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Sample records for controlling spontaneous emission

  1. Controlling spontaneous emission with plasmonic optical patch antennas.

    PubMed

    Belacel, C; Habert, B; Bigourdan, F; Marquier, F; Hugonin, J-P; de Vasconcellos, S Michaelis; Lafosse, X; Coolen, L; Schwob, C; Javaux, C; Dubertret, B; Greffet, J-J; Senellart, P; Maitre, A

    2013-04-10

    We experimentally demonstrate the control of the spontaneous emission rate and the radiation pattern of colloidal quantum dots deterministically positioned in a plasmonic patch antenna. The antenna consists of a thin gold microdisk separated from a planar gold layer by a few tens of nanometers thick dielectric layer. The emitters are shown to radiate through the entire patch antenna in a highly directional and vertical radiation pattern. Strong acceleration of spontaneous emission is observed, depending on the antenna geometry. Considering the double dipole structure of the emitters, this corresponds to a Purcell factor up to 80 for dipoles perpendicular to the disk. PMID:23461679

  2. Ultrafast non-local control of spontaneous emission.

    PubMed

    Jin, Chao-Yuan; Johne, Robert; Swinkels, Milo Y; Hoang, Thang B; Midolo, Leonardo; van Veldhoven, Peter J; Fiore, Andrea

    2014-11-01

    The radiative interaction of solid-state emitters with cavity fields is the basis of semiconductor microcavity lasers and cavity quantum electrodynamics (CQED) systems. Its control in real time would open new avenues for the generation of non-classical light states, the control of entanglement and the modulation of lasers. However, unlike atomic CQED or circuit quantum electrodynamics, the real-time control of radiative processes has not yet been achieved in semiconductors because of the ultrafast timescales involved. Here we propose an ultrafast non-local moulding of the vacuum field in a coupled-cavity system as an approach to the control of radiative processes and demonstrate the dynamic control of the spontaneous emission (SE) of quantum dots (QDs) in a photonic crystal (PhC) cavity on a ? 200 ps timescale, much faster than their natural SE lifetimes. PMID:25218324

  3. Active magneto-optical control of spontaneous emission in graphene

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kort-Kamp, W. J. M.; Amorim, B.; Bastos, G.; Pinheiro, F. A.; Rosa, F. S. S.; Peres, N. M. R.; Farina, C.

    2015-11-13

    In this study, we investigate the spontaneous emission rate of a two-level quantum emitter near a graphene-coated substrate under the influence of an external magnetic field or strain induced pseudomagnetic field. We demonstrate that the application of the magnetic field can substantially increase or decrease the decay rate. We show that a suppression as large as 99% in the Purcell factor is achieved even for moderate magnetic fields. The emitter's lifetime is a discontinuous function of |B|, which is a direct consequence of the occurrence of discrete Landau levels in graphene. We demonstrate that, in the near-field regime, the magneticmore » field enables an unprecedented control of the decay pathways into which the photon/polariton can be emitted. Our findings strongly suggest that a magnetic field could act as an efficient agent for on-demand, active control of light-matter interactions in graphene at the quantum level.« less

  4. Active magneto-optical control of spontaneous emission in graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Kort-Kamp, W. J. M.; Amorim, B.; Bastos, G.; Pinheiro, F. A.; Rosa, F. S. S.; Peres, N. M. R.; Farina, C.

    2015-11-13

    In this study, we investigate the spontaneous emission rate of a two-level quantum emitter near a graphene-coated substrate under the influence of an external magnetic field or strain induced pseudomagnetic field. We demonstrate that the application of the magnetic field can substantially increase or decrease the decay rate. We show that a suppression as large as 99% in the Purcell factor is achieved even for moderate magnetic fields. The emitter's lifetime is a discontinuous function of |B|, which is a direct consequence of the occurrence of discrete Landau levels in graphene. We demonstrate that, in the near-field regime, the magnetic field enables an unprecedented control of the decay pathways into which the photon/polariton can be emitted. Our findings strongly suggest that a magnetic field could act as an efficient agent for on-demand, active control of light-matter interactions in graphene at the quantum level.

  5. Controlling the directionality of spontaneous emission by evanescent wave coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xue-Lun E-mail: gdhao2@hotmail.com; Hao, Guo-Dong E-mail: gdhao2@hotmail.com; Toda, Naoya

    2015-09-28

    We report an approach toward controlling the directionality of spontaneous emissions by employing the evanescent wave coupling effect in a subwavelength-sized ridge or truncated cone structure. An InGaAs/GaAs light-emitting diode in which a stripe-shaped InGaAs/GaAs quantum well with a stripe width of about 100 nm is embedded at the center of a subwavelength-sized GaAs ridge (of width ∼520 nm) is fabricated by micro processing and epitaxial regrowth techniques. Strong directionalities characterized by a half-intensity angle of 43° are observed in planes perpendicular to the ridge axis. The directionality is found to be almost independent of operating conditions.

  6. Quantum dot spontaneous emission control in a ridge waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Stepanov, Petr; Delga, Adrien; Bleuse, Joël; Dupuy, Emmanuel; Peinke, Emanuel; Gérard, Jean-Michel; Claudon, Julien; Zang, Xiaorun; Lalanne, Philippe

    2015-01-26

    We investigate the spontaneous emission (SE) of self-assembled InAs quantum dots (QDs) embedded in GaAs ridge waveguides that lay on a low index substrate. In thin enough waveguides, the coupling to the fundamental guided mode is vanishingly small. A pronounced anisotropy in the coupling to non-guided modes is then directly evidenced by normal-incidence photoluminescence polarization measurements. In this regime, a measurement of the QD decay rate reveals a SE inhibition by a factor up to 4. In larger wires, which ensure an optimal transverse confinement of the fundamental guided mode, the decay rate approaches the bulk value. Building on the good agreement with theoretical predictions, we infer from calculations the fraction β of SE coupled to the fundamental guided mode for some important QD excitonic complexes. For a charged exciton (isotropic in plane optical dipole), β reaches 0.61 at maximum for an on-axis QD. In the case of a purely transverse linear optical dipole, β increases up to 0.91. This optimal configuration is achievable through the selective excitation of one of the bright neutral excitons.

  7. Single Photon Subradiance: Quantum Control of Spontaneous Emission and Ultrafast Readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scully, Marlan O.

    2015-12-01

    Recent work has shown that collective single photon emission from an ensemble of resonate two-level atoms, i.e., single photon superradiance, is a rich field of study. The present Letter addresses the flip side of superradiance, i.e., subradiance. Single photon subradiant states are potentially stable against collective spontaneous emission and can have ultrafast readout. In particular it is shown how many atom collective effects provide a new way to control spontaneous emission by preparing and switching between subradiant and superradiant states.

  8. Controlling the spontaneous emission rate of monolayer MoS2 in a photonic crystal nanocavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Xuetao; Gao, Yuanda; Fai Mak, Kin; Yao, Xinwen; Shiue, Ren-Jye; van der Zande, Arend; Trusheim, Matthew E.; Hatami, Fariba; Heinz, Tony F.; Hone, James; Englund, Dirk

    2013-10-01

    We report on controlling the spontaneous emission (SE) rate of a molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) monolayer coupled with a planar photonic crystal (PPC) nanocavity. Spatially resolved photoluminescence (PL) mapping shows strong variations of emission when the MoS2 monolayer is on the PPC cavity, on the PPC lattice, on the air gap, and on the unpatterned gallium phosphide substrate. Polarization dependences of the cavity-coupled MoS2 emission show a more than 5 times stronger extracted PL intensity than the un-coupled emission, which indicates an underlying cavity mode Purcell enhancement of the MoS2 SE rate exceeding a factor of 70.

  9. Controlling spontaneous emission rates of quantum dots with plasmonic nanopatch antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Thang; Akselrod, Gleb; Argyropoulos, Christos; Huang, Jiani; Smith, David; Mikkelsen, Maiken

    2015-03-01

    The radiative processes associated with quantum emitters can be strongly enhanced due to intense electromagnetic fields created by plasmonic nanostructures. Here, we experimentally demonstrate large enhancements of the spontaneous emission rate of colloidal quantum dots coupled to single plasmonic nanopatch antennas. The antennas consist of silver nanocubes (75 nm) coupled to a gold film separated by a thin polyelectrolyte spacer layer (~1 nm) and core-shell CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (~6 nm). By optimizing the size of the nanopatch antenna, the plasmonic mode is tuned to be on resonance with the quantum dot emission. We show an increase in the spontaneous emission rate by a factor of 880 (Purcell factor) and a 2300-fold enhancement in the total fluorescence while maintaining a high radiative quantum efficiency of ~50 %. The nanopatch antenna, as demonstrated here, offers highly directional and broadband radiation that can be tailored for emitters from the visible to the near infrared, providing a promising approach for the spontaneous emission control of single quantum emitters.

  10. Quantum state-controlled directional spontaneous emission of photons into a nanophotonic waveguide

    PubMed Central

    Mitsch, R.; Sayrin, C.; Albrecht, B.; Schneeweiss, P.; Rauschenbeutel, A.

    2014-01-01

    The spin of light in subwavelength-diameter waveguides can be orthogonal to the propagation direction of the photons because of the strong transverse confinement. This transverse spin changes sign when the direction of propagation is reversed. Using this effect, we demonstrate the directional spontaneous emission of photons by laser-trapped caesium atoms into an optical nanofibre and control their propagation direction by the excited state of the atomic emitters. In particular, we tune the spontaneous emission into the counter-propagating guided modes from symmetric to strongly asymmetric, where more than % of the optical power is launched into one or the other direction. We expect our results to have important implications for research in quantum nanophotonics and for implementations of integrated optical signal processing in the quantum regime. PMID:25502565

  11. Controlling the spontaneous emission rate of monolayer MoS2 in a photonic crystal nanocavity

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Xuetao; Gao, Yuanda; Fai Mak, Kin; Yao, Xinwen; Shiue, Ren-Jye; van der Zande, Arend; Trusheim, Matthew E.; Hatami, Fariba; Heinz, Tony F.; Hone, James; Englund, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    We report on controlling the spontaneous emission (SE) rate of a molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) monolayer coupled with a planar photonic crystal (PPC) nanocavity. Spatially resolved photoluminescence (PL) mapping shows strong variations of emission when the MoS2 monolayer is on the PPC cavity, on the PPC lattice, on the air gap, and on the unpatterned gallium phosphide substrate. Polarization dependences of the cavity-coupled MoS2 emission show a more than 5 times stronger extracted PL intensity than the un-coupled emission, which indicates an underlying cavity mode Purcell enhancement of the MoS2 SE rate exceeding a factor of 70. PMID:24273329

  12. Control of spontaneous emission of an inverted Y-type atomic system coupled by three coherent fields

    SciTech Connect

    Qi Jianbing

    2009-10-15

    We investigate the spontaneous emission from an inverted Y-type atomic system coupled by three coherent fields. We use the Schroedinger equation to calculate the probability amplitudes of the wave function of the system and derive an analytical expression of the spontaneous emission spectrum to trace the origin of the spectral features. Quantum interference effects, such as the spectral line narrowing, spectrum splitting, and dark resonance, are observed. The number of spectral components, the spectral linewidth, and relative heights can be very different depending on the physical parameters. A variety of spontaneous emission spectral features can be controlled by the amplitude of the coupling fields and the preparation of the initial quantum state of the atom. We propose an ultracold atomic {sup 87}Rb system for experimental observation.

  13. Spontaneous emission control of quantum dots embedded in photonic crystals: Effects of external fields and dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaseghi, B.; Hashemi, H.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper simultaneous effects of external electric and magnetic fields and quantum confinement on the radiation properties of spherical quantum dot embedded in a photonic crystal are investigated. Under the influence of photonic band-gap, effects of external static fields and dot dimension on the amplitude and spectrum of different radiation fields emitted by the quantum dot are studied. Our results show the considerable effects of external fields and quantum confinement on the spontaneous emission of the system.

  14. On coherence in spontaneous emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummings, F. W.; Dorri, Ali

    1983-05-01

    The case of a single excited two-level atom emitting spontaneously in the presence of N unexcited atoms is solved exactly for emission into a single electromagnetic mode. The two-level atoms are in inequivalent mode positions.

  15. Spontaneous emission control of single quantum dots by electrostatic tuning of a double-slab photonic crystal cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Midolo, Leonardo; Pagliano, Francesco; Hoang, Thang B.; Xia, Tian; van Otten, Frank W. M.; Li, Lianhe; Linfield, Edmund H.; Lermer, Matthias; Höfling, Sven; Fiore, Andrea

    2013-02-01

    We report the electromechanical control of spontaneous emission of single InAs quantum dots (QDs) embedded in wavelength-tunable double-membrane photonic crystal cavities (PCC). The tuning is achieved by modulating the distance between two parallel GaAs membranes by applying electrostatic forces across a p-i-n diode under reverse bias. The spontaneous emission rate of single dots has been modified by over a factor of ten, tuning the cavity reversibly between on- and off-resonant conditions without altering the emission energy of the dots. We also discuss a possible approach to integrate the double membrane structure with ridge waveguides, for the transmission of light within a photonic chip.

  16. Optical antenna enhanced spontaneous emission.

    PubMed

    Eggleston, Michael S; Messer, Kevin; Zhang, Liming; Yablonovitch, Eli; Wu, Ming C

    2015-02-10

    Atoms and molecules are too small to act as efficient antennas for their own emission wavelengths. By providing an external optical antenna, the balance can be shifted; spontaneous emission could become faster than stimulated emission, which is handicapped by practically achievable pump intensities. In our experiments, InGaAsP nanorods emitting at ∼ 200 THz optical frequency show a spontaneous emission intensity enhancement of 35 × corresponding to a spontaneous emission rate speedup ∼ 115 ×, for antenna gap spacing, d = 40 nm. Classical antenna theory predicts ∼ 2,500 × spontaneous emission speedup at d ∼ 10 nm, proportional to 1/d(2). Unfortunately, at d < 10 nm, antenna efficiency drops below 50%, owing to optical spreading resistance, exacerbated by the anomalous skin effect (electron surface collisions). Quantum dipole oscillations in the emitter excited state produce an optical ac equivalent circuit current, I(o) = qω|x(o)|/d, feeding the antenna-enhanced spontaneous emission, where q|x(o)| is the dipole matrix element. Despite the quantum-mechanical origin of the drive current, antenna theory makes no reference to the Purcell effect nor to local density of states models. Moreover, plasmonic effects are minor at 200 THz, producing only a small shift of antenna resonance frequency. PMID:25624503

  17. Optical antenna enhanced spontaneous emission

    PubMed Central

    Eggleston, Michael S.; Messer, Kevin; Zhang, Liming; Yablonovitch, Eli; Wu, Ming C.

    2015-01-01

    Atoms and molecules are too small to act as efficient antennas for their own emission wavelengths. By providing an external optical antenna, the balance can be shifted; spontaneous emission could become faster than stimulated emission, which is handicapped by practically achievable pump intensities. In our experiments, InGaAsP nanorods emitting at ∼200 THz optical frequency show a spontaneous emission intensity enhancement of 35× corresponding to a spontaneous emission rate speedup ∼115×, for antenna gap spacing, d = 40 nm. Classical antenna theory predicts ∼2,500× spontaneous emission speedup at d ∼ 10 nm, proportional to 1/d2. Unfortunately, at d < 10 nm, antenna efficiency drops below 50%, owing to optical spreading resistance, exacerbated by the anomalous skin effect (electron surface collisions). Quantum dipole oscillations in the emitter excited state produce an optical ac equivalent circuit current, Io = qω|xo|/d, feeding the antenna-enhanced spontaneous emission, where q|xo| is the dipole matrix element. Despite the quantum-mechanical origin of the drive current, antenna theory makes no reference to the Purcell effect nor to local density of states models. Moreover, plasmonic effects are minor at 200 THz, producing only a small shift of antenna resonance frequency. PMID:25624503

  18. Controlling spontaneous emission with the local density of states of honeycomb photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Ya-Chih; Lin, Chien-Fan; Chang, Jui-Wen

    2009-05-01

    We calculated the local density of state for various positions in a photonic crystal of honeycomb lattice to study how the spontaneous emission rate of a radiating dipole is altered in the presence of the photonic crystal. The local density of states is found to be position-sensitive and its value can be enhanced or depressed relative to the density of states, depending on the location of the dipole. Our study shows that the density of states tends to underestimate the effect of a photonic crystal on the prohibition of light propagation, while on the contrary tends to overestimate the effect on the enhancement of light emission. The calculations also indicate that it is possible to tailor the spontaneous emission of an active medium by careful selecting its location in the photonic crystal. The results are helpful in determining the insertion location of the active medium and in evaluating the efficiency of active photonic crystal devices such as light-emitting diodes or lasers.

  19. Laser cooling without spontaneous emission.

    PubMed

    Corder, Christopher; Arnold, Brian; Metcalf, Harold

    2015-01-30

    This Letter reports the demonstration of laser cooling without spontaneous emission, and thereby addresses a significant controversy. It works by restricting the atom-light interaction to a time short compared to a cycle of absorption followed by natural decay. It is achieved by using the bichromatic force on an atomic transition with a relatively long excited state lifetime and a relatively short cooling time so that spontaneous emission effects are minimized. The observed width of the one-dimensional velocity distribution is reduced by ×2 thereby reducing the "temperature" by ×4. Moreover, our results comprise a compression in phase space because the spatial expansion of the atomic sample is limited. This accomplishment is of interest to direct laser cooling of molecules or in experiments where working space or time is limited. PMID:25679888

  20. Quenching of spontaneous emission through interference of incoherent pump processes

    SciTech Connect

    Kapale, Kishore T.; Scully, Marlan O.; Zhu Shiyao; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2003-02-01

    We investigate the steady-state spontaneous emission of a V-type three-level atom, with the coherence between the two upper levels modified and controlled via incoherent pumping to a fourth auxiliary level. The external pumping gives us an easily controllable handle in manipulating the spontaneous emission to such an extent that, under certain conditions, complete quenching of spontaneous emission is possible. We also show that even the interference between the decay channels, which is considered a key requirement in spontaneous emission quenching through quantum interference, is not essential to achieve near 100% trapping and almost complete suppression of spontaneous emission. Thus we provide a scheme for spontaneous emission quenching which can be easily realized experimentally.

  1. InAs quantum boxes in GaAs/AlAs pillar microcavities: from spectroscopic investigations to spontaneous emission control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grard, J. M.; Legrand, B.; Gayral, B.; Costard, E.; Sermage, B.; Kuszelewicz, R.; Barrier, D.; Thierry-Mieg, V.; Rivera, T.; Marzin, J. Y.

    1998-07-01

    GaAs/AlAs pillar microcavities containing an array of InAs quantum boxes in their core region have been fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy, electron-beam lithography and reactive ion etching. By placing this broadband light emitter in the cavity, we can probe precisely by photoluminescence the modal structure of the micropillars. After having validated this approach through the study of circular pillars, we address two important issues in context of spontaneous emission control. We show first that it is possible, by choosing an elliptical cross-section, to lift the polarization degeneracy of the fundamental mode of circular micropillars. By measuring Purcells factor for small pillars containing quantum boxes, we then highlight their potential for observing large cavity quantum electrodynamic effects in the weak coupling regime, which is confirmed by recent preliminary time-resolved experiments.

  2. Mapping quantum state dynamics in spontaneous emission.

    PubMed

    Naghiloo, M; Foroozani, N; Tan, D; Jadbabaie, A; Murch, K W

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of a quantum state undergoing radiative decay depends on how its emission is detected. If the emission is detected in the form of energy quanta, the evolution is characterized by a quantum jump to a lower energy state. In contrast, detection of the wave nature of the emitted radiation leads to different dynamics. Here, we investigate the diffusive dynamics of a superconducting artificial atom under continuous homodyne detection of its spontaneous emission. Using quantum state tomography, we characterize the correlation between the detected homodyne signal and the emitter's state, and map out the conditional back-action of homodyne measurement. By tracking the diffusive quantum trajectories of the state as it decays, we characterize selective stochastic excitation induced by the choice of measurement basis. Our results demonstrate dramatic differences from the quantum jump evolution associated with photodetection and highlight how continuous field detection can be harnessed to control quantum evolution. PMID:27167893

  3. Mapping quantum state dynamics in spontaneous emission

    PubMed Central

    Naghiloo, M.; Foroozani, N.; Tan, D.; Jadbabaie, A.; Murch, K. W.

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of a quantum state undergoing radiative decay depends on how its emission is detected. If the emission is detected in the form of energy quanta, the evolution is characterized by a quantum jump to a lower energy state. In contrast, detection of the wave nature of the emitted radiation leads to different dynamics. Here, we investigate the diffusive dynamics of a superconducting artificial atom under continuous homodyne detection of its spontaneous emission. Using quantum state tomography, we characterize the correlation between the detected homodyne signal and the emitter's state, and map out the conditional back-action of homodyne measurement. By tracking the diffusive quantum trajectories of the state as it decays, we characterize selective stochastic excitation induced by the choice of measurement basis. Our results demonstrate dramatic differences from the quantum jump evolution associated with photodetection and highlight how continuous field detection can be harnessed to control quantum evolution. PMID:27167893

  4. Dynamics of spontaneous otoacoustic emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergevin, Christopher; Salerno, Anthony

    2015-12-01

    Spontaneous otoacoustic emissions (SOAEs) have become a hallmark feature in modern theories of an `active' inner ear, given their numerous correlations to auditory function (e.g., threshold microstructure, neurophysiological tuning curves), near universality across tetrapod classes, and physiological correlates at the single hair cell level. However, while several different classes of nonlinear models exist that describe the mechanisms underlying SOAE generation (e.g., coupled limit-cycle oscillators, global standing waves), there is still disagreement as to precisely which biophysical concepts are at work. Such is further compounded by the idiosyncratic nature of SOAEs: Not all ears emit, and when present, SOAE activity can occur at seemingly arbitrary frequencies (though always within the most sensitive range of the audiogram) and in several forms (e.g., peaks, broad `baseline' plateaus). The goal of the present study was to develop new signal processing and stimulation techniques that would allow for novel features of SOAE activity to be revealed. To this end, we analyzed data from a variety of different species: human, lizard, and owl. First, we explored several strategies for examining SOAE waveforms in the absence of external stimuli to further ascertain what constitutes `self-sustained sinusoids' versus `filtered noise'. We found that seemingly similar peaks in the spectral domain could exhibit key differences in the time domain, which we interpret as providing critical information about the underlying oscillators and their coupling. Second, we introduced dynamic stimuli (swept-tones, tone bursts) at a range of levels, whose interaction with SOAEs could be visualized in the time-frequency domain. Aside from offering a readily accessible way to visualize many previously reported effects (e.g., entrainment, facilitation), we observed several new features such as subharmonic distortion generation and competing pulling/pushing effects when multiple tones were present. Furthermore, the tone burst data provide quantitative bounds on the dynamics of the relaxation oscillations. These data should provide new insights into how precisely how SOAE generators are related to (the more commonly measured) OAEs evoked via external stimuli and presumably speak to the robustness of the hair cell as the underlying basis for SOAE activity.

  5. Coherent control of cooperative spontaneous emission from two identical three-level atoms in a photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woldeyohannes, Mesfin; Idehenre, Ighodalo; Hardin, Tyler

    2015-08-01

    The coherent control of cooperative spontaneous emission from two identical non-overlapping three-level atoms in the V-configuration located within a photonic band gap (PBG) material with two resonant frequencies near the upper band edge of the PBG and confined to a region small in comparison to their radiation wavelengths but still greater than their atomic sizes is investigated. The dependencies of cooperative effects in which a photon emitted by one atom is reabsorbed by the other atom on the inter-atomic separation, on the initial state of the two-atom system, on the strength of the driving control laser field, and on the detuning of the atomic resonant frequencies from the upper band edge frequency is analyzed so as to identify the conditions for which these cooperative effects are enhanced or inhibited. Cooperative effects between atoms are shown to be influenced more by the PBG than by the nature of the atomic transitions involved. Excited state populations as well as coherences between excited levels are expressed in terms of time-dependent amplitudes which are shown to satisfy coupled integro-differential equations for which analytic solutions are derived under special conditions. Unlike for the case of one atom in a PBG where the fractional non-zero steady state populations on the excited levels as well as the coherence between the excited levels are constants independent of time, in the case of two atoms in PBG these quantities continuously oscillate as a manifestation of beating due to the continuous exchange between the two atoms of the photon trapped by the PBG. The values of these quantities as well as the amplitudes and frequencies of their oscillations depend of the parameters of the system, providing different ways of manipulating the system. The general formalism presented here is shown to recapture the special results of investigations of similar systems in free space when the non-Markovian memory kernels of the PBG are replaced by delta function dependent Markovian memory kernels.

  6. Control of the spontaneous emission from a single quantum dash using a slow-light mode in a two-dimensional photonic crystal on a Bragg reflector

    SciTech Connect

    Chauvin, N.; Fiore, A.; Nedel, P.; Seassal, C.; Ben Bakir, B.; Letartre, X.; Gendry, M.; Viktorovitch, P.

    2009-07-15

    We demonstrate the coupling of a single InAs/InP quantum, emitting around 1.55 {mu}m, to a slow-light mode in a two-dimensional photonic crystal on Bragg reflector. These surface addressable 2.5D photonic crystal band-edge modes present the advantages of a vertical emission and the mode area and localization may be controlled, leading to a less critical spatial alignment with the emitter. An increase in the spontaneous emission rate by a factor of 1.5-2 is measured at low temperature and is compared to the Purcell factor predicted by three-dimensional time-domain electromagnetic simulations.

  7. Blue shift of spontaneous emission in hyperbolic metamaterial

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Lei; Tumkur, T. U.; Zhu, G.; Noginov, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous emission is one of the most fundamental quantum phenomena in optics. Following the seminal work of Purcell and in agreement with the Fermi's Golden Rule, its rate can be controlled with the photonic density of states (PDOS). In recent years, this effect has been demonstrated in metamaterials with hyperbolic dispersion – highly anisotropic composite materials, which have a broad-band singularity of the density of photonic states. At this time, we show that hyperbolic metamaterials can control spontaneous emission spectra as well. Experimentally, DCM laser dye has been embedded into lamellar metal/dielectric metamaterial. The observed 18 nm blue shift of emission is explained by strong dispersion of the density of photonic states. On the other hand, practically no spectral shift has been observed in the excitation spectra of the same dye. This suggests that the effect of PDOS on spontaneous emission is very different from its effect on excitation and absorption. PMID:24957679

  8. Ultrafast spontaneous emission source using plasmonic nanoantennas

    PubMed Central

    Hoang, Thang B.; Akselrod, Gleb M.; Argyropoulos, Christos; Huang, Jiani; Smith, David R.; Mikkelsen, Maiken H.

    2015-01-01

    Typical emitters such as molecules, quantum dots and semiconductor quantum wells have slow spontaneous emission with lifetimes of 1–10 ns, creating a mismatch with high-speed nanoscale optoelectronic devices such as light-emitting diodes, single-photon sources and lasers. Here we experimentally demonstrate an ultrafast (<11 ps) yet efficient source of spontaneous emission, corresponding to an emission rate exceeding 90 GHz, using a hybrid structure of single plasmonic nanopatch antennas coupled to colloidal quantum dots. The antennas consist of silver nanocubes coupled to a gold film separated by a thin polymer spacer layer and colloidal core–shell quantum dots, a stable and technologically relevant emitter. We show an increase in the spontaneous emission rate of a factor of 880 and simultaneously a 2,300-fold enhancement in the total fluorescence intensity, which indicates a high radiative quantum efficiency of ∼50%. The nanopatch antenna geometry can be tuned from the visible to the near infrared, providing a promising approach for nanophotonics based on ultrafast spontaneous emission. PMID:26212857

  9. Ultrafast spontaneous emission source using plasmonic nanoantennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Thang B.; Akselrod, Gleb M.; Argyropoulos, Christos; Huang, Jiani; Smith, David R.; Mikkelsen, Maiken H.

    2015-07-01

    Typical emitters such as molecules, quantum dots and semiconductor quantum wells have slow spontaneous emission with lifetimes of 1-10 ns, creating a mismatch with high-speed nanoscale optoelectronic devices such as light-emitting diodes, single-photon sources and lasers. Here we experimentally demonstrate an ultrafast (<11 ps) yet efficient source of spontaneous emission, corresponding to an emission rate exceeding 90 GHz, using a hybrid structure of single plasmonic nanopatch antennas coupled to colloidal quantum dots. The antennas consist of silver nanocubes coupled to a gold film separated by a thin polymer spacer layer and colloidal core-shell quantum dots, a stable and technologically relevant emitter. We show an increase in the spontaneous emission rate of a factor of 880 and simultaneously a 2,300-fold enhancement in the total fluorescence intensity, which indicates a high radiative quantum efficiency of ~50%. The nanopatch antenna geometry can be tuned from the visible to the near infrared, providing a promising approach for nanophotonics based on ultrafast spontaneous emission.

  10. Ultrafast spontaneous emission source using plasmonic nanoantennas.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Thang B; Akselrod, Gleb M; Argyropoulos, Christos; Huang, Jiani; Smith, David R; Mikkelsen, Maiken H

    2015-01-01

    Typical emitters such as molecules, quantum dots and semiconductor quantum wells have slow spontaneous emission with lifetimes of 1-10 ns, creating a mismatch with high-speed nanoscale optoelectronic devices such as light-emitting diodes, single-photon sources and lasers. Here we experimentally demonstrate an ultrafast (<11 ps) yet efficient source of spontaneous emission, corresponding to an emission rate exceeding 90 GHz, using a hybrid structure of single plasmonic nanopatch antennas coupled to colloidal quantum dots. The antennas consist of silver nanocubes coupled to a gold film separated by a thin polymer spacer layer and colloidal core-shell quantum dots, a stable and technologically relevant emitter. We show an increase in the spontaneous emission rate of a factor of 880 and simultaneously a 2,300-fold enhancement in the total fluorescence intensity, which indicates a high radiative quantum efficiency of ∼50%. The nanopatch antenna geometry can be tuned from the visible to the near infrared, providing a promising approach for nanophotonics based on ultrafast spontaneous emission. PMID:26212857

  11. Quenching of spontaneous emission coefficients in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Y.; Lemaire, P.; Suckewer, S.

    1987-09-01

    We have observed changing Einstein coefficients of spontaneous emission as a function of electron density in CO/sub 2/ laser-produced plasmas. These measurements are based on the intensity branching ratio of CIV lines 5801 to 5812 A and 312.41 to 312.46 A which share a common upper level. Similar observations for CIII lines are also discussed. 12 refs., 3 figs.

  12. Photonic Crystals-Inhibited Spontaneous Emission: Optical Antennas-Enhanced Spontaneous Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yablonovitch, Eli

    Photonic crystals are also part of everyday technological life in opto-electronic telecommunication devices that provide us with internet, cloud storage, and email. But photonic crystals have also been identified in nature, in the coloration of peacocks, parrots, chameleons, butterflies and many other species.In spite of its broad applicability, the original motivation of photonic crystals was to create a ``bandgap'' in which the spontaneous emission of light would be inhibited. Conversely, the opposite is now possible. The ``optical antenna'' can accelerate spontaneous emission. Over 100 years after the radio antenna, we finally have tiny ``optical antennas'' which can act on molecules and quantum dots. Employing optical antennas, spontaneous light emission can become faster than stimulated emission.

  13. Modified spontaneous emission in nanophotonic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelton, Matthew

    2015-07-01

    Spontaneous emission is not an inherent property of a luminescent material; rather, it arises due to interaction between the material and its local electromagnetic environment. Changing the environment can thus alter the emission rate, with potential applications in sensing, integrated photonics and solar energy conversion. Significant increases in emission rate require an optical resonator that stores light in as small a volume as possible, for as long as possible. This is currently achieved using two main systems: photonic crystal microcavities and plasmonic metal nanoparticles. These two systems have largely been developed independently, but the underlying physical mechanisms are the same. Comparing the two provides insight into emission modification and illustrates some of the subtleties involved in interpreting experimental results.

  14. Competition between coherent emission and broadband spontaneous emission in the quantum free electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Robb, G. R. M.; Bonifacio, R.

    2013-03-15

    We extend previous analyses of spontaneous emission in a quantum free electron laser (QFEL) and competition between spontaneous and coherent QFEL emission to include a broad distribution of photon frequencies and momenta appropriate for spontaneous undulator radiation. We show that although the predictions of monochromatic and broadband models predict different electron momentum distributions for the quantum regime due to spontaneous emission alone after many photon emissions, the inclusion of broadband spontaneous emission has a negligible effect on the competition between spontaneous and coherent emission in the QFEL. Numerical results from both models are well described by the same condition for the threshold/critical value of spontaneous emission rate.

  15. Analysis of self-amplified spontaneous emission

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.J.

    1985-11-01

    The analysis develops a classical theory of how a signal evolves from the initial incoherent spontaneous emission in long undulators. The theory is based on the coupled Klimontovich-Maxwell equations. Formulas for the radiated power, spectral characteristics and electron correlations are derived. The saturation due to nonlinear effects is studied using a quasi-linear extension of the theory. The results agree reasonably well with the recent Livermore experiment in the microwave range. Performance of a possible high-gain free electron laser in a short-wavelength region is evaluated.

  16. Transformation quantum optics: designing spontaneous emission using coordinate transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingjing; Wubs, Martijn; Ginzburg, Pavel; Wurtz, Gregory; Zayats, Anatoly V.

    2016-04-01

    Spontaneous decay is a fundamental quantum property of emitters that can be controlled in a material environment via modification of the local density of optical states (LDOS). Here we use transformation optics methods in order to design required density of states and thus spontaneous emission (SE) rate. Specifically, we show that the SE rate can be either enhanced or suppressed using invisibility cloaks or gradient index lenses. Furthermore, the anisotropic material profile of the cloak enables the directional control of SE. We also discuss how the practical issues, such as dispersion and losses, affect the LDOS in complex materials. Tailoring SE properties using transformation optics approach provides an innovative way for designing emission properties in a complex material environment needed for the development of active nanophotonic devices.

  17. Coherent and spontaneous emission in the quantum free electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Robb, G. R. M.; Bonifacio, R.

    2012-07-15

    We present an analysis of quantum free electron laser (QFEL) dynamics including the effects of spontaneous emission. The effects of spontaneous emission are undesirable for coherent short-wave generation using FELs and have been shown in previous studies to limit the capabilities of classical self amplified spontaneous emission (SASE)-FELs at short wavelengths {approx}1 A due to growth of electron beam energy spread. As one of the attractive features of the QFEL is its potential as a relatively compact coherent x-ray source, it is important to understand the role of spontaneous emission, but to date there has not been a model which is capable of consistently describing the dynamics of both coherent FEL emission and incoherent spontaneous emission. In this paper, we present such a model, and use it to show that the limitations imposed by spontaneous emission on coherent FEL operation are significantly different in the quantum regime to those in the classical regime. An example set of parameters constituting a QFEL using electron and laser parameters which satisfy the condition for neglect of spontaneous emission during coherent QFEL emission is presented.

  18. Simultaneous observation of NMR spin noise and maser spontaneous emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurkiewicz, Antoni

    2015-03-01

    Spin noise emission, absorbed noise, and spontaneous maser emission are distinguished in the hexanol molecule by changing spin noise dynamics along with coupling the spin system to a probe circuit. Inverted magnetization leads to spontaneous maser emission of methyl and methylene resonances permitting separation from broad overlapped peaks. The maser emission resonance shows random intensity the scattering range of which depends on the length of the gradient following magnetization inversion. Combination of thermal noise and spin noise can be altered by varying magnetization orientation. This results in radiation damping which alters how fluctuation signals are coupled with the probe circuit.

  19. Tunable Casimir-Polder Forces and Spontaneous Emission Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, Felipe; Kort-Kamp, Wilton; Pinheiro, Felipe; Cysne, Tarik; Oliver, Diego; Farina, Carlos

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the dispersive Casimir-Polder interaction between a Rubidium atom and a graphene sheet subjected to an external magnetic field B. We demonstrate that this concrete physical system allows for a high degree of control of dispersive interactions at micro and nanoscales. Indeed, we show that the application of an external magnetic field can induce a 80 % reduction of the Casimir-Polder energy relative to its value without the field. We also show that sharp discontinuities emerge in the Casimir-Polder interaction energy for certain values of the applied magnetic field at low temperatures. In addition, we also show that atomic spontaneous emission rates can be greatly modified by the action of the magnetic field, with an order of magnitude enhancement or suppression depending on the dipole's moment orientation.

  20. Large spontaneous emission rate enhancement in grating coupled hyperbolic metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Sreekanth, Kandammathe Valiyaveedu; Krishna, Koduru Hari; De Luca, Antonio; Strangi, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Hyperbolic metamaterial (HMM), a sub-wavelength periodic artificial structure with hyperbolic dispersion, can enhance the spontaneous emission of quantum emitters. Here, we demonstrate the large spontaneous emission rate enhancement of an organic dye placed in a grating coupled hyperbolic metamaterial (GCHMM). A two-dimensional (2D) silver diffraction grating coupled with an Ag/Al2O3 HMM shows 18-fold spontaneous emission decay rate enhancement of dye molecules with respect to the same HMM without grating. The experimental results are compared with analytical models and numerical simulations, which confirm that the observed enhancement of GCHMM is due to the outcoupling of non-radiative plasmonic modes as well as strong plasmon-exciton coupling in HMM via diffracting grating. PMID:25209102

  1. QED (quantum-electrodynamical) theory of excess spontaneous emission noise

    SciTech Connect

    Milonni, P.W.

    1990-01-01

    The results of a quantum-electrodynamical theory of excess spontaneous emission noise in lossy resonators will be presented. The Petermann K factor'' does not enter into the spontaneous emission rate of a single atom in the cavity. The QED theory allows different interpretations of the K factor, and we use this fact to justify semiclassical analyses and to provide in one example a simple derivation of K in terms of the amplification of the quantum vacuum field entering the resonator through its mirrors. 17 refs.

  2. Picosecond time of spontaneous emission in plasmonic patch nanoantennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliseev, S. P.; Vitukhnovsky, A. G.; Chubich, D. A.; Kurochkin, N. S.; Sychev, V. V.; Marchenko, A. A.

    2016-01-01

    A significant (to 12 ps) decrease in the lifetime of excited states of quantum emitters in the form of three-layer colloidal quantum dots (CdSe/CdS/ZnS) placed in an aluminum-triangular silver nanoprism cavity (patch nanoantenna) has been experimentally demonstrated. The decrease in the time of spontaneous emission of quantum dots has been explained by the Purcell effect. The Purcell coefficient for an emitter in the resonator has been found to be 625. Such a significant increase in the rate of spontaneous emission in the patch nanoantenna is due to an increase in the local density of photon states in the plasmonic cavity.

  3. Spontaneous Radio Frequency Emissions from Natural Aurora. Chapter 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaBelle, J.

    2009-01-01

    At high latitudes, suitably sensitive radio experiments tuned below 5 MHz detect up to three types of spontaneous radio emissions from the Earth s ionosphere. In recent years, ground-based and rocket-borne experiments have provided strong evidence for theoretical explanations of the generation mechanism of some of these emissions, but others remain unexplained. Achieving a thorough understanding of these ionospheric emissions, accessible to ground-based experiments, will not only bring a deeper understanding of Earth s radio environment and the interactions between waves and particles in the ionosphere but also shed light on similar spontaneous emissions occurring elsewhere in Earth s environment as well as other planetary and stellar atmospheres.

  4. Amplified spontaneous emission in solar-pumped iodine laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Yong S.; Hwang, In H.; Han, Kwang S.; Lee, Ja H.

    1992-01-01

    The amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) from a long pulse, solar-simulating radiation pumped iodine laser amplifier is studied. The ASE threshold pump intensity is almost proportional to the inverse of the laser gain length when the gas pressure is constant in the laser tube.

  5. Correlated spontaneous emission in a Zeeman laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winters, Michael P.; Hall, John L.; Toschek, Peter E.

    1990-12-01

    Proposals for enhancing the sensitivity of laser interferometers encompass the use of correlated-emission lasers (CELs) employing a gain medium having two laser transmissions that share a common lower level; a coherent superposition of the upper states is created by driving a microwave transition between these levels. A noise-reduction 40 percent below the Schawlow-Townes limit in a HeNe laser has been obtained via the CEL effect, thereby demonstrating potential applicability in the configuration of interferometers sufficiently sensitive for gravitational-wave detection.

  6. A hybrid nanoantenna for highly enhanced directional spontaneous emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, R. Yuanying; Lu, Guowei; Shen, Hongming; He, Yingbo; Cheng, Yuqing; Perriat, Pascal; Martini, Matteo; Tillement, Olivier; Gong, Qihuang

    2014-06-01

    Spontaneous emission modulated by a hybrid plasmonic nanoantenna has been investigated by employing finite-difference time-domain method. The hybrid nanoantenna configurations constituted by a gap hot-spot and of a plasmonic corrugated grating and a metal reflector sandwiching a SiO2 thin layer which appears promising for high spontaneous emission enhancement devices. Simulation assays show that the coupling between the gap-antenna and plasmonic corrugations reaches an ultra-high near-field enhancement factor in the excitation process. Moreover, concerning the emission process, the corrugations concentrate the far-field radiated power within a tiny angular volume, offering unprecedented collection efficiency. In the past decades, many kinds of optical antennas have been proposed and optimized to enhance single molecule detection. However, the excitation enhancement effect for single individual or dimmer plasmonic nanostructure is limited due to intrinsic nonradiative decay of the nanoparticle plasmon and quantum tunneling effect. The proposed hybrid configuration overwhelms the enhancement limit of single individual plasmonic structure. The findings provide an insight into spontaneous emission high enhancement through integrating the functions of different metallic nanostructures.

  7. A hybrid nanoantenna for highly enhanced directional spontaneous emission

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, R. Yuanying; Lu, Guowei Shen, Hongming; He, Yingbo; Cheng, Yuqing; Perriat, Pascal; Martini, Matteo; Tillement, Olivier; Gong, Qihuang

    2014-06-28

    Spontaneous emission modulated by a hybrid plasmonic nanoantenna has been investigated by employing finite-difference time-domain method. The hybrid nanoantenna configurations constituted by a gap hot-spot and of a plasmonic corrugated grating and a metal reflector sandwiching a SiO{sub 2} thin layer which appears promising for high spontaneous emission enhancement devices. Simulation assays show that the coupling between the gap-antenna and plasmonic corrugations reaches an ultra-high near-field enhancement factor in the excitation process. Moreover, concerning the emission process, the corrugations concentrate the far-field radiated power within a tiny angular volume, offering unprecedented collection efficiency. In the past decades, many kinds of optical antennas have been proposed and optimized to enhance single molecule detection. However, the excitation enhancement effect for single individual or dimmer plasmonic nanostructure is limited due to intrinsic nonradiative decay of the nanoparticle plasmon and quantum tunneling effect. The proposed hybrid configuration overwhelms the enhancement limit of single individual plasmonic structure. The findings provide an insight into spontaneous emission high enhancement through integrating the functions of different metallic nanostructures.

  8. Are Einstein's transition probabilities for spontaneous emission constant in plasmas?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griem, H. R.; Huang, Y. W.; Wang, J.-S.; Moreno, J. C.

    1991-01-01

    An investigation is conducted with a ruby laser to experimentally confirm the quenching of spontaneous emission coefficients and propose a mechanism for the phenomenon. Results of previous experiments are examined to determine the consistency and validity of interpretations of the spontaneous emissions. For the C IV 3s-3p and 2s-3p transitions, the line-intensity ratios are found to be dependent on the separation of the laser from the target. Density gradients and Stark broadening are proposed to interpret the results in a way that does not invalidate the Einstein A values. The interpretation is extended to C III and N V, both of which demonstrate similar changes in A values in previous experiments. The apparent quenching of Ar II by photon collisions is explained by Rabi oscillations and power broadening in the argon-ion laser cavity. It is concluded that the changes in A values cannot result from dense plasma effects.

  9. Modifying free-space spontaneous emission near a plasmonic nanostructure

    SciTech Connect

    Evangelou, Sofia; Yannopapas, Vassilios; Paspalakis, Emmanuel

    2011-02-15

    We study theoretically the effects of the presence of a plasmonic nanostructure on free-space spontaneous emission in a four-level quantum system, where one V-type transition is influenced by the interaction with surface plasmons and the other V-type transition occurs in free space. The plasmonic nanostructure that we consider is a two-dimensional array of metal-coated dielectric nanospheres. We show that the spectrum of spontaneous emission in the free-space modes is strongly influenced by the presence of the plasmonic nanostructure, and we explore the dependence of the spectrum on different initial conditions of the quantum system and on the distance from the nanostructure.

  10. Comprehensive, nonintercepting electron-beam diagnostics using spontaneous emission

    SciTech Connect

    Lumpkin, A.H.

    1989-01-01

    Characterization and optimization of electron-beam parameters are important aspects of optimizing free-electron laser (FEL) performance. The visible spontaneous emission ({lambda}{approximately}650 nm) from the 5-meter long undulator of the Boeing FEL experiment can be characterized in sufficient detail with a streak/spectrometer to deduce time-resolved electron-beam spatial position and profile, micropulse duration, and energy. 7 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. 2-.mu.m fiber amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Shibin (Inventor); Wu, Jianfeng (Inventor); Geng, Jihong (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A 2-.mu.m fiber Amplified Spontaneous Emission (ASE) source provides a wide emission bandwidth and improved spectral stability/purity for a given output power. The fiber ASE source is formed from a heavy metal oxide multicomponent glass selected from germanate, tellurite and bismuth oxides and doped with high concentrations, 0.5-15 wt. %, thulium oxides (Tm.sub.2O.sub.3) or 0.1-5 wt% holmium oxides (Ho.sub.2O.sub.3) or mixtures thereof. The high concentration of thulium dopants provide highly efficient pump absorption and high quantum efficiency. Co-doping of Tm and Ho can broaden the ASE spectrum.

  12. Spontaneous pion emission as a new natural radioactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ion, D. B.; Ivascu, M.; Ion-Mihai, R.

    1986-10-01

    In this paper the pionic nuclear radioactivity or spontaneous poin emission by a nucleus from its ground state is investigated. The Qπ-values as well as the statistical factors are calculated using the experimental masses tabulated by Wapstra and Audi. Then it was shown that the pionic radioactivity of the nuclear ground state is energetically possible via three-body channels for all nuclides with Z > 80. This new type of natural radioactivity is statistically favored especially for Z = 92 - 106 for which F π/F SF = 40 - 200 [ MeV] 2. Experimental detection of the neutral pion and also some possible emission mechanisms are discussed.

  13. Directional and enhanced spontaneous emission with a corrugated metal probe.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hongming; Lu, Guowei; He, Yingbo; Cheng, Yuqing; Liu, Haitao; Gong, Qihuang

    2014-07-01

    A three-dimensional corrugated metal tapered probe with surface corrugated gratings at the tip apex is proposed and investigated theoretically, which leads to an obvious emission beaming effect of spontaneous emission from a single emitter near the probe. In contrast with conventional apertureless metal probes, where only the enhancement of an optical near-field is concerned, the corrugated probe is able to manipulate local excitation intensity and far-field emission direction simultaneously. The angular emission from a single dipole source, being placed close to the corrugated probe, falls into a cone with a maximum directivity angle of ±11.6°, which improves the collection efficiency 25-fold. Such a probe simultaneously increases the localized field intensity to about twice as strong as the conventional bare tip. In addition, the radiation pattern is sensitive to the working wavelength and the dipole to tip-apex separation. These findings make a promising route to the development of plasmonic spontaneous emission manipulation based on corrugated tapered antenna-for instance, tip-enhanced spectroscopy, single-molecule sensing, and single-photon source. PMID:24887425

  14. Directional and enhanced spontaneous emission with a corrugated metal probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Hongming; Lu, Guowei; He, Yingbo; Cheng, Yuqing; Liu, Haitao; Gong, Qihuang

    2014-06-01

    A three-dimensional corrugated metal tapered probe with surface corrugated gratings at the tip apex is proposed and investigated theoretically, which leads to an obvious emission beaming effect of spontaneous emission from a single emitter near the probe. In contrast with conventional apertureless metal probes, where only the enhancement of an optical near-field is concerned, the corrugated probe is able to manipulate local excitation intensity and far-field emission direction simultaneously. The angular emission from a single dipole source, being placed close to the corrugated probe, falls into a cone with a maximum directivity angle of +/-11.6°, which improves the collection efficiency 25-fold. Such a probe simultaneously increases the localized field intensity to about twice as strong as the conventional bare tip. In addition, the radiation pattern is sensitive to the working wavelength and the dipole to tip-apex separation. These findings make a promising route to the development of plasmonic spontaneous emission manipulation based on corrugated tapered antenna--for instance, tip-enhanced spectroscopy, single-molecule sensing, and single-photon source .

  15. Highly enhanced spontaneous emission with nanoshell-based metallodielectric hybrid antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yuqing; Lu, Guowei; shen, Hongming; Wang, Yuwei; He, Yingbo; Chou, R. Yuanying; Gong, Qihuang

    2015-09-01

    The metallodielectric hybrid nanoantenna integrating plasmonic nanostructures with dielectric planar substrate can improve the spontaneous emission greatly. We demonstrated that the performances of the hybrid antenna can be substantially optimized with specific plasmonic nanostructures by employing finite-difference time-domain method. The hybrid antenna with core-shell nanostructure can enhance spontaneous emission greatly rather than the individual spherical nanoparticle. Moreover, the performances of the hybrid antenna can be boosted further through using asymmetrical nanoshell. The mechanism of the high enhancement effect is due to the hybrid structure being able to couple efficiently with the electric field by a larger dipolar moment. And the emission directivity of the hybrid antenna is able to be modified by adjusting the geometry of the plasmonic nanostructures. The results should be beneficial for various fundamental and applied research fields, including single molecule fluorescence and surface enhance Raman spectroscopy, etc. The enhancement of spontaneous emission is in demand in fundamental interests and various applied research fields. However, the electromagnetic enhancement of single plasmonic nanostructure is limited due to intrinsic loss of metal materials and quantum tunneling effect which also limits the ability of enhancement of spontaneous emission. Interestingly, it was found that hybrid structures can provide higher enhancement effect. This study is about a kind new type of optical antenna to control spontaneous emission of single emitter, i.e. a metallodielectric hybrid nanoantenna integrating plasmonic nanostructures with dielectric planar substrate which can improve the spontaneous emission greatly. We demonstrated that the performances of the hybrid antenna can be substantially optimized with specific plasmonic nanostructures by employing finite-difference time-domain method. The hybrid antenna with core-shell nanostructure can enhance spontaneous emission greatly rather than the individual spherical nanoparticle. Moreover, the performances of the hybrid antenna can be boosted further through using asymmetrical nanoshell. The mechanism of the high enhancement effect is due to the hybrid structure being able to couple efficiently with the electric field by a larger dipolar moment. And the emission directivity of the hybrid antenna is able to be modified by adjusting the geometry of the plasmonic nanostructures. The results should be beneficial for various fundamental and applied research fields, including single molecule fluorescence and surface enhance Raman spectroscopy, etc.

  16. Collective spontaneous emission in the framework of quantum trajectory theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemens, James Peter

    We investigate the emission of light from a collection of initially excited atoms using the methods of quantum trajectory theory. In particular we seek to understand the role of collective and noncollective emission and the emergence of directionality in the emitted pulse. Our general approach is to start with a model which accounts, in detail, for the emission from a few atoms, and then to extend the model to treat many atoms by means of appropriate approximations. This approach is complementary to one which assumes many atoms as a starting point. There are three main divisions in the work presented here. First, we investigate the competition between collective and noncollective emission from N initially excited atoms inside an optical cavity. We find a broad transition from normal spontaneous emission to superradiance as a function of N and the collective coupling strength. Next, we treat the more general problem of emission from initially excited atoms in free space. The emission process is treated using the Born-Markoff approximation, limiting the size of the atomic samples we can consider. The emission from a linear array of two, three, and eleven atoms is treated without further approximation with a focus on the directionality of the emitted light. We find a tendency for the last photon to be emitted along the axis of the array following a long waiting time from the previous emission. Finally, we extend the treatment to many atoms by means of suitable approximations. Here we consider the directionality of the emission from a linear array as well as three dimensional distributions of atoms. Making contact with previous work, we find that long thin atomic distributions show a strong directionality along the axis of the sample during the superradiant pulse. However, our results do not support the single-mode approximation which has often been used to simplify models of superradiance. Shot-to-shot fluctuations arising from the mode competition inherent in a multimode emission process are also considered.

  17. Insect spontaneous ultraweak photon emission as an indicator of insecticidal compounds.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yongqing; Yang, Chuping; Xu, Hanhong

    2014-11-01

    The influence of beta-cypermethrin, a commercial insecticide, and Cicuta virosa L. var. latisecta Celak (Umbelliferae:Cicutal), an insecticidal plant, on the spontaneous ultraweak photon emissions from larvae of Spodoptera litura Fabricius and Zophobas morio Fabricius were studied. The increased percentages of spontaneous photon emission intensities from S. litura treated with 0.1 and 1 μg/ml beta-cypermethrin were both lower than those of the control in the 24 post-treatment hours, remarkable difference could also be observed during the same period from Z. morio treated with beta-cypermethrin at 0.156, 0.313 and 0.625 μg/ml. The increased percentages of spontaneous photon emission intensities from the two mentioned insects treated with 10,100 and 1000 μg/ml petroleum ether fraction of C. virosa L. var. latisecta, which displayed little activity against whole insects, could also be changed noticeably. The present study indicated that change in the intensity of spontaneous ultraweak photon emission from insect could be used as a novel method for screening insecticidal compounds with very low content in plant. PMID:25108203

  18. Spontaneous Radiation Emission from Short, High Field Strength Insertion Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Geoffrey Krafft

    2005-09-15

    Since the earliest papers on undulaters were published, it has been known how to calculate the spontaneous emission spectrum from ''short'' undulaters when the magnetic field strength parameter is small compared to unity, or in ''single'' frequency sinusoidal undulaters where the magnetic field strength parameter is comparable to or larger than unity, but where the magnetic field amplitude is constant throughout the undulater. Fewer general results have been obtained in the case where the insertion device is both short, i.e., the magnetic field strength parameter changes appreciably throughout the insertion device, and the magnetic field strength is high enough that ponderomotive effects, radiation retardation, and harmonic generation are important physical phenomena. In this paper a general method is presented for calculating the radiation spectrum for short, high-field insertion devices. It is used to calculate the emission from some insertion device designs of recent interest.

  19. Amplified Spontaneous Emission Properties of Semiconducting Organic Materials

    PubMed Central

    Calzado, Eva M.; Boj, Pedro G.; Díaz-García, María A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper aims to review the recent advances achieved in the field of organic solid-state lasers with respect to the usage of semiconducting organic molecules and oligomers in the form of thin films as active laser media. We mainly focus on the work performed in the last few years by our research group. The amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) properties, by optical pump, of various types of molecules doped into polystyrene films in waveguide configuration, are described. The various systems investigated include N,N′-bis(3-methylphenyl)-N,N′-diphenylbenzidine (TPD), several perilenediimide derivatives (PDIs), as well as two oligo-phenylenevinylene derivatives. The ASE characteristics, i.e., threshold, emission wavelength, linewidth, and photostability are compared with that of other molecular materials investigated in the literature. PMID:20640167

  20. Spontaneous pion emission as a new natural radioactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Ion, D.B.; Ivascu, M.; Ion-Mihai, R.

    1986-10-15

    In this paper the pionic nuclear radioactivity or spontaneous pion emission by a nucleus from its ground state is investigated. The Q/sub ..pi../-values as well as the statistical factors are calculated using the experimental masses tabulated by Wapstra and Audi. Then it was shown that the pionic radioactivity of the nuclear ground state is energetically possible via three-body channels for all nuclides with Z>80. This new type of natural radioactivity is statistically favored especially for Z = 92-106 for which F/sub ..pi..//F/sub S//sub F/ = 40-200 (MeV)/sup 2/. Experimental detection of the neutral pion and also some possible emission mechanisms are discussed.

  1. Amplified spontaneous emission properties of semiconducting organic materials.

    PubMed

    Calzado, Eva M; Boj, Pedro G; Díaz-García, María A

    2010-01-01

    This paper aims to review the recent advances achieved in the field of organic solid-state lasers with respect to the usage of semiconducting organic molecules and oligomers in the form of thin films as active laser media. We mainly focus on the work performed in the last few years by our research group. The amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) properties, by optical pump, of various types of molecules doped into polystyrene films in waveguide configuration, are described. The various systems investigated include N,N'-bis(3-methylphenyl)-N,N'-diphenylbenzidine (TPD), several perilenediimide derivatives (PDIs), as well as two oligo-phenylenevinylene derivatives. The ASE characteristics, i.e., threshold, emission wavelength, linewidth, and photostability are compared with that of other molecular materials investigated in the literature. PMID:20640167

  2. Spontaneous emission enhancement of colloidal CdSe nanoplatelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhili; Pelton, Matthew; Waks, Edo

    Colloidal CdS /CdSe/CdS nanoplatelets synthesized recently are high efficient nano-emitters and gain media for nanoscale lasers and other nonlinear optical devices. They are characterized as quantum well structure due to energy gap difference between core CdSe and shell CdS, of which the luminescent wavelength could be tuned precisely by their thickness of growth. However, the influence of environment on the material's optical properties and further enhancement of the emission to implement nanoscale systems remains to be investigated. Here we demonstrate spontaneous emission rate enhancement of these CdSe nanoplatelets coupled to a photonic crystal cavity. We show clearly the photoluminescent spectrum modification of the nanoplatelets emission and an averaged Purcell enhancement factor of 3.1 is achieved when they are coupled to carefully-designed nanobeam photonic crystal cavities compared to the ones on unpatterned surface in our experiment of lifetime measurement. Also the phenomenon of cavity quality factor increasing is observed when increasing intensity of pumping, which attributes to saturable absorption of the nanoplatelets. Our success in enhancement of emission from these nanoplatelets here paves the road to realize actual nanoscale integrated systems such as ultra-low threshold micro-cavity lasers.

  3. Long-term stability of spontaneous otoacoustic emissions

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Edward M.

    2009-01-01

    Spontaneous otoacoustic emissions (SOAEs) were measured longitudinally for durations up to 19.5 years. Initial ages of the subjects ranged from 6 to 41 years. The most compelling finding was a decrease in frequency of all emissions in all subjects, which was approximately linear in %∕year and averaged 0.25%∕year. SOAE levels also tended to decrease with age, a trend that was significant, but not consistent across emissions, either within or across subjects. Levels of individual SOAEs might decrease, increase, or remain relatively constant with age. Several types of frequency∕level instabilities were noted in which some SOAEs within an ear interacted such that their levels were negatively correlated. These instabilities often persisted for many years. SOAEs were also measured in two females over the course of their pregnancies. No changes in SOAE levels or frequencies were seen, that were larger than have been reported in females over a menstrual cycle, suggesting that levels of female gonadal hormones do not have a significant direct effect on SOAE frequencies or levels. PMID:19425659

  4. Temperature quenching of spontaneous emission in tunnel-injection nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Talalaev, V. G. Novikov, B. V.; Cirlin, G. E.; Leipner, H. S.

    2015-11-15

    The spontaneous-emission spectra in the near-IR range (0.8–1.3 μm) from inverted tunnel-injection nanostructures are measured. These structures contain an InAs quantum-dot layer and an InGaAs quantum-well layer, separated by GaAs barrier spacer whose thickness varies in the range 3–9 nm. The temperature dependence of this emission in the range 5–295 K is investigated, both for optical excitation (photoluminescence) and for current injection in p–n junction (electroluminescence). At room temperature, current pumping proves more effective for inverted tunnel-injection nanostructures with a thin barrier (<6 nm), when the apexes of the quantum dots connect with the quantum well by narrow InGaAs straps (nanobridges). In that case, the quenching of the electroluminescence by heating from 5 to 295 K is slight. The quenching factor S{sub T} of the integrated intensity I is S{sub T} = I{sub 5}/I{sub 295} ≈ 3. The temperature stability of the emission from inverted tunnel-injection nanostructures is discussed on the basis of extended Arrhenius analysis.

  5. Randomness generation based on spontaneous emissions of lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hongyi; Yuan, Xiao; Ma, Xiongfeng

    2015-06-01

    Random numbers play a key role in information science, especially in cryptography. Based on the probabilistic nature of quantum mechanics, quantum random number generators can produce genuine randomness. In particular, random numbers can be produced from laser phase fluctuations with a very high speed, typically in the Gbps regime. In this work, by developing a physical model, we investigate the origin of the randomness in quantum random number generators based on laser phase fluctuations. We show how the randomness essentially stems from spontaneous emissions. The laser phase fluctuation can be quantitatively evaluated from basic principles and qualitatively explained by the Brownian motion model. After taking account of practical device precision, we show that the randomness generation speed is limited by the finite resolution of detection devices. Our result also provides the optimal experiment design in order to achieve the maximum generation speed.

  6. Theory of Spontaneous Emission Noise in Multisection Semiconductor Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loudon, Rodney; Ramoo, Desi; Adams, Michael J.

    2005-08-01

    Calculations of spontaneous emission noise in semiconductor lasers are mainly based on a fundamental theory developed by Henry in 1986, which is useful for simple systems, together with a formulation in terms of transfer matrices by Makino and others, which facilitates application of the theory to more complicated multisection systems. The aim of this review is to present a unified account of this theoretical work in a transparent form intended to encourage its further use in complex systems. The opportunity is taken to strengthen the existing theory by including the effects of differing optical wave vectors in different sections and the consequent reflections at interfaces, which are important in some applications. Sample calculations are presented for a range of systems with one, two, three, and four sections and the predictions compared with other theoretical and experimental results.

  7. High spectral density transmission emulation using amplified spontaneous emission noise.

    PubMed

    Elson, Daniel J; Galdino, Lidia; Maher, Robert; Killey, Robert I; Thomsen, Benn C; Bayvel, Polina

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of spectrally shaped amplified spontaneous emission (SS-ASE) noise for wideband channel loading in the investigation of nonlinear transmission limits in wavelength-division multiplexing transmission experiments using Nyquist-spaced channels. The validity of this approach is explored through statistical analysis and experimental transmission of Nyquist-spaced 10 GBaud polarization-division multiplexing (PDM) quadrature phase-shift keying and PDM-16-ary quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) channels, co-propagated with SS-ASE over single mode fiber. It is shown that this technique, which is simpler to implement than a fully modulated comb of channels, is valid for distances exceeding 240 km for PDM-16QAM with dispersion of 16 ps/nm/km, yields a good agreement with theory, and provides a conservative measure of system performance. PMID:26696160

  8. Frequency Clustering in Spontaneous Otoacoustic Emissions from a Lizard's Ear

    PubMed Central

    Vilfan, Andrej; Duke, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Spontaneous otoacoustic emissions (SOAEs) are indicators of an active process in the inner ear that enhances the sensitivity and frequency selectivity of hearing. They are particularly regular and robust in certain lizards, so these animals are good model organisms for studying how SOAEs are generated. We show that the published properties of SOAEs in the bobtail lizard are wholly consistent with a mathematical model in which active oscillators, with exponentially varying characteristic frequencies, are coupled together in a chain by visco-elastic elements. Physically, each oscillator corresponds to a small group of hair cells, covered by a tectorial sallet, so our theoretical analysis directly links SOAEs to the micromechanics of active hair bundles. PMID:18689448

  9. WDM optical steganography based on amplified spontaneous emission noise.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ben; Tait, Alexander N; Chang, Matthew P; Prucnal, Paul R

    2014-10-15

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a wavelength-division multiplexed (WDM) optical stealth transmission system carried by amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) noise. The stealth signal is hidden in both time and frequency domains by using ASE noise as the signal carrier. Each WDM channel uses part of the ASE spectrum, which provides more flexibility to apply stealth transmission in a public network and adds another layer of security to the stealth channel. Multi-channel transmission also increases the overall channel capacity, which is the major limitation of the single stealth channel transmission based on ASE noise. The relations between spectral bandwidth and coherence length of ASE carrier have been theoretically analyzed and experimentally investigated. PMID:25361121

  10. Optical steganography based on amplified spontaneous emission noise.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ben; Wang, Zhenxing; Tian, Yue; Fok, Mable P; Shastri, Bhavin J; Kanoff, Daniel R; Prucnal, Paul R

    2013-01-28

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate an optical steganography method in which a data signal is transmitted using amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) noise as a carrier. The ASE serving as a carrier for the private signal has an identical frequency spectrum to the existing noise generated by the Erbium doped fiber amplifiers (EDFAs) in the transmission system. The system also carries a conventional data channel that is not private. The so-called "stealth" or private channel is well-hidden within the noise of the system. Phase modulation is used for both the stealth channel and the public channel. Using homodyne detection, the short coherence length of the ASE ensures that the stealth signal can only be recovered if the receiver closely matches the delay-length difference, which is deliberately changed in a dynamic fashion that is only known to the transmitter and its intended receiver. PMID:23389187

  11. Sex and Ear Differences in Spontaneous and Click-Evoked Otoacoustic Emissions in Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snihur, Adrian W. K.; Hampson, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Effects of sex and handedness on the production of spontaneous and click-evoked otoacoustic emissions (OAEs) were explored in a non-hearing impaired population (ages 17-25 years). A sex difference in OAEs, either produced spontaneously (spontaneous OAEs or SOAEs) or in response to auditory stimuli (click-evoked OAEs or CEOAEs) has been reported in…

  12. Sex and Ear Differences in Spontaneous and Click-Evoked Otoacoustic Emissions in Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snihur, Adrian W. K.; Hampson, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Effects of sex and handedness on the production of spontaneous and click-evoked otoacoustic emissions (OAEs) were explored in a non-hearing impaired population (ages 17-25 years). A sex difference in OAEs, either produced spontaneously (spontaneous OAEs or SOAEs) or in response to auditory stimuli (click-evoked OAEs or CEOAEs) has been reported in

  13. Lateral Size-Dependent Spontaneous and Stimulated Emission Properties in Colloidal CdSe Nanoplatelets.

    PubMed

    Olutas, Murat; Guzelturk, Burak; Kelestemur, Yusuf; Yeltik, Aydan; Delikanli, Savas; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2015-05-26

    Here, we systematically investigated the spontaneous and stimulated emission performances of solution-processed atomically flat quasi-2D nanoplatelets (NPLs) as a function of their lateral size using colloidal CdSe core NPLs. We found that the photoluminescence quantum efficiency of these NPLs decreases with increasing lateral size while their photoluminescence decay rate accelerates. This strongly suggests that nonradiative channels prevail in the NPL ensembles having extended lateral size, which is well-explained by the increasing number of the defected NPL subpopulation. In the case of stimulated emission the role of lateral size in NPLs influentially emerges both in the single- and two-photon absorption (1PA and 2PA) pumping. In the amplified spontaneous emission measurements, we uncovered that the stimulated emission thresholds of 1PA and 2PA exhibit completely opposite behavior with increasing lateral size. The NPLs with larger lateral sizes exhibited higher stimulated emission thresholds under 1PA pumping due to the dominating defected subpopulation in larger NPLs. On the other hand, surprisingly, larger NPLs remarkably revealed lower 2PA-pumped amplified spontaneous emission thresholds. This is attributed to the observation of a "giant" 2PA cross-section overwhelmingly growing with increasing lateral size and reaching record levels higher than 10(6) GM, at least an order of magnitude stronger than colloidal quantum dots and rods. These findings suggest that the lateral size control in the NPLs, which is commonly neglected, is essential to high-performance colloidal NPL optoelectronic devices in addition to the vertical monolayer control. PMID:25950419

  14. Spontaneous emission noise in long-range surface plasmon polariton waveguide based optical gyroscope

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang-Yang; Zhang, Tong

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous emission noise is an important limit to the performance of active plasmonic devices. Here, we investigate the spontaneous emission noise in the long-range surface plasmon-polariton waveguide based optical gyroscope. A theoretical model of the sensitivity is established to study the incoherent multi-beam interference of spontaneous emission in the gyroscope. Numerical results show that spontaneous emission produces a drift in the transmittance spectra and lowers the signal-to-noise-ratio of the gyroscope. It also strengthens the shot noise to be the main limit to the sensitivity of the gyroscope for high propagation loss. To reduce the negative effects of the spontaneous emission noise on the gyroscope, an external feedback loop is suggested to estimate the drift in the transmittance spectra and therefor enhance the sensitivity. Our work lays a foundation for the improvement of long-range surface plasmon-polariton gyroscope and paves the way to its practical application. PMID:25234712

  15. Automotive Emissions Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, George

    2002-03-01

    Serious efforts to control emissions from automobiles commenced more than thirty-five years ago, focusing initially on aspects of engine design and the combustion process. For the past quarter century, however, the major emphasis has been on treating the engine exhaust gas before it leaves the vehicle, in order to limit the release of toxic and other pollutants. The system that was eventually devised and is now used on most gasoline-burning automobiles combines sensing, electronic engine control, and catalysis to decrease the emission of certain pollutants by more than ninety percent. This presentation will describe how the system works and briefly touch upon some of the consequences of automotive emissions control.

  16. Efficient computation of spontaneous emission dynamics in arbitrary photonic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teimourpour, M. H.; El-Ganainy, R.

    2015-12-01

    Defining a quantum mechanical wavefunction for photons is one of the remaining open problems in quantum physics. Thus quantum states of light are usually treated within the realm of second quantization. Consequently, spontaneous emission (SE) in arbitrary photonic media is often described by Fock space Hamiltonians. Here, we present a real space formulation of the SE process that can capture the physics of the problem accurately under different coupling conditions. Starting from first principles, we map the unitary evolution of a dressed two-level quantum emitter onto the problem of electromagnetic radiation from a self-interacting complex harmonic oscillator. Our formalism naturally leads to an efficient computational scheme of SE dynamics using finite difference time domain method without the need for calculating the photonic eigenmodes of the surrounding environment. In contrast to earlier investigations, our computational framework provides a unified numerical treatment for both weak and strong coupling regimes alike. We illustrate the versatility of our scheme by considering several different examples.

  17. A coupling model for amplified spontaneous emission in laser resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Hua; Wang, Xiaojun; Shang, Jianli; Yu, Yi; Tang, Chun

    2015-10-01

    The competition between amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) and main laser in solid-state laser resonators is investigated both theoretically and experimentally. A coupled model using the spatial volume integral instead of the Monte Carlo type raytrace technique is proposed to depict ASE in the laser resonators. This model is able to evaluate all possible reflections at both the polishing surface and the diffusive side, to calculate ASE for an inhomogeneous gain distribution, and to include the spectral correction. An experiment is carefully designed to verify the theoretical model and to investigate the distinct physical properties caused by the coupling between ASE and the laser oscillations. The experimental data exhibit an excellent agreement with the theoretical predictions. According to that model, we confirm that ASE in thin-disk lasers can be characterized approximately by the product of the threshold gain of the resonator and the diameter of the disks, as laser modes are highly overlapped with the pumping beam. Theoretical evaluation shows that the scattering characteristic of the disk side impacts on ASE significantly. Furthermore, we point out that ASE decreases output laser power by affecting threshold pumping power, while slope efficiency is not changed by ASE. This observation provides us with a simple way to estimate the decrease of the optical efficiency by ASE.

  18. Vacuum field energy and spontaneous emission in anomalously dispersive cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, Douglas H.; Di Rosa, Michael D.

    2011-05-15

    Anomalously dispersive cavities, particularly white-light cavities, may have larger bandwidth to finesse ratios than their normally dispersive counterparts. Partly for this reason, they have been proposed for use in laser interferometer gravitational-wave observatory (LIGO)-like gravity-wave detectors and in ring-laser gyroscopes. In this paper we analyze the quantum noise associated with anomalously dispersive cavity modes. The vacuum field energy associated with a particular cavity mode is proportional to the cavity-averaged group velocity of that mode. For anomalously dispersive cavities with group index values between 1 and 0, this means that the total vacuum field energy associated with a particular cavity mode must exceed ({h_bar}/2{pi}){omega}/2. For white-light cavities in particular, the group index approaches zero and the vacuum field energy of a particular spatial mode may be significantly enhanced. We predict enhanced spontaneous emission rates into anomalously dispersive cavity modes and broadened laser linewidths when the linewidth of intracavity emitters is broader than the cavity linewidth.

  19. Excitation dependent two-component spontaneous emission and ultrafast amplified spontaneous emission in dislocation-free InGaN nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    You, Guanjun; Zhang, Chunfeng; Xu, Jian; Guo, Wei; Bhattacharya, Pallab; Henderson, Ron

    2013-03-04

    Amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) at 456 nm from In{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}N nanowires grown on (001) silicon by catalyst-free molecular beam epitaxy was observed at room temperature under femtosecond excitation. The photoluminescence spectra below ASE threshold consist of two spontaneous emission bands centered at {approx}555 nm and {approx}480 nm, respectively, revealing the co-existence of deeply and shallowly localized exciton states in the nanowires. The ASE peak emerges from the 480 nm spontaneous emission band when the excitation density exceeds {approx}120 {mu}J/cm{sup 2}, indicating that optical gain arises from the radiative recombination of shallowly localized excitons in the nanowires. Time-resolved photoluminescence measurements revealed that the ASE process completes within 1.5 ps, suggesting a remarkably high stimulated emission recombination rate in one-dimensional InGaN nanowires.

  20. Automotive Emission Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Billy D.; And Others

    This publication contains instructional materials for both teachers and students for a course in automotive emission control. Instructional materials in this publication are written in terms of student performance using measurable objectives. The course includes 16 units. Each instructional unit includes some or all of the basic components of a…

  1. Automotive Emission Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Billy D.; Ragazzi, Ronald

    This guide designed to assist teachers in improving instruction in the area of automotive emission control curriculum includes four areas. Each area consists of one or more units of instruction, with each instructional unit including some or all of the following basic components: Performance objectives, suggested activities for teacher and…

  2. Modified spontaneous-emission rate in an inverted-opal structure with complete photonic bandgap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermann, Christian; Hess, Ortwin

    2002-12-01

    A finite three-dimensional photonic-crystal structure with a complete photonic bandgap is shown to drastically modify the spontaneous-emission rate of an embedded dipole. Calculations on the basis of the finite-difference time-domain method with perfectly matched layer boundary conditions demonstrate a strong position and polarization dependence of spontaneous emission within the unit cell. Strong enhancement effects are predicted at interfaces between the high-index and the low-index material. The inhibition of spontaneous emission within the bandgap is of the order of two magnitudes, even for relatively small crystallites.

  3. Controlled positions and kinetic analysis of spontaneous tin whisker growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Chien-Hao; Chen, Hao; Lee, Hsin-Yi; Wu, Albert T.

    2011-09-01

    This study achieved controlling the positions of spontaneous growth of tin whiskers. We surmounted the unpredictable growing nature of such whiskers and performed accurately quantitative analyses of the growth kinetics and yielded precise measurement of the growth rate. Furthermore, using synchrotron radiation x-ray, this study determined the stress variations in conjunction with whisker growth that fitted appropriately to the model. Accordingly, the results could address the debate held for decades and prove that forming a surface oxide layer is one of the required and necessary conditions for controlling the positions of spontaneous growth of tin whiskers.

  4. Controlled positions and kinetic analysis of spontaneous tin whisker growth

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Chien-Hao; Chen, Hao; Wu, Albert T.; Lee, Hsin-Yi

    2011-09-26

    This study achieved controlling the positions of spontaneous growth of tin whiskers. We surmounted the unpredictable growing nature of such whiskers and performed accurately quantitative analyses of the growth kinetics and yielded precise measurement of the growth rate. Furthermore, using synchrotron radiation x-ray, this study determined the stress variations in conjunction with whisker growth that fitted appropriately to the model. Accordingly, the results could address the debate held for decades and prove that forming a surface oxide layer is one of the required and necessary conditions for controlling the positions of spontaneous growth of tin whiskers.

  5. A semi-analytical approach for evaluating effects of amplified spontaneous emission on characteristics of Q-switched lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Razzaghi, D; Hajiesmaeilbaigi, F; Ruzbehani, M

    2012-08-31

    Possible effects of amplified spontaneous emission on output pulse characteristics of a Q-switched laser are discussed within the framework of a semi-analytical approach. It is shown that output energy decreases almost exponentially with average path length of the spontaneously emitted photons which in turn depends on geometrical specification and active medium properties as well as on optical finishing of the surfaces (for solid-state lasers). Optimal coupling dependence on the average path length is also investigated and shown to increase with average path length increment. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  6. Controlling boiler emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Katzel, J.

    1992-10-22

    This paper reports that if you are confused about how to interpret the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, you are not alone. The massive document runs several hundred pages and consists of 11 titles, each addressing a different aspect of air quality. In some cases, specific emissions levels are established; in others, they are left to the discretion of state and local governments. In many ways, the impact of the CAAA right now is no impact. But now is not the time for plant engineers to play any waiting games. The annual cost of complying with the comprehensive environmental legislation is estimated at $4 to $7 billion. Despite the ambiguity and uncertainty, one conclusion appears clear: control of emissions, especially nitrogen oxides, from all types of boilers and process units can be expected to become more stringent. More and more equipment and industries will fall under the regulations as they are implemented by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). An newly available and improved strategies and technologies will make it more and more difficult to circumvent the law. As the general concepts of the legislation are molded into specifics, plant engineers are well advised to take an active role in shaping the attainment and control programs being formed by their state sand in understanding and applying available control technologies.

  7. Manipulation of the spontaneous emission in mesoporous synthetic opals impregnated with fluorescent guests.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yuri; Yamada, Hisashi; Nakamura, Tadashi; Yano, Kazuhisa

    2009-12-01

    The spontaneous emission of light from light-emitting materials adsorbed within the ordered pores of monodispersed mesoporous silica spheres (MMSS) has been investigated. By taking advantage of the ordered starburst pores of MMSS, we can provide a simple strategy for fabricating synthetic opals consisting of homogeneous individual building blocks in which fluorescent guests are uniformly and stably impregnated. In this study, tris(8-hydroxyquinolinato)aluminum(III) (Alq(3)) and Rhodamine B (Rh B) are selected as the fluorescent guests. The former has a wider emission band than the reflection spectrum of MMSS synthetic opals, whereas the emission band of the latter is considerably narrower than the reflection spectrum of the opals. The spontaneous emissions of these functionalized synthetic opals are clearly influenced by the stop band governed by the Bragg equation. In the case of the Alq(3)-MMSS conjugate, the shape of the Alq(3) emission spectrum varies in accordance with the shift in the stop band. The emission of the Rh B-MMSS conjugate is noticeably narrowed, and its intensity is enhanced when the excitation intensity is increased. These results are well explained by an inhibition of spontaneous emission caused by a reduction in the density of optical states within the stop band. The results of this study indicate that MMSS synthetic opals are promising for use in novel optical applications in which the spontaneous emission can be manipulated. PMID:19642624

  8. Spontaneous emission of electromagnetic radiation in turbulent plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ziebell, L. F.; Yoon, P. H.; Simões, F. J. R.; Pavan, J.; Gaelzer, R.; Instituto de Física e Matemática, UFPel, Pelotas, Rio Grande do Sul

    2014-01-15

    Known radiation emission mechanisms in plasmas include bremmstrahlung (or free-free emission), gyro- and synchrotron radiation, cyclotron maser, and plasma emission. For unmagnetized plasmas, only bremmstrahlung and plasma emissions are viable. Of these, bremmstrahlung becomes inoperative in the absence of collisions, and the plasma emission requires the presence of electron beam, followed by various scattering and conversion processes. The present Letter proposes a new type of radiation emission process for plasmas in a state of thermodynamic quasi-equilibrium between particles and enhanced Langmuir turbulence. The radiation emission mechanism proposed in the present Letter is not predicted by the linear theory of thermal plasmas, but it relies on nonlinear wave-particle resonance processes. The electromagnetic particle-in-cell numerical simulation supports the new mechanism.

  9. Protecting remote atomic entanglement against spontaneous emission by separated photonic pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong, Xiao-Lan; Du, Chao-Qun; Yang, Ming; Zhang, Gang; Yang, Qing; Cao, Zhuo-Liang

    2015-07-01

    We study the entanglement dynamics between two spatially separated atoms trapped in two separate optical cavities. Based on cavity-assisted interactions between the atoms and separated photonic pulses, we propose a scheme for the implemention of a controlled-phase-flip gate (CPF gate) between each of the atoms and the photonic pulse to protect the remote atomic quantum entanglement against the decaying caused by spontaneous emission. What we need to do is to shoot the horizontally polarized photons onto the cavity mirror successively, plus a train of Hadamard operations on the atoms, and no measurement is needed here. It is shown that the quantum entanglement of the two remote atoms can be protected effectively in this way. We also extend our scheme to the case of weak coupling and low Q cavity cases. The simplicity of the current scheme may warrant its experimental realization.

  10. Bichromatic and trichromatic manipulation of spontaneous emission in a three-level Λ system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiang-ming; Xu, Qing; Li, Jing-yan; Li, Xiao-xia; Shi, Wen-xing; Zhang, Xiu

    2006-04-01

    Bichromatic and trichromatic manipulation of spontaneous emission in a three-level system in Λ configuration is studied on the basis of density matrix equation and quantum regression theorem. The spontaneous emission spectrum is numerically calculated by using harmonic expansion and matrix inversion. Two characteristic features are shown. Firstly, the central resonance peak, which is absent in the case of monochromatic excitation, is recovered for the bichromatic or trichromatic excitation. Secondly, selective elimination of the spectral lines is obtained by varying the amplitudes and phases of the trichromatic components. For the phase dependence, it is the sum of the relative phases of the two sideband components to the central component that plays a crucial role. The spontaneous emission spectrum is drastically modified once the sum phase is changed, but is kept unchanged regardless of the respective phases when the sum phase is fixed.

  11. Exponential Gain and Saturation of a Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission Free-Electron Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milton, S. V.; Gluskin, E.; Arnold, N. D.; Benson, C.; Berg, W.; Biedron, S. G.; Borland, M.; Chae, Y.-C.; Dejus, R. J.; Den Hartog, P. K.; Deriy, B.; Erdmann, M.; Eidelman, Y. I.; Hahne, M. W.; Huang, Z.; Kim, K.-J.; Lewellen, J. W.; Li, Y.; Lumpkin, A. H.; Makarov, O.; Moog, E. R.; Nassiri, A.; Sajaev, V.; Soliday, R.; Tieman, B. J.; Trakhtenberg, E. M.; Travish, G.; Vasserman, I. B.; Vinokurov, N. A.; Wang, X. J.; Wiemerslage, G.; Yang, B. X.

    2001-06-01

    Self-amplified spontaneous emission in a free-electron laser has been proposed for the generation of very high brightness coherent x-rays. This process involves passing a high-energy, high-charge, short-pulse, low-energy-spread, and low-emittance electron beam through the periodic magnetic field of a long series of high-quality undulator magnets. The radiation produced grows exponentially in intensity until it reaches a saturation point. We report on the demonstration of self-amplified spontaneous emission gain, exponential growth, and saturation at visible (530 nanometers) and ultraviolet (385 nanometers) wavelengths. Good agreement between theory and simulation indicates that scaling to much shorter wavelengths may be possible. These results confirm the physics behind the self-amplified spontaneous emission process and forward the development of an operational x-ray free-electron laser.

  12. Electrically controllable spontaneous magnetism in nanoscale mixed phase multiferroics.

    PubMed

    He, Q; Chu, Y-H; Heron, J T; Yang, S Y; Liang, W I; Kuo, C Y; Lin, H J; Yu, P; Liang, C W; Zeches, R J; Kuo, W C; Juang, J Y; Chen, C T; Arenholz, E; Scholl, A; Ramesh, R

    2011-01-01

    Magnetoelectrics and multiferroics present exciting opportunities for electric-field control of magnetism. However, there are few room-temperature ferromagnetic-ferroelectrics. Among the various types of multiferroics the bismuth ferrite system has received much attention primarily because both the ferroelectric and the antiferromagnetic orders are quite robust at room temperature. Here we demonstrate the emergence of an enhanced spontaneous magnetization in a strain-driven rhombohedral and super-tetragonal mixed phase of BiFeO₃. Using X-ray magnetic circular dichroism-based photoemission electron microscopy coupled with macroscopic magnetic measurements, we find that the spontaneous magnetization of the rhombohedral phase is significantly enhanced above the canted antiferromagnetic moment in the bulk phase, as a consequence of a piezomagnetic coupling to the adjacent tetragonal-like phase and the epitaxial constraint. Reversible electric-field control and manipulation of this magnetic moment at room temperature is also shown. PMID:21407191

  13. Spontaneous synchrotron emission from a plasma with an energetic runaway electron tail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freund, H. P.; Dillenburg, D.; Wu, C. S.; Lee, L. C.

    1978-01-01

    The emissivity of spontaneous synchrotron radiation is computed for a plasma consisting of a background thermal plasma in addition to an energetic runaway electron component. The analysis is performed for both the ordinary and extraordinary modes, for frequencies in the vicinity of the electron plasma frequency and the higher harmonics of the electron gyrofrequency, and for the case when the electron plasma frequency is approximately the same as or smaller than the cyclotron frequency. The relativistic gyroresonance with the runaway electrons is found to result in a level of spontaneous emission which, for frequencies in the neighborhood of the electron plasma frequency, is significantly enhanced over the thermal radiation.

  14. Spontaneous emission measurements from a low voltage pre-bunched electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Dearden, G.; Mayhew, S.E.; Lucas, J.

    1995-12-31

    Recently we have carried out measurements on the spontaneous microwave (8.2 GHz) emission which results when a low-voltage (55kV) pre-punched electron beam is passed through a waveguide in a wiggler magnetic field. The variation of the spontaneous emission output power level with the average electron beam current and energy are reported and compared with the theory presented by Doria et al. The effect of the degree of bunching of the electron beam has also been observed and compared with theory.

  15. Increased Spontaneous Otoacoustic Emissions in Mice with a Detached Tectorial Membrane.

    PubMed

    Cheatham, Mary Ann; Ahmad, Aisha; Zhou, Yingjie; Goodyear, Richard J; Dallos, Peter; Richardson, Guy P

    2016-04-01

    Mutations in genes encoding tectorial membrane (TM) proteins are a significant cause of human hereditary hearing loss (Hildebrand et al. 2011), and several mouse models have been developed to study the functional significance of this accessory structure in the mammalian cochlea. In this study, we use otoacoustic emissions (OAE), signals obtained from the ear canal that provide a measure of cochlear function, to characterize a mouse in which the TM is detached from the spiral limbus due to an absence of otoancorin (Otoa, Lukashkin et al. 2012). Our results demonstrate that spontaneous emissions (SOAE), sounds produced in the cochlea without stimulation, increase dramatically in mice with detached TMs even though their hearing sensitivity is reduced. This behavior is unusual because wild-type (WT) controls are rarely spontaneous emitters. SOAEs in mice lacking Otoa predominate around 7 kHz, which is much lower than in either WT animals when they generate SOAEs or in mutant mice in which the TM protein Ceacam16 is absent (Cheatham et al. 2014). Although both mutants lack Hensen's stripe, loss of this TM feature is only observed in regions coding frequencies greater than ~15 kHz in WT mice so its loss cannot explain the low-frequency, de novo SOAEs observed in mice lacking Otoa. The fact that ~80 % of mice lacking Otoa produce SOAEs even when they generate smaller distortion product OAEs suggests that the active process is still functioning in these mutants but the system(s) involved have become less stable due to alterations in TM structure. PMID:26691158

  16. Highly elevated emission of mercury vapor due to the spontaneous combustion of refuse in a landfill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wei; Sommar, Jonas; Li, Zhonggen; Feng, Xinbin; Lin, Che-Jen; Li, Guanghui

    2013-11-01

    Refuse disposal (e.g., landfilling and incineration) have been recognized as a significant anthropogenic source of mercury (Hg) emission globally. However, in-situ measurements of Hg emission from landfill or refuse dumping sites where fugitive spontaneous combustion occurs have not been reported. Gaseous elemental mercury (Hg0) concentration and emission flux were observed near spontaneous combustions of refuse at a landfill site in southwestern China. Ambient Hg0 concentrations above the refuse surface ranged from 42.7 ± 20.0 to 396.4 ± 114.2 ng m-3, up to 10 times enhancement due to the spontaneous burning. Using a box model with Hg0 data obtained from 2004 to 2013, we estimated that the Hg0 emission from refuse was amplified by 8-40 times due to spontaneous combustion. A micrometeorological flux measurement system based on relaxed eddy accumulation was configured downwind of the combustion sites to quantify the Hg0 emission. Extremely large turbulent deposition fluxes (up to -128.6 μg m-2 h-1, 20 min average) were detected during periods of high Hg0 concentration events over the measurement footprint. The effect of temperature, moisture and light on the air-surface exchange of Hg0 exchange was found to be masked by the overwhelming deposition of Hg0 from the enriched air from the refuse combustion plumes. This research reveals that mercury emission from the landfill refuse can be boosted by fugitive spontaneous combustion of refuse. The emission represents an anthropogenic source that has been overlooked in Hg inventory estimates.

  17. Electrically Controllable Spontaneous Magnetism in Nanoscale Mixed Phase Multiferroics

    SciTech Connect

    He, Q.; Chu, Y. H.; Heron, J. T.; Yang, S. Y.; Wang, C. H.; Kuo, C. Y.; Lin, H. J.; Yu, P.; Liang, C. W.; Zeches, R. J.; Chen, C. T.; Arenholz, E.; Scholl, A.; Ramesh, R.

    2010-08-02

    The emergence of enhanced spontaneous magnetic moments in self-assembled, epitaxial nanostructures of tetragonal (T-phase) and rhombohedral phases (R-phase) of the multiferroic BiFeO{sub 3} system is demonstrated. X-ray magnetic circular dichroism based photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM) was applied to investigate the local nature of this magnetism. We find that the spontaneous magnetization of the R-phase is significantly enhanced above the canted antiferromagnetic moment in the bulk phase, as a consequence of a piezomagnetic coupling to the adjacent T-phase and the epitaxial constraint. Reversible electric field control and manipulation of this magnetic moment at room temperature is shown using a combination of piezoresponse force microscopy and PEEM studies.

  18. Advanced Emissions Control Development Program

    SciTech Connect

    G. A. Farthing; G. T. Amrhein; G. A. Kudlac; D. A. Yurchison; D. K. McDonald; M. G. Milobowski

    2001-03-31

    The primary objective of the Advanced Emissions Control Development Program (AECDP) is to develop practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs, or air toxics) from coal-fired boilers. This objective is being met by identifying ways to effectively control air toxic emissions through the use of conventional flue gas cleanup equipment such as electrostatic precipitators (ESPs), fabric filters (fabric filters), and wet flue gas desulfurization (wet FGD) systems. Development work initially concentrated on the capture of trace metals, hydrogen chloride, and hydrogen fluoride. Recent work has focused almost exclusively on the control of mercury emissions.

  19. Optical instabilities and spontaneous light emission in moving media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silveirinha, Mario

    2015-03-01

    We show that when an uncharged plasmonic material is set in relative motion with respect to another uncharged polarizable body the system may be electromagnetically unstable. Particularly, when the relative velocity of the two bodies is enforced to remain constant the system may support natural oscillations that grow exponentially with time, even in presence of realistic material loss and dispersion. It is proven that a friction-type force acts on the moving bodies to oppose their relative motion. Hence, the optical instabilities result from the conversion of kinetic energy into electromagnetic energy. This new purely classical phenomenon is analogous to the Cherenkov and Smith-Purcell effects but for uncharged polarizable matter. We link the optical instabilities to a spontaneous parity-time symmetry breaking of the system, and demonstrate the possibility of optical amplification of a light pulse in the broken parity-time symmetry regime. This work is supported in part by Fundao para a Cincia e a Tecnologia Grant Number PTDC/EEI-TEL/2764/2012.

  20. Effect of surface-plasmon polaritons on spontaneous emission and intermolecular energy-transfer rates in multilayered geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Marocico, C. A.; Knoester, J.

    2011-11-15

    We use a Green's tensor method to investigate the spontaneous emission rate of a molecule and the energy-transfer rate between molecules placed in two types of layered geometries: a slab geometry and a planar waveguide. We focus especially on the role played by surface-plasmon polaritons in modifying the spontaneous emission and energy-transfer rates as compared to free space. In the presence of more than one interface, the surface-plasmon polariton modes split into several branches, and each branch can contribute significantly to modifying the electromagnetic properties of atoms and molecules. Enhancements of several orders of magnitude both in the spontaneous emission rate of a molecule and the energy-transfer rate between molecules are obtained and, by tuning the parameters of the geometry, one has the ability to control the range and magnitude of these enhancements. For the energy-transfer rate interference effects between contributions of different plasmon-polariton branches are observed as oscillations in the distance dependence of this rate.

  1. Comparative investigations of the spontaneous and stimulated emissions from nitrogen molecules in air with femtosecond laser excitation pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ziting; Chu, Wei; Zeng, Bin; Yao, Jinping; Li, Guihua; Xie, Hongqiang; Wang, Zhanshan; Cheng, Ya

    2016-03-01

    We report on experimental investigations on the spontaneous and stimulated emissions from excited nitrogen molecules generated in both linearly and circularly polarized intense laser fields. The spontaneous emission is measured from the side direction of the laser-induced filament whereas the stimulated emission generated by seed amplification is measured in the forward direction of the laser propagation. The comparison between the signal intensities of the spontaneous fluorescence emission and the seed-amplified stimulated emission provides an insight into the population inversion generated in nitrogen molecules with circularly polarized femtosecond laser pulses.

  2. Plasmonic engineering of spontaneous emission from silicon nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Goffard, Julie; Gérard, Davy; Miska, Patrice; Baudrion, Anne-Laure; Deturche, Régis; Plain, Jérôme

    2013-01-01

    Silicon nanocrystals offer huge advantages compared to other semi-conductor quantum dots as they are made from an abundant, non-toxic material and are compatible with silicon devices. Besides, among a wealth of extraordinary properties ranging from catalysis to nanomedicine, metal nanoparticles are known to increase the radiative emission rate of semiconductor quantum dots. Here, we use gold nanoparticles to accelerate the emission of silicon nanocrystals. The resulting integrated hybrid emitter is 5-fold brighter than bare silicon nanocrystals. We also propose an in-depth analysis highlighting the role of the different physical parameters in the photoluminescence enhancement phenomenon. This result has important implications for the practical use of silicon nanocrystals in optoelectronic devices, for instance for the design of efficient down-shifting devices that could be integrated within future silicon solar cells. PMID:24037020

  3. Plasmonic engineering of spontaneous emission from silicon nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    Goffard, Julie; Gérard, Davy; Miska, Patrice; Baudrion, Anne-Laure; Deturche, Régis; Plain, Jérôme

    2013-01-01

    Silicon nanocrystals offer huge advantages compared to other semi-conductor quantum dots as they are made from an abundant, non-toxic material and are compatible with silicon devices. Besides, among a wealth of extraordinary properties ranging from catalysis to nanomedicine, metal nanoparticles are known to increase the radiative emission rate of semiconductor quantum dots. Here, we use gold nanoparticles to accelerate the emission of silicon nanocrystals. The resulting integrated hybrid emitter is 5-fold brighter than bare silicon nanocrystals. We also propose an in-depth analysis highlighting the role of the different physical parameters in the photoluminescence enhancement phenomenon. This result has important implications for the practical use of silicon nanocrystals in optoelectronic devices, for instance for the design of efficient down-shifting devices that could be integrated within future silicon solar cells. PMID:24037020

  4. Nonlocal effects: relevance for the spontaneous emission rates of quantum emitters coupled to plasmonic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filter, Robert; Bösel, Christoph; Toscano, Giuseppe; Lederer, Falk; Rockstuhl, Carsten

    2014-11-01

    The spontaneous emission rate of dipole emitters close to plasmonic dimers are theoretically studied within a nonlocal hydrodynamic model. A nonlocal model has to be used since quantum emitters in the immediate environment of a metallic nanoparticle probe its electronic structure. Compared to local calculations, the emission rate is significantly reduced. The influence is mostly pronounced if the emitter is located close to sharp edges. We suggest to use quantum emitters to test nonlocal effects in experimentally feasible configurations.

  5. Exact solution for spontaneous emission in the presence of N atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummings, F. W.; Dorri, Ali

    1983-10-01

    N two-level "atoms" are considered in interaction with a single-mode resonant electromagnetic field. The exact solution is given nonrelativistically for all times for the case of spontaneous emission, when only one atom is initially excited. The solution is given for the general case of the N atoms in inequivalent mode positions.

  6. Low threshold amplified spontaneous emission and ambipolar charge transport in non-volatile liquid fluorene derivatives.

    PubMed

    Ribierre, Jean-Charles; Zhao, Li; Inoue, Munetomo; Schwartz, Pierre-Olivier; Kim, Ju-Hyung; Yoshida, Kou; Sandanayaka, Atula S D; Nakanotani, Hajime; Mager, Loic; Méry, Stéphane; Adachi, Chihaya

    2016-02-11

    Highly fluorescent non-volatile fluidic fluorene derivatives functionalized with siloxane chains were synthesized and used in monolithic solvent-free liquid organic semiconductor distributed feedback lasers. The photoluminescence quantum yield values, the amplified spontaneous emission thresholds and the ambipolar charge carrier mobilities demonstrate that this class of materials is extremely promising for organic fluidic light-emitting and lasing devices. PMID:26734693

  7. Noise-color-induced quenching of fluctuations in a correlated spontaneous-emission laser model

    SciTech Connect

    Habiger, R.G.K.; Risken, H. ); James, M.; Moss, F. ); Schleich, W. Center for Advanced Studies and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 )

    1990-04-01

    We show via (1) an approximate, analytical technique, (2) a formally exact matrix continued-fraction analysis, and (3) an analog simulation of the classical Langevin equation of a correlated spontaneous-emission laser (CEL) that noise of nonzero correlation time leads to an enhancement of the characteristic CEL noise quenching.

  8. Fast and bright spontaneous emission of Er(3+) ions in metallic nanocavity.

    PubMed

    Song, Jung-Hwan; Kim, Jisu; Jang, Hoon; Yong Kim, In; Karnadi, Indra; Shin, Jonghwa; Shin, Jung H; Lee, Yong-Hee

    2015-01-01

    By confining light in a small cavity, the spontaneous emission rate of an emitter can be controlled via the Purcell effect. However, while Purcell factors as large as ∼10,000 have been predicted, actual reported values were in the range of about 10-30 only, leaving a huge gap between theory and experiment. Here we report on enhanced 1.54-μm emission from Er(3+) ions placed in a very small metallic cavity. Using a cavity designed to enhance the overall Purcell effect instead of a particular component, and by systematically investigating its photonic properties, we demonstrate an unambiguous Purcell factor that is as high as 170 at room temperature. We also observe >90 times increase in the far-field radiant flux, indicating that as much as 55% of electromagnetic energy that was initially supplied to Er(3+) ions in the cavity escape safely into the free space in just one to two optical cycles. PMID:25940839

  9. Decoherence of Quantum Tunneling Induced by Spontaneous Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Li; Xiao, Zhi-Hong; Liu, Yu-Jie; Shi, Ying

    2015-07-01

    We study the decoherence dynamics of quantum tunneling of a two-level atom coupled into a single-mode electromagnetic field. Atomic internal and external degrees are entangled with the cavity field due to recoil during emission of a photon. We show that the quantum tunneling period depends on the distance between the two wells, and the tunneling process itself may or may not decohere depending on the distance between the two wells of the external potential compared to the wavelength corresponding to the internal transition.

  10. The interplay between spontaneous and controlled processing in creative cognition

    PubMed Central

    Mok, Leh Woon

    2014-01-01

    Neural studies of creativity have yielded relatively little consistent results. For example, in functional neuroanatomical studies, the prefrontal cortex (PFC) has often been implicated as a critical neural substrate. However, results in electrophysiological (EEG) studies have been inconsistent as to the role of the PFC. EEG results have more often implicated widespread alpha synchronization, particularly in posterior regions, in creative cognition. Recent fMRI evidence has indicated that the PFC may be activated as a part of and together with other components of a deliberate control brain network. Controlled processing is neurologically dissociated from, but may co-occur with, spontaneous cognition mediated by a subset of the default-mode network (e.g., the angular gyrus [BA 39] in the posterior parietal cortex, which has been increasingly implicated in creative cognition). When the demand for controlled processing is substantially increased, default-mode processing may be suppressed. There is now preliminary evidence to suggest an association between alpha synchronization and default-mode processing. Creative cognition likely emerges from an optimal balance between spontaneous processing and controlled processing. PMID:25221497

  11. Emission control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor); Chung, J. Landy (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Methods and apparatus utilizing hydrogen peroxide are useful to reduce SOx and mercury (or other heavy metal) emissions from combustion flue gas streams. The methods and apparatus may further be modified to reduce NOx emissions. Continuous concentration of hydrogen peroxide to levels approaching or exceeding propellant-grade hydrogen peroxide facilitates increased system efficiency. In this manner, combustion flue gas streams can be treated for the removal of SOx and heavy metals, while isolating useful by-products streams of sulfuric acid as well as solids for the recovery of the heavy metals. Where removal of NOx emissions is included, nitric acid may also be isolated for use in fertilizer or other industrial applications.

  12. Spontaneous ultraweak photon emission imaging of oxidative metabolic processes in human skin: effect of molecular oxygen and antioxidant defense system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastogi, Anshu; Pospíšil, Pavel

    2011-09-01

    All living organisms emit spontaneous ultraweak photon emission as a result of cellular metabolic processes. In this study, the involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) formed as the byproduct of oxidative metabolic processes in spontaneous ultraweak photon emission was studied in human hand skin. The effect of molecular oxygen and ROS scavengers on spontaneous ultraweak photon emission from human skin was monitored using a highly sensitive photomultiplier tube and charged coupled device camera. When spontaneous ultraweak photon emission was measured under anaerobic conditions, the photon emission was decreased, whereas under hyperaerobic condition the enhancement in photon emission was observed. Spontaneous ultraweak photon emission measured after topical application of glutathione, α-tocopherol, ascorbate, and coenzyme Q10 was observed to be decreased. These results reveal that ROS formed during the cellular metabolic processes in the epidermal cells play a significant role in the spontaneous ultraweak photon emission. It is proposed that spontaneous ultraweak photon emission can be used as a noninvasive tool for the temporal and spatial monitoring of the oxidative metabolic processes and intrinsic antioxidant system in human skin.

  13. Master equation for collective spontaneous emission with quantized atomic motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damanet, François; Braun, Daniel; Martin, John

    2016-02-01

    We derive a Markovian master equation for the internal dynamics of an ensemble of two-level atoms including all effects related to the quantization of their motion. Our equation provides a unifying picture of the consequences of recoil and indistinguishability of atoms beyond the Lamb-Dicke regime on both their dissipative and conservative dynamics, and applies equally well to distinguishable and indistinguishable atoms. We give general expressions for the decay rates and the dipole-dipole shifts for any motional states, and we find closed-form formulas for a number of relevant states (Gaussian states, Fock states, and thermal states). In particular, we show that dipole-dipole interactions and cooperative photon emission can be modulated through the external state of motion.

  14. Spontaneous emission in the presence of a realistically sized cylindrical waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dung, Ho Trung

    2016-02-01

    Various quantities characterizing the spontaneous emission process of a dipole emitter including the emission rate and the emission pattern can be expressed in terms of the Green tensor of the surrounding environment. By expanding the Green tensor around some analytically known background one as a Born series, and truncating it under appropriate conditions, complicated boundaries can be tackled with ease. However, when the emitter is embedded in the medium, even the calculation of the first-order term in the Born series is problematic because of the presence of a singularity. We show how to eliminate this singularity for a medium of arbitrary size and shape by expanding around the bulk medium rather than vacuum. In the highly symmetric configuration of an emitter located on the axis of a realistically sized cylinder, it is shown that the singularity can be removed by changing the integral variables and then the order of integration. Using both methods, we investigate the spontaneous emission rate of an initially excited two-level dipole emitter, embedded in a realistically sized cylinder, which can be a common optical fiber in the long-length limit and a disk in the short-length limit. The spatial distribution of the emitted light is calculated using the Born-expansion approach, and local-field corrections to the spontaneous emission rate are briefly discussed.

  15. Fabrication and characterization of plasmonic nanocone antennas for strong spontaneous emission enhancement.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Björn; Vassant, Simon; Chen, Xue-Wen; Götzinger, Stephan; Sandoghdar, Vahid; Christiansen, Silke

    2015-10-01

    Plasmonic antennas are attractive nanostructures for a large variety of studies ranging from fundamental aspects of light-matter interactions at the nanoscale to industry-relevant applications such as ultrasensitive sensing, enhanced absorption in solar cells or solar fuel generation. A particularly interesting feature of these antennas is that they can enhance the fluorescence properties of emitters. Theoretical calculations have shown that nanocone antennas provide ideal results, but a high degree of manufacturing precision and control is needed to reach optimal performance. In this study, we report on the fabrication of nanocones with base diameters and heights in the range of 100 nm with variable aspect ratios using focused ion beam milling of sputtered nano-crystalline gold layers. The controlled fabrication process allows us to obtain cones with tailored plasmon resonances. The measured plasmon spectra show very good agreement with finite-difference time-domain calculations. Theoretical investigations predict that these nanocones can enhance the spontaneous emission rate of a quantum emitter by several hundred times while keeping its quantum efficiency above 60%. PMID:26376922

  16. Fabrication and characterization of plasmonic nanocone antennas for strong spontaneous emission enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Björn; Vassant, Simon; Chen, Xue-Wen; Götzinger, Stephan; Sandoghdar, Vahid; Christiansen, Silke

    2015-10-01

    Plasmonic antennas are attractive nanostructures for a large variety of studies ranging from fundamental aspects of light-matter interactions at the nanoscale to industry-relevant applications such as ultrasensitive sensing, enhanced absorption in solar cells or solar fuel generation. A particularly interesting feature of these antennas is that they can enhance the fluorescence properties of emitters. Theoretical calculations have shown that nanocone antennas provide ideal results, but a high degree of manufacturing precision and control is needed to reach optimal performance. In this study, we report on the fabrication of nanocones with base diameters and heights in the range of 100 nm with variable aspect ratios using focused ion beam milling of sputtered nano-crystalline gold layers. The controlled fabrication process allows us to obtain cones with tailored plasmon resonances. The measured plasmon spectra show very good agreement with finite-difference time-domain calculations. Theoretical investigations predict that these nanocones can enhance the spontaneous emission rate of a quantum emitter by several hundred times while keeping its quantum efficiency above 60%.

  17. ADVANCED EMISSIONS CONTROL DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    M.J. Holmes

    1998-07-01

    The objective of this project is to develop practical strategies and systems for the simultaneous control of SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, particulate matter, and air toxics emissions from coal-fired boilers in such a way as to keep coal economically and environmentally competitive as a utility boiler fuel. Of particular interest is the control of air toxics emissions through the cost-effective use of conventional flue gas clean-up equipment such as electrostatic precipitators (ESP's), fabric filters (baghouses), and SO{sub 2} removal systems such as wet scrubbers and various clean coal technologies. This objective will be achieved through extensive development testing in the state-of-the art, 10 MW{sub e} equivalent, Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF). The project has extended the capabilities of the CEDF to facilitate air toxics emissions control development work on backend flue gas cleanup equipment. Specifically, an ESP, a baghouse, and a wet scrubber for SO{sub 2} (and air toxics) control were added--all designed to yield air toxics emissions data under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. A schematic of the CEDF and the project test equipment is shown in Figure 1. The specific objectives of the project are to: (1) Measure and understand production and partitioning of air toxics species in coal-fired power plant systems; (2) Optimize the air toxics removal performance of conventional flue gas cleanup systems; (3) Quantify the impacts of coal cleaning on air toxics emissions; (4) Identify and/or develop advanced air toxics emissions control concepts; (5) Develop and validate air toxics emissions measurement and monitoring techniques; (6) Establish an air toxics data library to facilitate studies of the impacts of coal selection, coal cleaning, and emissions control strategies on the emissions of coal-fired power plants.

  18. ADVANCED EMISSIONS CONTROL DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    M.J. Holmes

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this project is to develop practical strategies and systems for the simultaneous control of SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, particulate matter, and air toxics emissions from coal-fired boilers in such a way as to keep coal economically and environmentally competitive as a utility boiler fuel. Of particular interest is the control of air toxics emissions through the cost-effective use of conventional flue gas clean-up equipment such as electrostatic precipitators (ESP's), fabric filters (baghouses), and SO{sub 2} removal systems such as wet scrubbers and various clean coal technologies. This objective will be achieved through extensive development testing in the state-of-the art, 10 MW{sub e} equivalent, Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF). The project has extended the capabilities of the CEDF to facilitate air toxics emissions control development work on backend flue gas cleanup equipment. Specifically, an ESP, a baghouse, and a wet scrubber for SO{sub 2} (and air toxics) control were added--all designed to yield air toxics emissions data under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. A schematic of the CEDF and the project test equipment is shown in Figure 1. The specific objectives of the project are to: (1) Measure and understand production and partitioning of air toxics species in coal-fired power plant systems; (2) Optimize the air toxics removal performance of conventional flue gas cleanup systems; (3) Quantify the impacts of coal cleaning on air toxics emissions; (4) Identify and/or develop advanced air toxics emissions control concepts; (5) Develop and validate air toxics emissions measurement and monitoring techniques; (6) Establish an air toxics data library to facilitate studies of the impacts of coal selection, coal cleaning, and emissions control strategies on the emissions of coal-fired power plants.

  19. ADVANCED EMISSIONS CONTROL DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    M.J. Holmes

    1998-10-01

    The objective of this project is to develop practical strategies and systems for the simultaneous control of SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, particulate matter, and air toxics emissions from coal-fired boilers in such a way as to keep coal economically and environmentally competitive as a utility boiler fuel. Of particular interest is the control of air toxics emissions through the cost-effective use of conventional flue gas clean-up equipment such as electrostatic precipitators (ESP's), fabric filters (baghouses), and SO{sub 2} removal systems such as wet scrubbers and various clean coal technologies. This objective will be achieved through extensive development testing in the state-of-the art, 10 MW{sub e} equivalent, Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF). The project has extended the capabilities of the CEDF to facilitate air toxics emissions control development work on backend flue gas cleanup equipment. Specifically, an ESP, a baghouse, and a wet scrubber for SO{sub 2} (and air toxics) control were added--all designed to yield air toxics emissions data under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. A schematic of the CEDF and the project test equipment is shown in Figure 1. The specific objectives of the project are to: (1) Measure and understand production and partitioning of air toxics species in coal-fired power plant systems; (2) Optimize the air toxics removal performance of conventional flue gas cleanup systems; (3) Quantify the impacts of coal cleaning on air toxics emissions; (4) Identify and/or develop advanced air toxics emissions control concepts; (5) Develop and validate air toxics emissions measurement and monitoring techniques; (6) Establish an air toxics data library to facilitate studies of the impacts of coal selection, coal cleaning, and emissions control strategies on the emissions of coal-fired power plants.

  20. Emission control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Methods and apparatus utilizing hydrogen peroxide are useful to reduce NOx, SOx and mercury (or other heavy metal) emissions from combustion flue gas streams. Continuous concentration of hydrogen peroxide to levels approaching or exceeding propellant-grade hydrogen peroxide facilitates increased system efficiency. In this manner, combustion flue gas streams can be treated for the removal of NOx, SOx and heavy metals, while isolating useful by-products streams of sulfuric acid and nitric acid as well as solids for the recovery of the heavy metals.

  1. Preparation of three-dimensional entanglement for distant atoms in coupled cavities via atomic spontaneous emission and cavity decay

    PubMed Central

    Su, Shi-Lei; Shao, Xiao-Qiang; Wang, Hong-Fu; Zhang, Shou

    2014-01-01

    We propose a dissipative scheme to prepare a three-dimensional entangled state for two atoms trapped in separate coupled cavities. Our work shows that both atomic spontaneous emission and cavity decay, which are two typical obstacles in unitary-dynamics-based schemes, are no longer detrimental, but necessary for three-dimensional entangled state preparation without specifying initial state and controlling the evolution time precisely. Final numerical simulation with one group of experimental parameters indicates that the performance of our scheme could be better than the unitary-dynamics-based scheme. PMID:25523944

  2. Multicolor Amplified Spontaneous Emissions Based on Organic Polymorphs That Undergo Excited-State Intramolecular Proton Transfer.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiao; Zhang, Yufei; Han, Shenghua; Li, Feng; Zhang, Hongyu; Wang, Yue

    2016-03-24

    Two polymorphs emitting near-infrared (1 R form: α phase, λem =702 nm, Φf =0.41) and orange-red fluorescence (1 O form: β phase, λem =618 nm, Φf =0.05) were synthesized by finely controlling the crystallization conditions of compound 1, a structurally simple excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT)-active molecule. Multicolor amplified spontaneous emissions (ASEs) were realized, for the first time, based on these polymorphs. Notably, the 1 O crystal underwent heating-induced phase transformation from the β phase to the α form in a single-crystal to single-crystal (SCSC) manner accompanied with an unprecedented ASE changing. The ASE behavior of polymorphs 1 R, 1 O as well as the ASE changing during SCSC was investigated. The feasibility of multicolor lasing based on the present organic polymorphs was confirmed, which may provide a new development strategy for organic laser science and technology. PMID:26917274

  3. Simulations of the spontaneous emission of a quantum dot near a gap plasmon waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Perera, Chamanei S. Vernon, Kristy C.; Mcleod, Angus

    2014-02-07

    In this paper, we modeled a quantum dot at near proximity to a gap plasmon waveguide to study the quantum dot-plasmon interactions. Assuming that the waveguide is single mode, this paper is concerned about the dependence of spontaneous emission rate of the quantum dot on waveguide dimensions such as width and height. We compare coupling efficiency of a gap waveguide with symmetric configuration and asymmetric configuration illustrating that symmetric waveguide has a better coupling efficiency to the quantum dot. We also demonstrate that optimally placed quantum dot near a symmetric waveguide with 50 nm × 50 nm cross section can capture 80% of the spontaneous emission into a guided plasmon mode.

  4. Spontaneous emission from dipole-forbidden transitions in semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotrufo, Michele; Fiore, Andrea

    2015-09-01

    We theoretically investigate the multipolar effects on the dipole-forbidden transitions of a semiconductor quantum dot. An approximated expression for the decay rate of these transitions is derived. Unlike the general theory of the spontaneous emission beyond the dipole approximation, the distinct roles of the emitter and the vacuum electric field in the transition rate are here clearly recognizable and can be separately optimized. We illustrate the potential of this formalism by calculating the spontaneous emission decay rate of an InAs/GaAs quantum dot embedded into two realistic nanostructures—an L3 photonic crystal cavity and a plasmonic dimer antenna. The obtained results show that, although the two structures provide an enhancement of the same order of magnitude, the plasmonic antenna constitutes a more promising candidate for the experimental observation of the dipole-forbidden transitions of a quantum dot.

  5. All-optical cooling of Fermi gases via Pauli inhibition of spontaneous emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onofrio, Roberto

    2016-03-01

    A technique is proposed to cool Fermi gases to the regime of quantum degeneracy based on the expected inhibition of spontaneous emission due to the Pauli principle. The reduction of the linewidth for spontaneous emission originates a corresponding reduction of the Doppler temperature, which under specific conditions may give rise to a runaway process through which fermions are progressively cooled. The approach requires a combination of a magneto-optical trap as a cooling system and an optical dipole trap to enhance quantum degeneracy. This results in expected Fermi degeneracy factors T /TF comparable to the lowest values recently achieved, with potential for a direct implementation in optical lattices. The experimental demonstration of this technique should also indirectly provide a macroscopic manifestation of the Pauli exclusion principle at the atomic physics level.

  6. Directional spontaneous emission and lateral Casimir-Polder force on an atom close to a nanofiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheel, Stefan; Buhmann, Stefan Yoshi; Clausen, Christoph; Schneeweiss, Philipp

    2015-10-01

    We study the spontaneous emission of an excited atom close to an optical nanofiber and the resulting scattering forces. For a suitably chosen orientation of the atomic dipole, the spontaneous emission pattern becomes asymmetric and a resonant Casimir-Polder force parallel to the fiber axis arises. For a simple model case, we show that such a lateral force is due to the interaction of the circularly oscillating atomic dipole moment with its image inside the material. With the Casimir-Polder energy being constant in the lateral direction, the predicted lateral force does not derive from a potential in the usual way. Our results have implications for optical force measurements on a substrate as well as for laser cooling of atoms in nanophotonic traps.

  7. Cavity-enhanced spontaneous emission rates for rhodamine 6-G in levitated microdroplets

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, M.D.; Whitten, W.B.; Ramsey, J.M. ); Arnold, S. )

    1992-01-01

    Fluorescence decay kinetics of Rhodamine 6-G molecules in levitated glycerol microdroplets (4--20 microns in diameter) have been investigated to determine the effects of spherical cavity resonances on spontaneous emission rates. For droplet diameters greater than 10 microns, the fluorescence lifetime is essentially the same as in bulk glycerol. As the droplet diameter is decreased below 10 microns, bi-exponential decay behavior is observed with a slow component whose rate is similar to bulk glycerol, and a fast component whose rate is as much as a factor of 10 larger than the bulk decay rate. This fast component is attributed to cavity enhancement of the spontaneous emission rate and, within the weak coupling approximation, a value for the homogeneous linewidth at room temperature can be estimated from the fluorescence lifetime data.

  8. Cavity-enhanced spontaneous emission rates for rhodamine 6-G in levitated microdroplets

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, M.D.; Whitten, W.B.; Ramsey, J.M.; Arnold, S.

    1992-11-01

    Fluorescence decay kinetics of Rhodamine 6-G molecules in levitated glycerol microdroplets (4--20 microns in diameter) have been investigated to determine the effects of spherical cavity resonances on spontaneous emission rates. For droplet diameters greater than 10 microns, the fluorescence lifetime is essentially the same as in bulk glycerol. As the droplet diameter is decreased below 10 microns, bi-exponential decay behavior is observed with a slow component whose rate is similar to bulk glycerol, and a fast component whose rate is as much as a factor of 10 larger than the bulk decay rate. This fast component is attributed to cavity enhancement of the spontaneous emission rate and, within the weak coupling approximation, a value for the homogeneous linewidth at room temperature can be estimated from the fluorescence lifetime data.

  9. Spontaneous and stimulated emission due to cooperative processes in cadmium telluride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cingolani, A.; Ferrara, M.; Lugarà, M.; Avlijas, T.

    1984-08-01

    The spontaneous and the stimulated emission of both undoped and n-type CdTe crystals have been studied in a wide temperature range under dye laser excitation. Optical gain spectra have been also measured. The competition among the cooperative processes resulting in luminescence of CdTe is governed by the sample temperature and the doping level. When the exciton—electron collision is dominant, i.e. in n-type samples, the highest quantum efficiency is also achieved.

  10. Optical microcavities based on F2 color centers in lithium fluoride films: modification of spontaneous emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonfigli, Francesca; Jacquier, Bernard; Montereali, Rosamaria; Moretti, Paul; Nichelatti, Enrico; Piccinini, M.; Rigneault, Herve; Somma, F.

    2003-04-01

    Lithium fluoride (LiF) films irradiated by low energy electrons were employed as active spacers in all-solid, dielectric optical microcavities emitting in the visible spectral range. We present the results of optical characterization of the spontaneous emission from F2 color centers embedded in a LiF layer confined inside a planar microcavity. These structures seem promising for the realization of novel kinds of solid-state miniaturized emitting devices.

  11. GENERAL: Steady State Entanglement and Saturation Effects in Correlated Spontaneous Emission Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fei; Hu, Xiang-Ming; Shi, Wen-Xing

    2009-08-01

    It has recently been shown that correlated spontaneous emission lasers (CEL) exhibit transient entanglement in the linear regime. Here we re-examine the quantum correlations in two-photon CEL and explore the saturation effects on continuous variable entanglement. It is shown that the steady state entanglement is obtainable in the weak or moderate saturation regime, while is washed out in the deep saturation regime.

  12. Synthesis and photophysical properties of new oligophenylene vinylenes showing amplified spontaneous emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendonça, A. L.; Charas, A.; Di Paolo, R. E.; Scotognella, F.; Lanzani, G.; Morgado, J.

    2013-10-01

    Three new phenylene vinylene oligomers containing either a bis(oligoether)phenyl ring or a benzothiadiazole central unit and either carbazole or triphenylamine end capping groups were synthesized and characterized. The photophysical characterization in solution reveals a significant variation in properties depending on the combined moieties. Amplified spontaneous emission in neat drop cast films of two of these compounds was studied. One of them was also characterized in terms of its two-photon photoluminescence.

  13. Advanced Emissions Control Development Program: Mercury Control

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, A.P.; Redinger, K.W.; Holmes, M.J.

    1997-07-01

    McDermott Technology, Inc. (a subsidiary of Babcock & Wilcox) is conducting the Advanced Emissions Control Development Project (AECDP) which is aimed at the development of practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (HAPS) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for such controls may arise as the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proceeds with implementation of requirements set forth in the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA`s) of 1990. Promulgation of air toxics emissions regulations for electric utility plants could dramatically impact utilities burning coal, their industrial and residential customers, and the coal industry. AECDP project work will supply the information needed by utilities to respond to potential HAPs regulations in a timely, cost-effective, enviromnentally-sound manner which supports the continued use of the Nation`s abundant reserves of coal, such as those in the State of Ohio. The development work is being carried out using the 10 MW Clean Environment Development Facility wherein air toxics emissions control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions. The specific objectives of the project are to (1) measure and understand production and partitioning of air toxics species for a variety of coals, (2) optimize the air toxics removal performance of conventional flue gas cleanup systems, (3) develop advanced air toxics emissions control concepts, (4) develop and validate air toxics emissions measurement and monitoring techniques, and (5) establish a comprehensive, self-consistent air toxics data library. This project is supported by the Department of Energy, the Ohio Coal Development Office within the Ohio Department of Development and Babcock & Wilcox. A comprehensive assessment of HAP emissions from coal-fired electric utility boilers sponsored by the Department of Energy and the Electric Power Research Institute concluded that with the exception of selenium and mercury, the majority of trace elements are well controlled due to their association with the particulate phase of flue gas. Reflecting the current focus of the US EPA and state environmental agencies on mercury as a potential candidate for regulation, the project specifically targets the measurement and control of mercury species. This paper discusses the results of testing on the quantity and species distribution of mercury while firing Ohio high-sulfur coal to assess the mercury emissions control potential of conventional SO{sub 2} and particulate control systems. Results from recent AECDP tests are presented and two alternative mercury speciation methods are compared. The AECDP results clearly show that higher total mercury control efficiency can be achieved with a wet FGD scrubber than recently reported in the interim final US EPA report on HAP emissions from fossil-fired electric utility steam generating units.

  14. Enhanced Spontaneous Emission by Quantum Boxes in a Monolithic Optical Microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grard, J. M.; Sermage, B.; Gayral, B.; Legrand, B.; Costard, E.; Thierry-Mieg, V.

    1998-08-01

    Semiconductor quantum boxes (QB's) are well suited to cavity quantum electrodynamic experiments in the solid state because of their sharp emission. We study by time-resolved photoluminescence InAs QB's placed in the core of small-volume and high-finesse GaAs/AlAs pillar microresonators. A spontaneous emission rate enhancement by a factor of up to 5 is selectively observed for the QB's which are on resonance with one-cavity mode. We explain its magnitude by considering the Purcell figure of merit of the micropillars and the effect of the random spatial and spectral distributions of the QB's.

  15. Calculation of the spontaneous cyclotron emissivity using the complete relativistic resonance condition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freund, H. P.; Wu, C. S.; Gaffey, J. D., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    An expression for the spectral emissivity of spontaneous synchrotron radiation for a plasma which consists of both thermal and suprathermal electron components is derived using the complete relativistic cyclotron resonance condition. The expression is valid over all angles of propagation. The result is applied to the study of the emission of radiation from an energetic population of electrons with a loss-cone distribution in a relatively low-density plasma (i.e., the electron plasma frequency is less than the cyclotron frequency).

  16. Advanced Emissions Control Development Program

    SciTech Connect

    A.P.Evans; K.E. Redinger; M.J. Holmes

    1998-04-01

    The objective of the Advanced Emissions Control Development Program (AECDP) is to develop practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of air toxics from coal-fired boilers. Ideally, the project aim is to effectively control air toxic emissions through the use of conventional flue gas cleanup equipment such as electrostatic precipitators (ESPS), fabric filters (baghouse), and wet flue gas desulfurization. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate and hydrogen chloride. Following the construction and evaluation of a representative air toxics test facility in Phase I, Phase II focused on the evaluation of mercury and several other air toxics emissions. The AECDP is jointly funded by the United States Department of Energy's Federal Energy Technology Center (DOE), the Ohio Coal Development Office within the Ohio Department of Development (oCDO), and Babcock& Wilcox-a McDermott company (B&W).

  17. Spontaneous otoacoustic emissions in an active nonlinear cochlear model in the time domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fruth, Florian; Jülicher, Frank; Lindner, Benjamin

    2015-12-01

    A large fraction of human cochleas emits sounds even in the absence of external stimulation. These so-called spontaneous otoacoustic emissions (SOAEs) are a hallmark of the active nonlinear amplification process taking place in the cochlea. Here, we extend a previously proposed frequency domain model and put forward an active nonlinear one-dimensional model of the cochlea in the time domain describing human SOAEs [5]. In our model, oscillatory elements are close to an instability (Hopf bifurcation), they are subject to dynamical noise and coupled by hydrodynamic, elastic and dissipative interactions. Furthermore, oscillators are subject to a weak spatial irregularity in their activity (normally distributed and exponentially correlated in space) that gives rise to the individuality of each simulated cochlea. Our model captures main statistical features of the distribution of emission frequencies, the distribution of the numbers of emissions per cochlea, and the distribution of the distances between neighboring emissions as were previously measured in experiment [14].

  18. Advanced Emissions Control Development Program

    SciTech Connect

    A. P. Evans

    1998-12-03

    Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) is conducting a five-year project aimed at the development of practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (commonly called air toxics) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for air toxic emissions controls may arise as the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency proceeds with implementation of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) of 1990. Data generated during the program will provide utilities with the technical and economic information necessary to reliably evaluate various air toxics emissions compliance options such as fuel switching, coal cleaning, and flue gas treatment. The development work is being carried out using B&W�s new Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) wherein air toxics emissions control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. Tests conducted in the CEDF provide high quality, repeatable, comparable data over a wide range of coal properties, operating conditions, and emissions control systems. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate, and the inorganic species hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride.

  19. Advanced Emissions Control Development Program

    SciTech Connect

    A. P. Evans

    1998-12-03

    McDermott Technology, Inc. (MTI) is conducting a five-year project aimed at the development of practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (commonly called air toxics) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for air toxic emissions controls may arise as the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency proceeds with implementation of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) of 1990. Data generated during the program will provide utilities with the technical and economic information necessary to reliably evaluate various air toxics emissions compliance options such as fuel switching, coal cleaning, and flue gas treatment. The development work is being carried out using the Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) wherein air toxics emissions control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. Tests conducted in the CEDF provide high quality, repeatable, comparable data over a wide range of coal properties, operating conditions, and emissions control systems. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate, and the inorganic species, hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride.

  20. Advanced Emissions Control Development Program

    SciTech Connect

    M. J. Holmes

    1998-12-03

    McDermott Technology, Inc. (MTI) is conducting a five-year project aimed at the development of practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (commonly called air toxics) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for air toxic emissions controls may arise as the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency proceeds with implementation of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) of 1990. Data generated during the program will provide utilities with the technical and economic information necessary to reliably evaluate various air toxics emissions compliance options such as fuel switching, coal cleaning, and flue gas treatment. The development work is being carried out using the Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) wherein air toxics emissions control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. Tests conducted in the CEDF provide high quality, repeatable, comparable data over a wide range of coal properties, operating conditions, and emissions control systems. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate, and hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride.

  1. Advanced Emission Control Development Program.

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, A.P.

    1997-12-31

    Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) is conducting a five-year project aimed at the development of practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (commonly called air toxics) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for air toxic emissions controls may arise as the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency proceeds with implementation of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) of 1990. Data generated during the program will provide utilities with the technical and economic information necessary to reliably evaluate various air toxics emissions compliance options such as fuel switching, coal cleaning, and flue gas treatment. The development work is being carried out using B&W`s new Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) wherein air toxics emissions control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. Tests conducted in the CEDF provide high quality, repeatable, comparable data over a wide range of coal properties, operating conditions, and emissions control systems. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate, and the inorganic species hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride.

  2. Strong modification of quantum dot spontaneous emission via gap plasmon coupling in metal nanoslits

    SciTech Connect

    Jun, Y.C.

    2010-02-24

    A metal-dielectric-metal (MDM) waveguide with a nanoscale gap supports highly confined surface plasmon-polariton modes, termed gap plasmons. The spontaneous emission of an emitter placed in such a metal nanogap is expected to be strongly modified due to coupling to gap plasmons. We investigate the light emission properties of semiconductor quantum dots (QD) in a metal nanoslit, which is a truncated MDM waveguide. More specifically, we measure both the lifetime and the state of polarization of the out-coupled QD emission from a metal nanoslit. We observe clear lifetime and polarization changes of QD emission. As the slit width gets smaller, the QD exciton lifetime gradually decreases, and its emission becomes polarized normal to the slit, as expected for gap plasmon coupled light emission. We also find that the polarization of the collected QD emission is flipped (i.e., becomes parallel to a slit) when the excited emitters are located just outside the slit. We have conducted dipole emission calculations in metal nanoslits, and these explain the experimentally observed lifetime and polarization changes well. These findings may have novel applications in nanoscale optical sources, sensors, and active devices.

  3. Microscopic Theory of Optical Nonlinearities and Spontaneous Emission Lifetime in Group-III Nitride Quantum Wells

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, W.; Kira, M.; Koch, S.W.

    1999-03-16

    Microscopic calculations of the absorption/gain and luminescence spectra are presented for wide bandgap Ga{sub 1{minus}x}In{sub x}N/GaN quantum well systems. Whereas structures with narrow well widths exhibit the usual excitation dependent bleaching of the exciton resonance without shifting spectral position, a significant blue shift of the exciton peak is obtained for wider quantum wells. This blue shift, which is also present in the excitation dependent luminescence spectra, is attributed to the interplay between the screening of a strain induced piezoelectric field and the density dependence of many-body Coulomb effects. The calculations also show an over two orders of magnitude increase in the spontaneous electron-hole-pair lifetime with well width: due to the reduction of the electron-hole wavefunction overlap in the wider wells. The resulting decrease in spontaneous emission loss is predicted to lead to improved threshold properties in wide quantum well lasers.

  4. Spontaneous coherent microwave emission and the sawtooth instability in a compact storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arp, U.; Fraser, G. T.; Hight Walker, A. R.; Lucatorto, T. B.; Lehmann, K. K.; Harkay, K.; Sereno, N.; Kim, K.-J.

    2001-05-01

    Strong evidence for self-excited emission of coherent synchrotron radiation in the microwave spectral region was observed at the Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility (SURF III) electron storage ring at the NIST. The microwave emission between 25 and 35 mm was dominated by intense bursts of radiation. The intensity enhancement during these bursts was on the order of 10 000 to 50 000 over the incoherent value. The shape, width, and period of the bursts depend strongly on the operational parameters of the storage ring. Coherent microwave emission was observed only when the beam was unstable, namely, during bunch-length relaxation oscillations. We report on the measurements of the microwave bursts, and correlate the data with signals from a beam monitor electrode and photodiode detector. The coherent enhancement of the radiation intensity is ascribed to spontaneous self-induced microbunching of the electrons within the bunch.

  5. Bremsstrahlung emission of high energy accompanying spontaneous fission of {sup 252}Cf

    SciTech Connect

    Maydanyuk, S. P.; Olkhovsky, V. S.; Mandaglio, G.; Manganaro, M.; Fazio, G.; Giardina, G.

    2010-07-15

    The study of the bremsstrahlung photon emission accompanying fragments produced in the spontaneous fission of heavy nuclei by a fully quantum approach is presented for the first time. This kind of problem requires the knowledge of wave functions of the fissioning system leading to a wide distribution of couples of fragments that are the products of fission. With the aim of obtaining these wave functions, the interaction potential between the emitted fragment and residual nucleus is calculated by a standard approach. A new procedure was performed that allows an increase in the accuracy of calculations of radial integrals in the far asymptotic region and the achievement of the convenient convergence in calculations of the spectra. The total probability of the emitted photons in the spontaneous fission of {sup 252}Cf was calculated in such a way. We obtained good agreement between theory and experimental data up to 38 MeV for the bremsstrahlung spectrum of photons while the calculation of the total probability of photon emission accompanying fragments was performed up to an energy of 60 MeV. The analysis of contributions in the bremsstrahlung spectrum accompanying the emission of light, medium, and heavy fragments in the fission of {sup 252}Cf is presented.

  6. Molecular hot electroluminescence due to strongly enhanced spontaneous emission rates in a plasmonic nanocavity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gong; Li, Xiao-Guang; Zhang, Zhen-Yu; Dong, Zhen-Chao

    2015-02-14

    We have recently demonstrated anomalous relaxationless hot electroluminescence from molecules in the tunnel junction of a scanning tunneling microscope [Dong et al., Nat. Photonics, 2010, 4, 50]. In the present paper, based on physically realistic parameters, we aim to unravel the underlying physical mechanism using a multiscale modeling approach that combines classical generalized Mie theory with the quantum master equation. We find that the nanocavity-plasmon-tuned spontaneous emission rate plays a crucial role in shaping the spectral profile. In particular, on resonance, the radiative decay rate can be enhanced by three-to-five orders of magnitude, which enables the radiative process to occur on the lifetime scale of picoseconds and become competitive to the vibrational relaxation. Such a large Purcell effect opens up new emission channels to generate the hot luminescence that arises directly from higher vibronic levels of the molecular excited state. We also stress that the critical role of resonant plasmonic nanocavities in tunneling electron induced molecular luminescence is to enhance the spontaneous radiative decay through plasmon enhanced vacuum fluctuations rather than to generate an efficient plasmon stimulated emission process. This improved understanding has been partly overlooked in previous studies but is believed to be very important for further developments of molecular plasmonics and optoelectronics. PMID:25565003

  7. Spontaneous emission from ScF in a supersonic mixing flame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischell, D. R.; Cool, T. A.

    1977-01-01

    An investigation was conducted of the two reactions: Sc + F2 yields ScF(asterisk) + F and Y + Cl2 yields YCl(asterisk) + Cl. Experiments were designed for studying the reactions under the relatively high pressure conditions (5-20 torr) appropriate for chemical laser operation. A shock tube was used to provide a short duration flow through a supersonic nozzle array. Shock wave heating is used to dissociate the ScCl3 or YCl3 at temperatures of about 6000 K, before the gases are accelerated and expanded through the supersonic nozzle array. The expanded primary flow is then mixed with a secondary flow of F2 introduced through slots at the trailing edge of each nozzle blade. Graphs show the temporal behavior of the visible spontaneous emission over the range from 3000 to 9000 A for a typical test condition, a microdensitometer tracing of the visible emission over the range from 4000 to 7000 A, and the spontaneous emission from ScF(asterisk) obtained by computer image processing of intensity data.

  8. An Active Oscillator Model Describes the Statistics of Spontaneous Otoacoustic Emissions

    PubMed Central

    Fruth, Florian; Jülicher, Frank; Lindner, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Even in the absence of external stimulation, the cochleas of most humans emit very faint sounds below the threshold of hearing, sounds that are known as spontaneous otoacoustic emissions. They are a signature of the active amplification mechanism in the cochlea. Emissions occur at frequencies that are unique for an individual and change little over time. The statistics of a population of ears exhibit characteristic features such as a preferred relative frequency distance between emissions (interemission intervals). We propose a simplified cochlea model comprising an array of active nonlinear oscillators coupled both hydrodynamically and viscoelastically. The oscillators are subject to a weak spatial disorder that lends individuality to the simulated cochlea. Our model captures basic statistical features of the emissions: distributions of 1), emission frequencies; 2), number of emissions per ear; and 3), interemission intervals. In addition, the model reproduces systematic changes of the interemission intervals with frequency. We show that the mechanism for the preferred interemission interval in our model is the occurrence of synchronized clusters of oscillators. PMID:25140416

  9. An erbium-doped 1-D fiber-Bragg grating and its effect upon erbium (3+) radiative spontaneous emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boggs, Bryan S.

    Spontaneous atomic emission is not a process of the isolated atom but rather a cooperative effect of the atom and the vacuum field. It is now well established that spontaneous radiative decay rates can be enhanced or suppressed through the effect of cavities comprising various types of discrete, reflective-mirror type, boundaries. The cavity effect is generally understood in terms of a cavity-induced modification of the vacuum spectral energy density. Recently, interest has grown in the possibility that systems characterized by distributed periodic boundary conditions, such as a spatially varying index of refraction, might be effective in controlling radiative atomic processes. A semi-classical theory is given that enables an estimate of the size of the lifetime modification of a two-level radiator contained within a three-dimensionally incomplete photonic bandgap structure called a fiber-Bragg grating. Following this is an exploration of a specific system and its effect upon radiative spontaneous emission. It is found through fluorescence line narrowing and frequency hole burning measurements that the observation of lifetime modification of the specific system is complicated due to intra and inter Stark energy migration. A lifetime modification measurement then shows that no change in lifetime is observed beyond the error bars on the measurement results. The tuning and coherence properties of a short-external-cavity diode laser that may be useful for future time-dependent spectroscopic measurements are examined using a fiber-based, self-heterodyne technique. Coherence properties during active frequency scans are characterized through analysis of time-dependent heterodyne beat signals at the output of a fiber interferometer.

  10. Amplified spontaneous emission of Rhodamine 6G embedded in pure deoxyribonucleic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rau, Ileana; Szukalski, Adam; Sznitko, Lech; Miniewicz, Andrzej; Bartkiewicz, Stanislaw; Kajzar, Francois; Sahraoui, Bouchta; Mysliwiec, Jaroslaw

    2012-10-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is commonly viewed as a genetic information carrier. However, now it is recognized as a nanomaterial, rather than as a biological material, in the research field of nanotechnology. Here, we show that using pure DNA, doped with rhodamine 6G, we are able to observe amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) phenomenon. Moderate ASE threshold, photodegradation, and reasonable gain coefficient observed in this natural host gives some perspectives for practical applications of this system in biophotonics. Obtained results open the way and will be leading to construction of truly bio-lasers using nature made luminophores, such as anthocyanins.

  11. Spontaneous emission from an excited atom in the presence of N atoms and M modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummings, F. W.

    1985-05-01

    The spontaneous emission of an excited two-level atom into a system of N nonexcited atoms of the same type (with N much greater than 1) in the presence of M electromagnetic-field modes is investigated analytically, applying the Hamiltonian formulation of Dicke (1954) studied by Jaynes and Cummings (1963), Tavis and Cummings (1968), and Buley and Cummings (1964). It is shown that the trapping of radiation in the system seen when one EM mode is present does not persist as M approaches N. The feasibility of an experimental verification of these phenomena is discussed.

  12. Trace element emissions from spontaneous combustion of gob piles in coal mines, Shanxi, China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhao, Y.; Zhang, Jiahua; Chou, C.-L.; Li, Y.; Wang, Z.; Ge, Y.; Zheng, C.

    2008-01-01

    The emissions of potentially hazardous trace elements from spontaneous combustion of gob piles from coal mining in Shanxi Province, China, have been studied. More than ninety samples of solid waste from gob piles in Shanxi were collected and the contents of twenty potentially hazardous trace elements (Be, F, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Mo, Cd, Sn, Sb, Hg, Tl, Pb, Th, and U) in these samples were determined. Trace element contents in solid waste samples showed wide ranges. As compared with the upper continental crust, the solid waste samples are significantly enriched in Se (20x) and Tl (12x) and are moderately enriched in F, As, Mo, Sn, Sb, Hg, Th, and U (2-5x). The solid waste samples are depleted in V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, and Zn. The solid waste samples are enriched in F, V, Mn, Cr, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Sb, Th, and U as compared with the Shanxi coals. Most trace elements are higher in the clinker than in the unburnt solid waste except F, Sn, and Hg. Trace element abundances are related to the ash content and composition of the samples. The content of F is negatively correlated with the ash content, while Pb is positively correlated with the ash. The concentrations of As, Mn, Zn, and Cd are highly positively correlated with Fe2O3 in the solid waste. The As content increases with increasing sulfur content in the solid waste. The trace element emissions are calculated for mass balance. The emission factors of trace elements during the spontaneous combustion of the gobs are determined and the trace element concentrations in the flue gas from the spontaneous combustion of solid waste are calculated. More than a half of F, Se, Hg and Pb are released to the atmosphere during spontaneous combustion. Some trace element concentrations in flue gas are higher than the national emission standards. Thus, gob piles from coal mining pose a serious environmental problem. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Modeling of an optically side-pumped alkali vapor amplifier with consideration of amplified spontaneous emission.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zining; Wang, Hongyan; Lu, Qisheng; Hua, Weihong; Xu, Xiaojun

    2011-11-01

    Diode pumped alkali vapor amplifier (DPAA) is a potential candidate in high power laser field. In this paper, we set up a model for the diode double-side-pumped alkali vapor amplifier. For the three-dimensional volumetric gain medium, both the longitudinal and transverse amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) effects are considered and coupled into the rate equations. An iterative numerical approach is proposed to solve the model. Some important influencing factors are simulated and discussed. The results show that in the case of saturated amplification, the ASE effect can be well suppressed rather than a limitation in power scaling of a DPAA. PMID:22109192

  14. Observation of Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission and Exponential Growth at 530 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milton, S. V.; Gluskin, E.; Biedron, S. G.; Dejus, R. J.; den Hartog, P. K.; Galayda, J. N.; Kim, K.-J.; Lewellen, J. W.; Moog, E. R.; Sajaev, V.; Sereno, N. S.; Travish, G.; Vinokurov, N. A.; Arnold, N. D.; Benson, C.; Berg, W.; Biggs, J. A.; Borland, M.; Carwardine, J. A.; Chae, Y.-C.; Decker, G.; Deriy, B. N.; Erdmann, M. J.; Friedsam, H.; Gold, C.; Grelick, A. E.; Hahne, M. W.; Harkay, K. C.; Huang, Z.; Lessner, E. S.; Lill, R. M.; Lumpkin, A. H.; Makarov, O. A.; Markovich, G. M.; Meyer, D.; Nassiri, A.; Noonan, J. R.; Pasky, S. J.; Pile, G.; Smith, T. L.; Soliday, R.; Tieman, B. J.; Trakhtenberg, E. M.; Trento, G. F.; Vasserman, I. B.; Walters, D. R.; Wang, X. J.; Wiemerslage, G.; Xu, S.; Yang, B.-X.

    2000-07-01

    Experimental evidence for self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) at 530 nm is reported. The measurements were made at the low-energy undulator test line facility at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory. The experimental setup and details of the experimental results are presented, as well as preliminary analysis. This experiment extends to shorter wavelengths the operational knowledge of a linac-based SASE free-electron laser and explicitly shows the predicted exponential growth in intensity of the optical pulse as a function of length along the undulator.

  15. Gain coefficient method for amplified spontaneous emission in thin waveguided film of a conjugated polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvestre, I.; Marques, P. W. B.; Valadares, M.; Cury, L. A.

    2008-10-01

    A method based on the unidimensional gain equation has been developed in order to fit the experimental data due to amplification of spontaneous emission in a thin film of conjugated polymer waveguide. The results have confirmed not only a dependence of the gain coefficient on the laser intensity but also on the length of the excitation laser stripe. The results are presented as a function of the average intensity in W/cm2, which is a manner to express the threshold intensity for a direct comparison between different materials, independent of the setup used.

  16. Temperature dependence of spontaneous emission in GaAs-AlGaAs quantum well lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Blood, P.; Kucharska, A.I.; Foxon, C.T.; Griffiths, K. )

    1989-09-18

    Using quantum well laser devices with a window in the {ital p}-type contact, we have measured the relative change of spontaneous emission intensity at threshold with temperature for 58-A-wide GaAs wells. Over the range 250--340 K the data are in good agreement with the linear relation obtained from a gain-current calculation which includes transition broadening. This linear behavior contrasts with the stronger temperature dependence of the total measured threshold current of the same devices which includes nonradiative barrier recombination processes.

  17. Broadband filters for abatement of spontaneous emission in circuit quantum electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronn, Nicholas T.; Liu, Yanbing; Hertzberg, Jared B.; Córcoles, Antonio D.; Houck, Andrew A.; Gambetta, Jay M.; Chow, Jerry M.

    2015-10-01

    The ability to perform fast, high-fidelity readout of quantum bits (qubits) is essential to the goal of building a quantum computer. However, coupling a fast measurement channel to a superconducting qubit typically also speeds up its relaxation via spontaneous emission. Here, we use impedance engineering to design a filter by which photons may easily leave the resonator at the cavity frequency but not at the qubit frequency. We implement this broadband filter in both an on-chip and off-chip configuration.

  18. Light-charged-particle emission in the spontaneous fission of /sup 250/Cf, /sup 256/Fm, and /sup 257/Fm

    SciTech Connect

    Wild, J.F.; Baisden, P.A.; Dougan, R.J.; Hulet, E.K.; Lougheed, R.W.; Landrum, J.H.

    1985-08-01

    We have measured the energy spectra for the emission of long-range ..cap alpha.. particles from the spontaneous fission of /sup 250/Cf, /sup 256/Fm, and /sup 257/Fm, and for tritons and protons from the spontaneous fission of /sup 250/Cf and /sup 256/Fm. We have determined ..cap alpha.., triton, and proton emission probabilities and estimated total light-particle emission probabilities for these nuclides. We compare these and known emission probabilities for five other spontaneously fissioning nuclides with the deformation energy available at scission and show that there is a possible correlation that is consistent with a one-body dissipation mechanism for transferring release energy to particle clusters.

  19. Plasma effects on the spontaneous emission of synchrotron radiation from weakly relativistic electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freund, H. P.; Wu, C. S.

    1977-01-01

    A method for computing the spectral emissivity of spontaneous synchrotron radiation is discussed. The Klimontovich (1967) formalism in plasma kinetic theory is adopted in which an ensemble average of the microscopically emitted power is considered. The present method clarifies the meaning of the random phase approximation which is imposed in several existing theories of synchrotron radiation. Both the effects of dielectric polarization and two-particle correlations are included in the present discussion. The theory is applied to the case of a plasma in thermal equilibrium, for which it is shown that the effect of pair correlations on the emissivity vanishes. On the other hand, the effect of dielectric polarization is studied numerically for a wide range of parameters.

  20. Femtosecond spontaneous-emission studies of reaction centers from photosynthetic bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Du, M; Rosenthal, S J; Xie, X; DiMagno, T J; Schmidt, M; Hanson, D K; Schiffer, M; Norris, J R; Fleming, G R

    1992-01-01

    Spontaneous emission from reaction centers of photosynthetic bacteria has been recorded with a time resolution of 50 fs. Excitation was made directly into both the special-pair band (850 nm) and the Qx band of bacteriochlorophylls (608 nm). Rhodobacter sphaeroides R26, Rhodobacter capsulatus wild type, and four mutants of Rb. capsulatus were studied. In all cases the fluorescence decay was not single exponential and was well fit as a sum of two exponential decay components. The short components are in excellent agreement with the single component detected by measurements of stimulated emission. The origin of the nonexponential decay is discussed in terms of heterogeneity, the kinetic scheme, and the possibility of slow vibrational relaxation. PMID:1528856

  1. Madey's theorems for free-electron devices, spontaneous emission, and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, W.; McIver, J. K.

    1988-12-01

    Two theorems due to Madey occupy a central position in free-electron laser physics: one relates the gain to the derivative of the spontaneous emission line shape and the other one relates it to the derivative of the electron energy spread in stimulated emission. We use quantum mechanical perturbation thoery of first order in the radiation field to give a general derivation of the theorems based on (a) the hermiticity of the electronfield interaction, (b) the applicability of lowest order perturbation theory, and (c) the assumption that the emitted photon have a sufficiently low energy. Assumption (b) restricts the validity of the theorems to the small-signal weak-field regime, (c) to the small recoil regime where the gain is classical. We use scalar quantum electrodynamics in the Furry picture in order to keep effects which are nonlinear in the undulator field, e.g. higher harmonic emission. We consider a fairly general one-dimensional (i.e. not having transverse variations) monochromatic undulator field (magnetic or optical undulator, linear or circular polarization, possible presence of a diffractive medium). An appendix considers nonmonochromatic fields. We derive explicit results for the linearly polarized and the helical undulator allowing for an arbitrary orientation of the undulator axis, the electron beam and the emitted radiation with respect to each other. In particular, we discuss the case of Gaussian modes where the applicability of the first theorem has been questioned. It turns out that the theorem is applicable provided that spontaneous emission into the Gaussian mode in question is considered (more generally, into whatever mode is of interest for the gain).

  2. Spontaneous emission high-gain harmonic generation free-electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Qingzi; Xu, Xinlu; Feng, Chao; Tang, Chuanxiang

    2011-05-01

    A scheme, spontaneous emission high-gain harmonic generation (SEHG) free-electron laser (FEL), is proposed and analyzed for generating the X-ray FEL. The SEHG scheme works in a similar mechanism as high-gain harmonic generation (HGHG), but without the need for a seed laser. The scheme requires two undulators. The 1st undulator must be sufficiently long so that the energies of electrons are modulated within the bunch, but still away from saturation. A dispersion section is followed to transfer energy modulation into density modulation. The 2nd undulator simply serves as a radiator. A simple, one-dimensional, analytical estimation of SEHG is given to show the process of energy modulation and optimize the system parameters. The three-dimensional FEL simulation code, GENESIS, has been used to simulate, verify, and optimize the SEHG scheme for the soft X-ray free-electron laser (SXFEL) project in China. The simulation results are presented in comparison with the self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) and HGHG schemes. At 9 nm radiation wavelength, up to 120 MW of output power can be achieved by the SEHG scheme, with a total length of 47.3 m long undulators. Though the undulator length is comparable with the SASE scheme, the output bandwidth of the SEHG scheme is smaller. Moreover, it is tunable and does not require a seed laser. The SEHG scheme offers an attractive alternative option for the X-ray FEL.

  3. On the spontaneous emission of electromagnetic radiation in the CSL model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donadi, Sandro; Deckert, Dirk-André; Bassi, Angelo

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous photon emission in the Continuous Spontaneous Localization (CSL) model is studied one more time. In the CSL model each particle interacts with a noise field that induces the collapse of its wave function. As a consequence of this interaction, when the particle is electrically charged, it radiates. As discussed in Adler (2013) the formula for the emission rate, to first perturbative order, contains two terms: one is proportional to the Fourier component of the noise field at the same frequency as that of the emitted photon and one is proportional to the zero Fourier component of the noise field. As discussed in previous works, this second term seems unphysical. In Adler (2013) it was shown that the unphysical term disappears when the noise is confined to a bounded region and the final particle's state is a wave packet. Here we investigate the origin of this unphysical term and why it vanishes according to the previous prescription. We will see that perturbation theory is formally not valid in the large time limit since the effect of the noise accumulates continuously in time. Therefore either one performs an exact calculation (or at least in some way includes higher order terms) as we do here, or one finds a way to make a perturbative calculation meaningful, e.g., by confining the system as in Adler (2013).

  4. Spontaneous emission of electromagnetic and electrostatic fluctuations in magnetized plasmas: Quasi-parallel modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sunjung; Yoon, Peter H.; Choe, G. S.

    2016-02-01

    The present paper is devoted to the theoretical and numerical analysis of the spontaneously emitted electromagnetic fluctuations characterized by quasi-parallel wave vectors relative to the ambient magnetic field. The formulation is based upon the Klimontovich plasma kinetic theory. The comparative study is carried out between the spontaneously emitted field fluctuation spectrum constructed on the basis of a single Maxellian velocity distribution function (VDF) and the spectrum that arises from multi-component electron VDFs similar to those found in the solar wind. Typical solar wind electron VDF is composed of a Gaussian core and kappa distributions of halo and super-halo components. Of these, the halo and super-halo populations represent tenuous but energetic components. It is found that the energetic electrons make important contributions to the total emission spectrum. It is also found that the halo electrons are largely responsible for the emission spectrum in the whistler frequency range, whereas the more energetic super-halo electrons emit quasi-longitudinal fluctuations in the Langmuir frequency range, thus validating the recent quasi-steady state model of the solar wind electrons put forth by the present authors [Kim et al., Astrophys. J. 806, 32 (2015); Yoon et al., Astrophys. J. 812, 169 (2015)].

  5. Brillouin optical correlation domain analysis with 4 millimeter resolution based on amplified spontaneous emission.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Raphael; London, Yosef; Antman, Yair; Zadok, Avi

    2014-05-19

    A new technique for Brillouin scattering-based, distributed fiber-optic measurements of temperature and strain is proposed, analyzed, simulated, and demonstrated. Broadband Brillouin pump and signal waves are drawn from the filtered amplified spontaneous emission of an erbium-doped fiber amplifier, providing high spatial resolution. The reconstruction of the position-dependent Brillouin gain spectra along 5 cm of a silica single-mode fiber under test, with a spatial resolution of 4 mm, is experimentally demonstrated using a 25 GHz-wide amplified spontaneous emission source. A 4 mm-long localized hot spot is identified by the measurements. The uncertainty in the reconstruction of the local Brillouin frequency shift is ± 1.5 MHz. The single correlation peak between the pump and signal is scanned along a fiber under test using a mechanical variable delay line. The analysis of the expected spatial resolution and the measurement signal-to-noise ratio is provided. The measurement principle is supported by numerical simulations of the stimulated acoustic field as a function of position and time. Unlike most other Brillouin optical correlation domain analysis configurations, the proposed scheme is not restricted by the bandwidth of available electro-optic modulators, microwave synthesizers, or pattern generators. Resolution is scalable to less than one millimeter in highly nonlinear media. PMID:24921326

  6. The generation of amplified spontaneous emission in high‐power CPA laser systems

    PubMed Central

    Sävert, Alexander; Körner, Jörg; Hornung, Marco; Liebetrau, Hartmut; Hein, Joachim; Kaluza, Malte Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Abstract An analytical model is presented describing the temporal intensity contrast determined by amplified spontaneous emission in high‐intensity laser systems which are based on the principle of chirped pulse amplification. The model describes both the generation and the amplification of the amplified spontaneous emission for each type of laser amplifier. This model is applied to different solid state laser materials which can support the amplification of pulse durations ≤350 fs . The results are compared to intensity and fluence thresholds, e.g. determined by damage thresholds of a certain target material to be used in high‐intensity applications. This allows determining if additional means for contrast improvement, e.g. plasma mirrors, are required for a certain type of laser system and application. Using this model, the requirements for an optimized high‐contrast front‐end design are derived regarding the necessary contrast improvement and the amplified “clean” output energy for a desired focussed peak intensity. Finally, the model is compared to measurements at three different high‐intensity laser systems based on Ti:Sapphire and Yb:glass. These measurements show an excellent agreement with the model. PMID:27134684

  7. Performance of a quantum teleportation protocol based on collective spontaneous emission

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Richard Jr.; Clemens, James P.

    2009-03-15

    Recently a conditional quantum teleportation protocol has been proposed by Chen et al. [New J. Phys. 7, 172 (2005)], which is based on the collective spontaneous emission of a photon from a pair of quantum dots. We formulate a similar protocol for collective emission from a pair of atoms, one of which is entangled with a single mode of an optical cavity. We focus on the performance of the protocol as characterized by the fidelity of the teleported state and the overall success probability. We consider a strategy employing spatially resolved photodetection of the emitted photon in order to distinguish superradiant from subradiant emission on the basis of a single detected photon. We find that fidelity approaches unity as the spacing of the atoms becomes much smaller than the emission wavelength with a success probability of 0.25. The fidelity remains above the classical limit of 2/3 for arbitrary atomic separations with the ultimate limit of performance coming from the spatial resolution of the detectors.

  8. Bloch electron spontaneous emission from a single energy band in a classical ac field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, V. N.; Iafrate, G. J.; Krieger, J. B.

    2009-10-01

    A theory for the spontaneous emission of radiation for a Bloch electron in a single superlattice (SL) energy band under the influence of an external, spatially homogeneous, classical ac electric field is presented. The classical external ac electric field is described in the vector-potential gauge. The quantum radiation field is described by the free-space quantized electromagnetic field in the Coulomb gauge. Utilizing the instantaneous eigenstates of the Bloch Hamiltonian as the basis states, the Bloch electron dynamics is described to all orders in the classical ac electric field. It is shown that the spontaneous emission occurs with frequencies equal to integral multiples of the classical ac electric field frequency; this is due to the imposition of temporal periodic motion of the Bloch electrons in the SL miniband from the external periodic ac field. From appropriately derived selection rules for photon frequency and wave-vector transitions, the total spontaneous-emission probability (TSEP) is derived to first-order perturbation theory in the quantized radiation field. A general expression is obtained for the TSEP in terms of arbitrary SL miniband parameters; further, the TSEP is analyzed in detail based on the band model for the nearest-neighbor tight-binding approximation, and results show multiharmonic behavior and ac electric field tuning properties. In the nearest-neighbor tight-binding approximation, specific results for single Bloch electron manifest distinct plateaulike step structure in the analysis of normalized TSEP as a function of the ratio ω0/ω , where ω0 is the characteristic frequency, proportional to the ac electric field amplitude, and ω is the ac electric field frequency; the plateau centers of gravity are found to be defined by the Stark delocalization condition established in ac-field transport. Further, the influence of a microcavity waveguide is established and shows enhancement as well as harmonic tuning of the TSEP due to coupling to the microcavity modal environment. Finally, the one-electron TSEP is extended, within the independent electron approximation, so as to include fractional band filling along with a constant-temperature-dependent and electron-density-dependent analysis; from this analysis, TSEP numerical estimates are projected at terahertz external field frequencies for a half-filled GaAs/AlGaAs SL miniband at zero temperature.

  9. Spontaneous Emission Between - and Para-Levels of Water-Ion H_2O^+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Keiichi; Harada, Kensuke; Nanbu, Shinkoh; Oka, Takeshi

    2012-06-01

    Nuclear spin conversion interaction of water ion, H_2O^+, has been studied to derive spontaneous emission lifetime between ortho- and para-levels. H_2O^+ is a radical ion with the ^2B_1 electronic ground state. Its off-diagonal electron spin-nuclear spin interaction term, Tab(S_aΔ I_b + S_bΔ I_a), connects para and ortho levels, because Δ I = I_1 - I_2 has nonvanishing matrix elements between I = 0 and 1. The mixing by this term with Tab = 72 MHz predicted by ab initio theory in the MRD-CI/Bk level, is many orders of magnitude larger than for closed shell molecules because of the large magnetic interaction due to the un-paired electron. Using the molecular constants reported by Mürtz et al. by FIR-LMR, we searched for ortho and para coupling channels below 1000 cm-1 with accidental near degeneracy between para and ortho levels. For example, hyperfine components of the 42,2(ortho) and 33,0(para) levels mix by 1.2 × 10-3 due to their near degeneracy (Δ E = 0.417 cm-1), and give the ortho-para spontaneous emission lifetime of about 0.63 year. The most significant low lying 10,1(para) and 11,1(ortho) levels, on the contrary, mix only by 8.7 × 10-5 because of their large separation (Δ E = 16.267 cm-1) and give the spontaneous emission lifetime from 10,1(para) to 00,0(ortho) of about 100 year.These results qualitatively help to understand the observed high ortho- to para- H_2O^+ ratio of 4.8 ± 0.5 toward Sgr B2 but they are too slow to compete with the conversion by collision unless the number density of the region is very low (n ˜1 cm-3) or radiative temperature is very high (T_r > 100 K). M. Staikova, B. Engels, M. Peric, and S.D. Peyerimhoff, Mol. Phys. 80, 1485 (1993) P. Mürtz, L.R. Zink, K.M. Evenson, and J.M. Brown J. Chem. Phys. 109, 9744 (1998). LP. Schilke, et al., A&A 521, L11 (2010).

  10. Final LDRD report : enhanced spontaneous emission rate in visible III-nitride LEDs using 3D photonic crystal cavities.

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Arthur Joseph; Subramania, Ganapathi S.; Coley, Anthony J.; Lee, Yun-Ju; Li, Qiming; Wang, George T.; Luk, Ting Shan; Koleske, Daniel David; Fullmer, Kristine Wanta

    2009-09-01

    The fundamental spontaneous emission rate for a photon source can be modified by placing the emitter inside a periodic dielectric structure allowing the emission to be dramatically enhanced or suppressed depending on the intended application. We have investigated the relatively unexplored realm of interaction between semiconductor emitters and three dimensional photonic crystals in the visible spectrum. Although this interaction has been investigated at longer wavelengths, very little work has been done in the visible spectrum. During the course of this LDRD, we have fabricated TiO{sub 2} logpile photonic crystal structures with the shortest wavelength band gap ever demonstrated. A variety of different emitters with emission between 365 nm and 700 nm were incorporated into photonic crystal structures. Time-integrated and time-resolved photoluminescence measurements were performed to measure changes to the spontaneous emission rate. Both enhanced and suppressed emission were demonstrated and attributed to changes to the photonic density of states.

  11. Exhaust emission control and diagnostics

    DOEpatents

    Mazur, Christopher John; Upadhyay, Devesh

    2006-11-14

    A diesel engine emission control system uses an upstream oxidation catalyst and a downstream SCR catalyst to reduce NOx in a lean exhaust gas environment. The engine and upstream oxidation catalyst are configured to provide approximately a 1:1 ratio of NO to NO2 entering the downstream catalyst. In this way, the downstream catalyst is insensitive to sulfur contamination, and also has improved overall catalyst NOx conversion efficiency. Degradation of the system is determined when the ratio provided is no longer near the desired 1:1 ratio. This condition is detected using measurements of engine operating conditions such as from a NOx sensor located downstream of the catalysts. Finally, control action to adjust an injected amount of reductant in the exhaust gas based on the actual NO to NO2 ratio upstream of the SCR catalyst and downstream of the oxidation catalyst.

  12. Observation of novel radioactive decay by spontaneous emission of complex nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Barwick, S.W.

    1986-01-01

    Two years of experimental investigation on the subject of spontaneous emission of intermediate-mass fragments is described in this manuscript. A short introduction on this subject and a historical review are presented in chapter 1. In chapter 2, the author describe the experimental methods which led to the observation of /sup 14/C emission in polycarbonate etched-track detectors from the isotopes /sup 222/Ra, /sup 223/Ra, /sup 224/Ra and /sup 226/Ra at the branching ratios with respect to ..cap alpha..-decay of (3.7 +/- 0.6) x 10/sup -10/, (6.1 +/- 1.0) x 10/sup -10/, (4.3 +/- 1.2) x 10/sup -10/ and (2.9 +/- 1.0) x 10/sup -11/ respectively. Branching ratio limits for heavy-ion emission from /sup 221/Fr, /sup 221/Ra and /sup 225/Ac were determined to be at < 5.0 x 10/sup -14/, < 1.2 x 10/sup -13/ and < 4.0 x 10/sup -13/ respectively for the 90% C.L. The emission of /sup 24/Ne from /sup 232/U at a branching ratio of (2.0 +/- 0.5) x 10/sup -12/ has been discovered using polyethylene terephthalate etched-track plastics. A confirmation of /sup 24/Ne and/or /sup 25/Ne emission from /sup 233/U at a branching ratio of (5.3 +/- 2.3) x 10/sup -13/ is also reported. In chapter 3, three models of intermediate-mass decay are discussed-the analytic superasymmetric fission model, the model by Shi and Swiatecki, and a model based on a square-well + Coulomb potential.

  13. Spatially-selective amplified spontaneous emission source derived from an ultrahigh gain solid-state amplifier.

    PubMed

    Smith, G; Damzen, M J

    2006-04-17

    An investigation is made into the performance of a high power solid-state amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) source with near-diffraction-limited beam quality. The radiation from this ASE source has high spatial quality and power, but unlike a laser it has a high misalignment tolerance and does not require a precisely aligned cavity. The source is based on a diode-pumped Nd:YVO4 laser crystal in a bounce amplifier geometry with a uniquely ultra-high gain (~104-105). Double-pass ASE radiation with high power levels (>6W) is achieved in a near-diffraction-limited spatial quality. We further demonstrate that the double-pass ASE source also displays high spatial selectivity and capability to compensate for a phase diffuser, inserted in the double-pass arm, with only a small degradation in beam quality and power. PMID:19516475

  14. Spontaneous emission rate and optical amplification of Er3+ in double slot waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, XingJun; Jiang, LingJun; Guo, RuiMin; Ye, Rui; Zhou, ZhiPing

    2015-12-01

    The spontaneous emission (SE) of Er3+ embedded in a double slot dielectric structure was studied by a quantum-electrodynamical formalism. The study shows that the slot width and the position of Er3+ in slot structure have a significant effect on the SE. The double slot waveguides were fabricated by embedding two low-index Er/Yb silicate material layers into high-index silicon. The radiative efficiency of Er3+ in the double slot waveguides is found to be higher than that of the single slot waveguide, which is consistent with the theory simulation. The 0.67 dB signal enhancement at 1.53 m in a 4.6-mm-long slot waveguide was observed pumped by 1476 nm laser. These results show the relevance of our model to study the SE processes in multilayer structures and are important for future realization of silicon-compatible active optical devices.

  15. Self-Amplification of Coherent Spontaneous Emission in a Cherenkov Free-Electron Maser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiggins, S. M.; Jaroszynski, D. A.; McNeil, B. W. J.; Robb, G. R. M.; Aitken, P.; Phelps, A. D. R.; Cross, A. W.; Ronald, K.; Ginzburg, N. S.; Shpak, V. G.; Yalandin, M. I.; Shunailov, S. A.; Ulmaskulov, M. R.

    2000-03-01

    Ultrashort pulses of microwave radiation have been produced in a dielectric-lined Cherenkov free-electron maser (FEM) amplifier. An intense initial seed pulse, due to coherent spontaneous emission (CSE), arises at the leading edge of the electron pulse. There is evidence to show that 3-4 cycle spikes are produced through the amplification of these seed pulses. A strong dependence of the start-up power on the rise time of the electron pulse has been found. The experimental results are verified by a theoretical analysis. Our study shows that amplification in a FEM amplifier is always initiated by CSE arising from the edge of the electron pulse when the rise time is comparable to the electromagnetic wave period.

  16. Enhanced amplified spontaneous emission using layer-by-layer assembled cowpea mosaic virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Na; Deng, Zhaoqi; Lin, Yuan; Zhang, Xiaojie; Geng, Yanhou; Ma, Dongge; Su, Zhaohui

    2009-01-01

    Layer-by-layer assembly technique was used to construct ultrathin film of cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) by electrostatic interactions, and the film was employed as a precursor on which an OF8T2 film was deposited by spin coating. Amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) was observed and improved for the OF8T2 film. Compared with OF8T2 film on quartz, the introduction of CPMV nanoparticles reduced the threshold and loss, and remarkably increased the net gain. The threshold, loss, and gain reached 0.05 mJ/pulse, 6.9 cm-1, and 82 cm-1, respectively. CPMV nanoparticles may enormously scatter light, resulting in a positive feedback, thus the ASE is easily obtained and improved.

  17. High-power thulium-doped all-fibre amplified spontaneous emission sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Xiaoxi; Wang, Xiong; Xu, Jiangming; Wang, Xiaolin; Zhou, Pu

    2015-04-01

    We demonstrate high-power thulium-doped all-fibre amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) sources operating at ~2 ?m with both broadband and narrowband spectra based on thulium-doped fibre master oscillator power amplifier configuration. The maximum output power of broadband thulium-doped all-fibre ASE source reached 316 W with the spectral full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 24 nm and the slope efficiency of 53%. The maximum output power of 292 W and the FWHM of 1.5 nm were obtained with the slope efficiency of 56% in narrowband thulium-doped all-fibre ASE source. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest output power of both broadband and narrowband all-fibre ASE sources operating at 2 ?m. Output power could be further enhanced via increasing pump power and/or employing better cooling management.

  18. Nematicon-driven injection of amplified spontaneous emission into an optical fiber.

    PubMed

    Bolis, Serena; Virgili, Tersilla; Rajendran, Sai Kiran; Beeckman, Jeroen; Kockaert, Pascal

    2016-05-15

    We investigate experimentally the interaction between amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) and a soliton, which are both generated in a dye-doped nematic liquid crystal (LC) cell. A light beam is injected through an optical fiber slid into the cell to form a soliton beam. ASE is then automatically collected by this self-induced waveguide and efficiently coupled into the same optical fiber, in the backward direction. We demonstrate that the presence of the soliton improves the ASE collection by one order of magnitude. We also show that the ASE is highly polarized in the plane of the LC cell and that the ASE spectrum depends on the pump stripe orientation with respect to the LC director. The origin of the spectral anisotropy of the gain curves is determined with the help of femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy. PMID:27176973

  19. Spontaneous emission of radiation by relativistic electrons in a gyro-klystron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, G.; Prakash, Bramha; Sharma, Geetanjali

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we study spontaneous emission of radiation by relativistic electrons in a gyro-klystron. The scheme consists of two solenoid sections separated by a dispersive section. In the dispersive section the electrons are made non resonant with the radiation. The dispersive section transforms a small change of the velocity into changes of the phases of the electrons.This leads to enhanced radiation as compared to a conventional gyrotron type device driven by cyclotron maser interaction. It is shown that the klystron modulated spectrum depends on the dispersive field strength, finite perpendicular velocity component and length of the solenoids but do not depend on the axial magnetic field strength. The analysis is further extended to include the combined effects of the undulator aided gyrotron klystron radiation.

  20. Spontaneous emission of the Super-ACO fel optical klystron domino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couprie, M. E.; Bazin, C.; Billardon, M.; Velghe, M.

    1989-12-01

    New free electron laser experiments are planned on the Orsay storage ring Super-ACO, which has been commisioned in 1987 at LURE (Laboratoire d'Utilisation du Rayonnement Electromagnétique). For this purpose, a new insertion device, DOMINO, was set up on Super-ACO in January 1988; it consists of a permanent magnet optical klystron composed of two undulators separated by a dispersive section; the magnetic gaps can be changed independently. Here, the parameters of the optical klystron are specified, and the main steps of the optimization are described. Then, the effect of the insertion device on the stored beam is discussed. The spontaneous emission of the optical klystron has been observed and analysed. Consequently, with the ring parameters measurements, the free electron laser gain versus the current can be evaluated.

  1. Enhancing mammalian hearing by a balancing between spontaneous otoacoustic emissions and spatial coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zonghua; Li, Baowen; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2012-04-01

    Nonlinear dynamics has provided significant insights into the origin of frequency discrimination and signal amplification underlying mammalian hearing. Existing signal amplification models, however, tend to ignore two basic known aspects of the hearing: spontaneous otoacoustic emissions (SOAEs) and intrinsic dynamical coupling in the cochlea. We construct and study a class of coupled-oscillator models to remedy this deficiency. Our analysis and computations reveal that the interplay and balance between the two aspects can naturally explain the phenomena of frequency discrimination and signal amplification and, more strikingly, the origin of hearing loss, all at a quantitative level. In the presence of SOAEs, there exists a critical coupling threshold below which hearing loss can occur, suggesting enhancement of coupling as a potentially effective therapeutic strategy to restore or even significantly enhance hearing.

  2. Influence of the neodymium glass parameters on the amplified spontaneous emission in slab amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bingyan; Zhang, Junyong; Zhang, Yanli; Wang, Li; Zhu, Jianqiang

    2015-02-01

    Amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) causes the decrease of the inverted population density and the nonuniformity of gain in slab amplifier for high power laser systems. In this paper, a three dimension model, based on the data in SG-II, in which the residual reflection in the cladding and the ASE process are taken into consideration, is built to analyze the space distribution and time evolution of small signal gain coefficient using Monte Carlo algorithm and ray tracing. This model has been verified by comparing with the experimental data. The traverse size of slab is 68.2cm×36.3cm, which is usually decided by the clear aperture and the manufacture. By means of the model, the impact of thickness, residual reflectivity and the stimulated cross section of neodymium glass to the ASE are analyzed in detail.

  3. Temporal phase mask encrypted optical steganography carried by amplified spontaneous emission noise.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ben; Wang, Zhenxing; Shastri, Bhavin J; Chang, Matthew P; Frost, Nicholas A; Prucnal, Paul R

    2014-01-13

    A temporal phase mask encryption method is proposed and experimentally demonstrated to improve the security of the stealth channel in an optical steganography system. The stealth channel is protected in two levels. In the first level, the data is carried by amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) noise, which cannot be detected in either the time domain or spectral domain. In the second level, even if the eavesdropper suspects the existence of the stealth channel, each data bit is covered by a fast changing phase mask. The phase mask code is always combined with the wide band noise from ASE. Without knowing the right phase mask code to recover the stealth data, the eavesdropper can only receive the noise like signal with randomized phase. PMID:24515055

  4. Spontaneous Hot-Electron Light Emission from Electron-Fed Optical Antennas.

    PubMed

    Buret, Mickael; Uskov, Alexander V; Dellinger, Jean; Cazier, Nicolas; Mennemanteuil, Marie-Maxime; Berthelot, Johann; Smetanin, Igor V; Protsenko, Igor E; Colas-des-Francs, Gérard; Bouhelier, Alexandre

    2015-09-01

    Nanoscale electronics and photonics are among the most promising research areas providing functional nanocomponents for data transfer and signal processing. By adopting metal-based optical antennas as a disruptive technological vehicle, we demonstrate that these two device-generating technologies can be interfaced to create an electronically driven self-emitting unit. This nanoscale plasmonic transmitter operates by injecting electrons in a contacted tunneling antenna feedgap. Under certain operating conditions, we show that the antenna enters a highly nonlinear regime in which the energy of the emitted photons exceeds the quantum limit imposed by the applied bias. We propose a model based upon the spontaneous emission of hot electrons that correctly reproduces the experimental findings. The electron-fed optical antennas described here are critical devices for interfacing electrons and photons, enabling thus the development of optical transceivers for on-chip wireless broadcasting of information at the nanoscale. PMID:26214575

  5. Gravity Wave Emission by Spontaneous Imbalance of Baroclinic Waves in the Continuously Stratified Rotating Annulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borchert, Sebastian; Achatz, Ulrich; Rieper, Felix; Fruman, Mark

    2013-04-01

    We use a numerical model of the classic differentially heated rotating annulus experiment to study the spontaneous emission of gravity waves (GWs) from jet stream imbalances, which is a major source of these waves in the atmosphere for which no satisfactory parameterization exists. Atmospheric observations are the main tool for the testing and verification of theoretical concepts but have their limitations. Given their specific potential for yielding reproducible data and for studying process dependence on external system parameters, laboratory experiments are an invaluable complementary tool. Experiments with a rotating annulus exhibiting a jet modulated by large-scale waves due to baroclinic instability have already been used to study GWs: Williams et al (2008) observed spontaneously emitted interfacial GWs in a two-layer flow, and Jacoby et al (2011) detected GWs emitted from boundary-layer instabilities in a differentially heated rotating annulus. Employing a finite-volume code for the numerical simulation of a continuously stratified liquid in a differentially heated rotating annulus, we here investigate the GWs in a wide and shallow annulus with relatively large temperature difference between inner and outer cylinder walls. In this atmosphere-like regime where the Brunt-Vaisala frequency is larger than the inertial frequency, various analyses suggest a distinct gravity wave activity. To identify regions of GW emission we decompose the flow into the geostrophic and ageostrophic part through the inversion of the quasi-geostrophic potential vorticity (e.g. Verkley, 2009). The analysis of the geostrophic sources of the ageostrophic flow indicates that, in addition to boundary layer instabilities, spontaneous imbalance in the jet region acts as an important source mechanism. Jacoby, T. N. L., Read, P. L., Williams, P. D. and Young, R. M. B., 2011: Generation of inertia-gravity waves in the rotating thermal annulus by a localised boundary layer instability. Geophys. Astrophys. Fluid Dyn., 105, 161-181. Doi:10.1080/03091929.2011.560151 Verkley, W.T.M., 2009: A balanced approximation of the one-layer shallow-water equations on a sphere. J. Atmos. Sci., 66, 1735-1748. Doi:10.1175/2008JAS2837.1 Williams, P. D., Haine, T. W. N. and Read, P. L., 2008: Inertia-gravity waves emitted from balanced flow: observations, properties, and consequences. J. Atmos. Sci., 65, 3543-3556. Doi:10.1175/2008JAS2480.1

  6. PARTICULATE EMISSION MEASUREMENTS FROM CONTROLLED CONSTRUCTION ACTIVITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarized the results of field testing of the effectiveness of control measures for sources of fugitive particulate emissions found at construction sites. The effectiveness of watering temporary, unpaved travel surfaces on emissions of particulate matter with aerodyna...

  7. Spontaneous Emission and the Concept of Effective Area in a Very Short Optical Cavity with Plane-Parallel Dielectric Mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ujihara, Kikuo

    1991-05-01

    Spontaneous emission in a model cavity with very short length and with plane-parallel dielectric mirrors is calculated quantum-mechanically under perturbation approximation. Outgoing modes as well as guided modes are considered. Results on the directivity and the rate of emission into outer space are compared with the estimate by Purcell’s method. This leads to the concept of “effective area” of the “cavity mode”, which has a simpie physical interpretation.

  8. Spontaneous and stimulated emission from Cd{sub x}Hg{sub 1-x} Te semiconductor films

    SciTech Connect

    Andronov, A. A.; Nozdrin, Yu. N.; Okomel'kov, A. V. Varavin, V. S. Smirnov, R. N.; Ikusov, D. G.

    2006-11-15

    The experimental data on observation of spontaneous and stimulated emission from thin epitaxial Cd{sub x}Hg{sub 1-x} Te films optically pumped by Nd: YAG laser radiation are reported. A simple theoretical model is suggested to describe the initiation of population inversion under these conditions. The parameters realized under the experimental conditions are theoretically estimated.

  9. Observation and analysis of self-amplified spontaneous emission at the APS low-energy undulator test line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, N. D.; Attig, J.; Banks, G.; Bechtold, R.; Beczek, K.; Benson, C.; Berg, S.; Berg, W.; Biedron, S. G.; Biggs, J. A.; Borland, M.; Boerste, K.; Bosek, M.; Brzowski, W. R.; Budz, J.; Carwardine, J. A.; Castro, P.; Chae, Y.-C.; Christensen, S.; Clark, C.; Conde, M.; Crosbie, E. A.; Decker, G. A.; Dejus, R. J.; DeLeon, H.; Den Hartog, P. K.; Deriy, B. N.; Dohan, D.; Dombrowski, P.; Donkers, D.; Doose, C. L.; Dortwegt, R. J.; Edwards, G. A.; Eidelman, Y.; Erdmann, M. J.; Error, J.; Ferry, R.; Flood, R.; Forrestal, J.; Freund, H.; Friedsam, H.; Gagliano, J.; Gai, W.; Galayda, J. N.; Gerig, R.; Gilmore, R. L.; Gluskin, E.; Goeppner, G. A.; Goetzen, J.; Gold, C.; Gorski, A. J.; Grelick, A. E.; Hahne, M. W.; Hanuska, S.; Harkay, K. C.; Harris, G.; Hillman, A. L.; Hogrefe, R.; Hoyt, J.; Huang, Z.; Jagger, J. M.; Jansma, W. G.; Jaski, M.; Jones, S. J.; Keane, R. T.; Kelly, A. L.; Keyser, C.; Kim, K.-J.; Kim, S. H.; Kirshenbaum, M.; Klick, J. H.; Knoerzer, K.; Koldenhoven, R. J.; Knott, M.; Labuda, S.; Laird, R.; Lang, J.; Lenkszus, F.; Lessner, E. S.; Lewellen, J. W.; Li, Y.; Lill, R. M.; Lumpkin, A. H.; Makarov, O. A.; Markovich, G. M.; McDowell, M.; McDowell, W. P.; McNamara, P. E.; Meier, T.; Meyer, D.; Michalek, W.; Milton, S. V.; Moe, H.; Moog, E. R.; Morrison, L.; Nassiri, A.; Noonan, J. R.; Otto, R.; Pace, J.; Pasky, S. J.; Penicka, J. M.; Pietryla, A. F.; Pile, G.; Pitts, C.; Power, J.; Powers, T.; Putnam, C. C.; Puttkammer, A. J.; Reigle, D.; Reigle, L.; Ronzhin, D.; Rotela, E. R.; Russell, E. F.; Sajaev, V.; Sarkar, S.; Scapino, J. C.; Schroeder, K.; Seglem, R. A.; Sereno, N. S.; Sharma, S. K.; Sidarous, J. F.; Singh, O.; Smith, T. L.; Soliday, R.; Sprau, G. A.; Stein, S. J.; Stejskal, B.; Svirtun, V.; Teng, L. C.; Theres, E.; Thompson, K.; Tieman, B. J.; Torres, J. A.; Trakhtenberg, E. M.; Travish, G.; Trento, G. F.; Vacca, J.; Vasserman, I. B.; Vinokurov, N. A.; Walters, D. R.; Wang, J.; Wang, X. J.; Warren, J.; Wesling, S.; Weyer, D. L.; Wiemerslage, G.; Wilhelmi, K.; Wright, R.; Wyncott, D.; Xu, S.; Yang, B.-X.; Yoder, W.; Zabel, R. B.

    2001-12-01

    Exponential growth of self-amplified spontaneous emission at 530 nm was first experimentally observed at the Advanced Photon Source low-energy undulator test line in December 1999. Since then, further detailed measurements and analysis of the results have been made. Here, we present the measurements and compare these with calculations based on measured electron beam properties and theoretical expectations.

  10. Quantum-noise quenching in correlated spontaneous emission lasers, and their application to high-precision measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gea-Banacloche, J.; Scully, M. O.

    The theory of a correlated spontaneous emission laser (CEL) detector is discussed. The quenching of noise in ring laser CELs beyond current limits when the phase angle is not zero is addressed. Ring laser gyro CELs with low noise are significant for gravity wave detection.

  11. EFFECTS OF INSTILLED EMISSION PARTICULATE MATTER ON ELECTROCARDIOGRAPHIC INDICES AND HEART RATE VARIABILITY (HRV) IN SPONTANEOUSLY HYPERTENSIVE RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    EFFECTS OF INSTILLED EMISSION PARTICULATE MATTER (EPM) ON ELECTROCARDIOGRAPHIC INDICES AND HEART RATE VARIABILITY (HRV) IN SPONTANEOUSLY HYPERTENSIVE (SH) RATS. L.B. Wichers1, J.P. Nolan2, W.H. Rowan2, M.J. Campen3, T.P. Jenkins4, D.L. Costa2, and W.P. Watkinson2. 1UNC SPH, Chap...

  12. Standoff detection of nitrotoluenes using 213-nm amplified spontaneous emission from nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Bradley; Kelly, Lisa; Oleske, Jeffrey B; Schill, Alexander

    2009-09-01

    A method of standoff detection based on the observation of laser-induced fluorescence-amplified spontaneous emission (LIF-ASE) is described. LIF-ASE generates uniaxial intensity distributions of the observed fluorescence with the majority of intensity propagating along the excitation axis in both the forward and backward directions. The detection of bulk vapor at significant standoff distances is readily achieved. This method was used to detect NO directly and as a photoproduct after 213-nm excitation of 2-, 3-, and 4-nitrotoluene. The NO LIF-ASE spectra were studied as a function of buffer gas. These studies showed that the emission from different vibrational states was dependent upon the buffer gas used, suggesting that the populations of vibrational states were influenced by the environment. A similar sensitivity of the vibrational populations was observed when the different nitroaromatic precursors were used in nitrogen buffer gas. Such sensitivity to environmental influences can be used to distinguish among the different nitroaromatic precursors and facilitate the identification of the bulk vapor of these analytes. PMID:19649618

  13. Prolonged spontaneous emission and dephasing of localized excitons in air-bridged carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarpkaya, Ibrahim; Zhang, Zhengyi; Walden-Newman, William; Wang, Xuesi; Hone, James; Wong, Chee W.; Strauf, Stefan

    2013-07-01

    The bright exciton emission of carbon nanotubes is appealing for optoelectronic devices and fundamental studies of light-matter interaction in one-dimensional nanostructures. However, to date, the photophysics of excitons in carbon nanotubes is largely affected by extrinsic effects. Here we perform time-resolved photoluminescence measurements over 14 orders of magnitude for ultra-clean carbon nanotubes bridging an air gap over pillar posts. Our measurements demonstrate a new regime of intrinsic exciton photophysics with prolonged spontaneous emission times up to T1=18 ns, about two orders of magnitude better than prior measurements and in agreement with values hypothesized by theorists about a decade ago. Furthermore, we establish for the first time exciton decoherence times of individual nanotubes in the time domain and find fourfold prolonged values up to T2=2.1 ps compared with ensemble measurements. These first observations motivate new discussions about the magnitude of the intrinsic dephasing mechanism while the prolonged exciton dynamics is promising for applications.

  14. Spectroscopic properties and amplified spontaneous emission of fluorescein laser dye in ionic liquids as green media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AL-Aqmar, Dalal M.; Abdelkader, H. I.; Abou Kana, Maram T. H.

    2015-09-01

    The use of ionic liquids (ILs) as milieu materials for laser dyes is a promising field and quite competitive with volatile organic solvents and solid state-dye laser systems. This paper investigates some photo-physical parameters of fluorescein dye incorporated into ionic liquids; 1-Butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (BMIM Cl), 1-Butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrachloroaluminate (BMIM AlCl4) and 1-Butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (BMIM BF4) as promising host matrix in addition to ethanol as reference. These parameters are: absorption and emission cross-sections, fluorescence lifetime and quantum yield, in addition to the transition dipole moment, the attenuation length and oscillator strength were also investigated. Lasing characteristics such as amplified spontaneous emission (ASE), the gain, and the photostability of fluorescein laser dye dissolved in different host materials were assessed. The composition and properties of the matrix of ILs were found that it has great interest in optimizing the laser performance and photostability of the investigated laser dye. Under transverse pumping of fluorescein dye by blue laser diode (450 nm) of (400 mW), the initial ASE for dye dissolved in BMIM AlCl4 and ethanol were decreased to 39% and 36% respectively as time progressed 132 min. Relatively high efficiency and high fluorescence quantum yield (11.8% and 0.82% respectively) were obtained with good photostability in case of fluorescein in BMIM BF4 that was decreased to ∼56% of the initial ASE after continuously pumping with 400 mW for 132 min.

  15. Accurate binaural mirroring of spontaneous otoacoustic emissions suggests influence of time-locking in medial efferents.

    PubMed

    Braun, M

    1998-04-01

    Spontaneous otoacoustic emissions (SOAEs) of nearly identical acoustic frequency in both ears are a common observation, but it is unknown if this binaural mirroring effect is random, artefactual, genetic, developmental, or of other origin. The available raw data of all human SOAE surveys were pooled, and the intervals of all possible binaural emission pairs (N = 9555) were listed according to size on the Cent-scale (1 Cent = 1/100 semitone = 1/1200 octave). Statistical analysis showed (1) a slight broad-band mirroring in the 0-100 Cent range (P < 0.05), and (2) a strong narrow-band mirroring (NBM) in the 0-20 Cent range (P < 0.001). Negative results in a detailed SOAE cluster detection program excluded experimental artefacts as causes of NBM. Analysis of the large subgroup of twin data excluded genetic and intrauterine developmental causes. Systemic developmental causes are unrealistic, as 20 Cent corresponds to only approximately 80 microm on the cochlear map. Analysis of infant data indicated that the effect may be introduced after birth by secondary factors. Interaural crosstalk was examined but had to be rejected. It is suggested that bilaterally spreading period information in the medial olivocochlear system influences outer hair cells of the same best frequency in both ears very similarly. Evidence concerning possible effects on electromotility is discussed, and experimental tests are proposed. PMID:9606068

  16. Mammalian spontaneous otoacoustic emissions are amplitude-stabilized cochlear standing waves.

    PubMed

    Shera, Christopher A

    2003-07-01

    Mammalian spontaneous otoacoustic emissions (SOAEs) have been suggested to arise by three different mechanisms. The local-oscillator model, dating back to the work of Thomas Gold, supposes that SOAEs arise through the local, autonomous oscillation of some cellular constituent of the organ of Corti (e.g., the "active process" underlying the cochlear amplifier). Two other models, by contrast, both suppose that SOAEs are a global collective phenomenon--cochlear standing waves created by multiple internal reflection--but differ on the nature of the proposed power source: Whereas the "passive" standing-wave model supposes that SOAEs are biological noise, passively amplified by cochlear standing-wave resonances acting as narrow-band nonlinear filters, the "active" standing-wave model supposes that standing-wave amplitudes are actively maintained by coherent wave amplification within the cochlea. Quantitative tests of key predictions that distinguish the local-oscillator and global standing-wave models are presented and shown to support the global standing-wave model. In addition to predicting the existence of multiple emissions with a characteristic minimum frequency spacing, the global standing-wave model accurately predicts the mean value of this spacing, its standard deviation, and its power-law dependence on SOAE frequency. Furthermore, the global standing-wave model accounts for the magnitude, sign, and frequency dependence of changes in SOAE frequency that result from modulations in middle-ear stiffness. Although some of these SOAE characteristics may be replicable through artful ad hoc adjustment of local-oscillator models, they all arise quite naturally in the standing-wave framework. Finally, the statistics of SOAE time waveforms demonstrate that SOAEs are coherent, amplitude-stabilized signals, as predicted by the active standing-wave model. Taken together, the results imply that SOAEs are amplitude-stabilized standing waves produced by the cochlea acting as a biological, hydromechanical analog of a laser oscillator. Contrary to recent claims, spontaneous emission of sound from the ear does not require the autonomous mechanical oscillation of its cellular constituents. PMID:12880039

  17. Gravity Wave Emission by Spontaneous Imbalance of Baroclinic Waves in the Continuously Stratified Rotating Annulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borchert, S.; Achatz, U.; Rieper, F.; Fruman, M. D.

    2012-04-01

    We use a numerical model of the classic differentially heated rotating annulus experiment to study the spontaneous emission of gravity waves (GWs) from jet stream imbalances, which is a major source of these waves in the atmosphere for which no satisfactory parameterization exists. Atmospheric observations are the main tool for the testing and verification of theoretical concepts but have their limitations. Given their specific potential for yielding reproducible data and for studying process dependence on external system parameters, laboratory experiments are an invaluable complementary tool. Experiments with a rotating annulus exhibiting a jet modulated by large-scale waves due to baroclinic instability have already been used to study GWs: Williams et al (2008) observed spontaneously emitted interfacial GWs in a two-layer flow, and Jacoby et al (2011) detected GWs emitted from boundary-layer instabilities in a differentially heated rotating annulus. Employing a new finite-volume code for the numerical simulation of a continuously stratified liquid in a differentially heated rotating annulus, we here investigate whether such an experiment might be useful for studies of spontaneous imbalance. A major problem was the identification of experimental parameters yielding an atmosphere-like regime where the Brunt-Vaisala frequency is larger than the inertial frequency, so that energy transport by the lowest-frequency waves is predominantly horizontal while high-frequency GWs transport energy vertically. We show that this is indeed the case for a wide and shallow annulus with relatively large temperature difference between the inner and outer cylinder walls. We also show that this set-up yields a conspicuous signal in the horizontal divergence field close to the meandering jet. Various analyses support the notion that this signal is predominantly due to GWs superposed on a geostrophic flow. Jacoby, T. N. L., Read, P. L., Williams, P. D. and Young, R. M. B., 2011: Generation of inertia-gravity waves in the rotating thermal annulus by a localised boundary layer instability. Geophys. Astrophys. Fluid Dyn., 105, 161-181. doi:10.1080/03091929.2011.560151 Williams, P. D., Haine, T. W. N. and Read, P. L., 2008: Inertia-gravity waves emitted from balanced flow: observations, properties, and consequences. J. Atmos. Sci., 65, 3543-3556. doi:10.1175/2008JAS2480.1

  18. Brain modularity controls the critical behavior of spontaneous activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, R.; Herrmann, H. J.; de Arcangelis, L.

    2014-03-01

    The human brain exhibits a complex structure made of scale-free highly connected modules loosely interconnected by weaker links to form a small-world network. These features appear in healthy patients whereas neurological diseases often modify this structure. An important open question concerns the role of brain modularity in sustaining the critical behaviour of spontaneous activity. Here we analyse the neuronal activity of a model, successful in reproducing on non-modular networks the scaling behaviour observed in experimental data, on a modular network implementing the main statistical features measured in human brain. We show that on a modular network, regardless the strength of the synaptic connections or the modular size and number, activity is never fully scale-free. Neuronal avalanches can invade different modules which results in an activity depression, hindering further avalanche propagation. Critical behaviour is solely recovered if inter-module connections are added, modifying the modular into a more random structure.

  19. CONTROL OF COPPER SMELTER FUGITIVE EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report deals with fugitive emissions from copper smelting and with related emission control measures. The study involved evaluation of the controls now used in the copper smelting industry and development of suggestions for alternative control devices and practices. A brief ...

  20. A semi-analytical approach for evaluating effects of amplified spontaneous emission on characteristics of Q-switched lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razzaghi, D.; Hajiesmaeilbaigi, F.; Ruzbehani, M.

    2012-08-01

    Possible effects of amplified spontaneous emission on output pulse characteristics of a Q-switched laser are discussed within the framework of a semi-analytical approach. It is shown that output energy decreases almost exponentially with average path length of the spontaneously emitted photons which in turn depends on geometrical specification and active medium properties as well as on optical finishing of the surfaces (for solid-state lasers). Optimal coupling dependence on the average path length is also investigated and shown to increase with average path length increment.

  1. Loss of the Tectorial Membrane Protein CEACAM16 Enhances Spontaneous, Stimulus-Frequency, and Transiently Evoked Otoacoustic Emissions

    PubMed Central

    Goodyear, Richard J.; Homma, Kazuaki; Legan, P. Kevin; Korchagina, Julia; Naskar, Souvik; Siegel, Jonathan H.; Dallos, Peter; Zheng, Jing

    2014-01-01

    ?-Tectorin (TECTA), ?-tectorin (TECTB), and carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 16 (CEACAM) are secreted glycoproteins that are present in the tectorial membrane (TM), an extracellular structure overlying the hearing organ of the inner ear, the organ of Corti. Previous studies have shown that TECTA and TECTB are both required for formation of the striated-sheet matrix within which collagen fibrils of the TM are imbedded and that CEACAM16 interacts with TECTA. To learn more about the structural and functional significance of CEACAM16, we created a Ceacam16-null mutant mouse. In the absence of CEACAM16, TECTB levels are reduced, a clearly defined striated-sheet matrix does not develop, and Hensen's stripe, a prominent feature in the basal two-thirds of the TM in WT mice, is absent. CEACAM16 is also shown to interact with TECTB, indicating that it may stabilize interactions between TECTA and TECTB. Although brain-stem evoked responses and distortion product otoacoustic emissions are, for most frequencies, normal in young mice lacking CEACAM16, stimulus-frequency and transiently evoked emissions are larger. We also observed spontaneous otoacoustic emissions (SOAEs) in 70% of the homozygous mice. This incidence is remarkable considering that <3% of WT controls have SOAEs. The predominance of SOAEs >15 kHz correlates with the loss of Hensen's stripe. Results from mice lacking CEACAM16 are consistent with the idea that the organ of Corti evolved to maximize the gain of the cochlear amplifier while preventing large oscillations. Changes in TM structure appear to influence the balance between energy generation and dissipation such that the system becomes unstable. PMID:25080593

  2. Mono- to few-layered graphene oxide embedded randomness assisted microcavity amplified spontaneous emission source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Pratyusha; Maiti, Rishi; Barman, Prahalad K.; Ray, Samit K.; Shivakiran, Bhaktha B. N.

    2016-02-01

    The realization of optoelectronic devices using two-dimensional materials such as graphene and its intermediate product graphene oxide (GO) is extremely challenging owing to the zero band gap of the former. Here, a novel amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) system based on a GO-embedded all-dielectric one-dimensional photonic crystal (1DPhC) micro-resonator is presented. The mono- to few-layered GO sheet is inserted within a microcavity formed by two 5-bilayered SiO2/SnO2 Bragg reflectors. Significantly enhanced photoluminescence (PL) emission of GO embedded in 1DPhC is explicated by studying the electric field confined within the micro-resonator using the transfer matrix method. The inherent randomness, due to fabrication limitations, in the on-average periodic 1DPhC is exploited to further enhance the PL of the optically active micro-resonator. The 1DPhC and randomness assisted field confinement reduces the ASE threshold of the mono- to few-layered weak emitter making the realization of an ASE source feasible. Consequently, ASE at the microcavity resonance and at the low-frequency band-edge of photonic stop-band is demonstrated. Variation of the detection angle from 5° to 30°, with respect to the sample surface normal allows reallocation of the defect mode ASE peak over a spectral range of 558–542 nm, making the GO-incorporated 1DPhC a novel and attractive system for integrated optic applications.

  3. Mono- to few-layered graphene oxide embedded randomness assisted microcavity amplified spontaneous emission source.

    PubMed

    Das, Pratyusha; Maiti, Rishi; Barman, Prahalad K; Ray, Samit K; Shivakiran, Bhaktha B N

    2016-02-01

    The realization of optoelectronic devices using two-dimensional materials such as graphene and its intermediate product graphene oxide (GO) is extremely challenging owing to the zero band gap of the former. Here, a novel amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) system based on a GO-embedded all-dielectric one-dimensional photonic crystal (1DPhC) micro-resonator is presented. The mono- to few-layered GO sheet is inserted within a microcavity formed by two 5-bilayered SiO2/SnO2 Bragg reflectors. Significantly enhanced photoluminescence (PL) emission of GO embedded in 1DPhC is explicated by studying the electric field confined within the micro-resonator using the transfer matrix method. The inherent randomness, due to fabrication limitations, in the on-average periodic 1DPhC is exploited to further enhance the PL of the optically active micro-resonator. The 1DPhC and randomness assisted field confinement reduces the ASE threshold of the mono- to few-layered weak emitter making the realization of an ASE source feasible. Consequently, ASE at the microcavity resonance and at the low-frequency band-edge of photonic stop-band is demonstrated. Variation of the detection angle from 5° to 30°, with respect to the sample surface normal allows reallocation of the defect mode ASE peak over a spectral range of 558-542 nm, making the GO-incorporated 1DPhC a novel and attractive system for integrated optic applications. PMID:26670725

  4. Nonequilibrium quantum fluctuations of a dispersive medium: Spontaneous emission, photon statistics, entropy generation, and stochastic motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maghrebi, Mohammad F.; Jaffe, Robert L.; Kardar, Mehran

    2014-07-01

    We study the implications of quantum fluctuations of a dispersive medium, under steady rotation, either in or out of thermal equilibrium with its environment. A rotating object exhibits a quantum instability by dissipating its mechanical motion via spontaneous emission of photons, as well as internal heat generation. Universal relations are derived for the radiated energy and angular momentum as trace formulas involving the object's scattering matrix. We also compute the quantum noise by deriving the full statistics of the radiated photons out of thermal and/or dynamic equilibrium. The (entanglement) entropy generation is quantified and the total entropy is shown to be always increasing. Furthermore, we derive a Fokker-Planck equation governing the stochastic angular motion resulting from the fluctuating backreaction frictional torque. As a result, we find a quantum limit on the uncertainty of the object's angular velocity in steady rotation. Finally, we show in some detail that a rotating object drags nearby objects, making them spin parallel to its axis of rotation. A scalar toy model is introduced to simplify the technicalities and ease the conceptual complexities and then a detailed discussion of quantum electrodynamics is presented.

  5. Low-threshold amplified spontaneous emission and lasing from colloidal nanocrystals of caesium lead halide perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakunin, Sergii; Protesescu, Loredana; Krieg, Franziska; Bodnarchuk, Maryna I.; Nedelcu, Georgian; Humer, Markus; de Luca, Gabriele; Fiebig, Manfred; Heiss, Wolfgang; Kovalenko, Maksym V.

    2015-08-01

    Metal halide semiconductors with perovskite crystal structures have recently emerged as highly promising optoelectronic materials. Despite the recent surge of reports on microcrystalline, thin-film and bulk single-crystalline metal halides, very little is known about the photophysics of metal halides in the form of uniform, size-tunable nanocrystals. Here we report low-threshold amplified spontaneous emission and lasing from ~10 nm monodisperse colloidal nanocrystals of caesium lead halide perovskites CsPbX3 (X=Cl, Br or I, or mixed Cl/Br and Br/I systems). We find that room-temperature optical amplification can be obtained in the entire visible spectral range (440-700 nm) with low pump thresholds down to 5+/-1 μJ cm-2 and high values of modal net gain of at least 450+/-30 cm-1. Two kinds of lasing modes are successfully observed: whispering-gallery-mode lasing using silica microspheres as high-finesse resonators, conformally coated with CsPbX3 nanocrystals and random lasing in films of CsPbX3 nanocrystals.

  6. Spontaneous emission and Lamb shift in QED based on self-energy

    SciTech Connect

    Salamin, Y.I.H.

    1987-01-01

    This work consists of two parts. In the first part, a general fully relativistic formula is derived for the decay rates in atoms which reproduces the correct Einstein A coefficient of spontaneous emission when the dipole limit is taken. The derivation involves the evaluation of spin sums and angular and radial integrals performed in closed analytical form. When applied to the decay of the low-lying excited states of hydrogen and muonium, the formula gives results that are more precise than the most-recent perturbation-theory calculations and the experiments performed so far. In the second part, the self-energy contribution to the Lamb shift is taken up. Here, too, the new approach yields a formula that reduces to the famous logarithm of Bethe in the dipole approximation. All radial and angular integrations are performed exactly, and it is shown that the energy integral is well-behaved at both its ultra-violet and infrared ends. In this sense, the finiteness of the theory is demonstrated without the need for cutoffs or mass and charge renormalization. The final result is written as an expansion in powers of Z..cap alpha...

  7. Superradiance driven by coherent spontaneous emission in a Cherenkov free-electron maser amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaroszynski, D. A.; Wiggins, S. M.; McNeil, B. W. J.; Robb, G. R. M.; Aitken, P.; Phelps, A. D. R.; Cross, A. W.; Ronald, K.; Shpak, V. G.; Yalandin, M. I.; Ginzburg, N. S.

    2000-05-01

    Superradiance (SR) initiated by coherent spontaneous emission (CSE) has been studied in a 35 GHz high gain free-electron Cherenkov maser. We present experimental results that show the development of ultra-short pulses of radiation in the non-linear superradiant regime which are characterised by a quadratic dependence of the intensity on the current. The self-similar pulses that develop have a duration that scales inversely with the fourth root of the intensity leading to three cycle long pulses at the highest intensity (few MW). The non-linear SR regime is preceded by a stage of linear exponential growth of the microwave pulses with a gain length of 1 cm. The superradiant pulse is shown to evolve from a CSE seed by extrapolating the growth curve. Further confirmation of CSE has been obtained by varying the current pulse shape. By varying the slope of the leading edge, and thus the Fourier components of the longitudinal spectral density, we are able to vary the strength of the CSE source. We compare the experimental results with a theoretical analysis.

  8. Spontaneous emission dynamics in an omnidirectional waveguide made of photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chih-Hsien; Cheng, Szu-Cheng; Wu, Jing-Nuo; Hsieh, Wen-Feng

    2011-06-01

    The spontaneous emission dynamics of atoms embedded in an omnidirectional waveguide (ODWG), a novel optical waveguide, is studied on the basis of the complete reflection of one-dimensional photonic crystals. With the dispersion curve of the single waveguide mode within the photonic band gap and various extents of background dissipation, we characterize the photon-atom interaction in the ODWG. The photon emitter of the system is a two-level atom embedded in the low-index medium of the multilayer-film ODWG or the atom-ODWG system. Fractional calculus, an innovative mathematical method in optical systems, is applied to solve the equation of motion for this atom-ODWG system. Two kinds of states with different group velocities exhibit totally distinctive dynamical behavior. The high frequency waveguide mode with a fast group velocity shows fast exponential decay in propagation while the band-edge mode with a slow group velocity displays non-Markovian dynamics with non-exponential oscillating time evolution. We therefore suggest different functions of this atom-ODWG system for these two kinds of states. The richness of the physical content of the system is also revealed through investigating the dynamical behavior of the band-edge mode. These results aid in further application and fundamental understanding of the atom-ODWG system.

  9. Near infrared amplified spontaneous emission in a dye-doped polymeric waveguide for active plasmonic applications.

    PubMed

    Keshmarzi, Elham Karami; Tait, R Niall; Berini, Pierre

    2014-05-19

    Near-infrared amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) from an optically-pumped dye-doped polymeric slab waveguide, consisting of IR-140 in PMMA on a glass substrate, has been characterised. The ASE gain was measured using the variable stripe length method. Linewidth narrowing with increasing pump intensity was observed, indicating ASE gain in this material. The effects of the dye concentration and pump intensity on the gain were investigated under linear operation. The maximum achieved gain coefficient is γ ~68 cm(-1) for a film with 0.8 wt % of IR-140 to PMMA for a pump intensity of 43.4 mJ/cm(2). The polarisation dependence of the ASE gain was also investigated by measuring the gain coefficient of orthogonal TE and TM modes and varying the pump polarisation relative to the amplifier length. It was observed that there is some degree of gain anisotropy when the pump polarisation is aligned perpendicular to the length, but that the gain was isotropic when the pump polarisation is aligned parallel the length. The applicability of IR-140 doped PMMA for active plasmonic applications is discussed. PMID:24921362

  10. Enhanced Amplified Spontaneous Emission in Perovskites Using a Flexible Cholesteric Liquid Crystal Reflector.

    PubMed

    Stranks, Samuel D; Wood, Simon M; Wojciechowski, Konrad; Deschler, Felix; Saliba, Michael; Khandelwal, Hitesh; Patel, Jay B; Elston, Steve J; Herz, Laura M; Johnston, Michael B; Schenning, Albertus P H J; Debije, Michael G; Riede, Moritz K; Morris, Stephen M; Snaith, Henry J

    2015-08-12

    Organic-inorganic perovskites are highly promising solar cell materials with laboratory-based power conversion efficiencies already matching those of established thin film technologies. Their exceptional photovoltaic performance is in part attributed to the presence of efficient radiative recombination pathways, thereby opening up the possibility of efficient light-emitting devices. Here, we demonstrate optically pumped amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) at 780 nm from a 50 nm-thick film of CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite that is sandwiched within a cavity composed of a thin-film (∼7 μm) cholesteric liquid crystal (CLC) reflector and a metal back-reflector. The threshold fluence for ASE in the perovskite film is reduced by at least two orders of magnitude in the presence of the CLC reflector, which results in a factor of two reduction in threshold fluence compared to previous reports. We consider this to be due to improved coupling of the oblique and out-of-plane modes that are reflected into the bulk in addition to any contributions from cavity modes. Furthermore, we also demonstrate enhanced ASE on flexible reflectors and discuss how improvements in the quality factor and reflectivity of the CLC layers could lead to single-mode lasing using CLC reflectors. Our work opens up the possibility of fabricating widely wavelength-tunable "mirror-less" single-mode lasers on flexible substrates, which could find use in applications such as flexible displays and friend or foe identification. PMID:25989354

  11. Measurements of amplified spontaneous emission in π-conjugated polymer films with different morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuchen; Yang, Xiao; Wang, Ruizhi; Sheng, Chuanxiang

    2014-09-01

    π-conjugated polymers (PCPs) are attractive candidates as gain media in laser applications due to their high photoluminescence quantum efficiency in broad spectral range. However, the self-absorption of long-lived excited states was considered to be a limitation for achieving more effective organic lasers. Moreover, the morphology of films is found to be crucial to their optical and electrical properties recently. In this work, we studied amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) of a typical PCP, namely, Poly [2-methoxy-5-(2-ethylhexyloxy)-1, 4-phenylenevinylene] (MEH-PPV) films with a 10 ns 532 nm pulse laser focused by a cylindrical lens for obtaining an excitation area in the form of a 100 μm wide and 1 cm long stripe. In an as cast MEH-PPV film, the thresholds increase with the temperatures increase due to the thermal torsion and vibration mode shorten the conjugation chain. On the other hand, a MEH-PPV film which is annealed in Nitrogen at 350 K of half hour, the ASE is not observed at both 300 K and 77 K, for annealing will form π- stacks which increase the interchain interaction. Further analysis suggests that interchain excimers instead of intrachain excitons may be more primary to optical properties in annealed MEH-PPV film. Our measurements suggest that the morphology of the film instead of long lived photoexcitation with lifetime sensitive to the temperature is more crucial to threshold of ASE, as well as, to PCPs lasers.

  12. Whispering gallery mode laser enhanced by amplified spontaneous emission coupling in semiconducting polymer solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahoz, F.; Cáceres, J. M.

    2014-04-01

    Evanescent-wave-coupled gain microresonators suffer from inherent low efficiency under transversal pumping because they are based on the gain only in the evanescent field region of the whispering gallery modes (WGMs) of the resonator. In this paper we demonstrate a new coupling scheme that remarkably enhances the efficiency of the WGM laser. A glass fiber is used as the microresonator and semiconducting polymer solutions as the gain media. A single pump beam is used to produce a WGM laser and an optically induced liquid waveguide, which confines the amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) of the gain media. Both WGM lasing and ASE occur simultaneously in the sample. Despite the fact that only a small fraction of the pump beam directly excites the evanescent field volume around the microresonator, almost 97% of the output signal is due to the WGM laser, at the highest pump power. The liquid waveguide also serves to out-couple the WGM lasing. This simple one-step all-optical optofluidic circuit might improve the applications of WGMs in optoelectronics and optofluidics.

  13. Low-threshold amplified spontaneous emission and lasing from colloidal nanocrystals of caesium lead halide perovskites

    PubMed Central

    Yakunin, Sergii; Protesescu, Loredana; Krieg, Franziska; Bodnarchuk, Maryna I.; Nedelcu, Georgian; Humer, Markus; De Luca, Gabriele; Fiebig, Manfred; Heiss, Wolfgang; Kovalenko, Maksym V.

    2015-01-01

    Metal halide semiconductors with perovskite crystal structures have recently emerged as highly promising optoelectronic materials. Despite the recent surge of reports on microcrystalline, thin-film and bulk single-crystalline metal halides, very little is known about the photophysics of metal halides in the form of uniform, size-tunable nanocrystals. Here we report low-threshold amplified spontaneous emission and lasing from ∼10 nm monodisperse colloidal nanocrystals of caesium lead halide perovskites CsPbX3 (X=Cl, Br or I, or mixed Cl/Br and Br/I systems). We find that room-temperature optical amplification can be obtained in the entire visible spectral range (440–700 nm) with low pump thresholds down to 5±1 μJ cm−2 and high values of modal net gain of at least 450±30 cm−1. Two kinds of lasing modes are successfully observed: whispering-gallery-mode lasing using silica microspheres as high-finesse resonators, conformally coated with CsPbX3 nanocrystals and random lasing in films of CsPbX3 nanocrystals. PMID:26290056

  14. Red, Yellow, Green, and Blue Amplified Spontaneous Emission and Lasing Using Colloidal CdSe Nanoplatelets.

    PubMed

    She, Chunxing; Fedin, Igor; Dolzhnikov, Dmitriy S; Dahlberg, Peter D; Engel, Gregory S; Schaller, Richard D; Talapin, Dmitri V

    2015-10-27

    There have been multiple demonstrations of amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) and lasing using colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals. However, it has been proven difficult to achieve low thresholds suitable for practical use of nanocrystals as gain media. Low-threshold blue ASE and lasing from nanocrystals is an even more challenging task. Here, we show that colloidal nanoplatelets (NPLs) with electronic structure of quantum wells can produce ASE in the red, yellow, green, and blue regions of the visible spectrum with low thresholds and high gains. In particular, for blue-emitting NPLs, the ASE threshold is 50 μJ/cm(2), lower than any reported value for nanocrystals. We then demonstrate red, yellow, green, and blue lasing using NPLs with different thicknesses. We find that the lateral size of NPLs does not show any strong effect on the Auger recombination rates and, correspondingly, on the ASE threshold or gain saturation. This observation highlights the qualitative difference of multiexciton dynamics in CdSe NPLs and other quantum-confined CdSe materials, such as quantum dots and rods. Our measurements of the gain bandwidth and gain lifetime further support the prospects of colloidal NPLs as solution-processed optical gain materials. PMID:26302368

  15. Cold test, spontaneous emission and gain in a rectangular Cerenkov amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Scharer, J.E.; Joe, J.; Booske, J.H.; Basten, M.; Kirolous, H.

    1994-12-31

    The authors present experimental results for the rectangular Cerenkov grating amplifier. This research is being carried out to develop a Ka-band (35 GHz), low voltage (10 kV), moderate power (10 kW) source. They have constructed a Ku-band grating structure to study a scaled version of this source. The tapered grating consists of two tapered Ku-band smooth wave guide sections and two 3.5-inch sections of five-step-tapered gratings. Both tapered and untapered grating structures have been cold tested utilizing the network analyzer measurements. They find that their taper design reduced the reflection coefficient from {minus}5 dB to less than {minus}20 dB over a 12--15 GHz bandwidth. Spontaneous emission results resulting from passing the circular electron beam from a Litton thermionic gun over the grating structure will be presented. They have theoretically investigated the sheet beam interaction with hybrid modes in a deep groove rectangular grating waveguide. A complex dispersion relation, which includes a finite axial energy spread of the beam, describing the interaction has been solved. The authors find that the instability is always convective in the forward wave mode regime.

  16. Validity of the Relation Between Spontaneous and Stimulated Emissions in Semiconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ning, Cun-Zheng; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The Einstein relation between spontaneous emission and absorption was originally derived for a system consists of a two-state subsystem representing matter and harmonic fields representing radiation. The derivation is based on the detailed balance between these two subsystems under thermal equilibrium. The relationship was later investigated in connection with the interactions between radiation field and solids or semiconductors. The simple derivation dose not hold for semiconductors in general. In certain limiting cases, simple relation was obtained. The validity of this relation is important not only because of its fundamental role connecting two of the most fundamental optical processes in semiconductors, but mostly also because of its wide use as a practical method to measure the optical gain of a semiconductor. The validity of this relation for semiconductors has been an issue of controversial for some time. In this paper we numerically examine the validity of this relationship for several different lineshapes including Lorentzian, Gaussian, Sech, and a convoluted double Lorentzians (CDL). We find out that at relatively low density above transparency level, all first three lineshapes violate the Einstein relation. The relation is approximately valid at high density. At very high density, the validity of the Einstein relation holds well for all three lineshapes. The reason behind this observation is explained. The CDL lineshape has been shown analytically to obey the Einstein relationship previously. We show that for a 2D semiconductor with parabolic bands, the CDL lineshape can be integrated analytically. This analytic lineshape is compared with a simple Lorentzian lineshape.

  17. Realization of dynamic thermal emission control.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Takuya; De Zoysa, Menaka; Asano, Takashi; Noda, Susumu

    2014-10-01

    Thermal emission in the infrared range is important in various fields of research, including chemistry, medicine and atmospheric science. Recently, the possibility of controlling thermal emission based on wavelength-scale optical structures has been intensively investigated with a view towards a new generation of thermal emission devices. However, all demonstrations so far have involved the 'static' control of thermal emission; high-speed modulation of thermal emission has proved difficult to achieve because the intensity of thermal emission from an object is usually determined by its temperature, and the frequency of temperature modulation is limited to 10-100 Hz even when the thermal mass of the object is small. Here, we experimentally demonstrate the dynamic control of thermal emission via the control of emissivity (absorptivity), at a speed four orders of magnitude faster than is possible using the conventional temperature-modulation method. Our approach is based on the dynamic control of intersubband absorption in n-type quantum wells, which is enhanced by an optical resonant mode in a photonic crystal slab. The extraction of electrical carriers from the quantum wells leads to an immediate change in emissivity from 0.74 to 0.24 at the resonant wavelength while maintaining much lower emissivity at all other wavelengths. PMID:25064232

  18. Charge-carrier concentration and temperature in quantum wells of laser heterostructures under spontaneous- and stimulated-emission conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Vorob'ev, L. E. Zerova, V. L.; Borshchev, K. S.; Sokolova, Z. N.; Tarasov, I. S.; Belenky, G.

    2008-06-15

    The charge-carrier concentration and the temperature of hot electrons and holes in quantum-well laser nanostructures in the regimes of spontaneous and stimulated emission are determined as functions of the current density j, with InGaAs/GaAs structures as an example. Under spontaneous-emission conditions, the carrier concentration in the active region of a laser structure grows as the current increases, while carrier heating is insignificant. The spontaneous-emission spectra calculated taking into account forbidden optical transitions agree well with the experimental ones. Under stimulated-emission conditions, the behavior is quite different. When the pump current density is comparatively low (several times above the threshold), the concentration of injected charge carriers levels off and does not grow as the current increases, while the carrier temperature rises considerably. When the current density exceeds the threshold value by orders of magnitude, stabilization of the charge-carrier concentration does not take place; the carrier concentration exhibits a severalfold increase and the carrier temperature rises to about 450 K at j = 80 kA/cm{sup 2}. The number of the charge carriers escaping from the quantum wells into the barriers, which determines the laser efficiency, also increases under these conditions because of the carrier heating. This undesirable effect can be weakened by increasing the depth of the quantum wells.

  19. Controlling air emissions from incinerators

    SciTech Connect

    Foisy, M.B.; Li, R.; Chattapadhyay, A.

    1994-04-01

    Last year, EPA published final rules establishing technical standards for the use and disposal of wastewater biosolids (40 CFR, Part 503). Subpart E specifically regulates the operations of and emissions from municipal wastewater biosolids incinerators.

  20. Calculation of spontaneous emission from a V-type three-level atom in photonic crystals using fractional calculus

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chih-Hsien; Hsieh, Wen-Feng; Wu, Jing-Nuo; Cheng, Szu-Cheng; Li, Yen-Yin

    2011-07-15

    Fractional time derivative, an abstract mathematical operator of fractional calculus, is used to describe the real optical system of a V-type three-level atom embedded in a photonic crystal. A fractional kinetic equation governing the dynamics of the spontaneous emission from this optical system is obtained as a fractional Langevin equation. Solving this fractional kinetic equation by fractional calculus leads to the analytical solutions expressed in terms of fractional exponential functions. The accuracy of the obtained solutions is verified through reducing the system into the special cases whose results are consistent with the experimental observation. With accurate physical results and avoiding the complex integration for solving this optical system, we propose fractional calculus with fractional time derivative as a better mathematical method to study spontaneous emission dynamics from the optical system with non-Markovian dynamics.

  1. A novel, simple and efficient dye laser with low amplified spontaneous emission background for analytical fluorescence and ionization spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Matveev, Oleg I.; Omenetto, Nicolo'

    1995-04-01

    A new, simple, compact and efficient, grazing- incidence type of dye laser is suggested which has a low level of Amplified Spontaneous Emission. By using a Coumarin dye (LD 5000) pumped with a 20 mJ XeCl excimer laser, and a diffraction grating with 3000 grooves/mm, an efficiency of 11%, a spectral bandwidth of 0.6 cm{sup -1} and a tuning range from 458 to 517 nm have been obtained.

  2. Spontaneous Centralization of Control in a Network of Company Ownerships

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Sebastian M.; Peixoto, Tiago P.; Bornholdt, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a model for the adaptive evolution of a network of company ownerships. In a recent work it has been shown that the empirical global network of corporate control is marked by a central, tightly connected “core” made of a small number of large companies which control a significant part of the global economy. Here we show how a simple, adaptive “rich get richer” dynamics can account for this characteristic, which incorporates the increased buying power of more influential companies, and in turn results in even higher control. We conclude that this kind of centralized structure can emerge without it being an explicit goal of these companies, or as a result of a well-organized strategy. PMID:24324594

  3. Spontaneous centralization of control in a network of company ownerships.

    PubMed

    Krause, Sebastian M; Peixoto, Tiago P; Bornholdt, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a model for the adaptive evolution of a network of company ownerships. In a recent work it has been shown that the empirical global network of corporate control is marked by a central, tightly connected "core" made of a small number of large companies which control a significant part of the global economy. Here we show how a simple, adaptive "rich get richer" dynamics can account for this characteristic, which incorporates the increased buying power of more influential companies, and in turn results in even higher control. We conclude that this kind of centralized structure can emerge without it being an explicit goal of these companies, or as a result of a well-organized strategy. PMID:24324594

  4. Broadening and tuning of spontaneous Raman emission in porous silicon at 1.5 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirleto, L.; Ferrara, M. A.; Rendina, I.; Jalali, B.

    2006-05-01

    In the last three years, the possibility of light generation and/or amplification in silicon, based on Raman emission, has achieved significant results. However, limitations inherent to the physics of silicon have been pointed out, too. In this letter, an approach based on Raman scattering in porous silicon is investigated. Two significant advantages with respect to silicon are proved: the broadening of spontaneous Raman emission and the tuning of the Stokes shift. Finally, we discuss about the prospect of Raman amplifier in porous silicon.

  5. Spontaneous Raman emission in porous silicon at 1.5 µm and prospects for a Raman amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirleto, L.; Ferrara, M. A.; Jalali, B.; Rendina, I.

    2006-07-01

    In the last three years, the possibility of light generation and/or amplification in silicon, based on Raman emission, has achieved significant results. However, limitations inherent to the physics of silicon have also been pointed out. One possible option to overcome these limitations is to consider low dimensional silicon. In this paper, an approach based on Raman scattering in porous silicon is theoretically and experimentally investigated. We prove two significant advantages with respect to silicon: the broadening of the spontaneous Raman emission and the tuning of the Stokes shift. Finally, we discuss the prospect of a Raman amplifier in porous silicon.

  6. Detailed Study of the Angular Correlations in the Prompt Neutron Emission in Spontaneous Fission of 252Cf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopatch, Yu.; Chietera, A.; Stuttgé, L.; Gönnenwein, F.; Mutterer, M.; Gagarski, A.; Guseva, I.; Chernysheva, E.; Dorvaux, O.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Hanappe, F.; Mezentseva, Z.; Telezhnikov, S.

    An experiment has been performed at IPHC Strasbourg, aimed at the detailed investigation of angular correlations in the neutron emission from spontaneous fission of 252Cf. Fission fragments were measured by the angle-sensitive double ionization chamber CODIS while neutrons were detected by a set of 60 DEMON scintillator counters. The main aim of the experiment is the observation of the correlation between the fragment spins and neutron emission anisotropy. Preliminary results, based on the Monte-Carlo simulations, as well as the preliminary analysis of the experimental data are shown.

  7. Method and composition for controlling dust emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Kalau, H.

    1990-02-14

    The invention relates in general to a method and composition for controlling the emission of dust in a variety of settings, and in particular, to a composition comprising a polyethylene oxide polymer and an anionic surfactant which can be used to enhance the coal-wetting action in a water spray and reduce the emission of coal dust in an underground mining operation.

  8. Advances in engine emissions control technology

    SciTech Connect

    Chrisman, B. Serve, J.V. )

    1989-01-01

    This book is composed of papers presented at the Twelfth Annual Energy-Sources Technology Conference and Exhibition. Topics covered include: Emission control technology for stationary natural gas engines; Environmental aspects of coal-fueled diesel engines; and low emission diesel fuel for 1991-1994.

  9. The emission of prompt neutrons from the spontaneous fission of 252No and 244Fm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svirikhin, A. I.; Andreev, A. V.; Dushin, V. N.; Chelnokov, M. L.; Chepigin, V. I.; Gupta, M.; Isaev, A. V.; Izosimov, I. N.; Katrasev, D. E.; Kuznetsov, A. N.; Malyshev, O. N.; Mullins, S.; Popeko, A. G.; Sokol, E. A.; Yeremin, A. V.

    2012-09-01

    The neutron detector with 3He -filled counters placed in the focal plane of the VASSILISSA separator is used for measuring the average number and determining the multiplicity distribution of prompt neutrons from the spontaneous fission of heavy short-lived isotopes. The test reaction ensuremath {^{48}Ca}+{^{206}Pb}=2n+{^{252}No} is used for tuning the separator settings and calibrating the detector system with the spontaneous fission of the 252No . The average neutron number per 252No spontaneous fission event is as large as ensuremath bar{ν}=4.06 ± 0.12 . The short-lived heavy isotope 244Fm , produced in the complete fusion reaction 40Ar + 206Pb , is investigated. The average number of neutrons per spontaneous fission of 244Fm from the experimental data ( ensuremath bar{ν}=3.3 ± 0.3 is determined for the first time.

  10. Comment on “Competition between coherent emission and broadband spontaneous emission in the quantum free electron laser” [Phys. Plasmas 20, 033106 (2013)

    SciTech Connect

    Petrillo, V.; Rossi, A. R.; Serafini, L.

    2013-12-15

    We point out that in the equation for the electron distribution evolution during Thomson/Compton or undulator radiation used in the paper: “Competition between coherent emission and broadband spontaneous emission in the quantum free electron laser” by G. R. M. Robb and R. Bonifacio [Phys. Plasmas 20, 033106 (2013)], the weight function should be the distribution of the number of emitted photons and not the photon energy distribution. Nevertheless, the considerations expressed in this comment do not alter the conclusions drawn in the paper in object.

  11. Variable emissivity laser thermal control system

    DOEpatents

    Milner, Joseph R.

    1994-01-01

    A laser thermal control system for a metal vapor laser maintains the wall mperature of the laser at a desired level by changing the effective emissivity of the water cooling jacket. This capability increases the overall efficiency of the laser.

  12. Acidic emissions control technology and costs

    SciTech Connect

    Emmel, T.E.; Waddell, J.T.; Adams, R.C. )

    1989-01-01

    This book describes acidic emissions control technology and costs. The objectives are: to identify and characterize stationary combustion and industrial sources of directly emitted acidic materials in the United States; to evaluate the feasibility of control technologies for these sources; and to estimate the costs of applying these control technologies. This book gives results of estimates, using a model plant approach, of costs for retrofitting selected acidic emission control systems to utility and industrial boilers, Claus sulfur recovery plants, catalytic cracking units, primary copper smelters, coke oven plants, primary aluminum smelters, and municipal solid waste incinerators.

  13. Io control of Jovian radio emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desch, M. D.

    1980-01-01

    The possibility of Io controlling Jovian decametric radio emission, particularly in the region below 22 MHz, is discussed. Results of a two-year survey at 26.3 at 26.3 MHz are presented which demonstrate the control of Io over a high-intensity storm component of the radio emission and the independence of a weak radio component from the phase of Io, as was observed at lower frequencies. It is thus hypothesized that Io control is a flux-dependent rather than a frequency-dependent phenomenon, and results of analyses at 18 and 10 MHz which support this hypothesis are presented. The apparent correlation between frequency and Io control is thus shown to result from a selection effect due to the increase of non-Io emission with decreasing frequency and relative antenna detection threshold. This result implies a contiguous Io-controlled source region extending out several Jovian radii along the Io flux tube.

  14. Systematics of spontaneous emission of intermediate mass fragments from heavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barwick, S. W.; Price, P. B.; Ravn, H. L.; Hourani, E.; Hussonnois, M.

    1986-07-01

    We have used polycarbonate track-recording films to confirm the rare decay mode of 226Ra by 14C emission and to set stringent upper limits on 14emission rates of 221Fr, 221Ra, and 225Ac. The 14emission rate exhibits a pronounced odd-even effect. For Ra isotopes the hindrance factor for odd-even parents relative to even-even parents is at least 10 times higher for 14C emission than for ? emission.

  15. CO2 emission of coal spontaneous combustion and its relation with coal microstructure, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haiyan; Chen Chen; Huang, Tao; Gao, Wei

    2015-07-01

    Coal spontaneous combustion is widely distributed all over the world. CO2 is the main greenhouse gas emitted by coal spontaneous combustion. In the present study characters of CO2 emitted by 10 typical Chinese coal spontaneous combustion and the influence of raw coal functional group on CO2 was studied. CO2 already exists under normal temperature as coal exposed in atmosphere. Under low temperature, the quality of CO2 released by coal spontaneous combustion is relatively small, but tends to increase. And corresponding with it, the oxygen consumption amount is also small. At medium temperature, the oxygen consumption increases rapidly and CO2 mass release rate begins to increase rapidly. Then, CO2 release rate increase rapidly under relatively high temperature (higher than 673 K). Over 873K, concentration of O2 is 6% and release rate of CO2 tends to be steady. It also concluded that mass ratio of CO to CO2 (CO/CO2) during coal spontaneous combustion was lowerthan 0.10 at low temperature. And then, it increased rapidly at medium temperature and reached to top at about 673 K. At 673-873 K, the ratio decreased again, and did not decrease evidently at about 873K. At temperature higher than 873K, the ratio was about 0.13. During the whole testing temperature range, CO/CO2 was not be higher than 0.26, lower than 0.2. This means that release rate of CO2 was much higher than CO during the whole process of coal spontaneous combustion. Moreover, the gas release quantity of CO2 is positively related with carbony content in raw coal. Carbonyl and carboxyl were both material basis of CO2. PMID:26364484

  16. Economic growth and carbon emission control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhenyu

    The question about whether environmental improvement is compatible with continued economic growth remains unclear and requires further study in a specific context. This study intends to provide insight on the potential for carbon emissions control in the absence of international agreement, and connect the empirical analysis with theoretical framework. The Chinese electricity generation sector is used as a case study to demonstrate the problem. Both social planner and private problems are examined to derive the conditions that define the optimal level of production and pollution. The private problem will be demonstrated under the emission regulation using an emission tax, an input tax and an abatement subsidy respectively. The social optimal emission flow is imposed into the private problem. To provide tractable analytical results, a Cobb-Douglas type production function is used to describe the joint production process of the desired output and undesired output (i.e., electricity and emissions). A modified Hamiltonian approach is employed to solve the system and the steady state solutions are examined for policy implications. The theoretical analysis suggests that the ratio of emissions to desired output (refer to 'emission factor'), is a function of productive capital and other parameters. The finding of non-constant emission factor shows that reducing emissions without further cutting back the production of desired outputs is feasible under some circumstances. Rather than an ad hoc specification, the optimal conditions derived from our theoretical framework are used to examine the relationship between desired output and emission level. Data comes from the China Statistical Yearbook and China Electric Power Yearbook and provincial information of electricity generation for the year of 1993-2003 are used to estimate the Cobb-Douglas type joint production by the full information maximum likelihood (FIML) method. The empirical analysis shed light on the optimal policies of emissions control required for achieving the social goal in a private context. The results suggest that the efficiency of abatement technology is crucial for the timing of executing the emission tax. And emission tax is preferred to an input tax, as long as the detection of emissions is not costly and abatement technology is efficient. Keywords: Economic growth, Carbon emission, Power generation, Joint production, China

  17. CONTROL OF AIR EMISSIONS FROM SUPERFUND SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This handbook is an easy-to-use tool for decision makers to evaluate emission control devices for use with Superfund remediation actions. t will assist in the selection of cost-effective control options. t is intended for use by engineers and scientists involved in preparing reme...

  18. Multi-level quantum electrodynamic calculation of spontaneous emission and small signal gain in high voltage free electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C. S.; Fluhler, H. U.

    1991-12-01

    Using the Weisskopf-Wigner technique, a self consistent quantum electrodynamic (SCQED) theory of spontaneous emission of radiation and single photon small signal gain is developed for high voltage free electron lasers (FEL). Excellent agreement is obtained simultaneously to our knowledge for the first time between the predictions and the experimental observations for lineshift, linewidth and gain. The SCQED theory predicts lineshift and broadening due to quantum mechanical effects for linear, helical and tapered undulator FELs which are not predicted by the classical/conventional FEL theories, but which have been observed 4,5,18,22,23,45,46. Excellent agreement is obtained between the SCQED theory predicted spontaneous emission spectra and the 1980?81 ACO FEL4,18, ACO Optical Klystron FEL45,46, Stanford 10.6 ?m FEL22 and Stanford 3.4 ?m FEL23 experimental spectra. This agreement is much better than the prediction from the classical/conventional FEL theory which gives errors of many tens of percent. We show that the spontaneous emission spectrum obtained from classical/conventional FEL theories is valid only in the limit of a short undulator containing a small number of periods. The small signal gain derived from the SCQED theory is shown to reduce to Colson's gain formula12,34 in the classical limit. However, the SCQED theory predicts significant reductions in the small signal gain which agree well with the ACO gain data5, and are not predicted well by Colson's formula. Due to the non-neglible finite electron state lifetime, it is discovered that a fundamental physical gain limit exists which is universal to all types of FELs within the limits of the single photon transition scheme considered (i.e. if multiphoton effects are ignored). Finally, the implications of the theoretically obtained results are discussed for practical conditions of experimental interest. It is shown that under practical experimental conditions quantum effects can be quite important in the FEL.

  19. Quantum-noise quenching in the correlated spontaneous-emission laser as a multiplicative noise process. I. A geometrical argument

    SciTech Connect

    Schleich, W.; Scully, M.O.

    1988-02-15

    We show, via simple geometrical arguments, the quantum-noise quenching in a correlated (spontaneous) emission laser (CEL). This noise quenching is a consequence of the correlation between noise sources which results in a multiplicative noise process. The steady-state distribution for the phase difference between the two electric fields in a CEL is compared and contrasted to that of a standard phase-locked laser. Noise quenching is shown to occur in the case of the CEL via an explicit solution of the Fokker-Planck equation.

  20. High-precision three-dimensional atom localization via spontaneous emission in a four-level atomic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhiping; Yu, Benli

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the three-dimensional atom localization via spontaneous emission in a four-level atomic system. It is found that the detecting probability and precision of atom localization can be significantly improved due to the interference effects induced by the vacuum radiation field and the two laser fields. More importantly, the almost 100% probability of finding an atom within a certain range can be reached when corresponding conditions are satisfied. As a result, our scheme may be helpful in a spatially selective single-qubit phase gate, entangling gates, and quantum error correction for quantum information processing.

  1. Apparent deviations from causality in spontaneous light emission by atomic hydrogen in the mid- and far-field regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debierre, Vincent; Durt, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    We investigate, in the case of the 2 P -1 S transition in atomic hydrogen, the behavior of the spontaneously emitted electromagnetic field in space-time. We focus on Glauber's wave function for the emitted photon, a quantity which we find is nonzero outside the light cone at all times after the start of the emission. We identify the uncertainty on the position of the decaying electron as a source of departure from causality in the naive sense of the term. We carry out a detailed study of the emitted electric field in the mid- and far-field regions, through analytical and numerical computations as well as asymptotic arguments.

  2. Cavity-enhanced single photon emission from site-controlled In(Ga)As quantum dots fabricated using nanoimprint lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Tommila, J.; Hakkarainen, T. V.; Schramm, A. Guina, M.; Belykh, V. V.; Sibeldin, N. N.; Heinonen, E.

    2014-05-26

    We report on the emission dynamics of single In(Ga)As quantum dots formed in etched GaAs pits and integrated into micropillar cavities. The site-controlled quantum dots were fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy on nanoimprint lithography patterned GaAs(001) surfaces. Triggered single photon emission confirmed by photon autocorrelation measurements is demonstrated. Time-resolved photoluminescence experiments clearly show an effect of the cavity on the spontaneous emission rate of the quantum dot.

  3. Controlling light scattering and emission at subwavelength scale with plasmonic nanopatch antennas (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zilong; Zheng, Yuebing

    2015-09-01

    Controlling light scattering and emission at subwavelength scale has significant implications for solar energy conversion, sensing, and nanophotonic devices. Plasmonic nanopatch antennas (PNAs), which consist of plasmonic nanoparticle coupled with metallic films, have shown directionality of radiation and large emission rate enhancement due to the strong plasmonic waveguide modes within the spacer layer. Herein, we comparatively study the light scattering and emission behaviors of a series of plasmonic nanopatch antennas (PNAs) with different plasmonic nanoparticles (i.e., nanosquare, nanotriangle, nanorod, and nanodisk) to develop the design rules of the PNAs. Using finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations, we show that the shape and size of plasmonic nanoparticles can be tuned to control the resonance peak, intensity, directionality, and spatial distribution of the scattering light as well as the directionality, spatial distribution, spontaneous emission rate, quantum efficiency, and radiation enhancement factor of light emission. For example, high radiative quantum efficiency (0.74) and radiation enhancement factor (>20) can be achieved by disk PNA, while triangle PNA shows remarkable spontaneous emission rate enhancement of over 2,500. The effects of locations of emitters relative to the PNAs on the emission properties are also examined. Our results pave the way towards the rational design of PNAs for the optimal light scattering and emission as required by targeted applications.

  4. Controllable optical bistability and multistability in asymmetric double quantum wells via spontaneously generated coherence

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yuan; Deng, Li; Chen, Aixi

    2015-02-15

    We investigate the nonlinear optical phenomena of the optical bistability and multistability via spontaneously generated coherence in an asymmetric double quantum well structure coupled by a weak probe field and a controlling field. It is shown that the threshold and hysteresis cycle of the optical bistability can be conveniently controlled only by adjusting the intensity of the SGC or the controlling field. Moreover, switching between optical bistability and multistability can be achieved. These studies may have practical significance for the preparation of optical bistable switching device.

  5. On what controls the spacing of spontaneous adiabatic shear bands in collapsing thick-walled cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovinger, Zev; Rosenberg, Zvi; Rittel, Daniel

    2015-09-01

    Shear bands formation in collapsing thick walled cylinders occurs in a spontaneous manner. The advantage of examining spontaneous, as opposed to forced shear localization, is that it highlights the inherent susceptibility of the material to adiabatic shear banding without prescribed geometrical constraints. The Thick-Walled Cylinder technique (TWC) provides a controllable and repeatable technique to create and study multiple adiabatic shear bands. The technique, reported in the literature uses an explosive cylinder to create the driving force, collapsing the cylindrical sample. Recently, we developed an electro-magnetic set-up using a pulsed current generator to provide the collapsing force, replacing the use of explosives. Using this platform we examined the shear band evolution at different stages of formation in 7 metallic alloys, spanning a wide range of strength and failure properties. We examined the number of shear bands and spacing between them for the different materials to try and figure out what controls these parameters. The examination of the different materials enabled us to better comprehend the mechanisms which control the spatial distribution of multiple shear bands in this geometry. The results of these tests are discussed and compared to explosively driven collapsing TWC results in the literature and to existing analytical models for spontaneous adiabatic shear localization.

  6. Reduced threshold of optically pumped amplified spontaneous emission and narrow line-width electroluminescence at cutoff wavelength from bilayer organic waveguide devices.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jui-Fen; Huang, Yu-Syuan; Chen, Po-Ting; Kao, Ruei-Lin; Lai, Xuan-You; Chen, Chii-Chang; Lee, Cheng-Chung

    2015-06-01

    We present a detailed study of the optically and electrically pumped emission in the BSB-Cz/PVK bilayer waveguide devices. By optical pumping we demonstrate that PVK as a spacer between fluorescent BSB-Cz and ITO electrode allows the significant reduction of the threshold for amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) of BSB-Cz. The simulation provides a better understanding of how the PVK thickness affects the waveguide mode field distribution and hence the ASE threshold of BSB-Cz. On the other hand, the BSB-Cz/PVK bilayer OLED exhibits the external quantum efficiency of >1% and anisotropic electroluminescence with spectrally narrowed edge emission at the cutoff wavelength controlled by the BSB-Cz thickness. When tuning the cutoff wavelength to match the peak gain of BSB-Cz, we demonstrate an intense, particularly narrow edge emission (~5 nm) without obvious degradation of efficiency at a high current density of 1000 mA/cm2, suggesting a reliable device performance for high-power applications and further exploration of electrically-pumped ASE. PMID:26072828

  7. Estimate of sulfur, arsenic, mercury, fluorine emissions due to spontaneous combustion of coal gangue: An important part of Chinese emission inventories.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaobin; Luo, Kunli; Wang, Xing; Sun, Yuzhuang

    2016-02-01

    A rough estimate of the annual amount of sulfur, arsenic, mercury and fluoride emission from spontaneous combustion of coal gangue in China was determined. The weighted mean concentrations of S, As, Hg, and F in coal gangue are 1.01%, 7.98, 0.18, and 365.54 mg/kg, respectively. Amounts of S, As, Hg, and F emissions from coal gangue spontaneous combustion show approximately 1.13 Mt, and 246, 45, and 63,298 tons in 2013, respectively. The atmospheric release amount of sulfur from coal gangue is more than one tenth of this from coal combustion, and the amounts of As, Hg, and F are close to or even exceed those from coal combustion. China's coal gangue production growth from 1992 to 2013 show an obvious growth since 2002. It may indicate that Chinese coal gangue has become a potential source of air pollution, which should be included in emission inventories. PMID:26650082

  8. Advanced CIDI Emission Control System Development

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, Christine

    2006-05-31

    Ford Motor Company, with ExxonMobil and FEV, participated in the Department of Energy's (DOE) Ultra-Clean Transportation Fuels Program with the goal to develop an innovative emission control system for light-duty diesel vehicles. The focus on diesel engine emissions was a direct result of the improved volumetric fuel economy (up to 50%) and lower CO2 emissions (up to 25%) over comparable gasoline engines shown in Europe. Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) with aqueous urea as the NOx reductant and a Catalyzed Diesel Particulate Filter (CDPF) were chosen as the primary emission control system components. The program expected to demonstrate more than 90% durable reduction in particulate matter (PM) and NOx emissions on a light-duty truck application, based on the FTP-75 drive cycle. Very low sulfur diesel fuel (<15 ppm-wt) enabled lower PM emissions, reduced fuel economy penalty due to the emission control system and improved long-term system durability. Significant progress was made toward a durable system to meet Tier 2 Bin 5 emission standards on a 6000 lbs light-duty truck. A 40% reduction in engine-out NOx emissions was achieved with a mid-size prototype diesel engine through engine recalibration and increased exhaust gas recirculation. Use of a rapid warm-up strategy and urea SCR provided over 90% further NOx reduction while the CDPF reduced tailpipe PM to gasoline vehicle levels. Development work was conducted to separately improve urea SCR and CDPF system durability, as well as improved oxidation catalyst function. Exhaust gas NOx and ammonia sensors were also developed further. While the final emission control system did not meet Tier 2 Bin 5 NOx after 120k mi of aging on the dynamometer, it did meet the standards for HC, NMOG, and PM, and an improved SCR catalyst was shown to have potential to meet the NOx standard, assuming the DOC durability could be improved further. Models of DOC and SCR function were developed to guide the study of several key design factors for SCR systems and aid in the development of urea control strategy for maximum NOx reduction with minimum NH3 slip. A durable co-fueling system was successfully built and tested, with the help of service station nozzle and dispenser manufacturers, for simultaneous delivery of diesel fuel and aqueous urea to the vehicle. The business case for an aqueous urea infrastructure in the US for light-duty vehicles was explored.

  9. Systematics of spontaneous emission of intermediate mass fragments from heavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Barwick, S.W.; Price, P.B.; Ravn, H.L.; Hourani, E.; Hussonnois, M.

    1986-07-01

    We have used polycarbonate track-recording films to confirm the rare decay mode of /sup 226/Ra by /sup 14/C emission and to set stringent upper limits on /sup 14/C-emission rates of /sup 221/Fr, /sup 221/Ra, and /sup 225/Ac. The /sup 14/C-emission rate exhibits a pronounced odd-even effect. For Ra isotopes the hindrance factor for odd-even parents relative to even-even parents is at least 10 times higher for /sup 14/C emission than for ..cap alpha.. emission.

  10. Controlling formaldehyde emissions with MBS scrubbing

    SciTech Connect

    Lundquist, P.R.

    1998-12-31

    Sodium metabisulfite (MBS)-assisted water scrubbing was selected as the most cost-effective and reliable technology for removal of dilute formaldehyde emissions from a resin manufacturing plant. Dilute formaldehyde emission streams (e.g., from process hoods, sample hoods, and other miscellaneous captured sources) required treatment in order to meet the anticipated Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) standards and state air toxic requirements. Other conventional technologies (e.g., thermal oxidation, carbon adsorption, and biofiltration) were considered, but later discarded because they were cost prohibitive or technically impractical. Segregation of dilute volatile organic compound (VOC) and hazardous air pollutant (HAP) emissions from other more concentrated VOC and HAP emissions facilitated the use of technologies tailored to the characteristics of each stream type, and thereby provided significant cost savings. While past experience has shown that simple water scrubbing of dilute formaldehyde emissions would not meet generally accepted treatment performance (90+% control), removals in excess of 95% can be readily achieved with the addition of a reactant like MBS to the scrubbing liquor. MBS in solution reacts with formaldehyde absorbed by the scrubber water to form a bisulfite salt, rendering the reacted formaldehyde non-volatile. The reaction accelerates mass transfer of formaldehyde into the scrubbing liquid, thereby decreasing the size and cost of emission control equipment. Design of such systems should also consider the chemistry of the make-up water (and scrubber water) used in the process. Recirculating water scrubbers can be susceptible to carbonate scaling and other inorganic fouling experienced in similar water treatment systems (e.g., air strippers). The addition of salts to the recirculating scrubber solutions can be controlled to limit potential sulfur dioxide emissions and deposits.

  11. Amplified spontaneous emission from 2,7-bis(4-pyridyl)fluorene-doped DNA-cetyltrimethyl ammonium complex films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiuhua; Li, Xing; Zhao, Yayun; Zhang, Jie; Pan, Jianguo; Zhou, Jun

    2013-10-01

    The 2,7-bis(4-pyridyl)fluorene (BPF) was synthesized via a Suzuki coupling reaction. The optical spectra properties of BPF and BPF-deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-cetyltrimethyl ammonium (CTMA) thin films composed of BPF, DNA, and CTMA were characterized by the measurements of UV/Vis absorption spectra and fluorescence spectra. The amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) of the BPF-DNA-CTMA films was researched experimentally by pumping of a pulse laser with a wavelength of 355 nm. The results show that the absorption peak and the fluorescence peak of BPF are located at 327 and 380 nm, respectively. The emission peak of BPF corresponds to the vibronic transitions from an excited state of S1 level to the ground state of S0 level. The ASE peak of the BPF-DNA-CTMA film is located at 384 nm, and the threshold of ASE excited energy density is 3.12 mJ.cm-2.

  12. Voltage-Mediated Control of Spontaneous Bundle Oscillations in Saccular Hair Cells

    PubMed Central

    Meenderink, Sebastiaan W. F.; Quiñones, Patricia M.

    2015-01-01

    Hair cells of the vertebrate vestibular and auditory systems convert mechanical inputs into electrical signals that are relayed to the brain. This transduction involves mechanically gated ion channels that open following the deflection of mechanoreceptive hair bundles that reside on top of these cells. The mechano-electrical transduction includes one or more active feedback mechanisms to keep the mechanically gated ion channels in their most sensitive operating range. Coupling between the gating of the mechanosensitive ion channels and this adaptation mechanism leads to the occurrence of spontaneous limit-cycle oscillations, which indeed have been observed in vitro in hair cells from the frog sacculus and the turtle basilar papilla. We obtained simultaneous optical and electrophysiological recordings from bullfrog saccular hair cells with such spontaneously oscillating hair bundles. The spontaneous bundle oscillations allowed us to characterize several properties of mechano-electrical transduction without artificial loading the hair bundle with a mechanical stimulus probe. We show that the membrane potential of the hair cell can modulate or fully suppress innate oscillations, thus controlling the dynamic state of the bundle. We further demonstrate that this control is exerted by affecting the internal calcium concentration, which sets the resting open probability of the mechanosensitive channels. The auditory and vestibular systems could use the membrane potential of hair cells, possibly controlled via efferent innervation, to tune the dynamic states of the cells. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The sensation of sound and balance starts by converting minute mechanical motions into electrical signals. This is accomplished by sensory hair cells, in which the opening and closing of mechanosensitive channels follows the motion of their hair bundles. These hair bundles can exhibit motility without an external drive. Underlying these spontaneous bundle oscillations are two coupled feedback mechanisms that improve the cell's response when mechanically stimulated. Here, we present synchronized optical and electrical recordings from cells with spontaneously oscillating bundles and show that the membrane potential may be a control parameter, tuning the cell's feedback processes. This control comes from modulation of the channel's open probability, which is affected by the concentration of calcium inside the cell. PMID:26511238

  13. Photoelectric charging of dust particles: Effect of spontaneous and light induced field emission of electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Sodha, M. S.; Dixit, A.

    2009-09-07

    The authors have analyzed the charging of dust particles in a plasma, taking into account the electron/ion currents to the particles, electron/ion generation and recombination, electric field emission, photoelectric emission and photoelectric field emission of electrons under the influence of light irradiation; the irradiance has been assumed to be at a level, which lets the particles retain the negative sign of the charge. Numerical results and discussion conclude the papers.

  14. Variable emissivity laser thermal control system

    DOEpatents

    Milner, J.R.

    1994-10-25

    A laser thermal control system for a metal vapor laser maintains the wall temperature of the laser at a desired level by changing the effective emissivity of the water cooling jacket. This capability increases the overall efficiency of the laser. 8 figs.

  15. FIRED HEATERS: NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSIONS AND CONTROLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from, and controls for, fired heaters. The petroleum refining and chemical manufacturing industries account for most of fired-heater energy use with an estimated 4600 fired heaters in operation, in these two in...

  16. CONTROLLING ODOROUS EMISSIONS FROM IRON FOUNDRIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses the control of odorous emissions from iron foundries. he main process sources of odors in iron foundries are mold and core making, casting, and sand shakeout. he odors are usually caused by chemicals, which may be present as binders and other additives to the...

  17. WASTE INCINERATION AND EMISSION CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of a survey of available waste incineration and emission control technologies in the U.S., Japan, and Western Europe. Increasing concern over landfills as a waste management option and the decreasing availability of sites have focused attention on incinera...

  18. CONTROLLING EMISSIONS FROM FUEL AND WASTE COMBUSTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Control of emissions from combustion of fuels and wastes has been a traditional focus of air pollution regulations. Significant technology developments of the '50s and '60s have been refined into reliable chemical and physical process unit operations. In the U.S., acid rain legis...

  19. Averaged kinetic temperature controlling algorithm: Application to spontaneous alloying in microclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Taizo R.; Ikeda, Kensuke S.; Shimizu, Yasushi; Sawada, Shin-ichi

    2003-04-01

    A simple algorithm of velocity scaling is proposed for the isothermal simulation of nonequilibrium relaxation processes accompanied with heat generation or absorption. The algorithm controls the kinetic temperature averaged over an arbitrary time interval at an arbitrary relaxation rate and at an arbitrary velocity scaling interval. The general conditions of controlling temperature are derived analytically and criteria for stable control are established. Our algorithm is applied to simulating the effect of substrate on the "spontaneous alloying" process of metal microclusters [H. Yasuda, H. Mori, M. Komatsu, K. Takeda, and H. Fujita, J. Electron Microsc. 41, 267 (1992)]. The results are compared with the results obtained by the Langevin algorithm in which the kinetic energy of every atom is controlled by respective stochastic heat reservoir. In spite of the marked difference between the two algorithms the relaxation dynamics agree very well in quantity over a sufficient wide range of control parameters.

  20. Absorption and Spontaneous Emission of Light by Molecules Near Metal Nanoparticles in External Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucherenko, M. G.; Nalbandyan, V. M.

    The frequency dependence of dipole polarizabilities of diamagnetic metal nanoparticles in a constant magnetic field B of various values is investigated. It is shown that with change of a magnetic field induction optical spectrums of absorption, scattering and radiation of nanosystems are transformed. It occurs as for nanoparticles, and molecules located near a surface of these particles. Influence of a magnetic field on absorption rate of photons by a cluster "molecule-nanoparticle", and also on the rate of spontaneous radiation a molecule near a nanoparticle is established.

  1. Spontaneous emission of a two-level atom with an arbitrarily polarized electric dipole in front of a flat dielectric surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Kien, Fam; Rauschenbeutel, A.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate spontaneous emission of a two-level atom with an arbitrarily polarized electric dipole in front of a flat dielectric surface. We treat the general case where the atomic dipole matrix element is a complex vector, that is, the atomic dipole can rotate with time in space. We calculate the rates of spontaneous emission into evanescent and radiation modes. We systematically study the angular densities of the rates in the space of wave vectors for the field modes. We show that the asymmetry of the angular density of the spontaneous emission rate under central inversion in the space of in-plane wave vectors occurs when the ellipticity vector of the atomic dipole polarization overlaps with the ellipticity vector of the field mode polarization.

  2. Immune responses during spontaneous control of HIV and AIDS: what is the hope for a cure?

    PubMed Central

    Saez-Cirion, A.; Jacquelin, B.; Barré-Sinoussi, F.; Müller-Trutwin, M.

    2014-01-01

    HIV research has made rapid progress and led to remarkable achievements in recent decades, the most important of which are combination antiretroviral therapies (cART). However, in the absence of a vaccine, the pandemic continues, and additional strategies are needed. The ‘towards an HIV cure’ initiative aims to eradicate HIV or at least bring about a lasting remission of infection during which the host can control viral replication in the absence of cART. Cases of spontaneous and treatment-induced control of infection offer substantial hope. Here, we describe the scientific knowledge that is lacking, and the priorities that have been established for research into a cure. We discuss in detail the immunological lessons that can be learned by studying natural human and animal models of protection and spontaneous control of viraemia or of disease progression. In particular, we describe the insights we have gained into the immune mechanisms of virus control, the impact of early virus–host interactions and why chronic inflammation, a hallmark of HIV infection, is an obstacle to a cure. Finally, we enumerate current interventions aimed towards improving the host immune response. PMID:24821922

  3. Terahertz-range spontaneous emission under the optical excitation of donors in uniaxially stressed bulk silicon and SiGe/Si heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Zhukavin, R. Kh. Kovalevsky, K. A.; Orlov, M. L.; Tsyplenkov, V. V.; Bekin, N. A.; Yablonskiy, A. N.; Yunin, P. A.; Pavlov, S. G.; Abrosimov, N. V.; Hübers, H.-W.; Radamson, H. H.; Shastin, V. N.

    2015-01-15

    The results of measurements of the total terahertz-range photoluminescence of Group-V donors (phosphorus, antimony, bismuth, arsenic) in bulk silicon and SiGe/Si heterostructures depending on the excitation intensity are presented. The signal of bulk silicon was also measured as a function of uniaxial stress. The results of measurement of the dependence of the spontaneous emission intensity on the uniaxial stress is in rather good agreement with theoretical calculations of the relaxation times of excited states of donors in bulk silicon. Comparative measurements of the spontaneous emission from various strained heterostructures showed that the photoluminescence signal is caused by donor-doped silicon regions.

  4. Two-Dimensional Organic Single Crystals with Scale Regulated, Phase-Switchable, Polymorphism-Dependent, and Amplified Spontaneous Emission Properties.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenyu; Song, Xiaoxian; Wang, Shipan; Li, Feng; Zhang, Hongyu; Ye, Kaiqi; Wang, Yue

    2016-05-01

    The successful preparation of two-dimensional (2D) single crystals can promote the development of organic optoelectronic devices with excellent performance. A Schiff base compound salicylidene(4-dimethylamino)aniline with aggregation induced emission (AIE) property was employed as the building block to fabricate 2D thin single crystal plates with scales from around 50 μm to 1.5 cm. Yellow and red emissive polymorphs were concomitantly obtained during crystallization. The single-crystal-to-single-crystal (SC-to-SC) transformation from yellow polymorph to red one was demonstrated. Furthermore, both polymorphs exhibited amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) properties. Interestingly, the red polymorph displayed size-dependent ASE characteristics. The larger red polymorph showed near-infrared ASE with maximum at 706 nm, whereas the smaller one presented red ASE with maximum at 610 nm. These results suggest that the different scale single crystalline thin films with perfect optoelectronic properties may be fabricated by using the organic molecules with 2D assembly feature. PMID:27096197

  5. Spontaneous emission interference enhancement with a {mu}-negative metamaterial slab

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng Xiaodong; Xu Jingping; Yang Yaping

    2011-09-15

    The spontaneous decay and quantum interference of a V-type Zeeman atom placed near a {mu}-negative metamaterial (MNG) slab are investigated. Based on the fact that MNG slab supports only TE-polarized surface-plasmon polariton (SPP) modes, the decay rate of the dipole component parallel to the interface would be much larger than that normal to the interface, because one can couple while another decouple to TE modes. Consequently, high-level anisotropic environment is created and the two dipoles can interfere with each other strongly by sharing such SPP modes even if they are orthogonal. In our work, we analyze the influence of the parameters of the MNG slab as well as the atomic location on the interference intensity in detail. In addition, the dissipation of the slab is considered, and the quantum interference is still excellent even with large absorption.

  6. Spontaneous emission from a two-level atom in anisotropic one-band photonic crystals: A fractional calculus approach

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.-N.; Huang, C.-H.; Cheng, S.-C.; Hsieh, W.-F.

    2010-02-15

    Spontaneous emission (SE) from a two-level atom in an anisotropic photonic crystal (PC) is investigated by the fractional calculus. Physical phenomena of the SE are studied analytically by solving the fractional kinetic equations of the SE. There is a dynamical discrepancy between the SE of anisotropic and isotropic PCs. We find that, contrary to the SE phenomenon of the isotropic PC, the SE near the band edge of an anisotropic PC shows no photon-atom bound state. It is consistent with the experimental results of Barth, Schuster, Gruber, and Cichos [Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 243902 (2006)] that the anisotropic property of the system enhances the SE. We also study effects of dispersion curvatures on the changes of the photonic density of states and the appearance of the diffusion fields in the SE.

  7. Amplified spontaneous emission measurement of a line-narrowed, tunable, Ti:Al2O3 amplifier using rubidium absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, James C.; Barnes, Norman P.; Lockard, George E.; Cross, Patricia L.

    1989-01-01

    Amplified spontaneous emission, ASE, generated by a Ti:Al2O3 laser amplifier has been measured as a function of pump energy, and thus gain, using the atomic absorption of rubidium, Rb, gas at 0.780 micron. By tuning the Ti:Al2O3 laser, the Rb cell could selectively absorb the narrow spectral bandwidth laser radiation while transmitting the wide spectral bandwidth ASE. Transmission of laser amplifier pulses through a Rb absorption cell, measured at various temperatures, thus allows the measurement of the weak ASE in the vicinity of the strong laser pulse. A model for the transmission of Rb as a function of temperature and wavelength has been developed. The measured transmissions are in good agreement with the transmission model predictions.

  8. Spontaneous emission and spectral properties of radiation by relativistic electrons in a gyro-klystron and optical-klystron undulator.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Bramha; Mishra, Ganeswar; Khullar, Roma

    2016-03-01

    In this paper spontaneous emission of radiation by relativistic electrons in a gyro-klystron is studied. The scheme consists of two solenoid sections separated by a dispersive section. In the dispersive section the electrons are made non-resonant with the radiation. The dispersive section transforms a small change of the velocity into changes of the phases of the electrons. This leads to enhanced radiation due to klystron-type modulation as compared with a conventional gyrotron-type device driven by cyclotron maser interaction. It is shown that the klystron-modulated spectrum depends on the dispersive field strength, finite perpendicular velocity component and length of the solenoids but is independent of the axial magnetic field strength. A simple scheme to design a gyro-klystron is discussed. PMID:26917129

  9. Advanced Emissions Control Development Program: Phase III

    SciTech Connect

    G.T. Amrhein; R.T. Bailey; W. Downs; M.J. Holmes; G.A. Kudlac; D.A. Madden

    1999-07-01

    The primary objective of the Advanced Emissions Control Development Program (AECDP) is to develop practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of air toxics from coal-fired boilers. The project goal is to effectively control air toxic emissions through the use of conventional flue gas clean-up equipment such as electrostatic precipitators (ESPs), fabric filters (baghouses - BH), and wet flue gas desulfurization systems (WFGD). Development work concentrated on the capture of trace metals, fine particulate, hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride, with an emphasis on the control of mercury. The AECDP project is jointly funded by the US Department of Energy's Federal Energy Technology Center (DOE), the Ohio Coal Development Office within the Ohio Department of Development (OCDO), and Babcock and Wilcox, a McDermott company (B and W). This report discusses results of all three phases of the AECDP project with an emphasis on Phase III activities. Following the construction and evaluation of a representative air toxics test facility in Phase I, Phase II focused on characterization of the emissions of mercury and other air toxics and the control of these emissions for typical operating conditions of conventional flue gas clean-up equipment. Some general comments that can be made about the control of air toxics while burning a high-sulfur bituminous coal are as follows: (1) particulate control devices such as ESP's and baghouses do a good job of removing non-volatile trace metals, (2) particulate control devices (ESPs and baghouses) effectively remove the particulate-phase mercury, but the particulate-phase mercury was only a small fraction of the total for the coals tested, (3) wet scrubbing can effectively remove hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride, and (4) wet scrubbers show good potential for the removal of mercury when operated under certain conditions, however, for certain applications, system enhancements can be required to achieve high removals when the scrubber is operated downstream of an ESP. Phase III (Advanced Concepts and Comparison Coals) testing was directed at the development of enhanced air toxics emissions control strategies to further reduce the emissions of mercury. Phase III results further supported the findings of previous phases and demonstrated several methods of enhancing mercury control for both unscrubbed systems and systems equipped with WFGD. Results confirmed that the addition of sorbents can be used to significantly improve the capture of mercury in downstream particulate collection equipment. In addition, Phase III testing demonstrated three methods of minimizing the potential negative impact of an ESP on downstream control of mercury in WFGD systems. These methods included decreased oxidation air flow, the addition of H{sub 2}S into the flue gas at the scrubber inlet, and the addition of EDTA into the absorber reaction tank.

  10. Brief Report: Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial of Reciprocal Imitation Training for Teaching Elicited and Spontaneous Imitation to Children with Autism

    PubMed Central

    Ingersoll, Brooke

    2013-01-01

    Children with autism exhibit significant deficits in imitation skills. Reciprocal Imitation Training (RIT), a naturalistic imitation intervention, was developed to teach young children with autism to imitate during play. This study used a randomized controlled trial to evaluate the efficacy of RIT on elicited and spontaneous imitation skills in 21 young children with autism. Results found that children in the treatment group made significantly more gains in elicited and spontaneous imitation, replicating previous single-subject design studies. Number of spontaneous play acts at pre-treatment was related to improvements in imitation during the intervention, suggesting that children with a greater play repertoire make greater gains during RIT. PMID:20155309

  11. Spectral broadening effects of spontaneous emission and density of state on plasmonic enhancement in cermet waveguides.

    PubMed

    Chen, Keyong; Feng, Xue; Zhang, Chao; Cui, Kaiyu; Huang, Yidong

    2013-01-14

    Based on the full integration formula of Purcell factor (PF) deduced from Fermi's Golden Rule, the plasmonic enhancement in Au(1-α)S3N4(α) cermet waveguides is evaluated with the joint impact of finite emission linewidth and the broadening of PF spectrum. The calculation results indicate that the PF would be significantly degraded by the two broadening effects though the SPP resonance frequency can be tuned with different volume fractions (α) of Si3N4. It is also found that the critical emission linewidth is approximately linear to the PF spectrum linewidth. Thus in order to achieve strong plasmonic enhancement, both the emission and PF spectrum linewidths should be dramatically reduced. PMID:23388935

  12. Spectral discrimination between healthy people and cold patients using spontaneous photon emission

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Meina; Pang, Jiangxiang; Liu, Junyan; Liu, Yanli; Fan, Hua; Han, Jinxiang

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, ultra-weak photon emission (UPE) was used to distinguish cold patients from healthy subjects. The UPE intensity of fingertips of two hands from healthy subjects and cold patients was measured using a two-hand UPE detecting system and a group of cut-off filters. We found a significant difference in the maximum spectral peak and photon emission ratio between the filter of 550nm and 495nm, which can be used in distinguish cold patients from healthy people. Methods and results in this work could be useful for developing a new optical diagnostic tool for early disease diagnosis in the future. PMID:25909016

  13. Dynamically correlated spontaneous-emission laser: theory and comparison with experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Bergou, J.; Orszag, M.

    1988-02-01

    A higher-order correlated-emission laser (CEL) effect is found theoretically in a Doppler-broadened medium. A full quantum-mechanical account of the CEL in the nonlinear regime shows a large reduction in the beat-signal linewidth. This behavior is confirmed by a recent experiment.

  14. Model Identification for Optimal Diesel Emissions Control

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, Andrew J.; Sun, Yannan; Song, Xiaobo; Parker, Gordon

    2013-06-20

    In this paper we develop a model based con- troller for diesel emission reduction using system identification methods. Specifically, our method minimizes the downstream readings from a production NOx sensor while injecting a minimal amount of urea upstream. Based on the linear quadratic estimator we derive the closed form solution to a cost function that accounts for the case some of the system inputs are not controllable. Our cost function can also be tuned to trade-off between input usage and output optimization. Our approach performs better than a production controller in simulation. Our NOx conversion efficiency was 92.7% while the production controller achieved 92.4%. For NH3 conversion, our efficiency was 98.7% compared to 88.5% for the production controller.

  15. Factors controlling dimethylsulfide emission from salt marshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dacey, John W. H.; Wakeham, S. G.; Howes, B. L.

    1985-01-01

    The factors that control the emission of methylated gases from salt marshes are being studied. Research focusses on dimethylsulfide (DMS) formation and the mechanism of DMS and CH4 emission to the atmosphere. The approach is to consider the plants as valves regulating the emission of methylated gases to the atmosphere with the goal of developing appropriate methods for emission measurement. In the case of CH4, the sediment is the source and transport to the atmosphere occurs primarily through the internal gas spaces in the plants. The source of DMS appears to be dimethyl sulfoniopropionate (DMSP) which may play a role in osmoregulation in plant tissues. Concentrations of DMSP in leaves are typically several-fold higher than in roots and rhizomes. Even so, the large below ground biomass of this plant means that 2/3 of the DMSP in the ecosystem is below ground on the aerial basis. Upon introduction to sediment water, DMSP rapidly decomposes to DMS and acrylic acid. The solubility of a gas (its equilibrium vapor pressure) is a fundamental aspect of gas exchange kinetics. The first comprehensive study was conducted of DMS solubility in freshwater and seawater. Data suggest that the Setchenow relation holds for H at intermediate salinities collected. These data support the concept that the concentration of DMS in the atmosphere is far from equilibrium with seawater.

  16. Spontaneous and stimulated emission of ZnO/ZnMgO asymmetric double quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, S. C.; Lu, Y. M.; Xing, G. Z.; Wu, T.

    2010-11-01

    ZnO/Zn 0.85Mg 0.15O asymmetric double quantum wells (ADQWs) were fabricated on an m-plane Al 2O 3 substrate by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (P-MBE). The ADQW structures were confirmed by comparing the photoluminescence (PL) spectra of the ZnO/Zn 0.85Mg 0.15O MQWs and ZnO/Zn 0.85Mg 0.15O ADQWs. The exciton tunnelling properties of the ADQWs were studied by means of temperature-dependent PL spectra. The carrier tunneling through the thin barrier is conducive to stimulated emission in the wide wells (WWs) of the ADQWs. The origin of the stimulated emission is exciton-exciton scattering in the WWs of ADQWs.

  17. Influence of pump-phase fluctuations on entanglement generation using a correlated spontaneous-emission laser

    SciTech Connect

    Qamar, Shahid; Xiong Han; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2007-06-15

    In this paper, we study the effect of phase fluctuations of the pump field upon the entanglement generation in a two-photon correlated emission laser (CEL). We consider initial vacuum and coherent state for the two-cavity modes. In both cases, we find reduction in the entanglement due to the phase fluctuations. However, our results indicate that entanglement generation is highly sensitive to phase fluctuations when we have initial coherent state in the two modes.

  18. Influence of pump-phase fluctuations on entanglement generation using a correlated spontaneous-emission laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qamar, Shahid; Xiong, Han; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2007-06-01

    In this paper, we study the effect of phase fluctuations of the pump field upon the entanglement generation in a two-photon correlated emission laser (CEL). We consider initial vacuum and coherent state for the two-cavity modes. In both cases, we find reduction in the entanglement due to the phase fluctuations. However, our results indicate that entanglement generation is highly sensitive to phase fluctuations when we have initial coherent state in the two modes.

  19. CONTROLLING MULTIPLE EMISSIONS FROM COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper presents and analyzes nine existing and novel control technologies designed to achieve multipollutant emissions reductions. It provides an evaluation of multipollutant emission control technologies that are potentially available for coal-fired power plants of 25 MW capa...

  20. The research and implementation of coalfield spontaneous combustion of carbon emission WebGIS based on Silverlight and ArcGIS server

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Z.; Bi, J.; Wang, X.; Zhu, W.

    2014-02-01

    As an important sub-topic of the natural process of carbon emission data public information platform construction, coalfield spontaneous combustion of carbon emission WebGIS system has become an important study object. In connection with data features of coalfield spontaneous combustion carbon emissions (i.e. a wide range of data, which is rich and complex) and the geospatial characteristics, data is divided into attribute data and spatial data. Based on full analysis of the data, completed the detailed design of the Oracle database and stored on the Oracle database. Through Silverlight rich client technology and the expansion of WCF services, achieved the attribute data of web dynamic query, retrieval, statistical, analysis and other functions. For spatial data, we take advantage of ArcGIS Server and Silverlight-based API to invoke GIS server background published map services, GP services, Image services and other services, implemented coalfield spontaneous combustion of remote sensing image data and web map data display, data analysis, thematic map production. The study found that the Silverlight technology, based on rich client and object-oriented framework for WCF service, can efficiently constructed a WebGIS system. And then, combined with ArcGIS Silverlight API to achieve interactive query attribute data and spatial data of coalfield spontaneous emmission, can greatly improve the performance of WebGIS system. At the same time, it provided a strong guarantee for the construction of public information on China's carbon emission data.

  1. Coherent optical transition radiation and self-amplified spontaneous emission generated by chicane-compressed electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Lumpkin, A.H.; Dejus, R.J.; Sereno, N.S.; /Argonne

    2009-02-01

    Observations of strongly enhanced optical transition radiation (OTR) following significant bunch compression of photoinjector beams by a chicane have been reported during the commissioning of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) accelerator and recently at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) linac. These localized transverse spatial features involve signal enhancements of nearly a factor of 10 and 100 in the APS case at the 150-MeV and 375-MeV OTR stations, respectively. They are consistent with a coherent process seeded by noise and may be evidence of a longitudinal space charge (LSC) microbunching instability which leads to coherent OTR (COTR) emissions. Additionally, we suggest that localized transverse structure in the previous self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) free-electron laser (FEL) data at APS in the visible-UV regime as reported at FEL02 may be attributed to such beam structure entering the FEL undulators and inducing the SASE startup at those structures. Separate beam structures 120 microns apart in x and 2.9 nm apart in wavelength were reported. The details of these observations and operational parameters will be presented.

  2. Hot stuff controls for VOC emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Yewshenko, P.

    1995-12-01

    For close to three decades, American industry has paved the way and led the world in controlling volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions. As more and more systems have been installed, the history of operation for the various types of systems has broadened dramatically, spurring significant technological advances, the traditional technologies and those on the cutting edge of VOC control. With the number of technologies available, the environmental professional may have a difficult task choosing the most strategic environmental solution. The conventional, traditional or proven methodology for VOC control has been incineration. Other technologies have been used for very specific applications. In deciding the specific type of incineration system to select, the environmental professional will look at a broad spectrum of evaluation factors. These include initial system cost, operational cost, maintenance requirements, reliability factors and most importantly, the projected success of achieving 99% VOC destruction efficiency. This article provides an overview of the basic differences among incineration technologies.

  3. Polyfunctional HIV-Specific Antibody Responses Are Associated with Spontaneous HIV Control

    PubMed Central

    Ackerman, Margaret E.; Mikhailova, Anastassia; Brown, Eric P.; Dowell, Karen G.; Walker, Bruce D.; Bailey-Kellogg, Chris; Suscovich, Todd J.; Alter, Galit

    2016-01-01

    Elite controllers (ECs) represent a unique model of a functional cure for HIV-1 infection as these individuals develop HIV-specific immunity able to persistently suppress viremia. Because accumulating evidence suggests that HIV controllers generate antibodies with enhanced capacity to drive antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) that may contribute to viral containment, we profiled an array of extra-neutralizing antibody effector functions across HIV-infected populations with varying degrees of viral control to define the characteristics of antibodies associated with spontaneous control. While neither the overall magnitude of antibody titer nor individual effector functions were increased in ECs, a more functionally coordinated innate immune–recruiting response was observed. Specifically, ECs demonstrated polyfunctional humoral immune responses able to coordinately recruit ADCC, other NK functions, monocyte and neutrophil phagocytosis, and complement. This functionally coordinated response was associated with qualitatively superior IgG3/IgG1 responses, whereas HIV-specific IgG2/IgG4 responses, prevalent among viremic subjects, were associated with poorer overall antibody activity. Rather than linking viral control to any single activity, this study highlights the critical nature of functionally coordinated antibodies in HIV control and associates this polyfunctionality with preferential induction of potent antibody subclasses, supporting coordinated antibody activity as a goal in strategies directed at an HIV-1 functional cure. PMID:26745376

  4. Metallic nanoparticles enhanced the spontaneous emission of semiconductor nanocrystals embedded in nanoimprinted photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Reboud, V; Lévêque, G; Striccoli, M; Placido, T; Panniello, A; Curri, M L; Alducin, J A; Kehoe, T; Kehagias, N; Mecerreyes, D; Newcomb, S B; Iacopino, D; Redmond, G; Sotomayor Torres, C M

    2013-01-01

    We report on a method to enhance the light-emission efficiency of printable thin films of a polymer doped with luminescent (CdSe)ZnS nanocrystals via metallic nanoparticles and nanoimprinted photonic crystals. We experimentally show a strong fluorescence enhancement of nanocrystals by coupling exciton-plasmon with the localized surface plasmon of metallic nanoparticles. The emitted light is efficiently diffracted by photonic crystals structures directly imprinted in the nanocomposite polymer. By combining the field susceptibility technique with optical Bloch equations, we examine the interaction of the quantum and plasmonic entities at small distances. PMID:23154433

  5. Naphthyl-functionalized oligophenyls: Photophysical properties, film morphology, and amplified spontaneous emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lin; Wu, Zhaoxin; Lei, Ting; Yu, Yue; Yuan, Fang; Jiao, Bo; Hou, Xun

    2016-04-01

    Herein, we reported a series of deep-blue-emitting naphthyl-functionalized oligophenyls as new organic laser active materials with tunable wavelength from 385 to 410 nm in solid state. Introduction of peripheral naphthyl into the oligophenyls enabled the great sterical dimensions due to the prominent steric hindrance but not destroyed the molecular conjugation. We assumed that it would suppress the π-π stacking efficiently, driving by intermolecular interaction, to hinder crystallization in solid films. Finally, the neat films of naphthyl-functionalized oligophenyls demonstrated amorphous state compared to the polycrystalline state of oligophenyls. Thus, naphthyl-functionalized oligophenyls displayed high emission quantum yield (22-35%) in solid state neat films. In addition, these molecules possessed large oscillator strength and radiative decay rate, as predicted by the theoretical analysis. The outstanding photophysical properties and amorphous films render naphthyl-functionalized oligophenyls a new class of optical gain media in solid state.

  6. Amplified spontaneous emission from PicoGreen dye intercalated in deoxyribonucleic acid lipid complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradeep, C.; Vallabhan, C. P. G.; Radhakrishnan, P.; Nampoori, V. P. N.

    2015-12-01

    DNA as a genetic biomolecule is more commonly referred to in life sciences, genetics, and microbiology. With the development of ‘DNA photonics’, it has shown tremendous applicability as an optical and photonic material. In this letter, we introduce a novel dye PicoGreen as a lasing medium in which DNA not only acts as a host matrix but also functions as a fluorescence enhancer. A dramatic increase in the fluorescence led us to the observation of optical amplification in dye doped DNA thin films. We also indicate the possible tunability of the output emission in the green-yellow region. With the obtained results, we have enough reasons to lead to the development of DNA-based bio-lasers.

  7. Electrostatic control of acid mist emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlin, R S; Brown, T D

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes a two-phased study of the control of acid mist emissions using a compact, wet electrostatic precipitator (WESP). The goal of the study was to determine the degree of acid mist control that could be achieved when a compact WESP is used to replace or augment the mist eliminators in a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system. Phase I of the study examined the electrical operation of a lab-scale WESP collecting an acid mist from a coal combustion pilot plant equipped with a spray chamber. The results of this study were used to develop and validate a computer model of the WESP. In Phase II, measurements were made at two utility scrubber installations to determine the loadings of acid mist, fly ash, and scrubber carryover. These measurements were used as input to the model to project the performance of a retrofitted WESP.

  8. PARTICULATE EMISSIONS CONTROL AND ITS IMPACTS ON THE CONTROL OF OTHER AIR POLLUTANT EMISSIONS FROM MUNICIPAL WASTE COMBUSTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses particulate emissions control and its impacts on the control of other air pollutant emissions from municipal waste combustors (MWCs). Generally, particulate control is an inherent part of the systems used to limit the emissions of these air pollutants. The rel...

  9. Accuracy of pulse oximetry and capnography in healthy and compromised horses during spontaneous and controlled ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, Judith; McDonell, Wayne; Valverde, Alexander

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this prospective clinical study was to evaluate the accuracy of pulse oximetry and capnography in healthy and compromised horses during general anesthesia with spontaneous and controlled ventilation. Horses anesthetized in a dorsal recumbency position for arthroscopy (n = 20) or colic surgery (n = 16) were instrumented with an earlobe probe from the pulse oximeter positioned on the tip of the tongue and a sample line inserted at the Y-piece for capnography. The horses were allowed to breathe spontaneously (SV) for the first 20 min after induction, and thereafter ventilation was controlled (IPPV). Arterial blood, for blood gas analysis, was drawn 20 min after induction and 20 min after IPPV was started. Relationships between oxygen saturation as determined by pulse oximetry (SpO2), arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2), arterial carbon dioxide partial pressure (PaCO2), and end tidal carbon dioxide (P(et)CO2), several physiological variables, and the accuracy of pulse oximetry and capnography, were evaluated by BlandAltman or regression analysis. In the present study, both SpO2 and P(et)CO2 provided a relatively poor indication of SaO2 and PaCO2, respectively, in both healthy and compromised horses, especially during SV. A difference in heart rate obtained by pulse oximetry, ECG, or palpation is significantly correlated with any pulse oximeter inaccuracy. If blood gas analysis is not available, ventilation to P(et)CO2 of 35 to 45 mmHg should maintain the PaCO2 within a normal range. However, especially in compromised horses, it should never substitute blood gas analysis. PMID:12889721

  10. Complexin controls spontaneous and evoked neurotransmitter release by regulating the timing and properties of synaptotagmin activity.

    PubMed

    Jorquera, Ramon A; Huntwork-Rodriguez, Sarah; Akbergenova, Yulia; Cho, Richard W; Littleton, J Troy

    2012-12-12

    Neurotransmitter release following synaptic vesicle (SV) fusion is the fundamental mechanism for neuronal communication. Synaptic exocytosis is a specialized form of intercellular communication that shares a common SNARE-mediated fusion mechanism with other membrane trafficking pathways. The regulation of synaptic vesicle fusion kinetics and short-term plasticity is critical for rapid encoding and transmission of signals across synapses. Several families of SNARE-binding proteins have evolved to regulate synaptic exocytosis, including Synaptotagmin (SYT) and Complexin (CPX). Here, we demonstrate that Drosophila CPX controls evoked fusion occurring via the synchronous and asynchronous pathways. cpx(-/-) mutants show increased asynchronous release, while CPX overexpression largely eliminates the asynchronous component of fusion. We also find that SYT and CPX coregulate the kinetics and Ca(2+) co-operativity of neurotransmitter release. CPX functions as a positive regulator of release in part by coupling the Ca(2+) sensor SYT to the fusion machinery and synchronizing its activity to speed fusion. In contrast, syt(-/-); cpx(-/-) double mutants completely abolish the enhanced spontaneous release observe in cpx(-/-) mutants alone, indicating CPX acts as a fusion clamp to block premature exocytosis in part by preventing inappropriate activation of the SNARE machinery by SYT. CPX levels also control the size of synaptic vesicle pools, including the immediate releasable pool and the ready releasable pool-key elements of short-term plasticity that define the ability of synapses to sustain responses during burst firing. These observations indicate CPX regulates both spontaneous and evoked fusion by modulating the timing and properties of SYT activation during the synaptic vesicle cycle. PMID:23238737

  11. IDENTIFICATION, ASSESSMENT, AND CONTROL OF FUGITIVE PARTICULATE EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The technical manual, designed to assist national, state, and local control agency personnel and industry personnel in evaluating fugitive emission control plans and in developing cost-effective control strategies, describes the identification, assessment, and control of fugitive...

  12. Control emissions from marine vessel loading

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, G.N.; Cross, S.R.

    1994-03-01

    Regulations set by the US Coast Guard require safety measures during the loading of marine vessels connected to vapor collection systems. These regulations (which were promulgated in July 1990) immediately impacted all companies involved with the loading of benzene, due to previously enacted US Environmental Protection Agency regulations governing benzene transfer. In addition, regulations issued by the states of California, New Jersey, and Louisiana impose additional marine emission control requirements. These regulations effectively work together--the federal or state environmental rule first requires the collection of the vapors generate from vessel loading, and then the Coast Guard regulation governs the safety features that must be applied to the system. Depending on the vapor pressure of the chemical, a 10,000-barrel barge may emit over one ton of chemical to the atmosphere. Such large volumes make marine loading a prime target for the push to further reduce atmospheric pollution, and its is a good be that many more companies will be asked to look at the recovery of vapors during the loading of marine vessels. This article will aid the engineer who may be asked to evaluate the various methods of controlling emissions from vessel loading. It provides some guidance on the requirements of the Coast Guard regulations and briefly outlines some of the technologies that have been used to process the collected vapors. Some important design considerations unique to marine systems are discussed to help engineers avoid some of the potential pitfalls. Finally, some estimated costs are provided for two common types of marine vapor control systems.

  13. Even-odd effects in prompt emission of spontaneously fissioning even-even Pu isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tudora, A.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Giubega, G.; Visan, I.

    2015-01-01

    The available experimental Y (A, TKE) data for 236,238,240,242,244Pu(SF) together with the Zp model prescription with appropriate parameters allows the investigation of even-odd effects in fragment distributions. The size of the global even-odd effect in Y (Z) is decreasing from 244Pu(SF) to 236Pu(SF) confirming the general observation of a decrease of the even-odd effect with the fissility parameter. Charge polarizations (ΔZ) and root-mean squares (rms) as a function of A of 236-244Pu(SF) were obtained for the first time. In the asymmetric fission region both ΔZ (A) and rms (A) exhibit oscillations with a periodicity of about 5 mass units due to the even-odd effects. The total average charge deviations < ΔZ > (obtained by averaging ΔZ (A) over the experimental Y (A) distribution) are of about |0.5| for all studied Pu(SF) systems. The comparison of the calculated ΔZ (A) and rms (A) of 240Pu(SF) with those of 239Pu (nth, f) reported by Wahl shows an in-phase oscillation with a higher amplitude in the case of 240Pu(SF), confirming the higher even-odd effect in the case of SF. As in the previously studied cases (233,235U (nth, f), 239Pu (nth, f), 252Cf(SF)) the even-odd effects in the prompt emission of 236-244Pu(SF) are mainly due to the Z even-odd effects in fragment distributions and charge polarizations and the N even-odd effects in the average neutron separation energies from fragments < Sn >. The size of the global N even-odd effect in < Sn > is decreasing with the fissility parameter, being higher for the Pu(SF) systems compared to the previously studied systems. The prompt neutron multiplicities as a function of Z, ν (Z), exhibit sawtooth shapes with a visible staggering for asymmetric fragmentations. The size of the global Z even-odd effect in ν (Z) exhibits a decreasing trend with increasing fissility. The average prompt neutron multiplicities as a function of TKE show an increase of the even-odd effect with increasing TKE, with global effect sizes close to each other (a decrease of the effect for heavier fissioning nuclei is not observed here). The amounts of the global even-odd effect in Y (Z) and of the N even-odd effect in < Sn > of 240Pu(SF) are larger compared to 239Pu (nth, f). This fact affects the prompt emission leading to a lower Z even-odd effect in the prompt neutron multiplicity of 240Pu(SF) compared to 239Pu (nth, f).

  14. 40 CFR 89.110 - Emission control information label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Emission control information label. 89.110 Section 89.110 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE NONROAD COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Emission Standards and Certification Provisions §...

  15. 40 CFR 89.110 - Emission control information label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Emission control information label. 89.110 Section 89.110 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE NONROAD COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Emission Standards and Certification Provisions §...

  16. Spontaneous emission from a single two-level atom in the presence of N initially unexcited identical atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummings, F. W.

    1986-03-01

    The quantum-electrodynamical problem of N identical two-level atoms interacting with M field modes is considered, and an exact solution for the case of spontaneous emission from a single atom is obtained. The behavior of this system is shown to be quite different from the exponential decay of a single excited atom radiating into free space. A 'ringing' behavior at the enigmatic frequency of approximately the square root of N, which occurs when only one mode is accessible to the field, persists when many modes are present. When a continuum of modes is accessible, the long-time limit shows that the energy of the originally excited atom is equally likely to be shared by the N-1 originally unexcited atoms and the electromagnetic field when M/N approaches 1. 'Radiation suppression' occurs whenever N is much greater than 1 and M is much less than N, when the originally excited atom does not emit its energy. When M = N much greater than 1, the single atom decays monotonically to zero (and approximately exponentially), but with a decay rate that is the square root of N times the Rabi frequency. Such unexpected affects are presently within experimental range.

  17. Amplified and directional spontaneous emission from arbitrary composite bodies: A self-consistent treatment of Purcell effect below threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Weiliang; Khandekar, Chinmay; Pick, Adi; Polimeridis, Athanasios G.; Rodriguez, Alejandro W.

    2016-03-01

    We study amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) from wavelength-scale composite bodies—complicated arrangements of active and passive media—demonstrating highly directional and tunable radiation patterns, depending strongly on pump conditions, materials, and object shapes. For instance, we show that under large enough gain, PT symmetric dielectric spheres radiate mostly along either active or passive regions, depending on the gain distribution. Our predictions are based on a recently proposed fluctuating-volume-current formulation of electromagnetic radiation that can handle inhomogeneities in the dielectric and fluctuation statistics of active media, e.g., arising from the presence of nonuniform pump or material properties, which we exploit to demonstrate an approach to modeling ASE in regimes where Purcell effect (PE) has a significant impact on the gain, leading to spatial dispersion and/or changes in power requirements. The nonlinear feedback of PE on the active medium, captured by the Maxwell-Bloch equations but often ignored in linear formulations of ASE, is introduced into our linear framework by a self-consistent renormalization of the (dressed) gain parameters, requiring the solution of a large system of nonlinear equations involving many linear scattering calculations.

  18. Spontaneous emission and absorption properties of a driven three-level system. II. The Λ and cascade models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manka, A. S.; Doss, H. M.; Narducci, L. M.; Ru, P.; Oppo, G.-L.

    1991-04-01

    This paper is concerned with the spectral profile of spontaneously emitted radiation from Λ and cascade models of driven three-level atoms, and with the absorption spectra of a weak probe. The atoms are excited by a pair of coherent external fields that are resonant or nearly resonant with the two dipole-allowed transitions of each of these two models. The main aim of this work is to extend earlier studies of the V-model configuration of three-level atoms and to present a comprehensive survey of the emission and absorption features of these systems. In addition to a derivation of exact formulas for the spectra and explicit analytic approximations in the high-intensity limit, we provide an explanation for the existence of simultaneous stationary population inversion between pairs of atomic levels and explore the effect of Doppler broadening on the absorption profile of the weak probe. In view of the latter analysis, in particular, we conclude that gain features persist even in the presence of inhomogeneous broadening. This suggests the possibility of experimental tests in a cell rather than an atomic-beam environment.

  19. Decoupling activation and exhaustion of B cells in spontaneous controllers of HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Sciaranghella, Gaia; Tong, Neath; Mahan, Alison E.; Suscovich, Todd J.; Alter, Galit

    2013-01-01

    Objective To define the impact of chronic viremia and associated immune activation on B-cell exhaustion in HIV infection. Design Progressive HIV infection is marked by B-cell anergy and exhaustion coupled with dramatic hypergammaglobulinemia. Although both upregulation of CD95 and loss of CD21 have been used as markers of infection-associated B-cell dysfunction, little is known regarding the specific profiles of dysfunctional B cells and whether persistent viral replication and its associated immune activation play a central role in driving B-cell dysfunction. Methods Multiparameter flow cytometry was used to define the profile of dysfunctional B cells. The changes in the expression of CD21 and CD95 were tracked on B-cell subpopulations in patients with differential control of viral replication. Results Although the emergence of exhausted, CD21low tissue-like memory B cells followed similar patterns in both progressors and controllers, the frequency of CD21low activated memory B cells was lower in spontaneous controllers. Conclusion Our results suggest that the loss of CD21 and the upregulation of CD95 occur as separate events during the development of B-cell dysfunction. The loss of CD21 is a marker of B-cell exhaustion induced in the absence of appreciable viral replication, whereas the upregulation of CD95 is tightly linked to persistent viral replication and its associated immune activation. Thus, these dysfunctional profiles potentially represent two functionally distinct states within the B-cell compartment. PMID:23135171

  20. A case-control study to investigate the role of recent spontaneous abortion in the aetiology of neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Kurinczuk, J J; Clarke, M

    1993-04-01

    Clarke et al. suggested that women who have had a spontaneous abortion are at an increased risk in their next pregnancy of producing an offspring with a neural tube defect (NTD). A matched case-control study was carried out to test the related hypothesis that a spontaneous abortion occurring in the 6-month period prior to the conception of a pregnancy (recent spontaneous abortion) is a risk factor for the development of an NTD in that pregnancy. The cases were 177 singleton pregnancies to non-primigravida Leicestershire women, which were affected by non-syndromal NTDs between 1976 and 1989. Two control pregnancies were matched with each case on intended place of delivery and date of maternal last normal menstrual period (LNMP). After adjusting for potential confounders, recent spontaneous abortion was found to be associated with a decreased relative risk of neural tube defect, odds ratio 0.46, 95% confidence interval 0.20, 1.07. The result provided little evidence in favour of the hypothesis, suggesting instead that prior spontaneous abortion has a protective effect in relation to subsequent NTD development rather than being a major risk factor in the aetiology of NTDs. PMID:8516190

  1. Chemical mechanisms in mercury emission control technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, E. S.; Laumb, J. D.; Benson, S. A.; Dunham, G. E.; Sharma, R. K.; Mibeck, B. A.; Miller, S. J.; Holmes, M. J.; Pavlish, J. H.

    2003-05-01

    The emission of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-burning power plants is a major environmental concern. Control technologies utilizing activated carbon show promise and are currently under intense review. Oxidation and capture of elemental mercury on activated carbon was extensively investigated in a variety of flue gas atmospheres. Extensive parametric testing with individual and a variety of combinations and concentrations of reactive flue gas components and spectroscopic examination of the sulfur and chlorine forms present before and after breakthrough have led to an improved model to explain the kinetic and capacity results. The improved model delineates the independent Lewis acid oxidation site as well as a zig-zag carbene site on the carbon edge that performs as a Lewis base in reacting with both the oxidized mercury formed at the oxidation site and with the acidic flue gas components in competing reactions to form organochlorine, sulfinate, and sulfate ester moieties on the carbon edge.

  2. CONTROL OF HYDROCARBON EMISSIONS FROM GASOLINE LOADING BY REFRIGERATION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study of the capabilities of refrigeration systems, operated at three temperatures, to control volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from truck loading at bulk gasoline terminals. Achievable VOC emission rates were calculated for refrigeration sy...

  3. Quantum-noise quenching in the correlated spontaneous-emission laser as a multiplicative noise process. II. Rigorous analysis including amplitude noise

    SciTech Connect

    Schleich, W.; Scully, M.O.; von Garssen, H.

    1988-04-15

    An analytical steady-state distribution for the phase difference psi in a correlated spontaneous-emission laser (CEL) is derived based on the amplitude and phase equations of a CEL. This distribution is shown to be an excellent approximation to that obtained from a numerical simulation of the complete set of CEL equations. In particular, the effects of amplitude noise on CEL operation are considered and it is shown that fluctuations in the relative amplitude are also noise quenched.

  4. High cell density induces spontaneous bifurcations of dissolved oxygen controllers during CHO cell fermentations.

    PubMed

    Chung, John D; Chang, Conway C; Groves, James Ashley

    2003-10-20

    High cell density cultures of CHO cells growing in a bioreactor under dissolved oxygen control were found to undergo spontaneous bifurcations and a subsequent loss of stability some time into the fermentation. This loss of stability was manifested by sustained and amplified oscillations in the bioreactor dissolved oxygen concentration and in the oxygen gas flow rate to the reactor. To identify potential biological and operational causes for the phenomenon, linear stability analysis was applied in a neighborhood of the experimentally observed bifurcation point. The analysis revealed that two steady state process gains, K(P1) and K(P2), regulated k(l)a and gas phase oxygen concentration inputs, respectively, and the magnitude of K(P1) was found to determine system stability about the bifurcation point. The magnitude of K(P1), and hence the corresponding open-loop steady state gain K(OL1), scaled linearly with the bioreactor cell density, increasing with increasing cell density. These results allowed the generation of a fermentation stability diagram, which partitioned K(C)-N operating space into stable and unstable regions separated by the loci of predicted critically stable controller constants, K(C,critical), as a function of bioreactor cell density. This consistency of this operating diagram with experimentally observed changes in system stability was demonstrated. We conclude that time-dependent increases in cell density are the cause of the observed instabilities and that cell density is the critical bifurcation parameter. The results of this study should be readily applicable to the design of a more robust controller. PMID:12966579

  5. Quantum theory of two-photon correlated-spontaneous-emission lasers: Exact atom-field interaction Hamiltonian approach

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, N.; Zhu, S. )

    1989-11-15

    A quantum theory of two-photon correlated-spontaneous-emission lasers (CEL's) is developed, starting from the exact atom-field interaction Hamiltonian for cascade three-level atoms interacting with a single-mode radiation field. We consider the situation where the active atoms are prepared initially in a coherent superposition of three atomic levels and derive a master equation for the field-density operator by using a quantum theory for coherently pumped lasers. The master equation is transformed into a Fokker-Planck equation for the antinormal-ordering {ital Q} function. The drift coefficients of the Fokker-Planck equation enable us to study the steady-state operation of the two-photon CEL's analytically. We have studied both resonant two-photon CEL for which there is no threshold, and off-resonant two-photon CEL for which there exists a threshold. In both cases the initial atomic coherences provide phase locking, and squeezing in the phase quadrature of the field is found. The off-resonant two-photon CEL can build up from a vacuum when its linear gain is larger than the cavity loss (even without population inversion). Maximum squeezing is found in the no-population-inversion region with the laser intensities far below saturation in both cases, which are more than 90% for the resonant two-photon CEL and nearly 50% for the off-resonant one. Approximate steady-state {ital Q} functions are obtained for the resonant two-photon CEL and, in certain circumstances, for the off-resonant one.

  6. Numerical investigation of spontaneous flame propagation under Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhagatwala, Ankit; Sankaran, Ramanan; Kokjohn, Sage; Chen, Jacqueline

    2014-11-01

    Results from one and two-dimensional direct numerical simulations under dual-fuel Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) conditions will be presented. These simulations employ an improved model of compression heating through mass source/sink terms developed in a previous work, which incorporates feedback from the flow to follow a predetermined experimental pressure trace. One-dimensional simulations explored the effect of temperature and fuel concentration gradients on the combustion mode. Two-dimensional simulations explored parametric variation in temperature stratification, pressure profiles and n-heptane concentration. Statistics derived from analysis of local diffusion/reaction balances were used to elucidate combustion characteristics for the different cases. Both deflagration and spontaneous ignition modes were observed to co-exist. Higher n-heptane concentration and higher level of thermal stratification resulted in a greater degree of flame propagation, whereas lower n-heptane concentration (higher fraction of iso-octane) and higher pressure resulted in more prevalent autoignition. Starting with a uniform initial temperature and a stratified n-heptane concentration also resulted in a large fraction of combustion occurring through flame propagation.

  7. Unregulated emissions from a heavy-duty diesel engine with various fuels and emission control systems.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shida; Frank, Brian P; Lanni, Thomas; Rideout, Greg; Meyer, Norman; Beregszaszy, Chris

    2007-07-15

    This study evaluated the effects of various combinations of fuels and emission control technologies on exhaust emissions from a heavy-duty diesel engine tested on an engine dynamometer. Ten fuels were studied in twenty four combinations of fuel and emission control technology configurations. Emission control systems evaluated were diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC), continuously regenerating diesel particulate filter (CRDPF), and the CRDPF coupled with an exhaust gas recirculation system (EGRT). The effects of fuel type and emission control technology on emissions of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene (BTEX), and 1,3-butadiene, elemental carbon and organic carbon (EC/OC), carbonyls, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and nitro-PAHs (n-PAHs) are presented in this paper. Regulated gaseous criteria pollutants of total hydrocarbons (THC), carbon monoxide (CO), oxides of nitrogen (NO(x)) and particulate matter (PM) emissions have been reported elsewhere. In general, individual unregulated emission with a CRDPF or an EGRT system is similar (at very low emission level) or much lower than that operating solely with a DOC and choosing a "best" fuel. The water emulsion PuriNO(x) fuel exhibited higher BTEX, carbonyls and PAHs emissions compared to other ultralow sulfur diesel (ULSD) fuels tested in this study while n-PAH emissions were comparable to that from other ULSD fuels. Naphthalene accounted for greater than 50% of the total PAH emissions in this study and there was no significant increase of n-PAHs with the usage of CRDPF. PMID:17711220

  8. The sensitivity of the Spontaneous Selective Attention Test (SSAT): a study of schizophrenic inpatients and outpatients versus normal controls.

    PubMed

    Myles-Worsley, M; Coon, H; Byerley, W

    1998-05-25

    The Spontaneous Selective Attention Task (SSAT) is a visual word-identification task that measures the type of selective attention that occurs spontaneously when there are multiple stimuli, all potentially relevant, and insufficient time to process each of them fully. The present study was designed to examine the sensitivity of the SSAT by comparing the performance of 40 schizophrenic inpatients and 30 schizophrenic outpatients to that of 70 normal controls. The pattern of results reported previously for schizophrenic inpatients versus normals was replicated, and these findings were extended to include schizophrenic outpatients in partial symptom remission. Schizophrenic inpatients and outpatients were just as accurate in identifying words as normals, but spontaneous selective attention under conditions of predictability was abnormal in both patient groups. Furthermore, the ability of the SSAT to discriminate between schizophrenic patients and controls was confirmed. A ratio measure of spontaneous selective attention had a sensitivity of 77% and a base rate of 9% in a normal population (when a cutoff value was set to minimize false positives and false negatives). Thus, the SSAT is a sensitive measure of an attentional phenotype that may be useful in genetic studies of schizophrenia. PMID:9689717

  9. Controlled and Spontaneous Magnetic Field Generation in a Gun-Driven Spheromak

    SciTech Connect

    Woodruff, S; Cohen, B I; Hooper, E B; McLean, H S; Stallard, B W; Hill, D N; Holcomb, C T; Romero-Talamas, C; Wood, R D; Cone, G; Sovinec, C R

    2004-10-01

    In the Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment, SSPX, progress has been made in understanding the mechanisms that generate fields by helicity injection. SSPX injects helicity (linked magnetic flux) from 1-m diameter magnetized coaxial electrodes into a flux-conserving confinement region. Control of magnetic fluctuations ({delta}B/B{approx}1% on the midplane edge) yields T{sub e} profiles peaked at > 200eV. Trends indicate a limiting beta ({beta}{sub e} {approx} 4-6%), and so we have been motivated to increase T{sub e} by operating with stronger magnetic field. Two new operating modes are observed to increase the magnetic field: (A) Operation with constant current and spontaneous gun voltage fluctuations. In this case, the gun is operated continuously at the threshold for ejection of plasma from the gun: stored magnetic energy of the spheromak increases gradually with {delta}B/B {approx}2% and large voltage fluctuations ({delta}V {approx} 1kV), giving a 50% increase in current amplification, I{sub tor}/I{sub gun}. (B) Operation with controlled current pulses. In this case, spheromak magnetic energy increases in a stepwise fashion by pulsing the gun, giving the highest magnetic fields observed for SSPX ({approx}0.7T along the geometric axis). By increasing the time between pulses, a quasi-steady sustainment is produced (with periodic good confinement), comparing well with resistive MHD simulations. In each case, the processes that transport the helicity into the spheromak are inductive and exhibit a scaling of field with current that exceeds those previously obtained. We use our newly found scaling to suggest how to achieve higher temperatures with a series of pulses.

  10. Controlled and spontaneous magnetic field generation in a gun-driven spheromak

    SciTech Connect

    Woodruff, S.; Cohen, B.I.; Hooper, E.B.; Mclean, H.S.; Stallard, B.W.; Hill, D.N.; Holcomb, C.T.; Romero-Talamas, C.; Wood, R.D.; Cone, G.; Sovinec, C.R.

    2005-05-15

    In the Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment, SSPX [E. B. Hooper, D. Pearlstein, and D. D. Ryutov, Nucl. Fusion 39, 863 (1999)], progress has been made in understanding the mechanisms that generate fields by helicity injection. SSPX injects helicity (linked magnetic flux) from 1 m diameter magnetized coaxial electrodes into a flux-conserving confinement region. Control of magnetic fluctuations ({delta}B/B{approx}1% on the midplane edge) yields T{sub e} profiles peaked at >200 eV. Trends indicate a limiting beta ({beta}{sub e}{approx}4%-6%), and so we have been motivated to increase T{sub e} by operating with stronger magnetic field. Two new operating modes are observed to increase the magnetic field: (A) Operation with constant current and spontaneous gun voltage fluctuations. In this case, the gun is operated continuously at the threshold for ejection of plasma from the gun: stored magnetic energy of the spheromak increases gradually with {delta}B/B{approx}2% and large voltage fluctuations ({delta}V{approx}1 kV), giving a 50% increase in current amplification, I{sub tor}/I{sub gun}. (B) Operation with controlled current pulses. In this case, spheromak magnetic energy increases in a stepwise fashion by pulsing the gun, giving the highest magnetic fields observed for SSPX ({approx}0.7 T along the geometric axis). By increasing the time between pulses, a quasisteady sustainment is produced (with periodic good confinement), comparing well with resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulations. In each case, the processes that transport the helicity into the spheromak are inductive and exhibit a scaling of field with current that exceeds those previously obtained. We use our newly found scaling to suggest how to achieve higher temperatures with a series of pulses.

  11. 40 CFR 52.987 - Control of hydrocarbon emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control of hydrocarbon emissions. 52... (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Louisiana § 52.987 Control of hydrocarbon... compliance date of January 1, 1980. This shall result in an estimated hydrocarbon emission reduction of...

  12. 40 CFR 52.987 - Control of hydrocarbon emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Control of hydrocarbon emissions. 52... (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Louisiana § 52.987 Control of hydrocarbon... compliance date of January 1, 1980. This shall result in an estimated hydrocarbon emission reduction of...

  13. 40 CFR 52.987 - Control of hydrocarbon emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Control of hydrocarbon emissions. 52... (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Louisiana § 52.987 Control of hydrocarbon... compliance date of January 1, 1980. This shall result in an estimated hydrocarbon emission reduction of...

  14. 40 CFR 52.987 - Control of hydrocarbon emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Control of hydrocarbon emissions. 52... (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Louisiana § 52.987 Control of hydrocarbon... compliance date of January 1, 1980. This shall result in an estimated hydrocarbon emission reduction of...

  15. 40 CFR 52.987 - Control of hydrocarbon emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Control of hydrocarbon emissions. 52... (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Louisiana § 52.987 Control of hydrocarbon... compliance date of January 1, 1980. This shall result in an estimated hydrocarbon emission reduction of...

  16. 40 CFR 266.104 - Standards to control organic emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standards to control organic emissions... Standards to control organic emissions. (a) DRE standard—(1) General. Except as provided in paragraph (a)(3... and removal efficiency (DRE) of 99.99% for all organic hazardous constituents in the waste feed....

  17. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 1037 - Emission Control Identifiers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Appendix III to Part 1037 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... to Part 1037—Emission Control Identifiers This appendix identifies abbreviations for emission control... aerodynamic roof fairing -TGR—Gap reducing fairing (tractor to trailer gap) Other Components...

  18. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 1037 - Emission Control Identifiers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Appendix III to Part 1037 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... to Part 1037—Emission Control Identifiers This appendix identifies abbreviations for emission control... aerodynamic roof fairing -TGR—Gap reducing fairing (tractor to trailer gap) Other Components...

  19. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 1037 - Emission Control Identifiers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Appendix III to Part 1037 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... to Part 1037—Emission Control Identifiers This appendix identifies abbreviations for emission control... aerodynamic roof fairing -TGR—Gap reducing fairing (tractor to trailer gap) Other Components...

  20. Gaseous emissions from plants in controlled environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubay, Denis T.

    1988-01-01

    Plant growth in a controlled ecological life support system may entail the build-up over extended time periods of phytotoxic concentrations of volatile organic compounds produced by the plants themselves. Ethylene is a prominent gaseous emission of plants, and is the focus of this report. The objective was to determine the rate of ethylene release by spring wheat, white potato, and lettuce during early, middle, and late growth stages, and during both the light and dark segments of the diurnal cycle. Plants grown hydroponically using the nutrient film technique were covered with plexiglass containers for 4 to 6 h. At intervals after enclosure, gas samples were withdrawn with a syringe and analyzed for ethylene with a gas chromatograph. Lettuce produced 10 to 100 times more ethylene than wheat or potato, with production rates ranging from 141 to 158 ng g-dry/wt/h. Wheat produced from 1.7 to 14.3 ng g-dry/wt/h, with senescent wheat producing the least amount and flowering wheat the most. Potatoes produced the least amount of ethylene, with values never exceeding 5 ng g-dry/wt/h. Lettuce and potatoes each produced ethylene at similar rates whether in dark period or light period. Ethylene sequestering of 33 to 43 percent by the plexiglass enclosures indicated that these production estimates may be low by one-third to one-half. These results suggest that concern for ethylene build-up in a contained atmosphere should be greatest when growing lettuce, and less when growing wheat or potato.

  1. Spontaneous pushing to prevent postpartum urinary incontinence: a randomized, controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Janis M.; Guo, Ying; Ashton-Miller, James A.; DeLancey, John O. L.; Sampselle, Carolyn M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction and hypothesis The risk for urinary incontinence can be 2.6-fold greater in women after pregnancy and childbirth compared with their never-pregnant counterparts, with the incidence increasing with parity. We tested the hypothesis that the incidence of de novo postpartum urinary incontinence in primiparous women is reduced with the use of spontaneous pushing alone or in combination with perineal massage compared with women who experienced traditional directed pushing for second-stage management. Methods This was a prospective clinical trial enrolling and randomizing 249 women into a four-group design: (1) routine care with coached or directed pushing, (2) spontaneous self-directed pushing, (3) prenatal perineal massage initiated in the third trimester, and (4) the combination of spontaneous pushing plus perineal massage. Self-report of incontinence was assessed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and covariance (ANCOVA) models in 145 remaining women at 12 months postpartum using the Leakage Index, which is sensitive to minor leakage. Results No statistical difference in the incidence of de novo postpartum incontinence was found based on method of pushing (spontaneous/directed) (P value=0.57) or in combination with prenatal perineal massage (P value=0.57). Fidelity to pushing treatment of type was assessed and between-groups crossover detected. Conclusions Spontaneous pushing did not reduce the incidence of postpartum incontinence experienced by women 1 year after their first birth due to high cross-over between randomization groups. PMID:22829349

  2. Self-amplified spontaneous emission saturation at the Advanced Photon Source free-electron laser (abstract) (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moog, E. R.; Milton, S. V.; Arnold, N. D.; Benson, C.; Berg, W.; Biedron, S. G.; Borland, M.; Chae, Y.-C.; Dejus, R. J.; Den Hartog, P. K.; Deriy, B.; Erdmann, M.; Gluskin, E.; Huang, Z.; Kim, K.-J.; Lewellen, J. W.; Li, Y.; Lumpkin, A. H.; Makarov, O.; Nassiri, A.; Sajaev, V.; Soliday, R.; Tieman, B. J.; Trakhtenberg, E. M.; Travish, G.; Vasserman, I. B.; Vinokurov, N. A.; Wiemerslage, G.; Yang, B. X.

    2002-03-01

    Today, many bright photon beams in the ultraviolet and x-ray wavelength range are produced by insertion devices installed in specially designed third-generation storage rings. There is the possibility of producing photon beams that are orders of magnitude brighter than presently achieved at synchrotron sources, by using self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE). At the Advanced Photon Source (APS), the low-energy undulator test line (LEUTL) free-electron laser (FEL) project was built to explore the SASE process in the visible through vacuum ultraviolet wavelength range. While the understanding gained in these experiments will guide future work to extend SASE FELs to shorter wavelengths, the APS FEL itself will become a continuously tunable, bright light source. Measurements of the SASE process to saturation have been made at 530 and 385 nm. A number of quantities were measured to confirm our understanding of the SASE process and to verify that saturation was reached. The intensity of the FEL light was measured versus distance along the FEL, and was found to flatten out at saturation. The statistical variation of the light intensity was found to be wide in the exponential gain region where the intensity is expected to be noisy, and narrower once saturation was reached. Absolute power measurements compare well with GINGER simulations. The FEL light spectrum at different distances along the undulator line was measured with a high-resolution spectrometer, and the many sharp spectral spikes at the beginning of the SASE process coalesce into a single peak at saturation. The energy spread in the electron beam widens markedly after saturation due to the number of electrons that transfer a significant amount of energy to the photon beam. Coherent transition radiation measurements of the electron beam as it strikes a foil provide additional confirmation of the microbunching of the electron beam. The quantities measured confirm that saturation was indeed reached. Details are given in Milton et al., Science 292, 2037 (2001) (also online at www.sciencexpress.org as 10.1126/science. 1059955, 17 May 2001), and Lewellen et al., "Present Status and Recent Results from the APS SASE FEL," to be published in the Proceedings of the 23rd International Free-Electron Laser Conference, Darmstadt, Germany, 20-24 August 2001.

  3. Temperature Dependence of Factors Controlling Isoprene Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, Bryan N.; Yoshida, Yasuko; Damon, Megan R.; Douglass, Anne R.; Witte, Jacquelyn C.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the relationship of variability in the formaldehyde (HCHO) columns measured by the Aura Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) to isoprene emissions in the southeastern United States for 2005-2007. The data show that the inferred, regional-average isoprene emissions varied by about 22% during summer and are well correlated with temperature, which is known to influence emissions. Part of the correlation with temperature is likely associated with other causal factors that are temperature-dependent. We show that the variations in HCHO are convolved with the temperature dependence of surface ozone, which influences isoprene emissions, and the dependence of the HCHO column to mixed layer height as OMI's sensitivity to HCHO increases with altitude. Furthermore, we show that while there is an association of drought with the variation in HCHO, drought in the southeastern U.S. is convolved with temperature.

  4. Active control of excessive sound emission on a mobile device.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Se-Woon; Youn, Dae Hee; Park, Young-cheol; Lee, Gun-Woo

    2015-04-01

    During a phone conversation, loud vocal emission from the far-end to the near-end space can disturb nearby people. In this paper, the possibility of actively controlling such unwanted sound emission using a control source placed on the mobile device is investigated. Two different approaches are tested: Global control, minimizing the potential energy measured along a volumetric space surface, and local control, minimizing the squared sound pressure at a discrete point on the phone. From the test results, both approaches can reduce the unwanted sound emission by more than 6 dB in the frequency range up to 2 kHz. PMID:25920885

  5. X-RAY NONLINEAR OPTICAL PROCESSES IN ATOMS USING A SELF-AMPLIFIED SPONTANEOUS EMISSION FREE-ELECTRON LASER

    SciTech Connect

    Rohringer, N

    2008-08-08

    X-ray free electron lasers (xFEL) will open new avenues to the virtually unexplored territory of non-linear interactions of x rays with matter. Initially xFELs will be based on the principle of self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE). Each SASE pulse consists of a number of coherent intensity spikes of random amplitude, i.e. the process is chaotic and pulses are irreproducible. The coherence time of SASE xFELs will be a few femtoseconds for a photon energy near 1 keV. The importance of coherence properties of light in non-linear optical processes was theoretically discovered in the early 1960s. In this contribution we will illustrate the impact of field chaoticity on x-ray non-linear optical processes on neon for photon energies around 1 keV and intensities up to 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}. Resonant and non-resonant processes are discussed. The first process to be addressed is the formation of a double-core hole in neon by photoionization with x rays above 1.25 keV energy. In contrast to the long-wavelength regime, non-linear optical processes in the x-ray regime are characterized in general by sequential single-photon single-electron interactions. Despite this fact, the sequential absorption of multiple x-ray photons depends on the statistical properties of the radiation field. Treating the x rays generated by a SASE FEL as fully chaotic, a quantum-mechanical analysis of inner-shell two-photon absorption is performed. By solving a system of time-dependent rate equations, we demonstrate that double-core hole formation in neon via x-ray two-photon absorption is enhanced by chaotic photon statistics. At an intensity of 10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2}, the statistical enhancement is about 30%, much smaller than typical values in the optical regime. The second part of this presentation discusses the resonant Auger effect of atomic neon at the 1s-3p transition (at 867.1 eV). For low X-ray intensity, the excitation process 1s {yields} 3p in Neon can be treated perturbatively. The core-hole excited 1s{sup -1} 3p state is embedded in the continuum and decays via Auger-process on the timescale of approximately 5 fs. Increasing the x-ray intensity above 1.5 x 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}, a peak intensity accessible with xFEL sources in the near future, x-ray induced emission from 3p back to 1s becomes possible, i.e. Rabi oscillations between these two levels can be induced. For the numerical analysis of this process, an effective two-level model, including a description of the resonant Auger decay process, is employed. The observation of x-ray-driven atomic populations dynamics in the time domain is challenging for chaotic xFEL pulses. In addition to requiring single-shot measurements, sub-femtosecond temporal resolution would be needed. The Rabi oscillations will, however, be imprinted on the kinetic energy distribution of the resonant Auger electron (see Fig. 1). Measuring the resonant Auger-electron line profile will provide information on both atomic population dynamics and x-ray pulse properties.

  6. Dynamic control of light emission faster than the lifetime limit using VO2 phase-change.

    PubMed

    Cueff, Sébastien; Li, Dongfang; Zhou, You; Wong, Franklin J; Kurvits, Jonathan A; Ramanathan, Shriram; Zia, Rashid

    2015-01-01

    Modulation is a cornerstone of optical communication, and as such, governs the overall speed of data transmission. Currently, the two main strategies for modulating light are direct modulation of the excited emitter population (for example, using semiconductor lasers) and external optical modulation (for example, using Mach-Zehnder interferometers or ring resonators). However, recent advances in nanophotonics offer an alternative approach to control spontaneous emission through modifications to the local density of optical states. Here, by leveraging the phase-change of a vanadium dioxide nanolayer, we demonstrate broadband all-optical direct modulation of 1.5 μm emission from trivalent erbium ions more than three orders of magnitude faster than their excited state lifetime. This proof-of-concept demonstration shows how integration with phase-change materials can transform widespread phosphorescent materials into high-speed optical sources that can be integrated in monolithic nanoscale devices for both free-space and on-chip communication. PMID:26489436

  7. Dynamic control of light emission faster than the lifetime limit using VO2 phase-change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cueff, Sébastien; Li, Dongfang; Zhou, You; Wong, Franklin J.; Kurvits, Jonathan A.; Ramanathan, Shriram; Zia, Rashid

    2015-10-01

    Modulation is a cornerstone of optical communication, and as such, governs the overall speed of data transmission. Currently, the two main strategies for modulating light are direct modulation of the excited emitter population (for example, using semiconductor lasers) and external optical modulation (for example, using Mach-Zehnder interferometers or ring resonators). However, recent advances in nanophotonics offer an alternative approach to control spontaneous emission through modifications to the local density of optical states. Here, by leveraging the phase-change of a vanadium dioxide nanolayer, we demonstrate broadband all-optical direct modulation of 1.5 μm emission from trivalent erbium ions more than three orders of magnitude faster than their excited state lifetime. This proof-of-concept demonstration shows how integration with phase-change materials can transform widespread phosphorescent materials into high-speed optical sources that can be integrated in monolithic nanoscale devices for both free-space and on-chip communication.

  8. Control and pollution prevention options for ammonia emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, J.

    1995-04-01

    In response to requests for guidance concerning technologies available for the control and prevention of ammonia emissions, the Control Technology Center (CTC) initiated a review of current and potential methods for ammonia emissions control. A review of various industries has identified significant sources of ammonia to be fertilizer production, coke production using the by-product recovery method, fossil fuel combustion, livestock management, and refrigeration using ammonia as a refrigerant. Control methods implemented by these sources include wet scrubbers, condensate strippers, recovery and recycle of exhaust streams, capture systems, and good maintenance practices. The report discusses each industry process identified above, concentrating on the sources of ammonia emissions and the controls and pollution prevention (P2) methods applied. Other industries may have minor ammonia emissions but they are not addressed in this report because neither control technologies nor P2 are applied.

  9. Controlling laser emission by selecting crystal orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lijuan; Han, Shujuan; Wang, Zhengping; Wang, Jiyang; Zhang, Huanjin; Yu, Haohai; Han, Shuo; Xu, Xinguang

    2013-01-01

    Based on the anisotropy of laser crystal, we demonstrate a method of adjusting laser emission by selecting crystal orientation. When the light propagating direction varies from a to c axis of Nd:LiGd(MoO4)2 crystal, emission wavelength exhibits a sensitive change of 1061 nm → 1061/1062 + 1068 nm → 1068 nm. The experimental discipline is well explained by a theoretical study of simulating on the spatial distribution of stimulated emission cross-section. This letter manifests that the laser property along non-principal-axis direction is also valuable for research and application, which breaks through the traditional custom of using laser materials processed along principal-axis.

  10. Using Transfer of Stimulus Control Technology to Promote Generalization and Spontaneity of Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, Trina D.; Higbee, Thomas S.

    2012-01-01

    Children with autism often use newly acquired language in restricted contexts and with limited variability. Instructional tactics that embed generalization technology have shown promise for increasing spontaneity, response variation, and the generalized use of language across settings, people, and materials. In this study, we explored the…

  11. Genetic Control of Spontaneous Arthritis in a Four-Way Advanced Intercross Line

    PubMed Central

    Ranea, Laura Mellado; de Castro Marques, Andreia; Möller, Steffen; Gupta, Yask; Ibrahim, Saleh M.

    2013-01-01

    Identifying the genetic basis of complex diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, remains a challenge that requires experimental models to reduce the genetic and environmental variability. Numerous loci for arthritis have been identified in induced animal models; however, few spontaneous models have been genetically studied. Therefore, we generated a four-way advanced intercross line (AIL) from four inbred strains, including BXD2/TyJ which spontaneously develops autoimmune arthritis. A genome-wide scan for spontaneous arthritis was performed in a cohort of 366 mice of the fourth generation (G4) of this cross. Five loci contributing to clinical phenotypes were identified in chromosomes 3, 7, 13, 18, and X. Three of the loci found in this study, confirm previously identified loci; whereas two of them are novel loci. Interesting candidate genes for the loci are highlighted. This study provides a genetic overview of spontaneous arthritis in mice and aids to solve the genetic etiology of rheumatoid arthritis and to gain a better understanding of the disease. PMID:24146764

  12. Controlling quantum-dot light absorption and emission by a surface-plasmon field.

    PubMed

    Huang, Danhong; Easter, Michelle; Gumbs, Godfrey; Maradudin, A A; Lin, Shawn-Yu; Cardimona, D A; Zhang, Xiang

    2014-11-01

    The possibility for controlling both the probe-field optical gain and absorption, as well as photon conversion by a surface-plasmon-polariton near field is explored for a quantum dot located above a metal surface. In contrast to the linear response in the weak-coupling regime, the calculated spectra show an induced optical gain and a triply-split spontaneous emission peak resulting from the interference between the surface-plasmon field and the probe or self-emitted light field in such a strongly-coupled nonlinear system. Our result on the control of the mediated photon-photon interaction, very similar to the 'gate' control in an optical transistor, may be experimentally observable and applied to ultra-fast intrachip/interchip optical interconnects, improvement in the performance of fiber-optic communication networks, and developments of optical digital computers and quantum communications. PMID:25401904

  13. Some factors involved in the thalamic control of spontaneous barbiturate spindles

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, P.; Andersson, S. A.; Lømo, T.

    1967-01-01

    1. The origin of thalamic and cortical spontaneous spindles was studied in cats anaesthetized with sodium pentobarbital. 2. Complete removal of all cortical grey matter left the thalamic rhythmic spindle activity unchanged. 3. Removal of the entire thalamus or pronounced oedema in the thalamus abolished completely the spindle activity in the corresponding hemisphere. 4. In a neuronally isolated cortical area, a fast, low voltage background activity appeared, interrupted by occasional irregular rapid potential changes (sharp waves) of high voltage. Regular spindle rhythms were seldom observed unless excited by a depolarizing drug. Spontaneous spindles did not invade the isolated cortex via a bridge of intact cortical tissue. 5. With increasingly larger destruction of the thalamus in a rostro-caudal direction, the activity in the post-cruciate cortex did not change until the anterior third of the thalamus was encroached upon. A transverse section in front of the thalamus nearly eliminated the cortical spindles. 6. Complete removal of the mid line and intralaminar nuclei left the spontaneous rhythmic activity of the lateral thalamic nuclei and of the frontal cortex principally unchanged. 7. Removal of the laterally located thalamic nuclei, including the n. ventralis posterolateralis (VPL), abolished virtually all spontaneous spindle activity of the frontal cortex, including the post-cruciate area. 8. Local cortical cooling reduced the amplitude but not the frequency of the cortical spindles. 9. Cooling of the whole brain reduced both the amplitude and the frequency of the spindles. At low temperatures, all spindle activity in the cortex disappeared, and occasional sharp waves occurred, as with de-afferentation. 10. It is concluded that the rhythm of the cortical spontaneous barbiturate spindles is generated exclusively by thalamic neurones. The electromotive force of the corticographic waves, however, has a cortical origin. PMID:6050147

  14. A new self-controlled case series method for analyzing spontaneous reports of adverse events after vaccination.

    PubMed

    Escolano, S; Hill, C; Tubert-Bitter, P

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, we propose new methods for analyzing cases of vaccine adverse events spontaneously reported to a surveillance database. The methods use the self-controlled case series approach, extended in several ways with parametric and nonparametric assumptions to account for the specific features of the data (large amount of underreporting and variation of reporting with time since vaccination). This work was motivated by the documented risk of intussusception after RotaShield vaccination (Wyeth-Lederle Vaccines, Radnor, Pennsylvania) and used worldwide spontaneous reports of intussusception occurring after Rotarix vaccination (GlaxoSmithKline Biologics, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina) collected between January 2004 and February 2010. The estimated risk during the 3- to 7-day period after vaccination was approximately 5 times higher after dose 1 of Rotarix than after dose 2, which is similar to published findings on the same topic. We undertook a large simulation study to evaluate the performance of the method in different scenarios, including its robustness to different sample sizes and time-dependent reporting functions. The bias was generally small, the type I error rate was correctly controlled, and the power to detect a risk ratio of 4 was satisfactory, provided that the sample size was over 100. The proposed methods are an effective way to explore and quantify vaccine safety signals from spontaneous reports. PMID:24013203

  15. CONTROLLING NOX EMISSION FROM INDUSTRIAL SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of regulatory actions focused on reducing NOx emissions from stationary combustion sources have been taken in the United States in the last decade. These actions include the Acid Rain NOx regulations, the Ozone Transport Commission's NOx ...

  16. Sulfur oxide adsorbents and emissions control

    DOEpatents

    Li, Liyu; King, David L.

    2006-12-26

    High capacity sulfur oxide absorbents utilizing manganese-based octahedral molecular sieve (Mn--OMS) materials are disclosed. An emissions reduction system for a combustion exhaust includes a scrubber 24 containing these high capacity sulfur oxide absorbents located upstream from a NOX filter 26 or particulate trap.

  17. Emission control devices, fuel additive, and fuel composition changes.

    PubMed Central

    Piver, W T

    1977-01-01

    Emission control devices are installed to meet the exhaust standards of the Clean Air Act for carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons, and it is necessary to know, from a public health point of view, how exhaust emissions may be affected by changes in fuel additives and fuel composition. Since these topics are concerned with developing technologies, the available literature on exhaust emission characteristics and the limited information on health effects, is reviewed. PMID:71235

  18. Amplified spontaneous emission of 3-(1,1-dicyanoethenyl)-1-phenyl-4,5-dihydro-1H-pyrazole molecule embedded in various polymer matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mysliwiec, Jaroslaw; Sznitko, Lech; Szukalski, Adam; Parafiniuk, Kacper; Bartkiewicz, Stanislaw; Miniewicz, Andrzej; Sahraoui, Bouchta; Rau, Ileana; Kajzar, Francois

    2012-08-01

    Results of studies on the amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) phenomenon in 3-(1,1-dicyanoethenyl)-1-phenyl-4,5-dihydro-1H-pyrazole (DCNP) molecules in four different polymeric matrices are reported. We have analyzed ASE spectra coming from thin films of DCNP-matrix samples when excited by the Nd:YAG nanosecond pulsed laser doubled in frequency (? = 532 nm). We report on ASE characteristics in function of different excitation pulse energy densities evaluating ASE thresholds, exponential gain coefficients and reporting the influence of the specific matrix-dye interactions on the photo-degradation process of the dye.

  19. High amplified spontaneous emission contrast of 1011 in a Nd:glass laser based on a hybrid double chirped pulse amplification scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, X. M.; Leng, Y. X.; Sui, Z.; Li, Y. Y.; Zhang, Z. X.; Xu, Y.; Guo, X. Y.; Liu, Y. Q.

    2014-10-01

    By using a Ti:sapphire-Nd:glass hybrid double chirped pulse amplification scheme and a pulse cleaner based on optical parametric amplification and second harmonic generation, we demonstrate high amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) contrast at 1053 nm. The optimized ASE temporal contrast of the output pulse is about 1011 at about 160 ps before the main peak with an output of 140 mJ/500 fs. And the potential of 10 J level output with high ASE contrast is demonstrated in a laser system with attenuated injection.

  20. Mapping the transverse coherence of the self amplified spontaneous emission of a free-electron laser with the heterodyne speckle method.

    PubMed

    Alaimo, Matteo D; Anania, Maria Pia; Artioli, Marcello; Bacci, Alberto; Bellaveglia, Marco; Ciocci, Franco; Chiadroni, Enrica; Cianchi, Alessandro; Dattoli, Giuseppe; Di Pirro, Giampierro; Ferrario, Massimo; Gatti, Giancarlo; Giannessi, Luca; Manfredda, Michele; Martucci, Roberta; Mostacci, Andrea; Paroli, Bruno; Petralia, Alberto; Petrillo, Vittoria; Pompili, Riccardo; Potenza, Marco A C; Quattormini, Marcello; Rau, Julietta; Redoglio, Daniele; Rossi, Andrea R; Serafini, Luca; Surrenti, Vincenzo; Torre, Amalia; Vaccarezza, Cristina; Villa, Fabio

    2014-12-01

    The two-dimensional single shot transverse coherence of the Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission of the SPARC_LAB Free-Electron Laser was measured through the statistical analysis of a speckle field produced by heterodyning the radiation beam with a huge number of reference waves, scattered by a suspension of particles. In this paper we report the measurements and the evaluation of the transverse coherence along the SPARC_LAB undulator modules. The measure method was demonstrated to be precise and robust, it does not require any a priori assumptions and can be implemented over a wide range of wavelengths, from the optical radiation to the x-rays. PMID:25606931

  1. Angular distribution of polarized spontaneous emissions and its effect on light extraction behavior in InGaN-based light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Gangcheng; Chen, Xinjuan; Yu, Tongjun Lu, Huimin; Chen, Zhizhong; Kang, Xiangning; Wu, Jiejun; Zhang, Guoyi

    2014-03-07

    Angular intensity distributions of differently polarized light sources in multiple quantum wells (MQWs) and their effects on extraction behavior of spontaneous emission from light emitting diode (LED) chips have been studied. Theoretical calculation based on k·p approximation, ray tracing simulation and angular electroluminescence measurement were applied in this work. It is found that the electron-hole recombination in the InGaN MQWs produces a spherical distribution of an s-polarized source and a dumbbell-shaped p-polarized source. Light rays from different polarized sources experience different extraction processes, determining the polarization degree of electro-luminescence and extraction efficiency of LEDs.

  2. Wavefront Analysis of Nonlinear Self-Amplified Spontaneous-Emission Free-Electron Laser Harmonics in the Single-Shot Regime

    SciTech Connect

    Bachelard, R.; Chubar, O.; Mercere, P.; Idir, M.; Couprie, M.E.; Lambert, G.; Zeitoun, Ph.; Kimura, H.; Ohashi, H.; Higashiya, A.; Yabashi, M.; Nagasono, M.; Hara, T. and Ishikawa, T.

    2011-06-08

    The single-shot spatial characteristics of the vacuum ultraviolet self-amplified spontaneous emission of a free electron laser (FEL) is measured at different stages of amplification up to saturation with a Hartmann wavefront sensor. We show that the fundamental radiation at 61.5 nm tends towards a single-mode behavior as getting closer to saturation. The measurements are found in good agreement with simulations and theory. A near diffraction limited wavefront was measured. The analysis of Fresnel diffraction through the Hartmann wavefront sensor hole array also provides some further insight for the evaluation of the FEL transverse coherence, of high importance for various applications.

  3. Achieving Acceptable Air Quality: Some Reflections on Controlling Vehicle Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvert, J. G.; Heywood, J. B.; Sawyer, R. F.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    1993-07-01

    Motor vehicle emissions have been and are being controlled in an effort to abate urban air pollution. This article addresses the question: Will the vehicle exhaust emission control and fuel requirements in the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments and the California Air Resources Board regulations on vehicles and fuels have a significant impact? The effective control of in-use vehicle emissions is the key to a solution to the motor vehicle part of the urban air pollution problem for the next decade or so. It is not necessary, except perhaps in Southern California, to implement extremely low new car emission standards before the end of the 20th century. Some of the proposed gasoline volatility and composition changes in reformulated gasoline will produce significant reductions in vehicle emissions (for example, reduced vapor pressure, sulfur, and light olefin and improved high end volatility), whereas others (such as substantial oxygenate addition and aromatics reduction) will not.

  4. Alternative control technology document for bakery oven emissions. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, C.W.

    1992-12-01

    The document was produced in response to a request by the baking industry for Federal guidance to assist in providing a more uniform information base for State decision-making with regard to control of bakery oven emissions. The information in the document pertains to bakeries that produce yeast-leavened bread, rolls, buns, and similar products but not crackers, sweet goods, or baked foodstuffs that are not yeast leavened. Information on the baking processes, equipment, operating parameters, potential emissions from baking, and potential emission control options are presented. Catalytic and regenerative oxidation are identified as the most appropriate existing control technologies applicable to VOC emissions from bakery ovens. Cost analyses for catalytic and regenerative oxidation are included. A predictive formula for use in estimating oven emissions has been derived from source tests done in junction with the development of the document. Its use and applicability are described.

  5. CONTROL OF MOTOR VEHICLE EMISSIONS - THE U.S. EXPERIENCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    An historical overview of the U.S. experience with controlling emissions from highway motor vehicles is presented. he evolution of new motor vehicle emissions certification practice, end-of-assembly-line inspection, in-use surveillance and recall, inspection and maintenance, and ...

  6. EVALUATION OF MAINTENANCE FOR FUGITIVE VOC EMISSIONS CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. EPA Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards (OAQPS) has the responsibility for formulating regulations for the control of fugitive emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC). 'Fugitive emissions' generally refers to the diffuse release of vaporized hydrocarbon or...

  7. 40 CFR 266.104 - Standards to control organic emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards to control organic emissions. 266.104 Section 266.104 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID... emissions of chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans do not result in an increased lifetime...

  8. IRON AND STEEL PLANT OPEN SOURCE FUGITIVE EMISSION CONTROL EVALUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of measurements of the control efficiency of various techniques used to mitigate emissions from open dust sources in the iron and steel industry. Of estimated emissions of 88,800 tons/year suspended particulate in 1978 (based on a 10-plant survey), 70, 13...

  9. Emission control technology for diesel trucks (draft). Report to Congress

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    The report provides an overview of the various technologies being developed to meet the exhaust emission standards for diesel engines. Each technology is evaluated for its potential emission control benefits, as well as its cost and effect on fuel economy and durability.

  10. Advanced Combustion and Emission Control Technical Team Roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    2013-06-01

    The Advanced Combustion and Emission Control (ACEC) Technical Team is focused on removing technical barriers to the commercialization of advanced, high-efficiency, emission-compliant internal combustion (IC) engines for light-duty vehicle powertrains (i.e., passenger car, minivan, SUV, and pickup trucks).

  11. Neurophysiology of spontaneous facial expressions: I. Motor control of the upper and lower face is behaviorally independent in adults.

    PubMed

    Ross, Elliott D; Gupta, Smita S; Adnan, Asif M; Holden, Thomas L; Havlicek, Joseph; Radhakrishnan, Sridhar

    2016-03-01

    Facial expressions are described traditionally as monolithic entities. However, humans have the capacity to produce facial blends, in which the upper and lower face simultaneously display different emotional expressions. This, in turn, has led to the Component Theory of facial expressions. Recent neuroanatomical studies in monkeys have demonstrated that there are separate cortical motor areas for controlling the upper and lower face that, presumably, also occur in humans. The lower face is represented on the posterior ventrolateral surface of the frontal lobes in the primary motor and premotor cortices and the upper face is represented on the medial surface of the posterior frontal lobes in the supplementary motor and anterior cingulate cortices. Our laboratory has been engaged in a series of studies exploring the perception and production of facial blends. Using high-speed videography, we began measuring the temporal aspects of facial expressions to develop a more complete understanding of the neurophysiology underlying facial expressions and facial blends. The goal of the research presented here was to determine if spontaneous facial expressions in adults are predominantly monolithic or exhibit independent motor control of the upper and lower face. We found that spontaneous facial expressions are very complex and that the motor control of the upper and lower face is overwhelmingly independent, thus robustly supporting the Component Theory of facial expressions. Seemingly monolithic expressions, be they full facial or facial blends, are most likely the result of a timing coincident rather than a synchronous coordination between the ventrolateral and medial cortical motor areas responsible for controlling the lower and upper face, respectively. In addition, we found evidence that the right and left face may also exhibit independent motor control, thus supporting the concept that spontaneous facial expressions are organized predominantly across the horizontal facial axis and secondarily across the vertical axis. PMID:26854960

  12. Self-organized global control of carbon emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhenyuan; Fenn, Daniel J.; Hui, Pak Ming; Johnson, Neil F.

    2010-09-01

    There is much disagreement concerning how best to control global carbon emissions. We explore quantitatively how different control schemes affect the collective emission dynamics of a population of emitting entities. We uncover a complex trade-off which arises between average emissions (affecting the global climate), peak pollution levels (affecting citizens’ everyday health), industrial efficiency (affecting the nation’s economy), frequency of institutional intervention (affecting governmental costs), common information (affecting trading behavior) and market volatility (affecting financial stability). Our findings predict that a self-organized free-market approach at the level of a sector, state, country or continent can provide better control than a top-down regulated scheme in terms of market volatility and monthly pollution peaks. The control of volatility also has important implications for any future derivative carbon emissions market.

  13. Inhibitory control and l2 proficiency modulate bilingual language production: evidence from spontaneous monologue and dialogue speech.

    PubMed

    Pivneva, Irina; Palmer, Caroline; Titone, Debra

    2012-01-01

    Bilingual language production requires that speakers recruit inhibitory control (IC) to optimally balance the activation of more than one linguistic system when they produce speech. Moreover, the amount of IC necessary to maintain an optimal balance is likely to vary across individuals as a function of second language (L2) proficiency and inhibitory capacity, as well as the demands of a particular communicative situation. Here, we investigate how these factors relate to bilingual language production across monologue and dialogue spontaneous speech. In these tasks, 42 English-French and French-English bilinguals produced spontaneous speech in their first language (L1) and their L2, with and without a conversational partner. Participants also completed a separate battery that assessed L2 proficiency and inhibitory capacity. The results showed that L2 vs. L1 production was generally more effortful, as was dialogue vs. monologue speech production although the clarity of what was produced was higher for dialogues vs. monologues. As well, language production effort significantly varied as a function of individual differences in L2 proficiency and inhibitory capacity. Taken together, the overall pattern of findings suggests that both increased L2 proficiency and inhibitory capacity relate to efficient language production during spontaneous monologue and dialogue speech. PMID:22438846

  14. Spontaneous ultra-weak light emissions from wheat seedlings are rhythmic and synchronized with the time profile of the local gravimetric tide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moraes, Thiago A.; Barlow, Peter W.; Klingelé, Emile; Gallep, Cristiano M.

    2012-06-01

    Semi-circadian rhythms of spontaneous photon emission from wheat seedlings germinated and grown in a constant environment (darkened chamber) were found to be synchronized with the rhythm of the local gravimetric (lunisolar) tidal acceleration. Time courses of the photon-count curves were also found to match the growth velocity profile of the seedlings. Pair-wise analyses of the data—growth, photon count, and tidal—by local tracking correlation always revealed significant coefficients ( P > 0.7) for more than 80% of any of the time periods considered. Using fast Fourier transform, the photon-count data revealed periodic components similar to those of the gravimetric tide. Time courses of biophoton emissions would appear to be an additional, useful, and innovative tool in both chronobiological and biophysical studies.

  15. VOC from Vehicular Evaporation Emissions: Status and Control Strategy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huan; Man, Hanyang; Tschantz, Michael; Wu, Ye; He, Kebin; Hao, Jiming

    2015-12-15

    Vehicular evaporative emissions is an important source of volatile organic carbon (VOC), however, accurate estimation of emission amounts and scientific evaluation of control strategy for these emissions have been neglected outside of the United States. This study provides four kinds of basic emission factors: diurnal, hot soak, permeation, and refueling. Evaporative emissions from the Euro 4 vehicles (1.6 kg/year/car) are about four times those of U.S. vehicles (0.4 kg/year/car). Closing this emissions gap would have a larger impact than the progression from Euro 3 to Euro 6 tailpipe HC emission controls. Even in the first 24 h of parking, China's current reliance upon the European 24 h diurnal standard results in 508 g/vehicle/year emissions, higher than 32 g/vehicle/year from Tier 2 vehicles. The U.S. driving cycle matches Beijing real-world conditions much better on both typical trip length and average speed than current European driving cycles. At least two requirements should be added to the Chinese emissions standards: an onboard refueling vapor recovery to force the canister to be sized sufficiently large, and a 48-h evaporation test requirement to ensure that adequate purging occurs over a shorter drive sequence. PMID:26599318

  16. Emission control cost-effectiveness of alternative-fuel vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Q.; Sperling, D.; Olmstead, J.

    1993-06-14

    Although various legislation and regulations have been adopted to promote the use of alternative-fuel vehicles for curbing urban air pollution problems, there is a lack of systematic comparisons of emission control cost-effectiveness among various alternative-fuel vehicle types. In this paper, life-cycle emission reductions and life-cycle costs were estimated for passenger cars fueled with methanol, ethanol, liquefied petroleum gas, compressed natural gas, and electricity. Vehicle emission estimates included both exhaust and evaporative emissions for air pollutants of hydrocarbon, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, and air-toxic pollutants of benzene, formaldehyde, 1,3-butadiene, and acetaldehyde. Vehicle life-cycle cost estimates accounted for vehicle purchase prices, vehicle life, fuel costs, and vehicle maintenance costs. Emission control cost-effectiveness presented in dollars per ton of emission reduction was calculated for each alternative-fuel vehicle types from the estimated vehicle life-cycle emission reductions and costs. Among various alternative-fuel vehicle types, compressed natural gas vehicles are the most cost-effective vehicle type in controlling vehicle emissions. Dedicated methanol vehicles are the next most cost-effective vehicle type. The cost-effectiveness of electric vehicles depends on improvements in electric vehicle battery technology. With low-cost, high-performance batteries, electric vehicles are more cost-effective than methanol, ethanol, and liquified petroleum gas vehicles.

  17. Self-consistent quantum-electrodynamic calculation of spontaneous emission and small-signal gain in high-voltage free-electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C. S.; Fluhler, H. U.

    1990-10-01

    A self-consistent QED (SCQED) theory of spontaneous emission of radiation and single-photon small-signal gain (SSG) is developed for FELs using the Weisskopf-Wigner method. The results agree with existing experimental data on both the line broadening and the line shift and to a reasonable extent with the measured gain. It is shown that the spontaneous-emission spectrum obtained from classical or conventional FEL theories is valid only in the limit of a short undulator that contains a small number of periods. The SSG derived from the SCQED theory is shown to reduce to Colson's (1977) gain formula in the classical limit. However, the SCQED theory predicts significant reductions in the SSG that agree well with the ACO gain data and are not predicted well by Colson's formula. It is discovered that a fundamental physical gain limit exists that is universal to all types of FELs within the limits of the single-photon transition scheme considered.

  18. Circadian control of isoprene emissions from oil palm (Elaeis guineensis).

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Michael J; Owen, Susan M; Possell, Malcolm; Hartwell, James; Gould, Peter; Hall, Anthony; Vickers, Claudia; Nicholas Hewitt, C

    2006-09-01

    The emission of isoprene from the biosphere to the atmosphere has a profound effect on the Earth's atmospheric system. Until now, it has been assumed that the primary short-term controls on isoprene emission are photosynthetically active radiation and temperature. Here we show that isoprene emissions from a tropical tree (oil palm, Elaeis guineensis) are under strong circadian control, and that the circadian clock is potentially able to gate light-induced isoprene emissions. These rhythms are robustly temperature compensated with isoprene emissions still under circadian control at 38 degrees C. This is well beyond the acknowledged temperature range of all previously described circadian phenomena in plants. Furthermore, rhythmic expression of LHY/CCA1, a genetic component of the central clock in Arabidopsis thaliana, is still maintained at these elevated temperatures in oil palm. Maintenance of the CCA1/LHY-TOC1 molecular oscillator at these temperatures in oil palm allows for the possibility that this system is involved in the control of isoprene emission rhythms. This study contradicts the accepted theory that isoprene emissions are primarily light-induced. PMID:16899082

  19. Electric-utility emissions: control strategies and costs

    SciTech Connect

    Van Horn, A.; Arpi, D.; Bowen, C.; Chapman, R.; Cooper, R.; Greenfield, S.; Moffett, M.; Wells, M.

    1981-04-01

    The Utility Simulation Model has been used to project the emissions, costs, and operating decisions of the electric utilities for each year between 1980 and 2000. For each steam generating unit in the United States, the model simulates the compliance decision, including choice of fuels and pollution controls, as well as emissions and pollution control costs. Results are aggregated to state, regional, and national levels. The results presented here, summarized by strategy for selected years, include SO/sub 2/ and NO/sub x/ emissions, annual revenue requirements, the average price of electricity, dollars per ton of SO/sub 2/ reduced, coal capacity with FGD, utility fuel consumption, and regional production of coal for utility consumption. Because the strategies analyzed were aimed at SO/sub 2/ reduction, the results focus on the emissions and costs of controlling SO/sub 2/. This report is not intended to provide complete analysis and interpretation of the numerical results given in Section 3.

  20. Glutamatergic system controls synchronization of spontaneous neuronal activity in the murine neonatal entorhinal cortex.

    PubMed

    Unichenko, Petr; Yang, Jeng-Wei; Luhmann, Heiko J; Kirischuk, Sergei

    2015-07-01

    Synchronized spontaneous neuronal activity is a characteristic feature of the developing brain. Rhythmic network discharges in the neonatal medial entorhinal cortex (mEC) in vitro depend on activation of ionotropic glutamate receptors, but spontaneously active neurons are required for their initiation. Field potential recordings revealed synchronized neuronal activity in the mEC in vivo developmentally earlier than in vitro. We suggested that not only ionotropic receptors, but also other components of the glutamatergic system modulate neuronal activity in the mEC. Ca(2+) imaging was used to record neuronal activity in neonatal murine brain slices. Two types of spontaneous events were distinguished: global synchronous discharges (synchronous activity) and asynchronously (not synchronized with global discharges) active cells (asynchronous activity). AMPA receptor blockade strongly reduced the frequency of synchronous discharges, while NMDA receptor inhibition was less effective. AMPA and NMDA receptor blockade or activation of group 2/3 metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR2/3) completely suppressed synchronous discharges and increased the number of active cells. Blockade of glutamate transporters with DL-TBOA led to NMDA receptor-mediated hyper-synchronization of neuronal activity. Inhibition of NMDA receptors in the presence of DL-TBOA failed to restore synchronous discharges. The latter were partially reestablished only after blockade of mGluR2/3. We conclude that the glutamatergic system can influence neuronal activity via different receptors/mechanisms. As both NMDA and mGluR2/3 receptors have a high affinity for glutamate, changes in extracellular glutamate levels resulting for instance from glutamate transporter malfunction can balance neuronal activity in the mEC, affecting in turn synapse and network formation. PMID:25163767

  1. Insertion/deletion polymorphism in intron 16 of ACE gene in idiopathic recurrent spontaneous abortion: case-control study, systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Pereza, Nina; Ostojić, Saša; Zdravčević, Matea; Volk, Marija; Kapović, Miljenko; Peterlin, Borut

    2016-02-01

    The insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism in intron 16 of the angiotensin I-converting enzyme gene (ACE) has been extensively studied as a predisposing factor for idiopathic recurrent spontaneous abortion (IRSA). A case-control study including 149 women with ≥3 spontaneous abortions and 149 controls was performed to test the association of ACE I/D polymorphism with IRSA. A systematic review was conducted of previous case-control studies, with strict selection criteria for meta-analyses. We also aimed to evaluate the potential differences in summary estimates between studies defining IRSA as ≥2 and ≥3 spontaneous abortions. Genotyping was performed by PCR, and systematic review conducted using PubMed and Scopus. There was no association of the polymorphism with IRSA in Slovenian women. Sixteen case-control studies, showing substantial differences regarding IRSA definition and selection criteria for women were identified. Meta-analysis was performed and included four studies defining IRSA as ≥2 spontaneous abortions and the current study, which defined IRSA as ≥3 spontaneous abortions. Based on random effects model, meta-analysis conducted on 1192 patients and 736 controls showed no association with IRSA under dominant(DD+IDvsII) and recessive(DDvsID+II) genetic models. Well-designed studies are needed to evaluate the role of ACE I/D polymorphism in IRSA defined as ≥3 spontaneous abortions. PMID:26673102

  2. Historical evaluation of vehicle emission control in Guangzhou based on a multi-year emission inventory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shaojun; Wu, Ye; Liu, Huan; Wu, Xiaomeng; Zhou, Yu; Yao, Zhiliang; Fu, Lixin; He, Kebin; Hao, Jiming

    2013-09-01

    The Guangzhou government adopted many vehicle emission control policies and strategies during the five-year preparation (2005-2009) to host the 2010 Asian Games. This study established a multi-year emission inventory for vehicles in Guangzhou during 2005-2009 and estimated the uncertainty in total vehicle emissions by taking the assumed uncertainties in fleet-average emission factors and annual mileage into account. In 2009, the estimated total vehicle emissions in Guangzhou were 313 000 (242 000-387 000) tons of CO, 60 900 (54 000-70 200) tons of THC, 65 600 (56 800-74 100) tons of NOx and 2740 (2100-3400) tons of PM10. Vehicle emissions within the urban area of Guangzhou were estimated to be responsible for ˜40% of total gaseous pollutants and ˜25% of total PM10 in the entire city. Although vehicle use intensity increased rapidly in Guangzhou during 2005-2009, vehicle emissions were estimated to have been reduced by 12% for CO, 21% for THC and 20% for PM10 relative to those in 2005. NOx emissions were estimated to have remained almost constant during this period. Compared to the "without control" scenario, 19% (15%-23%) of CO, 20% (18%-23%) of THC, 9% (8%-10%) of NOx and 16% (12%-20%) of PM10 were estimated to have been mitigated from a combination of the implementation of Euro III standards for light-duty vehicles (LDVs) and heavy-duty diesel vehicles and improvement of fuel quality. This study also evaluated several enhanced vehicle emission control actions taken recently. For example, the enhanced I/M program for LDVs was estimated to reduce 11% (9%-14%) of CO, 9% (8%-10%) of THC and 2% (2%-3%) of NOx relative to total vehicle emissions in 2009. Total emission reductions by temporary traffic controls for the Asian Games were estimated equivalent to 9% (7%-11%) of CO, 9% (8%-10%) of THC, 5% (5%-6%) of NOx and 10% (8%-13%) of PM10 estimated total vehicle emissions in 2009. Those controls are essential to further vehicle emission mitigation in Guangzhou required by the new National Ambient Air Quality Standards.

  3. The disrupted basal ganglia and behavioural control: an integrative cross-domain perspective of spontaneous stereotypy.

    PubMed

    McBride, Sebastian D; Parker, Matthew O

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous stereotypic behaviour (SB) is common in many captive animal species, as well as in humans with some severe psychiatric disorders, and is often cited as being related to general basal ganglia dysfunction. Despite this assertion, there is little in the literature examining SB specifically in terms of the basal ganglia mechanics. In this review, we attempt to fill this gap by offering an integrative, cross-domain perspective of SB by linking what we currently understand about the SB phenotype with the ever-growing literature on the anatomy and functionality of the basal ganglia. After outlining current models of SB from different theoretical perspectives, we offer a broad but detailed overview of normally functioning basal ganglia mechanics, and attempt to link this with current neurophysiological evidence related to spontaneous SB. Based on this we present an empirically derived theoretical framework, which proposes that SB is the result of a dysfunctional action selection system that may reflect dysregulation of excitatory (direct) and inhibitory (indirect and hyperdirect) pathways as well as alterations in mechanisms of behavioural switching. This approach also suggests behaviours that specifically become stereotypic may reflect inbuilt low selection threshold behavioural sequences associated with early development and the species-specific ethogram or, low threshold behavioural sequences that are the result of stress-induced dopamine exposure at the time of performance. PMID:25052167

  4. CONTROLLING AGRICULTURAL EMISSIONS OF METHYL BROMIDE.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During the last 40 to 50 years, methyl bromide (MeBr) has been used to sterilize soils in preparation to planting various high-cash-value fruit and vegetable crops throughout the world. MeBr is a highly toxic chemical and is very effective in controlling a variety of soil-borne pests, such as nemato...

  5. CONTROL OF PARTICULATE EMISSIONS IN THE PRIMARY NONFERROUS METALS INDUSTRIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the symposium on 'Control of Particulate Emissions in the Primary Nonferrous Metals Industries' was to provide a forum for the exchange of knowledge and new ideas on particulate control technology with emphasis on industrial applications of environmental particulat...

  6. SUMMARY REPORT CONTROL OF NOX EMISSIONS BY REBURNING

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report covers NOx control employing reburning technology: A new, effective method of controlling NOx emissions from a wide range of stationary combustion sources including large, coal-fired, utility boilers. Although reburning potentially is applicable ...

  7. CONTROL OF SULFUR EMISSIONS FROM OIL SHALE RETORTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objectives of this study were to determine the best available control technology (BACT) for control of sulfur emissions from oil shale processing facilities and then to develop a design for a mobile slipstream pilot plant that could be used to test and demonstrate that techno...

  8. Coal-fueled diesel emissions control technology development

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, C.; Gal, E.; Mengel, M.; Van Kleunen, W.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this project is to develop an emissions control system for a GE locomotive powered by a Coal Water Slurry (CWS) fuel diesel engine. The development effort is directed toward reducing particulate matter, SO[sub 2] and NO[sub x] emissions from the engine exhaust gas at 700--800F and 1-2 psig. The commercial system should be economically attractive while subject to limited space constraints. After testing various alternatives, a system composed of a barrier filter with sorbent injection ups was selected for controlling particulates, SO[sub 2] and NO[sub x] emissions. In bench scale and 500 acfm slip s tests, removal efficiencies greater than 90% for SO[sub 2] and 85% for NO[sub x] were achieved. Particulate emissions from the barrier filter are within NSPS limits.

  9. Coal-fueled diesel emissions control technology development

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, C.; Gal, E.; Mengel, M.; Van Kleunen, W.

    1993-03-01

    The objective of this project is to develop an emissions control system for a GE locomotive powered by a Coal Water Slurry (CWS) fuel diesel engine. The development effort is directed toward reducing particulate matter, SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions from the engine exhaust gas at 700--800F and 1-2 psig. The commercial system should be economically attractive while subject to limited space constraints. After testing various alternatives, a system composed of a barrier filter with sorbent injection ups was selected for controlling particulates, SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions. In bench scale and 500 acfm slip s tests, removal efficiencies greater than 90% for SO{sub 2} and 85% for NO{sub x} were achieved. Particulate emissions from the barrier filter are within NSPS limits.

  10. Systems and methods for controlling diesel engine emissions

    DOEpatents

    Webb, Cynthia Chaffin; Weber, Phillip Anthony; Khair, Magdi K.

    2004-06-01

    Systems and methods for controlling diesel engine emissions, including, for example, oxides of nitrogen emissions, particulate matter emissions, and the like. The emission control system according to this invention is provided in the exhaust passageway of a diesel engine and includes a catalyst-based particulate filter; and first and second lean NO.sub.x trap systems coupled to the catalyst-based particulate filter. The first and second lean NO.sub.x trap systems are arranged in a parallel flow configuration with each other. Each of the first and second lean NO.sub.x trap systems include a carbon monoxide generating catalyst device, a sulfur trap device, a lean NO.sub.x device, a supplemental fuel injector device, and a plurality of flow diverter devices.

  11. Anthropogenic mercury flows in India and impacts of emission controls.

    PubMed

    Burger Chakraborty, Laura; Qureshi, Asif; Vadenbo, Carl; Hellweg, Stefanie

    2013-08-01

    India is a major emitter of mercury, a pollutant of global importance. However, quantitative information on mercury flows in the country is lacking. Here, we quantify major transfer pathways for anthropogenic mercury, its emissions to the environment (air, water, soil), and storage in consumer products and anthropogenic sinks (e.g., landfills) in India in the period 2001-2020, and evaluate the potential influence of six pollution control measures. Total mercury emissions in India were approximately 415 tonnes in 2001, 310 tonnes in 2010, and are projected to rise to 540 tonnes in 2020. In 2010, 76% of these emissions went to the atmosphere. The most important emission sources to atmosphere are coal power plants and zinc production. Pesticides were the most important source for emissions to soil in 2005 and dental amalgam in later years. Mercury stocks in products rose from 700 tonnes in 2001 to 1125 tonnes in 2010, and in landfills and ash-made structures (e.g., embankments) from 920 tonnes in 2001 to 1450 tonnes in 2010. These stocks are expected to rise further and may be regarded as stored toxicity, which may become a concern in the future. Total mercury emissions can be reduced by about 50% by combining pollution control measures that target different mercury emission sources. PMID:23834017

  12. Positional control of plasmonic fields and electron emission

    SciTech Connect

    Word, R. C.; Fitzgerald, J. P. S.; Könenkamp, R.

    2014-09-15

    We report the positional control of plasmonic fields and electron emission in a continuous gap antenna structure of sub-micron size. We show experimentally that a nanoscale area of plasmon-enhanced electron emission can be motioned by changing the polarization of an exciting optical beam of 800 nm wavelength. Finite-difference calculations are presented to support the experiments and to show that the plasmon-enhanced electric field distribution of the antenna can be motioned precisely and predictively.

  13. Primary production control of methane emission from wetlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiting, G. J.; Chanton, J. P.

    1993-01-01

    Based on simultaneous measurements of CO2 and CH4 exchange in wetlands extending from subarctic peatlands to subtropical marshes, a positive correlation between CH4 emission and net ecosystem production is reported. It is suggested that net ecosystem production is a master variable integrating many factors which control CH4 emission in vegetated wetlands. It is found that about 3 percent of the daily net ecosystem production is emitted back to the atmosphere as CH4. With projected stimulation of primary production and soil microbial activity in wetlands associated with elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration, the potential for increasing CH4 emission from inundated wetlands, further enhancing the greenhouse effect, is examined.

  14. The Role of the Spontaneous and Evoked K-Complex in Good-Sleeper Controls and in Individuals with Insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Forget, Daniel; Morin, Charles M.; Bastien, Clyne H.

    2011-01-01

    Study Objectives: Spontaneous and evoked K-complexes are believed to reflect a mechanism of sleep protection, yet their functional role remains a subject of debate. Studying the K-complex in primary insomnia, for which sleep protection appears to be of central importance, may provide further insight on its role. The purpose of the present study was to determine the role of spontaneous and evoked K-complexes in good sleepers and to investigate its role in primary insomnia. Participants: Twelve individuals with primary insomnia (mean age = 45.4 years) and 12 good-sleeper controls (mean age = 44.3 years). Methods and Procedure: Participants underwent 4 consecutive nights of polysomnographic recordings. Spontaneous K-complexes (SKC) were analyzed during continuous stage 2 sleep on the third night, whereas evoked K-complexes (EKC) were elicited by auditory stimuli on the fourth night. Relative spectral power was measured on 1-second electroencephalographic segments prior to and following SKC, EKC, and trials in which auditory stimuli did not elicit a K-complex (EKC-). K-complex amplitudes were also measured. Results: Measures of relative spectral power showed significant changes following EKC (increase in activity in the delta frequency band and decrease in activity in the theta, sigma, beta, and gamma frequency bands) and SKC (increase in activity in delta frequency band and decrease in activity in theta, alpha, sigma, and beta frequency bands) for good sleepers, whereas there was no such marked change in electroencephalographic activity surrounding EKC-. A similar pattern of electroencephalographic activity was also observed for the insomnia group on trials of each different K-complex. Auditory stimuli elicited the same proportion of EKC for both groups, whereas SKC density was higher for the insomnia group (1.52 SKC/min) than for good sleepers (1.06 SKC/minute) Conclusion: These results suggest that the SKC and the EKC both promote deeper sleep, further supporting a sleep-protection role. Citation: Forget D; Morin CM; Bastien CH. The role of the spontaneous and evoked K-complex in good-sleeper controls and in individuals with insomnia. SLEEP 2011;34(9):1251-1260. PMID:21886363

  15. Acoustic emission feedback control for control of boiling in a microwave oven

    DOEpatents

    White, Terry L.

    1991-01-01

    An acoustic emission based feedback system for controlling the boiling level of a liquid medium in a microwave oven is provided. The acoustic emissions from the medium correlated with surface boiling is used to generate a feedback control signal proportional to the level of boiling of the medium. This signal is applied to a power controller to automatically and continuoulsly vary the power applied to the oven to control the boiling at a selected level.

  16. Subtask 1 report: emission control system identification. Task 25

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-10-22

    The emphasis here is the identification of emission control systems through information contained in the vehicle identification number (VIN). The data base which maps each combination of carline and engine symbol into the possible engine families is described in detail. The methods used in developing this data base are summarized. The instances in which major features of the emission control system can not be determined unambiguously from the VIN are identified. Recommendations are presented for resolving the ambiguities with the assistance of auto manufacturers. The ability of the several manufacturers to assist in further decoding of VINs and is reported and the information presently available on costs of doing so is provided. Data files that will be used to extract manufacturer, carline, and engine symbols from VINs and then access the master VIN/engine family data base are listed. The master data base is listed in its entirety. The cases of ambiguous emission control identification are listed. (MHR)

  17. Mercury emissions control technologies for mixed waste thermal treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, A.; Knecht, M.; Soelberg, N.; Eaton, D.; Roberts, D.; Broderick, T.

    1997-12-31

    EPA has identified wet scrubbing at low mercury feedrates, as well as carbon adsorption via carbon injection into the offgas or via flow through fixed carbon beds, as control technologies that can be used to meet the proposed Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) rule limit for mercury emissions from hazardous waste incinerators. DOE is currently funding demonstrations of gold amalgamation that may also control mercury to the desired levels. Performance data from a variety of sources was reviewed to determine ranges of achievable mercury control. Preliminary costs were estimated for using these technologies to control mercury emissions from mixed waste incineration. Mercury emissions control for mixed waste incineration may need to be more efficient than for incineration of other hazardous wastes because of higher mercury concentrations in some mixed waste streams. However, mercury control performance data for wet scrubbing and carbon adsorption is highly variable. More information is needed to demonstrate control efficiencies that are achievable under various design and operating conditions for wet scrubbing, carbon adsorption, and gold amalgamation technologies. Given certain assumptions made in this study, capital costs, operating costs, and lifecycle costs for carbon injection, carbon beds, and gold amalgamation generally vary for different assumed mercury feedrates and for different offgas flowrates. Assuming that these technologies can in fact provide the necessary mercury control performance, each of these technologies may be less costly than the others for certain mercury feedrates and the offgas flowrates.

  18. Cliffside 6 integrated emissions control system

    SciTech Connect

    McGinnis, D.G.; Rader, P.C.; Gansley, R.R.; Wang, W.

    2009-04-15

    The article takes an inside look into the environmental hardware going into one of the highest profile coal-fired power plants projects in the US, a new 800 MW supercritical coal-fired facility at Cliffside, NC, Unit C6. This is currently under construction and scheduled to be in commercial service in 2012. To evaluate the alternative air quality control system (AQCS) options, Duke Energy established a cross-functional team and used a decision analysis process to select the 'best balanced choice'. Alstom's integrated AQCS which combines dry and wet flue gas desulfurization systems was the best balanced choice. Replacing an ESP with a spray dryer absorber achieved major cost savings and eliminated the need for wastewater treatment. 1 ref., 2 photos.

  19. New emission controls for Missouri batch-type charcoal kilns

    SciTech Connect

    Yronwode, P.; Graf, W.J.

    1999-07-01

    Charcoal kilns have been exempted from air emission regulation in the state of Missouri. Today, 80% of US charcoal production takes place in Missouri. As a result of a petition filed by people in the area around an installation in southern Missouri, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) set up air monitors and measured ambient air levels at that charcoal manufacturing installation. These monitors yielded the highest particulate matter less than 10 micron (PM{sub 10}) levels ever recorded in the state. Earlier stack testing at another charcoal manufacturing installation indicated that toxics and carcinogens are present in charcoal kiln air emissions. A Charcoal Kiln Workgroup was formed to determine the Best Available Control Technology (BACT) for charcoal kilns and to draft a charcoal kiln rule that requires BACT. The BACT report determined that afterburners were suitable for controlling emissions from batch-type charcoal kilns. In addition, the charcoal industry supported incorporating the BACT limits and requirements into an enforceable state rule and submitting this rule to the EPA for federal approval. A consent agreement between the EPA and three major charcoal companies was signed with provisions to install, operate, and maintain emission control devices on charcoal kilns. This agreement was to settle complaints alleging that the three major charcoal producers had failed to report toxic air emissions to federal and state regulators. The agreement provided that industry would install control devices on a set schedule with some charcoal kilns being shut down.

  20. Coal-fueled diesel technology development emissions control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vankleunen, W.; Kaldor, S.; Gal, E.; Mengel, M.; Arnold, M.

    1994-01-01

    General Electric Environmental Services, Inc. (GEESI), Emissions Control program activity ranged from control concept testing of 10 CFM slipstream from a coal-water-slurry (CWS) fuel single cylinder research diesel engine to the design, installation, and operation of a full-size emissions control system for a full-size CWS fuel diesel engine designed for locomotive operation. Early 10 CFM slipstream testing program activity was performed to determine emissions characteristics and to evaluate emissions control concepts such a barrier filtration, granular bed filtration, and cyclone particulate collection for reduction of particulate and gaseous emissions. Use of sorbent injection into the engine exhaust gas upstream of the barrier filter or use of sorbent media in the granular bed filter were found to provide reduction of exhaust gas SO2 and NO(x) in addition to collection of ash particulate. Emergence of the use of barrier filtration as a most practical emissions control concept disclosed a need to improve cleanability of the filter media in order to avoid reduction of turbocharger performance by excessive barrier filter pressure drop. The next progression of program activity, after the slipstream feasibility state, was 500 CFM cold flow testing of control system concepts. The successful completion of 500 CFM cold flow testing of the envelope filter led to a subsequent progression to a similar configuration envelope filter designed to operate at 500 CFM hot gas flow from the CWS fuel research diesel engine in the GETS engine test laboratory. This envelope filter included the design aspect proven by cold flow testing as well as optimization of the selection of the installed filter media.

  1. Coal-fueled diesel technology development Emissions Control

    SciTech Connect

    Van Kleunen, W.; Kaldor, S.; Gal, E.; Mengel, M.; Arnold, M.

    1994-01-01

    GEESI Emissions Control program activity ranged from control concept testing of 10 CFM slipstream from a CWS fuel single cylinder research diesel engine to the design, installation, and operation of a full-size Emissions Control system for a full-size CWS fuel diesel engine designed for locomotive operation.Early 10 CFM slipstream testing program activity was performed to determine Emissions Characteristics and to evaluate Emissions Control concepts such a Barrier filtration, Granular bed filtration, and Cyclone particulate collection for reduction of particulate and gaseous emissions. Use of sorbent injection into the engine exhaust gas upstream of the barrier filter or use of sorbent media in the granular bed filter were found to provide reduction of exhaust gas SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} in addition to collection of ash particulate. Emergence of the use of barrier filtration as a most practical Emissions Control concept disclosed a need to improve cleanability of the filter media in order to avoid reduction of turbocharger performance by excessive barrier filter pressure drop. The next progression of program activity, after the slipstream feasibility state, was 500 CFM cold flow testing of control system concepts. The successful completion of 500 CFM cold flow testing of the Envelope Filter led to a subsequent progression to a similar configuration Envelope Filter designed to operate at 500 CFM hot gas flow from the CWS fuel research diesel engine in the GETS engine test laboratory. This Envelope Filter included the design aspect proven by cold flow testing as well as optimization of the selection of the installed filter media.

  2. Gamma Ray Multiplicity Comparison of a 2-Neutron and a 4-Neutron Emission ^252Cf Spontaneous Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleuel, D. L.; Bernstein, L. A.; Burke, J. T.; Heffner, M. D.; Norman, E. B.; Scielzo, N. D.; Sheets, S. A.; Snyderman, N. J.; Stoyer, M. A.; Wiedeking, M.; Gibelin, J.; Phair, L. W.; Mintz, J.

    2008-10-01

    The correlation between γ-ray multiplicity and neutron multiplicity in the fission process is not currently well known. Competing theories predict opposite correlations and experiments have measured only average properties. We have measured the γ-ray multiplicity spectrum of ^252Cf spontaneous fission using the LiBerACE array, comprised of six high-purity germanium (HPGe) Clover detectors, each surrounded by 16 bismuth-germanate (BGO) detectors. The Clovers were arranged in a cubic pattern around a 1 μCi ^252Cf source. Neutron multiplicity was determined for two cases by identifying known correlated fission products from prompt γ-rays observed in the HPGe detectors. No difference in the γ-ray multiplicity spectrum was observed for fissions that produced ^106Mo/^144Ba (2 neutrons) compared to those producing ^106Mo/^142Ba (4 neutrons).

  3. Pulsed amplified spontaneous Raman emission at 2.2 μm in silica-based fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Huawei; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Xuezong; Yu, Ting; Feng, Yan

    2016-04-01

    All-fiber source at 2.2 μm is investigated with amplified spontaneous Raman scattering process in highly Ge-doped silica fiber. By optimizing the gain fiber length, the second-order Raman Stokes light at 2.43 μm is suppressed and 3 W first-order Raman Stokes light at 2.2 μm is obtained with a homemade 2-μm Q-switched Tm3+-doped fiber laser as pump source. The conversion efficiency is 35.9 % from 2.0 to 2.2 μm, and the peak power of the 2.2-μm laser is about 400 W.

  4. Inducing quantum coherence via decays and incoherent pumping with application to population trapping, lasing without inversion, and quenching of spontaneous emission

    SciTech Connect

    Kozlov, Victor V.; Rostovtsev, Yuri; Scully, Marlan O.

    2006-12-15

    Quantum interference in a decaying three-level system of V type with degenerate upper levels driven by a single incoherent field is shown to lead to a coherent population-trapping state and more generally to a population-locked state. The latter is a state with half the population locked in two upper states regardless of the strength of incoherent pumping and decay rates. We reveal the mechanism by which half the population is pumped to the upper states no matter how weak is the incoherent pumping. Transient regimes of gain without inversion and inversion without gain are demonstrated. Quenching of spontaneous emission due to electron collisions is also discussed in support of the experiments and ideas of Suckewer and [Phys. Rev. Lett. 60, 1122 (1988)].

  5. LASER APPLICATIONS AND OTHER TOPICS IN QUANTUM ELECTRONICS: Analysis of the outlook for using narrow-band spontaneous emission sources for atmospheric air purification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyarchuk, K. A.; Karelin, A. V.; Shirokov, R. V.

    2003-12-01

    The outlook for using narrow-band spontaneous emission sources for purification of smoke gases from sulphur and nitrogen oxides is demonstrated by calculations based on a nonstationary kinetic model of the N2 — O2 — H2O — CO2 — SO2 mixture. The dependences of the mixture purification efficiency on the UV source power at different wavelengths, the exposure time, and the mixture temperature are calculated. It is shown that the radiation sources proposed in the paper will provide better purification of waste gases in the atmosphere. The most promising is a KrCl* lamp emitting an average power of no less than 100 W at 222 nm.

  6. Amplified Spontaneous Emissions from π-conjugated Conductive Polymer Film: Evanescent-Field Modulation by a 1-D Photonic Crystal Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomioka, Akihiro; Kamiyama, Yasushi; Ohno, Yoshiyuki; Otani, Kota; Kosuge, Yuki

    2010-01-01

    One-dimensional photonic crystal (PC) with alternating layers of TiO2 and SiO2 was fabricated with spin coating and low temperature baking, resulting in a successful tuning of the PC stop band so as to block the amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) of a π-conjugated polymer film. Single PC as a substrate, not a cavity with two PC's, of the polymer film was sufficient to shift the tangential ASE to the energy at PC stop band edge, indicating that the tangential ASE propagating along the interface was modulated by its evanescent-field tail in the PC, which opens the new pathway for low-threshold coherent luminescence from an ultrathin π-conjugated polymer film with ultimate mode volume.

  7. SO2 Emission Control: The Problem and Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Leonard J.

    1981-03-01

    In the past 10 years sulfur oxide emission control has been a key factor in the economic performance of many smelting operations, and markedly effects the choice of process and the design of new installations. This paper presents a review of pyrometallurgical processes for the production of copper, lead, and zinc. To put the problem in perspective, the review first outlines sulfur emission sources and alternate processing techniques, including oxygen enrichment and continuous and flash smelting. Alternate control systems, including sulfuric acid, liquid SO2, elemental sulfur, and weak gas scrubbing processes are then described from operational and economic standpoints.

  8. NOx Sensor for Direct Injection Emission Control

    SciTech Connect

    Betteridge, William J

    2006-02-28

    The Electricore/Delphi team continues to leverage the electrochemical planar sensor technology that has produced stoichiometric planar and wide range oxygen sensors as the basis for development of a NOx sensor. Zirconia cell technology with an integrated heater will provide the foundation for the sensor structure. Proven materials and packaging technology will help to ensure a cost-effective approach to the manufacture of this sensor. The electronics technique and interface is considered to be an area where new strategies need to be employed to produce higher S/N ratios of the NOx signal with emphasis on signal stability over time for robustness and durability Both continuous mode and pulse mode control techniques are being evaluated. Packaging the electronics requires careful design and circuit partitioning so that only the necessary signal conditioning electronics are coupled directly in the wiring harness, while the remainder is situated within the ECM for durability and costs reasons. This task continues to be on hold due to the limitation that the definition of the interface electronics was unavailable until very late in the project. The sense element is based on the amperometric method utilizing integrated alumina and zirconia ceramics. Precious metal electrodes are used to form the integrated heater, the cell electrodes and leads. Inside the actual sense cell structure, it is first necessary to separate NOx from the remaining oxygen constituents of the exhaust, without reducing the NOx. Once separated, the NOx will be measured using a measurement cell. Development or test coupons have been used to facilitate material selection and refinement, cell, diffusion barrier, and chamber development. The sense element currently requires elaborate interconnections. To facilitate a robust durable connection, mechanical and metallurgical connections are under investigation. Materials and process refinements continue to play an important role in the development of the sensor.

  9. Environmental controls on Pan-Arctic wetland methane emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaodong; Bohn, Theodore; Lettenmaier, Dennis

    2015-04-01

    Environmental conditions such as soil temperature and moisture, incident solar radiation, and atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration are important environmental controls on methane emissions from northern wetlands. We investigated the spatio-temporal distributions of influence of these factors over northern wetland methane emissions via the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model. We simulated methane emissions from wetlands across the Pan-Arctic domain over the period 1948-2006, with annual average emissions of 35.1±6.7 TgCH4/year. From control simulations that each held one environmental factor constant, we characterized sensitivities to air temperature, precipitation, incident long- and short-wave radiation, and atmospheric [CO2] as a function of average summer air temperature and precipitation. Trade-offs between air temperature and precipitation caused maximal emissions to occur along a line in precipitation-temperature space with a slope of approximately 13 mm month-1 / K, leading to separation of wetlands into various combinations of water-limited and temperature-limited regimes. Emissions from relatively warm and dry wetlands in the southern (permafrost-free) portion of the domain tended to be positively correlated with precipitation and negatively correlated with air temperature, while emissions from wetter and colder wetlands further north (permafrost) tended to be positively correlated with air temperature. Over the period 1960-2006, emissions increased by 20%, over 90% of which can be attributed to climate change, with summer air temperatures explaining the majority of the variance. We estimated future emissions in response to CMIP5 model projections under the RCP4.5 scenario via two methods: (1) the VIC model and (2) the temperature- and precipitation-dependent sensitivities computed from the historical simulation. The two methods yielded similar projections of emissions, with end-of-century emissions at 142% of present-day levels, accompanied by an expansion of the area of water-limited wetlands. Both the magnitude of the increase in emissions and the widespread drying of wetlands are corroborated by other recent process-based studies.

  10. Spontaneous oscillations in a model for active control of microvessel diameters

    PubMed Central

    Arciero, J. C.; Secomb, T. W.

    2012-01-01

    A new theory is presented for the origin of spontaneous oscillations in blood vessel diameters that are observed experimentally in the microcirculation. These oscillations, known as vasomotion, involve time-varying contractions of the vascular smooth muscle in the walls of arterioles. It is shown that such oscillations can arise as a result of interactions between the mechanics of the vessel wall and the dynamics of the active contraction of smooth muscle cells in response to circumferential tension in the wall. A theoretical model is developed in which the diameter and the degree of activation in a vessel are dynamic variables. The model includes effects of wall shear stress and oxygen-dependent metabolic signals on smooth muscle activation and is applied to a single vessel and to simplified network structures. The model equations predict limit cycle oscillations for certain ranges of parameters such as wall shear stress, arterial pressure and oxygen consumption rate. Predicted characteristics of the oscillations, including their sensitivity to arterial pressure, are consistent with experimental observations. PMID:21525236

  11. Effects of opioid peptides on neural control of renal function in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Kapusta, D R; Jones, S Y; DiBona, G F

    1990-06-01

    The aims of the present study were to examine the effects of opioid receptor agonists and antagonists on the renal vascular (renal blood flow) and tubular (urinary sodium excretion) responses to renal nerve stimulation and norepinephrine in anesthetized spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Graded frequency renal nerve stimulation (0.5-4.0 Hz) and doses of norepinephrine (10-80 ng/kg) produced frequency and dose-dependent decreases in renal blood flow. The renal vasoconstrictor responses were not altered by intravenous infusion of the opioid receptor agonists methionine enkephalin (mu and delta, 75 micrograms/kg/min) or U-50488H (kappa, 20 micrograms/kg/min) or administration of the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone (1 mg/kg i.v.). The antinatriuretic response to low frequency (less than 1.0 Hz) electrical renal nerve stimulation was prevented by naloxone but not affected by methionine enkephalin administration without changes in glomerular filtration rate or effective renal plasma flow. These studies suggest that endogenous opioid receptor mechanisms are involved in the increased renal tubular sodium reabsorption response to low frequency renal nerve stimulation but not in the renal vasoconstrictor response to either renal nerve stimulation or norepinephrine. This might occur by facilitation of the renal nerve terminal release, the direct renal tubular action, or both, of norepinephrine to influence renal tubular sodium reabsorption. PMID:2351429

  12. On the understanding and control of the spontaneous heating of dried tannery wastewater sludge.

    PubMed

    Biasin, A; Della Zassa, M; Zerlottin, M; Refosco, D; Bertani, R; Canu, P

    2014-04-01

    We studied the spontaneous heating of dried sludge produced by treating wastewater mainly originating from tanneries. Heating up to burning has been observed in the presence of air and moisture, starting at ambient temperature. To understand and prevent the process we combined chemical and morphological analyses (ESEM) with thermal activity monitoring in insulated vessels. Selective additions of chemicals, either to amplify or depress the reactivity, have been used to investigate and identify both the chemical mechanism causing the sludge self-heating, and a prevention or a mitigation strategy. FeS additions accelerate the onset of reactivity, while S sustains it over time. On the contrary, Ca(OH)2, Na2CO3, NaHCO3, FeCl2, EDTA, NaClO can limit, up to completely preventing, the exothermic activity. All the experimental evidences show that the reactions supporting the dried sludge self-heating involve the Fe/S/O system. The total suppression of the reactivity requires amounts of additives that are industrially incompatible with waste reduction and economics. The best prevention requires reduction or removal of S and Fe from the dried solid matrix. PMID:24484766

  13. Emissions, combustion dynamics, and control of a multiple swirl combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guoqiang

    To achieve single digit NOx emission from gas turbine combustors and prevent the combustion dynamics encountered in Lean Premixed Combustion, it is essential to understand the correlations among emission characteristics, combustion dynamics, and dynamics and characteristics of swirling flow field. The focus of this dissertation is to investigate the emission characteristics and combustion dynamics of multiple swirl dump combustors either in premixing or non-premixed combustion (e.g. Lean Direct Injection), and correlate these combustion characteristics (emissions, combustion instability and lean flammability) to the fluids dynamics (flow structures and its evolution). This study covers measurement of velocity flow field, temperature field, and combustion under effects of various parameters, including inlet flow Reynolds number, inlet air temperature, swirl configurations, downstream exhaust nozzle contraction ratios, length of mixing tube. These parameters are tested in both liquid and gaseous fuel combustions. Knowledge obtained through this comprehensive study is applied to passive and active controls for improving gas turbine combustion performance in the aid of novel sensor and actuator technologies. Emissions and combustion characteristics are shown closely related to the shape and size of central recirculation zone (CRZ), the mean and turbulence velocity and strain rate, and dynamics of large vortical structures. The passive controls, mostly geometry factors, affect the combustion characteristics and emissions through their influences on flow fields, and consequently temperature and radical fields. Air assist, which is used to adjust the momentum of fuel spray, is effective in reducing NOx and depress combustion oscillation without hurting LBO. Fuel distribution/split is also one important factor for achieving low NOx emission and control of combustion dynamics. The dynamics of combustion, including flame oscillations close to LBO and acoustic combustion instability, can be characterized by OH*/CH* radical oscillations and phase-locked chemiluminescence imaging. The periodic fluctuation of jet velocity and formation of large vortical structures within CRZ are responsible for combustion instability in multiple swirl combustors.

  14. PHYSICAL COAL CLEANING FOR UTILITY BOILER SO2 EMISSION CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report examines physical coal cleaning as a control technique for sulfur oxides emissions. It includes an analysis of the availability of low-sulfur coal and of coal cleanable to compliance levels for alternate New Source Performance Standards (NSPS). Various alternatives to ...

  15. ASSESSMENT OF THE USE OF FUGITIVE EMISSION CONTROL DEVICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report compares the efficiencies and utility consumptions expected from three fugitive emission control techniques--building evacuation, charged fog sprays, and water sprays with additives--if they were applied in primary lead and copper smelters. Estimates are provided of th...

  16. SPRAY CHARGING AND TRAPPING SCRUBBER FOR FUGITIVE PARTICLE EMISSION CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a theoretical and experimental evaluation of the control of fugitive particle emissions (FPE) with a Spray Charging and Trapping (SCAT) Scrubber that uses an air curtain and/or jets to contain, convey, and divert the FPE into a charged spray scrubber. ...

  17. An adaptive controller for the administration of closed-circuit anesthesia during spontaneous and assisted ventilation.

    PubMed

    Sharma, A; Griffith, R L; Roy, R J

    1993-01-01

    Although reduced waste of expensive anesthetic gases is a strong incentive to use closed-circuit anesthesia, manual methods of performing closed-circuit anesthesia are labor intensive and thus not widely used. Automation of closed-circuit anesthesia delivery may reduce the work. A pressure-based adaptive controller was designed and tested on mongrel dogs to evaluate the feasibility of automating closed-circuit anesthesia using an accessory to an existing clinical anesthesia machine and a gas analyzer. The controller was found stable and responsive with good control of oxygen concentration and acceptable control of halothane end-tidal concentration. The response time for oxygen was 5.23 +/- 1.26 minutes, and that for halothane was 2.67 +/- 1.83 minutes. The average peak overshoot for halothane at the start of the experiment was 26.9%. This pressure controller differs from previously published closed-circuit anesthesia controllers that measure gas volume changes within a mechanical ventilator. A pressure-based controller is easily attached to a standard anesthesia machine and is compatible with modes of ventilation other than controlled mechanical ventilation. The controller used in this study is not designed for clinical use, but was developed to investigate the feasibility of pressure as a basis for gas volume control in closed-circuit anesthesia administration. PMID:8463802

  18. Improved control over spontaneously formed GaN nanowires in molecular beam epitaxy using a two-step growth process.

    PubMed

    Zettler, J K; Corfdir, P; Geelhaar, L; Riechert, H; Brandt, O; Fernndez-Garrido, S

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the influence of modified growth conditions during the spontaneous formation of GaN nanowires (NWs) on Si(111) in plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. We find that a two-step growth approach, where the substrate temperature is increased during the nucleation stage, is an efficient method to gain control over the area coverage, average diameter, and coalescence degree of GaN NW ensembles. Furthermore, we also demonstrate that the growth conditions employed during the incubation time that precedes nanowire nucleation do not influence the properties of the final nanowire ensemble. Therefore, when growing GaN NWs at elevated temperatures or with low Ga/N ratios, the total growth time can be reduced significantly by using more favorable growth conditions for nanowire nucleation during the incubation time. PMID:26457772

  19. Controlled synthesis and tunable properties of ultrathin silica nanotubes through spontaneous polycondensation on polyamine fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jian-Jun; Zhu, Pei-Xin; Noda, Daisuke

    2013-01-01

    Summary This paper describes a facile approach to a biomimetic rapid fabrication of ultrathin silica nanotubes with a highly uniform diameter of 10 nm and inner hollow of around 3 nm. The synthesis is carried out through a spontaneous polycondensation of alkoxysilane on polyamine crystalline fibrils that were conveniently produced from the neutralization of a solution of protonated linear polyethyleneimine (LPEI–H+) by alkali compounds. A simple mixing the fibrils with alkoxysilane in aqueous solution allowed for the rapid formation of silica to produce LPEI@silica hybrid nanotubes. These 10-nm nanotubes were hierarchically organized in a mat-like morphology with a typical size of 1–2 micrometers. The subsequent removal of organic LPEI via calcination resulted in silica nanotubes that keep this morphology. The morphology, the structure, the pore properties and the formation mechanism of the silica nanotubes were carefully investigated with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Brunauer–Emmett–Teller measurements (BET), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Detailed studies demonstrated that the formation of the nanotubes depends on the molar ratio of [OH]/[CH2CH2NH] during the neutralization as well as on the basicity of the alkali compound and on the concentration of the silica source. The synthesis of silica nanotubes established here could be easily applied to a fabrication on the kilogram scale. Silica nanotubes that were obtained from the calcination of hybrid nanotubes of LPEI@silica in an N2 atmosphere showed a distinct photoluminescence centered at 540 nm with a maximum excitation wavelength of 320 nm. Furthermore, LPEI@silica hybrid nanotubes were applied to create silica–carbon composite nanotubes by alternative adsorption of ionic polymers and subsequent carbonization. PMID:24367748

  20. Particulate Emissions from a Pre-Emissions Control Era Spark-Ignition Vehicle: A Historical Benchmark

    SciTech Connect

    John M.E. Storey; C. Scott Sluder; Douglas A. Blom; Erin Higinbotham

    2000-06-19

    This study examined the particulate emissions from a pre-emissions control era vehicle operated on both leaded and unleaded fuels for the purpose of establishing a historical benchmark. A pre-control vehicle was located that had been rebuilt with factory original parts to approximate an as-new vehicle prior to 1968. The vehicle had less than 20,000 miles on the rebuilt engine and exhaust. The vehicle underwent repeated FTP-75 tests to determine its regulated emissions, including particulate mass. Additionally, measurements of the particulate size distribution were made, as well as particulate lead concentration. These tests were conducted first with UTG96 certification fuel, followed by UTG96 doped with tetraethyl lead to approximate 1968 levels. Results of these tests, including transmission electron micrographs of individual particles from both the leaded and unleaded case are presented. The FTP composite PM emissions from this vehicle averaged 40.5 mg/mile using unleaded fuel. The results from the leaded fuel tests showed that the FTP composite PM emissions increased to an average of 139.5 mg/mile. Analysis of the particulate size distribution for both cases demonstrated that the mass-based size distribution of particles for this vehicle is heavily skewed towards the nano-particle range. The leaded-fuel tests showed a significant increase in mass concentration at the <0.1 micron size compared with the unleaded-fuel test case. The leaded-fuel tests produced lead emissions of nearly 0.04 g/mi, more than a 4-order-of-magnitude difference compared with unleaded-fuel results. Analysis of the size-fractionated PM samples showed that the lead PM emissions tended to be distributed in the 0.25 micron and smaller size range.

  1. Revisiting factors controlling methane emissions from high-arctic tundra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastepanov, M.; Sigsgaard, C.; Tagesson, T.; Ström, L.; Tamstorf, M. P.; Lund, M.; Christensen, T. R.

    2012-11-01

    Among the numerous studies of methane emission from northern wetlands the number of measurements carried on at high latitudes (north of the Arctic Circle) is very limited, and within these there is a bias towards studies of the growing season. Here we present results of five years of automatic chamber measurements at a high-arctic location in Zackenberg, NE Greenland covering both the growing seasons and two months of the following freeze-in period. The measurements show clear seasonal dynamics in methane emission. The start of the growing season increase in CH4 fluxes were strongly related to the date of snow melt. The greatest variation in fluxes between the study years were observed during the first part of the growing season. Somewhat surprisingly this variability could not be explained by commonly known factors controlling methane emission, i.e. temperature and water table position. Late in the growing season CH4 emissions were found to be very similar between the study years (except the extremely dry 2010) despite large differences in climatic factors (temperature and water table). Late-season bursts of CH4 coinciding with soil freezing in the autumn were observed at least during three years between 2006 and 2010. The accumulated emission during the freeze-in CH4 bursts was comparable in size with the growing season emission for the year 2007, and about one third of the growing season emissions for the years 2009 and 2010. In all three cases the CH4 burst was accompanied by a~corresponding episodic increase in CO2 emission, which can compose a significant contribution to the annual CO2 flux budget. The most probable mechanism of the late season CH4 and CO2 bursts is physical release of gases, accumulated in the soil during the growing season. In this study we investigate the drivers and links between growing season and late season fluxes. The reported surprising seasonal dynamics of CH4 emissions at this site show that there are important occasions where conventional knowledge on factors controlling methane emissions is overruled by other processes, acting in longer than seasonal time scales. Our findings suggest the importance of multiyear studies with continued focus on shoulder seasons.

  2. Revisiting factors controlling methane emissions from high-arctic tundra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastepanov, Mikhail; Sigsgaard, Charlotte; Tagesson, Torbern; Strom, Lena; Tamstorf, Mikkel; Lund, Magnus; Christensen, Torben

    2013-04-01

    Among the numerous studies of methane emission from northern wetlands the number of measurements carried on at high latitudes (north of the Arctic Circle) is very limited, and within these there is a bias towards studies of the growing season. Here we present results of five years of automatic chamber measurements at a high-arctic location in Zackenberg, NE Greenland, covering both the growing seasons and two months of the following freeze-in period. The measurements show clear seasonal dynamics in methane emission. In the beginning of the growing season increase in CH4 fluxes was strongly related to the date of snow melt. The greatest variation in fluxes between the study years were observed during the first part of the growing season. Somewhat surprisingly this variability could not be explained by commonly known factors controlling methane emission, i.e. temperature and water table position. Late in the growing season CH4 emissions were found to be very similar between the study years (except the extremely dry 2010) despite large differences in climatic factors (temperature and water table). Late-season bursts of CH4 coinciding with soil freezing in the autumn were observed at least during three out of five years 2006 - 2010. The accumulated emission during the freeze-in CH4 bursts was comparable in size with the growing season emission for the year 2007, and about one third of the growing season emissions for the years 2009 and 2010. In all three cases the CH4 burst was accompanied by a corresponding episodic increase in CO2 emission, which can compose a significant contribution to the annual CO2 flux budget. The most probable mechanism of the late season CH4 and CO2 bursts is physical release of gases, accumulated in the soil during the growing season. In this study we investigate the drivers and links between growing season and late season fluxes. The reported surprising seasonal dynamics of CH4 emissions at this site show that there are important occasions where conventional knowledge on factors controlling methane emissions is overruled by other processes, acting in longer than seasonal time scales. Our findings suggest the importance of multiyear studies with continued focus on shoulder seasons.

  3. Spontaneous Fission

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Segre, Emilio

    1950-11-22

    The first attempt to discover spontaneous fission in uranium was made by [Willard] Libby, who, however, failed to detect it on account of the smallness of effect. In 1940, [K. A.] Petrzhak and [G. N.] Flerov, using more sensitive methods, discovered spontaneous fission in uranium and gave some rough estimates of the spontaneous fission decay constant of this substance. Subsequently, extensive experimental work on the subject has been performed by several investigators and will be quoted in the various sections. [N.] Bohr and [A.] Wheeler have given a theory of the effect based on the usual ideas of penetration of potential barriers. On this project spontaneous fission has been studied for the past several years in an effort to obtain a complete picture of the phenomenon. For this purpose the spontaneous fission decay constants {lambda} have been measured for separated isotopes of the heavy elements wherever possible. Moreover, the number {nu} of neutrons emitted per fission has been measured wherever feasible, and other characteristics of the spontaneous fission process have been studied. This report summarizes the spontaneous fission work done at Los Alamos up to January 1, 1945. A chronological record of the work is contained in the Los Alamos monthly reports.

  4. Solar wind control of Jupiter's hectometric radio emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrow, C. H.; Desch, M. D.

    1989-01-01

    Radio, plasma, and magnetic field data obtained by Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 were used to examine the manner in which the Jovian hectometric radio emission (HOM) is controlled by the solar wind. Using the method of superposed epochs, it was found that the higher energy HOM is correlated with the IMF as well as with the solar wind density and pressure. However, unlike the Io-independent decametric radio emission (Non-Io DAM), the HOM displayed no correlation with the solar wind velocity, although this radio component appear to be also influenced by the IMF. The results suggest separate HOM amd Non-Io DAM sources.

  5. Modeling study of natural emissions, source apportionment, and emission control of atmospheric mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shetty, Suraj K.

    Mercury (Hg) is a toxic pollutant and is important to understand its cycling in the environment. In this dissertation, a number of modeling investigations were conducted to better understand the emission from natural surfaces, the source-receptor relationship of the emissions, and emission reduction of atmospheric mercury. The first part of this work estimates mercury emissions from vegetation, soil and water surfaces using a number of natural emission processors and detailed (LAI) Leaf Area Index data from GIS (Geographic Information System) satellite products. East Asian domain was chosen as it contributes nearly 50% of the global anthropogenic mercury emissions into the atmosphere. The estimated annual natural mercury emissions (gaseous elemental mercury) in the domain are 834 Mg yr-1 with 462 Mg yr-1 contributing from China. Compared to anthropogenic sources, natural sources show greater seasonal variability (highest in simmer). The emissions are significant, sometimes dominant, contributors to total mercury emission in the regions. The estimates provide possible explanation for the gaps between the anthropogenic emission estimates based on activity data and the emission inferred from field observations in the regions. To understand the contribution of domestic emissions to mercury deposition in the United States, the second part of the work applies the mercury model of Community Multi-scale Air Quality Modeling system (CMAQ-Hg v4.6) to apportion the various emission sources attributing to the mercury wet and dry deposition in the 6 United States receptor regions. Contributions to mercury deposition from electric generating units (EGU), iron and steel industry (IRST), industrial point sources excluding EGU and IRST (OIPM), the remaining anthropogenic sources (RA), natural processes (NAT), and out-of-boundary transport (BC) in domain was estimated. The model results for 2005 compared reasonably well to field observations made by MDN (Mercury Deposition Network) and CAMNet (Canadian Atmospheric Mercury Measurement Network). The model estimated a total deposition of 474 Mg yr-1 to the CONUS (Contiguous United States) domain, with two-thirds being dry deposited. Reactive gaseous mercury contributed the most to 60% of deposition. Emission speciation distribution is a key factor for local deposition as contribution from large point sources can be as high as 75% near (< 100 km) the emission sources, indicating that emission reduction may result in direct deposition decrease near the source locations. Among the sources, BC contributes to about 68% to 91% of total deposition. Excluding the BC's contribution, EGU contributes to nearly 50% of deposition caused by CONUS emissions in the Northeast, Southeast and East Central regions, while emissions from natural processes are more important in the Pacific and West Central regions (contributing up to 40% of deposition). The modeling results implies that implementation of the new emission standards proposed by USEPA (United States Environmental Protection Agency) would significantly benefit regions that have larger contributions from EGU sources. Control of mercury emissions from coal combustion processes has attracted great attention due to its toxicity and the emission-control regulations and has lead to advancement in state-of-the-art control technologies that alleviate the impact of mercury on ecosystem and human health. This part of the work applies a sorption model to simulate adsorption of mercury in flue gases, onto a confined-bed of activated carbon. The model's performances were studied at various flue gas flow rates, inlet mercury concentrations and adsorption bed temperatures. The process simulated a flue gas, with inlet mercury concentration of 300 ppb, entering at a velocity of 0.3 m s-1 from the bottom into a fixed bed (inside bed diameter of 1 m and 3 m bed height; bed temperature of 25 °C) of activated carbon (particle size of 0.004 m with density of 0.5 g cm-3 and surface area of 90.25 cm2 g -1). The model result demonstrated that a batch of activated carbon bed was capable of controlling mercury emission for approximately 275 days after which further mercury uptake starts to decrease till it reaches about 500 days when additional control ceases. An increase in bed temperature significantly reduces mercury sorption capacity of the activated carbon. Increase in flue gas flow rate may result in faster consumption of sorption capacity initially but at a later stage, the sorption rate decreases due to reduced sorption capacity. Thus, overall sorption rate remains unaffected. The activated carbon's effective life (time to reach saturation) is not affected by inlet mercury concentration, implying that the designing and operation of a mercury sorption process can be done independently. The results provide quantitative indication for designing efficient confined-bed process to remove mercury from flue gases.

  6. Air emission control equipment - the new challenge for equpiment suppliers

    SciTech Connect

    Lobb, F.H.

    1997-12-31

    The combination of Title V, the CAM Rule and the Credible Evidence Rule demand industrial sites view the selection and operation of emission control devices in a whole new light. No longer can users see these devices as detached end of pipe pieces of equipment essentially purchased off lowest bid. These regulatory changes force plants to fully integrate the operation of these devices into their process control systems and instrumentation. And this is specifically EPA`s stated intent. EPA believes that by forcing sites to exercise the same knowledge and attention to air emissions that they do to operate their production processes, emissions will undergo a natural reduction across the country. Process and operational data that historically has been the sole province of sites becomes public. And compliance with state defined requirements must be demonstrated essentially continuously. This paper explores the new approach to compliance and provides insight through specific field examples/installations of emission control equipment. The author seeks to promote understanding through discussion of these significant regulatory changes.

  7. Control of Trace Metal Emissions During Coal Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas C. Ho

    1997-07-01

    Emissions of toxic trace metals in the form of metal fumes or submicron particulates from a coal-fired combustion source have received greater environmental and regulatory concern over the past years. Current practice of controlling these emissions is to collect them at the cold-end of the process by air-pollution control devices (APCDs) such as electrostatic precipitators and baghouses. However, trace metal fumes may not always be effectively collected by these devices because the formed fumes are extremely small. The proposed research is to explore the opportunities for improved control of toxic trace metal emissions, alternatively, at the hot-end of the coal combustion process, i.e., in the combustion chamber. The technology proposed is to prevent the metal fumes from forming during the process, which would effectively eliminate the metal emission problems. Specifically, the technology is to employ suitable sorbents to (1) reduce the amount of metal volatilization during combustion and (2) capture volatilized metal vapors. The objectives of the project are to demonstrate the technology and to characterize the metal capture process during coal combustion in a fluidized bed combustor.

  8. Control of Trace Metal Emissions During Coal Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas C. Ho

    1997-04-01

    Emissions of toxic trace metals in the form of metal fumes or submicron particulates from a coal-fired combustion source have received greater environmental and regulatory concern over the past years. Current practice of controlling these emissions is to collect them at the cold-end of the process by air-pollution control devices (APCDs) such as electrostatic precipitators and baghouses. However, trace metal fumes may not always be effectively collected by these devices because the formed fumes are extremely small. The proposed research is to explore the opportunities for improved control of toxic trace metal emissions, alternatively, at the hot-end of the coal combustion process, i.e., in the combustion chamber. The technology proposed is to prevent the metal fumes from forming during the process, which would effectively eliminate the metal emission problems. Specifically, the technology is to employ suitable sorbents to (1) reduce the amount of metal volatilization during combustion and (2) capture volatilized metal vapors. The objectives of the project are to demonstrate the technology and to characterize the metal capture process during coal combustion in a fluidized bed combustor.

  9. Air quality assessment and control of emission rates.

    PubMed

    Skiba, Yuri N; Parra-Guevara, David; Belitskaya, Davydova Valentina

    2005-12-01

    Mathematical methods based on the adjoint model approach are given for the air-pollution estimation and control in an urban region. A simple advection-diffusion-reaction model and its adjoint are used to illustrate the application of the methods. Dual pollution concentration estimates in ecologically important zones are derived and used to develop two non-optimal strategies and one optimal strategy for controlling the emission rates of enterprises. A linear convex combination of these strategies represents a new sufficient strategy. A method for detecting the enterprises, which violate the emission rates prescribed by a control, is given. A method for determining an optimal position for a new enterprise in the region is also described. PMID:16311824

  10. Control of mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H.S.; Livengood, C.D.

    1992-09-01

    This project at Argonne is designed to investigate new concepts leading to advanced control technologies for fossil-energy systems. The objective of this new task on air toxics control is to develop new or improved, cost-effective control technology for the abatement of emissions of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) from fossil-fuel combustion plants and to evaluate the possible effects of any captured species on waste disposal. The HAPs to be investigated initially in this task include mercury and arsenic compounds.

  11. Control of mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H.S.; Livengood, C.D.

    1992-01-01

    This project at Argonne is designed to investigate new concepts leading to advanced control technologies for fossil-energy systems. The objective of this new task on air toxics control is to develop new or improved, cost-effective control technology for the abatement of emissions of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) from fossil-fuel combustion plants and to evaluate the possible effects of any captured species on waste disposal. The HAPs to be investigated initially in this task include mercury and arsenic compounds.

  12. 78 FR 36776 - Proposed Information Collection Request; Comment Request; Emission Control System Performance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-19

    ... AGENCY Proposed Information Collection Request; Comment Request; Emission Control System Performance... an information collection request (ICR), ``Emission Control System Performance Warranty Regulations and Voluntary Aftermarket Part Certification Program (Renewal)'' (EPA ICR No. 0116.10, OMB Control...

  13. A quantum dot single-photon source with on-the-fly all-optical polarization control and timed emission

    PubMed Central

    Heinze, Dirk; Breddermann, Dominik; Zrenner, Artur; Schumacher, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Sources of single photons are key elements for applications in quantum information science. Among the different sources available, semiconductor quantum dots excel with their integrability in semiconductor on-chip solutions and the potential that photon emission can be triggered on demand. Usually, the photon is emitted from a single-exciton ground state. Polarization of the photon and time of emission are either probabilistic or pre-determined by electronic properties of the system. Here, we study the direct two-photon emission from the biexciton. The two-photon emission is enabled by a laser pulse driving the system into a virtual state inside the band gap. From this intermediate state, the single photon of interest is then spontaneously emitted. We show that emission through this higher-order transition provides a versatile approach to generate a single photon. Through the driving laser pulse, polarization state, frequency and emission time of the photon can be controlled on-the-fly. PMID:26436776

  14. Spontaneous pre-stimulus fluctuations in the activity of right fronto-parietal areas influence inhibitory control performance

    PubMed Central

    Chavan, Camille F.; Manuel, Aurelie L.; Mouthon, Michael; Spierer, Lucas

    2013-01-01

    Inhibitory control refers to the ability to suppress planned or ongoing cognitive or motor processes. Electrophysiological indices of inhibitory control failure have been found to manifest even before the presentation of the stimuli triggering the inhibition, suggesting that pre-stimulus brain-states modulate inhibition performance. However, previous electrophysiological investigations on the state-dependency of inhibitory control were based on averaged event-related potentials (ERPs), a method eliminating the variability in the ongoing brain activity not time-locked to the event of interest. These studies thus left unresolved whether spontaneous variations in the brain-state immediately preceding unpredictable inhibition-triggering stimuli also influence inhibitory control performance. To address this question, we applied single-trial EEG topographic analyses on the time interval immediately preceding NoGo stimuli in conditions where the responses to NoGo trials were correctly inhibited [correct rejection (CR)] vs. committed [false alarms (FAs)] during an auditory spatial Go/NoGo task. We found a specific configuration of the EEG voltage field manifesting more frequently before correctly inhibited responses to NoGo stimuli than before FAs. There was no evidence for an EEG topography occurring more frequently before FAs than before CR. The visualization of distributed electrical source estimations of the EEG topography preceding successful response inhibition suggested that it resulted from the activity of a right fronto-parietal brain network. Our results suggest that the fluctuations in the ongoing brain activity immediately preceding stimulus presentation contribute to the behavioral outcomes during an inhibitory control task. Our results further suggest that the state-dependency of sensory-cognitive processing might not only concern perceptual processes, but also high-order, top-down inhibitory control mechanisms. PMID:23761747

  15. LANDFILL OPERATION FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND MAXIMUM METHANE EMISSION CONTROL

    SciTech Connect

    Don Augenstein

    1999-01-11

    ''Conventional'' waste landfills emit methane, a potent greenhouse gas, in quantities such that landfill methane is a major factor in global climate change. Controlled landfilling is a novel approach to manage landfills for rapid completion of total gas generation, maximizing gas capture and minimizing emissions of methane to the atmosphere. With controlled landfilling, methane generation is accelerated and brought to much earlier completion by improving conditions for biological processes (principally moisture levels) in the landfill. Gas recovery efficiency approaches 100% through use of surface membrane cover over porous gas recovery layers operated at slight vacuum. A field demonstration project's results at the Yolo County Central Landfill near Davis, California are, to date, highly encouraging. Two major controlled landfilling benefits would be the reduction of landfill methane emissions to minuscule levels, and the recovery of greater amounts of landfill methane energy in much shorter times than with conventional landfill practice. With the large amount of US landfill methane generated, and greenhouse potency of methane, better landfill methane control can play a substantial role in reduction of US greenhouse gas emissions.

  16. Dynamic Control of Thermal Emission with Plasmonically Active Graphene Metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brar, Victor; Sherrott, Michelle; Jang, Min; Kim, Seyoon; Kim, Laura; Lopez, Josue; Choi, Mansoo; Sweatlock, Luke; Atwater, Harry

    2015-03-01

    Thermal emission is typically viewed to be broadband, unpolarized and isotropic, with a spectral profile and intensity that depend on the emissivity of the material, and that vary only with changes in temperature. In this talk we demonstrate that the intensity, polarization and spectrum of thermal emission at constant temperature can be dynamically controlled through electrostatic gating of plasmonic graphene resonators on a heated SiNx substrate. We show that the plasmonic resonances in graphene act as antenna that to out-couple the thermal energy of substrate phonons and graphene electrons to create narrow, mid-infrared spectral features in the thermal emission profile. By varying the gate voltage and resonator width, we show that these features can be effectively turned on and off at kHz rates, and tuned across a broad frequency range. Our measurements show that at 7um the emissivity of the surface can be varied by 0.02, and that the emitted radiation is polarized, with a modulated power density of 0.02W/m2 over 100cm-1 of bandwidth.

  17. Venturi/vortex technology for controlling chromium electroplating emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, K.J.; Northrup, J.; Heck, S.R.

    1997-12-31

    A new technology has been developed to control air emissions from hexavalent chromium electroplating tanks. The venturi/vortex scrubber uses a patented drain assembly to pull plating solution, air with toxic particulates above the solution, and unpopped bubbles of generated gases down with a gravity generated vortex effect. The recirculated plating solution acts as the scrubbing liquid and air agitation is eliminated. Separated gases are passed through a condenser/filter to remove any remaining fumes. The device is almost entirely constructed of CPVC. This device offers several advantages over conventional end-of-pipe systems including significantly lower cost, no wastewater, no extensive ventilation system, and emissions are recycled. The system can be is easily retrofitted to existing tanks, however, a loose fitting tank lid is recommended. A pilot demonstration has been performed at Benet Laboratory, Watervliet, NY (US Army) with a 1,500 gallon chromic acid electroplating tank and 1,500 Amps of applied current. Overall chromium emissions results were 0.00002 mg/Amp-hr, surpassing the stringent California State requirement of 0.006 mg/Amp-hr. Emission prevention by capturing unpopped bubbles is the method in which this system reduces the most emissions. The system met current ambient worker safety standards. Two major improvements are recommended: an increase in gas flow rate through the system and a solution to the system`s sensitivity to the plating solution level.

  18. Control of Several Emissions during Olive Pomace Thermal Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Teresa; Nogales, Sergio; Román, Silvia; Montero, Irene; Arranz, José Ignacio; Sepúlveda, Francisco José

    2014-01-01

    Biomass plays an important role as an energy source, being an interesting alternative to fossil fuels due to its environment-friendly and sustainable characteristics. However, due to the exposure of customers to emissions during biomass heating, evolved pollutants should be taken into account and controlled. Changing raw materials or mixing them with another less pollutant biomass could be a suitable step to reduce pollution. This work studied the thermal behaviour of olive pomace, pyrenean oak and their blends under combustion using thermogravimetric analysis. It was possible to monitor the emissions released during the process by coupling mass spectrometry analysis. The experiments were carried out under non-isothermal conditions at the temperature range 25–750 °C and a heating rate of 20 °C·min−1. The following species were analysed: aromatic compounds (benzene and toluene), sulphur emissions (sulphur dioxide), 1,4-dioxin, hydrochloric acid, carbon dioxide and nitrogen oxides. The results indicated that pollutants were mainly evolved in two different stages, which are related to the thermal degradation steps. Thus, depending on the pollutant and raw material composition, different emission profiles were observed. Furthermore, intensity of the emission profiles was related, in some cases, to the composition of the precursor. PMID:25314298

  19. Ozone trends in Atlanta, Georgia - Have emission controls been effective?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsay, Ronald W.; Richardson, Jennifer L.; Chameldes, William L.

    1989-01-01

    Nine years of summertime ozone data from the Atlanta metropolitan area are analyzed and compared to local emissions of volatile organic carbon and nitrogen oxides. Trends from 1979 to 1987 were studied for the number of days per year ozone exceeded the NAAQS standard, the second-highest ozone level observed per year, and the first quartile summertime average ozone observed, as well as the mean difference between the ozone level observed downwind and upwind of the city. Because this last parameter is sensitive to chemical factors but relatively insensitive to the number of days each year with meteorological conditions conducive to ozone formation, its trend may be best suited for determining how effective emission controls have been in reducing O3 in the Atlanta area. In spite of the fact that sizeable reductions have been claimed for volatile organic carbon emissions over the past several years, the data give no indication that ozone levels have decreased and in fact, imply that summertime ozone production may have increased. The results imply that either emissions have not decreased as much as has been claimed or that ozone is not sensitive to anthropogenic volatile organic carbon emissions.

  20. Emissions from premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI) combustion and affect on emission control devices

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, II, James E; Kass, Michael D; Huff, Shean P; Barone, Teresa L; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur; Prikhodko, Vitaly Y; Storey, John Morse

    2010-01-01

    A light-duty diesel engine has been operated in advanced combustion modes known generally as premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI). The emissions have been characterized for several load and speed combinations. Fewer NO{sub x} and particulate matter (PM) emissions are produced by PCCI, but higher CO and hydrocarbon (HC) emissions result. In addition, the nature of the PM differs from conventional combustion; the PM is smaller and has a much higher soluble organic fraction (SOF) content (68% vs. 30% for conventional combustion). Three catalyst technologies were studied to determine the affects of HECC on catalyst performance; the technologies were a lean NO{sub x} trap (LNT), diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC), and diesel particulate filter (DPF). The LNT benefited greatly from the reduced NO{sub x} emissions associated with PCCI. NO{sub x} capacity requirements are reduced as well as overall tailpipe NO{sub x} levels particularly at low load and temperature conditions where regeneration of the LNT is difficult. The DOC performance requirements for PCCI are more stringent due to the higher CO and HC emissions; however, the DOC was effective at controlling the higher CO and HC emissions at conditions above the light-off temperature. Below light-off, CO and HC emissions are problematic. The study of DPF technology focused on the fuel penalties associated with DPF regeneration or 'desoot' due to the different PM loading rates from PCCI vs. conventional combustion. Less frequent desoot events were required from the lower PM from PCCI and, when used in conjunction with an LNT, the lower PM from less frequent LNT regeneration. The lower desoot frequency leads a {approx}3% fuel penalty for a mixture of PCCI and conventional loads vs. {approx}4% for conventional only combustion.

  1. Failing to Forget: Prospective Memory Commission Errors Can Result from Spontaneous Retrieval and Impaired Executive Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scullin, Michael K.; Bugg, Julie M.

    2013-01-01

    Prospective memory (PM) research typically examines the ability to remember to execute delayed intentions but often ignores the ability to forget finished intentions. We had participants perform (or not perform; control group) a PM task and then instructed them that the PM task was finished. We later (re)presented the PM cue. Approximately 25% of…

  2. Spontaneous and electric field-controlled front-rear polarization of human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Saltukoglu, Deniz; Grünewald, Julian; Strohmeyer, Nico; Bensch, Robert; Ulbrich, Maximilian H; Ronneberger, Olaf; Simons, Matias

    2015-12-01

    It has long been known that electrical fields (EFs) are able to influence the direction of migrating cells, a process commonly referred to as electrotaxis or galvanotaxis. Most studies have focused on migrating cells equipped with an existing polarity before EF application, making it difficult to delineate EF-specific pathways. Here we study the initial events in front-rear organization of spreading keratinocytes to dissect the molecular requirements for random and EF-controlled polarization. We find that Arp2/3-dependent protrusive forces and Rac1/Cdc42 activity were generally required for both forms of polarization but were dispensable for controlling the direction of EF-controlled polarization. By contrast, we found a crucial role for extracellular pH as well as G protein coupled-receptor (GPCR) or purinergic signaling in the control of directionality. The normal direction of polarization toward the cathode was reverted by lowering extracellular pH. Polarization toward the anode was also seen at neutral pH when GPCR or purinergic signaling was inhibited. However, the stepwise increase of extracellular pH in this scenario led to restoration of cathodal polarization. Overall our work puts forward a model in which the EF uses distinct polarization pathways. The cathodal pathway involves GPCR/purinergic signaling and is dominant over the anodal pathway at neutral pH. PMID:26424799

  3. Spontaneous and electric field–controlled front–rear polarization of human keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Saltukoglu, Deniz; Grünewald, Julian; Strohmeyer, Nico; Bensch, Robert; Ulbrich, Maximilian H.; Ronneberger, Olaf; Simons, Matias

    2015-01-01

    It has long been known that electrical fields (EFs) are able to influence the direction of migrating cells, a process commonly referred to as electrotaxis or galvanotaxis. Most studies have focused on migrating cells equipped with an existing polarity before EF application, making it difficult to delineate EF-specific pathways. Here we study the initial events in front–rear organization of spreading keratinocytes to dissect the molecular requirements for random and EF-controlled polarization. We find that Arp2/3-dependent protrusive forces and Rac1/Cdc42 activity were generally required for both forms of polarization but were dispensable for controlling the direction of EF-controlled polarization. By contrast, we found a crucial role for extracellular pH as well as G protein coupled–receptor (GPCR) or purinergic signaling in the control of directionality. The normal direction of polarization toward the cathode was reverted by lowering extracellular pH. Polarization toward the anode was also seen at neutral pH when GPCR or purinergic signaling was inhibited. However, the stepwise increase of extracellular pH in this scenario led to restoration of cathodal polarization. Overall our work puts forward a model in which the EF uses distinct polarization pathways. The cathodal pathway involves GPCR/purinergic signaling and is dominant over the anodal pathway at neutral pH. PMID:26424799

  4. Dynamic control of light emission faster than the lifetime limit using VO2 phase-change

    PubMed Central

    Cueff, Sébastien; Li, Dongfang; Zhou, You; Wong, Franklin J.; Kurvits, Jonathan A.; Ramanathan, Shriram; Zia, Rashid

    2015-01-01

    Modulation is a cornerstone of optical communication, and as such, governs the overall speed of data transmission. Currently, the two main strategies for modulating light are direct modulation of the excited emitter population (for example, using semiconductor lasers) and external optical modulation (for example, using Mach–Zehnder interferometers or ring resonators). However, recent advances in nanophotonics offer an alternative approach to control spontaneous emission through modifications to the local density of optical states. Here, by leveraging the phase-change of a vanadium dioxide nanolayer, we demonstrate broadband all-optical direct modulation of 1.5 μm emission from trivalent erbium ions more than three orders of magnitude faster than their excited state lifetime. This proof-of-concept demonstration shows how integration with phase-change materials can transform widespread phosphorescent materials into high-speed optical sources that can be integrated in monolithic nanoscale devices for both free-space and on-chip communication. PMID:26489436

  5. The effects of energy paths and emission controls and standards on future trends in China's emissions of primary air pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y.; Zhang, J.; Nielsen, C. P.

    2014-03-01

    To examine the efficacy of China's actions to control atmospheric pollution, three levels of growth of energy consumption and three levels of implementation of emission controls are estimated, generating a total of nine combined activity-emission control scenarios that are then used to estimate trends of national emissions of primary air pollutants through 2030. The emission control strategies are expected to have more effects than the energy paths on the future emission trends for all the concerned pollutants. As recently promulgated national action plans of air pollution prevention and control (NAPAPPC) are implemented, China's anthropogenic pollutant emissions should decline. For example, the emissions of SO2, NOx, total primary particulate matter (PM), PM10, and PM2.5 are estimated to decline 7%, 20%, 41%, 34%, and 31% from 2010 to 2030, respectively, in the "best guess" scenario that includes national commitment of energy saving policy and partial implementation of NAPAPPC. Should the issued/proposed emission standards be fully achieved, a less likely scenario, annual emissions would be further reduced, ranging from 17% (for primary PM2.5) to 29% (for NOx) declines in 2015, and the analogue numbers would be 12% and 24% in 2030. The uncertainties of emission projections result mainly from the uncertain operational conditions of swiftly proliferating air pollutant control devices and lack of detailed information about emission control plans by region. The predicted emission trends by sector and chemical species raise concerns about current pollution control strategies: the potential for emissions abatement in key sectors may be declining due to the near saturation of emission control devices use; risks of ecosystem acidification could rise because emissions of alkaline base cations may be declining faster than those of SO2; and radiative forcing could rise because emissions of positive-forcing carbonaceous aerosols may decline more slowly than those of SO2 emissions and thereby concentrations of negative-forcing sulfate particles. Expanded control of emissions of fine particles and carbonaceous aerosols from small industrial and residential sources is recommended, and a more comprehensive emission control strategy targeting a wider range of pollutants and taking account of more diverse environmental impacts is also urgently needed.

  6. The effects of energy paths and emission controls and standards on future trends in China's emissions of primary air pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y.; Zhang, J.; Nielsen, C. P.

    2014-09-01

    To examine the efficacy of China's actions to control atmospheric pollution, three levels of growth of energy consumption and three levels of implementation of emission controls are estimated, generating a total of nine combined activity-emission control scenarios that are then used to estimate trends of national emissions of primary air pollutants through 2030. The emission control strategies are expected to have more effects than the energy paths on the future emission trends for all the concerned pollutants. As recently promulgated national action plans of air pollution prevention and control (NAPAPPC) are implemented, China's anthropogenic pollutant emissions should decline. For example, the emissions of SO2, NOx, total suspended particles (TSP), PM10, and PM2.5 are estimated to decline 7, 20, 41, 34, and 31% from 2010 to 2030, respectively, in the "best guess" scenario that includes national commitment of energy saving policy and implementation of NAPAPPC. Should the issued/proposed emission standards be fully achieved, a less likely scenario, annual emissions would be further reduced, ranging from 17 (for primary PM2.5) to 29% (for NOx) declines in 2015, and the analogue numbers would be 12 and 24% in 2030. The uncertainties of emission projections result mainly from the uncertain operational conditions of swiftly proliferating air pollutant control devices and lack of detailed information about emission control plans by region. The predicted emission trends by sector and chemical species raise concerns about current pollution control strategies: the potential for emissions abatement in key sectors may be declining due to the near saturation of emission control devices use; risks of ecosystem acidification could rise because emissions of alkaline base cations may be declining faster than those of SO2; and radiative forcing could rise because emissions of positive-forcing carbonaceous aerosols may decline more slowly than those of SO2 emissions and thereby concentrations of negative-forcing sulfate particles. Expanded control of emissions of fine particles and carbonaceous aerosols from small industrial and residential sources is recommended, and a more comprehensive emission control strategy targeting a wider range of pollutants (volatile organic compounds, NH3 and CO, etc.) and taking account of more diverse environmental impacts is also urgently needed.

  7. Control of mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Hann S.; Livengood, C.D.; Wu, Jiann M.

    1993-06-01

    The Development of Advanced Environmental Control Technology project at Argonne is designed to investigate new concepts leading to advanced control technologies for fossil-energy systems. Within that project, specific research tasks are focused on the development of combined NO{sub x}/SO{sub 2}control technologies, evaluation of waste/byproduct materials from advanced flue-gas-cleanup (FGC) systems, and development of new or improved control measures for the abatement of emissions of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) from fossil-fuel combustion. The last task, which is the subject of this paper, also includes the evaluation of any possible effects of captured HAP species on waste disposal, as well as the evaluation of HAP measuring techniques and instruments. The HAPs currently under investigation in this task include mercury and arsenic compounds. Only experimental activities concerning mercury control are reported in this paper.

  8. Revisiting factors controlling methane emissions from high-Arctic tundra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastepanov, M.; Sigsgaard, C.; Tagesson, T.; Ström, L.; Tamstorf, M. P.; Lund, M.; Christensen, T. R.

    2013-07-01

    The northern latitudes are experiencing disproportionate warming relative to the mid-latitudes, and there is growing concern about feedbacks between this warming and methane production and release from high-latitude soils. Studies of methane emissions carried out in the Arctic, particularly those with measurements made outside the growing season, are underrepresented in the literature. Here we present results of 5 yr (2006-2010) of automatic chamber measurements at a high-Arctic location in Zackenberg, NE Greenland, covering both the growing seasons and two months of the following freeze-in periods. The measurements show clear seasonal dynamics in methane emission. The start of the growing season and the increase in CH4 fluxes were strongly related to the date of snowmelt. Within each particular growing season, CH4 fluxes were highly correlated with the soil temperature (R2 > 0.75), which is probably explained by high seasonality of both variables, and weakly correlated with the water table. The greatest variability in fluxes between the study years was observed during the first part of the growing season. Somewhat surprisingly, this variability could not be explained by commonly known factors controlling methane emission, i.e. temperature and water table position. Late in the growing season CH4 emissions were found to be very similar between the study years (except the extremely dry 2010) despite large differences in climatic factors (temperature and water table). Late-season bursts of CH4 coinciding with soil freezing in the autumn were observed during at least three years. The cumulative emission during the freeze-in CH4 bursts was comparable in size with the growing season emission for the year 2007, and about one third of the growing season emissions for the years 2009 and 2010. In all three cases the CH4 burst was accompanied by a corresponding episodic increase in CO2 emission, which can compose a significant contribution to the annual CO2 flux budget. The most probable mechanism of the late-season CH4 and CO2 bursts is physical release of gases accumulated in the soil during the growing season. In this study we discuss possible links between growing season and autumn fluxes. Multiannual dynamics of the subsurface CH4 storage pool are hypothesized to be such a link and an important driver of intearannual variations in the fluxes, capable of overruling the conventionally known short-term control factors (temperature and water table). Our findings suggest the importance of multiyear studies with a continued focus on shoulder seasons in Arctic ecosystems.

  9. Dust-emissions control mechanism for hand sanders

    SciTech Connect

    Hampl, V.; Topmiller, J.L.; Watkins, D.W.

    1991-01-01

    The invention relates to mechanisms for reducing dust emissions from a hand sander having a rotating or orbital sanding pad, and more particularly to a dust control device usable with either an electrical and an air-powered hand sander which allows the sander to be readily movable over the surface of a workpiece even when a strong vacuum is applied thereat to suck away dust generated by the sanding operation.

  10. Solid state carbon nanotube device for controllable trion electroluminescence emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Shuang; Ma, Ze; Wei, Nan; Liu, Huaping; Wang, Sheng; Peng, Lian-Mao

    2016-03-01

    Semiconducting carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have a direct chirality-dependent bandgap and reduced dimensionality-related quantum confinement effects, which are closely related to the performance of optoelectronic devices. Here, taking advantage of the large energy separations between neutral singlet excitons and charged excitons, i.e. trions in CNTs, we have achieved for the first time all trion electroluminescence (EL) emission from chirality-sorted (8,3) and (8,4) CNT-based solid state devices. We showed that strong trion emission can be obtained as a result of localized impact excitation and electrically injected holes, with an estimated efficiency of ~5 × 10-4 photons per injected hole. The importance of contact-controlled carrier injection (including symmetric and asymmetric contact configurations) and EL spectral stability for gradually increasing bias were also investigated. The realization of electrically induced pure trion emission opens up a new opportunity for CNT film-based optoelectronic devices, providing a new degree of freedom in controlling the devices to extend potential applications in spin or magnetic optoelectronics fields.Semiconducting carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have a direct chirality-dependent bandgap and reduced dimensionality-related quantum confinement effects, which are closely related to the performance of optoelectronic devices. Here, taking advantage of the large energy separations between neutral singlet excitons and charged excitons, i.e. trions in CNTs, we have achieved for the first time all trion electroluminescence (EL) emission from chirality-sorted (8,3) and (8,4) CNT-based solid state devices. We showed that strong trion emission can be obtained as a result of localized impact excitation and electrically injected holes, with an estimated efficiency of ~5 × 10-4 photons per injected hole. The importance of contact-controlled carrier injection (including symmetric and asymmetric contact configurations) and EL spectral stability for gradually increasing bias were also investigated. The realization of electrically induced pure trion emission opens up a new opportunity for CNT film-based optoelectronic devices, providing a new degree of freedom in controlling the devices to extend potential applications in spin or magnetic optoelectronics fields. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr07468a

  11. THE IMPACT OF PARTICULATE EMISSIONS CONTROL ON THE CONTROL OF OTHER MWC AIR EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    On December 20, 1989, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed revised new source performance standards for new municipal waste combustion (MWC) units and guidelines for existing sources. The proposed national regulations require tighter particulate matter control and a...

  12. Enhancement in the excitonic spontaneous emission rates for Si nanocrystal multi-layers covered with thin films of Au, Ag, and Al

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrin, Y.; Rich, D. H.; Rozenfeld, N.; Arad-Vosk, N.; Ron, A.; Sa'ar, A.

    2015-10-01

    The enhancement in the spontaneous emission rate (SER) for Ag, Au, and Al films on multilayer Si nanocrystals (SiNCs) was probed with time-resolved cathodoluminescence (CL). The SiNCs were grown on Si(100) using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Electron-hole pairs were generated in the metal-covered SiNCs by injecting a pulsed high-energy electron beam through the thin metal films, which is found to be an ideal method of excitation for plasmonic quantum heterostructures and nanostructures that are opaque to laser or light excitation. Spatially, spectrally, and temporally resolved CL was used to measure the excitonic lifetime of the SiNCs in metal-covered and bare regions of the same samples. The observed enhancement in the SER for the metal-covered SiNCs, relative to the SER for the bare sample, is attributed to a coupling of the SiNC excitons with surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) of the thin metal films. A maximum SER enhancement of ˜2.0, 1.4 and 1.2 was observed for the Ag, Au, and Al films, respectively, at a temperature of 55 K. The three chosen plasmonic metals of Ag, Au, and Al facilitate an interesting comparison of the exciton-SPP coupling for metal films that exhibit varying differences between the surface plasmon energy, ωsp, and the SiNC excitonic emission energy. A modeling of the temperature dependence of the Purcell enhancement factor, Fp, was performed and included the temperature dependence of the dielectric properties of the metals.

  13. Enhancement in the excitonic spontaneous emission rates for Si nanocrystal multi-layers covered with thin films of Au, Ag, and Al.

    PubMed

    Estrin, Y; Rich, D H; Rozenfeld, N; Arad-Vosk, N; Ron, A; Sa'ar, A

    2015-10-30

    The enhancement in the spontaneous emission rate (SER) for Ag, Au, and Al films on multilayer Si nanocrystals (SiNCs) was probed with time-resolved cathodoluminescence (CL). The SiNCs were grown on Si(100) using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Electron-hole pairs were generated in the metal-covered SiNCs by injecting a pulsed high-energy electron beam through the thin metal films, which is found to be an ideal method of excitation for plasmonic quantum heterostructures and nanostructures that are opaque to laser or light excitation. Spatially, spectrally, and temporally resolved CL was used to measure the excitonic lifetime of the SiNCs in metal-covered and bare regions of the same samples. The observed enhancement in the SER for the metal-covered SiNCs, relative to the SER for the bare sample, is attributed to a coupling of the SiNC excitons with surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) of the thin metal films. A maximum SER enhancement of ∼2.0, 1.4 and 1.2 was observed for the Ag, Au, and Al films, respectively, at a temperature of 55 K. The three chosen plasmonic metals of Ag, Au, and Al facilitate an interesting comparison of the exciton-SPP coupling for metal films that exhibit varying differences between the surface plasmon energy, ω(sp), and the SiNC excitonic emission energy. A modeling of the temperature dependence of the Purcell enhancement factor, Fp, was performed and included the temperature dependence of the dielectric properties of the metals. PMID:26436289

  14. Solution processable 2-(trityloxy)ethyl and tert-butyl group containing amorphous molecular glasses of pyranylidene derivatives with light-emitting and amplified spontaneous emission properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarins, Elmars; Vembris, Aivars; Misina, Elina; Narels, Martins; Grzibovskis, Raitis; Kokars, Valdis

    2015-11-01

    Small organic molecules with incorporated 4H-pyran-4-ylidene (pyranylidene) fragment as the π-conjugation system which bonds the electron acceptor fragment (A) with electron donor part (D) in the molecule - also well known as derivatives of 4-(dicyano-methylene)-2-methyl-6-[p-(dimethylamino)styryl]-4H-pyran (DCM) laser dye-have attracted considerable attention of scientists as potential new generation materials for organic photonics and molecular electronics due to their low-cost fabrication possibility, flexibility and low-weight. Six glassy derivatives of 4H-pyran-4-ylidene (pyranylidene) with attached bulky 2-(trityloxy)ethyl and tert-butyl groups are described in this report. Almost all of the synthesized compounds form good optical quality transparent amorphous films from volatile organic solvents and could be obtained in good yields up to 75%. Their light emission in solution and thin solid films is in the range of 600-700 nm, they are thermally stable and show glass transition in the range of 108-158 °C. The amplified spontaneous emission threshold values of the neat films of the glassy pyranylidene derivatives vary from 155 to 450 μJ/cm2 and their HOMO and LUMO energy levels are between of those of tris(8-hydroxy quinolinato) aluminum (Alq3). The photoluminescence quantum yields of the glassy compounds are in the range from 1% to about 7.7% and their electroluminescence properties have been investigated. Therefore, glassy pyranylidene derivatives could be a very potential low-cost solution processable materials for Alq3 hosted light-amplification and light-emitting application studies.

  15. Effects of macro-bending on 1500-nm amplified spontaneous emission, gain, and noise figure of erbium-gallium co-doped fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Leong Chia; Abdul Rashid, Hairul Azhar; Mokhtar, Mohd Ridzuan

    2015-12-01

    The relationships among macro-bending loss, power of the 1500-nm amplified spontaneous emission (ASE), gain, and noise figure of an erbium-gallium co-doped silica fiber amplifier are investigated and explained. The dependence of macro-bending loss on different bending radii is examined. Using different fiber lengths and bending radii, the effects of macro-bending on ASE, gain, and noise figure are analyzed in comparison to an unbent fiber. The ASE power changes because macro-bending alters the number of Er3+ ions in the I4 level that decay to the I4 level emitting photons of shorter and longer wavelengths. The trade-off relationship that exists between the change in the ASE power and signal loss, where both result from macro-bending, explains the gain change. Fiber length also affects the changes in the ASE power and gain. Noise figure in the longer-wavelength region increases. In the shorter-wavelength region, for a long fiber, the noise figure improves only slightly. For a short fiber, it worsens due to gain decrement. The findings from this study explain the reason for gain improvement upon suppressing either a competing or a noncompeting ASE via filters or macro-bending in other rare-earth-doped fibers.

  16. Real-time monitoring and fault locating using amplified spontaneous emission noise reflection for tree-structured Ethernet passive optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naim, Nani Fadzlina; Ab-Rahman, Mohammad Syuhaimi; Kamaruddin, Nur Hasiba; Bakar, Ahmad Ashrif A.

    2013-09-01

    Nowadays, optical networks are becoming dense while detecting faulty branches in the tree-structured networks has become problematic. Conventional methods are inconvenient as they require an engineer to visit the failure site to check the optical fiber using an optical time-domain reflectometer. An innovative monitoring technique for tree-structured network topology in Ethernet passive optical networks (EPONs) by using the erbium-doped fiber amplifier to amplify the traffic signal is demonstrated, and in the meantime, a residual amplified spontaneous emission spectrum is used as the input signal to monitor the optical cable from the central office. Fiber Bragg gratings with distinct center wavelengths are employed to reflect the monitoring signals. Faulty branches of the tree-structured EPONs can be identified using a simple and low-cost receiver. We will show that this technique is capable of providing monitoring range up to 32 optical network units using a power meter with a sensitivity of -65 dBm while maintaining the bit error rate of 10-13.

  17. Propagation of a strong x-ray pulse: Pulse compression, stimulated Raman scattering, amplified spontaneous emission, lasing without inversion, and four-wave mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Yuping; Wang Chuankui; Liu Jicai; Gel'mukhanov, Faris

    2010-01-15

    We study the compression of strong x-ray pulses from x-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) propagating through the resonant medium of atomic argon. The simulations are based on the three-level model with the frequency of the incident x-ray pulse tuned in the 2p{sub 3/2}-4s resonance. The pulse propagation is accompanied by the self-seeded stimulated resonant Raman scattering (SRRS). The SRRS starts from two channels of amplified spontaneous emission (ASE), 4s-2p{sub 3/2} and 3s-2p{sub 3/2}, which form the extensive ringing pattern and widen the power spectrum. The produced seed field triggers the Stokes ASE channel 3s-2p{sub 3/2}. The population inversion is quenched for longer propagation distances where the ASE is followed by the lasing without inversion (LWI), which amplifies the Stokes component. Both ASE and LWI reshape the input pulse: The compressed front part of the pulse (up to 100 as) is followed by the long tail of the ringing and beating between the pump and Stokes frequencies. The pump pulse also generates weaker Stokes and anti-Stokes fields caused by four-wave mixing. These four spectral bands have fine structures caused by the dynamical Stark effect. A slowdown of the XFEL pulse up to 78% of the speed of light in vacuum is found because of a large nonlinear refractive index.

  18. Emission control of gas effluents from geothermal power plants.

    PubMed

    Axtmann, R C

    1975-01-01

    Geothermal steam at the world's five largest power plants contains from 0.15 to 30% noncondensable gases including CO(2), H(2)S, H(2), CH(4), N(2), H(3)BO(3), and NH(3). At four of the plants the gases are first separated from the steam and then discharged to the environment; at the fifth, the noncondensables exhaust directly to the atmosphere along with spent steam. Some CO(2) and sulfur emission rates rival those from fossil-fueled plants on a per megawatt-day basis. The ammonia and boron effluents can interfere with animal and plant life. The effects of sulfur (which emerges as H(2)S but may oxidize to SO(2)) on either ambient air quality or longterm human health are largely unknown. Most geothermal turbines are equipped with direct contact condensers which complicate emission control because they provide two or more pathways for the effluents to reach the environment. Use of direct contact condensers could permit efficient emission control if coupled to processes that produce saleable quantities of purified carbon dioxide and elemental sulfur. PMID:1132388

  19. Solid state carbon nanotube device for controllable trion electroluminescence emission.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shuang; Ma, Ze; Wei, Nan; Liu, Huaping; Wang, Sheng; Peng, Lian-Mao

    2016-03-17

    Semiconducting carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have a direct chirality-dependent bandgap and reduced dimensionality-related quantum confinement effects, which are closely related to the performance of optoelectronic devices. Here, taking advantage of the large energy separations between neutral singlet excitons and charged excitons, i.e. trions in CNTs, we have achieved for the first time all trion electroluminescence (EL) emission from chirality-sorted (8,3) and (8,4) CNT-based solid state devices. We showed that strong trion emission can be obtained as a result of localized impact excitation and electrically injected holes, with an estimated efficiency of ∼5 × 10(-4) photons per injected hole. The importance of contact-controlled carrier injection (including symmetric and asymmetric contact configurations) and EL spectral stability for gradually increasing bias were also investigated. The realization of electrically induced pure trion emission opens up a new opportunity for CNT film-based optoelectronic devices, providing a new degree of freedom in controlling the devices to extend potential applications in spin or magnetic optoelectronics fields. PMID:26953676

  20. VOC emissions controls for aluminum cold rolling mills

    SciTech Connect

    Genoble, A.L.; Lagoe, D.J.; Wasyluk, W.J.R.

    1997-12-31

    This paper is a case history of retrofitting VOC emissions controls to two (2) aluminum cold rolling mills at an aluminum sheet complex in central New York. The plant site was located in the northeast ozone transport region, and it was necessary to achieve compliance with VOC emissions limitations. Emissions control equipment included high efficiency filters for VOC mists and a wash oil process for scrubbing VOC vapors. All rolling oil was recovered for reuse on site. A vacuum distillation process was used to separate wash oil from rolling oil. The equipment began operating in mid-1995, and long term results have proven the validity of the recovery concept. Total project costs were $7.2 million for two (2) 60,000 ACFM systems. Project duration from the date of the initial request for equipment price quotations to the first round of stack testing was twenty (20) months. The modular construction of the vacuum distillation equipment simplified field erection and shortened the duration of field work. Stack testing indicated overall VOC collection efficiencies that exceeded regulatory requirements. Initially, problems were experienced with Method 25 stack testing methodology. Final results were confirmed by two (2) independent methods.

  1. Active Control of Combustor Instability Shown to Help Lower Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLaat, John C.; Chang, Clarence T.

    2002-01-01

    In a quest to reduce the environmental impact of aerospace propulsion systems, extensive research is being done in the development of lean-burning (low fuel-to-air ratio) combustors that can reduce emissions throughout the mission cycle. However, these lean-burning combustors have an increased susceptibility to thermoacoustic instabilities, or high-pressure oscillations much like sound waves, that can cause severe high-frequency vibrations in the combustor. These pressure waves can fatigue the combustor components and even the downstream turbine blades. This can significantly decrease the safe operating life of the combustor and turbine. Thus, suppression of the thermoacoustic combustor instabilities is an enabling technology for lean, low-emissions combustors. Under the Aerospace Propulsion and Power Base Research and Technology Program, the NASA Glenn Research Center, in partnership with Pratt & Whitney and United Technologies Research Center, is developing technologies for the active control of combustion instabilities. With active combustion control, the fuel is pulsed to put pressure oscillations into the system. This cancels out the pressure oscillations being produced by the instabilities. Thus, the engine can have lower pollutant emissions and long life.The use of active combustion instability control to reduce thermo-acoustic-driven combustor pressure oscillations was demonstrated on a single-nozzle combustor rig at United Technologies. This rig has many of the complexities of a real engine combustor (i.e., an actual fuel nozzle and swirler, dilution cooling, etc.). Control was demonstrated through modeling, developing, and testing a fuel-delivery system able to the 280-Hz instability frequency. The preceding figure shows the capability of this system to provide high-frequency fuel modulations. Because of the high-shear contrarotating airflow in the fuel injector, there was some concern that the fuel pulses would be attenuated to the point where they would not be effective for control. Testing in the combustor rig showed that open-loop pulsing of the fuel was, in fact, able to effectively modulate the combustor pressure. To suppress the combustor pressure oscillations due to thermoacoustic instabilities, it is desirable to time the injection of the fuel so that it interferes with the instability. A closed-loop control scheme was developed that uses combustion pressure feedback and a phase-shifting controller to time the fuel-injection pulses. Some suppression of the pressure oscillations at the 280-Hz instability frequency was demonstrated (see the next figure). However, the overall peak-to- peak pressure oscillations in the combustor were only mildly reduced. Improvements to control hardware and control methods are being continued to gain improved closed-loop reduction of the pressure oscillations.pulse the fuel at

  2. Spontaneous acromegaly: a retrospective case control study in German shepherd dogs.

    PubMed

    Fracassi, F; Zagnoli, L; Rosenberg, D; Furlanello, T; Caldin, M

    2014-10-01

    Acromegaly results from the overproduction of growth hormone in adulthood and is characterised by overgrowth of soft tissue and/or bone as well as insulin resistance. There are few data indicating the risk factors associated with this disease in dogs or its clinicopathological features and sequelae. The objective of this retrospective study was to catalogue and assess these aspects of the disease in German shepherd dogs (GSDs) which were found to be over-represented among acromegalic dogs attending two veterinary referral clinics over a period of 7?years. Each acromegalic dog (AD) was compared with two breed/age/sex matched controls. Clinical signs of acromegaly included panting, polyuria/polydipsia, widened interdental spaces, weakness, inspiratory stridor, macroglossia, weight gain, redundant skin folds, thick coat, exophthalmos and mammary masses. Serum alkaline phosphatase, creatine-kinase, glucose, triglyceride, phosphate ion, and 'calcium per phosphate product' concentrations were significantly higher in acromegalic animals while haemoglobin concentration, blood urea nitrogen, sodium and chloride ion concentrations, and urinary specific gravity, osmolality and fractional excretion of phosphate were significantly lower. Although, in the majority of cases clinicopathological abnormalities resolved following ovariohysterectomy, in one dog, acromegalic signs abated and insulin-like growth factor-1 concentrations normalised only following the surgical excision of mammary tumours carried out 2?months after ovariohysterectomy. The findings of this study indicate that GSDs are predisposed to the development of acromegaly with a suspected inherited susceptibility. PMID:24986315

  3. CONTROL OF AIR EMISSIONS FROM MOLYBDENUM ROASTING. VOLUME 1. EMISSIONS CHARACTERIZATION AND PARTICULATE CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The primary objective of this project was to evaluate a baghouse employing Teflon coated fabric bags for particulate recovery and control. This system was of great interest because of the corrosion resistance of Teflon coated fabric filters and this unique application in the nonf...

  4. Hyperthermia treatment of spontaneously occurring oral cavity tumors using a computer-controlled Nd:YAG laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panjehpour, Masoud; Overholt, Bergein F.; Frazier, Donita L.; Klebanow, Edward R.

    1991-05-01

    Conventional hyperthermia treatment of superficial tumors in the oral cavity is difficult due to inability in accessing the lesion. A new hyperthermia technique employing near infrared Nd:YAG irradiation delivered through an optical fiber is introduced for heating oral and nasal tumors in animals. This system consisted of an Nd:YAG laser, a He-Ne laser, a computer controlled optical shutter, an interstitial thermometer, computer and a printer. The tumors were heated via surface illumination of the lesion. A thermocouple implanted in the base of the tumor provided temperature feedback for laser energy regulation. Three spontaneously occurring canine (two squamous cell carcinoma on the gum, one pigmented melanoma on the hard palate) and one feline tumor (squamous cell carcinoma on the nose) have been treated with the Nd:YAG laser-induced hyperthermia delivered following radiation therapy. The tumor temperature was maintained between 43.2-43.5 degree(s)C for one hour. Nd:YAG hyperthermia allowed efficient delivery of heat to veterinary oral and nasal lesions otherwise impossible to treat with conventional heating techniques.

  5. DEGRADATION OF EMISSIONS CONTROL PERFORMANCE OF WOODSTOVES IN CRESTED BUTTE, CO

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses the degradation of emissions control performance of woodstoves in Crested Butte, Colorado. Four seasons of field monitoring of EPA-certified woodstoves in and around Crested Butte has demonstrated some significant failures in emissions control performance. In...

  6. COMBUSTION CONTROL OF PCDD/PCDF EMISSIONS FROM MUNICIPAL WASTE INCINERATORS IN NORTH AMERICA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses combustion control of emissions of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDD) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDF) from municipal waste incinerators in North America. New regulations to control air pollution emissions from municipal waste incineration have b...

  7. Greenhouse gas emission from covered windrow composting with controlled ventilation.

    PubMed

    Ermolaev, Evgheni; Pell, Mikael; Smårs, Sven; Sundberg, Cecilia; Jönsson, Håkan

    2012-02-01

    Data on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from full-scale composting of municipal solid waste, investigating the effects of process temperature and aeration combinations, is scarce. Oxygen availability affects the composition of gases emitted during composting. In the present study, two experiments with three covered windrows were set up, treating a mixture of source separated biodegradable municipal solid waste (MSW) fractions from Uppsala, Sweden, and structural amendment (woodchips, garden waste and re-used compost) in the volume proportion 1:2. The effects of different aeration and temperature settings on the emission of methane (CH(4)), nitrous oxide (N(2)O) and carbon dioxide (CO(2)) during windrow composting with forced aeration following three different control schemes were studied. For one windrow, the controller was set to keep the temperature below 40 °C until the pH increased, another windrow had minimal aeration at the beginning of the process and the third one had constant aeration. In the first experiment, CH(4) concentrations (CH(4):CO(2) ratio) increased, from around 0.1% initially to between 1 and 2% in all windrows. In the second experiment, the initial concentrations of CH(4) displayed similar patterns of increase between windrows until day 12, when concentration peaked at 3 and 6%, respectively, in two of the windrows. In general, the N(2)O fluxes remained low (0.46 ± 0.02 ppm) in the experiments and were two to three times the ambient concentrations. In conclusion, the emissions of CH(4) and N(2)O were low regardless of the amount of ventilation. The data indicates a need to perform longer experiments in order to observe further emission dynamics. PMID:21994145

  8. Spontaneous Recovery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rescorla, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    Spontaneous recovery from extinction is one of the most basic phenomena of Pavlovian conditioning. Although it can be studied by using a variety of designs, some procedures are better than others for identifying the involvement of underlying learning processes. A wide range of different learning mechanisms has been suggested as being engaged by

  9. Emissions trading by electric utilities for acid deposition control

    SciTech Connect

    Raufer, R.K.

    1984-01-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has developed the Emissions Trading Program (ETP) in recent years, which is a limited market approach to pollution control. The currency in the market is the Emission Reduction Credit (ERC). Market impediments have slowed the development of the ETP, however, and have contributed to the hoarding of ERCs. Transactions in the existing ETP were analyzed, and both general and utility-specific market impediments were identified. The implications of these impediments on an acid deposition ERC market were then determined. A survey of utilities and Public Utility Commissions in the area of the country most likely to be affected by acid deposition control legislation was conducted to determine: their experience with the ETP; and their reaction to a mechanism which could enhance market use (i.e., ERC leasing). The survey identified very limited formal use of the ETP, although the program is well understood, and apparently well established internally. The reaction to leasing was sufficiently favorable for a market analysis to be conducted, focusing on the state of Illinois. Costs for as many as seven SO/sub 2/ control technologies were determined for each of the 66 existing or planned coal-fired utility units in the state, and projected operations for each unit from 1983 through the year 2000 were obtained from production cost modeling runs or other data.

  10. 40 CFR 63.325 - Determination of equivalent emission control technology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... control technology. 63.325 Section 63.325 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Determination of equivalent emission control technology. (a) Any person requesting that the use of certain... equivalent emission reductions: (1) Diagrams, as appropriate, illustrating the emission control...

  11. 40 CFR 63.325 - Determination of equivalent emission control technology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... control technology. 63.325 Section 63.325 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Determination of equivalent emission control technology. (a) Any person requesting that the use of certain... equivalent emission reductions: (1) Diagrams, as appropriate, illustrating the emission control...

  12. 40 CFR 75.34 - Units with add-on emission controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Units with add-on emission controls... add-on emission controls. (a) The owner or operator of an affected unit equipped with add-on SO2 and... which the add-on emission controls are documented to be operating properly, as described in the...

  13. 40 CFR 75.34 - Units with add-on emission controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Units with add-on emission controls... add-on emission controls. (a) The owner or operator of an affected unit equipped with add-on SO2 and... which the add-on emission controls are documented to be operating properly, as described in the...

  14. 40 CFR 75.34 - Units with add-on emission controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Units with add-on emission controls... add-on emission controls. (a) The owner or operator of an affected unit equipped with add-on SO2 and... which the add-on emission controls are documented to be operating properly, as described in the...

  15. 40 CFR 63.325 - Determination of equivalent emission control technology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... control technology. 63.325 Section 63.325 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Determination of equivalent emission control technology. (a) Any person requesting that the use of certain... equivalent emission reductions: (1) Diagrams, as appropriate, illustrating the emission control...

  16. 40 CFR 63.325 - Determination of equivalent emission control technology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... control technology. 63.325 Section 63.325 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Determination of equivalent emission control technology. (a) Any person requesting that the use of certain... equivalent emission reductions: (1) Diagrams, as appropriate, illustrating the emission control...

  17. 40 CFR 63.325 - Determination of equivalent emission control technology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... control technology. 63.325 Section 63.325 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Determination of equivalent emission control technology. (a) Any person requesting that the use of certain... equivalent emission reductions: (1) Diagrams, as appropriate, illustrating the emission control...

  18. 40 CFR 75.34 - Units with add-on emission controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Units with add-on emission controls... add-on emission controls. (a) The owner or operator of an affected unit equipped with add-on SO2 and... which the add-on emission controls are documented to be operating properly, as described in the...

  19. 40 CFR 57.704 - Compliance with fugitive emission evaluation and control requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Requirements § 57.704 Compliance with fugitive emission evaluation and control requirements. This section..., within any deadlines specified below. (a) Plan for fugitive emission control. The NSO shall provide that within a reasonable period after the submission of the report on the fugitive emission control...

  20. 40 CFR 57.704 - Compliance with fugitive emission evaluation and control requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Requirements § 57.704 Compliance with fugitive emission evaluation and control requirements. This section..., within any deadlines specified below. (a) Plan for fugitive emission control. The NSO shall provide that within a reasonable period after the submission of the report on the fugitive emission control...

  1. 40 CFR 57.704 - Compliance with fugitive emission evaluation and control requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Requirements § 57.704 Compliance with fugitive emission evaluation and control requirements. This section..., within any deadlines specified below. (a) Plan for fugitive emission control. The NSO shall provide that within a reasonable period after the submission of the report on the fugitive emission control...

  2. 40 CFR 57.704 - Compliance with fugitive emission evaluation and control requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Requirements § 57.704 Compliance with fugitive emission evaluation and control requirements. This section..., within any deadlines specified below. (a) Plan for fugitive emission control. The NSO shall provide that within a reasonable period after the submission of the report on the fugitive emission control...

  3. 40 CFR 57.704 - Compliance with fugitive emission evaluation and control requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Requirements § 57.704 Compliance with fugitive emission evaluation and control requirements. This section..., within any deadlines specified below. (a) Plan for fugitive emission control. The NSO shall provide that within a reasonable period after the submission of the report on the fugitive emission control...

  4. Survey of Emissions Associated with Enclosed Combustor Emission Control Devices in the Denver-Julesburg Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knighton, W. B.; Floerchinger, C. R.; Wormhoult, J.; Massoli, P.; Fortner, E.; Brooks, B.; Roscioli, J. R.; Bon, D.; Herndon, S. C.

    2014-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) play an important role in local and regional air quality. A large source of VOCs comes from the oil and gas industry and the Denver-Julesburg Basin (D-J Basin) has seen a sharp increase in production in recent years primarily due to advances in horizontal drilling techniques. To help curb emissions with extraction and production of natural gas and its associated oil, emission control devices are required for facilities emitting over 6 tons of hydrocarbons per year. Within the ozone non-attainment area, which encompasses Denver and much of the front range, enclosed combustion devices (enclosed flares) are required to reduce hydrocarbon emissions by at least 95%. While certification tests indicate that these enclosed combustor devices provide high destruction removal efficiencies, there is considerable interest in knowing how well they perform in the field. As part of Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Experiment (FRAPPE) project conducted during the Summer of 2014, the Aerodyne Mobile Laboratory (AML) surveyed oil and gas operations within the Wattenberg gas field and the surrounding D-J Basin. The AML deployed a full suite of gas and particle phase instrumentation providing a comprehensive set of on-line, real-time measurements for the major natural gas components (methane and ethane) and their combustion products (CO2, CO, NOx) using a variety of spectroscopic techniques. Additional gas phase organic gas emissions were made using a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS). Particle number and composition were determined using a condensation particle counter and an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS). A summary of the number of enclosed combustor devices measured and their observed combustion efficiencies will be presented.

  5. CONTROL OF TRACE METAL EMISSIONS DURING COAL COMBUSTION

    SciTech Connect

    THOMAS C. HO

    1998-02-18

    Emissions of toxic trace metals in the form of metal fumes or submicron particulates from a coal-fired combustion source have received greater environmental and regulatory concern over the past years. Current practice of controlling these emissions is to collect them at the cold-end of the process by air-pollution control devices (APCDs) such as electrostatic precipitators and baghouses. However, trace metal fumes may not always be effectively collected by these devices because the formed fumes are extremely small. The proposed research is to explore the opportunities for improved control of toxic trace metal emissions, alternatively, at the hot-end of the coal combustion process, i.e., in the combustion chamber. The technology proposed is to prevent the metal fumes from forming during the process, which would effectively eliminate the metal emission problems. Specifically, the technology is to employ suitable sorbents to (1) reduce the amount of metal volatilization during combustion and (2) capture volatilized metal vapors. The objectives of the project are to demonstrate the technology and to characterize the metal capture process during coal combustion in a fluidized bed combustor. This final technical report details the work performed, the conclusions obtained, and the accomplishments achieved over the project performance period from July 1, 1994 through December 31, 1997. Specifically, this report consists of the following five chapters: Chapter 1. Executive Summary; Chapter 2. Metal Capture by Various Sorbents; Chapter 3. Simultaneous Metal and Sulfur Capture; Chapter 4. Sorption and Desorption of Mercury on Sorbents; and Chapter 5. Project Conclusions. In summary, the metals involved in the project were arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury and selenium and the sorbents tested included bauxite, zeolite and calcined limestone. The three sorbents have been found to have various degree of metal capture capability on arsenic, cadmium, chromium and lead. Among them, calcined limestone is capable of simultaneouely capturing metals and sulfur. Mercury and selenium, however, can not be effectively retained by these sorbents under the combustion conditions. Mercury adsorption by sorbents at low temperatures was also investigated and the developed mass transfer model for mercury absorption appears to describe reasonably well the experimental results. Overall, the project has generated 18 presentations and/or publications in professional conferences and journals.

  6. Control of acid mist emissions from FGD systems

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlin, R S; Brown, T D

    1991-01-01

    Improved control of acid mist emissions can be achieved by replacing or augmenting the conventional mist eliminators with a wet electrostatic precipitator (WESP). This paper describes a two-phased study performed to determine the degree of control that can be achieved with this approach. Phase I was a study of the electrical operation of a lab-scale WESP collecting an acid mist from a coal combustion pilot plant equipped with a spray chamber. The results of this study were used to develop and validate a computer model of the WESP. In Phase II, measurements were made at two utility scrubber installations to determine the loadings of acid mist, fly ash, and scrubber carryover. These measurements were used as input to the model to project the performance of a retrofitted WESP.

  7. Nonlinear theory of a two-photon correlated-spontaneous-emission laser: A coherently pumped two-level--two-photon laser

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, N.; Zhao, F.; Bergou, J.

    1989-05-15

    We develop a nonlinear theory of a two-photon correlated-spontaneous-emission laser (CEL) by using an effective interaction Hamiltonian for a two-level system coupled by a two-photon transition. Assuming that the active atoms are prepared initially in a coherent superposition of two atomic levels involved in the two-photon transition, we derive a master equation for the field-density operator by using our quantum theory for coherently pumped lasers. The steady-state properties of the two-photon CEL are studied by converting the field master equation into a Fokker-Planck equation for the antinormal-ordering Q representation of the field-density operator. Because of the injected atomic coherence, the drift and diffusion coefficients become phase sensitive. This leads to laser phase locking and an extra two-photon CEL gain. The laser field can build up from a vacuum in the no-population-inversion region, in contrast to an ordinary two-photon laser for which triggering is needed. We find an approximate steady-state solution of the Q representation for the laser field, which consists of two identical peaks of elliptical type. We calculate the phase variance and, for any given mean photon number, obtain the minimum variance in the phase quadrature as a function of the initial atomic variables. Squeezing of the quantum noise in the phase quadrature is found and it exhibits the following features: (1) it is possible only when the laser intensity is smaller than a certain value; (2) it becomes most significant for small mean photon number, which is achievable in the no-population-inversion region; and (3) a maximum of 50% squeezing can be asymptotically approached in the small laser intensity limit.

  8. Work with existing hardware to maximize emissions control

    SciTech Connect

    Makansi, J.

    1995-03-01

    Regulatory uncertainty cripples capital investment, but has also helped unleash a surprising level of ingenuity to lower the costs of compliance. Techniques described here could become popular as CAA Phase 2 unfolds. Regulated rate-of-return structures are eroding as competitive forces erupt, permanently changing the business landscape. Meanwhile, complying with Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAA), a relative certainty, is clouded by a host of other potential environmental compliance issues -- air-toxics regulations, solid-waste restrictions, global warming and CO{sub 2} discharges, water management, and differing state, regional, and local regulations. As a result, utilities are reacting by spending as little as possible, especially in terms of compliance with CAA Phase 2. But by doing so, they are applying and/or demonstrating a variety of low-cost techniques that achieve significant emissions reductions. In some cases, these techniques may simply involve a trade off of capital investment for higher operating costs. But in a significant number of other cases, the techniques could emerge as key design improvements for the new generation of powerplants. To these techniques must be added the buying of SO{sub 2} allowances as a replacement for, or enhancement of, SO{sub 2}removal strategies. What many of these techniques have in common are (1) maximum use of existing hardware and (2) integration of emissions control into standard powerplant components. Broadly surveying the industry reveals the following general areas that are explored here: fuel changes, reducing NO{sub x} emissions through better control over the combustion process, employing low-cost catalyst and/or selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR), getting more out of existing flue-gas desulfurization (FGD) processes, and improving existing particulate collection devices.

  9. "APEC Blue": Secondary Aerosol Reductions from Emission Controls in Beijing.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yele; Wang, Zifa; Wild, Oliver; Xu, Weiqi; Chen, Chen; Fu, Pingqing; Du, Wei; Zhou, Libo; Zhang, Qi; Han, Tingting; Wang, Qingqing; Pan, Xiaole; Zheng, Haitao; Li, Jie; Guo, Xiaofeng; Liu, Jianguo; Worsnop, Douglas R

    2016-01-01

    China implemented strict emission control measures in Beijing and surrounding regions to ensure good air quality during the 2014 Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit. We conducted synchronous aerosol particle measurements with two aerosol mass spectrometers at different heights on a meteorological tower in urban Beijing to investigate the variations in particulate composition, sources and size distributions in response to emission controls. Our results show consistently large reductions in secondary inorganic aerosol (SIA) of 61-67% and 51-57%, and in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) of 55% and 37%, at 260 m and ground level, respectively, during the APEC summit. These changes were mainly caused by large reductions in accumulation mode particles and by suppression of the growth of SIA and SOA by a factor of 2-3, which led to blue sky days during APEC commonly referred to as "APEC Blue". We propose a conceptual framework for the evolution of primary and secondary species and highlight the importance of regional atmospheric transport in the formation of severe pollution episodes in Beijing. Our results indicate that reducing the precursors of secondary aerosol over regional scales is crucial and effective in suppressing the formation of secondary particulates and mitigating PM pollution. PMID:26891104

  10. Controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, R.

    2009-07-15

    Increasingly stringent US federal and state limits on mercury emissions form coal-fired power plants demand optimal mercury control technologies. This article summarises the successful removal of mercury emissions achieved with activated carbon injection and boiler bromide addition, technologies nearing commercial readiness, as well as several novel control concepts currently under development. It also discusses some of the issues standing in the way of confident performance and cost predictions. In testing conducted on western coal-fired units with fabric filters or TOXECON to date, ACI has generally achieved mercury removal rates > 90%. At units with ESPs, similar performance requires brominated ACI. Alternatively, units firing western coals can use boiler bromide addition to increase flue gas mercury oxidation and downstream capture in a wet scrubber, or to enhance mercury removal by ACI. At eastern bituminous fired units with ESPs, ACI is not as effective, largely due to SO{sub 3} resulting from the high sulfur content of the coal or the use of SO{sub 3} flue gas conditioning to improve ESP performance. 7 refs., 3 figs.

  11. Controlling GT arc length from arc light emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, R.W.; Edwards, F.S.

    1996-12-31

    Conventional systems for mechanized Gas Tungsten Arc (GTA) welding control arc length by utilizing its well known relationship with arc voltage. Such systems maintain a constant arc voltage by movement of the torch relative to the work surface. This has proven to be practicable over the years where the welding machine operator can make frequent visual observations of arc length, and then adjust the arc voltage set point in order to compensate for subtle changes in the arc length/arc voltage relationship. Fully automated robotic type welding systems do not present this luxury since weld cycles are required to proceed over long periods without manual intervention. The key fundamental difficulty is that the arc voltage is dominated by large voltage drops near the electrode surfaces which are independent of arc length. This paper presents a review of past and related work in the area, followed by results of a new study of arc light sensitivity and its application to arc length control. For this work, a standard automatic voltage controller was used which was modified to receive either arc voltage or a suitably scaled voltage signal derived from an arc light emission sensor. This allowed a direct comparison of conventional and arc light based control approaches. It was found that arc light control behaved more robustly when encountering disturbances which are known to seriously trouble a voltage based control. A prime example is welding from one base material onto another which was found to produce only a minor effect on a light based control, but unacceptable behavior of a voltage control. Details of experiments and results are presented.

  12. Automated Boiler Combustion Controls for Emission Reduction and Efficiency Improvement

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-02

    In the late 1980s, then President Bush visited Krakow, Poland. The terrible air quality theremotivated him to initiate a USAID-funded program, managed by DOE, entitled �Krakow Clean Fossil Fuels and Energy Efficiency Program.� The primary objective of this program was to encourage the formation of commercial ventures between U.S. and Polish firms to provide equipment and/or services to reduce pollution from low-emission sources in Krakow, Poland. This program led to the award of a number of cooperative agreements, including one to Control Techtronics International. The technical objective of CTI�s cooperative agreement is to apply combustion controls to existing boiler plants in Krakow and transfer knowledge and technology through a joint U.S. and Polish commercial venture. CTI installed automatic combustion controls on five coal boilers for the district heating system in Krakow. Three of these were for domestic hot-water boilers, and two were for steam for industrial boilers. The following results have occurred due to the addition of CTI�s combustion controls on these five existing boilers: ! 25% energy savings ! 85% reduction in particulate emissions The joint venture company CTI-Polska was then established. Eleven additional technical and costing proposals were initiated to upgrade other coal boilers in Krakow. To date, no co-financing has been made available on the Polish side. CTI-Polska continues in operation, serving customers in Russia and Ukraine. Should the market in Poland materialize, the joint venture company is established there to provide equipment and service.

  13. CO₂ laser emission modes to control enamel erosion.

    PubMed

    Scatolin, Renata Siqueira; Alonso-Filho, Fernando Luiz; Galo, Rodrigo; Rios, Daniela; Borsatto, Maria Cristina; Corona, Silmara Aparecida Milori

    2015-08-01

    Considering the importance and prevalence of dental erosion, the aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of different modes of pulse emission of CO2 laser associated or not to acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) 1.23% gel, in controlling enamel erosion by profilometry. Ninety-six fragments of bovine enamel were flattened and polished, and the specimens were subjected to initial erosive challenge with hydrochloric acid (pH = 2). Specimens were randomly assigned according to surface treatment: APF 1.23% gel and gel without fluoride (control), and subdivided according to the modes of pulse CO2 laser irradiation: no irradiation (control), continuous, ultrapulse, and repeated pulse (n = 12). After surface treatment, further erosive challenges were performed for 5 days, 4 × 2 min/day. Enamel structure loss was quantitatively determined by a profilometer, after surface treatment and after 5 days of erosive challenges. Two-away ANOVA revealed a significant difference between the pulse emission mode of the CO2 laser and the presence of fluoride (P ≤ 0.05). The Duncan's test showed that CO2 laser irradiation in continuous mode and the specimens only received fluoride, promoted lower enamel loss than that other treatments. A lower dissolution of the enamel prisms was observed when it was irradiated with CO2 laser in continuous mode compared other groups. It can be concluded that CO2 laser irradiation in continuous mode was the most effective to control the enamel structure loss submitted to erosive challenges with hydrochloric acid. PMID:25988247

  14. Increased Spontaneous Central Bleeding and Cognition Impairment in APP/PS1 Mice with Poorly Controlled Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Rodriguez, Juan José; Infante-Garcia, Carmen; Galindo-Gonzalez, Lucia; Garcia-Molina, Yaiza; Lechuga-Sancho, Alfonso; Garcia-Alloza, Mónica

    2016-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD) are the most common causes of dementia, and borderlines are blurred in many cases. Aging remains the main risk factor to suffer dementia; however, epidemiological studies reveal that diabetes may also predispose to suffer AD. In order to further study this relationship, we have induced hypoinsulinemic diabetes to APPswe/PS1dE9 (APP/PS1) mice, a classical model of AD. APP/PS1 mice received streptozotocin (STZ) ip at 18 weeks of age, when AD pathology is not yet established in this animal model. Cognition was evaluated at 26 weeks of age in the Morris water maze and the new object discrimination tests. We observed that STZ-induced episodic and working memory impairment was significantly worsened in APP/PS1 mice. Postmortem assessment included brain atrophy, amyloid-beta and tau pathology, spontaneous bleeding, and increased central inflammation. Interestingly, in APP/PS1-STZ diabetic mice, we detected a shift in Aβ soluble/insoluble levels, towards more toxic soluble species. Phospho-tau levels were also increased in APP/PS1-STZ mice, accompanied by an exacerbated inflammatory process, both in the close proximity to senile plaque (SP) and in SP-free areas. The presence of hemorrhages was significantly higher in APP/PS1-STZ mice, and although pericytes and endothelium were only partially affected, it remains possible that blood-brain barrier alterations underlie observed pathological features. Our data support the implication of the diabetic process in AD and VaD, and it is feasible that improving metabolic control could delay observed central pathology. PMID:26156287

  15. LANDFILL OPERATION FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND MAXIMUM METHANE EMISSION CONTROL

    SciTech Connect

    Don Augenstein; Ramin Yazdani; Rick Moore; Michelle Byars; Jeff Kieffer; Professor Morton Barlaz; Rinav Mehta

    2000-02-26

    Controlled landfilling is an approach to manage solid waste landfills, so as to rapidly complete methane generation, while maximizing gas capture and minimizing the usual emissions of methane to the atmosphere. With controlled landfilling, methane generation is accelerated to more rapid and earlier completion to full potential by improving conditions (principally moisture, but also temperature) to optimize biological processes occurring within the landfill. Gas is contained through use of surface membrane cover. Gas is captured via porous layers, under the cover, operated at slight vacuum. A field demonstration project has been ongoing under NETL sponsorship for the past several years near Davis, CA. Results have been extremely encouraging. Two major benefits of the technology are reduction of landfill methane emissions to minuscule levels, and the recovery of greater amounts of landfill methane energy in much shorter times, more predictably, than with conventional landfill practice. With the large amount of US landfill methane generated, and greenhouse potency of methane, better landfill methane control can play a substantial role both in reduction of US greenhouse gas emissions and in US renewable energy. The work described in this report, to demonstrate and advance this technology, has used two demonstration-scale cells of size (8000 metric tons [tonnes]), sufficient to replicate many heat and compaction characteristics of larger ''full-scale'' landfills. An enhanced demonstration cell has received moisture supplementation to field capacity. This is the maximum moisture waste can hold while still limiting liquid drainage rate to minimal and safely manageable levels. The enhanced landfill module was compared to a parallel control landfill module receiving no moisture additions. Gas recovery has continued for a period of over 4 years. It is quite encouraging that the enhanced cell methane recovery has been close to 10-fold that experienced with conventional landfills. This is the highest methane recovery rate per unit waste, and thus progress toward stabilization, documented anywhere for such a large waste mass. This high recovery rate is attributed to moisture, and elevated temperature attained inexpensively during startup. Economic analyses performed under Phase I of this NETL contract indicate ''greenhouse cost effectiveness'' to be excellent. Other benefits include substantial waste volume loss (over 30%) which translates to extended landfill life. Other environmental benefits include rapidly improved quality and stabilization (lowered pollutant levels) in liquid leachate which drains from the waste.

  16. Implementing Strategies for Drying and Pressing Wood Without Emissions Controls

    SciTech Connect

    Sujit Banerjee; Terrance Conners

    2007-09-07

    Drying and pressing wood for the manufacture of lumber, particleboard, oriented strand board (OSB), veneer and medium density fiberboard (MDF) release volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into the atmosphere. These emissions require control equipment that are capital-intensive and consume significant quantities of natural gas and electricity. The objective of our work was to understand the mechanisms through which volatile organic compounds are generated and released and to develop simple control strategies. Of the several strategies developed, two have been implemented for OSB manufacture over the course of this study. First, it was found that increasing final wood moisture by about 2-4 percentage points reduced the dryer emissions of hazardous air pollutants by over 70%. As wood dries, the escaping water evaporatively cools the wood. This cooling tapers off wood when the wood is nearly dry and the wood temperature rises. Thermal breakdown of the wood tissue occurs and VOCs are released. Raising the final wood moisture by only a few percentage points minimizes the temperature rise and reduces emissions. Evaporative cooling also impacts has implications for VOC release from wood fines. Flaking wood for OSB manufacture inevitable generates fines. Fines dry out rapidly because of their high surface area and evaporative cooling is lost more rapidly than for flakes. As a result, fines emit a disproportionate quantity of VOCs. Fines can be reduced in two ways: through screening of the green furnish and through reducing their generation during flaking. The second approach is preferable because it also increased wood yield. A procedure to do this by matching the sharpness angle of the flaker knife to the ambient temperature was also developed. Other findings of practical interests are as follows: Dielectric heating of wood under low-headspace conditions removes terpenes and other extractives from softwood; The monoterpene content in trees depend upon temperature and seasonal effects; Method 25A emissions from lumber drying can be modeled from a knowledge of the airflow through the kiln; A heat transfer model shows that VOCs released during hot-pressing mainly originate from the surface of the board; and Boiler ash can be used to adsorb formaldehyde from air streams.

  17. N2O and NO2 Emissions from Heavy-Duty Diesel Trucks with Advanced Emission Controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preble, C.; Harley, R.; Kirchstetter, T.

    2014-12-01

    Diesel engines are the largest source of nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions nationally, and also a major contributor to the black carbon (BC) fraction of fine particulate matter (PM). Recently, diesel particle filter (DPF) and selective catalytic reduction (SCR) emission control systems that target exhaust PM and NOx have become standard equipment on new heavy-duty diesel trucks. However, the deliberate catalytic oxidation of engine-out nitric oxide (NO) to nitrogen dioxide (NO2) in continuously regenerating DPFs leads to increased tailpipe emission of NO2. This is of potential concern due to the toxicity of NO2 and the resulting increases in atmospheric formation of other air pollutants such as ozone, nitric acid, and fine PM. While use of SCR reduces emissions of both NO and NO2, it may lead to increased emissions of nitrous oxide (N2O), a potent greenhouse gas. Here we report results from on-road measurements of heavy-duty diesel truck emissions conducted at the Port of Oakland and the Caldecott Tunnel in the San Francisco Bay Area. Emission factors (g pollutant per kg of diesel) were linked via recorded license plates to individual truck attributes, including engine model year and installed emission control equipment. Between 2009 and 2013, the fraction of DPF-equipped trucks at the Port of Oakland increased from 2 to 99%, and median engine age decreased from 11 to 6 years. Over the same period, fleet-average emission factors for black carbon and NOx decreased by 76 ± 22% and 53 ± 8%, respectively. However, direct emissions of NO2 increased, and consequently the NO2/NOx emission ratio increased from 0.03 ± 0.02 to 0.18 ± 0.03. Older trucks retrofitted with DPFs emitted approximately 3.5 times more NO2 than newer trucks equipped with both DPF and SCR. Preliminary data from summer 2014 measurements at the Caldecott Tunnel suggest that some older trucks have negative emission factors for N2O, and that for newer trucks, N2O emission factors have changed sign and are significantly increased. More comprehensive analysis of the effects of SCR on diesel NOx and N2O emissions will be reported in the presentation. These on-road emission studies indicate that advanced emission control systems such as DPF and SCR dramatically reduce PM and NOx emissions, but can cause undesirable side effects like increased NO2 and N2O emissions.

  18. 40 CFR 1060.104 - What running loss emission control requirements apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What running loss emission control... STATIONARY EQUIPMENT Emission Standards and Related Requirements § 1060.104 What running loss emission control requirements apply? (a) Engines and equipment must meet running loss requirements as follows:...

  19. Control of VOC emissions from ink and paint manufacturing processes. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    McMinn, B.W.; Marsosudiro, P.J.

    1992-04-01

    The document presents the results of a study to collect and report information on processes used to manufacture paint and ink, volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions generated during these operations, emission control techniques and their effectiveness, and costs associated with process changes and emission control options.

  20. Plasmonic control of light emission for enhanced efficiency and beam shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiMaria, Jeffrey V.

    InGaN alloys and related quantum structures are of great technological importance for the development of visible light emitting devices, motivated by a wide range of applications, particularly solid-state lighting. The InxGa1--xN material system provides continuous emission tuning from the ultraviolet across the visible spectrum by changing the In content. InGaN/GaN quantum wells (QW) also provide an efficient medium for electroluminescence for use as light emitting diodes. It is well known, however, that increasing the In content degrades the internal quantum efficiency of these devices, particularly in the green region of the spectrum. These limitations must be overcome before efficient all-solid-state lighting can be developed beyond the blue-green region using this material system. Recently, the application of plasmonic excitations supported by metallic nanostructures has emerged as a promising approach to address this issue. In this work, metallic nanoparticles (NPs) and nanostructures that support plasmonic modes are engineered to increase the local density of states of the electromagnetic field that overlaps the QW region. This leads to an enhancement of the spontaneous emission rate of the QW region mediated by direct coupling into the plasmonic modes of the nanostructure. Energy stored in these modes can then scatter efficiently into free-space radiation, thereby enhancing the light output intensity. The first section of this thesis concerns the enhancement of InGaN/GaN QW light emission by utilizing localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) and lattice surface modes of metal NP arrays. This work comprises a detailed study of the effect of geometry variations of Ag NPs on the LSPR wavelength, and the subsequent demonstration of photoluminescence intensity enhancement by Ag NPs in the vicinity of InGaN multiple QWs. The second section of this thesis concerns the far-field control of QW emission utilizing metallic nanostructures that support plasmonic excitations. This includes a study of the dispersion and competing effects of a metallic NP-film system, and the demonstration of beam collimation and unidirectional diffraction utilizing a similar geometry. These results may find novel applications in the emerging field of solid-state smart lighting.

  1. A bi-hemispheric neuronal network model of the cerebellum with spontaneous climbing fiber firing produces asymmetrical motor learning during robot control

    PubMed Central

    Pinzon-Morales, Ruben-Dario; Hirata, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    To acquire and maintain precise movement controls over a lifespan, changes in the physical and physiological characteristics of muscles must be compensated for adaptively. The cerebellum plays a crucial role in such adaptation. Changes in muscle characteristics are not always symmetrical. For example, it is unlikely that muscles that bend and straighten a joint will change to the same degree. Thus, different (i.e., asymmetrical) adaptation is required for bending and straightening motions. To date, little is known about the role of the cerebellum in asymmetrical adaptation. Here, we investigate the cerebellar mechanisms required for asymmetrical adaptation using a bi-hemispheric cerebellar neuronal network model (biCNN). The bi-hemispheric structure is inspired by the observation that lesioning one hemisphere reduces motor performance asymmetrically. The biCNN model was constructed to run in real-time and used to control an unstable two-wheeled balancing robot. The load of the robot and its environment were modified to create asymmetrical perturbations. Plasticity at parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapses in the biCNN model was driven by error signal in the climbing fiber (cf) input. This cf input was configured to increase and decrease its firing rate from its spontaneous firing rate (approximately 1 Hz) with sensory errors in the preferred and non-preferred direction of each hemisphere, as demonstrated in the monkey cerebellum. Our results showed that asymmetrical conditions were successfully handled by the biCNN model, in contrast to a single hemisphere model or a classical non-adaptive proportional and derivative controller. Further, the spontaneous activity of the cf, while relatively small, was critical for balancing the contribution of each cerebellar hemisphere to the overall motor command sent to the robot. Eliminating the spontaneous activity compromised the asymmetrical learning capabilities of the biCNN model. Thus, we conclude that a bi-hemispheric structure and adequate spontaneous activity of cf inputs are critical for cerebellar asymmetrical motor learning. PMID:25414644

  2. Three years operation demonstrates exhaust emission control system

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    The first field installation of a patented NO{sub x} emissions system completed its third year of operation as a demonstration site last August. The cogeneration site is powered by three Caterpillar 350 kW G398 natural gas-fueled engines. The Hybrid Low NO{sub x} system has achieved NO{sub x} and CO levels below 10 ppm consistently. Although this system initially appears complicated and somewhat sophisticated, it has been relatively maintenance free and easy to operate, according to university officials. Petrocon Technologies, of Beaumont, Texas, acquired the license to use the technology in 1994. The first step in the Hybrid Low NO{sub x} system`s process is an afterburner fired at substoichiometric conditions to increase the temperature while also increasing the CO content of the engine exhaust. The added fuel consumption of the burner limits the economy of the system to sites that have use for the additional thermal energy. Cogeneration plants are good candidates. Downstream from the burner, the high-temperature, CO-enriched exhaust passes through a heat recovery steam generator where the gas temperature is reduced to about 538{degree}C. Exhaust then passes over an Allied Signal-supplied reduction catalyst, where NO{sub x} is reduced to below 10 ppm. Controlled levels of CO in contact with the proprietary catalyst is the primary factor in achieving such extraordinarily low NO{sub x} emission levels.

  3. Catalytic destruction vs. adsorption in controlling dioxin emission.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Wei Ting; Hung, Pao Chen; Chang, Moo Been

    2015-12-01

    This study investigates the removal efficiencies of PCDD/Fs achieved with a catalytic filter (CF) and with activated carbon injection followed by bag filter (ACI+BF) as applied in an industrial waste incinerator (IWI) and a hazardous waste incinerator (HWI), respectively. Catalytic filtration has been successfully applied to remove PCDD/Fs from gas streams. Comparing the CF to the ACI+BF system, it appears that the PCDD/F removal efficiency achieved with a CF is higher than that of an ACI+BF system. The PCDD/F emissions from both incinerators are well controlled to meet the regulatory limit of 0.1 ng I-TEQ/Nm(3). Additionally, the PCDD/F concentration in BF ash is higher than the regulation limit of Taiwan (1.0 ng I-TEQ/g). In contrast, the PCDD/F concentration in CF ash is only 0.274 ng I-TEQ/g. The difference is attributed to the fact that the ACI+BF system just transfers PCDD/Fs from gas phase to solid phase and further increases the PCDD/F concentration in fly ash, while CF technology effectively destroys the gas-phase PCDD/Fs. Therefore, the disposal of the fly ash discharged from CF would be less expensive compared with the fly ash discharged from the ACI+BF system. In this study, the PCDD/F emission factors of both incinerators are also established. PMID:26350401

  4. Methane emissions from process equipment at natural gas production sites in the United States: pneumatic controllers.

    PubMed

    Allen, David T; Pacsi, Adam P; Sullivan, David W; Zavala-Araiza, Daniel; Harrison, Matthew; Keen, Kindal; Fraser, Matthew P; Daniel Hill, A; Sawyer, Robert F; Seinfeld, John H

    2015-01-01

    Emissions from 377 gas actuated (pneumatic) controllers were measured at natural gas production sites and a small number of oil production sites, throughout the United States. A small subset of the devices (19%), with whole gas emission rates in excess of 6 standard cubic feet per hour (scf/h), accounted for 95% of emissions. More than half of the controllers recorded emissions of 0.001 scf/h or less during 15 min of measurement. Pneumatic controllers in level control applications on separators and in compressor applications had higher emission rates than controllers in other types of applications. Regional differences in emissions were observed, with the lowest emissions measured in the Rocky Mountains and the highest emissions in the Gulf Coast. Average methane emissions per controller reported in this work are 17% higher than the average emissions per controller in the 2012 EPA greenhouse gas national emission inventory (2012 GHG NEI, released in 2014); the average of 2.7 controllers per well observed in this work is higher than the 1.0 controllers per well reported in the 2012 GHG NEI. PMID:25488196

  5. Application of microturbines to control emissions from associated gas

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Darren D.

    2013-04-16

    A system for controlling the emission of associated gas produced from a reservoir. In an embodiment, the system comprises a gas compressor including a gas inlet in fluid communication with an associated gas source and a gas outlet. The gas compressor adjusts the pressure of the associated gas to produce a pressure-regulated associated gas. In addition, the system comprises a gas cleaner including a gas inlet in fluid communication with the outlet of the gas compressor, a fuel gas outlet, and a waste product outlet. The gas cleaner separates at least a portion of the sulfur and the water from the associated gas to produce a fuel gas. Further, the system comprises a gas turbine including a fuel gas inlet in fluid communication with the fuel gas outlet of the gas cleaner and an air inlet. Still further, the system comprises a choke in fluid communication with the air inlet.

  6. CONTROL OF INDUSTRIAL VOC (VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND) EMISSIONS BY CATALYTIC INCINERATION. VOLUME 9. QUALITY ASSURANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Radian Corporation, under contract to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, performed site selection, test plan development, and performance tests of catalytic incinerators used for volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions control at industrial sites. VOC emissions are of co...

  7. Landfill aeration for emission control before and during landfill mining.

    PubMed

    Raga, Roberto; Cossu, Raffaello; Heerenklage, Joern; Pivato, Alberto; Ritzkowski, Marco

    2015-12-01

    The landfill of Modena, in northern Italy, is now crossed by the new high velocity railway line connecting Milan and Bologna. Waste was completely removed from a part of the landfill and a trench for the train line was built. With the aim of facilitating excavation and further disposal of the material extracted, suitable measures were defined. In order to prevent undesired emissions into the excavation area, the aerobic in situ stabilisation by means of the Airflow technology took place before and during the Landfill Mining. Specific project features involved the pneumatic leachate extraction from the aeration wells (to keep the leachate table low inside the landfill and increase the volume of waste available for air migration) and the controlled moisture addition into a limited zone, for a preliminary evaluation of the effects on process enhancement. Waste and leachate were periodically sampled in the landfill during the aeration before the excavation, for quality assessment over time; the evolution of biogas composition in the landfill body and in the extraction system for different plant set-ups during the project was monitored, with specific focus on uncontrolled migration into the excavation area. Waste biological stability significantly increased during the aeration (waste respiration index dropped to 33% of the initial value after six months). Leachate head decreased from 4 to 1.5m; leachate recirculation tests proved the beneficial effects of moisture addition on temperature control, without hampering waste aerobization. Proper management of the aeration plant enabled the minimization of uncontrolled biogas emissions into the excavation area. PMID:26445364

  8. Dynamics of non-Controlled Emission of Biogas From Landfills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, R.; Salazar, J.; Hernandez, P.; Perez, N.

    2001-12-01

    Landfills are important sources of CH4 and CO2 as well as other toxic gas components to the atmosphere. A significant amount of gases could be released to the surrounding environment as a "non-controlled" emission in a diffuse form. To understand the dynamics of non-controlled emission of biogas from landfills several soil gas and CO2 efflux surveys were performed at Arico's landfill (Tenerife, Canary Islands). Estimated diffuse CO2 emission for Arico's landfill (0.33 Km2) were 507 td-1 (1998) and 131 td-1 (2000), showing different spatial CO2 efflux patterns that can be explained in terms of new waste disposal and covering materials as well as the action of the biogas extraction system. Secular variations of diffuse CO2 efflux and meteorological and soil variables were measured hourly at one site in the center of the landfill for 11 months. Diffuse CO2 efflux ranged from 9.9 to 433.3 gm-2d^{-1} with a median value of 242.7 \\pm 73.3 gm^{-2}d-1. Diffuse CO2 efflux showed a temporal behavior that could be divided in two different periods: (a) a quasi-stationary period with minor fluctuations due to the influence of meteorological and soil variables, and (b) a non-stationary period with changing CO2 efflux level and major variations related to the preliminary tests on the biogas extraction system for Arico's landfill. Air and ground temperatures exhibit significant positive correlation with the observed CO2 efflux. Peaks of maximum inverse correlation between barometric pressure and CO2 efflux are found at semi-diurnal and diurnal frequencies. Wind speed and wind direction are cross-correlated with CO2 efflux by 12 hours. These results suggest that (i) minor fluctuations in the CO2 efflux could be driven by meteorological variations (solar radiation cycles and local wind patterns), and (ii) sudden and major fluctuations in the CO2 efflux cannot be explained sufficiently in terms of the observed meteorological and soil variables' fluctuations.

  9. Longitudinal Evaluation of Sympathetic Nervous System and Perfusion in Normal and Spontaneously Hypertensive Rat Hearts with Dynamic Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Zan, Yunlong; Boutchko, Rostyslav; Huang, Qiu; Li, Biao; Chen, Kewei; Gullberg, Grant T

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the sympathetic nervous system and structure remodeling during the progression of heart failure in a rodent model using dynamic cardiac single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) model was used to study changes in the nervous system innervation and perfusion in the left ventricular (LV) myocardium with the progression of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) to heart failure. Longitudinal dynamic SPECT studies were performed with seven SHR and seven Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats over 1.5 years using a dual-head SPECT scanner with pinhole collimators. Time-activity curves (TACs) of the 123I-MIBG and 201Tl distribution in the LV blood pool and myocardium were extracted from dynamic SPECT data and fitted to compartment models to determine the influx rate, washout rate, and distribution volume (DV) of 123I-MIBG and 201Tl in the LV myocardium. The standardized uptake values (SUVs) of 123I-MIBG and 201Tl in the LV myocardium were also calculated from the static reconstructed images. The influx and washout rates of 123I-MIBG did not show a significant difference between SHRs and WKY rats. The DVs of 123I-MIBG were greater in the SHRs than in the WKY rats (p = .0028). Specifically, the DV of 123I-MIBG became greater in the SHRs by 6 months of age (p = .0017) and was still significant at the age of 22 months. The SUV of 123I-MIBG in SHRs exhibited abnormal values compared to WKY rats from the age of 18 months. There was no difference in the influx rate and the washout rate of 201Tl between the SHRs and WKY rats. The SHRs exhibited greater DV of 201Tl than WKY rats after the age of 18 months (p = .034). The SUV of 201Tl in SHRs did not show any significant difference from WKY at all ages. The higher DV of 123I-MIBG in the LV myocardium reveals abnormal nervous system activity of the SHRs at an age of 6 months, whereas a greater DV of 201Tl in the LV myocardium can only be detected at an age of 18 months. The results show that the abnormal nervous system activity appears earlier than perfusion. Furthermore, the comparison between the DV and the SUV indicates that dynamic SPECT with 123I-MIBG and 201Tl with the kinetic parameter DV is capable of detecting abnormalities of the LV at an early age. PMID:26162232

  10. The Effect of Pleural Abrasion on the Treatment of Primary Spontaneous Pneumothorax: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Ming, Mo-yu; Cai, Shuang-qi; Chen, Yi-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Background Pleural abrasion has been widely used to control the recurrence of primary spontaneous pneumothorax (PSP). However, controversy still exists regarding the advantages and disadvantages of pleural abrasion compared with other interventions in preventing the recurrence of PSP. Methods The PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases were searched up to December 15, 2014 to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared the effects of pleural abrasion with those of other interventions in the treatment of PSP. The study outcomes included the PSP recurrence rate and the occurrence rate of adverse effects. Results Mechanical pleural abrasion and apical pleurectomy after thoracoscopic stapled bullectomy exhibited similarly persistent postoperative air leak occurrence rates (p = 0.978) and 1-year PSP recurrence rates (p = 0.821), whereas pleural abrasion led to reduced residual chest pain and discomfort (p = 0.001) and a smaller rate of hemothorax (p = 0.036) than did apical pleurectomy. However, the addition of minocycline pleurodesis to pleural abrasion did not reduce the pneumothorax recurrence rate compared with apical pleurectomy (3.8% for both procedures) but was associated with fewer complications. There was no statistical difference in the pneumothorax recurrence rate between mechanical pleural abrasion and chemical pleurodesis with minocycline on either an intention-to-treat basis (4 of 42 versus 0 of 42, p = 0.12; Fisher exact test) or after exclusions (2 of 40 versus 0 of 42, p = 0.24; Fisher exact test). Pleural abrasion plus minocycline pleurodesis also did not reduce the pneumothorax recurrence rate compared with pleural abrasion alone (p = 0.055). Moreover, pleural abrasion plus minocycline pleurodesis was associated with more intense acute chest pain. The postoperative overall recurrence rate in patients who underwent staple line coverage with absorbable cellulose mesh and fibrin glue was similar to that with mechanical abrasion after thoracoscopic bullectomy (13.8% vs. 14.2%, respectively; p = 0.555), but staple line coverage resulted in less postoperative residual pain than mechanical abrasion (0.4% vs.3.2%; p<0.0001). Pleural abrasion after thoracoscopic wedge resection did not decrease the recurrence of pneumothorax compared with wedge resection alone (p = 0.791), but the intraoperative bleeding and postoperative pleural drainage rates were higher when pleural abrasion was performed. Conclusions In addition to resulting in the same pneumothorax recurrence rate, thoracoscopic pleural abrasion with or without minocycline pleurodesis is safer than apical pleurectomy in the treatment of PSP. However, minocycline pleurodesis with or without pleural abrasion is not any more effective than pleural abrasion alone. Moreover, additional mechanical abrasion is not safer than additional staple line coverage with absorbable cellulose mesh and fibrin glue after thoracoscopic bullectomy because of increased postoperative pain. Additionally, pleural abrasion after thoracoscopic wedge resection should not be recommended for routine application due to the greater incidence of adverse effects than wedge resection alone. However, further large-scale, well-designed RCTs are needed to confirm the best procedure. PMID:26042737

  11. The next decade and emission controls for electric utilities

    SciTech Connect

    Herrin, W.D.

    1997-12-31

    The historical efforts to achieve attainment with the ozone and particulate related standards span over 25 years and involve billions of dollars with only minimal success related to ozone and unknown success related to certain fine particulates. The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments mandated significant new efforts, including Title IV - Acid Rain, to achieve reductions in ozone and fine particulate precursors and attainment with the standards. Initial reduction efforts have only recently been implemented and yet another hot summer continues to portray our futile efforts to gain much ground towards attainment with existing and revised or new standards. In order to review the issues more fully and to investigate the issue of regional transport. EPA has given the states a reprieve on ozone attainment plans until mid-1997 and set up the Clean Air Act Advisory Committee (CAAAC) structure to review implementation issues with new or revised standards. The states and other stockholders are involved in these EPA processes through the Ozone Transport Assessment Group (OTAG) and the CAAAC along with numerous working groups to get new answers arid help towards innovative solutions. A major target in these efforts is emissions from fossil-fuel fired utility boilers. The OTAG process has developed regional control strategy targets for utility NO{sub x} sources at three levels. These levels include consideration of costs, timing and availability of controls, and the anticipated reductions in NO{sub x}. The CAAAC is also considering regional controls and the associated implementation issues for both ozone and fine particulates. EPA is also considering a Clean Air Power Initiative (CAPI) to wrap all the utility control issues in a single consensus package. The next 10 years will be a crucial time for electric utilities in juggling environmental and competitive issues.

  12. Optical sensors for process control and emissions monitoring in industry

    SciTech Connect

    S. W. Allendorf; D. K. Ottesen; D. W. Hahn; T. J. Kulp; U. B. Goers

    1998-11-02

    Sandia National Laboratories has a number of ongoing projects developing optical sensors for industrial environments. Laser-based sensors can be attractive for relatively harsh environments where extractive sampling is difficult, inaccurate, or impractical. Tools developed primarily for laboratory research can often be adapted for the real world and applied to problems far from their original uses. Spectroscopic techniques, appropriately selected, have the potential to impact the bottom of line of a number of industries and industrial processes. In this paper the authors discuss three such applications: a laser-based instrument for process control in steelmaking, a laser-induced breakdown method for hazardous metal detection in process streams, and a laser-based imaging sensor for evaluating surface cleanliness. Each has the potential to provide critical, process-related information in a real-time, continuous manner. These sensor techniques encompass process control applications and emissions monitoring for pollution prevention. They also span the range from a field-tested pre-commercial prototype to laboratory instrumentation. Finally, these sensors employ a wide range of sophistication in both the laser source and associated analytical spectroscopy. In the ultimate applications, however, many attributes of the sensors are in common, such as the need for robust operation and hardening for harsh industrial environments.

  13. Optical sensors for process control and emissions monitoring in industry

    SciTech Connect

    S. W. Alendorf; D. K. Ottensen; D. W. Hahn; T. J. Kulp; U. B. Goers

    1999-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has a number of ongoing projects developing optical sensors for industrial environments. Laser-based sensors can be attractive for relatively harsh environments where extractive sampling is difficult, inaccurate, or impractical. Tools developed primarily for laboratory research can often be adapted for the real world and applied to problems far from their original uses. Spectroscopic techniques, appropriately selected, have the potential to impact the bottom line of a number of industries and industrial processes. In this paper the authors discuss three such applications: a laser-based instrument for process control in steelmaking, a laser-induced breakdown method for hazardous metal detection in process streams, and a laser-based imaging sensor for evaluating surface cleanliness. Each has the potential to provide critical, process-related information in a real-time, continuous manner. These sensor techniques encompass process control applications and emissions monitoring for pollution prevention. They also span the range from a field-tested pre-commercial prototype to laboratory instrumentation. Finally, these sensors employ a wide range of sophistication in both the laser source and associated analytical spectroscopy. In the ultimate applications, however, many attributes of the sensors are in common, such as the need for robust operation and hardening for harsh industrial environments.

  14. Mercury Emission Control Technologies for PPL Montana-Colstrip Testing

    SciTech Connect

    John P. Kay; Michael L. Jones; Steven A. Benson

    2007-04-01

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) was asked by PPL Montana LLC (PPL) to provide assistance and develop an approach to identify cost-effective options for mercury control at its coal-fired power plants. The work conducted focused on baseline mercury level and speciation measurement, short-term parametric testing, and week long testing of mercury control technology at Colstrip Unit 3. Three techniques and various combinations of these techniques were identified as viable options for mercury control. The options included oxidizing agents or sorbent enhancement additives (SEAs) such as chlorine-based SEA1 and an EERC proprietary SEA2 with and without activated carbon injection. Baseline mercury emissions from Colstrip Unit 3 are comparatively low relative to other Powder River Basin (PRB) coal-fired systems and were found to range from 5 to 6.5 g/Nm3 (2.9 to 3.8 lb/TBtu), with a rough value of approximately 80% being elemental upstream of the scrubber and higher than 95% being elemental at the outlet. Levels in the stack were also greater than 95% elemental. Baseline mercury removal across the scrubber is fairly variable but generally tends to be about 5% to 10%. Parametric results of carbon injection alone yielded minimal reduction in Hg emissions. SEA1 injection resulted in 20% additional reduction over baseline with the maximum rate of 400 ppm (3 gal/min). Week long testing was conducted with the combination of SEA2 and carbon, with injection rates of 75 ppm (10.3 lb/hr) and 1.5 lb/MMacf (40 lb/hr), respectively. Reduction was found to be an additional 30% and, overall during the testing period, was measured to be 38% across the scrubber. The novel additive injection method, known as novel SEA2, is several orders of magnitude safer and less expensive than current SEA2 injection methods. However, used in conjunction with this plant configuration, the technology did not demonstrate a significant level of mercury reduction. Near-future use of this technique at Colstrip is not seen. All the additives injected resulted in some reduction in mercury emissions. However, the target reduction of 55% was not achieved. The primary reason for the lower removal rates is because of the lower levels of mercury in the flue gas stream and the lower capture level of fine particles by the scrubbers (relative to that for larger particles). The reaction and interaction of the SEA materials is with the finer fraction of the fly ash, because the SEA materials are vaporized during the combustion or reaction process and condense on the surfaces of entrained particles or form very small particles. Mercury will have a tendency to react and interact with the finer fraction of entrained ash and sorbent as a result of the higher surface areas of the finer particles. The ability to capture the finer fraction of fly ash is the key to controlling mercury. Cost estimates for mercury removal based on the performance of each sorbent during this project are projected to be extremely high. When viewed on a dollar-per-pound-of-mercury removed basis activated carbon was projected to cost nearly $1.2 million per pound of mercury removed. This value is roughly six times the cost of other sorbent-enhancing agents, which were projected to be closer to $200,000 per pound of mercury removed.

  15. Three-Dimensional Composite Nanostructures for Lean NOx Emission Control

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Pu-Xian

    2013-07-31

    This final report to the Department of Energy (DOE) and National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) for DE-EE0000210 covers the period from October 1, 2009 to July 31, 2013. Under this project, DOE awarded UConn about $1,248,242 to conduct the research and development on a new class of 3D composite nanostructure based catalysts for lean NOx emission control. Much of the material presented here has already been submitted to DOE/NETL in quarterly technical reports. In this project, through a scalable solution process, we have successfully fabricated a new class of catalytic reactors, i.e., the composite nanostructure array (nano-array) based catalytic converters. These nanocatalysts, distinct from traditional powder washcoat based catalytic converters, directly integrate monolithic substrates together with nanostructures with well-defined size and shape during the scalable hydrothermal process. The new monolithic nanocatalysts are demonstrated to be able to save raw materials including Pt-group metals and support metal oxides by an order of magnitude, while perform well at various oxidation (e.g., CO oxidation and NO oxidation) and reduction reactions (H{sub 2} reduction of NOx) involved in the lean NOx emissions. The size, shape and arrangement of the composite nanostructures within the monolithic substrates are found to be the key in enabling the drastically reduced materials usage while maintaining the good catalytic reactivity in the enabled devices. The further understanding of the reaction kinetics associated with the unique mass transport and surface chemistry behind is needed for further optimizing the design and fabrication of good nanostructure array based catalytic converters. On the other hand, the high temperature stability, hydrothermal aging stability, as well as S-poisoning resistance have been investigated in this project on the nanocatalysts, which revealed promising results toward good chemical and mechanical robustness, as well as S-poisoning resistance. Further investigation is needed for unraveling the understanding, design and selection principles of this new class of nanostructure based monolithic catalysts.

  16. 40 CFR 1060.102 - What permeation emission control requirements apply for fuel lines?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What permeation emission control requirements apply for fuel lines? 1060.102 Section 1060.102 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EVAPORATIVE EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE NONROAD AND STATIONARY EQUIPMENT...

  17. The evolution of shipping emissions and the costs of recent and forthcoming emission regulations in the northern European emission control area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, L.; Jalkanen, J.-P.; Kalli, J.; Kukkonen, J.

    2013-06-01

    An extensive inventory of marine exhaust emissions is presented in the northern European emission control area (ECA) in 2009 and 2011. The emissions of SOx, NOx, CO2, CO and PM2.5 were evaluated using the Ship Traffic Emission Assessment Model (STEAM). We have combined the information on individual vessel characteristics and position reports generated by the Automatic Identification System (AIS). The emission limitations from 2009 to 2011 have had a significant impact on reducing the emissions of both SOx and PM2.5. The predicted emissions of SOx originated from IMO-registered marine traffic have been reduced by 33%, from 322 ktons to 217 ktons, in the ECA from 2009 to 2011. The corresponding predicted reduction of PM2.5 emissions was 20%, from 74 ktons to 59 ktons. The highest CO2 and PM2.5 emissions in 2011 were located in the vicinity of the coast of the Netherlands, in the English Channel, near the South-Eastern UK and along the busiest shipping lines in the Danish Straits and the Baltic Sea. The changes of emissions and the financial costs caused by various regulative actions since 2005 were also evaluated, based on the increased direct fuel costs. We also simulated the effects and direct costs associated with the forthcoming switch to low-sulfur distillate fuels in 2015. According to the projections for the future, there will be a reduction of 85% in SOx emissions and a~reduction of 50% in PM2.5 emissions in 2015, compared with the corresponding shipping emissions in 2011 in the ECA. The corresponding relative increase in fuel costs for all shipping varied between 10% and 63%, depending on the development of the prices of fuels and the use of the sulfur scrubber equipment.

  18. Spontaneous regression of pulmonary metastatic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Ong, Sook Fen; Harden, Michael; Irandoust, Shabnam; Lee, Richard Wai Wing

    2016-03-01

    Spontaneous regression of metastatic melanoma is a rare event with only 76 cases having been reported since 1866. The precise mechanism of regression remains unknown. We present a case of a man with spontaneous regression of pulmonary metastatic melanoma confirmed on histopathology accompanied by reduction in fluorodeoxyglucose-activity on serial positron emission tomography/computed tomography scan. PMID:26839692

  19. Spontaneous fission properties and lifetime systematics

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.C.

    1989-03-01

    Half-lives for spontaneous fission of nuclides with even and odd numbers of particles are compared with recent theoretical calculations. A summary of odd particle hindrance factors is given. The most recent measurements of kinetic-energy and mass distributions and neutron emission for spontaneous fission of the heaviest nuclides are summarized and discussed. 51 refs., 9 figs.

  20. COST EFFECTIVE VOC EMISSION CONTROL STARTEGIES FOR MILITARY, AEROSPACE,AND INDUSTRIAL PAINT SPRAY BOOTH OPERATIONS: COMBINING IMPROVED VENTILATION SYSTEMS WITH INNOVATIVE, LOW COST EMISSION CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes a full-scale demonstration program in which several paint booths were modified for recirculation ventilation; the booth exhaust streams are vented to an innovative volatile organic compound (VOC) emission control system having extremely low operating costs. ...