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1

Genome engineering and gene expression control for bacterial strain development.  

PubMed

In recent years, a number of techniques and tools have been developed for genome engineering and gene expression control to achieve desired phenotypes of various bacteria. Here we review and discuss the recent advances in bacterial genome manipulation and gene expression control techniques, and their actual uses with accompanying examples. Genome engineering has been commonly performed based on homologous recombination. During such genome manipulation, the counterselection systems employing SacB or nucleases have mainly been used for the efficient selection of desired engineered strains. The recombineering technology enables simple and more rapid manipulation of the bacterial genome. The group II intron-mediated genome engineering technology is another option for some bacteria that are difficult to be engineered by homologous recombination. Due to the increasing demands on high-throughput screening of bacterial strains having the desired phenotypes, several multiplex genome engineering techniques have recently been developed and validated in some bacteria. Another approach to achieve desired bacterial phenotypes is the repression of target gene expression without the modification of genome sequences. This can be performed by expressing antisense RNA, small regulatory RNA, or CRISPR RNA to repress target gene expression at the transcriptional or translational level. All of these techniques allow efficient and rapid development and screening of bacterial strains having desired phenotypes, and more advanced techniques are expected to be seen. PMID:25155412

Song, Chan Woo; Lee, Joungmin; Lee, Sang Yup

2015-01-01

2

Bacterial control of host gene expression through RNA polymerase II  

PubMed Central

The normal flora furnishes the host with ecological barriers that prevent pathogen attack while maintaining tissue homeostasis. Urinary tract infections (UTIs) constitute a highly relevant model of microbial adaptation in which some patients infected with Escherichia coli develop acute pyelonephritis, while other patients with bacteriuria exhibit an asymptomatic carrier state similar to bacterial commensalism. It remains unclear if the lack of destructive inflammation merely reflects low virulence or if carrier strains actively inhibit disease-associated responses in the host. Here, we identify a new mechanism of bacterial adaptation through broad suppression of RNA polymerase II–dependent (Pol II–dependent) host gene expression. Over 60% of all genes were suppressed 24 hours after human inoculation with the prototype asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU) strain E. coli 83972, and inhibition was verified by infection of human cells. Specific repressors and activators of Pol II–dependent transcription were modified, Pol II phosphorylation was inhibited, and pathogen-specific signaling was suppressed in cell lines and inoculated patients. An increased frequency of strains inhibiting Pol II was epidemiologically verified in ABU and fecal strains compared with acute pyelonephritis, and a Pol II antagonist suppressed the disease-associated host response. These results suggest that by manipulating host gene expression, ABU strains promote tissue integrity while inhibiting pathology. Such bacterial modulation of host gene expression may be essential to sustain asymptomatic bacterial carriage by ensuring that potentially destructive immune activation will not occur. PMID:23728172

Lutay, Nataliya; Ambite, Ines; Hernandez, Jenny Grönberg; Rydström, Gustav; Ragnarsdóttir, Bryndís; Puthia, Manoj; Nadeem, Aftab; Zhang, Jingyao; Storm, Petter; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Wullt, Björn; Svanborg, Catharina

2013-01-01

3

Bacterial Gene Transfer  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This resource provides detailed instructions for carrying out several laboratory exercises relating to bacterial transformation and conjugation. In this multi-session experiment, students are exposed to various techniques in microbiology, including bacterial transformation and assay and sterile techniques.

Roberta Ellington (Northwestern University; )

1991-01-01

4

Specific Gene Repression by CRISPRi System Transferred through Bacterial Conjugation  

PubMed Central

In microbial communities, bacterial populations are commonly controlled using indiscriminate, broad range antibiotics. There are few ways to target specific strains effectively without disrupting the entire microbiome and local environment. Here, we use conjugation, a natural DNA horizontal transfer process among bacterial species, to deliver an engineered CRISPR interference (CRISPRi) system for targeting specific genes in recipient Escherichia coli cells. We show that delivery of the CRISPRi system is successful and can specifically repress a reporter gene in recipient cells, thereby establishing a new tool for gene regulation across bacterial cells and potentially for bacterial population control. PMID:25409531

2014-01-01

5

Specific Gene Repression by CRISPRi System Transferred through Bacterial Conjugation.  

PubMed

In microbial communities, bacterial populations are commonly controlled using indiscriminate, broad range antibiotics. There are few ways to target specific strains effectively without disrupting the entire microbiome and local environment. Here, we use conjugation, a natural DNA horizontal transfer process among bacterial species, to deliver an engineered CRISPR interference (CRISPRi) system for targeting specific genes in recipient Escherichia coli cells. We show that delivery of the CRISPRi system is successful and can specifically repress a reporter gene in recipient cells, thereby establishing a new tool for gene regulation across bacterial cells and potentially for bacterial population control. PMID:25409531

Ji, Weiyue; Lee, Derrick; Wong, Eric; Dadlani, Priyanka; Dinh, David; Huang, Verna; Kearns, Kendall; Teng, Sherry; Chen, Susan; Haliburton, John; Heimberg, Graham; Heineike, Benjamin; Ramasubramanian, Anusuya; Stevens, Thomas; Helmke, Kara J; Zepeda, Veronica; Qi, Lei S; Lim, Wendell A

2014-12-19

6

Control of lactate production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing a bacterial LDH gene  

Microsoft Academic Search

Potential industrial applications for lactate, such as the production of chemicals, has led to interest in producing this organic acid by metabolically engineered yeast such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Such microorganisms are more acid tolerant than lactic acid bacteria. This paper deals with the potential of the genetically modified S. cerevisiae strain K1-LDH (the lactate dehydrogenase gene of Lactobacillus plantarum has

S Dequin; J. M Sablayrolles

2003-01-01

7

Control of bacterial spores.  

PubMed

Bacterial spores are much more resistant than their vegetative counterparts. The most dangerous spore-former is Clostridium botulinum which produces a potent neurotoxin that can prove fatal. The most common food poisoning from a spore-former is caused by C. perfringens. Other food poisoning spore-formers include Bacillus cereus, B. subtilis and B. licheniformis. There are a number of non-pathogenic spore-formers including butyric and thermophilic anaerobes that cause significant economic losses to food producers. Some unusual spoilage complaints have been reported, for example, B. sporothermodurans in UHT milk, Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris in apple and orange juice and Desulfotomaculum nigrificans in hot vending machines. Control of spore-formers requires an understanding of both the resistance and outgrowth characteristics of the spores. PMID:10885113

Brown, K L

2000-01-01

8

Gene flow and bacterial transformation  

SciTech Connect

It is common knowledge that Salmonella which should be removed during the processing of sewage can persist is sewage sludge that is sprayed as agricultural fertilizer. Currently, researchers have found that Salmonella may become nonculturable by conventional means, while remaining viable. The issue raised by this article is the knowledge of lateral gene flow as secure as scientist suppose The author sites several research papers that suggest that intergeneric transformation can and does take place in marine environments such as tropical and subtropical estuaries.

Dixon, B.

1993-07-01

9

Bacterial Ice Crystal Controlling Proteins  

PubMed Central

Across the world, many ice active bacteria utilize ice crystal controlling proteins for aid in freezing tolerance at subzero temperatures. Ice crystal controlling proteins include both antifreeze and ice nucleation proteins. Antifreeze proteins minimize freezing damage by inhibiting growth of large ice crystals, while ice nucleation proteins induce formation of embryonic ice crystals. Although both protein classes have differing functions, these proteins use the same ice binding mechanisms. Rather than direct binding, it is probable that these protein classes create an ice surface prior to ice crystal surface adsorption. Function is differentiated by molecular size of the protein. This paper reviews the similar and different aspects of bacterial antifreeze and ice nucleation proteins, the role of these proteins in freezing tolerance, prevalence of these proteins in psychrophiles, and current mechanisms of protein-ice interactions. PMID:24579057

Lorv, Janet S. H.; Rose, David R.; Glick, Bernard R.

2014-01-01

10

Control of Gene Expression at a Bacterial Leader RNA, the agn43 Gene Encoding Outer Membrane Protein Ag43 of Escherichia coli  

PubMed Central

The family of agn alleles in Escherichia coli pathovars encodes autotransporters that have been implicated in biofilm formation, autoaggregation, and attachment to cells. The alleles all have long leader RNAs preceding the Ag43 translation initiation codon. Here we present an analysis of the agn43 leader RNA from E. coli K-12. We demonstrate the presence of a rho-independent transcription terminator just 28 bp upstream of the main translation start codon and show that it is functional in vitro. Our data indicate that an as-yet-unknown mechanism of antitermination of transcription must be operative in earlier phases of growth. However, as bacterial cell cultures mature, progressively fewer transcripts are able to bypass this terminator. In the K-12 leader sequence, two in-frame translation initiation codons have been identified, one upstream and the other downstream of the transcription terminator. For optimal agn43 expression, both codons need to be present. Translation from the upstream start codon leads to increased downstream agn43 expression. Our findings have revealed two novel modes of regulation of agn43 expression in the leader RNA in addition to the previously well-characterized regulation of phase variation at the agn43 promoter. PMID:24837285

Wallecha, Anu; Oreh, Heather; van der Woude, Marjan W.

2014-01-01

11

Inferring Bacterial Genome Flux While Considering Truncated Genes  

PubMed Central

Bacterial gene content variation during the course of evolution has been widely acknowledged and its pattern has been actively modeled in recent years. Gene truncation or gene pseudogenization also plays an important role in shaping bacterial genome content. Truncated genes could also arise from small-scale lateral gene transfer events. Unfortunately, the information of truncated genes has not been considered in any existing mathematical models on gene content variation. In this study, we developed a model to incorporate truncated genes. Maximum-likelihood estimates (MLEs) of the new model reveal fast rates of gene insertions/deletions on recent branches, suggesting a fast turnover of many recently transferred genes. The estimates also suggest that many truncated genes are in the process of being eliminated from the genome. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the ignorance of truncated genes in the estimation does not lead to a systematic bias but rather has a more complicated effect. Analysis using the new model not only provides more accurate estimates on gene gains/losses (or insertions/deletions), but also reduces any concern of a systematic bias from applying simplified models to bacterial genome evolution. Although not a primary purpose, the model incorporating truncated genes could be potentially used for phylogeny reconstruction using gene family content. PMID:20551435

Hao, Weilong; Golding, G. Brian

2010-01-01

12

A new experimental approach for studying bacterial genomic island evolution identifies island genes with bacterial host-specific expression patterns  

PubMed Central

Background Genomic islands are regions of bacterial genomes that have been acquired by horizontal transfer and often contain blocks of genes that function together for specific processes. Recently, it has become clear that the impact of genomic islands on the evolution of different bacterial species is significant and represents a major force in establishing bacterial genomic variation. However, the study of genomic island evolution has been mostly performed at the sequence level using computer software or hybridization analysis to compare different bacterial genomic sequences. We describe here a novel experimental approach to study the evolution of species-specific bacterial genomic islands that identifies island genes that have evolved in such a way that they are differentially-expressed depending on the bacterial host background into which they are transferred. Results We demonstrate this approach by using a "test" genomic island that we have cloned from the Salmonella typhimurium genome (island 4305) and transferred to a range of Gram negative bacterial hosts of differing evolutionary relationships to S. typhimurium. Systematic analysis of the expression of the island genes in the different hosts compared to proper controls allowed identification of genes with genera-specific expression patterns. The data from the analysis can be arranged in a matrix to give an expression "array" of the island genes in the different bacterial backgrounds. A conserved 19-bp DNA site was found upstream of at least two of the differentially-expressed island genes. To our knowledge, this is the first systematic analysis of horizontally-transferred genomic island gene expression in a broad range of Gram negative hosts. We also present evidence in this study that the IS200 element found in island 4305 in S. typhimurium strain LT2 was inserted after the island had already been acquired by the S. typhimurium lineage and that this element is likely not involved in the integration or excision of island 4305. Conclusion The "clone-and-transfer" approach of evolutionary study identifies genes whose expression patterns indicate the existence of genera-specific regulatory mechanisms that influence the expression of horizontally-transferred DNA sections. The results provide key information that can be used to facilitate the identification of these regulatory mechanisms. PMID:16396675

Wilson, James W; Nickerson, Cheryl A

2006-01-01

13

Transport of magnesium by a bacterial Nramp-related gene.  

PubMed

Magnesium is an essential divalent metal that serves many cellular functions. While most divalent cations are maintained at relatively low intracellular concentrations, magnesium is maintained at a higher level (?0.5-2.0 mM). Three families of transport proteins were previously identified for magnesium import: CorA, MgtE, and MgtA/MgtB P-type ATPases. In the current study, we find that expression of a bacterial protein unrelated to these transporters can fully restore growth to a bacterial mutant that lacks known magnesium transporters, suggesting it is a new importer for magnesium. We demonstrate that this transport activity is likely to be specific rather than resulting from substrate promiscuity because the proteins are incapable of manganese import. This magnesium transport protein is distantly related to the Nramp family of proteins, which have been shown to transport divalent cations but have never been shown to recognize magnesium. We also find gene expression of the new magnesium transporter to be controlled by a magnesium-sensing riboswitch. Importantly, we find additional examples of riboswitch-regulated homologues, suggesting that they are a frequent occurrence in bacteria. Therefore, our aggregate data discover a new and perhaps broadly important path for magnesium import and highlight how identification of riboswitch RNAs can help shed light on new, and sometimes unexpected, functions of their downstream genes. PMID:24968120

Shin, Jung-Ho; Wakeman, Catherine A; Goodson, Jonathan R; Rodionov, Dmitry A; Freedman, Benjamin G; Senger, Ryan S; Winkler, Wade C

2014-06-01

14

Transport of Magnesium by a Bacterial Nramp-Related Gene  

PubMed Central

Magnesium is an essential divalent metal that serves many cellular functions. While most divalent cations are maintained at relatively low intracellular concentrations, magnesium is maintained at a higher level (?0.5–2.0 mM). Three families of transport proteins were previously identified for magnesium import: CorA, MgtE, and MgtA/MgtB P-type ATPases. In the current study, we find that expression of a bacterial protein unrelated to these transporters can fully restore growth to a bacterial mutant that lacks known magnesium transporters, suggesting it is a new importer for magnesium. We demonstrate that this transport activity is likely to be specific rather than resulting from substrate promiscuity because the proteins are incapable of manganese import. This magnesium transport protein is distantly related to the Nramp family of proteins, which have been shown to transport divalent cations but have never been shown to recognize magnesium. We also find gene expression of the new magnesium transporter to be controlled by a magnesium-sensing riboswitch. Importantly, we find additional examples of riboswitch-regulated homologues, suggesting that they are a frequent occurrence in bacteria. Therefore, our aggregate data discover a new and perhaps broadly important path for magnesium import and highlight how identification of riboswitch RNAs can help shed light on new, and sometimes unexpected, functions of their downstream genes. PMID:24968120

Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Freedman, Benjamin G.; Senger, Ryan S.; Winkler, Wade C.

2014-01-01

15

Molecular Control of Bacterial Death and Lysis  

PubMed Central

Summary: Although the phenomenon of bacterial cell death and lysis has been studied for over 100 years, the contribution of these important processes to bacterial physiology and development has only recently been recognized. Contemporary study of cell death and lysis in a number of different bacteria has revealed that these processes, once thought of as being passive and unregulated, are actually governed by highly complex regulatory systems. An emerging paradigm in this field suggests that, analogous to programmed cell death in eukaryotes, regulated cell death and lysis in bacteria play an important role in both developmental processes, such as competence and biofilm development, and the elimination of damaged cells, such as those irreversibly injured by environmental or antibiotic stress. Further study in this exciting field of bacterial research may provide new insight into the potential evolutionary link between control of cell death in bacteria and programmed cell death (apoptosis) in eukaryotes. PMID:18322035

Rice, Kelly C.; Bayles, Kenneth W.

2008-01-01

16

Bacteriophage-encoded shiga toxin gene in atypical bacterial host  

PubMed Central

Background Contamination from fecal bacteria in recreational waters is a major health concern since bacteria capable of causing human disease can be found in animal feces. The Dog Beach area of Ocean Beach in San Diego, California is a beach prone to closures due to high levels of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB). A potential source of these FIB could be the canine feces left behind by owners who do not clean up after their pets. We tested this hypothesis by screening the DNA isolated from canine feces for the bacteriophage-encoded stx gene normally found in the virulent strains of the fecal bacterium Escherichia coli. Results Twenty canine fecal samples were collected, processed for total and bacterial fraction DNA, and screened by PCR for the stx gene. The stx gene was detected in the total and bacterial fraction DNA of one fecal sample. Bacterial isolates were then cultivated from the stx-positive fecal sample. Eighty nine of these canine fecal bacterial isolates were screened by PCR for the stx gene. The stx gene was detected in five of these isolates. Sequencing and phylogenetic analyses of 16S rRNA gene PCR products from the canine fecal bacterial isolates indicated that they were Enterococcus and not E. coli. Conclusions The bacteriophage-encoded stx gene was found in multiple species of bacteria cultivated from canine fecal samples gathered at the shoreline of the Dog Beach area of Ocean Beach in San Diego, California. The canine fecal bacteria carrying the stx gene were not the typical E. coli host and were instead identified through phylogenetic analyses as Enterococcus. This suggests a large degree of horizontal gene transfer of exotoxin genes in recreational waters. PMID:21733190

2011-01-01

17

Mechanisms of post-transcriptional gene regulation in bacterial biofilms  

PubMed Central

Biofilms are characterized by a dense multicellular community of microorganisms that can be formed by the attachment of bacteria to an inert surface and to each other. The development of biofilm involves the initial attachment of planktonic bacteria to a surface, followed by replication, cell-to-cell adhesion to form microcolonies, maturation, and detachment. Mature biofilms are embedded in a self-produced extracellular polymeric matrix composed primarily of bacterial-derived exopolysaccharides, specialized proteins, adhesins, and occasionally DNA. Because the synthesis and assembly of biofilm matrix components is an exceptionally complex process, the transition between its different phases requires the coordinate expression and simultaneous regulation of many genes by complex genetic networks involving all levels of gene regulation. The finely controlled intracellular level of the chemical second messenger molecule, cyclic-di-GMP is central to the post-transcriptional mechanisms governing the switch between the motile planktonic lifestyle and the sessile biofilm forming state in many bacteria. Several other post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms are known to dictate biofilm development and assembly and these include RNA-binding proteins, small non-coding RNAs, toxin-antitoxin systems, riboswitches, and RNases. Post-transcriptional regulation is therefore a powerful molecular mechanism employed by bacteria to rapidly adjust to the changing environment and to fine tune gene expression to the developmental needs of the cell. In this review, we discuss post-transcriptional mechanisms that influence the biofilm developmental cycle in a variety of pathogenic bacteria. PMID:24724055

Martínez, Luary C.; Vadyvaloo, Viveka

2014-01-01

18

Efficient Gene Transfer in Bacterial Cell Chains  

E-print Network

Horizontal gene transfer contributes to evolution and the acquisition of new traits. In bacteria, horizontal gene transfer is often mediated by conjugative genetic elements that transfer directly from cell to cell. Integrative ...

Babic, Ana

19

Gene identication in bacterial and organellar genomes using GeneScan  

E-print Network

Gene identi®cation in bacterial and organellar genomes using GeneScan Ramaswamy Ramakrishnaa, 110 067, India Received 23 June 1998; accepted 13 November 1998 Abstract The performance of the GeneScan algorithm for gene identi®cation has been improved by incorporation of a directed iterative scanning

Ramaswamy, Ram

20

Three computational tools for predicting bacterial essential genes.  

PubMed

Essential genes are those genes indispensable for the survival of any living cell. Bacterial essential genes constitute the cornerstones of synthetic biology and are often attractive targets in the development of antibiotics and vaccines. Because identification of essential genes with wet-lab ways often means expensive economic costs and tremendous labor, scientists changed to seek for alternative way of computational prediction. Aiming to help to solve this issue, our research group (CEFG: group of Computational, Comparative, Evolutionary and Functional Genomics, http://cefg.uestc.edu.cn ) has constructed three online services to predict essential genes in bacterial genomes. These freely available tools are applicable for single gene sequences without annotated functions, single genes with definite names, and complete genomes of bacterial strains. To ensure reliable predictions, the investigated species should belong to the same family (for EGP) or phylum (for CEG_Match and Geptop) with one of the reference species, respectively. As the pilot software for the issue, predicting accuracies of them have been assessed and compared with existing algorithms, and note that all of other published algorithms have not any formed online services. We hope these services at CEFG will help scientists and researchers in the field of essential genes. PMID:25636621

Guo, Feng-Biao; Ye, Yuan-Nong; Ning, Lu-Wen; Wei, Wen

2015-01-01

21

Lateral organ boundaries 1 is a disease susceptibility gene for citrus bacterial canker disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Citrus bacterial canker (CBC) disease occurs worldwide and incurs considerable costs both from control measures and yield losses. Bacteria that cause CBC require one of six known type III transcription activator-like (TAL) effector genes for the characteristic pustule formation at the site of infection. Here, we show that Xanthomonas citri subspecies citri strain Xcc306, with the type III TAL effector

Y. Hu; J. Zhang; H. Jia; D. Sosso; T. Li; W. B. Frommer; B. Yang; F. F. White; N. Wang; J. B. Jones

2014-01-01

22

Genomic islands: tools of bacterial horizontal gene transfer and evolution  

PubMed Central

Bacterial genomes evolve through mutations, rearrangements or horizontal gene transfer. Besides the core genes encoding essential metabolic functions, bacterial genomes also harbour a number of accessory genes acquired by horizontal gene transfer that might be beneficial under certain environmental conditions. The horizontal gene transfer contributes to the diversification and adaptation of microorganisms, thus having an impact on the genome plasticity. A significant part of the horizontal gene transfer is or has been facilitated by genomic islands (GEIs). GEIs are discrete DNA segments, some of which are mobile and others which are not, or are no longer mobile, which differ among closely related strains. A number of GEIs are capable of integration into the chromosome of the host, excision, and transfer to a new host by transformation, conjugation or transduction. GEIs play a crucial role in the evolution of a broad spectrum of bacteria as they are involved in the dissemination of variable genes, including antibiotic resistance and virulence genes leading to generation of hospital ‘superbugs’, as well as catabolic genes leading to formation of new metabolic pathways. Depending on the composition of gene modules, the same type of GEIs can promote survival of pathogenic as well as environmental bacteria. PMID:19178566

Juhas, Mario; van der Meer, Jan Roelof; Gaillard, Muriel; Harding, Rosalind M; Hood, Derek W; Crook, Derrick W

2009-01-01

23

Towards an Informative Mutant Phenotype for Every Bacterial Gene  

PubMed Central

Mutant phenotypes provide strong clues to the functions of the underlying genes and could allow annotation of the millions of sequenced yet uncharacterized bacterial genes. However, it is not known how many genes have a phenotype under laboratory conditions, how many phenotypes are biologically interpretable for predicting gene function, and what experimental conditions are optimal to maximize the number of genes with a phenotype. To address these issues, we measured the mutant fitness of 1,586 genes of the ethanol-producing bacterium Zymomonas mobilis ZM4 across 492 diverse experiments and found statistically significant phenotypes for 89% of all assayed genes. Thus, in Z. mobilis, most genes have a functional consequence under laboratory conditions. We demonstrate that 41% of Z. mobilis genes have both a strong phenotype and a similar fitness pattern (cofitness) to another gene, and are therefore good candidates for functional annotation using mutant fitness. Among 502 poorly characterized Z. mobilis genes, we identified a significant cofitness relationship for 174. For 57 of these genes without a specific functional annotation, we found additional evidence to support the biological significance of these gene-gene associations, and in 33 instances, we were able to predict specific physiological or biochemical roles for the poorly characterized genes. Last, we identified a set of 79 diverse mutant fitness experiments in Z. mobilis that are nearly as biologically informative as the entire set of 492 experiments. Therefore, our work provides a blueprint for the functional annotation of diverse bacteria using mutant fitness. PMID:25112473

Deutschbauer, Adam; Price, Morgan N.; Wetmore, Kelly M.; Tarjan, Daniel R.; Xu, Zhuchen; Shao, Wenjun; Leon, Dacia

2014-01-01

24

Subgingival bacterial colonization profiles correlate with gingival tissue gene expression  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease caused by the microbiota of the periodontal pocket. We investigated the association between subgingival bacterial profiles and gene expression patterns in gingival tissues of patients with periodontitis. A total of 120 patients undergoing periodontal surgery contributed with a minimum of two interproximal gingival papillae (range 2-4) from a maxillary posterior region. Prior to

Panos N Papapanou; Jan H Behle; M. Kebschull; Romanita Celenti; Dana L Wolf; Martin Handfield; Paul Pavlidis; Ryan T Demmer

2009-01-01

25

Bacterial gene transfer by natural genetic transformation in the environment.  

PubMed Central

Natural genetic transformation is the active uptake of free DNA by bacterial cells and the heritable incorporation of its genetic information. Since the famous discovery of transformation in Streptococcus pneumoniae by Griffith in 1928 and the demonstration of DNA as the transforming principle by Avery and coworkers in 1944, cellular processes involved in transformation have been studied extensively by in vitro experimentation with a few transformable species. Only more recently has it been considered that transformation may be a powerful mechanism of horizontal gene transfer in natural bacterial populations. In this review the current understanding of the biology of transformation is summarized to provide the platform on which aspects of bacterial transformation in water, soil, and sediments and the habitat of pathogens are discussed. Direct and indirect evidence for gene transfer routes by transformation within species and between different species will be presented, along with data suggesting that plasmids as well as chromosomal DNA are subject to genetic exchange via transformation. Experiments exploring the prerequisites for transformation in the environment, including the production and persistence of free DNA and factors important for the uptake of DNA by cells, will be compiled, as well as possible natural barriers to transformation. The efficiency of gene transfer by transformation in bacterial habitats is possibly genetically adjusted to submaximal levels. The fact that natural transformation has been detected among bacteria from all trophic and taxonomic groups including archaebacteria suggests that transformability evolved early in phylogeny. Probable functions of DNA uptake other than gene acquisition will be discussed. The body of information presently available suggests that transformation has a great impact on bacterial population dynamics as well as on bacterial evolution and speciation. PMID:7968924

Lorenz, M G; Wackernagel, W

1994-01-01

26

Pyramiding B genes in cotton achieves broader but not always higher resistance to bacterial blight.  

PubMed

ABSTRACT Near-isogenic lines of upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) carrying single, race-specific genes B4, BIn, and b7 for resistance to bacterial blight were used to develop a pyramid of lines with all possible combinations of two and three genes to learn whether the pyramid could achieve broad and high resistance approaching that of L. A. Brinkerhoff's exceptional line Im216. Isogenic strains of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. malvacearum carrying single avirulence (avr) genes were used to identify plants carrying specific resistance (B) genes. Under field conditions in north-central Oklahoma, pyramid lines exhibited broader resistance to individual races and, consequently, higher resistance to a race mixture. It was predicted that lines carrying two or three B genes would also exhibit higher resistance to race 1, which possesses many avr genes. Although some enhancements were observed, they did not approach the level of resistance of Im216. In a growth chamber, bacterial populations attained by race 1 in and on leaves of the pyramid lines decreased significantly with increasing number of B genes in only one of four experiments. The older lines, Im216 and AcHR, exhibited considerably lower bacterial populations than any of the one-, two-, or three-B-gene lines. A spreading collapse of spray-inoculated AcBIn and AcBInb7 leaves appears to be a defense response (conditioned by BIn) that is out of control. PMID:24655289

Essenberg, Margaret; Bayles, Melanie B; Pierce, Margaret L; Verhalen, Laval M

2014-10-01

27

Bacterial cell curvature through mechanical control of cell growth  

E-print Network

Bacterial cell curvature through mechanical control of cell growth Matthew T Cabeen1 , Godefroid growth. The bacterial peptidogly- can cell wall is a covalently closed meshwork of rigid glycan strands, a bacterial intermediate filament-like protein, is required for the curved shape of Caulobacter crescentus

Weibel, Douglas B.

28

Gene calling and bacterial genome annotation with BG7.  

PubMed

New massive sequencing technologies are providing many bacterial genome sequences from diverse taxa but a refined annotation of these genomes is crucial for obtaining scientific findings and new knowledge. Thus, bacterial genome annotation has emerged as a key point to investigate in bacteria. Any efficient tool designed specifically to annotate bacterial genomes sequenced with massively parallel technologies has to consider the specific features of bacterial genomes (absence of introns and scarcity of nonprotein-coding sequence) and of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies (presence of errors and not perfectly assembled genomes). These features make it convenient to focus on coding regions and, hence, on protein sequences that are the elements directly related with biological functions. In this chapter we describe how to annotate bacterial genomes with BG7, an open-source tool based on a protein-centered gene calling/annotation paradigm. BG7 is specifically designed for the annotation of bacterial genomes sequenced with NGS. This tool is sequence error tolerant maintaining their capabilities for the annotation of highly fragmented genomes or for annotating mixed sequences coming from several genomes (as those obtained through metagenomics samples). BG7 has been designed with scalability as a requirement, with a computing infrastructure completely based on cloud computing (Amazon Web Services). PMID:25343866

Tobes, Raquel; Pareja-Tobes, Pablo; Manrique, Marina; Pareja-Tobes, Eduardo; Kovach, Evdokim; Alekhin, Alexey; Pareja, Eduardo

2015-01-01

29

Predicting bacterial essential genes using only sequence composition information.  

PubMed

Essential genes are those genes that are needed by organisms at any time and under any conditions. It is very important for us to identify essential genes from bacterial genomes because of their vital role in synthetic biology and biomedical practices. In this paper, we developed a support vector machine (SVM)-based method to predict essential genes of bacterial genomes using only compositional features. These features are all derived from the primary sequences, i.e., nucleotide sequences and protein sequences. After training on the multiple samplings of the labeled (essential or not essential) features using a library for SVM, we obtained an average area under the ROC curve (AUC) of about 0.82 in a 5-fold cross-validation for Escherichia coli and about 0.74 for Mycoplasma pulmonis. We further evaluated the performance of the method proposed using the dataset consisting of 16 bacterial genomes, and an average AUC of 0.76 was achieved. Based on this training dataset, a model for essential gene prediction was established. Another two independent genomes, Shewanella oneidensis RW1 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium SL1344 were used to evalutate the model. Results showed that the AUC sores were 0.77 and 0.81, respectively. For the convenience of the vast majority of experimental scientists, a web server has been constructed, which is freely available at http://cefg.uestc.edu.cn:9999/egp. PMID:25036505

Ning, L W; Lin, H; Ding, H; Huang, J; Rao, N; Guo, F B

2014-01-01

30

A mutation spectra database for bacterial and mammalian genes.  

PubMed

Each mutation spectrum in this database is a dataset of changes in DNA base sequence in mutations induced in a gene by a particular mutagen (including spontaneous processes) under defined conditions. There are 240 datasets with 24 500 mutants in nine bacterial genes, two phage genes, five mammalian genes and one yeast gene. The database is available on the Web at http://info.med.yale.edu/mutbase/ . The data tables can be viewed on the Web and downloaded in text form for local use. The data are also available in dBASE III, a format which can be utilized by essentially any desktop computer database program or spreadsheet, and makes feasible analyses of a large number of mutants. Researchers are invited to submit additional data. A data entry program, MUTSIN, diagrams each mutation on the computer screen as the data are entered and alerts the user to any discrepancies between the entry and the gene sequence. PMID:9016534

Hutchinson, F; Donnellan, J E

1997-01-01

31

Bacterial bioluminescence: organization, regulation, and application of the lux genes.  

PubMed

Significant advances have been made in the characterization of luciferases and other lux-specific proteins as well as the lux genes from a number of different species of marine and terrestrial luminescent bacteria. A common lux gene organization (luxCDAB..E) modulated by the presence of specific genes involved in regulation and flavin binding and metabolism (luxF-I,L,R,Y) has been found with the luciferase genes (luxAB) flanked by the genes involved in synthesis of its fatty aldehyde substrate (luxCDE). For many species, light intensity per cell is highly dependent on cellular growth resulting in a spectacular autoinduction of luminescence at high cell density. Consequently, the bacterial lux system is of particular interest as it can serve as an excellent model for more general signal transduction systems involved in developmental processes, intercellular communication, and even symbioses. Identification of the lux autoinducers and regulatory proteins of Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio fischeri has provided the biochemical and genetic basis for dissection of the luminescent system. Isolation of the lux genes and the ability to transfer these genes into prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms have greatly expanded the scope and potential uses of bacterial bioluminescence as a safe, rapid, and sensitive sensor for a wide variety of compounds and metabolic processes. PMID:8370470

Meighen, E A

1993-08-01

32

Overexpression of a bacterial 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase gene in potato tubers perturbs the isoprenoid metabolic network: implications for the control of the tuber life cycle.  

PubMed

Potato tubers were engineered to express a bacterial gene encoding 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS) in order to investigate the effects of perturbation of isoprenoid biosynthesis. Twenty-four independent transgenic lines out of 38 generated produced tubers with significantly elongated shape that also exhibited an early tuber sprouting phenotype. Expression analysis of nine transgenic lines (four exhibiting the phenotype and five showing a wild-type phenotype) demonstrated that the phenotype was strongly associated with dxs expression. At harvest, apical bud growth had already commenced in dxs-expressing tubers whereas in control lines no bud growth was evident until dormancy was released after 56-70 d of storage. The initial phase of bud growth in dxs tubers was followed by a lag period of approximately 56 d, before further elongation of the developing sprouts could be detected. Thus dxs expression results in the separation of distinct phases in the dormancy and sprouting processes. In order to account for the sprouting phenotype, the levels of plastid-derived isoprenoid growth regulators were measured in transgenic and control tubers. The major difference measured was an increase in the level of trans-zeatin riboside in tubers at harvest expressing dxs. Additionally, compared with controls, in some dxs-expressing lines, tuber carotenoid content increased approximately 2-fold, with most of the increase accounted for by a 6-7-fold increase in phytoene. PMID:16873449

Morris, Wayne L; Ducreux, Laurence J M; Hedden, Peter; Millam, Steve; Taylor, Mark A

2006-01-01

33

Bacterial cellular engineering by genome editing and gene silencing.  

PubMed

Genome editing is an important technology for bacterial cellular engineering, which is commonly conducted by homologous recombination-based procedures, including gene knockout (disruption), knock-in (insertion), and allelic exchange. In addition, some new recombination-independent approaches have emerged that utilize catalytic RNAs, artificial nucleases, nucleic acid analogs, and peptide nucleic acids. Apart from these methods, which directly modify the genomic structure, an alternative approach is to conditionally modify the gene expression profile at the posttranscriptional level without altering the genomes. This is performed by expressing antisense RNAs to knock down (silence) target mRNAs in vivo. This review describes the features and recent advances on methods used in genomic engineering and silencing technologies that are advantageously used for bacterial cellular engineering. PMID:24552876

Nakashima, Nobutaka; Miyazaki, Kentaro

2014-01-01

34

Cloning of pig parotid secretory protein gene upstream promoter and the establishment of a transgenic mouse model expressing bacterial phytase for agricultural phosphorus pollution control.  

PubMed

This study examined the feasibility of using the promoter of the pig parotid secretory protein (PSP) gene for expression of the phytase transgene in mouse models. The pig parotid secretory protein gene is specifically expressed at high levels in the salivary glands. The 10-kb upstream promoter region of the gene necessary for tissue-specific expression has been identified. We have constructed phytase transgenes composed of the appA phytase gene from Escherichia coli driven by the upstream promoter region of the pig PSP gene with a 3' tail of either bovine growth hormone or the pig PSP gene polyadenylation signal. Transgenic mouse models with the construct showed that the upstream region of the pig PSP gene is sufficient for directing the expression of phytase transgenes in the saliva. Expression of salivary phytase reduced fecal phytate by 8.5 and 12.5% in 2 transgenic mouse lines, respectively. These results suggest that the expression of phytase in salivary glands of monogastric animals offers a promising biological approach to relieve the requirement for dietary phosphate supplements and to reduce phosphorus pollution from animal agriculture. PMID:16478942

Yin, H F; Fan, B L; Yang, B; Liu, Y F; Luo, J; Tian, X H; Li, N

2006-03-01

35

Evolution of a Bacterial Regulon Controlling Virulence Homeostasis  

E-print Network

Evolution of a Bacterial Regulon Controlling Virulence and Mg2+ Homeostasis J. Christian Perez1,2¤a governs virulence and Mg2+ homeostasis in several bacterial species. We establish that the ancestral Pho Regulon Controlling Virulence and Mg2+ Homeostasis. PLoS Genet 5(3): e1000428. doi:10.1371/journal

Granada, Universidad de

36

Lateral organ boundaries 1 is a disease susceptibility gene for citrus bacterial canker disease.  

PubMed

Citrus bacterial canker (CBC) disease occurs worldwide and incurs considerable costs both from control measures and yield losses. Bacteria that cause CBC require one of six known type III transcription activator-like (TAL) effector genes for the characteristic pustule formation at the site of infection. Here, we show that Xanthomonas citri subspecies citri strain Xcc306, with the type III TAL effector gene pthA4 or with the distinct yet biologically equivalent gene pthAw from strain XccA(w), induces two host genes, CsLOB1 and CsSWEET1, in a TAL effector-dependent manner. CsLOB1 is a member of the Lateral Organ Boundaries (LOB) gene family of transcription factors, and CsSWEET1 is a homolog of the SWEET sugar transporter and rice disease susceptibility gene. Both TAL effectors drive expression of CsLOB1 and CsSWEET1 promoter reporter gene fusions when coexpressed in citrus or Nicotiana benthamiana. Artificially designed TAL effectors directed to sequences in the CsLOB1 promoter region, but not the CsSWEET1 promoter, promoted pustule formation and higher bacterial leaf populations. Three additional distinct TAL effector genes, pthA*, pthB, and pthC, also direct pustule formation and expression of CsLOB1. Unlike pthA4 and pthAw, pthB and pthC do not promote the expression of CsSWEET1. CsLOB1 expression was associated with the expression of genes associated with cell expansion. The results indicate that CBC-inciting species of Xanthomonas exploit a single host disease susceptibility gene by altering the expression of an otherwise developmentally regulated gene using any one of a diverse set of TAL effector genes in the pathogen populations. PMID:24474801

Hu, Yang; Zhang, Junli; Jia, Hongge; Sosso, Davide; Li, Ting; Frommer, Wolf B; Yang, Bing; White, Frank F; Wang, Nian; Jones, Jeffrey B

2014-01-28

37

Limits of Feedback Control in Bacterial Chemotaxis  

PubMed Central

Inputs to signaling pathways can have complex statistics that depend on the environment and on the behavioral response to previous stimuli. Such behavioral feedback is particularly important in navigation. Successful navigation relies on proper coupling between sensors, which gather information during motion, and actuators, which control behavior. Because reorientation conditions future inputs, behavioral feedback can place sensors and actuators in an operational regime different from the resting state. How then can organisms maintain proper information transfer through the pathway while navigating diverse environments? In bacterial chemotaxis, robust performance is often attributed to the zero integral feedback control of the sensor, which guarantees that activity returns to resting state when the input remains constant. While this property provides sensitivity over a wide range of signal intensities, it remains unclear how other parameters such as adaptation rate and adapted activity affect chemotactic performance, especially when considering that the swimming behavior of the cell determines the input signal. We examine this issue using analytical models and simulations that incorporate recent experimental evidences about behavioral feedback and flagellar motor adaptation. By focusing on how sensory information carried by the response regulator is best utilized by the motor, we identify an operational regime that maximizes drift velocity along chemical concentration gradients for a wide range of environments and sensor adaptation rates. This optimal regime is outside the dynamic range of the motor response, but maximizes the contrast between run duration up and down gradients. In steep gradients, the feedback from chemotactic drift can push the system through a bifurcation. This creates a non-chemotactic state that traps cells unless the motor is allowed to adapt. Although motor adaptation helps, we find that as the strength of the feedback increases individual phenotypes cannot maintain the optimal operational regime in all environments, suggesting that diversity could be beneficial. PMID:24967937

Hernandez-Nunez, Luis; Emonet, Thierry

2014-01-01

38

Limits of feedback control in bacterial chemotaxis.  

PubMed

Inputs to signaling pathways can have complex statistics that depend on the environment and on the behavioral response to previous stimuli. Such behavioral feedback is particularly important in navigation. Successful navigation relies on proper coupling between sensors, which gather information during motion, and actuators, which control behavior. Because reorientation conditions future inputs, behavioral feedback can place sensors and actuators in an operational regime different from the resting state. How then can organisms maintain proper information transfer through the pathway while navigating diverse environments? In bacterial chemotaxis, robust performance is often attributed to the zero integral feedback control of the sensor, which guarantees that activity returns to resting state when the input remains constant. While this property provides sensitivity over a wide range of signal intensities, it remains unclear how other parameters such as adaptation rate and adapted activity affect chemotactic performance, especially when considering that the swimming behavior of the cell determines the input signal. We examine this issue using analytical models and simulations that incorporate recent experimental evidences about behavioral feedback and flagellar motor adaptation. By focusing on how sensory information carried by the response regulator is best utilized by the motor, we identify an operational regime that maximizes drift velocity along chemical concentration gradients for a wide range of environments and sensor adaptation rates. This optimal regime is outside the dynamic range of the motor response, but maximizes the contrast between run duration up and down gradients. In steep gradients, the feedback from chemotactic drift can push the system through a bifurcation. This creates a non-chemotactic state that traps cells unless the motor is allowed to adapt. Although motor adaptation helps, we find that as the strength of the feedback increases individual phenotypes cannot maintain the optimal operational regime in all environments, suggesting that diversity could be beneficial. PMID:24967937

Dufour, Yann S; Fu, Xiongfei; Hernandez-Nunez, Luis; Emonet, Thierry

2014-06-01

39

Adaptive identification and control algorithms for nonlinear bacterial growth systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper suggests how nonlinear adaptive control of nonlinear bacterial growth systems could be performed. The process is described by a time-varying nonlinear model obtained from material balance equations. Two different control problems are considered: substrate concentration control and production rate control. For each of these cases, an adaptive minimum variance control algorithm is proposed and its effectiveness is shown

D. DOCHAINt; G. BASTIN

1984-01-01

40

Bacterial community assembly based on functional genes rather than species  

PubMed Central

The principles underlying the assembly and structure of complex microbial communities are an issue of long-standing concern to the field of microbial ecology. We previously analyzed the community membership of bacterial communities associated with the green macroalga Ulva australis, and proposed a competitive lottery model for colonization of the algal surface in an attempt to explain the surprising lack of similarity in species composition across different algal samples. Here we extend the previous study by investigating the link between community structure and function in these communities, using metagenomic sequence analysis. Despite the high phylogenetic variability in microbial species composition on different U. australis (only 15% similarity between samples), similarity in functional composition was high (70%), and a core of functional genes present across all algal-associated communities was identified that were consistent with the ecology of surface- and host-associated bacteria. These functions were distributed widely across a variety of taxa or phylogenetic groups. This observation of similarity in habitat (niche) use with respect to functional genes, but not species, together with the relative ease with which bacteria share genetic material, suggests that the key level at which to address the assembly and structure of bacterial communities may not be “species” (by means of rRNA taxonomy), but rather the more functional level of genes. PMID:21825123

Burke, Catherine; Steinberg, Peter; Rusch, Doug; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Thomas, Torsten

2011-01-01

41

Small molecule control of bacterial biofilms  

PubMed Central

Bacterial biofilms are defined as a surface attached community of bacteria embedded in a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances that they have produced. When in the biofilm state, bacteria are more resistant to antibiotics and the host immune response than are their planktonic counterparts. Biofilms are increasingly recognized as being significant in human disease, accounting for 80% of bacterial infections in the body and diseases associated with bacterial biofilms include: lung infections of cystic fibrosis, colitis, urethritis, conjunctivitis, otitis, endocarditis and periodontitis. Additionally, biofilm infections of indwelling medical devices are of particular concern, as once the device is colonized infection is virtually impossible to eradicate. Given the prominence of biofilms in infectious diseases, there has been an increased effort toward the development of small molecules that will modulate bacterial biofilm development and maintenance. In this review, we highlight the development of small molecules that inhibit and/or disperse bacterial biofilms through non-microbicidal mechanisms. The review discuses the numerous approaches that have been applied to the discovery of lead small molecules that mediate biofilm development. These approaches are grouped into: 1) the identification and development of small molecules that target one of the bacterial signaling pathways involved in biofilm regulation, 2) chemical library screening for compounds with anti-biofilm activity, and 3) the identification of natural products that possess anti-biofilm activity, and the chemical manipulation of these natural products to obtain analogues with increased activity. PMID:22733439

Worthington, Roberta J.; Richards, Justin J.

2012-01-01

42

The coevolution of toxin and antitoxin genes drives the dynamics of bacterial addiction  

E-print Network

The coevolution of toxin and antitoxin genes drives the dynamics of bacterial addiction complexes Bacterial genomes commonly contain `addiction' gene complexes that code for both a toxin and a corre-segregational killing; genetic addiction; toxin­antitoxin systems 1. INTRODUCTION Genomes comprise multiple genes

Rankin, Daniel

43

Impacts of bioturbation on temporal variation in bacterial and archaeal nitrogen-cycling gene abundance in coastal sediments.  

PubMed

In marine environments, macrofauna living in or on the sediment surface may alter the structure, diversity and function of benthic microbial communities. In particular, microbial nitrogen (N)-cycling processes may be enhanced by the activity of large bioturbating organisms. Here, we study the effect of the burrowing mud shrimp Upogebia deltaura upon temporal variation in the abundance of genes representing key N-cycling functional guilds. The abundance of bacterial genes representing different N-cycling guilds displayed different temporal patterns in burrow sediments in comparison with surface sediments, suggesting that the burrow provides a unique environment where bacterial gene abundances are influenced directly by macrofaunal activity. In contrast, the abundances of archaeal ammonia oxidizers varied temporally but were not affected by bioturbation, indicating differential responses between bacterial and archaeal ammonia oxidizers to environmental physicochemical controls. This study highlights the importance of bioturbation as a control over the temporal variation in nitrogen-cycling microbial community dynamics within coastal sediments. PMID:24596269

Laverock, B; Tait, K; Gilbert, J A; Osborn, A M; Widdicombe, S

2014-02-01

44

Impacts of bioturbation on temporal variation in bacterial and archaeal nitrogen-cycling gene abundance in coastal sediments  

PubMed Central

In marine environments, macrofauna living in or on the sediment surface may alter the structure, diversity and function of benthic microbial communities. In particular, microbial nitrogen (N)-cycling processes may be enhanced by the activity of large bioturbating organisms. Here, we study the effect of the burrowing mud shrimp Upogebia deltaura upon temporal variation in the abundance of genes representing key N-cycling functional guilds. The abundance of bacterial genes representing different N-cycling guilds displayed different temporal patterns in burrow sediments in comparison with surface sediments, suggesting that the burrow provides a unique environment where bacterial gene abundances are influenced directly by macrofaunal activity. In contrast, the abundances of archaeal ammonia oxidizers varied temporally but were not affected by bioturbation, indicating differential responses between bacterial and archaeal ammonia oxidizers to environmental physicochemical controls. This study highlights the importance of bioturbation as a control over the temporal variation in nitrogen-cycling microbial community dynamics within coastal sediments. PMID:24596269

Laverock, B; Tait, K; Gilbert, J A; Osborn, A M; Widdicombe, S

2014-01-01

45

Bacterial syntenies: an exact approach with gene quorum  

PubMed Central

Background The automatic identification of syntenies across multiple species is a key step in comparative genomics that helps biologists shed light both on evolutionary and functional problems. Results In this paper, we present a versatile tool to extract all syntenies from multiple bacterial species based on a clear-cut and very flexible definition of the synteny blocks that allows for gene quorum, partial gene correspondence, gaps, and a partial or total conservation of the gene order. Conclusions We apply this tool to two different kinds of studies. The first one is a search for functional gene associations. In this context, we compare our tool to a widely used heuristic - I-ADHORE - and show that at least up to ten genomes, the problem remains tractable with our exact definition and algorithm. The second application is linked to evolutionary studies: we verify in a multiple alignment setting that pairs of orthologs in synteny are more conserved than pairs outside, thus extending a previous pairwise study. We then show that this observation is in fact a function of the size of the synteny: the larger the block of synteny is, the more conserved the genes are. PMID:21605461

2011-01-01

46

Light-Controlled Synthetic Gene Circuits  

PubMed Central

Highly complex synthetic gene circuits have been engineered in living organisms to develop systems with new biological properties. A precise trigger to activate or deactivate these complex systems is desired in order to tightly control different parts of a synthetic or natural network. Light represents an excellent tool to achieve this goal as it can be regulated in timing, location, intensity, and wavelength, which allows for precise spatiotemporal control over genetic circuits. Recently, light has been used as a trigger to control the biological function of small molecules, oligonucleotides, and proteins involved as parts in gene circuits. Light activation has enabled the construction of unique systems in living organisms such as band-pass filters and edge-detectors in bacterial cells. Additionally, light also allows for the regulation of intermediate steps of complex dynamic pathways in mammalian cells such as those involved in kinase networks. Herein we describe recent advancements in the area of light-controlled synthetic networks. PMID:22633822

Gardner, Laura; Deiters, Alexander

2012-01-01

47

Method of controlling gene expression  

DOEpatents

A method of controlling expression of a DNA segment under the control of a nod gene promoter which comprises administering to a host containing a nod gene promoter an amount sufficient to control expression of the DNA segment of a compound of the formula: ##STR1## in which each R is independently H or OH, is described.

Peters, Norman K. (Berkeley, CA); Frost, John W. (Menlo Park, CA); Long, Sharon R. (Palo Alto, CA)

1991-12-03

48

A versatile element for gene addition in bacterial chromosomes.  

PubMed

The increasing interest in genetic manipulation of bacterial host metabolic pathways for protein or small molecule production has led to a need to add new genes to a chromosome quickly and easily without leaving behind a selectable marker. The present report describes a vector and four-day procedure that enable site-specific chromosomal insertion of cloned genes in a context insulated from external transcription, usable once in a construction series. The use of rhamnose-inducible transcription from rhaBp allows regulation of the inserted genes independently of the commonly used IPTG and arabinose strategies. Using lacZ as a reporter, we first show that expression from the rhamnose promoter is tightly regulatable, exhibiting very low leakage of background expression compared with background, and moderate rhamnose-induced expression compared with IPTG-induced expression from lacp. Second, the expression of a DNA methyltransferase was used to show that rhamnose regulation yielded on-off expression of this enzyme, such that a resident high-copy plasmid was either fully sensitive or fully resistant to isoschizomer restriction enzyme cleavage. In both cases, growth medium manipulation allows intermediate levels of expression. The vehicle can also be adapted as an ORF-cloning vector. PMID:22123741

Sibley, Marion H; Raleigh, Elisabeth A

2012-02-01

49

Bacterial Bioluminescence Regulates Expression of a Host Cryptochrome Gene in the Squid-Vibrio Symbiosis  

E-print Network

Bacterial Bioluminescence Regulates Expression of a Host Cryptochrome Gene in the Squid expression of a cryptochrome gene in the symbiotic organ. The finding that bacteria can di- rectly influence-Heckman EAC, Peyer SM, Whistler CA, Apicella MA, Goldman WE, McFall-Ngai MJ. 2013. Bacterial bioluminescence

McFall-Ngai, Margaret

50

Use of a bacterial antimicrobial resistance gene microarray for the identification of resistant Staphylococcus aureus.  

PubMed

As diagnostic and surveillance activities are vital to determine measures needed to control antimicrobial resistance (AMR), new and rapid laboratory methods are necessary to facilitate this important effort. DNA microarray technology allows the detection of a large number of genes in a single reaction. This technology is simple, specific and high-throughput. We have developed a bacterial antimicrobial resistance gene DNA microarray that will allow rapid antimicrobial resistance gene screening for all Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. A prototype microarray was designed using a 70-mer based oligonucleotide set targeting AMR genes of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. In the present version, the microarray consists of 182 oligonucleotides corresponding to 166 different acquired AMR gene targets, covering most of the resistance genes found in both Gram-negative and -positive bacteria. A test study was performed on a collection of Staphylococcus aureus isolates from milk samples from dairy farms in Québec, Canada. The reproducibility of the hybridizations was determined, and the microarray results were compared with those obtained by phenotypic resistance tests (either MIC or Kirby-Bauer). The microarray genotyping demonstrated a correlation between penicillin, tetracycline and erythromycin resistance phenotypes with the corresponding acquired resistance genes. The hybridizations showed that the 38 antimicrobial resistant S. aureus isolates possessed at least one AMR gene. PMID:21083822

Garneau, P; Labrecque, O; Maynard, C; Messier, S; Masson, L; Archambault, M; Harel, J

2010-11-01

51

Detecting rare gene transfer events in bacterial populations.  

PubMed

Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) enables bacteria to access, share, and recombine genetic variation, resulting in genetic diversity that cannot be obtained through mutational processes alone. In most cases, the observation of evolutionary successful HGT events relies on the outcome of initially rare events that lead to novel functions in the new host, and that exhibit a positive effect on host fitness. Conversely, the large majority of HGT events occurring in bacterial populations will go undetected due to lack of replication success of transformants. Moreover, other HGT events that would be highly beneficial to new hosts can fail to ensue due to lack of physical proximity to the donor organism, lack of a suitable gene transfer mechanism, genetic compatibility, and stochasticity in tempo-spatial occurrence. Experimental attempts to detect HGT events in bacterial populations have typically focused on the transformed cells or their immediate offspring. However, rare HGT events occurring in large and structured populations are unlikely to reach relative population sizes that will allow their immediate identification; the exception being the unusually strong positive selection conferred by antibiotics. Most HGT events are not expected to alter the likelihood of host survival to such an extreme extent, and will confer only minor changes in host fitness. Due to the large population sizes of bacteria and the time scales involved, the process and outcome of HGT are often not amenable to experimental investigation. Population genetic modeling of the growth dynamics of bacteria with differing HGT rates and resulting fitness changes is therefore necessary to guide sampling design and predict realistic time frames for detection of HGT, as it occurs in laboratory or natural settings. Here we review the key population genetic parameters, consider their complexity and highlight knowledge gaps for further research. PMID:24432015

Nielsen, Kaare M; Bøhn, Thomas; Townsend, Jeffrey P

2014-01-01

52

Bacterial evolution. The type VI secretion system of Vibrio cholerae fosters horizontal gene transfer.  

PubMed

Natural competence for transformation is a common mode of horizontal gene transfer and contributes to bacterial evolution. Transformation occurs through the uptake of external DNA and its integration into the genome. Here we show that the type VI secretion system (T6SS), which serves as a predatory killing device, is part of the competence regulon in the naturally transformable pathogen Vibrio cholerae. The T6SS-encoding gene cluster is under the positive control of the competence regulators TfoX and QstR and is induced by growth on chitinous surfaces. Live-cell imaging revealed that deliberate killing of nonimmune cells via competence-mediated induction of T6SS releases DNA and makes it accessible for horizontal gene transfer in V. cholerae. PMID:25554784

Borgeaud, Sandrine; Metzger, Lisa C; Scrignari, Tiziana; Blokesch, Melanie

2015-01-01

53

Bacterial Foraging Based Optimization Design of Fuzzy PID Controllers  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, a bacterial foraging optimization scheme (BFOS) is proposed for the multi-objective optimization design of\\u000a a fuzzy PID controller and applies it to the control of an active magnetic bearing (AMB) system. Different from PID controllers\\u000a with fixed gains, the fuzzy PID controller is expressed in terms of fuzzy rules whose rule consequences employ analytical\\u000a PID expressions. The

Hung-cheng Chen

2008-01-01

54

Exposure of different bacterial inocula to newborn chicken affects gut microbiota development and ileum gene expression.  

PubMed

The transition from a sterile gut environment to the development of microbiota in the newborns is not fully understood. The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of exposure to bacterial communities on the development of gut microbiota in the newly hatched chicken. A total of 90 as-hatched chicks were divided into three groups. Groups A and B were treated with inocula of the cecal origin, whereas group C was fed with sterile water. The major bacteria in Inoculum-I to treat group A included Bacteroides (20.7%), Lachnospiraceae (17.2%) and unclassified Ruminococcaceae (16.1%), whereas group B was introduced with Inoculum-II composed of Prevotella (37.9%), Acidaminococcus (16.1%) and Dorea (12.6%). Analyses of the ileal and cecal contents over a period of 15 days showed that Inoculum-I resulted in a higher rate of colonization than Inoculum-II, but the colonization was predominantly in the cecum. The influence of Inoculum-II on group B was similar to that of water on group C, showing only a marginal effect on colonization. Microarray analysis showed that each group presented a distinct pattern of gene expression in the ileum. In group A, the most obvious changes were noted in genes controlling the function of ion transport, cell cycle and chromosome maintenance, suggesting that the inocula influenced gene expression. Our findings indicate that initial exposure to different bacterial communities could lead to the development of distinct microbiota and gene expression in the gut. It is possible to manipulate the gut microbiota by feeding to a proper bacterial composition at an early age. PMID:19956274

Yin, Yeshi; Lei, Fang; Zhu, Liying; Li, Sujuan; Wu, Zuowei; Zhang, Ruifen; Gao, George F; Zhu, Baoli; Wang, Xin

2010-03-01

55

GeneOrder3.0: Software for comparing the order of genes in pairs of small bacterial genomes  

PubMed Central

Background An increasing number of whole viral and bacterial genomes are being sequenced and deposited in public databases. In parallel to the mounting interest in whole genomes, the number of whole genome analyses software tools is also increasing. GeneOrder was originally developed to provide an analysis of genes between two genomes, allowing visualization of gene order and synteny comparisons of any small genomes. It was originally developed for comparing virus, mitochondrion and chloroplast genomes. This is now extended to small bacterial genomes of sizes less than 2 Mb. Results GeneOrder3.0 has been developed and validated successfully on several small bacterial genomes (ca. 580 kb to 1.83 Mb) archived in the NCBI GenBank database. It is an updated web-based "on-the-fly" computational tool allowing gene order and synteny comparisons of any two small bacterial genomes. Analyses of several bacterial genomes show that a large amount of gene and genome re-arrangement occurs, as seen with earlier DNA software tools. This can be displayed at the protein level using GeneOrder3.0. Whole genome alignments of genes are presented in both a table and a dot plot. This allows the detection of evolutionary more distant relationships since protein sequences are more conserved than DNA sequences. Conclusions GeneOrder3.0 allows researchers to perform comparative analysis of gene order and synteny in genomes of sizes up to 2 Mb "on-the-fly." Availability: and . PMID:15128433

Celamkoti, Srikanth; Kundeti, Sashidhara; Purkayastha, Anjan; Mazumder, Raja; Buck, Charles; Seto, Donald

2004-01-01

56

Horizontal gene transfer of a bacterial insect toxin gene into the Epichloë fungal symbionts of grasses.  

PubMed

Horizontal gene transfer is recognized as an important factor in genome evolution, particularly when the newly acquired gene confers a new capability to the recipient species. We identified a gene similar to the makes caterpillars floppy (mcf1 and mcf2) insect toxin genes in Photorhabdus, bacterial symbionts of nematodes, in the genomes of the Epichloë fungi, which are intercellular symbionts of grasses. Infection by Epichloë spp. often confers insect resistance to the grass hosts, largely due to the production of fungal alkaloids. A mcf-like gene is present in all of the Epichloë genome sequences currently available but in no other fungal genomes. This suggests the Epichloë genes were derived from a single lineage-specific HGT event. Molecular dating was used to estimate the time of the HGT event at between 7.2 and 58.8 million years ago. The mcf-like coding sequence from Epichloë typhina subsp. poae was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. E. coli cells expressing the Mcf protein were toxic to black cutworms (Agrotis ipsilon), whereas E. coli cells containing the vector only were non-toxic. These results suggest that the Epichloë mcf-like genes may be a component, in addition to the fungal alkaloids, of the insect resistance observed in Epichloë-infected grasses. PMID:24990771

Ambrose, Karen V; Koppenhöfer, Albrecht M; Belanger, Faith C

2014-01-01

57

Electrokinetic and optical control of bacterial microrobots  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

One of the great challenges in microscale science and engineering is the independent manipulation of cells and man-made objects on the micron scale. For such work, motile microorganisms are integrated with engineered systems to construct microbiorobots (MBRs). MBRs are negative photosensitive epoxy (SU-8) microfabricated structures with typical feature sizes ranging from 1 to 100 µm coated with a monolayer of swarmer cells of the bacterium Serratia marcescens. The adherent cells naturally coordinate to propel the microstructures in fluidic environments. In this study, ultraviolet light is used to control rotational motion and direct current electric fields are used to control the two-dimensional movement of MBRs. They are steered in a fully automated fashion using computer-controlled visual servoing, used to transport and manipulate micron-sized objects, and employed as cell-based biosensors. This work is a step toward in vitro mechanical or chemical manipulation of cells as well as controlled assembly of microcomponents.

Steager, Edward B.; Selman Sakar, Mahmut; Kim, Dal Hyung; Kumar, Vijay; Pappas, George J.; Kim, Min Jun

2011-03-01

58

Salmonella typhimurium Virulence Genes Are Induced upon Bacterial Invasion into Phagocytic and Nonphagocytic Cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

Survival and growth of salmonellae within host cells are important aspects of bacterial virulence. We have developed an assay to identify Salmonella typhimurium genes that are induced inside Salmonella-containing vacuoles within macrophage and epithelial cells. A promoterless luciferase gene cassette was inserted randomly into the Salmonella chromosome, and the resulting mutants were screened for genes upregulated in intracel- lular bacteria

CHERYL G. PFEIFER; SANDRA L. MARCUS; OLIVIA STEELE-MORTIMER; LEIGH A. KNODLER; B. BRETT FINLAY

1999-01-01

59

Tetracycline Resistance Gene Maintenance under Varying Bacterial Growth Rate, Substrate and Oxygen Availability, and Tetracycline  

E-print Network

Tetracycline Resistance Gene Maintenance under Varying Bacterial Growth Rate, Substrate and Oxygen, bacterial growth rate, and medium richness affect the maintenance of plasmid-borne TC resistance (Tet. aeruginosa in the absence of TC, and faster loss was observed in continuous culture at higher growth rates

Alvarez, Pedro J.

60

Genes Encoding Phospholipases A2 Mediate Insect Nodulation Reactions to Bacterial Challenge  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

We propose that expression of four genes encoding secretory phospholipases A2 (sPLA2) mediates insect nodulation responses to bacterial infection. Nodulation is the quantitatively predominant cellular defense reaction to bacterial infection. This reaction is mediated by eicosanoids, the biosynthesis...

61

Bacterial community composition and chitinase gene diversity of vermicompost with antifungal activity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bacterial communities and chitinase gene diversity of vermicompost (VC) were investigated to clarify the influence of earthworms on the inhibition of plant pathogenic fungi in VC. The spore germination of Fusarium moniliforme was reduced in VC aqueous extracts prepared from paper sludge and dairy sludge (fresh sludge, FS). The bacterial communities were examined by culture-dependent and -independent analyses. Unique clones

Muhammad Yasir; Zubair Aslam; Seon Won Kim; Seon-Woo Lee; Che Ok Jeon; Young Ryun Chung

2009-01-01

62

Electromagnetically Controlled Biological Assembly of Aligned Bacterial Cellulose Nanofibers  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have developed a new biofabrication process in which the precise control of bacterial motion is used to fabricate customizable\\u000a networks of cellulose nanofibrils. This article describes how the motion of Acetobacter xylinum can be controlled by electric fields while the bacteria simultaneously produce nanocellulose, resulting in networks with\\u000a aligned fibers. Since the electrolysis of water due to the application

Michael B. Sano; Andrea D. Rojas; Paul Gatenholm; Rafael V. Davalos

2010-01-01

63

Gene Regulation: Gene Control Network in Development  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract Controlling the differential expression of many,thousands,of genes is the most fundamental,task of a developing organism. It requires an enormous,computational,device that has the capacity to process in parallel a vast number,of regulatory inputs in the various cells of the embryo,and,come,out with regulatory outputs that are tissue specific. The regulatory genome,constitutes this computational,de- vice, comprising many thousands of processing units in

Smadar Ben-Tabou de-Leon; Eric H. Davidson

2007-01-01

64

Expression of the bacterial hemoglobin gene from Vitreoscilla stercoraria increases rifamycin B production in Amycolatopsis mediterranei.  

PubMed

It is well known that the culture for rifamycin B production by Amycolatopsis mediterranei requires high levels of dissolved oxygen, particularly in industrial processes. In this study, we report the construction of a vector for the expression of the bacterial hemoglobin gene (vhb) from Vitreoscilla stercoraria in a rifamycin B-overproducing strain of A. mediterranei. The effect was evaluated in the presence and absence of barbital. The vhb gene was cloned under the control of the PermE promoter, the Amycolatopsis lactamdurans plasmid pULVK2 origin of replication, the kanamycin-resistant gene (Km), the erythromycin-resistant gene (ermE) for selection, and ColE1. Industrial fermentation conditions were simulated in shake-flask cultures. Under low aeration, the transformed A. mediterranei strain with the vhb gene showed a 13.9% higher production of rifamycin B in a culture with barbital compared with the parental strain, and 29.5% higher production under the same conditions without barbital. PMID:19111646

Priscila, Guerra; Fernández, Francisco J; Absalón, Angel E; Suarez, Ma del Rocío; Sainoz, Mara; Barrios-González, Javier; Mejía, Armando

2008-11-01

65

Bacterial Bioluminescence: Its Control and Ecological Significance  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Microbiological Reviews scholarly article (23-page PDF) presents an overview of data relevant to the ecology of bioluminescent bacteria and the functional importance of light emission. The review article discusses the biochemistry of bioluminescence, taxonomic relationships of luminous bacteria, control of the synthesis and activity of the luminescent system, habitats and distribution of luminous bacteria, functions of bioluminescence, and new perspectives. These perspectives and other specific postulates presented in the article provide new approaches for data collection and experimental work.

Hastings, J. Woodland (John Woodland), 1927-; Nealson, Kenneth H.

2010-03-24

66

Genes for all metals—a bacterial view of the Periodic Table  

Microsoft Academic Search

  Bacterial chromosomes have genes for transport proteins for inorganic nutrient cations and oxyanions, such as NH4\\u000a +, K+, Mg2+, Co2+, Fe3+, Mn2+, Zn2+ and other trace cations, PO4\\u000a 3-, SO4\\u000a 2- and less abundant oxyanions. Together these account for perhaps a few hundred genes in many bacteria. Bacterial plasmids\\u000a encode resistance systems for toxic metal and metalloid ions including Ag+

S Silver

1998-01-01

67

Pyramiding of bacterial blight resistance genes in rice: marker-assisted selection using RFLP and PCR  

Microsoft Academic Search

DNA marker-assisted selection was used to pyramid four bacterial blight resistance genes, Xa-4, xa-5, xa-13 and Xa-21. Breeding lines with two, three and four resistance genes were developed and tested for resistance to the bacterial blight\\u000a pathogen (Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae). The pyramid lines showed a wider spectrum and a higher level of resistance than lines with only a single

N. Huang; E. R. Angeles; J. Domingo; G. Magpantay; S. Singh; G. Zhang; N. Kumaravadivel; J. Bennett; G. S. Khush

1997-01-01

68

Controlled bacterial lysis for electron tomography of native cell membranes.  

PubMed

Cryo-electron tomography (cryoET) has become a powerful tool for direct visualization of 3D structures of native biological specimens at molecular resolution, but its application is limited to thin specimens (<300 nm). Recently, vitreous sectioning and cryoFIB milling technologies were developed to physically reduce the specimen thickness; however, cryoET analysis of membrane protein complexes within native cell membranes remains a great challenge. Here, we use phage ?X174 lysis gene E to rapidly produce native, intact, bacterial cell membranes for high resolution cryoET. We characterized E gene-induced cell lysis using FIB/SEM and cryoEM and showed that the bacteria cytoplasm was largely depleted through spot lesion, producing ghosts with the cell membranes intact. We further demonstrated the utility of E-gene-induced lysis for cryoET using the bacterial chemotaxis receptor signaling complex array. The described method should have a broad application for structural and functional studies of native, intact cell membranes and membrane protein complexes. PMID:25456413

Fu, Xiaofeng; Himes, Benjamin A; Ke, Danxia; Rice, William J; Ning, Jiying; Zhang, Peijun

2014-12-01

69

Riboswitches: discovery of drugs that target bacterial gene-regulatory RNAs  

PubMed Central

Conspectus Riboswitches, which were discovered in the first years of the XXI century, are gene-regulatory mRNA domains that respond to the intracellular concentration of a variety of metabolites and second messengers. They control essential genes in many pathogenic bacteria, and represent a new class of biomolecular target for the development of antibiotics and chemical-biological tools. Five mechanisms of gene regulation are known for riboswitches. Most bacterial riboswitches modulate transcription termination or translation initiation in response to ligand binding. All known examples of eukaryotic riboswitches and some bacterial riboswitches control gene expression by alternative splicing. The glmS riboswitch, widespread in Gram-positive bacteria, is a catalytic RNA activated by ligand binding. Its self-cleavage destabilizes the mRNA of which it is part. Finally, one example of trans-acting riboswitch is known. Three-dimensional (3D) structures have been determined of representatives of thirteen structurally distinct riboswitch classes, providing atomic-level insight into their mechanisms of ligand recognition. While cellular and viral RNAs in general have attracted interest as potential drug targets, riboswitches show special promise due to the diversity and sophistication of small molecule recognition strategies on display in their ligand binding pockets. Moreover, uniquely among known structured RNA domains, riboswitches evolved to recognize small molecule ligands. Structural and biochemical advances in the study of riboswitches provide an impetus for the development of methods for the discovery of novel riboswitch activators and inhibitors. Recent rational drug design efforts focused on select riboswitch classes have yielded a small number of candidate antibiotic compounds, including one active in a mouse model of Staphylococcus aureus infection. The development of high-throughput methods suitable for riboswitch-specific drug discovery is ongoing. A fragment-based screening approach employing equilibrium dialysis that may be generically useful has had early success. Riboswitch-mediated gene regulation is widely employed by bacteria; however, only the thiamine pyrophosphate-responsive riboswitch has thus far been found in eukaryotes. Thus, riboswitches are particularly attractive as targets for antibacterials. Indeed, antimicrobials with previously unknown mechanisms have been found to function by binding riboswitches and leading to aberrant gene expression. PMID:21615107

Deigan, Katherine E.; Ferré-D’Amaré, Adrian R.

2011-01-01

70

Post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression in bacterial pathogens by toxin-antitoxin systems  

PubMed Central

Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems are small genetic elements ubiquitous in prokaryotic genomes that encode toxic proteins targeting various vital cellular functions. Typically, toxin activity is controlled by adjacently encoded protein or RNA antitoxins and unleashed as a consequence of genetic fluctuations or stressful conditions. Whereas some TA systems interfere with replication or cell wall synthesis, most of them influence transcriptional and post-transcriptional gene regulation. Antitoxin proteins often act as DNA binding transcriptional regulators and many TA toxins exhibit endoribonuclease activity to selectively degrade different RNA species and thus alter gene expression patterns. Some TA RNases cleave tRNA, tmRNAs or rRNAs, whereas most commonly mRNAs either in association with the ribosome or as free transcripts, are targeted. Examples are provided on how TA toxins differentially shape gene expression in bacterial pathogens by creating specialized ribosomes or by altering the transcriptome and how this may be tied in the control of pathogenicity factors. PMID:24524029

Bertram, Ralph; Schuster, Christopher F.

2014-01-01

71

Enhanced Production of ?-Caprolactone by Coexpression of Bacterial Hemoglobin Gene in Recombinant Escherichia coli Expressing Cyclohexanone Monooxygenase Gene.  

PubMed

Baeyer-Villiger (BV) oxidation of cyclohexanone to epsilon-caprolactone in a microbial system expressing cyclohexanone monooxygenase (CHMO) can be influenced by not only the efficient regeneration of NADPH but also a sufficient supply of oxygen. In this study, the bacterial hemoglobin gene from Vitreoscilla stercoraria (vhb) was introduced into the recombinant Escherichia coli expressing CHMO to investigate the effects of an oxygen-carrying protein on microbial BV oxidation of cyclohexanone. Coexpression of Vhb allowed the recombinant E. coli strain to produce a maximum epsilon-caprolactone concentration of 15.7 g/l in a fed-batch BV oxidation of cyclohexanone, which corresponded to a 43% improvement compared with the control strain expressing CHMO only under the same conditions. PMID:25269815

Lee, Won-Heong; Park, Eun-Hee; Kim, Myoung-Dong

2014-12-28

72

Diversity and expression of nitrogen fixation genes in bacterial symbionts of marine sponges.  

PubMed

Marine sponges contain complex assemblages of bacterial symbionts, the roles of which remain largely unknown. We identified diverse bacterial nifH genes within sponges and found that nifH genes are expressed in sponges. This is the first demonstration of the expression of any protein-coding bacterial gene within a sponge. Two sponges Ircinia strobilina and Mycale laxissima were collected from Key Largo, Florida and had delta(15)N values of c. 0-1 per thousand and 3-4 per thousand respectively. The potential for nitrogen fixation by symbionts was assessed by amplification of nifH genes. Diverse nifH genes affiliated with Proteobacteria and Cyanobacteria were detected, and expression of nifH genes affiliated with those from cyanobacteria was detected. The nifH genes from surrounding seawater were similar to those of Trichodesmium and clearly different from the cyanobacterial nifH genes detected in the two sponges. This study advances understanding of the role of bacterial symbionts in sponges and suggests that provision of fixed nitrogen is a means whereby symbionts benefit sponges in nutrient-limited reef environments. Nitrogen fixation by sponge symbionts is possibly an important source of new nitrogen to the reef environment that heretofore has been neglected and warrants further investigation. PMID:18761667

Mohamed, Naglaa M; Colman, Albert S; Tal, Yossi; Hill, Russell T

2008-11-01

73

A Comprehensive Analysis of Gene Expression Changes Provoked by Bacterial and Fungal Infection in C. elegans  

E-print Network

that the response to infection in C. elegans is determined by the nature of the pathogen, the site of infectionA Comprehensive Analysis of Gene Expression Changes Provoked by Bacterial and Fungal Infection in C to infection by the up-regulation of certain genes, distinct pathogens trigger the expression of a common set

Tichit, Laurent

74

Bacterial metabarcoding by 16S rRNA gene ion torrent amplicon sequencing.  

PubMed

Ion Torrent is a next generation sequencing technology based on the detection of hydrogen ions produced during DNA chain elongation; this technology allows analyzing and characterizing genomes, genes, and species. Here, we describe an Ion Torrent procedure applied to the metagenomic analysis of 16S rRNA gene amplicons to study the bacterial diversity in food and environmental samples. PMID:25343859

Fantini, Elio; Gianese, Giulio; Giuliano, Giovanni; Fiore, Alessia

2015-01-01

75

More than 9,000,000 Unique Genes in Human Gut Bacterial Community: Estimating Gene Numbers Inside a Human Body  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundEstimating the number of genes in human genome has been long an important problem in computational biology. With the new conception of considering human as a super-organism, it is also interesting to estimate the number of genes in this human super-organism.Principal FindingsWe presented our estimation of gene numbers in the human gut bacterial community, the largest microbial community inside the

Xing Yang; Lu Xie; Yixue Li; Chaochun Wei; Stefan Bereswill

2009-01-01

76

Bacterial Systems for Tumor-Specific Gene Therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

This chapter describes the power of genetically engineered bacteria in cancer therapy. In the applications we consider, the\\u000a bacteria are genetically engineered to carry a specific gene into tumors, and on this basis, it can be considered gene therapy.\\u000a However, if gene therapy is defined as the introduction of a gene, or part of a gene, into the cancer cells

J. Martin Brown; Shie-Chau Liu; Jan Theys; Philippe Lambin

77

A recently transferred cluster of bacterial genes in Trichomonas vaginalis - lateral gene transfer and the fate of acquired genes  

PubMed Central

Background Lateral Gene Transfer (LGT) has recently gained recognition as an important contributor to some eukaryote proteomes, but the mechanisms of acquisition and fixation in eukaryotic genomes are still uncertain. A previously defined norm for LGTs in microbial eukaryotes states that the majority are genes involved in metabolism, the LGTs are typically localized one by one, surrounded by vertically inherited genes on the chromosome, and phylogenetics shows that a broad collection of bacterial lineages have contributed to the transferome. Results A unique 34 kbp long fragment with 27 clustered genes (TvLF) of prokaryote origin was identified in the sequenced genome of the protozoan parasite Trichomonas vaginalis. Using a PCR based approach we confirmed the presence of the orthologous fragment in four additional T. vaginalis strains. Detailed sequence analyses unambiguously suggest that TvLF is the result of one single, recent LGT event. The proposed donor is a close relative to the firmicute bacterium Peptoniphilus harei. High nucleotide sequence similarity between T. vaginalis strains, as well as to P. harei, and the absence of homologs in other Trichomonas species, suggests that the transfer event took place after the radiation of the genus Trichomonas. Some genes have undergone pseudogenization and degradation, indicating that they may not be retained in the future. Functional annotations reveal that genes involved in informational processes are particularly prone to degradation. Conclusions We conclude that, although the majority of eukaryote LGTs are single gene occurrences, they may be acquired in clusters of several genes that are subsequently cleansed of evolutionarily less advantageous genes. PMID:24898731

2014-01-01

78

The role of bacterial vaginosis in preterm labor and preterm birth: a case-control study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To study the association between preterm labor and bacterial vaginosis; in women with preterm labor, to determine whether vaginosis modifies the risk of preterm delivery. Study Design: Case-control study. We used Amsel’s clinical criteria to test 102 patients hospitalized for preterm labor and 102 control patients for bacterial vaginosis. Results: Patients with preterm labor were diagnosed with bacterial vaginosis

Damien Subtil; Valérie Denoit; Françoise Le Gouëff; Marie-Odile Husson; Dominique Trivier; Francis Puech

2002-01-01

79

Tandem riboswitch architectures exhibit complex gene control functions.  

PubMed

Riboswitches are structured RNAs typically located in the 5' untranslated regions of bacterial mRNAs that bind metabolites and control gene expression. Most riboswitches sense one metabolite and function as simple genetic switches. However, we found that the 5' region of the Bacillus clausii metE messenger RNA includes two riboswitches that respond to S-adenosylmethionine and coenzyme B12. This tandem arrangement yields a composite gene control system that functions as a two-input Boolean NOR logic gate. These findings and the discovery of additional tandem riboswitch architectures reveal how simple RNA elements can be assembled to make sophisticated genetic decisions without involving protein factors. PMID:17038623

Sudarsan, Narasimhan; Hammond, Ming C; Block, Kirsten F; Welz, Rüdiger; Barrick, Jeffrey E; Roth, Adam; Breaker, Ronald R

2006-10-13

80

The "domino theory" of gene death: gradual and mass gene extinction events in three lineages of obligate symbiotic bacterial pathogens.  

PubMed

During the adaptation of an organism to a parasitic lifestyle, various gene functions may be rendered superfluous due to the fact that the host may supply these needs. As a consequence, obligate symbiotic bacterial pathogens tend to undergo reductive genomic evolution through gene death (nonfunctionalization or pseudogenization) and deletion. Here, we examine the evolutionary sequence of gene-death events during the process of genome miniaturization in three bacterial species that have experienced extensive genome reduction: Mycobacterium leprae, Shigella flexneri, and Salmonella typhi. We infer that in all three lineages, the distribution of functional categories is similar in pseudogenes and genes but different from that of absent genes. Based on an analysis of evolutionary distances, we propose a two-step "domino effect" model for reductive genome evolution. The process starts with a gradual gene-by-gene-death sequence of events. Eventually, a crucial gene within a complex pathway or network is rendered nonfunctional triggering a "mass gene extinction" of the dependent genes. In contrast to published reports according to which genes belonging to certain functional categories are prone to nonfunctionalization more frequently and earlier than genes belonging to other functional categories, we could discern no characteristic regularity in the temporal order of function loss. PMID:16237210

Dagan, Tal; Blekhman, Ran; Graur, Dan

2006-02-01

81

Genes for the cytoskeletal protein tubulin in the bacterial genus Prosthecobacter  

PubMed Central

Tubulins, the protein constituents of the microtubule cytoskeleton, are present in all known eukaryotes but have never been found in the Bacteria or Archaea. Here we report the presence of two tubulin-like genes [bacterial tubulin a (btuba) and bacterial tubulin b (btubb)] in bacteria of the genus Prosthecobacter (Division Verrucomicrobia). In this study, we investigated the organization and expression of these genes and conducted a comparative analysis of the bacterial and eukaryotic protein sequences, focusing on their phylogeny and 3D structures. The btuba and btubb genes are arranged as adjacent loci within the genome along with a kinesin light chain gene homolog. RT-PCR experiments indicate that these three genes are cotranscribed, and a probable promoter was identified upstream of btuba. On the basis of comparative modeling data, we predict that the Prosthecobacter tubulins are monomeric, unlike eukaryotic ? and ? tubulins, which form dimers and are therefore unlikely to form microtubule-like structures. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that the Prosthecobacter tubulins are quite divergent and do not support recent horizontal transfer of the genes from a eukaryote. The discovery of genes for tubulin in a bacterial genus may offer new insights into the evolution of the cytoskeleton. PMID:12486237

Jenkins, Cheryl; Samudrala, Ram; Anderson, Iain; Hedlund, Brian P.; Petroni, Giulio; Michailova, Natasha; Pinel, Nicolas; Overbeek, Ross; Rosati, Giovanna; Staley, James T.

2002-01-01

82

Biodegradation of atrazine by three transgenic grasses and alfalfa expressing a modified bacterial atrazine chlorohydrolase gene.  

PubMed

The widespread use of atrazine and other s-triazine herbicides to control weeds in agricultural production fields has impacted surface and groundwater in the United States and elsewhere. We previously reported the cloning, sequencing, and expression of six genes involved in the atrazine biodegradation pathway of Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP, which is initiated by atzA, encoding atrazine chlorohydrolase. Here we explored the use of enhanced expression of a modified bacterial atrazine chlorohydrolase, p-AtzA, in transgenic grasses (tall fescue, perennial ryegrass, and switchgrass) and the legume alfalfa for the biodegradation of atrazine. Enhanced expression of p-AtzA was obtained by using combinations of the badnavirus promoter, the maize alcohol dehydrogenase first intron, and the maize ubiquitin promoter. For alfalfa, we used the first intron of the 5'-untranslated region tobacco alcohol dehydrogenase gene and the cassava vein mosaic virus promoter. Resistance of plants to atrazine in agar-based and hydroponic growth assays was correlated with in vivo levels of gene expression and atrazine degradation. The in planta expression of p-atzA enabled transgenic tall fescue to transform atrazine into hydroxyatrazine and other metabolites. Results of our studies highlight the potential use of transgenic plants for bioremediating atrazine in the environment. PMID:25432082

Vail, Andrew W; Wang, Ping; Uefuji, Hirotaka; Samac, Deborah A; Vance, Carroll P; Wackett, Lawrence P; Sadowsky, Michael J

2014-11-29

83

Expression of the Bs2 Pepper Gene Confers Resistance to Bacterial Spot Disease in Tomato  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Bs2 resistance gene of pepper specifically recognizes and confers resistance to strains of Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria that contain the corresponding bacterial avirulence gene, avrBs2. The involvement of avrBs2 in pathogen fitness and its prevalence in many X. campestris pathovars suggests that the Bs2 gene may be durable in the field and provide resistance when introduced into other plant

Thomas H. Tai; Douglas Dahlbeck; Eszter T. Clark; Paresh Gajiwala; Romela Pasion; Maureen C. Whalen; Robert E. Stall; Brian J. Staskawicz

1999-01-01

84

Bacterial quorum sensing inhibitors: attractive alternatives for control of infectious pathogens showing multiple drug resistance.  

PubMed

Quorum sensing (QS) is a bacterial communication process that depends on the bacterial population density. It involves small diffusible signaling molecules which activate the expression of myriad genes that control diverse array of functions like bioluminescence, virulence, biofilm formation, sporulation, to name a few. Since QS is responsible for virulence in the clinically relevant bacteria, inhibition of QS appears to be a promising strategy to control these pathogenic bacteria. With indiscriminate use of antibiotics, there has been an alarming increase in the number of antibiotic resistant pathogens. Antibiotics are no longer the magic bullets they were once thought to be and therefore there is a need for development of new antibiotics and/or other novel strategies to combat the infections caused by multidrug resistant organisms. Quorum sensing inhibition or quorum quenching has been pursued as one of such novel strategies. While antibiotics kill or slow down the growth of bacteria, quorum sensing inhibitors (QSIs) or quorum quenchers (QQs) attenuate bacterial virulence. A large body of work on QS has been carried out in deadly pathogens like Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Vibrio fischeri, V. harveyi, Escherichia coli and V. cholerae etc to unravel the mechanisms of QS as well as identify and study QSIs. This review describes various aspects of QS, QSI, different model systems to study these phenomena and recent patents on various QSIs. It suggests QSIs as attractive alternatives for controlling human, animal and plant pathogens and their utility in agriculture and other industries. PMID:23394143

Bhardwaj, Ashima K; Vinothkumar, Kittappa; Rajpara, Neha

2013-04-01

85

Development and application of the active surveillance of pathogens microarray to monitor bacterial gene flux  

PubMed Central

Background Human and animal health is constantly under threat by emerging pathogens that have recently acquired genetic determinants that enhance their survival, transmissibility and virulence. We describe the construction and development of an Active Surveillance of Pathogens (ASP) oligonucleotide microarray, designed to 'actively survey' the genome of a given bacterial pathogen for virulence-associated genes. Results The microarray consists of 4958 reporters from 151 bacterial species and include genes for the identification of individual bacterial species as well as mobile genetic elements (transposons, plasmid and phage), virulence genes and antibiotic resistance genes. The ASP microarray was validated with nineteen bacterial pathogens species, including Francisella tularensis, Clostridium difficile, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecium and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. The ASP microarray identified these bacteria, and provided information on potential antibiotic resistance (eg sufamethoxazole resistance and sulfonamide resistance) and virulence determinants including genes likely to be acquired by horizontal gene transfer (e.g. an alpha-haemolysin). Conclusion The ASP microarray has potential in the clinic as a diagnostic tool, as a research tool for both known and emerging pathogens, and as an early warning system for pathogenic bacteria that have been recently modified either naturally or deliberately. PMID:18844996

Stabler, Richard A; Dawson, Lisa F; Oyston, Petra CF; Titball, Richard W; Wade, Jim; Hinds, Jason; Witney, Adam A; Wren, Brendan W

2008-01-01

86

13. CONTROL ROOM OF GENE PUMPING STATION. CONTROL CUBICLES ARRAYED ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

13. CONTROL ROOM OF GENE PUMPING STATION. CONTROL CUBICLES ARRAYED BEHIND MANAGER'S ART DECO-STYLE CONTROL DESK, WITH CONTROL CUBICLE 1 AT FAR RIGHT AND CONTROL CUBICLE 9 AT FAR LEFT. - Gene Pump Plant, South of Gene Wash Reservoir, 2 miles west of Whitsett Pump Plant, Parker Dam, San Bernardino County, CA

87

A dual switch controls bacterial enhancer-dependent transcription.  

PubMed

Bacterial RNA polymerases (RNAPs) are targets for antibiotics. Myxopyronin binds to the RNAP switch regions to block structural rearrangements needed for formation of open promoter complexes. Bacterial RNAPs containing the major variant ?(54) factor are activated by enhancer-binding proteins (bEBPs) and transcribe genes whose products are needed in pathogenicity and stress responses. We show that (i) enhancer-dependent RNAPs help Escherichia coli to survive in the presence of myxopyronin, (ii) enhancer-dependent RNAPs partially resist inhibition by myxopyronin and (iii) ATP hydrolysis catalysed by bEBPs is obligatory for functional interaction of the RNAP switch regions with the transcription start site. We demonstrate that enhancer-dependent promoters contain two barriers to full DNA opening, allowing tight regulation of transcription initiation. bEBPs engage in a dual switch to (i) allow propagation of nucleated DNA melting from an upstream DNA fork junction and (ii) complete the formation of the transcription bubble and downstream DNA fork junction at the RNA synthesis start site, resulting in switch region-dependent RNAP clamp closure and open promoter complex formation. PMID:22965125

Wiesler, Simone C; Burrows, Patricia C; Buck, Martin

2012-11-01

88

A dual switch controls bacterial enhancer-dependent transcription  

PubMed Central

Bacterial RNA polymerases (RNAPs) are targets for antibiotics. Myxopyronin binds to the RNAP switch regions to block structural rearrangements needed for formation of open promoter complexes. Bacterial RNAPs containing the major variant ?54 factor are activated by enhancer-binding proteins (bEBPs) and transcribe genes whose products are needed in pathogenicity and stress responses. We show that (i) enhancer-dependent RNAPs help Escherichia coli to survive in the presence of myxopyronin, (ii) enhancer-dependent RNAPs partially resist inhibition by myxopyronin and (iii) ATP hydrolysis catalysed by bEBPs is obligatory for functional interaction of the RNAP switch regions with the transcription start site. We demonstrate that enhancer-dependent promoters contain two barriers to full DNA opening, allowing tight regulation of transcription initiation. bEBPs engage in a dual switch to (i) allow propagation of nucleated DNA melting from an upstream DNA fork junction and (ii) complete the formation of the transcription bubble and downstream DNA fork junction at the RNA synthesis start site, resulting in switch region-dependent RNAP clamp closure and open promoter complex formation. PMID:22965125

Wiesler, Simone C.; Burrows, Patricia C.; Buck, Martin

2012-01-01

89

Isolation of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens S20 and its application in control of eggplant bacterial wilt.  

PubMed

Bacterial strain S20 was isolated and identified as Bacillus amyloliquefaciens based on physiological and biochemical characteristics and a 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Strain S20 inhibits the growth of Fusarium oxysporum and Ralstonia solanacearum. Some genes associated with the synthesis of some lipopeptides were detected in strain S20 by PCR. Iturins A were identified as the main antagonistic substrates by analysis with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry/collision-induced dissociation (ESI-MS/CID). Four homologues of iturin A (C13-C16) were identified. Pot experiments showed that the application of strain S20 alone could control eggplant wilt with an efficacy of 25.3% during a 40 day experiment. If strain S20 was used with organic fertilizer, the control efficacy against eggplant wilt reached as high as 70.7%. The application of organic fertilizer alone promotes the growth of R. solanacearum, resulting in a higher wilt incidence than that observed in control plants. The application of strain S20 effectively inhibits R. solanacearum in the rhizosphere soil of eggplant. The combined use of strain S20 and organic fertilizer more effectively controlled R. solanacearum in soil than the use of strain S20 alone. The soil count of strain S20 decreased gradually during the course of the experiment after inoculation. Organic fertilizer was beneficial for the survival of the antagonistic bacterial strain S20; a higher level of these bacteria could be maintained. The application of organic fertilizer with strain S20 increased bacterial diversity in rhizosphere soil. PMID:24632400

Chen, Da; Liu, Xin; Li, Chunyu; Tian, Wei; Shen, Qirong; Shen, Biao

2014-05-01

90

Electromagnetically controlled biological assembly of aligned bacterial cellulose nanofibers.  

PubMed

We have developed a new biofabrication process in which the precise control of bacterial motion is used to fabricate customizable networks of cellulose nanofibrils. This article describes how the motion of Acetobacter xylinum can be controlled by electric fields while the bacteria simultaneously produce nanocellulose, resulting in networks with aligned fibers. Since the electrolysis of water due to the application of electric fields produces the oxygen in the culture media far from the liquid-air boundary, aerobic cellulose production in 3D structures is readily achievable. Five separate sets of experiments were conducted to demonstrate the assembly of nanocellulose by A. xylinum in the presence of electric fields in micro- and macro-environments. This study demonstrates a new concept of bottom up material synthesis by the control of a biological assembly process. PMID:20300846

Sano, Michael B; Rojas, Andrea D; Gatenholm, Paul; Davalos, Rafael V

2010-08-01

91

Genomic Analyses of Bacterial Porin-Cytochrome Gene Clusters  

SciTech Connect

The porin-cytochrome (Pcc) protein complex is responsible for trans-outer membrane electron transfer during extracellular reduction of Fe(III) by the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA. The identified and characterized Pcc complex of G. sulfurreducens PCA consists of a porin-like outer-membrane protein, a periplasmic 8-heme c type cytochrome (c-Cyt) and an outer-membrane 12-heme c-Cyt, and the genes encoding the Pcc proteins are clustered in the same regions of genome (i.e., the pcc gene clusters) of G. sulfurreducens PCA. A survey of additionally microbial genomes has identified the pcc gene clusters in all sequenced Geobacter spp. and other bacteria from six different phyla, including Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans 2CP-1, A. dehalogenans 2CP-C, Anaeromyxobacter sp. K, Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis, Denitrovibrio acetiphilus DSM 12809, Desulfurispirillum indicum S5, Desulfurivibrio alkaliphilus AHT2, Desulfurobacterium thermolithotrophum DSM 11699, Desulfuromonas acetoxidans DSM 684, Ignavibacterium album JCM 16511, and Thermovibrio ammonificans HB-1. The numbers of genes in the pcc gene clusters vary, ranging from two to nine. Similar to the metal-reducing (Mtr) gene clusters of other Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, such as Shewanella spp., additional genes that encode putative c-Cyts with predicted cellular localizations at the cytoplasmic membrane, periplasm and outer membrane often associate with the pcc gene clusters. This suggests that the Pcc-associated c-Cyts may be part of the pathways for extracellular electron transfer reactions. The presence of pcc gene clusters in the microorganisms that do not reduce solid-phase Fe(III) and Mn(IV) oxides, such as D. alkaliphilus AHT2 and I. album JCM 16511, also suggests that some of the pcc gene clusters may be involved in extracellular electron transfer reactions with the substrates other than Fe(III) and Mn(IV) oxides.

Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.

2014-11-26

92

Genomic analyses of bacterial porin-cytochrome gene clusters.  

PubMed

The porin-cytochrome (Pcc) protein complex is responsible for trans-outer membrane electron transfer during extracellular reduction of Fe(III) by the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA. The identified and characterized Pcc complex of G. sulfurreducens PCA consists of a porin-like outer-membrane protein, a periplasmic 8-heme c-type cytochrome (c-Cyt) and an outer-membrane 12-heme c-Cyt, and the genes encoding the Pcc proteins are clustered in the same regions of genome (i.e., the pcc gene clusters) of G. sulfurreducens PCA. A survey of additionally microbial genomes has identified the pcc gene clusters in all sequenced Geobacter spp. and other bacteria from six different phyla, including Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans 2CP-1, A. dehalogenans 2CP-C, Anaeromyxobacter sp. K, Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis, Denitrovibrio acetiphilus DSM 12809, Desulfurispirillum indicum S5, Desulfurivibrio alkaliphilus AHT2, Desulfurobacterium thermolithotrophum DSM 11699, Desulfuromonas acetoxidans DSM 684, Ignavibacterium album JCM 16511, and Thermovibrio ammonificans HB-1. The numbers of genes in the pcc gene clusters vary, ranging from two to nine. Similar to the metal-reducing (Mtr) gene clusters of other Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, such as Shewanella spp., additional genes that encode putative c-Cyts with predicted cellular localizations at the cytoplasmic membrane, periplasm and outer membrane often associate with the pcc gene clusters. This suggests that the Pcc-associated c-Cyts may be part of the pathways for extracellular electron transfer reactions. The presence of pcc gene clusters in the microorganisms that do not reduce solid-phase Fe(III) and Mn(IV) oxides, such as D. alkaliphilus AHT2 and I. album JCM 16511, also suggests that some of the pcc gene clusters may be involved in extracellular electron transfer reactions with the substrates other than Fe(III) and Mn(IV) oxides. PMID:25505896

Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, James K; Zachara, John M

2014-01-01

93

Genomic analyses of bacterial porin-cytochrome gene clusters  

PubMed Central

The porin-cytochrome (Pcc) protein complex is responsible for trans-outer membrane electron transfer during extracellular reduction of Fe(III) by the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA. The identified and characterized Pcc complex of G. sulfurreducens PCA consists of a porin-like outer-membrane protein, a periplasmic 8-heme c-type cytochrome (c-Cyt) and an outer-membrane 12-heme c-Cyt, and the genes encoding the Pcc proteins are clustered in the same regions of genome (i.e., the pcc gene clusters) of G. sulfurreducens PCA. A survey of additionally microbial genomes has identified the pcc gene clusters in all sequenced Geobacter spp. and other bacteria from six different phyla, including Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans 2CP-1, A. dehalogenans 2CP-C, Anaeromyxobacter sp. K, Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis, Denitrovibrio acetiphilus DSM 12809, Desulfurispirillum indicum S5, Desulfurivibrio alkaliphilus AHT2, Desulfurobacterium thermolithotrophum DSM 11699, Desulfuromonas acetoxidans DSM 684, Ignavibacterium album JCM 16511, and Thermovibrio ammonificans HB-1. The numbers of genes in the pcc gene clusters vary, ranging from two to nine. Similar to the metal-reducing (Mtr) gene clusters of other Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, such as Shewanella spp., additional genes that encode putative c-Cyts with predicted cellular localizations at the cytoplasmic membrane, periplasm and outer membrane often associate with the pcc gene clusters. This suggests that the Pcc-associated c-Cyts may be part of the pathways for extracellular electron transfer reactions. The presence of pcc gene clusters in the microorganisms that do not reduce solid-phase Fe(III) and Mn(IV) oxides, such as D. alkaliphilus AHT2 and I. album JCM 16511, also suggests that some of the pcc gene clusters may be involved in extracellular electron transfer reactions with the substrates other than Fe(III) and Mn(IV) oxides. PMID:25505896

Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, James K.; Zachara, John M.

2014-01-01

94

Bacterial IMPDH gene used for the selection of mammalian cell transfectants.  

SciTech Connect

Stable cell transfection is used for the expression of exogenous genes or cDNAs in eukaryotic cells. Selection of these transfectants requires a dominant selectable marker. A variety of such markers has been identified and is currently in use. However, many of these are not suitable for all cell types or require unique conditions. Here we describe a simple and versatile dominant selectable marker that involves bacterial IMP dehydrogenase (IMPDH), an enzyme essential for the replication of mammalian and bacterial cells. Although IMPDH is evolutionarily conserved, the bacterial enzyme is orders of magnitude more resistant to the toxic effect of the drug mycophenolic acid, which is an IMPDH inhibitor. We have demonstrated that transfection of human, monkey or Chinese hamster cell lines with an expression vector containing bacterial IMPDH and mycophenolic acid treatment resulted in the selection of colonies with a strikingly increased resistance to mycophenolic acid toxicity. Analysis of cells derived from these colonies indicated that the acquisition of this resistance was associated with bacterial IMPDH protein expression. As a proof of principle, we showed that mammalian cell transfection with a hicistronic IMPDH/GFP expression vector and mycophenolic acid treatment can he used to successfully select transfectants that express the fluorescent protein. These results indicate that bacterial IMPDH is a practical dominant selectable marker that can be used for the selection of transfectants that express exogenous genes or cDNAs in mammalian cells.

Baccam, M.; Huberman, E.; Energy Systems

2003-06-01

95

Interplay of Noisy Gene Expression and Dynamics Explains Patterns of Bacterial Operon Organization  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Bacterial chromosomes are organized into operons -- sets of genes co-transcribed into polycistronic messenger RNA. Hypotheses explaining the emergence and maintenance of operons include proportional co-regulation, horizontal transfer of intact "selfish" operons, emergence via gene duplication, and co-production of physically interacting proteins to speed their association. We hypothesized an alternative: operons can reduce or increase intrinsic gene expression noise in a manner dependent on the post-translational interactions, thereby resulting in selection for or against operons in depending on the network architecture. We devised five classes of two-gene network modules and show that the effects of operons on intrinsic noise depend on class membership. Two classes exhibit decreased noise with co-transcription, two others reveal increased noise, and the remaining one does not show a significant difference. To test our modeling predictions we employed bioinformatic analysis to determine the relationship gene expression noise and operon organization. The results confirm the overrepresentation of noise-minimizing operon architectures and provide evidence against other hypotheses. Our results thereby suggest a central role for gene expression noise in selecting for or maintaining operons in bacterial chromosomes. This demonstrates how post-translational network dynamics may provide selective pressure for organizing bacterial chromosomes, and has practical consequences for designing synthetic gene networks.

Igoshin, Oleg

2011-03-01

96

FliZ Is a Global Regulatory Protein Affecting the Expression of Flagellar and Virulence Genes in Individual Xenorhabdus nematophila Bacterial Cells  

PubMed Central

Heterogeneity in the expression of various bacterial genes has been shown to result in the presence of individuals with different phenotypes within clonal bacterial populations. The genes specifying motility and flagellar functions are coordinately regulated and form a complex regulon, the flagellar regulon. Complex interplay has recently been demonstrated in the regulation of flagellar and virulence gene expression in many bacterial pathogens. We show here that FliZ, a DNA-binding protein, plays a key role in the insect pathogen, Xenorhabdus nematophila, affecting not only hemolysin production and virulence in insects, but efficient swimming motility. RNA-Seq analysis identified FliZ as a global regulatory protein controlling the expression of 278 Xenorhabdus genes either directly or indirectly. FliZ is required for the efficient expression of all flagellar genes, probably through its positive feedback loop, which controls expression of the flhDC operon, the master regulator of the flagellar circuit. FliZ also up- or downregulates the expression of numerous genes encoding non-flagellar proteins potentially involved in key steps of the Xenorhabdus lifecycle. Single-cell analysis revealed the bimodal expression of six identified markers of the FliZ regulon during exponential growth of the bacterial population. In addition, a combination of fluorescence-activated cell sorting and RT-qPCR quantification showed that this bimodality generated a mixed population of cells either expressing (“ON state”) or not expressing (“OFF state”) FliZ-dependent genes. Moreover, studies of a bacterial population exposed to a graded series of FliZ concentrations showed that FliZ functioned as a rheostat, controlling the rate of transition between the “OFF” and “ON” states in individuals. FliZ thus plays a key role in cell fate decisions, by transiently creating individuals with different potentials for motility and host interactions. PMID:24204316

Severac, Dany; Rialle, Stéphanie; Longin, Cyrille; Gaudriault, Sophie; Givaudan, Alain

2013-01-01

97

The Ecology of Bacterial Genes and the Survival of the New  

PubMed Central

Much of the observed variation among closely related bacterial genomes is attributable to gains and losses of genes that are acquired horizontally as well as to gene duplications and larger amplifications. The genomic flexibility that results from these mechanisms certainly contributes to the ability of bacteria to survive and adapt in varying environmental challenges. However, the duplicability and transferability of individual genes imply that natural selection should operate, not only at the organismal level, but also at the level of the gene. Genes can be considered semiautonomous entities that possess specific functional niches and evolutionary dynamics. The evolution of bacterial genes should respond both to selective pressures that favor competition, mostly among orthologs or paralogs that may occupy the same functional niches, and cooperation, with the majority of other genes coexisting in a given genome. The relative importance of either type of selection is likely to vary among different types of genes, based on the functional niches they cover and on the tightness of their association with specific organismal lineages. The frequent availability of new functional niches caused by environmental changes and biotic evolution should enable the constant diversification of gene families and the survival of new lineages of genes. PMID:22900231

Francino, M. Pilar

2012-01-01

98

Overexpression of Bacterial mtlD Gene in Peanut Improves Drought Tolerance through Accumulation of Mannitol  

PubMed Central

In the changing global environmental scenarios, water scarcity and recurrent drought impose huge reductions to the peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) crop yield. In plants, osmotic adjustments associated with efficient free radical scavenging ability during abiotic stress are important components of stress tolerance mechanisms. Mannitol, a compatible solute, is known to scavenge hydroxyl radicals generated during various abiotic stresses, thereby conferring tolerance to water-deficit stress in many plant species. However, peanut plant is not known to synthesize mannitol. Therefore, bacterial mtlD gene coding for mannitol 1-phosphate dehydrogenase under the control of constitutive promoter CaMV35S was introduced and overexpressed in the peanut cv. GG 20 using Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. A total of eight independent transgenic events were confirmed at molecular level by PCR, Southern blotting, and RT-PCR. Transgenic lines had increased amount of mannitol and exhibited enhanced tolerance in response to water-deficit stress. Improved performance of the mtlD transgenics was indicated by excised-leaf water loss assay and relative water content under water-deficit stress. Better performance of transgenics was due to the ability of the plants to synthesize mannitol. However, regulation of mtlD gene expression in transgenic plants remains to be elucidated. PMID:25436223

Bhauso, Tengale Dipak; Radhakrishnan, Thankappan; Kumar, Abhay; Mishra, Gyan Prakash; Dobaria, Jentilal Ramjibhai; Patel, Kirankumar; Rajam, Manchikatla Venkat

2014-01-01

99

Expression of bacterial genes in transgenic tobacco: methods, applications and future prospects  

PubMed Central

Tobacco is the most commonly used plant for expression of transgenes from a variety of organisms, because it is easily grown and transformed, it provides abundant amounts of fresh tissue and has a well-established cell culture system. Many bacterial proteins involved in the synthesis of commercial products are currently engineered for production in tobacco. Bacterial enzymes synthesized in tobacco can enhance protection against abiotic stresses and diseases, and provide a system to test applied strategies such as phytoremediation. Examples of bacterial gene expression in tobacco include production of antigen proteins from several human bacterial pathogens as vaccines, bacterial proteins for enhancing resistance against insects, pathogens and herbicides, and bacterial enzymes for the production of polymers, sugars, and bioethanol. Further improvements in the expression of recombinant proteins and their recovery from tobacco will enhance production and commercial use of these proteins. This review highlights the dynamic use of tobacco in bacterial protein production by examining the most relevant research in this field. PMID:19750137

Jube, Sandro

2009-01-01

100

Salmonella typhimurium virulence genes are induced upon bacterial invasion into phagocytic and nonphagocytic cells.  

PubMed

Survival and growth of salmonellae within host cells are important aspects of bacterial virulence. We have developed an assay to identify Salmonella typhimurium genes that are induced inside Salmonella-containing vacuoles within macrophage and epithelial cells. A promoterless luciferase gene cassette was inserted randomly into the Salmonella chromosome, and the resulting mutants were screened for genes upregulated in intracellular bacteria compared to extracellular bacteria. We identified four genes in S. typhimurium that were upregulated upon bacterial invasion of both phagocytic and nonphagocytic cells. Expression of these genes was not induced by factors secreted by host cells or media alone. All four genes were induced at early time points (2 to 4 h) postinvasion and continued to be upregulated within host cells at later times (5 to 7 h). One mutant contained an insertion in the ssaR gene, within Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI-2), which abolished bacterial virulence in a murine typhoid model. Two other mutants contained insertions within SPI-5, one in the sopB/sigD gene and the other in a downstream gene, pipB. The insertions within SPI-5 resulted in the attenuation of S. typhimurium in the mouse model. The fourth mutant contained an insertion within a previously undescribed region of the S. typhimurium chromosome, iicA (induced intracellularly A). We detected no effect on virulence as a result of this insertion. In conclusion, all but one of the genes identified in this study were virulence factors within pathogenicity islands, illustrating the requirement for specific gene expression inside mammalian cells and indicating the key role that virulence factor regulation plays in Salmonella pathogenesis. PMID:10531217

Pfeifer, C G; Marcus, S L; Steele-Mortimer, O; Knodler, L A; Finlay, B B

1999-11-01

101

Salmonella typhimurium Virulence Genes Are Induced upon Bacterial Invasion into Phagocytic and Nonphagocytic Cells  

PubMed Central

Survival and growth of salmonellae within host cells are important aspects of bacterial virulence. We have developed an assay to identify Salmonella typhimurium genes that are induced inside Salmonella-containing vacuoles within macrophage and epithelial cells. A promoterless luciferase gene cassette was inserted randomly into the Salmonella chromosome, and the resulting mutants were screened for genes upregulated in intracellular bacteria compared to extracellular bacteria. We identified four genes in S. typhimurium that were upregulated upon bacterial invasion of both phagocytic and nonphagocytic cells. Expression of these genes was not induced by factors secreted by host cells or media alone. All four genes were induced at early time points (2 to 4 h) postinvasion and continued to be upregulated within host cells at later times (5 to 7 h). One mutant contained an insertion in the ssaR gene, within Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI-2), which abolished bacterial virulence in a murine typhoid model. Two other mutants contained insertions within SPI-5, one in the sopB/sigD gene and the other in a downstream gene, pipB. The insertions within SPI-5 resulted in the attenuation of S. typhimurium in the mouse model. The fourth mutant contained an insertion within a previously undescribed region of the S. typhimurium chromosome, iicA (induced intracellularly A). We detected no effect on virulence as a result of this insertion. In conclusion, all but one of the genes identified in this study were virulence factors within pathogenicity islands, illustrating the requirement for specific gene expression inside mammalian cells and indicating the key role that virulence factor regulation plays in Salmonella pathogenesis. PMID:10531217

Pfeifer, Cheryl G.; Marcus, Sandra L.; Steele-Mortimer, Olivia; Knodler, Leigh A.; Finlay, B. Brett

1999-01-01

102

Host Response to Respiratory Bacterial Pathogens as Identified by Integrated Analysis of Human Gene Expression Data  

PubMed Central

Respiratory bacterial pathogens are one of the leading causes of infectious death in the world and a major health concern complicated by the rise of multi-antibiotic resistant strains. Therapeutics that modulate host genes essential for pathogen infectivity could potentially avoid multi-drug resistance and provide a wider scope of treatment options. Here, we perform an integrative analysis of published human gene expression data generated under challenges from the gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria pathogens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Streptococcus pneumoniae, respectively. We applied a previously described differential gene and pathway enrichment analysis pipeline to publicly available host mRNA GEO datasets resulting from exposure to bacterial infection. We found 72 canonical human pathways common between four GEO datasets, representing P. aeruginosa and S. pneumoniae. Although the majority of these pathways are known to be involved with immune response, we found several interesting new interactions such as the SUMO1 pathway that might have a role in bacterial infections. Furthermore, 36 host-bacterial pathways were also shared with our previous results for respiratory virus host gene expression. Based on our pathway analysis we propose several drug-repurposing opportunities supported by the literature. PMID:24086587

Smith, Steven B.; Magid-Slav, Michal; Brown, James R.

2013-01-01

103

A benefit of high temperature: increased effectiveness of a rice bacterial blight disease resistance gene  

E-print Network

challenges for plant disease management (Coakley et al., 1999; Garrett et al., 2006). While the specificA benefit of high temperature: increased effectiveness of a rice bacterial blight disease single disease resistance (R) genes imposes a strong selection for virulence in pathogen populations

Garrett, Karen A.

104

The Effect of Nitrogen on Disease Development and Gene Expression in Bacterial and Fungal Plant Pathogens  

Microsoft Academic Search

Successful colonisation of plants by pathogens requires efficient utilisation of nutrient resources available in host tissues. Several bacterial and fungal genes are specifically induced during pathogenesis and under nitrogen-limiting conditions in vitro. This suggests that a nitrogen-limiting environment may be one of the cues for disease symptom development during growth of the pathogens in planta. Here we review recent literature

Sandor S. Snoeijers; Alejandro Pérez-García; Matthieu H. A. J. Joosten

2000-01-01

105

Evaluating bacterial gene-finding HMM structures as probabilistic logic programs  

PubMed Central

Motivation: Probabilistic logic programming offers a powerful way to describe and evaluate structured statistical models. To investigate the practicality of probabilistic logic programming for structure learning in bioinformatics, we undertook a simplified bacterial gene-finding benchmark in PRISM, a probabilistic dialect of Prolog. Results: We evaluate Hidden Markov Model structures for bacterial protein-coding gene potential, including a simple null model structure, three structures based on existing bacterial gene finders and two novel model structures. We test standard versions as well as ADPH length modeling and three-state versions of the five model structures. The models are all represented as probabilistic logic programs and evaluated using the PRISM machine learning system in terms of statistical information criteria and gene-finding prediction accuracy, in two bacterial genomes. Neither of our implementations of the two currently most used model structures are best performing in terms of statistical information criteria or prediction performances, suggesting that better-fitting models might be achievable. Availability: The source code of all PRISM models, data and additional scripts are freely available for download at: http://github.com/somork/codonhmm. Contact: soer@ruc.dk Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:22215819

Mørk, Søren; Holmes, Ian

2012-01-01

106

Seasonality and resource availability control bacterial and archaeal communities in soils of a temperate beech forest  

PubMed Central

It was hypothesized that seasonality and resource availability altered through tree girdling were major determinants of the phylogenetic composition of the archaeal and bacterial community in a temperate beech forest soil. During a 2-year field experiment, involving girdling of beech trees to intercept the transfer of easily available carbon (C) from the canopy to roots, members of the dominant phylogenetic microbial phyla residing in top soils under girdled versus untreated control trees were monitored at bimonthly intervals through 16S rRNA gene-based terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism profiling and quantitative PCR analysis. Effects on nitrifying and denitrifying groups were assessed by measuring the abundances of nirS and nosZ genes as well as bacterial and archaeal amoA genes. Seasonal dynamics displayed by key phylogenetic and nitrogen (N) cycling functional groups were found to be tightly coupled with seasonal alterations in labile C and N pools as well as with variation in soil temperature and soil moisture. In particular, archaea and acidobacteria were highly responsive to soil nutritional and soil climatic changes associated with seasonality, indicating their high metabolic versatility and capability to adapt to environmental changes. For these phyla, significant interrelations with soil chemical and microbial process data were found suggesting their potential, but poorly described contribution to nitrification or denitrification in temperate forest soils. In conclusion, our extensive approach allowed us to get novel insights into effects of seasonality and resource availability on the microbial community, in particular on hitherto poorly studied bacterial phyla and functional groups. PMID:20882059

Rasche, Frank; Knapp, Daniela; Kaiser, Christina; Koranda, Marianne; Kitzler, Barbara; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, Sophie; Richter, Andreas; Sessitsch, Angela

2011-01-01

107

Cloning and Characterization of the Zymobacter palmae Pyruvate Decarboxylase Gene (pdc) and Comparison to Bacterial Homologues†  

PubMed Central

Pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) is the key enzyme in all homo-ethanol fermentations. Although widely distributed among plants, yeasts, and fungi, PDC is absent in animals and rare in bacteria (established for only three organisms). Genes encoding the three known bacterial pdc genes have been previously described and expressed as active recombinant proteins. The pdc gene from Zymomonas mobilis has been used to engineer ethanol-producing biocatalysts for use in industry. In this paper, we describe a new bacterial pdc gene from Zymobacter palmae. The pattern of codon usage for this gene appears quite similar to that for Escherichia coli genes. In E. coli recombinants, the Z. palmae PDC represented approximately 1/3 of the soluble protein. Biochemical and kinetic properties of the Z. palmae enzyme were compared to purified PDCs from three other bacteria. Of the four bacterial PDCs, the Z. palmae enzyme exhibited the highest specific activity (130 U mg of protein?1) and the lowest Km for pyruvate (0.24 mM). Differences in biochemical properties, thermal stability, and codon usage may offer unique advantages for the development of new biocatalysts for fuel ethanol production. PMID:12039744

Raj, Krishnan Chandra; Talarico, Lee A.; Ingram, Lonnie O.; Maupin-Furlow, Julie A.

2002-01-01

108

A functional gene array for detection of bacterial virulence elements  

SciTech Connect

We report our development of the first of a series of microarrays designed to detect pathogens with known mechanisms of virulence and antibiotic resistance. By targeting virulence gene families as well as genes unique to specific biothreat agents, these arrays will provide important data about the pathogenic potential and drug resistance profiles of unknown organisms in environmental samples. To validate our approach, we developed a first generation array targeting genes from Escherichia coli strains K12 and CFT073, Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus. We determined optimal probe design parameters for microorganism detection and discrimination, measured the required target concentration, and assessed tolerance for mismatches between probe and target sequences. Mismatch tolerance is a priority for this application, due to DNA sequence variability among members of gene families. Arrays were created using the NimbleGen Maskless Array Synthesizer at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Purified genomic DNA from combinations of one or more of the four target organisms, pure cultures of four related organisms, and environmental aerosol samples with spiked-in genomic DNA were hybridized to the arrays. Based on the success of this prototype, we plan to design further arrays in this series, with the goal of detecting all known virulence and antibiotic resistance gene families in a greatly expanded set of organisms.

Jaing, C

2007-11-01

109

Recurrent Horizontal Transfer of Bacterial Toxin Genes to Eukaryotes  

PubMed Central

In this work, we report likely recurrent horizontal (lateral) gene transfer events of genes encoding pore-forming toxins of the aerolysin family between species belonging to different kingdoms of life. Clustering based on pairwise similarity and phylogenetic analysis revealed several distinct aerolysin sequence groups, each containing proteins from multiple kingdoms of life. These results strongly support at least six independent transfer events between distantly related phyla in the evolutionary history of one protein family and discount selective retention of ancestral genes as a plausible explanation for this patchy phylogenetic distribution. We discuss the possible roles of these proteins and show evidence for a convergent new function in two extant species. We hypothesize that certain gene families are more likely to be maintained following horizontal gene transfer from commensal or pathogenic organism to its host if they 1) can function alone; and 2) are immediately beneficial for the ecology of the organism, as in the case of pore-forming toxins which can be utilized in multicellular organisms for defense and predation. PMID:22411854

Moran, Yehu; Fredman, David; Szczesny, Pawel; Grynberg, Marcin; Technau, Ulrich

2012-01-01

110

Denitrification gene expression in clay-soil bacterial community  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Our contribution in the Italian research project SOILSINK was focused on microbial denitrification gene expression in Mediterranean agricultural soils. In ecosystems with high inputs of nitrogen, such as agricultural soils, denitrification causes a net loss of nitrogen since nitrate is reduced to gaseous forms, which are released into the atmosphere. Moreover, incomplete denitrification can lead to emission of nitrous oxide, a potent greenhouse gas which contributes to global warming and destruction of ozone layer. A critical role in denitrification is played by microorganisms and the ability to denitrify is widespread among a variety of phylogenetically unrelated organisms. Data reported here are referred to wheat cultivation in a clay-rich soil under different environmental impact management (Agugliano, AN, Italy). We analysed the RNA directly extracted from soil to provide information on in situ activities of specific populations. The expression of genes coding for two nitrate reductases (narG and napA), two nitrite reductases (nirS and nirK), two nitric oxide reductases (cnorB and qnorB) and nitrous oxide reductase (nosZ) was analyzed by reverse transcription (RT)-nested PCR. Only napA, nirS, nirK, qnorB and nosZ were detected and fragments sequenced showed high similarity with the corresponding gene sequences deposited in GenBank database. These results suggest the suitability of the method for the qualitative detection of denitrifying bacteria in environmental samples and they offered us the possibility to perform the denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analyzes for denitrification genes.. Earlier conclusions showed nirK gene is more widely distributed in soil environment than nirS gene. The results concerning the nosZ expression indicated that microbial activity was clearly present only in no-tilled and no-fertilized soils.

Pastorelli, R.; Landi, S.

2009-04-01

111

Occurrence and expression of bacterial human virulence gene homologues in natural soil bacteria.  

PubMed

The presence and in vitro expression of homologues to 22 bacterial human virulence determinants amongst culturable soil bacteria were investigated. About 25% of the bacterial isolates contained virulence gene homologues representing toxin (hblA, cytK2), adhesin (fimH), regulator (phoQ) and resistance (yfbI) determinants in pathogenic bacteria. The homologues of the toxin genes were found in Actinobacteria and Firmicutes (hblA), and in Firmicutes and Alpha- and Gammaproteobacteria (cytK2). The homologues to the type 1 fimbrial adhesin gene, fimH, and the L-Ara4N transferase gene, yfbI, were observed in Actinobacteria, Firmicutes and Gammaproteobacteria. The regulator gene, phoQ, was only found in Gammaproteobacteria. The presence of cytK2 in Alpha- and Gammaproteobacteria, fimH in Actinobacteria and Firmicutes, and hblA in Actinobacteria has not previously been described. A close sequence similarity (84-100%) was observed between the genes of environmental and clinical isolates, and expression assays suggested that the genes in some cases were expressed in vitro. The presence of functional virulence gene homologues underpins their importance for the survival of environmental bacteria. Furthermore, the high degree of sequence conservation to clinical sequences indicates that natural environments may be 'evolutionary cribs' of emerging pathogens. PMID:25118010

Søborg, Ditte A; Hendriksen, Niels Bohse; Kroer, Niels

2014-11-01

112

Gain and Loss of Phototrophic Genes Revealed by Comparison of Two Citromicrobium Bacterial Genomes  

PubMed Central

Proteobacteria are thought to have diverged from a phototrophic ancestor, according to the scattered distribution of phototrophy throughout the proteobacterial clade, and so the occurrence of numerous closely related phototrophic and chemotrophic microorganisms may be the result of the loss of genes for phototrophy. A widespread form of bacterial phototrophy is based on the photochemical reaction center, encoded by puf and puh operons that typically are in a ‘photosynthesis gene cluster’ (abbreviated as the PGC) with pigment biosynthesis genes. Comparison of two closely related Citromicrobial genomes (98.1% sequence identity of complete 16S rRNA genes), Citromicrobium sp. JL354, which contains two copies of reaction center genes, and Citromicrobium strain JLT1363, which is chemotrophic, revealed evidence for the loss of phototrophic genes. However, evidence of horizontal gene transfer was found in these two bacterial genomes. An incomplete PGC (pufLMC-puhCBA) in strain JL354 was located within an integrating conjugative element, which indicates a potential mechanism for the horizontal transfer of genes for phototrophy. PMID:22558224

Zheng, Qiang; Zhang, Rui; Fogg, Paul C. M.; Beatty, J. Thomas; Wang, Yu; Jiao, Nianzhi

2012-01-01

113

Carboxymethylcellulose film for bacterial wound infection control and healing.  

PubMed

Infection control and wound healing profiles of sodium carboxymethylcellulose (SCMC) films were investigated as a function of their anti-bacterial action, physical structures, polymer molecular weights and carboxymethyl substitution degrees. The films were prepared with in vitro polymer/film and in vivo microbe-colonized wound healing/systemic infection profiles examined. Adhesive high carboxymethyl substituted SCMC films aided healing via attaching to microbes and removing them from wound. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was removed via encapsulating in gelling low molecular weight SCMC film, whereas Staphylococcus aureus was trapped in tight folds of high molecular weight SCMC film. Incomplete microbe removal from wound did not necessary translate to inability to heal as microbe remnant at wound induced fibroblast migration and aided tissue reconstruction. Using no film nonetheless will cause systemic blood infection. SCMC films negate infection and promote wound healing via specific polymer-microbe adhesion, and removal of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa requires films of different polymer characteristics. PMID:25129756

Wong, Tin Wui; Ramli, Nor Amlizan

2014-11-01

114

Horizontal Gene Transfer and the Evolution of Bacterial and Archaeal Population Structure  

PubMed Central

Many bacterial and archaeal lineages have a history of extensive and ongoing horizontal gene transfer and loss, as evidenced by the large differences in genome content even among otherwise closely related isolates. How ecologically cohesive populations might evolve and be maintained under such conditions of rapid gene turnover has remained controversial. Here we synthesize recent literature demonstrating the importance of habitat and niche in structuring horizontal gene transfer. This leads to a model of ecological speciation via gradual genetic isolation triggered by differential habitat association of nascent populations. Further, we hypothesize that subpopulations can evolve through local gene exchange networks by tapping into a gene pool that is adaptive towards local, continuously changing organismic interactions and is, to a large degree, responsible for the observed rapid gene turnover. Overall, these insights help explain how bacteria and archaea form populations that display both ecological cohesion and high genomic diversity. PMID:23332119

Alm, Eric J.; Hanage, William P.

2013-01-01

115

Nucleoprotein filament formation is the structural basis for bacterial protein H-NS gene silencing  

PubMed Central

H-NS is an abundant nucleoid-associated protein in bacteria that globally silences genes, including horizontally-acquired genes related to pathogenesis. Although it has been shown that H-NS has multiple modes of DNA-binding, which mode is employed in gene silencing is still unclear. Here, we report that in H-NS mutants that are unable to silence genes, are unable to form a rigid H-NS nucleoprotein filament. These results indicate that the H-NS nucleoprotein filament is crucial for its gene silencing function, and serves as the fundamental structural basis for gene silencing by H-NS and likely other H-NS-like bacterial proteins. PMID:22798986

Lim, Ci Ji; Lee, Sin Yi; Kenney, Linda J.; Yan, Jie

2012-01-01

116

Nucleoprotein filament formation is the structural basis for bacterial protein H-NS gene silencing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

H-NS is an abundant nucleoid-associated protein in bacteria that globally silences genes, including horizontally-acquired genes related to pathogenesis. Although it has been shown that H-NS has multiple modes of DNA-binding, which mode is employed in gene silencing is still unclear. Here, we report that in H-NS mutants that are unable to silence genes, are unable to form a rigid H-NS nucleoprotein filament. These results indicate that the H-NS nucleoprotein filament is crucial for its gene silencing function, and serves as the fundamental structural basis for gene silencing by H-NS and likely other H-NS-like bacterial proteins.

Lim, Ci Ji; Lee, Sin Yi; Kenney, Linda J.; Yan, Jie

2012-07-01

117

Both msa genes in Renibacterium salmoninarum are needed for full virulence in bacterial kidney disease  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Renibacterium salmoninarum, a gram-positive diplococcobacillus that causes bacterial kidney disease among salmon and trout, has two chromosomal loci encoding the major soluble antigen (msa) gene. Because the MSA protein is widely suspected to be an important virulence factor, we used insertion-duplication mutagenesis to generate disruptions of either the msa1 or msa2 gene. Surprisingly, expression of MSA protein in broth cultures appeared unaffected. However, the virulence of either mutant in juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) by intraperitoneal challenge was severely attenuated, suggesting that disruption of the msa1 or msa2 gene affected in vivo expression. Copyright ?? 2006, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

Coady, A.M.; Murray, A.L.; Elliott, D.G.; Rhodes, L.D.

2006-01-01

118

Bacterial Community Succession During in situ Uranium Bioremediation: Spatial Similarities Along Controlled Flow Paths  

SciTech Connect

Bacterial community succession was investigated in a field-scale subsurface reactor formed by a series of wells that received weekly ethanol additions to re-circulating groundwater. Ethanol additions stimulated denitrification, metal reduction, sulfate reduction, and U(VI) reduction to sparingly soluble U(IV). Clone libraries of SSU rRNA gene sequences from groundwater samples enabled tracking of spatial and temporal changes over a 1.5 y period. Analyses showed that the communities changed in a manner consistent with geochemical variations that occurred along temporal and spatial scales. Canonical correspondence analysis revealed that the levels of nitrate, uranium, sulfide, sulfate, and ethanol strongly correlated with particular bacterial populations. As sulfate and U(VI) levels declined, sequences representative of sulfate-reducers and metal-reducers were detected at high levels. Ultimately, sequences associated with sulfate-reducing populations predominated, and sulfate levels declined as U(VI) remained at low levels. When engineering controls were compared to the population variation via canonical ordination, changes could be related to dissolved oxygen control and ethanol addition. The data also indicated that the indigenous populations responded differently to stimulation for bio-reduction; however, the two bio-stimulated communities became more similar after different transitions in an idiosyncratic manner. The strong associations between particular environmental variables and certain populations provide insight into the establishment of practical and successful remediation strategies in radionuclide-contaminated environments with respect to engineering controls and microbial ecology.

Hwang, Chiachi; Wu, Weimin; Gentry, Terry J.; Carley, Jack; Corbin, Gail A.; Carroll, Sue L.; Watson, David B.; Jardine, Phil M.; Zhou, Jizhong; Criddle, Craig S.; Fields, Matthew W.

2009-05-22

119

Reduced set of virulence genes allows high accuracy prediction of bacterial pathogenicity in humans.  

PubMed

Although there have been great advances in understanding bacterial pathogenesis, there is still a lack of integrative information about what makes a bacterium a human pathogen. The advent of high-throughput sequencing technologies has dramatically increased the amount of completed bacterial genomes, for both known human pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains; this information is now available to investigate genetic features that determine pathogenic phenotypes in bacteria. In this work we determined presence/absence patterns of 814 different virulence-related genes among more than 600 finished bacterial genomes from both human pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains, belonging to different taxonomic groups (i.e: Actinobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Firmicutes, etc.). An accuracy of 95% using a cross-fold validation scheme with in-fold feature selection is obtained when classifying human pathogens and non-pathogens. A reduced subset of highly informative genes (120) is presented and applied to an external validation set. The statistical model was implemented in the BacFier v1.0 software (freely available at http : ==bacfier:googlecode:com=files=Bacfier v1 0:zip), that displays not only the prediction (pathogen/non-pathogen) and an associated probability for pathogenicity, but also the presence/absence vector for the analyzed genes, so it is possible to decipher the subset of virulence genes responsible for the classification on the analyzed genome. Furthermore, we discuss the biological relevance for bacterial pathogenesis of the core set of genes, corresponding to eight functional categories, all with evident and documented association with the phenotypes of interest. Also, we analyze which functional categories of virulence genes were more distinctive for pathogenicity in each taxonomic group, which seems to be a completely new kind of information and could lead to important evolutionary conclusions. PMID:22916122

Iraola, Gregorio; Vazquez, Gustavo; Spangenberg, Lucía; Naya, Hugo

2012-01-01

120

Dissecting specific and global transcriptional regulation of bacterial gene expression  

PubMed Central

Gene expression is regulated by specific transcriptional circuits but also by the global expression machinery as a function of growth. Simultaneous specific and global regulation thus constitutes an additional—but often neglected—layer of complexity in gene expression. Here, we develop an experimental-computational approach to dissect specific and global regulation in the bacterium Escherichia coli. By using fluorescent promoter reporters, we show that global regulation is growth rate dependent not only during steady state but also during dynamic changes in growth rate and can be quantified through two promoter-specific parameters. By applying our approach to arginine biosynthesis, we obtain a quantitative understanding of both specific and global regulation that allows accurate prediction of the temporal response to simultaneous perturbations in arginine availability and growth rate. We thereby uncover two principles of joint regulation: (i) specific regulation by repression dominates the transcriptional response during metabolic steady states, largely repressing the biosynthesis genes even when biosynthesis is required and (ii) global regulation sets the maximum promoter activity that is exploited during the transition between steady states. PMID:23591774

Gerosa, Luca; Kochanowski, Karl; Heinemann, Matthias; Sauer, Uwe

2013-01-01

121

Bacterial Adaptation of Respiration from Oxic to Microoxic and Anoxic Conditions: Redox Control  

PubMed Central

Abstract Under a shortage of oxygen, bacterial growth can be faced mainly by two ATP-generating mechanisms: (i) by synthesis of specific high-affinity terminal oxidases that allow bacteria to use traces of oxygen or (ii) by utilizing other substrates as final electron acceptors such as nitrate, which can be reduced to dinitrogen gas through denitrification or to ammonium. This bacterial respiratory shift from oxic to microoxic and anoxic conditions requires a regulatory strategy which ensures that cells can sense and respond to changes in oxygen tension and to the availability of other electron acceptors. Bacteria can sense oxygen by direct interaction of this molecule with a membrane protein receptor (e.g., FixL) or by interaction with a cytoplasmic transcriptional factor (e.g., Fnr). A third type of oxygen perception is based on sensing changes in redox state of molecules within the cell. Redox-responsive regulatory systems (e.g., ArcBA, RegBA/PrrBA, RoxSR, RegSR, ActSR, ResDE, and Rex) integrate the response to multiple signals (e.g., ubiquinone, menaquinone, redox active cysteine, electron transport to terminal oxidases, and NAD/NADH) and activate or repress target genes to coordinate the adaptation of bacterial respiration from oxic to anoxic conditions. Here, we provide a compilation of the current knowledge about proteins and regulatory networks involved in the redox control of the respiratory adaptation of different bacterial species to microxic and anoxic environments. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 16, 819–852. PMID:22098259

Bueno, Emilio; Mesa, Socorro; Bedmar, Eulogio J.; Richardson, David J.

2012-01-01

122

Phylogeny of Bacterial and Archaeal Genomes Using Conserved Genes: Supertrees and Supermatrices  

PubMed Central

Over 3000 microbial (bacterial and archaeal) genomes have been made publically available to date, providing an unprecedented opportunity to examine evolutionary genomic trends and offering valuable reference data for a variety of other studies such as metagenomics. The utility of these genome sequences is greatly enhanced when we have an understanding of how they are phylogenetically related to each other. Therefore, we here describe our efforts to reconstruct the phylogeny of all available bacterial and archaeal genomes. We identified 24, single-copy, ubiquitous genes suitable for this phylogenetic analysis. We used two approaches to combine the data for the 24 genes. First, we concatenated alignments of all genes into a single alignment from which a Maximum Likelihood (ML) tree was inferred using RAxML. Second, we used a relatively new approach to combining gene data, Bayesian Concordance Analysis (BCA), as implemented in the BUCKy software, in which the results of 24 single-gene phylogenetic analyses are used to generate a “primary concordance” tree. A comparison of the concatenated ML tree and the primary concordance (BUCKy) tree reveals that the two approaches give similar results, relative to a phylogenetic tree inferred from the 16S rRNA gene. After comparing the results and the methods used, we conclude that the current best approach for generating a single phylogenetic tree, suitable for use as a reference phylogeny for comparative analyses, is to perform a maximum likelihood analysis of a concatenated alignment of conserved, single-copy genes. PMID:23638103

Lang, Jenna Morgan; Darling, Aaron E.; Eisen, Jonathan A.

2013-01-01

123

Unexpected effect of a Bacteroides conjugative transposon, CTnDOT, on chromosomal gene expression in its bacterial host  

PubMed Central

Foreign DNA elements such as plasmids and conjugative transposons are constantly entering new bacterial hosts. A possible outcome of such events that has not been considered previously is that regulatory genes carried on some of them might affect the expression of chromosomal genes of the new host. To assess this possibility, we investigated the effect of the Bacteroides conjugative transposon CTnDOT on expression of chromosomal genes in Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron 5482 (BT4001). Most of the upregulated genes were genes of unknown function, but a number of them were associated with a region of the chromosome that contained a putative conjugative transposon, which had been tentatively designated as CTn4-bt. Upregulation of CTn4-bt genes and other chromosomal genes affected by CTnDOT was controlled by two regulatory genes on CTnDOT, rteA and rteB, which encode a two-component regulatory system. Transfer of CTn4-bt was also mediated by rteA and rteB. Three other putative CTns, CTn1-bt, CTn2-bt and CTn3-bt, were mobilized by CTnERL, a CTn closely related to CTnDOT, but genes from CTnERL other than rteA and rteB were also required. Unexpectedly, homologous recombination was required for CTn1-bt, CTn2-bt, CTn3-bt and CTn4-bt to integrate in the recipient. Our results show that regulatory genes on an incoming mobile element can have multiple effects on its new host, including the activation of previously non-transmissible elements. PMID:17555438

Moon, Kyung; Sonnenburg, Justin; Salyers, Abigail A

2007-01-01

124

Direct Detection and Quantification of Bacterial Genes Associated with Inflammation in DNA Isolated from Stool  

PubMed Central

Although predominantly associated with health benefits, the gut microbiota has also been shown to harbor genes that promote inflammation. In this work, we report a method for the direct detection and quantification of these pro-inflammatory bacterial genes by PCR and qPCR in DNA extracted from human stool samples. PCR reactions were performed to detect (i) the pks island genes, (ii) tcpC, which is present in some strains of Escherichia coli and (iii) gelE presented in some strains of Enterococcus faecalis. Additionally, we screened for the presence of the following genes encoding cyclomodulins that disrupted mammalian cell division: (iv) cdt (which encodes the cytolethal distending toxin) and (v) cnf-1 (which encodes the cytotoxic necrotizing factor-1). Our results show that 20% of the samples (N = 41) tested positive for detectable amounts of pks island genes, whereas 10% of individuals were positive for tcpC or gelE and only one individual was found to harbor the cnf-1 gene. Of the 13 individuals that were positive for at least one of the pro-inflammatory genes, 5 were found to harbor more than one. A quantitative version of the assay, which used real-time PCR, revealed the pro-inflammatory genes to be in high copy numbers: up to 1.3 million copies per mg of feces for the pks island genes. Direct detection of specific genes in stool could prove useful toward screening for the presence of pro-inflammatory bacterial genes in individuals with inflammatory bowel diseases or colorectal cancer.

Gómez-Moreno, Ramón; Robledo, Iraida E.; Baerga-Ortiz, Abel

2014-01-01

125

Relationship between operon preference and functional properties of persistent genes in bacterial genomes  

PubMed Central

Background Genes in bacteria may be organised into operons, leading to strict co-expression of the genes that participate in the same operon. However, comparisons between different bacterial genomes have shown that much of the operon structure is dynamic on an evolutionary time scale. This indicates that there are opposing effects influencing the tendency for operon formation, and these effects may be reflected in properties like evolutionary rate, complex formation, metabolic pathways and gene fusion. Results We have used multi-species protein-protein comparisons to generate a high-quality set of genes that are persistent in bacterial genomes (i.e. they have close to universal distribution). We have analysed these genes with respect to operon participation and important functional properties, including evolutionary rate and protein-protein interactions. Conclusions Genes for ribosomal proteins show a very slow rate of evolution. This is consistent with a strong tendency for the genes to participate in operons and for their proteins to be involved in essential and well defined complexes. Persistent genes for non-ribosomal proteins can be separated into two classes according to tendency to participate in operons. Those with a strong tendency for operon participation make proteins with fewer interaction partners that seem to participate in relatively static complexes and possibly linear pathways. Genes with a weak tendency for operon participation tend to produce proteins with more interaction partners, but possibly in more dynamic complexes and convergent pathways. Genes that are not regulated through operons are therefore more evolutionary constrained than the corresponding operon-associated genes and will on average evolve more slowly. PMID:20109203

2010-01-01

126

Impulse Control: Temporal Dynamics in Gene Transcription  

E-print Network

Regulatory circuits controlling gene expression constantly rewire to adapt to environmental stimuli, differentiation cues, and disease. We review our current understanding of the temporal dynamics of gene expression in ...

Yosef, Nir

127

Bacterial and fungal chitinase chiJ orthologs evolve under different selective constraints following horizontal gene transfer  

PubMed Central

Background Certain bacteria from the genus Streptomyces are currently used as biological control agents against plant pathogenic fungi. Hydrolytic enzymes that degrade fungal cell wall components, such as chitinases, are suggested as one possible mechanism in biocontrol interactions. Adaptive evolution of chitinases are previously reported for plant chitinases involved in defence against fungal pathogens, and in fungal chitinases involved in fungal-fungal interactions. In this study we investigated the molecular evolution of chitinase chiJ in the bacterial genus Streptomyces. In addition, as chiJ orthologs are previously reported in certain fungal species as a result from horizontal gene transfer, we conducted a comparative study of differences in evolutionary patterns between bacterial and fungal taxa. Findings ChiJ contained three sites evolving under strong positive selection and four groups of co-evolving sites. Regions of high amino acid diversity were predicted to be surface-exposed and associated with coil regions that connect certain ?-helices and ?-strands in the family 18 chitinase TIM barrel structure, but not associated with the catalytic cleft. The comparative study with fungal ChiJ orthologs identified three regions that display signs of type 1 functional divergence, where unique adaptations in the bacterial and fungal taxa are driven by positive selection. Conclusions The identified surface-exposed regions of chitinase ChiJ where sequence diversification is driven by positive selection may putatively be related to functional divergence between bacterial and fungal orthologs. These results show that ChiJ orthologs have evolved under different selective constraints following the horizontal gene transfer event. PMID:23095575

2012-01-01

128

The inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) susceptibility genes NOD1 and NOD2 have conserved anti-bacterial roles in zebrafish  

PubMed Central

SUMMARY Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), in the form of Crohn’s disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis (UC), is a debilitating chronic immune disorder of the intestine. A complex etiology resulting from dysfunctional interactions between the intestinal immune system and its microflora, influenced by host genetic susceptibility, makes disease modeling challenging. Mutations in NOD2 have the highest disease-specific risk association for CD, and a related gene, NOD1, is associated with UC. NOD1 and NOD2 encode intracellular bacterial sensor proteins acting as innate immune triggers, and represent promising therapeutic targets. The zebrafish has the potential to aid in modeling genetic and environmental aspects of IBD pathogenesis. Here, we report the characterization of the Nod signaling components in the zebrafish larval intestine. The nod1 and nod2 genes are expressed in intestinal epithelial cells and neutrophils together with the Nod signaling pathway genes ripk2, a20, aamp, cd147, centaurin b1, erbin and grim-19. Using a zebrafish embryo Salmonella infection model, morpholino-mediated depletion of Nod1 or Nod2 reduced the ability of embryos to control systemic infection. Depletion of Nod1 or Nod2 decreased expression of dual oxidase in the intestinal epithelium and impaired the ability of larvae to reduce intracellular bacterial burden. This work highlights the potential use of zebrafish larvae in the study of components of IBD pathogenesis. PMID:21729873

Oehlers, Stefan H.; Flores, Maria Vega; Hall, Chris J.; Swift, Simon; Crosier, Kathryn E.; Crosier, Philip S.

2011-01-01

129

Programmable repression and activation of bacterial gene expression using an engineered CRISPR-Cas system  

E-print Network

The ability to artificially control transcription is essential both to the study of gene function and to the construction of synthetic gene networks with desired properties. Cas9 is an RNA-guided double-stranded DNA nuclease ...

Zhang, Feng

130

Why Are Genes Encoded on the Lagging Strand of the Bacterial Genome?  

PubMed Central

Genomic DNA is used as the template for both replication and transcription, whose machineries may collide and result in mutagenesis, among other damages. Because head-on collisions are more deleterious than codirectional collisions, genes should be preferentially encoded on the leading strand to avoid head-on collisions, as is observed in most bacterial genomes examined. However, why are there still lagging strand encoded genes? Paul et al. recently proposed that these genes take advantage of the increased mutagenesis resulting from head-on collisions and are thus adaptively encoded on the lagging strand. We show that the evidence they provided is invalid and that the existence of lagging strand encoded genes is explainable by a balance between deleterious mutations that bring genes from the leading to the lagging strand and purifying selection purging such mutants. Therefore, the adaptive hypothesis is neither theoretically needed nor empirically supported. PMID:24273314

Chen, Xiaoshu; Zhang, Jianzhi

2013-01-01

131

Transcriptome profiling of bacterial responses to root exudates identifies genes involved in microbe-plant interactions.  

PubMed

Molecules exuded by plant roots are thought to act as signals to influence the ability of microbial strains to colonize the roots and to survive in the rhizosphere. Differential bacterial responses to signals from different plant species may mediate the selection of specific rhizosphere populations. Very little, however, is known about the effects of plant exudates on patterns of bacterial gene expression. Here, we have tested the concept that plant root exudates modulate expression of bacterial genes involved in establishing microbe-plant interactions. We have examined the influence on the Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA01 transcriptome of exudates from two varieties of sugarbeet that select for genetically distinct pseudomonad populations in the rhizosphere. The response to the two exudates showed only a partial overlap; the majority of those genes with altered expression was regulated in response to only one of the two exudates. Genes with altered expression included those with functions previously implicated in microbe-plant interactions, such as aspects of metabolism, chemotaxis and type III secretion, and a subset with putative or unknown function. Use of a panel of mutants with targeted disruptions allowed us to identify previously uncharacterized genes with roles in the competitive ability of P. aeruginosa in the rhizosphere within this subset. No genes with host-specific effects were identified. Homologues of the genes identified occur in the genomes of both beneficial and pathogenic root-associated bacteria, suggesting that this strategy may help to elucidate molecular interactions that are important for biocontrol, plant growth promotion, and plant pathogenesis. PMID:16301542

Mark, G Louise; Dow, J Maxwell; Kiely, Patrick D; Higgins, Hazel; Haynes, Jill; Baysse, Christine; Abbas, Abdelhamid; Foley, Tara; Franks, Ashley; Morrissey, John; O'Gara, Fergal

2005-11-29

132

Analysis of transduction in wastewater bacterial populations by targeting the phage-derived 16S rRNA gene sequences.  

PubMed

Bacterial 16S rRNA genes transduced by bacteriophages were identified and analyzed in order to estimate the extent of the bacteriophage-mediated horizontal gene transfer in the wastewater environment. For this purpose, phage and bacterial DNA was isolated from the oxidation tank of a municipal wastewater treatment plant. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences cloned from a phage metagenome revealed that bacteriophages transduce genetic material in several major groups of bacteria. The groups identified were as follows: Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Actinomycetales and Firmicutes. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences in the total bacterial DNA from the same sample revealed that several bacterial groups found in the oxidation tank were not present in the phage metagenome (e.g. Deltaproteobacteria, Nitrospira, Planctomycetes and many Actinobacteria genera). These results suggest that transduction in a wastewater environment occurs in several bacterial groups; however, not all species are equally involved into this process. The data also showed that a number of distinctive bacterial strains participate in transduction-mediated gene transfer within identified bacterial groupings. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis confirmed that profiles of the transduced 16S rRNA gene sequences and those present in the whole microbial community show significant differences. PMID:21223328

Del Casale, Antonio; Flanagan, Paul V; Larkin, Michael J; Allen, Christopher C R; Kulakov, Leonid A

2011-04-01

133

ARG-ANNOT, a New Bioinformatic Tool To Discover Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Bacterial Genomes  

PubMed Central

ARG-ANNOT (Antibiotic Resistance Gene-ANNOTation) is a new bioinformatic tool that was created to detect existing and putative new antibiotic resistance (AR) genes in bacterial genomes. ARG-ANNOT uses a local BLAST program in Bio-Edit software that allows the user to analyze sequences without a Web interface. All AR genetic determinants were collected from published works and online resources; nucleotide and protein sequences were retrieved from the NCBI GenBank database. After building a database that includes 1,689 antibiotic resistance genes, the software was tested in a blind manner using 100 random sequences selected from the database to verify that the sensitivity and specificity were at 100% even when partial sequences were queried. Notably, BLAST analysis results obtained using the rmtF gene sequence (a new aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme gene sequence that is not included in the database) as a query revealed that the tool was able to link this sequence to short sequences (17 to 40 bp) found in other genes of the rmt family with significant E values. Finally, the analysis of 178 Acinetobacter baumannii and 20 Staphylococcus aureus genomes allowed the detection of a significantly higher number of AR genes than the Resfinder gene analyzer and 11 point mutations in target genes known to be associated with AR. The average time for the analysis of a genome was 3.35 ± 0.13 min. We have created a concise database for BLAST using a Bio-Edit interface that can detect AR genetic determinants in bacterial genomes and can rapidly and easily discover putative new AR genetic determinants. PMID:24145532

Gupta, Sushim Kumar; Padmanabhan, Babu Roshan; Diene, Seydina M.; Lopez-Rojas, Rafael; Kempf, Marie; Landraud, Luce

2014-01-01

134

ARG-ANNOT, a new bioinformatic tool to discover antibiotic resistance genes in bacterial genomes.  

PubMed

ARG-ANNOT (Antibiotic Resistance Gene-ANNOTation) is a new bioinformatic tool that was created to detect existing and putative new antibiotic resistance (AR) genes in bacterial genomes. ARG-ANNOT uses a local BLAST program in Bio-Edit software that allows the user to analyze sequences without a Web interface. All AR genetic determinants were collected from published works and online resources; nucleotide and protein sequences were retrieved from the NCBI GenBank database. After building a database that includes 1,689 antibiotic resistance genes, the software was tested in a blind manner using 100 random sequences selected from the database to verify that the sensitivity and specificity were at 100% even when partial sequences were queried. Notably, BLAST analysis results obtained using the rmtF gene sequence (a new aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme gene sequence that is not included in the database) as a query revealed that the tool was able to link this sequence to short sequences (17 to 40 bp) found in other genes of the rmt family with significant E values. Finally, the analysis of 178 Acinetobacter baumannii and 20 Staphylococcus aureus genomes allowed the detection of a significantly higher number of AR genes than the Resfinder gene analyzer and 11 point mutations in target genes known to be associated with AR. The average time for the analysis of a genome was 3.35 ± 0.13 min. We have created a concise database for BLAST using a Bio-Edit interface that can detect AR genetic determinants in bacterial genomes and can rapidly and easily discover putative new AR genetic determinants. PMID:24145532

Gupta, Sushim Kumar; Padmanabhan, Babu Roshan; Diene, Seydina M; Lopez-Rojas, Rafael; Kempf, Marie; Landraud, Luce; Rolain, Jean-Marc

2014-01-01

135

CONJUGAL GENE TRANSFER IN THE RHIZOSPHERE OF WATER GRASS (ECHINOCHLORA CRUSGALLI): INFLUENCE OF ROOT EXUDATE AND BACTERIAL ACTIVITY  

EPA Science Inventory

The premise that genetic exchange is primarily localized in niches characterized by dense bacterial populations and high availability of growth substrates was tested by relating conjugal gene transfer of an RP4 derivative to availability of root exudates and bacterial metabolic a...

136

Expression of tumor suppressor genes in channel catfish after bacterial infections.  

PubMed

Tumor suppressor genes are negative regulators of tumor formation. While their anti-tumor functions have been well studied, they have been found to be also involved in immune responses and innate immunity. In this study, 21 tumor suppressor genes in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) were characterized. Phylogenetic and syntenic analyses allowed annotation of all 21 catfish tumor suppressor genes. The expression profiles of the 21 catfish tumor suppressor genes were determined using the RNA-Seq datasets. After Edwardsiella ictaluri infection, expression of five of the 21 tumor suppressor genes was up-regulated at 3?days in the intestine, and four of the 21 genes were up-regulated in the liver 14 days post-infection. With Flavobacterium columnare infection, seven genes were up-regulated in the gill at 48?h post-infection. These results expanded our knowledge on the tumor suppressor genes in teleosts, setting a foundation for future studies to unravel functions of tumor suppressor genes in response to stresses, particularly after bacterial disease infections. PMID:25453578

Mu, Weijie; Yao, Jun; Zhang, Jiaren; Liu, Shikai; Wen, Haishen; Feng, Jianbin; Liu, Zhanjiang

2015-01-01

137

Evolution of variation in presence and absence of genes in bacterial pathways  

PubMed Central

Background Bacterial genomes exhibit a remarkable degree of variation in the presence and absence of genes, which probably extends to the level of individual pathways. This variation may be a consequence of the significant evolutionary role played by horizontal gene transfer, but might also be explained by the loss of genes through mutation. A challenge is to understand why there would be variation in gene presence within pathways if they confer a benefit only when complete. Results Here, we develop a mathematical model to study how variation in pathway content is produced by horizontal transfer, gene loss and partial exposure of a population to a novel environment. Conclusions We discuss the possibility that variation in gene presence acts as cryptic genetic variation on which selection acts when the appropriate environment occurs. We find that a high level of variation in gene presence can be readily explained by decay of the pathway through mutation when there is no longer exposure to the selective environment, or when selection becomes too weak to maintain the genes. In the context of pathway variation the role of horizontal gene transfer is probably the initial introduction of a complete novel pathway rather than in building up the variation in a genome without the pathway. PMID:22520826

2012-01-01

138

High-resolution genetic mapping of rice bacterial blight resistance gene Xa23.  

PubMed

Bacterial blight (BB) caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) is the most devastating bacterial disease of rice (Oryza sativa L.), a staple food crop that feeds half of the world's population. In management of this disease, the most economical and effective approach is cultivating resistant varieties. Due to rapid change of pathogenicity in the pathogen, it is necessary to identify and characterize more host resistance genes for breeding new resistant varieties. We have previously identified the BB resistance (R) gene Xa23 that confers the broadest resistance to Xoo strains isolated from different rice-growing regions and preliminarily mapped the gene within a 1.7 cm region on the long arm of rice chromosome 11. Here, we report fine genetic mapping and in silico analysis of putative candidate genes of Xa23. Based on F2 mapping populations derived from crosses between Xa23-containing rice line CBB23 and susceptible varieties JG30 or IR24, six new STS markers Lj36, Lj46, Lj138, Lj74, A83B4, and Lj13 were developed. Linkage analysis revealed that the new markers were co-segregated with or closely linked to the Xa23 locus. Consequently, the Xa23 gene was mapped within a 0.4 cm region between markers Lj138 and A83B4, in which the co-segregating marker Lj74 was identified. The corresponding physical distance between Lj138 and A83B4 on Nipponbare genome is 49.8 kb. Six Xa23 candidate genes have been annotated, including four candidate genes encoding hypothetical proteins and the other two encoding a putative ADP-ribosylation factor protein and a putative PPR protein. These results will facilitate marker-assisted selection of Xa23 in rice breeding and molecular cloning of this valuable R gene. PMID:24715026

Wang, Chunlian; Fan, Yinglun; Zheng, Chongke; Qin, Tengfei; Zhang, Xiaoping; Zhao, Kaijun

2014-10-01

139

Consequences and controls of bacterial sulfate reduction in marine sediments  

SciTech Connect

Bacterial sulfate reduction is an integral part of the geochemical cycles of carbon and sulfur. To better understand the environmental consequences of sulfate reduction and to further clarify the factors controlling this important biogeochemical process, rates of sulfate reduction were measured in Long Island Sound sediments and in controlled laboratory experiments using the /sup 35/S-SO/sub 4/= radiotracer technique. Four sediment localities (NWC, FOAM, Sachem, and BH) in the Sound, with different sedimentation rates and different macrofaunal populations, were chosen for study. Geochemical evidence from the FOAM site, based on the rate data, supports the use of a simple stoichiometric model for overall organic matter decomposition in the zone of sulfate reduction. Once other less important factors affecting the rate of sulfate reduction have been considered, both the laboratory and field work in the present study show that the rate of organic matter decomposition via sulfate reduction is ultimately dependant on the quality and quantity of the organic matter undergoing decomposition. In order to quantify this widely accepted statement, a multiple, first-order rate equation for organic matter decomposition in marine sediments is developed and its validity proven by laboratory experiments. The salient feature of this model is developed and its validity proven by laboratory experiments. The salient feature of this model is the hypothesis that a finite number of organic matter types exist, each with their own particular decay constant. The significance of the different organic matter fractions in the model is discussed in terms of general models for organic matter diagenesis and preservation.

Westrich, J.T.

1983-01-01

140

Infection by bacterial pathogens expressing type III secretion decreases luciferase activity: ramifications for reporter gene studies.  

PubMed

Pathogenic microbes influence gene regulation in eukaryotic hosts. Reporter gene studies can define the roles of promoter regulatory sequences. The effect of pathogenic bacteria on reporter genes has not been examined. The aim of this study was to identify which reporter genes are reliable in studies concerning host gene regulation by bacterial pathogens expressing type III secretory systems. Human intestinal epithelial cells, T84, Caco-2 and HT-29, were transfected with plasmids containing luciferase (luc), chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) or beta-galactosidase (beta-gal) as reporter genes driven by the inducible interleukin-8 (IL-8) or constitutively active simian virus 40 (SV40) promoter. Cells were infected with enteropathogenic E. coli or Salmonella typhimurium, and the reporter activity was assessed. Luc activity significantly decreased following infection, regardless of the promoter. The activity of recombinant luc was nearly ablated by incubation with either EPEC or Salmonella in a cell-free system. Activity was partially preserved by protease inhibitors, and immunoblot analysis showed a decreased amount and molecular weight of recombinant luc, suggesting protein degradation. Neither beta-gal nor CAT activity was altered by infection. Disruption of type III secretion prevented the loss of luc activity. We conclude that CAT or beta-gal, but not luc, can be used as reliable reporter genes to assess the impact of pathogenic microbes, especially those expressing type III secretion on host cell gene regulation. PMID:10997265

Savkovic, S D; Koutsouris, A; Wu, G; Hecht, G

2000-09-01

141

Gene expression in gut symbiotic organ of stinkbug affected by extracellular bacterial symbiont.  

PubMed

The bean bug Riptortus pedestris possesses a specialized symbiotic organ in a posterior region of the midgut, where numerous crypts harbor extracellular betaproteobacterial symbionts of the genus Burkholderia. Second instar nymphs orally acquire the symbiont from the environment, and the symbiont infection benefits the host by facilitating growth and by occasionally conferring insecticide resistance. Here we performed comparative transcriptomic analyses of insect genes expressed in symbiotic and non-symbiotic regions of the midgut dissected from Burkholderia-infected and uninfected R. pedestris. Expression sequence tag analysis of cDNA libraries and quantitative reverse transcription PCR identified a number of insect genes expressed in symbiosis- or aposymbiosis-associated patterns. For example, genes up-regulated in symbiotic relative to aposymbiotic individuals, including many cysteine-rich secreted protein genes and many cathepsin protease genes, are likely to play a role in regulating the symbiosis. Conversely, genes up-regulated in aposymbiotic relative to symbiotic individuals, including a chicken-type lysozyme gene and a defensin-like protein gene, are possibly involved in regulation of non-symbiotic bacterial infections. Our study presents the first transcriptomic data on gut symbiotic organ of a stinkbug, which provides initial clues to understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying the insect-bacterium gut symbiosis and sheds light on several intriguing commonalities between endocellular and extracellular symbiotic associations. PMID:23691247

Futahashi, Ryo; Tanaka, Kohjiro; Tanahashi, Masahiko; Nikoh, Naruo; Kikuchi, Yoshitomo; Lee, Bok Luel; Fukatsu, Takema

2013-01-01

142

Ubiquity and Diversity of Heterotrophic Bacterial nasA Genes in Diverse Marine Environments.  

PubMed

Nitrate uptake by heterotrophic bacteria plays an important role in marine N cycling. However, few studies have investigated the diversity of environmental nitrate assimilating bacteria (NAB). In this study, the diversity and biogeographical distribution of NAB in several global oceans and particularly in the western Pacific marginal seas were investigated using both cultivation and culture-independent molecular approaches. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA and nasA (encoding the large subunit of the assimilatory nitrate reductase) gene sequences indicated that the cultivable NAB in South China Sea belonged to the ?-Proteobacteria, ?-Proteobacteria and CFB (Cytophaga-Flavobacteria-Bacteroides) bacterial groups. In all the environmental samples of the present study, ?-Proteobacteria, ?-Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were found to be the dominant nasA-harboring bacteria. Almost all of the ?-Proteobacteria OTUs were classified into three Roseobacter-like groups (I to III). Clone library analysis revealed previously underestimated nasA diversity; e.g. the nasA gene sequences affiliated with ?-Proteobacteria, ?-Proteobacteria and Lentisphaerae were observed in the field investigation for the first time, to the best of our knowledge. The geographical and vertical distributions of seawater nasA-harboring bacteria indicated that NAB were highly diverse and ubiquitously distributed in the studied marginal seas and world oceans. Niche adaptation and separation and/or limited dispersal might mediate the NAB composition and community structure in different water bodies. In the shallow-water Kueishantao hydrothermal vent environment, chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria were the primary NAB, indicating a unique nitrate-assimilating community in this extreme environment. In the coastal water of the East China Sea, the relative abundance of Alteromonas and Roseobacter-like nasA gene sequences responded closely to algal blooms, indicating that NAB may be active participants contributing to the bloom dynamics. Our statistical results suggested that salinity, temperature and nitrate may be some of the key environmental factors controlling the composition and dynamics of the marine NAB communities. PMID:25647610

Jiang, Xuexia; Dang, Hongyue; Jiao, Nianzhi

2015-01-01

143

Ubiquity and Diversity of Heterotrophic Bacterial nasA Genes in Diverse Marine Environments  

PubMed Central

Nitrate uptake by heterotrophic bacteria plays an important role in marine N cycling. However, few studies have investigated the diversity of environmental nitrate assimilating bacteria (NAB). In this study, the diversity and biogeographical distribution of NAB in several global oceans and particularly in the western Pacific marginal seas were investigated using both cultivation and culture-independent molecular approaches. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA and nasA (encoding the large subunit of the assimilatory nitrate reductase) gene sequences indicated that the cultivable NAB in South China Sea belonged to the ?-Proteobacteria, ?-Proteobacteria and CFB (Cytophaga-Flavobacteria-Bacteroides) bacterial groups. In all the environmental samples of the present study, ?-Proteobacteria, ?-Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were found to be the dominant nasA-harboring bacteria. Almost all of the ?-Proteobacteria OTUs were classified into three Roseobacter-like groups (I to III). Clone library analysis revealed previously underestimated nasA diversity; e.g. the nasA gene sequences affiliated with ?-Proteobacteria, ?-Proteobacteria and Lentisphaerae were observed in the field investigation for the first time, to the best of our knowledge. The geographical and vertical distributions of seawater nasA-harboring bacteria indicated that NAB were highly diverse and ubiquitously distributed in the studied marginal seas and world oceans. Niche adaptation and separation and/or limited dispersal might mediate the NAB composition and community structure in different water bodies. In the shallow-water Kueishantao hydrothermal vent environment, chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria were the primary NAB, indicating a unique nitrate-assimilating community in this extreme environment. In the coastal water of the East China Sea, the relative abundance of Alteromonas and Roseobacter-like nasA gene sequences responded closely to algal blooms, indicating that NAB may be active participants contributing to the bloom dynamics. Our statistical results suggested that salinity, temperature and nitrate may be some of the key environmental factors controlling the composition and dynamics of the marine NAB communities. PMID:25647610

Jiang, Xuexia; Dang, Hongyue; Jiao, Nianzhi

2015-01-01

144

GC-Content Evolution in Bacterial Genomes: The Biased Gene Conversion Hypothesis Expands.  

PubMed

The characterization of functional elements in genomes relies on the identification of the footprints of natural selection. In this quest, taking into account neutral evolutionary processes such as mutation and genetic drift is crucial because these forces can generate patterns that may obscure or mimic signatures of selection. In mammals, and probably in many eukaryotes, another such confounding factor called GC-Biased Gene Conversion (gBGC) has been documented. This mechanism generates patterns identical to what is expected under selection for higher GC-content, specifically in highly recombining genomic regions. Recent results have suggested that a mysterious selective force favouring higher GC-content exists in Bacteria but the possibility that it could be gBGC has been excluded. Here, we show that gBGC is probably at work in most if not all bacterial species. First we find a consistent positive relationship between the GC-content of a gene and evidence of intra-genic recombination throughout a broad spectrum of bacterial clades. Second, we show that the evolutionary force responsible for this pattern is acting independently from selection on codon usage, and could potentially interfere with selection in favor of optimal AU-ending codons. A comparison with data from human populations shows that the intensity of gBGC in Bacteria is comparable to what has been reported in mammals. We propose that gBGC is not restricted to sexual Eukaryotes but also widespread among Bacteria and could therefore be an ancestral feature of cellular organisms. We argue that if gBGC occurs in bacteria, it can account for previously unexplained observations, such as the apparent non-equilibrium of base substitution patterns and the heterogeneity of gene composition within bacterial genomes. Because gBGC produces patterns similar to positive selection, it is essential to take this process into account when studying the evolutionary forces at work in bacterial genomes. PMID:25659072

Lassalle, Florent; Périan, Séverine; Bataillon, Thomas; Nesme, Xavier; Duret, Laurent; Daubin, Vincent

2015-02-01

145

Emerging or re-emerging bacterial zoonoses: factors of emergence, surveillance and control  

Microsoft Academic Search

Surveillance and control of emerging bacterial zoonoses is essential in order to prevent both human and animal deaths and to avoid potential economic disorders created by trade barriers or a ban on free circulation of human or animal populations. An increased risk of exposition to zoonotic agents, the breakdown of the host's defenses, the emergence of bacterial strains resistant to

Jean Blancou; Bruno B. Chomel; Albino Belotto

2005-01-01

146

Bacterial chitinase with phytopathogen control capacity from suppressive soil revealed by functional metagenomics.  

PubMed

Plant disease caused by fungal pathogens results in vast crop damage globally. Microbial communities of soil that is suppressive to fungal crop disease provide a source for the identification of novel enzymes functioning as bioshields against plant pathogens. In this study, we targeted chitin-degrading enzymes of the uncultured bacterial community through a functional metagenomics approach, using a fosmid library of a suppressive soil metagenome. We identified a novel bacterial chitinase, Chi18H8, with antifungal activity against several important crop pathogens. Sequence analyses show that the chi18H8 gene encodes a 425-amino acid protein of 46 kDa with an N-terminal signal peptide, a catalytic domain with the conserved active site F175DGIDIDWE183, and a chitinase insertion domain. Chi18H8 was expressed (pGEX-6P-3 vector) in Escherichia coli and purified. Enzyme characterization shows that Chi18H8 has a prevalent chitobiosidase activity with a maximum activity at 35 °C at pH lower than 6, suggesting a role as exochitinase on native chitin. To our knowledge, Chi18H8 is the first chitinase isolated from a metagenome library obtained in pure form and which has the potential to be used as a candidate agent for controlling fungal crop diseases. Furthermore, Chi18H8 may also answer to the demand for novel chitin-degrading enzymes for a broad range of other industrial processes and medical purposes. PMID:24121932

Hjort, Karin; Presti, Ilaria; Elväng, Annelie; Marinelli, Flavia; Sjöling, Sara

2014-03-01

147

Mechanisms of control of gene expression  

SciTech Connect

This book examines an array of topics on the regulation of gene expression, including an examination of DNA-protein interactions and the role of oncogene proteins in normal and abnormal cellular responses. The book focuses on the control of mRNA transcription in eykaryotes and delineates other areas including gene regulation in prokaryotes and control of stable RNA synthesis.

Cullen, B.; Gage, L.P.; Siddiqui, M.A.Q.; Skalka, A.M.; Weissbach, H.

1987-01-01

148

Generation of a Complete Single-Gene Knockout Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Library of Cowpox Virus and Identification of Its Essential Genes  

PubMed Central

Cowpox virus (CPXV) belongs to the genus Orthopoxvirus in the Poxviridae family. It infects a broad range of vertebrates and can cause zoonotic infections. CPXV has the largest genome among the orthopoxviruses and is therefore considered to have the most complete set of genes of all members of the genus. Since CPXV has also become a model for studying poxvirus genetics and pathogenesis, we created and characterized a complete set of single gene knockout bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones of the CPXV strain Brighton Red. These mutants allow a systematic assessment of the contribution of single CPXV genes to the outcome of virus infection and replication, as well as to the virus host range. A full-length BAC clone of CPXV strain Brighton Red (pBRF) harboring the gene expressing the enhanced green fluorescent protein under the control of a viral late promoter was modified by introducing the mrfp1 gene encoding the monomeric red fluorescent protein driven by a synthetic early vaccinia virus promoter. Based on the modified BAC (pBRFseR), a library of targeted knockout mutants for each single viral open reading frame (ORF) was generated. Reconstitution of infectious virus was successful for 109 of the 183 mutant BAC clones, indicating that the deleted genes are not essential for virus replication. In contrast, 74 ORFs were identified as essential because no virus progeny was obtained upon transfection of the mutant BAC clones and in the presence of a helper virus. More than 70% of all late CPXV genes belonged to this latter group of essential genes. PMID:24155400

Xu, Zhiyong; Zikos, Dimitrios; Osterrieder, Nikolaus

2014-01-01

149

Code-assisted discovery of TAL effector targets in bacterial leaf streak of rice reveals contrast with bacterial blight and a novel susceptibility gene  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors found in Xanthomonas spp. promote bacterial growth and plant susceptibility by binding specific DNA sequences or, effector-binding elements (EBEs), and inducing host gene expression. In this study, we have found substantially different transcriptional pro...

150

A novel ion-beam-mutation effect application in identification of gene involved in bacterial antagonism to fungal infection of ornamental crops  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This work is on a novel application of ion beam effect on biological mutation. Bacillus licheniformis (B. licheniformis) is a common soil bacterium with an antagonistic effect on Curcuma alismatifolia Gagnep. and Chrysanthemum indicum Linn. In an attempt to control fungal diseases of local crops by utilizing B. licheniformis, we carried out gene analysis of the bacterium to understand the bacterial antagonistic mechanism. The bacterial cells were bombarded to induce mutations using nitrogen ion beam. After ion bombardment, DNA analysis revealed that the modified polymorphism fragment present in the wild type was missing in a bacterial mutant which lost the antifungal activity. The fragments conserved in the wild type but lost in the mutant bacteria was identified to code for the thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) gene. The gene analysis showed that the TrxR gene from B. licheniformis had the expression of the antagonism to fungi in a synchronous time evolution with the fungus inhibition when the bacteria were co-cultivated with the fungi. The collective results indicate the TrxR gene responsible for the antagonism of bacteria B. licheniformis to fungal infection.

Mahadtanapuk, S.; Teraarusiri, W.; Nanakorn, W.; Yu, L. D.; Thongkumkoon, P.; Anuntalabhochai, S.

2014-05-01

151

Transcriptional regulation of bacterial virulence gene expression by molecular oxygen and nitric oxide.  

PubMed

Molecular oxygen (O 2) and nitric oxide (NO) are diatomic gases that play major roles in infection. The host innate immune system generates reactive oxygen species and NO as bacteriocidal agents and both require O 2 for their production. Furthermore, the ability to adapt to changes in O 2 availability is crucial for many bacterial pathogens, as many niches within a host are hypoxic. Pathogenic bacteria have evolved transcriptional regulatory systems that perceive these gases and respond by reprogramming gene expression. Direct sensors possess iron-containing co-factors (iron-sulfur clusters, mononuclear iron, heme) or reactive cysteine thiols that react with O 2 and/or NO. Indirect sensors perceive the physiological effects of O 2 starvation. Thus, O 2 and NO act as environmental cues that trigger the coordinated expression of virulence genes and metabolic adaptations necessary for survival within a host. Here, the mechanisms of signal perception by key O 2- and NO-responsive bacterial transcription factors and the effects on virulence gene expression are reviewed, followed by consideration of these aspects of gene regulation in two major pathogens, Staphylococcus aureus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. PMID:24495931

Green, Jeffrey; Rolfe, Matthew D; Smith, Laura J

2014-02-01

152

Bacterial origin of a diverse family of UDP-glycosyltransferase genes in the Tetranychus urticae genome.  

PubMed

UDP-glycosyltransferases (UGTs) catalyze the conjugation of a variety of small lipophilic molecules with uridine diphosphate (UDP) sugars, altering them into more water-soluble metabolites. Thereby, UGTs play an important role in the detoxification of xenobiotics and in the regulation of endobiotics. Recently, the genome sequence was reported for the two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae, a polyphagous herbivore damaging a number of agricultural crops. Although various gene families implicated in xenobiotic metabolism have been documented in T. urticae, UGTs so far have not. We identified 80 UGT genes in the T. urticae genome, the largest number of UGT genes in a metazoan species reported so far. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that lineage-specific gene expansions increased the diversity of the T. urticae UGT repertoire. Genomic distribution, intron-exon structure and structural motifs in the T. urticae UGTs were also described. In addition, expression profiling after host-plant shifts and in acaricide resistant lines supported an important role for UGT genes in xenobiotic metabolism. Expanded searches of UGTs in other arachnid species (Subphylum Chelicerata), including a spider, a scorpion, two ticks and two predatory mites, unexpectedly revealed the complete absence of UGT genes. However, a centipede (Subphylum Myriapoda) and a water flea and a crayfish (Subphylum Crustacea) contain UGT genes in their genomes similar to insect UGTs, suggesting that the UGT gene family might have been lost early in the Chelicerata lineage and subsequently re-gained in the tetranychid mites. Sequence similarity of T. urticae UGTs and bacterial UGTs and their phylogenetic reconstruction suggest that spider mites acquired UGT genes from bacteria by horizontal gene transfer. Our findings show a unique evolutionary history of the T. urticae UGT gene family among other arthropods and provide important clues to its functions in relation to detoxification and thereby host adaptation. PMID:24727020

Ahn, Seung-Joon; Dermauw, Wannes; Wybouw, Nicky; Heckel, David G; Van Leeuwen, Thomas

2014-07-01

153

Importance of Combinatorial Gene Control  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A hypothetical scheme illustrating how combinations of a few gene regulatory proteins can generate many different cell types during development. In this simple scheme a "decision" to make a new gene regulatory protein (shown as a numbered circle) is made after each cell division. Repetition of this simple rule enables eight cell types (A through H) to be created using only three different regulatory proteins. Each of these hypothetical cell types would then express different genes, as dictated by the combination of gene regulatory proteins that are present within it.

Bruce Alberts

1998-07-01

154

Bacterial resistance evolution by recruitment of super-integron gene cassettes.  

PubMed

The capture and spread of antibiotic resistance determinants by integrons underlies the rapid evolution of multiple antibiotic resistance among diverse Gram-negative clinical isolates. The association of multiple resistance integrons (MRIs) with mobile DNA elements facilitates their transit across phylogenetic boundaries and augments the potential impact of integrons on bacterial evolution. Recently, ancestral chromosomal versions, the super-integrons (SIs), were found to be genuine components of the genomes of diverse bacterial species. SIs possess evolutionary characteristics and stockpiles of adaptive functions, including cassettes related to antibiotic resistance determinants previously characterized in clinical isolates, which suggest that MRIs and their resistance genes were originally recruited from SIs and their pool of amassed genes. However, the recombination activity of integrons has never been demonstrated in a bacterium other than Escherichia coli. We introduced a naturally occurring MRI (TpR, SulR) on a conjugative plasmid into Vibrio cholerae, a species known to harbour a SI. We show that MRIs can randomly recruit genes directly from the cache of SI cassettes. By applying a selective constraint for the development of antibiotic resistance, we demonstrate bacterial resistance evolution through the recruitment a novel, but phenotypically silent, chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene from the V. cholerae SI and its precise insertion into the MRI. The resulting resistance profile (CmR, TpR, SulR) could then be disseminated by conjugation to other clinically relevant pathogens at high frequency. These results demonstrate that otherwise phenotypically sensitive strains may still be a genetic source for the evolution of resistance to clinically relevant antibiotics through integron-mediated recombination events. PMID:11952913

Rowe-Magnus, Dean A; Guerout, Anne-Marie; Mazel, Didier

2002-03-01

155

Ras GTPase-Like Protein MglA, a Controller of Bacterial Social-Motility in Myxobacteria, Has Evolved to Control Bacterial Predation by Bdellovibrio  

PubMed Central

Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus invade Gram-negative bacteria in a predatory process requiring Type IV pili (T4P) at a single invasive pole, and also glide on surfaces to locate prey. Ras-like G-protein MglA, working with MglB and RomR in the deltaproteobacterium Myxococcus xanthus, regulates adventurous gliding and T4P-mediated social motility at both M. xanthus cell poles. Our bioinformatic analyses suggested that the GTPase activating protein (GAP)-encoding gene mglB was lost in Bdellovibrio, but critical residues for MglABd GTP-binding are conserved. Deletion of mglABd abolished prey-invasion, but not gliding, and reduced T4P formation. MglABd interacted with a previously uncharacterised tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain protein Bd2492, which we show localises at the single invasive pole and is required for predation. Bd2492 and RomR also interacted with cyclic-di-GMP-binding receptor CdgA, required for rapid prey-invasion. Bd2492, RomRBd and CdgA localize to the invasive pole and may facilitate MglA-docking. Bd2492 was encoded from an operon encoding a TamAB-like secretion system. The TamA protein and RomR were found, by gene deletion tests, to be essential for viability in both predatory and non-predatory modes. Control proteins, which regulate bipolar T4P-mediated social motility in swarming groups of deltaproteobacteria, have adapted in evolution to regulate the anti-social process of unipolar prey-invasion in the “lone-hunter” Bdellovibrio. Thus GTP-binding proteins and cyclic-di-GMP inputs combine at a regulatory hub, turning on prey-invasion and allowing invasion and killing of bacterial pathogens and consequent predatory growth of Bdellovibrio. PMID:24721965

Milner, David S.; Till, Rob; Cadby, Ian; Lovering, Andrew L.; Basford, Sarah M.; Saxon, Emma B.; Liddell, Susan; Williams, Laura E.; Sockett, R. Elizabeth

2014-01-01

156

Bioluminescence in soybean root nodules: Demonstration of a general approach to assay gene expression in vivo by using bacterial luciferase  

PubMed Central

Two plasmid vectors pFIT001 and pPALE001, containing luxAB genes encoding bacterial luciferase [alkanal, reduced-FMN:oxygen oxidoreductase (1-hydroxylating, luminescing), EC 1.14.14.3] from Vibrio harveyi, have been constructed. Escherichia coli carrying derivatives of pFIT001 with DNA inserts in the unique EcoRI site located in luxB form “dark” colonies that can be readily distinguished from the bioluminescent or “bright” colonies. In contrast, promoterless pPALE001 is used as a promoter-search vector based on bioluminescence. The control and regulation of gene expression can be analyzed in vivo using promoter-luxAB fusions by a variety of simple methods, including a technique called “luxdot.” As an example, we have introduced nitrogenase nifD and nifH promoter-luxAB fusions into the Bradyrhizobium japonicum chromosome and shown symbiotically regulated bioluminescence in soybean root nodules. B. japonicum transconjugants containing a single copy per genome of the nif promoter-controlled luciferase structural genes did not produce light in free-living cultures, but the same transconjugants did express bioluminescence in root nodules that was strong enough to be detected by the naked eye. Images PMID:16593783

Legocki, Roman P.; Legocki, Misuk; Baldwin, Thomas O.; Szalay, Aladar A.

1986-01-01

157

Phylogeographic reconstruction of a bacterial species with high levels of lateral gene transfer  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Background: Phylogeographic reconstruction of some bacterial populations is hindered by low diversity coupled with high levels of lateral gene transfer. A comparison of recombination levels and diversity at seven housekeeping genes for eleven bacterial species, most of which are commonly cited as having high levels of lateral gene transfer shows that the relative contributions of homologous recombination versus mutation for Burkholderia pseudomallei is over two times higher than for Streptococcus pneumoniae and is thus the highest value yet reported in bacteria. Despite the potential for homologous recombination to increase diversity, B. pseudomallei exhibits a relative lack of diversity at these loci. In these situations, whole genome genotyping of orthologous shared single nucleotide polymorphism loci, discovered using next generation sequencing technologies, can provide very large data sets capable of estimating core phylogenetic relationships. We compared and searched 43 whole genome sequences of B. pseudomallei and its closest relatives for single nucleotide polymorphisms in orthologous shared regions to use in phylogenetic reconstruction. Results: Bayesian phylogenetic analyses of >14,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms yielded completely resolved trees for these 43 strains with high levels of statistical support. These results enable a better understanding of a separate analysis of population differentiation among >1,700 B. pseudomallei isolates as defined by sequence data from seven housekeeping genes. We analyzed this larger data set for population structure and allele sharing that can be attributed to lateral gene transfer. Our results suggest that despite an almost panmictic population, we can detect two distinct populations of B. pseudomallei that conform to biogeographic patterns found in many plant and animal species. That is, separation along Wallace's Line, a biogeographic boundary between Southeast Asia and Australia. Conclusion: We describe an Australian origin for B. pseudomallei, characterized by a single introduction event into Southeast Asia during a recent glacial period, and variable levels of lateral gene transfer within populations. These patterns provide insights into mechanisms of genetic diversification in B. pseudomallei and its closest relatives, and provide a framework for integrating the traditionally separate fields of population genetics and phylogenetics for other bacterial species with high levels of lateral gene transfer. ?? 2009 Pearson et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

Pearson, T.; Giffard, P.; Beckstrom-Sternberg, S.; Auerbach, R.; Hornstra, H.; Tuanyok, A.; Price, E.P.; Glass, M.B.; Leadem, B.; Beckstrom-Sternberg, J. S.; Allan, G.J.; Foster, J.T.; Wagner, D.M.; Okinaka, R.T.; Sim, S.H.; Pearson, O.; Wu, Z.; Chang, J.; Kaul, R.; Hoffmaster, A.R.; Brettin, T.S.; Robison, R.A.; Mayo, M.; Gee, J.E.; Tan, P.; Currie, B.J.; Keim, P.

2009-01-01

158

Bacterial social engagements  

Microsoft Academic Search

Quorum sensing is a process that enables bacteria to communicate using secreted signaling molecules called autoinducers. This process enables a population of bac- teria to regulate gene expression collectively and, there- fore, control behavior on a community-wide scale. Quorum sensing is widespread in the bacterial world and, generally, processes controlled by quorum sensing are unproductive when undertaken by an individual

Jennifer M. Henke; Bonnie L. Bassler

2004-01-01

159

Analysis of gene expression levels in individual bacterial cells without image segmentation  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We present a method for extracting gene expression data from images of bacterial cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method does not employ cell segmentation and does not require high magnification. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fluorescence and phase contrast images of the cells are correlated through the physics of phase contrast. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We demonstrate the method by characterizing noisy expression of comX in Streptococcus mutans. -- Abstract: Studies of stochasticity in gene expression typically make use of fluorescent protein reporters, which permit the measurement of expression levels within individual cells by fluorescence microscopy. Analysis of such microscopy images is almost invariably based on a segmentation algorithm, where the image of a cell or cluster is analyzed mathematically to delineate individual cell boundaries. However segmentation can be ineffective for studying bacterial cells or clusters, especially at lower magnification, where outlines of individual cells are poorly resolved. Here we demonstrate an alternative method for analyzing such images without segmentation. The method employs a comparison between the pixel brightness in phase contrast vs fluorescence microscopy images. By fitting the correlation between phase contrast and fluorescence intensity to a physical model, we obtain well-defined estimates for the different levels of gene expression that are present in the cell or cluster. The method reveals the boundaries of the individual cells, even if the source images lack the resolution to show these boundaries clearly.

Kwak, In Hae; Son, Minjun [Physics Department, University of Florida, P.O. Box 118440, Gainesville, FL 32611-8440 (United States)] [Physics Department, University of Florida, P.O. Box 118440, Gainesville, FL 32611-8440 (United States); Hagen, Stephen J., E-mail: sjhagen@ufl.edu [Physics Department, University of Florida, P.O. Box 118440, Gainesville, FL 32611-8440 (United States)

2012-05-11

160

Simultaneous amplification of two bacterial genes: more reliable method of Helicobacter pylori detection in microbial rich dental plaque samples.  

PubMed

Polymerase Chain reaction (PCR) assay is considered superior to other methods for detection of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) in oral cavity; however, it also has limitations when sample under study is microbial rich dental plaque. The type of gene targeted and number of primers used for bacterial detection in dental plaque samples can have a significant effect on the results obtained as there are a number of closely related bacterial species residing in plaque biofilm. Also due to high recombination rate of H. pylori some of the genes might be down regulated or absent. The present study was conducted to determine the frequency of H. pylori colonization of dental plaque by simultaneously amplifying two genes of the bacterium. One hundred dental plaque specimens were collected from dyspeptic patients before their upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and presence of H. pylori was determined through PCR assay using primers targeting two different genes of the bacterium. Eighty-nine of the 100 samples were included in final analysis. With simultaneous amplification of two bacterial genes 51.6% of the dental plaque samples were positive for H. pylori while this prevalence increased to 73% when only one gene amplification was used for bacterial identification. Detection of H. pylori in dental plaque samples is more reliable when two genes of the bacterium are simultaneously amplified as compared to one gene amplification only. PMID:20512648

Chaudhry, Saima; Idrees, Muhammad; Izhar, Mateen; Butt, Arshad Kamal; Khan, Ayyaz Ali

2011-01-01

161

Comparing wastewater chemicals, indicator bacteria concentrations, and bacterial pathogen genes as fecal pollution indicators  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The objective of this study was to compare fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) (fecal coliforms, Escherichia coli [EC], and enterococci [ENT]) concentrations with a wide array of typical organic wastewater chemicals and selected bacterial genes as indicators of fecal pollution in water samples collected at or near 18 surface water drinking water intakes. Genes tested included esp (indicating human-pathogenic ENT) and nine genes associated with various animal sources of shiga-toxin-producing EC (STEC). Fecal pollution was indicated by genes and/or chemicals for 14 of the 18 tested samples, with little relation to FIB standards. Of 13 samples with <50 EC 100 mL-1, human pharmaceuticals or chemical indicators of wastewater treatment plant effluent occurred in six, veterinary antibiotics were detected in three, and stx1 or stx2 genes (indicating varying animal sources of STEC) were detected in eight. Only the EC eaeA gene was positively correlated with FIB concentrations. Human-source fecal pollution was indicated by the esp gene and the human pharmaceutical carbamazepine in one of the nine samples that met all FIB recreational water quality standards. Escherichia coli rfbO157 and stx2c genes, which are typically associated with cattle sources and are of potential human health significance, were detected in one sample in the absence of tested chemicals. Chemical and gene-based indicators of fecal contamination may be present even when FIB standards are met, and some may, unlike FIB, indicate potential sources. Application of multiple water quality indicators with variable environmental persistence and fate may yield greater confidence in fecal pollution assessment and may inform remediation decisions. Copyright ?? 2009 by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

Haack, S.K.; Duris, J.W.; Fogarty, L.R.; Kolpin, D.W.; Focazio, M.J.; Furlong, E.T.; Meyer, M.T.

2009-01-01

162

Incidence, contributing factors, and control of bacterial pathogens in produce  

Microsoft Academic Search

The importance of bacterial pathogens in the transmission of foodborne illness has become apparent in recent years. Several large, well-publicized outbreaks of foodborne illness have been linked to cantaloupe, tomatoes, lettuce, alfalfa sprouts, and both apple and orange juices. In addition, numerous other smaller scale outbreaks linked to these and other commodities have also been reported. Although contributing factors have

Robert E. Brackett

1999-01-01

163

An integrated analysis of plant and bacterial gene expression in symbiotic root nodules using laser-capture microdissection coupled to RNA sequencing.  

PubMed

Rhizobium-induced root nodules are specialized organs for symbiotic nitrogen fixation. Indeterminate-type nodules are formed from an apical meristem and exhibit a spatial zonation which corresponds to successive developmental stages. To get a dynamic and integrated view of plant and bacterial gene expression associated with nodule development, we used a sensitive and comprehensive approach based upon oriented high-depth RNA sequencing coupled to laser microdissection of nodule regions. This study, focused on the association between the model legume Medicago truncatula and its symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti, led to the production of 942 million sequencing read pairs that were unambiguously mapped on plant and bacterial genomes. Bioinformatic and statistical analyses enabled in-depth comparison, at a whole-genome level, of gene expression in specific nodule zones. Previously characterized symbiotic genes displayed the expected spatial pattern of expression, thus validating the robustness of our approach. We illustrate the use of this resource by examining gene expression associated with three essential elements of nodule development, namely meristem activity, cell differentiation and selected signaling processes related to bacterial Nod factors and redox status. We found that transcription factor genes essential for the control of the root apical meristem were also expressed in the nodule meristem, while the plant mRNAs most enriched in nodules compared with roots were mostly associated with zones comprising both plant and bacterial partners. The data, accessible on a dedicated website, represent a rich resource for microbiologists and plant biologists to address a variety of questions of both fundamental and applied interest. PMID:24483147

Roux, Brice; Rodde, Nathalie; Jardinaud, Marie-Françoise; Timmers, Ton; Sauviac, Laurent; Cottret, Ludovic; Carrère, Sébastien; Sallet, Erika; Courcelle, Emmanuel; Moreau, Sandra; Debellé, Frédéric; Capela, Delphine; de Carvalho-Niebel, Fernanda; Gouzy, Jérôme; Bruand, Claude; Gamas, Pascal

2014-03-01

164

Facilitation of Bacterial Adaptation to Chlorothalonil-Contaminated Sites by Horizontal Transfer of the Chlorothalonil Hydrolytic Dehalogenase Gene?  

PubMed Central

Horizontal transfer of the chlorothalonil hydrolytic dehalogenase gene (chd) is proposed based on the high conservation of the chd gene and its close association with a novel insertion sequence, ISOcsp1, in 16 isolated chlorothalonil-dechlorinating strains belonging to eight different genera. The ecological role of horizontal gene transfer is assumed to facilitate bacterial adaptation to chlorothalonil-contaminated sites, through detoxification of chlorothalonil to less toxic 2,4,5-trichloro-6-hydroxybenzene-1,3-dicarbonitrile. PMID:21498744

Liang, Bin; Wang, Guangli; Zhao, Yanfu; Chen, Kai; Li, Shunpeng; Jiang, Jiandong

2011-01-01

165

Levels of Bacterial Community Diversity in Four Arid Soils Compared by Cultivation and 16S rRNA Gene Cloning  

Microsoft Academic Search

Techniques based on amplification of 16S rRNA genes for comparing bacterial communities are now widely used in microbial ecology, but calibration of these techniques with traditional tools, such as cultivation, has been conspicuously absent. In this study, we compared levels of bacterial community diversity in two pinyon rhizosphere soil samples and two between-tree (interspace) soil samples by analyzing 179 cultivated

JOHN DUNBAR; SHANNON TAKALA; SUSAN M. BARNS; JODY A. DAVIS; CHERYL R. KUSKE

1999-01-01

166

Selected Lactic Acid-Producing Bacterial Isolates with the Capacity to Reduce Salmonella Translocation and Virulence Gene Expression in Chickens  

PubMed Central

Background Probiotics have been used to control Salmonella colonization/infection in chickens. Yet the mechanisms of probiotic effects are not fully understood. This study has characterized our previously-selected lactic acid-producing bacterial (LAB) isolates for controlling Salmonella infection in chickens, particularly the mechanism underlying the control. Methodology/Principal Findings In vitro studies were conducted to characterize 14 LAB isolates for their tolerance to low pH (2.0) and high bile salt (0.3–1.5%) and susceptibility to antibiotics. Three chicken infection trials were subsequently carried out to evaluate four of the isolates for reducing the burden of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in the broiler cecum. Chicks were gavaged with LAB cultures (106–7 CFU/chick) or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) at 1 day of age followed by Salmonella challenge (104 CFU/chick) next day. Samples of cecal digesta, spleen, and liver were examined for Salmonella counts on days 1, 3, or 4 post-challenge. Salmonella in the cecum from Trial 3 was also assessed for the expression of ten virulence genes located in its pathogenicity island-1 (SPI-1). These genes play a role in Salmonella intestinal invasion. Tested LAB isolates (individuals or mixed cultures) were unable to lower Salmonella burden in the chicken cecum, but able to attenuate Salmonella infection in the spleen and liver. The LAB treatments also reduced almost all SPI-1 virulence gene expression (9 out of 10) in the chicken cecum, particularly at the low dose. In vitro treatment with the extracellular culture fluid from a LAB culture also down-regulated most SPI-1 virulence gene expression. Conclusions/Significance The possible correlation between attenuation of Salmonella infection in the chicken spleen and liver and reduction of Salmonella SPI-1 virulence gene expression in the chicken cecum by LAB isolates is a new observation. Suppression of Salmonella virulence gene expression in vivo can be one of the strategies for controlling Salmonella infection in chickens. PMID:24728092

Yang, Xiaojian; Brisbin, Jennifer; Yu, Hai; Wang, Qi; Yin, Fugui; Zhang, Yonggang; Sabour, Parviz; Sharif, Shayan; Gong, Joshua

2014-01-01

167

Comparative genomics of the bacterial genus Listeria: Genome evolution is characterized by limited gene acquisition and limited gene loss  

PubMed Central

Background The bacterial genus Listeria contains pathogenic and non-pathogenic species, including the pathogens L. monocytogenes and L. ivanovii, both of which carry homologous virulence gene clusters such as the prfA cluster and clusters of internalin genes. Initial evidence for multiple deletions of the prfA cluster during the evolution of Listeria indicates that this genus provides an interesting model for studying the evolution of virulence and also presents practical challenges with regard to definition of pathogenic strains. Results To better understand genome evolution and evolution of virulence characteristics in Listeria, we used a next generation sequencing approach to generate draft genomes for seven strains representing Listeria species or clades for which genome sequences were not available. Comparative analyses of these draft genomes and six publicly available genomes, which together represent the main Listeria species, showed evidence for (i) a pangenome with 2,032 core and 2,918 accessory genes identified to date, (ii) a critical role of gene loss events in transition of Listeria species from facultative pathogen to saprotroph, even though a consistent pattern of gene loss seemed to be absent, and a number of isolates representing non-pathogenic species still carried some virulence associated genes, and (iii) divergence of modern pathogenic and non-pathogenic Listeria species and strains, most likely circa 47 million years ago, from a pathogenic common ancestor that contained key virulence genes. Conclusions Genome evolution in Listeria involved limited gene loss and acquisition as supported by (i) a relatively high coverage of the predicted pan-genome by the observed pan-genome, (ii) conserved genome size (between 2.8 and 3.2 Mb), and (iii) a highly syntenic genome. Limited gene loss in Listeria did include loss of virulence associated genes, likely associated with multiple transitions to a saprotrophic lifestyle. The genus Listeria thus provides an example of a group of bacteria that appears to evolve through a loss of virulence rather than acquisition of virulence characteristics. While Listeria includes a number of species-like clades, many of these putative species include clades or strains with atypical virulence associated characteristics. This information will allow for the development of genetic and genomic criteria for pathogenic strains, including development of assays that specifically detect pathogenic Listeria strains. PMID:21126366

2010-01-01

168

Variation of nonylphenol-degrading gene abundance and bacterial community structure in bioaugmented sediment microcosm.  

PubMed

Nonylphenol (NP) can accumulate in river sediment. Bioaugmentation is an attractive option to dissipate heavy NP pollution in river sediment. In this study, two NP degraders were isolated from crude oil-polluted soil and river sediment. Microcosms were constructed to test their ability to degrade NP in river sediment. The shift in the proportion of NP-degrading genes and bacterial community structure in sediment microcosms were characterized using quantitative PCR assay and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the soil isolate belonged to genus Stenotrophomonas, while the sediment isolate was a Sphingobium species. Both of them could almost completely clean up a high level of NP in river sediment (150 mg/kg NP) in 10 or 14 days after inoculation. An increase in the proportion of alkB and sMO genes was observed in sediment microcosms inoculated with Stenotrophomonas strain Y1 and Sphingobium strain Y2, respectively. Moreover, bioaugmentation using Sphingobium strain Y2 could have a strong impact on sediment bacterial community structure, while inoculation of Stenotrophomonas strain Y1 illustrated a weak impact. This study can provide some new insights towards NP biodegradation and bioremediation. PMID:25277711

Wang, Zhao; Yang, Yuyin; Sun, Weimin; Dai, Yu; Xie, Shuguang

2015-02-01

169

Biological controls on bacterial populations in ballast water during ocean transit.  

PubMed

Bacteria (and viruses) numerically dominate ballast water communities, but what controls their population dynamics during transit is largely unexplored. Here, bacterial abundance, net and intrinsic growth rates, and grazing mortality were determined during a trans-Atlantic voyage. The effects of grazing pressure by microzooplankton on heterotrophic bacteria during transit were determined for source port, mid-ocean exchange (MOE), and six-day-old source port ballast water. When the grazer component was removed, bacterial abundances significantly increased. Additionally, we determined that the grazer-mediated mortality for ballast water originating from ports was greater than MOE water and that mortality decreased over time for the source port ballast water. This study shows that bacterial populations in transit are controlled by microzooplankton grazing. If these findings are representative of ballast water environments, they suggest that if the grazing component is selectively removed by various treatment methods, bacterial populations may increase; this could have environmental and human health consequences. PMID:24246652

Seiden, Jennica M; Rivkin, Richard B

2014-01-15

170

Involvement of the cell-specific pigment genes pks and sult in bacterial defense response of sea urchins Strongylocentrotus intermedius.  

PubMed

Bacterial infections are one of the most important problems in mass aquaculture, causing the loss of millions of juvenile organisms. We isolated 22 bacterial strains from the cavity fluid of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus pallidus and used phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences to separate the bacterial strains into 9 genera (Aliivibrio, Bizionia, Colwellia, Olleya, Paenibacillus, Photobacterium, Pseudoalteromonas, Shewanella, and Vibrio). Incubating Strongylocentrotus intermedius larvae with a strain from each of the 9 bacterial genera, we investigated the viability of the larvae, the amount of pigment cells, and the level of polyketide synthase (pks) and sulfotransferase (sult) gene expression. Results of the assay on sea urchin development showed that all bacterial strains, except Pseudoalteromonas and Bizionia, suppressed sea urchin development (resulting in retardation of the embryos' development with cellular disorders) and reduced cell viability. We found that pks expression in the sea urchin larvae after incubation with the bacteria of 9 tested genera was significantly increased, while the sult expression was increased only after the treatment with Pseudoalteromonas and Shewanella. Shikimic acid, which is known to activate the biosynthesis of naphthoquinone pigments, increased the tolerance of the sea urchin embryos to the bacteria. In conclusion, we show that the cell-specific pigment genes pks and sult are involved in the bacterial defense response of sea urchins. PMID:23548362

Kiselev, Konstantin V; Ageenko, Natalya V; Kurilenko, Valeria V

2013-03-26

171

Bacterial Bile Metabolising Gene Abundance in Crohn's, Ulcerative Colitis and Type 2 Diabetes Metagenomes  

PubMed Central

We performed an analysis to determine the importance of bile acid modification genes in the gut microbiome of inflammatory bowel disease and type 2 diabetic patients. We used publicly available metagenomic datasets from the Human Microbiome Project and the MetaHIT consortium, and determined the abundance of bile salt hydrolase gene (bsh), 7 alpha-dehydroxylase gene (adh) and 7-alpha hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase gene (hsdh) in fecal bacteria in diseased populations of Crohn's disease (CD), Ulcerative Colitis (UC) and Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Phylum level abundance analysis showed a significant reduction in Firmicute-derived bsh in UC and T2DM patients but not in CD patients, relative to healthy controls. Reduction of adh and hsdh genes was also seen in UC and T2DM patients, while an increase was observed in the CD population as compared to healthy controls. A further analysis of the bsh genes showed significant differences in the correlations of certain Firmicutes families with disease or healthy populations. From this observation we proceeded to analyse BSH protein sequences and identified BSH proteins clusters representing the most abundant strains in our analysis of Firmicute bsh genes. The abundance of the bsh genes corresponding to one of these protein clusters was significantly reduced in all disease states relative to healthy controls. This cluster includes bsh genes derived from Lachospiraceae, Clostridiaceae, Erysipelotrichaceae and Ruminococcaceae families. This metagenomic analysis provides evidence of the importance of bile acid modifying enzymes in health and disease. It further highlights the importance of identifying gene and protein clusters, as the same gene may be associated with health or disease, depending on the strains expressing the enzyme, and differences in the enzymes themselves. PMID:25517115

Labbé, Alain; Ganopolsky, Jorge G.; Martoni, Christopher J.; Prakash, Satya; Jones, Mitchell L.

2014-01-01

172

A 72-base pair AT-rich DNA sequence element functions as a bacterial gene silencer.  

PubMed

We have previously demonstrated that sequential activation of the bacterial ilvIH-leuO-leuABCD gene cluster involves a promoter-relay mechanism. In the current study, we show that the final activation of the leuABCD operon is through a transcriptional derepression mechanism. The leuABCD operon is transcriptionally repressed by the presence of a 318-base pair AT-rich upstream element. LeuO is required for derepressing the repressed leuABCD operon. Deletion analysis of the repressive effect of the 318-bp element has led to the identification of a 72-bp AT-rich (78% A+T) DNA sequence element, AT4, which is capable of silencing a number of unrelated promoters in addition to the leuABCD promoter. AT4-mediated gene silencing is orientation-independent and occurs within a distance of 300 base pairs. Furthermore, an increased gene-silencing effect was observed with a tandemly repeated AT4 dimer. The possible mechanism of AT4-mediated gene silencing in bacteria is discussed. PMID:11121424

Chen, C C; Fang, M; Majumder, A; Wu, H Y

2001-03-23

173

Bacterial pathogen gene abundance and relation to recreational water quality at seven great lakes beaches.  

PubMed

Quantitative assessment of bacterial pathogens, their geographic variability, and distribution in various matrices at Great Lakes beaches are limited. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) was used to test for genes from E. coli O157:H7 (eaeO157), shiga-toxin producing E. coli (stx2), Campylobacter jejuni (mapA), Shigella spp. (ipaH), and a Salmonella enterica-specific (SE) DNA sequence at seven Great Lakes beaches, in algae, water, and sediment. Overall, detection frequencies were mapA>stx2>ipaH>SE>eaeO157. Results were highly variable among beaches and matrices; some correlations with environmental conditions were observed for mapA, stx2, and ipaH detections. Beach seasonal mean mapA abundance in water was correlated with beach seasonal mean log10 E. coli concentration. At one beach, stx2 gene abundance was positively correlated with concurrent daily E. coli concentrations. Concentration distributions for stx2, ipaH, and mapA within algae, sediment, and water were statistically different (Non-Detect and Data Analysis in R). Assuming 10, 50, or 100% of gene copies represented viable and presumably infective cells, a quantitative microbial risk assessment tool developed by Michigan State University indicated a moderate probability of illness for Campylobacter jejuni at the study beaches, especially where recreational water quality criteria were exceeded. Pathogen gene quantification may be useful for beach water quality management. PMID:25423586

Oster, Ryan J; Wijesinghe, Rasanthi U; Haack, Sheridan K; Fogarty, Lisa R; Tucker, Taaja R; Riley, Stephen C

2014-12-16

174

High-Throughput Bioluminescence-Based Mutant Screening Strategy for Identification of Bacterial Virulence Genes?  

PubMed Central

A high-throughput bioluminescence screening procedure for identification of virulence genes in bacteria was developed and applied to the fish pathogen Edwardsiella ictaluri. A random transposon mutant library expressing bioluminescence was constructed and robotically arrayed on 384-well plates. Mutants were cultivated and mixed with catfish serum and neutrophils in 96-well plates, and bioluminescence was used to detect mutants that are more susceptible to killing by these host factors. The virulence and vaccine efficacy of selected mutants were determined in channel catfish. Transposon insertion sites in 13 mutants attenuated in the natural host were mapped to the E. ictaluri genome. Ten unique genes were mutated, including genes encoding a negative regulator of sigmaE activity, a glycine cleavage system protein, tricarboxylic acid cycle enzymes, an O polysaccharide biosynthesis enzyme, proteins encoded on the native plasmid pEI1, and a fimbrial chaperon protein. Three of these mutants were found to have potential as live attenuated vaccines. This study demonstrates a novel application of bioluminescence to identify bacterial genes required for host resistance; as a result, efficacious and genetically defined live attenuated vaccine candidates were developed. PMID:19201969

Karsi, Attila; Gülsoy, Nagihan; Corb, Erin; Dumpala, Pradeep R.; Lawrence, Mark L.

2009-01-01

175

Review: Phage therapy: A modern tool to control bacterial infections.  

PubMed

The evolution of antibiotic-resistant in bacteria has aggravated curiosity in development of alternative therapy to conventional drugs. One of the emerging drugs that can be used alternative to antibiotics is bacteriophage therapy. The use of living phages in the cure of lethal infectious life threatening diseases caused by Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria has been reported. Another development in the field of bacteriophage therapy is the use of genetically modified and non replicating phages in the treatment of bacterial infection. Genetically engineered bacteriophages can be used as adjuvant along with antibiotic therapy. Phages encoded with lysosomal enzymes are also effectual in the treatment of infectious diseases. PMID:25553704

Qadir, Muhammad Imran

2015-01-01

176

Assessment of Bacterial bph Gene in Amazonian Dark Earth and Their Adjacent Soils  

PubMed Central

Amazonian Anthrosols are known to harbour distinct and highly diverse microbial communities. As most of the current assessments of these communities are based on taxonomic profiles, the functional gene structure of these communities, such as those responsible for key steps in the carbon cycle, mostly remain elusive. To gain insights into the diversity of catabolic genes involved in the degradation of hydrocarbons in anthropogenic horizons, we analysed the bacterial bph gene community structure, composition and abundance using T-RFLP, 454-pyrosequencing and quantitative PCR essays, respectively. Soil samples were collected in two Brazilian Amazon Dark Earth (ADE) sites and at their corresponding non-anthropogenic adjacent soils (ADJ), under two different land use systems, secondary forest (SF) and manioc cultivation (M). Redundancy analysis of T-RFLP data revealed differences in bph gene structure according to both soil type and land use. Chemical properties of ADE soils, such as high organic carbon and organic matter, as well as effective cation exchange capacity and pH, were significantly correlated with the structure of bph communities. Also, the taxonomic affiliation of bph gene sequences revealed the segregation of community composition according to the soil type. Sequences at ADE sites were mostly affiliated to aromatic hydrocarbon degraders belonging to the genera Streptomyces, Sphingomonas, Rhodococcus, Mycobacterium, Conexibacter and Burkholderia. In both land use sites, shannon's diversity indices based on the bph gene data were higher in ADE than ADJ soils. Collectively, our findings provide evidence that specific properties in ADE soils shape the structure and composition of bph communities. These results provide a basis for further investigations focusing on the bio-exploration of novel enzymes with potential use in the biotechnology/biodegradation industry. PMID:24927167

Brossi, Maria Julia de Lima; Mendes, Lucas William; Germano, Mariana Gomes; Lima, Amanda Barbosa; Tsai, Siu Mui

2014-01-01

177

Biomarkers and Bacterial Pneumonia Risk in Patients with Treated HIV Infection: A Case-Control Study  

PubMed Central

Background Despite advances in HIV treatment, bacterial pneumonia continues to cause considerable morbidity and mortality in patients with HIV infection. Studies of biomarker associations with bacterial pneumonia risk in treated HIV-infected patients do not currently exist. Methods We performed a nested, matched, case-control study among participants randomized to continuous combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in the Strategies for Management of Antiretroviral Therapy trial. Patients who developed bacterial pneumonia (cases) and patients without bacterial pneumonia (controls) were matched 1?1 on clinical center, smoking status, age, and baseline cART use. Baseline levels of Club Cell Secretory Protein 16 (CC16), Surfactant Protein D (SP-D), C-reactive protein (hsCRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and d-dimer were compared between cases and controls. Results Cases (n?=?72) and controls (n?=?72) were 25.7% female, 51.4% black, 65.3% current smokers, 9.7% diabetic, 36.1% co-infected with Hepatitis B/C, and 75.0% were on cART at baseline. Median (IQR) age was 45 (41, 51) years with CD4+ count of 553 (436, 690) cells/mm3. Baseline CC16 and SP-D were similar between cases and controls, but hsCRP was significantly higher in cases than controls (2.94 µg/mL in cases vs. 1.93 µg/mL in controls; p?=?0.02). IL-6 and d-dimer levels were also higher in cases compared to controls, though differences were not statistically significant (p-value 0.06 and 0.10, respectively). Conclusions In patients with cART-treated HIV infection, higher levels of systemic inflammatory markers were associated with increased bacterial pneumonia risk, while two pulmonary-specific inflammatory biomarkers, CC16 and SP-D, were not associated with bacterial pneumonia risk. PMID:23457535

Bjerk, Sonja M.; Baker, Jason V.; Emery, Sean; Neuhaus, Jacqueline; Angus, Brian; Gordin, Fred M.; Pett, Sarah L.; Stephan, Christoph; Kunisaki, Ken M.

2013-01-01

178

A Novel Bacterial Foraging Algorithm for Automated tuning of PID controllers of UAVs  

E-print Network

A Novel Bacterial Foraging Algorithm for Automated tuning of PID controllers of UAVs John Oyekan, Colchester CO3 4SQ, United Kingdom Email: jooyek@essex.ac.uk; hhu@essex.ac.uk Abstract--Up to now, PID of a PID controller for a UAV. This approach relies on the bacteria foraging technique to guide the search

Hu, Huosheng

179

Fabrication of microtemplates for the control of bacterial immobilization  

SciTech Connect

The authors described a region-selective immobilization methods of bacteria by using superhydrophobic/superhydrophilic and superhydrophobic/poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) micropatterns for culture scaffold templates. In the case of superhydrophobic/superhydrophilic micropatterns, the superhydrophobic surface was prepared first by microwave-plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPECVD) from trimethylmethoxysilane. Then the superhydrophilic regions were fabricated by irradiating the superhydrophobic surface with vuv light through a stencil mask. In the case of the superhydrophobic/PEG micropatterned surfaces, PEG surfaces were fabricated first by chemical reaction of ester groups of p-nitrophenyl PEG with NH{sub 2} group of NH{sub 2}-terminated self assembled monolayer from n-6-hexyl-3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane. The superhydrophobic regions were fabricated by MPECVD thorough a stencil mask. In this study four bacteria were selected from viewpoint of peptidoglycan cell wall (E. coli versus B. subtilis), extracellular polysaccharide (E.coli versus P. stutzeri, P. aeruginosa), and growth rate (P. stutzeri versus P. aeruginosa). The former micropattern brought discrete adhesions of E. coli and B. subtilis specifically on the hydrophobic regions, Furthermore, using the superhydrophobic/PEG micropattern, adhesion of bacteria expanded for E. coli, B. subtilis, P. stutzeri, and P. aeruginosa. They observed a high bacterial adhesion onto superhydrophobic surfaces and the inhibitive effect of bacterial adhesion on PEG surfaces.

Miyahara, Yasuhiro; Mitamura, Koji; Saito, Nagahiro; Takai, Osamu [Department of Materials, Physics and Energy Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa, Nagoya, 464-8603 (Japan); EcoTopia Science Research Institute, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa, Nagoya, 464-8603 (Japan); Department of Materials, Physics and Energy Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University and Department of Molecular Design and Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa, Nagoya, 464-8603 (Japan); Department of Materials, Physics and Energy Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University and EcoTopia Science Research Institute, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa, Nagoya, 464-8603 (Japan)

2009-09-15

180

Genes and Co-Expression Modules Common to Drought and Bacterial Stress Responses in Arabidopsis and Rice  

PubMed Central

Plants are simultaneously exposed to multiple stresses resulting in enormous changes in the molecular landscape within the cell. Identification and characterization of the synergistic and antagonistic components of stress response mechanisms contributing to the cross talk between stresses is of high priority to explore and enhance multiple stress responses. To this end, we performed meta-analysis of drought (abiotic), bacterial (biotic) stress response in rice and Arabidopsis by analyzing a total of 386 microarray samples belonging to 20 microarray studies and identified approximately 3100 and 900 DEGs in rice and Arabidopsis, respectively. About 38.5% (1214) and 28.7% (272) DEGs were common to drought and bacterial stresses in rice and Arabidopsis, respectively. A majority of these common DEGs showed conserved expression status in both stresses. Gene ontology enrichment analysis clearly demarcated the response and regulation of various plant hormones and related biological processes. Fatty acid metabolism and biosynthesis of alkaloids were upregulated and, nitrogen metabolism and photosynthesis was downregulated in both stress conditions. WRKY transcription family genes were highly enriched in all upregulated gene sets while ‘CO-like’ TF family showed inverse relationship of expression between drought and bacterial stresses. Weighted gene co-expression network analysis divided DEG sets into multiple modules that show high co-expression and identified stress specific hub genes with high connectivity. Detection of consensus modules based on DEGs common to drought and bacterial stress revealed 9 and 4 modules in rice and Arabidopsis, respectively, with conserved and reversed co-expression patterns. PMID:24130868

Shaik, Rafi; Ramakrishna, Wusirika

2013-01-01

181

"Horizontal" gene transfer from a transgenic potato line to a bacterial pathogen (Erwinia chrysanthemi) occurs--if at all--at an extremely low frequency.  

PubMed

The frequency of possible "horizontal" gene transfer between a plant and a tightly associated bacterial pathogen was studied in a model system consisting of transgenic Solanum tuberosum, containing a beta-lactamase gene linked to a pBR322 origin of replication, and Erwinia chrysanthemi. This experimental system offers optimal conditions for the detection of possible horizontal gene transfer events, even when they occur at very low frequency. Horizontal gene transfer was not detected under conditions mimicking a "natural" infection. The gradual, stepwise alteration of artificial, positive control conditions to idealized natural conditions, however, allowed the characterization of factors that affected gene transfer, and revealed a gradual decrease of the gene transfer frequency from 6.3 x 10(-2) under optimal control conditions to a calculated 2.0 x 10(-17) under idealized natural conditions. These data, in combination with other published studies, argue that horizontal gene transfer is so rare as to be essentially irrelevant to any realistic assessment of the risk involved in release experiments involving transgenic plants. PMID:9636282

Schlüter, K; Fütterer, J; Potrykus, I

1995-10-01

182

DNA Microarray-Based Identification of Genes Controlled by Autoinducer 2Stimulated Quorum Sensing in Escherichia coli  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bacterial cell-to-cell communication facilitates coordinated expression of specific genes in a growth rate-II and cell density-dependent manner, a process known as quorum sensing. While the discovery of a diffusible Escherichia coli signaling pheromone, termed autoinducer 2 (AI-2), has been made along with several quorum sensing genes, the overall number and coordination of genes controlled by quorum sensing through the AI-2

MATTHEW P. DELISA; CHI-FANG WU; LIANG WANG; JAMES J. VALDES; WILLIAM E. BENTLEY

2001-01-01

183

Bacterial beta-galactosidase and human dystrophin genes are expressed in mouse skeletal muscle fibers after ballistic transfection.  

PubMed

Ballistic transfection, based on cell and tissue bombardment by the tungsten and gold microparticles covered with the gene DNA, was used for the delivery of a bacterial beta-galactosidase and a full-length cDNA copy of the human dystrophin genes into mouse skeletal muscles. CMV-lacZ, SV40-lacZ, LTR-lacZneo and full-length cDNA dystrophin (pDMD-1, approximately 16 kb) in eukaryotic expression vector pJ OMEGA driven by mouse leukaemia virus promotor (pMLVDy) were used throughout the studies. Musculus glutaeus superficialis of C57BL/6J and quadriceps femoris of mdx male mice were opened surgically under anesthesia and bombarded by means of the gene-gun technique originally developed by us. Different mixtures of gold and tungsten particles at ratios of 4:1, 1:1, 1:4 were applied. X-gal assay revealed marked beta-gal activity, both in total muscles and whole muscle fibers on histological sections, up to three months after transfection. The most intensive staining was observed after SV40-lacZ delivery. No staining was detected with LTR-lacZneo DNA as well as in untreated muscles. The higher tungsten particle concentration in the bombardment mixture correlated with more intense X-gal staining. At the gold/tungsten ratio of 1:4 the microparticles penetrated the musculus glutaeus superficialis and transfected the underlying musculus glutaeus medius as well. Immuno-cytochemical assay for human dystrophin revealed dystrophin positive myofibers (DPM) in the bombarded area up to two months after transfection. The proportion of DMP varied from 2.5% on day 17 up two 5% on day 60 after bombardment compared to only 0.5% in the control mdx mice. These results suggest the applicability of particle bombardment for gene delivery into muscle fibers. PMID:9315710

Zelenin, A V; Kolesnikov, V A; Tarasenko, O A; Shafei, R A; Zelenina, I A; Mikhailov, V V; Semenova, M L; Kovalenko, D V; Artemyeva, O V; Ivaschenko, T E; Evgrafov, O V; Dickson, G; Baranovand, V S

1997-09-01

184

Influence of dietary antioxidants and fatty acids on neutrophil mediated bacterial killing and gene expression in healthy Beagles.  

PubMed

Dietary (n-3) fatty acids from fish oil have been used to modulate immune function in many mammalian species. Together, dietary antioxidants and behavioral enrichment have been shown to enhance neutrophil phagocytosis in geriatric Beagle dogs. The purpose of this study was to further investigate the effects of vitamins E and C, in combination with dietary fish oil, on neutrophil mediated bacterial killing, and on transcript levels of selected neutrophil mRNA. Fifty adult Beagle dogs were randomized into five dietary treatment groups for 60 days. All foods were complete and balanced and met the nutrient profiles of AAFCO for adult dogs. For 60 days before study initiation, dogs consumed a pretrial food that contained 74 IU/kg vitamin E and 0 mg/kg vitamin C. The five experimental foods were confirmed by analytical methods to contain ?640 IU/kg vitamin E and 130 mg/kg vitamin C (as fed). Experimental foods ranged from low levels of EPA and DHA (pretrial food and lowest experimental food had 0.01% EPA and no detectable DHA) to the highest experimental food with 0.25% EPA and 0.17% DHA. Ex vivo bactericidal activity of activated, peripheral-blood neutrophils against Lactococcus lactis was determined after 1 h incubation. Bactericidal activity was calculated as a percentage of control values (bacteria incubated in media without neutrophils). Transcript levels of genes involved in neutrophil-mediated immune functions were determined by real-time qPCR. Dogs in all treatment groups had increased serum vitamin E concentration (P<0.01). After consuming experimental food for 60 days, neutrophils from dogs in all 5 treatment groups also had increased bactericidal activity (P<0.01). Dietary fish oil however, had no effect on bactericidal activity. Stepwise multiple regression analysis demonstrated that the change in neutrophil mediated bacterial killing was significantly correlated to changes in gene expression of interleukin-8 receptor (IL-8R), interleukin converting enzyme (ICE), and myeloperoxidase (MPO; r(2)=0.33; P=0.003). When stepwise multiple regression analysis was performed considering each mRNA as a dependent variable and change in selected individual and summed fatty acid concentrations as independent variables, change in the ratio of saturated fatty acids (SFA) to polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) was significant (P?0.05) in the mRNA regression analyses for IL-8R, ICE, MPO, and cyclooxygenase-2. In summary, circulating neutrophils from dogs fed diets enriched in vitamins E and C had significantly increased bactericidal activity as well as altered gene expression. Change in SFA to PUFA ratio also altered neutrophil gene expression. PMID:21112644

Hall, Jean A; Chinn, Rachel M; Vorachek, William R; Gorman, M Elena; Greitl, Joe L; Joshi, Dinesh K; Jewell, Dennis E

2011-02-15

185

Application of nanotechnology to control bacterial adhesion and patterning on material surfaces  

PubMed Central

Bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation on surfaces raises health hazard issues in the medical environment. Previous studies of bacteria adhesion have focused on observations in their natural/native environments. Recently, surface science has contributed in advancing the understanding of bacterial adhesion by providing ideal platforms that attempt to mimic the bacteria's natural environments, whilst also enabling concurrent control, selectivity and spatial control of bacterial adhesion. In this review, we will look at techniques of how nanotechnology is used to control cell adhesion on a planar scale, in addition to describing the use of nanotools for cell micropatterning. Additionally, it will provide a general background of common methods for nanoscale modification enabling biologist unfamiliar with nanotechnology to enter the field. PMID:24273593

Costello, Cait M.; Yeung, Chun L.; Rawson, Frankie J.; Mendes, Paula M.

2012-01-01

186

Who possesses drug resistance genes in the aquatic environment?: sulfamethoxazole (SMX) resistance genes among the bacterial community in water environment of Metro-Manila, Philippines  

PubMed Central

Recent evidence has shown that antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) are ubiquitous in natural environments, including sites considered pristine. To understand the origin of ARGs and their dynamics, we must first define their actual presence in the natural bacterial assemblage. Here we found varying distribution profiles of sul genes in “colony forming bacterial assemblages” and “natural bacterial assemblages.” Our monitoring for antibiotic contamination revealed that sulfamethoxazole (SMX) is a major contaminant in aquatic environments of Metro-Manila, which would have been derived from human and animal use, and subsequently decreased through the process of outflow from source to the sea. The SMX-resistant bacterial rate evaluated by the colony forming unit showed 10 to 86% of the total colony numbers showed higher rates from freshwater sites compared to marine sites. When sul genes were quantified by qPCR, colony-forming bacteria conveyed sul1 and sul2 genes in freshwater and seawater (10?5–10?2 copy/16S) but not sul3. Among the natural bacterial assemblage, all sul1, sul2, and sul3 were detected (10?5–10?3 copy/16S), whereas all sul genes were at an almost non-detectable level in the freshwater assemblage. This study suggests that sul1 and sul2 are main sul genes in culturable bacteria, whereas sul3 is conveyed by non-culturable bacteria in the sea. As a result marine bacteria possess sul1, sul2 and sul3 genes in the marine environment. PMID:23641240

Suzuki, Satoru; Ogo, Mitsuko; Miller, Todd W.; Shimizu, Akiko; Takada, Hideshige; Siringan, Maria Auxilia T.

2013-01-01

187

Rapid pair-wise synteny analysis of large bacterial genomes using web-based GeneOrder4.0  

PubMed Central

Background The growing whole genome sequence databases necessitate the development of user-friendly software tools to mine these data. Web-based tools are particularly useful to wet-bench biologists as they enable platform-independent analysis of sequence data, without having to perform complex programming tasks and software compiling. Findings GeneOrder4.0 is a web-based "on-the-fly" synteny and gene order analysis tool for comparative bacterial genomics (ca. 8 Mb). It enables the visualization of synteny by plotting protein similarity scores between two genomes and it also provides visual annotation of "hypothetical" proteins from older archived genomes based on more recent annotations. Conclusions The web-based software tool GeneOrder4.0 is a user-friendly application that has been updated to allow the rapid analysis of synteny and gene order in large bacterial genomes. It is developed with the wet-bench researcher in mind. PMID:20178631

2010-01-01

188

[Effects of bacterial consortium EG03 on control of pepper bacterial wilt and rhizosphere microbial community characteristics in fields].  

PubMed

Bacterial consortium EG03, consisted of several different antagonistic bacteria against Ralstonia solanacearum, was demonstrated to efficiently control bacterial wilt of pepper in field with a biocontrol efficacy of 85.8%. The traditional dilution plate method, the most probable number (MPN) method and Biolog system were adopted to determine effects of EG03 on characteristics of microbial community in pepper rhizosphere. It's shown that EGO3's effects on microbial community in pepper rhizospheric soil varied with time. There were an increase in the number of fungus and Bacillus spp. to some extent and a significant increase in that of nitrogen-fixing bacteria. Biolog analysis showed that the curve between average well color development (AWCD) and incubation time was S-shaped for all the treatments and that the AWCD of pepper rhizospheric soil at the early stage was higher than at the late stage. The analysis of carbon source utilization showed that EG03 decreased microbial utilization of carbon source in short-term, and the microbial community of pepper rhizospheric soil at the late stage composed mainly of microbes depended on sugars as carbon resource. EG03 treatment could decrease the five microbial diversity indices of rhizospheric microbes in short term, then increased those indices instead, especially with significant (P < 0.05) increases in Simpson index and McIntosh evenness. PMID:25129950

Qiu, Jing-Ping; Huang, Yan-Xia; Wang, Chao; Yu, Yi-Yang; Ke, Hong-Jiao; Guo, Jian-Hua

2014-05-01

189

Light without substrate amendment: the bacterial luciferase gene cassette as a mammalian bioreporter  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Bioluminescent production represents a facile method for bioreporter detection in mammalian tissues. The lack of endogenous bioluminescent reactions in these tissues allows for high signal to noise ratios even at low signal strength compared to fluorescent signal detection. While the luciferase enzymes commonly employed for bioluminescent detection are those from class Insecta (firefly and click beetle luciferases), these are handicapped in that they require concurrent administration of a luciferin compound to elicit a bioluminescent signal. The bacterial luciferase (lux) gene cassette offers the advantages common to other bioluminescent proteins, but is simultaneously capable of synthesizing its own luciferin substrates using endogenously available cellular compounds. The longstanding shortcoming of the lux cassette has been its recalcitrance to function in the mammalian cellular environment. This paper will present an overview of the work completed to date to overcome this limitation and provide examples of mammalian lux-based bioreporter technologies that could provide the framework for advanced, biomedically relevant real-time sensor development.

Close, Dan M.; Xu, Tingting; Smartt, Abby E.; Jegier, Pat; Ripp, Steven A.; Sayler, Gary S.

2011-06-01

190

Combinatorial control of gene expression.  

PubMed

The complexity and diversity of eukaryotic organisms are a feat of nature's engineering. Pulling the strings of such an intricate machinery requires an even more masterful and crafty approach. Only the number and type of responses that they generate exceed the staggering proportions of environmental signals perceived and processed by eukaryotes. Hence, at first glance, the cell's sparse stockpile of controlling factors does not seem remotely adequate to carry out this response. The question as to how eukaryotes sense and respond to environmental cues has no single answer. It is an amalgamation, an interplay between several processes, pathways, and factors-a combinatorial control. A short description of some of the most important elements that operate this entire conglomerate is given in this paper. PMID:24069600

Bhattacharjee, Soumya; Renganaath, Kaushik; Mehrotra, Rajesh; Mehrotra, Sandhya

2013-01-01

191

Natural Transformation Facilitates Transfer of Transposons, Integrons and Gene Cassettes between Bacterial Species  

PubMed Central

We have investigated to what extent natural transformation acting on free DNA substrates can facilitate transfer of mobile elements including transposons, integrons and/or gene cassettes between bacterial species. Naturally transformable cells of Acinetobacter baylyi were exposed to DNA from integron-carrying strains of the genera Acinetobacter, Citrobacter, Enterobacter, Escherichia, Pseudomonas, and Salmonella to determine the nature and frequency of transfer. Exposure to the various DNA sources resulted in acquisition of antibiotic resistance traits as well as entire integrons and transposons, over a 24 h exposure period. DNA incorporation was not solely dependent on integrase functions or the genetic relatedness between species. DNA sequence analyses revealed that several mechanisms facilitated stable integration in the recipient genome depending on the nature of the donor DNA; homologous or heterologous recombination and various types of transposition (Tn21-like and IS26-like). Both donor strains and transformed isolates were extensively characterized by antimicrobial susceptibility testing, integron- and cassette-specific PCRs, DNA sequencing, pulsed field gel electrophoreses (PFGE), Southern blot hybridizations, and by re-transformation assays. Two transformant strains were also genome-sequenced. Our data demonstrate that natural transformation facilitates interspecies transfer of genetic elements, suggesting that the transient presence of DNA in the cytoplasm may be sufficient for genomic integration to occur. Our study provides a plausible explanation for why sequence-conserved transposons, IS elements and integrons can be found disseminated among bacterial species. Moreover, natural transformation of integron harboring populations of competent bacteria revealed that interspecies exchange of gene cassettes can be highly efficient, and independent on genetic relatedness between donor and recipient. In conclusion, natural transformation provides a much broader capacity for horizontal acquisitions of genetic elements and hence, resistance traits from divergent species than previously assumed. PMID:22876180

Domingues, Sara; Harms, Klaus; Fricke, W. Florian; Johnsen, Pål J.; da Silva, Gabriela J.; Nielsen, Kaare Magne

2012-01-01

192

Distinct Ectomycorrhizospheres Share Similar Bacterial Communities as Revealed by Pyrosequencing-Based Analysis of 16S rRNA Genes  

PubMed Central

Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences generated from Xerocomus pruinatus and Scleroderma citrinum ectomycorrhizospheres revealed that similar bacterial communities inhabited the two ectomycorrhizospheres in terms of phyla and genera, with an enrichment of the Burkholderia genus. Compared to the bulk soil habitat, ectomycorrhizospheres hosted significantly more Alpha-, Beta-, and Gammaproteobacteria. PMID:22307291

Oger, P.; Morin, E.; Frey-Klett, P.

2012-01-01

193

Journal of Theoretical Biology 244 (2007) 326348 Bacterial gene regulation in diauxic and non-diauxic growth  

E-print Network

Journal of Theoretical Biology 244 (2007) 326­348 Bacterial gene regulation in diauxic and non-diauxic growth Atul Naranga,�, Sergei S. Pilyuginb a Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Florida growth-limiting substrates, they exhibit a rich spectrum of substrate consumption patterns including

Pilyugin, Sergei S.

194

Bacterial competition reveals differential regulation of the pks genes by Bacillus subtilis.  

PubMed

Bacillus subtilis is adaptable to many environments in part due to its ability to produce a broad range of bioactive compounds. One such compound, bacillaene, is a linear polyketide/nonribosomal peptide. The pks genes encode the enzymatic megacomplex that synthesizes bacillaene. The majority of pks genes appear to be organized as a giant operon (>74 kb from pksC-pksR). In previous work (P. D. Straight, M. A. Fischbach, C. T. Walsh, D. Z. Rudner, and R. Kolter, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 104:305-310, 2007, doi:10.1073/pnas.0609073103), a deletion of the pks operon in B. subtilis was found to induce prodiginine production by Streptomyces coelicolor. Here, colonies of wild-type B. subtilis formed a spreading population that induced prodiginine production from Streptomyces lividans, suggesting differential regulation of pks genes and, as a result, bacillaene. While the parent colony showed widespread induction of pks expression among cells in the population, we found the spreading cells uniformly and transiently repressed the expression of the pks genes. To identify regulators that control pks genes, we first determined the pattern of pks gene expression in liquid culture. We next identified mutations in regulatory genes that disrupted the wild-type pattern of pks gene expression. We found that expression of the pks genes requires the master regulator of development, Spo0A, through its repression of AbrB and the stationary-phase regulator, CodY. Deletions of degU, comA, and scoC had moderate effects, disrupting the timing and level of pks gene expression. The observed patterns of expression suggest that complex regulation of bacillaene and other antibiotics optimizes competitive fitness for B. subtilis. PMID:24187085

Vargas-Bautista, Carol; Rahlwes, Kathryn; Straight, Paul

2014-02-01

195

Bacterial Competition Reveals Differential Regulation of the pks Genes by Bacillus subtilis  

PubMed Central

Bacillus subtilis is adaptable to many environments in part due to its ability to produce a broad range of bioactive compounds. One such compound, bacillaene, is a linear polyketide/nonribosomal peptide. The pks genes encode the enzymatic megacomplex that synthesizes bacillaene. The majority of pks genes appear to be organized as a giant operon (>74 kb from pksC-pksR). In previous work (P. D. Straight, M. A. Fischbach, C. T. Walsh, D. Z. Rudner, and R. Kolter, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 104:305–310, 2007, doi:10.1073/pnas.0609073103), a deletion of the pks operon in B. subtilis was found to induce prodiginine production by Streptomyces coelicolor. Here, colonies of wild-type B. subtilis formed a spreading population that induced prodiginine production from Streptomyces lividans, suggesting differential regulation of pks genes and, as a result, bacillaene. While the parent colony showed widespread induction of pks expression among cells in the population, we found the spreading cells uniformly and transiently repressed the expression of the pks genes. To identify regulators that control pks genes, we first determined the pattern of pks gene expression in liquid culture. We next identified mutations in regulatory genes that disrupted the wild-type pattern of pks gene expression. We found that expression of the pks genes requires the master regulator of development, Spo0A, through its repression of AbrB and the stationary-phase regulator, CodY. Deletions of degU, comA, and scoC had moderate effects, disrupting the timing and level of pks gene expression. The observed patterns of expression suggest that complex regulation of bacillaene and other antibiotics optimizes competitive fitness for B. subtilis. PMID:24187085

Vargas-Bautista, Carol; Rahlwes, Kathryn

2014-01-01

196

Engineering an Enhanced, Thermostable, Monomeric Bacterial Luciferase Gene As a Reporter in Plant Protoplasts  

PubMed Central

The application of the luxCDABE operon of the bioluminescent bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens as a reporter has been published for bacteria, yeast and mammalian cells. We report here the optimization of fused luxAB (the bacterial luciferase heterodimeric enzyme) expression, quantum yield and its application as a reporter gene in plant protoplasts. The fused luxAB gene was mutated by error prone PCR or chemical mutagenesis and screened for enhanced luciferase activity utilizing decanal as substrate. Positive luxAB mutants with superior quantum yield were subsequently shuffled by DNase I digestion and PCR assembly for generation of recombinants with additional increases in luciferase activity in bacteria. The coding sequence of the best recombinant, called eluxAB, was then optimized further to conform to Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) codon usage. A plant expression vector of the final, optimized eluxAB gene (opt-eluxAB) was constructed and transformed into protoplasts of Arabidopsis and maize (Zea mays). Luciferase activity was dramatically increased for opt-eluxAB compared to the original luxAB in Arabidopsis and maize cells. The opt-eluxAB driven by two copies of the 35S promoter expresses significantly higher than that driven by a single copy. These results indicate that the eluxAB gene can be used as a reporter in plant protoplasts. To our knowledge, this is the first report to engineer the bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens luciferase luxAB as a reporter by directed evolution which paved the way for further improving the luxAB reporter in the future. PMID:25271765

Song, Yunhong; Wei, Jinsong; Li, Changfu; Wang, Tietao; Wang, Yao; Zhao, Tianyong; Shen, Xihui

2014-01-01

197

Engineering an enhanced, thermostable, monomeric bacterial luciferase gene as a reporter in plant protoplasts.  

PubMed

The application of the luxCDABE operon of the bioluminescent bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens as a reporter has been published for bacteria, yeast and mammalian cells. We report here the optimization of fused luxAB (the bacterial luciferase heterodimeric enzyme) expression, quantum yield and its application as a reporter gene in plant protoplasts. The fused luxAB gene was mutated by error prone PCR or chemical mutagenesis and screened for enhanced luciferase activity utilizing decanal as substrate. Positive luxAB mutants with superior quantum yield were subsequently shuffled by DNase I digestion and PCR assembly for generation of recombinants with additional increases in luciferase activity in bacteria. The coding sequence of the best recombinant, called eluxAB, was then optimized further to conform to Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) codon usage. A plant expression vector of the final, optimized eluxAB gene (opt-eluxAB) was constructed and transformed into protoplasts of Arabidopsis and maize (Zea mays). Luciferase activity was dramatically increased for opt-eluxAB compared to the original luxAB in Arabidopsis and maize cells. The opt-eluxAB driven by two copies of the 35S promoter expresses significantly higher than that driven by a single copy. These results indicate that the eluxAB gene can be used as a reporter in plant protoplasts. To our knowledge, this is the first report to engineer the bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens luciferase luxAB as a reporter by directed evolution which paved the way for further improving the luxAB reporter in the future. PMID:25271765

Cui, Boyu; Zhang, Lifeng; Song, Yunhong; Wei, Jinsong; Li, Changfu; Wang, Tietao; Wang, Yao; Zhao, Tianyong; Shen, Xihui

2014-01-01

198

Overexpression of bacterial ethylene-forming enzyme gene in Trichoderma reesei enhanced the production of ethylene  

PubMed Central

In order to efficiently utilize natural cellulose materials to produce ethylene, three expression vectors containing the ethylene-forming enzyme (efe) gene from Pseudomonas syringae pv. glycinea were constructed. The target gene was respectively controlled by different promoters: cbh I promoter from Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolases I gene, gpd promoter from Aspergillus nidulans glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene and pgk I promoter from T. reesei 3-phosphoglycerate kinase I gene. After transforming into T. reesei QM9414, 43 stable transformants were obtained by PCR amplification and ethylene determination. Southern blot analysis of 14 transformants demonstrated that the efe gene was integrated into chromosomal DNA with copy numbers from 1 to 4. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis of 6 transformants showed that the heterologous gene was transcribed. By using wheat straw as a carbon source, the ethylene production rates of aforementioned 14 transformants were measured. Transformant C30-3 with pgk I promoter had the highest ethylene production (4,012 nl h-1 l-1). This indicates that agricultural wastes could be used to produce ethylene in recombinant filamentous fungus T. reesei. PMID:20150979

Chen, Xi; Liang, Yong; Hua, Jing; Tao, Li; Qin, Wensheng; Chen, Sanfeng

2010-01-01

199

Heterochromatin and Epigenetic Control of Gene Expression  

Microsoft Academic Search

Eukaryotic DNA is organized into structurally distinct domains that regulate gene expression and chromosome behavior. Epigenetically heritable domains of heterochromatin control the structure and expression of large chromosome domains and are required for proper chromosome segregation. Recent studies have identified many of the enzymes and structural proteins that work together to assemble heterochromatin. The assembly process appears to occur in

Shiv I. S. Grewal; Danesh Moazed

2003-01-01

200

Transcriptional Control in the Segmentation Gene Network  

E-print Network

¤ , Eric D. Siggia2 , Ulrike Gaul1* 1 Laboratory of Developmental Neurogenetics, Rockefeller UniversityTranscriptional Control in the Segmentation Gene Network of Drosophila Mark D. Schroeder1[ , Michael Pearce1[ , John Fak1[ , HongQing Fan1 , Ulrich Unnerstall1 , Eldon Emberly2 , Nikolaus Rajewsky2

Siggia, Eric

201

Biodegradation of atrazine by three transgenic grasses and alfalfa expressing a modified bacterial atrazine chlorohydrolase gene  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The widespread use of atrazine and other s-triazine herbicides to control weeds in agricultural production fields has impacted surface and ground water in the United States and elsewhere. We previously reported the cloning, sequencing, and expression of six genes involved in the atrazine biodegradat...

202

Control of gene expression in trypanosomes.  

PubMed Central

Trypanosomes are protozoan agents of major parasitic diseases such as Chagas' disease in South America and sleeping sickness of humans and nagana disease of cattle in Africa. They are transmitted to mammalian hosts by specific insect vectors. Their life cycle consists of a succession of differentiation and growth phases requiring regulated gene expression to adapt to the changing extracellular environment. Typical of such stage-specific expression is that of the major surface antigens of Trypanosoma brucei, procyclin in the procyclic (insect) form and the variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) in the bloodstream (mammalian) form. In trypanosomes, the regulation of gene expression is effected mainly at posttranscriptional levels, since primary transcription of most of the genes occurs in long polycistronic units and is constitutive. The transcripts are processed by transsplicing and polyadenylation under the influence of intergenic polypyrimidine tracts. These events show some developmental regulation. Untranslated sequences of the mRNAs seem to play a prominent role in the stage-specific control of individual gene expression, through a modulation of mRNA abundance. The VSG and procyclin transcription units exhibit particular features that are probably related to the need for a high level of expression. The promoters and RNA polymerase driving the expression of these units resemble those of the ribosomal genes. Their mutually exclusive expression is ensured by controls operating at several levels, including RNA elongation. Antigenic variation in the bloodstream is achieved through DNA rearrangements or alternative activation of the telomeric VSG gene expression sites. Recent discoveries, such as the existence of a novel nucleotide in telomeric DNA and the generation of point mutations in VSG genes, have shed new light on the mechanisms and consequences of antigenic variation. PMID:7603410

Vanhamme, L; Pays, E

1995-01-01

203

14. GENE PUMPING STATION CONTROL ROOM AS SEEN FROM MAIN ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

14. GENE PUMPING STATION CONTROL ROOM AS SEEN FROM MAIN STATION MANAGER'S CONTROL DESK. ELECTRICAL CONTROL INDICATORS AND CONTROLS FOR REGULATING ELECTRICITY INTO PLANT AS WELL AS SYNCHRONIZING STARTUP OF PUMPS. - Gene Pump Plant, South of Gene Wash Reservoir, 2 miles west of Whitsett Pump Plant, Parker Dam, San Bernardino County, CA

204

Using Bacterial Extract along with Differential Gene Expression in Acropora millepora Larvae to Decouple the Processes of Attachment and Metamorphosis  

PubMed Central

Biofilms of the bacterium Pseudoalteromonas induce metamorphosis of acroporid coral larvae. The bacterial metabolite tetrabromopyrrole (TBP), isolated from an extract of Pseudoalteromonas sp. associated with the crustose coralline alga (CCA) Neogoniolithon fosliei, induced coral larval metamorphosis (100%) with little or no attachment (0–2%). To better understand the molecular events and mechanisms underpinning the induction of Acropora millepora larval metamorphosis, including cell proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, migration, adhesion and biomineralisation, two novel coral gene expression assays were implemented. These involved the use of reverse-transcriptase quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) and employed 47 genes of interest (GOI), selected based on putative roles in the processes of settlement and metamorphosis. Substantial differences in transcriptomic responses of GOI were detected following incubation of A. millepora larvae with a threshold concentration and 10-fold elevated concentration of TBP-containing extracts of Pseudoalteromonas sp. The notable and relatively abrupt changes of the larval body structure during metamorphosis correlated, at the molecular level, with significant differences (p<0.05) in gene expression profiles of 24 GOI, 12 hours post exposure. Fourteen of those GOI also presented differences in expression (p<0.05) following exposure to the threshold concentration of bacterial TBP-containing extract. The specificity of the bacterial TBP-containing extract to induce the metamorphic stage in A. millepora larvae without attachment, using a robust, low cost, accurate, ecologically relevant and highly reproducible RT-qPCR assay, allowed partially decoupling of the transcriptomic processes of attachment and metamorphosis. The bacterial TBP-containing extract provided a unique opportunity to monitor the regulation of genes exclusively involved in the process of metamorphosis, contrasting previous gene expression studies that utilized cues, such as crustose coralline algae, biofilms or with GLW-amide neuropeptides that stimulate the entire onset of larval metamorphosis and attachment. PMID:22655067

Siboni, Nachshon; Abrego, David; Seneca, Francois; Motti, Cherie A.; Andreakis, Nikos; Tebben, Jan; Blackall, Linda L.; Harder, Tilmann

2012-01-01

205

NEWS AND VIEWS Modeling gene expression control using Omes Law  

E-print Network

to map gene regulation networks. Many of the molecular players that govern gene expression are knownNEWS AND VIEWS Modeling gene expression control using Omes Law Harmen J Bussemaker Department factors (TFs) to specific sites in the genome is a crucial step in the molecular process controlling gene

Nguyen, Dat H.

206

MECHANISMS FOR REDOX CONTROL OF GENE EXPRESSION  

Microsoft Academic Search

? Abstract This review discusses various mechanisms,that regulatory proteins use to control gene expression,in response,to alterations in redox. The transcription fac- tor SoxR contains stable [2Fe-2S] centers that promote,transcription activation when oxidized. FNR contains [4Fe-4S] centers that disassemble under oxidizing conditions, which affects DNA-binding activity. FixL is a histidine sensor kinase that utilizes heme as a cofactor to bind oxygen,

Carl E. Bauer; Sylvie Elsen; Terry H. Bird

1999-01-01

207

An exceptional horizontal gene transfer in plastids: gene replacement by a distant bacterial paralog and evidence that haptophyte and cryptophyte plastids are sisters  

PubMed Central

Background Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) to the plant mitochondrial genome has recently been shown to occur at a surprisingly high rate; however, little evidence has been found for HGT to the plastid genome, despite extensive sequencing. In this study, we analyzed all genes from sequenced plastid genomes to unearth any neglected cases of HGT and to obtain a measure of the overall extent of HGT to the plastid. Results Although several genes gave strongly supported conflicting trees under certain conditions, we are confident of HGT in only a single case beyond the rubisco HGT already reported. Most of the conflicts involved near neighbors connected by long branches (e.g. red algae and their secondary hosts), where phylogenetic methods are prone to mislead. However, three genes – clpP, ycf2, and rpl36 – provided strong support for taxa moving far from their organismal position. Further taxon sampling of clpP and ycf2 resulted in rejection of HGT due to long-branch attraction and a serious error in the published plastid genome sequence of Oenothera elata, respectively. A single new case, a bacterial rpl36 gene transferred into the ancestor of the cryptophyte and haptophyte plastids, appears to be a true HGT event. Interestingly, this rpl36 gene is a distantly related paralog of the rpl36 type found in other plastids and most eubacteria. Moreover, the transferred gene has physically replaced the native rpl36 gene, yet flanking genes and intergenic regions show no sign of HGT. This suggests that gene replacement somehow occurred by recombination at the very ends of rpl36, without the level and length of similarity normally expected to support recombination. Conclusion The rpl36 HGT discovered in this study is of considerable interest in terms of both molecular mechanism and phylogeny. The plastid acquisition of a bacterial rpl36 gene via HGT provides the first strong evidence for a sister-group relationship between haptophyte and cryptophyte plastids to the exclusion of heterokont and alveolate plastids. Moreover, the bacterial gene has replaced the native plastid rpl36 gene by an uncertain mechanism that appears inconsistent with existing models for the recombinational basis of gene conversion. PMID:16956407

Rice, Danny W; Palmer, Jeffrey D

2006-01-01

208

A study of iterative type II polyketide synthases, using bacterial genes cloned from soil DNA: a means to access and use genes from uncultured microorganisms.  

PubMed Central

To examine as randomly as possible the role of the beta-ketoacyl and acyl carrier protein (ACP) components of bacterial type II polyketide synthases (PKSs), homologs of the chain-length-factor (CLF) genes were cloned from the environmental community of microorganisms. With PCR primers derived from conserved regions of known ketosynthase (KSalpha) and ACP genes specifying the formation of 16- to 24-carbon polyketides, two CLF (KSbeta) genes were cloned from unclassified streptomycetes isolated from the soil, and two were cloned from soil DNA without the prior isolation of the parent microorganism. The sequence and deduced product of each gene were distinct from those of known KSbeta genes and, by phylogenetic analysis, belonged to antibiotic-producing PKS gene clusters. Hybrid PKS gene cassettes were constructed with each novel KSbeta gene substituted for the actI-ORF2 or tcmL KSbeta subunit genes, along with the respective actI-ORF1 or tcmK KSalpha, tcmM ACP, and tcmN cyclase genes, and were found to produce an octaketide or decaketide product characteristic of the ones known to be made by the heterologous KSalpha gene partner. Since substantially less than 1% of the microorganisms present in soil are thought to be cultivatable by standard methods, this work demonstrates a potential way to gain access to a more extensive range of microbial molecular diversity and to biosynthetic pathways whose products can be tested for biological applications. PMID:9393700

Seow, K T; Meurer, G; Gerlitz, M; Wendt-Pienkowski, E; Hutchinson, C R; Davies, J

1997-01-01

209

Integrating chemical and genetic silencing strategies to identify host kinase-phosphatase inhibitor networks that control bacterial infection.  

PubMed

Every year three million people die as a result of bacterial infections, and this number may further increase due to resistance to current antibiotics. These antibiotics target almost all essential bacterial processes, leaving only a few new targets for manipulation. The host proteome has many more potential targets for manipulation in order to control bacterial infection, as exemplified by the observation that inhibiting the host kinase Akt supports the elimination of different intracellular bacteria including Salmonella and M. tuberculosis. If host kinases are involved in the control of bacterial infections, phosphatases could be as well. Here we present an integrated small interference RNA and small molecule screen to identify host phosphatase-inhibitor combinations that control bacterial infection. We define host phosphatases inhibiting intracellular growth of Salmonella and identify corresponding inhibitors for the dual specificity phosphatases DUSP11 and 27. Pathway analysis places many kinases and phosphatases controlling bacterial infection in an integrated pathway centered around Akt. This network controls host cell metabolism, survival, and growth and bacterial survival and reflect a natural host cell response to bacterial infection. Inhibiting two enzyme classes with opposite activities-kinases and phosphatases-may be a new strategy to overcome infections by antibiotic-resistant bacteria. PMID:24274083

Albers, Harald M H G; Kuijl, Coenraad; Bakker, Jeroen; Hendrickx, Loes; Wekker, Sharida; Farhou, Nadha; Liu, Nora; Blasco-Moreno, Bernat; Scanu, Tiziana; den Hertog, Jeroen; Celie, Patrick; Ovaa, Huib; Neefjes, Jacques

2014-02-21

210

Integrating Chemical and Genetic Silencing Strategies To Identify Host Kinase-Phosphatase Inhibitor Networks That Control Bacterial Infection  

PubMed Central

Every year three million people die as a result of bacterial infections, and this number may further increase due to resistance to current antibiotics. These antibiotics target almost all essential bacterial processes, leaving only a few new targets for manipulation. The host proteome has many more potential targets for manipulation in order to control bacterial infection, as exemplified by the observation that inhibiting the host kinase Akt supports the elimination of different intracellular bacteria including Salmonella and M. tuberculosis. If host kinases are involved in the control of bacterial infections, phosphatases could be as well. Here we present an integrated small interference RNA and small molecule screen to identify host phosphatase-inhibitor combinations that control bacterial infection. We define host phosphatases inhibiting intracellular growth of Salmonella and identify corresponding inhibitors for the dual specificity phosphatases DUSP11 and 27. Pathway analysis places many kinases and phosphatases controlling bacterial infection in an integrated pathway centered around Akt. This network controls host cell metabolism, survival, and growth and bacterial survival and reflect a natural host cell response to bacterial infection. Inhibiting two enzyme classes with opposite activities–kinases and phosphatases–may be a new strategy to overcome infections by antibiotic-resistant bacteria. PMID:24274083

2013-01-01

211

Biapenem versus meropenem in the treatment of bacterial infections: a multicenter, randomized, controlled clinical trial  

PubMed Central

Background & objectives: Biapenem is a newly developed carbapenem to treat moderate and severe bacterial infections. This multicenter, randomized, parallel-controlled clinical trial was conducted to compare the clinical efficacy, bacterial eradication rates and safety of biapenem and meropenem in the treatment of bacterial lower respiratory tract infections and urinary tract infections (UTIs) at nine centres in China. Methods: Patients diagnosed with bacterial lower respiratory tract infections or UTIs were randomly assigned to receive either biapenem (300 mg every 12 h) or meropenem (500 mg every 8 h) by intravenous infusion for 7 to 14 days according to their disease severity. The overall clinical efficacy, bacterial eradication rates and drug-related adverse reactions of biapenem and meropenem were analyzed. Results: A total of 272 enrolled cases were included in the intent-to-treat (ITT) analysis and safety analysis. There were no differences in demographics and baseline medical characteristics between biapenem group and meropenem group. The overall clinical efficacies of biapenem and meropenem were not significantly different, 94.70 per cent (125/132) vs. 93.94 per cent (124/132). The overall bacterial eradication rates of biapenem and meropenem showed no significant difference, 96.39 per cent (80/83) vs. 93.75 per cent (75/80). Drug-related adverse reactions were comparable in biapenem and meropenem groups with the incidence of 11.76 per cent (16/136) and 15.44 per cent (21/136), respectively. The most common symptoms of biapenem-related adverse reactions were rash (2.2%) and gastrointestinal distress (1.5%). Interpretation & conclusions: Biapenem was non-inferior to meropenem and was well-tolerated in the treatment of moderate and severe lower respiratory tract infections and UTIs. PMID:24521647

Wang, Xiaohui; Zhang, Xiaoke; Zong, Zhiyong; Yu, Rujia; Lv, Xiaoju; Xin, Jianbao; Tong, Chaohui; Hao, Qinglin; Qin, Zhiqiang; Xiong, Ying; Liu, Hong; Ding, Guohua; Hu, Chengping

2013-01-01

212

Levels of Bacterial Community Diversity in Four Arid Soils Compared by Cultivation and 16S rRNA Gene Cloning  

PubMed Central

Techniques based on amplification of 16S rRNA genes for comparing bacterial communities are now widely used in microbial ecology, but calibration of these techniques with traditional tools, such as cultivation, has been conspicuously absent. In this study, we compared levels of bacterial community diversity in two pinyon rhizosphere soil samples and two between-tree (interspace) soil samples by analyzing 179 cultivated bacterial isolates and 801 16S rRNA genes amplified from extracted soil DNA. Phylotypes were defined by performing a restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences with the enzymes RsaI and BstUI. The average level of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of members of a phylotype was 86.6% based on an analysis of partial sequences. A total of 498 phylotypes were identified among the 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) clones, while 34 phylotypes occurred among the cultivated isolates. Analysis of sequences from a subset of the phylotypes showed that at least seven bacterial divisions were represented in the clone libraries, whereas the isolates represented only three. The phylotype richness, frequency distribution (evenness), and composition of the four culture collections and the four clone libraries were investigated by using a variety of diversity indices. Although cultivation and 16S rRNA cloning analyses gave contradictory descriptions of the relative phylotype richness for one of the four environments, the two methods identified qualitatively consistent relationships when levels of evenness were compared. The levels of phylotype similarity between communities were uniformly low (15 to 31%). Both methods consistently indicated that one environment was distinct from the other three. Our data illustrate that while 16S rDNA cloning and cultivation generally describe similar relationships between soil microbial communities, significant discrepancies can occur. PMID:10103265

Dunbar, John; Takala, Shannon; Barns, Susan M.; Davis, Jody A.; Kuske, Cheryl R.

1999-01-01

213

Transgenic tomato cv. Pusa Uphar expressing a bacterial mannitol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase gene confers abiotic stress tolerance  

Microsoft Academic Search

A bacterial mannitol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase (mtlD) gene driven by the constitutive cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter was transferred into tomato plants using an Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation protocol in an attempt to improve abiotic stress tolerance in the transformed plants. Transgene integration\\u000a was confirmed by PCR analysis and Southern blot analysis, and transgene expression was confirmed by reverse transcription\\u000a (RT)-PCR and

Neeraj KhareDanswrang; Danswrang Goyary; Narendra Kumar Singh; Pramila Shah; Meenal Rathore; Sivalingam Anandhan; Dinesh Sharma; Mohomad Arif; Zakwan Ahmed

2010-01-01

214

Creation of a transgenic mouse for hair-cell gene targeting by using a modified bacterial artificial chromosome containing Prestin.  

PubMed

We made a transgenic mouse that expresses Cre recombinase activity in inner ear hair cells by using a modified bacterial artificial chromosome containing Prestin. Cre recombinase activity was restricted to inner and outer hair cells, a subset of vestibular hair cells, spiral and vestibular ganglia in the inner ear, and a subset of cells in the testis, epididymis, and ear bone. This mouse will be useful for hair-cell-specific gene targeting. PMID:15305300

Tian, Yong; Li, Mingyuan; Fritzsch, Bernd; Zuo, Jian

2004-09-01

215

INFLUENCE OF ROOT EXUDATES AND BACTERIAL METABOLIC ACTIVITY ON APPARENT CONJUGAL GENE TRANSFER FREQUENCIES IN THE RHIZOSPHERE OF WATER GRASS (ECHINOCLORA CRUSGALLI)  

EPA Science Inventory

The premise that genetic exchange is primarily localized in niches characterized by dense bacterial populations and high availability of growth substrates was tested by relating conjugal gene transfer of an RP4 derivative to availability of root exudates and bacterial metabolic a...

216

Genome-Wide Identification of Hsp40 Genes in Channel Catfish and Their Regulated Expression after Bacterial Infection  

PubMed Central

Heat shock proteins (HSPs) consist of a large group of chaperones whose expression is induced by high temperature, hypoxia, infection and a number of other stresses. Among all the HSPs, Hsp40 is the largest HSP family, which bind to Hsp70 ATPase domain in assisting protein folding. In this study, we identified 57 hsp40s in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) through in silico analysis using RNA-Seq and genome databases. These genes can be classified into three different types, Type I, II and III, based on their structural similarities. Phylogenetic and syntenic analyses provided strong evidence in supporting the orthologies of these HSPs. Meta-analyses of RNA-Seq datasets were conducted to analyze expression profile of Hsp40s following bacterial infection. Twenty seven hsp40s were found to be significantly up- or down-regulated in the liver after infection with E. ictaluri; 19 hsp40s were found to be significantly regulated in the intestine after infection with E. ictaluri; and 19 hsp40s were found to be significantly regulated in the gill following infection with F. columnare. Altogether, a total of 42 Hsp40 genes were regulated under disease situations involving three tissues and two bacterial infections. The significant regulated expression of Hsp40 genes after bacterial infection suggested their involvement in disease defenses in catfish. PMID:25542027

Li, Chao; Yao, Jun; Jiang, Chen; Li, Yun; Liu, Shikai; Liu, Zhanjiang

2014-01-01

217

Genome-wide identification of hsp40 genes in channel catfish and their regulated expression after bacterial infection.  

PubMed

Heat shock proteins (HSPs) consist of a large group of chaperones whose expression is induced by high temperature, hypoxia, infection and a number of other stresses. Among all the HSPs, Hsp40 is the largest HSP family, which bind to Hsp70 ATPase domain in assisting protein folding. In this study, we identified 57 hsp40s in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) through in silico analysis using RNA-Seq and genome databases. These genes can be classified into three different types, Type I, II and III, based on their structural similarities. Phylogenetic and syntenic analyses provided strong evidence in supporting the orthologies of these HSPs. Meta-analyses of RNA-Seq datasets were conducted to analyze expression profile of Hsp40s following bacterial infection. Twenty seven hsp40s were found to be significantly up- or down-regulated in the liver after infection with E. ictaluri; 19 hsp40s were found to be significantly regulated in the intestine after infection with E. ictaluri; and 19 hsp40s were found to be significantly regulated in the gill following infection with F. columnare. Altogether, a total of 42 Hsp40 genes were regulated under disease situations involving three tissues and two bacterial infections. The significant regulated expression of Hsp40 genes after bacterial infection suggested their involvement in disease defenses in catfish. PMID:25542027

Song, Lin; Zhang, Jiaren; Li, Chao; Yao, Jun; Jiang, Chen; Li, Yun; Liu, Shikai; Liu, Zhanjiang

2014-01-01

218

Catfish hepcidin gene is expressed in a wide range of tissues and exhibits tissue-specific upregulation after bacterial infection.  

PubMed

Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are important components of the host innate immune response against microbial invasion. The cysteine-rich AMPs such as defensin and hepcidin have been extensively studied from various organisms, but their role in disease defense in catfish is unknown. As a first step, we sequenced a hepcidin cDNA from both channel catfish and blue catfish, and characterized the channel catfish hepcidin gene. The channel catfish hepcidin gene consists of two introns and three exons that encode a peptide of 96 amino acids. The amino acid sequences and gene organization were conserved between catfish and other organisms. In contrast to its almost exclusive expression in the liver in humans, the channel catfish hepcidin gene was expressed in a wide range of tissues except brain. Its expression was detected early during embryonic and larval development, and induced after bacterial infection with Edwardsiella ictaluri, the causative agent of enteric septicemia of catfish (ESC) in a tissue-specific manner. The upregulation was observed in the spleen and head kidney, but not in the liver. The expression of hepcidin was upregulated 1--3 days after challenge, but returned to normal levels at 7 days after challenge. The expression profile of the catfish hepcidin gene during the course of bacterial infection mirrors those of inflammatory proteins such as chemokines, suggesting an important role for hepcidin during inflammatory responses. PMID:15935472

Bao, Baolong; Peatman, Eric; Li, Ping; He, Chongbo; Liu, Zhanjiang

2005-01-01

219

Copy Number Variation of the Beta Defensin Gene Cluster on Chromosome 8p Influences the Bacterial Microbiota within the Nasopharynx of Otitis-Prone Children  

PubMed Central

As there is increasing evidence that aberrant defensin expression is related to susceptibility for infectious disease and inflammatory disorders, we sought to determine if copy number of the beta-defensin gene cluster located on chromosome 8p23.1 (DEFB107, 106, 105, 104, 103, DEFB4 and SPAG11), that shows copy number variation as a block, was associated with susceptibility to otitis media (OM). The gene DEFB103 within this complex encodes human beta defensin-3 (hBD-3), an antimicrobial peptide (AP) expressed by epithelial cells that line the mammalian airway, important for defense of mucosal surfaces and previously shown to have bactericidal activity in vitro against multiple human pathogens, including the three that predominate in OM. To this end, we conducted a retrospective case-control study of 113 OM prone children and 267 controls aged five to sixty months. We identified the copy number of the above defined beta-defensin gene cluster (DEFB-CN) in each study subject by paralogue ratio assays. The mean DEFB-CN was indistinguishable between subjects classified as OM prone based on a recent history of multiple episodes of OM and control subjects who had no history of OM (4.4±0.96 versus 4.4±1.08, respectively: Odds Ratio [OR]: 1.16 (95% CI: 0.61, 2.20). Despite a lack of direct association, we observed a statistically significant correlation between DEFB-CN and nasopharyngeal bacterial colonization patterns. Collectively, our findings suggested that susceptibility to OM might be mediated by genetic variation among individuals, wherein a DEFB-CN less than 4 exerts a marked influence on the microbiota of the nasopharynx, specifically with regard to colonization by the three predominant bacterial pathogens of OM. PMID:24867293

Bevins, Charles L.; Hollox, Edward J.; Bakaletz, Lauren O.

2014-01-01

220

Integration of Biological Control Agents and Systemic Acquired Resistance Inducers Against Bacterial Spot on Tomato  

Microsoft Academic Search

Obradovic, A., Jones, J. B., Momol, M. T., Olson, S. M., Jackson, L. E., Balogh, B., Guven, K., and Iriarte, F. B. 2005. Integration of biological control agents and systemic acquired resistance inducers against bacterial spot on tomato. Plant Dis. 89:712-716. Two strains of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria, two systemic acquired resistance inducers (harpin and acibenzolar-S-methyl), host-specific unformulated bacteriophages, and two

A. Obradovic; J. B. Jones; M. T. Momol; S. M. Olson; L. E. Jackson; B. Balogh; K. Guven; F. B. Iriarte

2005-01-01

221

Characterization of new bacterial catabolic genes and mobile genetic elements by high throughput genetic screening of a soil metagenomic library.  

PubMed

A mix of oligonucleotide probes was used to hybridize soil metagenomic DNA from a fosmid clone library spotted on high density membranes. The pooled radio-labeled probes were designed to target genes encoding glycoside hydrolases GH18, dehalogenases, bacterial laccases and mobile genetic elements (integrases from integrons and insertion sequences). Positive hybridizing spots were affiliated to the corresponding clones in the library and the metagenomic inserts were sequenced. After assembly and annotation, new coding DNA sequences related to genes of interest were identified with low protein similarity against the closest hits in databases. This work highlights the sensitivity of DNA/DNA hybridization techniques as an effective and complementary way to recover novel genes from large metagenomic clone libraries. This study also supports that some of the identified catabolic genes might be associated with horizontal transfer events. PMID:24721211

Jacquiod, Samuel; Demanèche, Sandrine; Franqueville, Laure; Ausec, Luka; Xu, Zhuofei; Delmont, Tom O; Dunon, Vincent; Cagnon, Christine; Mandic-Mulec, Ines; Vogel, Timothy M; Simonet, Pascal

2014-11-20

222

Soil type affects plant colonization, activity and catabolic gene expression of inoculated bacterial strains during phytoremediation of diesel.  

PubMed

The combined use of plants and associated microorganisms has great potential for cleaning up soils contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons. Apart from environmental conditions the physicochemical properties of the soil are the main factors influencing the survival and activity of an inoculated strain as well as the growth of plants. This study examined the effect of different soil types (sandy, loamy sand and loam) on the survival, gene abundance and catabolic gene expression of two inoculated strains (Pseudomonas sp. strain ITRI53 and Pantoea sp. strain BTRH79) in the rhizosphere and shoot interior of Italian ryegrass vegetated in diesel contaminated soils. High colonization, gene abundance and expression in loamy soils were observed. By contrast, low colonization, gene abundance and absence of gene expression in sandy soil were found. The highest levels of genes expression and hydrocarbon degradation were seen in loamy soil that had been inoculated with BTRH79 and were significantly higher compared to those in other soils. A positive correlation was observed between gene expression and hydrocarbon degradation indicating that catabolic gene expression is necessary for contaminant degradation. These results suggest that soil type influences the bacterial colonization and microbial activities and subsequently the efficiency of contaminant degradation. PMID:21216097

Afzal, Muhammad; Yousaf, Sohail; Reichenauer, Thomas G; Kuffner, Melanie; Sessitsch, Angela

2011-02-28

223

Nature of bacterial colonization influences transcription of mucin genes in mice during the first week of life  

PubMed Central

Background Postnatal regulation of the small intestinal mucus layer is potentially important in the development of adult gut functionality. We hypothesized that the nature of bacterial colonization affects mucus gene regulation in early life. We thus analyzed the influence of the presence of a conventional microbiota as well as two selected monocolonizing bacterial strains on the transcription of murine genes involved in mucus layer development during the first week of life. Mouse pups (N?=?8/group) from differently colonized dams: Germ-free (GF), conventional specific pathogen free (SPF), monocolonized with either Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM (Lb) or Escherichia coli Nissle (Ec) were analyzed by qPCR on isolated ileal tissue sections from postnatal days 1 and 6 (PND1, PND6) after birth with respect to: (i) transcription of specific genes involved in mucus production (Muc1-4, Tff3) and (ii) amounts of 16S rRNA of Lactobacillus and E. coli. Quantification of 16S rRNA genes was performed to obtain a measure for amounts of colonized bacteria. Results We found a microbiota-independent transcriptional increase of all five mucus genes from PND1 to PND6. Furthermore, the relative level of transcription of certain mucus genes on PND1 was increased by the presence of bacteria. This was observed for Tff3 in the SPF, Ec, and Lb groups; for Muc2 in SPF; and for Muc3 and Muc4 in Ec and Lb, respectively. Detection of bacterial 16S rRNA genes levels above the qPCR detection level occurred only on PND6 and only for some of the colonized animals. On PND6, we found significantly lower levels of Muc1, Muc2 and Muc4 gene transcription for Lb animals with detectable Lactobacillus levels as compared to animals with Lactobacillus levels below the detection limit. Conclusions In summary, our data show that development of the expression of genes encoding secreted (Muc2/Tff3) and membrane-bound (Muc1/Muc3/Muc4) mucus regulatory proteins, respectively, is distinct and that the onset of this development may be accelerated by specific groups of bacteria present or absent at the mucosal site. PMID:22857743

2012-01-01

224

Information dimension analysis of bacterial essential and nonessential genes based on chaos game representation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Essential genes are indispensable for the survival of an organism. Investigating features associated with gene essentiality is fundamental to the prediction and identification of the essential genes. Selecting features associated with gene essentiality is fundamental to predict essential genes with computational techniques. We use fractal theory to make comparative analysis of essential and nonessential genes in bacteria. The information dimensions of essential genes and nonessential genes available in the DEG database for 27 bacteria are calculated based on their gene chaos game representations (CGRs). It is found that weak positive linear correlation exists between information dimension and gene length. Moreover, for genes of similar length, the average information dimension of essential genes is larger than that of nonessential genes. This indicates that essential genes show less regularity and higher complexity than nonessential genes. Our results show that for bacterium with a similar number of essential genes and nonessential genes, the CGR information dimension is helpful for the classification of essential genes and nonessential genes. Therefore, the gene CGR information dimension is very probably a useful gene feature for a genetic algorithm predicting essential genes.

Zhou, Qian; Yu, Yong-ming

2014-11-01

225

Bacterial diversity in maize rhizospheres: conclusions on the use of genetic profiles based on PCR-amplified partial small subunit rRNA genes in ecological studies.  

PubMed

A cultivation-independent approach based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified partial small subunit rRNA genes and genetic profiling by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) was used to characterize the bacterial diversity inhabiting the rhizosphere of maize plants grown on an agricultural field. The community structures of two cultivars, a genetically engineered and a nonengineered variety, different herbicide regimes and soil tillage were compared with each other at two sampling dates. SSCP-profiles were generated with DNA from bacterial cell consortia with primers hybridizing to evolutionarily highly conserved rRNA gene regions. On silver-stained gels, each profile consisted of approx. 50 distinguishable bands. Similarity analyses of patterns recorded by digital image analyses could not detect any difference between cultivars or treatments that was greater than the variability between replicates. A total of 54 sequences recovered from different bands were identified and grouped into operational taxonomical units (OTUs). Surprisingly, only five of 40 OTUs contained sequences of both samplings. Three different bands from a profile were selected to test whether this small overlap was due to an incomplete recovery of sequences. From a faint band, two different OTUs were found when 12 clones were analysed, and from two strong bands 24 and 22 OTUs were detected from a total of 26 and 36 clones, respectively. The OTUs belonged to phylogenetically different groups of bacteria. Gene probes that were developed to target different bands of the profiles, however, indicated in Southern blot analyses that patterns between treatments, replicates and samplings, and even from two different growing seasons were highly conserved. Our study demonstrates that community profiles can consist of more sequences than detectable by staining and that gene probes in Southern blot can be a useful control to investigate the composition of microbial communities by genetic profiles. PMID:12492893

Schmalenberger, Achim; Tebbe, Christoph C

2003-01-01

226

Low-shear modeled microgravity: a global environmental regulatory signal affecting bacterial gene expression, physiology, and pathogenesis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Bacteria inhabit an impressive variety of ecological niches and must adapt constantly to changing environmental conditions. While numerous environmental signals have been examined for their effect on bacteria, the effects of mechanical forces such as shear stress and gravity have only been investigated to a limited extent. However, several important studies have demonstrated a key role for the environmental signals of low shear and/or microgravity in the regulation of bacterial gene expression, physiology, and pathogenesis [Chem. Rec. 1 (2001) 333; Appl. Microbiol. Biotechnol. 54 (2000) 33; Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 63 (1997) 4090; J. Ind. Microbiol. 18 (1997) 22; Curr. Microbiol. 34(4) (1997) 199; Appl. Microbiol. Biotechnol. 56(3-4) (2001) 384; Infect Immun. 68(6) (2000) 3147; Cell 109(7) (2002) 913; Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 68(11) (2002) 5408; Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 99(21) (2002) 13807]. The response of bacteria to these environmental signals, which are similar to those encountered during prokaryotic life cycles, may provide insight into bacterial adaptations to physiologically relevant conditions. This review focuses on the current and potential future research trends aimed at understanding the effect of the mechanical forces of low shear and microgravity analogues on different bacterial parameters. In addition, this review also discusses the use of microgravity technology to generate physiologically relevant human tissue models for research in bacterial pathogenesis.

Nickerson, Cheryl A.; Ott, C. Mark; Wilson, James W.; Ramamurthy, Rajee; LeBlanc, Carly L.; Honer zu Bentrup, Kerstin; Hammond, Timothy; Pierson, Duane L.

2003-01-01

227

Non-coding-regulatory regions of human brain genes delineated by bacterial artificial chromosome knock-in mice  

PubMed Central

Background The next big challenge in human genetics is understanding the 98% of the genome that comprises non-coding DNA. Hidden in this DNA are sequences critical for gene regulation, and new experimental strategies are needed to understand the functional role of gene-regulation sequences in health and disease. In this study, we build upon our HuGX ('high-throughput human genes on the X chromosome’) strategy to expand our understanding of human gene regulation in vivo. Results In all, ten human genes known to express in therapeutically important brain regions were chosen for study. For eight of these genes, human bacterial artificial chromosome clones were identified, retrofitted with a reporter, knocked single-copy into the Hprt locus in mouse embryonic stem cells, and mouse strains derived. Five of these human genes expressed in mouse, and all expressed in the adult brain region for which they were chosen. This defined the boundaries of the genomic DNA sufficient for brain expression, and refined our knowledge regarding the complexity of gene regulation. We also characterized for the first time the expression of human MAOA and NR2F2, two genes for which the mouse homologs have been extensively studied in the central nervous system (CNS), and AMOTL1 and NOV, for which roles in CNS have been unclear. Conclusions We have demonstrated the use of the HuGX strategy to functionally delineate non-coding-regulatory regions of therapeutically important human brain genes. Our results also show that a careful investigation, using publicly available resources and bioinformatics, can lead to accurate predictions of gene expression. PMID:24124870

2013-01-01

228

Expression of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) genes in channel catfish is highly regulated and time dependent after bacterial challenges.  

PubMed

Nitric oxide is well known for its roles in immune responses. As such, its synthesizing enzymes have been extensively studied from various species including some teleost fish species. However, the NOS genes have not been characterized in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus). In this study, we identified and characterized three NOS genes including one NOS1 and two NOS2 genes in channel catfish. Comparing with the NOS genes from other fish species, the catfish NOS genes are highly conserved in their structural features. Phylogenetic and syntenic analyses allowed determination of NOS1 and NOS2 genes of channel catfish and their orthology relationships. Syntenic analysis, as well as the phylogenetic analysis, indicated that the two NOS2 genes of catfish were lineage-specific duplication. The NOS genes were broadly expressed in most tested tissues, with NOS1 being expressed at the highest levels in the brain, NOS2b1 highly expressed in the skin and gill, and NOS2b2 lowly expressed in most of the tested tissues. The most striking findings of this study was that the expression of the NOS genes are highly regulated after bacterial infection, with time-dependent expression patterns that parallel the migration of macrophages. After Edwardsiella ictaluri challenge, dramatically different responses among the three NOS genes were observed. NOS1 was only significantly in the skin early after infection, while NOS2b1 was rapidly upregulated in gill, but more up-regulated in trunk kidney with the progression of the disease, suggesting such differences in gene expression may be reflective of the migration of macrophages among various tissues of the infected fish. In contrast to NOS1 and NOS2b1, NOS2b2 was normally expressed at very low levels, but it is induced in the brain and liver while significantly down-regulated in most other tissues. PMID:24560653

Yao, Jun; Li, Chao; Zhang, Jiaren; Liu, Shikai; Feng, Jianbin; Wang, Ruijia; Li, Yun; Jiang, Chen; Song, Lin; Chen, Ailu; Liu, Zhanjiang

2014-07-01

229

Linezolid Exerts Greater Bacterial Clearance but No Modification of Host Lung Gene Expression Profiling: A Mouse MRSA Pneumonia Model  

PubMed Central

Background Linezolid (LZD) is beneficial to patients with MRSA pneumonia, but whether and how LZD influences global host lung immune responses at the mRNA level during MRSA-mediated pneumonia is still unknown. Methods A lethal mouse model of MRSA pneumonia mediated by USA300 was employed to study the influence of LZD on survival, while the sublethal mouse model was used to examine the effect of LZD on bacterial clearance and lung gene expression during MRSA pneumonia. LZD (100mg/kg/day, IP) was given to C57Bl6 mice for three days. On Day 1 and Day 3 post infection, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) protein concentration and levels of cytokines including IL6, TNF?, IL1?, Interferon-? and IL17 were measured. In the sublethal model, left lungs were used to determine bacterial clearance and right lungs for whole-genome transcriptional profiling of lung immune responses. Results LZD therapy significantly improved survival and bacterial clearance. It also significantly decreased BALF protein concentration and levels of cytokines including IL6, IL1?, Interferon-? and IL17. No significant gene expression changes in the mouse lungs were associated with LZD therapy. Conclusion LZD is beneficial to MRSA pneumonia, but it does not modulate host lung immune responses at the transcriptional level. PMID:23826353

Chen, Jiwang; Feng, Gang; Song, Yang; Wardenburg, Juliane B.; Lin, Simon; Inoshima, Ichiro; Otto, Michael; Wunderink, Richard G.

2013-01-01

230

Root transcriptome analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana exposed to beneficial Bacillus subtilis FB17 rhizobacteria revealed genes for bacterial recruitment and plant defense independent of malate efflux.  

PubMed

Our previous work has demonstrated that Arabidopsis thaliana can actively recruit beneficial rhizobacteria Bacillus subtilis strain FB17 (hereafter FB17) through an unknown shoot-to-root long-distance signaling pathway post a foliar bacterial pathogen attack. However, it is still not well understood which genetic targets FB17 affects in plants. Microarray analysis of A. thaliana roots treated with FB17 post 24 h of treatment showed 168 and 129 genes that were up- and down-regulated, respectively, compared with the untreated control roots. Those up-regulated include auxin-regulated genes as well as genes involved in metabolism, stress response, and plant defense. In addition, other defense-related genes, as well as cell-wall modification genes were also down-regulated with FB17 colonization. Expression patterns of 20 selected genes were analyzed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR, validating the microarray results. A. thaliana insertion mutants were used against FB17 to further study the functional response of the differentially expressed genes. Five mutants for the up-regulated genes were tested for FB17 colonization, three (at3g28360, at3g20190 and at1g21240) mutants showed decreased FB17 colonization on the roots while increased FB17 titers was seen with three mutants of the down-regulated genes (at3g27980, at4g19690 and at5g56320). Further, these mutants for up-regulated genes and down-regulated genes were foliar infected with Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (hereafter PstDC3000) and analyzed for Aluminum activated malate transporter (ALMT1) expression which showed that ALMT1 may be the key regulator for root FB17 colonization. Our microarray showed that under natural condition, FB17 triggers plant responses in a manner similar to known plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria and to some extent also suppresses defense-related genes expression in roots, enabling stable colonization. The possible implication of this study opens up a new dialogin terms of how beneficial microbes regulate plant genetic response for mutualistic associations. PMID:23794026

Lakshmanan, Venkatachalam; Castaneda, Rafael; Rudrappa, Thimmaraju; Bais, Harsh P

2013-10-01

231

Description of Drinking Water Bacterial Communities Using 16S rRNA Gene Sequence Analyses  

EPA Science Inventory

Descriptions of bacterial communities inhabiting water distribution systems (WDS) have mainly been accomplished using culture-based approaches. Due to the inherent selective nature of culture-based approaches, the majority of bacteria inhabiting WDS remain uncharacterized. The go...

232

The physicochemical process of bacterial attachment to abiotic surfaces: Challenges for mechanistic studies, predictability and the development of control strategies.  

PubMed

Abstract Bacterial attachment to abiotic surfaces can be explained as a physicochemical process. Mechanisms of the process have been widely studied but are not yet well understood due to their complexity. Physicochemical processes can be influenced by various interactions and factors in attachment systems, including, but not limited to, hydrophobic interactions, electrostatic interactions and substratum surface roughness. Mechanistic models and control strategies for bacterial attachment to abiotic surfaces have been established based on the current understanding of the attachment process and the interactions involved. Due to a lack of process control and standardization in the methodologies used to study the mechanisms of bacterial attachment, however, various challenges are apparent in the development of models and control strategies. In this review, the physicochemical mechanisms, interactions and factors affecting the process of bacterial attachment to abiotic surfaces are described. Mechanistic models established based on these parameters are discussed in terms of their limitations. Currently employed methods to study these parameters and bacterial attachment are critically compared. The roles of these parameters in the development of control strategies for bacterial attachment are reviewed, and the challenges that arise in developing mechanistic models and control strategies are assessed. PMID:24635643

Wang, Yi; Lee, Sui Mae; Dykes, Gary

2014-03-17

233

Culturable bacterial microflora associated with nectarine fruit and their potential for control of brown rot.  

PubMed

Microflora of fruit surfaces have been the best source of antagonists against fungi causing postharvest decay of fruit. However, there is little information on microflora colonizing surfaces of fruits other than grape, apple, and citrus. We characterized bacterial microflora on nectarine fruit surfaces from the early stage of development until harvest. Identification of bacterial strains was made using MIDI (fatty acid methyl ester analysis) and Biolog systems. Biolog identified 35% and MIDI 53% of the strains. Thus results from MIDI were used to determine the frequency of occurrence of genera and species. The most frequently occurring genera were Curtobacterium (21.31%), followed by Pseudomonas (19.99%), Microbacterium (13.57%), Clavibacter (9.69%), Pantoea (6.59%), and Enterobacter (4.26%). The frequency of isolations of some bacteria - for example, the major pseudomonads (Pseudomonas syringae, Pseudomonas putida, and Pseudomonas savastanoi) or Pantoea agglomerans - tended to decline as fruit developed. As Pseudomonas declined, Curtobacterium became more dominant. Time of isolation was a significant factor in the frequency of occurrence of different bacteria, indicating succession of the genera. Throughput screening of the bacterial strains against Monilinia fructicola on nectarine fruit resulted in the detection of strains able to control brown rot. The 10 best-performing antagonistic strains were subjected to secondary screening. Four strains reduced decay severity by more than 50% (51.7%-91.4% reduction) at the high pathogen inoculum concentration of 105 conidia/mL. PMID:20657618

Janisiewicz, Wojciech J; Buyer, Jeffrey S

2010-06-01

234

Posttranscriptional control of gene expression: a genome-wide perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

Gene expression is regulated at multiple levels, and cells need to integrate and coordinate different layers of control to implement the information in the genome. Post-transcriptional levels of regulation such as tran- script turnover and translational control are an integral part of gene expression and might rival the sophisti- cation and importance of transcriptional control. Micro- array-based methods are increasingly

Juan Mata; Samuel Marguerat; Jürg Bähler

2005-01-01

235

Metabolic engineering of Serratia marcescens with the bacterial hemoglobin gene: alterations in fermentation pathways.  

PubMed

Serratia marcescens was transformed with plasmid vector pUC8 or pUC8 containing the bacterial (Vitreoscilla) hemoglobin gene (vgb) on either a 2.3-kb fragment (pUC8:15) or 1.4-kb fragment (pUC8:16) of Vitreoscilla DNA. The vgb-bearing strains were compared with the pUC8 transformant and untransformed S. marcescens with respect to growth in Luria-Bertani (LB) broth supplemented with glucose or casein acid hydrolysate. Growth (on a viable cell basis) was similar to that in unsupplemented LB. Total acid excretion (as estimated by medium pH) was similar for all strains in both LB plus 2% casein acid hydrolysate and LB without additions. Acid excretion in LB plus 2% glucose was somewhat greater at up to 10 h in culture for the two vgb-bearing strains; from 10 to 26 h in culture, the pHs of these cultures continued to decrease (to 4.1-4.2), whereas those of the non-vgb-bearing strains returned to near the starting pH (7.4-7.8). Concomitantly, after 26 h of culture in LB plus 2% glucose, the non-vgb-bearing strains had produced about 15 times as much acetoin and about three to four times as much 2,3-butanediol as the vgb-bearing strains. In general, for all strains, much more acetoin and 2,3-butanediol were produced in LB plus 2% glucose than in unsupplemented LB. The exception was acetoin production by the strain bearing vgb on plasmid pUC8:15; after 26 h of culture in LB without supplementation it was between three and four times that of the other strains, and about 50% higher than its level in LB plus 2% glucose. When grown with the 2% casein acid hydrolysate supplement, the strain bearing vgb on plasmid pUC8:15 produced much more acetoin and 2,3-butanediol than the other strains after 26 hours in culture. The results confirm that vgb can significantly alter carbon metabolism and suggest that the use of vgb technology for directed metabolic engineering may be a complicated process, depending in part on medium composition. PMID:10099382

Wei, M L; Webster, D A; Stark, B C

1998-09-01

236

Expression of a Synthesized Gene Encoding Cationic Peptide Cecropin B in Transgenic Tomato Plants Protects against Bacterial Diseases?  

PubMed Central

The cationic lytic peptide cecropin B (CB), isolated from the giant silk moth (Hyalophora cecropia), has been shown to effectively eliminate Gram-negative and some Gram-positive bacteria. In this study, the effects of chemically synthesized CB on plant pathogens were investigated. The S50s (the peptide concentrations causing 50% survival of a pathogenic bacterium) of CB against two major pathogens of the tomato, Ralstonia solanacearum and Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria, were 529.6 ?g/ml and 0.29 ?g/ml, respectively. The CB gene was then fused to the secretory signal peptide (sp) sequence from the barley ?-amylase gene, and the new construct, pBI121-spCB, was used for the transformation of tomato plants. Integration of the CB gene into the tomato genome was confirmed by PCR, and its expression was confirmed by Western blot analyses. In vivo studies of the transgenic tomato plant demonstrated significant resistance to bacterial wilt and bacterial spot. The levels of CB expressed in transgenic tomato plants (?0.05 ?g in 50 mg of leaves) were far lower than the S50 determined in vitro. CB transgenic tomatoes could therefore be a new mode of bioprotection against these two plant diseases with significant agricultural applications. PMID:19966019

Jan, Pey-Shynan; Huang, Hsu-Yuang; Chen, Hueih-Min

2010-01-01

237

Gene Expression Analysis of TREM1 and GRK2 in Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes as the Surrogate Biomarkers of Acute Bacterial Infections  

PubMed Central

Objective: In the acute stage of infectious diseases such as pneumonia and sepsis, sequelae hypercytokinemia and cytokine storm are often observed simultaneously. During bacterial infections, activated polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) cause inflammation and organ dysfunction in severely ill patients. Gene expression of the triggering receptor on myeloid cells (TREM)-1 and G-coupled-protein receptor kinase (GRK)-2 in PMNs isolated from patients was analysed to identify genes correlated with the severity of pathophysiological conditions. Methods: mRNA levels of TREM1 and GRK2 in the PMNs from 26 patients (13 with pneumonia, 5 with severe sepsis, and 8 with septic shock) were analysed by using quantitative real-time PCR. The synthesised soluble form (s)TREM-1 was incubated with normal PMNs to investigate its biological functions in vitro. Results: Copies of TREM1 transcript were 0.7- to 2.1-fold higher in patients with pneumonia compared to those of normal subjects; the average fold-change was 1.1-fold. The mRNA levels of patients suffering from severe sepsis and septic shock were 0.34- and 0.33-fold lower compared to those of healthy subjects, respectively. TREM1 mRNA levels in 5 of 26 patients in convalescent stages recovered to normal levels. The mRNA levels of GRK2 in the PMNs of patients were also downregulated. The synthesised sTREM-1 upregulated the mRNA levels of TREM1 in normal PMNs. Conclusions: TREM1 mRNA levels were inversely correlated with the severity of pathophysiological conditions in acute bacterial infections. The gene expression levels of TREM1 in PMNs isolated from patients with bacterial infections may be used as a surrogate biomarker for determining the severity. PMID:24465168

Ubagai, Tsuneyuki; Nakano, Ryuichi; Kikuchi, Hirotoshi; Ono, Yasuo

2014-01-01

238

Enrichment of carotenoids in flaxseed by introducing a bacterial phytoene synthase gene.  

PubMed

Carotenoids are well-known natural pigments, typically ranging from yellow to red. Carotenoids are industrially utilized as functional materials due to their strong antioxidant properties. Phytoene synthesis is known to be a rate-determining step in the entire carotenoid biosynthetic pathway in plants. We show methods of pathway engineering for the enrichment of carotenoids in flaxseed (linseed; Linum usitatissimum L.), which is an industrially important oleaginous crop. A phytoene synthase gene (crtB) derived from a soil bacterium Pantoea ananatis (formerly called Erwinia uredovora) strain 20D3 was introduced into L. usitatissimum WARD cultivar. The resulting transgenic flax plants formed orange seeds, which contained phytoene, alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, and lutein. The total carotenoid amount in the transgenic seeds was 156 microg/g fresh weight at the maximum, corresponding to 18.6-fold increase compared with that of untransformed controls. PMID:20552453

Fujisawa, Masaki; Misawa, Norihiko

2010-01-01

239

A Comparison between Droplet Digital and Quantitative PCR in the Analysis of Bacterial 16S Load in Lung Tissue Samples from Control and COPD GOLD 2  

PubMed Central

Background Low biomass in the bacterial lung tissue microbiome utilizes quantitative PCR (qPCR) 16S bacterial assays at their limit of detection. New technology like droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) could allow for higher sensitivity and accuracy of quantification. These attributes are needed if specific bacteria within the bacterial lung tissue microbiome are to be evaluated as potential contributors to diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We hypothesize that ddPCR is better at quantifying the total bacterial load in lung tissue versus qPCR. Methods Control (n?=?16) and COPD GOLD 2 (n?=?16) tissue samples were obtained from patients who underwent lung resection surgery, were cut on a cryotome, and sections were assigned for use in quantitative histology or for DNA extraction. qPCR and ddPCR were performed on these samples using primers spanning the V2 region on the 16S rRNA gene along with negative controls. Total 16S counts were compared between the two methods. Both methods were assessed for correlations with quantitative histology measurements of the tissue. Results There was no difference in the average total 16S counts (P>0.05) between the two methods. However, the negative controls contained significantly lower counts in the ddPCR (0.55 ± 0.28 16S/uL) than in the qPCR assay (1.00 ± 0.70 16S copies) (P <0.05). The coefficient of variation was significantly lower for the ddPCR assay (0.18 ± 0.14) versus the qPCR assay (0.62 ± 0.29) (P<0.05). Conclusion Overall the ddPCR 16S assay performed better by reducing the background noise in 16S of the negative controls compared with 16S qPCR assay. PMID:25329701

Sze, Marc A.; Abbasi, Meysam; Hogg, James C.; Sin, Don D.

2014-01-01

240

Designer gene networks: Towards fundamental cellular control.  

PubMed

The engineered control of cellular function through the design of synthetic genetic networks is becoming plausible. Here we show how a naturally occurring network can be used as a parts list for artificial network design, and how model formulation leads to computational and analytical approaches relevant to nonlinear dynamics and statistical physics. We first review the relevant work on synthetic gene networks, highlighting the important experimental findings with regard to genetic switches and oscillators. We then present the derivation of a deterministic model describing the temporal evolution of the concentration of protein in a single-gene network. Bistability in the steady-state protein concentration arises naturally as a consequence of autoregulatory feedback, and we focus on the hysteretic properties of the protein concentration as a function of the degradation rate. We then formulate the effect of an external noise source which interacts with the protein degradation rate. We demonstrate the utility of such a formulation by constructing a protein switch, whereby external noise pulses are used to switch the protein concentration between two values. Following the lead of earlier work, we show how the addition of a second network component can be used to construct a relaxation oscillator, whereby the system is driven around the hysteresis loop. We highlight the frequency dependence on the tunable parameter values, and discuss design plausibility. We emphasize how the model equations can be used to develop design criteria for robust oscillations, and illustrate this point with parameter plots illuminating the oscillatory regions for given parameter values. We then turn to the utilization of an intrinsic cellular process as a means of controlling the oscillations. We consider a network design which exhibits self-sustained oscillations, and discuss the driving of the oscillator in the context of synchronization. Then, as a second design, we consider a synthetic network with parameter values near, but outside, the oscillatory boundary. In this case, we show how resonance can lead to the induction of oscillations and amplification of a cellular signal. Finally, we construct a toggle switch from positive regulatory elements, and compare the switching properties for this network with those of a network constructed using negative regulation. Our results demonstrate the utility of model analysis in the construction of synthetic gene regulatory networks. (c) 2001 American Institute of Physics. PMID:12779454

Hasty, Jeff; Isaacs, Farren; Dolnik, Milos; McMillen, David; Collins, J. J.

2001-03-01

241

BB Seminar: Detecting gene-gene interactions in genome-wide case-control studies  

Cancer.gov

Gene-gene interactions have long been recognized to be fundamentally important to understand genetic causes of complex disease traits. At present, identifying gene-gene interactions from genome-wide case-control studies is computationally and methodologically challenging. In this talk, we introduce a new method, named Boolean Operation based Screening and Testing(BOOST). To discover unknown gene-gene interactions that underlie complex diseases, BOOST allows examining all pair-wise interactions in genome-wide case-control studies in a remarkably fast manner.

242

Bacterial colonization factors control specificity and stability of the gut microbiota.  

PubMed

Mammals harbour a complex gut microbiome, comprising bacteria that confer immunological, metabolic and neurological benefits. Despite advances in sequence-based microbial profiling and myriad studies defining microbiome composition during health and disease, little is known about the molecular processes used by symbiotic bacteria to stably colonize the gastrointestinal tract. We sought to define how mammals assemble and maintain the Bacteroides, one of the most numerically prominent genera of the human microbiome. Here we find that, whereas the gut normally contains hundreds of bacterial species, germ-free mice mono-associated with a single Bacteroides species are resistant to colonization by the same, but not different, species. To identify bacterial mechanisms for species-specific saturable colonization, we devised an in vivo genetic screen and discovered a unique class of polysaccharide utilization loci that is conserved among intestinal Bacteroides. We named this genetic locus the commensal colonization factors (ccf). Deletion of the ccf genes in the model symbiont, Bacteroides fragilis, results in colonization defects in mice and reduced horizontal transmission. The ccf genes of B. fragilis are upregulated during gut colonization, preferentially at the colonic surface. When we visualize microbial biogeography within the colon, B. fragilis penetrates the colonic mucus and resides deep within crypt channels, whereas ccf mutants are defective in crypt association. Notably, the CCF system is required for B. fragilis colonization following microbiome disruption with Citrobacter rodentium infection or antibiotic treatment, suggesting that the niche within colonic crypts represents a reservoir for bacteria to maintain long-term colonization. These findings reveal that intestinal Bacteroides have evolved species-specific physical interactions with the host that mediate stable and resilient gut colonization, and the CCF system represents a novel molecular mechanism for symbiosis. PMID:23955152

Lee, S Melanie; Donaldson, Gregory P; Mikulski, Zbigniew; Boyajian, Silva; Ley, Klaus; Mazmanian, Sarkis K

2013-09-19

243

Bacterial colonization factors control specificity and stability of the gut microbiota  

PubMed Central

Mammals harbor a complex gut microbiome, comprised of bacteria that confer immunologic, metabolic and neurologic benefits1. Despite advances in sequence-based microbial profiling and myriad studies defining microbiome composition during health and disease, little is known about the molecular processes employed by symbiotic bacteria to stably colonize the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. We sought to define how mammals assemble and maintain the Bacteroides, one of the most numerically prominent genera of the human microbiome. While the gut normally contains hundreds of bacterial species2,3, we surprisingly find that germ-free mice mono-associated with a single Bacteroides are resistant to colonization by the same, but not different, species. To identify bacterial mechanisms for species-specific saturable colonization, we devised an in vivo genetic screen and discovered a unique class of Polysaccharide Utilization Loci (PUL) that are conserved among intestinal Bacteroides. We named this genetic locus the commensal colonization factors (ccf). Deletion of the ccf genes in the model symbiont, Bacteroides fragilis, results in colonization defects in mice and reduced horizontal transmission. The ccf genes of B. fragilis are up-regulated during gut colonization, preferentially at the colonic surface. When we visualize microbial biogeography within the colon, B. fragilis penetrates the colonic mucus and resides deep within crypt channels, while ccf mutants are defective in crypt association. Remarkably, the CCF system is required for B. fragilis colonization following microbiome disruption with Citrobacter rodentium infection or antibiotic treatment, suggesting the niche within colonic crypts represents a reservoir for bacteria to maintain long-term colonization. These findings reveal that intestinal Bacteroides have evolved species-specific physical interactions with the host that mediate stable and resilient gut colonization, and the CCF system represents a novel molecular mechanism for symbiosis. PMID:23955152

Lee, S. Melanie; Donaldson, Gregory P.; Mikulski, Zbigniew; Boyajian, Silva; Ley, Klaus; Mazmanian, Sarkis K.

2014-01-01

244

Enhanced bacterial disease resistance of transgenic channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus possessing cecropin genes.  

PubMed

The cecropin B gene from the moth Hyalophora cecropia, driven by the cytomegalovirus promoter, was transferred to the channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus. Transgenic individuals (P1) were mated to produce individuals (F1) that exhibited enhanced disease resistance and survival when challenged with pathogenic bacteria. During the epizootic of Flavobacterium columnare in an earthen pond, the percentage of transgenic individuals containing preprocecropin B construct that survived (100%) was significantly greater (P <0.005) than that of nontransgenic controls (27.3%). Also, when challenged in tanks with Edwardsiella ictaluri, the causative agent of enteric septicemia of catfish, the percentage of transgenic individuals containing catfish IG leader cecropin B construct that survived (40.7%) was significantly greater (P <0.01) than that of nontransgenic controls (14.8%). There were no pleiotropic effects of the transgenes, and growth rates of the transgenic and nontransgenic siblings were not different (P > 0.05). Inheritance of the transgene by the F1 generation, 20.2% to 30.7% was typical of that in studies with transgenic channel catfish. PMID:14961267

Dunham, Rex A; Warr, Gregory W; Nichols, Amy; Duncan, Patricia L; Argue, Brad; Middleton, Darlene; Kucuktas, Huseyin

2002-06-01

245

Diversity of endophytic bacteria in Malaysian plants as revealed by 16S rRNA encoding gene sequence based method of bacterial identification.  

PubMed

Bacterial endophytes do have several potential applications in pharmacy, medicine and agricultural biotech industry. The main objective of this study was to understand types of bacterial endophytes associated with dicotyledonous (dicot) and monocotyledonous (monocot) plant species. Isolation of the endophytic bacteria was performed using surface-sterilized various tissue samples, and identification of the endophytic bacterial isolates (EBIs) was completed using 16S rRNA encoding gene sequence similarity based method. In total, 996 EBIs were isolated and identified from 1055 samples of 31 monocot and 65 dicot plant species from Peninsular Malaysia. The 996 EBIs represented 71 different types of bacterial species. Twelve (12) out of 71 species are reported as endophytes for the first time. We conclude that diverse types of bacterial endophytes are associated with dicot and monocot plants, and could be useful in pharmacy, medicine and agricultural biotechnology for various potential applications. PMID:24396249

Loh, Chye Ying; Tan, Yin Yin; Rohani, Rahim; Weber, Jean-Frédéric F; Bhore, Subhash Janardhan

2013-09-01

246

Binding motifs in bacterial gene promoters modulate transcriptional effects of global regulators CRP and ArcA  

SciTech Connect

Bacterial gene regulation involves transcription factors (TF) that bind to DNA recognition sequences in operon promoters. These recognition sequences, many of which are palindromic, are known as regulatory elements or transcription factor binding sites (TFBS). Some TFs are global regulators that can modulate the expression of hundreds of genes. In this study we examine global regulator half-sites, where a half-site, which we shall call a binding motif (BM), is one half of a palindromic TFBS. We explore the hypothesis that the number of BMs plays an important role in transcriptional regulation, examining empirical data from transcriptional profiling of the CRP and ArcA regulons. We compare the power of BM counts and of full TFBS characteristics to predict induced transcriptional activity. We find that CRP BM counts have a nonlinear effect on CRP-dependent transcriptional activity and predict this activity better than full TFBS quality or location.

Leuze, Mike; Karpinets, Tatiana V.; Syed, Mustafa H.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Uberbacher, Edward

2012-05-30

247

A red beet (Beta vulgaris) UDP-glucosyltransferase gene induced by wounding, bacterial infiltration and oxidative stress.  

PubMed

Mechanical wounding, infiltration with P. syringae or A. tumefaciens, and exposure to an H(2)O(2)-generating system (Glc/Glc oxidase) induce betacyanin synthesis in red beet (Beta vulgaris) leaves. These conditions also induced the expression of BvGT, a gene encoding a glucosyltransferase (GT) from Beta vulgaris. BvGT has a high similarity to Dorotheanthus bellidiformis betanidin-5 GT involved in betacyanin synthesis. Furthermore, the transient expression of a BvGT antisense construct resulted in the reduction of BvGT transcript accumulation and betanin synthesis, suggesting a role for this gene product in betacyanin glucosylation. In addition, the NADPH oxidase inhibitor, diphenylene iodonium (DPI), inhibited the accumulation of the BvGT transcript in response to infiltration with Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Hence, this result suggests that ROS produced by a plasma membrane NADPH oxidase may act as a signal to induce BvGT expression, necessary for betanin synthesis after wounding and bacterial infiltration. PMID:15582929

Sepúlveda-Jiménez, Gabriela; Rueda-Benítez, Patricia; Porta, Helena; Rocha-Sosa, Mario

2005-02-01

248

Phenotypic signatures arising from unbalanced bacterial growth.  

PubMed

Fluctuations in the growth rate of a bacterial culture during unbalanced growth are generally considered undesirable in quantitative studies of bacterial physiology. Under well-controlled experimental conditions, however, these fluctuations are not random but instead reflect the interplay between intra-cellular networks underlying bacterial growth and the growth environment. Therefore, these fluctuations could be considered quantitative phenotypes of the bacteria under a specific growth condition. Here, we present a method to identify "phenotypic signatures" by time-frequency analysis of unbalanced growth curves measured with high temporal resolution. The signatures are then applied to differentiate amongst different bacterial strains or the same strain under different growth conditions, and to identify the essential architecture of the gene network underlying the observed growth dynamics. Our method has implications for both basic understanding of bacterial physiology and for the classification of bacterial strains. PMID:25101949

Tan, Cheemeng; Smith, Robert Phillip; Tsai, Ming-Chi; Schwartz, Russell; You, Lingchong

2014-08-01

249

Phenotypic Signatures Arising from Unbalanced Bacterial Growth  

PubMed Central

Fluctuations in the growth rate of a bacterial culture during unbalanced growth are generally considered undesirable in quantitative studies of bacterial physiology. Under well-controlled experimental conditions, however, these fluctuations are not random but instead reflect the interplay between intra-cellular networks underlying bacterial growth and the growth environment. Therefore, these fluctuations could be considered quantitative phenotypes of the bacteria under a specific growth condition. Here, we present a method to identify “phenotypic signatures” by time-frequency analysis of unbalanced growth curves measured with high temporal resolution. The signatures are then applied to differentiate amongst different bacterial strains or the same strain under different growth conditions, and to identify the essential architecture of the gene network underlying the observed growth dynamics. Our method has implications for both basic understanding of bacterial physiology and for the classification of bacterial strains. PMID:25101949

Tan, Cheemeng; Smith, Robert Phillip; Tsai, Ming-Chi; Schwartz, Russell; You, Lingchong

2014-01-01

250

Bacterial Cell Wall Synthesis Gene uppP Is Required for Burkholderia Colonization of the Stinkbug Gut  

PubMed Central

To establish a host-bacterium symbiotic association, a number of factors involved in symbiosis must operate in a coordinated manner. In insects, bacterial factors for symbiosis have been poorly characterized at the molecular and biochemical levels, since many symbionts have not yet been cultured or are as yet genetically intractable. Recently, the symbiotic association between a stinkbug, Riptortus pedestris, and its beneficial gut bacterium, Burkholderia sp., has emerged as a promising experimental model system, providing opportunities to study insect symbiosis using genetically manipulated symbiotic bacteria. Here, in search of bacterial symbiotic factors, we targeted cell wall components of the Burkholderia symbiont by disruption of uppP gene, which encodes undecaprenyl pyrophosphate phosphatase involved in biosynthesis of various bacterial cell wall components. Under culture conditions, the ?uppP mutant showed higher susceptibility to lysozyme than the wild-type strain, indicating impaired integrity of peptidoglycan of the mutant. When administered to the host insect, the ?uppP mutant failed to establish normal symbiotic association: the bacterial cells reached to the symbiotic midgut but neither proliferated nor persisted there. Transformation of the ?uppP mutant with uppP-encoding plasmid complemented these phenotypic defects: lysozyme susceptibility in vitro was restored, and normal infection and proliferation in the midgut symbiotic organ were observed in vivo. The ?uppP mutant also exhibited susceptibility to hypotonic, hypertonic, and centrifugal stresses. These results suggest that peptidoglycan cell wall integrity is a stress resistance factor relevant to the successful colonization of the stinkbug midgut by Burkholderia symbiont. PMID:23747704

Kim, Jiyeun Kate; Lee, Ho Jin; Kikuchi, Yoshitomo; Kitagawa, Wataru; Nikoh, Naruo

2013-01-01

251

Diffusion characteristics and controlled release of bacterial fertilizers from modified calcium alginate capsules.  

PubMed

An indigenous Cellulosimicrobium cellulans GS6 isolate able to solubilize insoluble phosphate complexes in soil is a potential bacterial fertilizer. Enclosure of the phosphate-solubilizing bacterium (PSB) in biodegradable capsules may protect the PSB cells inoculated into soil and, in the meantime, enable the control of cell release that confers long-term fertilizing effects. In this study, calcium alginate (CA) was used as the core matrix to encapsulate cells of C. cellulans GS6. The cell-liberating properties of the CA-based capsules were modified by blending with a variety of supplemental materials (SM), including chitin, cellulose, olive oil, and gelatin. The experimental results showed that the maximum cell-release percentage (MCR%) of the capsules decreased in the order of CA-cellulose>CA-olive oil>CA-chitin>CA-gelatin>CA. Furthermore, a mass transport model was developed to accurately describe the kinetics of cell release results for each capsule. The diffusion coefficient (D(e)) of each capsule was also determined from the model simulation. We found that the estimated D(e) values are positively correlated to the release rate with rare exceptions. Lastly, as our results underscored the crucial roles that the type of capsules plays in the rate and amount of cell release, controlled release of the bacterial fertilizer (C. cellulans GS6 cells) may be achieved via the design of capsule materials. PMID:17482812

Liu, Chien-Hung; Wu, Jane-Yii; Chang, Jo-Shu

2008-04-01

252

Macrophage arginase-1 controls bacterial growth and pathology in hypoxic tuberculosis granulomas  

PubMed Central

Lung granulomas develop upon Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection as a hallmark of human tuberculosis (TB). They are structured aggregates consisting mainly of Mtb-infected and -uninfected macrophages and Mtb-specific T cells. The production of NO by granuloma macrophages expressing nitric oxide synthase-2 (NOS2) via l-arginine and oxygen is a key protective mechanism against mycobacteria. Despite this protection, TB granulomas are often hypoxic, and bacterial killing via NOS2 in these conditions is likely suboptimal. Arginase-1 (Arg1) also metabolizes l-arginine but does not require oxygen as a substrate and has been shown to regulate NOS2 via substrate competition. However, in other infectious diseases in which granulomas occur, such as leishmaniasis and schistosomiasis, Arg1 plays additional roles such as T-cell regulation and tissue repair that are independent of NOS2 suppression. To address whether Arg1 could perform similar functions in hypoxic regions of TB granulomas, we used a TB murine granuloma model in which NOS2 is absent. Abrogation of Arg1 expression in macrophages in this setting resulted in exacerbated lung granuloma pathology and bacterial burden. Arg1 expression in hypoxic granuloma regions correlated with decreased T-cell proliferation, suggesting that Arg1 regulation of T-cell immunity is involved in disease control. Our data argue that Arg1 plays a central role in the control of TB when NOS2 is rendered ineffective by hypoxia. PMID:25201986

Duque-Correa, María A.; Kühl, Anja A.; Rodriguez, Paulo C.; Zedler, Ulrike; Schommer-Leitner, Sandra; Rao, Martin; Weiner, January; Hurwitz, Robert; Qualls, Joseph E.; Kosmiadi, George A.; Murray, Peter J.; Kaufmann, Stefan H. E.; Reece, Stephen T.

2014-01-01

253

Multicopy Integration of Heterologous Genes, Using the Lactococcal Group II Intron Targeted to Bacterial Insertion Sequences  

Microsoft Academic Search

Group II introns are mobile genetic elements that can be redirected to invade specific genes. Here we describe the use of the lactococcal group II intron, Ll.ltrB, to achieve multicopy delivery of heterologous genes into the genome of Lactococcus lactis IL1403-UCD without the need for selectable markers. Ll.ltrB was retargeted to invade three transposase genes, the tra gene found in

Helen Rawsthorne; Kevin N. Turner; David A. Mills

2006-01-01

254

A reporter gene assay for inhibitors of the bacterial phosphoenolpyruvate: sugar phosphotransferase system.  

PubMed

The phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS) plays a key role in sugar uptake and metabolic regulation in bacteria. PTS proteins form a divergent phosphorylation cascade. Enzyme I (EI) is at the top of the cascade and mediates phosphoryl-transfer from phosphoenolpyruvate to the phosphoryl-carrier protein HPr, which then distributes the phosphoryl-groups to the different carbohydrate transporters. In addition, some PTS proteins have a regulatory function in catabolite repression, inducer exclusion and chemotaxis which is modulated by their degree of phosphorylation in response to the availability of substrates. Using as a reporter the IacZ gene under control of the bgl t2 transcriptional terminator and as an effector the transcriptional antiterminator LicT from B. subtilis, a two-plasmid reporter gene system was constructed in order to monitor PTS activity. LicT, when present at low concentration in E. coli, is inactivated by EI/HPr-dependent phosphorylation and conversely is active in a ptsl- mutant lacking El. Active LicT allows for transcriptional readthrough at bgl t2, resulting in a full-length lacZ transcript. Beta-galactosidase activities are increased 4-8-fold in a ptsl+ strain growing on PTS substrates relative to growth on non-PTS substrates and approximately 30-fold in a ptsl- mutant. This gain-of-function in response to dephosphorylation of El or lack of active El can be used to monitor changes of El activity caused by mutations and environmental factors and for screening and validation of inhibitors of the PTS as potentially novel antibacterial compounds. PMID:10943562

Hesterkamp, T; Erni, B

1999-11-01

255

Influence of Rice Development on the Function of Bacterial Blight Resistance Genes  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Disease resistance genes most commonly used in breeding programs are single, dominant, resistance (R) genes with relative effectiveness influenced by plant developmental stage. Knowing the developmental stages at which an R gene is functional is important for disease management. In rice, resistanc...

256

A polyketide synthase-peptide synthetase gene cluster from an uncultured bacterial symbiont of Paederus beetles  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many drug candidates from marine and terrestrial invertebrates are suspected metabolites of uncultured bacterial symbionts. The antitumor polyketides of the pederin family, isolated from beetles and sponges, are an example. Drug development from such sources is commonly hampered by low yields and the difficulty of sustaining invertebrate cultures. To obtain insight into the true producer and find alternative supplies of

Jörn Piel

2002-01-01

257

Prosthecobacter fluviatilis sp. nov., which lacks the bacterial tubulin btubA and btubB genes.  

PubMed

Leptothrix cholodnii is a sheathed bacterium often found in metal-rich and oligotrophic aquatic environments. A bacterial strain that is able to degrade the NaOH-treated sheath of L. cholodnii was isolated. The isolate was a Gram-negative, aerobic and prosthecate bacterium. The optimum growth temperature and pH were 30 degrees C and pH 7.0, respectively. The DNA G+C content was 62.9 mol%. The major respiratory quinone was MK-6. A phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene indicated that the isolate is a member of the genus Prosthecobacter. The nearest relative was the type strain of Prosthecobacter vanneervenii, with a similarity of 97.1 %. However, the isolate does not possess the bacterial tubulin genes, btubA and btubB, unique to known species of the genus Prosthecobacter. It is proposed that the isolate represents a novel species, Prosthecobacter fluviatilis sp. nov. The type strain is HAQ-1(T) (=JCM 14805(T) =KACC 12649(T) =KCTC 22182(T)). PMID:18599695

Takeda, Minoru; Yoneya, Akiko; Miyazaki, Yuichi; Kondo, Keiko; Makita, Hiroko; Kondoh, Masashi; Suzuki, Ichiro; Koizumi, Jun-ichi

2008-07-01

258

Use of 16S rRNA Gene for Identification of a Broad Range of Clinically Relevant Bacterial Pathogens  

PubMed Central

According to World Health Organization statistics of 2011, infectious diseases remain in the top five causes of mortality worldwide. However, despite sophisticated research tools for microbial detection, rapid and accurate molecular diagnostics for identification of infection in humans have not been extensively adopted. Time-consuming culture-based methods remain to the forefront of clinical microbial detection. The 16S rRNA gene, a molecular marker for identification of bacterial species, is ubiquitous to members of this domain and, thanks to ever-expanding databases of sequence information, a useful tool for bacterial identification. In this study, we assembled an extensive repository of clinical isolates (n = 617), representing 30 medically important pathogenic species and originally identified using traditional culture-based or non-16S molecular methods. This strain repository was used to systematically evaluate the ability of 16S rRNA for species level identification. To enable the most accurate species level classification based on the paucity of sequence data accumulated in public databases, we built a Naïve Bayes classifier representing a diverse set of high-quality sequences from medically important bacterial organisms. We show that for species identification, a model-based approach is superior to an alignment based method. Overall, between 16S gene based and clinical identities, our study shows a genus-level concordance rate of 96% and a species-level concordance rate of 87.5%. We point to multiple cases of probable clinical misidentification with traditional culture based identification across a wide range of gram-negative rods and gram-positive cocci as well as common gram-negative cocci. PMID:25658760

Srinivasan, Ramya; Karaoz, Ulas; Volegova, Marina; MacKichan, Joanna; Kato-Maeda, Midori; Miller, Steve; Nadarajan, Rohan; Brodie, Eoin L.; Lynch, Susan V.

2015-01-01

259

Genetic markers reveal novel genes which control rice cooking quality  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Rice molecular markers have been developed in the gene (Waxy) that controls grain amylose content and the gene (Alk) that controls alkali spreading value. Both of these factors are considered the major determinants of rice cooking quality and texture. This set of markers is now being routinely used...

260

Bacterial pathogenomics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Genomes from all of the crucial bacterial pathogens of humans, plants and animals have now been sequenced, as have genomes from many of the important commensal, symbiotic and environmental microorganisms. Analysis of these sequences has revealed the forces that shape pathogen evolution and has brought to light unexpected aspects of pathogen biology. The finding that horizontal gene transfer and genome

Mark J. Pallen; Brendan W. Wren

2007-01-01

261

Intrinsic and extrinsic approaches for detecting genes in a bacterial genome.  

PubMed Central

The unannotated regions of the Escherichia coli genome DNA sequence from the EcoSeq6 database, totaling 1,278 'intergenic' sequences of the combined length of 359,279 basepairs, were analyzed using computer-assisted methods with the aim of identifying putative unknown genes. The proposed strategy for finding new genes includes two key elements: i) prediction of expressed open reading frames (ORFs) using the GeneMark method based on Markov chain models for coding and non-coding regions of Escherichia coli DNA, and ii) search for protein sequence similarities using programs based on the BLAST algorithm and programs for motif identification. A total of 354 putative expressed ORFs were predicted by GeneMark. Using the BLASTX and TBLASTN programs, it was shown that 208 ORFs located in the unannotated regions of the E. coli chromosome are significantly similar to other protein sequences. Identification of 182 ORFs as probable genes was supported by GeneMark and BLAST, comprising 51.4% of the GeneMark 'hits' and 87.5% of the BLAST 'hits'. 73 putative new genes, comprising 20.6% of the GeneMark predictions, belong to ancient conserved protein families that include both eubacterial and eukaryotic members. This value is close to the overall proportion of highly conserved sequences among eubacterial proteins, indicating that the majority of the putative expressed ORFs that are predicted by GeneMark, but have no significant BLAST hits, nevertheless are likely to be real genes. The majority of the putative genes identified by BLAST search have been described since the release of the EcoSeq6 database, but about 70 genes have not been detected so far. Among these new identifications are genes encoding proteins with a variety of predicted functions including dehydrogenases, kinases, several other metabolic enzymes, ATPases, rRNA methyltransferases, membrane proteins, and different types of regulatory proteins. Images PMID:7984428

Borodovsky, M; Rudd, K E; Koonin, E V

1994-01-01

262

Two genes with similarity to bacterial response regulators are rapidly and specifically induced by cytokinin in Arabidopsis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Cytokinins are central regulators of plant growth and development, but little is known about their mode of action. By using differential display, we identified a gene, IBC6 (for induced by cytokinin), from etiolated Arabidopsis seedlings, that is induced rapidly by cytokinin. The steady state level of IBC6 mRNA was elevated within 10 min by the exogenous application of cytokinin, and this induction did not require de novo protein synthesis. IBC6 was not induced by other plant hormones or by light. A second Arabidopsis gene with a sequence highly similar to IBC6 was identified. This IBC7 gene also was induced by cytokinin, although with somewhat slower kinetics and to a lesser extent. The pattern of expression of the two genes was similar, with higher expression in leaves, rachises, and flowers and lower transcript levels in roots and siliques. Sequence analysis revealed that IBC6 and IBC7 are similar to the receiver domain of bacterial two-component response regulators. This homology, coupled with previously published work on the CKI1 histidine kinase homolog, suggests that these proteins may play a role in early cytokinin signaling.

Brandstatter, I.; Kieber, J. J.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

1998-01-01

263

Characterization of transgenic tobacco plants containing bacterial bphC gene and study of their phytoremediation ability.  

PubMed

Genetically modified plants can serve as an efficient tool for remediation of diverse dangerous pollutants of the environment such as pesticides, heavy metals, explosives and persistent organic compounds. Transgenic lines of Nicotiana tabacum containing bacterial bphC gene from the degradation pathway of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were tested. The product of the bphC gene - enzyme 2,3-dihydroxybiphenyl-1,2-dioxygenase is responsible for cleaving of the biphenyl ring. The presence of bphC gene in transgenic plants was detected on DNA, RNA and protein level. The expression of the bphC/His gene was verified afterpurification of the enzyme from plants by affinity chromatography followed by a Western blot and immunochemical assay. The enzyme activity of isolated protein was detected. Efficient transformation of 2,3-DHB by transgenic plants was achieved and the lines also exhibited high production of biomass. The transgenic plants were more tolerant to the commercial PCBs mixture Delor 103 than non-transgenic tobacco. And finally, the higher decrease of total PCB content and especially congener 28 in real contaminated soil from a dumpsite was determined after cultivation of transgenic plant in comparison with nontransgenic tobacco. The substrate specificity of transgenic plants was the same as substrate specificity of BphC enzyme. PMID:24933894

Viktorovtá, Jitka; Novakova, Martina; Trbolova, Ladislava; Vrchotova, Blanka; Lovecka, Petra; Mackova, Martina; Macek, Tomas

2014-01-01

264

Sensitivity function-based model reduction: A bacterial gene expression case study.  

PubMed

Mathematical models used to predict the behavior of genetically modified organisms require 1). a (rather) large number of state variables, and 2). complicated kinetic expressions containing a large number of parameters. Since these models are hardly identifiable and of limited use in model-based optimization and control strategies, a generic methodology based on sensitivity function analysis is presented to reduce the model complexity at the level of the kinetics, while maintaining high prediction power. As a case study to illustrate the method and results obtained, the influence of the dissolved oxygen concentration on the cytN gene expression in the bacterium Azospirillum brasilense Sp7 is modeled. As a first modeling approach, available mechanistic knowledge is incorporated into a mass balance equation model with 3 states and 14 parameters. The large differences in order of magnitude of the model parameters identified on the available experimental data indicate 1). possible structural problems in the kinetic model and, associated with this, 2). a possibly too high number of model parameters. A careful sensitivity function analysis reveals that a reduced model with only seven parameters is almost as accurate as the original model. PMID:12209775

Smets, Ilse; Bernaerts, Kristel; Sun, Jun; Marchal, Kathleen; Vanderleyden, Jos; Van Impe, Jan

2002-10-20

265

R gene-controlled host specificity in the legume–rhizobia symbiosis  

PubMed Central

Leguminous plants can enter into root nodule symbioses with nitrogen-fixing soil bacteria known as rhizobia. An intriguing but still poorly understood property of the symbiosis is its host specificity, which is controlled at multiple levels involving both rhizobial and host genes. It is widely believed that the host specificity is determined by specific recognition of bacterially derived Nod factors by the cognate host receptor(s). Here we describe the positional cloning of two soybean genes Rj2 and Rfg1 that restrict nodulation with specific strains of Bradyrhizobium japonicum and Sinorhizobium fredii, respectively. We show that Rj2 and Rfg1 are allelic genes encoding a member of the Toll-interleukin receptor/nucleotide-binding site/leucine-rich repeat (TIR-NBS-LRR) class of plant resistance (R) proteins. The involvement of host R genes in the control of genotype-specific infection and nodulation reveals a common recognition mechanism underlying symbiotic and pathogenic host–bacteria interactions and suggests the existence of their cognate avirulence genes derived from rhizobia. This study suggests that establishment of a root nodule symbiosis requires the evasion of plant immune responses triggered by rhizobial effectors. PMID:20937853

Yang, Shengming; Tang, Fang; Gao, Muqiang; Krishnan, Hari B.; Zhu, Hongyan

2010-01-01

266

Regulated bioluminescence as a tool for bioremediation process monitoring and control of bacterial cultures  

SciTech Connect

An effective on-line monitoring technique for toxic waste bioremediation using bioluminescent microorganisms has demonstrated great potential for the description and optimization of biological processes. The lux genes of the bacterium Vibrio Fascheri are used by this species to produce visible light. The lux genes can be genetically fused to the control region of a catabolic gene, with the result that bioluminescence is produced whenever the catabolic gene is induced. Thus the detection of light from a sample (monoculture, consortium, or bioreactor) indicates that genetic expression from a specific gene is occurring. We have used this technique to monitor biodegradation of specific contaminants from waste sites. For these studies, fusions between the lux genes and the operons for naphthalene (nah) and toluene/xylene (xyl) degradation were constructed. Strains carrying one of these fusions respond sensitively and specifically to target substrates. Bioluminescence from these cultures can be rapidly measured in a non-destructive and non-invasive manner. The potential for this technique in this and other biological systems is discussed. 7 refs., 3 figs.

Burlage, R.S. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Heitzer, A.; DiGrazia, P.M. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Center for Environmental Biotechnology)

1991-01-01

267

The use of artificial microRNA technology to control gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana.  

PubMed

In plants, double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) is an effective trigger of RNA silencing, and several classes of endogenous small RNA (sRNA), processed from dsRNA substrates by DICER-like (DCL) endonucleases, are essential in controlling gene expression. One such sRNA class, the microRNAs (miRNAs) control the expression of closely related genes to regulate all aspects of plant development, including the determination of leaf shape, leaf polarity, flowering time, and floral identity. A single miRNA sRNA silencing signal is processed from a long precursor transcript of nonprotein-coding RNA, termed the primary miRNA (pri-miRNA). A region of the pri-miRNA is partially self-complementary allowing the transcript to fold back onto itself to form a stem-loop structure of imperfectly dsRNA. Artificial miRNA (amiRNA) technology uses endogenous pri-miRNAs, in which the miRNA and miRNA* (passenger strand of the miRNA duplex) sequences have been replaced with corresponding amiRNA/amiRNA* sequences that direct highly efficient RNA silencing of the targeted gene. Here, we describe the rules for amiRNA design, as well as outline the PCR and bacterial cloning procedures involved in the construction of an amiRNA plant expression vector to control target gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana. PMID:24057368

Eamens, Andrew L; McHale, Marcus; Waterhouse, Peter M

2014-01-01

268

A MATHEMATICAL MODEL OF THE BACTERIAL GENE NETWORK PARTIALLY RESPONSIBLE FOR REGULATING  

E-print Network

bacteria utilizes similar versions of a gene network characterized by negative and positive feedback signals on the glnALG operon. I developed a model that describes the dynamics of auxiliary ammonia levels of intracellular protein and mRNA concentration has been described mathematically for a variety of gene networks

Kuang, Yang

269

A phenylalanine rotameric switch for signal-state control in bacterial chemoreceptors  

PubMed Central

Bacterial chemoreceptors are widely used as a model system for elucidating the molecular mechanisms of transmembrane signaling and have provided a detailed understanding of how ligand binding by the receptor modulates the activity of its associated kinase CheA. However, the mechanisms by which conformational signals move between signaling elements within a receptor dimer and how they control kinase activity remain unknown. Here, using long molecular dynamics simulations, we show that the kinase-activating cytoplasmic tip of the chemoreceptor fluctuates between two stable conformations in a signal-dependent manner. A highly conserved residue, Phe396, appears to serve as the conformational switch, because flipping of the stacked aromatic rings of an interacting F396-F396' pair in the receptor homodimer takes place concomitantly with the signal-related conformational changes. We suggest that interacting aromatic residues, which are common stabilizers of protein tertiary structure, might serve as rotameric molecular switches in other biological processes as well. PMID:24335957

Ortega, Davi R.; Yang, Chen; Ames, Peter; Baudry, Jerome; Parkinson, John S.; Zhulin, Igor B.

2015-01-01

270

Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays for a bacterial thiaminase I gene and the thiaminase-producing bacterium Paenibacillus thiaminolyticus.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The thiaminase I enzyme produced by the gram-positive bacterium Paenibacillus thiaminolyticus isolated from the viscera of Lake Michigan alewives Alosa pseudoharengus is currently the only defined source of the thiaminase activity linked to thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency in early mortality syndrome (EMS) in the larvae of Great Lakes salmonines. Diets of alewife or isolated strains of P. thiaminolyticus mixed in a semipurified diet and fed to lake trout Salvelinus namaycush have been shown to produce EMS in fry. We utilized quantitative polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR) to aid in studies of the sources of P. thiaminolyticus and thiaminase I. Quantitative PCR assays were established to detect the thiaminase I gene of P. thiaminolyticus, the 16S rRNA gene from most species of bacteria, and the 16S rRNA gene specifically from P. thiaminolyticus and a few closely related taxa. The Q-PCR assays are linear over at least six orders of magnitude and can detect the thiaminase I gene of P. thiaminolyticus from as few as 1,000 P. thiaminolyticus cells/g of sample or the Paenibacillus 16S rRNA gene from as few as 100 P. thiaminolyticus cells/g of sample. The initial results from alewife viscera samples with high thiaminase activity yielded unexpectedly low densities of P. thiaminolyticus cells; Paenibacillus thiaminolyticus was detectable in 2 of 6 alewife viscera tested at densities on the order of 100 cells/g out of 100,000,000 total bacterial cells/g. The low numbers of P. thiaminolyticus detected suggest that alewives contain additional non-P. thiaminolyticus sources of thiaminase activity.

Richter, C.A.; Wright-Osment, M. K.; Zajicek, J.L.; Honeyfield, D.C.; Tillitt, D.E.

2009-01-01

271

Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays for a bacterial thiaminase I gene and the thiaminase-producing bacterium Paenibacillus thiaminolyticus.  

PubMed

The thiaminase I enzyme produced by the gram-positive bacterium Paenibacillus thiaminolyticus isolated from the viscera of Lake Michigan alewives Alosa pseudoharengus is currently the only defined source of the thiaminase activity linked to thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency in early mortality syndrome (EMS) in the larvae of Great Lakes salmonines. Diets of alewife or isolated strains of P. thiaminolyticus mixed in a semipurified diet and fed to lake trout Salvelinus namaycush have been shown to produce EMS in fry. We utilized quantitative polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR) to aid in studies of the sources of P. thiaminolyticus and thiaminase I. Quantitative PCR assays were established to detect the thiaminase I gene of P. thiaminolyticus, the 16S rRNA gene from most species of bacteria, and the 16S rRNA gene specifically from P. thiaminolyticus and a few closely related taxa. The Q-PCR assays are linear over at least six orders of magnitude and can detect the thiaminase I gene of P. thiaminolyticus from as few as 1,000 P. thiaminolyticus cells/g of sample or the Paenibacillus 16S rRNA gene from as few as 100 P. thiaminolyticus cells/g of sample. The initial results from alewife viscera samples with high thiaminase activity yielded unexpectedly low densities of P. thiaminolyticus cells; Paenibacillus thiaminolyticus was detectable in 2 of 6 alewife viscera tested at densities on the order of 100 cells/g out of 100,000,000 total bacterial cells/g. The low numbers of P. thiaminolyticus detected suggest that alewives contain additional non-P. thiaminolyticus sources of thiaminase activity. PMID:20218497

Richter, Catherine A; Wright-Osment, Maureen K; Zajicek, James L; Honeyfield, Dale C; Tillitt, Donald E

2009-12-01

272

Gene make-up: rapid and massive intron gains after horizontal transfer of a bacterial ?-amylase gene to Basidiomycetes  

PubMed Central

Background Increasing genome data show that introns, a hallmark of eukaryotes, already existed at a high density in the last common ancestor of extant eukaryotes. However, intron content is highly variable among species. The tempo of intron gains and losses has been irregular and several factors may explain why some genomes are intron-poor whereas other are intron-rich. Results We studied the dynamics of intron gains and losses in an ?-amylase gene, whose product breaks down starch and other polysaccharides. It was transferred from an Actinobacterium to an ancestor of Agaricomycotina. This gene underwent further duplications in several species. The results indicate a high rate of intron insertions soon after the gene settled in the fungal genome. A number of these oldest introns, regularly scattered along the gene, remained conserved. Subsequent gains and losses were lineage dependent, with a majority of losses. Moreover, a few species exhibited a high number of both specific intron gains and losses in recent periods. There was little sequence conservation around insertion sites, then probably little information for splicing, whereas splicing sites, inside introns, showed typical and conserved patterns. There was little variation of intron size. Conclusions Since most Basidiomycetes have intron-rich genomes and this richness was ancestral in Fungi, long before the transfer event, we suggest that the new gene was shaped to comply with requirements of the splicing machinery, such as short exon and intron sizes, in order to be correctly processed. PMID:23405862

2013-01-01

273

An Acidic PATHOGENESIS-RELATED1 Gene of Oryza grandiglumis is Involved in Disease Resistance Response Against Bacterial Infection.  

PubMed

Wild rice, Oryza grandiglumis shows hyper-resistance response to pathogen infection. In order to identify genes necessary for defense response in plants, we have carried out a subtractive hybridization coupled with a cDNA macroarray. An acidic PATHOGENESIS-RELATED1 (PR1) gene of the wild rice is highly identical to the acidic PR1 genes of different plant species. The OgPR1a cDNA has an apparent single open reading frame with a predicted molecular mass 40,621 Da and an isoelectic point of 5.14. Both in silico analysis and a transient expression assay in onion epidermal cells revealed that the OgPR1a protein could be localized in intercellular space in plants. The OgPR1a mRNA was strongly transcribed by the exogenous treatment with ethylene and jasmonic acid as well as protein phosphatase inhibitors. Additionally, ectopic expression of the OgPR1a conferred disease resistance on Arabidopsis to the bacterial and fungal infections. PMID:25289005

Shin, Sang Hyun; Pak, Jung-Hun; Kim, Mi Jin; Kim, Hye Jeong; Oh, Ju Sung; Choi, Hong Kyu; Jung, Ho Won; Chung, Young Soo

2014-06-01

274

Expression of a bacterial flagellin gene triggers plant immune responses and confers disease resistance in transgenic rice plants.  

PubMed

Flagellin is a component of bacterial flagella and acts as a proteinaceous elicitor of defence responses in organisms. Flagellin from a phytopathogenic bacterium, Acidovorax avenae strain N1141, induces immune responses in suspension-cultured rice cells. To analyse the function of flagellin in rice, we fused the N1141 flagellin gene to the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter and introduced it into rice. Many of the resulting transgenic rice plants accumulated flagellin at various levels. The transgenic rice developed pale spots in the leaves. The expression of a defence-related gene for phenylalanine ammonia-lyase was induced in the transgenic plants, and H(2)O(2) production and cell death were observed in some plants with high levels of gene expression, suggesting that the flagellin triggers immune responses in the transgenic rice. Transgenic plants inoculated with Magnaporthe grisea, the causal agent of rice blast, showed enhanced resistance to blast, suggesting that the flagellin production confers disease resistance in the transgenic rice. PMID:18705865

Takakura, Yoshimitsu; Che, Fang-Sik; Ishida, Yuji; Tsutsumi, Fumiki; Kurotani, Ken-ichi; Usami, Satoru; Isogai, Akira; Imaseki, Hidemasa

2008-07-01

275

Isolation of Poly-3-Hydroxybutyrate Metabolism Genes from Complex Microbial Communities by Phenotypic Complementation of Bacterial Mutants  

PubMed Central

The goal of this study was to initiate investigation of the genetics of bacterial poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) metabolism at the community level. We constructed metagenome libraries from activated sludge and soil microbial communities in the broad-host-range IncP cosmid pRK7813. Several unique clones were isolated from these libraries by functional heterologous complementation of a Sinorhizobium meliloti bdhA mutant, which is unable to grow on the PHB cycle intermediate d-3-hydroxybutyrate due to absence of the enzyme d-3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase activity. Clones that conferred d-3-hydroxybutyrate utilization on Escherichia coli were also isolated. Although many of the S. meliloti bdhA mutant complementing clones restored d-3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase activity to the mutant host, for some of the clones this activity was not detectable. This was also the case for almost all of the clones isolated in the E. coli selection. Further analysis was carried out on clones isolated in the S. meliloti complementation. Transposon mutagenesis to locate the complementing genes, followed by DNA sequence analysis of three of the genes, revealed coding sequences that were broadly divergent but lay within the diversity of known short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase encoding genes. In some cases, the amino acid sequence identity between pairs of deduced BdhA proteins was <35%, a level at which detection by nucleic acid hybridization based methods would probably not be successful. PMID:16391068

Wang, Chunxia; Meek, David J.; Panchal, Priya; Boruvka, Natalie; Archibald, Frederick S.; Driscoll, Brian T.; Charles, Trevor C.

2006-01-01

276

Discovery of bacterial polyhydroxyalkanoate synthase (PhaC)-encoding genes from seasonal Baltic Sea ice and cold estuarine waters.  

PubMed

Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are macromolecules produced by bacteria as means for storing carbon and energy in intracellular granules. PHAs have physical properties similar to those of plastics and have become of interest to industry as materials for environmentally friendly bioplastic production. There is an ongoing search for new PHA-producing bacterial strains and PHA-synthesizing enzymes tolerating extreme conditions to find ways of producing PHAs at cold temperatures and high solute concentrations. Moreover, the study of PHA producers in the sea-ice biome can aid in understanding the microbial ecology of carbon cycling in ice-associated ecosystems. In this study, PHA producers and PHA synthase genes were examined under the extreme environmental conditions of sea ice and cold seawater to find evidence of PHA production in an environment requiring adaptation to high salinity and cold temperatures. Sea ice and cold estuarine water samples were collected from the northern Baltic Sea and evidence of PHA production was gathered, using microscopy with Nile Blue A staining of PHA-granules and PCR assays detecting PHA-synthesis genes. The PHA granules and PHA synthases were found at all sampling locations, in both sea ice and water, and throughout the sampling period spanning over 10 years. Our study shows, for the first time, that PHA synthesis occurs in Baltic Sea cold-adapted bacteria in their natural environment, which makes the Baltic Sea and its cold environments an interesting choice in the quest for PHA-synthesizing bacteria and synthesis genes. PMID:25280551

Pärnänen, Katariina; Karkman, Antti; Virta, Marko; Eronen-Rasimus, Eeva; Kaartokallio, Hermanni

2015-01-01

277

Relationship between bacterial virulence and nucleotide metabolism: a mutation in the adenylate kinase gene renders Yersinia pestis avirulent.  

PubMed Central

Nucleoside monophosphate kinases (NMPKs) are essential catalysts for bacterial growth and multiplication. These enzymes display high primary sequence identities among members of the family Enterobacteriaceae. Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, belongs to this family. However, it was previously shown that its thymidylate kinase (TMPKyp) exhibits biochemical properties significantly different from those of its Escherichia coli counterpart [Chenal-Francisque, Tourneux, Carniel, Christova, Li de la Sierra, Barzu and Gilles (1999) Eur. J. Biochem. 265, 112-119]. In this work, the adenylate kinase (AK) of Y. pestis (AKyp) was characterized. As with TMPKyp, AKyp displayed a lower thermodynamic stability than other studied AKs. Two mutations in AK (Ser129Phe and Pro87Ser), previously shown to induce a thermosensitive growth defect in E. coli, were introduced into AKyp. The recombinant variants had a lower stability than wild-type AKyp and a higher susceptibility to proteolytic digestion. When the Pro87Ser substitution was introduced into the chromosomal adk gene of Y. pestis, growth of the mutant strain was altered at the non-permissive temperature of 37 degree C. In virulence testings, less than 50 colony forming units (CFU) of wild-type Y. pestis killed 100% of the mice upon subcutaneous infection, whereas bacterial loads as high as 1.5 x 10(4) CFU of the adk mutant were unable to kill any animals. PMID:12879903

Munier-Lehmann, Hélène; Chenal-Francisque, Viviane; Ionescu, Mihaela; Chrisova, Petya; Foulon, Jeannine; Carniel, Elisabeth; Bârzu, Octavian

2003-01-01

278

Control of gene expression by cell size  

E-print Network

Polyploidy, increased copy number of whole chromosome sets in the genome, is a common cellular state in evolution, development and disease. Polyploidy enlarges cell size and alters gene expression, producing novel phenotypes ...

Wu, Chia-Yung

2010-01-01

279

The AS87_04050 Gene Is Involved in Bacterial Lipopolysaccharide Biosynthesis and Pathogenicity of Riemerella anatipestifer  

PubMed Central

Riemerella anatipestifer is reported worldwide as a cause of septicemic and exudative diseases of domestic ducks. In this study, we identified a mutant strain RA2640 by Tn4351 transposon mutagenesis, in which the AS87_04050 gene was inactivated by insertion of the transposon. Southern blot analysis indicated that only one insertion was found in the genome of the mutant strain RA2640. SDS-PAGE followed by silver staining showed that the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) pattern of mutant strain RA2640 was different from its wild-type strain Yb2, suggesting the LPS was defected. In addition, the phenotype of the mutant strain RA2640 was changed to rough-type, evident by altered colony morphology, autoaggregation ability and crystal violet staining characteristics. Bacterial LPS is a key factor in virulence as well as in both innate and acquired host responses to infection. The rough-type mutant strain RA2640 showed higher sensitivity to antibiotics, disinfectants and normal duck serum, and higher capability of adherence and invasion to Vero cells, compared to its wild-type strain Yb2. Moreover, the mutant strain RA2640 lost the agglutination ability of its wild-type strain Yb2 to R. anatipestifer serotype 2 positive sera, suggesting that the O-antigen is defected. Animal experiments indicated that the virulence of the mutant strain RA2640 was attenuated by more than 100,000-fold, compared to its wild-type strain Yb2. These results suggested that the AS87_04050 gene in R. anatipestifer is associated with the LPS biosynthesis and bacterial pathogenicity. PMID:25303276

Wang, Xiaolan; Ding, Chan; Wang, Shaohui; Han, Xiangan; Hou, Wanwan; Yue, Jiaping; Zou, Jiechi; Yu, Shengqing

2014-01-01

280

The Pto kinase conferring resistance to tomato bacterial speck disease interacts with proteins that bind a cis-element of pathogenesis-related genes  

Microsoft Academic Search

In tomato, the Pto kinase confers resistance to bacterial speck disease by recognizing the expression of a corresponding avirulence gene, avrPto, in the pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato. Using the yeast two-hybrid system, we have identified three genes, Pti4, Pti5 and Pti6, that encode proteins that physically interact with the Pto kinase. Pti4\\/5\\/6 each encode a protein with characteristics that

Jianmin Zhou; Xiaoyan Tang; Gregory B. Martin

1997-01-01

281

Controlled delivery of bioactive molecules into live cells using the bacterial mechanosensitive channel MscL  

PubMed Central

Bacterial mechanosensitive channels are some of the largest pores in nature. In particular, MscL, with a pore diameter > 25 Å, allows passage of large organic ions and small proteins. Functional MscL reconstitution into lipids has been proposed for applications in vesicular-based drug release. Here we show that these channels can be functionally expressed in mammalian cells to afford rapid controlled uptake of membrane impermeable molecules. We first demonstrate that MscL gating in response to increased membrane tension is preserved in mammalian cell membranes. Molecular delivery is controlled by adopting an established method of MscL charge-induced activation. We then determine pore size limitations using fluorescently labeled model cargoes. Finally, we activate MscL to introduce the cell-impermeable bi-cyclic peptide phalloidin, a specific marker for actin filaments, into cells. We propose that MscL will be a useful tool for gated and controlled delivery of bioactive molecules into cells. PMID:22871809

Doerner, Julia F.; Febvay, Sebastien; Clapham, David E.

2013-01-01

282

Mammalian Hibernation: Physiology, Cell Signaling, and Gene Controls on Metabolic  

E-print Network

Chapter 13 Mammalian Hibernation: Physiology, Cell Signaling, and Gene Controls on Metabolic Rate Depression Kenneth B. Storey, Gerhard Heldmaier, and Mark H. Rider Abstract During the hibernating season torpor bouts triggering the up-regulation of specific genes that serve the hibernation phenotype. 13

Storey, Kenneth B.

283

GenePRIMP: A software quality control tool  

ScienceCinema

Amrita Pati of the DOE Joint Genome Institute's Genome Biology group describes the software tool GenePRIMP and how it fits into the quality control pipeline for microbial genomics. Further details regarding GenePRIMP appear in a paper published online May 2, 2010 in Nature Methods.

Amrita Pati

2010-09-01

284

GenePRIMP: A software quality control tool  

SciTech Connect

Amrita Pati of the DOE Joint Genome Institute's Genome Biology group describes the software tool GenePRIMP and how it fits into the quality control pipeline for microbial genomics. Further details regarding GenePRIMP appear in a paper published online May 2, 2010 in Nature Methods.

Amrita Pati

2010-05-05

285

Short-term effect of elevated temperature on the abundance and diversity of bacterial and archaeal amoA genes in Antarctic Soils.  

PubMed

Global warming will have far-reaching effects on our ecosystem. However, its effects on Antarctic soils have been poorly explored. To assess the effects of warming on microbial abundance and community composition, we sampled Antarctic soils from the King George Island in the Antarctic Peninsula and incubated these soils at elevated temperatures of 5°C and 8°C for 14 days. The reduction in total organic carbon and increase in soil respiration were attributed to the increased proliferation of Bacteria, Fungi, and Archaea. Interestingly, bacterial ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) genes were predominant over archaeal amoA, unlike in many other environments reported previously. Phylogenetic analyses of bacterial and archaeal amoA communities via clone libraries revealed that the diversity of amoA genes in Antarctic ammonia-oxidizing prokaryotic communities were temperature-insensitive. Interestingly, our data also showed that the amoA of Antarctic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) communities differed from previously described amoA sequences of cultured isolates and clone library sequences, suggesting the presence of novel Antarctic-specific AOB communities. Denitrification-related genes were significantly reduced under warming conditions, whereas the abundance of amoA and nifH increased. Barcoded pyrosequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene revealed that Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, and Actinobacteria were the major phyla in Antarctic soils and the effect of short-term warming on the bacterial community was not apparent. PMID:23751559

Han, Jiwon; Jung, Jaejoon; Park, Minsuk; Hyun, Seunghun; Park, Woojun

2013-09-28

286

Linking Temporal Changes in Bacterial Community Structures with the Detection and Phylogenetic Analysis of Neutral Metalloprotease Genes in the Sediments of a Hypereutrophic Lake  

PubMed Central

We investigated spatial and temporal variations in bacterial community structures as well as the presence of three functional proteolytic enzyme genes in the sediments of a hypereutrophic freshwater lake in order to acquire an insight into dynamic links between bacterial community structures and proteolytic functions. Bacterial communities determined from 16S rRNA gene clone libraries markedly changed bimonthly, rather than vertically in the sediment cores. The phylum Firmicutes dominated in the 4–6 cm deep sediment layer sample after August in 2007, and this correlated with increases in interstitial ammonium concentrations (p < 0.01). The Firmicutes clones were mostly composed of the genus Bacillus. npr genes encoding neutral metalloprotease, an extracellular protease gene, were detected after the phylum Firmicutes became dominant. The deduced Npr protein sequences from the retrieved npr genes also showed that most of the Npr sequences used in this study were closely related to those of the genus Bacillus, with similarities ranging from 61% to 100%. Synchronous temporal occurrences of the 16S rRNA gene and Npr sequences, both from the genus Bacillus, were positively associated with increases in interstitial ammonium concentrations, which may imply that proteolysis by Npr from the genus Bacillus may contribute to the marked increases observed in ammonium concentrations in the sediments. Our results suggest that sedimentary bacteria may play an important role in the biogeochemical nitrogen cycle of freshwater lakes. PMID:25130992

Tsuboi, Shun; Yamamura, Shigeki; Imai, Akio; Satou, Takayuki; Iwasaki, Kazuhiro

2014-01-01

287

Impact of the Spatial Heterogeneity of the Spermosphere and Rhizosphere on Performance of Bacterial Biological Control Agents  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The spermosphere and rhizosphere environments are the critical interfaces where many plant-microbe and microbe-microbe interactions occurs that lead to plant disease and the suppression of plant disease by bacterial and other biological control agents. We discuss the spatial heterogeneity of the ph...

288

Bacterial Biosynthetic Gene Clusters Encoding the Anti-cancer Haterumalide Class of Molecules  

PubMed Central

Haterumalides are halogenated macrolides with strong antitumor properties, making them attractive targets for chemical synthesis. Unfortunately, current synthetic routes to these molecules are inefficient. The potent haterumalide, oocydin A, was previously identified from two plant-associated bacteria through its high bioactivity against plant pathogenic fungi and oomycetes. In this study, we describe oocydin A (ooc) biosynthetic gene clusters identified by genome sequencing, comparative genomics, and chemical analysis in four plant-associated enterobacteria of the Serratia and Dickeya genera. Disruption of the ooc gene cluster abolished oocydin A production and bioactivity against fungi and oomycetes. The ooc gene clusters span between 77 and 80 kb and encode five multimodular polyketide synthase (PKS) proteins, a hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA synthase cassette and three flavin-dependent tailoring enzymes. The presence of two free-standing acyltransferase proteins classifies the oocydin A gene cluster within the growing family of trans-AT PKSs. The amino acid sequences and organization of the PKS domains are consistent with the chemical predictions and functional peculiarities associated with trans-acyltransferase PKS. Based on extensive in silico analysis of the gene cluster, we propose a biosynthetic model for the production of oocydin A and, by extension, for other members of the haterumalide family of halogenated macrolides exhibiting anti-cancer, anti-fungal, and other interesting biological properties. PMID:23012376

Matilla, Miguel A.; Stöckmann, Henning; Leeper, Finian J.; Salmond, George P. C.

2012-01-01

289

Characterization of foot-and-mouth disease virus gene products with antisera against bacterially synthesized fusion proteins  

SciTech Connect

Defined segments of the cloned foot-and-mouth disease virus genome corresponding to all parts of the coding region were expressed in Escherichia coli as fusions to the N-terminal part of the MS2-polymerase gene under the control of the inducible lambdaPL promoter. All constructs yielded large amounts of proteins, which were purified and used to raise sequence-specific antisera in rabbits. These antisera were used to identify the corresponding viral gene products in /sup 35/S-labeled extracts from foot-and-mouth disease virus-infected BHK cells. This allowed us to locate unequivocally all mature foot-and-mouth disease virus gene products in the nucleotide sequence, to identify precursor-product relationships, and to detect several foot-and mouth disease virus gene products not previously identified in vivo or in vitro.

Strebel, K.; Beck, E.; Strohmaier, K.; Schaller, H.

1986-03-01

290

Bacterial growth: global effects on gene expression, growth feedback and proteome partition.  

PubMed

The function of endogenous as well as synthetic genetic circuits is generically coupled to the physiological state of the cell. For exponentially growing bacteria, a key characteristic of the state of the cell is the growth rate and thus gene expression is often growth-rate dependent. Here we review recent results on growth-rate dependent gene expression. We distinguish different types of growth-rate dependencies by the mechanisms of regulation involved and the presence or absence of an effect of the gene product on growth. The latter can lead to growth feedback, feedback mediated by changes of the global state of the cell. Moreover, we discuss how growth rate dependence can be used as a guide to study the molecular implementation of physiological regulation. PMID:24495512

Klumpp, Stefan; Hwa, Terence

2014-08-01

291

Bacterial diversity in Fez tanneries and Morocco's Binlamdoune River, using 16S RNA gene based fingerprinting.  

PubMed

Tannery wastewater causes serious ecological and sanitary damage. Chemical analysis of water from Binlamdoune River of the medina of Fez was conducted and the results revealed the presence of toxic elements from tanneries and other industrial activities, which strongly affected water quality. To determine the effectiveness of bioremediation for depollution, we studied the abundance and diversity of bacteria residing in these polluted environments. Conducting denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) of the 16S rDNA area using primers related to bacteria showed a bacterial community belonging to eubacterial groups, that is, Epsilonproteobacteria, Clostridia, Lactobacillales, Bacteroidetes, Gammaproteobacteria, and Alphaproteobacteria. In addition, cloning displayed the presence of clones belonging to the Firmicutes group. Moreover, scanning electron microscopy revealed a significant heterogeneity of microorganism forms and structures. These endogenous microbes could have a significant role in the purification of Binlamdoune River and Fez tannery wastewater. PMID:21462714

Essahale, Adil; Malki, Moustafa; Marín, Irma; Moumni, Mohieddine

2010-01-01

292

Inference of quantitative models of bacterial promoters from time-series reporter gene data.  

PubMed

The inference of regulatory interactions and quantitative models of gene regulation from time-series transcriptomics data has been extensively studied and applied to a range of problems in drug discovery, cancer research, and biotechnology. The application of existing methods is commonly based on implicit assumptions on the biological processes under study. First, the measurements of mRNA abundance obtained in transcriptomics experiments are taken to be representative of protein concentrations. Second, the observed changes in gene expression are assumed to be solely due to transcription factors and other specific regulators, while changes in the activity of the gene expression machinery and other global physiological effects are neglected. While convenient in practice, these assumptions are often not valid and bias the reverse engineering process. Here we systematically investigate, using a combination of models and experiments, the importance of this bias and possible corrections. We measure in real time and in vivo the activity of genes involved in the FliA-FlgM module of the E. coli motility network. From these data, we estimate protein concentrations and global physiological effects by means of kinetic models of gene expression. Our results indicate that correcting for the bias of commonly-made assumptions improves the quality of the models inferred from the data. Moreover, we show by simulation that these improvements are expected to be even stronger for systems in which protein concentrations have longer half-lives and the activity of the gene expression machinery varies more strongly across conditions than in the FliA-FlgM module. The approach proposed in this study is broadly applicable when using time-series transcriptome data to learn about the structure and dynamics of regulatory networks. In the case of the FliA-FlgM module, our results demonstrate the importance of global physiological effects and the active regulation of FliA and FlgM half-lives for the dynamics of FliA-dependent promoters. PMID:25590141

Stefan, Diana; Pinel, Corinne; Pinhal, Stéphane; Cinquemani, Eugenio; Geiselmann, Johannes; de Jong, Hidde

2015-01-01

293

Inference of Quantitative Models of Bacterial Promoters from Time-Series Reporter Gene Data  

PubMed Central

The inference of regulatory interactions and quantitative models of gene regulation from time-series transcriptomics data has been extensively studied and applied to a range of problems in drug discovery, cancer research, and biotechnology. The application of existing methods is commonly based on implicit assumptions on the biological processes under study. First, the measurements of mRNA abundance obtained in transcriptomics experiments are taken to be representative of protein concentrations. Second, the observed changes in gene expression are assumed to be solely due to transcription factors and other specific regulators, while changes in the activity of the gene expression machinery and other global physiological effects are neglected. While convenient in practice, these assumptions are often not valid and bias the reverse engineering process. Here we systematically investigate, using a combination of models and experiments, the importance of this bias and possible corrections. We measure in real time and in vivo the activity of genes involved in the FliA-FlgM module of the E. coli motility network. From these data, we estimate protein concentrations and global physiological effects by means of kinetic models of gene expression. Our results indicate that correcting for the bias of commonly-made assumptions improves the quality of the models inferred from the data. Moreover, we show by simulation that these improvements are expected to be even stronger for systems in which protein concentrations have longer half-lives and the activity of the gene expression machinery varies more strongly across conditions than in the FliA-FlgM module. The approach proposed in this study is broadly applicable when using time-series transcriptome data to learn about the structure and dynamics of regulatory networks. In the case of the FliA-FlgM module, our results demonstrate the importance of global physiological effects and the active regulation of FliA and FlgM half-lives for the dynamics of FliA-dependent promoters. PMID:25590141

Stefan, Diana; Pinel, Corinne; Pinhal, Stéphane; Cinquemani, Eugenio; Geiselmann, Johannes; de Jong, Hidde

2015-01-01

294

Effects of season and experimental warming on the bacterial community in a temperate mountain forest soil assessed by 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing.  

PubMed

Climate warming may induce shifts in soil microbial communities possibly altering the long-term carbon mineralization potential of soils. We assessed the response of the bacterial community in a forest soil to experimental soil warming (+4 °C) in the context of seasonal fluctuations. Three experimental plots were sampled in the fourth year of warming in summer and winter and compared to control plots by 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. We sequenced 17,308 amplicons per sample and analysed operational taxonomic units at genetic distances of 0.03, 0.10 and 0.25, with respective Good's coverages of 0.900, 0.977 and 0.998. Diversity indices did not differ between summer, winter, control or warmed samples. Summer and winter samples differed in community structure at a genetic distance of 0.25, corresponding approximately to phylum level. This was mainly because of an increase of Actinobacteria in winter. Abundance patterns of dominant taxa (> 0.06% of all reads) were analysed individually and revealed, that seasonal shifts were coherent among related phylogenetic groups. Seasonal community dynamics were subtle compared to the dynamics of soil respiration. Despite a pronounced respiration response to soil warming, we did not detect warming effects on community structure or composition. Fine-scale shifts may have been concealed by the considerable spatial variation. PMID:22670891

Kuffner, Melanie; Hai, Brigitte; Rattei, Thomas; Melodelima, Christelle; Schloter, Michael; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, Sophie; Jandl, Robert; Schindlbacher, Andreas; Sessitsch, Angela

2012-12-01

295

Cancer genes and the pathways they control  

Microsoft Academic Search

The revolution in cancer research can be summed up in a single sentence: cancer is, in essence, a genetic disease. In the last decade, many important genes responsible for the genesis of various cancers have been discovered, their mutations precisely identified, and the pathways through which they act characterized. The purposes of this review are to highlight examples of progress

Bert Vogelstein; Kenneth W Kinzler

2004-01-01

296

Nucleotide and partner-protein control of bacterial replicative helicase structure and function  

PubMed Central

Cellular replication forks are powered by ring-shaped, hexameric helicases that encircle and unwind DNA. To better understand the molecular mechanisms and control of these enzymes, we used multiple methods to investigate the bacterial replicative helicase, DnaB. A 3.3 Å crystal structure of Aquifex aeolicus DnaB complexed with nucleotide reveals a new conformational state for this motor protein. Electron microscopy and small angle X-ray scattering studies confirm the state seen crystallographically, showing that the DnaB ATPase domains and an associated N-terminal collar transition between two physical states in a nucleotide-dependent manner. Mutant helicases locked in either collar state are active, but display different capacities to support critical activities such as duplex translocation and primase-dependent RNA synthesis. Our findings establish the DnaB collar as an auto-regulatory hub that controls the ability of the helicase to transition between different functional states in response to nucleotide and both replication initiation and elongation factors. PMID:24373746

Strycharska, Melania S.; Arias-Palomo, Ernesto; Lyubimov, Artem Y.; Erzberger, Jan P.; O’Shea, Valerie; Bustamante, Carlos J.; Berger, James M.

2014-01-01

297

Magnetic field-controlled gene expression in encapsulated cells  

PubMed Central

Cell and gene therapies have an enormous range of potential applications, but as for most other therapies, dosing is a critical issue, which makes regulated gene expression a prerequisite for advanced strategies. Several inducible expression systems have been established, which mainly rely on small molecules as inducers, such as hormones or antibiotics. The application of these inducers is difficult to control and the effects on gene regulation are slow. Here we describe a novel system for induction of gene expression in encapsulated cells. This involves the modification of cells to express potential therapeutic genes under the control of a heat inducible promoter and the co-encapsulation of these cells with magnetic nanoparticles. These nanoparticles produce heat when subjected to an alternating magnetic field; the elevated temperatures in the capsules then induce gene expression. In the present study we define the parameters of such systems and provide proof-of-principle using reporter gene constructs. The fine-tuned heating of nanoparticles in the magnetic field allows regulation of gene expression from the outside over a broad range and within short time. Such a system has great potential for advancement of cell and gene therapy approaches. PMID:22197778

Ortner, Viktoria; Kaspar, Cornelius; Halter, Christian; Töllner, Lars; Mykhaylyk, Olga; Walzer, Johann; Günzburg, Walter H.; Dangerfield, John A.; Hohenadl, Christine; Czerny, Thomas

2012-01-01

298

The Influence of DNA Extraction Procedure and Primer Set on the Bacterial Community Analysis by Pyrosequencing of Barcoded 16S rRNA Gene Amplicons  

PubMed Central

In this study, the effect of different DNA extraction procedures and primer sets on pyrosequencing results regarding the composition of bacterial communities in the ileum of piglets was investigated. Ileal chyme from piglets fed a diet containing different amounts of zinc oxide was used to evaluate a pyrosequencing study with barcoded 16S rRNA PCR products. Two DNA extraction methods (bead beating versus silica gel columns) and two primer sets targeting variable regions of bacterial 16S rRNA genes (8f-534r versus 968f-1401r) were considered. The SEED viewer software of the MG-RAST server was used for automated sequence analysis. A total of 5.2 × 105 sequences were used for analysis after processing for read length (150?bp), minimum sequence occurrence (5), and exclusion of eukaryotic and unclassified/uncultured sequences. DNA extraction procedures and primer sets differed significantly in total sequence yield. The distribution of bacterial order and main bacterial genera was influenced significantly by both parameters. However, this study has shown that the results of pyrosequencing studies using barcoded PCR amplicons of bacterial 16S rRNA genes depend on DNA extraction and primer choice, as well as on the manner of downstream sequence analysis. PMID:25120931

Starke, Ingo C.; Vahjen, Wilfried; Pieper, Robert; Zentek, Jürgen

2014-01-01

299

Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification of Specific Endoglucanase Gene Sequence for Detection of the Bacterial Wilt Pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum  

PubMed Central

The increased globalization of crops production and processing industries also promotes the side-effects of more rapid and efficient spread of plant pathogens. To prevent the associated economic losses, and particularly those related to bacterial diseases where their management relies on removal of the infected material from production, simple, easy-to-perform, rapid and cost-effective tests are needed. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assays that target 16S rRNA, fliC and egl genes were compared and evaluated as on-site applications. The assay with the best performance was that targeted to the egl gene, which shows high analytical specificity for diverse strains of the betaproteobacterium Ralstonia solanacearum, including its non-European and non-race 3 biovar 2 strains. The additional melting curve analysis provides confirmation of the test results. According to our extensive assessment, the egl LAMP assay requires minimum sample preparation (a few minutes of boiling) for the identification of pure cultures and ooze from symptomatic material, and it can also be used in a high-throughput format in the laboratory. This provides sensitive and reliable detection of R. solanacearum strains of different phylotypes. PMID:24763488

Pirc, Manca; Llop, Pablo; Ravnikar, Maja; Dreo, Tanja

2014-01-01

300

Spatiotemporal Analysis of Bacterial Diversity in Sediments of Sundarbans Using Parallel 16S rRNA Gene Tag Sequencing.  

PubMed

The influence of temporal and spatial variations on the microbial community composition was assessed in the unique coastal mangrove of Sundarbans using parallel 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. The total sediment DNA was extracted and subjected to the 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing, which resulted in 117 Mbp of data from three experimental stations. The taxonomic analysis of the pyrosequencing data was grouped into 24 different phyla. In general, Proteobacteria were the most dominant phyla with predominance of Deltaproteobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, and Gammaproteobacteria within the sediments. Besides Proteobacteria, there are a number of sequences affiliated to the following major phyla detected in all three stations in both the sampling seasons: Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Planctomycetes, Acidobacteria, Chloroflexi, Cyanobacteria, Nitrospira, and Firmicutes. Further taxonomic analysis revealed abundance of micro-aerophilic and anaerobic microbial population in the surface layers, suggesting anaerobic nature of the sediments in Sundarbans. The results of this study add valuable information about the composition of microbial communities in Sundarbans mangrove and shed light on possible transformations promoted by bacterial communities in the sediments. PMID:25256302

Basak, Pijush; Majumder, Niladri Shekhar; Nag, Sudip; Bhattacharyya, Anish; Roy, Debojyoti; Chakraborty, Arpita; SenGupta, Sohan; Roy, Arunava; Mukherjee, Arghya; Pattanayak, Rudradip; Ghosh, Abhrajyoti; Chattopadhyay, Dhrubajyoti; Bhattacharyya, Maitree

2014-09-26

301

Differential distribution and abundance of diazotrophic bacterial communities across different soil niches using a gene-targeted clone library approach.  

PubMed

Diazotrophs are key players of the globally important biogeochemical nitrogen cycle, having a significant role in maintaining ecosystem sustainability. Saline soils are pristine and unexplored habitats representing intriguing ecosystems expected to harbour potential diazotrophs capable of adapting in extreme conditions, and these implicated organisms are largely obscure. Differential occurrence of diazotrophs was studied by the nifH gene-targeted clone library approach. Four nifH gene clone libraries were constructed from different soil niches, that is saline soils (low and high salinity; EC 3.8 and 7.1 ds m(-1) ), and agricultural and rhizosphere soil. Additionally, the abundance of diazotrophic community members was assessed using quantitative PCR. Results showed environment-dependent metabolic versatility and the presence of nitrogen-fixing bacteria affiliated with a range of taxa, encompassing members of the Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Cyanobacteria and Firmicutes. The analyses unveiled the dominance of Alphaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria (Pseudomonas, Halorhodospira, Ectothiorhodospira, Bradyrhizobium, Agrobacterium, Amorphomonas) as nitrogen fixers in coastal-saline soil ecosystems, and Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria (Bradyrhizobium, Azohydromonas, Azospirillum, Ideonella) in agricultural/rhizosphere ecosystems. The results revealed a repertoire of novel nitrogen-fixing bacterial guilds particularly in saline soil ecosystems. PMID:25196726

Yousuf, Basit; Kumar, Raghawendra; Mishra, Avinash; Jha, Bhavanath

2014-11-01

302

Cloning and expression analysis of a ubiquitin gene ( Ub L40 ) in the haemocytes of Crassostrea hongkongensis under bacterial challenge  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ubiquitin, a highly conserved stress-related protein, is assigned multiple functions, such as DNA processing, protein degradation, and ribosome synthesis. The Crassostrea hongkongensis ubiquitin gene (designated ChUb L40 ) was cloned by a combination of suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH) and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). The full-length cDNA of ChUb L40 is 496 bp in length, consisting of a 5' untranslated region (UTR) of 34 bp, a 3'-UTR of 75 bp and an open reading frame of 387 bp encoding a ubiquitin fusion protein of 128 amino acids. Analysis of the amino acid sequence of ChUb L40 reveals that Ub L40 is highly conservative during evolution. The expression patterns of ChUb L40 gene in various tissues were examined by real-time PCR. The expression level of ChUb L40 in haemocytes is down-regulated at 4 h and gradually returned to its original level from 6 h to 24 h after Vibrio alginolyticus challenge. Our results suggest that ChUb L40 is ubiquitously expressed and plays an important role in immune defense against bacterial challenge.

Fu, Dingkun; Zhang, Yang; Yu, Ziniu

2011-01-01

303

From amplification to gene in thyroid cancer: a high-resolution mapped bacterial-artificial-chromosome resource for cancer chromosome aberrations guides gene discovery after comparative genome hybridization.  

PubMed Central

Chromosome rearrangements associated with neoplasms provide a rich resource for definition of the pathways of tumorigenesis. The power of comparative genome hybridization (CGH) to identify novel genes depends on the existence of suitable markers, which are lacking throughout most of the genome. We now report a general approach that translates CGH data into higher-resolution genomic-clone data that are then used to define the genes located in aneuploid regions. We used CGH to study 33 thyroid-tumor DNAs and two tumor-cell-line DNAs. The results revealed amplifications of chromosome band 2p21, with less-intense amplification on 2p13, 19q13.1, and 1p36 and with least-intense amplification on 1p34, 1q42, 5q31, 5q33-34, 9q32-34, and 14q32. To define the 2p21 region amplified, a dense array of 373 FISH-mapped chromosome 2 bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) was constructed, and 87 of these were hybridized to a tumor-cell line. Four BACs carried genomic DNA that was amplified in these cells. The maximum amplified region was narrowed to 3-6 Mb by multicolor FISH with the flanking BACs, and the minimum amplicon size was defined by a contig of 420 kb. Sequence analysis of the amplified BAC 1D9 revealed a fragment of the gene, encoding protein kinase C epsilon (PKCepsilon), that was then shown to be amplified and rearranged in tumor cells. In summary, CGH combined with a dense mapped resource of BACs and large-scale sequencing has led directly to the definition of PKCepsilon as a previously unmapped candidate gene involved in thyroid tumorigenesis. PMID:9683604

Chen, X; Knauf, J A; Gonsky, R; Wang, M; Lai, E H; Chissoe, S; Fagin, J A; Korenberg, J R

1998-01-01

304

Intestinal immune gene response to bacterial challenge in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The mucosal immune system of fish is poorly understood and defined models for studying this system are lacking. The objective of this study was to evaluate different challenge paradigms and pathogens to examine the magnitude of change in intestinal immune gene expression. Rainbow trout were expos...

305

Influence of temperature regimes on resistance gene-mediated response to rice bacterial blight  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Increasing temperatures could reduce yield growth rate of rice by 10% in several rice production areas. Similarly, higher temperatures are predicted to accelerate the breakdown of plant disease resistance through higher disease pressure or altered resistance (R) gene effectiveness in many host-path...

306

Key respiratory genes elucidate bacterial community respiration in a seasonally anoxic estuary.  

PubMed

Intense annual spring phytoplankton blooms and thermohaline stratification lead to anoxia in Chesapeake Bay bottom waters. Once oxygen becomes depleted in the system, microbial communities use energetically favorable alternative electron acceptors for respiration. The extent to which changes in respiration are reflected in community gene expression have only recently been investigated. Metatranscriptomes prepared from near-bottom water plankton over a four month time series in central Chesapeake Bay demonstrated changes consistent with terminal electron acceptor availability. The frequency of respiration-related genes in metatranscriptomes was examined by BLASTx against curated databases of genes intimately and exclusively involved in specific electron acceptor utilization pathways. The relative expression of genes involved in denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium were coincident with changes in nitrate, nitrite and ammonium concentrations. Dissimilatory iron and manganese reduction transcript ratios increase during anoxic conditions and corresponded with the highest soluble reactive phosphate and manganese concentrations. The sulfide concentration peaked in late July and early August and also matched dissimilatory sulfate reduction transcript ratios. We show that rather than abrupt transitions between terminal electron acceptors, there seems to be substantial overlap in time and space of these various anaerobic respiratory processes in Chesapeake Bay. PMID:25470994

Eggleston, Erin M; Lee, Dong Y; Owens, Michael S; Cornwell, Jeffrey C; Crump, Byron C; Hewson, Ian

2014-12-01

307

GeneTox manager for bacterial mutagenicity assays: a personal computer and minicomputer system  

Microsoft Academic Search

GeneTox Manager (GTM) is a data capture, data management, and statistical analysis program used for microbial mutagenicity data. Its main purpose is to provide a homogeneous environment for the collection. organization, and analysis of data generated in the laboratory while also supporting a quality assurance program. The complete system consists of both personal computer (PC) system and a minicomputer (VAX)

Larry D. Claxton; John Creason; Joseph A. Nader; John D. Orr

1995-01-01

308

A Benefit of High Temperature: Increased Effectiveness of a Rice Bacterial Blight Disease Resistance Gene  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

High temperatures promote development of many plant diseases and reduce effectiveness of disease resistance (R) genes. In many rice producing countries, two crops of rice are produced, with more disease occurring in the season with higher day/night temperatures. While studying the factors that influ...

309

Comparative expression analysis of genes induced during development of bacterial rot and induction of hypersensitive cell death in lettuce.  

PubMed

The development of bacterial rot disease caused by Pseudomonas cichorii is closely associated with programmed cell death. To investigate the molecular events occurring during the development of bacterial rot, we isolated 20 P. cichorii-responsive genes (PcRGs) in lettuce by differential display. Among these PcRGs, signal transduction-, transcription/translation- and defense/stress responses-related PcRGs were subjected to a comparative expression study. We used RNA samples isolated from lettuce leaves inoculated with P. cichorii and hypersensitive response-inducing Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae. Expression of PcRG1-5-5 (spliceosomal protein), 2-9-2 (protein kinase) and 1-6-2 (ACC oxidase), 7-5 (alternative oxidase) and BI-I (bax inhibitor I) significantly increased in lettuce leaves inoculated with both P. cichorii and P. syringae pv. syringae. Intriguingly, PcRG 1-2-6 (protein phosphatase 2C) and 4-D-5 (protein kinase) were only up-regulated in P. cichorii-inoculated lettuce, whereas expression of PcRG1-3-2 (ribonucleoprotein) was only enhanced in P. syringae pv. syringae-inoculated lettuce. Expressions of PcRG1-3-2, 1-5-5, 1-6-2, 2-9-2, 7-5 and BI-I were induced by treatments with salicylic acid and/or methyl jasmonate. However, expression of PcRG1-2-6 and 4-D-5, which were specifically up-regulated by P. cichorii, were scarcely affected by these chemicals. Pharmacological studies suggested that ethylene and alternative oxidase were commonly related to disease development and hypersensitive responses. By contrast, there may be a different role for protein synthesis and protein kinase during disease development and in hypersensitive responses. These results suggested the overall similarity of genes expressed during disease development and in hypersensitive responses. However, there were differences not only in induction kinetics and the level of gene expression but also in the signal transduction pathway between hypersensitive responses and disease development. PMID:18171591

Kiba, Akinori; Lee, Kyon-Ye; Ohnishi, Kouhei; Hikichi, Yasufumi

2008-11-28

310

Broad-range PCR, cloning and sequencing of the full 16S rRNA gene for detection of bacterial DNA in synovial fluid samples of Tunisian patients with reactive and undifferentiated arthritis  

PubMed Central

Introduction Broad-range rDNA PCR provides an alternative, cultivation-independent approach for identifying bacterial DNA in reactive and other form of arthritis. The aim of this study was to use broad-range rDNA PCR targeting the 16S rRNA gene in patients with reactive and other forms of arthritis and to screen for the presence of DNA from any given bacterial species in synovial fluid (SF) samples. Methods We examined the SF samples from a total of 27 patients consisting of patients with reactive arthritis (ReA) (n = 5), undifferentiated arthritis (UA) (n = 9), rheumatoid arthritis (n = 7), and osteoarthritis (n = 6) of which the latter two were used as controls. Using broad-range bacterial PCR amplifying a 1400 bp fragment from the 16S rRNA gene, we identified and sequenced at least 24 clones from each SF sample. To identify the corresponding bacteria, DNA sequences were compared to the EMBL (European Molecular Biology Laboratory) database. Results Bacterial DNA was identified in 20 of the 27 SF samples (74, 10%). Analysis of a large number of sequences revealed the presence of DNA from more than one single bacterial species in the SF of all patients studied. The nearly complete sequences of the 1400 bp were obtained for most of the detected species. DNA of bacterial species including Shigella species, Escherichia species, and other coli-form bacteria as well as opportunistic pathogens such as Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and Achromobacter xylosoxidans were shared in all arthritis patients. Among pathogens described to trigger ReA, DNA from Shigella sonnei was found in ReA and UA patients. We also detected DNA from rarely occurring human pathogens such as Aranicola species and Pantoea ananatis. We also found DNA from bacteria so far not described in human infections such as Bacillus niacini, Paenibacillus humicus, Diaphorobacter species and uncultured bacterium genera incertae sedis OP10. Conclusions Broad-range PCR followed by cloning and sequencing the entire 16S rDNA, allowed the identification of the bacterial DNA environment in the SF samples of arthritic patients. We found a wide spectrum of bacteria including those known to be involved in ReA and others not previously associated with arthritis. PMID:19570210

Siala, Mariam; Gdoura, Radhouane; Fourati, Hela; Rihl, Markus; Jaulhac, Benoit; Younes, Mohamed; Sibilia, Jean; Baklouti, Sofien; Bargaoui, Naceur; Sellami, Slaheddine; Sghir, Abdelghani; Hammami, Adnane

2009-01-01

311

Control of the Human B-Globin Gene  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The diagram shows some of the gene regulatory proteins thought to control expression of this gene during red blood cell development. Some of the gene regulatory proteins shown, such as CP1, are found in many types of cells, while others, such as GATA-1, are present in only a few types of cells, including red blood cell precursors, and are therefore thought to contribute to the cell-type specificity of beta-globin gene expression. As indicated by the bidirectional arrows, several of the binding sites for GATA-1 overlap those of other gene regulatory proteins; it is thought that occupancy of these sites by GATA-1 excludes binding of other proteins. (Adapted from B. Emerson, In Gene Expression: General and Cell-Type Specific (M. Karin, ed.), pp. 116-161. Boston: Birkhauser, 1993.)

Bruce Alberts

1998-07-01

312

A gonococcal homologue of meningococcal ?-glutamyl transpeptidase gene is a new type of bacterial pseudogene that is transcriptionally active but phenotypically silent  

PubMed Central

Background It has been speculated that the ?-glutamyl transpeptidase (ggt) gene is present only in Neisseria meningitidis and not among related species such as Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Neisseria lactamica, because N. meningitidis is the only bacterium with GGT activity. However, nucleotide sequences highly homologous to the meningococcal ggt gene were found in the genomes of N. gonorrhoeae isolates. Results The gonococcal homologue (ggt gonococcal homologue; ggh) was analyzed. The nucleotide sequence of the ggh gene was approximately 95 % identical to that of the meningococcal ggt gene. An open reading frame in the ggh gene was disrupted by an ochre mutation and frameshift mutations induced by a 7-base deletion, but the amino acid sequences deduced from the artificially corrected ggh nucleotide sequences were approximately 97 % identical to that of the meningococcal ggt gene. The analyses of the sequences flanking the ggt and ggh genes revealed that both genes were localized in a common DNA region containing the fbp-ggt (or ggh)-glyA-opcA-dedA-abcZ gene cluster. The expression of the ggh RNA could be detected by dot blot, RT-PCR and primer extension analyses. Moreover, the truncated form of ggh-translational product was also found in some of the gonococcal isolates. Conclusion This study has shown that the gonococcal ggh gene is a pseudogene of the meningococcal ggt gene, which can also be designated as ?ggt. The gonococcal ggh (?ggt) gene is the first identified bacterial pseudogene that is transcriptionally active but phenotypically silent. PMID:16202144

Takahashi, Hideyuki; Watanabe, Haruo

2005-01-01

313

In an early branching metazoan, bacterial colonization of the embryo is controlled by maternal antimicrobial  

E-print Network

antimicrobial peptides Sebastian Fraunea , René Augustina , Friederike Anton-Erxlebena , Jörg Wittlieba bacterial colonization by using maternal antimicrobial peptides. An- timicrobial peptides of the periculin. These findings delineate a role for antimicrobial peptides both in selecting particular bacterial partners during

314

Evidence of bacteriophage-mediated horizontal transfer of bacterial 16S rRNA genes in the viral metagenome of the marine sponge Hymeniacidon perlevis.  

PubMed

Marine sponges have never been directly examined with respect to the presence of viruses or their potential involvement in horizontal gene transfer. Here we demonstrate for the first time, to our knowledge, the presence of viruses in the marine sponge Hymeniacidon perlevis. Moreover, bacterial 16S rDNA was detected in DNA isolated from these viruses, indicating that phage-derived transduction appears to occur in H. perlevis. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that bacterial 16S rDNA isolated from sponge-derived viral and total DNA differed significantly, indicating that not all species are equally involved in transduction. PMID:22902729

Harrington, Catriona; Del Casale, Antonio; Kennedy, Jonathan; Neve, Horst; Picton, Bernard E; Mooij, Marlies J; O'Gara, Fergal; Kulakov, Leonid A; Larkin, Michael J; Dobson, Alan D W

2012-11-01

315

Characterizing bacterial gene expression in nitrogen cycle metabolism with RT-qPCR.  

PubMed

Recent advances in DNA sequencing have greatly accelerated our ability to obtain the raw information needed to recognize both known and potential novel modular microbial genomic capacity for nitrogen metabolism. With PCR-based approaches to quantifying microbial mRNA expression now mainstream in most laboratories, researchers can now more efficiently propose and test hypotheses on the contributions of individual microbes to the biological accessibility of nitrogen upon which all other life depends. We review known microbial roles in these key nitrogen transformations, and describe the necessary steps in carrying out relevant gene expression studies. An example experimental design is then provided characterizing Nitrosococcus oceani mRNA expression in cultures responding to ammonia. The approach described, that of assessing microbial genome inventory and testing putative modular gene expression by mRNA quantification, is likely to remain an important tool in understanding individual microbial contributions within microbial community activities that maintain the Earth's nitrogen balance. PMID:21514471

Graham, James E; Wantland, Nicholas B; Campbell, Mark; Klotz, Martin G

2011-01-01

316

Mechanisms that control bacterial populations in continuous-flow culture models of mouse large intestinal flora.  

PubMed

A previous study had established that anaerobic continuous-flow (CF) cultures of conventional mouse cecal flora were able to maintain the in vivo ecological balance among the indigenous bacterial species tested. This paper describes experiments designed to determine the mechanisms which control the population sizes of these species in such CF cultures. One strain each of Escherichia coli, Fusobacterium sp., and Eubacterium sp. were studied. Growth of these strains in filtrates of CF cultures was considerably more rapid than in the CF cultures themselves, indicating that the inhibitory activity had been lost in the process of filtration. Growth rates to match those in CF cultures could be obtained, however, by restoring the original levels of H(2)S in the culture filtrates. The inhibitory effect of H(2)S in filtrates and in dialysates of CF cultures could be abolished by adding glucose or pyruvate, but not formate or lactate. The fatty acids present in CF cultures matched those in the cecum of conventional mice in both quality and concentration. These acids could not account for the slow rates of growth of the tested strains in CF cultures, but they did cause a marked increase in the initial lag phase of E. coli growth. The results obtained are compatible with the hypothesis that the populations of most indigenous intestinal bacteria are controlled by one or a few nutritional substrates which a given strain can utilize most efficiently in the presence of H(2)S and at the prevailing conditions of pH and anaerobiosis. This hypothesis consequently implies that the populations of enterobacteria, such as the E. coli strain tested, and those of the predominant anaerobes are controlled by analogous mechanisms. PMID:6339388

Freter, R; Brickner, H; Botney, M; Cleven, D; Aranki, A

1983-02-01

317

Ingestion of bacterially expressed double-stranded RNA inhibits gene expression in planarians  

Microsoft Academic Search

population that is present in the adult planarian. The study of these organisms, classic experimental models for investigating metazoan regeneration, has been revitalized by the application of modern molecular biological approaches. The identification of thousands of unique planarian ESTs, coupled with large-scale whole-mount in situ hybridization screens, and the ability to inhibit planarian gene expression through double-stranded RNA-mediated genetic inter-

Phillip A. Newmark; Peter W. Reddien; Francesc Cebria; Alejandro Sanchez Alvarado

2003-01-01

318

Conservation of Transcription Start Sites within Genes across a Bacterial Genus  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT Transcription start sites (TSSs) lying inside annotated genes, on the same or opposite strand, have been observed in diverse bacteria, but the function of these unexpected transcripts is unclear. Here, we use the metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and its relatives to study the evolutionary conservation of unexpected TSSs. Using high-resolution tiling microarrays and 5?-end RNA sequencing, we identified 2,531 TSSs in S. oneidensis MR-1, of which 18% were located inside coding sequences (CDSs). Comparative transcriptome analysis with seven additional Shewanella species revealed that the majority (76%) of the TSSs within the upstream regions of annotated genes (gTSSs) were conserved. Thirty percent of the TSSs that were inside genes and on the sense strand (iTSSs) were also conserved. Sequence analysis around these iTSSs showed conserved promoter motifs, suggesting that many iTSS are under purifying selection. Furthermore, conserved iTSSs are enriched for regulatory motifs, suggesting that they are regulated, and they tend to eliminate polar effects, which confirms that they are functional. In contrast, the transcription of antisense TSSs located inside CDSs (aTSSs) was significantly less likely to be conserved (22%). However, aTSSs whose transcription was conserved often have conserved promoter motifs and drive the expression of nearby genes. Overall, our findings demonstrate that some internal TSSs are conserved and drive protein expression despite their unusual locations, but the majority are not conserved and may reflect noisy initiation of transcription rather than a biological function. PMID:24987095

Shao, Wenjun; Price, Morgan N.; Deutschbauer, Adam M.; Romine, Margaret F.

2014-01-01

319

Properties of the Macrophomina phaseolina endoglucanase (EGL 1) gene product in bacterial and yeast expression systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Functional expression of a ?-d-1,4 glucanase-encoding gene (egl1) from a filamentous fungus was achieved in both Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a modified version of pRS413. Optimal activity of the E. coli-expressed enzyme was found at incubation temperatures of 60°C, whereas the enzyme activity was optimal at 40°C when expressed\\u000a by S. cerevisiae. Enzyme activity at different pH levels

Haiyin Wang; Richard W. Jones

1999-01-01

320

Bacterial populations and environmental factors controlling cellulose degradation in an acidic Sphagnum peat.  

PubMed

Northern peatlands represent a major global carbon store harbouring approximately one-third of the global reserves of soil organic carbon. A large proportion of these peatlands consists of acidic Sphagnum-dominated ombrotrophic bogs, which are characterized by extremely low rates of plant debris decomposition. The degradation of cellulose, the major component of Sphagnum-derived litter, was monitored in long-term incubation experiments with acidic (pH 4.0) peat extracts. This process was almost undetectable at 10°C and occurred at low rates at 20°C, while it was significantly accelerated at both temperature regimes by the addition of available nitrogen. Cellulose breakdown was only partially inhibited in the presence of cycloheximide, suggesting that bacteria participated in this process. We aimed to identify these bacteria by a combination of molecular and cultivation approaches and to determine the factors that limit their activity in situ. The indigenous bacterial community in peat was dominated by Alphaproteobacteria and Acidobacteria. The addition of cellulose induced a clear shift in the community structure towards an increase in the relative abundance of the Bacteroidetes. Increasing temperature and nitrogen availability resulted in a selective development of bacteria phylogenetically related to Cytophaga hutchinsonii (94-95% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity), which densely colonized microfibrils of cellulose. Among isolates obtained from this community only some subdivision 1 Acidobacteria were capable of degrading cellulose, albeit at a very slow rate. These Acidobacteria represent indigenous cellulolytic members of the microbial community in acidic peat and are easily out-competed by Cytophaga-like bacteria under conditions of increased nitrogen availability. Members of the phylum Firmicutes, known to be key players in cellulose degradation in neutral habitats, were not detected in the cellulolytic community enriched at low pH. PMID:21564458

Pankratov, Timofey A; Ivanova, Anastasia O; Dedysh, Svetlana N; Liesack, Werner

2011-07-01

321

ORF2 gene involves in the construction of high-order structure of bacterial cellulose.  

PubMed

An ORF2 gene located upstream of the cellulose synthase (bcs) operon of Acetobacter xylinum BPR2001 was disrupted and a mutant (M2-2) was constructed. In static cultivation, the parent strain produced a tough, colorless, and insoluble cellulose pellicle, whereas M2-2 culture produced a thin, yellow, and fragile pellicle. The results of X-ray diffraction and 13C solid-state NMR indicated that the product of M2-2 is a mixture of cellulose I, cellulose II, and amorphous cellulose. The cellulose I to cellulose II ratio of the mixture was evaluated from the signal areas of C6 to be about 1:2. Electron microscopy revealed that the product of M2-2 included ribbon-like cellulose and irregularly shaped particles attached to the ribbons. On the other hand, the mutant complemented with plasmid pSA-ORF2/k containing the ORF2 gene and BPR2001 produced only cellulose I. These results indicate that the ORF2 gene is involved in the production and crystallization of cellulose I microfibrils by this microorganism. PMID:12150971

Nakai, Tomonori; Nishiyama, Yoshiharu; Kuga, Shigenori; Sugano, Yasushi; Shoda, Makoto

2002-07-12

322

Effect of ultrasound irradiation on bacterial internalization and bacteria-mediated gene transfer to cancer cells.  

PubMed

The present study demonstrates that ultrasound irradiation can facilitate bacteria-mediated gene delivery (bactofection). Escherichia coli modified with avidin were employed as a vehicle for delivery of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene, a model heterologous gene, into the breast cancer cell line MCF-7. Avidin-mediated binding of E. coli to MCF-7 cells enhanced the internalization of E. coli by approximately 17%, irrespective of the use of ultrasound irradiation. Furthermore, the use of ultrasound irradiation increased the internalization by approximately 5%, irrespective of the presence of avidin on the E. coli cell surface. The percentages of GFP-expressing MCF-7 cells at 24h after bactofection were below 0.5% and 2% for the case with only avidin-modification of E. coli cell surface and only ultrasound irradiation, respectively. However, combining avidin modification with the ultrasound treatment increased this value to 8%. Thus, the use of avidin-modified bacteria in conjunction with ultrasound irradiation has potential as an effective strategy for tumor-targeted bactofection. PMID:24373691

Ninomiya, Kazuaki; Yamada, Ryuji; Meisaku, Hitomi; Shimizu, Nobuaki

2014-05-01

323

Creation of a bacterial cell controlled by a chemically synthesized genome.  

PubMed

We report the design, synthesis, and assembly of the 1.08-mega-base pair Mycoplasma mycoides JCVI-syn1.0 genome starting from digitized genome sequence information and its transplantation into a M. capricolum recipient cell to create new M. mycoides cells that are controlled only by the synthetic chromosome. The only DNA in the cells is the designed synthetic DNA sequence, including "watermark" sequences and other designed gene deletions and polymorphisms, and mutations acquired during the building process. The new cells have expected phenotypic properties and are capable of continuous self-replication. PMID:20488990

Gibson, Daniel G; Glass, John I; Lartigue, Carole; Noskov, Vladimir N; Chuang, Ray-Yuan; Algire, Mikkel A; Benders, Gwynedd A; Montague, Michael G; Ma, Li; Moodie, Monzia M; Merryman, Chuck; Vashee, Sanjay; Krishnakumar, Radha; Assad-Garcia, Nacyra; Andrews-Pfannkoch, Cynthia; Denisova, Evgeniya A; Young, Lei; Qi, Zhi-Qing; Segall-Shapiro, Thomas H; Calvey, Christopher H; Parmar, Prashanth P; Hutchison, Clyde A; Smith, Hamilton O; Venter, J Craig

2010-07-01

324

Structure-Function Analysis of a Broad Specificity Populus trichocarpa Endo-?-glucanase Reveals an Evolutionary Link between Bacterial Licheninases and Plant XTH Gene Products*  

PubMed Central

The large xyloglucan endotransglycosylase/hydrolase (XTH) gene family continues to be the focus of much attention in studies of plant cell wall morphogenesis due to the unique catalytic functions of the enzymes it encodes. The XTH gene products compose a subfamily of glycoside hydrolase family 16 (GH16), which also comprises a broad range of microbial endoglucanases and endogalactanases, as well as yeast cell wall chitin/?-glucan transglycosylases. Previous whole-family phylogenetic analyses have suggested that the closest relatives to the XTH gene products are the bacterial licheninases (EC 3.2.1.73), which specifically hydrolyze linear mixed linkage ?(1?3)/?(1?4)-glucans. In addition to their specificity for the highly branched xyloglucan polysaccharide, XTH gene products are distinguished from the licheninases and other GH16 enzyme subfamilies by significant active site loop alterations and a large C-terminal extension. Given these differences, the molecular evolution of the XTH gene products in GH16 has remained enigmatic. Here, we present the biochemical and structural analysis of a unique, mixed function endoglucanase from black cottonwood (Populus trichocarpa), which reveals a small, newly recognized subfamily of GH16 members intermediate between the bacterial licheninases and plant XTH gene products. We postulate that this clade comprises an important link in the evolution of the large plant XTH gene families from a putative microbial ancestor. As such, this analysis provides new insights into the diversification of GH16 and further unites the apparently disparate members of this important family of proteins. PMID:23572521

Eklöf, Jens M.; Shojania, Shaheen; Okon, Mark; McIntosh, Lawrence P.; Brumer, Harry

2013-01-01

325

Structure-function analysis of a broad specificity Populus trichocarpa endo-?-glucanase reveals an evolutionary link between bacterial licheninases and plant XTH gene products.  

PubMed

The large xyloglucan endotransglycosylase/hydrolase (XTH) gene family continues to be the focus of much attention in studies of plant cell wall morphogenesis due to the unique catalytic functions of the enzymes it encodes. The XTH gene products compose a subfamily of glycoside hydrolase family 16 (GH16), which also comprises a broad range of microbial endoglucanases and endogalactanases, as well as yeast cell wall chitin/?-glucan transglycosylases. Previous whole-family phylogenetic analyses have suggested that the closest relatives to the XTH gene products are the bacterial licheninases (EC 3.2.1.73), which specifically hydrolyze linear mixed linkage ?(1?3)/?(1?4)-glucans. In addition to their specificity for the highly branched xyloglucan polysaccharide, XTH gene products are distinguished from the licheninases and other GH16 enzyme subfamilies by significant active site loop alterations and a large C-terminal extension. Given these differences, the molecular evolution of the XTH gene products in GH16 has remained enigmatic. Here, we present the biochemical and structural analysis of a unique, mixed function endoglucanase from black cottonwood (Populus trichocarpa), which reveals a small, newly recognized subfamily of GH16 members intermediate between the bacterial licheninases and plant XTH gene products. We postulate that this clade comprises an important link in the evolution of the large plant XTH gene families from a putative microbial ancestor. As such, this analysis provides new insights into the diversification of GH16 and further unites the apparently disparate members of this important family of proteins. PMID:23572521

Eklöf, Jens M; Shojania, Shaheen; Okon, Mark; McIntosh, Lawrence P; Brumer, Harry

2013-05-31

326

Multi-chromatic control of mammalian gene expression and signaling  

PubMed Central

The emergence and future of mammalian synthetic biology depends on technologies for orchestrating and custom tailoring complementary gene expression and signaling processes in a predictable manner. Here, we demonstrate for the first time multi-chromatic expression control in mammalian cells by differentially inducing up to three genes in a single cell culture in response to light of different wavelengths. To this end, we developed an ultraviolet B (UVB)-inducible expression system by designing a UVB-responsive split transcription factor based on the Arabidopsis thaliana UVB receptor UVR8 and the WD40 domain of COP1. The system allowed high (up to 800-fold) UVB-induced gene expression in human, monkey, hamster and mouse cells. Based on a quantitative model, we determined critical system parameters. By combining this UVB-responsive system with blue and red light-inducible gene control technology, we demonstrate multi-chromatic multi-gene control by differentially expressing three genes in a single cell culture in mammalian cells, and we apply this system for the multi-chromatic control of angiogenic signaling processes. This portfolio of optogenetic tools enables the design and implementation of synthetic biological networks showing unmatched spatiotemporal precision for future research and biomedical applications. PMID:23625964

Müller, Konrad; Engesser, Raphael; Schulz, Simon; Steinberg, Thorsten; Tomakidi, Pascal; Weber, Cornelia C.; Ulm, Roman; Timmer, Jens; Zurbriggen, Matias D.; Weber, Wilfried

2013-01-01

327

Effervescent fast-disintegrating bacterial formulation for biological control of rice sheath blight.  

PubMed

A lack of effective, easily applied and stable formulation has been a major obstacle to widespread use of biocontrol agents for control of rice sheath blight. In this study, effervescent fast-disintegrating granules containing endospores of Bacillus megaterium were developed for use either by broadcast or spray application. The formulation composed of lactose, polyvinyl pyrrolidone K-30 (PVP, K-30) and effervescent base (citric acid, tartaric acid and sodium bicarbonate). The number of living bacteria in effervescent granules that performed mycelial growth inhibition was in the range of 10(9) CFU/g after 12 months storage at room temperature. The number of viable bacteria after applying into the water and spraying on the rice seedling for 7 days in the greenhouse tests were also satisfactory high (10(9) CFU/g of granules and 10(6) CFU/g of plant, respectively). The scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to observe bacterial antagonist on the surface of leaf sheath and leaf blade after spraying with formulation. Effervescent formulation applied either broadcasting or spraying reduced incidence of sheath blight disease in the greenhouse experiments. PMID:17428569

Wiwattanapatapee, R; Chumthong, A; Pengnoo, A; Kanjanamaneesathian, M

2007-06-01

328

Composite films of poly(vinyl alcohol)-chitosan-bacterial cellulose for drug controlled release.  

PubMed

Mono and multilayer composite films of poly(vinyl alcohol)-chitosan-bacterial cellulose (PVA/chitosan/BC) have been prepared to achieve controlled release of ibuprofen sodium salt (IbuNa) as model drug. The composite films have been characterized by Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Surface morphology was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Equilibrium swelling was measured in water at two different pH values and in vitro release of IbuNa in pH 1.2 and pH 7.4 media was studied. The release experiments revealed that drug release is pH sensitive. The release kinetics of IbuNa could be described by the Fickian model of diffusion with a good agreement. The IbuNa release rate was decreasing for all the films as the BC concentration was increased in the films composition, the decrease being higher for the multilayer films. PMID:24769089

Pavaloiu, Ramona-Daniela; Stoica-Guzun, Anicuta; Stroescu, Marta; Jinga, Sorin Ion; Dobre, Tanase

2014-07-01

329

Traffic Control of Bacteria-Derived Molecules: A New System of Host-Bacterial Crosstalk  

PubMed Central

Virulent microorganisms, such as pathogenic bacteria and viruses, are recognized by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), including toll-like receptors (TLRs) and nucleotide-binding oligomerization-domain proteins (NODs), and induce inflammatory responses in mammalian hosts. Conversely, commensal bacteria and probiotics, which symbiotically confer health benefits on the host organisms, can lodge in the host intestinal tract without inducing intestinal inflammation. Recent advances in investigations concerning host-microbial interactions have shown that some effector molecules secreted from beneficial bacteria activate cell survival pathways, such as those mediated by p38 MAPK and Akt, and bring health benefits to mammalian hosts. It is noteworthy that such bacteria-derived molecules are taken into the intestinal epithelia through a transport or endocytosis system, thereafter exhibiting their beneficial effects. Understanding this traffic control process can aid in the comprehension of host and microbe interactions and may provide new insight to clarify the pathogenesis of intestinal disorders. This paper highlights the intestinal trafficking systems of bacteria-derived molecules that affect the bacterial functions and modulate epithelial signaling cascades. The latter mechanism may contribute to the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis by improving the host damage induced by virulence factors and various disease states. PMID:23606846

Konishi, Hiroaki; Fujiya, Mikihiro; Kohgo, Yutaka

2013-01-01

330

The Prc and RseP proteases control bacterial cell-surface signalling activity.  

PubMed

Extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factors play a key role in the regulation of vital functions in the bacterial response to the environment. In Gram-negative bacteria, activity of these sigma factors is often controlled by cell-surface signalling (CSS), a regulatory system that also involves an outer membrane receptor and a transmembrane anti-sigma factor. To get more insight into the molecular mechanism behind CSS regulation, we have focused on the unique Iut system of Pseudomonas putida. This system contains a hybrid protein containing both a cytoplasmic ECF sigma domain and a periplasmic anti-sigma domain, apparently leading to a permanent interaction between the sigma and anti-sigma factor. We show that the Iut ECF sigma factor regulates the response to aerobactin under iron deficiency conditions and is activated by a proteolytic pathway that involves the sequential action of two proteases: Prc, which removes the periplasmic anti-sigma domain, and RseP, which subsequently removes the transmembrane domain and thereby generates the ECF active transcriptional form. We furthermore demonstrate the role of these proteases in the regulation of classical CSS systems in which the sigma and anti-sigma factors are two different proteins. PMID:24373018

Bastiaansen, Karlijn C; Ibañez, Aurelia; Ramos, Juan L; Bitter, Wilbert; Llamas, María A

2014-08-01

331

EVALUATION OF BIOTIC AND TREATMENT FACTORS RELATING TO BACTERIAL CONTROL OF ZEBRA MUSSELS  

SciTech Connect

Testing over the last quarter has indicated the following regarding control of zebra mussels with bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens strain CL0145A: (1) the concentration of bacteria suspended in water is directly correlated with mussel kill; (2) the ratio of bacterial mass per mussel, if too low, could limit mussel kill; a treatment must be done at a high enough ratio so that mussels do not deplete all the suspended bacteria before the end of the desired exposure period; (3) bacteria appear to lose almost all their toxicity after suspension for 24 hr in highly oxygenated water; (4) in a recirculating pipe system, the same percentage mussel kill will be achieved irrespective of whether all the bacteria are applied at once or divided up and applied intermittently in smaller quantities over a 10-hr period. Since this is the fourth quarterly report, a summation of all test results over the last twelve months is provided as a table in this report. The table includes the above-mentioned fourth-quarter results.

Daniel P. Molloy

2002-04-30

332

Diversity of bacterial communities that colonize the filter units used for controlling plant pathogens in soilless cultures.  

PubMed

In recent years, increasing the level of suppressiveness by the addition of antagonistic bacteria in slow filters has become a promising strategy to control plant pathogens in the recycled solutions used in soilless cultures. However, knowledge about the microflora that colonize the filtering columns is still limited. In order to get information on this issue, the present study was carried out over a 4-year period and includes filters inoculated or not with suppressive bacteria at the start of the filtering process (two or three filters were used each year). After 9 months of filtration, polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-single strand conformation polymorphism analyses point out that, for the same year of experiment, the bacterial communities from control filters were relatively similar but that they were significantly different between the bacteria-amended and control filters. To characterize the changes in bacterial communities within the filters, this microflora was studied by quantitative PCR, community-level physiological profiles, and sequencing 16SrRNA clone libraries (filters used in year 1). Quantitative PCR evidenced a denser bacterial colonization of the P-filter (amended with Pseudomonas putida strains) than control and B-filter (amended with Bacillus cereus strains). Functional analysis focused on the cultivable bacterial communities pointed out that bacteria from the control filter metabolized more carbohydrates than those from the amended filters whose trophic behaviors were more targeted towards carboxylic acids and amino acids. The bacterial communities in P- and B-filters both exhibited significantly more phylotype diversity and markedly distinct phylogenetic compositions than those in the C-filter. Although there were far fewer Proteobacteria in B- and P-filters than in the C-filter (22% and 22% rather than 69% of sequences, respectively), the percentages of Firmicutes was much higher (44% and 55% against 9%, respectively). Many Pseudomonas species were also found in the bacterial communities of the control filter. The persistence of the amended suppressive-bacteria in the filters is discussed with regards to the management of suppressive microflora in soilless culture. PMID:22015683

Renault, David; Vallance, Jessica; Déniel, Franck; Wery, Nathalie; Godon, Jean Jacques; Barbier, Georges; Rey, Patrice

2012-01-01

333

Bacterial Quorum Sensing: Its Role in Virulence and Possibilities for Its Control  

PubMed Central

Quorum sensing is a process of cell–cell communication that allows bacteria to share information about cell density and adjust gene expression accordingly. This process enables bacteria to express energetically expensive processes as a collective only when the impact of those processes on the environment or on a host will be maximized. Among the many traits controlled by quorum sensing is the expression of virulence factors by pathogenic bacteria. Here we review the quorum-sensing circuits of Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Vibrio cholerae. We outline these canonical quorum-sensing mechanisms and how each uniquely controls virulence factor production. Additionally, we examine recent efforts to inhibit quorum sensing in these pathogens with the goal of designing novel antimicrobial therapeutics. PMID:23125205

Rutherford, Steven T.; Bassler, Bonnie L.

2012-01-01

334

A bacterial model for expression of mutations in the human ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) gene  

SciTech Connect

OTC is a mitochondrial enzyme catalyzing the formation of citrulline from carbamyl phosphate and ornithine. X-linked deficiency of OTC is the most prevalent genetic defect of ureagenesis. Mutations and polymorphisms in the OTC gene identified in deficient patients have indicated the occurrence of many family-specific, unique alleles. Due to the low frequency of recurrent mutations, distinguishing between deleterious mutations and polymorphisms is difficult. Using a human OTC gene containing plasmid driven by a tac promoter, we have devised a simple and efficient method for expressing mutations in the mature human OTC enzyme. To demonstrate this method, PCR engineered site-directed mutagenesis was employed to generated cDNA fragments which contained either the R151Q or R277W known mutations found in patients with neonatal and late-onset OTC deficiency, respectively. The normal allele for each mutation was also generated by an identical PCR procedure. Digestion with Bgl II- and Sty I-generated mutant and normal replacement cassettes containing the respective mutant and wild type sequences. Upon transformation of JM109 E.coli cells, OTC enzymatic activity was measured at log and stationary phases of growth using a radiochromatographic method. The R141Q mutation abolished enzymatic activity (<0.02% of normal), whereas the R277W mutation expressed partial activity (2.3% of normal). In addition, a PCR-generated mutation, A280V, resulted in 73% loss of catalytic activity. This OTC expression system is clinically applicable for distinguishing between mutations and polymorphisms, and it can be used to investigate the effects of mutations on various domains of the OTC gene.

Tuchman, M.; McCann, M.T.; Qureshi, A.A. [Univ. of Minnesota, Mineapolis (United States)

1994-09-01

335

TLR8 gene polymorphism and association in bacterial load in southern Punjab of Pakistan: an association study with pulmonary tuberculosis.  

PubMed

Only 5-10% of people infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis develop active tuberculosis which suggests a role of genetic variation in host immunity. Genetic variants in TLRs are potential indicator for host susceptibility and outcome of several diseases. We explored the association of nonsynonymous genetic variants (Met1Val) with Toll-like receptor 8 in Pakistani population. Genotypic and allelic distribution of TLR8 polymorphism (rs3764880) in patients with TB and healthy donors from different areas of southern Punjab, Pakistan, was determined. Results provide that our population is highly influenced by TLR8 Met1Val SNP for TB, and G allele appeared to increase TB susceptibility. Mutant genotype GG or G/- and G allele was significantly higher among all the categories of cases than in controls. Among different levels of bacillary load and genotypes, GG or G/- and G allele significantly supports the incidence of 2 +  class for bacterial load. PMID:25572425

Bukhari, M; Aslam, M A; Khan, A; Iram, Q; Akbar, A; Naz, A G; Ahmad, S; Ahmad, M M; Ashfaq, U A; Aziz, H; Ali, M

2015-02-01

336

A bacterial view of the periodic table: genes and proteins for toxic inorganic ions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Essentially all bacteria have genes for toxic metal ion resistances and these include those for Ag+, AsO2?, AsO43?, Cd2+, Co2+, CrO42?, Cu2+, Hg2+, Ni2+, Pb2+, TeO32?, Tl+ and Zn2+. The largest group of resistance systems functions by energy-dependent efflux of toxic ions. Fewer involve enzymatic transformations\\u000a (oxidation, reduction, methylation, and demethylation) or metal-binding proteins (for example, metallothionein SmtA, chaperone\\u000a CopZ

Simon Silver; Le T. Phung

2005-01-01

337

Optimal control of gene expression for fast proteome adaptation to environmental change  

PubMed Central

Bacterial populations growing in a changing world must adjust their proteome composition in response to alterations in the environment. Rapid proteome responses to growth medium changes are expected to increase the average growth rate and fitness value of these populations. Little is known about the dynamics of proteome change, e.g., whether bacteria use optimal strategies of gene expression for rapid proteome adjustments and if there are lower bounds to the time of proteome adaptation in response to growth medium changes. To begin answering these types of questions, we modeled growing bacteria as stoichiometrically coupled networks of metabolic pathways. These are balanced during steady-state growth in a constant environment but are initially unbalanced after rapid medium shifts due to a shortage of enzymes required at higher concentrations in the new environment. We identified an optimal strategy for rapid proteome adjustment in the absence of protein degradation and found a lower bound to the time of proteome adaptation after medium shifts. This minimal time is determined by the ratio between the Kullback–Leibler distance from the pre- to the postshift proteome and the postshift steady-state growth rate. The dynamics of optimally controlled proteome adaptation has a simple analytical solution. We used detailed numerical modeling to demonstrate that realistic bacterial control systems can emulate this optimal strategy for rapid proteome adaptation. Our results may provide a conceptual link between the physiology and population genetics of growing bacteria. PMID:24297927

Pavlov, Michael Y.; Ehrenberg, Måns

2013-01-01

338

Histone demethylases and control of gene expression in plants.  

PubMed

Covalent histone modifications, chromatin remodeling and incorporation of histone variants regulate the dynamics of chromatin structure. Among covalent histone modifications, histone methylation mediates by histone methylases that influence the gene expression in heterochromatin silencing, genomic imprinting and transcription. In contrast to methylases, histone demethylases remove the methyl groups from lysine or arginine residues of histones and have enormous impact on gene expression via modified chromatin structures. Two types of histone lysie demethylases have been identified, including lysine specific demethylases 1 (LSD1) and Jmj (Jumonji) domain containing family proteins. The human demethyliminase (PADI4) converts monomethyl arginine residue to citrulline by the arginine demethylimination. In this review we summarize recent advances to understand the mechanism of demethylases in regulation of plant gene expression. In addition we are highlighting the function of four human like LSD1 (LDL) and jmj domain containing genes of Arabidopsis that regulate the defense related, flowering controlling and brassinosteroid response genes. PMID:25535719

Prakash, S; Singh, R; Lodhi, N

2014-01-01

339

Antibiotic resistance genes in bacterial and bacteriophage fractions of Tunisian and Spanish wastewaters as markers to compare the antibiotic resistance patterns in each population.  

PubMed

The emergence and increased prevalence of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in the environment may pose a serious global health concern. This study evaluates the abundance of several ARGs in bacterial and bacteriophage DNA via real-time qPCR in samples from five different sampling points in Tunisia; three wastewater treatment plants (WWTP 1, 2 and 3) and wastewater from two abattoirs slaughtering different animals. Results are compared with those obtained in the Barcelona area, in northeast Spain. Eight ARGs were quantified by qPCR from total and phage DNA fraction from the samples. Three ?-lactamases (bla(TEM), bla(CTX-M) cluster 1 and bla(CTX-M) cluster 9), two quinolone resistance genes (qnrA and qnrS), the mecA gene that confers resistance to methicillin in Staphylococcus aureus, the emerging armA gene, conferring resistance to aminoglycosides and sul1, the most extended gene conferring resistance to sulfonamides, were evaluated. Sul1 and bla(TEM) were the most prevalent ARGs detected at all five Tunisian sampling points, similarly with the observations in Barcelona. bla(CTX-M-9) was more prevalent than bla(CTX-M-1) both in bacterial and DNA within phage particles in all samples analysed. mecA and armA were almost absent in Tunisian waters from human or animal origin in contrast with Barcelona that showed a medium prevalence. qnrA was more prevalent than qnrS in bacterial and phage DNA from all sampling points. In conclusion, our study shows that ARGs are found in the bacterial and is reflected in the phage DNA fraction of human and animal wastewaters. The densities of each ARGs vary depending on the ARGs shed by each population and is determined by the characteristics of each area. Thus, the evaluation of ARGs in wastewaters seems to be suitable as marker reflecting the antibiotic resistance patterns of a population. PMID:25127043

Colomer-Lluch, Marta; Calero-Cáceres, William; Jebri, Sihem; Hmaied, Fatma; Muniesa, Maite; Jofre, Juan

2014-12-01

340

The nac (nitrogen assimilation control) gene from Klebsiella aerogenes.  

PubMed Central

The Klebsiella aerogenes nac gene, whose product is necessary for nitrogen regulation of a number of operons, was identified and its DNA sequence determined. The nac sequence predicted a protein a 305 amino acids with a strong similarity to members of the LysR family of regulatory proteins, especially OxyR from Escherichia coli. Analysis of proteins expressed in minicells showed that nac is a single-gene operon whose product has an apparent molecular weight of about 32 kDa as measured in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Immediately downstream from nac is a two-gene operon, the first gene of which encodes another member of the LysR family. Upstream from nac is a tRNAAsn gene transcribed divergently from nac. About 60 bp upstream from the nac open reading frame lies a sequence nearly identical to the consensus for sigma 54-dependent promoters, with the conserved GG and GC nucleotides at -26 and -14 relative to the start of transcription. About 130 bp farther upstream (at -153 relative to the start of transcription) is a sequence nearly identical to the transcriptional activator NTRC-responsive enhancer consensus. Another weaker NTRC-binding site is located adjacent to this site (at -133 relative to the start of transcription). Thus, we propose that nac is transcribed by RNA polymerase carrying sigma 54 in response to the nitrogen regulatory (NTR) system. A transposon located between the promoter and the nac ORF prevented NTR-mediated expression of nac, supporting this identification of the promoter sequence. The insertion of over 5 kb of transposon DNA between the enhancer and its target promoter had only a weak effect on enhancer-mediated regulation, suggesting that enhancers may be able to act at a considerable distance on the bacterial chromosome. Images PMID:8458853

Schwacha, A; Bender, R A

1993-01-01

341

Structure and function of pseudoknots involved in gene expression control.  

PubMed

Natural RNA molecules can have a high degree of structural complexity but even the most complexly folded RNAs are assembled from simple structural building blocks. Among the simplest RNA elements are double-stranded helices that participate in the formation of different folding topologies and constitute the major fraction of RNA structures. One common folding motif of RNA is a pseudoknot, defined as a bipartite helical structure formed by base-pairing of the apical loop in the stem-loop structure with an outside sequence. Pseudoknots constitute integral parts of the RNA structures essential for various cellular activities. Among many functions of pseudoknotted RNAs is feedback regulation of gene expression, carried out through specific recognition of various molecules. Pseudoknotted RNAs autoregulate ribosomal and phage protein genes in response to downstream encoded proteins, while many metabolic and transport genes are controlled by cellular metabolites interacting with pseudoknotted RNA elements from the riboswitch family. Modulation of some genes also depends on metabolite-induced messenger RNA (mRNA) cleavage performed by pseudoknotted ribozymes. Several regulatory pseudoknots have been characterized biochemically and structurally in great detail. These studies have demonstrated a plethora of pseudoknot-based folds and have begun uncovering diverse molecular principles of the ligand-dependent gene expression control. The pseudoknot-mediated mechanisms of gene control and many unexpected and interesting features of the regulatory pseudoknots have significantly advanced our understanding of the genetic circuits and laid the foundation for modulation of their outcomes. PMID:25044223

Peselis, Alla; Serganov, Alexander

2014-01-01

342

Influenza vaccines to control influenza-associated bacterial infection: where do we stand?  

PubMed

Influenza A virus is a pathogen that is feared for its capacity to cause pandemics. In this review, we illustrate the clinical evidence which support the theory that bacterial co-infection is a considerable risk factor for exacerbated disease during pandemic and seasonal influenza, including infection with influenza B viruses. We provide an overview of the multiple and diverse mechanisms that help explain how influenza creates an opportunity for replication of secondary bacterial infections. Influenza vaccines and pneumococcal vaccines are widely used and often in overlapping target groups. We summarize the evidence for a protective effect of influenza immunization against bacterial infections, and vice versa of pneumococcal vaccines against influenza-associated pneumonia and lethality. It is important that future implementation of broadly protective influenza vaccines also takes into account protection against secondary bacterial infection. PMID:25209381

Christopoulou, Ioanna; Roose, Kenny; Ibañez, Lorena Itatí; Saelens, Xavier

2015-01-01

343

Comparison of bacterial communities in the Solimões and Negro River tributaries of the Amazon River based on small subunit rRNA gene sequences.  

PubMed

The microbiota of the Amazon River basin has been little studied. We compared the structure of bacterial communities of the Solimões and Negro Rivers, the main Amazon River tributaries, based on analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences. Water was sampled with a 3-L Van Dorn collection bottle; samples were collected at nine different points/depths totaling 27 L of water from each river. Total DNA was extracted from biomass retained by a 0.22-?m filter after sequential filtration of the water through 0.8- and 0.22-?m filters. The 16S rRNA gene was amplified by PCR, cloned and sequenced, and the sequences were analyzed with the PHYLIP and DOTUR programs to obtain the operational taxonomic units (OTUs) and to calculate the diversity and richness indices using the SPADE program. Taxonomic affiliation was determined using the naive Bayesian rRNA Classifier of the RDP II (Ribosomal Database Project). We recovered 158 sequences from the Solimões River grouped into 103 OTUs, and 197 sequences from the Negro River library grouped into 90 OTUs by the DOTUR program. The Solimões River was found to have a greater diversity of bacterial genera, and greater estimated richness of 446 OTUs, compared with 242 OTUs from the Negro River, as calculated by ACE estimator. The Negro River has less bacterial diversity, but more 16S rRNA gene sequences belonging to the bacterial genus Polynucleobacter were detected; 56 sequences from this genus were found (about 30% of the total sequences). We suggest that a more in-depth investigation be made to elucidate the role played by these bacteria in the river environment. These differences in bacterial diversity between Solimões and Negro Rivers could be explained by differences in organic matter content and pH of the rivers. PMID:22183948

Peixoto, J C C; Leomil, L; Souza, J V; Peixoto, F B S; Astolfi-Filho, S

2011-01-01

344

Cyclic AMP Receptor Protein Regulates cspD, a Bacterial Toxin Gene, in Escherichia coli  

PubMed Central

cspD, a member of cspA family of cold shock genes in Escherichia coli, is not induced during cold shock. Its expression is induced during stationary phase. CspD inhibits DNA replication, and a high level of the protein is toxic to cells. Recently, CspD was proposed to be associated with persister cell formation in E. coli. Here, we show that cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) upregulates cspD transcription. Sequence analysis of the cspD upstream region revealed two tandem CRP target sites, CRP site-I (the proximal site centered at ?83.5 with respect to the transcription start) and CRP site-II (the distal site centered at ?112.5). The results from electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that CRP indeed binds to these two target sites in PcspD. The promoter-proximal CRP target site was found to play a major role in PcspD activation by CRP, as studied by transcriptional fusions carrying mutations in the target sites. The results from in vitro transcription assays demonstrated that CRP activates PcspD transcription in the absence of additional factors other than RNA polymerase. The requirement for activating region 1 of CRP in PcspD activation, along with the involvement of the 287, 265, and 261 determinants of the ?-CTD, suggest that CRP activates by a class I-type mechanism. However, only moderate activation in vitro was observed compared to high activation in vivo, suggesting there might be additional activators of PcspD. Overall, our findings show that CRP, a global metabolic regulator in E. coli, activates a gene potentially related to persistence. PMID:24509317

Shetty, Deeksha M.; Jawali, Narendra

2014-01-01

345

Characterization of bacterial community shift in human Ulcerative Colitis patients revealed by Illumina based 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing  

PubMed Central

Background The healthy human intestine is represented by the presence of bacterial communities predominantly belonging to obligate anaerobes; however disparity and dysanaerobiosis in intestinal microflora may lead to the progression of ulcerative colitis (UC). The foremost aim of this study is to consider and compare the gut microbiota composition in patients suffering from different stages of UC. Methods This study represents data from the biopsy samples of six individuals suffering from UC. The samples were collected by colonoscopy and were processed immediately for isolation of DNA. Mucosal microbiota was analyzed by means of 16S rRNA gene-based Illumina high throughput sequencing. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) was performed to determine total bacterial abundances. Results Analysis of 23,927 OTUs demonstrated a significant reduction of bacterial diversity consistently from phylum to species level (p?bacterial count was detected in patients suffering from severe inflammatory stage (2.98 +/-0.49 E?+?09/ml) when compared with patients with moderate (1.03+/-0.29 E?+?08/ml) and mild (1.76 +/-0.34 E?+?08/ml) stages of inflammation. Conclusion The reduction of bacterial diversity with an increase in the total bacterial count indicates a shift of bacterial communities which signifies dysbiosis and dysanaerobiosis at the mucosal level for patients suffering from UC. PMID:25018784

2014-01-01

346

Resource Availability and Spatial Heterogeneity Control Bacterial Community Response to Nutrient Enrichment in Lakes  

PubMed Central

The diversity and composition of ecological communities often co-vary with ecosystem productivity. However, the relative importance of productivity, or resource abundance, versus the spatial distribution of resources in shaping those ecological patterns is not well understood, particularly for the bacterial communities that underlie most important ecosystem functions. Increasing ecosystem productivity in lakes has been shown to influence the composition and ecology of bacterial communities, but existing work has only evaluated the effect of increasing resource supply and not heterogeneity in how those resources are distributed. We quantified how bacterial communities varied with the trophic status of lakes and whether community responses differed in surface and deep habitats in response to heterogeneity in nutrient resources. Using ARISA fingerprinting, we found that bacterial communities were more abundant, richer, and more distinct among habitats as lake trophic state and vertical heterogeneity in nutrients increased, and that spatial resource variation produced habitat specific responses of bacteria in response to increased productivity. Furthermore, changes in communities in high nutrient lakes were not produced by turnover in community composition but from additional taxa augmenting core bacterial communities found in lower productivity lakes. These data suggests that bacterial community responses to nutrient enrichment in lakes vary spatially and are likely influenced disproportionately by rare taxa. PMID:24489823

Jankowski, KathiJo; Schindler, Daniel E.; Horner-Devine, M. Claire

2014-01-01

347

Bacterial community composition of anthropogenic biochar and Amazonian anthrosols assessed by 16S rRNA gene 454 pyrosequencing.  

PubMed

Biochar (BC) is a common minor constituent of soils and is usually derived from the burning of wood materials. In the case of Amazonian dark earth (ADE) soils, the increased amount of this material is believed to be due to anthropogenic action by ancient indigenous populations. In this study, we use 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing to assess the bacterial diversity observed in the BC found in ADEs as well as in the dark earth itself and the adjacent Acrisol. Samples were taken from two sites, one cultivated with manioc and one with secondary forest cover. Analyses revealed that the community structure found in each sample had unique features. At a coarse phylogenetic resolution, the most abundant phyla in all sequence libraries were Actinobacteria, Acidobacteria, Verrucomicrobia and Proteobacteria that were present in similar relative abundance across all samples. However, the class composition varied between them highlighting the difference between the Acrisol and the remaining samples. This result was also corroborated by the comparison of the OTU composition (at 97 % identity). Also, soil coverage has shown an effect over the community structure observed in all samples. This pattern was found to be significant through unweighted UniFrac as well as P tests. These results indicate that, although the ADEs are found in patches within the Acrisols, the contrasting characteristics found between them led to the development of significantly different communities. PMID:23743632

Taketani, Rodrigo Gouvêa; Lima, Amanda Barbosa; da Conceição Jesus, Ederson; Teixeira, Wenceslau Geraldes; Tiedje, James M; Tsai, Siu Mui

2013-08-01

348

Minimization of chloroplast contamination in 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing of insect herbivore bacterial communities  

PubMed Central

Chloroplast sequence contamination in 16S ribosomal RNA gene (16S) analyses can be particularly problematic when sampling microbial communities in plants and folivorous arthropods. We previously encountered high levels of plastid contamination in herbivorous insect samples when we used the predominant 454 pyrosequencing 16S methodologies described in the literature. 799F, a primer previously found to exclude chloroplast sequences, was modified to enhance its efficacy, and we describe, in detail, our methodology throughout amplicon pyrosequencing. Thirteen versions of 799F were assessed for the exclusion of chloroplast sequences from our samples. We found that a shift in the mismatch between 799F and chloroplast 16S resulted in significant reduction of chloroplast reads. Our results also indicate that amplifying sequences from environmental samples in a two-step PCR process, with the addition of the multiplex identifiers and 454 adapters in a second round of PCR, further improved primer specificity. Primers that included 3? phosphorothioate bonds, which were designed to block primer degradation, did not amplify consistently across samples. The different forward primers do not appear to bias the bacterial communities detected. We provide a methodological framework for reducing chloroplast reads in high-throughput sequencing data sets that can be applied to a number of environmental samples and sequencing techniques. PMID:23968645

Hanshew, Alissa S.; Mason, Charles J.; Raffa, Kenneth F.; Currie, Cameron R.

2014-01-01

349

Hierarchical expression of genes controlled by the Bacillus subtilis global regulatory protein CodY  

PubMed Central

Global regulators that bind strategic metabolites allow bacteria to adapt rapidly to dynamic environments by coordinating the expression of many genes. We report an approach for determining gene regulation hierarchy using the regulon of the Bacillus subtilis global regulatory protein CodY as proof of principle. In theory, this approach can be used to measure the dynamics of any bacterial transcriptional regulatory network that is affected by interaction with a ligand. In B. subtilis, CodY controls dozens of genes, but the threshold activities of CodY required to regulate each gene are unknown. We hypothesized that targets of CodY are differentially regulated based on varying affinity for the protein’s many binding sites. We used RNA sequencing to determine the transcription profiles of B. subtilis strains expressing mutant CodY proteins with different levels of residual activity. In parallel, we quantified intracellular metabolites connected to central metabolism. Strains producing CodY variants F71Y, R61K, and R61H retained varying degrees of partial activity relative to the WT protein, leading to gene-specific, differential alterations in transcript abundance for the 223 identified members of the CodY regulon. Using liquid chromatography coupled to MS, we detected significant increases in branched-chain amino acids and intermediates of arginine, proline, and glutamate metabolism, as well as decreases in pyruvate and glycerate as CodY activity decreased. We conclude that a spectrum of CodY activities leads to programmed regulation of gene expression and an apparent rerouting of carbon and nitrogen metabolism, suggesting that during changes in nutrient availability, CodY prioritizes the expression of specific pathways. PMID:24843172

Brinsmade, Shaun R.; Alexander, Elizabeth L.; Livny, Jonathan; Stettner, Arion I.; Segrè, Daniel; Rhee, Kyu Y.; Sonenshein, Abraham L.

2014-01-01

350

Incidence and Persistence of Zoonotic Bacterial and Protozoan Pathogens in a Beef Cattle Feedlot Runoff Control–Vegetative Treatment System  

Microsoft Academic Search

Determining the survival of zoonotic pathogens in livestock manure and runoff is critical for understanding the environmental and public health risks associated with these wastes. Th e occurrence and persistence of the bacterial pathogens Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Campylobacter spp. in a passive beef cattle feedlot runoff control-vegetative treatment system were examined over a 26-mo period. Incidence of the protozoans

Elaine D. Berry; Bryan L. Woodbury; John A. Nienaber; Roger A. Eigenberg; Jeanette A. Thurston; James E. Wells

2007-01-01

351

A theophylline responsive riboswitch based on helix slipping controls gene expression in vivo  

PubMed Central

Riboswitches are newly discovered regulatory elements which control a wide set of basic metabolic pathways. They consist solely of RNA, sense their ligand in a preformed binding pocket and perform a conformational switch in response to ligand binding resulting in altered gene expression. We have utilized the enormous potential of RNA for molecular sensing and conformational changes to develop novel molecular switches with predetermined structural transitions in response to the binding of a small molecule. To validate these in vivo, we exploit the distance-dependent inhibitory potential of secondary structure elements placed close to the bacterial ribosome binding site. We created a translational control element by combining the theophylline aptamer with a helical communication module for which a ligand-dependent one-nucleotide slipping mechanism had been proposed. This structural element was inserted at a position just interfering with translation in the non ligand-bound form. Addition of the ligand then shifts the inhibitory element to a distance which permits efficient translation. We present here a novel regulatory mechanism in the first rationally designed, in vivo active RNA switch. Its use of a slippage mechanism to control gene expression makes it different from natural riboswitches which are based on sequestration or antitermination. PMID:15004248

Suess, Beatrix; Fink, Barbara; Berens, Christian; Stentz, Régis; Hillen, Wolfgang

2004-01-01

352

Site-related differences in gene expression and bacterial densities in the mussel Bathymodiolus azoricus from the Menez Gwen and Lucky Strike deep-sea hydrothermal vent sites.  

PubMed

The deep-sea hydrothermal vent mussel Bathymodiolus azoricus is a symbiont bearing bivalve that is found in great abundance at the Menez Gwen and Lucky Strike hydrothermal vent sites and in close vicinity of the Azores region near the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR). The physiological relationships that vent mussels have developed with their physical and chemical environments are likely to influence global gene expression profiles providing thus the means to investigate distinct biological markers predicting the origin of Bathymodiolus sp. irrespectively of their geographical localization. Differences found at gene expression levels, and between fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing results provided experimental evidence for the distinction of both Menez Gwen and Lucky Strike vent mussel individuals based on bacterial and vent mussel gene expression signatures and on the constitutive distribution and relative abundance of endosymbiotic bacteria within gill tissues. Our results confirmed the presence of methanotroph endosymbionts in Menez Gwen vent mussels whereas Lucky Strike specimens seem to harbor a different bacterial morphotype when a methane monooxygenase gene specific probe was used. No qualitative differences could be visualized between Menez Gwen and Lucky Strike individuals when tested with a sulfur-oxidizing-related probe. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) studies revealed different gene expression profiles in both Menez Gwen and Lucky Strike mussel gill tissues for the immune genes selected. Genes encoding transcription factors presented noticeably low levels of fold expression whether in Menez Gwen or Lucky Strike animals whereas the genes encoding effector molecules appeared to have higher levels expression in gill tissues from Menez Gwen animals. The peptidoglycan recognition molecule encoding gene, PGRP, presented the highest level of transcriptional activity among the genes analyzed in Menez Gwen mussel gill tissues, seconded by carcinolectin and thus denoting the relevance of immune recognition molecules in early stage of the immune responses onset. Genes regarded as encoding molecules involved in signaling pathways were consistently expressed in both Menez Gwen and Lucky Strike mussel gill tissues. Remarkably, the immunity-related GTPase encoding gene demonstrated, in Lucky Strike samples, the highest level of expression among the signaling molecule encoding genes tested when expressions levels were compared between Menez Gwen and Lucky Strike animals. A differential expression analysis of bacterial genes between Menez Gwen and Lucky Strike mussels indicated a clear expression signature in the latter animal gill tissues. The bacterial community structure ensued from the 16S rRNA sequencing analyses pointed at an unpredicted conservation of endosymbiont bacterial loads between Menez Gwen and Lucky Strike samples. Taken together, our results support the hypothesis that B. azoricus exhibits different transcriptional statuses while living in distinct hydrothermal vent sites may result in distinct gene expressions because of physico-chemical and/or symbiont densities differences. PMID:24882018

Bettencourt, Raul; Rodrigues, Mónica; Barros, Inês; Cerqueira, Teresa; Freitas, Cátia; Costa, Valentina; Pinheiro, Miguel; Egas, Conceição; Santos, Ricardo Serrão

2014-08-01

353

Transcriptome Profiling of a Toxic Dinoflagellate Reveals a Gene-Rich Protist and a Potential Impact on Gene Expression Due to Bacterial Presence  

PubMed Central

Background Dinoflagellates are unicellular, often photosynthetic protists that play a major role in the dynamics of the Earth's oceans and climate. Sequencing of dinoflagellate nuclear DNA is thwarted by their massive genome sizes that are often several times that in humans. However, modern transcriptomic methods offer promising approaches to tackle this challenging system. Here, we used massively parallel signature sequencing (MPSS) to understand global transcriptional regulation patterns in Alexandrium tamarense cultures that were grown under four different conditions. Methodology/Principal Findings We generated more than 40,000 unique short expression signatures gathered from the four conditions. Of these, about 11,000 signatures did not display detectable differential expression patterns. At a p-value < 1E-10, 1,124 signatures were differentially expressed in the three treatments, xenic, nitrogen-limited, and phosphorus-limited, compared to the nutrient-replete control, with the presence of bacteria explaining the largest set of these differentially expressed signatures. Conclusions/Significance Among microbial eukaryotes, dinoflagellates contain the largest number of genes in their nuclear genomes. These genes occur in complex families, many of which have evolved via recent gene duplication events. Our expression data suggest that about 73% of the Alexandrium transcriptome shows no significant change in gene expression under the experimental conditions used here and may comprise a “core” component for this species. We report a fundamental shift in expression patterns in response to the presence of bacteria, highlighting the impact of biotic interaction on gene expression in dinoflagellates. PMID:20300646

Moustafa, Ahmed; Evans, Andrew N.; Kulis, David M.; Hackett, Jeremiah D.; Erdner, Deana L.; Anderson, Donald M.; Bhattacharya, Debashish

2010-01-01

354

New Regulatory Gene That Contributes to Control of Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron Starch Utilization Genes  

PubMed Central

Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron uses starch as a source of carbon and energy. Early steps in the pathway of starch utilization, such as starch binding and starch hydrolysis, are encoded by sus genes, which have been characterized previously. The sus structural genes are expressed only if cells are grown in medium containing maltose or higher oligomers of glucose. Regulation of the sus structural genes is mediated by SusR, an activator that is encoded by a gene located next to the sus structural genes. A strain with a disruption in susR cannot grow on starch but can still grow on maltose and maltotriose. A search for transposon-generated mutants that could not grow on maltose and maltotriose unexpectedly located a gene, designated malR, which regulates expression of an ?-glucosidase not controlled by SusR. Although a disruption in susR did not affect expression of the malR controlled gene, a disruption in malR reduced expression of the sus structural genes. Thus, MalR appears to participate with SusR in regulation of the sus genes. Results of transcriptional fusion assays and reverse transcription-PCR experiments showed that malR is expressed constitutively. Moreover, multiple copies of malR provided on a plasmid (5 to 10 copies per cell) more than doubled the amount of ?-glucosidase activity in cell extracts. Our results demonstrate that the starch utilization system of B. thetaiotaomicron is controlled on at least two levels by the regulatory proteins SusR and MalR. PMID:11717279

Cho, Kyu Hong; Cho, Diedre; Wang, Gui-Rong; Salyers, Abigail A.

2001-01-01

355

Identification of Bacterial Species Associated with the Sheep Scab Mite (Psoroptes ovis) by Using Amplified Genes Coding for 16S rRNA  

PubMed Central

This was the first molecular study of the bacterial flora of the sheep scab mite (Psoroptes ovis). A sequence analysis of genes coding for 16S rRNA revealed that Serratia marcescens and bacteria closely related to Staphylococcus intermedius or Staphylococcus chromogens and Alloiococcus otitidis were present. These bacteria were associated with skin lesions, dermatitis, and otitis media caused by P. ovis. PMID:10473440

Hogg, J. C.; Lehane, M. J.

1999-01-01

356

Identification of bacterial species associated with the sheep scab mite (Psoroptes ovis) by using amplified genes coding for 16S rRNA.  

PubMed

This was the first molecular study of the bacterial flora of the sheep scab mite (Psoroptes ovis). A sequence analysis of genes coding for 16S rRNA revealed that Serratia marcescens and bacteria closely related to Staphylococcus intermedius or Staphylococcus chromogens and Alloiococcus otitidis were present. These bacteria were associated with skin lesions, dermatitis, and otitis media caused by P. ovis. PMID:10473440

Hogg, J C; Lehane, M J

1999-09-01

357

Carbapenem-Hydrolyzing GES-5-Encoding Gene on Different Plasmid Types Recovered from a Bacterial Community in a Sewage Treatment Plant  

PubMed Central

Plasmids pRSB113 and pRSB115 were recovered from an activated sludge bacterial community of a municipal wastewater treatment plant in Germany. Both plasmids carry the same blaGES-5 carbapenemase gene, located within two distinct class 1 integrons. These plasmids have different backbones, belong to different incompatibility groups, and could replicate in both Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli. PMID:22156421

Girlich, Delphine; Poirel, Laurent; Szczepanowski, Rafael; Schlüter, Andreas

2012-01-01

358

The bacterial adaptive response gene, barA , encodes a novel conserved histidine kinase regulatory switch for adaptation and modulation of metabolism in Escherichia coli  

Microsoft Academic Search

Histidine kinases are important prokaryotic determinants of cellular adaptation to environmental conditions, particularly stress. The highly conserved histidine kinase, BarA, encoded by the bacterial adaptive response gene, barA, is a member of the family of tripartite histidine kinases, and is involved in stress adaptation. BarA has been implicated to play a role during infection of epithelial cells. Homologues and orthologues

Surasri Nandan Sahu; Sharmistha Acharya; Helina Tuminaro; Isha Patel; Kim Dudley; J. Eugene LeClerc; Thomas A. Cebula; Suman Mukhopadhyay

2003-01-01

359

Copper resistance gene homologs in pathogenic and saprophytic bacterial species from tomato.  

PubMed

Copper-resistant strains of Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria, Pseudomonas cichorii, Pseudomonas putida, Pseudomonas fluorescens, and a yellow Pseudomonas sp. were isolated from tomato plants or seeds. In Southern hybridizations, DNA from each strain showed homology with the copper resistance (cop) operon previously cloned from Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato PT23. Homology was associated with plasmid and chromosomal DNA in X. compestris pv. vesicatoria, P. putida, and the yellow Pseudomonas sp. Homology was detected only in the chromosomal DNA of P. cichorii and P. fluorescens. Homology with cop was also detected in chromosomal DNA from copper-sensitive strains of P. cichorii, P. fluorescens, and P. syringae pv. tomato, suggesting that the cop homolog may be indigenous to certain Pseudomonas species and have some function other than copper resistance. No homology was detected in DNA from a copper-sensitive X. campestris pv. vesicatoria strain. Copper-inducible protein products were detected in each copper-resistant bacterium by immunoblot analysis with antibodies raised to the CopB protein from the cop operon. The role of the homologous DNA in copper resistance was confirmed for the X. campestris pv. vesicatoria strain by cloning and transferring the cop homolog to a copper-sensitive strain of X. campestris pv. vesicatoria. The possibility and implications of copper resistance gene exchange between different species and genera of pathogenic and saprophytic bacteria on tomato plants are discussed. PMID:16348118

Cooksey, D A; Azad, H R; Cha, J S; Lim, C K

1990-02-01

360

Introduction and recovery of a selectable bacterial gene from the genome of mammalian cells  

SciTech Connect

The simian virus 40 (SV40)-pBR322 recombinant, pSV2, carrying the origin of SV40 replication and the gpt gene of Escherichia coli, has been stably introduced into Chinese hamster ovary hprt/sup -/ cells. All gpt-transformed cell lines were found to contain one or more insertions of pSV2 sequences exclusively associated with high-molecular-weight DNA. Upon fusion with COS-1 cells, a simian cell line permissive for autonomous pSV2 replication, most gpt-transformed cell lines produced low-molecular-weight DNA molecules related to pSV2. The majority of these replicating DNAs were indistinguishable from the original transfecting plasmid in both size and restriction enzyme cleavage pattern. In addition, the recovered DNA molecules were able to confer ampicillin resistance to E. coli and to transform mouse L cells and Gpt/sup -/ E. coli to a Gpt/sup +/ phenotype. These studies indicate that all of the genetic information carried by this SV40-plasmid recombinant can be introduced into and retrieved from the genome of mammalian cells.

Breitman, M.L.; Tsui, L.C.; Buchwald, M.; Siminovitch, L.

1982-08-01

361

Controls on bacterial and archaeal community structure and greenhouse gas production in natural, mined, and restored Canadian peatlands  

PubMed Central

Northern peatlands are important global C reservoirs, largely because of their slow rates of microbial C mineralization. Particularly in sites that are heavily influenced by anthropogenic disturbances, there is scant information about microbial ecology and whether or not microbial community structure influences greenhouse gas production. This work characterized communities of bacteria and archaea using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and sequence analysis of 16S rRNA and functional genes across eight natural, mined, or restored peatlands in two locations in eastern Canada. Correlations were explored among chemical properties of peat, bacterial and archaeal community structure, and carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) production rates under oxic and anoxic conditions. Bacteria and archaea similar to those found in other peat soil environments were detected. In contrast to other reports, methanogen diversity was low in our study, with only 2 groups of known or suspected methanogens. Although mining and restoration affected substrate availability and microbial activity, these land-uses did not consistently affect bacterial or archaeal community composition. In fact, larger differences were observed between the two locations and between oxic and anoxic peat samples than between natural, mined, and restored sites, with anoxic samples characterized by less detectable bacterial diversity and stronger dominance by members of the phylum Acidobacteria. There were also no apparent strong linkages between prokaryote community structure and CH4 or CO2 production, suggesting that different organisms exhibit functional redundancy and/or that the same taxa function at very different rates when exposed to different peat substrates. In contrast to other earlier work focusing on fungal communities across similar mined and restored peatlands, bacterial and archaeal communities appeared to be more resistant or resilient to peat substrate changes brought about by these land uses. PMID:23914185

Basiliko, Nathan; Henry, Kevin; Gupta, Varun; Moore, Tim R.; Driscoll, Brian T.; Dunfield, Peter F.

2013-01-01

362

A keystone predator controls bacterial diversity in the pitcher-plant (Sarracenia purpurea) microecosystem.  

PubMed

The community of organisms inhabiting the water-filled leaves of the carnivorous pitcher-plant Sarracenia purpurea includes arthropods, protozoa and bacteria, and serves as a model system for studies of food web dynamics. Despite the wealth of data collected by ecologists and zoologists on this food web, very little is known about the bacterial assemblage in this microecosystem. We used terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis to quantify bacterial diversity within the pitchers as a function of pitcher size, pH of the pitcher fluid and the presence of the keystone predator in this food web, larvae of the pitcher-plant mosquito Wyeomyia smithii. Results were analysed at two spatial scales: within a single bog and across three isolated bogs. Pitchers were sterile before they opened and composition of the bacterial assemblage was more variable between different bogs than within bogs. Measures of bacterial richness and diversity were greater in the presence of W. smithii and increased with increasing pitcher size. Our results suggest that fundamental ecological concepts derived from macroscopic food webs can also be used to predict the bacterial assemblages in pitcher plants. PMID:18479443

Peterson, Celeste N; Day, Stephanie; Wolfe, Benjamin E; Ellison, Aaron M; Kolter, Roberto; Pringle, Anne

2008-09-01

363

Abundance and Diversity of Bacterial Nitrifiers and Denitrifiers and Their Functional Genes in Tannery Wastewater Treatment Plants Revealed by High-Throughput Sequencing  

PubMed Central

Biological nitrification/denitrification is frequently used to remove nitrogen from tannery wastewater containing high concentrations of ammonia. However, information is limited about the bacterial nitrifiers and denitrifiers and their functional genes in tannery wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) due to the low-throughput of the previously used methods. In this study, 454 pyrosequencing and Illumina high-throughput sequencing, combined with molecular methods, were used to comprehensively characterize structures and functions of nitrification and denitrification bacterial communities in aerobic and anaerobic sludge of two full-scale tannery WWTPs. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes showed that Proteobacteria and Synergistetes dominated in the aerobic and anaerobic sludge, respectively. Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) amoA gene cloning revealed that Nitrosomonas europaea dominated the ammonia-oxidizing community in the WWTPs. Metagenomic analysis showed that the denitrifiers mainly included the genera of Thauera, Paracoccus, Hyphomicrobium, Comamonas and Azoarcus, which may greatly contribute to the nitrogen removal in the two WWTPs. It is interesting that AOB and ammonia-oxidizing archaea had low abundance although both WWTPs demonstrated high ammonium removal efficiency. Good correlation between the qPCR and metagenomic analysis is observed for the quantification of functional genes amoA, nirK, nirS and nosZ, indicating that the metagenomic approach may be a promising method used to comprehensively investigate the abundance of functional genes of nitrifiers and denitrifiers in the environment. PMID:25420093

Wang, Zhu; Zhang, Xu-Xiang; Lu, Xin; Liu, Bo; Li, Yan; Long, Chao; Li, Aimin

2014-01-01

364

The control of size in animals: insights from selector genes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary How size is controlled during animal development remains a fascinating problem despite decades of research. Here we review key concepts in size biology and develop our thesis that much can be learned by studying how different organ sizes are differentially scaled by homeotic selector genes. A common theme from initial studies using this approach is that morph- ogen pathways

Michael A. Crickmore; Richard S. Mann

2008-01-01

365

RNA Silencing Genes Control de Novo DNA Methylation  

E-print Network

RNA Silencing Genes Control de Novo DNA Methylation Simon W.-L. Chan,1 Daniel Zilberman,1 Zhixin double mutants cannot initiate DNA methylation and silencing and therefore flow- er late (2). De novo DNA at the SUPERMAN locus, did not affect the initiation of FWA silencing. However, four mutants--rna dependent rna

Jacobsen, Steve

366

Application of targeted metagenomics to explore abundance and diversity of CO?-fixing bacterial community using cbbL gene from the rhizosphere of Arachis hypogaea.  

PubMed

Sequestration of CO(2) by autotrophic bacteria is a key process of biogeochemical carbon cycling in soil ecosystem. Rhizosphere is a rich niche of microbial activity and diversity, influenced by change in atmospheric CO(2). Structural changes in rhizosphere composition influence microbial communities and the nutrient cycling. In the present study, the bacterial diversity and population dynamics were established using cbbL and 16S rRNA gene targeted metagenomics approach from the rhizosphere of Arachis hypogaea. A total of 108 cbbL clones were obtained from the rhizospheric soil which revealed predominance of cbbL sequences affiliated to Rhizobium leguminosarum, Bradyrhizobium sp., Sinorhizobium meliloti, Ochrobactrum anthropi and a variety of uncultured cbbL harboring bacteria. The 16S rRNA gene clone library exhibited the dominance of Firmicutes (34.4%), Proteobacteria (18.3%), Actinobacteria (17.2%) and Bacteroidetes (16.1%). About 43% nucleotide sequences of 16S rRNA gene clone library were novel genera which showed <95% homology with published sequences. Gene copy number of cbbL and 16S rRNA genes, determined by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT PCR), was 9.38 ± 0.75 × 10(7) and 5.43 ± 0.79 × 10(8) (per g dry soil), respectively. The results exhibited bacterial community structure with high bacterial diversity and abundance of CO(2)-fixing bacteria, which can be explored further for their role in carbon cycling, sustainable agriculture and environment management. PMID:22766402

Yousuf, Basit; Keshri, Jitendra; Mishra, Avinash; Jha, Bhavanath

2012-09-10

367

Efficiency of ciprofloxacin for bacterial control, post-thaw quality, and in vivo fertility of buffalo spermatozoa.  

PubMed

Ciprofloxacin (CP) was evaluated for bacterial control, post-thaw quality, and fertility of buffalo semen. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Proteus sp., Corynebacterium sp., Micrococcus sp., and Staphylococcus sp. were isolated from buffalo semen. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Corynebacterium sp., and Micrococcus sp. were resistant to streptomycin, whereas P. aeruginosa and Proteus sp. were resistant to penicillin. All bacteria were susceptible to CP. In vitro dose toxicity was assessed in sodium citrate buffer containing 0, 200 to 2000 ?g/mL of CP. CP up to 1000 ?g/mL was found nontoxic to motility and viability of buffalo sperm. For post-thaw quality, buffalo semen was frozen in Tris-citric acid extender containing streptomycin-penicillin (SP; 1000 ?g/mL-1000 IU/mL) or CP 600 ?g/mL and was assessed for total aerobic bacterial count (post-thaw), motility, plasma membrane integrity, viability at 0, 2, and 4 hours post-thaw. At 4 hours post-thaw, plasma membrane integrity (%) was higher (P < 0.05) in extender containing CP than SP. Total aerobic bacterial count was 0.00 in extender containing CP compared with 0.07 × 10(4) cfu/mL with SP. To assess the in vivo fertility rate, semen (two bulls) frozen in Tris-citric acid extender containing SP or CP was used to inseminate, and 400 inseminations (200/group) were recorded. Higher (P ? 0.05) fertility rate was recorded with CP (55%) compared with SP (41%). In conclusion, use of CP in extender was efficient to control the bacterial contamination without compromising the post-thaw quality and fertility of cryopreserved water buffalo bull semen. PMID:23746693

Akhter, S; Ansari, M S; Rakha, B A; Andrabi, S M H; Qadeer, S; Iqbal, R; Ullah, N

2013-09-01

368

Characterization of the Bacteroides fragilis bfr Gene Product Identifies a Bacterial DPS-Like Protein and Suggests Evolutionary Links in the Ferritin Superfamily  

PubMed Central

A factor contributing to the pathogenicity of Bacteroides fragilis, the most common anaerobic species isolated from clinical infections, is the bacterium's extreme aerotolerance, which allows survival in oxygenated tissues prior to anaerobic abscess formation. We investigated the role of the bacterioferritin-related (bfr) gene in the B. fragilis oxidative stress response. The bfr mRNA levels are increased in stationary phase or in response to O2 or iron. In addition, bfr null mutants exhibit reduced aerotolerance, and the bfr gene product protects DNA from hydroxyl radical cleavage in vitro. Crystallographic studies revealed a protein with a dodecameric structure and greater similarity to an archaeal DNA protection in starved cells (DPS)-like protein than to the 24-subunit bacterioferritins. Similarity to the DPS-like (DPSL) protein extends to the subunit and includes a pair of conserved cysteine residues juxtaposed to a buried dimetal binding site within the four-helix bundle. Compared to archaeal DPSLs, however, this bacterial DPSL protein contains several unique features, including a significantly different conformation in the C-terminal tail that alters the number and location of pores leading to the central cavity and a conserved metal binding site on the interior surface of the dodecamer. Combined, these characteristics confirm this new class of miniferritin in the bacterial domain, delineate the similarities and differences between bacterial DPSL proteins and their archaeal homologs, allow corrected annotations for B. fragilis bfr and other dpsl genes within the bacterial domain, and suggest an evolutionary link within the ferritin superfamily that connects dodecameric DPS to the (bacterio)ferritin 24-mer. PMID:22020642

Gauss, George H.; Reott, Michael A.; Rocha, Edson R.; Young, Mark J.; Douglas, Trevor

2012-01-01

369

Remote detection of human toxicants in real time using a human-optimized, bioluminescent bacterial luciferase gene cassette bioreporter  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Traditionally, human toxicant bioavailability screening has been forced to proceed in either a high throughput fashion using prokaryotic or lower eukaryotic targets with minimal applicability to humans, or in a more expensive, lower throughput manner that uses fluorescent or bioluminescent human cells to directly provide human bioavailability data. While these efforts are often sufficient for basic scientific research, they prevent the rapid and remote identification of potentially toxic chemicals required for modern biosecurity applications. To merge the advantages of high throughput, low cost screening regimens with the direct bioavailability assessment of human cell line use, we re-engineered the bioluminescent bacterial luciferase gene cassette to function autonomously (without exogenous stimulation) within human cells. Optimized cassette expression provides for fully endogenous bioluminescent production, allowing continuous, real time monitoring of the bioavailability and toxicology of various compounds in an automated fashion. To access the functionality of this system, two sets of bioluminescent human cells were developed. The first was programed to suspend bioluminescent production upon toxicological challenge to mimic the non-specific detection of a toxicant. The second induced bioluminescence upon detection of a specific compound to demonstrate autonomous remote target identification. These cells were capable of responding to ?M concentrations of the toxicant n-decanal, and allowed for continuous monitoring of cellular health throughout the treatment process. Induced bioluminescence was generated through treatment with doxycycline and was detectable upon dosage at a 100 ng/ml concentration. These results demonstrate that leveraging autonomous bioluminescence allows for low-cost, high throughput direct assessment of toxicant bioavailability.

Close, Dan; Webb, James; Ripp, Steven; Patterson, Stacey; Sayler, Gary

2012-06-01

370

Bacterial diversity in paclobutrazol applied agricultural soils.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to investigate the bacterial communities on paclobutrazol [(2RS, 3RS)-1-(4-Chlorophenyl)-4, 4-dimethyl-2-(1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl) pentan-3-ol]-applied agricultural soils by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplified 16S rDNA gene fragments. Three different agricultural soil samples were collected from paclobutrazol applied mango and waxapple orchards, peanut fields and untreated rice fields as a control for DGGE analysis. The DGGE pattern of PCR- generated 16S rDNA gene fragments indicated that the bacterial populations from four paclobutrazol-applied soils of peanut fields were closely related to each other and two paclobutrazol-applied soils of mango and waxapple orchards harbored closely related bacterial communities. But, paclobutrazol-free agricultural soils comprised relatively a different bacterial group. However, the bacterial populations of mango and waxapple orchard are completely different from the bacterial communities of peanut field. Further purification and sequence analysis of 40 DGGE bands followed by phylogenetic tree assay showed similar results that soil bacteria from paclobutrazol applied mango and waxapple orchard are phylogenetically related. Based on the phylogenetic analysis, the clone M-4 was clad 100 % (bootstrap value) with Mycobacterium sp. The Mycobacterium sp. has been proved to degrade the phenolic compounds such as phenol, 4-chlorphenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol and paclobutrazol molecule containing chlorobenzene ring. PMID:20845182

Lin, Chorng-Horng; Kuo, Jimmy; Wang, Yen-Wen; Chen, Michael; Lin, Chin-Ho

2010-10-01

371

Replication timing control can be maintained in extrachromosomally amplified genes.  

PubMed Central

Extrachromosomal elements are common early intermediates of gene amplification in vivo and in cell culture. The time at which several extrachromosomal elements replicate was compared with that of the corresponding amplified or unamplified chromosomal sequences. The replication timing analysis employed a retroactive synchrony method in which fluorescence-activated cell sorting was used to obtain cells at different stages of the cell cycle. Extrachromosomally amplified Syrian hamster CAD genes (CAD is an acronym for the single gene which encodes the trifunctional protein which catalyzes the first three steps of uridine biosynthesis) replicated in a narrow window of early S-phase which was approximately the same as that of chromosomally amplified CAD genes. Similarly, extrachromosomally amplified mouse adenosine deaminase genes replicated at a discrete time in early S-phase which approximated the replication time of the unamplified adenosine deaminase gene. In contrast, the multicopy extrachromosomal Epstein-Barr virus genome replicated within a narrow window in late S-phase in latently infected human Rajii cells. The data indicate that localization within a chromosome is not required for the maintenance of replication timing control. Images PMID:1678857

Carroll, S M; Trotter, J; Wahl, G M

1991-01-01

372

Gene set control analysis predicts hematopoietic control mechanisms from genome-wide transcription factor binding data.  

PubMed

Transcription factors are key regulators of both normal and malignant hematopoiesis. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) coupled with high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-Seq) has become the method of choice to interrogate the genome-wide effect of transcription factors. We have collected and integrated 142 publicly available ChIP-Seq datasets for both normal and leukemic murine blood cell types. In addition, we introduce the new bioinformatic tool Gene Set Control Analysis (GSCA). GSCA predicts likely upstream regulators for lists of genes based on statistical significance of binding event enrichment within the gene loci of a user-supplied gene set. We show that GSCA analysis of lineage-restricted gene sets reveals expected and previously unrecognized candidate upstream regulators. Moreover, application of GSCA to leukemic gene sets allowed us to predict the reactivation of blood stem cell control mechanisms as a likely contributor to LMO2 driven leukemia. It also allowed us to clarify the recent debate on the role of Myc in leukemia stem cell transcriptional programs. As a result, GSCA provides a valuable new addition to analyzing gene sets of interest, complementary to Gene Ontology and Gene Set Enrichment analyses. To facilitate access to the wider research community, we have implemented GSCA as a freely accessible web tool (http://bioinformatics.cscr.cam.ac.uk/GSCA/GSCA.html). PMID:23220237

Joshi, Anagha; Hannah, Rebecca; Diamanti, Evangelia; Göttgens, Berthold

2013-04-01

373

Gene set control analysis predicts hematopoietic control mechanisms from genome-wide transcription factor binding data  

PubMed Central

Transcription factors are key regulators of both normal and malignant hematopoiesis. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) coupled with high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-Seq) has become the method of choice to interrogate the genome-wide effect of transcription factors. We have collected and integrated 142 publicly available ChIP-Seq datasets for both normal and leukemic murine blood cell types. In addition, we introduce the new bioinformatic tool Gene Set Control Analysis (GSCA). GSCA predicts likely upstream regulators for lists of genes based on statistical significance of binding event enrichment within the gene loci of a user-supplied gene set. We show that GSCA analysis of lineage-restricted gene sets reveals expected and previously unrecognized candidate upstream regulators. Moreover, application of GSCA to leukemic gene sets allowed us to predict the reactivation of blood stem cell control mechanisms as a likely contributor to LMO2 driven leukemia. It also allowed us to clarify the recent debate on the role of Myc in leukemia stem cell transcriptional programs. As a result, GSCA provides a valuable new addition to analyzing gene sets of interest, complementary to Gene Ontology and Gene Set Enrichment analyses. To facilitate access to the wider research community, we have implemented GSCA as a freely accessible web tool (http://bioinformatics.cscr.cam.ac.uk/GSCA/GSCA.html). PMID:23220237

Joshi, Anagha; Hannah, Rebecca; Diamanti, Evangelia; Göttgens, Berthold

2013-01-01

374

Isolation of bacterial strains colonizable in mosquito larval guts as novel host cells for mosquito control  

Microsoft Academic Search

We screened for microorganisms that can be utilized as new host cells for mosquito larvicides. As long persistence in the environment is required of host cells, we examined the bacterial populations in the guts of mosquito larvae collected from natural breeding habitats. Larvae of Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus were examined, and Bacillus species, particularly Bacillus cereus, were found to

Plearnpis Luxananil; Haruyuki Atomi; Sakol Panyim; Tadayuki Imanaka

2001-01-01

375

Phenotypic Resistance and the Dynamics of Bacterial Escape from Phage Control  

PubMed Central

The canonical view of phage - bacterial interactions in dense, liquid cultures is that the phage will eliminate most of the sensitive cells; genetic resistance will then ascend to restore high bacterial densities. Yet there are various mechanisms by which bacteria may remain sensitive to phages but still attain high densities in their presence – because bacteria enter a transient state of reduced adsorption. Importantly, these mechanisms may be cryptic and inapparent prior to the addition of phage yet result in a rapid rebound of bacterial density after phage are introduced. We describe mathematical models of these processes and suggest how different types of this ‘phenotypic’ resistance may be elucidated. We offer preliminary in vitro studies of a previously characterized E. coli model system and Campylobacter jejuni illustrating apparent phenotypic resistance. As phenotypic resistance may be specific to the receptors used by phages, awareness of its mechanisms may identify ways of improving the choice of phages for therapy. Phenotypic resistance can also explain several enigmas in the ecology of phage-bacterial dynamics. Phenotypic resistance does not preclude the evolution of genetic resistance and may often be an intermediate step to genetic resistance. PMID:24743264

Bull, James J.; Vegge, Christina Skovgaard; Schmerer, Matthew; Chaudhry, Waqas Nasir; Levin, Bruce R.

2014-01-01

376

Cutability, bacterial control and packaging effects on the merchandising of lamb  

E-print Network

resulted in increased tender- ness and a shift in bacterial flora from a predominance of Pseudomonas prior to storage to a preponderance of Lactobacillus after 21 days of storage. Flavor desirability as rated by a 5- member trained panel was only...

Varnadore, William Lee

1972-01-01

377

A Bistable Switch and Anatomical Site Control Vibrio cholerae Virulence Gene Expression in the Intestine  

PubMed Central

A fundamental, but unanswered question in host-pathogen interactions is the timing, localization and population distribution of virulence gene expression during infection. Here, microarray and in situ single cell expression methods were used to study Vibrio cholerae growth and virulence gene expression during infection of the rabbit ligated ileal loop model of cholera. Genes encoding the toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP) and cholera toxin (CT) were powerfully expressed early in the infectious process in bacteria adjacent to epithelial surfaces. Increased growth was found to co-localize with virulence gene expression. Significant heterogeneity in the expression of tcpA, the repeating subunit of TCP, was observed late in the infectious process. The expression of tcpA, studied in single cells in a homogeneous medium, demonstrated unimodal induction of tcpA after addition of bicarbonate, a chemical inducer of virulence gene expression. Striking bifurcation of the population occurred during entry into stationary phase: one subpopulation continued to express tcpA, whereas the expression declined in the other subpopulation. ctxA, encoding the A subunit of CT, and toxT, encoding the proximal master regulator of virulence gene expression also exhibited the bifurcation phenotype. The bifurcation phenotype was found to be reversible, epigenetic and to persist after removal of bicarbonate, features consistent with bistable switches. The bistable switch requires the positive-feedback circuit controlling ToxT expression and formation of the CRP-cAMP complex during entry into stationary phase. Key features of this bistable switch also were demonstrated in vivo, where striking heterogeneity in tcpA expression was observed in luminal fluid in later stages of the infection. When this fluid was diluted into artificial seawater, bacterial aggregates continued to express tcpA for prolonged periods of time. The bistable control of virulence gene expression points to a mechanism that could generate a subpopulation of V. cholerae that continues to produce TCP and CT in the rice water stools of cholera patients. PMID:20862321

Nielsen, Alex T.; Dolganov, Nadia A.; Rasmussen, Thomas; Otto, Glen; Miller, Michael C.; Felt, Stephen A.; Torreilles, Stéphanie; Schoolnik, Gary K.

2010-01-01

378

Flowering in time: genes controlling photoperiodic flowering in Arabidopsis.  

PubMed Central

Successful sexual reproduction in plants relies upon the strict coordination of flowering time with favourable seasons of the year. One of the most important seasonal cues for the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) is day length. Genes influencing flowering time in Arabidopsis have been isolated, some of which are involved in the perception and signalling of day length. This review discusses recent progress that has been made in understanding how Arabidopsis integrates environmental and internal signals to ensure a sharp transition to flowering and new insights on the role of the circadian clock in controlling the expression of genes that promote flowering in response to day length. PMID:11710983

Putterill, J

2001-01-01

379

Bacterial Community Composition in the Gut Content and Ambient Sediment of Sea Cucumber Apostichopus japonicus Revealed by 16S rRNA Gene Pyrosequencing  

PubMed Central

The composition of the bacterial communities in the contents of the foregut and hindgut of the sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus and in the ambient surface sediment was surveyed by 16S rRNA gene 454-pyrosequencing. A total of 188,623 optimized reads and 15,527 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were obtained from the ten gut contents samples and four surface sediment samples. The sequences in the sediments, foregut contents, and hindgut contents were assigned to 38.0±4.7, 31.2±6.2 and 27.8±6.5 phyla, respectively. The bacterial richness and Shannon diversity index were both higher in the ambient sediments than in the gut contents. Proteobacteria was the predominant phylum in both the gut contents and sediment samples. The predominant classes in the foregut, hindgut, and ambient sediment were Holophagae and Gammaproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria, and Gammaproteobacteria and Deltaproteobacteria, respectively. The potential probiotics, including sequences related to Bacillus, lactic acid bacteria (Lactobacillus, Lactococcus, and Streptococcus) and Pseudomonas were detected in the gut of A. japonicus. Principle component analysis and heatmap figure showed that the foregut, hindgut, and ambient sediment respectively harbored different characteristic bacterial communities. Selective feeding of A. japonicus may be the primary source of the different bacterial communities between the foregut contents and ambient sediments. PMID:24967593

Gao, Fei; Li, Fenghui; Tan, Jie; Yan, Jingping; Sun, Huiling

2014-01-01

380

A Pilot Study of Bacterial Genes with Disrupted ORFs Reveals a Surprising Profusion of Protein Sequence Recoding Mediated by Ribosomal Frameshifting and Transcriptional Realignment  

PubMed Central

Bacterial genome annotations contain a number of coding sequences (CDSs) that, in spite of reading frame disruptions, encode a single continuous polypeptide. Such disruptions have different origins: sequencing errors, frameshift, or stop codon mutations, as well as instances of utilization of nontriplet decoding. We have extracted over 1,000 CDSs with annotated disruptions and found that about 75% of them can be clustered into 64 groups based on sequence similarity. Analysis of the clusters revealed deep phylogenetic conservation of open reading frame organization as well as the presence of conserved sequence patterns that indicate likely utilization of the nonstandard decoding mechanisms: programmed ribosomal frameshifting (PRF) and programmed transcriptional realignment (PTR). Further enrichment of these clusters with additional homologous nucleotide sequences revealed over 6,000 candidate genes utilizing PRF or PTR. Analysis of the patterns of conservation apparently associated with nontriplet decoding revealed the presence of both previously characterized frameshift-prone sequences and a few novel ones. Since the starting point of our analysis was a set of genes with already annotated disruptions, it is highly plausible that in this study, we have identified only a fraction of all bacterial genes that utilize PRF or PTR. In addition to the identification of a large number of recoded genes, a surprising observation is that nearly half of them are expressed via PTR—a mechanism that, in contrast to PRF, has not yet received substantial attention. PMID:21673094

Sharma, Virag; Firth, Andrew E.; Antonov, Ivan; Fayet, Olivier; Atkins, John F.; Borodovsky, Mark; Baranov, Pavel V.

2011-01-01

381

A gene regulatory network controlling the embryonic specification of endoderm  

PubMed Central

Specification of endoderm is the prerequisite for gut formation in the embryogenesis of bilaterian organisms. Modern lineage labelling studies 1–3 have shown that in the sea urchin embryo model system, descendants of the veg1 and veg2 cell lineages produce the endoderm, and that the veg2 lineage also gives rise to mesodermal cell types. It is known that Wnt/?-catenin signalling is required for endoderm specification4–6 and Delta/Notch signalling is required for mesoderm specification7–9. Some direct cis-regulatory targets of these signals have been found10,11 and various phenomenological patterns of gene expression have been observed in the pre-gastrular endomesoderm. However, no comprehensive, causal explanation of endoderm specification has been conceived for sea urchins, nor for any other deuterostome. Here we propose a model, on the basis of the underlying genomic control system, that provides such an explanation, built at several levels of biological organization. The hardwired core of the control system consists of the cis-regulatory apparatus of endodermal regulatory genes, which determine the relationship between the inputs to which these genes are exposed and their outputs. The architecture of the network circuitry controlling the dynamic process of endoderm specification then explains, at the system level, a sequence of developmental logic operations, which generate the biological process. The control system initiates noninteracting endodermal and mesodermal gene regulatory networks in veg2-derived cells and extinguishes the endodermal gene regulatory network in mesodermal precursors. It also generates a cross-regulatory network that specifies future anterior endoderm in veg2 descendants and institutes a distinct network specifying posterior endoderm in veg1-derived cells. The network model provides an explanatory framework that relates endoderm specification to the genomic regulatory code. PMID:21623371

Peter, Isabelle S.; Davidson, Eric H.

2014-01-01

382

A gene regulatory network controlling the embryonic specification of endoderm.  

PubMed

Specification of endoderm is the prerequisite for gut formation in the embryogenesis of bilaterian organisms. Modern lineage labelling studies have shown that in the sea urchin embryo model system, descendants of the veg1 and veg2 cell lineages produce the endoderm, and that the veg2 lineage also gives rise to mesodermal cell types. It is known that Wnt/?-catenin signalling is required for endoderm specification and Delta/Notch signalling is required for mesoderm specification. Some direct cis-regulatory targets of these signals have been found and various phenomenological patterns of gene expression have been observed in the pre-gastrular endomesoderm. However, no comprehensive, causal explanation of endoderm specification has been conceived for sea urchins, nor for any other deuterostome. Here we propose a model, on the basis of the underlying genomic control system, that provides such an explanation, built at several levels of biological organization. The hardwired core of the control system consists of the cis-regulatory apparatus of endodermal regulatory genes, which determine the relationship between the inputs to which these genes are exposed and their outputs. The architecture of the network circuitry controlling the dynamic process of endoderm specification then explains, at the system level, a sequence of developmental logic operations, which generate the biological process. The control system initiates non-interacting endodermal and mesodermal gene regulatory networks in veg2-derived cells and extinguishes the endodermal gene regulatory network in mesodermal precursors. It also generates a cross-regulatory network that specifies future anterior endoderm in veg2 descendants and institutes a distinct network specifying posterior endoderm in veg1-derived cells. The network model provides an explanatory framework that relates endoderm specification to the genomic regulatory code. PMID:21623371

Peter, Isabelle S; Davidson, Eric H

2011-06-30

383

Arabidopsis nonhost resistance gene PSS1 confers immunity against an oomycete and a fungal pathogen but not a bacterial pathogen that cause diseases in soybean  

PubMed Central

Background Nonhost resistance (NHR) provides immunity to all members of a plant species against all isolates of a microorganism that is pathogenic to other plant species. Three Arabidopsis thaliana PEN (penetration deficient) genes, PEN1, 2 and 3 have been shown to provide NHR against the barley pathogen Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei at the prehaustorial level. Arabidopsis pen1-1 mutant lacking the PEN1