredths of meters long and several meters thick. These structures probably constitute the gas pockets that accumulate explosive energy and that were intuited by previous studies. We tested the numerical robustness of our results by simulating the fragmented state of the magma contained within the pockets, by testing various fragmentation criteria, and by varying computational gird size. These gas pockets are robust features that occur regardless of wallrock permeability (from very permeable at 10-12 m2 to quasi impermeable at 10-16 m2) but that are sensitive to the volume to surface ratio of the volcanic conduit. One implication is that the formation of these large degassing structures probably plays an essential role in the triggering of violent explosions. Such large scale outgassing feature may also bring a partial answer to the long standing issue of the observed gas transfer across entire magmatic systems despite high magma viscosity and no obvious physical mechanism of transfer.

  2. Polyisobutylene Urolithiasis Due to Ileal Conduit Urostomy Appliance: An Index Case

    PubMed Central

    Kolbach-Mandel, Ann M.; Mandel, Ian C.; Mandel, Neil S.; Dietrich, Peter N.; Wesson, Jeffrey A.; Davis, Carley M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Polyisobutylene (PIB) is a synthetic elastomer that is a component of sealants, adhesives, and chewing gum base. We report a case of bilateral PIB urolithiasis in a patient with an ileal conduit urinary diversion due to neurogenic bladder from spinal cord injury. Infrared spectroscopy confirmed the composition of bilateral stones and adhesive from the patient's urostomy appliance to be PIB. No previous cases of PIB urolithiasis are reported in the literature.

  3. Fluid dynamics of supercritical hellium within cable-in-conduit conductors

    SciTech Connect

    Van Sciver, S.W.

    1992-07-01

    The enclosed report summarizes work carried out under DOE/MFE Support, during the past four years. Emphasis is placed on progress within the last year. Results of experiments on pressure drop and heat transfer within several Cable-in-Conduit Conductors are described. These results are compared to models for flow in similar geometrics. The work provides a basis for design of magnets using the CIC Conductor Concept.

  4. Fluid dynamics of supercritical hellium within cable-in-conduit conductors. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Van Sciver, S.W.

    1992-07-01

    The enclosed report summarizes work carried out under DOE/MFE Support, during the past four years. Emphasis is placed on progress within the last year. Results of experiments on pressure drop and heat transfer within several Cable-in-Conduit Conductors are described. These results are compared to models for flow in similar geometrics. The work provides a basis for design of magnets using the CIC Conductor Concept.

  5. Final report on fluid dynamics of supercritical helium within cable-in-conduit conductors

    SciTech Connect

    Van Sciver, S.W.

    1992-07-01

    The enclosed report summarizes work carried out under DOE/MFE support during the past four years. Emphasis is placed on progress during the last year. Results of experiments on pressure drop and heat transfer within several Cable-in-Conduit conductors are described. These results are compared to models developed for flow in similar geometries. The work provides a basis for design of magnets using CIC conductors in fusion magnetic systems.

  6. CO2 outgassing in a combined fracture and conduit karst aquifer near lititz spring, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Toran, L.; Roman, E.

    2006-01-01

    Lititz Spring in southeastern Pennsylvania and a nearby domestic well were sampled for 9 months. Although both locations are connected to conduits (as evidenced by a tracer test), most of the year they were saturated with respect to calcite, which is more typical of matrix flow. Geochemical modeling (PHREEQC) was used to explain this apparent paradox and to infer changes in matrix and conduit contribution to flow. The saturation index varied from 0.5 to 0 most of the year, with a few samples in springtime dropping below saturation. The log PCO2 value varied from -2.5 to -1.7. Lower log PCO2 values (closer to the atmospheric value of -3.5) were observed when the solutions were at or above saturation with respect to calcite. In contrast, samples collected in the springtime had high PCO2, low saturation indices, and high water levels. Geochemical modeling showed that when outgassing occurs from a water with initially high PCO2, the saturation index of calcite increases. In the Lititz Spring area, the recharge water travels through the soil zone, where it picks up CO2 from soil gas, and excess CO 2 subsequently is outgassed when this recharge water reaches the conduit. At times of high water level (pipe full), recharge with excess CO 2 enters the system but the outgassing does not occur. Instead the recharge causes dilution, reducing the calcite saturation index. Understanding the temporal and spatial variation in matrix and conduit flow in karst aquifers benefited here by geochemical modeling and calculation of PCO2 values. ?? 2006 Geological Society of America.

  7. A decahaem cytochrome as an electron conduit in protein-enzyme redox processes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chong-Yong; Reuillard, Bertrand; Sokol, Katarzyna P; Laftsoglou, Theodoros; Lockwood, Colin W J; Rowe, Sam F; Hwang, Ee Taek; Fontecilla-Camps, Juan C; Jeuken, Lars J C; Butt, Julea N; Reisner, Erwin

    2016-05-31

    The decahaem cytochrome MtrC from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was employed as a protein electron conduit between a porous indium tin oxide electrode and redox enzymes. Using a hydrogenase and a fumarate reductase, MtrC was shown as a suitable and efficient diode to shuttle electrons to and from the electrode with the MtrC redox activity regulating the direction of the enzymatic reactions. PMID:27193068

  8. Possible conduit-matrix water exchange signatures outlined at a karst spring.

    PubMed

    Mitrofan, Horia; Marin, Constantin; Povară, Ioan

    2015-04-01

    During a significant flood event, reversible water exchanges may occur between a karst conduit and its adjacent porous rock (frequently designated as "matrix"): while the flood pulse rises, some conduit-derived water is forced into the matrix; then, as the flood recedes, the same water flows back into the stream passage. The present note addresses such a karst setting in the Carpathian Mountains (Romania), where in addition, a usually stable flux of chloride originating in a natural saline inflow, was being mixed with a variable flow of karst freshwater. For that particular case, with the above-mentioned process of matrix storage/release from storage assumedly taking place downstream of the mixing site, two distinct chemical signatures could be noticed during a flood event: an initial depletion in the spring flow chloride flux, subsequently followed by a comparable chloride flux enrichment (the depletion and the enrichment being outlined with respect to the essentially stable chloride flux value that had been noticed to persist at the spring over a long period of flow rate recession). Concomitantly with such flood-induced fluctuations in the spring chloride flux, the spring discharge displayed, for long periods, abnormally slow variations: the latter likely indicated that the spring supply rate actual oscillations were buffered by the reversible water exchanges which took place between the karst conduit and its adjacent matrix. On the whole, these results show that conduit-matrix water exchanges could be interpreted by simple mass balance calculations that involved fluxes of a conservative tracer (the chloride ion in that particular case). PMID:25394224

  9. The quench experiment on long length cable-in-conduit conductor (QUELL) in SULTAN

    SciTech Connect

    Anghel, A.

    1995-03-01

    A description of the QUELL experiment at the SULTAN facility, its objectives and plan is given. After reviewing the quench properties of the Cable in Conduit Conductors and a short review of the theoretical background foreseen for the interpretation of the experimental results, information are given concerning the QUELL sample layout, quench sensors, cryogenic system, power supplies, current bus, current leads and data acquisition system. A detailed test plan and information on the experiment time schedule are also presented.

  10. Laparoscopic Repair of Ileal Conduit Parastomal Hernia Using the Sling Technique

    PubMed Central

    Chand, Bipan

    2008-01-01

    Laparoscopic parastomal hernia repair has become a viable option to overcome the challenges that face the hernia surgeon. Multiple techniques have been described over the last 5 years, one of which is the lateralizing “sling” technique, first described by Sugarbaker in1980. In this study, we report the technique and our early results with the laparoscopic modified Sugarbaker repair of parastomal hernias after ileal conduit. PMID:18435893

  11. Fluid dynamics of supercritical helium within cable-in-conduit conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vansciver, S. W.

    1992-07-01

    The enclosed report summarizes work carried out under DOE/MFE support during the past four years. Emphasis is placed on progress within the last year. Results of experiments on pressure drop and heat transfer within several cable-in-conduit conductors are described. These results are compared to models for flow in similar geometrics. The work provides a basis for design of magnets using the CIC conductor concept.

  12. A Rare Window Into Magmatic Conduit Processes: Time Series Observations From Active Lava Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lev, E.; Ruprecht, P.; Patrick, M.; Oppenheimer, C.; Peters, N.; Spampinato, L.; Hernandez Perez, P. A.; Unglert, K.; Barreyre, T.

    2015-12-01

    Time-lapse thermal images of the lake surface are used to investigate the circulation and cooling patterns of three lava lakes: Kilauea's Halema'uma'u crater, Mount Erebus, and Nyiragongo. We report results for the time-dependent, two-dimensional velocity and temperature fields of the lake surface. These data sets constrain the locations of flow divergence (upwelling) and convergence (downwelling), the distribution of distinct "plates" and "rifts", the dominant time scales for changes in flow pattern at each lake, and the physical properties of the magma. Upwelling and downwelling locations are strikingly different between the three lakes. Upwelling at Nyiragongo and Erebus occurs dominantly in the interior of the lake, where it is occasionally interrupted by catastrophic downwellings. At Halema'uma'u upwelling and downwelling occur consistently along the perimeter. It remains to be seen whether these differences are dictated merely by the system's geometry or are indicative of intrinsic factors such as melt viscosity, temperature and volatile and crystal content, or of conduit processes such as gas pistoning or slug flow. The availability of high resolution data at Halema'uma'u allows as us to document the evolution of crustal plates and rifts and to investigate the physical properties of the lava and the crust. The physical properties of the lake's surface control lake cooling rates, and thus need to be included in lake circulation and thermal evolution models. We produce time-temperature cooling curves from surface temperature profiles normal to surface rifts and by tracking the cooling of intra-plate bubble bursts. By comparing observations to analytical cooling models, we estimate a porosity of > 80% during the high stand of the lake, slightly higher than estimates of 70% for the upper 120 meters based on gravity data, and close to the porosity of clasts ejected from the lake during recent minor explosions. Furthermore,we find that the number of surface plates

  13. Gas slug ascent through changes in conduit diameter: Laboratory insights into a volcano-seismic source process in low-viscosity magmas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    James, M.R.; Lane, S.J.; Chouet, B.A.

    2006-01-01

    Seismic signals generated during the flow and degassing of low-viscosity magmas include long-period (LP) and very-long-period (VLP) events, whose sources are often attributed to dynamic fluid processes within the conduit. We present the results of laboratory experiments designed to investigate whether the passage of a gas slug through regions of changing conduit diameter could act as a suitable source mechanism. A vertical, liquid-filled glass tube featuring a concentric diameter change was used to provide canonical insights into potentially deep or shallow seismic sources. As gas slugs ascend the tube, we observe systematic pressure changes varying with slug size, liquid depth, tube diameter, and liquid viscosity. Gas slugs undergoing an abrupt flow pattern change upon entering a section of significantly increased tube diameter induce a transient pressure decrease in and above the flare and an associated pressure increase below it, which stimulates acoustic and inertial resonant oscillations. When the liquid flow is not dominantly controlled by viscosity, net vertical forces on the apparatus are also detected. The net force is a function of the magnitude of the pressure transients generated and the tube geometry, which dictates where, and hence when, the traveling pressure pulses can couple into the tube. In contrast to interpretations of related volcano-seismic data, where a single downward force is assumed to result from an upward acceleration of the center of mass in the conduit, our experiments suggest that significant downward forces can result from the rapid deceleration of relatively small volumes of downward-moving liquid. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  14. Comparison of Small-Intestinal Submucosa and Expanded Polytetrafluoroethylene as a Vascular Conduit in the Presence of Gram-Positive Contamination

    PubMed Central

    Shell, Daniel H.; Croce, Martin A.; Cagiannos, Catherine; Jernigan, T Wright; Edwards, Norma; Fabian, Timothy C.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: As a vascular conduit, expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) is susceptible to graft infection with Gram-positive organisms. Biomaterials, such as porcine small-intestinal submucosa (SIS), have been successfully used clinically as tissue substitutes outside the vascular arena. Summary Background Data: In the present study, we compared a small-diameter conduit of SIS to ePTFE in the presence of Gram-positive contamination to evaluate infection resistance, incorporation and remodeling, morphometry, graft patency, and neointimal hyperplasia (NH) development. Methods: Adult male mongrel pigs were randomized to receive either SIS or ePTFE (3-cm length, 6-mm diameter) and further randomized to 1 of 3 groups: Control (no graft inoculation), Staphylococcus aureus, or mucin-producing S epidermidis (each graft inoculation with 108 colonies/mL). Pressure measurements were obtained proximal and distal to the graft to create the iliac/aorta pressure ratio. Morphometric analysis of the neointima and histopathologic examinations was performed. Other outcomes included weekly WBC counts, graft incorporation, and quantitative culture of explanted grafts. Results: Eighteen animals were randomized. All grafts were patent throughout the 6-week study period. Infected SIS grafts had less NH and little change in their iliac/aorta indices compared with infected ePTFE grafts. Quantitative cultures at euthanasia demonstrated no growth in either SIS group compared with 1.7 × 104 colonies for ePTFE S aureus and 6 × 102 for ePTFE S epi (each P < 0.001). All SIS grafts were incorporated. Histology demonstrated remodeling into host artery with smooth muscle and capillary ingrowth in all SIS groups. Scanning electron micrography illustrated smooth and complete endothelialization of all SIS grafts. Conclusions: Compared with ePTFE, SIS induces host tissue remodeling, exhibits a decreased neointimal response to infection, and is resistant to bacterial colonization. SIS may provide a

  15. [Urinary diversion in patients treated with pelvic irradiation: transverse colon conduit revisited].

    PubMed

    Matsui, Yoshiyuki; Kanematsu, Akihiro; Negoro, Hiromitsu; Kobayashi, Takashi; Terada, Naoki; Sugino, Yoshio; Yamasaki, Toshinari; Inoue, Takahiro; Kamba, Tomomi; Yoshimura, Koji; Ogawa, Osamu

    2014-08-01

    In patients receiving pelvic irradiation for gynecological or genitourinary malignancies, urinary diversion is sometimes required for complete resection of malignancies or treatment of urological complications by irradiation. We report our attempts to promote healing and prevent complications by urinary diversion using a transverse colon conduit in cases in which urinary reconstruction was performed with irradiated lower abdominal organs such as small intestine or distal ureters. Between 2008 and 2012, 9 patients with pelvic irradiation received transverse colon conduit urinary diversion. Six patients received diversion for genitourinary complications, while 3 patients received complete resection of pelvic malignancies. Colostomy formation and lithotripsy of vesical stones were simultaneously performed in 4 cases. Wallace method was adopted for ureterointestinal anastomosis. There was no operative mortality. Although acute pyelonephritis, ileus, wound dehiscence and pelvic abscess formation were seen as postoperative complications, all but two improved without any additional procedure. Cases of pelvic abscess or wound dehiscence were treated by abscess drainage. In observation periods, no patients required urinary stent placement and none suffered from defecation problems. We think that transverse colon conduit can be a viable option for patients with pelvic irradiation history, affording them reasonable quality of life postoperatively. PMID:25179985

  16. PRGD/PDLLA conduit potentiates rat sciatic nerve regeneration and the underlying molecular mechanism.

    PubMed

    Li, Binbin; Qiu, Tong; Iyer, K Swaminathan; Yan, Qiongjiao; Yin, Yixia; Xie, Lijuan; Wang, Xinyu; Li, Shipu

    2015-07-01

    Peripheral nerve injury requires optimal conditions in both macro-environment and micro-environment for reestablishment. Though various strategies have been carried out to improve the macro-environment, the underlying molecular mechanism of axon regeneration in the micro-environment provided by nerve conduit remains unclear. In this study, the rat sciatic nerve of 10 mm defect was made and bridged by PRGD/PDLLA nerve conduit. We investigated the process of nerve regeneration using histological, functional and real time PCR analyses after implantation from 7 to 35 days. Our data demonstrated that the ciliary neurotrophic factor highly expressed and up-regulated the downstream signaling pathways, in the case of activated signals, the expressions of axon sprout relative proteins, such as tubulin and growth-associated protein-43, were strongly augmented. Taken together, these data suggest a possible mechanism of axon regeneration promoted by PRGD/PDLLA conduit, which created a micro-environment for enhancement of diffusion of neurotrophic factors secreted by the injured nerve stumps, and activation of molecular signal transduction involved in growth cone, to potentiate the nerve recovery. PMID:25934451

  17. Optimum air-demand ratio for maximum aeration efficiency in high-head gated circular conduits.

    PubMed

    Ozkan, Fahri; Tuna, M Cihat; Baylar, Ahmet; Ozturk, Mualla

    2014-01-01

    Oxygen is an important component of water quality and its ability to sustain life. Water aeration is the process of introducing air into a body of water to increase its oxygen saturation. Water aeration can be accomplished in a variety of ways, for instance, closed-conduit aeration. High-speed flow in a closed conduit involves air-water mixture flow. The air flow results from the subatmospheric pressure downstream of the gate. The air entrained by the high-speed flow is supplied by the air vent. The air entrained into the flow in the form of a large number of bubbles accelerates oxygen transfer and hence also increases aeration efficiency. In the present work, the optimum air-demand ratio for maximum aeration efficiency in high-head gated circular conduits was studied experimentally. Results showed that aeration efficiency increased with the air-demand ratio to a certain point and then aeration efficiency did not change with a further increase of the air-demand ratio. Thus, there was an optimum value for the air-demand ratio, depending on the Froude number, which provides maximum aeration efficiency. Furthermore, a design formula for aeration efficiency was presented relating aeration efficiency to the air-demand ratio and Froude number. PMID:25225935

  18. Endoscopic evaluation of gastric conduit perfusion in minimally invasive Ivor Lewis esophagectomy

    PubMed Central

    Fikfak, Vid; Gaur, Puja; Kim, Min P.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Laser-assisted indocyanine green (ICG) fluorescent dye angiography has been used in esophageal reconstructive surgery where it has been shown to significantly decrease the anastomotic leak rate. Recent advances in technology have made this possible in minimally invasive esophagectomy. Presentation of case We present a 69-year-old male with a cuT2N0M0 adenocarcinoma of the esophagus at the gastroesophageal junction who presented to our clinic after chemoradiation and underwent a minimally invasive Ivor Lewis esophagectomy. The perfusion of the gastric conduit was assessed intraoperatively using endoscopic ICG fluorescent imaging system. The anastomosis was created at the well-perfused site identified on the fluorescent imaging. The patient tolerated the procedure well, had an uneventful recovery going home on postoperative day 6 and tolerating a regular diet 2 weeks after the surgery. Discussion Combination of minimally invasive surgery and endoscopic evaluation of perfusion of gastric conduit provide improved outcomes for surgical treatment for patients with esophageal cancer. Conclusion The gastric conduit during minimally invasive Ivor Lewis esophagectomy can be evaluated using endoscopic ICG fluorescent imaging. PMID:26745315

  19. Long distance seawater intrusion through a karst conduit network in the Woodville Karst Plain, Florida

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zexuan; Bassett, Seth Willis; Hu, Bill; Dyer, Scott Barrett

    2016-01-01

    Five periods of increased electrical conductivity have been found in the karst conduits supplying one of the largest first magnitude springs in Florida with water. Numerous well-developed conduit networks are distributed in the Woodville Karst Plain (WKP), Florida and connected to the Gulf of Mexico. A composite analysis of precipitation and electrical conductivity data provides strong evidence that the increases in conductivity are directly tied to seawater intrusion moving inland and traveling 11 miles against the prevailing regional hydraulic gradient from from Spring Creek Spring Complex (SCSC), a group of submarine springs at the Gulf Coast. A geochemical analysis of samples from the spring vent rules out anthropogenic contamination and upwelling regional recharge from the deep aquifer as sources of the rising conductivity. The interpretation is supported by the conceptual model established by prior researchers working to characterize the study area. This paper documents the first and longest case of seawater intrusion in the WKP, and also indicates significant possibility of seawater contamination through subsurface conduit networks in a coastal karst aquifer. PMID:27557803

  20. Large bifid ureteric calculus in a patient with an ileal conduit

    PubMed Central

    Rajaian, Shanmugasundaram; Kekre, Nitin S.

    2012-01-01

    Urinary diversion after extirpative surgery of the bladder is done by various methods. Conduit urinary diversion is the most commonly practiced method of urinary diversion. It is relatively easy to perform and has a lower complication rate than other forms of diversion, e.g., orthotopic neobladder and continent cutaneous urinary diversion. Urolithiasis is a known and common complication of urinary diversion. Upper tract calculi in these cases often manifest symptomatically as occurs in the general population. Stones in the conduit can have a variable clinical presentation. Asymptomatic presentation is also noted in a few cases. We report a case of a large silent bifid ureteric calculus within an ileal conduit in a woman who had undergone urinary diversion 32 years earlier. Plain X-ray of the abdomen is the only investigation necessary to rule out urinary lithiasis in those who have had urinary diversion for a long time. This simple tool can diagnose the condition well in advance and aid in planning the management of this condition. PMID:23248527

  1. Continent catheterizable conduit for urinary diversion in children: Applicability and acceptability

    PubMed Central

    Solanki, Shailesh; Babu, Muniamjanappa Narendra; Jadhav, Vinay; Shankar, Gowri; Ramesh, Santhanakrishnan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Continent catheterizable conduit (CCC) has made clean intermittent catheterization (CIC) painless and easy. It is applicable in diverse clinical conditions. Nonetheless, convincing the parents for the need of conduit procedure is still difficult. Materials and Methods: A prospective study, included children who underwent CCC procedure from March 2008 to February 2013. The data were assessed for; diagnosis, type of conduit, number of preoperative counselling sessions before acceptance, role of “self-help group” in decision making, parental concern and satisfaction for the procedure. Results: Twenty-nine patients (males; 24, females; 5) underwent CCC procedure for various clinical conditions. The multiple preoperative counselling sessions and creation of “self-help groups” were helped them for decision making. The main concerns among parents were: (1) Impact of procedure on future fertility and sexual life. (2) Patency of native urethral channel. (3) Permanent urinary stoma over the abdomen. Conclusion: CCC procedures are applicable to a wide array of clinical situations with a good outcome. The acceptability of the CCC procedure improves with preoperative counselling of parent/child, initiation of preoperative per urethral CIC and creation of self-help groups. PMID:25659547

  2. Large bifid ureteric calculus in a patient with an ileal conduit.

    PubMed

    Rajaian, Shanmugasundaram; Kekre, Nitin S

    2012-09-01

    Urinary diversion after extirpative surgery of the bladder is done by various methods. Conduit urinary diversion is the most commonly practiced method of urinary diversion. It is relatively easy to perform and has a lower complication rate than other forms of diversion, e.g., orthotopic neobladder and continent cutaneous urinary diversion. Urolithiasis is a known and common complication of urinary diversion. Upper tract calculi in these cases often manifest symptomatically as occurs in the general population. Stones in the conduit can have a variable clinical presentation. Asymptomatic presentation is also noted in a few cases. We report a case of a large silent bifid ureteric calculus within an ileal conduit in a woman who had undergone urinary diversion 32 years earlier. Plain X-ray of the abdomen is the only investigation necessary to rule out urinary lithiasis in those who have had urinary diversion for a long time. This simple tool can diagnose the condition well in advance and aid in planning the management of this condition. PMID:23248527

  3. Thermo-Hydraulic Characteristics of Anatase Titania Nanofluids Flowing Through a Circular Conduit.

    PubMed

    Kristiawan, Budi; Kamal, Samsul; Yanuar

    2016-06-01

    The thermo-hydraulic characteristics of anatase titanium dioxide dispersed into distilled water with particle concentration of 0.1, 0.3, and 0.5 vol.% were investigated experimentally in this work. The influence of rheological behavior on hydrodynamic and convective heat transfer characteristics was evaluated under both laminar and turbulent flow conditions in a plain conduit and with twisted tape insert for twist ratio of 7. The nanofluids exhibited a strong shear-thinning behavior at low shear rate particularly higher particle concentration. The non-Newtonian titania nanofluids have also demonstrated a drag reduction phenomena in turbulent flow. At equal Reynolds number, the values of performance evaluation criterion in a conduit inserted a twisted tape were lower than those of in a plain conduit. It implies the unfavourable energy budget for twisted tape insert. The convective heat transfer coefficient does not gradually enhance with an increase of particle concentration. The flow features due mainly to the rheology of colloidal dispersions might be a reason for this phenomenon. PMID:27427674

  4. Rootless cone eruption processes informed by dissected tephra deposits and conduits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, P.; Brown, R. J.; Thordarson, T.; Llewellin, E. W.; Fielding, K.

    2015-09-01

    Rootless cones result from the explosive interaction between lava flows and underlying water-saturated sediment or volcaniclastic deposits. Rootless explosions can represent a significant far-field hazard during basaltic eruptions, but there are few detailed studies of their deposits. A rootless cone field in the 8.5 Ma Ice Harbor flow field of the Columbia River Basalt Province, NW USA, is revealed by sections through rootless conduit and cone structures. The Ice Harbor lava flow hosting the rootless cones was emplaced across a floodplain or lacustrine environment that had recently been mantled by a layer of silicic volcanic ash from a major explosive eruption. Our observations indicate a two-stage growth model for the rootless cones: (1) initial explosions generated sediment-rich tephra emplaced by fallout and pyroclastic density currents and (2) later weaker explosions that generated spatter-rich fountains. Variable explosive activity resulted in a wide range of pyroclast morphologies and vesicularities. Cross-sections through funnel-shaped conduits also show how the conduits were constructed and stabilised. The growth model is consistent with decreasing water availability with time, as inferred for rootless cones described in Iceland. The Ice Harbor rootless cones provide further lithological data to help distinguish between rootless cone-derived tephra and tephra generated above an erupting dyke.

  5. Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery Using the Radial Artery as a Secondary Conduit Improves Patient Survival

    PubMed Central

    Lin, John; Cheng, Wen; Czer, Lawrence S.; De Robertis, Michele A.; Mirocha, James; Ruzza, Andrea; Kass, Robert M.; Khoynezhad, Ali; Ramzy, Danny; Esmailian, Fardad; Trento, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    Background The clinical benefits of the left internal thoracic artery–to–left anterior descending coronary artery graft are well established in coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG). However, limited data are available regarding the long‐term outcome of the radial artery (RA) as a secondary conduit over the established standard of the saphenous venous graft. Methods and Results We compared the 12‐year survival outcome in a set of propensity‐matched CABG patients who received either the RA or the saphenous vein as a secondary conduit. A multivariable logistic regression that included 18 baseline characteristics was used to define the propensity of receiving an RA graft. The propensity model resulted in 260 matched pairs who underwent first‐time isolated CABG from 1996 to 2001 with similar preoperative characteristics (C statistic=0.86). The cumulative 12‐year survival estimated by use of the Kaplan–Meier method was higher for the RA graft patients (hazard ratio 0.76; P=0.03). This survival advantage was especially significant in diabetics (P=0.005), in women (P=0.02), and in the elderly (P=0.04.) The protective effect appeared beginning at year 5 post surgical intervention. Conclusion The RA as a secondary conduit provided superior long‐term survival after CABG, especially in diabetic patients, women, and the elderly. This effect was most pronounced >5 years after surgery. PMID:23969224

  6. Non-Newtonian rheology of bubble-bearing magmas: effects on conduit dynamics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colucci, Simone; Papale, Paolo; Montagna, Chiara

    2015-04-01

    Non-Newtonian rheology typically arises in magmas from the presence of a dispersed phase. In particular bubbles can reduce or increase the relative viscosity, depending on size and strain regime (i.e., capillary number), for example large bubbles, as well as low strain, reduce the apparent viscosity. In a Non-Newtonian regime it is not possible to define a strain-rate-independent viscosity and the velocity profile is complex. In this work we extended the 1D, steady, isothermal, multiphase non-homogeneous magma ascent model of Papale (2001) to 1.5D to include the Non-Newtonian effect of a bubble-bearing magma. The model has been tested with a basaltic test case. In this way we were able to calculate depth-dependent Non-newtonian velocity profiles across the conduit radius along with shear strain-rate and viscosity distributions. Moreover, the model could quantify the effects of the Non-Newtonian rheology on conduit flow dynamics, in terms of flow variables (e.g. velocity, pressure). P. Papale (2001). Dynamics of magma flow in volcanic conduits with variable fragmentation efficiency and nonequilibrium pumice degassing. JGR, 106, 11043-11065.

  7. Long distance seawater intrusion through a karst conduit network in the Woodville Karst Plain, Florida.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zexuan; Bassett, Seth Willis; Hu, Bill; Dyer, Scott Barrett

    2016-01-01

    Five periods of increased electrical conductivity have been found in the karst conduits supplying one of the largest first magnitude springs in Florida with water. Numerous well-developed conduit networks are distributed in the Woodville Karst Plain (WKP), Florida and connected to the Gulf of Mexico. A composite analysis of precipitation and electrical conductivity data provides strong evidence that the increases in conductivity are directly tied to seawater intrusion moving inland and traveling 11 miles against the prevailing regional hydraulic gradient from from Spring Creek Spring Complex (SCSC), a group of submarine springs at the Gulf Coast. A geochemical analysis of samples from the spring vent rules out anthropogenic contamination and upwelling regional recharge from the deep aquifer as sources of the rising conductivity. The interpretation is supported by the conceptual model established by prior researchers working to characterize the study area. This paper documents the first and longest case of seawater intrusion in the WKP, and also indicates significant possibility of seawater contamination through subsurface conduit networks in a coastal karst aquifer. PMID:27557803

  8. X-ray computed-tomography imaging of gas migration in water-saturated sediments: From capillary invasion to conduit opening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jeong-Hoon; Seol, Yongkoo; Boswell, Ray; Juanes, Ruben

    2011-09-01

    The strong coupling between multiphase flow and sediment mechanics determines the spatial distribution and migration dynamics of gas percolating through liquid-filled soft granular media. Here, we investigate, by means of controlled experiments and computed tomography (CT) imaging, the preferential mode of gas migration in three-dimensional samples of water-saturated silica-sand and silica-silt sediments. Our experimental system allowed us to independently control radial and axial confining stresses and pore pressure while performing continuous x-ray CT scanning. The CT image analysis of the three-dimensional gas migration provides the first experimental confirmation that capillary invasion preferentially occurs in coarse-grained sediments whereas grain displacement and conduit openings are dominant in fine-grained sediments. Our findings allow us to rationalize prior field observations and pore-scale modeling results, and provide critical experimental evidence to explain the means by which conduits for the transit of methane gas may be established through the gas hydrate stability zone in oceanic sediments, and cause large episodic releases of carbon into the deep ocean.

  9. Conduit process in vulcanian eruptions at Sakurajima volcano, Japan: Inference from comparison of volcanic ash with pressure wave and seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miwa, T.; Toramaru, A.

    2013-01-01

    To elucidate the conduit processes controlling the amplitude of air pressure waves ( A pw) from vulcanian eruptions at the Sakurajima volcano, Japan, we examine ash particles emitted by eruptions preceded by swarms of low-frequency B-type earthquakes (BL-swarms). We measure the water content of glassy ash, an indicator of shallow magma storage pressure, and vesicle textures, such as vesicle number density (VND). These data allow us to reconstruct the shallow conduit by comparing vesicularity with inferred pressure, and therefore depth, of magma storage. The results show that VND increases with depth, implying formation of a dense, outgassed magma cap underlain by more-vesicular, less-outgassed, magma. The VND and water content in the glassy ash positively correlate with the duration of BL-swarms, suggesting that such seismic signals reflect upward migration of deep gas- and vesicle-rich magma. Finally, it is determined that A pw positively correlates with VND, suggesting that the amplitude of the air pressure waves is controlled by the amount of accumulated gas- and bubble-rich magma below the dense magma cap.

  10. Application of near real-time radial semblance to locate the shallow magmatic conduit at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dawson, P.; Whilldin, D.; Chouet, B.

    2004-01-01

    Radial Semblance is applied to broadband seismic network data to provide source locations of Very-Long-Period (VLP) seismic energy in near real time. With an efficient algorithm and adequate network coverage, accurate source locations of VLP energy are derived to quickly locate the shallow magmatic conduit system at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii. During a restart in magma flow following a brief pause in the current eruption, the shallow magmatic conduit is pressurized, resulting in elastic radiation from various parts of the conduit system. A steeply dipping distribution of VLP hypocenters outlines a region extending from sea level to about 550 m elevation below and just east of the Halemaumau Pit Crater. The distinct hypocenters suggest the shallow plumbing system beneath Halemaumau consists of a complex plexus of sills and dikes. An unconstrained location for a section of the conduit is also observed beneath the region between Kilauea Caldera and Kilauea Iki Crater.

  11. Development and evaluation of a pliable biological valved conduit. Part I: Preparation, biochemical properties, and histological findings.

    PubMed

    Noishiki, Y; Hata, C; Tu, R; Shen, S H; Lin, D; Sung, H W; Witzel, T; Wang, E; Thyagarajan, K; Tomizawa, Y

    1993-04-01

    Different types of external valved conduits have been used for the repair of complex congenital cardiac anomalies that may have otherwise been inoperable. However, an ideal conduit has yet to be found due to complications such as stenosis, thrombosis, calcification of the valve and graft wall, and "peeling" of the neointima. To address those problems, a new extracardiac valved conduit made of bovine jugular vein was developed and evaluated in a preliminary animal study. Harvested bovine vein containing a naturally existing valve was initially incorporated with protamine on the inner surface and then was cross-linked in diglycidyl ether (DE). Fixation with DE allowed the vein and its leaflets to retain a tissue-like elasticity. To provide antithrombogenicity to the graft, heparin was introduced into the lumen to bind ionically to the pre-entrapped protamine. The biological valved conduit of approximately 14 mm diameter was implanted from the right ventricle to pulmonary artery as bypass graft in three dogs. After implantation, the native main pulmonary artery was ligated between the anastomotic sites of the bypass conduit. No anticoagulant or antiplatelet drugs were administered after surgery. One DE-fixed valved conduit was retrieved at 3 months, and the others were removed at 5 months. Only small thrombus areas were found on the white luminal surfaces. The valves and the conduits maintained softness and pliability, similar to before implantation. Additionally, the collagen content, shrink temperature, and tanning index of this newly developed biological valved conduit before and after fixation were measured in the study.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8325696

  12. Conduit margin heating and deformation during the AD 1886 basaltic Plinian eruption at Tarawera volcano, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schauroth, Jenny; Wadsworth, Fabian B.; Kennedy, Ben; von Aulock, Felix W.; Lavallée, Yan; Damby, David E.; Vasseur, Jérémie; Scheu, Bettina; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2016-02-01

    During explosive eruptions, a suspension of gas and pyroclasts rises rapidly within a conduit. Here, we have analysed textures preserved in the walls of a pyroclastic feeder dyke of the AD 1886 Tarawera basaltic Plinian fissure eruption. The samples examined consist of basaltic ash and scoria plastered onto a conduit wall of a coherent rhyolite dome and a welded rhyolitic dome breccia. We examine the textural evidence for the response of the wall material, built of ˜75 vol.% glass and ˜25 vol.% crystals (pore-free equivalent), to mass movement in the adjacent conduit. In the rhyolitic wall material, we quantify the orientation and aspect ratio of biotite crystals as strain markers of simple shear deformation, and interpret juxtaposed regions of vesiculation and vesicle collapse as evidence of conduit wall heating. Systematic changes occur close to the margin: (1) porosity is highly variable, with areas locally vesiculated or densified, (2) biotite crystals are oriented with their long axis parallel to the margin, (3) the biotites have greater aspect ratios close to the margin and (4) the biotite crystals are fractured. We interpret the biotite phenocryst deformation to result from crystal fracture, rotation and cleavage-parallel bookcase translation. These textural observations are inferred to indicate mechanical coupling between the hot gas-ash jet and the conduit wall and reheating of wall rock rhyolite. We couple these observations with a simple 1D conductive heating model to show what minimum temperature the conduit wall needs to reach in order to achieve a temperature above the glass transition throughout the texturally-defined deformed zone. We propose that conduit wall heating and resulting deformation influences conduit margin outgassing and may enhance the intensity of such large basaltic eruptions.

  13. Sciatic nerve regeneration in rats by a promising electrospun collagen/poly(ε-caprolactone) nerve conduit with tailored degradation rate

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To cope with the limitations faced by autograft acquisitions particularly for multiple nerve injuries, artificial nerve conduit has been introduced by researchers as a substitute for autologous nerve graft for the easy specification and availability for mass production. In order to best mimic the structures and components of autologous nerve, great efforts have been made to improve the designation of nerve conduits either from materials or fabrication techniques. Electrospinning is an easy and versatile technique that has recently been used to fabricate fibrous tissue-engineered scaffolds which have great similarity to the extracellular matrix on fiber structure. Results In this study we fabricated a collagen/poly(ε-caprolactone) (collagen/PCL) fibrous scaffold by electrospinning and explored its application as nerve guide substrate or conduit in vitro and in vivo. Material characterizations showed this electrospun composite material which was made of submicron fibers possessed good hydrophilicity and flexibility. In vitro study indicated electrospun collagen/PCL fibrous meshes promoted Schwann cell adhesion, elongation and proliferation. In vivo test showed electrospun collagen/PCL porous nerve conduits successfully supported nerve regeneration through an 8 mm sciatic nerve gap in adult rats, achieving similar electrophysiological and muscle reinnervation results as autografts. Although regenerated nerve fibers were still in a pre-mature stage 4 months postoperatively, the implanted collagen/PCL nerve conduits facilitated more axons regenerating through the conduit lumen and gradually degraded which well matched the nerve regeneration rate. Conclusions All the results demonstrated this collagen/PCL nerve conduit with tailored degradation rate fabricated by electrospinning could be an efficient alternative to autograft for peripheral nerve regeneration research. Due to its advantage of high surface area for cell attachment, it is believed that this

  14. Resonances of a Volcanic Conduit Triggered by Repetitive Injections of an Ash-laden gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina, I.; Kumagai, H.; Yepes, H.

    2003-12-01

    Tungurahua Volcano, located at the center of the Ecuadorian Andes, entered in eruption characterized by ash emissions, vulcanian and strombolian activities in October 1999. There have been 7 to 10 short-period seismic stations and 1 broadband station to monitor the Tungurahua volcanic activity. Between December 5 and 11, 2001, a swarm of long-period (LP) events occurred. The LP waveform is characterized by screw-shaped harmonic oscillations. In this study, we used the LP waveforms to calculate temporal variations in their complex frequencies (frequency, f and quality factor, Q) to understand the source process associated with this activity. We applied the Sompi spectral method to 57 LP waveforms from the station RETU, which provided the best continuous data in the Tungurahua seismic network. We determined the temporal variations in the complex frequencies of the LP events, which indicated that the frequency gradually decreased from 3.5 to 2 Hz, whereas Q gradually increased from 100 to 400 with wide scatter along this trend. Based on the acoustic properties of a crack containing various types of magmatic and hydrothermal fluids, the observed high Q values can only be explained by a large velocity contrast between the surrounding rock and fluid. Such a high velocity contrast suggests ash-gas or water droplet-gas mixtures in a crack developed in the solid rock. Since the LP events are most probably located around 2 km below the summit, a water droplet (liquid water) may not exist at this source depth. We may therefore reasonably assume that the fluid at the source of the LP events is an ash-gas mixture. We propose that an ash-laden gas was injected into a closed conduit (pre-existing crack) just above the magmatic system, causing the resonance of the conduit or an LP event. This process repeatedly occurred and accumulated ash particles in the conduit, generating the temporal variations in the frequency and Q of the LP events. Finally, the conduit was almost filled

  15. Incorporation of cooling-induced crystallization into a 2-dimensional axisymmetric conduit heat flow model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heptinstall, David; Bouvet de Maisonneuve, Caroline; Neuberg, Jurgen; Taisne, Benoit; Collinson, Amy

    2016-04-01

    Heat flow models can bring new insights into the thermal and rheological evolution of volcanic 3 systems. We shall investigate the thermal processes and timescales in a crystallizing, static 4 magma column, with a heat flow model of Soufriere Hills Volcano (SHV), Montserrat. The latent heat of crystallization is initially computed with MELTS, as a function of pressure and temperature for an andesitic melt (SHV groundmass starting composition). Three fractional crystallization simulations are performed; two with initial pressures of 34MPa (runs 1 & 2) and one of 25MPa (run 3). Decompression rate was varied between 0.1MPa/° C (runs 1 & 3) and 0.2MPa/° C (run 2). Natural and experimental matrix glass compositions are accurately reproduced by all MELTS runs. The cumulative latent heat released for runs 1, 2 and 3 differs by less than 9% (8.69E5 J/kg*K, 9.32E5 J/kg*K, and 9.49E5 J/kg*K respectively). The 2D axisymmetric conductive cooling simulations consider a 30m-diameter conduit that extends from the surface to a depth of 1500m (34MPa). The temporal evolution of temperature is closely tracked at depths of 10m, 750m and 1400m in the centre of the conduit, at the conduit walls, and 20m from the walls into the host rock. Following initial cooling by 7-15oC at 10m depth inside the conduit, the magma temperature rebounds through latent heat release by 32-35oC over 85-123 days to a maximum temperature of 1002-1005oC. At 10m depth, it takes 4.1-9.2 years for the magma column to cool by 108-131oC and crystallize to 75wt%, at which point it cannot be easily remobilized. It takes 11-31.5 years to reach the same crystallinity at 750-1400m depth. We find a wide range in cooling timescales, particularly at depths of 750m or greater, attributed to the initial run pressure and the dominant latent heat producing crystallizing phase, Albite-rich Plagioclase Feldspar. Run 1 is shown to cool fastest and run 3 cool the slowest, with surface emissivity having the strongest cooling

  16. B-cell follicle development remodels the conduit system and allows soluble antigen delivery to follicular dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Germain, Ronald N.

    2009-01-01

    Afferent lymph is transported throughout lymph nodes (LNs) by the conduit system. Whereas this conduit network is dense in the T-cell zone, it is sparse in B-cell follicles. In this study, we show that this differential organization emerges during lymph node development. Neonatal LNs lack B follicles, but have a developed T-cell zone and a dense conduit network. As new T and B cells enter the developing LN, the conduit network density is maintained in the T, but not the B zone, leading to a profound remodeling of the follicular network that nevertheless maintains its connectivity. In adults, the residual follicular conduits transport soluble antigen to deep regions, where follicular dendritic cells are abundant and appear to replace the fibroblastic reticular cells that enwrap conduits in the T zone. This strategic location correlates with the capacity of the follicular dendritic cells to capture antigen even in the absence of antigen-specific antibodies. Together, these results describe how the stromal organization of the T and B regions of LNs diverges during development, giving rise to distinct antigen transport and delivery modes in the 2 compartments. PMID:19713459

  17. Combined use of Y-tube conduits with human umbilical cord stem cells for repairing nerve bifurcation defects.

    PubMed

    Muheremu, Aikeremujiang; Sun, Jun-Gang; Wang, Xi-Yuan; Zhang, Fei; Ao, Qiang; Peng, Jiang

    2016-04-01

    Given the anatomic complexity at the bifurcation point of a nerve trunk, enforced suturing between stumps can lead to misdirection of nerve axons, thereby resulting in adverse consequences. We assumed that Y-tube conduits injected with human umbilical cord stem cells could be an effective method to solve such problems, but studies focused on the best type of Y-tube conduit remain controversial. Therefore, the present study evaluated the applicability and efficacy of various types of Y-tube conduits containing human umbilical cord stem cells for treating rat femoral nerve defects on their bifurcation points. At 12 weeks after the bridging surgery that included treatment with different types of Y-tube conduits, there were no differences in quadriceps femoris muscle weight or femoral nerve ultrastructure. However, the Y-tube conduit group with longer branches and a short trunk resulted in a better outcome according to retrograde labeling and electrophysiological analysis. It can be concluded from the study that repairing a mixed nerve defect at its bifurcation point with Y-tube conduits, in particular those with long branches and a short trunk, is effective and results in good outcomes. PMID:27212932

  18. Combined use of Y-tube conduits with human umbilical cord stem cells for repairing nerve bifurcation defects

    PubMed Central

    Muheremu, Aikeremujiang; Sun, Jun-gang; Wang, Xi-yuan; Zhang, Fei; Ao, Qiang; Peng, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Given the anatomic complexity at the bifurcation point of a nerve trunk, enforced suturing between stumps can lead to misdirection of nerve axons, thereby resulting in adverse consequences. We assumed that Y-tube conduits injected with human umbilical cord stem cells could be an effective method to solve such problems, but studies focused on the best type of Y-tube conduit remain controversial. Therefore, the present study evaluated the applicability and efficacy of various types of Y-tube conduits containing human umbilical cord stem cells for treating rat femoral nerve defects on their bifurcation points. At 12 weeks after the bridging surgery that included treatment with different types of Y-tube conduits, there were no differences in quadriceps femoris muscle weight or femoral nerve ultrastructure. However, the Y-tube conduit group with longer branches and a short trunk resulted in a better outcome according to retrograde labeling and electrophysiological analysis. It can be concluded from the study that repairing a mixed nerve defect at its bifurcation point with Y-tube conduits, in particular those with long branches and a short trunk, is effective and results in good outcomes. PMID:27212932

  19. Linking observations at active volcanoes to physical processes through conduit flow modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Mark; Neuberg, Jurgen

    2010-05-01

    Low frequency seismic events observed on volcanoes such as Soufriere hills, Montserrat may offer key indications about the state of a volcanic system. To obtain a better understanding of the source of these events and of the physical processes that take place within a volcano it is necessary to understand the conditions of magma a depth. This can be achieved through conduit flow modelling (Collier & Neuberg, 2006). 2-D compressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved through a Finite Element approach, for differing initial water and crystal contents, magma temperatures, chamber overpressures and geometric shapes of conduit. In the fully interdependent modelled system each of these variables has an effect on the magma density, viscosity, gas content, and also the pressure within the flow. These variables in turn affect the magma ascent velocity and the overall eruption dynamics of an active system. Of particular interest are the changes engendered in the flow by relativity small variations in the conduit geometry. These changes can have a profound local effect of the ascent velocity of the magma. By restricting the width of 15m wide, 5000m long vertical conduit over a 100m distance a significant acceleration of the magma is seen in this area. This has implications for the generation of Low-Frequency (LF) events at volcanic systems. The strain-induced fracture of viscoelastic magma or brittle failure of melt has been previously discussed as a possible source of LF events by several authors (e.g. Tuffen et al., 2003; Neuberg et al., 2006). The location of such brittle failure however has been seen to occur at relativity shallow depths (<1000m), which does not agree with the location of recorded LF events. By varying the geometry of the conduit and causing accelerations in the magma flow, localised increases in the shear strain rate of up to 30% are observed. This provides a mechanism of increasing the depth over witch brittle failure of melt may occur. A key observable

  20. Conduit Processes Driving Pre-explosive Harmonic Tremor in the 2009 Redoubt Volcano Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summers, P.; Dunham, E. M.

    2013-12-01

    During the 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska, gliding harmonic tremor was observed before many vulcanian explosions. Though harmonic tremor is relatively common at volcanoes, the high fundamental frequency of these tremors (up to 30 Hz) is unique and of particular interest. Hotovec et al. (JVGR, 2013) linked this tremor to rapidly repeating magnitude ~1 earthquakes located a few kilometers beneath the vent. These events might be occurring as brittle failure of the magma or as slip along the margins of an obstruction within the conduit. Using a frictional faulting model, Dmitrieva et al. (Nature Geoscience, 2013) converted the seismicity and tremor signals into an estimate of the history of shear stresses acting on the fault surface and causing slip. Stressing rates increased, in a nonlinear manner, from less than 1 MPa/s to about 20 MPa/s over the final ten minutes before the explosions. Here we investigate what conduit processes could plausibly be responsible for such high stressing rates. One possibility is that a blockage develops in the conduit prior to each explosion, perhaps from a crystal-rich magma plug or collapse of the conduit walls. This obstacle temporarily prevents upward flow of magma, while deeper influx from below thus compresses and pressurizes magma in the conduit beneath the blockage. This compression largely occurs between the base of the obstruction and the H2O exsolution depth, which petrologic estimates of volatile content and standard solubility laws suggest is nominally located about a kilometer or two deeper than the blockage. We solve the unsteady conduit flow equations (mass and momentum balance for a compressible, viscous mixture of gas and liquid). Gas exsolution is treated with Henry's law, and in our present models exsolution begins abruptly below a critical pressure. No flow is permitted past the blockage and the system is driven by steady influx at depth. We find that as magma accumulates within the conduit beneath the

  1. Application of a new multiphase multicomponent volcanic conduit model with magma degassing and crystallization to Stromboli volcano.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Spina, Giuseppe; Burton, Mike; de'Michieli Vitturi, Mattia

    2014-05-01

    reproduce both effusive and explosive eruptive activities at Stromboli volcano. Three different crystal components (olivine, pyroxene and feldspar) and two different gas species (water and carbon dioxide) are taken into account. The equilibrium profiles of crystallization as function of pressure, temperature and water content are modeled using the numerical codes AlphaMELTS and DAKOTA. The equilibrium of dissolved gas content, instead, is obtained using a non-linear fitting of data computed using VolatileCALC. With these data, we simulate numerically the lava effusion that occurred at Stromboli between 27 February and 2 April 2007, and find good agreement with the observed data (vesicularity, exsolved gas composition, crystal content and mass flow rate) at the vent. We find that the model is highly sensitive to input magma temperature, going from effusive to explosive eruption with temperature changes by just 20 °C. We thoroughly investigated through a sensitivity analysis the control of the temperature of magma chamber and of the radius of the conduit on the mass flow rate, obtaining also a set of admissible temperatures and conduit radii that produce results in agreement with the real observations.

  2. Electrospun and woven silk fibroin/poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nerve guidance conduits for repairing peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ya-Ling; Gu, Xiao-Mei; Kong, Yan; Feng, Qi-Lin; Yang, Yu-Min

    2015-10-01

    We have designed a novel nerve guidance conduit (NGC) made from silk fibroin and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) through electrospinning and weaving (ESP-NGCs). Several physical and biological properties of the ESP-NGCs were assessed in order to evaluate their biocompatibility. The physical properties, including thickness, tensile stiffness, infrared spectroscopy, porosity, and water absorption were determined in vitro. To assess the biological properties, Schwann cells were cultured in ESP-NGC extracts and were assessed by morphological observation, the MTT assay, and immunohistochemistry. In addition, ESP-NGCs were subcutaneously implanted in the backs of rabbits to evaluate their biocompatibility in vivo. The results showed that ESP-NGCs have high porosity, strong hydrophilicity, and strong tensile stiffness. Schwann cells cultured in the ESP-NGC extract fluids showed no significant differences compared to control cells in their morphology or viability. Histological evaluation of the ESP-NGCs implanted in vivo indicated a mild inflammatory reaction and high biocompatibility. Together, these data suggest that these novel ESP-NGCs are biocompatible, and may thus provide a reliable scaffold for peripheral nerve repair in clinical application. PMID:26692862

  3. Electrospun and woven silk fibroin/poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nerve guidance conduits for repairing peripheral nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ya-ling; Gu, Xiao-mei; Kong, Yan; Feng, Qi-lin; Yang, Yu-min

    2015-01-01

    We have designed a novel nerve guidance conduit (NGC) made from silk fibroin and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) through electrospinning and weaving (ESP-NGCs). Several physical and biological properties of the ESP-NGCs were assessed in order to evaluate their biocompatibility. The physical properties, including thickness, tensile stiffness, infrared spectroscopy, porosity, and water absorption were determined in vitro. To assess the biological properties, Schwann cells were cultured in ESP-NGC extracts and were assessed by morphological observation, the MTT assay, and immunohistochemistry. In addition, ESP-NGCs were subcutaneously implanted in the backs of rabbits to evaluate their biocompatibility in vivo. The results showed that ESP-NGCs have high porosity, strong hydrophilicity, and strong tensile stiffness. Schwann cells cultured in the ESP-NGC extract fluids showed no significant differences compared to control cells in their morphology or viability. Histological evaluation of the ESP-NGCs implanted in vivo indicated a mild inflammatory reaction and high biocompatibility. Together, these data suggest that these novel ESP-NGCs are biocompatible, and may thus provide a reliable scaffold for peripheral nerve repair in clinical application. PMID:26692862

  4. The use of electrical resistivity techniques to detect an underground conduit in the karst regions of the Inner Bluegrass

    SciTech Connect

    Bonita, J.; Sendlein, L.V.A. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-03-01

    Electrical resistivity studies conducted within the Inner Bluegrass Karst Region have been employed to map the presence of a fracture controlled solution that drains the royal Spring Basin. Exist theories by authors such as Thrailkill (1982) suggest that the Inner Bluegrass Karst Region is divided into basin and interbasin areas, with the zone of active meteoric water circulation at deep depths below the surface in basin areas and flow within a few meters of the surface in interbasin areas. Initial resistivity soundings were performed along various traverses to access information on the underlying lexington Limestone. Sounding curves calculated form the modeling program RESIX indicate that low resistivity zones occur at two distinctly different depth intervals, denoting the boundary between the basin and interbasin areas. Information from electric resistivity profiles within this now defined basin area indicate resistivity anomalies trending in linear segments of N45W and N40E. Fracture and joint orientation measurements at roadcuts and on topographic maps and air photographs also indicate a preferential orientation parallel to the orientation of the linear segments of the conduit.

  5. Nano bubble migration in a tapered conduit in the asymptotic limits of zero capillary and Bond Numbers - Theory and Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, Michael; Ross, Frances; Bau, Haim

    2015-11-01

    Using a hermetically sealed liquid cell, we observed the growth and migration of bubbles (tens to hundreds of nanometers in diameter) in a tapered conduit and supersaturated solution with a transmission electron microscope. To better understand bubble shape and migration dynamics, we developed simple 2D and 3D models valid in the limit of zero capillary and Bond numbers. The 3D model is restricted to small taper slope, weakly non-circular contact line geometries and large bubble aspect ratio (high confinement), and was solved using a pseudo-spectral decomposition. Both models utilize the Blake-Haynes mechanism to relate dynamic contact angle to local contact line velocity The influence of pinning of a portion of the contact line on bubble geometry is also considered. Contact line dissipation controls curvature and regulates growth rate. Our 2D and 3D models predict growth rates in agreement with experimental observations, but several orders of magnitude lower than predicted by the classical Epstein - Plesset theory. The work was supported, in part, by NSF CBET grant 1066573.

  6. Confort 15 model of conduit dynamics: applications to Pantelleria Green Tuff and Etna 122 BC eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campagnola, S.; Romano, C.; Mastin, L. G.; Vona, A.

    2016-06-01

    Numerical simulations are useful tools to illustrate how flow parameters and physical processes may affect eruption dynamics of volcanoes. In this paper, we present an updated version of the Conflow model, an open-source numerical model for flow in eruptive conduits during steady-state pyroclastic eruptions (Mastin and Ghiorso in A numerical program for steady-state flow of magma-gas mixtures through vertical eruptive conduits. U.S. Geological Survey Open File Report 00-209, 2000). In the modified version, called Confort 15, the rheological constraints are improved, incorporating the most recent constitutive equations of both the liquid viscosity and crystal-bearing rheology. This allows all natural magma compositions, including the peralkaline melts excluded in the original version, to be investigated. The crystal-bearing rheology is improved by computing the effect of strain rate and crystal shape on the rheology of natural magmatic suspensions and expanding the crystal content range in which rheology can be modeled compared to the original version ( Conflow is applicable to magmatic mixtures with up to 30 vol% crystal content). Moreover, volcanological studies of the juvenile products (crystal and vesicle size distribution) of the investigated eruption are directly incorporated into the modeling procedure. Vesicle number densities derived from textural analyses are used to calculate, through Toramaru equations, maximum decompression rates experienced during ascent. Finally, both degassing under equilibrium and disequilibrium conditions are considered. This allows considerations on the effect of different fragmentation criteria on the conduit flow analyses, the maximum volume fraction criterion ("porosity criterion"), the brittle fragmentation criterion and the overpressure fragmentation criterion. Simulations of the pantelleritic and trachytic phases of the Green Tuff (Pantelleria) and of the Plinian Etna 122 BC eruptions are performed to test the upgrades in

  7. Confort 15 model of conduit dynamics: applications to Pantelleria Green Tuff and Etna 122 BC eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campagnola, S.; Romano, C.; Mastin, L. G.; Vona, A.

    2016-06-01

    Numerical simulations are useful tools to illustrate how flow parameters and physical processes may affect eruption dynamics of volcanoes. In this paper, we present an updated version of the Conflow model, an open-source numerical model for flow in eruptive conduits during steady-state pyroclastic eruptions (Mastin and Ghiorso in A numerical program for steady-state flow of magma-gas mixtures through vertical eruptive conduits. U.S. Geological Survey Open File Report 00-209, 2000). In the modified version, called Confort 15, the rheological constraints are improved, incorporating the most recent constitutive equations of both the liquid viscosity and crystal-bearing rheology. This allows all natural magma compositions, including the peralkaline melts excluded in the original version, to be investigated. The crystal-bearing rheology is improved by computing the effect of strain rate and crystal shape on the rheology of natural magmatic suspensions and expanding the crystal content range in which rheology can be modeled compared to the original version ( Conflow is applicable to magmatic mixtures with up to 30 vol% crystal content). Moreover, volcanological studies of the juvenile products (crystal and vesicle size distribution) of the investigated eruption are directly incorporated into the modeling procedure. Vesicle number densities derived from textural analyses are used to calculate, through Toramaru equations, maximum decompression rates experienced during ascent. Finally, both degassing under equilibrium and disequilibrium conditions are considered. This allows considerations on the effect of different fragmentation criteria on the conduit flow analyses, the maximum volume fraction criterion ("porosity criterion"), the brittle fragmentation criterion and the overpressure fragmentation criterion. Simulations of the pantelleritic and trachytic phases of the Green Tuff (Pantelleria) and of the Plinian Etna 122 BC eruptions are performed to test the upgrades in

  8. A comparison of the performance of mono- and bi-component electrospun conduits in a rat sciatic model

    PubMed Central

    Cirillo, Valentina; Clements, Basak A.; Guarino, Vincenzo; Bushman, Jared; Kohn, Joachim; Ambrosio, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic nerve conduits represent a promising strategy to enhance functional recovery in peripheral nerve injury repair. However, the efficiency of synthetic nerve conduits is often compromised by the lack of molecular factors to create an enriched microenvironment for nerve regeneration. Here, we investigate the in vivo response of mono (MC) and bi-component (BC) fibrous conduits obtained by processing via electrospinning poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) and gelatin solutions. In vitro studies demonstrate that the inclusion of gelatin leads to uniform electrospun fiber size and positively influences the response of Dorsal Root Ganglia (DRGs) neurons as confirmed by the preferential extensions of neurites from DRG bodies. This behavior can be attributed to gelatin as a bioactive cue for the cultured DRG and to the reduced fibers size. However, in vivo studies in rat sciatic nerve defect model show an opposite response: MC conduits stimulate superior nerve regeneration than gelatin containing PCL conduits as confirmed by electrophysiology, muscle weight and histology. The G-ratio, 0.71 ± 0.07 for MC and 0.66 ± 0.05 for autograft, is close to 0.6, the value measured in healthy nerves. In contrast, BC implants elicited a strong host response and infiltrating tissue occluded the conduits preventing the formation of myelinated axons. Therefore, although gelatin promotes in vitro nerve regeneration, we conclude that bi-component electrospun conduits are not satisfactory in vivo due to intrinsic limits to their mechanical performance and degradation kinetics, which are essential to peripheral nerve regeneration in vivo. PMID:25085857

  9. A comparison of the performance of mono- and bi-component electrospun conduits in a rat sciatic model.

    PubMed

    Cirillo, Valentina; Clements, Basak A; Guarino, Vincenzo; Bushman, Jared; Kohn, Joachim; Ambrosio, Luigi

    2014-10-01

    Synthetic nerve conduits represent a promising strategy to enhance functional recovery in peripheral nerve injury repair. However, the efficiency of synthetic nerve conduits is often compromised by the lack of molecular factors to create an enriched microenvironment for nerve regeneration. Here, we investigate the in vivo response of mono (MC) and bi-component (BC) fibrous conduits obtained by processing via electrospinning poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) and gelatin solutions. In vitro studies demonstrate that the inclusion of gelatin leads to uniform electrospun fiber size and positively influences the response of Dorsal Root Ganglia (DRGs) neurons as confirmed by the preferential extensions of neurites from DRG bodies. This behavior can be attributed to gelatin as a bioactive cue for the cultured DRG and to the reduced fibers size. However, in vivo studies in rat sciatic nerve defect model show an opposite response: MC conduits stimulate superior nerve regeneration than gelatin containing PCL conduits as confirmed by electrophysiology, muscle weight and histology. The G-ratio, 0.71 ± 0.07 for MC and 0.66 ± 0.05 for autograft, is close to 0.6, the value measured in healthy nerves. In contrast, BC implants elicited a strong host response and infiltrating tissue occluded the conduits preventing the formation of myelinated axons. Therefore, although gelatin promotes in vitro nerve regeneration, we conclude that bi-component electrospun conduits are not satisfactory in vivo due to intrinsic limits to their mechanical performance and degradation kinetics, which are essential to peripheral nerve regeneration in vivo. PMID:25085857

  10. A Linearized Model for Wave Propagation through Coupled Volcanic Conduit-crack Systems Filled with Multiphase Magma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, C.; Dunham, E. M.; OReilly, O. J.; Karlstrom, L.

    2015-12-01

    Both the oscillation of magma in volcanic conduits and resonance of fluid-filled cracks (dikes and sills) are appealing explanations for very long period signals recorded at many active volcanoes. While these processes have been studied in isolation, real volcanic systems involve interconnected networks of conduits and cracks. The overall objective of our work is to develop a model of wave propagation and ultimately eruptive fluid dynamics through this coupled system. Here, we present a linearized model for wave propagation through a conduit with multiple cracks branching off of it. The fluid is compressible and viscous, and is comprised of a mixture of liquid melt and gas bubbles. Nonequilibrium bubble growth and resorption (BGR) is quantified by introducing a time scale for mass exchange between phases, following the treatment in Karlstrom and Dunham (2015). We start by deriving the dispersion relation for crack waves travelling along the multiphase-magma-filled crack embedded in an elastic solid. Dissipation arises from magma viscosity, nonequilibrium BGR, and radiation of seismic waves into the solid. We next introduce coupling conditions between the conduit and crack, expressing conservation of mass and the balance of forces across the junction. Waves in the conduit, like those in the crack, are influenced by nonequilibrium BGR, but the deformability of the surrounding solid is far less important than for cracks. Solution of the coupled system of equations provides the evolution of pressure and fluid velocity within the conduit-crack system. The system has various resonant modes that are sensitive to fluid properties and to the geometry of the conduit and cracks. Numerical modeling of seismic waves in the solid allows us to generate synthetic seismograms.

  11. Mechanical properties and permeability of porous chitosan-poly(p-dioxanone)/silk fibroin conduits used for peripheral nerve repair.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hua; Zhang, Jun; Luo, Ying; Wan, Ying; Sun, Shaofa

    2015-10-01

    Some poly(p-dioxanone) (PDO) homopolymers were first synthesized and the selected PDO was conjugated onto chitosan using a group-protecting method to produce chitosan-poly(p-dioxanone) (CH-PDO) copolymers with various PDO percentages changing from around 30 to 60 wt%. The CH-PDO with the PDO content of around 42 wt% was used to blend with prescribed amounts of silk fibroin (SF) to build porous single-lumen conduits that are intended to be used for long-gap peripheral nerve repair. Some genipin-crosslinked CH-PDO/SF conduits were endowed with an average porosity of around 60% in their porous wall, and with changed pore-sizes varying from around 10 to ca. 70 μm using optimized processing conditions. After being degraded in a PBS medium containing a certain amount of lysozyme for various periods up to 8 weeks, some optimal CH-PDO/SF conduits were able to retain their compressive load and deformation recovery at around 59 N/m and 73% in wet state, respectively. In addition, the achieved CH-PDO/SF conduits allowed the permeation of nutritional molecules with various molecular weights while showing a certain ability to prevent cells from infiltrating through the conduit wall. Cell culture confirmed that the optimized CH-PDO/SF conduits were able well supported the growth of rat glioma C6 cells. These results suggest that presently developed CH-PDO/SF conduits have promising potential for long-gap peripheral nerve repair. PMID:26143352

  12. Laboratory analog and numerical study of groundwater flow and solute transport in a karst aquifer with conduit and matrix domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faulkner, Jonathan; Hu, Bill X.; Kish, Stephen; Hua, Fei

    2009-11-01

    New mathematical and laboratory methods have been developed for simulating groundwater flow and solute transport in karst aquifers having conduits imbedded in a porous medium, such as limestone. The Stokes equations are used to model the flow in the conduits and the Darcy equation is used for the flow in the matrix. The Beavers-Joseph interface boundary conditions are adopted to describe the flow exchange at the interface boundary between the two domains. A laboratory analog is used to simulate the conduit and matrix domains of a karst aquifer. The conduit domain is located at the bottom of the transparent plexiglas laboratory analog and glass beads occupy the remaining space to represent the matrix domain. Water flows into and out of the two domains separately and each has its own supply and outflow reservoirs. Water and solute are exchanged through an interface between the two domains. Pressure transducers located within the matrix and conduit domains of the analog provide data that is processed and stored in digital format. Dye tracing experiments are recorded using time-lapse imaging. The data and images produced are analyzed by a spatial analysis program. The experiments provide not only hydraulic head distribution but also capture solute front images and mass exchange measurements between the conduit and matrix domains. In the experiment, we measure and record pressures, and quantify flow rates and solute transport. The results present a plausible argument that laboratory analogs can characterize groundwater water flow, solute transport, and mass exchange between the conduit and matrix domains in a karst aquifer. The analog validates the predictions of a numerical model and demonstrates the need of laboratory analogs to provide verification of proposed theories and the calibration of mathematical models.

  13. Solute transport in solution conduits exhibiting multi-peaked breakthrough curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, Malcolm S.; Leij, Feike J.

    2012-05-01

    SummarySolute transport in karst aquifers is primarily constrained to solution conduits where transport is rapid, turbulent, and relatively unrestrictive. Breakthrough curves generated from tracer tests are typically positively-skewed and may exhibit multiple peaks. In order to understand the circumstances under which multi-peaked positively skewed breakthrough curves occur, physical experiments utilizing single- and multiple-flow channels were conducted. Experiments also included waterfalls, short-term solute detention in pools, and flow obstructions. Results demonstrated that breakthrough curve skewness nearly always occurs to some degree but is magnified as immobile-flow regions are encountered. Multi-peaked breakthrough curves occurred when flow in the main channel became partially occluded from blockage in the main channel that forced divergence of solute into auxiliary channels and when waterfalls and detention in pools occurred. Currently, multi-peaked breakthrough curves are fitted by a multi-dispersion model in which a series of curves generated by the advection-dispersion equation are fitted to each measured peak by superimposing the measured breakthrough curve to obtain a combined model fit with a consequent set of estimated velocities and dispersions. In this paper, a dual-advection dispersion equation with first-order mass transfer between conduits was derived. The dual-advection dispersion equation was then applied to the multi-peaked breakthrough curves obtained from the physical experiments in order to obtain some insight into the operative solute-transport processes through the acquisition of a consequent set of velocities, dispersions, and related parameters. Successful application of the dual-advection, dispersion equation to a tracer test that exhibited dual peaks for a karst aquifer known to consist of two connected but mostly separate conduits confirmed the appropriateness of using a multi-dispersion type model when conditions warrant.

  14. A robotic approach to mapping post-eruptive volcanic fissure conduits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parcheta, Carolyn E.; Pavlov, Catherine A.; Wiltsie, Nicholas; Carpenter, Kalind C.; Nash, Jeremy; Parness, Aaron; Mitchell, Karl L.

    2016-06-01

    VolcanoBot was developed to map volcanic vents and their underlying conduit systems, which are rarely preserved and generally inaccessible to human exploration. It uses a PrimeSense Carmine 1.09 sensor for mapping and carries an IR temperature sensor, analog distance sensor, and an inertial measurement unit (IMU) inside a protective shell. The first field test succeeded in collecting valuable scientific data but revealed several needed improvements, including more rugged cable connections and mechanical couplers, increased ground clearance, and higher-torque motors for uphill mobility. The second field test significantly improved on all of these aspects but it traded electrical ruggedness for reduced data collection speed. Data collected by the VolcanoBots, while intermittent, yield the first insights into the cm-scale geometry of volcanic fissures at depths of up to 25 m. VolcanoBot was deployed at the 1969 Mauna Ulu fissure system on Kīlauea volcano in Hawai'i. It collected first-of-its-kind data from inside the fissure system. We hypothesized that 1) fissure sinuosity should decrease with depth, 2) irregularity should be persistent with depth, 3) any blockages in the conduit should occur at the narrowest points, and 4) the fissure should narrow with depth until it is too narrow for VolcanoBot to pass or is plugged with solidified lava. Our field campaigns did not span enough lateral or vertical area to test sinuosity. The preliminary data indicate that 1) there were many irregularities along fissures at depth, 2) blockages occurred, but not at obviously narrow locations, and 3) the conduit width remained a consistent 0.4-0.5 m for most of the upper 10 m that we analyzed.

  15. Banding the Right Ventricular Assist Device Outflow Conduit: Is It Really Necessary With Current Devices?

    PubMed

    Lo, Casey; Gregory, Shaun; Stevens, Michael; Murphy, Deirdre; Marasco, Silvana

    2015-12-01

    Implantable left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) have been adapted clinically for right-sided mechanical circulatory support (RVAD). Previous studies on RVAD support have established the benefits of outflow cannula restriction and rotational speed reduction, and recent literature has focused on assessing either the degree of outflow cannula restriction required to simulate left-sided afterload, or the limitation of RVAD rotational speeds. Anecdotally, the utility of outflow cannula restriction has been questioned, with suggestion that banding may be unnecessary and may be replaced simply by varying the outflow conduit length. Furthermore, many patients have a high pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) at the time of ventricular assist device (VAD) insertion that reduces with pulmonary vascular bed remodeling. It is therefore important to assess the potential changes in flow through an RVAD as PVR changes. In this in vitro study, we observed the use of dual HeartWare HVAD devices (HeartWare Inc., Framingham, MA, USA) in biventricular support (BiVAD) configuration. We assessed the pumps' ability to maintain hemodynamic stability with and without banding; and with varying outflow cannulae length (20, 40, and 60 cm). Increased length of the outflow conduit was found to produce significantly increased afterload to the device, but this was not found to be necessary to maintain the device within the manufacturer's recommended operational parameters under a simulated normal physiological setting of mild and severe right ventricular (RV) failure. We hypothesize that 40 cm of outflow conduit, laid down along the diaphragm and then up over the RV to reach the pulmonary trunk, will generate sufficient resistance to maintain normal pump function. PMID:25994563

  16. Conduit entrainment surrounding sinking metal-silicate plumes during core formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, S. M.; Brand, D.; Weeraratne, D. S.

    2014-12-01

    Although the Earth today is segregated into two distinct compositional regions of a silicate mantle and metallic core, the process of differentiation from their original chondritic form is not clear. Continuous meteorite bombardment melted impactors and target bodies causing dissociation of metal from silicates which may have formed magma reservoirs or oceans. The heavy liquid metal phase will sink quickly through a silicate magma ocean and settle at the base as a metal pond. A high density metal pond will be unstable and is expected to sink as a Rayleigh-Taylor instability descending as liquid metal plumes to the core. Previous experiments have shown that lighter silicate material from the magma ocean becomes entrained as a conduit that trails behind sinking metal diapirs. These silicates are then transported to the base of the mantle with implications for mantle and core composition. We perform laboratory fluid experiments which model this process of entrainment and differentiation using glass and gallium spheres in high viscosity liquid sucrose solutions. We use high speed photography and dye to visualize and measure conduit formation and entrainment surrounding a descending sphere. Preliminary experiments indicate that the volume of material that surrounds a sphere is highest at the top of the box when the sphere begins its descent. As the sphere sinks, the entrainment of dyed fluid around the sphere decreases exponentially with falling distance. We suggest this is the result of drag forces acting on walls of the conduit. The volume of entrained material reduces by 80% in the upper 1/3 of the drop trajectory. As much as 8-10% of the original fluid volume is carried to the base of the box and will segregate from the sphere or diffuse after it settles. Higher viscosity fluids are observed to entrain more material on average compared to lower viscosity fluids. These results have important implications for delivery of silicate materials to the base of the mantle

  17. Thermal and chemical diffusion within conduits of sinking metal-silicate plumes during core formation events.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weeraratne, D. S.; Olson, P. L.

    2008-12-01

    Early and rapid core formation is suggested by recent isotopic studies. Accumulation of a short lived liquid metal pond at the base of a magma ocean during early impacts may provide a model for chemical diffusion of silicates and liquid metal to produce the observed abundances of siderophile elements in the Earth's mantle. Here we present results from laboratory fluid experiments of liquid gallium in high viscosity stratified corn syrup solutions to model the physical dynamics of core formation processes in the early Earth. Experiments are designed to consider the instability of a dense liquid metal pond as single droplets, Rayleigh-Taylor instability, and evolution of a liquid metal emulsion layer. We find that in all cases, a wide trailing conduit develops behind rapidly descending metallic plumes which entrains low density fluid to the base of the fluid box. We propose a model where the conduit itself provides a vehicle for thermal and chemical equilibration between metals and silicates at high pressures and temperatures during its path through the lower mantle. Diffusion processes contribute to the formation of this new entrained fluid layer at the base of the fluid box which is buoyant and evolves into a new type of thermo-chemical plume which subsequently rises. Using a range of viscosity and buoyancy ratios, experimental results will constrain the time scales for instability of a liquid metal pond, descent and upwelling times of this unique type of plume, as well as the nature and dynamics of conduit formation. This model provides a high pressure/temperature environment for metal- silicate equilibration consistent with petrologic and isotopic studies, is consistent with rapid core formation, and may also connect core formation to ancient hotspot activity on terrestrial planets.

  18. Parametric study of the stability margins of cable-in-conduit superconductors: experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Lue, J.W.; Miller, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    In a previous experiment on the stability of cable-in-conduit superconductors, we sometimes observed multivalued stability margins, which we attributed to strong heating-induced transient flows. We proposed a schematic theory from which we derived a scaling relation for the limiting current below which the stability margin is always singlevalued. Measurements at different magnetic fields are used to test the scaling with critical temperature and resistivity. We also examine the scaling with heated length and heat pulse duration. The results of these experiments are given and compared with theory.

  19. Radical Cystectomy with Ileal Conduit Urinary Diversion in a Patient with a Left Ventricular Assist Device

    PubMed Central

    Pariser, Joseph J.; Weiner, Adam B.; Steinberg, Gary D.

    2015-01-01

    Left ventricular assist device (LVAD) is an option for the surgical management of severe heart failure, and radical cystectomy remains the standard of care for muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Given a complicated population in terms of comorbidities and management for patients with an LVAD, there is little experience with major urologic procedures, which require balancing the benefits of surgery with considerable perioperative risks. We report our experience performing the first radical cystectomy with ileal conduit in a patient with an LVAD and muscle-invasive bladder cancer. PMID:26290767

  20. Mid-term patency of the inverted left internal thoracic artery conduit.

    PubMed

    Nezic, Dusko G; Bojovic, Zeljko R; Milicic, Miroslav D; Antonic, Zelimir D; Boricic, Mladen I; Micovic, Slobodan V

    2014-11-01

    In order to expand the revascularization of the left anterior descending coronary artery, we have applied the inverted left internal thoracic artery (left internal thoracic artery [LITA] transected near its origin, thus supplied by retrograde flow from superior epigastric and musculophrenic arteries) in carefully selected cases (four patients). The 64-slice multidetector row computed tomographic scans performed postoperatively (range, 6 to 40 days), as well as the scans performed in the follow-up period (range, 18 to 35 months) showed preserved inverted LITA conduits with thrombolysis in myocardial infarction (TIMI) 3 flow in all patients. PMID:25100203

  1. Methods for coating conduit interior surfaces utilizing a thermal spray gun with extension arm

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Karen A.; Zatorski, Raymond A.

    2007-10-02

    Systems and methods for applying a coating to an interior surface of a conduit. In one embodiment, a spray gun configured to apply a coating is attached to an extension arm which may be inserted into the bore of a pipe. The spray gun may be a thermal spray gun adapted to apply a powder coating. An evacuation system may be used to provide a volume area of reduced air pressure for drawing overspray out of the pipe interior during coating. The extension arm as well as the spray gun may be cooled to maintain a consistent temperature in the system, allowing for more consistent coating.

  2. Systems and methods for coating conduit interior surfaces utilizing a thermal spray gun with extension arm

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Karen A.; Zatorski, Raymond A.

    2005-07-12

    Systems and methods for applying a coating to an interior surface of a conduit. In one embodiment, a spray gun configured to apply a coating is attached to an extension arm which may be inserted into the bore of a pipe. The spray gun may be a thermal spray gun adapted to apply a powder coating. An evacuation system may be used to provide a volume area of reduced air pressure for drawing overspray out of the pipe interior during coating. The extension arm as well as the spray gun may be cooled to maintain a consistent temperature in the system, allowing for more consistent coating.

  3. Application of cable-in-conduit conductor (CICC) to maglev magnet systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Thome, R.J.; Montgomery, D.B.; Minervini, J.V.; Titus, P.H.; Pisera, J.

    1992-07-31

    The report summarizes the evaluation of Cable-in-Conduit Conductor (CICC) as an option for MAGLEV levitation coils. Superconducting magnets are cooled by: (1) immersion in a liquid helium bath at near saturation conditions; (2) conduction cooling of an epoxy-impregnated coil; or (3) use of CICC in which single-phase supercritical helium cooling becomes an intrinsic part of the conductor design with helium contained in the conductor sheath. Major problems with options 1 and 2 are mitigated by use of option 3. Many levitation coil geometries were reviewed and the racetrack coil shape selected for the levitation coil system design task.

  4. Device and method for measuring multi-phase fluid flow and density of fluid in a conduit having a gradual bend

    DOEpatents

    Ortiz, Marcos German; Boucher, Timothy J.

    1998-01-01

    A system for measuring fluid flow in a conduit having a gradual bend or arc, and a straight section. The system includes pressure transducers, one or more disposed in the conduit on the outside of the arc, and one disposed in the conduit in a straight section thereof. The pressure transducers measure the pressure of fluid in the conduit at the locations of the pressure transducers and this information is used by a computational device to calculate fluid flow rate in the conduit. For multi-phase fluid, the density of the fluid is measured by another pair of pressure transducers, one of which is located in the conduit elevationally above the other. The computation device then uses the density measurement along with the fluid pressure measurements, to calculate fluid flow.

  5. Device and method for measuring multi-phase fluid flow and density of fluid in a conduit having a gradual bend

    DOEpatents

    Ortiz, M.G.; Boucher, T.J.

    1998-10-27

    A system is described for measuring fluid flow in a conduit having a gradual bend or arc, and a straight section. The system includes pressure transducers, one or more disposed in the conduit on the outside of the arc, and one disposed in the conduit in a straight section thereof. The pressure transducers measure the pressure of fluid in the conduit at the locations of the pressure transducers and this information is used by a computational device to calculate fluid flow rate in the conduit. For multi-phase fluid, the density of the fluid is measured by another pair of pressure transducers, one of which is located in the conduit elevationally above the other. The computation device then uses the density measurement along with the fluid pressure measurements, to calculate fluid flow. 1 fig.

  6. Physical rock properties in and around a conduit zone by well-logging in the Unzen Scientific Drilling Project, Japan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ikeda, R.; Kajiwara, T.; Omura, K.; Hickman, S.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the Unzen Scientific Drilling Project (USDP) is not only to reveal the structure and eruption history of the Unzen volcano but also to clarify the ascent and degassing mechanisms of the magma conduit. Conduit drilling (USDP-4) was conducted in 2004, which targeted the magma conduit for the 1990-95 eruption. The total drilled length of USDP-4 was 1995.75??m. Geophysical well logging, including resistivity, gamma-ray, spontaneous potential, sonic-wave velocity, density, neutron porosity, and Fullbore Formation MicroImager (FMI), was conducted at each drilling stage. Variations in the physical properties of the rocks were revealed by the well-log data, which correlated with not only large-scale formation boundaries but also small-scale changes in lithology. Such variations were evident in the lava dike, pyroclastic rocks, and breccias over depth intervals ranging from 1 to 40??m. These data support previous models for structure of the lava conduit, in that they indicate the existence of alternating layers of high-resistivity and high P-wave velocity rocks corresponding to the lava dikes, in proximity to narrower zones exhibiting high porosity, low resistivity, and low P-wave velocity. These narrow, low-porosity zones are presumably higher in permeability than the adjacent rocks and may form preferential conduits for degassing during magma ascent. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V.

  7. Effectively Axonal-supercharged Interpositional Jump-Graft with an Artificial Nerve Conduit for Rat Facial Nerve Paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Niimi, Yosuke; Takeuchi, Yuichi; Sasaki, Ryo; Watanabe, Yorikatsu; Yamato, Masayuki; Miyata, Mariko; Sakurai, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Background: Interpositional jump graft (IPJG) is a nerve graft axonally supercharged from the hypoglossal nerve. However, for using the technique, an autologous nerve, which should contain the great auricular and sural nerves, must be obtained. Depending on the donor site, unavoidable issues such as nerve disorders and postoperative scarring may appear. To reduce the issues, in this study, the authors developed an end-to-side neurorrhaphy technique with the recipient nerve and an artificial nerve conduit and investigated the efficacy of an IPJG with an artificial nerve conduit in a rat facial nerve paresis model. Methods: A ligature clip was used to crush the facial nerve trunk, thereby creating a partial facial nerve paresis model. An artificial nerve conduit was then prepared with a 10-mm-long silicone tube containing 10 μL type I collagen and used to create an IPJG between the facial nerve trunk and the hypoglossal nerve (the silicone tube group). Thirteen weeks after the surgery, the outcome was histologically and physiologically compared with conventional IPJG with autograft using the great auricular nerve. Results: Retrograde tracer test confirmed a double innervation by the facial and hypoglossal nerve nuclei. In the autograft and silicone tube groups, the regeneration of myelinated axons was observed. Conclusion: In this study, the authors successfully developed an end-to-side neurorrhaphy technique with the recipient nerve and an artificial nerve conduit, and revealed that an IPJG in the conduit was effective in the rat facial nerve paresis model. PMID:26180717

  8. Study of Relationship between In-Situ Stress and Fluid Conduits in Hongchailin of Ilan Plain, NE Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kao, T. E.; Yeh, E. C.; Wu, F. Y.; Wang, T. T.; Hung, J. H.; Song, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    Ilan plan in northeastern Taiwan possesses abundant geothermal resources resulted from a higher geothermal gradient due to the influences of compression of mountain building and extension of back-arc rifting. Understanding in-situ stress field can evaluate current extension state for benefiting geothermal exploration and development and providing important information to geothermal engineering. Because development of geothermal fluid conduits is highly depended on in-situ stress, for enhancing geothermal productivity, this study conducted Anelastic Strain Recovery (ASR) and core description to study the relationship between in-situ stress and fluid conduits in Hongchailin area, Ilan Plain. Based on experiments of ASR, this study assessed in-situ 3D stress field including stress direction. Information of fractures and veins with depth obtained from core observation provided insights into the distribution of fluid conduits. Current results display a mixing stress regime of normal faulting and strike-slip faulting with NW-SE compression and SW-NE extension, which is consistent with results of focal mechanisms. Results of core description showed E-W striking gouge, indicating an early N-S compression. The fluid conduits with NW-SE strike are consistent with the predicted conduits inferred from in-situ stress field. Integrating with other information of stress direction and magnitude will provide insights into developing enhanced geothermal systems and utilizing geothermal energy efficiently.

  9. Computational modeling of lava domes using particle dynamics to investigate the effect of conduit flow mechanics on flow patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husain, Taha Murtuza

    Large (1--4 x 106 m3) to major (> 4 x 106 m3) dome collapses for andesitic lava domes such as Soufriere Hills Volcano, Montserrat are observed for elevated magma discharge rates (6--13 m3/s). The gas rich magma pulses lead to pressure build up in the lava dome that result in structural failure of the over steepened canyon-like walls which may lead to rockfall or pyroclastic flow. This indicates that dome collapse intimately related to magma extrusion rate. Variation in magma extrusion rate for open-system magma chambers is observed to follow alternating periods of high and low activity. Periodic behavior of magma exhibits a rich diversity in the nature of its eruptive history due to variation in magma chamber size, total crystal content, linear crystal growth rate and magma replenishment rate. Distinguished patterns of growth were observed at different magma flow rates ranging from endogenous to exogenous dome growth for magma with varying strengths. Determining the key parameters that control the transition in flow pattern of the magma during its lava dome building eruption is the main focus. This dissertation examines the mechanical effects on the morphology of the evolving lava dome on the extrusion of magma from a central vent using a 2D particle dynamics model. The particle dynamics model is coupled with a conduit flow model that incorporates the kinetics of crystallization and rheological stiffening to investigate important mechanisms during lava dome building eruptions. Chapter I of this dissertation explores lava dome growth and failure mechanics using a two-dimensional particle-dynamics model. The model follows the evolution of fractured lava, with solidification driven by degassing induced crystallization of magma. The particle-dynamics model emulates the natural development of dome growth and rearrangement of the lava dome which is difficult in mesh-based analyses due to mesh entanglement effects. The deformable talus evolves naturally as a frictional

  10. Comparison between two different methods of immobilizing NGF in poly(DL-lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) conduit for peripheral nerve regeneration by EDC/NHS/MES and genipin.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Shu-Chih; Tang, Cheng-Ming; Huang, Wen-Tao; Hsieh, Ling-Ling; Lu, Chun-Mei; Chang, Chen-Jung; Hsu, Shan-hui

    2011-12-15

    For surface modification and nerve regeneration, chitosan, followed by nerve growth factor (NGF), was immobilized onto the interior surface of poly (lactic acit-co-glycolic) conduits, using EDC/NHS/MES system (EDCs) and genipin (GP). Four new conduits were, therefore, obtained and named by immobilizing order-EDCs/EDCs, GP/EDCs, EDCs/GP, and GP/GP groups. The immobilized methods used were evaluated and compared, respectively. The researchers found that the EDCs- and GP-cross-linked chitosan displayed higher hydrophilic than pure poly (DL-lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) in water contact angle experiment, which meant the cell compatibility was improved by the modification. Scanning electron microscopic observations revealed that the GP-cross-linking of chitosan greatly improved cell compatibility while cultured rat PC12 cells were flatter and more spindle-shaped than EDCs-cross-linked chitosan. The results concerning the GP-cross-linked chitosan revealed significant proliferation of the seeded cells relative to pure PLGA films, as determined by counting cells and MTT assay. The NGF was released from the modified conduits in two separate periods--an initial burst in 5 days and then slow release from day 10 to day 40. The GP/EDCs group had the highest NGF value among all groups after the 5th day. Finally, the controlled-release conduits were used to bridge a 10 mm rat sciatic nerve defect. Six weeks following implantation, morphological analysis revealed the highest numbers of myelinated axons in the midconduit and distal regenerated nerve in GP/EDCs group. Therefore, the results confirm that GP/EDCs groups with good cell compatibility and effective release of NGF can considerably improve peripheral nerve regeneration. PMID:21953828

  11. Multiwalled CNT-pHEMA composite conduit for peripheral nerve repair.

    PubMed

    Arslantunali, D; Budak, G; Hasirci, V

    2014-03-01

    A nerve conduit is designed to improve peripheral nerve regeneration by providing guidance to the nerve cells. Conductivity of such guides is reported to enhance this process. In the current study, a nerve guide was constructed from poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (pHEMA), which was loaded with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (mwCNT) to introduce conductivity. PHEMA hydrogels were designed to have a porous structure to facilitate the transportation of the compounds needed for cell nutrition and growth and also for waste removal. We showed that when loaded with relatively high concentrations of mwCNTs (6%, w/w in hydrogels), the pHEMA guide was more conductive and more hydrophobic than pristine pHEMA hydrogel. The mechanical properties of the composites were better when they carried mwCNT. Elastic modulus of 6% mwCNT loaded pHEMA was twofold higher (0.32 ± 0.06 MPa) and similar to that of the soft tissues. Electrical conductivity was significantly improved (11.4-fold) from 7 × 10(-3) Ω(-1).cm(-1) (pHEMA) to 8.0 × 10(-2) Ω(-1).cm(-1) (6% mwCNT loaded pHEMA). On application of electrical potential, the SHSY5Y neuroblastoma cells seeded on mwCNTs carrying pHEMA maintained their viability, whereas those on pure pHEMA could not, indicating that mwCNT helped conduct electricity and make them more suitable as nerve conduits. PMID:23554154

  12. Simulation of particle motion in a closed conduit validated against experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolanský, Jindřich

    2015-05-01

    Motion of a number of spherical particles in a closed conduit is examined by means of both simulation and experiment. The bed of the conduit is covered by stationary spherical particles of the size of the moving particles. The flow is driven by experimentally measured velocity profiles which are inputs of the simulation. Altering input velocity profiles generates various trajectory patterns. The lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) based simulation is developed to study mutual interactions of the flow and the particles. The simulation enables to model both the particle motion and the fluid flow. The entropic LBM is employed to deal with the flow characterized by the high Reynolds number. The entropic modification of the LBM along with the enhanced refinement of the lattice grid yield an increase in demands on computational resources. Due to the inherently parallel nature of the LBM it can be handled by employing the Parallel Computing Toolbox (MATLAB) and other transformations enabling usage of the CUDA GPU computing technology. The trajectories of the particles determined within the LBM simulation are validated against data gained from the experiments. The compatibility of the simulation results with the outputs of experimental measurements is evaluated. The accuracy of the applied approach is assessed and stability and efficiency of the simulation is also considered.

  13. 3D Printed Trileaflet Valve Conduits Using Biological Hydrogels and Human Valve Interstitial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Bin; Kapetanovic, Edi; Hockaday, Laura A.; Butcher, Jonathan T.

    2014-01-01

    Tissue engineering has great potential to provide a functional de novo living valve replacement capable of integration with host tissue and growth. Among various valve conduit fabrication techniques, 3D bioprinting enables deposition of cells and hydrogels into 3D constructs with anatomical geometry and heterogeneous mechanical properties. Successful translation of this approach is however constrained by the dearth of printable and biocompatible hydrogel materials. Furthermore, it is not known how human valve cells respond to these printed environments. In this study, we develop 3D printable formulations of hybrid hydrogels based on methacrylated hyaluronic acid (Me-HA) and methacrylated gelatin (Me-Gel), and utilize them to bioprint heart valve conduits containing encapsulated human aortic valvular interstitial cells (HAVIC). Increasing Me-Gel concentration resulted in lower stiffness and higher viscosity, facilitated cell spreading, and better maintained HAVIC fibroblastic phenotype. Bioprinting accuracy was dependent upon the relative concentrations of Me-Gel and Me-HA, but when optimized enabled the fabrication of a trileaflet valve shape accurate to the original design. HAVIC encapsulated within bioprinted heart valves maintained high viability, and remodeled the initial matrix by depositing collagen and glyosaminoglycans. These findings represent the first rational design of bioprinted trileaflet valve hydrogels that regulate encapsulated human VIC behavior. The use of anatomically accurate living valve scaffolds through bioprinting may accelerate our understanding of physiological valve cell interactions and our progress towards de novo living valve replacements. PMID:24334142

  14. Low-quality habitat corridors as movement conduits for two butterfly species.

    SciTech Connect

    Haddad, Nick, M.; Tewksbury, Joshua, J.

    2005-01-01

    Haddad, Nick, M, and Joshua J. Tewksbury. Low-quality habitat corridors as movement conduits for two butterfly species. Ecol. Apps. 15(1):250-257. Abstract. Corridors are a primary conservation tool to increase connectivity, promote individual movement, and increase gene flow among populations in fragmented landscapes. The establishment of effective conservation corridors will depend on constructing or pre-serving connecting habitat that attracts dispersing individuals. Yet, it remains unclear whether corridors must necessarily be composed of high-quality habitat to be effective and promote dispersal and gene flow. We address this issue with two mobile, open-habitat butterfly species, Junonia coenia HuÈbner and Euptoieta claudia Cramer. Using experimental landscapes created explicitly to examine the effects of corridors on dispersal rates, we show that open-habitat corridors can serve as dispersal conduits even when corridors do not support resident butterfly populations. Both butterfly species were rare near forest edges and equally rare in narrow corridors, yet both species dispersed more often between patches connected by these corridors than between isolated patches. At least for species that can traverse corridors within a generation, corridor habitat may be lower in quality than larger patches and still increase dispersal and gene flow. For these species, abundance surveys may not accurately represent the conservation value of corridors.

  15. Fortune or misfortune: asymptomatic, delayed presentation of complete dehiscence of mechanical aortic valve conduit and pseudoaneurysm.

    PubMed

    Oh, Kyung Taek; Derose, Joseph; Taub, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    Complete dehiscence of a composite aortic valve graft with pseudoaneurysm formation is a rare complication following aortic root replacement. This complication often takes place in the setting of acute graft infection and accompanies symptoms of heart failure, valve insufficiency or sepsis. We present a delayed, asymptomatic presentation of this complication in a young man with distant history of aortic root replacement and medically treated prosthetic valve endocarditis a year postoperatively. He had been non-adherent to warfarin over 10 years, but otherwise maintained a healthy life. After being lost to follow-up, he re-presented 12 years after the initial operation with new-onset seizures. Echocardiogram revealed complete dehiscence of a composite valved conduit at the proximal anastomosis site with a resultant large pseudoaneurysm. The patient underwent an urgent re-operation with resection of the pseudoaneurysm and insertion of a tissue valved conduit. He had an uncomplicated postoperative recovery and promised close follow-up on discharge. PMID:27530875

  16. A tool for computing time-dependent permeability reduction of fractured volcanic conduit margins.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farquharson, Jamie; Wadsworth, Fabian; Heap, Michael; Baud, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    Laterally-oriented fractures within volcanic conduit margins are thought to play an important role in tempering eruption explosivity by allowing magmatic volatiles to outgas. The permeability of a fractured conduit margin - the equivalent permeability - can be modelled as the sum of permeability contributions of the edifice host rock and the fracture(s) within it. We present here a flexible MATLAB® tool which computes the time-dependent equivalent permeability of a volcanic conduit margin containing ash-filled fractures. The tool is designed so that the end-user can define a wide range of input parameters to yield equivalent permeability estimates for their application. The time-dependence of the equivalent permeability is incorporated by considering permeability decrease as a function of porosity loss in the ash-filled fractures due to viscous sintering (after Russell and Quane, 2005), which is in turn dependent on the depth and temperature of each fracture and the crystal-content of the magma (all user-defined variables). The initial viscosity of the granular material filling the fracture is dependent on the water content (Hess and Dingwell, 1996), which is computed assuming equilibrium depth-dependent water content (Liu et al., 2005). Crystallinity is subsequently accounted for by employing the particle-suspension rheological model of Mueller et al. (2010). The user then defines the number of fractures, their widths, and their depths, and the lengthscale of interest (e.g. the length of the conduit). Using these data, the combined influence of transient fractures on the equivalent permeability of the conduit margin is then calculated by adapting a parallel-plate flow model (developed by Baud et al., 2012 for porous sandstones), for host rock permeabilities from 10‑11 to 10‑22 m2. The calculated values of porosity and equivalent permeability with time for each host rock permeability is then output in text and worksheet file formats. We introduce two

  17. Two- and live/real time three-dimensional transthoracic echocardiographic assessment of infective endocarditis of a valved pulmonary conduit.

    PubMed

    Gulotta, John C; Gaba, Saurabh; Bulur, Serkan; Joson, Marisa; Sungur, Aylin; Nanda, Navin C

    2015-02-01

    We describe the use of a nonstandard left infraclavicular approach in making the diagnosis of an infected valved conduit with two-dimensional transthoracic echocardiography. The patient was an adult with tetralogy of Fallot and pulmonary atresia who had undergone multiple surgical repair procedures. The initial diagnosis of infective endocarditis was made by transesophageal echocardiography. Both techniques demonstrated a single, large vegetation in the conduit. Live/real time three-dimensional transthoracic echocardiography, on the other hand, provided further information by demonstrating several additional vegetations in the conduit and more comprehensively assessed their size by enabling measurement of their azimuthal dimensions and volumes. The patient was treated with antibiotics with complete resolution of the vegetations. PMID:25410293

  18. The earliest open conduit eruptive center of the Etnean region: evidence from aeromagnetic, geophysical, and geological data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolosi, Iacopo; D'Ajello Caracciolo, Francesca; Branca, Stefano; Ferlito, Carmelo; Chiappini, Massimo

    2016-07-01

    At Mount Etna, the present-day active volcano is an open conduit structure characterized by continuous eruptive activity. Such conditions have been thought unique in the evolution of the Etnean volcano as well as in the Mediterranean region. However, a review study of available geophysical data and models, combined with geological records, petrographic and geochemical considerations, has led us to consider that a large area of about 28 km2 located in Val Calanna, on the eastern side of Valle del Bove, can be interpreted as the site of an old open conduit volcano. A dyke swarm outcrops in the area, whose deep alteration and fumarolization can be attributed to the sustained passage of volcanic gases over long periods. Radiometric dating yields an age of about 129 ka. This finding sheds new light on the evolution of Mount Etna volcano, indicating that the tectonic conditions leading to an open conduit volcano must also have been active in the past.

  19. High microsatellite and mitochondrial diversity in Anatolian native horse breeds shows Anatolia as a genetic conduit between Europe and Asia.

    PubMed

    Koban, E; Denizci, M; Aslan, O; Aktoprakligil, D; Aksu, S; Bower, M; Balcioglu, B K; Ozdemir Bahadir, A; Bilgin, R; Erdag, B; Bagis, H; Arat, S

    2012-08-01

    The horse has been a food source, but more importantly, it has been a means for transport. Its domestication was one of the crucial steps in the history of human civilization. Despite the archaeological and molecular studies carried out on the history of horse domestication, which would contribute to conservation of the breeds, the details of the domestication of horses still remain to be resolved. We employed 21 microsatellite loci and mitochondrial control region partial sequences to analyse genetic variability within and among four Anatolian native horse breeds, Ayvacık Pony, Malakan Horse, Hınıs Horse and Canik Horse, as well as samples from indigenous horses of unknown breed ancestry. The aims of the study were twofold: first, to produce data from the prehistorically and historically important land bridge, Anatolia, in order to assess its role in horse domestication and second, to analyse the data from a conservation perspective to help the ministry improve conservation and management strategies regarding native horse breeds. Even though the microsatellite data revealed a high allelic diversity, 98% of the genetic variation partitioned within groups. Genetic structure did not correlate with a breed or geographic origin. High diversity was also detected in mtDNA control region sequence analysis. Frequencies of two haplogroups (HC and HF) revealed a cline between Asia and Europe, suggesting Anatolia as a probable connection route between the two continents. This first detailed genetic study on Anatolian horse breeds revealed high diversity among horse mtDNA haplogroups in Anatolia and suggested Anatolia's role as a conduit between the two continents. The study also provides an important basis for conservation practices in Turkey. PMID:22497212

  20. Fast evolving conduits in clay-bonded sandstone: Characterization, erosion processes and significance for the origin of sandstone landforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruthans, Jiri; Svetlik, Daniel; Soukup, Jan; Schweigstillova, Jana; Valek, Jan; Sedlackova, Marketa; Mayo, Alan L.

    2012-12-01

    In Strelec Quarry, the Czech Republic, an underground conduit network > 300 m long with a volume of ~ 104 m3 and a catchment of 7 km2 developed over 5 years by groundwater flow in Cretaceous marine quartz sandstone. Similar landforms at natural exposures (conduits, slot canyons, undercuts) are stabilized by case hardening and have stopped evolving. The quarry offers a unique opportunity to study conduit evolution in sandstone at local to regional scales, from the initial stage to maturity, and to characterize the erosion processes which may form natural landforms prior to stabilization. A new technique was developed to distinguish erodible and non-erodible sandstone surfaces. Based on measurements of relative erodibility, drilling resistance, ambient and water-saturated tensile strength (TS) at natural and quarry exposures three distinct kinds of surfaces were found. 1) Erodible sandstone exposed at ~ 60% of surfaces in quarry. This sandstone loses as much as 99% of TS when saturated. 2) Sub-vertical fracture surfaces that are non-erodible already prior to exposure at ground surface and which keep considerable TS if saturated. 3) Case hardened surfaces that start to form after exposure. In favorable conditions they became non-erodible and reach the full TS in just 6 years. An increase in the hydraulic gradient from ~ 0.005 to > 0.02 triggered conduit evolution, based on long-term monitoring of water table in 18 wells and inflows to the quarry. Rapidly evolving major conduits are characterized by a channel gradient of ~ 0.01, a flow velocity ~ 40 cm/s and sediment concentration ~ 10 g/l. Flow in openings with a discharge 1 ml/s and hydraulic gradient > 0.05 exceeds the erosion threshold and initiates piping. In the first phase of conduit evolution, fast concentrated flow mobilizes erodible sandstone between sets of parallel fractures in the shallow phreatic zone. In the second phase the conduit opening mainly expands vertically upward into the vadose zone by mass

  1. Apparatus for controlling fluidized beds

    DOEpatents

    Rehmat, A.G.; Patel, J.G.

    1987-05-12

    An apparatus and process are disclosed for control and maintenance of fluidized beds under non-steady state conditions. An ash removal conduit is provided for removing solid particulates from a fluidized bed separate from an ash discharge conduit in the lower portion of the grate supporting such a bed. The apparatus and process of this invention is particularly suitable for use in ash agglomerating fluidized beds and provides control of the fluidized bed before ash agglomeration is initiated and during upset conditions resulting in stable, sinter-free fluidized bed maintenance. 2 figs.

  2. Apparatus for controlling fluidized beds

    DOEpatents

    Rehmat, Amirali G.; Patel, Jitendra G.

    1987-05-12

    An apparatus and process for control and maintenance of fluidized beds under non-steady state conditions. An ash removal conduit is provided for removing solid particulates from a fluidized bed separate from an ash discharge conduit in the lower portion of the grate supporting such a bed. The apparatus and process of this invention is particularly suitable for use in ash agglomerating fluidized beds and provides control of the fluidized bed before ash agglomeration is initiated and during upset conditions resulting in stable, sinter-free fluidized bed maintenance.

  3. Heterogeneity of endothelial cell phenotype within and amongst conduit vessels of the swine vasculature.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Grant H; Padilla, Jaume; Laughlin, M Harold

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the extent of endothelial cell phenotypic heterogeneity throughout the swine vasculature, with a focus on the conduit vessels of the arterial and venous circulations. We tested the hypothesis that atheroprone arteries exhibit higher expression of markers of inflammation and oxidative stress than do veins and atheroresistant arteries. The study sample included tissues from 79 castrated, male swine. Immediately after the animals were killed, endothelial cells were mechanically scraped from isolated segments of the thoracic and abdominal aorta, carotid, brachial, femoral and renal arteries, and the vein regionally associated with each of these vessels, as well as the internal mammary and right coronary arteries. Cells were also taken from two regions of the aortic arch contrasted by atheroprone versus atherosusceptible haemodynamics. Endothelial cell phenotype was assessed by either immunoblotting or quantitative real-time PCR for a host of both pro- and anti-atherogenic markers (e.g. endothelial nitric oxide synthase, p67phox, cyclo-oxygenase-1 and superoxide dismutase 1). Marked heterogeneity across the vasculature was observed in the expression of both pro- and anti-atherogenic markers, at both the protein and transcriptional levels. In particular, the coronary vascular endothelium expressed higher levels of the oxidative stress marker p67phox (P < 0.05 versus other arteries). In addition, differential expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and KLF4 was evident between atheroprone and atherosusceptible regions of the aorta, while expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase, KLF2, KLF4 and cyclo-oxygenase-1 was lower in both areas of the aortic arch compared with the internal mammary artery. Conduit arteries typically expressed higher levels of both pro- and anti-atherogenic markers relative to their associated veins. We show, for the first time, that endothelial cell phenotype is variable within vessels

  4. Visualizing water-filled versus embolized status of xylem conduits by desktop x-ray microtomography

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The hydraulic conductivity of the stem is a major factor limiting the capability of trees to transport water from the soil to transpiring leaves. During drought conditions, the conducting capacity of xylem can be reduced by some conduits being filled with gas, i.e. embolized. In order to understand the dynamics of embolism formation and repair, considerable attention has been given to developing reliable and accurate methods for quantifying the phenomenon. In the past decade, non-destructive imaging of embolism formation in living plants has become possible. Magnetic resonance imaging has been used to visualize the distribution of water within the stem, but in most cases it is not possible to resolve individual cells. Recently, high-resolution synchrotron x-ray microtomography has been introduced as a tool to visualize the water contents of individual cells in vivo, providing unprecedented insight into the dynamics of embolism repair. We have investigated the potential of an x-ray tube -based microtomography setup to visualize and quantify xylem embolism and embolism repair in water-stressed young saplings and shoot tips of Silver and Curly birch (Betula pendula and B. pendula var. carelica). Results From the microtomography images, the water-filled versus gas-filled status of individual xylem conduits can be seen, and the proportion of stem cross-section that consists of embolized tissue can be calculated. Measuring the number of embolized vessels in the imaged area is a simple counting experiment. In the samples investigated, wood fibers were cavitated in a large proportion of the xylem cross-section shortly after watering of the plant was stopped, but the number of embolized vessels remained low several days into a drought period. Under conditions of low evaporative demand, also refilling of previously embolized conduits was observed. Conclusions Desktop x-ray microtomography is shown to be an effective method for evaluating the water-filled versus

  5. Coupled evolution of magma chambers and flow in conduits during large volcanic eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlstrom, L.; Manga, M.; Rudolph, M. L.

    2010-12-01

    The largest silicic and mafic volcanic eruptions in the geologic record, Supervolcano and Large Igneous Province (LIP) eruptions, are distinguished by differences in surface emplacement mode, geologic context, magma volatile content, viscosity, and reservoir depth. However, these large eruptions also share several common features. Individual eruptions of both types emplace roughly the same total volume (10^3 - 10^4 km^3) of remarkably homogeneous magma that likely comes from a single reservoir. In addition, they both release large quantities of volatiles, and hence individual eruptions may significantly perturb global climate. We have developed a model that couples conduit flow and magma chamber deformation, allowing us to study both eruption types. Steady, one-dimensional multiphase flow of magma containing crystals, exsolved water, and CO_2 in a cylindrical conduit is coupled to pressure evolution within an ellipsoidal magma chamber beneath a free surface. LIP eruptions are characterized by gas-driven flow of mafic lava that may be sustained past the cessation of chamber overpressure, much like a siphon. Eruptions cease when the yield strength of the country rocks is reached and the (generally Moho-level) chamber or the conduit implodes, resulting in steady discharge and atmospheric volatile loading. In contrast, more shallow silicic lavas such as the Fish Canyon Tuff erupt through rapid mobilization of a long-lived crystal-rich mush. The crystal-rich mush is a yield strength fluid, which we model using the von Mises criterion for mobilization. If the trigger for mobilization of the mush leads directly to eruption, time-progressive yielding due to mass removal results in a fluid magma chamber that grows as the eruption proceeds, until free-surface stresses induce roof collapse and caldera formation. Chamber pressure evolution may be buffered by the mobilization of the mush, maintaining overpressure and high discharge throughout the eruption. This model suggests

  6. Conduit changes and eruptive styles at Red Mountain cinder cone, AZ, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riggs, N. R.; Duffield, W. A.; Cashman, K. V.; Zimmer, B. W.

    2006-12-01

    Red Mountain volcano is a Pleistocene (ca. 740 ky) cinder cone north of Flagstaff, AZ, in the northern Mio- Recent San Francisco volcanic field. Red Mountain erupted onto Permian sedimentary rocks with low topographic relief, likely covered in some places by older flows. The cone evolved through several stages that erupted and emplaced cinder, lava flow, agglutinate, and clastogenic lava. The transition from cinder eruption to mild hawaiian-type fountaining is contrary to observed activity at cinder cones, but may provide insight into conduit processes during basaltic eruptions. Earliest strombolian eruptions built a cone as much as 400 m high. Agglutinate is a relatively minor constituent as are vulcanian bombs < 1 m in diameter. Near the end of strombolian eruptions lava flowed from the base of the cone, primarily toward the west. Continued lava flow caused rafting of ~15% of the cone, including the vent area. Eruptions transitioned to mild hawaiian, with agglutinate emplacement, lava flow, clastogenic flow, and minor scoria eruption. Agglutinate at 200-350 m on the inner face of the rafted cone suggests a relatively low fountain height. Successions up to 30 m thick 4 km from vent expose interbedded welded cinder, agglutinate, clastogenic flow, and rooted lava flow. Activity at Red Mountain transitioned from strombolian to mild hawaiian, in opposition to most cinder cones. Hawaiian activity is generally attributed to a higher rate of magma flux than strombolian. Some change in the conduit clearly occurred causing either an increase in flux rate and/or a significant change in the vesiculation depth below the vent. We suggest two possibilities: 1) the rafting collapse of the cone, which decreased the conduit length by as much as 350 m, caused a significant change in the pressure profile, which in turn affected both the onset of bubble nucleation and the path length for bubble coalescence. This in turn caused less bubble/melt segregation and steadier (mild hawaiian

  7. Evaluation of Previously Cannulated Radial Arteries as Patent Coronary Artery Bypass Conduits

    PubMed Central

    Pope, Adele; van Pelt, Niels; Ruygrok, Peter N.

    2015-01-01

    In coronary artery bypass grafting, good-quality conduits are needed to maximize the potential for long-term patency. Revascularization has traditionally been achieved with use of the saphenous vein and the internal thoracic arteries. In recent years, total arterial revascularization with use of the radial arteries has been promoted. Meanwhile, use of the transradial approach for coronary angiography has also increased. The long-term effects of previous cannulation in radial artery bypass grafts are not known. Therefore, we used multidetector computed tomographic angiography to investigate radial-artery graft patency in a small series of patients who had undergone transradial angiography. We found a high patency rate, and we discuss those findings here. PMID:26504438

  8. Stability of cable-in-conduit internally cooled superconductors subject to local disturbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, K.; Tsukamoto, O.; Michael, P. C.; Amemiya, N.

    1994-07-01

    A likely source of a quench in cable-in-conduit internally cooled superconductors (CCICS) is frictional heating due to strand motion in the cable. Most previous studies on CCICS stability evaluate the amount of energy needed to quench the conductor by assuming that the disturbance energy is uniformly distributed across the cross section. We believe that these studies are too optimistic, and have studied the stability of CCICS assuming that the disturbance energy is abruptly input into a small part of a single strand. To perform this analysis, the transient heat transfer characteristics of supercritical helium (SHE) have been measured. This paper presents the transient heat transfer characteristics of SHE and the results of our stability analysis.

  9. A novel approach to estimate the eruptive potential and probability in open conduit volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Gregorio, Sofia; Camarda, Marco

    2016-07-01

    In open conduit volcanoes, volatile-rich magma continuously enters into the feeding system nevertheless the eruptive activity occurs intermittently. From a practical perspective, the continuous steady input of magma in the feeding system is not able to produce eruptive events alone, but rather surplus of magma inputs are required to trigger the eruptive activity. The greater the amount of surplus of magma within the feeding system, the higher is the eruptive probability.Despite this observation, eruptive potential evaluations are commonly based on the regular magma supply, and in eruptive probability evaluations, generally any magma input has the same weight. Conversely, herein we present a novel approach based on the quantification of surplus of magma progressively intruded in the feeding system. To quantify the surplus of magma, we suggest to process temporal series of measurable parameters linked to the magma supply. We successfully performed a practical application on Mt Etna using the soil CO2 flux recorded over ten years.

  10. Conduit dynamics and post explosion degassing on Stromboli: A combined UV camera and numerical modeling treatment

    PubMed Central

    McGonigle, A. J. S.; James, M. R.; Tamburello, G.; Aiuppa, A.; Delle Donne, D.; Ripepe, M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Recent gas flux measurements have shown that Strombolian explosions are often followed by periods of elevated flux, or “gas codas,” with durations of order a minute. Here we present UV camera data from 200 events recorded at Stromboli volcano to constrain the nature of these codas for the first time, providing estimates for combined explosion plus coda SO2 masses of ≈18–225 kg. Numerical simulations of gas slug ascent show that substantial proportions of the initial gas mass can be distributed into a train of “daughter bubbles” released from the base of the slug, which we suggest, generate the codas, on bursting at the surface. This process could also cause transitioning of slugs into cap bubbles, significantly reducing explosivity. This study is the first attempt to combine high temporal resolution gas flux data with numerical simulations of conduit gas flow to investigate volcanic degassing dynamics. PMID:27478285

  11. A novel approach to estimate the eruptive potential and probability in open conduit volcanoes

    PubMed Central

    De Gregorio, Sofia; Camarda, Marco

    2016-01-01

    In open conduit volcanoes, volatile-rich magma continuously enters into the feeding system nevertheless the eruptive activity occurs intermittently. From a practical perspective, the continuous steady input of magma in the feeding system is not able to produce eruptive events alone, but rather surplus of magma inputs are required to trigger the eruptive activity. The greater the amount of surplus of magma within the feeding system, the higher is the eruptive probability.Despite this observation, eruptive potential evaluations are commonly based on the regular magma supply, and in eruptive probability evaluations, generally any magma input has the same weight. Conversely, herein we present a novel approach based on the quantification of surplus of magma progressively intruded in the feeding system. To quantify the surplus of magma, we suggest to process temporal series of measurable parameters linked to the magma supply. We successfully performed a practical application on Mt Etna using the soil CO2 flux recorded over ten years. PMID:27456812

  12. Computations of quenching and stability in a CICC (cable-in-conduit conductor) conductor

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, R.L.

    1990-09-21

    The quenching and stability behavior of forced-flow helium-cooled, cable-in-conduit conductors (CICC) has been analyzed using a new computer program. This computer analysis code was developed for performing general, transient, thermal analyses on CICCs. The program includes the necessary details for the physical properties of all the constituent materials of such conductors, and accurately models the thermo- and fluid-dynamic behavior of the helium coolant starting from a wide range of initial conditions. It has been applied to a study of the stability and quench behavior of several large-scale conductor options being considered for use in the magnet systems of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), and the results will be reported here. 3 refs., 14 figs.

  13. SOME NATURAL CONDUIT ANALOGUES FOR POTENTIAL IGNEOUS ACTIVITY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN

    SciTech Connect

    D.J. Krier; G.N. Keating; G.A. Valentine

    2005-08-26

    Eruptive conduit geometry has direct relation to number of waste packages that would be damaged if a new volcano were to form at the proposed Yucca Mountain radioactive waste repository, and therefore is a key factor in predicting the consequences of such an eruption. Current risk calculations treat conduits as having circular plan view and range from a few meters to 150 m diameter at repository depths ({approx}300 m). We present new observations of shallow basaltic plumbing at analog sites aimed at testing these parameter values. East Grants Ridge. NM, is a remnant of a {approx}2.6 Ma alkali basaltic volcano with a chain of 2-3 vents that fed {approx}10-km long lava flows. The south side of the ridge exposes a plug of vertically jointed, dense basalt that intruded rhyolitic tuffs. The plug is exposed vertically for {approx}125 m, including 40 m beneath the paleosurface, and has a relatively constant width of {approx}135 m with no indication of downward narrowing. The size of the plug in the third dimension is not well known but could extend laterally up to {approx}1.5 km beneath the chain of vents. Paiute Ridge, NV, is an 8.6 Ma alkali basalt intrusion into Paleozoic carbonate and shale and Miocene silicic tuffs and includes extrusive equivalents. Dikes, small sills and lopoliths, scoria, and flows are exposed in a 2 km-wide graben. Depth of intrusion has been estimated at 100-250 m beneath the paleosurface. Dikes range from 3-20 m in width and produced limited contact vitrophyre in the host tuff. At least one sub-volcanic neck is preserved. The top of the plug is {approx}27 m lower than the base of related basalt flows 1 km distant. This neck is irregularly shaped by intersection of feeder dikes and has a sheath of mixed basaltic magma and host tuff (with both breccia and fluidal textures). The basalt interior of the plug is {approx}100 m x 70 m in map view but inclusion of the mixed zone increases this to {approx}220 m x 110 m. Basalt Ridge, NV, contains two

  14. Capillary Flows along Open Channel Conduits: the Open-Star Section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weislogel, Mark; Chen, Yongkang; Nguyen, Thanh; Geile, John; Callahan, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Capillary rise in tubes, channels, and grooves has received significant attention in the literature for over 100 years. In yet another incremental extension of related work, a transient capillary rise problem is solved for spontaneous flow along an interconnected array of open channels forming what is referred to as an ``open-star'' section. This geometry possesses several attractive characteristics including passive phase separations and high diffusive gas transport rates. Despite the complex geometry, novel and convenient approximations for capillary pressure and viscous resistance enable closed form predictions of the flow. As part of the solution, a combined scaling approach is applied that identifies unsteady-inertial-capillary, convective-inertial-capillary, and visco-capillary transient regimes in a single parameter. Drop tower experiments are performed employing 3-D printed conduits to corroborate all findings. NASA NNX09AP66A, Glenn Research Center.

  15. Conduit dynamics and post explosion degassing on Stromboli: A combined UV camera and numerical modeling treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pering, T. D.; McGonigle, A. J. S.; James, M. R.; Tamburello, G.; Aiuppa, A.; Delle Donne, D.; Ripepe, M.

    2016-05-01

    Recent gas flux measurements have shown that Strombolian explosions are often followed by periods of elevated flux, or "gas codas," with durations of order a minute. Here we present UV camera data from 200 events recorded at Stromboli volcano to constrain the nature of these codas for the first time, providing estimates for combined explosion plus coda SO2 masses of ≈18-225 kg. Numerical simulations of gas slug ascent show that substantial proportions of the initial gas mass can be distributed into a train of "daughter bubbles" released from the base of the slug, which we suggest, generate the codas, on bursting at the surface. This process could also cause transitioning of slugs into cap bubbles, significantly reducing explosivity. This study is the first attempt to combine high temporal resolution gas flux data with numerical simulations of conduit gas flow to investigate volcanic degassing dynamics.

  16. A novel approach to estimate the eruptive potential and probability in open conduit volcanoes.

    PubMed

    De Gregorio, Sofia; Camarda, Marco

    2016-01-01

    In open conduit volcanoes, volatile-rich magma continuously enters into the feeding system nevertheless the eruptive activity occurs intermittently. From a practical perspective, the continuous steady input of magma in the feeding system is not able to produce eruptive events alone, but rather surplus of magma inputs are required to trigger the eruptive activity. The greater the amount of surplus of magma within the feeding system, the higher is the eruptive probability.Despite this observation, eruptive potential evaluations are commonly based on the regular magma supply, and in eruptive probability evaluations, generally any magma input has the same weight. Conversely, herein we present a novel approach based on the quantification of surplus of magma progressively intruded in the feeding system. To quantify the surplus of magma, we suggest to process temporal series of measurable parameters linked to the magma supply. We successfully performed a practical application on Mt Etna using the soil CO2 flux recorded over ten years. PMID:27456812

  17. Pressure drop measurements on supercritical helium cooled cable in conduit conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daugherty, M. A.; Huang, Y.; Vansciver, S. W.

    1988-08-01

    Forced flow cable-in-conduit conductors with large cooled surface areas provide excellent stability margins at the price of high frictional losses and large pumping power requirements. For extensive projects such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor design cooperation, it is essential to know the pressure drops to be expected from different conductor geometries and operating conditions. To measure these pressure drops a flow loop was constructed to circulate supercritical helium through different conductors. The loop is surrounded by a 5 K radiation shield to allow for stable operation at the required temperatures. A coil heat exchanger immersed in a helium bath is used to remove the heat generated by the pump. Pressure drops are measured across 1 meter lengths of the conductors for various mass flow rates. Friction factor versus Reynolds number plots are used to correlate the data.

  18. Experimental verification of displacement-current conduits in metamaterials-inspired optical circuitry.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Brian; Engheta, Nader

    2012-05-11

    Electric displacement current is present in capacitors and optical waveguides; however, unlike the conduction current in metallic wires, it is not confined. Analogous to the contrast in conductivity between a metallic wire and the surrounding air, displacement-current wires based on near-zero permittivity media contain a large contrast in effective permittivity. As a variation on this idea, in this Letter, we demonstrate at microwave frequencies two displacement-current cables based on effectively negative and effectively positive permittivity metastructures. Our experimental results clearly show cablelike behaviors that allow bending of the structure while still confining and maintaining the primarily longitudinal forward and reverse effective displacement currents within each conduit. The results presented here experimentally verify the notion of displacement-current wires and cables in metatronics as metamaterial-inspired circuitry. PMID:23003040

  19. 64Cu-ATSM Hypoxia Positron Emission Tomography for Detection of Conduit Ischemia in an Experimental Rat Esophagectomy Model

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seong Yong; Kang, Won Jun; Cho, Arthur; Chae, Ju Ri; Cho, Ye Lim; Kim, Jung Young; Lee, Ji Woong; Chung, Kyung Young

    2015-01-01

    Background We designed a hypoxia-imaging modality to detect ischemia of the gastric conduit after esophagectomy. Materials and Methods A rat esophagectomy model was created using 12-16-week-old, 300-350 g male Sprague-Dawley rats. In the operation group (n=6), partial gastric devascularization was performed by ligating the left gastric artery and the short gastric arteries and an esophagogastric anastomosis was performed. In the control group (n=6), the esophageal-gastric junction was incised and suturing was performed without gastric devascularization. Positron emission tomography (PET) images were taken using a microPET rodent model scanner, 24 h after the initial operation, after injection of 200 μCi 64Cu-diacetyl-bis (N4-methylsemicarbazone) (64Cu-ATSM) and pimonidazole 120 mg/kg. After microPET imaging, autoradiography and immunohistochemistry were performed. Results The PET image revealed 64Cu-ATSM uptake at the fundus in the operation group 3 h after 64Cu-ATSM injection. The maximum percentage of the injected dose per gram of tissue was higher in the operation group (0.047±0.015 vs. 0.026±0.006, p=0.021). The fundus/liver ratio was also higher in the operation group (0.541±0.126 vs. 0.278±0.049, p=0.002). Upon autoradiography, 64Cu-ATSM uptake was observed in the fundus in the operation group, and was well-correlated to that observed on the PET image. Upon immunohistochemistry, expression of hypoxia-inducible factor 1a and pimonidazole were significantly increased at the fundus and lesser curvature compared to the greater curvature in the operation group. Conclusion Hypoxia PET imaging with 64Cu-ATSM can detect ischemia in a rat esophagectomy model. Further clinical studies are needed to verify whether hypoxia imaging may be useful in humans. PMID:26098420

  20. A conduit-related genesis of the Lengshuiqing intrusive assemblage (Sichuan, SW China)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munteanu, Marian; Wilson, Allan H.; Yao, Yong; Jiang, Shao-Yong; Chunnett, Gordon; Luo, Yaonan; Mafurutu, Leonard; Phadagi, Rofhiwa

    2010-01-01

    Lengshuiqing is part of the late Proterozoic igneous province from the western margin of the Yangtze craton. The Lengshuiqing area comprises five ultramafic-mafic intrusions, emplaced in the late Proterozoic Yanbian Group. The intrusions from Lengshuiqing contain cumulate ultramafic zones (peridotite + olivine pyroxenite), with cumulus olivine and Cr-spinel, and intercumulus pyroxenes, hornblende, phlogopite and plagioclase. Ni-Cu ore (pyrrhotite + pentlandite + chalcopyrite) is hosted in the ultramafic zones. Olivine-free diorite-quartz diorite ± gabbro and granite zones commonly occur above the ultramafic rocks. The genesis of the intrusions (conduit-related accumulation or differentiation from stagnant magma) was investigated. The amount of sulphides in the intrusions from Lengshuiqing is one order of magnitude bigger than the sulphides that can be dissolved by a volume of mafic magma similar with the volume of the intrusions. Most intrusions from Lengshuiqing have bulk composition (peridotite ± diorite ± granite) more magnesian (MgO = 21-22%; Mg# > 78) than the deduced composition of their parental magma (MgO = 9-11%; Mg# = 64-67). This indicates the accumulation of sulphide and mafic silicates from a volume of magma much bigger than the volume of the intrusions, which can be explained by the fractionation from magma ascending through the intrusions to shallower depths. A continuous supply and vent of magma is consistent with the lack of chilled margins, the melting of the wall rocks and the generation of high-temperature mineral assemblages (K-feldspar, diopside, and sillimanite) in the Yanbian Group. The intrusions from Lengshuiqing are seen as microchambers on conduits draining olivine-, Cr-spinel-, and sulphide-bearing mafic magma from a larger staging chamber.

  1. Integrating Laboratory and Numerical Decompression Experiments to Investigate Fluid Dynamics into the Conduit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spina, Laura; Colucci, Simone; De'Michieli Vitturi, Mattia; Scheu, Bettina; Dingwell, Donald Bruce

    2015-04-01

    The study of the fluid dynamics of magmatic melts into the conduit, where direct observations are unattainable, was proven to be strongly enhanced by multiparametric approaches. Among them, the coupling of numerical modeling with laboratory experiments represents a fundamental tool of investigation. Indeed, the experimental approach provide invaluable data to validate complex multiphase codes. We performed decompression experiments in a shock tube system, using pure silicon oil as a proxy for the basaltic melt. A range of viscosity comprised between 1 and 1000 Pa s was investigated. The samples were saturated with Argon for 72h at 10MPa, before being slowly decompressed to atmospheric pressure. The evolution of the analogue magmatic system was monitored through a high speed camera and pressure sensors, located into the analogue conduit. The experimental decompressions have then been reproduced numerically using a multiphase solver based on OpenFOAM framework. The original compressible multiphase Openfoam solver twoPhaseEulerFoam was extended to take into account the multicomponent nature of the fluid mixtures (liquid and gas) and the phase transition. According to the experimental conditions, the simulations were run with values of fluid viscosity ranging from 1 to 1000 Pa s. The sensitivity of the model has been tested for different values of the parameters t and D, representing respectively the relaxation time for gas exsolution and the average bubble diameter, required by the Gidaspow drag model. Valuable range of values for both parameters are provided from experimental observations, i.e. bubble nucleation time and bubble size distribution at a given pressure. The comparison of video images with the outcomes of the numerical models was performed by tracking the evolution of the gas volume fraction through time. Therefore, we were able to calibrate the parameter of the model by laboratory results, and to track the fluid dynamics of experimental decompression.

  2. Welding of Pyroclastic Conduit Infill: A Mechanism for Cyclical Explosive Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolzenburg, Stephan; Russell, James K.

    2014-05-01

    Vulcanian style eruptions are small to moderate sized singular to cyclical events commonly having volcanic explosivity indices (VEI) of 1-3. They produce pyroclastic flows, disperse tephra over considerable areas and can occur as precursors to larger (e.g. Plinian) eruptions. Here we present a study on the evolution of the physical properties (strain, porosity, permeability and ultrasonic wave velocities) of breadcrust bombs recovered from the deposits of the 2350 B.P. eruption of Mt Meager, BC, Canada. These accessory lithics are fragments of welded intra vent deposits formed during compaction and deformation processes operating in the shallow (less than 2 km) conduit. The deformation experienced by these samples is a combination of compaction within the conduit and post-compaction stretching associated with the subsequent eruption. Our results highlight a profound directionality in the measured physical properties of these samples related to the deformation-induced fabric. Gas permeability varies drastically with increasing strain and decreasing porosity along the compaction direction of the fabric. However, permeability varies little along the elongation direction of the fabric. Similarly, ultrasonic wave velocities increase along the compaction direction and remain unaffected along the direction of fabric stretching; Poisons ratio increases along the fabric stretching direction. We combine these physical property measurements with models describing the timescales of porosity loss and to explore the timescales of permeability reduction and re-pressurization of the edifice. Modelling results and reconstruction of the deformation history also suggest the potential for a low-cost technique for monitoring the pressure build-up within volcanic systems based on fumarolic activity.

  3. Pockets, conduits, channels, and plumes: links to volcanism and orogeny in the rollback dominated western Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Meghan S.; Sun, Daoyuan; O'Driscoll, Leland; Becker, Thorsten W.; Holt, Adam; Diaz, Jordi; Thomas, Christine

    2015-04-01

    Detailed mantle and lithospheric structure from the Canary Islands to Iberia have been imaged with data from recent temporary deployments and select permanent stations from over 300 broadband seismometers. The stations extended across Morocco and Spain as part of the PICASSO, IberArray, and Morocco-Münster experiments. We present results from S receiver functions (SRF), shear wave splitting, waveform modeling, and geodynamic models that help constrain the tectonic evolution of the westernmost Mediterranean, including orogenesis of the Atlas Mountains and occurrence of localized alkaline volcanism. Our receiver function images, in agreement with previous geophysical modeling, show that the lithosphere is thin (~65 km) beneath the Atlas, but thickens (~100 km) over a very short length scale at the flanks of the mountains. We find that these dramatic changes in lithospheric thickness also correspond to dramatic decreases in delay times inferred from S and SKS splitting observations of seismic anisotropy. Pockets and conduits of low seismic velocity material below the lithosphere extend along much of the Atlas to Southern Spain and correlate with the locations of Pliocene-Quaternary magmatism. Waveform analysis from the USC linear seismic array across the Atlas Mountains constrains the position, shape, and physical characteristics of one localized, low velocity conduit that extends from the uppermost mantle (~200 km depth) up to the volcanoes in the Middle Atlas. The shape, position and temperature of these seismically imaged low velocity anomalies, topography of the base of the lithosphere, morphology of the subducted slab beneath the Alboran Sea, position of the West African Craton and correlation with mantle flow inferred from shear wave splitting suggest that the unusually high topography of the Atlas Mountains and isolated recent volcanics are due to active mantle support that may be from material channeled from the Canary Island plume.

  4. Theory and modelling of quench in cable-in-conduit superconducting magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Shajii, A.

    1994-04-01

    A new simple, self consistent theoretical model is presented that describes the phenomena of quench propagation in Cable-In-Conduit superconducting magnets. The model (Quencher) circumvents many of the difficulties associated with obtaining numerical solutions in more general existing models. Specifically, a factor of 30-50 is gained in CPU time over the general, explicit time dependent codes used to study typical quench events. The corresponding numerical implementation of the new model is described and the numerical results are shown to agree very well with those of the more general models, as well as with experimental data. Further, well justified approximations lead to the MacQuench model that is shown to be very accurate and considerably more efficient than the Quencher model. The MacQuench code is suitable for performing quench studies on a personal computer, requiring only several minutes of CPU time. In order to perform parametric studies on new conductor designs it is required to utilize a model such as MacQuench because of the high computational efficiency of this model. Finally, a set of analytic solutions for the problem of quench propagation in Cable-In-Conduit Conductors is presented. These analytic solutions represent the first such results that remain valid for the long time scales of interest during a quench process. The assumptions and the resulting simplifications that lead to the analytic solutions are discussed, and the regimes of validity of the various approximations are specified. The predictions of the analytic results are shown to be in very good agreement with numerical as well as experimental results. Important analytic scaling relations are verified by such comparisons, and the consequences of some of these scalings on currently designed superconducting magnets are discussed.

  5. Aptitude visuelle à la conduite automobile: exemple des candidats au permis de conduire à Libreville

    PubMed Central

    Souhail, Hassane; Assoumou, Prudence; Birinda, Hilda; Mengome, Emmanuel Mve

    2015-01-01

    L'objectif était d’évaluer l'aptitude visuelle à la conduite automobile des candidats au permis de conduire à Libreville. Il s'agissait d'une étude transversale, descriptive et analytique, qui s'est déroulée à Libreville pendant la période du 4 avril 2012 au 14 juillet 2012 (soit 4 mois et 10 jours). La population d’étude concernait les candidats soumis aux épreuves d'obtention du permis de conduire. Nous avons inclus dans notre travail, les candidats, ayant donné leur consentement par écrit et exclus ceux refusant d'adhérer à l'enquête. Les variables étudiées concernaient l’âge, le sexe, la population d’étude, l'activité professionnelle, l'acuité visuelle de loin et de près, la vision des couleurs, la catégorie du permis de conduire, et l'aptitude visuelle à la conduite automobile. La saisie et l'analyse des données ont été collectées au moyen d'une fiche d'enquête standardisée; après vérification et validation, elles ont été saisies sur le logiciel Excel Windows et analysées sur le logiciel Epi Info version 3.5.1. L’âge moyen des 406 candidats était de 29 ans ± 6,65 ans avec des extrêmes allant de 17 ans à 52 ans. Les hommes représentaient 283 (69,7%) et les femmes 123 (30,3%), soit un ratio de 2,3. Les fonctionnaires étaient retrouvés dans 39,4 % des cas, suivi des élèves-étudiants dans 33,5%. Dans notre population d’étude, 71 sur 406 candidats avaient une baisse de l'acuité visuelle de loin, soit 17,5%. Dans notre série, nous avons retrouvés 34 candidats âgés de 40 ans et plus, et seulement 14 candidats (41,2%) avaient une baisse de l'acuité visuelle de près. La quasi-totalité des patients avaient une vision de couleurs normale (99,5%), cependant 2 candidats avaient une vision de couleurs anormale, soit une prévalence de 0,5%. Dans notre échantillon, 403 (99,3%) sollicitaient un permis de conduire de catégorie léger (perms A, A1, B, F) et 3 (0,7%) sollicitaient un permis de conduire de type

  6. Failing left ventricle to ascending aorta conduit-Hybrid implantation of a melody valve and NuMed covered stent.

    PubMed

    Gössl, Mario; Johnson, Jonathan N; Hagler, Donald J

    2014-04-01

    We present the case of a 36-year-old woman with increasing shortness of breath, a new 3/4 diastolic murmur, and a complex history of LV outflow tract obstruction. She has undergone multiple surgeries including the replacement of her old LV apex to ascending aorta conduit with a 20-mm Gore-Tex tube graft, addition of a 24-mm homograft sutured between the conduit and the LV apex, and insertion of a 21-mm Freestyle porcine valve conduit between the Gore-Tex tube graft and allograft at age 23. The current assessment showed a failing Freestyle conduit prosthesis leading to left heart decompensation. Due to substantial surgical risk, the patient underwent successful implantation of a Melody valve into the Gore-Tex tube and exclusion of the failing Freestyle bioprosthesis with a NuMed CP stent in a hybrid procedure. The case nicely illustrates the collaborative potential of cardiovascular surgeons and interventional cardiologists in the new arena of a hybrid operating room. Complex hybrid procedures like the current one, especially those including percutaneous placements of valves, offer therapeutic options for patients that are otherwise too high risk for conventional open heart surgery. PMID:23784974

  7. 26 CFR 1.6081-7 - Automatic extension of time to file Real Estate Mortgage Investment Conduit (REMIC) income tax...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Automatic extension of time to file Real Estate...) Extension of Time for Filing Returns § 1.6081-7 Automatic extension of time to file Real Estate Mortgage Investment Conduit (REMIC) income tax return. (a) In general. A Real Estate Mortgage Investment...

  8. 26 CFR 1.67-3T - Allocation of expenses by real estate mortgage investment conduits (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Allocation of expenses by real estate mortgage... Income, Adjusted Gross Income, and Taxable Income § 1.67-3T Allocation of expenses by real estate... real estate mortgage investment conduit or REMIC (as defined in section 860D) shall allocate to each...

  9. 26 CFR 1.6081-7 - Automatic extension of time to file Real Estate Mortgage Investment Conduit (REMIC) income tax...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Automatic extension of time to file Real Estate...) Extension of Time for Filing Returns § 1.6081-7 Automatic extension of time to file Real Estate Mortgage Investment Conduit (REMIC) income tax return. (a) In general. A Real Estate Mortgage Investment...

  10. 26 CFR 1.67-3T - Allocation of expenses by real estate mortgage investment conduits (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Allocation of expenses by real estate mortgage... Income, Adjusted Gross Income, and Taxable Income § 1.67-3T Allocation of expenses by real estate... real estate mortgage investment conduit or REMIC (as defined in section 860D) shall allocate to each...

  11. 26 CFR 1.6081-7 - Automatic extension of time to file Real Estate Mortgage Investment Conduit (REMIC) income tax...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Automatic extension of time to file Real Estate...) Extension of Time for Filing Returns § 1.6081-7 Automatic extension of time to file Real Estate Mortgage Investment Conduit (REMIC) income tax return. (a) In general. A Real Estate Mortgage Investment...

  12. First dorsal metacarpal artery adiposofascial flap for venous conduit and soft tissue cover in an avulsed thumb: case report.

    PubMed

    Dodakundi, Chaitanya; Hattori, Yasunori; Doi, Kazuteru

    2012-06-01

    Skin loss, need for vein grafts, and secondary surgeries are often encountered in avulsion injuries of the thumb. We report a case of successful salvage of an avulsion type of near total amputation of the thumb following a conveyor belt injury in which the first dorsal metacarpal artery adiposofascial flap was used for combined soft tissue cover and venous conduit. PMID:22517573

  13. 26 CFR 1.67-3T - Allocation of expenses by real estate mortgage investment conduits (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Allocation of expenses by real estate mortgage... Income, Adjusted Gross Income, and Taxable Income § 1.67-3T Allocation of expenses by real estate... real estate mortgage investment conduit or REMIC (as defined in section 860D) shall allocate to each...

  14. 77 FR 102 - Turnbull Hydro LLC; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing for Exemption for a Small Conduit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Turnbull Hydro LLC; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing for Exemption for a Small Conduit Hydroelectric Facility and Soliciting Comments, Motions To Intervene, and...

  15. Rise of a variable-viscosity fluid in a steadily spreading wedge-shaped conduit with accreting walls

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lachenbruch, Arthur H.; Nathenson, Manuel

    1976-01-01

    Relatively rigid plates making up the outer 50 to 100 km of the Earth are steadily separating from one another along narrow globe-circling zones of submarine volcanism, the oceanic spreading centers. Continuity requires that the viscous underlying material rise beneath spreading centers and accrete onto the steadily diverging plates. It is likely that during the rise the viscosity changes systematically and that the viscous tractions exerted on the plates contribute to the unique pattern of submarine mountains and earthquake faults observed at spreading centers. The process is modeled by viscous creep in a wedge-shaped conduit (with apex at the sea floor) in which the viscosity varies as rm where r is distance from the apex and m is a parameter. For these conditions, the governing differential equations take a simple form. The solution for the velocity is independent of r and of the sign of m. As viscous stresses vary as rm-1, the pattern of stress on the conduit wall is sensitive to viscosity variation. For negative m, the viscous pressure along the base of the conduit is quite uniform; for positive m, it falls toward zero in the axial region as the conduit base widens. For small opening angles, viscous forces push the plates apart, and for large ones, they oppose plate separation. Though highly idealized, the solution provides a tool for investigating tectonic processes at spreading centers.

  16. Carbonate aquifers: Distinctions between conduit flow or diffuse flow should be abandoned in their classification and design of monitoring systems

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, G.J. ); Quinlan, J.F. ); Worthington, S.R.H. )

    1992-01-01

    For more than 20 years most karst hydrogeologists have thought that karst aquifers could be classified within a continuum characterized by two end-members, conduit-flow and diffuse-flow, and that these aquifer types could be reliably identified by interpretation of long-term measurement of variations in water hardness (or specific conductance) and temperature. From the work of Newson (1971), Worthington (1991) and the senior author's 16-month study of 11 springs in the Knox Dolomite in Tennessee, it is clear that variations in specific conductance are an indicator of percentage of spring discharge that is point-recharge via swallets and other open sinkholes (rather than dispersed recharge as infiltration through soil). Variations in water temperatures indicate changes in the relative proportions of quick-flow and slow-flow components. Neither of these parameters is an indicator of proportions of conduit flow or diffuse flow. Also, the meaning of these latter terms has evolved and become too ambiguous. Observation of many cave streams leads to the conclusion that conduit flow and diffuse flow exist at the local scale (100 m); at any larger scales, mixed flow always occurs. In the light of recent knowledge any ground-water monitoring strategy based upon the presumed presence of diffuse flow versus conduit flow in any karst aquifer and that attempts distinction between them is unreliable.

  17. Terrestrial analogs to lunar sinuous rilles - Kauhako Crater and channel, Kalaupapa, Molokai, and other Hawaiian lava conduit systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coombs, C. R.; Hawke, B. R.; Wilson, L.

    1990-01-01

    Two source vents, one explosive and one effusive erupted to form a cinder cone and low lava shield that together compose the Kalaupapa peninsula of Molokai, Hawaii, A 50-100-m-wide channel/tube system extends 2.3 km northward from kauhako crater in the center of the shield. Based on modeling, a volume of up to about 0.2 cu km of lava erupted at a rate of 260 cu m/sec to flow through the Kauhako conduit system in one of the last eruptive episodes on the peninsula. Channel downcutting by thermal erosion occurred at a rate of about 10 micron/sec to help form the 30-m-deep conduit. Two smaller, secondary tube systems formed east of the main lava channel/tube. Several other lava conduit systems on the islands of Oahu and Hawaii were also compared to the Kauhako and lunar sinuous rille systems. These other lava conduits include Whittington, Kupaianaha, and Mauna Ulu lava tubes. Morphologically, the Hawaiian tube systems studied are very similar to lunar sinuous rilles in that they have deep head craters, sinuous channels, and gentle slopes. Thermal erosion is postulated to be an important factor in the formation of these terrestrial channel systems and by analogy is inferred to be an important process involved in the formation of lunar sinuous rilles.

  18. Approaches to Peripheral Nerve Repair: Generations of Biomaterial Conduits Yielding to Replacing Autologous Nerve Grafts in Craniomaxillofacial Surgery.

    PubMed

    Gaudin, Robert; Knipfer, Christian; Henningsen, Anders; Smeets, Ralf; Heiland, Max; Hadlock, Tessa

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury is a common clinical entity, which may arise due to traumatic, tumorous, or even iatrogenic injury in craniomaxillofacial surgery. Despite advances in biomaterials and techniques over the past several decades, reconstruction of nerve gaps remains a challenge. Autografts are the gold standard for nerve reconstruction. Using autografts, there is donor site morbidity, subsequent sensory deficit, and potential for neuroma development and infection. Moreover, the need for a second surgical site and limited availability of donor nerves remain a challenge. Thus, increasing efforts have been directed to develop artificial nerve guidance conduits (ANCs) as new methods to replace autografts in the future. Various synthetic conduit materials have been tested in vitro and in vivo, and several first- and second-generation conduits are FDA approved and available for purchase, while third-generation conduits still remain in experimental stages. This paper reviews the current treatment options, summarizes the published literature, and assesses future prospects for the repair of peripheral nerve injury in craniomaxillofacial surgery with a particular focus on facial nerve regeneration. PMID:27556032

  19. 26 CFR 1.6081-7 - Automatic extension of time to file Real Estate Mortgage Investment Conduit (REMIC) income tax...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Automatic extension of time to file Real Estate...) Extension of Time for Filing Returns § 1.6081-7 Automatic extension of time to file Real Estate Mortgage Investment Conduit (REMIC) income tax return. (a) In general. A Real Estate Mortgage Investment...

  20. Approaches to Peripheral Nerve Repair: Generations of Biomaterial Conduits Yielding to Replacing Autologous Nerve Grafts in Craniomaxillofacial Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Knipfer, Christian; Hadlock, Tessa

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury is a common clinical entity, which may arise due to traumatic, tumorous, or even iatrogenic injury in craniomaxillofacial surgery. Despite advances in biomaterials and techniques over the past several decades, reconstruction of nerve gaps remains a challenge. Autografts are the gold standard for nerve reconstruction. Using autografts, there is donor site morbidity, subsequent sensory deficit, and potential for neuroma development and infection. Moreover, the need for a second surgical site and limited availability of donor nerves remain a challenge. Thus, increasing efforts have been directed to develop artificial nerve guidance conduits (ANCs) as new methods to replace autografts in the future. Various synthetic conduit materials have been tested in vitro and in vivo, and several first- and second-generation conduits are FDA approved and available for purchase, while third-generation conduits still remain in experimental stages. This paper reviews the current treatment options, summarizes the published literature, and assesses future prospects for the repair of peripheral nerve injury in craniomaxillofacial surgery with a particular focus on facial nerve regeneration. PMID:27556032

  1. Monitoring of stage and velocity, for computation of discharge in the Summit Conduit near Summit, Illinois, 2010-2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Kevin K.; Goodwin, Greg E.

    2013-01-01

    Lake Michigan diversion accounting is the process used by the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers to quantify the amount of water that is diverted from the Lake Michigan watershed into the Illinois and Mississippi River Basins. A network of streamgages within the Chicago area waterway system monitor tributary river flows and the major river flow on the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal near Lemont as one of the instrumental tools used for Lake Michigan diversion accounting. The mean annual discharges recorded by these streamgages are used as additions or deductions to the mean annual discharge recorded by the main stream gaging station currently used in the Lake Michigan diversion accounting process, which is the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal near Lemont, Illinois (station number 05536890). A new stream gaging station, Summit Conduit near Summit, Illinois (station number 414757087490401), was installed on September 23, 2010, for the purpose of monitoring stage, velocity, and discharge through the Summit Conduit for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in accordance with Lake Michigan diversion accounting. Summit Conduit conveys flow from a small part of the lower Des Plaines River watershed underneath the Des Plaines River directly into the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal. Because the Summit Conduit discharges into the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal upstream from the stream gaging station at Lemont, Illinois, but does not contain flow diverted from the Lake Michigan watershed, it is considered a flow deduction to the discharge measured by the Lemont stream gaging station in the Lake Michigan diversion accounting process. This report offers a technical summary of the techniques and methods used for the collection and computation of the stage, velocity, and discharge data at the Summit Conduit near Summit, Illinois stream gaging station for the 2011 and 2012 Water Years. The stream gaging station Summit Conduit near Summit, Illinois (station number 414757087490401) is an

  2. Subterranean fragmentation of magma during conduit initiation and evolution in the shallow plumbing system of the small-volume Jagged Rocks volcanoes (Hopi Buttes Volcanic Field, Arizona, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Re, Giuseppe; White, James D. L.; Muirhead, James D.; Ort, Michael H.

    2016-08-01

    Monogenetic volcanoes have limited magma supply and lack long-lived sustained magma plumbing systems. They erupt once, often from multiple vents and sometimes over several years, and are rarely or never re-activated. Eruptive behavior is very sensitive to physical processes (e.g., volatile exsolution, magma-water interaction) occurring in the later stages of magma ascent at shallow crustal depths (<1 km), which yield a spectrum of eruptive styles including weak to moderate explosive activity, violent phreatomagmatism, and lava effusion. Jagged Rocks Complex in the late Miocene Hopi Buttes Volcanic field (Arizona, USA) exposes the frozen remnants of the feeding systems for one or a few monogenetic volcanoes. It provides information on how a shallow magmatic plumbing system evolved within a stable non-marine sedimentary basin, and the processes by which magma flowing through dikes fragmented and conduits were formed. We have identified three main types of fragmental deposits, (1) buds (which emerge from dikes), (2) pyroclastic massifs, and (3) diatremes; these represent three different styles and intensities of shallow-depth magma fragmentation. They may develop successively and at different sites during the evolution of a monogenetic volcano. The deposits consist of a mixture of pyroclasts with varying degrees of welding and country-rock debris in various proportions. Pyroclasts are commonly welded together, but also reveal in places features consistent with phreatomagmatism, such as blocky shapes, dense groundmasses, and composite clasts (loaded and cored). The extent of fragmentation and the formation of subterranean open space controlled the nature of the particles and the architecture and geometry of these conduit structures and their deposits.

  3. Dynamics within geyser conduits: Insights from downhole measurements in El Jefe geyser, El Tatio Geyser Field, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz Saez, C.; Manga, M.; Hurwitz, S.; Rudolph, M. L.; Namiki, A.; Wang, C.; King, E.; Patel, A.

    2013-12-01

    The El Tatio geothermal area is located in the Atacama Desert at an elevation of 4200 m asl. It is the third largest geyser field in the world, with more than 100 active geysers. Recharge of meteoric waters from the NE is limited, and temperatures vary daily from -5 to 10 C. We studied a geyser that we named 'El Jefe' (601768 E, 7530174 S, WGS84 19S). Its conduit has a constriction at a depth of 1.5 m and its diameter is 30 cm. Erupted water ponds in a natural pool around the conduit, and a large fraction then flows back into to the conduit at the end of the eruption. To quantify the mechanics and thermodynamics of the geyser's eruptions, we measured temperature, and pressure continuously inside the geyser conduit for 7 days. Pressure was measured at three depths at a frequency of 100 Hz and temperature was measured at depth intervals of 30 cm at a frequency of 1Hz. During the period of our study, eruption duration was 25 +/- 1.5 seconds and the interval between eruptions was 132 +/-2.5 sec. Variations of the eruption duration and intervals did not correlate with atmospheric pressure and temperature variations. The eruption cycle consists of four distinct stages: (1) Pre-play: lasts for 15 seconds prior to the surface manifestation of the eruption. (2) Eruption: lasts for 25 seconds (3) Post-eruption relaxation: pressure decreases rapidly in two steps, but temperature decreases gradually lagging behind the pressure decrease. Erupted water is drained into the conduit. (4) Recharge: temperature remains nearly constant while pressure increases, suggesting recharge of cold water from below.

  4. Sural nerve defects after nerve biopsy or nerve transfer as a sensory regeneration model for peripheral nerve conduit implantation.

    PubMed

    Radtke, C; Kocsis, J D; Reimers, K; Allmeling, C; Vogt, P M

    2013-09-01

    Nerve repair after injury can be effectively accomplished by direct suture approximation of the proximal and distal segments. This is more successful if coadaptation can be achieved without tension. Currently, the gold standard repair of larger deficits is the transplantation of an autologous sensory sural nerve graft. However, a significant disadvantage of this technique is the inevitable donor morbidity (sensory loss, neuroma and scar formation) after harvesting of the sural nerve. Moreover, limitation of autologous donor nerve length and fixed diameter of the available sural nerve are major drawbacks of current autograft treatment. Another approach that was introduced for nerve repair is the implantation of alloplastic nerve tubes made of, for example, poly-L-lactide. In these, nerve stumps of the transected nerves are surgically bridged using the biosynthetic conduit. A number of experimental studies, primarily in rodents, indicate axonal regeneration and remyelination after implantation of various conduits. However, only limited clinical studies with conduit implantation have been performed in acute peripheral nerve injuries particularly on digital nerves. Clinical transfer of animal studies, which can be carefully calibrated for site and extent of injury, to humans is difficult to interpret due to the intrinsic variability in human nerve injuries. This prevents effective quantification of improvement and induces bias in the study. Therefore, standardization of lesion/repair in human studies is warranted. Here we propose to use sural nerve defects, induced due to nerve graft harvesting or from diagnostic nerve biopsies as a model site to enable standardization of nerve conduit implantation. This would help better with the characterization of the implants and its effectiveness in axonal regeneration and remyelination. Nerve regeneration can be assessed, for example, by recovery of sensation, measured non-invasively by threshold to von Frey filaments and cold

  5. Long-Term Regeneration and Functional Recovery of a 15 mm Critical Nerve Gap Bridged by Tremella fuciformis Polysaccharide-Immobilized Polylactide Conduits.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Shan-Hui; Chan, Shan-Ho; Weng, Chih-Tsung; Yang, Shu-Hui; Jiang, Ching-Fen

    2013-01-01

    Novel peripheral nerve conduits containing the negatively charged Tremella fuciformis polysaccharide (TF) were prepared, and their efficacy in bridging a critical nerve gap was evaluated. The conduits were made of poly(D,L-lactide) (PLA) with asymmetric microporous structure. TF was immobilized on the lumen surface of the nerve conduits after open air plasma activation. The TF-modified surface was characterized by the attenuated total reflection Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy and the scanning electron microscopy. TF modification was found to enhance the neurotrophic gene expression of C6 glioma cells in vitro. TF-modified PLA nerve conduits were tested for their ability to bridge a 15 mm gap of rat sciatic nerve. Nerve regeneration was monitored by the magnetic resonance imaging. Results showed that TF immobilization promoted the nerve connection in 6 weeks. The functional recovery in animals receiving TF-immobilized conduits was greater than in those receiving the bare conduits during an 8-month period. The degree of functional recovery reached ~90% after 8 months in the group of TF-immobilized conduits. PMID:24027599

  6. Fabrication of bioactive conduits containing the fibroblast growth factor 1 and neural stem cells for peripheral nerve regeneration across a 15 mm critical gap.

    PubMed

    Ni, Hsiao-Chiang; Tseng, Ting-Chen; Chen, Jeng-Rung; Hsu, Shan-Hui; Chiu, Ing-Ming

    2013-09-01

    Nerve conduits are often used in combination with bioactive molecules and stem cells to enhance peripheral nerve regeneration. In this study, the acidic fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF1) was immobilized onto the microporous/micropatterned poly (D, L-lactic acid) (PLA) nerve conduits after open air plasma treatment. PLA substrates grafted with chitosan in the presence of a small amount of gold nanoparticles (nano Au) showed a protective effect on the activity of the immobilized FGF1 in vitro. Different conduits were tested for their ability to bridge a 15 mm critical gap defect in a rat sciatic nerve injury model. Axon regeneration and functional recovery were evaluated by histology, walking track analysis and electrophysiology. Among different conduits, PLA conduits grafted with chitosan-nano Au and the FGF1 after plasma activation had the greatest regeneration capacity and functional recovery in the experimental animals. When the above conduit was seeded with aligned neural stem cells, the efficacy was further enhanced and it approached that of the autograft group. This work suggested that microporous/micropatterned nerve conduits containing bioactive growth factors may be successfully fabricated by micropatterning techniques, open plasma activation, and immobilization, which, combined with aligned stem cells, may synergistically contribute to the regeneration of the severely damaged peripheral nerve. PMID:23880639

  7. Long-Term Regeneration and Functional Recovery of a 15 mm Critical Nerve Gap Bridged by Tremella fuciformis Polysaccharide-Immobilized Polylactide Conduits

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Shan-hui; Chan, Shan-Ho; Weng, Chih-tsung; Yang, Shu-Hui; Jiang, Ching-Fen

    2013-01-01

    Novel peripheral nerve conduits containing the negatively charged Tremella fuciformis polysaccharide (TF) were prepared, and their efficacy in bridging a critical nerve gap was evaluated. The conduits were made of poly(D,L-lactide) (PLA) with asymmetric microporous structure. TF was immobilized on the lumen surface of the nerve conduits after open air plasma activation. The TF-modified surface was characterized by the attenuated total reflection Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy and the scanning electron microscopy. TF modification was found to enhance the neurotrophic gene expression of C6 glioma cells in vitro. TF-modified PLA nerve conduits were tested for their ability to bridge a 15 mm gap of rat sciatic nerve. Nerve regeneration was monitored by the magnetic resonance imaging. Results showed that TF immobilization promoted the nerve connection in 6 weeks. The functional recovery in animals receiving TF-immobilized conduits was greater than in those receiving the bare conduits during an 8-month period. The degree of functional recovery reached ~90% after 8 months in the group of TF-immobilized conduits. PMID:24027599

  8. Functional recoveries of sciatic nerve regeneration by combining chitosan-coated conduit and neurosphere cells induced from adipose-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hsueh, Yuan-Yu; Chang, Ya-Ju; Huang, Tzu-Chieh; Fan, Shih-Chen; Wang, Duo-Hsiang; Chen, Jia-Jin Jason; Wu, Chia-Ching; Lin, Sheng-Che

    2014-02-01

    Suboptimal repair occurs in a peripheral nerve gap, which can be partially restored by bridging the gap with various biosynthetic conduits or cell-based therapy. In this study, we developed a combination of chitosan coating approach to induce neurosphere cells from human adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) on chitosan-coated plate and then applied these cells to the interior of a chitosan-coated silicone tube to bridge a 10-mm gap in a rat sciatic nerve. Myelin sheath degeneration and glial scar formation were discovered in the nerve bridged by the silicone conduit. By using a single treatment of chitosan-coated conduit or neurosphere cell therapy, the nerve gap was partially recovered after 6 weeks of surgery. Substantial improvements in nerve regeneration were achieved by combining neurosphere cells and chitosan-coated conduit based on the increase of myelinated axons density and myelin thickness, gastrocnemius muscle weight and muscle fiber diameter, and step and stride lengths from gait analysis. High expressions of interleukin-1β and leukotriene B4 receptor 1 in the intra-neural scarring caused by using silicone conduits revealed that the inflammatory mechanism can be inhibited when the conduit is coated with chitosan. This study demonstrated that the chitosan-coated surface performs multiple functions that can be used to induce neurosphere cells from ASCs and to facilitate nerve regeneration in combination with a cells-assisted coated conduit. PMID:24360575

  9. Reusing the patent internal mammary artery as a conduit in redo coronary artery bypass surgery.

    PubMed

    Nwaejike, Nnamdi; Tennyson, Charlene; Mosca, Roberto; Venkateswaran, Rajamiyer

    2016-03-01

    mortality and satisfactory follow-up at up to 29 months. Evidently, the recycled ITA can be used in redo coronary artery bypass grafting. Papers found were retrospective series or case reports. As such, there is no direct comparison in outcomes between the recycled ITA and first-time ITA harvest or any other conduit for CABG. In conclusion, we find that when it is possible to harvest a previously used ITA, studies have shown it to be a safe and viable conduit in redo CABG with good long-term outcomes. PMID:26669852

  10. A sampling plan for conduit-flow karst springs: Minimizing sampling cost and maximizing statistical utility

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Currens, J.C.

    1999-01-01

    Analytical data for nitrate and triazines from 566 samples collected over a 3-year period at Pleasant Grove Spring, Logan County, KY, were statistically analyzed to determine the minimum data set needed to calculate meaningful yearly averages for a conduit-flow karst spring. Results indicate that a biweekly sampling schedule augmented with bihourly samples from high-flow events will provide meaningful suspended-constituent and dissolved-constituent statistics. Unless collected over an extensive period of time, daily samples may not be representative and may also be autocorrelated. All high-flow events resulting in a significant deflection of a constituent from base-line concentrations should be sampled. Either the geometric mean or the flow-weighted average of the suspended constituents should be used. If automatic samplers are used, then they may be programmed to collect storm samples as frequently as every few minutes to provide details on the arrival time of constituents of interest. However, only samples collected bihourly should be used to calculate averages. By adopting a biweekly sampling schedule augmented with high-flow samples, the need to continuously monitor discharge, or to search for and analyze existing data to develop a statistically valid monitoring plan, is lessened.Analytical data for nitrate and triazines from 566 samples collected over a 3-year period at Pleasant Grove Spring, Logan County, KY, were statistically analyzed to determine the minimum data set needed to calculate meaningful yearly averages for a conduit-flow karst spring. Results indicate that a biweekly sampling schedule augmented with bihourly samples from high-flow events will provide meaningful suspended-constituent and dissolved-constituent statistics. Unless collected over an extensive period of time, daily samples may not be representative and may also be autocorrelated. All high-flow events resulting in a significant deflection of a constituent from base-line concentrations

  11. Formation of dunite conduits in the mantle: observations from the Lanzo peridotite in NW-Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müntener, O.; Pettke, T.; Piccardo, G.; Zanetti, A.

    2003-04-01

    Mantle dunites may be the most important conduits for melt transport in the shallow upper mantle (1). Dunites as observed in the Lanzo ophiolites are generally tabular bodies with sharp, replacive contacts and are oriented parallel or discordant to the foliation in the surrounding harzburgite and plagioclase lherzolites (2, 3). In order to evaluate the mechanisms of how dunite formed, we examined in detail dunite - plagioclase lherzolite transects by a combined field, electron microprobe and Laser ablation ICP-MS study. Field observations show that some discordant dunites locally contain small interstitial clinopyroxene, and large clinopyroxene megacrysts sometimes associated with plagioclase. Calculated liquids in equilibrium with clinopyroxenes have REE slopes and concentrations similar to MORB crystallised from low percentage aggregate liquids (less than 5%). In addition spinel in Lanzo dunite is similar to spinels from MORB (4), with high TiO2 and elevated Cr#. Preliminary results on a dunite transect containing a small gabbro dikelet in its center indicate, however, that spinel compositions consistently vary perpendicular to the contact. The Cr#, TiO2 and a number of trace elements (Zn, Co V, Cr, Mn) decrease with increasing distance from the medial gabbro, while Ni increases. In addition, spinels far from the medial gabbro rarely contain inclusions of primary hydrous phases (pargasite and phlogopite). Compositional variations in olivine are more subtle, e.g. contents of compatible trace elements (Co, Ni) are systematically lower in dunite olivine than in olivine from plagioclase lherzolite. The observed spatial chemical variations may reflect melt focussing with time even within a single dunite conduit. These data might be used to place constraints on the relative importance of focused porous flow vs cracks in the shallow mantle. 1. Kelemen, P. B., Hirth, G., Shimizu, N., Spiegelman, M. &Dick, H. J. B. (1997) Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of

  12. Guidance of dorsal root ganglion neurites and Schwann cells by isolated Schwann cell topography on poly(dimethyl siloxane) conduits and films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, J. A.; Rementer, C. W.; Bruder, Jan M.; Hoffman-Kim, D.

    2011-08-01

    Biomimetic replicas of cellular topography have been utilized to direct neurite outgrowth. Here, we cultured postnatal rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) explants in the presence of Schwann cell (SC) topography to determine the influence of SC topography on neurite outgrowth. Four distinct poly(dimethyl siloxane) conduits were fabricated within which DRG explants were cultured. To determine the contribution of SC topographical features to neurite guidance, the extent of neurite outgrowth into unpatterned conduits, conduits with randomly oriented SC replicas, and conduits with SC replicas parallel or perpendicular to the conduit long axis was measured. Neurite directionality and outgrowth from DRG were also quantified on two-dimensional SC replicas with orientations corresponding to the four conduit conditions. Additionally, live SC migration and neurite extension from DRG on SC replicas were examined as a first step toward quantification of the interactions between live SC and navigating neurites on SC replicas. DRG neurite outgrowth and morphology within conduits and on two-dimensional SC replicas were directed by the underlying SC topographical features. Maximal neurite outgrowth and alignment to the underlying features were observed into parallel conduits and on parallel two-dimensional substrates, whereas the least extent of outgrowth was observed into perpendicular conduits and on perpendicular two-dimensional replica conditions. Additionally, neurites on perpendicular conditions turned to extend along the direction of underlying SC topography. Neurite outgrowth exceeded SC migration in the direction of the underlying anisotropic SC replica after two days in culture. This finding confirms the critical role that SC have in guiding neurite outgrowth and suggests that the mechanism of neurite alignment to SC replicas depends on direct contact with cellular topography. These results suggest that SC topographical replicas may be used to direct and optimize neurite

  13. [Ross operation using "contegra" conduit in a 5 year old girl with severe aortic valve insufficiency in Kawasaki disease coexisting with infective endocarditis--a case report].

    PubMed

    Piaszczyński, Maciej; Pawelec-Wojtalik, Małgorzata; Orzeszko-Spaczyńska, Anna; Wojtalik, Michał; Siwińska, Aldona; Mrówczyński, Wojciech

    2005-07-01

    A case of a 5-year-old girl with severe dysfunction of aortic valve in Kawasaki disease coexisting with endocarditis, is described. The role of Ross operation in the treatment of this condition is discussed. The 18-months follow-up showed good function of aortic valve and "Contegra" conduit (bovine jugular vein), but long-term follow-up of patients with "Contegra" conduit remains unknown. In conclusion, a Ross operation using "Contegra" conduit in pulmonary position could be effective method in the treatment of dysfunction of aortic valve in Kawasaki disease coexisting with endocarditis in children. PMID:16136434

  14. Pure Laparoscopic Radical Cystectomy with Ileal Conduit: A Single Surgeon's Mid-Term Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Park, Bumsoo; Jeong, Byong Chang; Jeon, Seong Soo; Lee, Hyun Moo; Choi, Han Yong

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The use of laparoscopic radical cystectomy (LRC) for muscle-invasive bladder cancer is not yet widespread because of the technical difficulties of the procedure and the lengthy operating time. In this study, we report a single surgeon's experience with LRC. Materials and Methods Thirty patients (25 men and 5 women) with bladder cancer underwent LRC and ileal conduit by a single surgeon between November 2007 and May 2011. An extracorporeal urinary diversion was performed through 5-6 cm midline incision for specimen extraction. Results The median operating time and estimated blood loss were 527.5 minutes and 275 mL, respectively. There was no conversion to open surgery. The median time to oral intake and postoperative hospital stay were 5 days and 12 days, respectively. The rates of immediate, early postoperative and late postoperative complication were 3.3%, 20% and 20%, respectively. With 16 months of median follow-up, the overall and recurrence-free survival rates were 70% and 56.7%, respectively. Conclusion LRC is feasible for the management of invasive bladder cancer and, with appropriate patient selection, can be a good alternative to open or robot-assisted radical cystectomy in the era of robot-assisted surgery. PMID:23709426

  15. The medial temporal lobe—conduit of parallel connectivity: a model for attention, memory, and perception

    PubMed Central

    Mozaffari, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Based on the notion that the brain is equipped with a hierarchical organization, which embodies environmental contingencies across many time scales, this paper suggests that the medial temporal lobe (MTL)—located deep in the hierarchy—serves as a bridge connecting supra- to infra—MTL levels. Bridging the upper and lower regions of the hierarchy provides a parallel architecture that optimizes information flow between upper and lower regions to aid attention, encoding, and processing of quick complex visual phenomenon. Bypassing intermediate hierarchy levels, information conveyed through the MTL “bridge” allows upper levels to make educated predictions about the prevailing context and accordingly select lower representations to increase the efficiency of predictive coding throughout the hierarchy. This selection or activation/deactivation is associated with endogenous attention. In the event that these “bridge” predictions are inaccurate, this architecture enables the rapid encoding of novel contingencies. A review of hierarchical models in relation to memory is provided along with a new theory, Medial-temporal-lobe Conduit for Parallel Connectivity (MCPC). In this scheme, consolidation is considered as a secondary process, occurring after a MTL-bridged connection, which eventually allows upper and lower levels to access each other directly. With repeated reactivations, as contingencies become consolidated, less MTL activity is predicted. Finally, MTL bridging may aid processing transient but structured perceptual events, by allowing communication between upper and lower levels without calling on intermediate levels of representation. PMID:25426036

  16. Measurements of the transverse resistance and eddy current losses in a cable-in-conduit conductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keilin, V. E.; Kovalev, I. A.; Kruglov, S. L.; Lelekhov, S. A.; Il'in, A. A.; Naumov, A. V.; Shcherbakov, V. I.; Shutov, K. A.

    2015-11-01

    In the case of plasma current interruption in tokamaks, the conductor of toroidial field (TF) coils experiences the action of a pulsed decreasing magnetic field (PDMF) parallel to the conductor's axis. To estimate the stability of a cable-in-conduit conductor against the PDMF, a new experimental method to study different types of losses is applied. This method exploits a high sensitivity of temperature and gas pressure to input energy in a closed volume. It allows one to measure hysteresis losses with a rather high accuracy (provided that the rate of change of the PDMF is low) and a sum of hysteresis losses and eddy current losses (when the rate of change of the PDMF is high). An experimental setup to measure the transverse (circumferential) resistance and losses has been developed at the National Research Centre Kurchatov Institute. A Russianmade Nb3Sn conductor intended for the TF coils of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor is subjected to a PDMF with different amplitudes and characteristic times. The electromagnetic time constant and the transverse resistivity of the conductor are experimentally determined. The maximum temperature of strands under the action of the PDMF is calculated.

  17. Fundamental Design based on Current Distribution in Coaxial Multi-Layer Cable-in-Conduit Conductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamajima, Takataro; Tsuda, Makoto; Yagai, Tsuyoshi; Takahata, Kazuya; Imagawa, Shinsaku

    An imbalanced current distribution is often observed in cable-in-conduit (CIC) superconductors which are composed of multi-staged, triplet type sub-cables, and hence deteriorates the performance of the coils. Therefore, since it is very important to obtain a homogeneous current distribution in the superconducting strands, we propose a coaxial multi-layer type CIC conductor. We use a circuit model for all layers in the coaxial multi-layer CIC conductor, and derive a generalized formula governing the current distribution as explicit functions of the superconductor construction parameters, such as twist pitch, twist direction, radius of each layer, and number of superconducting (SC) strands and copper (Cu) strands. We apply the formula to design the coaxial multi-layer CIC which has the same number of SC strands and Cu strands of the CIC for Central Solenoid of ITER. We can design three kinds of the coaxial multi-layer CIC depending on distribution of SC and Cu strands on all layers. It is shown that the SC strand volume should be optimized as a function of SC and Cu strand distribution on the layers.

  18. Peripheral Nerve Regeneration Through Hydrogel-Enriched Chitosan Conduits Containing Engineered Schwann Cells for Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Cora; Wrobel, Sandra; Raimondo, Stefania; Rochkind, Shimon; Heimann, Claudia; Shahar, Abraham; Ziv-Polat, Ofra; Geuna, Stefano; Grothe, Claudia; Haastert-Talini, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    Critical length nerve defects in the rat sciatic nerve model were reconstructed with chitosan nerve guides filled with Schwann cells (SCs) containing hydrogel. The transplanted SCs were naive or had been genetically modified to overexpress neurotrophic factors, thus providing a cellular neurotrophic factor delivery system. Prior to the assessment in vivo, in vitro studies evaluating the properties of engineered SCs overexpressing glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) or fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2(18kDa)) demonstrated their neurite outgrowth inductive bioactivity for sympathetic PC-12 cells as well as for dissociated dorsal root ganglion cell drop cultures. SCs within NVR-hydrogel, which is mainly composed of hyaluronic acid and laminin, were delivered into the lumen of chitosan hollow conduits with a 5% degree of acetylation. The viability and neurotrophic factor production by engineered SCs within NVR-Gel inside the chitosan nerve guides was further demonstrated in vitro. In vivo we studied the outcome of peripheral nerve regeneration after reconstruction of 15-mm nerve gaps with either chitosan/NVR-Gel/SCs composite nerve guides or autologous nerve grafts (ANGs). While ANGs did guarantee for functional sensory and motor regeneration in 100% of the animals, delivery of NVR-Gel into the chitosan nerve guides obviously impaired sufficient axonal outgrowth. This obstacle was overcome to a remarkable extent when the NVR-Gel was enriched with FGF-2(18kDa) overexpressing SCs. PMID:25876520

  19. Reverse saphenous conduit flap in small animals: Clinical applications and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Ross C

    2014-01-01

    Due to the lack of skin elasticity defects of the distal hind limb can be a challenge to close. This article assesses a well-described, but completely under-used technique for closure of wounds on the distal tarsus. The technique was used with good success in six cases presenting to the Bryanston Veterinary Hospital with a wide range of underlying pathology ranging from trauma to neoplastic disease of the tarsus. All six cases were treated with a reverse saphenous conduit flap and two of them underwent radiation therapy with no adverse side effects. All cases showed excellent results with a very low degree of flap necrosis that never exceeded 15% of the total flap area. This skin flap provides an excellent treatment method that is reliable in closure of defects of the distal tarsus with few adverse effects. To the author's knowledge there has been only one previously published report on the clinical use of this type of skin flap, even though the flap is well described in most texts. PMID:25685994

  20. Volcanic conduit migration over a basement landslide at Mount Etna (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolosi, I.; Caracciolo, F. D'ajello; Branca, S.; Ventura, G.; Chiappini, M.

    2014-06-01

    The flanks of volcanoes may slide in response to the loading of the edifice on a weak basement, magma push, and/or to tectonic stress. However, examples of stratovolcanoes emplaced on active landslides are lacking and the possible effects on the volcano dynamics unknown. Here, we use aeromagnetic data to construct a three-dimensional model of the clay-rich basement of Etna volcano (Italy). We provide evidence for a large stratovolcano growing on a pre-existing basement landslide and show that the eastern Etna flank, which slides toward the sea irrespective of volcanic activity, moves coherently with the underlying landslide. The filling of the landslide depression by lava flows through time allows the formation of a stiffness barrier, which is responsible for the long-term migration of the magma pathways from the coast to the present-day Etna summit. These unexpected results provide a new interpretation clue on the causes of the volcanic instability processes and of the mechanisms of deflection and migration of volcanic conduits.

  1. Orphanhood and vulnerability: a conduit to poor child health outcomes in Rwanda.

    PubMed

    Amoako Johnson, Fiifi; Padmadas, Sabu S; Smith, Peter W F

    2010-03-01

    The HIV epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa has caused many children to become orphaned and vulnerable. Recent studies show that orphaned and vulnerable children (OVC) lack the basic necessities for survival and development. These children are particularly at high risk of poor health and poverty. Although the poor health outcomes of these children are well documented, the complexities of the factors that mediate their health outcomes have not been systematically studied. The aim of this paper is to examine how the complex relationships between and within the proximate and socio-economic determinants mediate the poor health outcomes of children through their OVC status. The analyses considered graphical chain modelling of morbidity data from a sample of 3745 children aged below five years from the 2005 Rwandan Demographic and Health Survey. The results show that OVC status influences the risk of childhood morbidity both directly and indirectly and also as a conduit through which other significant proximate factors and socio-economic factors operate. PMID:20390511

  2. Exploring the role of lipids in intercellular conduits: breakthroughs in the pipeline

    PubMed Central

    Delage, Elise; Zurzolo, Chiara

    2013-01-01

    It has been known for more than a century that most of the plant cells are connected to their neighbors through membranous pores perforating the cell wall, namely plasmodesmata (PDs). The recent discovery of tunneling nanotubes (TNTs), thin membrane bridges established between distant mammalian cells, suggests that intercellular communication mediated through cytoplasmic continuity could be a conserved feature of eukaryotic organisms. Although TNTs differ from PDs in their formation and architecture, both are characterized by a continuity of the plasma membrane between two cells, delimiting a nanotubular channel supported by actin-based cytoskeleton. Due to this unusual membrane organization, lipids are likely to play critical roles in the formation and stability of intercellular conduits like TNTs and PDs, but also in regulating the transfer through these structures. While it is crucial for a better understanding of those fascinating communication highways, the study of TNT lipid composition and dynamics turned out to be extremely challenging. The present review aims to give an overview of the recent findings in this context. We will also discuss some of the promising imaging approaches, which might be the key for future breakthroughs in the field and could also benefit the research on PDs. PMID:24368909

  3. A Decaheme Cytochrome as a Molecular Electron Conduit in Dye-Sensitized Photoanodes

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Ee Taek; Sheikh, Khizar; Orchard, Katherine L; Hojo, Daisuke; Radu, Valentin; Lee, Chong-Yong; Ainsworth, Emma; Lockwood, Colin; Gross, Manuela A; Adschiri, Tadafumi; Reisner, Erwin; Butt, Julea N; Jeuken, Lars J C

    2015-01-01

    In nature, charge recombination in light-harvesting reaction centers is minimized by efficient charge separation. Here, it is aimed to mimic this by coupling dye-sensitized TiO2 nanocrystals to a decaheme protein, MtrC from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, where the 10 hemes of MtrC form a ≈7-nm-long molecular wire between the TiO2 and the underlying electrode. The system is assembled by forming a densely packed MtrC film on an ultra-flat gold electrode, followed by the adsorption of approximately 7 nm TiO2 nanocrystals that are modified with a phosphonated bipyridine Ru(II) dye (RuP). The step-by-step construction of the MtrC/TiO2 system is monitored with (photo)electrochemistry, quartz-crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Photocurrents are dependent on the redox state of the MtrC, confirming that electrons are transferred from the TiO2 nanocrystals to the surface via the MtrC conduit. In other words, in these TiO2/MtrC hybrid photodiodes, MtrC traps the conduction-band electrons from TiO2 before transferring them to the electrode, creating a photobioelectrochemical system in which a redox protein is used to mimic the efficient charge separation found in biological photosystems. PMID:26180522

  4. Solid-cryogen-stabilized, cable-in-conduit (CIC) superconducting cables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voccio, J. P.; Michael, P. C.; Bromberg, L.; Hahn, S.

    2015-12-01

    This paper considers the use of a solid cryogen as a means to stabilize, both mechanically and thermally, magnesium diboride (MgB2) superconducting strands within a dual-channel cable-in-conduit (CIC) cable for use in AC applications, such as a generator stator winding. The cable consists of two separate channels; the outer channel contains the superconducting strands and is filled with a fluid (liquid or gas) that becomes solid at the device operating temperature. Several options for fluid will be presented, such as liquid nitrogen, hydrocarbons and other chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) that have a range of melting temperatures and volumetric expansions (from solid at operating temperature to fixed volume at room temperature). Implications for quench protection and conductor stability, enhanced through direct contact with the solid cryogen, which has high heat capacity and thermal conductivity (compared with helium gas), will be presented. Depending on the cryogen, the conductor will be filled initially either with liquid at atmospheric conditions or a gas at high pressure (∼100 atm). After cooldown, the cryogen in the stranded-channel will be solid, essentially locking the strands in place, preventing strand motion and degradation due to mechanical deformation while providing enhanced thermal capacity for stability and protection. The effect of cryogen porosity is also considered. The relatively high heat capacity of solid cryogens at these lower temperatures (compared to gaseous helium) enhances the thermal stability of the winding. During operation, coolant flow through the open inner channel will minimize pressure drop.

  5. Volcanic conduit migration over a basement landslide at Mount Etna (Italy).

    PubMed

    Nicolosi, I; Caracciolo, F D'Ajello; Branca, S; Ventura, G; Chiappini, M

    2014-01-01

    The flanks of volcanoes may slide in response to the loading of the edifice on a weak basement, magma push, and/or to tectonic stress. However, examples of stratovolcanoes emplaced on active landslides are lacking and the possible effects on the volcano dynamics unknown. Here, we use aeromagnetic data to construct a three-dimensional model of the clay-rich basement of Etna volcano (Italy). We provide evidence for a large stratovolcano growing on a pre-existing basement landslide and show that the eastern Etna flank, which slides toward the sea irrespective of volcanic activity, moves coherently with the underlying landslide. The filling of the landslide depression by lava flows through time allows the formation of a stiffness barrier, which is responsible for the long-term migration of the magma pathways from the coast to the present-day Etna summit. These unexpected results provide a new interpretation clue on the causes of the volcanic instability processes and of the mechanisms of deflection and migration of volcanic conduits. PMID:24924784

  6. FEMCAM Analysis of SULTAN Test Results for ITER Nb3SN Cable-conduit Conductors

    SciTech Connect

    Yuhu Zhai, Pierluigi Bruzzone, Ciro Calzolaio

    2013-03-19

    Performance degradation due to filament fracture of Nb3 Sn cable-in-conduit conductors (CICCs) is a critical issue in large-scale magnet designs such as ITER which is currently being constructed in the South of France. The critical current observed in most SULTAN TF CICC samples is significantly lower than expected and the voltage-current characteristic is seen to have a much broader transition from a single strand to the CICC. Moreover, most conductors exhibit the irreversible degradation due to filament fracture and strain relaxation under electromagnetic cyclic loading. With recent success in monitoring thermal strain distribution and its evolution under the electromagnetic cyclic loading from in situ measurement of critical temperature, we apply FEMCAM which includes strand filament breakage and local current sharing effects to SULTAN tested CICCs to study Nb3 Sn strain sensitivity and irreversible performance degradation. FEMCAM combines the thermal bending effect during cool down and the EM bending effect due to locally accumulating Lorentz force during magnet operation. It also includes strand filament fracture and related local current sharing for the calculation of cable n value. In this paper, we model continuous performance degradation under EM cyclic loading based on strain relaxation and the transition broadening upon cyclic loading to the extreme cases seen in SULTAN test data to better quantify conductor performance degradation.

  7. Volcanic conduit migration over a basement landslide at Mount Etna (Italy)

    PubMed Central

    Nicolosi, I.; Caracciolo, F. D'Ajello; Branca, S.; Ventura, G.; Chiappini, M.

    2014-01-01

    The flanks of volcanoes may slide in response to the loading of the edifice on a weak basement, magma push, and/or to tectonic stress. However, examples of stratovolcanoes emplaced on active landslides are lacking and the possible effects on the volcano dynamics unknown. Here, we use aeromagnetic data to construct a three-dimensional model of the clay-rich basement of Etna volcano (Italy). We provide evidence for a large stratovolcano growing on a pre-existing basement landslide and show that the eastern Etna flank, which slides toward the sea irrespective of volcanic activity, moves coherently with the underlying landslide. The filling of the landslide depression by lava flows through time allows the formation of a stiffness barrier, which is responsible for the long-term migration of the magma pathways from the coast to the present-day Etna summit. These unexpected results provide a new interpretation clue on the causes of the volcanic instability processes and of the mechanisms of deflection and migration of volcanic conduits. PMID:24924784

  8. Optimization of lamp arrangement in a closed-conduit UV reactor based on a genetic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Sultan, Tipu; Ahmad, Zeshan; Cho, Jinsoo

    2016-01-01

    The choice for the arrangement of the UV lamps in a closed-conduit ultraviolet (CCUV) reactor significantly affects the performance. However, a systematic methodology for the optimal lamp arrangement within the chamber of the CCUV reactor is not well established in the literature. In this research work, we propose a viable systematic methodology for the lamp arrangement based on a genetic algorithm (GA). In addition, we analyze the impacts of the diameter, angle, and symmetry of the lamp arrangement on the reduction equivalent dose (RED). The results are compared based on the simulated RED values and evaluated using the computational fluid dynamics simulations software ANSYS FLUENT. The fluence rate was calculated using commercial software UVCalc3D, and the GA-based lamp arrangement optimization was achieved using MATLAB. The simulation results provide detailed information about the GA-based methodology for the lamp arrangement, the pathogen transport, and the simulated RED values. A significant increase in the RED values was achieved by using the GA-based lamp arrangement methodology. This increase in RED value was highest for the asymmetric lamp arrangement within the chamber of the CCUV reactor. These results demonstrate that the proposed GA-based methodology for symmetric and asymmetric lamp arrangement provides a viable technical solution to the design and optimization of the CCUV reactor. PMID:27191576

  9. Results of Buoyancy-gravity Effects in ITER Cable-in- Conduit Conductor with Dual Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruzzone, P.; Stepanov, B.; Zanino, R.; Richard, L. Savoldi

    2006-04-01

    The coolant in the ITER cable-in-conduit conductors (CICC) flows at significant higher speed in the central channel than in the strand bundle region due to the large difference of hydraulic impedance. When energy is deposited in the bundle region, e.g. by ac loss or radiation, the heat removal in vertically oriented dual channel CICC with the coolant flowing downward is affected by the reduced density of helium (buoyancy) in the bundle region, which is arising from the temperature gradient due to poor heat exchange between the two channels. At large deposited power, flow stagnation and back-flow can cause in the strand bundle area a slow temperature runaway eventually leading to quench. A new test campaign of the thermal-hydraulic behavior was carried out in the SULTAN facility on an instrumented section of the ITER Poloidal Field Conductor Insert (PFIS). The buoyancy-gravity effect was investigated using ac loss heating, with ac loss in the cable calibrated in separate runs. The extent of upstream temperature increase was explored over a broad range of mass flow rate and deposited power. The experimental behavior is partly reproduced by numerical simulations. The results from the tests are extrapolated to the likely operating conditions of the ITER Toroidal Field conductor with the inboard leg cooled from top to bottom and heat deposited by nuclear radiation from the burning plasma.

  10. A numerical program for steady-state flow of magma-gas mixtures through vertical eruptive conduits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mastin, Larry G.; Ghiorso, Mark S.

    2000-01-01

    This report presents a model that calculates flow properties (pressure, vesicularity, and some 35 other parameters) as a function of vertical position within a volcanic conduit during a steady-state eruption. The model idealizes the magma-gas mixture as a single homogeneousfluid and calculates gas exsolution under the assumption of equilibrium conditions. These are the same assumptions on which classic conduit models (e.g. Wilson and Head, 1981) have been based. They are most appropriate when applied to eruptions of rapidly ascending magma (basaltic lava-fountain eruptions, and Plinian or sub-Plinian eruptions of intermediate or silicic magmas) that contains abundant nucleation sites (microlites, for example) for bubble growth.

  11. Treatment of an aortic fungal false aneurysm by composite stentless porcine/pericardial conduit: a case report.

    PubMed

    Mahesh, B; Caputo, M; Angelini, G D; Bryan, A J

    2003-02-01

    Fungal prosthetic valve endocarditis is an uncommon but serious condition with high early and long-term mortality. The majority of these cases occur after aortic valve surgery and are caused by Candida species. Radical debridement of all infected tissues, valve replacement with perioperative and long-term anti-fungal agents is the recommended treatment. Choice of prosthesis varies widely among surgeons, but present recommendations favour biological prostheses. We report for the first time the case of a fungal PVE with false aneurysm after composite aortic root replacement with a dacron composite conduit treated successfully with aortic root replacement using a Shelhigh (Shelhigh Inc., Millburn, NJ) stentless porcine pericardial valved conduit. PMID:12543581

  12. Peripheral Nerve Repair in Rats Using Composite Hydrogel-Filled Aligned Nanofiber Conduits with Incorporated Nerve Growth Factor

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Jenny; Limburg, Sonja; Joshi, Sunil K.; Landman, Rebeccah; Park, Michelle; Zhang, Qia; Kim, Hubert T.

    2013-01-01

    Repair of peripheral nerve defects with current synthetic, tubular nerve conduits generally shows inferior recovery when compared with using nerve autografts, the current gold standard. We tested the ability of composite collagen and hyaluronan hydrogels, with and without the nerve growth factor (NGF), to stimulate neurite extension on a promising aligned, nanofiber poly-L-lactide-co-caprolactone (PLCL) scaffold. In vitro, the hydrogels significantly increased neurite extension from dorsal root ganglia explants. Consistent with these results, the addition of hydrogels as luminal fillers within aligned, nanofiber tubular PLCL conduits led to improved sensory function compared to autograft repair in a critical-size defect in the sciatic nerve in a rat model. Sensory recovery was assessed 3 and 12 weeks after repair using a withdrawal assay from thermal stimulation. The addition of hydrogel did not enhance recovery of motor function in the rat model. The NGF led to dose-dependent improvements in neurite out-growth in vitro, but did not have a significant effect in vivo. In summary, composite collagen/hyaluronan hydrogels enhanced sensory neurite outgrowth in vitro and sensory recovery in vivo. The use of such hydrogels as luminal fillers for tubular nerve conduits may therefore be useful in assisting restoration of protective sensation following peripheral nerve injury. PMID:23659607

  13. Specificity of motor axon regeneration: a comparison of recovery following biodegradable conduit small gap tubulization and epineurial neurorrhaphy

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Youlai; Zhang, Peixun; Yin, Xiaofeng; Han, Na; Kou, Yuhui; Jiang, Baoguo

    2015-01-01

    Functional recovery is often unsatisfactory after lesions in the peripheral nervous system despite the strong potential for regeneration and advances in microsurgical techniques. Axonal regeneration in mixed nerve into inappropriate pathways is a major contributing factor to this failure. In this study, the rat femoral nerve model of transection and surgical repair was used to evaluate the specificity of motor axon regeneration as well as functional and morphological recovery using biodegradable conduit small gap tubulization compared to epineurial neurorrhaphy. 12 weeks after nerve repair, the specificity was assessed using the retrograde neurotracers TB and DiI to backlabel motor neurons that regenerate axons into muscle and cutaneous pathways. To evaluate the functional recovery of the quadriceps muscle, the quadriceps muscle forces were examined. The quadriceps muscle and myelinated axons were assessed using electrophysiology and histology. The results showed that the specificity of motor axon regeneration (preferential reinnervation) was significantly higher when the nerve transection was treated by biodegradable conduit small gap tubulization and there was no significant difference between the two suture methods with respect to the functional and morphological recovery. This study demonstrated that the quicker and easier biodegradable conduit small gap tubulization may get more accurate reinnervation than traditional epineurial neurorrhaphy and produced functional and morphological recovery equal to traditional epineurial neurorrhaphy. PMID:25755828

  14. Evaluation of the Melody transcatheter pulmonary valve and Ensemble delivery system for the treatment of dysfunctional right ventricle to pulmonary artery conduits.

    PubMed

    Asnes, Jeremy; Hellenbrand, William E

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic conduits and bioprosthetic valves are used in the treatment of patients with congenital heart disease involving the right ventricular outflow tract and pulmonary valve. In-situ time-dependent degradation uniformly results in conduit and valve dysfunction. The abnormal hemodynamics imposed by valve and conduit dysfunction have been linked to exercise intolerance, arrhythmia, right heart failure, and sudden death. Starting in childhood, affected patients are subjected to repeated open-heart surgeries to restore valve function and potentially reduce morbidity and mortality. Percutaneous transcatheter pulmonary valve replacement with the Melody Transcatheter Pulmonary Valve (Medtronic, Inc., Minneapolis, MN) has been performed in ≈8000 patients worldwide. The valve and implant procedure provide a far less invasive means of restoring valve and conduit function and allow patients to forego multiple operations. Recent clinical trials have shown excellent and durable results in terms of valve function, relief of obstruction, and improvement in functional class up to 7 years from implant. PMID:26513599

  15. Apparatus and process for controlling fluidized beds

    DOEpatents

    Rehmat, Amirali G.; Patel, Jitendra G.

    1985-10-01

    An apparatus and process for control and maintenance of fluidized beds under non-steady state conditions. An ash removal conduit is provided for removing solid particulates from a fluidized bed separate from an ash discharge conduit in the lower portion of the grate supporting such a bed. The apparatus and process of this invention is particularly suitable for use in ash agglomerating fluidized beds and provides control of the fluidized bed before ash agglomeration is initiated and during upset conditions resulting in stable, sinter-free fluidized bed maintenance.

  16. Bioherms: the conduits of connection between regional (bedrock) and surface (peatland) aquifers in the James Bay Lowlands: Diamond mining and the fate of peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittington, P. N.; Price, J. S.

    2010-12-01

    The James Bay Lowlands host one of the largest wetland complexes in the world because the extremely low relief delays lateral runoff, the thick low permeability marine deposits suppress groundwater seepage loss and the subarctic climate reduces ET losses, creating favourable conditions for wetland development. Recent discovery of kimberlite pipes in the area has led to open-pit diamond mining which requires substantial pumping to dewater the mine, thus depressurization of the regional bedrock aquifer. Outcropping and subcropping bioherms (ancient coral reefs) provide a direct connection between the surface peatland-dominated hydrological system and the Silurian limestone bedrock. It is proposed that these outcrops will act as flow conduits connecting (and draining) the surficial aquifer (wetland) to the regional bedrock aquifer. What is unknown is the spatial extent of the peatlands that the bioherms may affect. In total, 8 bioherms and the surrounding peatland were variously instrumented with wells, piezometers and tensiometers. Three bioherms contained deep (>25 m) bedrock monitoring wells and three had radial transects (extending up to 100 m from the edge of the bioherm into the surrounding peatland) of wells and piezometers installed in the peat (1-3 m deep) and marine deposits (3-7 m deep) to assess lateral water table draw down and hydraulic gradients. As a result of the bedrock aquifer dewatering, the water levels in the bioherms near the mine decreased between 3 and 6 meters; at a control site (unaffected) water levels did not decline. The local water table drawdown cone around the bioherm was limited to ~ 10-15m. However, the vertical gradients in the peat piezometers located near the bioherms showed increasing vertical hydraulic gradients from 0.1 to >1, which are 2-3 orders of magnitude greater than that of the control site. This was consistent in the majority of piezometer nests and these large gradients extended up to 50 m from the bioherms. Soil water

  17. Complexities within the shallow conduit during Vulcanian explosions: Insights from Episode IV of the 1912 eruption of Novarupta, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, S. J.; Houghton, B. F.; Gonnermann, H. M.; Arbaret, L.; Burgisser, A.

    2015-12-01

    Models for initiation of Vulcanian eruptions involve disruption of a conduit-sealing plug or dome and the downward propagation of decompression and fragmentation waves into the conduit. At this time, we have a limited understanding of the physical state of the magma prior to its disruption, including the range of viscosities and vesicularities and the extent to which brecciated, outgassed, degassed, and volatile-rich melt may be co-mingled. Current models propose that the dense, outgassed dome/plug overlies an orderly, predominantly horizontally layered conduit with pressure increasing with depth. The 1912 eruption of Novarupta, Alaska, U.S.A. provided a unique situation to study Vulcanian explosions because its proximal deposits are exceptionally well preserved. After 60 hours and three episodes of Plinian activity and caldera collapse 10 km from vent, a dacite dome was extruded and completely destroyed by a Vulcanian phase. The fifth and final episode comprised of extrusion of a rhyolite dome without explosive activity, thus allowing preservation of the Episode IV Vulcanian block apron. We have collected data on over 1,300 of the largest juvenile and lithic blocks within an ~2-3 km radius from vent, making Episode IV the best mapped Vulcanian deposit in the world to-date. Sectors rich in specific lithologies (pumice, dense dacite, flow-banded clasts or breccia, +/- breadcrusting) and/or of contrasting block size suggest multiple explosions. Vesicularities of breadcrust rinds preserve syn-eruptive vesicularities and volatile contents and suggest considerable heterogeneity on length scales down to mm. Their vesicularity range is between 0.5 and 55% whereas dense dacite blocks lie between 0 and 33%. On equally short length scales, similar broad ranges for porosity/permeability and contrasts in micro-textures indicate major physical and chemical heterogeneity reflecting very local variations in the extent to which the melt was degassed or outgassed. Our new data

  18. Investigation of Relationship between In-Situ Stress and Fluid Conduits from Chinshui Geothermal Area, NE Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, E.; Sun, T.; Lin, S.; Lee, W.; Lin, W.; Wu, Y.; Wang, T.; Song, S.; Lin, W.

    2013-12-01

    Recently, underground geo-engineering has been paying more and more attention as the demand of natural resources and waste disposal dramatically increases these years, such as petroleum exploitation, geothermal energy, carbon capture and sequestration, and nuclear waste disposal. In the underground geo-engineering, knowledge of in-situ stress is essential for engineering design. Furthermore, understanding the relationship between fractures and in-situ stress is one of key information to evaluate the potential of fracture seal/conduit for such projects. In this study, we summarized the results of geothermal exploration in the ChinShui Geothermal area, NE Taiwan. The results are integrated from core observation, downhole physical logging, anelastic strain recovery, paleostress analysis, and focal mechanism stress inversion around the ChinShui geothermal area, Ilan, NE Taiwan. The in-situ stress results from multi-scale observations of core-based method, local paleostress, and regionally focal mechanisms all show strike-slip faulting stress regime of NE-compression and NW-extension as recent stress state. Using the classification of non-filling and filling (closed and opened) fractures, we are able to identify no-fluid fractures, healed fractures and fluid conduits, respectively. The fluid conduits strike NE, which is consistent with the predicted orientation of open cracks based on current stress state. Accroding to the orientation distribution of fluid conduits, the stress ratio and fluid pressure ratio are estimated as 0.30 and 0.59, respectively. Furthremore, in accordance with the tensile strength of 2.56MPa and the assumption of S2 as vertical lithostatic stress, the magnitude of S1, S3 and fluid pressure at 700m can be estimated as 21.6, 17.2 and 19.8 MPa, respectively. This study provides insights into understanding the relationship between in-situ stress state and fracture sealing/conduits. The results can be applied for geo-engineering projects such as

  19. Étude des perturbations conduites et rayonnées dans une cellule de commutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, F.; Forest, F.; Puzo, A.; Rojat, G.

    1993-12-01

    The principles used in static conversion and the rise of the performances of the new switching devices contribue to increase the level of electromagnetic noises emitted by electronic converters. We have studied the way how these perturbations are created and coupled through their environment in conducted and radiated mode by a switching cell. This one can work in hard switching, zero current or voltage switching modes. We first outline the general problems of electromagnetic pollution and their metrology in converters. Then we describe the experimental environment. We analyse the mechanisms of generation of parasitic signals in a switching cell related to the electrical constraints and its switching mode. The simulated results, issued of the analytical models obtained, are confronted with the experimental ones. Then we show a method to calculate analytically the E and H near fields. It has been confirmed by experimental results. At last, we present, in a synthetic manner, the main results obtained, relative to the switching mode and the electrical constraints, using a new characterizing method. Theses results will allow the designer to incorporate the electromagnetic considerations in the conception of a converter. Les principes de commutation employés en conversion statique, l'évolution des performances statiques et dynamiques des composants, contribuent à faire des dispositifs de conversion statique de puissants générateurs de perturbations conduites et rayonnées. Nous nous sommes attachés à étudier les mécanismes de génération et de couplage des perturbations, tant en mode conduit que rayonné dans des structures à une seule cellule de commutation et fonctionnant selon les trois principaux modes de commutation : commutation forcée, à zéro de courant (ZCS), et à zéro de tension (ZVS). Après la mise en évidence de la problématique de pollution électromagnétique dans les structures et leur métrologie, nous décrivons l'environnement exp

  20. Conduit-margin faulting at Mount St. Helens - a seismogenic process?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallister, J. S.; Cashman, K. V.; Hagstrum, J. T.

    2008-12-01

    The 2004-2008 eruption of Mount St. Helens produced dacite spines mantled by fault gouge and breccia, with textures and structures remarkably similar to those in brittle tectonic fault zones. The spines are mantled by 1-3 meters of cataclastic fault rocks, comprising a fault core overlying a damage zone. The outermost surface of the fault core consists of 1-3-mm-thick layers of extremely fine-grained slickenside-bearing ultracataclasite, within finely comminuted fault gouge and soft cataclasite. The fault core varies in thickness from spine to spine, ranging from a few centimeters to about 1 m. Interior to the gouge is a 1-3-m-thick damage zone composed of dense cataclastic breccia, which overlies massive dacite lava of the spine interior. Structures and micro-textures indicate entirely brittle deformation, including rock breakage, shearing, grain flow, faulting and gas escape through intergranular porosity and along fractures. Slickenside lineations on fault surfaces and consistent orientations of thousands of Riedel shears in the damage zone indicate shear between the vertically extruding spines and the formerly adjacent conduit wall. Field relations indicate that Riedel shears formed in a continuous cycle of deformation, beginning with episodes of fracture and granular flow and followed by transfer of slip to bounding fault planes. Granular flow in the cataclasite may also result in stress concentration along force-chains as seen in laboratory experiments. Paleomagnetic pole positions, demagnetization paths, and oxide mineralogy indicate that cataclasis took place within the solidified and oxidizing sub-vertical volcanic conduit and at temperatures above 500°C. Low water content of matrix glass is consistent with brittle behavior at these high temperatures, and along with tridymite in the groundmass of the dacite, requires nearly complete decompression-driven solidification at depths <1 km. Such shallow depths for brittle failure are coincident with the