Sample records for controls bacterial genes

  1. Genome engineering and gene expression control for bacterial strain development.

    PubMed

    Song, Chan Woo; Lee, Joungmin; Lee, Sang Yup

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, a number of techniques and tools have been developed for genome engineering and gene expression control to achieve desired phenotypes of various bacteria. Here we review and discuss the recent advances in bacterial genome manipulation and gene expression control techniques, and their actual uses with accompanying examples. Genome engineering has been commonly performed based on homologous recombination. During such genome manipulation, the counterselection systems employing SacB or nucleases have mainly been used for the efficient selection of desired engineered strains. The recombineering technology enables simple and more rapid manipulation of the bacterial genome. The group II intron-mediated genome engineering technology is another option for some bacteria that are difficult to be engineered by homologous recombination. Due to the increasing demands on high-throughput screening of bacterial strains having the desired phenotypes, several multiplex genome engineering techniques have recently been developed and validated in some bacteria. Another approach to achieve desired bacterial phenotypes is the repression of target gene expression without the modification of genome sequences. This can be performed by expressing antisense RNA, small regulatory RNA, or CRISPR RNA to repress target gene expression at the transcriptional or translational level. All of these techniques allow efficient and rapid development and screening of bacterial strains having desired phenotypes, and more advanced techniques are expected to be seen. PMID:25155412

  2. Bacterial avirulence genes.

    PubMed

    Leach, J E; White, F F

    1996-01-01

    Although more than 30 bacterial avirulence genes have been cloned and characterized, the function of the gene products in the elictitation of resistance is unknown in all cases but one. The product of avrD from Pseudomonas syringae pv. glycinea likely functions indirectly to elicit resistance in soybean, that is, evidence suggests the gene product is an enzyme involved in elicitor production. In most if not all cases, bacterial avirulence gene function is dependent on interactions with the hypersensitive response and pathogenicity (hrp) genes. Many hrp genes are similar to genes involved in delivery of pathogenicity factors in mammalian bacterial pathogens. Thus, analogies between mammalian and plant pathogens may provide needed clues to elucidate how virulence gene products control induction of resistance. PMID:15012539

  3. Genes as early responders regulate quorum-sensing and control bacterial cooperation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Kelei; Li, Yi; Yue, Bisong; Wu, Min

    2014-01-01

    Quorum-sensing (QS) allows bacterial communication to coordinate the production of extracellular products essential for population fitness at higher cell densities. It has been generally accepted that a significant time duration is required to reach appropriate cell density to activate the relevant quiescent genes encoding these costly but beneficial public goods. Which regulatory genes are involved and how these genes control bacterial communication at the early phases are largely un-explored. By determining time-dependent expression of QS-related genes of the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aerugionsa, we show that the induction of social cooperation could be critically influenced by environmental factors to optimize the density of population. In particular, small regulatory RNAs (RsmY and RsmZ) serving as early responders, can promote the expression of dependent genes (e.g. lasR) to boost the synthesis of intracellular enzymes and coordinate instant cooperative behavior in bacterial cells. These early responders, acting as a rheostat to finely modulate bacterial cooperation, which may be quickly activated under environment threats, but peter off when critical QS dependent genes are fully functional for cooperation. Our findings suggest that RsmY and RsmZ critically control the timing and levels of public goods production, which may have implications in sociomicrobiology and infection control. PMID:25006971

  4. Single-taxon field measurements of bacterial gene regulation controlling DMSP fate.

    PubMed

    Varaljay, Vanessa A; Robidart, Julie; Preston, Christina M; Gifford, Scott M; Durham, Bryndan P; Burns, Andrew S; Ryan, John P; Marin Iii, Roman; Kiene, Ronald P; Zehr, Jonathan P; Scholin, Christopher A; Ann Moran, Mary

    2015-07-01

    The 'bacterial switch' is a proposed regulatory point in the global sulfur cycle that routes dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) to two fundamentally different fates in seawater through genes encoding either the cleavage or demethylation pathway, and affects the flux of volatile sulfur from ocean surface waters to the atmosphere. Yet which ecological or physiological factors might control the bacterial switch remains a topic of considerable debate. Here we report the first field observations of dynamic changes in expression of DMSP pathway genes by a single marine bacterial species in its natural environment. Detection of taxon-specific gene expression in Roseobacter species HTCC2255 during a month-long deployment of an autonomous ocean sensor in Monterey Bay, CA captured in situ regulation of the first gene in each DMSP pathway (dddP and dmdA) that corresponded with shifts in the taxonomy of the phytoplankton community. Expression of the cleavage pathway was relatively greater during a high-DMSP-producing dinoflagellate bloom, and expression of the demethylation pathway was greater in the presence of a mixed diatom and dinoflagellate community. These field data fit the prevailing hypothesis for bacterial DMSP gene regulation based on bacterial sulfur demand, but also suggest a modification involving oxidative stress response, evidenced as upregulation of catalase via katG, when DMSP is demethylated. PMID:25700338

  5. First insights into the genes that control plant-bacterial interactions.

    PubMed

    Staskawicz, Brian

    2009-11-01

    The events leading up to the cloning of the first bacterial avirulence gene, avrA, from Pseudomonas syringae pv. glycinea are described. The cloning of this gene marked the beginning of the molecular analyses of bacterial effectors and has paved the way for determining of the role of bacterial effectors in pathogen virulence and the triggering of plant innate immunity. PMID:19849779

  6. A widespread riboswitch candidate that controls bacterial genes involved in molybdenum cofactor and tungsten cofactor metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Regulski, Elizabeth E; Moy, Ryan H; Weinberg, Zasha; Barrick, Jeffrey E; Yao, Zizhen; Ruzzo, Walter L; Breaker, Ronald R

    2008-01-01

    We have identified a highly conserved RNA motif located upstream of genes encoding molybdate transporters, molybdenum cofactor (Moco) biosynthesis enzymes, and proteins that utilize Moco as a coenzyme. Bioinformatics searches have identified 176 representatives in ?-Proteobacteria, ?-Proteobacteria, Clostridia, Actinobacteria, Deinococcus-Thermus species and DNAs from environmental samples. Using genetic assays, we demonstrate that a Moco RNA in Escherichia coli associated with the Moco biosynthetic operon controls gene expression in response to Moco production. In addition, we provide evidence indicating that this conserved RNA discriminates against closely related analogues of Moco. These results, together with extensive phylogenetic conservation and typical gene control structures near some examples, indicate that representatives of this structured RNA represent a novel class of riboswitches that sense Moco. Furthermore, we identify variants of this RNA that are likely to be triggered by the related tungsten cofactor (Tuco), which carries tungsten in place of molybdenum as the metal constituent. PMID:18363797

  7. Specific Gene Repression by CRISPRi System Transferred through Bacterial Conjugation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In microbial communities, bacterial populations are commonly controlled using indiscriminate, broad range antibiotics. There are few ways to target specific strains effectively without disrupting the entire microbiome and local environment. Here, we use conjugation, a natural DNA horizontal transfer process among bacterial species, to deliver an engineered CRISPR interference (CRISPRi) system for targeting specific genes in recipient Escherichia coli cells. We show that delivery of the CRISPRi system is successful and can specifically repress a reporter gene in recipient cells, thereby establishing a new tool for gene regulation across bacterial cells and potentially for bacterial population control. PMID:25409531

  8. Specific gene repression by CRISPRi system transferred through bacterial conjugation.

    PubMed

    Ji, Weiyue; Lee, Derrick; Wong, Eric; Dadlani, Priyanka; Dinh, David; Huang, Verna; Kearns, Kendall; Teng, Sherry; Chen, Susan; Haliburton, John; Heimberg, Graham; Heineike, Benjamin; Ramasubramanian, Anusuya; Stevens, Thomas; Helmke, Kara J; Zepeda, Veronica; Qi, Lei S; Lim, Wendell A

    2014-12-19

    In microbial communities, bacterial populations are commonly controlled using indiscriminate, broad range antibiotics. There are few ways to target specific strains effectively without disrupting the entire microbiome and local environment. Here, we use conjugation, a natural DNA horizontal transfer process among bacterial species, to deliver an engineered CRISPR interference (CRISPRi) system for targeting specific genes in recipient Escherichia coli cells. We show that delivery of the CRISPRi system is successful and can specifically repress a reporter gene in recipient cells, thereby establishing a new tool for gene regulation across bacterial cells and potentially for bacterial population control. PMID:25409531

  9. Gene Control

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    WGBH Educational Foundation

    2003-09-26

    The development of creatures that appear to have nothing in common is directed by a surprisingly small number of genes. In this video segment, learn about the power of master control genes. Footage from The Secret of Life: Birth, Sex & Death.

  10. Bacterial nitrate assimilation: gene distribution and regulation.

    PubMed

    Luque-Almagro, Víctor M; Gates, Andrew J; Moreno-Vivián, Conrado; Ferguson, Stuart J; Richardson, David J; Roldán, M Dolores

    2011-12-01

    In the context of the global nitrogen cycle, the importance of inorganic nitrate for the nutrition and growth of marine and freshwater autotrophic phytoplankton has long been recognized. In contrast, the utilization of nitrate by heterotrophic bacteria has historically received less attention because the primary role of these organisms has classically been considered to be the decomposition and mineralization of dissolved and particulate organic nitrogen. In the pre-genome sequence era, it was known that some, but not all, heterotrophic bacteria were capable of growth on nitrate as a sole nitrogen source. However, examination of currently available prokaryotic genome sequences suggests that assimilatory nitrate reductase (Nas) systems are widespread phylogenetically in bacterial and archaeal heterotrophs. Until now, regulation of nitrate assimilation has been mainly studied in cyanobacteria. In contrast, in heterotrophic bacterial strains, the study of nitrate assimilation regulation has been limited to Rhodobacter capsulatus, Klebsiella oxytoca, Azotobacter vinelandii and Bacillus subtilis. In Gram-negative bacteria, the nas genes are subjected to dual control: ammonia repression by the general nitrogen regulatory (Ntr) system and specific nitrate or nitrite induction. The Ntr system is widely distributed in bacteria, whereas the nitrate/nitrite-specific control is variable depending on the organism. PMID:22103536

  11. Bacterial plant oncogenes: The rol genes' saga

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Costantino; I. Capone; M. Cardarelli; A. De Paolis; M. L. Mauro; M. Trovato

    1994-01-01

    Therol genes are part of the T-DNA which is transferred byAgrobacterium rhizogenes in plant cells, causing neoplastic growth and differentiation. Each of these bacterial oncogenes deeply influences plant development and is finely regulated once transferred into the plant host. Both from the study of the effects and biochemical function of therol genes and from the analysis of their regulation, important

  12. Horizontal gene transfer and bacterial diversity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chitra Dutta; Archana Pan

    2002-01-01

    Bacterial genomes are extremely dynamic and mosaic in nature. A substantial amount of genetic information is inserted into\\u000a or deleted from such genomes through the process of horizontal transfer. Through the introduction of novel physiological traits\\u000a from distantly related organisms, horizontal gene transfer often causes drastic changes in the ecological and pathogenic character\\u000a of bacterial species and thereby promotes microbial

  13. Mutations in the Control of Virulence Sensor Gene from Streptococcus pyogenes after Infection in Mice Lead to Clonal Bacterial Variants with Altered Gene Regulatory Activity and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Mayfield, Jeffrey A.; Liang, Zhong; Agrahari, Garima; Lee, Shaun W.; Donahue, Deborah L.; Ploplis, Victoria A.; Castellino, Francis J.

    2014-01-01

    The cluster of virulence sensor (CovS)/responder (CovR) two-component operon (CovRS) regulates ?15% of the genes of the Group A Streptococcal pyogenes (GAS) genome. Bacterial clones containing inactivating mutations in the covS gene have been isolated from patients with virulent invasive diseases. We report herein an assessment of the nature and types of covS mutations that can occur in both virulent and nonvirulent GAS strains, and assess whether a nonvirulent GAS can attain enhanced virulence through this mechanism. A group of mice were infected with a globally-disseminated clonal M1T1 GAS (isolate 5448), containing wild-type (WT) CovRS (5448/CovR+S+), or less virulent engineered GAS strains, AP53/CovR+S+ and Manfredo M5/CovR+S+. SpeB negative GAS clones from wound sites and/or from bacteria disseminated to the spleen were isolated and the covS gene was subjected to DNA sequence analysis. Numerous examples of inactivating mutations were found in CovS in all regions of the gene. The mutations found included frame-shift insertions and deletions, and in-frame small and large deletions in the gene. Many of the mutations found resulted in early translation termination of CovS. Thus, the covS gene is a genomic mutagenic target that gives GAS enhanced virulence. In cases wherein CovS? was discovered, these clonal variants exhibited high lethality, further suggesting that randomly mutated covS genes occur during the course of infection, and lead to the development of a more invasive infection. PMID:24968349

  14. Measurement of bacterial gene expression in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Hautefort, I; Hinton, J C

    2000-01-01

    The complexities of bacterial gene expression during mammalian infection cannot be addressed by in vitro experiments. We know that the infected host represents a complex and dynamic environment, which is modified during the infection process, presenting a variety of stimuli to which the pathogen must respond if it is to be successful. This response involves hundreds of ivi (in vivo-induced) genes which have recently been identified in animal and cell culture models using a variety of technologies including in vivo expression technology, differential fluorescence induction, subtractive hybridization and differential display. Proteomic analysis is beginning to be used to identify IVI proteins, and has benefited from the availability of genome sequences for increasing numbers of bacterial pathogens. The patterns of bacterial gene expression during infection remain to be investigated. Are ivi genes expressed in an organ-specific or cell-type-specific fashion? New approaches are required to answer these questions. The uses of the immunologically based in vivo antigen technology system, in situ PCR and DNA microarray analysis are considered. This review considers existing methods for examining bacterial gene expression in vivo, and describes emerging approaches that should further our understanding in the future. PMID:10874733

  15. Bacterial plant oncogenes: the rol genes' saga.

    PubMed

    Costantino, P; Capone, I; Cardarelli, M; De Paolis, A; Mauro, M L; Trovato, M

    1994-01-01

    The rol genes are part of the T-DNA which is transferred by Agrobacterium rhizogenes in plant cells, causing neoplastic growth and differentiation. Each of these bacterial oncogenes deeply influences plant development and is finely regulated once transferred into the plant host. Both from the study of the effects and biochemical function of the rol genes and from the analysis of their regulation, important insight in plant development can be derived. Some of the most intriguing aspects of past, current and future research on this gene system are highlighted and discussed. PMID:7896140

  16. Gene flow and bacterial transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, B.

    1993-07-01

    It is common knowledge that Salmonella which should be removed during the processing of sewage can persist is sewage sludge that is sprayed as agricultural fertilizer. Currently, researchers have found that Salmonella may become nonculturable by conventional means, while remaining viable. The issue raised by this article is the knowledge of lateral gene flow as secure as scientist suppose The author sites several research papers that suggest that intergeneric transformation can and does take place in marine environments such as tropical and subtropical estuaries.

  17. A Combination of Independent Transcriptional Regulators Shapes Bacterial Virulence Gene Expression during Infection

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Samuel A. Shelburne; Randall J. Olsen; Bryce Suber; Pranoti Sahasrabhojane; Paul Sumby; Richard G. Brennan; James M. Musser

    2010-01-01

    Transcriptional regulatory networks are fundamental to how microbes alter gene expression in response to environmental stimuli, thereby playing a critical role in bacterial pathogenesis. However, understanding how bacterial transcriptional regulatory networks function during host-pathogen interaction is limited. Recent studies in group A Streptococcus (GAS) suggested that the transcriptional regulator catabolite control protein A (CcpA) influences many of the same genes

  18. Enzymes Are Enriched in Bacterial Essential Genes

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Feng; Zhang, Randy Ren

    2011-01-01

    Essential genes, those indispensable for the survival of an organism, play a key role in the emerging field, synthetic biology. Characterization of functions encoded by essential genes not only has important practical implications, such as in identifying antibiotic drug targets, but can also enhance our understanding of basic biology, such as functions needed to support cellular life. Enzymes are critical for almost all cellular activities. However, essential genes have not been systematically examined from the aspect of enzymes and the chemical reactions that they catalyze. Here, by comprehensively analyzing essential genes in 14 bacterial genomes in which large-scale gene essentiality screens have been performed, we found that enzymes are enriched in essential genes. Essential enzymes have overrepresented ligases (especially those forming carbon-oxygen bonds and carbon-nitrogen bonds), nucleotidyltransferases and phosphotransferases, while have underrepresented oxidoreductases. Furthermore, essential enzymes tend to associate with more gene ontology domains. These results, from the aspect of chemical reactions, provide further insights into the understanding of functions needed to support natural cellular life, as well as synthetic cells, and provide additional parameters that can be integrated into gene essentiality prediction algorithms. PMID:21738765

  19. Highly potent dUTPase inhibition by a bacterial repressor protein reveals a novel mechanism for gene expression control

    PubMed Central

    Szabó, Judit E.; Németh, Veronika; Papp-Kádár, Veronika; Nyíri, Kinga; Leveles, Ibolya; Bendes, Ábris Á.; Zagyva, Imre; Róna, Gergely; Pálinkás, Hajnalka L.; Besztercei, Balázs; Ozohanics, Olivér; Vékey, Károly; Liliom, Károly; Tóth, Judit; Vértessy, Beáta G.

    2014-01-01

    Transfer of phage-related pathogenicity islands of Staphylococcus aureus (SaPI-s) was recently reported to be activated by helper phage dUTPases. This is a novel function for dUTPases otherwise involved in preservation of genomic integrity by sanitizing the dNTP pool. Here we investigated the molecular mechanism of the dUTPase-induced gene expression control using direct techniques. The expression of SaPI transfer initiating proteins is repressed by proteins called Stl. We found that ?11 helper phage dUTPase eliminates SaPIbov1 Stl binding to its cognate DNA by binding tightly to Stl protein. We also show that dUTPase enzymatic activity is strongly inhibited in the dUTPase:Stl complex and that the dUTPase:dUTP complex is inaccessible to the Stl repressor. Our results disprove the previously proposed G-protein-like mechanism of SaPI transfer activation. We propose that the transfer only occurs if dUTP is cleared from the nucleotide pool, a condition promoting genomic stability of the virulence elements. PMID:25274731

  20. Bacterial Ice Crystal Controlling Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lorv, Janet S. H.; Rose, David R.; Glick, Bernard R.

    2014-01-01

    Across the world, many ice active bacteria utilize ice crystal controlling proteins for aid in freezing tolerance at subzero temperatures. Ice crystal controlling proteins include both antifreeze and ice nucleation proteins. Antifreeze proteins minimize freezing damage by inhibiting growth of large ice crystals, while ice nucleation proteins induce formation of embryonic ice crystals. Although both protein classes have differing functions, these proteins use the same ice binding mechanisms. Rather than direct binding, it is probable that these protein classes create an ice surface prior to ice crystal surface adsorption. Function is differentiated by molecular size of the protein. This paper reviews the similar and different aspects of bacterial antifreeze and ice nucleation proteins, the role of these proteins in freezing tolerance, prevalence of these proteins in psychrophiles, and current mechanisms of protein-ice interactions. PMID:24579057

  1. Surface nanocrystallization for bacterial control.

    PubMed

    Yu, Bin; Lesiuk, Adam; Davis, Elisabeth; Irvin, Randall T; Li, D Y

    2010-07-01

    Stainless steel is commonly used in indwelling medical devices, food preparation, and heavy industry. Bacteria display reduced adherence to nanocrystallized stainless steel. In this article, we present quantitative information on the surface adhesive force, surface electron work function, and bacterial adherence to surfaces of nanocrystallized stainless steel with differing grain sizes. Surface nanocrystallization was achieved by sandblasting followed by recovery treatment. The adhesive force of bacterial binding to nanocrystallized surfaces was measured using an atomic force microscope with a synthetic-peptide-coated AFM tip designed to mimic the bacterial binding site of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a common pathogen known to form biofilms. The electron work function of the steel surfaces was measured, and bacterial binding assays were performed using subinoculated P. aeruginosa cultures. It was demonstrated that for nanograined steel surfaces, the adhesive force, peptide adherence, surface electron activity, and bacterial binding all decreased with decreasing grain size. PMID:20433185

  2. Evolutionary relationships of bacterial and archaeal glutamine synthetase genes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. R. Brown; Y. Masuchi; F. T. Robb; W. F. Doolittlel

    1994-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS), an essential enzyme in ammonia assimilation and glutamine biosynthesis, has three distinctive types: GSI, GSII and GSIII. Genes for GSI have been found only in bacteria (eubacteria) and archaea (archaebacteria), while GSII genes only occur in eukaryotes and a few soil-dwelling bacteria. GSIII genes have been found in only a few bacterial species. Recently, it has been

  3. Simultaneous Identification of Bacterial Virulence Genes by Negative Selection

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Hensel; Jacqueline E. Shea; Colin Gleeson; Michael D. Jones; Emma Dalton; David W. Holden

    1995-01-01

    An insertional mutagenesis system that uses transposons carrying unique DNA sequence tags was developed for the isolation of bacterial virulence genes. The tags from a mixed population of bacterial mutants representing the inoculum and bacteria recovered from infected hosts were detected by amplification, radiolabeling, and hybridization analysis. When applied to a murine model of typhoid fever caused by Salmonella typhimurium,

  4. Transport of Magnesium by a Bacterial Nramp-Related Gene

    PubMed Central

    Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Freedman, Benjamin G.; Senger, Ryan S.; Winkler, Wade C.

    2014-01-01

    Magnesium is an essential divalent metal that serves many cellular functions. While most divalent cations are maintained at relatively low intracellular concentrations, magnesium is maintained at a higher level (?0.5–2.0 mM). Three families of transport proteins were previously identified for magnesium import: CorA, MgtE, and MgtA/MgtB P-type ATPases. In the current study, we find that expression of a bacterial protein unrelated to these transporters can fully restore growth to a bacterial mutant that lacks known magnesium transporters, suggesting it is a new importer for magnesium. We demonstrate that this transport activity is likely to be specific rather than resulting from substrate promiscuity because the proteins are incapable of manganese import. This magnesium transport protein is distantly related to the Nramp family of proteins, which have been shown to transport divalent cations but have never been shown to recognize magnesium. We also find gene expression of the new magnesium transporter to be controlled by a magnesium-sensing riboswitch. Importantly, we find additional examples of riboswitch-regulated homologues, suggesting that they are a frequent occurrence in bacteria. Therefore, our aggregate data discover a new and perhaps broadly important path for magnesium import and highlight how identification of riboswitch RNAs can help shed light on new, and sometimes unexpected, functions of their downstream genes. PMID:24968120

  5. Detection of bacterial blight resistance genes in basmati rice landraces.

    PubMed

    Ullah, I; Jamil, S; Iqbal, M Z; Shaheen, H L; Hasni, S M; Jabeen, S; Mehmood, A; Akhter, M

    2012-01-01

    Aromatic basmati rice is vulnerable to bacterial blight disease. Genes conferring resistance to bacterial blight have been identified in coarse rice; however, their incorporation into basmati varieties compromises the prized basmati aroma. We identified bacterial blight resistance genes Xa4, xa5, Xa7, and xa13 in 52 basmati landraces and five basmati cultivars using PCR markers. The Xa7 gene was found to be the most prevalent among the cultivars and landraces. The cultivars Basmati-385 and Basmati-2000 also contained the Xa4 gene; however, xa5 and xa13 were confined to landraces only. Ten landraces were found to have multiple resistance genes. Landraces Basmati-106, Basmati-189 and Basmati-208 contained Xa4 and Xa7 genes. Whereas, landraces Basmati-122, Basmati-427, Basmati-433 were observed to have xa5 and Xa7 genes. Landraces Basmati-48, Basmati-51A, Basmati-334, and Basmati-370A possessed Xa7 and xa13 genes. The use of landraces containing recessive genes xa5 and xa13 as donor parents in hybridization with cultivars Basmati-385 and Basmati-2000, which contain the genes Xa4 and Xa7, will expedite efforts to develop bacterial blight-resistant basmati rice cultivars through marker assisted selection, based on a pyramiding approach, without compromising aroma and grain quality. PMID:22869552

  6. Bacteriophage-mediated spread of bacterial virulence genes.

    PubMed

    Penadés, José R; Chen, John; Quiles-Puchalt, Nuria; Carpena, Nuria; Novick, Richard P

    2015-02-01

    Bacteriophages are types of viruses that infect bacteria. They are the most abundant and diverse entities in the biosphere, and influence the evolution of most bacterial species by promoting gene transfer, sometimes in unexpected ways. Although pac-type phages can randomly package and transfer bacterial DNA by a process called generalized transduction, some mobile genetic elements have developed elegant and sophisticated strategies to hijack the phage DNA-packaging machinery for their own transfer. Moreover, phage-like particles (gene transfer agents) have also evolved, that can package random pieces of the producing cell's genome. The purpose of this review is to give an overview of some of the various ways by which phages and phage-like particles can transfer bacterial genes, driving bacterial evolution and promoting the emergence of novel pathogens. PMID:25528295

  7. Differential gene expression in bacterial symbionts from loliginid squids demonstrates variation between mutualistic and

    E-print Network

    McFall-Ngai, Margaret

    Differential gene expression in bacterial symbionts from loliginid squids demonstrates variation to the colonization process. Therefore, we identified bacterial genes required for successful colonization-living stages. Selective capture of transcribed sequences (SCOTS) was used to differentiate genes expressed

  8. Gene identication in bacterial and organellar genomes using GeneScan

    E-print Network

    Ramaswamy, Ram

    Gene identi®cation in bacterial and organellar genomes using GeneScan Ramaswamy Ramakrishnaa, 110 067, India Received 23 June 1998; accepted 13 November 1998 Abstract The performance of the GeneScan algorithm for gene identi®cation has been improved by incorporation of a directed iterative scanning

  9. A RAPD-derived STS marker is linked to a bacterial wilt ( Burkholderia caryophylli ) resistance gene in carnation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Takashi Onozaki; Natsu Tanikawa; Mitsuyasu Taneya; Kiyofumi Kudo; Takuya Funayama; Hiroshi Ikeda; Michio Shibata

    2004-01-01

    Bacterial wilt caused by Burkholderia caryophylli is one of the most important and damaging diseases of carnations (Dianthus caryophyllus) in Japan. We aimed to identify random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers associated with the genes controlling bacterial wilt resistance in a resistance-segregating population of 134 progeny plants derived from a cross between ‘Carnation Nou No. 1’ (a carnation breeding line

  10. Lateral organ boundaries 1 is a disease susceptibility gene for citrus bacterial canker disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y. Hu; J. Zhang; H. Jia; D. Sosso; T. Li; W. B. Frommer; B. Yang; F. F. White; N. Wang; J. B. Jones

    2014-01-01

    Citrus bacterial canker (CBC) disease occurs worldwide and incurs considerable costs both from control measures and yield losses. Bacteria that cause CBC require one of six known type III transcription activator-like (TAL) effector genes for the characteristic pustule formation at the site of infection. Here, we show that Xanthomonas citri subspecies citri strain Xcc306, with the type III TAL effector

  11. Bacterial gene transfer by natural genetic transformation in the environment.

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, M G; Wackernagel, W

    1994-01-01

    Natural genetic transformation is the active uptake of free DNA by bacterial cells and the heritable incorporation of its genetic information. Since the famous discovery of transformation in Streptococcus pneumoniae by Griffith in 1928 and the demonstration of DNA as the transforming principle by Avery and coworkers in 1944, cellular processes involved in transformation have been studied extensively by in vitro experimentation with a few transformable species. Only more recently has it been considered that transformation may be a powerful mechanism of horizontal gene transfer in natural bacterial populations. In this review the current understanding of the biology of transformation is summarized to provide the platform on which aspects of bacterial transformation in water, soil, and sediments and the habitat of pathogens are discussed. Direct and indirect evidence for gene transfer routes by transformation within species and between different species will be presented, along with data suggesting that plasmids as well as chromosomal DNA are subject to genetic exchange via transformation. Experiments exploring the prerequisites for transformation in the environment, including the production and persistence of free DNA and factors important for the uptake of DNA by cells, will be compiled, as well as possible natural barriers to transformation. The efficiency of gene transfer by transformation in bacterial habitats is possibly genetically adjusted to submaximal levels. The fact that natural transformation has been detected among bacteria from all trophic and taxonomic groups including archaebacteria suggests that transformability evolved early in phylogeny. Probable functions of DNA uptake other than gene acquisition will be discussed. The body of information presently available suggests that transformation has a great impact on bacterial population dynamics as well as on bacterial evolution and speciation. PMID:7968924

  12. Pyramiding B genes in cotton achieves broader but not always higher resistance to bacterial blight.

    PubMed

    Essenberg, Margaret; Bayles, Melanie B; Pierce, Margaret L; Verhalen, Laval M

    2014-10-01

    ABSTRACT Near-isogenic lines of upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) carrying single, race-specific genes B4, BIn, and b7 for resistance to bacterial blight were used to develop a pyramid of lines with all possible combinations of two and three genes to learn whether the pyramid could achieve broad and high resistance approaching that of L. A. Brinkerhoff's exceptional line Im216. Isogenic strains of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. malvacearum carrying single avirulence (avr) genes were used to identify plants carrying specific resistance (B) genes. Under field conditions in north-central Oklahoma, pyramid lines exhibited broader resistance to individual races and, consequently, higher resistance to a race mixture. It was predicted that lines carrying two or three B genes would also exhibit higher resistance to race 1, which possesses many avr genes. Although some enhancements were observed, they did not approach the level of resistance of Im216. In a growth chamber, bacterial populations attained by race 1 in and on leaves of the pyramid lines decreased significantly with increasing number of B genes in only one of four experiments. The older lines, Im216 and AcHR, exhibited considerably lower bacterial populations than any of the one-, two-, or three-B-gene lines. A spreading collapse of spray-inoculated AcBIn and AcBInb7 leaves appears to be a defense response (conditioned by BIn) that is out of control. PMID:24655289

  13. Dynamic control and quantification of bacterial population dynamics in droplets.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shuqiang; Srimani, Jaydeep K; Lee, Anna J; Zhang, Ying; Lopatkin, Allison J; Leong, Kam W; You, Lingchong

    2015-08-01

    Culturing and measuring bacterial population dynamics are critical to develop insights into gene regulation or bacterial physiology. Traditional methods, based on bulk culture to obtain such quantification, have the limitations of higher cost/volume of reagents, non-amendable to small size of population and more laborious manipulation. To this end, droplet-based microfluidics represents a promising alternative that is cost-effective and high-throughput. However, difficulties in manipulating the droplet environment and monitoring encapsulated bacterial population for long-term experiments limit its utilization. To overcome these limitations, we used an electrode-free injection technology to modulate the chemical environment in droplets. This ability is critical for precise control of bacterial dynamics in droplets. Moreover, we developed a trapping device for long-term monitoring of population dynamics in individual droplets for at least 240 h. We demonstrated the utility of this new microfluidic system by quantifying population dynamics of natural and engineered bacteria. Our approach can further improve the analysis for systems and synthetic biology in terms of manipulability and high temporal resolution. PMID:26005763

  14. Genes Necessary for Bacterial Magnetite Biomineralization Identified by Transposon Mutagenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nash, C. Z.; Komeili, A.; Newman, D. K.; Kirschvink, J. L.

    2004-12-01

    Magnetic bacteria synthesize nanoscale crystals of magnetite in intracellular, membrane-bounded organelles (magnetosomes). These crystals are preserved in the fossil record at least as far back as the late Neoproterozoic and have been tentatively identified in much older rocks (1). This fossil record may provide deep time calibration points for molecular evolution studies once the genes involved in biologically controlled magnetic mineralization (BCMM) are known. Further, a genetic and biochemical understanding of BCMM will give insight into the depositional environment and biogeochemical cycles in which magnetic bacteria play a role. The BCMM process is not well understood, though proteins have been identified from the magnetosome membrane and genetic manipulation and biochemical characterization of these proteins are underway. Most of the proteins currently thought to be involved are encoded within the mam cluster, a large cluster of genes whose products localize to the magnetosome membrane and are conserved among magnetic bacteria (2). In an effort to identify all of the genes necessary for bacterial BCMM, we undertook a transposon mutagenesis of Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1. Non-magnetic mutants (MNMs) were identified by growth in liquid culture followed by a magnetic assay. The insertion site of the transposon was identified two ways. First MNMs were screened with a PCR assay to determine if the transposon had inserted into the mam cluster. Second, the transposon was rescued from the mutant DNA and cloned for sequencing. The majority insertion sites are located within the mam cluster. Insertion sites also occur in operons which have not previously been suspected to be involved in magnetite biomineralization. None of the insertion sites have occurred within genes reported from previous transposon mutagenesis studies of AMB-1 (3, 4). Two of the non-mam cluster insertion sites occur in operons containing genes conserved particularly between MS-1 and MC-1. We are undertaking a complementation strategy to demonstrate the necessity of these novel genes in BCMM as well as characterizing the phenotypes of the mutants. 1. S. B. R. Chang, J. F. Stolz, J. L. Kirschvink, S. M. Awramik, Precambrian Res. 43, 305-315 (1989). 2. K. Grünberg, C. Wawer, B. M. Tebo, D. Schüler, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 67, 4573-4582 (2001). 3. A. T. Wahyudi, H. Takeyama, T. Matsunaga, Appl. Biochem. Biotechnol. 91-3, 147-154 (2001). 4. T. Matsunaga, C. Nakamura, J. G. Burgess, K. Sode, J. Bacteriol. 174, 2748-2753 (1992).

  15. Subgingival bacterial colonization profiles correlate with gingival tissue gene expression

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease caused by the microbiota of the periodontal pocket. We investigated the association between subgingival bacterial profiles and gene expression patterns in gingival tissues of patients with periodontitis. A total of 120 patients undergoing periodontal surgery contributed with a minimum of two interproximal gingival papillae (range 2-4) from a maxillary posterior region. Prior to tissue harvesting, subgingival plaque samples were collected from the mesial and distal aspects of each tissue sample. Gingival tissue RNA was extracted, reverse-transcribed, labeled, and hybridized with whole-genome microarrays (310 in total). Plaque samples were analyzed using checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridizations with respect to 11 bacterial species. Random effects linear regression models considered bacterial levels as exposure and expression profiles as outcome variables. Gene Ontology analyses summarized the expression patterns into biologically relevant categories. Results Wide inter-species variation was noted in the number of differentially expressed gingival tissue genes according to subgingival bacterial levels: Using a Bonferroni correction (p < 9.15 × 10-7), 9,392 probe sets were differentially associated with levels of Tannerella forsythia, 8,537 with Porphyromonas gingivalis, 6,460 with Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, 506 with Eikenella corrodens and only 8 with Actinomyces naeslundii. Cluster analysis identified commonalities and differences among tissue gene expression patterns differentially regulated according to bacterial levels. Conclusion Our findings suggest that the microbial content of the periodontal pocket is a determinant of gene expression in the gingival tissues and provide new insights into the differential ability of periodontal species to elicit a local host response. PMID:19835625

  16. CRISPR-Cas systems: new players in gene regulation and bacterial physiology

    PubMed Central

    Sampson, Timothy R.; Weiss, David S.

    2014-01-01

    CRISPR-Cas systems are bacterial defenses against foreign nucleic acids derived from bacteriophages, plasmids or other sources. These systems are targeted in an RNA-dependent, sequence-specific manner, and are also adaptive, providing protection against previously encountered foreign elements. In addition to their canonical function in defense against foreign nucleic acid, their roles in various aspects of bacterial physiology are now being uncovered. We recently revealed a role for a Cas9-based Type II CRISPR-Cas system in the control of endogenous gene expression, a novel form of prokaryotic gene regulation. Cas9 functions in association with two small RNAs to target and alter the stability of an endogenous transcript encoding a bacterial lipoprotein (BLP). Since BLPs are recognized by the host innate immune protein Toll-like Receptor 2 (TLR2), CRISPR-Cas-mediated repression of BLP expression facilitates evasion of TLR2 by the intracellular bacterial pathogen Francisella novicida, and is essential for its virulence. Here we describe the Cas9 regulatory system in detail, as well as data on its role in controlling virulence traits of Neisseria meningitidis and Campylobacter jejuni. We also discuss potential roles of CRISPR-Cas systems in the response to envelope stress and other aspects of bacterial physiology. Since ~45% of bacteria and ~83% of Archaea encode these machineries, the newly appreciated regulatory functions of CRISPR-Cas systems are likely to play broad roles in controlling the pathogenesis and physiology of diverse prokaryotes. PMID:24772391

  17. Gene calling and bacterial genome annotation with BG7.

    PubMed

    Tobes, Raquel; Pareja-Tobes, Pablo; Manrique, Marina; Pareja-Tobes, Eduardo; Kovach, Evdokim; Alekhin, Alexey; Pareja, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    New massive sequencing technologies are providing many bacterial genome sequences from diverse taxa but a refined annotation of these genomes is crucial for obtaining scientific findings and new knowledge. Thus, bacterial genome annotation has emerged as a key point to investigate in bacteria. Any efficient tool designed specifically to annotate bacterial genomes sequenced with massively parallel technologies has to consider the specific features of bacterial genomes (absence of introns and scarcity of nonprotein-coding sequence) and of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies (presence of errors and not perfectly assembled genomes). These features make it convenient to focus on coding regions and, hence, on protein sequences that are the elements directly related with biological functions. In this chapter we describe how to annotate bacterial genomes with BG7, an open-source tool based on a protein-centered gene calling/annotation paradigm. BG7 is specifically designed for the annotation of bacterial genomes sequenced with NGS. This tool is sequence error tolerant maintaining their capabilities for the annotation of highly fragmented genomes or for annotating mixed sequences coming from several genomes (as those obtained through metagenomics samples). BG7 has been designed with scalability as a requirement, with a computing infrastructure completely based on cloud computing (Amazon Web Services). PMID:25343866

  18. Bacterial gene import and mesophilic adaptation in archaea.

    PubMed

    López-García, Purificación; Zivanovic, Yvan; Deschamps, Philippe; Moreira, David

    2015-07-01

    It is widely believed that the archaeal ancestor was hyperthermophilic, but during archaeal evolution, several lineages - including haloarchaea and their sister methanogens, the Thaumarchaeota, and the uncultured Marine Group II and Marine Group III Euryarchaeota (MGII/III) - independently adapted to lower temperatures. Recent phylogenomic studies suggest that the ancestors of these lineages were recipients of massive horizontal gene transfer from bacteria. Many of the acquired genes, which are often involved in metabolism and cell envelope biogenesis, were convergently acquired by distant mesophilic archaea. In this Opinion article, we explore the intriguing hypothesis that the import of these bacterial genes was crucial for the adaptation of archaea to mesophilic lifestyles. PMID:26075362

  19. A Discovery Laboratory Investigating Bacterial Gene Regulation

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Robert Moss (Wofford College; )

    1999-01-01

    This laboratory exercise introduces students to experimental design and gene regulation using different sugar ("food" sources) and an enzyme assay for beta-glalctosidase to identify different E. coli stains with respect to lac operon mutations, then designing their own experiments to study the various aspects of the lac operon.

  20. Bacterial Cellular Engineering by Genome Editing and Gene Silencing

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Nobutaka; Miyazaki, Kentaro

    2014-01-01

    Genome editing is an important technology for bacterial cellular engineering, which is commonly conducted by homologous recombination-based procedures, including gene knockout (disruption), knock-in (insertion), and allelic exchange. In addition, some new recombination-independent approaches have emerged that utilize catalytic RNAs, artificial nucleases, nucleic acid analogs, and peptide nucleic acids. Apart from these methods, which directly modify the genomic structure, an alternative approach is to conditionally modify the gene expression profile at the posttranscriptional level without altering the genomes. This is performed by expressing antisense RNAs to knock down (silence) target mRNAs in vivo. This review describes the features and recent advances on methods used in genomic engineering and silencing technologies that are advantageously used for bacterial cellular engineering. PMID:24552876

  1. Differential bacterial gene expression during experimental pneumococcal endophthalmitis.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Justin A; Tullos, Nathan A; Sanders, Melissa E; Ridout, Granger; Wang, Yong-Dong; Taylor, Sidney D; McDaniel, Larry S; Marquart, Mary E

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is a potential cause of bacterial endophthalmitis in humans that can result in ocular morbidity. We sought to identify pneumococcal genes that are differentially expressed during growth in the vitreous humor of the eye in an experimental endophthalmitis model. Microarray analysis was used to identify genes that were differentially expressed when pneumococci replicated in the vitreous of rabbit eyes as compared with bacteria grown in vitro in Todd Hewitt medium. Array results were verified by quantitative real-time PCR analysis of representative genes. Select genes potentially playing a role in virulence during endophthalmitis were deleted, and mutants were tested for reduced eye pathogenesis and altered adhesion to host cells. Array analysis identified 134 genes that were differentially expressed during endophthalmitis; 112 genes demonstrated increased expression during growth in the eye whereas 22 were downregulated. Real-time analysis verified increased expression of neuraminidase A (NanA; SP1693), neuraminidase B (NanB; SP1687) and serine protease (SP1954), and decreased expression of RlrA (SP0461) and choline transporter (SP1861). Mutation of NanA and NanB had no major effect on pathogenesis. Loss of SP1954 led to increased adherence to host cells. S. pneumoniae enhances and represses the expression of a variety of genes during endophthalmitis. While some of these genes reflect changes in metabolic requirements, some appear to play a role in immune evasion and pathogenesis in the eye. PMID:25791614

  2. Cloning of pig parotid secretory protein gene upstream promoter and the establishment of a transgenic mouse model expressing bacterial phytase for agricultural phosphorus pollution control.

    PubMed

    Yin, H F; Fan, B L; Yang, B; Liu, Y F; Luo, J; Tian, X H; Li, N

    2006-03-01

    This study examined the feasibility of using the promoter of the pig parotid secretory protein (PSP) gene for expression of the phytase transgene in mouse models. The pig parotid secretory protein gene is specifically expressed at high levels in the salivary glands. The 10-kb upstream promoter region of the gene necessary for tissue-specific expression has been identified. We have constructed phytase transgenes composed of the appA phytase gene from Escherichia coli driven by the upstream promoter region of the pig PSP gene with a 3' tail of either bovine growth hormone or the pig PSP gene polyadenylation signal. Transgenic mouse models with the construct showed that the upstream region of the pig PSP gene is sufficient for directing the expression of phytase transgenes in the saliva. Expression of salivary phytase reduced fecal phytate by 8.5 and 12.5% in 2 transgenic mouse lines, respectively. These results suggest that the expression of phytase in salivary glands of monogastric animals offers a promising biological approach to relieve the requirement for dietary phosphate supplements and to reduce phosphorus pollution from animal agriculture. PMID:16478942

  3. Lateral organ boundaries 1 is a disease susceptibility gene for citrus bacterial canker disease

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yang; Zhang, Junli; Jia, Hongge; Sosso, Davide; Li, Ting; Frommer, Wolf B.; Yang, Bing; White, Frank F.; Wang, Nian; Jones, Jeffrey B.

    2014-01-01

    Citrus bacterial canker (CBC) disease occurs worldwide and incurs considerable costs both from control measures and yield losses. Bacteria that cause CBC require one of six known type III transcription activator-like (TAL) effector genes for the characteristic pustule formation at the site of infection. Here, we show that Xanthomonas citri subspecies citri strain Xcc306, with the type III TAL effector gene pthA4 or with the distinct yet biologically equivalent gene pthAw from strain XccAw, induces two host genes, CsLOB1 and CsSWEET1, in a TAL effector-dependent manner. CsLOB1 is a member of the Lateral Organ Boundaries (LOB) gene family of transcription factors, and CsSWEET1 is a homolog of the SWEET sugar transporter and rice disease susceptibility gene. Both TAL effectors drive expression of CsLOB1 and CsSWEET1 promoter reporter gene fusions when coexpressed in citrus or Nicotiana benthamiana. Artificially designed TAL effectors directed to sequences in the CsLOB1 promoter region, but not the CsSWEET1 promoter, promoted pustule formation and higher bacterial leaf populations. Three additional distinct TAL effector genes, pthA*, pthB, and pthC, also direct pustule formation and expression of CsLOB1. Unlike pthA4 and pthAw, pthB and pthC do not promote the expression of CsSWEET1. CsLOB1 expression was associated with the expression of genes associated with cell expansion. The results indicate that CBC-inciting species of Xanthomonas exploit a single host disease susceptibility gene by altering the expression of an otherwise developmentally regulated gene using any one of a diverse set of TAL effector genes in the pathogen populations. PMID:24474801

  4. Evolution of a Bacterial Regulon Controlling Virulence Homeostasis

    E-print Network

    Granada, Universidad de

    Evolution of a Bacterial Regulon Controlling Virulence and Mg2+ Homeostasis J. Christian Perez1,2¤a governs virulence and Mg2+ homeostasis in several bacterial species. We establish that the ancestral Pho Regulon Controlling Virulence and Mg2+ Homeostasis. PLoS Genet 5(3): e1000428. doi:10.1371/journal

  5. Phylogeographic reconstruction of a bacterial species with high levels of lateral gene transfer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Talima Pearson; Philip Giffard; Stephen Beckstrom-Sternberg; Raymond Auerbach; Heidie Hornstra; Apichai Tuanyok; Erin P Price; Mindy B Glass; Benjamin Leadem; James S Beckstrom-Sternberg; Gerard J Allan; Jeffrey T Foster; David M Wagner; Richard T Okinaka; Siew Hoon Sim; Ofori Pearson; Zaining Wu; Jean Chang; Rajinder Kaul; Alex R Hoffmaster; Thomas S Brettin; Richard A Robison; Mark Mayo; Jay E Gee; Patrick Tan; Bart J Currie; Paul Keim

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Phylogeographic reconstruction of some bacterial populations is hindered by low diversity coupled with high levels of lateral gene transfer. A comparison of recombination levels and diversity at seven housekeeping genes for eleven bacterial species, most of which are commonly cited as having high levels of lateral gene transfer shows that the relative contributions of homologous recombination versus mutation for

  6. The coevolution of toxin and antitoxin genes drives the dynamics of bacterial addiction

    E-print Network

    Rankin, Daniel

    The coevolution of toxin and antitoxin genes drives the dynamics of bacterial addiction complexes Bacterial genomes commonly contain `addiction' gene complexes that code for both a toxin and a corre-segregational killing; genetic addiction; toxin­antitoxin systems 1. INTRODUCTION Genomes comprise multiple genes

  7. Finding gene expression patterns in bacterial biofilms Christophe BELOIN and Jean-Marc GHIGO*

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Finding gene expression patterns in bacterial biofilms Christophe BELOIN and Jean-Marc GHIGO lifestyle that is thought to require or involve a differential gene expression compared common bacterial biofilm gene expression patterns through global expression analysis is still difficult

  8. [Advances in molecular mechanisms of bacterial resistance caused by stress-induced transfer of resistance genes--a review].

    PubMed

    Sun, Dongchang; Wang, Bing; Zhu, Lihong

    2013-07-01

    The transfer of resistance gene is one of the most important causes of bacterial resistance. Recent studies reveal that stresses induce the transfer of antibiotic resistance gene through multiple mechanisms. DNA damage stresses trigger bacterial SOS response and induce the transfer of resistance gene mediated by conjugative DNA. Antibiotic stresses induce natural bacterial competence for transformation in some bacteria which lack the SOS system. In addition, our latest studies show that the general stress response regulator RpoS regulates a novel type of resistance gene transfer which is mediated by double-stranded plasmid DNA and occurs exclusively on the solid surface. In this review, we summarized recent advances in SOS dependent and independent stress-induced DNA transfer which is mediated by conjugation and transformation respectively, and the transfer of double-stranded plasmid DNA on the solid surface which is regulated by RpoS. We propose that future work should address how stresses activate the key regulators and how these regulators control the expression of gene transfer related genes. Answers to the above questions would pave the way for searching for candidate targets for controlling bacterial resistance resulted from the transfer of antibiotic genes. PMID:24195370

  9. Impacts of bioturbation on temporal variation in bacterial and archaeal nitrogen-cycling gene abundance in coastal sediments

    PubMed Central

    Laverock, B; Tait, K; Gilbert, J A; Osborn, A M; Widdicombe, S

    2014-01-01

    In marine environments, macrofauna living in or on the sediment surface may alter the structure, diversity and function of benthic microbial communities. In particular, microbial nitrogen (N)-cycling processes may be enhanced by the activity of large bioturbating organisms. Here, we study the effect of the burrowing mud shrimp Upogebia deltaura upon temporal variation in the abundance of genes representing key N-cycling functional guilds. The abundance of bacterial genes representing different N-cycling guilds displayed different temporal patterns in burrow sediments in comparison with surface sediments, suggesting that the burrow provides a unique environment where bacterial gene abundances are influenced directly by macrofaunal activity. In contrast, the abundances of archaeal ammonia oxidizers varied temporally but were not affected by bioturbation, indicating differential responses between bacterial and archaeal ammonia oxidizers to environmental physicochemical controls. This study highlights the importance of bioturbation as a control over the temporal variation in nitrogen-cycling microbial community dynamics within coastal sediments. PMID:24596269

  10. MLST revisited: the gene-by-gene approach to bacterial genomics

    PubMed Central

    Maiden, Martin C. J.; Jansen van Rensburg, Melissa J.; Bray, James E.; Earle, Sarah G.; Ford, Suzanne A.; Jolley, Keith A.; McCarthy, Noel D.

    2014-01-01

    Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) was proposed in 1998 as a portable sequence-based method for identifying clonal relationships among bacteria. Today, in the whole-genome era of microbiology, the need for systematic, standardized descriptions of bacterial genotypic variation remains a priority. Here, to meet this need, we draw on the successes of MLST and 16S rRNA gene sequencing to propose a hierarchical gene-by-gene approach that reflects functional and evolutionary relationships and catalogues bacteria ‘from domain to strain’. Our gene-based typing approach using online platforms such as the Bacterial Isolate Genome Sequence Database (BIGSdb) allows the scalable organization and analysis of whole-genome sequence data. PMID:23979428

  11. Adaptive identification and control algorithms for nonlinear bacterial growth systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. DOCHAINt; G. BASTIN

    1984-01-01

    This paper suggests how nonlinear adaptive control of nonlinear bacterial growth systems could be performed. The process is described by a time-varying nonlinear model obtained from material balance equations. Two different control problems are considered: substrate concentration control and production rate control. For each of these cases, an adaptive minimum variance control algorithm is proposed and its effectiveness is shown

  12. Biomimicry of bacterial foraging for distributed optimization and control

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. M. Passino

    2002-01-01

    We explain the biology and physics underlying the chemotactic (foraging) behavior of E. coli bacteria. We explain a variety of bacterial swarming and social foraging behaviors and discuss the control system on the E. coli that dictates how foraging should proceed. Next, a computer program that emulates the distributed optimization process represented by the activity of social bacterial foraging is

  13. Gene targeting by the TAL effector PthXo2 reveals cryptic resistance gene for bacterial blight of rice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Zhou; Z. Peng; J. Long; D. Sosso; B. Liu; J. S. Eom; S. Huang; S. Liu; C. Vera Cruz; W. B. Frommer; F. F. White; B. Yang

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial blight of rice is caused by the gamma-proteobacterium Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, which utilizes a group of type III TAL (transcription activator-like) effectors to induce host gene expression and condition host susceptibility. Five SWEET genes are functionally redundant to support bacterial disease, but only two were experimentally proven targets of natural TAL effectors. Here, we report the identification of

  14. Distance matters: the impact of gene proximity in bacterial gene regulation

    E-print Network

    Otto Pulkkinen; Ralf Metzler

    2013-05-13

    Following recent discoveries of colocalization of downstream-regulating genes in living cells, the impact of the spatial distance between such genes on the kinetics of gene product formation is increasingly recognized. We here show from analytical and numerical analysis that the distance between a transcription factor (TF) gene and its target gene drastically affects the speed and reliability of transcriptional regulation in bacterial cells. For an explicit model system we develop a general theory for the interactions between a TF and a transcription unit. The observed variations in regulation efficiency are linked to the magnitude of the variation of the TF concentration peaks as a function of the binding site distance from the signal source. Our results support the role of rapid binding site search for gene colocalization and emphasize the role of local concentration differences.

  15. Distance Matters: The Impact of Gene Proximity in Bacterial Gene Regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulkkinen, Otto; Metzler, Ralf

    2013-05-01

    Following recent discoveries of colocalization of downstream-regulating genes in living cells, the impact of the spatial distance between such genes on the kinetics of gene product formation is increasingly recognized. We here show from analytical and numerical analysis that the distance between a transcription factor (TF) gene and its target gene drastically affects the speed and reliability of transcriptional regulation in bacterial cells. For an explicit model system, we develop a general theory for the interactions between a TF and a transcription unit. The observed variations in regulation efficiency are linked to the magnitude of the variation of the TF concentration peaks as a function of the binding site distance from the signal source. Our results support the role of rapid binding site search for gene colocalization and emphasize the role of local concentration differences.

  16. Light-Controlled Synthetic Gene Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Laura; Deiters, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Highly complex synthetic gene circuits have been engineered in living organisms to develop systems with new biological properties. A precise trigger to activate or deactivate these complex systems is desired in order to tightly control different parts of a synthetic or natural network. Light represents an excellent tool to achieve this goal as it can be regulated in timing, location, intensity, and wavelength, which allows for precise spatiotemporal control over genetic circuits. Recently, light has been used as a trigger to control the biological function of small molecules, oligonucleotides, and proteins involved as parts in gene circuits. Light activation has enabled the construction of unique systems in living organisms such as band-pass filters and edge-detectors in bacterial cells. Additionally, light also allows for the regulation of intermediate steps of complex dynamic pathways in mammalian cells such as those involved in kinase networks. Herein we describe recent advancements in the area of light-controlled synthetic networks. PMID:22633822

  17. Bacterial Genomes as New Gene Homes: The Genealogy of ORFans in E. coli

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vincent Daubin; Howard Ochman

    2004-01-01

    Differences in gene repertoire among bacterial genomes are usually ascribed to gene loss or to lateral gene transfer from unrelated cellular organisms. However, most bacteria contain large numbers of ORFans, that is, annotated genes that are restricted to a particular genome and that possess no known homologs. The uniqueness of ORFans within a genome has precluded the use of a

  18. Method of controlling gene expression

    DOEpatents

    Peters, Norman K. (Berkeley, CA); Frost, John W. (Menlo Park, CA); Long, Sharon R. (Palo Alto, CA)

    1991-12-03

    A method of controlling expression of a DNA segment under the control of a nod gene promoter which comprises administering to a host containing a nod gene promoter an amount sufficient to control expression of the DNA segment of a compound of the formula: ##STR1## in which each R is independently H or OH, is described.

  19. Host PGRP Gene Expression and Bacterial Release in Endosymbiosis of the Weevil Sitophilus zeamais

    PubMed Central

    Anselme, Caroline; Vallier, Agnès; Balmand, Séverine; Fauvarque, Marie-Odile; Heddi, Abdelaziz

    2006-01-01

    Intracellular symbiosis (endosymbiosis) with gram-negative bacteria is common in insects, yet little is known about how the host immune system perceives the endosymbionts and controls their growth and invasion without complete bacterial clearance. In this study, we have explored the expression of a peptidoglycan recognition protein gene of the weevil Sitophilus zeamais (wPGRP); an ortholog in Drosophila (i.e., PGRP-LB) was recently shown to downregulate the Imd pathway (A. Zaidman-Remy, M. Herve, M. Poidevin, S. Pili-Floury, M. S. Kim, D. Blanot, B. H. Oh, R. Ueda, D. Mengin-Lecreulx, and B. Lemaitre, Immunity 24:463-473, 2006). Insect challenges with bacteria have demonstrated that wPGRP is induced by gram-negative bacteria and that the level of induction depends on bacterial growth. Real-time reverse transcription-PCR quantification of the wPGRP gene transcript performed at different points in insect development has shown a high steady-state level in the bacteria-bearing organ (the bacteriome) of larvae and a high level of wPGRP up-regulation in the symbiotic nymphal phase. Concomitantly, during this stage fluorescence in situ hybridization has revealed an endosymbiont release from the host bacteriocytes. Together with the previously described high induction level of endosymbiont virulence genes at the nymphal phase (C. Dale, G. R. Plague, B. Wang, H. Ochman, and N. A. Moran, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 99:12397-12402, 2002), these findings indicate that insect mutualistic relationships evolve through an interplay between bacterial virulence and host immune defense and that the host immunity engages the PGRP gene family in that interplay. PMID:17021229

  20. GeneOrder3.0: Software for comparing the order of genes in pairs of small bacterial genomes

    PubMed Central

    Celamkoti, Srikanth; Kundeti, Sashidhara; Purkayastha, Anjan; Mazumder, Raja; Buck, Charles; Seto, Donald

    2004-01-01

    Background An increasing number of whole viral and bacterial genomes are being sequenced and deposited in public databases. In parallel to the mounting interest in whole genomes, the number of whole genome analyses software tools is also increasing. GeneOrder was originally developed to provide an analysis of genes between two genomes, allowing visualization of gene order and synteny comparisons of any small genomes. It was originally developed for comparing virus, mitochondrion and chloroplast genomes. This is now extended to small bacterial genomes of sizes less than 2 Mb. Results GeneOrder3.0 has been developed and validated successfully on several small bacterial genomes (ca. 580 kb to 1.83 Mb) archived in the NCBI GenBank database. It is an updated web-based "on-the-fly" computational tool allowing gene order and synteny comparisons of any two small bacterial genomes. Analyses of several bacterial genomes show that a large amount of gene and genome re-arrangement occurs, as seen with earlier DNA software tools. This can be displayed at the protein level using GeneOrder3.0. Whole genome alignments of genes are presented in both a table and a dot plot. This allows the detection of evolutionary more distant relationships since protein sequences are more conserved than DNA sequences. Conclusions GeneOrder3.0 allows researchers to perform comparative analysis of gene order and synteny in genomes of sizes up to 2 Mb "on-the-fly." Availability: and . PMID:15128433

  1. Interaction of two photoreceptors in the regulation of bacterial photosynthesis genes

    PubMed Central

    Metz, Sebastian; Haberzettl, Kerstin; Frühwirth, Sebastian; Teich, Kristin; Hasewinkel, Christian; Klug, Gabriele

    2012-01-01

    The expression of photosynthesis genes in the facultatively photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides is controlled by the oxygen tension and by light quantity. Two photoreceptor proteins, AppA and CryB, have been identified in the past, which are involved in this regulation. AppA senses light by its N-terminal BLUF domain, its C-terminal part binds heme and is redox-responsive. Through its interaction to the transcriptional repressor PpsR the AppA photoreceptor controls expression of photosynthesis genes. The cryptochrome-like protein CryB was shown to affect regulation of photosynthesis genes, but the underlying signal chain remained unknown. Here we show that CryB interacts with the C-terminal domain of AppA and modulates the binding of AppA to the transcriptional repressor PpsR in a light-dependent manner. Consequently, binding of the transcription factor PpsR to its DNA target is affected by CryB. In agreement with this, all genes of the PpsR regulon showed altered expression levels in a CryB deletion strain after blue-light illumination. These results elucidate for the first time how a bacterial cryptochrome affects gene expression. PMID:22434878

  2. A bacterial hormone (the SCB1) directly controls the expression of a pathway-specific regulatory gene in the cryptic type I polyketide biosynthetic gene cluster of Streptomyces coelicolor.

    PubMed

    Takano, Eriko; Kinoshita, Hiroshi; Mersinias, Vassilis; Bucca, Giselda; Hotchkiss, Graham; Nihira, Takuya; Smith, Colin P; Bibb, Mervyn; Wohlleben, Wolfgang; Chater, Keith

    2005-04-01

    Gamma-butyrolactone signalling molecules are produced by many Streptomyces species, and several have been shown to regulate antibiotic production. In Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) at least one gamma-butyrolactone (SCB1) has been shown to stimulate antibiotic production, and genes encoding proteins that are involved in its synthesis (scbA) and binding (scbR) have been characterized. Expression of these genes is autoregulated by a complex mechanism involving the gamma-butyrolactone. In this study, additional genes influenced by ScbR were identified by DNA microarray analysis, and included a cryptic cluster of genes for a hypothetical type I polyketide. Further analysis of this gene cluster revealed that the pathway-specific regulatory gene, kasO, is a direct target for regulation by ScbR. Gel retardation and DNase I footprinting analyses identified two potential binding sites for ScbR, one at -3 to -35 nt and the other at -222 to -244 nt upstream of the kasO transcriptional start site. Addition of SCB1 eliminated the DNA binding activity of ScbR at both sites. The expression of kasO was growth phase regulated in the parent (maximal during transition phase), undetectable in a scbA null mutant, and constitutively expressed in a scbR null mutant. Addition of SCB1 to the scbA mutant restored the expression of kasO, indicating that ScbR represses kasO until transition phase, when presumably SCB1 accumulates in sufficient quantity to relieve kasO repression. Expression of the cryptic antibiotic gene cluster was undetectable in a kasO deletion mutant. This is the first report with comprehensive in vivo and in vitro data to show that a gamma-butyrolactone-binding protein directly regulates a secondary metabolite pathway-specific regulatory gene in Streptomyces. PMID:15813737

  3. A bacterial hormone (the SCB1) directly controls the expression of a pathway-specific regulatory gene in the cryptic type I polyketide biosynthetic gene cluster of Streptomyces coelicolor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eriko Takano; Hiroshi Kinoshita; Vassilis Mersinias; Giselda Bucca; Graham Hotchkiss; Takuya Nihira; Colin P. Smith; Mervyn Bibb; Wolfgang Wohlleben; Keith Chater

    2005-01-01

    Gamma-butyrolactone signalling molecules are produced by many Streptomyces species, and several have been shown to regulate antibiotic production. In Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) at least one ?-butyrolactone (SCB1) has been shown to stimulate antibiotic production, and genes encoding proteins that are involved in its synthesis (scbA) and binding (scbR) have been characterized. Expression of these genes is autoregulated by a complex

  4. Peripheral blood RNA gene expression profiling in patients with bacterial meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Lill, Margit; Kõks, Sulev; Soomets, Ursel; Schalkwyk, Leonard C.; Fernandes, Cathy; Lutsar, Irja; Taba, Pille

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of present study was to find genetic pathways activated during infection with bacterial meningitis (BM) and potentially influencing the course of the infection using genome-wide RNA expression profiling combined with pathway analysis and functional annotation of the differential transcription. Methods: We analyzed 21 patients with BM hospitalized in 2008. The control group consisted of 18 healthy subjects. The RNA was extracted from whole blood, globin mRNA was depleted and gene expression profiling was performed using GeneChip Human Gene 1.0 ST Arrays which can assess the transcription of 28,869 genes. Gene expression profile data were analyzed using Bioconductor packages and Bayesian modeling. Functional annotation of the enriched gene sets was used to define the altered genetic networks. We also analyzed whether gene expression profiles depend on the clinical course and outcome. In order to verify the microarray results, the expression levels of ten functionally relevant genes with high statistical significance (CD177, IL1R2, IL18R1, IL18RAP, OLFM4, TLR5, CPA3, FCER1A, IL5RA, and IL7R) were confirmed by quantitative real-time (qRT) PCR. Results: There were 8569 genes displaying differential expression at a significance level of p < 0.05. Following False Discovery Rate (FDR) correction, a total of 5500 genes remained significant at a p-value of < 0.01. Quantitative RT-PCR confirmed the differential expression in 10 selected genes. Functional annotation and network analysis indicated that most of the genes were related to activation of humoral and cellular immune responses (enrichment score 43). Those changes were found in both adults and in children with BM compared to the healthy controls. The gene expression profiles did not significantly depend on the clinical outcome, but there was a strong influence of the specific type of pathogen underlying BM. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that there is a very strong activation of immune response at the transcriptional level during BM and that the type of pathogen influences this transcriptional activation. PMID:23515576

  5. Salmonella typhimurium Virulence Genes Are Induced upon Bacterial Invasion into Phagocytic and Nonphagocytic Cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    CHERYL G. PFEIFER; SANDRA L. MARCUS; OLIVIA STEELE-MORTIMER; LEIGH A. KNODLER; B. BRETT FINLAY

    1999-01-01

    Survival and growth of salmonellae within host cells are important aspects of bacterial virulence. We have developed an assay to identify Salmonella typhimurium genes that are induced inside Salmonella-containing vacuoles within macrophage and epithelial cells. A promoterless luciferase gene cassette was inserted randomly into the Salmonella chromosome, and the resulting mutants were screened for genes upregulated in intracel- lular bacteria

  6. Selection of Bacterial Virulence Genes That Are Specifically Induced in Host Tissues

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael J. Mahan; James M. Slauch; John J. Mekalanos

    1993-01-01

    A genetic system was devised that positively selects for bacterial genes that are specifically induced when bacteria infect their host. With the pathogen Salmonella typhimurium, the genes identified by this selection show a marked induction in bacteria recovered from mouse spleen. Mutations in all ivi (in vivo-induced) genes that were tested conferred a defect in virulence. This genetic system was

  7. Computational Bacterial Genome-Wide Analysis of Phylogenetic Profiles Reveals Potential Virulence Genes of Streptococcus agalactiae

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Frank Po-Yen Lin; Ruiting Lan; Vitali Sintchenko; Gwendolyn L. Gilbert; Fanrong Kong; Enrico Coiera; Herman Tse

    2011-01-01

    The phylogenetic profile of a gene is a reflection of its evolutionary history and can be defined as the differential presence or absence of a gene in a set of reference genomes. It has been employed to facilitate the prediction of gene functions. However, the hypothesis that the application of this concept can also facilitate the discovery of bacterial virulence

  8. Detection of type III secretion genes as a general indicator of bacterial virulence

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Katja Stuber; Joachim Frey; André P Burnens; Peter Kuhnert

    2003-01-01

    Type III secretion systems of Gram-negative bacteria are specific export machineries for virulence factors which allow their translocation to eukaryotic cells. Since they correlate with bacterial pathogenicity, their presence is used as a general indicator of bacterial virulence. By comparing the genetic relationship of the major type III secretion systems we found the family of genes encoding the inner-membrane channel

  9. Why Are Genes Encoded on the Lagging Strand of the Bacterial Genome?

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Jianzhi

    . Interestingly, GBE ß The Author(s) 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the SocietyWhy Are Genes Encoded on the Lagging Strand of the Bacterial Genome? Xiaoshu Chen and Jianzhi Zhang

  10. Green fluorescent protein as a marker for conditional gene expression in bacterial cells.

    PubMed

    Bongaerts, Roy J M; Hautefort, Isabelle; Sidebotham, Julie M; Hinton, Jay C D

    2002-01-01

    To date, the majority of studies of bacterial gene expression have been carried out on large communities, as techniques for analysis of expression in individual cells have not been available. Recent developments now allow us to use reporter genes to monitor gene expression in individual bacterial cells. Conventional reporters are not suitable for studies of living single cells. However, variants of GFP have proved to be ideal for the study of development, cell biology, and pathogenesis and are now the reporters of choice for microbial studies. In combination with techniques such as DFI and IVET and the use of flow cytometry and advanced fluorescence microscopy, the latest generation of GFP reporters allows the investigation of gene expression in individual bacterial cells within particular environments. These studies promise to bring a new level of understanding to the fields of bacterial pathogenesis and environmental microbiology. PMID:12474378

  11. A statistical model for bacterial speciation triggered by lateral gene transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidhu, Sunjeet; Peng, Wequin

    2006-03-01

    The process of bacterial speciation has been a major unresolved issue in the study of bacterial evolution. It has been proposed that lateral gene transfer and homologous recombination play critical and complementary roles in speciation. We introduce a statistical model, of a population, for the evolution under lateral gene transfer and local homologous recombination. We examine the evolutionary dynamics and its dependence on various evolutionary operators. J. G. Lawrence, Theor. Popul. Biol. 61, 449(2002).

  12. Interplay of gene expression noise and ultrasensitive dynamics affects bacterial operon organization

    E-print Network

    Ray, J. Christian J.; Igoshin, Oleg A.

    2012-08-30

    Interplay of Gene Expression Noise and Ultrasensitive Dynamics Affects Bacterial Operon Organization J. Christian J. Ray1,2, Oleg A. Igoshin1,2* 1Department of Bioengineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas, United States of America, 2Department... have declared that no competing interests exist. * E-mail: igoshin@rice.edu Introduction The organization of genes into operons is a prominent feature of bacterial chromosomes [1] that appear in some eukaryotes as well [2]. An operon is typically...

  13. Constitutive presence of antibiotic resistance genes within the bacterial community of a large subalpine lake.

    PubMed

    Di Cesare, Andrea; Eckert, Ester M; Teruggi, Alessia; Fontaneto, Diego; Bertoni, Roberto; Callieri, Cristiana; Corno, Gianluca

    2015-08-01

    The fate of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in environmental microbial communities is of primary concern as prodromal of a potential transfer to pathogenic bacteria. Although of diverse origin, the persistence of ARGs in aquatic environments is highly influenced by anthropic activities, allowing potential control actions in well-studied environments. However, knowledge of abundance and space-time distribution of ARGs in ecosystems is still scarce. Using quantitative real-time PCR, we investigated the presence and the abundance of twelve ARGs (against tetracyclines, ?-lactams, aminoglycosides, quinolones and sulphonamides) at different sampling sites, depths and seasons, in Lake Maggiore, a large subalpine lake, and in the area of its watershed. We then evaluated the correlation between each ARG and a number of ecological parameters in the water column in the deepest part of the lake. Our results suggest the constitutive presence of at least four ARGs within the bacterial community with a high proportion of bacteria potentially resistant to tetracyclines and sulphonamides. The presence of these ARGs was independent of the total bacterial density and temperature. The dynamics of tet(A) and sulII genes were, however, positively correlated with dissolved oxygen and negatively to chlorophyll a, suggesting that the resistant microbes inhabit specific niches. These observations indicate that the lake is a reservoir of antibiotic resistances, highlighting the need of a deeper understanding of the sources of ARGs and the factors allowing their persistence in waters. PMID:26118321

  14. A system for the targeted amplification of bacterial gene clusters multiplies antibiotic yield in Streptomyces coelicolor

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Takeshi; Burian, Jan; Yanai, Koji; Bibb, Mervyn J.; Thompson, Charles J.

    2011-01-01

    Gene clusters found in bacterial species classified as Streptomyces encode the majority of known antibiotics as well as many pharmaceutically active compounds. A site-specific recombination system similar to those that mediate plasmid conjugation was engineered to catalyze tandem amplification of one of these gene clusters in a heterologous Streptomyces species. Three genetic elements were known to be required for DNA amplification in S. kanamyceticus: the oriT-like recombination sites RsA and RsB, and ZouA, a site-specific relaxase similar to TraA proteins that catalyze plasmid transfer. We inserted RsA and RsB sequences into the S. coelicolor genome flanking a cluster of 22 genes (act) responsible for biosynthesis of the polyketide antibiotic actinorhodin. Recombination between RsA and RsB generated zouA-dependent DNA amplification resulting in 4–12 tandem copies of the act gene cluster averaging nine repeats per genome. This resulted in a 20-fold increase in actinorhodin production compared with the parental strain. To determine whether the recombination event required taxon-specific genetic effectors or generalized bacterial recombination (recA), it was also analyzed in the heterologous host Escherichia coli. zouA was expressed under the control of an inducible promoter in wild-type and recA mutant strains. A plasmid was constructed with recombination sites RsA and RsB bordering a drug resistance marker. Induction of zouA expression generated hybrid RsB/RsA sites, evidence of site-specific recombination that occurred independently of recA. ZouA-mediated DNA amplification promises to be a valuable tool for increasing the activities of commercially important biosynthetic, degradative, and photosynthetic pathways in a wide variety of organisms. PMID:21903924

  15. A system for the targeted amplification of bacterial gene clusters multiplies antibiotic yield in Streptomyces coelicolor.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Takeshi; Burian, Jan; Yanai, Koji; Bibb, Mervyn J; Thompson, Charles J

    2011-09-20

    Gene clusters found in bacterial species classified as Streptomyces encode the majority of known antibiotics as well as many pharmaceutically active compounds. A site-specific recombination system similar to those that mediate plasmid conjugation was engineered to catalyze tandem amplification of one of these gene clusters in a heterologous Streptomyces species. Three genetic elements were known to be required for DNA amplification in S. kanamyceticus: the oriT-like recombination sites RsA and RsB, and ZouA, a site-specific relaxase similar to TraA proteins that catalyze plasmid transfer. We inserted RsA and RsB sequences into the S. coelicolor genome flanking a cluster of 22 genes (act) responsible for biosynthesis of the polyketide antibiotic actinorhodin. Recombination between RsA and RsB generated zouA-dependent DNA amplification resulting in 4-12 tandem copies of the act gene cluster averaging nine repeats per genome. This resulted in a 20-fold increase in actinorhodin production compared with the parental strain. To determine whether the recombination event required taxon-specific genetic effectors or generalized bacterial recombination (recA), it was also analyzed in the heterologous host Escherichia coli. zouA was expressed under the control of an inducible promoter in wild-type and recA mutant strains. A plasmid was constructed with recombination sites RsA and RsB bordering a drug resistance marker. Induction of zouA expression generated hybrid RsB/RsA sites, evidence of site-specific recombination that occurred independently of recA. ZouA-mediated DNA amplification promises to be a valuable tool for increasing the activities of commercially important biosynthetic, degradative, and photosynthetic pathways in a wide variety of organisms. PMID:21903924

  16. Post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression in bacterial pathogens by toxin-antitoxin systems

    PubMed Central

    Bertram, Ralph; Schuster, Christopher F.

    2014-01-01

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems are small genetic elements ubiquitous in prokaryotic genomes that encode toxic proteins targeting various vital cellular functions. Typically, toxin activity is controlled by adjacently encoded protein or RNA antitoxins and unleashed as a consequence of genetic fluctuations or stressful conditions. Whereas some TA systems interfere with replication or cell wall synthesis, most of them influence transcriptional and post-transcriptional gene regulation. Antitoxin proteins often act as DNA binding transcriptional regulators and many TA toxins exhibit endoribonuclease activity to selectively degrade different RNA species and thus alter gene expression patterns. Some TA RNases cleave tRNA, tmRNAs or rRNAs, whereas most commonly mRNAs either in association with the ribosome or as free transcripts, are targeted. Examples are provided on how TA toxins differentially shape gene expression in bacterial pathogens by creating specialized ribosomes or by altering the transcriptome and how this may be tied in the control of pathogenicity factors. PMID:24524029

  17. Silencing VP28 Gene of White Spot Syndrome Virus of Shrimp by Bacterially Expressed dsRNA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Sarathi; Martin C. Simon; V. P. Ishaq Ahmed; S. Rajesh Kumar; A. S. Sahul Hameed

    2008-01-01

    An in vivo expression system to produce large amounts of virus-derived dsRNAs in bacteria to provide a practical control of\\u000a white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) in shrimp was developed. The bacterially synthesized dsRNA specific to VP28 gene of WSSV\\u000a promoted gene-specific interference with the WSSV infection in shrimp. Virus infectivity was significantly reduced in WSSV-challenged\\u000a shrimp injected with VP28-dsRNA and

  18. Diptericin-like protein: an immune response gene regulated by the anti-bacterial gene induction pathway in Drosophila

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jun Hee Lee; Kyoung Sang Cho; Jiwoon Lee; Jungsik Yoo; Jihyun Lee; Jongkyeong Chung

    2001-01-01

    Insects produce various anti-microbial peptides in response to injury and infection. In Drosophila, diptericin has previously been studied as an anti-bacterial immune response gene. Here, we report the cloning of the diptericin-like protein (dptlp) gene as a paralog of Drosophila diptericin. By comparison of their sequences, we found that the dptlp gene has all of the functional domains conserved in

  19. Essential genes from Arctic bacteria used to construct stable, temperature-sensitive bacterial vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Duplantis, Barry N.; Osusky, Milan; Schmerk, Crystal L.; Ross, Darrell R.; Bosio, Catharine M.; Nano, Francis E.

    2010-01-01

    All bacteria share a set of evolutionarily conserved essential genes that encode products that are required for viability. The great diversity of environments that bacteria inhabit, including environments at extreme temperatures, place adaptive pressure on essential genes. We sought to use this evolutionary diversity of essential genes to engineer bacterial pathogens to be stably temperature-sensitive, and thus useful as live vaccines. We isolated essential genes from bacteria found in the Arctic and substituted them for their counterparts into pathogens of mammals. We found that substitution of nine different essential genes from psychrophilic (cold-loving) bacteria into mammalian pathogenic bacteria resulted in strains that died below their normal-temperature growth limits. Substitution of three different psychrophilic gene orthologs of ligA, which encode NAD-dependent DNA ligase, resulted in bacterial strains that died at 33, 35, and 37 °C. One ligA gene was shown to render Francisella tularensis, Salmonella enterica, and Mycobacterium smegmatis temperature-sensitive, demonstrating that this gene functions in both Gram-negative and Gram-positive lineage bacteria. Three temperature-sensitive F. tularensis strains were shown to induce protective immunity after vaccination at a cool body site. About half of the genes that could be tested were unable to mutate to temperature-resistant forms at detectable levels. These results show that psychrophilic essential genes can be used to create a unique class of bacterial temperature-sensitive vaccines for important human pathogens, such as S. enterica and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. PMID:20624965

  20. The source of laterally transferred genes in bacterial genomes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vincent Daubin; Emmanuelle Lerat; Guy Perrière

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Laterally transferred genes have often been identified on the basis of compositional features that distinguish them from ancestral genes in the genome. These genes are usually A+T-rich, arguing either that there is a bias towards acquiring genes from donor organisms having low G+C contents or that genes acquired from organisms of similar genomic base compositions go undetected in these

  1. A recently transferred cluster of bacterial genes in Trichomonas vaginalis - lateral gene transfer and the fate of acquired genes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Lateral Gene Transfer (LGT) has recently gained recognition as an important contributor to some eukaryote proteomes, but the mechanisms of acquisition and fixation in eukaryotic genomes are still uncertain. A previously defined norm for LGTs in microbial eukaryotes states that the majority are genes involved in metabolism, the LGTs are typically localized one by one, surrounded by vertically inherited genes on the chromosome, and phylogenetics shows that a broad collection of bacterial lineages have contributed to the transferome. Results A unique 34 kbp long fragment with 27 clustered genes (TvLF) of prokaryote origin was identified in the sequenced genome of the protozoan parasite Trichomonas vaginalis. Using a PCR based approach we confirmed the presence of the orthologous fragment in four additional T. vaginalis strains. Detailed sequence analyses unambiguously suggest that TvLF is the result of one single, recent LGT event. The proposed donor is a close relative to the firmicute bacterium Peptoniphilus harei. High nucleotide sequence similarity between T. vaginalis strains, as well as to P. harei, and the absence of homologs in other Trichomonas species, suggests that the transfer event took place after the radiation of the genus Trichomonas. Some genes have undergone pseudogenization and degradation, indicating that they may not be retained in the future. Functional annotations reveal that genes involved in informational processes are particularly prone to degradation. Conclusions We conclude that, although the majority of eukaryote LGTs are single gene occurrences, they may be acquired in clusters of several genes that are subsequently cleansed of evolutionarily less advantageous genes. PMID:24898731

  2. Expression of the Bs2 Pepper Gene Confers Resistance to Bacterial Spot Disease in Tomato

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas H. Tai; Douglas Dahlbeck; Eszter T. Clark; Paresh Gajiwala; Romela Pasion; Maureen C. Whalen; Robert E. Stall; Brian J. Staskawicz

    1999-01-01

    The Bs2 resistance gene of pepper specifically recognizes and confers resistance to strains of Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria that contain the corresponding bacterial avirulence gene, avrBs2. The involvement of avrBs2 in pathogen fitness and its prevalence in many X. campestris pathovars suggests that the Bs2 gene may be durable in the field and provide resistance when introduced into other plant

  3. Substrate Diffusion Heterogeneity Controls Bacterial Competition and Coexistence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dechesne, A.; Or, D.; Smets, B. F.

    2005-12-01

    Diffusion has long been recognized as a key process affecting bacterial physiological functions ranging from nutrient uptake to removal of metabolic waste products. In the vadose zone, significant convective flows are limited and bacteria rely primarily on diffusion for nutrient supply. Even under relatively "wet" conditions (e.g. matric potentials -20 J/kg), soil water is fragmented and exists as thin liquid films or held in crevices imposing constraints on substrate diffusion. Our objective was to investigate the role of diffusion on soil microbial diversity, by focusing on one of the processes that shapes the structure of bacterial communities: competitive interactions. We used a simplified setup, in which the substrate (citrate) fluxes were controlled by different agar gels thicknesses and spatially heterogeneous diffusive pathways were created by an impermeable film with prescribed hole sizes and patterns. Our competition experiments involved two soil bacteria: Burkholderia xenovorans LB400 and Pseudomonas putida KT2440, which were tagged with different constitutive fluorescent markers, allowing for their on line microscopic detection. The growth parameters on citrate of these strains were thoroughly assessed. B. xenovorans LB400 is the weaker competitor. As a result, this strain was outcompeted by KT2440 under high substrate diffusivity and homogeneous conditions. Conversely, the disadvantage of the weakest competitor was not so marked under low substrate diffusivity condition. These results suggest that dry conditions in soil would provide conditions allowing the sustaining of weak bacterial competitors, resulting in the maintenance of high bacterial diversity.

  4. Multidirectional chemical signalling between Mammalian hosts, resident microbiota, and invasive pathogens: neuroendocrine hormone-induced changes in bacterial gene expression.

    PubMed

    Karavolos, Michail H; Khan, C M Anjam

    2014-01-01

    Host-pathogen communication appears to be crucial in establishing the outcome of bacterial infections. There is increasing evidence to suggest that this communication can take place by bacterial pathogens sensing and subsequently responding to host neuroendocrine (NE) stress hormones. Bacterial pathogens have developed mechanisms allowing them to eavesdrop on these communication pathways within their hosts. These pathogens can use intercepted communication signals to adjust their fitness to persist and cause disease in their hosts. Recently, there have been numerous studies highlighting the ability of NE hormones to act as an environmental cue for pathogens, helping to steer their responses during host infection. Host NE hormone sensing can take place indirectly or directly via bacterial adrenergic receptors (BARs). The resulting changes in bacterial gene expression can be of strategic benefit to the pathogen. Furthermore, it is intriguing that not only can bacteria sense NE stress hormones but they are also able to produce key signalling molecules known as autoinducers. The rapid advances in our knowledge of the human microbiome, and its impact on health and disease highlights the potential importance of communication between the microbiota, pathogens and the host. It is indeed likely that the microbiota input significantly in the neuroendocrinological homeostasis of the host by catabolic, anabolic, and signalling processes. The arrival of unwanted guests, such as bacterial pathogens, clearly has a major impact on these delicately balanced interactions. Unravelling the pathways involved in interkingdom communication between invading bacterial pathogens, the resident microbiota, and hosts, may provide novel targets in our continuous search for new antimicrobials to control disease. PMID:24997037

  5. Bioinformatic Analysis Reveals High Diversity of Bacterial Genes for Laccase-Like Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Ausec, Luka; Zakrzewski, Martha; Goesmann, Alexander; Schlüter, Andreas; Mandic-Mulec, Ines

    2011-01-01

    Fungal laccases have been used in various fields ranging from processes in wood and paper industries to environmental applications. Although a few bacterial laccases have been characterized in recent years, prokaryotes have largely been neglected as a source of novel enzymes, in part due to the lack of knowledge about the diversity and distribution of laccases within Bacteria. In this work genes for laccase-like enzymes were searched for in over 2,200 complete and draft bacterial genomes and four metagenomic datasets, using the custom profile Hidden Markov Models for two- and three- domain laccases. More than 1,200 putative genes for laccase-like enzymes were retrieved from chromosomes and plasmids of diverse bacteria. In 76% of the genes, signal peptides were predicted, indicating that these bacterial laccases may be exported from the cytoplasm, which contrasts with the current belief. Moreover, several examples of putatively horizontally transferred bacterial laccase genes were described. Many metagenomic sequences encoding fragments of laccase-like enzymes could not be phylogenetically assigned, indicating considerable novelty. Laccase-like genes were also found in anaerobic bacteria, autotrophs and alkaliphiles, thus opening new hypotheses regarding their ecological functions. Bacteria identified as carrying laccase genes represent potential sources for future biotechnological applications. PMID:22022440

  6. The role of bacterial vaginosis in preterm labor and preterm birth: a case-control study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Damien Subtil; Valérie Denoit; Françoise Le Gouëff; Marie-Odile Husson; Dominique Trivier; Francis Puech

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the association between preterm labor and bacterial vaginosis; in women with preterm labor, to determine whether vaginosis modifies the risk of preterm delivery. Study Design: Case-control study. We used Amsel’s clinical criteria to test 102 patients hospitalized for preterm labor and 102 control patients for bacterial vaginosis. Results: Patients with preterm labor were diagnosed with bacterial vaginosis

  7. Statistical Analysis of Hurst Exponents of Essential/Nonessential Genes in 33 Bacterial Genomes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao; Wang, Baojin; Xu, Luo

    2015-01-01

    Methods for identifying essential genes currently depend predominantly on biochemical experiments. However, there is demand for improved computational methods for determining gene essentiality. In this study, we used the Hurst exponent, a characteristic parameter to describe long-range correlation in DNA, and analyzed its distribution in 33 bacterial genomes. In most genomes (31 out of 33) the significance levels of the Hurst exponents of the essential genes were significantly higher than for the corresponding full-gene-set, whereas the significance levels of the Hurst exponents of the nonessential genes remained unchanged or increased only slightly. All of the Hurst exponents of essential genes followed a normal distribution, with one exception. We therefore propose that the distribution feature of Hurst exponents of essential genes can be used as a classification index for essential gene prediction in bacteria. For computer-aided design in the field of synthetic biology, this feature can build a restraint for pre- or post-design checking of bacterial essential genes. Moreover, considering the relationship between gene essentiality and evolution, the Hurst exponents could be used as a descriptive parameter related to evolutionary level, or be added to the annotation of each gene. PMID:26067107

  8. Statistical Analysis of Hurst Exponents of Essential/Nonessential Genes in 33 Bacterial Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao; Wang, Baojin; Xu, Luo

    2015-01-01

    Methods for identifying essential genes currently depend predominantly on biochemical experiments. However, there is demand for improved computational methods for determining gene essentiality. In this study, we used the Hurst exponent, a characteristic parameter to describe long-range correlation in DNA, and analyzed its distribution in 33 bacterial genomes. In most genomes (31 out of 33) the significance levels of the Hurst exponents of the essential genes were significantly higher than for the corresponding full-gene-set, whereas the significance levels of the Hurst exponents of the nonessential genes remained unchanged or increased only slightly. All of the Hurst exponents of essential genes followed a normal distribution, with one exception. We therefore propose that the distribution feature of Hurst exponents of essential genes can be used as a classification index for essential gene prediction in bacteria. For computer-aided design in the field of synthetic biology, this feature can build a restraint for pre- or post-design checking of bacterial essential genes. Moreover, considering the relationship between gene essentiality and evolution, the Hurst exponents could be used as a descriptive parameter related to evolutionary level, or be added to the annotation of each gene. PMID:26067107

  9. Emerging frontiers in detection and control of bacterial biofilms.

    PubMed

    Tan, Seth Yang-En; Chew, Su Chuen; Tan, Sean Yang-Yi; Givskov, Michael; Yang, Liang

    2014-04-01

    Bacteria form surface-attached biofilm communities in nature. In contrast to free-living cells, bacterial cells within biofilms resist sanitizers and antimicrobials. While building biofilms, cells physiologically adapt to sustain the otherwise lethal impacts of a variety of environmental stress conditions. In this development, the production and embedding of cells in extracellular polymeric substances plays a key role. Biofilm bacteria can cause a range of problems to food processing including reduced heat-cold transfer, clogging water pipelines, food spoilage and they may cause infections among consumers. Recent biofilm investigations with the aim of potential control approaches include a combination of bacterial genetics, systems biology, materials and mechanic engineering and chemical biology. PMID:24679251

  10. Geptop: A Gene Essentiality Prediction Tool for Sequenced Bacterial Genomes Based on Orthology and Phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wen; Ning, Lu-Wen; Ye, Yuan-Nong; Guo, Feng-Biao

    2013-01-01

    Integrative genomics predictors, which score highly in predicting bacterial essential genes, would be unfeasible in most species because the data sources are limited. We developed a universal approach and tool designated Geptop, based on orthology and phylogeny, to offer gene essentiality annotations. In a series of tests, our Geptop method yielded higher area under curve (AUC) scores in the receiver operating curves than the integrative approaches. In the ten-fold cross-validations among randomly upset samples, Geptop yielded an AUC of 0.918, and in the cross-organism predictions for 19 organisms Geptop yielded AUC scores between 0.569 and 0.959. A test applied to the very recently determined essential gene dataset from the Porphyromonas gingivalis, which belongs to a phylum different with all of the above 19 bacterial genomes, gave an AUC of 0.77. Therefore, Geptop can be applied to any bacterial species whose genome has been sequenced. Compared with the essential genes uniquely identified by the lethal screening, the essential genes predicted only by Gepop are associated with more protein-protein interactions, especially in the three bacteria with lower AUC scores (<0.7). This may further illustrate the reliability and feasibility of our method in some sense. The web server and standalone version of Geptop are available at http://cefg.uestc.edu.cn/geptop/ free of charge. The tool has been run on 968 bacterial genomes and the results are accessible at the website. PMID:23977285

  11. A Comprehensive Analysis of Gene Expression Changes Provoked by Bacterial and Fungal Infection in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Engelmann, Ilka; Griffon, Aurélien; Tichit, Laurent; Montañana-Sanchis, Frédéric; Wang, Guilin; Reinke, Valerie; Waterston, Robert H.; Hillier, LaDeana W.; Ewbank, Jonathan J.

    2011-01-01

    While Caenorhabditis elegans specifically responds to infection by the up-regulation of certain genes, distinct pathogens trigger the expression of a common set of genes. We applied new methods to conduct a comprehensive and comparative study of the transcriptional response of C. elegans to bacterial and fungal infection. Using tiling arrays and/or RNA-sequencing, we have characterized the genome-wide transcriptional changes that underlie the host's response to infection by three bacterial (Serratia marcescens, Enterococcus faecalis and otorhabdus luminescens) and two fungal pathogens (Drechmeria coniospora and Harposporium sp.). We developed a flexible tool, the WormBase Converter (available at http://wormbasemanager.sourceforge.net/), to allow cross-study comparisons. The new data sets provided more extensive lists of differentially regulated genes than previous studies. Annotation analysis confirmed that genes commonly up-regulated by bacterial infections are related to stress responses. We found substantial overlaps between the genes regulated upon intestinal infection by the bacterial pathogens and Harposporium, and between those regulated by Harposporium and D. coniospora, which infects the epidermis. Among the fungus-regulated genes, there was a significant bias towards genes that are evolving rapidly and potentially encode small proteins. The results obtained using new methods reveal that the response to infection in C. elegans is determined by the nature of the pathogen, the site of infection and the physiological imbalance provoked by infection. They form the basis for future functional dissection of innate immune signaling. Finally, we also propose alternative methods to identify differentially regulated genes that take into account the greater variability in lowly expressed genes. PMID:21602919

  12. The Ecology of Bacterial Genes and the Survival of the New

    PubMed Central

    Francino, M. Pilar

    2012-01-01

    Much of the observed variation among closely related bacterial genomes is attributable to gains and losses of genes that are acquired horizontally as well as to gene duplications and larger amplifications. The genomic flexibility that results from these mechanisms certainly contributes to the ability of bacteria to survive and adapt in varying environmental challenges. However, the duplicability and transferability of individual genes imply that natural selection should operate, not only at the organismal level, but also at the level of the gene. Genes can be considered semiautonomous entities that possess specific functional niches and evolutionary dynamics. The evolution of bacterial genes should respond both to selective pressures that favor competition, mostly among orthologs or paralogs that may occupy the same functional niches, and cooperation, with the majority of other genes coexisting in a given genome. The relative importance of either type of selection is likely to vary among different types of genes, based on the functional niches they cover and on the tightness of their association with specific organismal lineages. The frequent availability of new functional niches caused by environmental changes and biotic evolution should enable the constant diversification of gene families and the survival of new lineages of genes. PMID:22900231

  13. Expression of a Bacterial Gene in a Trypanosomatid Protozoan

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vivian Bellofatto; George A. M. Cross

    1989-01-01

    A simple and reproducible assay for DNA-mediated transfection in the trypanosomatid protozoan Leptomonas seymouri has been developed. The assay is based on expression of the Escherichia coli chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) gene flanked by Leptomonas DNA fragments that are likely to contain necessary elements for gene expression in trypanosomes. After electroporation of cells in the presence of plasmid DNA, CAT

  14. Bacterial diversity of the Inner Mongolian Baer Soda Lake as revealed by 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yanhe Ma; Weizhou Zhang; Yanfen Xue; Peijin Zhou; Antonio Ventosa; William D. Grant

    2004-01-01

    Bacterial diversity associated with Baer Soda Lake in Inner Mongolia of China was investigated using a culture-independent method. Bacterial 16S rRNA gene libraries were generated using bacterial oligonucleotide primers, and 16S rRNA gene sequences of 58 clones were analyzed phylogenetically. The library was dominated by 16S rDNAs of Gram-negative bacteria (24% a-Proteobacteria, 31% ß-Proteobacteria, 33% ?-Proteobacteria, and 2% d-Proteobacteria), with

  15. Genomic Analyses of Bacterial Porin-Cytochrome Gene Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.

    2014-11-26

    The porin-cytochrome (Pcc) protein complex is responsible for trans-outer membrane electron transfer during extracellular reduction of Fe(III) by the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA. The identified and characterized Pcc complex of G. sulfurreducens PCA consists of a porin-like outer-membrane protein, a periplasmic 8-heme c type cytochrome (c-Cyt) and an outer-membrane 12-heme c-Cyt, and the genes encoding the Pcc proteins are clustered in the same regions of genome (i.e., the pcc gene clusters) of G. sulfurreducens PCA. A survey of additionally microbial genomes has identified the pcc gene clusters in all sequenced Geobacter spp. and other bacteria from six different phyla, including Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans 2CP-1, A. dehalogenans 2CP-C, Anaeromyxobacter sp. K, Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis, Denitrovibrio acetiphilus DSM 12809, Desulfurispirillum indicum S5, Desulfurivibrio alkaliphilus AHT2, Desulfurobacterium thermolithotrophum DSM 11699, Desulfuromonas acetoxidans DSM 684, Ignavibacterium album JCM 16511, and Thermovibrio ammonificans HB-1. The numbers of genes in the pcc gene clusters vary, ranging from two to nine. Similar to the metal-reducing (Mtr) gene clusters of other Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, such as Shewanella spp., additional genes that encode putative c-Cyts with predicted cellular localizations at the cytoplasmic membrane, periplasm and outer membrane often associate with the pcc gene clusters. This suggests that the Pcc-associated c-Cyts may be part of the pathways for extracellular electron transfer reactions. The presence of pcc gene clusters in the microorganisms that do not reduce solid-phase Fe(III) and Mn(IV) oxides, such as D. alkaliphilus AHT2 and I. album JCM 16511, also suggests that some of the pcc gene clusters may be involved in extracellular electron transfer reactions with the substrates other than Fe(III) and Mn(IV) oxides.

  16. Combinatorial Approach for Fabrication of Coatings to Control Bacterial Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Pedron, S; Peinado, C; Catalina, F; Bosch, P; Anseth, K S; Abrusci, C

    2011-08-29

    Due to the high importance of bacterial infections in medical devices there is an increasing interest in the design of anti-fouling coatings. The application of substrates with controlled chemical gradients to prevent microbial adhesion is presented. We describe here the co-polymerization of poly(ethylene glycol) dimethacrylate with a hyperbranched multimethacrylate (H30MA) using a chemical gradient generator; and the resulting films were characterized with respect to their ability to serve as coating for biomedical devices. The photo-polymerized materials present special surface properties due to the hyperbranched structure of H30MA and phase separation at specific concentrations in the PEGDM matrix. This approach affords the investigation of cell response to a large range of different chemistries on a single sample. Two bacterial strains commonly associated with surgical site infections, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, have been cultured on these substrates to study their attachment behaviour. These gradient-coated samples demonstrate less bacterial adhesion at higher concentrations of H30MA, and the adhesion is substantially affected by the extent of surface phase segregation. PMID:21888758

  17. Isolation of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens S20 and its application in control of eggplant bacterial wilt.

    PubMed

    Chen, Da; Liu, Xin; Li, Chunyu; Tian, Wei; Shen, Qirong; Shen, Biao

    2014-05-01

    Bacterial strain S20 was isolated and identified as Bacillus amyloliquefaciens based on physiological and biochemical characteristics and a 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Strain S20 inhibits the growth of Fusarium oxysporum and Ralstonia solanacearum. Some genes associated with the synthesis of some lipopeptides were detected in strain S20 by PCR. Iturins A were identified as the main antagonistic substrates by analysis with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry/collision-induced dissociation (ESI-MS/CID). Four homologues of iturin A (C13-C16) were identified. Pot experiments showed that the application of strain S20 alone could control eggplant wilt with an efficacy of 25.3% during a 40 day experiment. If strain S20 was used with organic fertilizer, the control efficacy against eggplant wilt reached as high as 70.7%. The application of organic fertilizer alone promotes the growth of R. solanacearum, resulting in a higher wilt incidence than that observed in control plants. The application of strain S20 effectively inhibits R. solanacearum in the rhizosphere soil of eggplant. The combined use of strain S20 and organic fertilizer more effectively controlled R. solanacearum in soil than the use of strain S20 alone. The soil count of strain S20 decreased gradually during the course of the experiment after inoculation. Organic fertilizer was beneficial for the survival of the antagonistic bacterial strain S20; a higher level of these bacteria could be maintained. The application of organic fertilizer with strain S20 increased bacterial diversity in rhizosphere soil. PMID:24632400

  18. 13. CONTROL ROOM OF GENE PUMPING STATION. CONTROL CUBICLES ARRAYED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. CONTROL ROOM OF GENE PUMPING STATION. CONTROL CUBICLES ARRAYED BEHIND MANAGER'S ART DECO-STYLE CONTROL DESK, WITH CONTROL CUBICLE 1 AT FAR RIGHT AND CONTROL CUBICLE 9 AT FAR LEFT. - Gene Pump Plant, South of Gene Wash Reservoir, 2 miles west of Whitsett Pump Plant, Parker Dam, San Bernardino County, CA

  19. A gene expression atlas of the central nervous system based on bacterial artificial chromosomes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shiaoching Gong; Chen Zheng; Martin L. Doughty; Kasia Losos; Nicholas Didkovsky; Uta B. Schambra; Norma J. Nowak; Alexandra Joyner; Gabrielle Leblanc; Mary E. Hatten; Nathaniel Heintz

    2003-01-01

    The mammalian central nervous system (CNS) contains a remarkable array of neural cells, each with a complex pattern of connections that together generate perceptions and higher brain functions. Here we describe a large-scale screen to create an atlas of CNS gene expression at the cellular level, and to provide a library of verified bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) vectors and transgenic

  20. The Effect of Nitrogen on Disease Development and Gene Expression in Bacterial and Fungal Plant Pathogens

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sandor S. Snoeijers; Alejandro Pérez-García; Matthieu H. A. J. Joosten

    2000-01-01

    Successful colonisation of plants by pathogens requires efficient utilisation of nutrient resources available in host tissues. Several bacterial and fungal genes are specifically induced during pathogenesis and under nitrogen-limiting conditions in vitro. This suggests that a nitrogen-limiting environment may be one of the cues for disease symptom development during growth of the pathogens in planta. Here we review recent literature

  1. A functional gene array for detection of bacterial virulence elements.

    PubMed

    Jaing, Crystal; Gardner, Shea; McLoughlin, Kevin; Mulakken, Nisha; Alegria-Hartman, Michelle; Banda, Phillip; Williams, Peter; Gu, Pauline; Wagner, Mark; Manohar, Chitra; Slezak, Tom

    2008-01-01

    Emerging known and unknown pathogens create profound threats to public health. Platforms for rapid detection and characterization of microbial agents are critically needed to prevent and respond to disease outbreaks. Available detection technologies cannot provide broad functional information about known or novel organisms. As a step toward developing such a system, we have produced and tested a series of high-density functional gene arrays to detect elements of virulence and antibiotic resistance mechanisms. Our first generation array targets genes from Escherichia coli strains K12 and CFT073, Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus. We determined optimal probe design parameters for gene family detection and discrimination. When tested with organisms at varying phylogenetic distances from the four target strains, the array detected orthologs for the majority of targeted gene families present in bacteria belonging to the same taxonomic family. In combination with whole-genome amplification, the array detects femtogram concentrations of purified DNA, either spiked in to an aerosol sample background, or in combinations from one or more of the four target organisms. This is the first report of a high density NimbleGen microarray system targeting microbial antibiotic resistance and virulence mechanisms. By targeting virulence gene families as well as genes unique to specific biothreat agents, these arrays will provide important data about the pathogenic potential and drug resistance profiles of unknown organisms in environmental samples. PMID:18478124

  2. Ribonucleases, antisense RNAs and the control of bacterial plasmids.

    PubMed

    Saramago, Margarida; Bárria, Cátia; Arraiano, Cecília M; Domingues, Susana

    2015-03-01

    In the last decade regulatory RNAs have emerged as powerful tools to regulate the expression of genes both in prokaryotes and in eukaryotes. RNases, by degrading these RNA molecules, control the right amount of regulatory RNAs, which is fundamental for an accurate regulation of gene expression in the cell. Remarkably the first antisense RNAs identified were plasmid-encoded and their detailed study was crucial for the understanding of prokaryotic antisense RNAs. In this review we highlight the role of RNases in the precise modulation of antisense RNAs that control plasmid replication, maintenance and transfer. PMID:25263573

  3. Analysis of bacterial xylose isomerase gene diversity using gene-targeted metagenomics.

    PubMed

    Nurdiani, Dini; Ito, Michihiro; Maruyama, Toru; Terahara, Takeshi; Mori, Tetsushi; Ugawa, Shin; Takeyama, Haruko

    2015-08-01

    Bacterial xylose isomerases (XI) are promising resources for efficient biofuel production from xylose in lignocellulosic biomass. Here, we investigated xylose isomerase gene (xylA) diversity in three soil metagenomes differing in plant vegetation and geographical location, using an amplicon pyrosequencing approach and two newly-designed primer sets. A total of 158,555 reads from three metagenomic DNA replicates for each soil sample were classified into 1127 phylotypes, detected in triplicate and defined by 90% amino acid identity. The phylotype coverage was estimated to be within the range of 84.0-92.7%. The xylA gene phylotypes obtained were phylogenetically distributed across the two known xylA groups. They shared 49-100% identities with their closest-related XI sequences in GenBank. Phylotypes demonstrating <90% identity with known XIs in the database accounted for 89% of the total xylA phylotypes. The differences among xylA members and compositions within each soil sample were significantly smaller than they were between different soils based on a UniFrac distance analysis, suggesting soil-specific xylA genotypes and taxonomic compositions. The differences among xylA members and their compositions in the soil were strongly correlated with 16S rRNA variation between soil samples, also assessed by amplicon pyrosequencing. This is the first report of xylA diversity in environmental samples assessed by amplicon pyrosequencing. Our data provide information regarding xylA diversity in nature, and can be a basis for the screening of novel xylA genotypes for practical applications. PMID:25656071

  4. Recurrent horizontal transfer of bacterial toxin genes to eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Moran, Yehu; Fredman, David; Szczesny, Pawel; Grynberg, Marcin; Technau, Ulrich

    2012-09-01

    In this work, we report likely recurrent horizontal (lateral) gene transfer events of genes encoding pore-forming toxins of the aerolysin family between species belonging to different kingdoms of life. Clustering based on pairwise similarity and phylogenetic analysis revealed several distinct aerolysin sequence groups, each containing proteins from multiple kingdoms of life. These results strongly support at least six independent transfer events between distantly related phyla in the evolutionary history of one protein family and discount selective retention of ancestral genes as a plausible explanation for this patchy phylogenetic distribution. We discuss the possible roles of these proteins and show evidence for a convergent new function in two extant species. We hypothesize that certain gene families are more likely to be maintained following horizontal gene transfer from commensal or pathogenic organism to its host if they 1) can function alone; and 2) are immediately beneficial for the ecology of the organism, as in the case of pore-forming toxins which can be utilized in multicellular organisms for defense and predation. PMID:22411854

  5. Recurrent Horizontal Transfer of Bacterial Toxin Genes to Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Yehu; Fredman, David; Szczesny, Pawel; Grynberg, Marcin; Technau, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we report likely recurrent horizontal (lateral) gene transfer events of genes encoding pore-forming toxins of the aerolysin family between species belonging to different kingdoms of life. Clustering based on pairwise similarity and phylogenetic analysis revealed several distinct aerolysin sequence groups, each containing proteins from multiple kingdoms of life. These results strongly support at least six independent transfer events between distantly related phyla in the evolutionary history of one protein family and discount selective retention of ancestral genes as a plausible explanation for this patchy phylogenetic distribution. We discuss the possible roles of these proteins and show evidence for a convergent new function in two extant species. We hypothesize that certain gene families are more likely to be maintained following horizontal gene transfer from commensal or pathogenic organism to its host if they 1) can function alone; and 2) are immediately beneficial for the ecology of the organism, as in the case of pore-forming toxins which can be utilized in multicellular organisms for defense and predation. PMID:22411854

  6. Role of starvation genes in the survival of deep subsurface bacterial communities. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Matin, A. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Microbiology and Immunology; Schmidt, T. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Dept. of Microbiology; Caldwell, D. [Univ. of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada). Dept. of Microbiology

    1998-11-01

    The investigation dealt with several aspects of subsurface bacterial survival and their nature. Mutants of Pseudomonas putida, a common environmental bacterium with counterparts in the subsurface, were isolated by transposon mutagenesis. These mutants were highly sensitive to starvation stress. Reporter gene fusions also showed that these genes were starvation genes since they were induced several fold when the cultures were started. Since the regulatory religions (promoters) of starvation genes are of interest in bioremediation and in experiments designed to understand the roles of starvation genes in the maintenance of microbial community structure, the promoter of one of these genes (pstarv1, contained in strain MK107) was characterized in detail. As a preliminary to these studies, the growth characteristics of Pseudomonas putida MK1 and MK107 were compared for cells growing in batch cultures or as an attached monolayer in microstat cultures.

  7. Both msa genes in Renibacterium salmoninarum are needed for full virulence in bacterial kidney disease

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coady, A.M.; Murray, A.L.; Elliott, D.G.; Rhodes, L.D.

    2006-01-01

    Renibacterium salmoninarum, a gram-positive diplococcobacillus that causes bacterial kidney disease among salmon and trout, has two chromosomal loci encoding the major soluble antigen (msa) gene. Because the MSA protein is widely suspected to be an important virulence factor, we used insertion-duplication mutagenesis to generate disruptions of either the msa1 or msa2 gene. Surprisingly, expression of MSA protein in broth cultures appeared unaffected. However, the virulence of either mutant in juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) by intraperitoneal challenge was severely attenuated, suggesting that disruption of the msa1 or msa2 gene affected in vivo expression. Copyright ?? 2006, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. A bacterial glycosyltransferase gene toolbox: Generation and applications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Annette Erb; Holger Weiß; Johannes Härle; Andreas Bechthold

    2009-01-01

    The bioactivity of many natural products produced by microorganisms can be attributed to their sugar substituents. These substituents are transferred as nucleotide-activated sugars to an aglycon by glycosyltransferases. Engineering these enzymes can broaden their substrate specificity and can therefore have an impact on the bioactivity of the secondary metabolites.In this review we present the generation of a glycosyltransferase gene toolbox

  9. Identifying bacterial genes and endosymbiont DNA with Glimmer

    PubMed Central

    Delcher, Arthur L.; Bratke, Kirsten A.; Powers, Edwin C.; Salzberg, Steven L.

    2008-01-01

    Motivation: The Glimmer gene-finding software has been successfully used for finding genes in bacteria, archæa and viruses representing hundreds of species. We describe several major changes to the Glimmer system, including improved methods for identifying both coding regions and start codons. We also describe a new module of Glimmer that can distinguish host and endosymbiont DNA. This module was developed in response to the discovery that eukaryotic genome sequencing projects sometimes inadvertently capture the DNA of intracellular bacteria living in the host. Results: The new methods dramatically reduce the rate of false-positive predictions, while maintaining Glimmer's 99% sensitivity rate at detecting genes in most species, and they find substantially more correct start sites, as measured by comparisons to known and well-curated genes. We show that our interpolated Markov model (IMM) DNA discriminator correctly separated 99% of the sequences in a recent genome project that produced a mixture of sequences from the bacterium Prochloron didemni and its sea squirt host, Lissoclinum patella. PMID:17237039

  10. Lineage-Specific Gene Expansions in Bacterial and Archaeal Genomes

    E-print Network

    Jordan, King

    . In an attempt to assess the contribution of gene duplication to genome evolution in archaea and bacteria (archaea and bacteria), provides a wealth of data that can be exam- ined to assess various aspects similarity (as reflected by average score density) than larger clusters. Regardless of size, cluster members

  11. Reduced Set of Virulence Genes Allows High Accuracy Prediction of Bacterial Pathogenicity in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Iraola, Gregorio; Vazquez, Gustavo; Spangenberg, Lucía; Naya, Hugo

    2012-01-01

    Although there have been great advances in understanding bacterial pathogenesis, there is still a lack of integrative information about what makes a bacterium a human pathogen. The advent of high-throughput sequencing technologies has dramatically increased the amount of completed bacterial genomes, for both known human pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains; this information is now available to investigate genetic features that determine pathogenic phenotypes in bacteria. In this work we determined presence/absence patterns of different virulence-related genes among more than finished bacterial genomes from both human pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains, belonging to different taxonomic groups (i.e: Actinobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Firmicutes, etc.). An accuracy of 95% using a cross-fold validation scheme with in-fold feature selection is obtained when classifying human pathogens and non-pathogens. A reduced subset of highly informative genes () is presented and applied to an external validation set. The statistical model was implemented in the BacFier v1.0 software (freely available at ), that displays not only the prediction (pathogen/non-pathogen) and an associated probability for pathogenicity, but also the presence/absence vector for the analyzed genes, so it is possible to decipher the subset of virulence genes responsible for the classification on the analyzed genome. Furthermore, we discuss the biological relevance for bacterial pathogenesis of the core set of genes, corresponding to eight functional categories, all with evident and documented association with the phenotypes of interest. Also, we analyze which functional categories of virulence genes were more distinctive for pathogenicity in each taxonomic group, which seems to be a completely new kind of information and could lead to important evolutionary conclusions. PMID:22916122

  12. Effects of nucleoid-associated proteins on bacterial chromosome structure and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Browning, Douglas F; Grainger, David C; Busby, Stephen Jw

    2010-12-01

    Bacterial nucleoid-associated proteins play a key role in the organisation, replication, segregation, repair and expression of bacterial chromosomes. Here, we review some recent progress in our understanding of the effects of these proteins on DNA and their biological role, focussing mainly on Escherichia coli and its chromosome. Certain nucleoid-associated proteins also regulate transcription initiation at specific promoters, and work in concert with dedicated transcription factors to regulate gene expression in response to growth phase and environmental change. Some specific examples, involving the E. coli IHF and Fis proteins, that illustrate new principles, are described in detail. PMID:20951079

  13. Exploration and grading of possible genes from 183 bacterial strains by a common protocol to identification of new genes: Gene Trek in Prokaryote Space (GTPS).

    PubMed

    Kosuge, Takehide; Abe, Takashi; Okido, Toshihisa; Tanaka, Naoto; Hirahata, Masaki; Maruyama, Yutaka; Mashima, Jun; Tomiki, Aki; Kurokawa, Motoyoshi; Himeno, Ryutaro; Fukuchi, Satoshi; Miyazaki, Satoru; Gojobori, Takashi; Tateno, Yoshio; Sugawara, Hideaki

    2006-12-31

    A large number of complete microorganism genomes has been sequenced and submitted to the public database and then incorporated into our complete genome database, Genome Information Broker (GIB, http://gib.genes.nig.ac.jp/). However, when comparative genomics is carried out, researchers must be aware that there are protein-coding genes not confirmed by homology or motif search and that reliable protein-coding genes are missing. Therefore, we developed a protocol (Gene Trek in Prokaryote Space, GTPS) for finding possible protein-coding genes in bacterial genomes. GTPS assigns a degree of reliability to predicted protein-coding genes. We first systematically applied the protocol to the complete genomes of all 123 bacterial species and strains that were publicly available as of July 2003, and then to those of 183 species and strains available as of September 2004. We found a number of incorrect genes and several new ones in the genome data in question. We also found a way to estimate the total number of orthologous genes in the bacterial world. PMID:17166861

  14. Could bacteriophages transfer antibiotic resistance genes from environmental bacteria to human-body associated bacterial populations?

    PubMed Central

    Muniesa, Maite; Colomer-Lluch, Marta; Jofre, Juan

    2013-01-01

    Environments without any contact with anthropogenic antibiotics show a great abundance of antibiotic resistance genes that use to be chromosomal and are part of the core genes of the species that harbor them. Some of these genes are shared with human pathogens where they appear in mobile genetic elements. Diversity of antibiotic resistance genes in non-contaminated environments is much greater than in human and animal pathogens, and in environments contaminated with antibiotic from anthropogenic activities. This suggests the existence of some bottleneck effect for the mobilization of antibiotic resistance genes among different biomes. Bacteriophages have characteristics that make them suitable vectors between different biomes, and as well for transferring genes from biome to biome. Recent metagenomic studies and detection of bacterial genes by genomic techniques in the bacteriophage fraction of different microbiota provide indirect evidences that the mobilization of genes mediated by phages, including antibiotic resistance genes, is far more relevant than previously thought. Our hypothesis is that bacteriophages might be of critical importance for evading one of the bottlenecks, the lack of ecological connectivity that modulates the pass of antibiotic resistance genes from natural environments such as waters and soils, to animal and human microbiomes. This commentary concentrates on the potential importance of bacteriophages in transferring resistance genes from the environment to human and animal body microbiomes, but there is no doubt that transduction occurs also in body microbiomes. PMID:24195016

  15. Resistance of Antimicrobial Peptide Gene Transgenic Rice to Bacterial Blight

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wei WANG; Chao WU; Mei LIU; Xu-ri LIU; Guo-cheng HU; Hua-min SI; Zong-xiu SUN; Wen-zhen LIU; Ya-ping FU

    2011-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptide is a polypeptide with antimicrobial activity. Antimicrobial peptide genes Np3 and Np5 from Chinese shrimp (Fenneropenaeus Chinensis) were integrated into Oryza sativa L. subsp. japonica cv. Aichi ashahi by Agrobacterium mediated transformation system. PCR analysis showed that the positive ratios of Np3 and Np5 were 36% and 45% in T0 generation, respectively. RT-PCR analysis showed that the antimicrobial

  16. Dissecting specific and global transcriptional regulation of bacterial gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Gerosa, Luca; Kochanowski, Karl; Heinemann, Matthias; Sauer, Uwe

    2013-01-01

    Gene expression is regulated by specific transcriptional circuits but also by the global expression machinery as a function of growth. Simultaneous specific and global regulation thus constitutes an additional—but often neglected—layer of complexity in gene expression. Here, we develop an experimental-computational approach to dissect specific and global regulation in the bacterium Escherichia coli. By using fluorescent promoter reporters, we show that global regulation is growth rate dependent not only during steady state but also during dynamic changes in growth rate and can be quantified through two promoter-specific parameters. By applying our approach to arginine biosynthesis, we obtain a quantitative understanding of both specific and global regulation that allows accurate prediction of the temporal response to simultaneous perturbations in arginine availability and growth rate. We thereby uncover two principles of joint regulation: (i) specific regulation by repression dominates the transcriptional response during metabolic steady states, largely repressing the biosynthesis genes even when biosynthesis is required and (ii) global regulation sets the maximum promoter activity that is exploited during the transition between steady states. PMID:23591774

  17. Programmable repression and activation of bacterial gene expression using an engineered CRISPR-Cas system

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Feng

    The ability to artificially control transcription is essential both to the study of gene function and to the construction of synthetic gene networks with desired properties. Cas9 is an RNA-guided double-stranded DNA nuclease ...

  18. Biological control of bacterial wilt in Arabidopsis thaliana involves abscissic acid signalling.

    PubMed

    Feng, Dong Xin; Tasset, Céline; Hanemian, Mathieu; Barlet, Xavier; Hu, Jian; Trémousaygue, Dominique; Deslandes, Laurent; Marco, Yves

    2012-06-01

    Means to control bacterial wilt caused by the phytopathogenic root bacteria Ralstonia solanacearum are limited. Mutants in a large cluster of genes (hrp) involved in the pathogenicity of R. solanacearum were successfully used in a previous study as endophytic biocontrol agents in challenge inoculation experiments on tomato. However, the molecular mechanisms controlling this resistance remained unknown. We developed a protection assay using Arabidopsis thaliana as a model plant and analyzed the events underlying the biological control by genetic, transcriptomic and molecular approaches. High protection rates associated with a significant decrease in the multiplication of R. solanacearum were observed in plants pre-inoculated with a ?hrpB mutant strain. Neither salicylic acid, nor jasmonic acid/ethylene played a role in the establishment of this resistance. Microarray analysis showed that 26% of the up-regulated genes in protected plants are involved in the biosynthesis and signalling of abscissic acid (ABA). In addition 21% of these genes are constitutively expressed in the irregular xylem cellulose synthase mutants (irx), which present a high level of resistance to R. solanacearum. We propose that inoculation with the ?hrpB mutant strain generates a hostile environment for subsequent plant colonization by a virulent strain of R. solanacearum. PMID:22432714

  19. Relationship between bacterial load, morbidity and cagA gene in patients infected by Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Belda, S; Saez, J; Santibáñez, M; Rodríguez, J C; Sola-Vera, J; Ruiz-García, M; Brotons, A; López-Girona, E; Pérez, E; Sillero, C; Royo, G

    2012-07-01

    One hundred and seventy-six biopsies of the gastric corpus and antrum from 97 patients were processed using classical and molecular methods in order to study the relationship between the factor cagA of Helicobacter pylori, bacterial load and morbidity. Bacterial load in patients with cagA was greater than in patients without it, both in the antrum and corpus (p<0.01). There was a statistically significant association between cagA and consumption of proton pump inhibitors (adjusted odds ratio 3.11). Haemorrhage of the upper digestive tract was more associated with bacterial load than with the cagA gene (adjusted odds ratio 2.34 and 1.12, respectively), but none of these associations yielded statistical significance. PMID:22551001

  20. Anti-inflammatory effect and prostate gene expression profiling of steryl ferulate on experimental rats with non-bacterial prostatitis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yinzhou; Xiong, Lina; Huang, Weisu; Cai, Huafang; Luo, Yanxi; Zhang, Ying; Lu, Baiyi

    2014-06-01

    Steryl ferulate (SF) is a bioactive mixture extracted from rice bran and shows higher inhibitory activity against inflammation than the corresponding free sterols. In this study, the aim was to investigate the anti-inflammatory effect and prostate gene expression profiling of SF using a Xiaozhiling-induced non-bacterial prostatitis (NBP) rat model. The anti-inflammatory effect was evaluated by prostate weight, prostate index, acid phosphatase, density of lecithin corpuscles (DLC), white blood cell count (WBC), and prostatic histologic section. Prostate gene expression profiling was assessed by a cDNA microarray and validated by quantitative real-time PCR of five selected genes. Pathway analysis and Gene ontology (GO) analysis were applied to determine the roles of these differentially expressed genes involved in these biological pathways or GO terms. SF treatment could significantly inhibit prostate weight, prostate index, total acid phosphatase, prostatic acid phosphatase and WBC, suppress the severity of histological lesion and increase the DLC. Compared with the control group, the SF treatment group contained 238 up-regulated genes and 111 down-regulated genes. GO analysis demonstrated that the most significant expression genes were closely related to the terms of fibrinolysis, inflammatory response, high-density lipoprotein particle, protein-lipid complex, enzyme inhibitor activity, peptidase inhibitor activity and others. Canonical pathway analysis indicated five pathways were significantly regulated, which were associated with inflammation and tumorgenesis. In conclusion, SF may be used as a health supplement to prevent NBP, in that it could inhibit prostate inflammation in NBP patients by affecting the expression of genes in the related GO terms and pathways. PMID:24686498

  1. Bacterial Adaptation of Respiration from Oxic to Microoxic and Anoxic Conditions: Redox Control

    PubMed Central

    Bueno, Emilio; Mesa, Socorro; Bedmar, Eulogio J.; Richardson, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Under a shortage of oxygen, bacterial growth can be faced mainly by two ATP-generating mechanisms: (i) by synthesis of specific high-affinity terminal oxidases that allow bacteria to use traces of oxygen or (ii) by utilizing other substrates as final electron acceptors such as nitrate, which can be reduced to dinitrogen gas through denitrification or to ammonium. This bacterial respiratory shift from oxic to microoxic and anoxic conditions requires a regulatory strategy which ensures that cells can sense and respond to changes in oxygen tension and to the availability of other electron acceptors. Bacteria can sense oxygen by direct interaction of this molecule with a membrane protein receptor (e.g., FixL) or by interaction with a cytoplasmic transcriptional factor (e.g., Fnr). A third type of oxygen perception is based on sensing changes in redox state of molecules within the cell. Redox-responsive regulatory systems (e.g., ArcBA, RegBA/PrrBA, RoxSR, RegSR, ActSR, ResDE, and Rex) integrate the response to multiple signals (e.g., ubiquinone, menaquinone, redox active cysteine, electron transport to terminal oxidases, and NAD/NADH) and activate or repress target genes to coordinate the adaptation of bacterial respiration from oxic to anoxic conditions. Here, we provide a compilation of the current knowledge about proteins and regulatory networks involved in the redox control of the respiratory adaptation of different bacterial species to microxic and anoxic environments. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 16, 819–852. PMID:22098259

  2. Abstract Inactivation of the sapABCDF genes results in a loss of virulence in several bacterial pathogens of ani-

    E-print Network

    Ruby, Edward G.

    Abstract Inactivation of the sapABCDF genes results in a loss of virulence in several bacterial. fischeri sap genes do not encode functions required for the transport of a spe- cific form of any- ulation size in the host, but not in medium, suggests that the sap genes play another role

  3. Wall teichoic acid structure governs horizontal gene transfer between major bacterial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Winstel, Volker; Liang, Chunguang; Sanchez-Carballo, Patricia; Steglich, Matthias; Munar, Marta; Bröker, Barbara M.; Penadés, Jose R.; Nübel, Ulrich; Holst, Otto; Dandekar, Thomas; Peschel, Andreas; Xia, Guoqing

    2013-01-01

    Mobile genetic elements (MGEs) encoding virulence and resistance genes are widespread in bacterial pathogens, but it has remained unclear how they occasionally jump to new host species. Staphylococcus aureus clones exchange MGEs such as S. aureus pathogenicity islands (SaPIs) with high frequency via helper phages. Here we report that the S. aureus ST395 lineage is refractory to horizontal gene transfer (HGT) with typical S. aureus but exchanges SaPIs with other species and genera including Staphylococcus epidermidis and Listeria monocytogenes. ST395 produces an unusual wall teichoic acid (WTA) resembling that of its HGT partner species. Notably, distantly related bacterial species and genera undergo efficient HGT with typical S. aureus upon ectopic expression of S. aureus WTA. Combined with genomic analyses, these results indicate that a ‘glycocode’ of WTA structures and WTA-binding helper phages permits HGT even across long phylogenetic distances thereby shaping the evolution of Gram-positive pathogens. PMID:23965785

  4. Impulse Control: Temporal Dynamics in Gene Transcription

    E-print Network

    Yosef, Nir

    Regulatory circuits controlling gene expression constantly rewire to adapt to environmental stimuli, differentiation cues, and disease. We review our current understanding of the temporal dynamics of gene expression in ...

  5. Reorganisation of the caecal extracellular matrix upon Salmonella infection—Relation between bacterial invasiveness and expression of virulence genes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Angela Berndt; Jens Müller; Laura Borsi; Hartwig Kosmehl; Ulrich Methner; Alexander Berndt

    2009-01-01

    Interactions of Salmonella (S.) outer membrane structures with extracellular matrix (ECM) of host tissues seem to be crucial for bacterial adhesion and invasion. To evaluate the relationship between the ECM and bacterial invasiveness, the reorganisation of fibronectin, tenascin-C and laminin after Salmonella exposure in vivo, the Salmonella adhesiveness to ECM proteins in vitro and the virulence gene expression upon co-cultivation

  6. CONJUGAL GENE TRANSFER IN THE RHIZOSPHERE OF WATER GRASS (ECHINOCHLORA CRUSGALLI): INFLUENCE OF ROOT EXUDATE AND BACTERIAL ACTIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The premise that genetic exchange is primarily localized in niches characterized by dense bacterial populations and high availability of growth substrates was tested by relating conjugal gene transfer of an RP4 derivative to availability of root exudates and bacterial metabolic a...

  7. Seven Lotus japonicus Genes Required for Transcriptional Reprogramming of the Root during Fungal and Bacterial Symbiosis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Catherine Kistner; Thilo Winzer; Andrea Pitzschke; Lonneke Mulder; Shusei Sato; Takakazu Kaneko; Satoshi Tabata; Niels Sandal; Jens Stougaard; K. Judith Webb; Krzysztof Szczyglowski; Martin Parniskea

    2005-01-01

    A combined genetic and transcriptome analysis was performed to study the molecular basis of the arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) symbiosis. By testing the AM phenotype of nodulation-impaired mutants and complementation analysis, we defined seven Lotus japonicus common symbiosis genes (SYMRK, CASTOR, POLLUX, SYM3, SYM6, SYM15, and SYM24) that are required for both fungal and bacterial entry into root epidermal or cortical

  8. Identification and expression profiles of multiple genes in Nile tilapia in response to bacterial infections

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Julia W. Pridgeon; Mediha Aksoy; Phillip H. Klesius; Yuehong Li; Xingjiang Mu; Kunwar Srivastava; Gopal Reddy

    To understand the molecular mechanisms involved in response of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) to bacterial infection, suppression subtractive cDNA hybridization technique was used to identify upregulated genes in the posterior kidney of Nile tilapia at 6h post infection with Aeromonas hydrophila. A total of 31 unique expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were identified from 192 clones of the subtractive cDNA library.

  9. Single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping of aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 gene using a single bacterial magnetic particle

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tomoko Yoshino; Tsuyoshi Tanaka; Haruko Takeyama; Tadashi Matsunaga

    2003-01-01

    A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping for aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 gene (ALDH2) has been developed by using a nano-sized magnetic particle, which was synthesized intracellularly by magnetic bacteria. Streptavidin-immobilized on bacterial magnetic particles (BMPs) were prepared using biotin labeled cross-linkers reacting with the amine group on BMPs. ALDH2 fragments from genomic DNA were amplified using a TRITC labeled primer and

  10. Expression of tumor suppressor genes in channel catfish after bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Mu, Weijie; Yao, Jun; Zhang, Jiaren; Liu, Shikai; Wen, Haishen; Feng, Jianbin; Liu, Zhanjiang

    2015-01-01

    Tumor suppressor genes are negative regulators of tumor formation. While their anti-tumor functions have been well studied, they have been found to be also involved in immune responses and innate immunity. In this study, 21 tumor suppressor genes in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) were characterized. Phylogenetic and syntenic analyses allowed annotation of all 21 catfish tumor suppressor genes. The expression profiles of the 21 catfish tumor suppressor genes were determined using the RNA-Seq datasets. After Edwardsiella ictaluri infection, expression of five of the 21 tumor suppressor genes was up-regulated at 3?days in the intestine, and four of the 21 genes were up-regulated in the liver 14 days post-infection. With Flavobacterium columnare infection, seven genes were up-regulated in the gill at 48?h post-infection. These results expanded our knowledge on the tumor suppressor genes in teleosts, setting a foundation for future studies to unravel functions of tumor suppressor genes in response to stresses, particularly after bacterial disease infections. PMID:25453578

  11. Role of epigenetic reprogramming of host genes in bacterial pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Al Akeel, Raid

    2013-01-01

    The genomes are regularly targeted by epigenetic regulatory mechanisms (DNA methylation, histone modifications, binding of regulatory proteins) in infected cells. In addition, proteins encoded by microbial genomes may disturb the action of a set of cellular promoters by interacting with the same epi-regulatory machinery. The outcome of this may result in epigenetic dysregulation and subsequent cellular dysfunctions that may manifest in or contribute to the development of pathological changes. How epigenetic methylation decorations on DNA and histones are started and established remains largely unknown. The inherited nature of these processes in regulation of genes suggests that they could play key roles in chronic diseases associated with microbial persistence; they might also explain so-called hit-and-run phenomena in infectious disease pathogenesis. Microbes infecting mammals may cause diseases by causing hyper-methylation of key cellular promoters at CpG di-nucleotides and may induce pathological changes by epigenetic reprogramming of host cells they are interacting with elucidation of the epigenetic consequences of microbe–host interactions may have important therapeutic implications because epigenetic processes can be reverted and elimination of microbes inducing patho-epigenetic changes may prevent disease development. PMID:24235865

  12. Rice Xa21 primed genes and pathways that are critical for combating bacterial blight infection

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hai; Chen, Zheng; Fang, Zhiwei; Zhou, Junfei; Xia, Zhihui; Gao, Lifen; Chen, Lihong; Li, Lili; Li, Tiantian; Zhai, Wenxue; Zhang, Weixiong

    2015-01-01

    Rice bacterial blight (BB) is a devastating rice disease. The Xa21 gene confers a broad and persistent resistance against BB. We introduced Xa21 into Oryza sativa L ssp indica (rice 9311), through multi-generation backcrossing, and generated a nearly isogenic, blight-resistant 9311/Xa21 rice. Using next-generation sequencing, we profiled the transcriptomes of both varieties before and within four days after infection of bacterium Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae. The identified differentially expressed (DE) genes and signaling pathways revealed insights into the functions of Xa21. Surprisingly, before infection 1,889 genes on 135 of the 316 signaling pathways were DE between the 9311/Xa21 and 9311 plants. These Xa21-mediated basal pathways included mainly those related to the basic material and energy metabolisms and many related to phytohormones such as cytokinin, suggesting that Xa21 triggered redistribution of energy, phytohormones and resources among essential cellular activities before invasion. Counter-intuitively, after infection, the DE genes between the two plants were only one third of that before the infection; other than a few stress-related pathways, the affected pathways after infection constituted a small subset of the Xa21-mediated basal pathways. These results suggested that Xa21 primed critically important genes and signaling pathways, enhancing its resistance against bacterial infection. PMID:26184504

  13. Antibiotics, Antibiotic Resistance Genes, and Bacterial Community Composition in Fresh Water Aquaculture Environment in China.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Wenguang; Sun, Yongxue; Zhang, Tong; Ding, Xueyao; Li, Yafei; Wang, Mianzhi; Zeng, Zhenling

    2015-08-01

    Environmental antibiotic resistance has drawn increasing attention due to its great threat to human health. In this study, we investigated concentrations of antibiotics (tetracyclines, sulfonamides and (fluoro)quinolones) and abundances of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs), including tetracycline resistance genes, sulfonamide resistance genes, and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes, and analyzed bacterial community composition in aquaculture environment in Guangdong, China. The concentrations of sulfametoxydiazine, sulfamethazine, sulfamethoxazole, oxytetracycline, chlorotetracycline, doxycycline, ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin, and enrofloxacin were as high as 446 ?g kg(-1) and 98.6 ng L(-1) in sediment and water samples, respectively. The relative abundances (ARG copies/16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene copies) of ARGs (sul1, sul2, sul3, tetM, tetO, tetW, tetS, tetQ, tetX, tetB/P, qepA, oqxA, oqxB, aac(6')-Ib, and qnrS) were as high as 2.8?×?10(-2). The dominant phyla were Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Firmicutes in sediment samples and Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes in water samples. The genera associated with pathogens were also observed, such as Acinetobacter, Arcobacter, and Clostridium. This study comprehensively investigated antibiotics, ARGs, and bacterial community composition in aquaculture environment in China. The results indicated that fish ponds are reservoirs of ARGs and the presence of potential resistant and pathogen-associated taxonomic groups in fish ponds might imply the potential risk to human health. PMID:25753824

  14. Gene targeting by the TAL effector PthXo2 reveals cryptic resistance gene for bacterial blight of rice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Junhui; Peng, Zhao; Long, Juying; Sosso, Davide; Liu, Bo; Eom, Joon-Seob; Huang, Sheng; Liu, Sanzhen; Vera Cruz, Casiana; Frommer, Wolf B; White, Frank F; Yang, Bing

    2015-05-01

    Bacterial blight of rice is caused by the ?-proteobacterium Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, which utilizes a group of type III TAL (transcription activator-like) effectors to induce host gene expression and condition host susceptibility. Five SWEET genes are functionally redundant to support bacterial disease, but only two were experimentally proven targets of natural TAL effectors. Here, we report the identification of the sucrose transporter gene OsSWEET13 as the disease-susceptibility gene for PthXo2 and the existence of cryptic recessive resistance to PthXo2-dependent X. oryzae pv. oryzae due to promoter variations of OsSWEET13 in japonica rice. PthXo2-containing strains induce OsSWEET13 in indica rice IR24 due to the presence of an unpredicted and undescribed effector binding site not present in the alleles in japonica rice Nipponbare and Kitaake. The specificity of effector-associated gene induction and disease susceptibility is attributable to a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), which is also found in a polymorphic allele of OsSWEET13 known as the recessive resistance gene xa25 from the rice cultivar Minghui 63. The mutation of OsSWEET13 with CRISPR/Cas9 technology further corroborates the requirement of OsSWEET13 expression for the state of PthXo2-dependent disease susceptibility to X. oryzae pv. oryzae. Gene profiling of a collection of 104 strains revealed OsSWEET13 induction by 42 isolates of X. oryzae pv. oryzae. Heterologous expression of OsSWEET13 in Nicotiana benthamiana leaf cells elevates sucrose concentrations in the apoplasm. The results corroborate a model whereby X. oryzae pv. oryzae enhances the release of sucrose from host cells in order to exploit the host resources. PMID:25824104

  15. Gene Expression in Gut Symbiotic Organ of Stinkbug Affected by Extracellular Bacterial Symbiont

    PubMed Central

    Futahashi, Ryo; Tanaka, Kohjiro; Tanahashi, Masahiko; Nikoh, Naruo; Kikuchi, Yoshitomo; Lee, Bok Luel; Fukatsu, Takema

    2013-01-01

    The bean bug Riptortus pedestris possesses a specialized symbiotic organ in a posterior region of the midgut, where numerous crypts harbor extracellular betaproteobacterial symbionts of the genus Burkholderia. Second instar nymphs orally acquire the symbiont from the environment, and the symbiont infection benefits the host by facilitating growth and by occasionally conferring insecticide resistance. Here we performed comparative transcriptomic analyses of insect genes expressed in symbiotic and non-symbiotic regions of the midgut dissected from Burkholderia-infected and uninfected R. pedestris. Expression sequence tag analysis of cDNA libraries and quantitative reverse transcription PCR identified a number of insect genes expressed in symbiosis- or aposymbiosis-associated patterns. For example, genes up-regulated in symbiotic relative to aposymbiotic individuals, including many cysteine-rich secreted protein genes and many cathepsin protease genes, are likely to play a role in regulating the symbiosis. Conversely, genes up-regulated in aposymbiotic relative to symbiotic individuals, including a chicken-type lysozyme gene and a defensin-like protein gene, are possibly involved in regulation of non-symbiotic bacterial infections. Our study presents the first transcriptomic data on gut symbiotic organ of a stinkbug, which provides initial clues to understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying the insect-bacterium gut symbiosis and sheds light on several intriguing commonalities between endocellular and extracellular symbiotic associations. PMID:23691247

  16. Precise bacterial polyprenol length control fails in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Pozna?ski, Jaros?aw; Szkopinska, Anna

    2007-06-01

    A comparison of amino acid sequences of yeast Rer2p and Srt1p Z-prenyltransferases shows that the spatial organization of their substrate tunnels agrees with that determined by X-ray for the E. coli undecaprenyl diphosphate synthase (UPPs). The observed trend in the maxima of product length distribution shifted from C(55) in UPPs to C(80) in Rer2p and to C(110) in Srt1p. This suggests a significant increase in the size of the enzyme hydrophobic tunnel from approximately 1000 A(3) of E. coli UPPs to approximately 1300 A(3) required to accommodate C(80) in Rer2p and to 1700 A(3) for C(110) in Srt1p. Moreover, Srt1p products reaching C(290) indicate the failure of a strict bacterial-like chain length control. On the basis of E. coli UPPs crystallographic structure the yeast Rer2p model was constructed. In the model three amino acid residues inserted into the sequence corresponding to the "floor" region of the tunnel extends the bottom loop what results in the required increase of the tunnel volume. Moreover, thermal fluctuations of this loop occasionally create a hole in the tunnel floor, making escape of polyprenol omega end out of the tunnel possible what switches off the control mechanism of product length thereby allowing a practically unlimited elongation process leading to an exponential distribution of longer chain polyprenols. PMID:17345630

  17. Generation of a Complete Single-Gene Knockout Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Library of Cowpox Virus and Identification of Its Essential Genes

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhiyong; Zikos, Dimitrios; Osterrieder, Nikolaus

    2014-01-01

    Cowpox virus (CPXV) belongs to the genus Orthopoxvirus in the Poxviridae family. It infects a broad range of vertebrates and can cause zoonotic infections. CPXV has the largest genome among the orthopoxviruses and is therefore considered to have the most complete set of genes of all members of the genus. Since CPXV has also become a model for studying poxvirus genetics and pathogenesis, we created and characterized a complete set of single gene knockout bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones of the CPXV strain Brighton Red. These mutants allow a systematic assessment of the contribution of single CPXV genes to the outcome of virus infection and replication, as well as to the virus host range. A full-length BAC clone of CPXV strain Brighton Red (pBRF) harboring the gene expressing the enhanced green fluorescent protein under the control of a viral late promoter was modified by introducing the mrfp1 gene encoding the monomeric red fluorescent protein driven by a synthetic early vaccinia virus promoter. Based on the modified BAC (pBRFseR), a library of targeted knockout mutants for each single viral open reading frame (ORF) was generated. Reconstitution of infectious virus was successful for 109 of the 183 mutant BAC clones, indicating that the deleted genes are not essential for virus replication. In contrast, 74 ORFs were identified as essential because no virus progeny was obtained upon transfection of the mutant BAC clones and in the presence of a helper virus. More than 70% of all late CPXV genes belonged to this latter group of essential genes. PMID:24155400

  18. GC-Content Evolution in Bacterial Genomes: The Biased Gene Conversion Hypothesis Expands

    PubMed Central

    Lassalle, Florent; Périan, Séverine; Bataillon, Thomas; Nesme, Xavier; Duret, Laurent; Daubin, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    The characterization of functional elements in genomes relies on the identification of the footprints of natural selection. In this quest, taking into account neutral evolutionary processes such as mutation and genetic drift is crucial because these forces can generate patterns that may obscure or mimic signatures of selection. In mammals, and probably in many eukaryotes, another such confounding factor called GC-Biased Gene Conversion (gBGC) has been documented. This mechanism generates patterns identical to what is expected under selection for higher GC-content, specifically in highly recombining genomic regions. Recent results have suggested that a mysterious selective force favouring higher GC-content exists in Bacteria but the possibility that it could be gBGC has been excluded. Here, we show that gBGC is probably at work in most if not all bacterial species. First we find a consistent positive relationship between the GC-content of a gene and evidence of intra-genic recombination throughout a broad spectrum of bacterial clades. Second, we show that the evolutionary force responsible for this pattern is acting independently from selection on codon usage, and could potentially interfere with selection in favor of optimal AU-ending codons. A comparison with data from human populations shows that the intensity of gBGC in Bacteria is comparable to what has been reported in mammals. We propose that gBGC is not restricted to sexual Eukaryotes but also widespread among Bacteria and could therefore be an ancestral feature of cellular organisms. We argue that if gBGC occurs in bacteria, it can account for previously unexplained observations, such as the apparent non-equilibrium of base substitution patterns and the heterogeneity of gene composition within bacterial genomes. Because gBGC produces patterns similar to positive selection, it is essential to take this process into account when studying the evolutionary forces at work in bacterial genomes. PMID:25659072

  19. The heat-shock-regulated grpE gene of Escherichia coli is required for bacterial growth at all temperatures but is dispensable in certain mutant backgrounds.

    PubMed Central

    Ang, D; Georgopoulos, C

    1989-01-01

    Previous work has established that the grpE+ gene product is a heat shock protein that is essential for bacteriophage lambda growth at all temperatures and for Escherichia coli growth at temperatures above 43 degrees C. Here it is shown that the grpE+ gene product is essential for bacterial viability at all temperatures. The strategy required constructing a grpE deletion derivative carrying a selectable chloramphenicol drug resistance marker provided by an omega insertion and showing that this deletion construct can be crossed into the bacterial chromosome if and only if a functional grpE+ gene is present elsewhere in the same cell. As a control, the same omega insertion could be placed immediately downstream of the grpE+ coding sequence without any observable effects on host growth. This result demonstrates that the inability to construct a grpE-deleted E. coli strain is not simply due to a lethal polar effect on neighboring gene expression. Unexpectedly, it was found that the grpE deletion derivative could be crossed into the bacterial chromosome in a strain that was defective in DnaK function. Further analysis showed that it was not the lack of DnaK function per se that allowed E. coli to tolerate a deletion in the grpE+ gene. Rather, it was the presence of unknown extragenic suppressors of a dnaK mutation that somehow compensated for the deficiency in both DnaK and GrpE function. Images PMID:2651417

  20. Alignment-free detection of horizontal gene transfer between closely related bacterial genomes.

    PubMed

    Domazet-Lošo, Mirjana; Haubold, Bernhard

    2011-09-01

    Bacterial epidemics are often caused by strains that have acquired their increased virulence through horizontal gene transfer. Due to this association with disease, the detection of horizontal gene transfer continues to receive attention from microbiologists and bioinformaticians alike. Most software for detecting transfer events is based on alignments of sets of genes or of entire genomes. But despite great advances in the design of algorithms and computer programs, genome alignment remains computationally challenging. We have therefore developed an alignment-free algorithm for rapidly detecting horizontal gene transfer between closely related bacterial genomes. Our implementation of this algorithm is called alfy for "ALignment Free local homologY" and is freely available from http://guanine.evolbio.mpg.de/alfy/. In this comment we demonstrate the application of alfy to the genomes of Staphylococcus aureus. We also argue that-contrary to popular belief and in spite of increasing computer speed-algorithmic optimization is becoming more, not less, important if genome data continues to accumulate at the present rate. PMID:22312592

  1. Genes Lost and Genes Found: Evolution of Bacterial Pathogenesis and Symbiosis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Howard Ochman; Nancy A. Moran

    2001-01-01

    Traditionally, evolutionary biologists have viewed mutations within individual genes as the major source of phenotypic variation leading to adaptation through natural selection, and ultimately generating diversity among species. Although such processes must contribute to the initial development of gene functions and their subsequent fine-tuning, changes in genome repertoire, occurring through gene acquisition and deletion, are the major events underlying the

  2. Use Of Low Light Image Microscopy To Monitor Genetically Engineered Bacterial Luciferase Gene Expression In Living Cells And Gene Activation Throughout The Development Of A Transgenic Organism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langridge, W. H.; Escher, Alan P.; Baga, M.; O'Kane, Dennis J.; Wampler, John E.; Koncz, C.; Schell, John D.; Szalay, A. A.

    1989-12-01

    Procaryotic and eucaryotic expression vectors which contain a marker gene for selection of transformants linked to genes encoding bacterial luciferase for detection of promoter activated gene expression in vivo were used to transform the appropriate host organisms and drug resistant colonies, cells, or calli were obtained. Bacterial luciferase expression was measured by a luminescence assay for quantitative determination of promoter activation. The cellular localization of bacteria inside the host plant cell cytoplasm was achieved in a single infected plant cell based on the light emitting ability of the genetically engineered bacteria. In addition, the bacterial luciferase marker gene fusions were used to monitor cell type, tissue, and organ specific gene expression in transgenic plants in vivo. To monitor physiological changes during ontogeny of a transformed plant, low light video microscopy, aided by real time image processing techniques developed specifically to enhance extreme low light images, was successfully applied.

  3. Bacterial Dimethylsulfoniopropionate Degradation Genes in the Oligotrophic North Pacific Subtropical Gyre

    PubMed Central

    Varaljay, Vanessa A.; Gifford, Scott M.; Wilson, Samuel T.; Sharma, Shalabh; Karl, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) is an organic sulfur compound that is rapidly metabolized by marine bacteria either by cleavage to dimethylsulfide (DMS) or demethylation to 3-methiolpropionate. The abundance and diversity of genes encoding bacterial DMS production (dddP) and demethylation (dmdA) were measured in the North Pacific subtropical gyre (NPSG) between May 2008 and February 2009 at Station ALOHA (22°45?N, 158°00?W) at two depths: 25 m and the deep chlorophyll maximum (DCM; ?100 m). The highest abundance of dmdA genes was in May 2008 at 25 m, with ?16.5% of cells harboring a gene in one of the eight subclades surveyed, while the highest abundance of dddP genes was in July 2008 at 25 m, with ?2% of cells harboring a gene. The dmdA gene pool was consistently dominated by homologs from SAR11 subclades, which was supported by findings in metagenomic data sets derived from Station ALOHA. Expression of the SAR11 dmdA genes was low, with typical transcript:gene ratios between 1:350 and 1:1,400. The abundance of DMSP genes was statistically different between 25 m and the DCM and correlated with a number of environmental variables, including primary production, photosynthetically active radiation, particulate DMSP, and DMS concentrations. At 25 m, dddP abundance was positively correlated with pigments that are diagnostic of diatoms; at the DCM, dmdA abundance was positively correlated with temperature. Based on gene abundance, we hypothesize that SAR11 bacterioplankton dominate DMSP cycling in the oligotrophic NPSG, with lesser but consistent involvement of other members of the bacterioplankton community. PMID:22327587

  4. Mechanisms of control of gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, B.; Gage, L.P.; Siddiqui, M.A.Q.; Skalka, A.M.; Weissbach, H.

    1987-01-01

    This book examines an array of topics on the regulation of gene expression, including an examination of DNA-protein interactions and the role of oncogene proteins in normal and abnormal cellular responses. The book focuses on the control of mRNA transcription in eykaryotes and delineates other areas including gene regulation in prokaryotes and control of stable RNA synthesis.

  5. Efficacy of Bacterial Seed Treatments for Controlling Pythium Root Rot of Winter Wheat

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. A. Milus; C. S. Rothrock

    1997-01-01

    Milus, E. A., and Rothrock, C. S. 1997. Effi cacy of bacterial seed treatments for controlling Pythium root rot of winter wheat. Plant Dis. 81:180-184. Pythium root rot, caused by various Pythium spp., is a widespread disease of wheat. The objec- tive of this study was to identify bacterial strains from wheat roots in Arkansas that suppressed Pythium root rot

  6. Bacterial social engagements

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jennifer M. Henke; Bonnie L. Bassler

    2004-01-01

    Quorum sensing is a process that enables bacteria to communicate using secreted signaling molecules called autoinducers. This process enables a population of bac- teria to regulate gene expression collectively and, there- fore, control behavior on a community-wide scale. Quorum sensing is widespread in the bacterial world and, generally, processes controlled by quorum sensing are unproductive when undertaken by an individual

  7. Phylogeographic reconstruction of a bacterial species with high levels of lateral gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Phylogeographic reconstruction of some bacterial populations is hindered by low diversity coupled with high levels of lateral gene transfer. A comparison of recombination levels and diversity at seven housekeeping genes for eleven bacterial species, most of which are commonly cited as having high levels of lateral gene transfer shows that the relative contributions of homologous recombination versus mutation for Burkholderia pseudomallei is over two times higher than for Streptococcus pneumoniae and is thus the highest value yet reported in bacteria. Despite the potential for homologous recombination to increase diversity, B. pseudomallei exhibits a relative lack of diversity at these loci. In these situations, whole genome genotyping of orthologous shared single nucleotide polymorphism loci, discovered using next generation sequencing technologies, can provide very large data sets capable of estimating core phylogenetic relationships. We compared and searched 43 whole genome sequences of B. pseudomallei and its closest relatives for single nucleotide polymorphisms in orthologous shared regions to use in phylogenetic reconstruction. Results Bayesian phylogenetic analyses of >14,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms yielded completely resolved trees for these 43 strains with high levels of statistical support. These results enable a better understanding of a separate analysis of population differentiation among >1,700 B. pseudomallei isolates as defined by sequence data from seven housekeeping genes. We analyzed this larger data set for population structure and allele sharing that can be attributed to lateral gene transfer. Our results suggest that despite an almost panmictic population, we can detect two distinct populations of B. pseudomallei that conform to biogeographic patterns found in many plant and animal species. That is, separation along Wallace's Line, a biogeographic boundary between Southeast Asia and Australia. Conclusion We describe an Australian origin for B. pseudomallei, characterized by a single introduction event into Southeast Asia during a recent glacial period, and variable levels of lateral gene transfer within populations. These patterns provide insights into mechanisms of genetic diversification in B. pseudomallei and its closest relatives, and provide a framework for integrating the traditionally separate fields of population genetics and phylogenetics for other bacterial species with high levels of lateral gene transfer. PMID:19922616

  8. Multiplex immune-related genes expression analysis response to bacterial challenge in mud crab, Scylla paramamosain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fengying; Jiang, Keji; Sun, Manman; Zhang, Dan; Ma, Lingbo

    2013-02-01

    Crabs lack an acquired adaptive immune system and host defense is believed to depend entirely on innate, non-adaptive mechanisms to resist invasion by pathogens. Discovery of immune-related factors are helpful for understanding the molecular response of crabs to pathogens. The mud crab Scylla paramamosain is an important marine species for aquaculture in China because of its high nutritional value for humans. In recent years, the crab is prone to being infected by microbes with the enlargement of breeding scale. In this study, eight immune-related genes were analyzed by multiplex genes expression analysis using the GenomeLab GeXP analysis system (Beckman Coulter). The expression levels of all the detected genes rose after challenged by the live bacteria, but the levels of only four genes (C-type lectin, alpha 2-macroglobulin, HSP70 and thioredoxin 1) increased after challenge in heat-killed bacteria group. So the live bacteria were more effective in motivating expressions of immune factors than heat-killed bacteria. However, the transcript of C-type lectin firstly increased at 1 h after challenge in both heat-killed and live bacteria group. This indicated that C-type lectin was a quite susceptive immune factor responding to external pathogen. In group challenged by live bacteria, the genes of alpha 2-macroglobulin, HSP40, thioredoxin 1 and prophenoloxidase activating factor (PPAF) showed response earlier than the other genes. The rise of PPAF expression preceded prophenoloxidase (proPO), which suggested that PPAF might trigger production of proPO transcripts in the early stage of phenoloxidase reaction system. C-type lectin, proPO, thioredoxin 1, HSP40, and alpha 2-macroglobulin are very important immunity factors in response to bacterial infection. According to the result of heat-killed group, HSP70 is a sensitively inductive factor to foreign stimulus compared with the other genes. The multi-gene analysis presented an alternative approach for screening of immune-related genes, and provided a more global overview of genes transcript alteration in response to bacterial challenge. PMID:23231853

  9. A polyketide synthase-peptide synthetase gene cluster from an uncultured bacterial symbiont of Paederus beetles

    PubMed Central

    Piel, Jörn

    2002-01-01

    Many drug candidates from marine and terrestrial invertebrates are suspected metabolites of uncultured bacterial symbionts. The antitumor polyketides of the pederin family, isolated from beetles and sponges, are an example. Drug development from such sources is commonly hampered by low yields and the difficulty of sustaining invertebrate cultures. To obtain insight into the true producer and find alternative supplies of these rare drug candidates, the putative pederin biosynthesis genes were cloned from total DNA of Paederus fuscipes beetles, which use this compound for chemical defense. Sequence analysis of the gene cluster and adjacent regions revealed the presence of ORFs with typical bacterial architecture and homologies. The ped cluster, which is present only in beetle specimens with high pederin content, is located on a 54-kb region bordered by transposase pseudogenes and encodes a mixed modular polyketide synthase/nonribosomal peptide synthetase. Notably, none of the modules contains regions with homology to acyltransferase domains, but two copies of isolated monodomain acyltransferase genes were found at the upstream end of the cluster. In line with an involvement in pederin biosynthesis, the upstream cluster region perfectly mirrors pederin structure. The unexpected presence of additional polyketide synthase/nonribosomal peptide synthetase modules reveals surprising insights into the evolutionary relationship between pederin-type pathways in beetles and sponges. PMID:12381784

  10. A polyketide synthase-peptide synthetase gene cluster from an uncultured bacterial symbiont of Paederus beetles.

    PubMed

    Piel, Jörn

    2002-10-29

    Many drug candidates from marine and terrestrial invertebrates are suspected metabolites of uncultured bacterial symbionts. The antitumor polyketides of the pederin family, isolated from beetles and sponges, are an example. Drug development from such sources is commonly hampered by low yields and the difficulty of sustaining invertebrate cultures. To obtain insight into the true producer and find alternative supplies of these rare drug candidates, the putative pederin biosynthesis genes were cloned from total DNA of Paederus fuscipes beetles, which use this compound for chemical defense. Sequence analysis of the gene cluster and adjacent regions revealed the presence of ORFs with typical bacterial architecture and homologies. The ped cluster, which is present only in beetle specimens with high pederin content, is located on a 54-kb region bordered by transposase pseudogenes and encodes a mixed modular polyketide synthase/nonribosomal peptide synthetase. Notably, none of the modules contains regions with homology to acyltransferase domains, but two copies of isolated monodomain acyltransferase genes were found at the upstream end of the cluster. In line with an involvement in pederin biosynthesis, the upstream cluster region perfectly mirrors pederin structure. The unexpected presence of additional polyketide synthase/nonribosomal peptide synthetase modules reveals surprising insights into the evolutionary relationship between pederin-type pathways in beetles and sponges. PMID:12381784

  11. Comparing wastewater chemicals, indicator bacteria concentrations, and bacterial pathogen genes as fecal pollution indicators

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haack, S.K.; Duris, J.W.; Fogarty, L.R.; Kolpin, D.W.; Focazio, M.J.; Furlong, E.T.; Meyer, M.T.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) (fecal coliforms, Escherichia coli [EC], and enterococci [ENT]) concentrations with a wide array of typical organic wastewater chemicals and selected bacterial genes as indicators of fecal pollution in water samples collected at or near 18 surface water drinking water intakes. Genes tested included esp (indicating human-pathogenic ENT) and nine genes associated with various animal sources of shiga-toxin-producing EC (STEC). Fecal pollution was indicated by genes and/or chemicals for 14 of the 18 tested samples, with little relation to FIB standards. Of 13 samples with <50 EC 100 mL-1, human pharmaceuticals or chemical indicators of wastewater treatment plant effluent occurred in six, veterinary antibiotics were detected in three, and stx1 or stx2 genes (indicating varying animal sources of STEC) were detected in eight. Only the EC eaeA gene was positively correlated with FIB concentrations. Human-source fecal pollution was indicated by the esp gene and the human pharmaceutical carbamazepine in one of the nine samples that met all FIB recreational water quality standards. Escherichia coli rfbO157 and stx2c genes, which are typically associated with cattle sources and are of potential human health significance, were detected in one sample in the absence of tested chemicals. Chemical and gene-based indicators of fecal contamination may be present even when FIB standards are met, and some may, unlike FIB, indicate potential sources. Application of multiple water quality indicators with variable environmental persistence and fate may yield greater confidence in fecal pollution assessment and may inform remediation decisions. Copyright ?? 2009 by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

  12. Ras GTPase-like protein MglA, a controller of bacterial social-motility in Myxobacteria, has evolved to control bacterial predation by Bdellovibrio.

    PubMed

    Milner, David S; Till, Rob; Cadby, Ian; Lovering, Andrew L; Basford, Sarah M; Saxon, Emma B; Liddell, Susan; Williams, Laura E; Sockett, R Elizabeth

    2014-04-01

    Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus invade Gram-negative bacteria in a predatory process requiring Type IV pili (T4P) at a single invasive pole, and also glide on surfaces to locate prey. Ras-like G-protein MglA, working with MglB and RomR in the deltaproteobacterium Myxococcus xanthus, regulates adventurous gliding and T4P-mediated social motility at both M. xanthus cell poles. Our bioinformatic analyses suggested that the GTPase activating protein (GAP)-encoding gene mglB was lost in Bdellovibrio, but critical residues for MglA(Bd) GTP-binding are conserved. Deletion of mglA(Bd) abolished prey-invasion, but not gliding, and reduced T4P formation. MglA(Bd) interacted with a previously uncharacterised tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain protein Bd2492, which we show localises at the single invasive pole and is required for predation. Bd2492 and RomR also interacted with cyclic-di-GMP-binding receptor CdgA, required for rapid prey-invasion. Bd2492, RomR(Bd) and CdgA localize to the invasive pole and may facilitate MglA-docking. Bd2492 was encoded from an operon encoding a TamAB-like secretion system. The TamA protein and RomR were found, by gene deletion tests, to be essential for viability in both predatory and non-predatory modes. Control proteins, which regulate bipolar T4P-mediated social motility in swarming groups of deltaproteobacteria, have adapted in evolution to regulate the anti-social process of unipolar prey-invasion in the "lone-hunter" Bdellovibrio. Thus GTP-binding proteins and cyclic-di-GMP inputs combine at a regulatory hub, turning on prey-invasion and allowing invasion and killing of bacterial pathogens and consequent predatory growth of Bdellovibrio. PMID:24721965

  13. Ras GTPase-Like Protein MglA, a Controller of Bacterial Social-Motility in Myxobacteria, Has Evolved to Control Bacterial Predation by Bdellovibrio

    PubMed Central

    Milner, David S.; Till, Rob; Cadby, Ian; Lovering, Andrew L.; Basford, Sarah M.; Saxon, Emma B.; Liddell, Susan; Williams, Laura E.; Sockett, R. Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus invade Gram-negative bacteria in a predatory process requiring Type IV pili (T4P) at a single invasive pole, and also glide on surfaces to locate prey. Ras-like G-protein MglA, working with MglB and RomR in the deltaproteobacterium Myxococcus xanthus, regulates adventurous gliding and T4P-mediated social motility at both M. xanthus cell poles. Our bioinformatic analyses suggested that the GTPase activating protein (GAP)-encoding gene mglB was lost in Bdellovibrio, but critical residues for MglABd GTP-binding are conserved. Deletion of mglABd abolished prey-invasion, but not gliding, and reduced T4P formation. MglABd interacted with a previously uncharacterised tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain protein Bd2492, which we show localises at the single invasive pole and is required for predation. Bd2492 and RomR also interacted with cyclic-di-GMP-binding receptor CdgA, required for rapid prey-invasion. Bd2492, RomRBd and CdgA localize to the invasive pole and may facilitate MglA-docking. Bd2492 was encoded from an operon encoding a TamAB-like secretion system. The TamA protein and RomR were found, by gene deletion tests, to be essential for viability in both predatory and non-predatory modes. Control proteins, which regulate bipolar T4P-mediated social motility in swarming groups of deltaproteobacteria, have adapted in evolution to regulate the anti-social process of unipolar prey-invasion in the “lone-hunter” Bdellovibrio. Thus GTP-binding proteins and cyclic-di-GMP inputs combine at a regulatory hub, turning on prey-invasion and allowing invasion and killing of bacterial pathogens and consequent predatory growth of Bdellovibrio. PMID:24721965

  14. An integrated analysis of plant and bacterial gene expression in symbiotic root nodules using laser-capture microdissection coupled to RNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Roux, Brice; Rodde, Nathalie; Jardinaud, Marie-Françoise; Timmers, Ton; Sauviac, Laurent; Cottret, Ludovic; Carrère, Sébastien; Sallet, Erika; Courcelle, Emmanuel; Moreau, Sandra; Debellé, Frédéric; Capela, Delphine; de Carvalho-Niebel, Fernanda; Gouzy, Jérôme; Bruand, Claude; Gamas, Pascal

    2014-03-01

    Rhizobium-induced root nodules are specialized organs for symbiotic nitrogen fixation. Indeterminate-type nodules are formed from an apical meristem and exhibit a spatial zonation which corresponds to successive developmental stages. To get a dynamic and integrated view of plant and bacterial gene expression associated with nodule development, we used a sensitive and comprehensive approach based upon oriented high-depth RNA sequencing coupled to laser microdissection of nodule regions. This study, focused on the association between the model legume Medicago truncatula and its symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti, led to the production of 942 million sequencing read pairs that were unambiguously mapped on plant and bacterial genomes. Bioinformatic and statistical analyses enabled in-depth comparison, at a whole-genome level, of gene expression in specific nodule zones. Previously characterized symbiotic genes displayed the expected spatial pattern of expression, thus validating the robustness of our approach. We illustrate the use of this resource by examining gene expression associated with three essential elements of nodule development, namely meristem activity, cell differentiation and selected signaling processes related to bacterial Nod factors and redox status. We found that transcription factor genes essential for the control of the root apical meristem were also expressed in the nodule meristem, while the plant mRNAs most enriched in nodules compared with roots were mostly associated with zones comprising both plant and bacterial partners. The data, accessible on a dedicated website, represent a rich resource for microbiologists and plant biologists to address a variety of questions of both fundamental and applied interest. PMID:24483147

  15. RNAi knock-down of the Litopenaeus vannamei Toll gene (LvToll) significantly increases mortality and reduces bacterial clearance after challenge with Vibrio harveyi.

    PubMed

    Han-Ching Wang, Kc; Tseng, Chun-Wei; Lin, Han-You; Chen, I-Tung; Chen, Ya-Hui; Chen, Yi-Min; Chen, Tzong-Yueh; Yang, Huey-Lang

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we used real-time PCR to simultaneously monitor the responses of 12 key genes of the shrimp innate immune system in Litopenaeus vannamei after challenge with Vibrio harveyi. In the proPO activating system, we found that proPO was up-regulated (3.3x control at 36hpi). The hemolymph clotting genes transglutaminase (TGase) and clotting protein were also up-regulated, as were 5 genes in the antimicrobial peptide system (ALF, Crustin, Lyz, PEN2 and PEN4), with only PEN3 showing no significant changes. In the antioxidant defense system, SOD was slightly elevated while GPx was substantially down-regulated. In the pattern recognition receptor system, at 24hpi, the Toll gene (LvToll) showed the highest relative increase in expression level of all the investigated genes (15x greater than the sterile seawater control). In the second part of this study, when LvToll was knocked down by RNAi silencing, there was no effect on either survival rates or bacterial number in unchallenged shrimp. There was also no difference in mortality rates between control shrimp and LvToll-silenced shrimp when these two groups were challenged with a viral pathogen (white spot syndrome virus; WSSV). However, when LvToll-silenced shrimp were challenged by V. harveyi, there was a significant increase in mortality and bacterial CFU counts. We note that the increase in bacterial CFU count occurred even though treatment with EGFP dsRNA had the opposite effect of reducing the CFU counts. We conclude that LvToll is an important factor in the shrimp innate immune response to acute V. harveyi infection, but not to WSSV. PMID:19698743

  16. Distribution and Properties of the Genes Encoding the Biosynthesis of the Bacterial Cofactor, Pyrroloquinoline Quinone†

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yao-Qing; Bonnot, Florence; Imsand, Erin M.; RoseFigura, Jordan M.; Sjölander, Kimmen; Klinman, Judith P.

    2012-01-01

    Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) is a small, redox-active molecule that serves as a cofactor for several bacterial dehydrogenases, introducing pathways for carbon utilization that confer a growth advantage. Early studies had implicated a ribosomally translated peptide as the substrate for PQQ production. This study presents a sequence and structure based analysis of the components of the pqq operon. We find the necessary components for PQQ production are present in 126 prokaryotes, most of which are Gram- negative and a number of which are pathogens. A total of five gene products, PqqA, PqqB, PqqC, PqqD and PqqE, are concluded to be obligatory for PQQ production. Three of the gene products in the pqq operon, PqqB, PqqC and PqqE, are members of large protein superfamilies. By combining evolutionary conservation patterns with information from three-dimensional structures, we are able to differentiate the gene products involved in PQQ biosynthesis from those with divergent functions. The observed persistence of a conserved gene order within analyzed operons strongly suggests a role for protein/protein interactions in the course of cofactor biosynthesis. These studies propose previously unidentified roles for several of the gene products as well as possible new targets for antibiotic design and application. PMID:22324760

  17. Novel terpenes generated by heterologous expression of bacterial terpene synthase genes in an engineered Streptomyces host.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yuuki; Arima, Shiho; Nagamitsu, Tohru; Johmoto, Kohei; Uekusa, Hidehiro; Eguchi, Tadashi; Shin-Ya, Kazuo; Cane, David E; Ikeda, Haruo

    2015-06-01

    Mining of bacterial genome data has revealed numerous presumptive terpene synthases. Heterologous expression of several putative terpene synthase genes in an engineered Streptomyces host has revealed 13 newly discovered terpenes whose GC-MS and NMR data did not match with any known compounds in spectroscopic databases. Each of the genes encoding the corresponding terpene synthases were silent in their parent microorganisms. Heterologous expression and detailed NMR spectroscopic analysis allowed assignment of the structures of 13 new cyclic terpenes. Among these newly identified compounds, two were found to be linear triquinane sesquiterpenes that have never previously been isolated from bacteria or any other source. The remaining 11 new compounds were shown to be diterpene hydrocarbons and alcohol, including hydropyrene (1), hydropyrenol (2), tsukubadiene (11) and odyverdienes A (12) and B (13) each displaying a novel diterpene skeleton that had not previously been reported. PMID:25605043

  18. Recruitment in the sea: bacterial genes required for inducing larval settlement in a polychaete worm

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ying; Callahan, Sean; Hadfield, Michael G.

    2012-01-01

    Metamorphically competent larvae of the marine tubeworm Hydroides elegans can be induced to metamorphose by biofilms of the bacterium Pseudoalteromonas luteoviolacea strain HI1. Mutational analysis was used to identify four genes that are necessary for metamorphic induction and encode functions that may be related to cell adhesion and bacterial secretion systems. No major differences in biofilm characteristics, such as biofilm cell density, thickness, biomass and EPS biomass, were seen between biofilms composed of P. luteoviolacea (HI1) and mutants lacking one of the four genes. The analysis indicates that factors other than those relating to physical characteristics of biofilms are critical to the inductive capacity of P. luteoviolacea (HI1), and that essential inductive molecular components are missing in the non-inductive deletion-mutant strains. PMID:22355742

  19. Selected Lactic Acid-Producing Bacterial Isolates with the Capacity to Reduce Salmonella Translocation and Virulence Gene Expression in Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaojian; Brisbin, Jennifer; Yu, Hai; Wang, Qi; Yin, Fugui; Zhang, Yonggang; Sabour, Parviz; Sharif, Shayan; Gong, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    Background Probiotics have been used to control Salmonella colonization/infection in chickens. Yet the mechanisms of probiotic effects are not fully understood. This study has characterized our previously-selected lactic acid-producing bacterial (LAB) isolates for controlling Salmonella infection in chickens, particularly the mechanism underlying the control. Methodology/Principal Findings In vitro studies were conducted to characterize 14 LAB isolates for their tolerance to low pH (2.0) and high bile salt (0.3–1.5%) and susceptibility to antibiotics. Three chicken infection trials were subsequently carried out to evaluate four of the isolates for reducing the burden of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in the broiler cecum. Chicks were gavaged with LAB cultures (106–7 CFU/chick) or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) at 1 day of age followed by Salmonella challenge (104 CFU/chick) next day. Samples of cecal digesta, spleen, and liver were examined for Salmonella counts on days 1, 3, or 4 post-challenge. Salmonella in the cecum from Trial 3 was also assessed for the expression of ten virulence genes located in its pathogenicity island-1 (SPI-1). These genes play a role in Salmonella intestinal invasion. Tested LAB isolates (individuals or mixed cultures) were unable to lower Salmonella burden in the chicken cecum, but able to attenuate Salmonella infection in the spleen and liver. The LAB treatments also reduced almost all SPI-1 virulence gene expression (9 out of 10) in the chicken cecum, particularly at the low dose. In vitro treatment with the extracellular culture fluid from a LAB culture also down-regulated most SPI-1 virulence gene expression. Conclusions/Significance The possible correlation between attenuation of Salmonella infection in the chicken spleen and liver and reduction of Salmonella SPI-1 virulence gene expression in the chicken cecum by LAB isolates is a new observation. Suppression of Salmonella virulence gene expression in vivo can be one of the strategies for controlling Salmonella infection in chickens. PMID:24728092

  20. Activating the expression of bacterial cryptic genes by rpoB mutations in RNA polymerase or by rare earth elements.

    PubMed

    Ochi, Kozo; Tanaka, Yukinori; Tojo, Shigeo

    2014-02-01

    Since bacteria were found to contain genes encoding enzymes that synthesize a plethora of potential secondary metabolites, interest has grown in the activation of these cryptic pathways. Homologous and heterologous expression of these cryptic secondary metabolite-biosynthetic genes, often "silent" under ordinary laboratory fermentation conditions, may lead to the discovery of novel secondary metabolites. We review current progress on this topic, describing concepts for activating silent genes. We especially focus on genetic manipulation of transcription and translation, as well as the utilization of rare earth elements as a novel method to activate the silent genes. The possible roles of silent genes in bacterial physiology are also discussed. PMID:24127067

  1. Copper control of bacterial nitrous oxide emission and its impact on vitamin B12-dependent metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Matthew J.; Gates, Andrew J.; Appia-Ayme, Corinne; Rowley, Gary; Richardson, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Global agricultural emissions of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O) have increased by around 20% over the last 100 y, but regulation of these emissions and their impact on bacterial cellular metabolism are poorly understood. Denitrifying bacteria convert nitrate in soils to inert di-nitrogen gas (N2) via N2O and the biochemistry of this process has been studied extensively in Paracoccus denitrificans. Here we demonstrate that expression of the gene encoding the nitrous oxide reductase (NosZ), which converts N2O to N2, is regulated in response to the extracellular copper concentration. We show that elevated levels of N2O released as a consequence of decreased cellular NosZ activity lead to the bacterium switching from vitamin B12-dependent to vitamin B12-independent biosynthetic pathways, through the transcriptional modulation of genes controlled by vitamin B12 riboswitches. This inhibitory effect of N2O can be rescued by addition of exogenous vitamin B12. PMID:24248380

  2. Variation of nonylphenol-degrading gene abundance and bacterial community structure in bioaugmented sediment microcosm.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhao; Yang, Yuyin; Sun, Weimin; Dai, Yu; Xie, Shuguang

    2015-02-01

    Nonylphenol (NP) can accumulate in river sediment. Bioaugmentation is an attractive option to dissipate heavy NP pollution in river sediment. In this study, two NP degraders were isolated from crude oil-polluted soil and river sediment. Microcosms were constructed to test their ability to degrade NP in river sediment. The shift in the proportion of NP-degrading genes and bacterial community structure in sediment microcosms were characterized using quantitative PCR assay and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the soil isolate belonged to genus Stenotrophomonas, while the sediment isolate was a Sphingobium species. Both of them could almost completely clean up a high level of NP in river sediment (150 mg/kg NP) in 10 or 14 days after inoculation. An increase in the proportion of alkB and sMO genes was observed in sediment microcosms inoculated with Stenotrophomonas strain Y1 and Sphingobium strain Y2, respectively. Moreover, bioaugmentation using Sphingobium strain Y2 could have a strong impact on sediment bacterial community structure, while inoculation of Stenotrophomonas strain Y1 illustrated a weak impact. This study can provide some new insights towards NP biodegradation and bioremediation. PMID:25277711

  3. Plasticity and epistasis strongly affect bacterial fitness after losing multiple metabolic genes.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Glen; Waschina, Silvio; Kaleta, Christoph; Kost, Christian

    2015-05-01

    Many bacterial lineages lack seemingly essential metabolic genes. Previous work suggested selective benefits could drive the loss of biosynthetic functions from bacterial genomes when the corresponding metabolites are sufficiently available in the environment. However, the factors that govern this "genome streamlining" remain poorly understood. Here we determine the effect of plasticity and epistasis on the fitness of Escherichia coli genotypes from whose genome biosynthetic genes for one, two, or three different amino acids have been deleted. Competitive fitness experiments between auxotrophic mutants and prototrophic wild-type cells in one of two carbon environments revealed that plasticity and epistasis strongly affected the mutants' fitness individually and interactively. Positive and negative epistatic interactions were prevalent, yet on average cancelled each other out. Moreover, epistasis correlated negatively with the expected effects of combined auxotrophy-causing mutations, thus producing a pattern of diminishing returns. Moreover, computationally analyzing 1,432 eubacterial metabolic networks revealed that most pairs of auxotrophies co-occurred significantly more often than expected by chance, suggesting epistatic interactions and/or environmental factors favored these combinations. Our results demonstrate that both the genetic background and environmental conditions determine the adaptive value of a loss-of-biochemical-function mutation and that fitness gains decelerate, as more biochemical functions are lost. PMID:25765095

  4. Incidence, contributing factors, and control of bacterial pathogens in produce

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert E. Brackett

    1999-01-01

    The importance of bacterial pathogens in the transmission of foodborne illness has become apparent in recent years. Several large, well-publicized outbreaks of foodborne illness have been linked to cantaloupe, tomatoes, lettuce, alfalfa sprouts, and both apple and orange juices. In addition, numerous other smaller scale outbreaks linked to these and other commodities have also been reported. Although contributing factors have

  5. Identification and Expression Analysis of a Gene Encoding a Bacterial-Type Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase from Arabidopsis and Rice1

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Rosario; Cejudo, Francisco Javier

    2003-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) is distributed in plants and bacteria but is not found in fungi and animal cells. Important motifs for enzyme activity and structure are conserved in plant and bacterial PEPCs, with the exception of a phosphorylation domain present at the N terminus of all plant PEPCs reported so far, which is absent in the bacterial enzymes. Here, we describe a gene from Arabidopsis, stated as Atppc4, encoding a PEPC, which shows more similarity to Escherichia coli than to plant PEPCs. Interestingly, this enzyme lacks the phosphorylation domain, hence indicating that it is a bacterial-type PEPC. Three additional PEPC genes are present in Arabidopsis, stated as Atppc1, Atppc2, and Atppc3, encoding typical plant-type enzymes. As most plant PEPC genes, Atppc1, Atppc2, and Atppc3 are formed by 10 exons interrupted by nine introns. In contrast, Atppc4 gene has an unusual structure formed by 20 exons. A bacterial-type PEPC gene was also identified in rice (Oryza sativa), stated as Osppc-b, therefore showing the presence of this type of PEPC in monocots. The phylogenetic analysis suggests that both plant-type and bacterial-type PEPCs diverged early during the evolution of plants from a common ancestor, probably the PEPC from ?-proteobacteria. The diversity of plant-type PEPCs in C3, C4, and Crassulacean acid metabolism plants is indicative of the evolutionary success of the regulation by phosphorylation of this enzyme. Although at a low level, the bacterial-type PEPC genes are expressed in Arabidopsis and rice. PMID:12805623

  6. High-Throughput Bioluminescence-Based Mutant Screening Strategy for Identification of Bacterial Virulence Genes?

    PubMed Central

    Karsi, Attila; Gülsoy, Nagihan; Corb, Erin; Dumpala, Pradeep R.; Lawrence, Mark L.

    2009-01-01

    A high-throughput bioluminescence screening procedure for identification of virulence genes in bacteria was developed and applied to the fish pathogen Edwardsiella ictaluri. A random transposon mutant library expressing bioluminescence was constructed and robotically arrayed on 384-well plates. Mutants were cultivated and mixed with catfish serum and neutrophils in 96-well plates, and bioluminescence was used to detect mutants that are more susceptible to killing by these host factors. The virulence and vaccine efficacy of selected mutants were determined in channel catfish. Transposon insertion sites in 13 mutants attenuated in the natural host were mapped to the E. ictaluri genome. Ten unique genes were mutated, including genes encoding a negative regulator of sigmaE activity, a glycine cleavage system protein, tricarboxylic acid cycle enzymes, an O polysaccharide biosynthesis enzyme, proteins encoded on the native plasmid pEI1, and a fimbrial chaperon protein. Three of these mutants were found to have potential as live attenuated vaccines. This study demonstrates a novel application of bioluminescence to identify bacterial genes required for host resistance; as a result, efficacious and genetically defined live attenuated vaccine candidates were developed. PMID:19201969

  7. Bacterial pathogen gene abundance and relation to recreational water quality at seven Great Lakes beaches.

    PubMed

    Oster, Ryan J; Wijesinghe, Rasanthi U; Haack, Sheridan K; Fogarty, Lisa R; Tucker, Taaja R; Riley, Stephen C

    2014-12-16

    Quantitative assessment of bacterial pathogens, their geographic variability, and distribution in various matrices at Great Lakes beaches are limited. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) was used to test for genes from E. coli O157:H7 (eaeO157), shiga-toxin producing E. coli (stx2), Campylobacter jejuni (mapA), Shigella spp. (ipaH), and a Salmonella enterica-specific (SE) DNA sequence at seven Great Lakes beaches, in algae, water, and sediment. Overall, detection frequencies were mapA>stx2>ipaH>SE>eaeO157. Results were highly variable among beaches and matrices; some correlations with environmental conditions were observed for mapA, stx2, and ipaH detections. Beach seasonal mean mapA abundance in water was correlated with beach seasonal mean log10 E. coli concentration. At one beach, stx2 gene abundance was positively correlated with concurrent daily E. coli concentrations. Concentration distributions for stx2, ipaH, and mapA within algae, sediment, and water were statistically different (Non-Detect and Data Analysis in R). Assuming 10, 50, or 100% of gene copies represented viable and presumably infective cells, a quantitative microbial risk assessment tool developed by Michigan State University indicated a moderate probability of illness for Campylobacter jejuni at the study beaches, especially where recreational water quality criteria were exceeded. Pathogen gene quantification may be useful for beach water quality management. PMID:25423586

  8. Isolation of identical nitrilase genes from multiple bacterial strains and real-time PCR detection of the genes from soils provides evidence of horizontal gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Coffey, Lee; Clarke, Adrienne; Duggan, Patrick; Tambling, Karen; Horgan, Serenia; Dowling, David; O'Reilly, Catherine

    2009-10-01

    Bacterial enzymes capable of nitrile hydrolysis have significant industrial potential. Microbacterium sp. AJ115, Rhodococcus erythropolis AJ270 and AJ300 were isolated from the same location in England and harbour identical nitrile hydratase/amidase gene clusters. Strain AJ270 has been well studied due to its nitrile hydratase and amidase activity. R. erythropolis ITCBP was isolated from Denmark and carries a very similar nitrile hydratase/amidase gene cluster. In this study, an identical nitrilase gene (nit1) was isolated from the four strains, and the nitrilase from strain AJ270 cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Analysis of the recombinant nitrilase has shown it to be functional with activity demonstrated towards phenylacetonitrile. A real-time PCR TaqMan assay was developed that allowed nit1 detection directly from soil enrichment cultures without DNA extraction, with nit1 detected in all samples tested. Real-time PCR screening of isolates from these soils resulted in the isolation of nit1 and also very similar nitrilase gene nit2 from a number of Burkholderia sp. The genes nit1 and nit2 have also been detected in many bacteria of different genera but are unstable in these isolates. It is likely that the genes were acquired by horizontal gene transfer and may be wide-spread in the environment. PMID:19730817

  9. Assessment of Bacterial bph Gene in Amazonian Dark Earth and Their Adjacent Soils

    PubMed Central

    Brossi, Maria Julia de Lima; Mendes, Lucas William; Germano, Mariana Gomes; Lima, Amanda Barbosa; Tsai, Siu Mui

    2014-01-01

    Amazonian Anthrosols are known to harbour distinct and highly diverse microbial communities. As most of the current assessments of these communities are based on taxonomic profiles, the functional gene structure of these communities, such as those responsible for key steps in the carbon cycle, mostly remain elusive. To gain insights into the diversity of catabolic genes involved in the degradation of hydrocarbons in anthropogenic horizons, we analysed the bacterial bph gene community structure, composition and abundance using T-RFLP, 454-pyrosequencing and quantitative PCR essays, respectively. Soil samples were collected in two Brazilian Amazon Dark Earth (ADE) sites and at their corresponding non-anthropogenic adjacent soils (ADJ), under two different land use systems, secondary forest (SF) and manioc cultivation (M). Redundancy analysis of T-RFLP data revealed differences in bph gene structure according to both soil type and land use. Chemical properties of ADE soils, such as high organic carbon and organic matter, as well as effective cation exchange capacity and pH, were significantly correlated with the structure of bph communities. Also, the taxonomic affiliation of bph gene sequences revealed the segregation of community composition according to the soil type. Sequences at ADE sites were mostly affiliated to aromatic hydrocarbon degraders belonging to the genera Streptomyces, Sphingomonas, Rhodococcus, Mycobacterium, Conexibacter and Burkholderia. In both land use sites, shannon's diversity indices based on the bph gene data were higher in ADE than ADJ soils. Collectively, our findings provide evidence that specific properties in ADE soils shape the structure and composition of bph communities. These results provide a basis for further investigations focusing on the bio-exploration of novel enzymes with potential use in the biotechnology/biodegradation industry. PMID:24927167

  10. Embryonal brain tumors and developmental control genes

    SciTech Connect

    Aguzzi, A. [Univ. Hospital, Schmelzbergstr (Switzerland)

    1995-12-31

    Cell proliferation in embryogenesis and neoplastic transformation is thought to be controlled by similar sets of regulatory genes. This is certainly true for tumors of embryonic origin, such as Ewing sarcoma, Wilms` tumor and retinoblastoma, in which developmental control genes are either activated as oncogenes to promote proliferation, or are inactivated to eliminate their growth suppressing function. However, to date little is known about the genetic events underlying the pathogenesis of medulloblastoma, the most common brain tumor in children, which still carries an unfavourable prognosis. None of the common genetic alterations identified in other neuroectodermal tumors, such as mutation of the p53 gene or amplification of tyrosine kinase receptor genes, could be uncovered as key events in the formation of medulloblastoma. The identification of regulatory genes which are expressed in this pediatric brain tumor may provide an alternative approach to gain insight into the molecular aspects of tumor formation.

  11. Secondary Metabolites Control the Associated Bacterial Communities of Saprophytic Basidiomycotina Fungi

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho, Maira Peres; Türck, Patrick; Abraham, Wolf-Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Fungi grow under humid conditions and are, therefore, prone to biofilm infections. A 16S rRNA fingerprint analysis was performed on 49 sporocarps of Basidiomycotina in order to determine whether they are able to control these biofilms. Ninety-five bacterial phylotypes, comprising 4 phyla and 10 families, were identified. While ectomycorrhizal fungi harbored the highest bacterial diversity, saprophytic fungi showed little or no association with bacteria. Seven fungal species were screened for antimicrobial and antibiofilm activities. Biofilm formation and bacterial growth was inhibited by extracts obtained from saprophytic fungi, which confirmed the hypothesis that many fungi modulate biofilm colonization on their sporocarps. PMID:25904019

  12. Bacterial community structure of acid-impacted lakes: what controls diversity?

    PubMed

    Percent, Sascha F; Frischer, Marc E; Vescio, Paul A; Duffy, Ellen B; Milano, Vincenzo; McLellan, Maggie; Stevens, Brett M; Boylen, Charles W; Nierzwicki-Bauer, Sandra A

    2008-03-01

    Although it is recognized that acidification of freshwater systems results in decreased overall species richness of plants and animals, little is known about the response of aquatic microbial communities to acidification. In this study we examined bacterioplankton community diversity and structure in 18 lakes located in the Adirondack Park (in the state of New York in the United States) that were affected to various degrees by acidic deposition and assessed correlations with 31 physical and chemical parameters. The pH of these lakes ranged from 4.9 to 7.8. These studies were conducted as a component of the Adirondack Effects Assessment Program supported by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Thirty-one independent 16S rRNA gene libraries consisting of 2,135 clones were constructed from epilimnion and hypolimnion water samples. Bacterioplankton community composition was determined by sequencing and amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis of the clone libraries. Nineteen bacterial classes representing 95 subclasses were observed, but clone libraries were dominated by representatives of the Actinobacteria and Betaproteobacteria classes. Although the diversity and richness of bacterioplankton communities were positively correlated with pH, the overall community composition assessed by principal component analysis was not. The strongest correlations were observed between bacterioplankton communities and lake depth, hydraulic retention time, dissolved inorganic carbon, and nonlabile monomeric aluminum concentrations. While there was not an overall correlation between bacterioplankton community structure and pH, several bacterial classes, including the Alphaproteobacteria, were directly correlated with acidity. These results indicate that unlike more identifiable correlations between acidity and species richness for higher trophic levels, controls on bacterioplankton community structure are likely more complex, involving both direct and indirect processes. PMID:18245245

  13. Factors controlling bacterial production in marine and freshwater sediments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bettina C. Sander; Jacob Kalff

    1993-01-01

    We collected benthic bacterial production data measured by 3H thymidine incorporation (TTI) (25 studies), frequency of dividing cells (FDC) (3 studies), dark-C02 assimilation (1 study) and 3H-adenine uptake (2 studies) from the literature, which included 18 marine, 6 river, and 2 lake studies. In all of the studies that used the TTI method, 3H-DNA was isolated and incubations were carried

  14. DNA Microarray-Based Identification of Genes Controlled by Autoinducer 2Stimulated Quorum Sensing in Escherichia coli

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MATTHEW P. DELISA; CHI-FANG WU; LIANG WANG; JAMES J. VALDES; WILLIAM E. BENTLEY

    2001-01-01

    Bacterial cell-to-cell communication facilitates coordinated expression of specific genes in a growth rate-II and cell density-dependent manner, a process known as quorum sensing. While the discovery of a diffusible Escherichia coli signaling pheromone, termed autoinducer 2 (AI-2), has been made along with several quorum sensing genes, the overall number and coordination of genes controlled by quorum sensing through the AI-2

  15. Rapid pair-wise synteny analysis of large bacterial genomes using web-based GeneOrder4.0

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The growing whole genome sequence databases necessitate the development of user-friendly software tools to mine these data. Web-based tools are particularly useful to wet-bench biologists as they enable platform-independent analysis of sequence data, without having to perform complex programming tasks and software compiling. Findings GeneOrder4.0 is a web-based "on-the-fly" synteny and gene order analysis tool for comparative bacterial genomics (ca. 8 Mb). It enables the visualization of synteny by plotting protein similarity scores between two genomes and it also provides visual annotation of "hypothetical" proteins from older archived genomes based on more recent annotations. Conclusions The web-based software tool GeneOrder4.0 is a user-friendly application that has been updated to allow the rapid analysis of synteny and gene order in large bacterial genomes. It is developed with the wet-bench researcher in mind. PMID:20178631

  16. Nucleotide Diversity Analysis of Three Major Bacterial Blight Resistance Genes in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Bimolata, Waikhom; Kumar, Anirudh; M, Sai Kiran Reddy; Sundaram, Raman Meenakshi; Laha, Gouri Sankar; Qureshi, Insaf Ahmed; Ghazi, Irfan Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Nucleotide sequence polymorphisms among R gene alleles influence the process of co-evolutionary interaction between host and pathogen by shaping the response of host plants towards invading pathogens. Here, we present the DNA sequence polymorphisms and diversities present among natural alleles of three rice bacterial blight resistance genes, Xa21, Xa26 and xa5. The diversity was examined across different wild relatives and cultivars of Oryza species. Functional significance of selected alleles was evaluated through semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and real time PCR. The greatest nucleotide diversity and singleton variable sites (SVS) were present in Xa26 (? = 0.01958; SVS = 182) followed by xa5 and Xa21 alleles. The highest frequency of single nucleotide polymorphisms were observed in Xa21 alleles and least in xa5. Transition bias was observed in all the genes and ‘G’ to ‘A’ transitions were more favored than other form of transitions. Neutrality tests failed to show the presence of selection at these loci, though negative Tajima’s D values indicate the presence of a rare form of polymorphisms. At the interspecies level, O. nivara exhibited more diversity than O. sativa. We have also identified two nearly identical resistant alleles of xa5 and two sequentially identical alleles of Xa21. The alleles of xa5 showed basal levels of expression while Xa21 alleles were functionally not expressed. PMID:25807168

  17. The Oral Bacterial Communities of Children with Well-Controlled HIV Infection and without HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Brittany E.; Mongodin, Emmanuel F.; Jones, Cheron E.; Chung, Michelle; Fraser, Claire M.; Tate, Anupama; Zeichner, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    The oral microbial community (microbiota) plays a critical role in human health and disease. Alterations in the oral microbiota may be associated with disorders such as gingivitis, periodontitis, childhood caries, alveolar osteitis, oral candidiasis and endodontic infections. In the immunosuppressed population, the spectrum of potential oral disease is even broader, encompassing candidiasis, necrotizing gingivitis, parotid gland enlargement, Kaposi’s sarcoma, oral warts and other diseases. Here, we used 454 pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes to examine the oral microbiome of saliva, mucosal and tooth samples from HIV-positive and negative children. Patient demographics and clinical characteristics were collected from a cross-section of patients undergoing routine dental care. Multiple specimens from different sampling sites in the mouth were collected for each patient. The goal of the study was to observe the potential diversity of the oral microbiota among individual patients, sample locations, HIV status and various dental characteristics. We found that there were significant differences in the microbiome among the enrolled patients, and between sampling locations. The analysis was complicated by uneven enrollment in the patient cohorts, with only five HIV-negative patients enrolled in the study and by the rapid improvement in the health of HIV-infected children between the time the study was conceived and completed. The generally good oral health of the HIV-negative patients limited the number of dental plaque samples that could be collected. We did not identify significant differences between well-controlled HIV-positive patients and HIV-negative controls, suggesting that well-controlled HIV-positive patients essentially harbor similar oral flora compared to patients without HIV. Nor were significant differences in the oral microbiota identified between different teeth or with different dental characteristics. Additional studies are needed to better characterize the oral microbiome in children and those with poorly-controlled HIV infections. PMID:26146997

  18. Natural transformation facilitates transfer of transposons, integrons and gene cassettes between bacterial species.

    PubMed

    Domingues, Sara; Harms, Klaus; Fricke, W Florian; Johnsen, Pål J; da Silva, Gabriela J; Nielsen, Kaare Magne

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated to what extent natural transformation acting on free DNA substrates can facilitate transfer of mobile elements including transposons, integrons and/or gene cassettes between bacterial species. Naturally transformable cells of Acinetobacter baylyi were exposed to DNA from integron-carrying strains of the genera Acinetobacter, Citrobacter, Enterobacter, Escherichia, Pseudomonas, and Salmonella to determine the nature and frequency of transfer. Exposure to the various DNA sources resulted in acquisition of antibiotic resistance traits as well as entire integrons and transposons, over a 24 h exposure period. DNA incorporation was not solely dependent on integrase functions or the genetic relatedness between species. DNA sequence analyses revealed that several mechanisms facilitated stable integration in the recipient genome depending on the nature of the donor DNA; homologous or heterologous recombination and various types of transposition (Tn21-like and IS26-like). Both donor strains and transformed isolates were extensively characterized by antimicrobial susceptibility testing, integron- and cassette-specific PCRs, DNA sequencing, pulsed field gel electrophoreses (PFGE), Southern blot hybridizations, and by re-transformation assays. Two transformant strains were also genome-sequenced. Our data demonstrate that natural transformation facilitates interspecies transfer of genetic elements, suggesting that the transient presence of DNA in the cytoplasm may be sufficient for genomic integration to occur. Our study provides a plausible explanation for why sequence-conserved transposons, IS elements and integrons can be found disseminated among bacterial species. Moreover, natural transformation of integron harboring populations of competent bacteria revealed that interspecies exchange of gene cassettes can be highly efficient, and independent on genetic relatedness between donor and recipient. In conclusion, natural transformation provides a much broader capacity for horizontal acquisitions of genetic elements and hence, resistance traits from divergent species than previously assumed. PMID:22876180

  19. Glycosylation Genes Expressed in Seam Cells Determine Complex Surface Properties and Bacterial Adhesion to the Cuticle of Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Gravato-Nobre, Maria J.; Stroud, Dave; O'Rourke, Delia; Darby, Creg; Hodgkin, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    The surface of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is poorly understood but critical for its interactions with the environment and with pathogens. We show here that six genes (bus-2, bus-4, and bus-12, together with the previously cloned srf-3, bus-8, and bus-17) encode proteins predicted to act in surface glycosylation, thereby affecting disease susceptibility, locomotory competence, and sexual recognition. Mutations in all six genes cause resistance to the bacterial pathogen Microbacterium nematophilum, and most of these mutations also affect bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation by Yersinia species, demonstrating that both infection and biofilm formation depend on interaction with complex surface carbohydrates. A new bacterial interaction, involving locomotory inhibition by a strain of Bacillus pumilus, reveals diversity in the surface properties of these mutants. Another biological property—contact recognition of hermaphrodites by males during mating—was also found to be impaired in mutants of all six genes. An important common feature is that all are expressed most strongly in seam cells, rather than in the main hypodermal syncytium, indicating that seam cells play the major role in secreting surface coat and consequently in determining environmental interactions. To test for possible redundancies in gene action, the 15 double mutants for this set of genes were constructed and examined, but no synthetic phenotypes were observed. Comparison of the six genes shows that each has distinctive properties, suggesting that they do not act in a linear pathway. PMID:20980242

  20. Cloning and expression of heat shock protein 70 gene in the haemocytes of pearl oyster (Pinctada fucata, Gould 1850) responding to bacterial challenge.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhongliang; Wu, Zaohe; Jian, Jichang; Lu, Yishan

    2009-04-01

    The cDNA of pearl oyster Pinctada fucata Hsp70 (designated PFHsp70) was cloned by EST and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) techniques. The full length of PFHsp70 cDNA was 2376 bp, consisting of a 5'-terminal untranslated region (UTR) of 89 bp, a 3' terminal UTR of 328 bp, and an open reading frame (ORF) of 1959 bp encoding a polypeptide of 652 amino acids with a theoretical molecular weight of 71.42 kDa and an estimated isoelectric point of 5.18. BLAST analysis revealed that the PFHsp70 gene shared high similarity with other Hsp70 genes. PFHsp70 contained all the three classical Hsp70 family signatures. The results indicated that the PFHsp70 was a member of the heat shock protein 70 family. Fluorescent real-time quantitative RT-PCR was used to examine the expression of PFHsp70 gene in haemocytes of P. fucata after the challenge of bacteria Vibrio alginolyticus. There was a clear time-dependent expression pattern of PFHsp70 after bacterial challenge, and the mRNA expression reached a maximum level at 4 h post-challenge, which returned to control level after 32 h. The up-regulated mRNA expression of PFHsp70 in P. fucata after bacterial challenge indicates that the Hsp70 gene is inducible and involved in immune response. PMID:19026750

  1. Bacterial transformation: distribution, shared mechanisms and divergent control.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Calum; Martin, Bernard; Fichant, Gwennaele; Polard, Patrice; Claverys, Jean-Pierre

    2014-03-01

    Natural bacterial transformation involves the internalization and chromosomal integration of DNA and has now been documented in ~80 species. Recent advances have established that phylogenetically distant species share conserved uptake and processing proteins but differ in the inducing cues and regulatory mechanisms that are involved. In this Review, we highlight divergent and common principles that govern the transformation process in different bacteria. We discuss how this cumulative knowledge enables the prediction of new transformable species and supports the idea that the main role of internalized DNA is in the generation of genetic diversity or in chromosome repair rather than in nutrition. PMID:24509783

  2. Factors controlling extremely productive heterotrophic bacterial communities in shallow soda pools.

    PubMed

    Eiler, A; Farnleitner, A H; Zechmeister, T C; Herzig, A; Hurban, C; Wesner, W; Krachler, R; Velimirov, B; Kirschner, A K T

    2003-07-01

    Dilute soda lakes are among the world's most productive environments and are usually dominated by dense blooms of cyanobacteria. Up to now, there has been little information available on heterotrophic bacterial abundance, production, and their controlling factors in these ecosystems. In the present study the main environmental factors responsible for the control of the heterotrophic bacterial community in five shallow soda pools in Eastern Austria were investigated during an annual cycle. Extremely high cyanobacterial numbers and heterotrophic bacterial numbers up to 307 x 10(9) L(-1) and 268 x 10(9) L(-1) were found, respectively. Bacterial secondary production rates up to 738 micro g C L(-1) h(-1) and specific growth rates up to 1.65 h(-1) were recorded in summer and represent the highest reported values for natural aquatic ecosystems. The combination of dense phytoplankton blooms, high temperature, high turbidity, and nutrient concentration due to evaporation is supposed to enable the development of such extremely productive microbial populations. By principal component analysis containing the data set of all five investigated pools, two factors were extracted which explained 62.5% of the total variation of the systems. The first factor could be interpreted as a turbidity factor; the second was assigned to as concentration factor. From this it was deduced that bacterial and cyanobacterial abundance were mainly controlled by wind-induced sediment resuspension and turbidity stabilized by the high pH and salinity and less by evaporative concentration of salinity and dissolved organic carbon. Bacterial production was clustered with temperature in factor 3, showing that bacterial growth was mainly controlled by temperature. The concept of describing the turbid water columns of the shallow soda pools as "fluid sediment" is discussed. PMID:12739080

  3. BPhyOG: An interactive server for genome-wide inference of bacterial phylogenies based on overlapping genes

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yingqin; Fu, Cong; Zhang, Da-Yong; Lin, Kui

    2007-01-01

    Background Overlapping genes (OGs) in bacterial genomes are pairs of adjacent genes of which the coding sequences overlap partly or entirely. With the rapid accumulation of sequence data, many OGs in bacterial genomes have now been identified. Indeed, these might prove a consistent feature across all microbial genomes. Our previous work suggests that OGs can be considered as robust markers at the whole genome level for the construction of phylogenies. An online, interactive web server for inferring phylogenies is needed for biologists to analyze phylogenetic relationships among a set of bacterial genomes of interest. Description BPhyOG is an online interactive server for reconstructing the phylogenies of completely sequenced bacterial genomes on the basis of their shared overlapping genes. It provides two tree-reconstruction methods: Neighbor Joining (NJ) and Unweighted Pair-Group Method using Arithmetic averages (UPGMA). Users can apply the desired method to generate phylogenetic trees, which are based on an evolutionary distance matrix for the selected genomes. The distance between two genomes is defined by the normalized number of their shared OG pairs. BPhyOG also allows users to browse the OGs that were used to infer the phylogenetic relationships. It provides detailed annotation for each OG pair and the features of the component genes through hyperlinks. Users can also retrieve each of the homologous OG pairs that have been determined among 177 genomes. It is a useful tool for analyzing the tree of life and overlapping genes from a genomic standpoint. Conclusion BPhyOG is a useful interactive web server for genome-wide inference of any potential evolutionary relationship among the genomes selected by users. It currently includes 177 completely sequenced bacterial genomes containing 79,855 OG pairs, the annotation and homologous OG pairs of which are integrated comprehensively. The reliability of phylogenies complemented by annotations make BPhyOG a powerful web server for genomic and genetic studies. It is freely available at . PMID:17650344

  4. Biodegradation of atrazine by three transgenic grasses and alfalfa expressing a modified bacterial atrazine chlorohydrolase gene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The widespread use of atrazine and other s-triazine herbicides to control weeds in agricultural production fields has impacted surface and ground water in the United States and elsewhere. We previously reported the cloning, sequencing, and expression of six genes involved in the atrazine biodegradat...

  5. Sludge as a potential important source of antibiotic resistance genes in both the bacterial and bacteriophage fractions.

    PubMed

    Calero-Cáceres, William; Melgarejo, Ana; Colomer-Lluch, Marta; Stoll, Claudia; Lucena, Francisco; Jofre, Juan; Muniesa, Maite

    2014-07-01

    The emergence and prevalence of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in the environment is a serious global health concern. ARGs found in bacteria can become mobilized in bacteriophage particles in the environment. Sludge derived from secondary treatment in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) constitutes a concentrated pool of bacteria and phages that are removed during the treatment process. This study evaluates the prevalence of ARGs in the bacterial and phage fractions of anaerobic digested sludge; five ARGs (blaTEM, blaCTX-M, qnrA, qnrS, and sul1) are quantified by qPCR. Comparison between the wastewater and sludge revealed a shift in the prevalence of ARGs (blaTEM and sul1 became more prevalent in sludge), suggesting there is a change in the bacterial and phage populations from wastewater to those selected during the secondary treatment and the later anaerobic mesophilic digestion of the sludge. ARGs densities were higher in the bacterial than in the phage fraction, with high densities in both fractions; particularly for blaTEM and sul1 (5 and 8 log10 gene copies (GC)/g, respectively, in bacterial DNA; 5.5 and 4.4 log10 GC/g, respectively, in phage DNA). These results question the potential agricultural uses of treated sludge, as it could contribute to the spread of ARGs in the environment and have an impact on the bacterial communities of the receiving ecosystem. PMID:24873655

  6. [Effects of bacterial consortium EG03 on control of pepper bacterial wilt and rhizosphere microbial community characteristics in fields].

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jing-Ping; Huang, Yan-Xia; Wang, Chao; Yu, Yi-Yang; Ke, Hong-Jiao; Guo, Jian-Hua

    2014-05-01

    Bacterial consortium EG03, consisted of several different antagonistic bacteria against Ralstonia solanacearum, was demonstrated to efficiently control bacterial wilt of pepper in field with a biocontrol efficacy of 85.8%. The traditional dilution plate method, the most probable number (MPN) method and Biolog system were adopted to determine effects of EG03 on characteristics of microbial community in pepper rhizosphere. It's shown that EGO3's effects on microbial community in pepper rhizospheric soil varied with time. There were an increase in the number of fungus and Bacillus spp. to some extent and a significant increase in that of nitrogen-fixing bacteria. Biolog analysis showed that the curve between average well color development (AWCD) and incubation time was S-shaped for all the treatments and that the AWCD of pepper rhizospheric soil at the early stage was higher than at the late stage. The analysis of carbon source utilization showed that EG03 decreased microbial utilization of carbon source in short-term, and the microbial community of pepper rhizospheric soil at the late stage composed mainly of microbes depended on sugars as carbon resource. EG03 treatment could decrease the five microbial diversity indices of rhizospheric microbes in short term, then increased those indices instead, especially with significant (P < 0.05) increases in Simpson index and McIntosh evenness. PMID:25129950

  7. Absolute quantification of gene expression in individual bacterial cells using two-photon fluctuation microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Matthew L; Le Coq, Dominique; Jules, Matthieu; Aymerich, Stéphane; Declerck, Nathalie; Royer, Catherine A

    2011-12-15

    Quantification of promoter activity or protein expression in gene regulatory networks is generally achieved via measurement of fluorescent protein (FP) intensity, which is related to the true FP concentration by an unknown scaling factor, thereby limiting analysis and interpretation. Here, using approaches originally developed for eukaryotic cells, we show that two-photon (2p) fluorescence fluctuation microscopy, specifically scanning number and brightness (sN&B) analysis, can be applied to determine the absolute concentrations of diffusing FPs in live bacterial cells. First, we demonstrate the validity of the approach, despite the small size of the bacteria, using the central pixels and spatial averaging. We established the lower detection limit at or below 75 nM (~3 molecules of FP/vol(ex)) and the upper detection limit at approximately 10 ?M, which can be extended using intensity measurements. We found that the uncertainty inherent in our measurements (<5%) was smaller than the high cell-cell variations observed for stochastic leakage from FP fusions of the lac promoter in the repressed state or the 10 to 25% variation observed on induction. This demonstrates that a reliable and absolute measure of transcriptional noise can be made using our approach, which should make it particularly appropriate for the investigation of stochasticity in gene expression networks. PMID:21907700

  8. Analysis of gene expression levels in individual bacterial cells without image segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, In Hae; Son, Minjun; Hagen, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    Studies of stochasticity in gene expression typically make use of fluorescent protein reporters, which permit the measurement of expression levels within individual cells by fluorescence microscopy. Analysis of such microscopy images is almost invariably based on a segmentation algorithm, where the image of a cell or cluster is analyzed mathematically to delineate individual cell boundaries. However segmentation can be ineffective for studying bacterial cells or clusters, especially at lower magnification, where outlines of individual cells are poorly resolved. Here we demonstrate an alternative method for analysing such images without segmentation. The method employs a comparison between the pixel brightness in phase contrast vs. fluorescence microscopy images. By fitting the correlation between phase contrast and fluorescence intensity to a physical model, we obtain well-defined estimates for the different expression levels of gene expression that are present in the cell or cluster. The method reveals the boundaries of the individual cells, even if the source images lack the resolution to show these boundaries clearly. PMID:22487793

  9. Two host clades, two bacterial arsenals: evolution through gene losses in facultative endosymbionts.

    PubMed

    Rollat-Farnier, Pierre-Antoine; Santos-Garcia, Diego; Rao, Qiong; Sagot, Marie-France; Silva, Francisco J; Henri, Hélène; Zchori-Fein, Einat; Latorre, Amparo; Moya, Andrés; Barbe, Valérie; Liu, Shu-Sheng; Wang, Xiao-Wei; Vavre, Fabrice; Mouton, Laurence

    2015-03-01

    Bacterial endosymbiosis is an important evolutionary process in insects, which can harbor both obligate and facultative symbionts. The evolution of these symbionts is driven by evolutionary convergence, and they exhibit among the tiniest genomes in prokaryotes. The large host spectrum of facultative symbionts and the high diversity of strategies they use to infect new hosts probably impact the evolution of their genome and explain why they undergo less severe genomic erosion than obligate symbionts. Candidatus Hamiltonella defensa is suitable for the investigation of the genomic evolution of facultative symbionts because the bacteria are engaged in specific relationships in two clades of insects. In aphids, H. defensa is found in several species with an intermediate prevalence and confers protection against parasitoids. In whiteflies, H. defensa is almost fixed in some species of Bemisia tabaci, which suggests an important role of and a transition toward obligate symbiosis. In this study, comparisons of the genome of H. defensa present in two B. tabaci species (Middle East Asia Minor 1 and Mediterranean) and in the aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum revealed that they belong to two distinct clades and underwent specific gene losses. In aphids, it contains highly virulent factors that could allow protection and horizontal transfers. In whiteflies, the genome lost these factors and seems to have a limited ability to acquire genes. However it contains genes that could be involved in the production of essential nutrients, which is consistent with a primordial role for this symbiont. In conclusion, although both lineages of H. defensa have mutualistic interactions with their hosts, their genomes follow distinct evolutionary trajectories that reflect their phenotype and could have important consequences on their evolvability. PMID:25714744

  10. Recent trends in control methods for bacterial wilt diseases caused by Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Yuliar; Nion, Yanetri Asi; Toyota, Koki

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have described the development of control methods against bacterial wilt diseases caused by Ralstonia solanacearum. This review focused on recent advances in control measures, such as biological, physical, chemical, cultural, and integral measures, as well as biocontrol efficacy and suppression mechanisms. Biological control agents (BCAs) have been dominated by bacteria (90%) and fungi (10%). Avirulent strains of R. solanacearum, Pseudomonas spp., Bacillus spp., and Streptomyces spp. are well-known BCAs. New or uncommon BCAs have also been identified such as Acinetobacter sp., Burkholderia sp., and Paenibacillus sp. Inoculation methods for BCAs affect biocontrol efficacy, such as pouring or drenching soil, dipping of roots, and seed coatings. The amendment of different organic matter, such as plant residue, animal waste, and simple organic compounds, have frequently been reported to suppress bacterial wilt diseases. The combined application of BCAs and their substrates was shown to more effectively suppress bacterial wilt in the tomato. Suppression mechanisms are typically attributed to the antibacterial metabolites produced by BCAs or those present in natural products; however, the number of studies related to host resistance to the pathogen is increasing. Enhanced/modified soil microbial communities are also indirectly involved in disease suppression. New promising types of control measures include biological soil disinfection using substrates that release volatile compounds. This review described recent advances in different control measures. We focused on the importance of integrated pest management (IPM) for bacterial wilt diseases. PMID:25762345

  11. Transition Metals in Control of Gene Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Halloran, Thomas V.

    1993-08-01

    Metalloproteins play structural and catalytic roles in gene expression. The metalloregulatory proteins are a subclass that exerts metal-responsive control of genes involved in respiration, metabolism, and metal-specific homeostasis or stress-response systems, such as iron uptake and storage, copper efflux, and mercury detoxification. Two allosteric mechanisms for control of gene expression were first discovered in metalloregulatory systems: an iron-responsive translational control mechanism for ferritin production and a mercury-responsive DNA-distortion mechanism for transcriptional control of detoxification genes. These otherwise unrelated mechanisms give rise to a rapid physiological response when metal ion concentrations exceed a dangerous threshold. Molecular recognition in these allosteric metal ion receptors is achieved through atypical coordination geometries, cluster formation, or complexes with prosthetic groups, such as sulfide and heme. Thus, many of the inorganic assemblies that otherwise buttress the structure of biopolymers or catalyze substrate transformation in active sites of enzymes have also been adapted to serve sensor functions in the metalloregulatory proteins. Mechanistic studies of these metal-sensor protein interactions are providing new insights into fundamental aspects of inorganic chemistry, molecular biology, and cellular physiology.

  12. A mixed incoherent feed-forward loop contributes to the regulation of bacterial photosynthesis genes

    PubMed Central

    Mank, Nils N.; Berghoff, Bork A.; Klug, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    Living cells use a variety of regulatory network motifs for accurate gene expression in response to changes in their environment or during differentiation processes. In Rhodobacter sphaeroides, a complex regulatory network controls expression of photosynthesis genes to guarantee optimal energy supply on one hand and to avoid photooxidative stress on the other hand. Recently, we identified a mixed incoherent feed-forward loop comprising the transcription factor PrrA, the sRNA PcrZ and photosynthesis target genes as part of this regulatory network. This point-of-view provides a comparison to other described feed-forward loops and discusses the physiological relevance of PcrZ in more detail. PMID:23392242

  13. Using Bacterial Extract along with Differential Gene Expression in Acropora millepora Larvae to Decouple the Processes of Attachment and Metamorphosis

    PubMed Central

    Siboni, Nachshon; Abrego, David; Seneca, Francois; Motti, Cherie A.; Andreakis, Nikos; Tebben, Jan; Blackall, Linda L.; Harder, Tilmann

    2012-01-01

    Biofilms of the bacterium Pseudoalteromonas induce metamorphosis of acroporid coral larvae. The bacterial metabolite tetrabromopyrrole (TBP), isolated from an extract of Pseudoalteromonas sp. associated with the crustose coralline alga (CCA) Neogoniolithon fosliei, induced coral larval metamorphosis (100%) with little or no attachment (0–2%). To better understand the molecular events and mechanisms underpinning the induction of Acropora millepora larval metamorphosis, including cell proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, migration, adhesion and biomineralisation, two novel coral gene expression assays were implemented. These involved the use of reverse-transcriptase quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) and employed 47 genes of interest (GOI), selected based on putative roles in the processes of settlement and metamorphosis. Substantial differences in transcriptomic responses of GOI were detected following incubation of A. millepora larvae with a threshold concentration and 10-fold elevated concentration of TBP-containing extracts of Pseudoalteromonas sp. The notable and relatively abrupt changes of the larval body structure during metamorphosis correlated, at the molecular level, with significant differences (p<0.05) in gene expression profiles of 24 GOI, 12 hours post exposure. Fourteen of those GOI also presented differences in expression (p<0.05) following exposure to the threshold concentration of bacterial TBP-containing extract. The specificity of the bacterial TBP-containing extract to induce the metamorphic stage in A. millepora larvae without attachment, using a robust, low cost, accurate, ecologically relevant and highly reproducible RT-qPCR assay, allowed partially decoupling of the transcriptomic processes of attachment and metamorphosis. The bacterial TBP-containing extract provided a unique opportunity to monitor the regulation of genes exclusively involved in the process of metamorphosis, contrasting previous gene expression studies that utilized cues, such as crustose coralline algae, biofilms or with GLW-amide neuropeptides that stimulate the entire onset of larval metamorphosis and attachment. PMID:22655067

  14. Taxonomic Classification of Bacterial 16S rRNA Genes Using Short Sequencing Reads: Evaluation of Effective Study Designs

    PubMed Central

    Mizrahi-Man, Orna; Davenport, Emily R.; Gilad, Yoav

    2013-01-01

    Massively parallel high throughput sequencing technologies allow us to interrogate the microbial composition of biological samples at unprecedented resolution. The typical approach is to perform high-throughout sequencing of 16S rRNA genes, which are then taxonomically classified based on similarity to known sequences in existing databases. Current technologies cause a predicament though, because although they enable deep coverage of samples, they are limited in the length of sequence they can produce. As a result, high-throughout studies of microbial communities often do not sequence the entire 16S rRNA gene. The challenge is to obtain reliable representation of bacterial communities through taxonomic classification of short 16S rRNA gene sequences. In this study we explored properties of different study designs and developed specific recommendations for effective use of short-read sequencing technologies for the purpose of interrogating bacterial communities, with a focus on classification using naïve Bayesian classifiers. To assess precision and coverage of each design, we used a collection of ?8,500 manually curated 16S rRNA gene sequences from cultured bacteria and a set of over one million bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences retrieved from environmental samples, respectively. We also tested different configurations of taxonomic classification approaches using short read sequencing data, and provide recommendations for optimal choice of the relevant parameters. We conclude that with a judicious selection of the sequenced region and the corresponding choice of a suitable training set for taxonomic classification, it is possible to explore bacterial communities at great depth using current technologies, with only a minimal loss of taxonomic resolution. PMID:23308262

  15. Using bacterial extract along with differential gene expression in Acropora millepora larvae to decouple the processes of attachment and metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Siboni, Nachshon; Abrego, David; Seneca, Francois; Motti, Cherie A; Andreakis, Nikos; Tebben, Jan; Blackall, Linda L; Harder, Tilmann

    2012-01-01

    Biofilms of the bacterium Pseudoalteromonas induce metamorphosis of acroporid coral larvae. The bacterial metabolite tetrabromopyrrole (TBP), isolated from an extract of Pseudoalteromonas sp. associated with the crustose coralline alga (CCA) Neogoniolithon fosliei, induced coral larval metamorphosis (100%) with little or no attachment (0-2%). To better understand the molecular events and mechanisms underpinning the induction of Acropora millepora larval metamorphosis, including cell proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, migration, adhesion and biomineralisation, two novel coral gene expression assays were implemented. These involved the use of reverse-transcriptase quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) and employed 47 genes of interest (GOI), selected based on putative roles in the processes of settlement and metamorphosis. Substantial differences in transcriptomic responses of GOI were detected following incubation of A. millepora larvae with a threshold concentration and 10-fold elevated concentration of TBP-containing extracts of Pseudoalteromonas sp. The notable and relatively abrupt changes of the larval body structure during metamorphosis correlated, at the molecular level, with significant differences (p<0.05) in gene expression profiles of 24 GOI, 12 hours post exposure. Fourteen of those GOI also presented differences in expression (p<0.05) following exposure to the threshold concentration of bacterial TBP-containing extract. The specificity of the bacterial TBP-containing extract to induce the metamorphic stage in A. millepora larvae without attachment, using a robust, low cost, accurate, ecologically relevant and highly reproducible RT-qPCR assay, allowed partially decoupling of the transcriptomic processes of attachment and metamorphosis. The bacterial TBP-containing extract provided a unique opportunity to monitor the regulation of genes exclusively involved in the process of metamorphosis, contrasting previous gene expression studies that utilized cues, such as crustose coralline algae, biofilms or with GLW-amide neuropeptides that stimulate the entire onset of larval metamorphosis and attachment. PMID:22655067

  16. In an early branching metazoan, bacterial colonization of the embryo is controlled by maternal antimicrobial

    E-print Network

    In an early branching metazoan, bacterial colonization of the embryo is controlled by maternal) Early embryos of many organisms develop outside the mother and are immediately confronted with myriads and in early embryos. If overexpressed in hydra ectodermal epithelial cells, periculin1a drastically reduces

  17. Importance of Sulfate-Reducing Bacterial Activity in Controlling Mercury Methylation in Anoxic Estuarine Sediment Slurries

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Han; A. Obraztsova; P. Pretto; D. D. Deheyn; J. Gieskes; B. M. Tebo

    2007-01-01

    Solution speciation of dissolved Hg has been considered an important factor controlling Hg methylation in anoxic sediments. Our previous research with sediments from the Venice Lagoon, Italy, however, has shown that the Hg methylation rate is affected by the activity of sulfate-reducing bacteria, which varies widely within the lagoon. To understand the role of sulfate-reducing bacterial activity in monomethylmercury (MMHg)

  18. Control of bacterial wilt of bean ( Curtobacterium flaccumfaciens pv. flaccumfaciens) by seed treatment with Rhizobium leguminosarum

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. C. Huang; R. S. Erickson; T. F. Hsieh

    2007-01-01

    Experiments were conducted in a growth chamber to determine the effectiveness of seed treatment with Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viceae R12 or R21, R. leguminosarum bv. phaseoli BR, or Pantoea agglomerans PA for control of bacterial wilt of bean caused by a yellow variant “YSB-2” of Curtobacterium flaccumfaciens pv. flaccumfaciens. In the first experiment, seeds of navy bean cv. Morden003 artificially

  19. Spaceflight Alters Bacterial Gene Expression and Virulence and Reveals Role for Global Regulator Hfq

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Ott, C. M.; zuBentrup, K. Honer; Ramamurthy R.; Quick, L.; Porwollik, S.; Cheng, P.; McClellan, M.; Tsaprailis, G.; Radabaugh, T.; Hunt, A.; Fernandez, D.; Richter, E.; Shah, M.; Kilcoyne, M.; Joshi, L.; Nelman-Gonzalez, M.; Hing, S.; Parra, M.; Dumaras, P.; Norwood, K.; Nickerson, C. A.; Bober, R.; Devich, J.; Ruggles, A.

    2007-01-01

    A comprehensive analysis of both the molecular genetic and phenotypic responses of any organism to the spaceflight environment has never been accomplished due to significant technological and logistical hurdles. Moreover, the effects of spaceflight on microbial pathogenicity and associated infectious disease risks have not been studied. The bacterial pathogen Salmonella typhimurium was grown aboard Space Shuttle mission STS-115 and compared to identical ground control cultures. Global microarray and proteomic analyses revealed 167 transcripts and 73 proteins changed expression with the conserved RNA-binding protein Hfq identified as a likely global regulator involved in the response to this environment. Hfq involvement was confirmed with a ground based microgravity culture model. Spaceflight samples exhibited enhanced virulence in a murine infection model and extracellular matrix accumulation consistent with a biofilm. Strategies to target Hfq and related regulators could potentially decrease infectious disease risks during spaceflight missions and provide novel therapeutic options on Earth.

  20. Decision tools for bacterial blight resistance gene deployment in rice-based agricultural ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Dossa, Gerbert S; Sparks, Adam; Cruz, Casiana Vera; Oliva, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Attempting to achieve long-lasting and stable resistance using uniformly deployed rice varieties is not a sustainable approach. The real situation appears to be much more complex and dynamic, one in which pathogens quickly adapt to resistant varieties. To prevent disease epidemics, deployment should be customized and this decision will require interdisciplinary actions. This perspective article aims to highlight the current progress on disease resistance deployment to control bacterial blight in rice. Although the model system rice-Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae has distinctive features that underpin the need for a case-by-case analysis, strategies to integrate those elements into a unique decision tool could be easily extended to other crops. PMID:25999970

  1. Decision tools for bacterial blight resistance gene deployment in rice-based agricultural ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Dossa, Gerbert S.; Sparks, Adam; Cruz, Casiana Vera; Oliva, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Attempting to achieve long-lasting and stable resistance using uniformly deployed rice varieties is not a sustainable approach. The real situation appears to be much more complex and dynamic, one in which pathogens quickly adapt to resistant varieties. To prevent disease epidemics, deployment should be customized and this decision will require interdisciplinary actions. This perspective article aims to highlight the current progress on disease resistance deployment to control bacterial blight in rice. Although the model system rice-Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae has distinctive features that underpin the need for a case-by-case analysis, strategies to integrate those elements into a unique decision tool could be easily extended to other crops. PMID:25999970

  2. Construction of a 1.2Mb contig including the citrus tristeza virus resistance gene locus using a bacterial artificial chromosome library of Poncirus trifoliata (L.) Raf

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zhong-Nan Yang; Xin-Rong Ye; Sandong Choi; Joe Molina; Francis Moonan; Rod A. Wing; Mikeal L. Roose; T. Erik Mirkov

    2001-01-01

    The citrus tristeza virus resistance gene ( Ctv) is a single dominant gene in Poncirus trifoliata, a sexually compatible relative of citrus. To clone this gene, a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library has been constructed from an individual plant that was homozygous for Ctv. This library contains 45 696 clones with an average insert size of 80 kb, corresponding to

  3. Bacterial Bioluminescence Regulates Expression of a Host Cryptochrome Gene in the Squid-Vibrio Symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Heath-Heckman, Elizabeth A. C.; Peyer, Suzanne M.; Whistler, Cheryl A.; Apicella, Michael A.; Goldman, William E.; McFall-Ngai, Margaret J.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT The symbiosis between the squid Euprymna scolopes and its luminous symbiont, Vibrio fischeri, is characterized by daily transcriptional rhythms in both partners and daily fluctuations in symbiont luminescence. In this study, we sought to determine whether symbionts affect host transcriptional rhythms. We identified two transcripts in host tissues (E. scolopes cry1 [escry1] and escry2) that encode cryptochromes, proteins that influence circadian rhythms in other systems. Both genes cycled daily in the head of the squid, with a pattern similar to that of other animals, in which expression of certain cry genes is entrained by environmental light. In contrast, escry1 expression cycled in the symbiont-colonized light organ with 8-fold upregulation coincident with the rhythms of bacterial luminescence, which are offset from the day/night light regime. Colonization of the juvenile light organ by symbionts was required for induction of escry1 cycling. Further, analysis with a mutant strain defective in light production showed that symbiont luminescence is essential for cycling of escry1; this defect could be complemented by presentation of exogenous blue light. However, blue-light exposure alone did not induce cycling in nonsymbiotic animals, but addition of molecules of the symbiont cell envelope to light-exposed animals did recover significant cycling activity, showing that light acts in synergy with other symbiont features to induce cycling. While symbiont luminescence may be a character specific to rhythms of the squid-vibrio association, resident microbial partners could similarly influence well-documented daily rhythms in other systems, such as the mammalian gut. PMID:23549919

  4. Eye-specification genes in the bacterial light organ of the bobtail squid Euprymna scolopes, and their expression in response to symbiont cues.

    PubMed

    Peyer, Suzanne M; Pankey, M Sabrina; Oakley, Todd H; McFall-Ngai, Margaret J

    2014-02-01

    The squid Euprymna scolopes has evolved independent sets of tissues capable of light detection, including a complex eye and a photophore or 'light organ', which houses the luminous bacterial symbiont Vibrio fischeri. As the eye and light organ originate from different embryonic tissues, we examined whether the eye-specification genes, pax6, eya, six, and dac, are shared by these two organs, and if so, whether they are regulated in the light organ by symbiosis. We obtained sequences of the four genes with PCR, confirmed orthology with phylogenetic analysis, and determined that each was expressed in the eye and light organ. With in situ hybridization (ISH), we localized the gene transcripts in developing embryos, comparing the patterns of expression in the two organs. The four transcripts localized to similar tissues, including those associated with the visual system ?1/4 into embryogenesis (Naef stage 18) and the light organ ?3/4 into embryogenesis (Naef stage 26). We used ISH and quantitative real-time PCR to examine transcript expression and differential regulation in postembryonic light organs in response to the following colonization conditions: wild-type, luminescent V. fischeri; a mutant strain defective in light production; and as a control, no symbiont. In ISH experiments light organs showed down regulation of the pax6, eya, and six transcripts in response to wild-type V. fischeri. Mutant strains also induced down regulation of the pax6 and eya transcripts, but not of the six transcript. Thus, luminescence was required for down regulation of the six transcript. We discuss these results in the context of symbiont-induced light-organ development. Our study indicates that the eye-specification genes are expressed in light-interacting tissues independent of their embryonic origin and are capable of responding to bacterial cues. These results offer evidence for evolutionary tinkering or the recruitment of eye development genes for use in a light-sensing photophore. PMID:24157521

  5. Eye-specification genes in the bacterial light organ of the bobtail squid Euprymna scolopes, and their expression in response to symbiont cues

    PubMed Central

    Peyer, Suzanne M.; Pankey, M. Sabrina; Oakley, Todd H.; McFall-Ngai, Margaret J.

    2014-01-01

    The squid Euprymna scolopes has evolved independent sets of tissues capable of light detection, including a complex eye and a photophore or ‘light organ’, which houses the luminous bacterial symbiont Vibrio fischeri. As the eye and light organ originate from different embryonic tissues, we examined whether the eye-specification genes, pax6, eya, six, and dac, are shared by these two organs, and if so, whether they are regulated in the light organ by symbiosis. We obtained sequences of the four genes with PCR, confirmed orthology with phylogenetic analysis, and determined that each was expressed in the eye and light organ. With in situ hybridization (ISH), we localized the gene transcripts in developing embryos, comparing the patterns of expression in the two organs. The four transcripts localized to similar tissues, including those associated with the visual system ~1/4 into embryogenesis (Naef stage 18) and the light organ ~3/4 into embryogenesis (Naef stage 26). We used ISH and quantitative real-time PCR to examine transcript expression and differential regulation in postembryonic light organs in response to the following colonization conditions: wild-type, luminescent V. fischeri; a mutant strain defective in light production; and as a control, no symbiont. In ISH experiments light organs showed down regulation of the pax6, eya, and six transcripts in response to wild-type V. fischeri. Mutant strains also induced down regulation of the pax6 and eya transcripts, but not of the six transcript. Thus, luminescence was required for down regulation of the six transcript. We discuss these results in the context of symbiont-induced light-organ development. Our study indicates that the eye-specification genes are expressed in light-interacting tissues independent of their embryonic origin and are capable of responding to bacterial cues. These results offer evidence for evolutionary tinkering or the recruitment of eye development genes for use in a light-sensing photophore. PMID:24157521

  6. Influence of uranium on bacterial communities: a comparison of natural uranium-rich soils with controls.

    PubMed

    Mondani, Laure; Benzerara, Karim; Carrière, Marie; Christen, Richard; Mamindy-Pajany, Yannick; Février, Laureline; Marmier, Nicolas; Achouak, Wafa; Nardoux, Pascal; Berthomieu, Catherine; Chapon, Virginie

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of uranium on the indigenous bacterial community structure in natural soils with high uranium content. Radioactive soil samples exhibiting 0.26% - 25.5% U in mass were analyzed and compared with nearby control soils containing trace uranium. EXAFS and XRD analyses of soils revealed the presence of U(VI) and uranium-phosphate mineral phases, identified as sabugalite and meta-autunite. A comparative analysis of bacterial community fingerprints using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) revealed the presence of a complex population in both control and uranium-rich samples. However, bacterial communities inhabiting uraniferous soils exhibited specific fingerprints that were remarkably stable over time, in contrast to populations from nearby control samples. Representatives of Acidobacteria, Proteobacteria, and seven others phyla were detected in DGGE bands specific to uraniferous samples. In particular, sequences related to iron-reducing bacteria such as Geobacter and Geothrix were identified concomitantly with iron-oxidizing species such as Gallionella and Sideroxydans. All together, our results demonstrate that uranium exerts a permanent high pressure on soil bacterial communities and suggest the existence of a uranium redox cycle mediated by bacteria in the soil. PMID:21998695

  7. Influence of Uranium on Bacterial Communities: A Comparison of Natural Uranium-Rich Soils with Controls

    PubMed Central

    Mondani, Laure; Benzerara, Karim; Carrière, Marie; Christen, Richard; Mamindy-Pajany, Yannick; Février, Laureline; Marmier, Nicolas; Achouak, Wafa; Nardoux, Pascal; Berthomieu, Catherine; Chapon, Virginie

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of uranium on the indigenous bacterial community structure in natural soils with high uranium content. Radioactive soil samples exhibiting 0.26% - 25.5% U in mass were analyzed and compared with nearby control soils containing trace uranium. EXAFS and XRD analyses of soils revealed the presence of U(VI) and uranium-phosphate mineral phases, identified as sabugalite and meta-autunite. A comparative analysis of bacterial community fingerprints using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) revealed the presence of a complex population in both control and uranium-rich samples. However, bacterial communities inhabiting uraniferous soils exhibited specific fingerprints that were remarkably stable over time, in contrast to populations from nearby control samples. Representatives of Acidobacteria, Proteobacteria, and seven others phyla were detected in DGGE bands specific to uraniferous samples. In particular, sequences related to iron-reducing bacteria such as Geobacter and Geothrix were identified concomitantly with iron-oxidizing species such as Gallionella and Sideroxydans. All together, our results demonstrate that uranium exerts a permanent high pressure on soil bacterial communities and suggest the existence of a uranium redox cycle mediated by bacteria in the soil. PMID:21998695

  8. INFLUENCE OF ROOT EXUDATES AND BACTERIAL METABOLIC ACTIVITY ON APPARENT CONJUGAL GENE TRANSFER FREQUENCIES IN THE RHIZOSPHERE OF WATER GRASS (ECHINOCLORA CRUSGALLI)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The premise that genetic exchange is primarily localized in niches characterized by dense bacterial populations and high availability of growth substrates was tested by relating conjugal gene transfer of an RP4 derivative to availability of root exudates and bacterial metabolic a...

  9. Diversity of the Ring-Cleaving Dioxygenase Gene pcaH in a Salt Marsh Bacterial Community

    Microsoft Academic Search

    ALISON BUCHAN; ELLEN L. NEIDLE; MARY ANN MORAN

    2001-01-01

    Degradation of lignin-related aromatic compounds is an important ecological process in the highly produc- tive salt marshes of the southeastern United States, yet little is known about the mediating organisms or their catabolic pathways. Here we report the diversity of a gene encoding a key ring-cleaving enzyme of the -ketoadipate pathway, pcaH, amplified from bacterial communities associated with decaying Spartina

  10. Levels of Bacterial Community Diversity in Four Arid Soils Compared by Cultivation and 16S rRNA Gene Cloning

    PubMed Central

    Dunbar, John; Takala, Shannon; Barns, Susan M.; Davis, Jody A.; Kuske, Cheryl R.

    1999-01-01

    Techniques based on amplification of 16S rRNA genes for comparing bacterial communities are now widely used in microbial ecology, but calibration of these techniques with traditional tools, such as cultivation, has been conspicuously absent. In this study, we compared levels of bacterial community diversity in two pinyon rhizosphere soil samples and two between-tree (interspace) soil samples by analyzing 179 cultivated bacterial isolates and 801 16S rRNA genes amplified from extracted soil DNA. Phylotypes were defined by performing a restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences with the enzymes RsaI and BstUI. The average level of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of members of a phylotype was 86.6% based on an analysis of partial sequences. A total of 498 phylotypes were identified among the 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) clones, while 34 phylotypes occurred among the cultivated isolates. Analysis of sequences from a subset of the phylotypes showed that at least seven bacterial divisions were represented in the clone libraries, whereas the isolates represented only three. The phylotype richness, frequency distribution (evenness), and composition of the four culture collections and the four clone libraries were investigated by using a variety of diversity indices. Although cultivation and 16S rRNA cloning analyses gave contradictory descriptions of the relative phylotype richness for one of the four environments, the two methods identified qualitatively consistent relationships when levels of evenness were compared. The levels of phylotype similarity between communities were uniformly low (15 to 31%). Both methods consistently indicated that one environment was distinct from the other three. Our data illustrate that while 16S rDNA cloning and cultivation generally describe similar relationships between soil microbial communities, significant discrepancies can occur. PMID:10103265

  11. Genome-wide identification of hsp40 genes in channel catfish and their regulated expression after bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Song, Lin; Zhang, Jiaren; Li, Chao; Yao, Jun; Jiang, Chen; Li, Yun; Liu, Shikai; Liu, Zhanjiang

    2014-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) consist of a large group of chaperones whose expression is induced by high temperature, hypoxia, infection and a number of other stresses. Among all the HSPs, Hsp40 is the largest HSP family, which bind to Hsp70 ATPase domain in assisting protein folding. In this study, we identified 57 hsp40s in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) through in silico analysis using RNA-Seq and genome databases. These genes can be classified into three different types, Type I, II and III, based on their structural similarities. Phylogenetic and syntenic analyses provided strong evidence in supporting the orthologies of these HSPs. Meta-analyses of RNA-Seq datasets were conducted to analyze expression profile of Hsp40s following bacterial infection. Twenty seven hsp40s were found to be significantly up- or down-regulated in the liver after infection with E. ictaluri; 19 hsp40s were found to be significantly regulated in the intestine after infection with E. ictaluri; and 19 hsp40s were found to be significantly regulated in the gill following infection with F. columnare. Altogether, a total of 42 Hsp40 genes were regulated under disease situations involving three tissues and two bacterial infections. The significant regulated expression of Hsp40 genes after bacterial infection suggested their involvement in disease defenses in catfish. PMID:25542027

  12. Integral Feedback Control in System Biology Application to Bacterial Chemotaxis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ahmed Kamal

    2006-01-01

    The necessity of integral feedback control is important to bioengineers, because they must reverse engineer systems designed by evolution. When a system exhibits robust asymptotic tracking, it must have Integral feedback as structural properties of the system. In this paper we are investigating the conditions under which a system has the property that the output is independent of the input

  13. Copy Number Variation of the Beta Defensin Gene Cluster on Chromosome 8p Influences the Bacterial Microbiota within the Nasopharynx of Otitis-Prone Children

    PubMed Central

    Bevins, Charles L.; Hollox, Edward J.; Bakaletz, Lauren O.

    2014-01-01

    As there is increasing evidence that aberrant defensin expression is related to susceptibility for infectious disease and inflammatory disorders, we sought to determine if copy number of the beta-defensin gene cluster located on chromosome 8p23.1 (DEFB107, 106, 105, 104, 103, DEFB4 and SPAG11), that shows copy number variation as a block, was associated with susceptibility to otitis media (OM). The gene DEFB103 within this complex encodes human beta defensin-3 (hBD-3), an antimicrobial peptide (AP) expressed by epithelial cells that line the mammalian airway, important for defense of mucosal surfaces and previously shown to have bactericidal activity in vitro against multiple human pathogens, including the three that predominate in OM. To this end, we conducted a retrospective case-control study of 113 OM prone children and 267 controls aged five to sixty months. We identified the copy number of the above defined beta-defensin gene cluster (DEFB-CN) in each study subject by paralogue ratio assays. The mean DEFB-CN was indistinguishable between subjects classified as OM prone based on a recent history of multiple episodes of OM and control subjects who had no history of OM (4.4±0.96 versus 4.4±1.08, respectively: Odds Ratio [OR]: 1.16 (95% CI: 0.61, 2.20). Despite a lack of direct association, we observed a statistically significant correlation between DEFB-CN and nasopharyngeal bacterial colonization patterns. Collectively, our findings suggested that susceptibility to OM might be mediated by genetic variation among individuals, wherein a DEFB-CN less than 4 exerts a marked influence on the microbiota of the nasopharynx, specifically with regard to colonization by the three predominant bacterial pathogens of OM. PMID:24867293

  14. Antibiotic prophylaxis to prevent post-abortal upper genital tract infection in women with bacterial vaginosis: randomised controlled trial

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tessa Crowley; Nicola Low; Andrew Turner; Ian Harvey; Ken Bidgood; Patrick Horner

    2001-01-01

    Objective To determine the prevalence of bacterial vaginosis in women undergoing first trimester suction termination of pregnancy and to evaluate the efficacy of metronidazole in reducing the risk of post abortal pelvic infection in women with bacterial vaginosis.Design Randomised double-blind placebo-controlled trial.Setting Two teaching hospitals and one district general hospital.Sample Two hundred and seventy-three women with bacterial vaginosis undergoing termination

  15. Characterization of new bacterial catabolic genes and mobile genetic elements by high throughput genetic screening of a soil metagenomic library.

    PubMed

    Jacquiod, Samuel; Demanèche, Sandrine; Franqueville, Laure; Ausec, Luka; Xu, Zhuofei; Delmont, Tom O; Dunon, Vincent; Cagnon, Christine; Mandic-Mulec, Ines; Vogel, Timothy M; Simonet, Pascal

    2014-11-20

    A mix of oligonucleotide probes was used to hybridize soil metagenomic DNA from a fosmid clone library spotted on high density membranes. The pooled radio-labeled probes were designed to target genes encoding glycoside hydrolases GH18, dehalogenases, bacterial laccases and mobile genetic elements (integrases from integrons and insertion sequences). Positive hybridizing spots were affiliated to the corresponding clones in the library and the metagenomic inserts were sequenced. After assembly and annotation, new coding DNA sequences related to genes of interest were identified with low protein similarity against the closest hits in databases. This work highlights the sensitivity of DNA/DNA hybridization techniques as an effective and complementary way to recover novel genes from large metagenomic clone libraries. This study also supports that some of the identified catabolic genes might be associated with horizontal transfer events. PMID:24721211

  16. PopW activates PAMP-triggered immunity in controlling tomato bacterial spot disease.

    PubMed

    Wei, Tian; Wang, Luyao; Zhou, Xiaosi; Ren, Xiuyan; Dai, Xiangqun; Liu, Hongxia

    2015-08-01

    PopW, a protein elicitor, reduces tomato bacterial spot disease caused by Xanthomonas euvesicatoria (X.e.) with a significantly decreased titer of X.e., achieving more than 50% biocontrol efficacy. Along with phenotype changes, apparent reactive oxygen species (ROS) burst and callose deposition were triggered by PopW at the cellular level; The mRNA abundance of PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI)-associated marker genes (PTI5, LRR22, GRAS2) was increased by PopW at the molecular level. These results demonstrated that PopW, as a PAMP, triggers early immunity of tomato against X.e. to reduce tomato bacterial spot disease. PMID:26071355

  17. Genome-wide gene responses in a transgenic rice line carrying the maize resistance gene Rxo1 to the rice bacterial streak pathogen, Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yong-Li Zhou; Mei-Rong Xu; Ming-Fu Zhao; Xue-Wen Xie; Ling-Hua Zhu; Bin-Ying Fu; Zhi-Kang Li

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Non-host resistance in rice to its bacterial pathogen, Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola (Xoc), mediated by a maize NBS-LRR type R gene, Rxo1 shows a typical hypersensitive reaction (HR) phenotype, but the molecular mechanism(s) underlying this type of non-host resistance remain largely unknown. RESULTS: A microarray experiment was performed to reveal the molecular mechanisms underlying HR of rice to Xoc

  18. Dynamic subcellular localization of a respiratory complex controls bacterial respiration.

    PubMed

    Alberge, François; Espinosa, Leon; Seduk, Farida; Sylvi, Léa; Toci, René; Walburger, Anne; Magalon, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Respiration, an essential process for most organisms, has to optimally respond to changes in the metabolic demand or the environmental conditions. The branched character of their respiratory chains allows bacteria to do so by providing a great metabolic and regulatory flexibility. Here, we show that the native localization of the nitrate reductase, a major respiratory complex under anaerobiosis in Escherichia coli, is submitted to tight spatiotemporal regulation in response to metabolic conditions via a mechanism using the transmembrane proton gradient as a cue for polar localization. These dynamics are critical for controlling the activity of nitrate reductase, as the formation of polar assemblies potentiates the electron flux through the complex. Thus, dynamic subcellular localization emerges as a critical factor in the control of respiration in bacteria. PMID:26077726

  19. Dynamic subcellular localization of a respiratory complex controls bacterial respiration

    PubMed Central

    Alberge, François; Espinosa, Leon; Seduk, Farida; Sylvi, Léa; Toci, René; Walburger, Anne; Magalon, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Respiration, an essential process for most organisms, has to optimally respond to changes in the metabolic demand or the environmental conditions. The branched character of their respiratory chains allows bacteria to do so by providing a great metabolic and regulatory flexibility. Here, we show that the native localization of the nitrate reductase, a major respiratory complex under anaerobiosis in Escherichia coli, is submitted to tight spatiotemporal regulation in response to metabolic conditions via a mechanism using the transmembrane proton gradient as a cue for polar localization. These dynamics are critical for controlling the activity of nitrate reductase, as the formation of polar assemblies potentiates the electron flux through the complex. Thus, dynamic subcellular localization emerges as a critical factor in the control of respiration in bacteria. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05357.001 PMID:26077726

  20. Biological treatments to control bacterial canker of greenhouse tomatoes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Raj Utkhede; Carol Koch

    2004-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine the effects of treatments on Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis in vitro and on young seedlingsinoculated with the pathogen under greenhouseconditions. Lysozyme was bactericidal at 10 g\\/l concentration in vitro. Tomato plantstreated with lysozyme at 10 g\\/l and 100 g\\/lshowed significantly higher plant heightcompared with the inoculated control plants,and plants in these treatments were as tall

  1. Integrating chemical and genetic silencing strategies to identify host kinase-phosphatase inhibitor networks that control bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Albers, Harald M H G; Kuijl, Coenraad; Bakker, Jeroen; Hendrickx, Loes; Wekker, Sharida; Farhou, Nadha; Liu, Nora; Blasco-Moreno, Bernat; Scanu, Tiziana; den Hertog, Jeroen; Celie, Patrick; Ovaa, Huib; Neefjes, Jacques

    2014-02-21

    Every year three million people die as a result of bacterial infections, and this number may further increase due to resistance to current antibiotics. These antibiotics target almost all essential bacterial processes, leaving only a few new targets for manipulation. The host proteome has many more potential targets for manipulation in order to control bacterial infection, as exemplified by the observation that inhibiting the host kinase Akt supports the elimination of different intracellular bacteria including Salmonella and M. tuberculosis. If host kinases are involved in the control of bacterial infections, phosphatases could be as well. Here we present an integrated small interference RNA and small molecule screen to identify host phosphatase-inhibitor combinations that control bacterial infection. We define host phosphatases inhibiting intracellular growth of Salmonella and identify corresponding inhibitors for the dual specificity phosphatases DUSP11 and 27. Pathway analysis places many kinases and phosphatases controlling bacterial infection in an integrated pathway centered around Akt. This network controls host cell metabolism, survival, and growth and bacterial survival and reflect a natural host cell response to bacterial infection. Inhibiting two enzyme classes with opposite activities-kinases and phosphatases-may be a new strategy to overcome infections by antibiotic-resistant bacteria. PMID:24274083

  2. Antisense Suppression of a (+)-?-Cadinene Synthase Gene in Cotton Prevents the Induction of This Defense Response Gene during Bacterial Blight Infection But Not Its Constitutive Expression1[w

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Belinda J.; Poole, Andrew; Blake, Christopher J.; Llewellyn, Danny J.

    2005-01-01

    In cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) the enzyme (+)-?-cadinene synthase (CDNS) catalyzes the first committed step in the biosynthesis of cadinane-type sesquiterpenes, such as gossypol, that provide constitutive and inducible protection against pests and diseases. A cotton cDNA clone encoding CDNS (cdn1-C4) was isolated from developing embryos and functionally characterized. Southern analysis showed that CDNS genes belong to a large multigene family, of which five genomic clones were studied, including three pseudogenes and one gene that may represent another subfamily of CDNS. CDNS expression was shown to be induced in cotton infected with either the bacterial blight or verticillium wilt pathogens. Constructs for the constitutive or seed-specific antisense suppression of cdn1-C4 were introduced into cotton by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Gossypol levels were not reduced in the seeds of transformants with either construct, nor was the induction of CDNS expression affected in stems of the constitutive antisense plants infected with Verticillium dahliae Kleb. However, the induction of CDNS mRNA and protein in response to bacterial blight infection of cotyledons was completely blocked in the constitutive antisense plants. These results suggest that cdn1-C4 may be involved specifically in the bacterial blight response and that the CDNS multigene family comprises a complex set of genes differing in their temporal and spatial regulation and responsible for different branches of the cotton sesquiterpene pathway. PMID:15849309

  3. Quantification of Yeast and Bacterial Gene Transcripts in Retail Cheeses by Reverse Transcription-Quantitative PCR

    PubMed Central

    Straub, Cécile; Castellote, Jessie; Onesime, Djamila; Bonnarme, Pascal; Irlinger, Françoise

    2013-01-01

    The cheese microbiota contributes to a large extent to the development of the typical color, flavor, and texture of the final product. Its composition is not well defined in most cases and varies from one cheese to another. The aim of the present study was to establish procedures for gene transcript quantification in cheeses by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR. Total RNA was extracted from five smear-ripened cheeses purchased on the retail market, using a method that does not involve prior separation of microbial cells. 16S rRNA and malate:quinone oxidoreductase gene transcripts of Corynebacterium casei, Brevibacterium aurantiacum, and Arthrobacter arilaitensis and 26S rRNA and beta tubulin gene transcripts of Geotrichum candidum and Debaryomyces hansenii could be detected and quantified in most of the samples. Three types of normalization were applied: against total RNA, against the amount of cheese, and against a reference gene. For the first two types of normalization, differences of reverse transcription efficiencies from one sample to another were taken into account by analysis of exogenous control mRNA. No good correlation was found between the abundances of target mRNA or rRNA transcripts and the viable cell concentration of the corresponding species. However, in most cases, no mRNA transcripts were detected for species that did not belong to the dominant species. The applications of gene expression measurement in cheeses containing an undefined microbiota, as well as issues concerning the strategy of normalization and the assessment of amplification specificity, are discussed. PMID:23124230

  4. A mutation within the leucine-rich repeat domain of the Arabidopsis disease resistance gene RPS5 partially suppresses multiple bacterial and downy mildew resistance genes.

    PubMed Central

    Warren, R F; Henk, A; Mowery, P; Holub, E; Innes, R W

    1998-01-01

    Recognition of pathogens by plants is mediated by several distinct families of functionally variable but structurally related disease resistance (R) genes. The largest family is defined by the presence of a putative nucleotide binding domain and 12 to 21 leucine-rich repeats (LRRs). The function of these LRRs has not been defined, but they are speculated to bind pathogen-derived ligands. We have isolated a mutation in the Arabidopsis RPS5 gene that indicates that the LRR region may interact with other plant proteins. The rps5-1 mutation causes a glutamate-to-lysine substitution in the third LRR and partially compromises the function of several R genes that confer bacterial and downy mildew resistance. The third LRR is relatively well conserved, and we speculate that it may interact with a signal transduction component shared by multiple R gene pathways. PMID:9724691

  5. New insight into the molecular control of bacterial functional amyloids

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Jonathan D.; Matthews, Steve J.

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid protein structure has been discovered in a variety of functional or pathogenic contexts. What distinguishes the former from the latter is that functional amyloid systems possess dedicated molecular control systems that determine the timing, location, and structure of the fibers. Failure to guide this process can result in cytotoxicity, as observed in several pathologies like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's Disease. Many gram-negative bacteria produce an extracellular amyloid fiber known as curli via a multi-component secretion system. During this process, aggregation-prone, semi-folded curli subunits have to cross the periplasm and outer-membrane and self-assemble into surface-attached fibers. Two recent breakthroughs have provided molecular details regarding periplasmic chaperoning and subunit secretion. This review offers a combined perspective on these first mechanistic insights into the curli system. PMID:25905048

  6. Molecular characterization of peach PR genes and their induction kinetics in response to bacterial infection and signaling molecules.

    PubMed

    Sherif, S; Paliyath, G; Jayasankar, Subramanian

    2012-04-01

    'Venture' and 'BabyGold 5' are two peach cultivars with a demonstrated resistance and susceptibility, respectively, to bacterial spot disease caused by Xanthomonas campestris pv. pruni (Xcp). To explore the differences between these cultivars at the molecular level, two PR1 (Pp-PR1a, Pp-PR1b) and three PR5 (Pp-TLP1, Pp-TLP2 and Pp-TLP3) genes were isolated from peach (Prunus persica L.) and investigated by in silico and in situ approaches. The analysis of gene expression by qRT-PCR indicated that all PR genes, except Pp-PR1a, were induced to a significantly higher degree in the resistant cultivar. In response to signaling molecules, Pp-PR1a was induced chiefly by SA treatment, while other PR genes were induced mainly by ethephon or MeJA treatments. The induction of the same set of PR genes in response to bacterial infection, MeJA or ethephon suggests the involvement of jasmonic acid (JA)/ethylene (ET)-signaling pathways in mediating resistance against Xcp, which is consistent with the potential hemibiotrophic nature of this bacterium. The identification of binding sites for ERF and MYC2 transcription factors in the promoter of Pp-TLP1 and Pp-TLP2 genes further supported the role of JA/ET pathways in the transcription regulation of these genes. The role of stomata in defense against Xcp was also investigated by measuring stomatal apertures in both 'Venture' and 'BabyGold 5' leaves after 1 and 3 HPI. While most stomata closed in both cultivars within 1 HPI, stomata reopened again at 3 HPI with a higher percentage recorded for 'BabyGold 5', suggesting a potential role of stomata in the susceptibility of this cultivar. PMID:22101723

  7. Accumulation of clinically relevant antibiotic-resistance genes, bacterial load, and metals in freshwater lake sediments in central europe.

    PubMed

    Devarajan, Naresh; Laffite, Amandine; Graham, Neil D; Meijer, Maria; Prabakar, Kandasamy; Mubedi, Josué I; Elongo, Vicky; Mpiana, Pius T; Ibelings, Bastiaan Willem; Wildi, Walter; Poté, John

    2015-06-01

    Wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) receive the effluents from various sources (communities, industrial, and hospital effluents) and are recognized as reservoir for antibiotic-resistance genes (ARGs) that are associated with clinical pathogens. The aquatic environment is considered a hot-spot for horizontal gene transfer, and lake sediments offer the opportunity for reconstructing the pollution history and evaluating the impacts. In this context, variation with depth and time of the total bacterial load, the abundance of faecal indicator bacteria (FIB; E. coli and Enterococcus spp. (ENT)), Pseudomonas spp., and ARGs (blaTEM, blaSHV, blaCTX-M, blaNDM, and aadA) were quantified in sediment profiles of different parts of Lake Geneva using quantitative PCR. The abundance of bacterial marker genes was identified in sediments contaminated by WWTP following eutrophication of the lake. Additionally, ARGs, including the extended-spectrum ß-lactam- and aminoglycoside-resistance genes, were identified in the surface sediments. The ARG and FIB abundance strongly correlated (r ? 0.403, p < 0.05, n = 34) with organic matter and metal concentrations in the sediments, indicating a common and contemporary source of contamination. The contamination of sediments by untreated or partially treated effluent water can affect the quality of ecosystem. Therefore, the reduction of contaminants from the source is recommended for further improvement of water quality. PMID:25933054

  8. Toxin gene expression by shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli: the role of antibiotics and the bacterial SOS response.

    PubMed Central

    Kimmitt, P. T.; Harwood, C. R.; Barer, M. R.

    2000-01-01

    Toxin synthesis by Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) appears to be coregulated through induction of the integrated bacteriophage that encodes the toxin gene. Phage production is linked to induction of the bacterial SOS response, a ubiquitous response to DNA damage. SOS-inducing antimicrobial agents, particularly the quinolones, trimethoprim, and furazolidone, were shown to induce toxin gene expression in studies of their effects on a reporter STEC strain carrying a chromosome-based stx2::lacZ transcriptional fusion. At antimicrobial levels above those required to inhibit bacterial replication, these agents are potent inducers (up to 140-fold) of the transcription of type 2 Shiga toxin genes (stx2); therefore, they should be avoided in treating patients with potential or confirmed STEC infections. Other agents (20 studied) and incubation conditions produced significant but less striking effects on stx2 transcription; positive and negative influences were observed. SOS-mediated induction of toxin synthesis also provides a mechanism that could exacerbate STEC infections and increase dissemination of stx genes. These features and the use of SOS-inducing antibiotics in clinical practice and animal husbandry may account for the recent emergence of STEC disease. PMID:10998375

  9. Expression of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) genes in channel catfish is highly regulated and time dependent after bacterial challenges.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jun; Li, Chao; Zhang, Jiaren; Liu, Shikai; Feng, Jianbin; Wang, Ruijia; Li, Yun; Jiang, Chen; Song, Lin; Chen, Ailu; Liu, Zhanjiang

    2014-07-01

    Nitric oxide is well known for its roles in immune responses. As such, its synthesizing enzymes have been extensively studied from various species including some teleost fish species. However, the NOS genes have not been characterized in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus). In this study, we identified and characterized three NOS genes including one NOS1 and two NOS2 genes in channel catfish. Comparing with the NOS genes from other fish species, the catfish NOS genes are highly conserved in their structural features. Phylogenetic and syntenic analyses allowed determination of NOS1 and NOS2 genes of channel catfish and their orthology relationships. Syntenic analysis, as well as the phylogenetic analysis, indicated that the two NOS2 genes of catfish were lineage-specific duplication. The NOS genes were broadly expressed in most tested tissues, with NOS1 being expressed at the highest levels in the brain, NOS2b1 highly expressed in the skin and gill, and NOS2b2 lowly expressed in most of the tested tissues. The most striking findings of this study was that the expression of the NOS genes are highly regulated after bacterial infection, with time-dependent expression patterns that parallel the migration of macrophages. After Edwardsiella ictaluri challenge, dramatically different responses among the three NOS genes were observed. NOS1 was only significantly in the skin early after infection, while NOS2b1 was rapidly upregulated in gill, but more up-regulated in trunk kidney with the progression of the disease, suggesting such differences in gene expression may be reflective of the migration of macrophages among various tissues of the infected fish. In contrast to NOS1 and NOS2b1, NOS2b2 was normally expressed at very low levels, but it is induced in the brain and liver while significantly down-regulated in most other tissues. PMID:24560653

  10. Bacterial Community Composition of South China Sea Sediments through Pyrosequencing-Based Analysis of 16S rRNA Genes

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Daochen; Tanabe, Shoko-Hosoi; Yang, Chong; Zhang, Weimin; Sun, Jianzhong

    2013-01-01

    Background Subseafloor sediments accumulate large amounts of organic and inorganic materials that contain a highly diverse microbial ecosystem. The aim of this study was to survey the bacterial community of subseafloor sediments from the South China Sea. Methodology/Principal Findings Pyrosequencing of over 265,000 amplicons of the V3 hypervariable region of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene was performed on 16 sediment samples collected from multiple locations in the northern region of the South China Sea from depths ranging from 35 to 4000 m. A total of 9,726 operational taxonomic units (OTUs; between 695 and 2819 unique OTUs per sample) at 97% sequence similarity level were generated. In total, 40 bacterial phyla including 22 formally described phyla and 18 candidate phyla, with Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Planctomycetes, Actinobacteria and Chloroflexi being most diverse, were identified. The most abundant phylotype, accounting for 42.6% of all sequences, belonged to Gammaproteobacteria, which possessed absolute predominance in the samples analyzed. Among the 18 candidate phyla, 12 were found for the first time in the South China Sea. Conclusions This study provided a novel insight into the composition of bacterial communities of the South China Sea subseafloor. Furthermore, abundances and community similarity analysis showed that the compositions of the bacterial communities are very similar at phylum level at different depths from 35-4000 m. PMID:24205246

  11. Application of a microcomputer-based system to control and monitor bacterial growth.

    PubMed

    Titus, J A; Luli, G W; Dekleva, M L; Strohl, W R

    1984-02-01

    A modular microcomputer-based system was developed to control and monitor various modes of bacterial growth. The control system was composed of an Apple II Plus microcomputer with 64-kilobyte random-access memory; a Cyborg ISAAC model 91A multichannel analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog converter; paired MRR-1 pH, pO(2), and foam control units; and in-house-designed relay, servo control, and turbidimetry systems. To demonstrate the flexibility of the system, we grew bacteria under various computer-controlled and monitored modes of growth, including batch, turbidostat, and chemostat systems. The Apple-ISAAC system was programmed in Labsoft BASIC (extended Applesoft) with an average control program using ca. 6 to 8 kilobytes of memory and up to 30 kilobytes for datum arrays. This modular microcomputer-based control system was easily coupled to laboratory scale fermentors for a variety of fermentations. PMID:16346462

  12. Control of tumbling in bacterial chemotaxis by divalent cation.

    PubMed Central

    Ordal, G W

    1976-01-01

    Chemotaxis is migration of organisms to higher concentrations of attractant or lower concentrations of repellent. Understanding the switch than controls whether the flagella rotate counterclockwise for swimming or clockwise for tumbling (thrashing about without making much forward progress) is central to understanding chemotaxis of peritrichous bacteria, since chemotaxis results from selective suppression of tumbles. Depletion of divalent cation by chelating agents in the presence of A23187, an ionophore that conveys divalent cation across membrane, causes incessant tumbling in Bacillus subtilis. Small additions of MgCl2 prevent this tumbling. In this tumbling condition, the bacteria which normally swim extensively when given attractant, do not respond even to 10 mM alanine, a strong attractant. MnCl2, by contrast to others potentiated by the ionophore. Permanent cations, including tetraphenylarsonium ion and triphenylmethylphosphonium ion, cause permanent swimming, even in the presence of A23187 and chelating agents. We propose that divalent cation, probably Mg2+ ion, binds to the switch to cause swimming and that, in the absence of divalent cation at the switch, the bacterium tumbles. PMID:816789

  13. Prevalence of Antibiotic Resistance Genes and Bacterial Community Composition in a River Influenced by a Wastewater Treatment Plant

    PubMed Central

    Marti, Elisabet; Jofre, Juan; Balcazar, Jose Luis

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance represents a global health problem, requiring better understanding of the ecology of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs), their selection and their spread in the environment. Antibiotics are constantly released to the environment through wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents. We investigated, therefore, the effect of these discharges on the prevalence of ARGs and bacterial community composition in biofilm and sediment samples of a receiving river. We used culture-independent approaches such as quantitative PCR to determine the prevalence of eleven ARGs and 16S rRNA gene-based pyrosequencing to examine the composition of bacterial communities. Concentration of antibiotics in WWTP influent and effluent were also determined. ARGs such as qnrS, blaTEM, blaCTX-M, blaSHV, erm(B), sul(I), sul(II), tet(O) and tet(W) were detected in all biofilm and sediment samples analyzed. Moreover, we observed a significant increase in the relative abundance of ARGs in biofilm samples collected downstream of the WWTP discharge. We also found significant differences with respect to community structure and composition between upstream and downstream samples. Therefore, our results indicate that WWTP discharges may contribute to the spread of ARGs into the environment and may also impact on the bacterial communities of the receiving river. PMID:24205347

  14. Seven Lotus japonicus Genes Required for Transcriptional Reprogramming of the Root during Fungal and Bacterial SymbiosisW?

    PubMed Central

    Kistner, Catherine; Winzer, Thilo; Pitzschke, Andrea; Mulder, Lonneke; Sato, Shusei; Kaneko, Takakazu; Tabata, Satoshi; Sandal, Niels; Stougaard, Jens; Webb, K. Judith; Szczyglowski, Krzysztof; Parniske, Martin

    2005-01-01

    A combined genetic and transcriptome analysis was performed to study the molecular basis of the arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) symbiosis. By testing the AM phenotype of nodulation-impaired mutants and complementation analysis, we defined seven Lotus japonicus common symbiosis genes (SYMRK, CASTOR, POLLUX, SYM3, SYM6, SYM15, and SYM24) that are required for both fungal and bacterial entry into root epidermal or cortical cells. To describe the phenotype of these mutants at the molecular level, we screened for differentiating transcriptional responses of mutant and wild-type roots by large-scale gene expression profiling using cDNA-amplified fragment length polymorphism. Two percent of root transcripts was found to increase in abundance during AM development, from which a set of AM-regulated marker genes was established. A Ser-protease (SbtS) and a Cys-protease (CysS) were also activated during root nodule development. AM-induced transcriptional activation was abolished in roots carrying mutations in common symbiosis genes, suggesting a central position of these genes in a pathway leading to the transcriptional activation of downstream genes. By contrast, AM fungus-induced gene repression appeared to be unaffected in mutant backgrounds, which indicates the presence of additional independent signaling pathways. PMID:15980262

  15. Influence of Uranium on Bacterial Communities: A Comparison of Natural Uranium-Rich Soils with Controls

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Laure Mondani; Karim Benzerara; Marie Carrière; Richard Christen; Yannick Mamindy-Pajany; Laureline Février; Nicolas Marmier; Wafa Achouak; Pascal Nardoux; Catherine Berthomieu; Virginie Chapon

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of uranium on the indigenous bacterial community structure in natural soils with high uranium content. Radioactive soil samples exhibiting 0.26% - 25.5% U in mass were analyzed and compared with nearby control soils containing trace uranium. EXAFS and XRD analyses of soils revealed the presence of U(VI) and uranium-phosphate mineral phases, identified as sabugalite and

  16. Microbial control of the culture of Artemia juveniles through preemptive colonization by selected bacterial strains.

    PubMed

    Verschuere, L; Rombaut, G; Huys, G; Dhont, J; Sorgeloos, P; Verstraete, W

    1999-06-01

    The use of juvenile Artemia as feed in aquaculture and in the pet shop industry has been getting more attention during the last decade. In this study, the use of selected bacterial strains to improve the nutritional value of dry food for Artemia juveniles and to obtain control of the associated microbial community was examined. Nine bacterial strains were selected based on their positive effects on survival and/or growth of Artemia juveniles under monoxenic culture conditions, while other strains caused no significant effect, significantly lower rates of survival and/or growth, or even total mortality of the Artemia. The nine selected strains were used to preemptively colonize the culture water of Artemia juveniles. Xenic culture of Artemia under suboptimal conditions yielded better survival and/or growth rates when they were grown in the preemptively colonized culture medium than when grown in autoclaved seawater. The preemptive colonization of the culture water had a drastic influence on the microbial communities that developed in the culture water or that were associated with the Artemia, as determined with Biolog GN community-level physiological profiles. Chemotaxonomical characterization based on fatty acid methyl ester analysis of bacterial isolates recovered from the culture tanks was performed, and a comparison with the initially introduced strains was made. Finally, several modes of action for the beneficial effect of the bacterial strains are proposed. PMID:10347038

  17. Seasonal Changes in Bacterial and Archaeal Gene Expression Patterns across Salinity Gradients in the Columbia River Coastal Margin

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Maria W.; Herfort, Lydie; Tyrol, Kaitlin; Suciu, Dominic; Campbell, Victoria; Crump, Byron C.; Peterson, Tawnya D.; Zuber, Peter; Baptista, Antonio M.; Simon, Holly M.

    2010-01-01

    Through their metabolic activities, microbial populations mediate the impact of high gradient regions on ecological function and productivity of the highly dynamic Columbia River coastal margin (CRCM). A 2226-probe oligonucleotide DNA microarray was developed to investigate expression patterns for microbial genes involved in nitrogen and carbon metabolism in the CRCM. Initial experiments with the environmental microarrays were directed toward validation of the platform and yielded high reproducibility in multiple tests. Bioinformatic and experimental validation also indicated that >85% of the microarray probes were specific for their corresponding target genes and for a few homologs within the same microbial family. The validated probe set was used to query gene expression responses by microbial assemblages to environmental variability. Sixty-four samples from the river, estuary, plume, and adjacent ocean were collected in different seasons and analyzed to correlate the measured variability in chemical, physical and biological water parameters to differences in global gene expression profiles. The method produced robust seasonal profiles corresponding to pre-freshet spring (April) and late summer (August). Overall relative gene expression was high in both seasons and was consistent with high microbial abundance measured by total RNA, heterotrophic bacterial production, and chlorophyll a. Both seasonal patterns involved large numbers of genes that were highly expressed relative to background, yet each produced very different gene expression profiles. April patterns revealed high differential gene expression in the coastal margin samples (estuary, plume and adjacent ocean) relative to freshwater, while little differential gene expression was observed along the river-to-ocean transition in August. Microbial gene expression profiles appeared to relate, in part, to seasonal differences in nutrient availability and potential resource competition. Furthermore, our results suggest that highly-active particle-attached microbiota in the Columbia River water column may perform dissimilatory nitrate reduction (both dentrification and DNRA) within anoxic particle microniches. PMID:20967204

  18. A bacterial gene homologous to ABC transporters protect Oenococcus oeni from ethanol and other stress factors in wine.

    PubMed

    Bourdineaud, J-P; Nehmé, B; Tesse, S; Lonvaud-Funel, A

    2004-04-01

    The wine lactic acid bacteria Oenococcus oeni has to cope with harsh environmental conditions including an acidic pH, a high alcoholic content, non-optimal growth temperatures, and growth inhibitory compounds such as fatty acids, phenolic acids and tannins. We here describe characterisation and cloning of the O. oeni omrA gene encoding a protein belonging to the ATP-binding cassette superfamily of transporters. The OmrA protein displays the highest sequence similarity with the subfamily of ATP-dependent multidrug resistance (MDR) proteins, most notably the bacterial Lactococcus lactis LmrA homologue of the human MDR1 P-glycoprotein. The omrA gene proved to be a stress-responsive gene since its expression was increased at high temperature or under osmotic shock. The OmrA protein function was tested in Escherichia coli, and consistent with the omrA gene expression pattern, OmrA conferred protection to bacteria grown on a high salt medium. OmrA also triggered bacterial resistance to sodium laurate, wine and ethanol toxicity. The homologous LmrA protein featured the same stress-protective pattern than OmrA when expressed in E. coli, and the contribution to resistance of both OmrA and LmrA transporters was decreased by verapamil, a well-known inhibitor of the human MDR1 protein. Genes homologous to omrA were detected in other wine lactic acid bacteria, suggesting that this type of genes might constitute a well-conserved stress-protective molecular device. PMID:15033264

  19. Two novel human members of an emerging mammalian gene family related to mono-ADP-ribosylating bacterial toxins

    SciTech Connect

    Koch-Nolte, F.; Haag, F.; Braren, R. [Univ. Hospital, Hamburg (Germany)] [and others] [Univ. Hospital, Hamburg (Germany); and others

    1997-02-01

    Mono-ADP-ribosylation is one of the posttranslational protein modifications regulating cellular metabolism, e.g., nitrogen fixation, in prokaryotes. Several bacterial toxins mono-ADP-ribosylate and inactivate specific proteins in their animal hosts. Recently, two mammalian GPI-anchored cell surface enzymes with similar activities were cloned (designated ART1 and ART2). We have now identified six related expressed sequence tags (ESTs) in the public database and cloned the two novel human genes from which these are derived (designated ART3 and ART4). The deduced amino acid sequences of the predicted gene products show 28% sequence identity to one another and 32-41% identity vs the muscle and T cell enzymes. They contain signal peptide sequences characteristic of GPI anchorage. Southern Zoo blot analyses suggest the presence of related genes in other mammalian species. By PCR screening of somatic cell hybrids and by in situ hybridization, we have mapped the two genes to human chromosomes 4p14-p15.l and 12q13.2- q13.3. Northern blot analyses show that these genes are specifically expressed in testis and spleen, respectively. Comparison of genomic and cDNA sequences reveals a conserved exon/intron structure, with an unusually large exon encoding the predicted mature membrane proteins. Secondary structure prediction analyses indicate conserved motifs and amino acid residues consistent with a common ancestry of this emerging mammalian enzyme family and bacterial mono(ADP-ribosyl)transferases. It is possible that the four human gene family members identified so far represent the {open_quotes}tip of an iceberg,{close_quote} i.e., a larger family of enzymes that influences the function of target proteins via mono-ADP-ribosylation. 35 refs., 4 figs.

  20. Bacillus thuringiensis Suppresses Bacterial wilt Disease Caused by Ralstonia solanacearum with Systemic Induction of Defense-Related Gene Expression in Tomato

    PubMed Central

    Hyakumachi, Mitsuro; Nishimura, Mitsuyoshi; Arakawa, Tatsuyuki; Asano, Shinichiro; Yoshida, Shigenobu; Tsushima, Seiya; Takahashi, Hideki

    2013-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis is a naturally abundant Gram-positive bacterium and a well-known, effective bio-insecticide. Recently, B. thuringiensis has attracted considerable attention as a potential biological control agent for the suppression of plant diseases. In this study, the bacterial wilt disease-suppressing activity of B. thuringiensis was examined in tomato plants. Treatment of tomato roots with B. thuringiensis culture followed by challenge inoculation with Ralstonia solanacearum suppressed the development of wilt symptoms to less than one third of the control. This disease suppression in tomato plants was reproduced by pretreating their roots with a cell-free filtrate (CF) that had been fractionated from B. thuringiensis culture by centrifugation and filtration. In tomato plants challenge-inoculated with R. solanacearum after pretreatment with CF, the growth of R. solanacearum in stem tissues clearly decreased, and expression of defense-related genes such as PR-1, acidic chitinase, and ?-1,3-glucanase was induced in stem and leaf tissues. Furthermore, the stem tissues of tomato plants with their roots were pretreated with CF exhibited resistance against direct inoculation with R. solanacearum. Taken together, these results suggest that treatment of tomato roots with the CF of B. thuringiensis systemically suppresses bacterial wilt through systemic activation of the plant defense system. PMID:23257909

  1. Original article The hormonal control of ovine ?-lactoglobulin gene

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    under the influence of gluco- corticoids (Gaye et al, 1986). Moreover, ovine (3-lactoglobulin geneOriginal article The hormonal control of ovine ?-lactoglobulin gene in cultured ewe mammary. [3-lactoglobulin gene in ewes, is therefore, controlled by the lactogenic hormones which also induce

  2. Description of Drinking Water Bacterial Communities Using 16S rRNA Gene Sequence Analyses

    EPA Science Inventory

    Descriptions of bacterial communities inhabiting water distribution systems (WDS) have mainly been accomplished using culture-based approaches. Due to the inherent selective nature of culture-based approaches, the majority of bacteria inhabiting WDS remain uncharacterized. The go...

  3. Dominant gene for common bean resistance to common bacterial blight caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. phaseoli

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mildred Zapata; James S. Beaver; Timothy G. Porch

    2011-01-01

    The common bacterial blight pathogen [Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. phaseoli (Xap)] is a limiting factor for common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) production worldwide and resistance to the pathogen in most commercial cultivars is inadequate. Variability in virulence\\u000a of the bacterial pathogen has been observed in strains isolated from Puerto Rico and Central America. A few common bean lines\\u000a show a differential

  4. Randomized Controlled Trial to Reduce Bacterial Colonization of Surgical Drains After Breast and Axillary Operations

    PubMed Central

    Degnim, Amy C.; Scow, Jeffrey S.; Hoskin, Tanya L.; Miller, Joyce P.; Loprinzi, Margie; Boughey, Judy C.; Jakub, James W.; Throckmorton, Alyssa; Patel, Robin; Baddour, Larry M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine if bacterial colonization of drains can be reduced by local antiseptic interventions. Summary Background Drains are a potential source of bacterial entry into surgical wounds and may contribute to surgical site infection (SSI) after breast surgery. Methods Following IRB approval, patients undergoing total mastectomy and/or axillary lymph node dissection were randomized to standard drain care (control) or drain antisepsis (treated). Standard drain care comprised twice daily cleansing with alcohol swabs. Antisepsis drain care included 1) a chlorhexidine disc at the drain exit site and 2) irrigation of the drain bulb twice daily with dilute sodium hypochlorite (Dakin’s) solution. Cultures results of drain fluid and tubing were compared between control and antisepsis groups. Results Overall, 100 patients with 125 drains completed the study with 48 patients (58 drains) in the control group and 52 patients (67 drains) in the antisepsis group. Cultures of drain bulb fluid at one week were positive (1+ or greater growth) in 66% (38/58) of control drains compared to 21% of antisepsis drains (14/67), (p=0.0001). Drain tubing cultures demonstrated >50 CFU in 19% (8/43) of control drains versus 0% (0/53) of treated drains (p=0.004). SSI was diagnosed in 6 patients (6%) - 5 patients in the control group and 1 patient in the antisepsis group (p=0.06). Conclusions Simple and inexpensive local antiseptic interventions with a chlorhexidine disc and hypochlorite solution reduce bacterial colonization of drains. Based on these data, further study of drain antisepsis and its potential impact on SSI rate is warranted. PMID:23518704

  5. Regulated bioluminescence as a tool for bioremediation process monitoring and control of bacterial cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlage, Robert S.; Heitzer, Armin; Digrazia, Philip M.

    1991-01-01

    An effective on-line monitoring technique for toxic waste bioremediation using bioluminescent microorganisms has shown great potential for the description and optimization of biological processes. The lux genes of the bacterium Vibrio fischeri are used by this species to produce visible light. The lux genes can be genetically fused to the control region of a catabolic gene, with the result that bioluminescence is produced whenever the catabolic gene is induced. Thus the detection of light from a sample indicates that genetic expression from a specific gene is occurring. This technique was used to monitor biodegradation of specific contaminants from waste sites. For these studies, fusions between the lux genes and the operons for naphthalene and toluene/xylene degradation were constructed. Strains carrying one of these fusions respond sensitively and specifically to target substrates. Bioluminescence from these cultures can be rapidly measured in a nondestructive and noninvasive manner. The potential for this technique in this and other biological systems is discussed.

  6. A controllable bacterial lysis system to enhance biological safety of live attenuated Vibrio anguillarum vaccine.

    PubMed

    Chu, Teng; Guan, Lingyu; Shang, Pengfei; Wang, Qiyao; Xiao, Jingfan; Liu, Qin; Zhang, Yuanxing

    2015-08-01

    Bacterial strains used as backbone for the generation of vaccine prototypes should exhibit an adequate and stable safety profile. Given the fact that live attenuated vaccines often contain some potential risks in virulence recovery and spread infections, new approaches are greatly needed to improve their biological safety. Here, a critically iron-regulated promoter PviuA was screened from Vibrio anguillarum, which was demonstrated to respond to iron-limitation signal both in vitro and in vivo. By using PviuA as a regulatory switch to control the expression of phage P22 lysis cassette 13-19-15, a novel in vivo inducible bacterial lysis system was established in V. anguillarum. This system was proved to be activated by iron-limitation signals and then effectively lyse V. anguillarum both in vitro and in vivo. Further, this controllable bacterial lysis system, after being transformed into a live attenuated V. anguillarum vaccine strain MVAV6203, was confirmed to significantly improve biological safety of the live attenuated vaccine without impairing its immune protection efficacy. PMID:26052008

  7. NK cells activated in vivo by bacterial DNA control the intracellular growth of Francisella tularensis LVS.

    PubMed

    Elkins, Karen L; Colombini, Susan M; Krieg, Arthur M; De Pascalis, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrated previously that mice treated with bacterial or oligonucleotide DNA containing unmethylated CpG motifs are transiently protected against lethal parenteral challenge with the intracellular bacterium Francisella tularensis Live Vaccine Strain (LVS). Here we explore the cellular basis of this protection. Wild-type mice that were treated with CpG oligonucleotide DNA and challenged with a lethal dose of LVS survived, while mice lacking TLR9 did not. In vitro, treatment of LVS-infected macrophages and/or naive splenocytes with oligo DNA had no impact on intracellular bacterial replication. In contrast, in vitro co-culture of LVS-infected macrophages with splenocytes obtained from mice treated with oligo DNA in vivo resulted in control of intracellular LVS growth. Control was reversed by antibodies to interferon-gamma or to tumor necrosis factor-alpha and by inhibition of nitric oxide, and to a lesser degree by antibodies to Interleukin-12. Further, splenocytes from DNA-primed normal, T cell KO, B cell KO, lymphocyte-deficient scid, or perforin KO mice all controlled intra-macrophage LVS growth. Enriched DNA-primed natural killer cells, but not B cells, clearly controlled intracellular LVS growth. Thus, NK cells contribute to DNA-mediated protection by production of cytokines including IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha, resulting in nitric oxide production and control of intracellular Francisella replication. PMID:18992838

  8. Survey of Culture, GoldenGate Assay, Universal Biosensor Assay, and 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing as Alternative Methods of Bacterial Pathogen Detection

    PubMed Central

    Pop, Mihai; Antonio, Martin; Walker, Alan W.; Mai, Volker; Ahmed, Dilruba; Oundo, Joseph; Tamboura, Boubou; Panchalingam, Sandra; Levine, Myron M.; Kotloff, Karen; Li, Shan; Magder, Laurence S.; Paulson, Joseph N.; Liu, Bo; Ikumapayi, Usman; Ebruke, Chinelo; Dione, Michel; Adeyemi, Mitchell; Rance, Richard; Stares, Mark D.; Ukhanova, Maria; Barnes, Bret; Lewis, Ian; Ahmed, Firoz; Alam, Meer Taifur; Amin, Ruhul; Siddiqui, Sabbir; Ochieng, John B.; Ouma, Emmanuel; Juma, Jane; Mailu, Eunice; Omore, Richard; O'Reilly, Ciara E.; Hannis, James; Manalili, Sheri; DeLeon, Jonna; Yasuda, Irene; Blyn, Lawrence; Ranken, Raymond; Li, Feng; Housley, Roberta; Ecker, David J.; Hossain, M. Anowar; Breiman, Robert F.; Morris, J. Glenn; McDaniel, Timothy K.; Parkhill, Julian; Saha, Debasish; Sampath, Rangarajan; Stine, O. Colin; Nataro, James P.

    2013-01-01

    Cultivation-based assays combined with PCR or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)-based methods for finding virulence factors are standard methods for detecting bacterial pathogens in stools; however, with emerging molecular technologies, new methods have become available. The aim of this study was to compare four distinct detection technologies for the identification of pathogens in stools from children under 5 years of age in The Gambia, Mali, Kenya, and Bangladesh. The children were identified, using currently accepted clinical protocols, as either controls or cases with moderate to severe diarrhea. A total of 3,610 stool samples were tested by established clinical culture techniques: 3,179 DNA samples by the Universal Biosensor assay (Ibis Biosciences, Inc.), 1,466 DNA samples by the GoldenGate assay (Illumina), and 1,006 DNA samples by sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. Each method detected different proportions of samples testing positive for each of seven enteric pathogens, enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC), enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC), enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), Shigella spp., Campylobacter jejuni, Salmonella enterica, and Aeromonas spp. The comparisons among detection methods included the frequency of positive stool samples and kappa values for making pairwise comparisons. Overall, the standard culture methods detected Shigella spp., EPEC, ETEC, and EAEC in smaller proportions of the samples than either of the methods based on detection of the virulence genes from DNA in whole stools. The GoldenGate method revealed the greatest agreement with the other methods. The agreement among methods was higher in cases than in controls. The new molecular technologies have a high potential for highly sensitive identification of bacterial diarrheal pathogens. PMID:23884998

  9. Bacterial Genome Instability

    PubMed Central

    Darmon, Elise

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Bacterial genomes are remarkably stable from one generation to the next but are plastic on an evolutionary time scale, substantially shaped by horizontal gene transfer, genome rearrangement, and the activities of mobile DNA elements. This implies the existence of a delicate balance between the maintenance of genome stability and the tolerance of genome instability. In this review, we describe the specialized genetic elements and the endogenous processes that contribute to genome instability. We then discuss the consequences of genome instability at the physiological level, where cells have harnessed instability to mediate phase and antigenic variation, and at the evolutionary level, where horizontal gene transfer has played an important role. Indeed, this ability to share DNA sequences has played a major part in the evolution of life on Earth. The evolutionary plasticity of bacterial genomes, coupled with the vast numbers of bacteria on the planet, substantially limits our ability to control disease. PMID:24600039

  10. Violacein as a genetically-controlled, enzymatically amplified and photobleaching-resistant chromophore for optoacoustic bacterial imaging.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yuanyuan; Sigmund, Felix; Reber, Josefine; Luís Deán-Ben, Xosé; Glasl, Sarah; Kneipp, Moritz; Estrada, Héctor; Razansky, Daniel; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Westmeyer, Gil G

    2015-01-01

    There is growing interest in genetically expressed reporters for in vivo studies of bacterial colonization in the context of infectious disease research, studies of the bacterial microbiome or cancer imaging and treatment. To empower non-invasive high-resolution bacterial tracking with deep tissue penetration, we herein use the genetically controlled biosynthesis of the deep-purple pigment Violacein as a photobleaching-resistant chromophore label for in vivo optoacoustic (photoacoustic) imaging in the near-infrared range. We demonstrate that Violacein-producing bacteria can be imaged with high contrast-to-noise in strongly vascularized xenografted murine tumors and further observe that Violacein shows anti-tumoral activity. Our experiments thus identify Violacein as a robust bacterial label for non-invasive optoacoustic imaging with high potential for basic research and future theranostic applications in bacterial tumor targeting. PMID:26091543

  11. Violacein as a genetically-controlled, enzymatically amplified and photobleaching-resistant chromophore for optoacoustic bacterial imaging

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yuanyuan; Sigmund, Felix; Reber, Josefine; Luís Deán-Ben, Xosé; Glasl, Sarah; Kneipp, Moritz; Estrada, Héctor; Razansky, Daniel; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Westmeyer, Gil G.

    2015-01-01

    There is growing interest in genetically expressed reporters for in vivo studies of bacterial colonization in the context of infectious disease research, studies of the bacterial microbiome or cancer imaging and treatment. To empower non-invasive high-resolution bacterial tracking with deep tissue penetration, we herein use the genetically controlled biosynthesis of the deep-purple pigment Violacein as a photobleaching-resistant chromophore label for in vivo optoacoustic (photoacoustic) imaging in the near-infrared range. We demonstrate that Violacein-producing bacteria can be imaged with high contrast-to-noise in strongly vascularized xenografted murine tumors and further observe that Violacein shows anti-tumoral activity. Our experiments thus identify Violacein as a robust bacterial label for non-invasive optoacoustic imaging with high potential for basic research and future theranostic applications in bacterial tumor targeting. PMID:26091543

  12. Thousands of missed genes found in bacterial genomes and their analysis with COMBREX

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The dramatic reduction in the cost of sequencing has allowed many researchers to join in the effort of sequencing and annotating prokaryotic genomes. Annotation methods vary considerably and may fail to identify some genes. Here we draw attention to a large number of likely genes missing from annotations using common tools such as Glimmer and BLAST. Results By analyzing 1,474 prokaryotic genome annotations in GenBank, we identify 13,602 likely missed genes that are homologs to non-hypothetical proteins, and 11,792 likely missed genes that are homologs only to hypothetical proteins, yet have supporting evidence of their protein-coding nature from COMBREX, a newly created gene function database. We also estimate the likelihood that each potential missing gene found is a genuine protein-coding gene using COMBREX. Conclusions Our analysis of the causes of missed genes suggests that larger annotation centers tend to produce annotations with fewer missed genes than smaller centers, and many of the missed genes are short genes <300 bp. Over 1,000 of the likely missed genes could be associated with phenotype information available in COMBREX. 359 of these genes, found in pathogenic organisms, may be potential targets for pharmaceutical research. The newly identified genes are available on COMBREX’s website. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Daniel Haft, Arcady Mushegian, and M. Pilar Francino (nominated by David Ardell). PMID:23111013

  13. Virulence genes of Aeromonas isolates, bacterial endotoxins and cyanobacterial toxins from recreational water samples associated with human health symptoms.

    PubMed

    Berg, Katri A; Lyra, Christina; Niemi, R Maarit; Heens, Benoit; Hoppu, Kalle; Erkomaa, Kirsti; Sivonen, Kaarina; Rapala, Jarkko

    2011-12-01

    Exposure to cyanobacterial water blooms has been associated with various kinds of adverse health effects. In addition to cyanobacteria and their toxins, the bacteria associated with cyanobacteria could also be the etiological agents. We isolated Aeromonas strains (n = 176) from water samples (n = 38) taken from sites where cyanobacteria were suspected to have caused human health symptoms, of which fever and gastrointestinal symptoms were the most common. The isolates were screened by PCR for six virulence gene types (12 genes). The majority (90%) of the strains contained at least one of the virulence genes. Most common amplification products were those of genes (act/aerA/hlyA) that encode cytotoxic enterotoxin and haemolytic products. The genes encoding cytotonic enterotoxins (ast and alt), phospholipase (lip/pla/lipH3/alp-1), elastase (ahyB) and flagellin subunits (flaA/flaB) were also present in 5-37% of the Aeromonas strains. Analysed toxins (cyanobacterial hepatotoxins and neurotoxins, and bacterial endotoxins) were not detectable or were present in only low concentrations in the majority of the samples. The results indicated that the toxins were unlikely to be the main cause of the reported adverse health effects, whereas more attention should be paid to bacteria associated with cyanobacteria as a source of health effects. PMID:22048427

  14. DNA bridging and antibridging: a role for bacterial nucleoid-associated proteins in regulating the expression of laterally acquired genes.

    PubMed

    Dorman, Charles J; Kane, Kelly A

    2009-05-01

    Horizontal DNA transfer plays a major role in the evolution of bacteria. It allows them to acquire new traits rapidly and these may confer fitness advantages as the bacteria compete with others in the environment. Historically, the mechanisms of horizontal DNA transfer, chiefly conjugation, transformation and transduction, have received a great deal of attention. Less attention has been focused on the regulatory problems that may accompany the acquisition of new genes by lateral routes. How are these genes integrated into the existing regulatory circuits of the cell? Does a process of 'plug-and-play' operate, or are the new genes silenced pending the evolution of regulatory mechanisms that make their expression not only safe but also beneficial to both the gene and its new host? Recent research shows that bacterial nucleoid-associated proteins such as H-NS, HU and Fis are important contributors to the processes of regulatory integration that accompany horizontal gene transfer. A key emerging theme is the antagonism that exists between the DNA-protein-DNA bridging activity of the H-NS repressor and the DNA-bending and DNA-wrapping activities of regulatory proteins that oppose H-NS. PMID:19207739

  15. Metagenomic analysis of the 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase gene ( acdS ) operon of an uncultured bacterial endophyte colonizing Solanum tuberosum L

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Branislav Nikolic; Helmut Schwab; Angela Sessitsch

    Deamination of the ethylene precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) is a key plant-beneficial trait found in\\u000a many plant growth-promoting bacteria. In this study, we analysed ACC deaminase genes (acdS) of bacterial endophytes colonizing field-grown potato plants. PCR analysis revealed the presence of two types of acdS genes, the dominant one showing high homology to an acdS gene derived from Pseudomonas fluorescens.

  16. Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library resource for positional cloning of pest and disease resistance genes in cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz).

    PubMed

    Tomkins, J; Fregene, M; Main, D; Kim, H; Wing, R; Tohme, J

    2004-11-01

    Pest and disease problems are important constraints of cassava production and host plant resistance is the most efficient method of combating them. Breeding for host plant resistance is considerably slowed down by the crop's biological constraints of a long growth cycle, high levels of heterozygosity and a large genetic load. More efficient methods such as gene cloning and transgenesis are required to deploy resistance genes. To facilitate the cloning of resistance genes, bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library resources have been developed for cassava. Two libraries were constructed from the cassava clones, TMS 30001, resistant to the cassava mosaic disease (CMD) and the cassava bacterial blight (CBB), and MECU72, resistant to cassava white fly. The TMS30001 library has 55, 296 clones with an insert size range of 40-150 kb with an average of 80 kb, while the MECU72 library consists of 92 160 clones and an insert size range of 25-250 kb average of 93 kb. Based on a genome size of 772 Mb, the TMS30001 and MECU72 libraries have a 5 and 11.3 haploid genome equivalents and a 95 and 99 chance of finding any sequence, respectively. To demonstrate the potential of the libraries, the TMS30001 library was screened by southern hybridization using a cassava analog (CBB1) of the Xa21 gene from rice that maps to a region containing a QTL for resistance to CBB as probe. Five BAC clones that hybridized to CBB1 were isolated and a Hind III fingerprint revealed 2-3 copies of the gene in individual BAC clones. A larger scale analysis of resistance gene analogs (RGAs) in cassava has also been conducted in order to understand the number and organization of RGAs. To scan for gene and repeat DNA content in the libraries, end-sequencing was performed on 2,301 clones from the MECU72 library. A total of 1705 unique sequences were obtained with an average size of 715 bp. Database homology searches using BLAST revealed that 458 sequences had significant homology with known proteins and 321 with transposable elements. The use of the library in positional cloning of pest and disease resistance genes is discussed. PMID:15630619

  17. A Comparison between Droplet Digital and Quantitative PCR in the Analysis of Bacterial 16S Load in Lung Tissue Samples from Control and COPD GOLD 2

    PubMed Central

    Sze, Marc A.; Abbasi, Meysam; Hogg, James C.; Sin, Don D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Low biomass in the bacterial lung tissue microbiome utilizes quantitative PCR (qPCR) 16S bacterial assays at their limit of detection. New technology like droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) could allow for higher sensitivity and accuracy of quantification. These attributes are needed if specific bacteria within the bacterial lung tissue microbiome are to be evaluated as potential contributors to diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We hypothesize that ddPCR is better at quantifying the total bacterial load in lung tissue versus qPCR. Methods Control (n?=?16) and COPD GOLD 2 (n?=?16) tissue samples were obtained from patients who underwent lung resection surgery, were cut on a cryotome, and sections were assigned for use in quantitative histology or for DNA extraction. qPCR and ddPCR were performed on these samples using primers spanning the V2 region on the 16S rRNA gene along with negative controls. Total 16S counts were compared between the two methods. Both methods were assessed for correlations with quantitative histology measurements of the tissue. Results There was no difference in the average total 16S counts (P>0.05) between the two methods. However, the negative controls contained significantly lower counts in the ddPCR (0.55 ± 0.28 16S/uL) than in the qPCR assay (1.00 ± 0.70 16S copies) (P <0.05). The coefficient of variation was significantly lower for the ddPCR assay (0.18 ± 0.14) versus the qPCR assay (0.62 ± 0.29) (P<0.05). Conclusion Overall the ddPCR 16S assay performed better by reducing the background noise in 16S of the negative controls compared with 16S qPCR assay. PMID:25329701

  18. Culturable bacterial microflora associated with nectarine fruit and their potential for control of brown rot.

    PubMed

    Janisiewicz, Wojciech J; Buyer, Jeffrey S

    2010-06-01

    Microflora of fruit surfaces have been the best source of antagonists against fungi causing postharvest decay of fruit. However, there is little information on microflora colonizing surfaces of fruits other than grape, apple, and citrus. We characterized bacterial microflora on nectarine fruit surfaces from the early stage of development until harvest. Identification of bacterial strains was made using MIDI (fatty acid methyl ester analysis) and Biolog systems. Biolog identified 35% and MIDI 53% of the strains. Thus results from MIDI were used to determine the frequency of occurrence of genera and species. The most frequently occurring genera were Curtobacterium (21.31%), followed by Pseudomonas (19.99%), Microbacterium (13.57%), Clavibacter (9.69%), Pantoea (6.59%), and Enterobacter (4.26%). The frequency of isolations of some bacteria - for example, the major pseudomonads (Pseudomonas syringae, Pseudomonas putida, and Pseudomonas savastanoi) or Pantoea agglomerans - tended to decline as fruit developed. As Pseudomonas declined, Curtobacterium became more dominant. Time of isolation was a significant factor in the frequency of occurrence of different bacteria, indicating succession of the genera. Throughput screening of the bacterial strains against Monilinia fructicola on nectarine fruit resulted in the detection of strains able to control brown rot. The 10 best-performing antagonistic strains were subjected to secondary screening. Four strains reduced decay severity by more than 50% (51.7%-91.4% reduction) at the high pathogen inoculum concentration of 105 conidia/mL. PMID:20657618

  19. Biological control of rice bacterial blight by plant-associated bacteria producing 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol.

    PubMed

    Velusamy, Palaniyandi; Immanuel, J Ebenezar; Gnanamanickam, Samuel S; Thomashow, Linda

    2006-01-01

    Certain plant-associated strains of fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. are known to produce the antimicrobial antibiotic 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (DAPG). It has antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, and antihelminthic properties and has played a significant role in the biological control of tobacco, wheat, and sugar beet diseases. It has never been reported from India and has not been implicated in the biological suppression of a major disease of the rice crop. Here, we report that a subpopulation of 27 strains of plant-associated Pseudomonas fluorescens screened in a batch of 278 strains of fluorescent pseudomonads produced DAPG. The DAPG production was detected by a PCR-based screening method that used primers Phl2a and Phl2b and amplified a 745-bp fragment characteristic of DAPG. HPLC, 1H NMR, and IR analyses provided further evidence for its production. We report also that this compound inhibited the growth of the devastating rice bacterial blight pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae in laboratory assays and suppressed rice bacterial blight up to 59%-64% in net-house and field experiments. Tn5 mutants defective in DAPG production (Phl-) of P. fluorescens PTB 9 were much less effective in their suppression of rice bacterial blight. PMID:16541159

  20. Bacterial Cell Wall Synthesis Gene uppP Is Required for Burkholderia Colonization of the Stinkbug Gut

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jiyeun Kate; Lee, Ho Jin; Kikuchi, Yoshitomo; Kitagawa, Wataru; Nikoh, Naruo

    2013-01-01

    To establish a host-bacterium symbiotic association, a number of factors involved in symbiosis must operate in a coordinated manner. In insects, bacterial factors for symbiosis have been poorly characterized at the molecular and biochemical levels, since many symbionts have not yet been cultured or are as yet genetically intractable. Recently, the symbiotic association between a stinkbug, Riptortus pedestris, and its beneficial gut bacterium, Burkholderia sp., has emerged as a promising experimental model system, providing opportunities to study insect symbiosis using genetically manipulated symbiotic bacteria. Here, in search of bacterial symbiotic factors, we targeted cell wall components of the Burkholderia symbiont by disruption of uppP gene, which encodes undecaprenyl pyrophosphate phosphatase involved in biosynthesis of various bacterial cell wall components. Under culture conditions, the ?uppP mutant showed higher susceptibility to lysozyme than the wild-type strain, indicating impaired integrity of peptidoglycan of the mutant. When administered to the host insect, the ?uppP mutant failed to establish normal symbiotic association: the bacterial cells reached to the symbiotic midgut but neither proliferated nor persisted there. Transformation of the ?uppP mutant with uppP-encoding plasmid complemented these phenotypic defects: lysozyme susceptibility in vitro was restored, and normal infection and proliferation in the midgut symbiotic organ were observed in vivo. The ?uppP mutant also exhibited susceptibility to hypotonic, hypertonic, and centrifugal stresses. These results suggest that peptidoglycan cell wall integrity is a stress resistance factor relevant to the successful colonization of the stinkbug midgut by Burkholderia symbiont. PMID:23747704

  1. Arabidopsis enhanced disease susceptibility mutants exhibit enhanced susceptibility to several bacterial pathogens and alterations in PR-1 gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, E E; Ausubel, F M

    1997-01-01

    To identify plant defense responses that limit pathogen attack, Arabidopsis eds mutants that exhibit enhanced disease susceptibility to the virulent bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv maculicola ES4326 were previously identified. In this study, we show that each of four eds mutants (eds5-1, eds6-1, eds7-1, and eds9-1) has a distinguishable phenotype with respect to the degree of susceptibility to a panel of bacterial phytopathogens and the ability to activate pathogenesis-related PR-1 gene expression after pathogen attack. None of the four eds mutants exhibited observable defects in mounting a hypersensitive response. Although all four eds mutants were also capable of mounting a systemic acquired resistance response, enhanced growth of P. s. maculicola ES4326 was still apparent in the secondarily infected leaves of three of the eds mutants. These data indicate that eds genes define a diverse set of previously unknown defense responses that affect resistance to virulent pathogens. PMID:9090877

  2. Influence of Rice Development on the Function of Bacterial Blight Resistance Genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Disease resistance genes most commonly used in breeding programs are single, dominant, resistance (R) genes with relative effectiveness influenced by plant developmental stage. Knowing the developmental stages at which an R gene is functional is important for disease management. In rice, resistanc...

  3. The M949_1556 gene plays a role on the bacterial antigenicity and pathogenicity of Riemerella anatipestifer.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jiechi; Wang, Xiaolan; Tian, Mingxing; Cao, Shoulin; Hou, Wanwan; Wang, Shaohui; Han, Xiangan; Ding, Chan; Yu, Shengqing

    2015-05-15

    Riemerella anatipestifer is one of the most economically important pathogens of farm ducks worldwide. However, the molecular mechanisms regarding its antigenicity and pathogenicity are poorly understood. We previously constructed a library of random Tn4351 transposon mutants using R. anatipestifer strain CH3. In this study, M949_1556 gene inactivated mutant strain CH3?M949_1556 was identified by screening of the library using monoclonal antibody against R. anatipestifer serotype 1 lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (anti-LPS MAb) followed by sequence analysis. The mutant strain presented no reactivity to the anti-LPS MAb in an indirect ELISA. Animal studies showed that the median lethal dose (LD50) of CH3?M949_1556 was >10(10) colony forming units (CFU), which was attenuated more than 50 times, compared with that of wild-type strain CH3 (LD50=2×10(8) CFU). The bacterial loads in the blood of CH3?M949_1556 infected ducks were significantly decreased, compared with those of CH3-infected ducks. In addition, CH3?M949_1556 presented significant, higher susceptibility to complement-dependent killing than CH3 did in vitro. Furthermore, CH3?M949_1556 showed increased bacterial adhesion and invasion capacities to Vero cells. Immunization with CH3?M949_1556-inactived vaccine was effective in protecting the ducks from challenge with R. anatipestifer serotype 1 strain WJ4, serotype 2 strain Yb2 and serotype 10 strain HXb2, suggesting that the mutant strain CH3?M949_1556 could provide a broad cross-protection among R. anatipestifer serotypes 1, 2 and 10 strains. Our results demonstrated that the M949_1556 gene plays a role on the bacterial antigenicity and pathogenicity of R. anatipestifer. PMID:25804836

  4. Use of 16S rRNA Gene for Identification of a Broad Range of Clinically Relevant Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Ramya; Karaoz, Ulas; Volegova, Marina; MacKichan, Joanna; Kato-Maeda, Midori; Miller, Steve; Nadarajan, Rohan; Brodie, Eoin L.; Lynch, Susan V.

    2015-01-01

    According to World Health Organization statistics of 2011, infectious diseases remain in the top five causes of mortality worldwide. However, despite sophisticated research tools for microbial detection, rapid and accurate molecular diagnostics for identification of infection in humans have not been extensively adopted. Time-consuming culture-based methods remain to the forefront of clinical microbial detection. The 16S rRNA gene, a molecular marker for identification of bacterial species, is ubiquitous to members of this domain and, thanks to ever-expanding databases of sequence information, a useful tool for bacterial identification. In this study, we assembled an extensive repository of clinical isolates (n = 617), representing 30 medically important pathogenic species and originally identified using traditional culture-based or non-16S molecular methods. This strain repository was used to systematically evaluate the ability of 16S rRNA for species level identification. To enable the most accurate species level classification based on the paucity of sequence data accumulated in public databases, we built a Naïve Bayes classifier representing a diverse set of high-quality sequences from medically important bacterial organisms. We show that for species identification, a model-based approach is superior to an alignment based method. Overall, between 16S gene based and clinical identities, our study shows a genus-level concordance rate of 96% and a species-level concordance rate of 87.5%. We point to multiple cases of probable clinical misidentification with traditional culture based identification across a wide range of gram-negative rods and gram-positive cocci as well as common gram-negative cocci. PMID:25658760

  5. Sequential expression of bacterial virulence and plant defense genes during infection of tomato with Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis.

    PubMed

    Chalupowicz, L; Cohen-Kandli, M; Dror, O; Eichenlaub, R; Gartemann, K-H; Sessa, G; Barash, I; Manulis-Sasson, S

    2010-03-01

    The molecular interactions between Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis and tomato plant were studied by following the expression of bacterial virulence and host-defense genes during early stages of infection. The C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis genes included the plasmid-borne cellulase (celA) and the serine protease (pat-1), and the serine proteases chpC and ppaA, residing on the chp/tomA pathogenicity island (PAI). Gene expression was measured following tomato inoculation with Cmm382 (wild type), Cmm100 (lacking the plasmids pCM1 and pCM2), and Cmm27 (lacking the PAI). Transcriptional analysis revealed that celA and pat-1 were significantly induced in Cmm382 at initial 12 to 72 h, whereas chpC and ppaA were highly expressed only 96 h after inoculation. Interdependence between the expression of chromosomal and of plasmid-located genes was revealed: expression of celA and pat-1 was substantially reduced in the absence of the chp/tomA PAI, whereas chpC and ppaA expressions were reduced in the absence of the virulence plasmids. Transcription of chromosomal genes involved in cell wall degradation (i.e., pelA1, celB, xysA, and xysB), was also induced at early stages of infection. Expression of the host-defense genes, chitinase class II and pathogenesis-related protein-5 isoform was induced in the absence of the PAI at early stages of infection, suggesting that PAI-located genes are involved in suppression of tomato basal defenses. PMID:20128699

  6. Designer gene networks: Towards fundamental cellular control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasty, Jeff; Isaacs, Farren; Dolnik, Milos; McMillen, David; Collins, J. J.

    2001-03-01

    The engineered control of cellular function through the design of synthetic genetic networks is becoming plausible. Here we show how a naturally occurring network can be used as a parts list for artificial network design, and how model formulation leads to computational and analytical approaches relevant to nonlinear dynamics and statistical physics. We first review the relevant work on synthetic gene networks, highlighting the important experimental findings with regard to genetic switches and oscillators. We then present the derivation of a deterministic model describing the temporal evolution of the concentration of protein in a single-gene network. Bistability in the steady-state protein concentration arises naturally as a consequence of autoregulatory feedback, and we focus on the hysteretic properties of the protein concentration as a function of the degradation rate. We then formulate the effect of an external noise source which interacts with the protein degradation rate. We demonstrate the utility of such a formulation by constructing a protein switch, whereby external noise pulses are used to switch the protein concentration between two values. Following the lead of earlier work, we show how the addition of a second network component can be used to construct a relaxation oscillator, whereby the system is driven around the hysteresis loop. We highlight the frequency dependence on the tunable parameter values, and discuss design plausibility. We emphasize how the model equations can be used to develop design criteria for robust oscillations, and illustrate this point with parameter plots illuminating the oscillatory regions for given parameter values. We then turn to the utilization of an intrinsic cellular process as a means of controlling the oscillations. We consider a network design which exhibits self-sustained oscillations, and discuss the driving of the oscillator in the context of synchronization. Then, as a second design, we consider a synthetic network with parameter values near, but outside, the oscillatory boundary. In this case, we show how resonance can lead to the induction of oscillations and amplification of a cellular signal. Finally, we construct a toggle switch from positive regulatory elements, and compare the switching properties for this network with those of a network constructed using negative regulation. Our results demonstrate the utility of model analysis in the construction of synthetic gene regulatory networks.

  7. Development of candidate gene markers associated to common bacterial blight resistance in common bean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Common bacterial blight (CBB), caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. phaseoli (Xap), is a major yield-limiting factor of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) production around the world. Two major CBB-resistant quantitative trait loci (QTL), linked to the sequence characterized amplified region marker...

  8. Bacterial genes induced within the nodule during the Rhizobium-legume symbiosis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Valerie Oke; Sharon R. Long

    1999-01-01

    Summary During the symbiosis between the bacterium Rhizo- bium meliloti and plants such as alfalfa, the bacteria elicit the formation of nodules on the roots of host plants. The bacteria infect the nodule, enter the cyto- plasm of plant cells and differentiate into a distinct cell type called a bacteroid, which is capable of fixing atmospheric nitrogen. To discover bacterial

  9. The regulation of bacterial transcription initiation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Douglas F. Browning; Stephen J. W. Busby

    2004-01-01

    Bacteria use their genetic material with great effectiveness to make the right products in the correct amounts at the appropriate time. Studying bacterial transcription initiation in Escherichia coli has served as a model for understanding transcriptional control throughout all kingdoms of life. Every step in the pathway between gene and function is exploited to exercise this control, but for reasons

  10. Bacterial colonization factors control specificity and stability of the gut microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Lee, S. Melanie; Donaldson, Gregory P.; Mikulski, Zbigniew; Boyajian, Silva; Ley, Klaus; Mazmanian, Sarkis K.

    2014-01-01

    Mammals harbor a complex gut microbiome, comprised of bacteria that confer immunologic, metabolic and neurologic benefits1. Despite advances in sequence-based microbial profiling and myriad studies defining microbiome composition during health and disease, little is known about the molecular processes employed by symbiotic bacteria to stably colonize the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. We sought to define how mammals assemble and maintain the Bacteroides, one of the most numerically prominent genera of the human microbiome. While the gut normally contains hundreds of bacterial species2,3, we surprisingly find that germ-free mice mono-associated with a single Bacteroides are resistant to colonization by the same, but not different, species. To identify bacterial mechanisms for species-specific saturable colonization, we devised an in vivo genetic screen and discovered a unique class of Polysaccharide Utilization Loci (PUL) that are conserved among intestinal Bacteroides. We named this genetic locus the commensal colonization factors (ccf). Deletion of the ccf genes in the model symbiont, Bacteroides fragilis, results in colonization defects in mice and reduced horizontal transmission. The ccf genes of B. fragilis are up-regulated during gut colonization, preferentially at the colonic surface. When we visualize microbial biogeography within the colon, B. fragilis penetrates the colonic mucus and resides deep within crypt channels, while ccf mutants are defective in crypt association. Remarkably, the CCF system is required for B. fragilis colonization following microbiome disruption with Citrobacter rodentium infection or antibiotic treatment, suggesting the niche within colonic crypts represents a reservoir for bacteria to maintain long-term colonization. These findings reveal that intestinal Bacteroides have evolved species-specific physical interactions with the host that mediate stable and resilient gut colonization, and the CCF system represents a novel molecular mechanism for symbiosis. PMID:23955152

  11. Two genes with similarity to bacterial response regulators are rapidly and specifically induced by cytokinin in Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandstatter, I.; Kieber, J. J.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Cytokinins are central regulators of plant growth and development, but little is known about their mode of action. By using differential display, we identified a gene, IBC6 (for induced by cytokinin), from etiolated Arabidopsis seedlings, that is induced rapidly by cytokinin. The steady state level of IBC6 mRNA was elevated within 10 min by the exogenous application of cytokinin, and this induction did not require de novo protein synthesis. IBC6 was not induced by other plant hormones or by light. A second Arabidopsis gene with a sequence highly similar to IBC6 was identified. This IBC7 gene also was induced by cytokinin, although with somewhat slower kinetics and to a lesser extent. The pattern of expression of the two genes was similar, with higher expression in leaves, rachises, and flowers and lower transcript levels in roots and siliques. Sequence analysis revealed that IBC6 and IBC7 are similar to the receiver domain of bacterial two-component response regulators. This homology, coupled with previously published work on the CKI1 histidine kinase homolog, suggests that these proteins may play a role in early cytokinin signaling.

  12. Two linked pairs of Arabidopsis TNL resistance genes independently confer recognition of bacterial effector AvrRps4.

    PubMed

    Saucet, Simon B; Ma, Yan; Sarris, Panagiotis F; Furzer, Oliver J; Sohn, Kee Hoon; Jones, Jonathan D G

    2015-01-01

    Plant immunity requires recognition of pathogen effectors by intracellular NB-LRR immune receptors encoded by Resistance (R) genes. Most R proteins recognize a specific effector, but some function in pairs that recognize multiple effectors. Arabidopsis thaliana TIR-NB-LRR proteins RRS1-R and RPS4 together recognize two bacterial effectors, AvrRps4 from Pseudomonas syringae and PopP2 from Ralstonia solanacearum. However, AvrRps4, but not PopP2, is recognized in rrs1/rps4 mutants. We reveal an R gene pair that resembles and is linked to RRS1/RPS4, designated as RRS1B/RPS4B, which confers recognition of AvrRps4 but not PopP2. Like RRS1/RPS4, RRS1B/RPS4B proteins associate and activate defence genes upon AvrRps4 recognition. Inappropriate combinations (RRS1/RPS4B or RRS1B/RPS4) are non-functional and this specificity is not TIR domain dependent. Distinct putative orthologues of both pairs are maintained in the genomes of Arabidopsis thaliana relatives and are likely derived from a common ancestor pair. Our results provide novel insights into paired R gene function and evolution. PMID:25744164

  13. Characterization of transgenic tobacco plants containing bacterial bphC gene and study of their phytoremediation ability.

    PubMed

    Viktorovtá, Jitka; Novakova, Martina; Trbolova, Ladislava; Vrchotova, Blanka; Lovecka, Petra; Mackova, Martina; Macek, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    Genetically modified plants can serve as an efficient tool for remediation of diverse dangerous pollutants of the environment such as pesticides, heavy metals, explosives and persistent organic compounds. Transgenic lines of Nicotiana tabacum containing bacterial bphC gene from the degradation pathway of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were tested. The product of the bphC gene - enzyme 2,3-dihydroxybiphenyl-1,2-dioxygenase is responsible for cleaving of the biphenyl ring. The presence of bphC gene in transgenic plants was detected on DNA, RNA and protein level. The expression of the bphC/His gene was verified afterpurification of the enzyme from plants by affinity chromatography followed by a Western blot and immunochemical assay. The enzyme activity of isolated protein was detected. Efficient transformation of 2,3-DHB by transgenic plants was achieved and the lines also exhibited high production of biomass. The transgenic plants were more tolerant to the commercial PCBs mixture Delor 103 than non-transgenic tobacco. And finally, the higher decrease of total PCB content and especially congener 28 in real contaminated soil from a dumpsite was determined after cultivation of transgenic plant in comparison with nontransgenic tobacco. The substrate specificity of transgenic plants was the same as substrate specificity of BphC enzyme. PMID:24933894

  14. Variability in abundance of the Bacterial and Archaeal 16S rRNA and amoA genes in water columns of northern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H.; Yang, C.; Chen, S.; Xie, W.; Wang, P.; Zhang, C. L.

    2014-12-01

    Recent advances in marine microbial ecology have shown that ammonia-oxidizing Archaea (AOA) are more abundant than ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), although total Bacteria are more abundant than total Archaea in marine environments. This study aimed to examine the spatial distribution and abundance of planktonic archaeal and bacterial 16S rRNA- and amoA genes in the northern South China Sea. Water samples were collected at different depths at six stations (maximum depth ranging from 1800 m to 3200 m?with four stations (B2, B3, B6, B7) located along a transect from the northeastern continental slope to the Bashi Strait and the other two (D3, D5) located southwest of this transect. Quantitative PCR of the 16S rRNA- and amoA genes was used to estimate the abundances of total Archaea, total Bacteria, and AOA and AOB, respectively. At the B series stations, the abundance of bacterial 16S rRNA gene was twofold to 36fold higher than that of the archaeal 16S rRNA gene while fivefold lower to sixfold higher at the two D stations, with both genes showing peak values slightly below sea surface (5-75 m depths) at all stations. The archaeal amoA gene had similar variations with the archaeal 16S rRNA gene, but was 1-4 orders of magnitude lower than the archaeal 16S rRNA gene at all stations. Bacterial amoA gene was below the detection at all stations. Our results also show the difference in depth profiles among these stations, which may be caused by the difference in water movement between these regions. The non-detection of bacterial amoA gene indicates that ammonia-oxidizing Archaea are the dominant group of microorganisms in nitrification of the South China Sea, which is consistent with observations in other oceans.

  15. Isolating the effects of storm events on arctic aquatic bacteria: temperature, nutrients, and community composition as controls on bacterial productivity

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Heather E.; Crump, Byron C.; Kling, George W.

    2015-01-01

    Storm events can pulse nutrients and carbon from soils and provide an important subsidy to food webs in oligotrophic streams and lakes. Bacterial nutrient limitation and the potential response of stream aquatic bacteria to storm events was investigated in arctic tundra environments by manipulating both water temperature and inorganic nutrient concentrations in short (up to 4 days) and long duration (up to 2 weeks) laboratory mesocosm experiments. Inorganic N and P additions increased bacterial production (14C-labeled leucine uptake) up to seven times over controls, and warmer incubation temperatures increased the speed of this response to added nutrients. Bacterial cell numbers also increased in response to temperature and nutrient additions with cell-specific carbon uptake initially increasing and then declining after 2 days. Bacterial community composition (BCC; determined by means of 16S denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis fingerprinting) shifted rapidly in response to changes in incubation temperature and the addition of nutrients, within 2 days in some cases. While the bacteria in these habitats responded to nutrient additions with rapid changes in productivity and community composition, water temperature controlled the speed of the metabolic response and affected the resultant change in bacterial community structure, constraining the potential responses to pulsed nutrient subsidies associated with storm events. In all cases, at higher nutrient levels and temperatures the effect of initial BCC on bacterial activity was muted, suggesting a consistent, robust interaction of temperature, and nutrients controlling activity in these aquatic systems. PMID:25873916

  16. The host metabolite D-serine contributes to bacterial niche specificity through gene selection.

    PubMed

    Connolly, James P R; Goldstone, Robert J; Burgess, Karl; Cogdell, Richard J; Beatson, Scott A; Vollmer, Waldemar; Smith, David G E; Roe, Andrew J

    2015-04-01

    Escherichia coli comprise a diverse array of both commensals and niche-specific pathotypes. The ability to cause disease results from both carriage of specific virulence factors and regulatory control of these via environmental stimuli. Moreover, host metabolites further refine the response of bacteria to their environment and can dramatically affect the outcome of the host-pathogen interaction. Here, we demonstrate that the host metabolite, D-serine, selectively affects gene expression in E. coli O157:H7. Transcriptomic profiling showed exposure to D-serine results in activation of the SOS response and suppresses expression of the Type 3 Secretion System (T3SS) used to attach to host cells. We also show that concurrent carriage of both the D-serine tolerance locus (dsdCXA) and the locus of enterocyte effacement pathogenicity island encoding a T3SS is extremely rare, a genotype that we attribute to an 'evolutionary incompatibility' between the two loci. This study demonstrates the importance of co-operation between both core and pathogenic genetic elements in defining niche specificity. PMID:25526369

  17. A Locked Nucleic Acid (LNA)-Based Real-Time PCR Assay for the Rapid Detection of Multiple Bacterial Antibiotic Resistance Genes Directly from Positive Blood Culture

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lingxiang; Shen, Dingxia; Zhou, Qiming; Li, Zexia; Fang, Xiangdong; Li, Quan-Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial strains resistant to various antibiotic drugs are frequently encountered in clinical infections, and the rapid identification of drug-resistant strains is highly essential for clinical treatment. We developed a locked nucleic acid (LNA)-based quantitative real-time PCR (LNA-qPCR) method for the rapid detection of 13 antibiotic resistance genes and successfully used it to distinguish drug-resistant bacterial strains from positive blood culture samples. A sequence-specific primer-probe set was designed, and the specificity of the assays was assessed using 27 ATCC bacterial strains and 77 negative blood culture samples. No cross-reaction was identified among bacterial strains and in negative samples, indicating 100% specificity. The sensitivity of the assays was determined by spiking each bacterial strain into negative blood samples, and the detection limit was 1–10 colony forming units (CFU) per reaction. The LNA-qPCR assays were first applied to 72 clinical bacterial isolates for the identification of known drug resistance genes, and the results were verified by the direct sequencing of PCR products. Finally, the LNA-qPCR assays were used for the detection in 47 positive blood culture samples, 19 of which (40.4%) were positive for antibiotic resistance genes, showing 91.5% consistency with phenotypic susceptibility results. In conclusion, LNA-qPCR is a reliable method for the rapid detection of bacterial antibiotic resistance genes and can be used as a supplement to phenotypic susceptibility testing for the early detection of antimicrobial resistance to allow the selection of appropriate antimicrobial treatment and to prevent the spread of resistant isolates. PMID:25775001

  18. A general system for generating unlabelled gene replacements in bacterial chromosomes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Leenhouts; G. Buist; A. Bolhuis; A. ten Berge; J. Kiel; I. Mierau; M. Dabrowska; G. Venema; J. Kok

    1996-01-01

    A general system is described that facilitates gene replacements such that the recombinant strains are not labelled with\\u000a antibiotic resistance genes. The method is based on the conditional replication of derivatives of the lactococcal plasmid\\u000a pWV01, which lacks the repA gene encoding the replication initiation protein. Replacement vectors can be constructed in and isolated from gram-positive\\u000a and gram-negative helper strains

  19. Translational control genes in the sea urchin genome

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Julia Morales; Odile Mulner-Lorillon; Bertrand Cosson; Emmanuelle Morin; Robert Bellé; Cynthia A. Bradham; Wendy S. Beane; Patrick Cormier

    2006-01-01

    Sea urchin eggs and early cleavage stage embryos provide an example of regulated gene expression at the level of translation. The availability of the sea urchin genome offers the opportunity to investigate the “translational control” toolkit of this model system. The annotation of the genome reveals that most of the factors implicated in translational control are encoded by nonredundant genes

  20. Automated Large-Scale Control of Gene Regulatory Networks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mehmet Tan; Reda Alhajj; Faruk Polat

    2010-01-01

    Controlling gene regulatory networks (GRNs) is an important and hard problem. As it is the case in all control problems, the curse of dimensionality is the main issue in real applications. It is possible that hundreds of genes may regulate one biological activity in an organism; this implies a huge state space, even in the case of Boolean models. This

  1. Bacterial hrp and Avirulence Genes are Key Determinants in Plant-Pathogen Interactions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ulla Bonas; Guido Van den Ackerveken

    Among the 1600 different species known in the bacterial kingdom only a small number are plant pathogenic. In fact, most pathogens\\u000a can only infect a limited number of host plant species. On the other hand, many bacteria live in the plant’s phyllosphere\\u000a and rhizosphere without causing any harm. To be successful as a pathogen, i.e., live on the expense of

  2. Abundance and distribution of dimethylsulfoniopropionate degradation genes and the corresponding bacterial community structure at dimethyl sulfide hot spots in the tropical and subtropical pacific ocean.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yingshun; Suzuki, Shotaro; Omori, Yuko; Wong, Shu-Kuan; Ijichi, Minoru; Kaneko, Ryo; Kameyama, Sohiko; Tanimoto, Hiroshi; Hamasaki, Koji

    2015-06-15

    Dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) is mainly produced by marine phytoplankton but is released into the microbial food web and degraded by marine bacteria to dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and other products. To reveal the abundance and distribution of bacterial DMSP degradation genes and the corresponding bacterial communities in relation to DMS and DMSP concentrations in seawater, we collected surface seawater samples from DMS hot spot sites during a cruise across the Pacific Ocean. We analyzed the genes encoding DMSP lyase (dddP) and DMSP demethylase (dmdA), which are responsible for the transformation of DMSP to DMS and DMSP assimilation, respectively. The averaged abundance (±standard deviation) of these DMSP degradation genes relative to that of the 16S rRNA genes was 33% ± 12%. The abundances of these genes showed large spatial variations. dddP genes showed more variation in abundances than dmdA genes. Multidimensional analysis based on the abundances of DMSP degradation genes and environmental factors revealed that the distribution pattern of these genes was influenced by chlorophyll a concentrations and temperatures. dddP genes, dmdA subclade C/2 genes, and dmdA subclade D genes exhibited significant correlations with the marine Roseobacter clade, SAR11 subgroup Ib, and SAR11 subgroup Ia, respectively. SAR11 subgroups Ia and Ib, which possessed dmdA genes, were suggested to be the main potential DMSP consumers. The Roseobacter clade members possessing dddP genes in oligotrophic subtropical regions were possible DMS producers. These results suggest that DMSP degradation genes are abundant and widely distributed in the surface seawater and that the marine bacteria possessing these genes influence the degradation of DMSP and regulate the emissions of DMS in subtropical gyres of the Pacific Ocean. PMID:25862229

  3. Candidate genes revealed by a genome scan for mosquito resistance to a bacterial insecticide: sequence and gene expression variations

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Genome scans are becoming an increasingly popular approach to study the genetic basis of adaptation and speciation, but on their own, they are often helpless at identifying the specific gene(s) or mutation(s) targeted by selection. This shortcoming is hopefully bound to disappear in the near future, thanks to the wealth of new genomic resources that are currently being developed for many species. In this article, we provide a foretaste of this exciting new era by conducting a genome scan in the mosquito Aedes aegypti with the aim to look for candidate genes involved in resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis (Bti) insecticidal toxins. Results The genome of a Bti-resistant and a Bti-susceptible strains was surveyed using about 500 MITE-based molecular markers, and the loci showing the highest inter-strain genetic differentiation were sequenced and mapped on the Aedes aegypti genome sequence. Several good candidate genes for Bti-resistance were identified in the vicinity of these highly differentiated markers. Two of them, coding for a cadherin and a leucine aminopeptidase, were further examined at the sequence and gene expression levels. In the resistant strain, the cadherin gene displayed patterns of nucleotide polymorphisms consistent with the action of positive selection (e.g. an excess of high compared to intermediate frequency mutations), as well as a significant under-expression compared to the susceptible strain. Conclusion Both sequence and gene expression analyses agree to suggest a role for positive selection in the evolution of this cadherin gene in the resistant strain. However, it is unlikely that resistance to Bti is conferred by this gene alone, and further investigation will be needed to characterize other genes significantly associated with Bti resistance in Ae. aegypti. Beyond these results, this article illustrates how genome scans can build on the body of new genomic information (here, full genome sequence and MITE characterization) to finally hold their promises and help pinpoint candidate genes for adaptation and speciation. PMID:19930593

  4. R gene-controlled host specificity in the legume–rhizobia symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shengming; Tang, Fang; Gao, Muqiang; Krishnan, Hari B.; Zhu, Hongyan

    2010-01-01

    Leguminous plants can enter into root nodule symbioses with nitrogen-fixing soil bacteria known as rhizobia. An intriguing but still poorly understood property of the symbiosis is its host specificity, which is controlled at multiple levels involving both rhizobial and host genes. It is widely believed that the host specificity is determined by specific recognition of bacterially derived Nod factors by the cognate host receptor(s). Here we describe the positional cloning of two soybean genes Rj2 and Rfg1 that restrict nodulation with specific strains of Bradyrhizobium japonicum and Sinorhizobium fredii, respectively. We show that Rj2 and Rfg1 are allelic genes encoding a member of the Toll-interleukin receptor/nucleotide-binding site/leucine-rich repeat (TIR-NBS-LRR) class of plant resistance (R) proteins. The involvement of host R genes in the control of genotype-specific infection and nodulation reveals a common recognition mechanism underlying symbiotic and pathogenic host–bacteria interactions and suggests the existence of their cognate avirulence genes derived from rhizobia. This study suggests that establishment of a root nodule symbiosis requires the evasion of plant immune responses triggered by rhizobial effectors. PMID:20937853

  5. Relative importance of diffusion and reaction control during the bacterial and ferric sulphate leaching of zinc sulphide

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gabriel da Silva

    2004-01-01

    A study has been undertaken on the bacterial and ferric sulphate leaching of sphalerite, with the aim of observing the relative importance of both diffusion and reaction control, across a range of operating conditions. To facilitate this kinetic analysis a mixed-control rate equation was developed based upon the shrinking particle and shrinking core models, featuring both an intrinsic rate of

  6. Temporal and spatial coexistence of archaeal and bacterial amoA genes and gene transcripts in Lake Lucerne.

    PubMed

    Vissers, Elisabeth W; Anselmetti, Flavio S; Bodelier, Paul L E; Muyzer, Gerard; Schleper, Christa; Tourna, Maria; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J

    2013-01-01

    Despite their crucial role in the nitrogen cycle, freshwater ecosystems are relatively rarely studied for active ammonia oxidizers (AO). This study of Lake Lucerne determined the abundance of both amoA genes and gene transcripts of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB) over a period of 16 months, shedding more light on the role of both AO in a deep, alpine lake environment. At the surface, at 42 m water depth, and in the water layer immediately above the sediment, AOA generally outnumbered AOB. However, in the surface water during summer stratification, when both AO were low in abundance, AOB were more numerous than AOA. Temporal distribution patterns of AOA and AOB were comparable. Higher abundances of amoA gene transcripts were observed at the onset and end of summer stratification. In summer, archaeal amoA genes and transcripts correlated negatively with temperature and conductivity. Concentrations of ammonium and oxygen did not vary enough to explain the amoA gene and transcript dynamics. The observed herbivorous zooplankton may have caused a hidden flux of mineralized ammonium and a change in abundance of genes and transcripts. At the surface, AO might have been repressed during summer stratification due to nutrient limitation caused by active phytoplankton. PMID:23533328

  7. Effective strategy for pyramiding three bacterial blight resistance genes into fine grain rice cultivar, Samba Mahsuri, using sequence tagged site markers.

    PubMed

    Kottapalli, Kameswara Rao; Lakshmi Narasu, M; Jena, Kshirod K

    2010-07-01

    Bacterial leaf blight (BB) of rice is a major disease limiting rice production in several rice growing regions of the world. The pathogen, Xanthomonas oryzae pv oryzae, causing the disease is highly virulent to rice crops and is capable of evolving new races. Breeding efforts to incorporate single BB resistant gene often leads to resistance breakdown within a short period. To overcome such breakdown of resistance and develop germplasm with durable disease resistance, we have introgressed three bacterial blight resistance genes, xa5, xa13, and Xa21 into a fine grain rice variety, Samba Mahsuri, using sequence tagged site (STS) markers linked to these genes. Since the efficiency of the STS markers linked to recessive genes to detect homozygotes is less than 100%, we adopted four different pyramiding schemes to minimize loss of recessive resistance genes in advanced backcross generations. Pyramiding scheme A in which a two-gene Samba Mahsuri pyramid line containing Xa21 and xa5 genes was crossed with the Samba Mahsuri line having xa13 gene alone was found to be most effective in preventing the loss of an important recessive gene xa13. We further demonstrated that there was no yield penalty due to pyramiding of multiple genes into the elite indica rice variety. PMID:20349335

  8. [Identification of bacterial strain ge15 and its controlling effect on ginseng diseases].

    PubMed

    Liu, Min; Ding, Wan-long; Gao, Yuan; Li, Yong

    2014-12-01

    Based on previous results of 16S rDNA sequence homologuous and results of physic-biochemical indexes and morphological characteristics in the present work, bacterial strain ge15 isolated from roots of ginseng plants was identified as Stenotrophomonas rhizophila. Confronting incubation results showed that, strain ge15 inhibited the growth of Alternaria panax, Phytophthora cactorum, and Cylindrocapon destructans significantly, and the width of inhibition zone was 13.3, 24.0, 12.0 mm, respectively. Further results showed that the emergence rate and seedling survive rate of ge15 treatment was significantly higher than those of the control, and which was similar to pesticide carbendazol treatment. The ge15 strain has good application potential in ginseng diseases control without contamination. PMID:25898572

  9. DISTRIBUTION OF THE ERMG GENE IN BACTERIAL ISOLATES FROM PORCINE INTESTINAL CONTENTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ermG gene was first found in the soil bacterium, Bacillus sphaericus. More recently, it was found in human intestinal Bacteroides species. We report here the first finding of ermG genes in gram-positive bacteria isolated from porcine feces and from under barn manure pits used to store porcine ...

  10. Chimeric phage-bacterial enzymes: a clue to the modular evolution of genes.

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, E; López, R; García, J L

    1990-01-01

    Pneumococcal peptidoglycan amidase (N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase, EC 3.5.1.28) and phage CPL1 lysozyme degrade a common substrate (choline-containing pneumococcal cell walls); the former hydrolyzes the bond between muramic acid and alanine, whereas the latter breaks down the linkage between muramic acid and glucosamine. The amino acid sequences of their C-terminal domains are homologous. Chimeric genes were constructed by site-directed mutagenesis: a unique SnaBI restriction site in the cpl1 gene, coding for the phage lysozyme, was introduced at a location equivalent to the SnaBI site present in the lytA gene, which codes for the pneumococcal amidase. The resulting genes expressed lytic activities at levels similar to those of the parental genes. The gene products, which have been purified to electrophoretical homogeneity, exhibited unusual combined biochemical properties--e.g., by exchange of protein domains, we have switched the regulatory properties of these enzymes without altering their catalytic activities. Chimeric gene construction in Streptococcus pneumoniae and its bacteriophages is an excellent model to study the modular organization of genes and proteins and to help to establish evolutionary relationships between phage and bacteria. These constructions provide an experimental approach to the molecular processes involved in cassette recruitment during evolution and contribute support to the concept of bacteria as adaptable chimeras. Images PMID:1978320

  11. Analysis of developmental control genes using virus-induced gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Geuten, Koen; Viaene, Tom; Vekemans, Dries; Kourmpetli, Sofia; Drea, Sinead

    2013-01-01

    A consistent challenge in studying the evolution of developmental processes has been the problem of explicitly assessing the function of developmental control genes in diverse species. In recent years, virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) has proved to be remarkably adaptable and efficient in silencing developmental control genes in species across the angiosperms. Here we describe proven protocols for Nicotiana benthamiana and Papaver somniferum, representing a core and basal eudicot species. PMID:23386295

  12. Identification, phylogenetic analysis and expression profile of an anionic insect defensin gene, with antibacterial activity, from bacterial-challenged cotton leafworm, Spodoptera littoralis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Defensins are a well known family of cationic antibacterial peptides (AMPs) isolated from fungi, plants, insects, mussels, birds, and various mammals. They are predominantly active against gram (+) bacteria, and a few of them are also active against gram (-) bacteria and fungi. All insect defensins belonging to the invertebrate class have a consensus motif, C-X5-16-C-X3-C-X9-10-C-X4-7-CX1-C. Only seven AMPs have already been found in different lepidopteran species. No report was published on the isolation of defensin from the Egyptian cotton leafworm, Spodoptera littoralis. Results An anionic defensin, termed SpliDef, was isolated from the haemolymph of the cotton leafworm, S. littoralis, after bacterial challenge using differential display technique. Based on sequence analyses of the data, specific primers for full length and mature peptide of defensin were designed and successfully amplified 471 and 150 bp amplicons. The integration of the results revealed that the 471 bp-PCR product has one open reading frame (orf) of 303 bp long, including both start codon (AUG) and stop codon (UGA). The deduced peptide consists of a 23-residues signal peptide, a 27-residues propeptide and a 50-residues mature peptide with the conserved six-cysteine motif of insect defensins. Both haemolymph and expressed protein exhibited antibacterial activities comparable to positive control. The RT-qPCR indicated that it was more than 41-folds up-regulated at 48 h p.i. Conclusion Our results highlight an important immune role of the defensin gene in Spodoptera littoralis by cooperating with other AMPs to control bacterial infection. PMID:22067477

  13. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays for a bacterial thiaminase I gene and the thiaminase-producing bacterium Paenibacillus thiaminolyticus.

    PubMed

    Richter, Catherine A; Wright-Osment, Maureen K; Zajicek, James L; Honeyfield, Dale C; Tillitt, Donald E

    2009-12-01

    The thiaminase I enzyme produced by the gram-positive bacterium Paenibacillus thiaminolyticus isolated from the viscera of Lake Michigan alewives Alosa pseudoharengus is currently the only defined source of the thiaminase activity linked to thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency in early mortality syndrome (EMS) in the larvae of Great Lakes salmonines. Diets of alewife or isolated strains of P. thiaminolyticus mixed in a semipurified diet and fed to lake trout Salvelinus namaycush have been shown to produce EMS in fry. We utilized quantitative polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR) to aid in studies of the sources of P. thiaminolyticus and thiaminase I. Quantitative PCR assays were established to detect the thiaminase I gene of P. thiaminolyticus, the 16S rRNA gene from most species of bacteria, and the 16S rRNA gene specifically from P. thiaminolyticus and a few closely related taxa. The Q-PCR assays are linear over at least six orders of magnitude and can detect the thiaminase I gene of P. thiaminolyticus from as few as 1,000 P. thiaminolyticus cells/g of sample or the Paenibacillus 16S rRNA gene from as few as 100 P. thiaminolyticus cells/g of sample. The initial results from alewife viscera samples with high thiaminase activity yielded unexpectedly low densities of P. thiaminolyticus cells; Paenibacillus thiaminolyticus was detectable in 2 of 6 alewife viscera tested at densities on the order of 100 cells/g out of 100,000,000 total bacterial cells/g. The low numbers of P. thiaminolyticus detected suggest that alewives contain additional non-P. thiaminolyticus sources of thiaminase activity. PMID:20218497

  14. Reference genes for quantitative, reverse-transcription PCR in Bacillus cereus group strains throughout the bacterial life cycle.

    PubMed

    Reiter, Lillian; Kolstø, Anne-Brit; Piehler, Armin P

    2011-08-01

    Quantitative reverse-transcription PCR (RT-qPCR) has become a major tool to better understand the biology and pathogenesis of bacteria. One prerequisite of valid RT-qPCR data is their proper normalization to stably expressed reference genes. To identify and evaluate reference genes suitable for normalization of gene expression data in Bacillus cereus group strains, mRNA levels of eleven candidate reference genes (rpsU, nifU, udp (UDP-N-acetylglucosamine 2-epimerase), BT9727_5154/BC_5475, BT9727_4034/BC_4293, BT9727_4549/BC_4813, pspA, gatB_Yqey (gatB_Yqey domain containing protein), helicase (SWF/SNF family protein), adk and pta) and a target gene (BT9727_3305/BC3547+BC3546) were quantified by RT-qPCR at different time points throughout the entire life cycle of the wild-type B. cereus ATCC 14579 and Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. konkukian 97-27, a phylogenetically closely related strain to Bacillus anthracis. The programs geNorm and Normfinder were used to calculate expression stabilities and identified the genes gatB_Yqey, rpsU and udp as the most stably expressed reference genes. Compared to this combination or the sets of reference genes as recommended by geNorm or Normfinder, normalization using a traditional housekeeping gene (adk) alone resulted in significantly different gene expression results and in a significant overestimation of the target gene transcription. Normalization of the data to the reference gene gatB_Yqey alone showed no or only small differences to the reference gene combinations indicating that gatB_Yqey may be used as a single reference gene when investigating rather large changes in mRNA transcription. Otherwise, a combination of the stably expressed reference genes is recommended. In conclusion, the present study underlines the importance of normalization to stably expressed reference genes and presents valid endogenous controls suitable for normalization of transcriptional data throughout the life cycle of B. cereus group strains. PMID:21620905

  15. Proteomics as a Quality Control Tool of Pharmaceutical Probiotic Bacterial Lysate Products

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Günter; Schanstra, Joost P.; Hoffmann, Janosch; Mischak, Harald; Siwy, Justyna; Zimmermann, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    Probiotic bacteria have a wide range of applications in veterinary and human therapeutics. Inactivated probiotics are complex samples and quality control (QC) should measure as many molecular features as possible. Capillary electrophoresis coupled to mass spectrometry (CE/MS) has been used as a multidimensional and high throughput method for the identification and validation of biomarkers of disease in complex biological samples such as biofluids. In this study we evaluate the suitability of CE/MS to measure the consistency of different lots of the probiotic formulation Pro-Symbioflor which is a bacterial lysate of heat-inactivated Escherichia coli and Enterococcus faecalis. Over 5000 peptides were detected by CE/MS in 5 different lots of the bacterial lysate and in a sample of culture medium. 71 to 75% of the total peptide content was identical in all lots. This percentage increased to 87–89% when allowing the absence of a peptide in one of the 5 samples. These results, based on over 2000 peptides, suggest high similarity of the 5 different lots. Sequence analysis identified peptides of both E. coli and E. faecalis and peptides originating from the culture medium, thus confirming the presence of the strains in the formulation. Ontology analysis suggested that the majority of the peptides identified for E. coli originated from the cell membrane or the fimbrium, while peptides identified for E. faecalis were enriched for peptides originating from the cytoplasm. The bacterial lysate peptides as a whole are recognised as highly conserved molecular patterns by the innate immune system as microbe associated molecular pattern (MAMP). Sequence analysis also identified the presence of soybean, yeast and casein protein fragments that are part of the formulation of the culture medium. In conclusion CE/MS seems an appropriate QC tool to analyze complex biological products such as inactivated probiotic formulations and allows determining the similarity between lots. PMID:23840518

  16. Mode of action clustering of chemicals and environmental samples on the bases of bacterial stress gene inductions.

    PubMed

    Dardenne, Freddy; Van Dongen, Stefan; Nobels, Ingrid; Smolders, Roel; De Coen, Wim; Blust, Ronny

    2008-02-01

    Over the years, environment and the human population have seen an increasing exposure to both existing and newly developed chemicals. It is generally accepted that at least some of those are toxic, albeit as pure compound or in combination with others. In response to a growing public awareness and scientific data, the new European chemicals legislation (Registration, Evaluation and Authorization of Chemicals) is under implementation at the moment. As a consequence, during the coming years about 30,000 chemicals have to be assessed on their potential hazard for man and biota. Part of this assessment will be done using existing and new in vitro tests offering insight into the toxicity of chemicals and into their toxicological mode of action. This study presents data on a battery of 14 bacterial reporter gene assay allowing mode of action determination and statistical grouping of chemicals based on their induction profile. Gene induction results are used to group reference chemicals in a statistical cascade employing hierarchical tree and k-means clustering for initial grouping. Both complementary, yet mathematically different, algorithms are consequently confirmed by principal component analysis (PCA). The gene induction profiles of an environmental extract with documented in vivo effects and a chemical with limited toxicological are data available and projected in the PCA vector space. The projection allows correct mode of action grouping and indicates that effect predictions based on the known toxicological effects of the reference compounds can be made. PMID:17951611

  17. Evidence for the bacterial origin of genes encoding fermentation enzymes of the amitochondriate protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, B; Mai, Z; Caplivski, D; Ghosh, S; de la Vega, H; Graf, T; Samuelson, J

    1997-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is an amitochondriate protozoan parasite with numerous bacterium-like fermentation enzymes including the pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (POR), ferredoxin (FD), and alcohol dehydrogenase E (ADHE). The goal of this study was to determine whether the genes encoding these cytosolic E. histolytica fermentation enzymes might derive from a bacterium by horizontal transfer, as has previously been suggested for E. histolytica genes encoding heat shock protein 60, nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase, and superoxide dismutase. In this study, the E. histolytica por gene and the adhE gene of a second amitochondriate protozoan parasite, Giardia lamblia, were sequenced, and their phylogenetic positions were estimated in relation to POR, ADHE, and FD cloned from eukaryotic and eubacterial organisms. The E. histolytica por gene encodes a 1,620-amino-acid peptide that contained conserved iron-sulfur- and thiamine pyrophosphate-binding sites. The predicted E. histolytica POR showed fewer positional identities to the POR of G. lamblia (34%) than to the POR of the enterobacterium Klebsiella pneumoniae (49%), the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. (44%), and the protozoan Trichomonas vaginalis (46%), which targets its POR to anaerobic organelles called hydrogenosomes. Maximum-likelihood, neighbor-joining, and parsimony analyses also suggested as less likely E. histolytica POR sharing more recent common ancestry with G. lamblia POR than with POR of bacteria and the T. vaginalis hydrogenosome. The G. lamblia adhE encodes an 888-amino-acid fusion peptide with an aldehyde dehydrogenase at its amino half and an iron-dependent (class 3) ADH at its carboxy half. The predicted G. lamblia ADHE showed extensive positional identities to ADHE of Escherichia coli (49%), Clostridium acetobutylicum (44%), and E. histolytica (43%) and lesser identities to the class 3 ADH of eubacteria and yeast (19 to 36%). Phylogenetic analyses inferred a closer relationship of the E. histolytica ADHE to bacterial ADHE than to the G. lamblia ADHE. The 6-kDa FD of E. histolytica and G. lamblia were most similar to those of the archaebacterium Methanosarcina barkeri and the delta-purple bacterium Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, respectively, while the 12-kDa FD of the T. vaginalis hydrogenosome was most similar to the 12-kDa FD of gamma-purple bacterium Pseudomonas putida. E. histolytica genes (and probably G. lamblia genes) encoding fermentation enzymes therefore likely derive from bacteria by horizontal transfer, although it is not clear from which bacteria these amebic genes derive. These are the first nonorganellar fermentation enzymes of eukaryotes implicated to have derived from bacteria. PMID:9171424

  18. Genetic diversity of the conserved motifs of six bacterial leaf blight resistance genes in a set of rice landraces

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Bacterial leaf blight (BLB) caused by the vascular pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) is one of the most serious diseases leading to crop failure in rice growing countries. A total of 37 resistance genes against Xoo has been identified in rice. Of these, ten BLB resistance genes have been mapped on rice chromosomes, while 6 have been cloned, sequenced and characterized. Diversity analysis at the resistance gene level of this disease is scanty, and the landraces from West Bengal and North Eastern states of India have received little attention so far. The objective of this study was to assess the genetic diversity at conserved domains of 6 BLB resistance genes in a set of 22 rice accessions including landraces and check genotypes collected from the states of Assam, Nagaland, Mizoram and West Bengal. Results In this study 34 pairs of primers were designed from conserved domains of 6 BLB resistance genes; Xa1, xa5, Xa21, Xa21(A1), Xa26 and Xa27. The designed primer pairs were used to generate PCR based polymorphic DNA profiles to detect and elucidate the genetic diversity of the six genes in the 22 diverse rice accessions of known disease phenotype. A total of 140 alleles were identified including 41 rare and 26 null alleles. The average polymorphism information content (PIC) value was 0.56/primer pair. The DNA profiles identified each of the rice landraces unequivocally. The amplified polymorphic DNA bands were used to calculate genetic similarity of the rice landraces in all possible pair combinations. The similarity among the rice accessions ranged from 18% to 89% and the dendrogram produced from the similarity values was divided into 2 major clusters. The conserved domains identified within the sequenced rare alleles include Leucine-Rich Repeat, BED-type zinc finger domain, sugar transferase domain and the domain of the carbohydrate esterase 4 superfamily. Conclusions This study revealed high genetic diversity at conserved domains of six BLB resistance genes in a set of 22 rice accessions. The inclusion of more genotypes from remote ecological niches and hotspots holds promise for identification of further genetic diversity at the BLB resistance genes. PMID:25016378

  19. Joint effects of heavy metal binary mixtures on seed germination, root and shoot growth, bacterial bioluminescence, and gene mutation.

    PubMed

    Kong, In Chul

    2013-05-01

    This investigation was to assess the joint effects of metal binary mixtures on seed germination, root and shoot growth, bacterial bioluminescence, and gene mutation based on the one toxic unit (1 TU) approach. Different sensitivities and orders of toxicity of metal mixtures were observed among the bioassays. In general, mostly additive or antagonistic effects were observed, while almost no synergistic effects by the binary metal mixtures in all bioassays. Therefore, the combined effects of heavy metals in the different bioassays were difficult to generalize since they were dependent on both chemical type and the organism used in each bioassay. However, these results indicate that a battery of bioassays with mixture chemicals as opposed to just a single assay with single metal is a better strategy for the bioassessment of environmental pollutants. PMID:24218818

  20. Novel cyclic di-GMP effectors of the YajQ protein family control bacterial virulence.

    PubMed

    An, Shi-qi; Caly, Delphine L; McCarthy, Yvonne; Murdoch, Sarah L; Ward, Joseph; Febrer, Melanie; Dow, J Maxwell; Ryan, Robert P

    2014-10-01

    Bis-(3',5') cyclic di-guanylate (cyclic di-GMP) is a key bacterial second messenger that is implicated in the regulation of many critical processes that include motility, biofilm formation and virulence. Cyclic di-GMP influences diverse functions through interaction with a range of effectors. Our knowledge of these effectors and their different regulatory actions is far from complete, however. Here we have used an affinity pull-down assay using cyclic di-GMP-coupled magnetic beads to identify cyclic di-GMP binding proteins in the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc). This analysis identified XC_3703, a protein of the YajQ family, as a potential cyclic di-GMP receptor. Isothermal titration calorimetry showed that the purified XC_3703 protein bound cyclic di-GMP with a high affinity (K(d)?2 µM). Mutation of XC_3703 led to reduced virulence of Xcc to plants and alteration in biofilm formation. Yeast two-hybrid and far-western analyses showed that XC_3703 was able to interact with XC_2801, a transcription factor of the LysR family. Mutation of XC_2801 and XC_3703 had partially overlapping effects on the transcriptome of Xcc, and both affected virulence. Electromobility shift assays showed that XC_3703 positively affected the binding of XC_2801 to the promoters of target virulence genes, an effect that was reversed by cyclic di-GMP. Genetic and functional analysis of YajQ family members from the human pathogens Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia showed that they also specifically bound cyclic di-GMP and contributed to virulence in model systems. The findings thus identify a new class of cyclic di-GMP effector that regulates bacterial virulence. PMID:25329577

  1. The AS87_04050 Gene Is Involved in Bacterial Lipopolysaccharide Biosynthesis and Pathogenicity of Riemerella anatipestifer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaolan; Ding, Chan; Wang, Shaohui; Han, Xiangan; Hou, Wanwan; Yue, Jiaping; Zou, Jiechi; Yu, Shengqing

    2014-01-01

    Riemerella anatipestifer is reported worldwide as a cause of septicemic and exudative diseases of domestic ducks. In this study, we identified a mutant strain RA2640 by Tn4351 transposon mutagenesis, in which the AS87_04050 gene was inactivated by insertion of the transposon. Southern blot analysis indicated that only one insertion was found in the genome of the mutant strain RA2640. SDS-PAGE followed by silver staining showed that the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) pattern of mutant strain RA2640 was different from its wild-type strain Yb2, suggesting the LPS was defected. In addition, the phenotype of the mutant strain RA2640 was changed to rough-type, evident by altered colony morphology, autoaggregation ability and crystal violet staining characteristics. Bacterial LPS is a key factor in virulence as well as in both innate and acquired host responses to infection. The rough-type mutant strain RA2640 showed higher sensitivity to antibiotics, disinfectants and normal duck serum, and higher capability of adherence and invasion to Vero cells, compared to its wild-type strain Yb2. Moreover, the mutant strain RA2640 lost the agglutination ability of its wild-type strain Yb2 to R. anatipestifer serotype 2 positive sera, suggesting that the O-antigen is defected. Animal experiments indicated that the virulence of the mutant strain RA2640 was attenuated by more than 100,000-fold, compared to its wild-type strain Yb2. These results suggested that the AS87_04050 gene in R. anatipestifer is associated with the LPS biosynthesis and bacterial pathogenicity. PMID:25303276

  2. A MATHEMATICAL MODEL OF THE BACTERIAL GENE NETWORK PARTIALLY RESPONSIBLE FOR REGULATING

    E-print Network

    Kuang, Yang

    and glutamate collectively provide all the nitrogen used by enteric bacteria for anabolism. Nitrogen is derived bacteria utilizes similar versions of a gene network characterized by negative and positive feedback

  3. Linking Temporal Changes in Bacterial Community Structures with the Detection and Phylogenetic Analysis of Neutral Metalloprotease Genes in the Sediments of a Hypereutrophic Lake

    PubMed Central

    Tsuboi, Shun; Yamamura, Shigeki; Imai, Akio; Satou, Takayuki; Iwasaki, Kazuhiro

    2014-01-01

    We investigated spatial and temporal variations in bacterial community structures as well as the presence of three functional proteolytic enzyme genes in the sediments of a hypereutrophic freshwater lake in order to acquire an insight into dynamic links between bacterial community structures and proteolytic functions. Bacterial communities determined from 16S rRNA gene clone libraries markedly changed bimonthly, rather than vertically in the sediment cores. The phylum Firmicutes dominated in the 4–6 cm deep sediment layer sample after August in 2007, and this correlated with increases in interstitial ammonium concentrations (p < 0.01). The Firmicutes clones were mostly composed of the genus Bacillus. npr genes encoding neutral metalloprotease, an extracellular protease gene, were detected after the phylum Firmicutes became dominant. The deduced Npr protein sequences from the retrieved npr genes also showed that most of the Npr sequences used in this study were closely related to those of the genus Bacillus, with similarities ranging from 61% to 100%. Synchronous temporal occurrences of the 16S rRNA gene and Npr sequences, both from the genus Bacillus, were positively associated with increases in interstitial ammonium concentrations, which may imply that proteolysis by Npr from the genus Bacillus may contribute to the marked increases observed in ammonium concentrations in the sediments. Our results suggest that sedimentary bacteria may play an important role in the biogeochemical nitrogen cycle of freshwater lakes. PMID:25130992

  4. Expression of a bacterial gene in transgenic plants confers resistance to the herbicide phenmedipham

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wolfgang R. Streber; Ulrike Kutschka; Frank Thomas; Hans-Dieter Pohlenz

    1994-01-01

    Tobacco plants were genetically engineered to express a detoxifying pathway for the herbicide phenmedipham. A gene fromArthrobacter oxidans strain P52 that encodes an enzyme catalysing the hydrolytic cleavage of the carbamate compound phenmedipham has recently been cloned and sequenced. The coding sequence was fused with a cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter and introduced into tobacco plants byAgrobacterium-mediated gene transfer. Transgenic

  5. Modulation of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) intestinal immune gene expression following bacterial challenge.

    PubMed

    Evenhuis, Jason P; Cleveland, Beth M

    2012-03-15

    The mucosal immune systems of fishes are still poorly understood, and defined models for studying natural host-pathogen interactions are lacking. The objective of this study was to evaluate different challenge models and pathogens to examine the magnitude of change in intestinal immune gene expression. Rainbow trout were exposed by immersion to Yersinia ruckeri or by intraperitoneal injection with Flavobacterium psychrophilum. At 3, 9, or 10 days post-challenge, pathogen load was quantified by plate count and intestinal tissue was removed and immune gene expression measured by real-time PCR. In general, the magnitude of infection was correlated with change in immune gene transcript abundance. We found that messages for the innate immune molecules, SAA, IL-8, INF-? and TNF-?, as well as the message for IgM, were up-regulated in intestinal tissue in both challenge paradigms. A >250-fold increase was observed in SAA and 20-fold increase of IL-8 gene transcript abundance occurred on day 10 following challenge with F. psychrophilum. Within individual fish, there was a positive correlation between bacteria load in the spleen and the increase of immune gene message between 3 and 10 days post-infection. These findings demonstrate that measurable changes in immune gene expression occur in the intestine of rainbow trout following bath challenge with Y. ruckeri or injection challenge with F. psychrophilum. PMID:22341800

  6. Organization and control of genes encoding catabolic enzymes in Rhizobiaceae

    SciTech Connect

    Parke, D.; Ornston, L.N.

    1993-03-01

    Rhizobiaceae, a diverse bacterial group comprising rhizobia and agrobacteria, symbiotic partnership with plants form nitrogen-fixing nodules on plant roots or are plant pathogens. Phenolic compounds produced by plants serve as inducers of rhizobial nodulation genes and agrobacterial virulence genes reflect their capacity to utilize numerous aromatics, including phenolics, as a source of carbon and energy. In many microbes the aerobic degradation of numerous aromatic compounds to tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates is achieved by the [beta]-ketoadipate pathway. Our initial studies focused on the organization and regulation of the ketoadipate pathway in Agrobacterium tumefaciens. We have cloned, identified and characterized a novel regulatory gene that modulates expression of an adjacent pca (protocatechuate) structural gene, pcaD. Regulation of pcaD is mediated by the regulatory gene, termed pcaQ, in concert with the intermediate [beta]-carboxy-cis,cis-muconate. [beta]-carboxy-cis,cismuconate is an unstable chemical, not marketed commercially, and it is unlikely to permeate Escherichia coli cells if supplied in media. Because of these factors, characterization of pcaQ in E. coli required an in vivo delivery system for [beta]-carboxycis,cis-muconate. This was accomplished by designing an E. coli strain that expressed an Acinetobacter calcoaceticus pcaA gene for conversion of protocatechuate to [beta]-carboxy-cis,cis-muconate.

  7. Evolution of Bacterial Phosphoglycerate Mutases: Non-Homologous Isofunctional Enzymes Undergoing Gene Losses, Gains and Lateral Transfers

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Jeremy M.; Davis, Paul J.; Raverdy, Sylvine; Sibley, Marion H.; Raleigh, Elisabeth A.; Kumar, Sanjay; Carlow, Clotilde K. S.

    2010-01-01

    Background The glycolytic phosphoglycerate mutases exist as non-homologous isofunctional enzymes (NISE) having independent evolutionary origins and no similarity in primary sequence, 3D structure, or catalytic mechanism. Cofactor-dependent PGM (dPGM) requires 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate for activity; cofactor-independent PGM (iPGM) does not. The PGM profile of any given bacterium is unpredictable and some organisms such as Escherichia coli encode both forms. Methods/Principal Findings To examine the distribution of PGM NISE throughout the Bacteria, and gain insight into the evolutionary processes that shape their phyletic profiles, we searched bacterial genome sequences for the presence of dPGM and iPGM. Both forms exhibited patchy distributions throughout the bacterial domain. Species within the same genus, or even strains of the same species, frequently differ in their PGM repertoire. The distribution is further complicated by the common occurrence of dPGM paralogs, while iPGM paralogs are rare. Larger genomes are more likely to accommodate PGM paralogs or both NISE forms. Lateral gene transfers have shaped the PGM profiles with intradomain and interdomain transfers apparent. Archaeal-type iPGM was identified in many bacteria, often as the sole PGM. To address the function of PGM NISE in an organism encoding both forms, we analyzed recombinant enzymes from E. coli. Both NISE were active mutases, but the specific activity of dPGM greatly exceeded that of iPGM, which showed highest activity in the presence of manganese. We created PGM null mutants in E. coli and discovered the ?dPGM mutant grew slowly due to a delay in exiting stationary phase. Overexpression of dPGM or iPGM overcame this defect. Conclusions/Significance Our biochemical and genetic analyses in E. coli firmly establish dPGM and iPGM as NISE. Metabolic redundancy is indicated since only larger genomes encode both forms. Non-orthologous gene displacement can fully account for the non-uniform PGM distribution we report across the bacterial domain. PMID:21187861

  8. Salix purpurea Stimulates the Expression of Specific Bacterial Xenobiotic Degradation Genes in a Soil Contaminated with Hydrocarbons

    PubMed Central

    Pagé, Antoine P.; Yergeau, Étienne; Greer, Charles W.

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to uncover Salix purpurea-microbe xenobiotic degradation systems that could be harnessed in rhizoremediation, and to identify microorganisms that are likely involved in these partnerships. To do so, we tested S. purpurea‘s ability to stimulate the expression of 10 marker microbial oxygenase genes in a soil contaminated with hydrocarbons. In what appeared to be a detoxification rhizosphere effect, transcripts encoding for alkane 1-monooxygenases, cytochrome P450 monooxygenases, laccase/polyphenol oxidases, and biphenyl 2,3-dioxygenase small subunits were significantly more abundant in the vicinity of the plant's roots than in bulk soil. This gene expression induction is consistent with willows' known rhizoremediation capabilities, and suggests the existence of S. purpurea-microbe systems that target many organic contaminants of interest (i.e. C4-C16 alkanes, fluoranthene, anthracene, benzo(a)pyrene, biphenyl, polychlorinated biphenyls). An enhanced expression of the 4 genes was also observed within the bacterial orders Actinomycetales, Rhodospirillales, Burkholderiales, Alteromonadales, Solirubrobacterales, Caulobacterales, and Rhizobiales, which suggest that members of these taxa are active participants in the exposed partnerships. Although the expression of the other 6 marker genes did not appear to be stimulated by the plant at the community level, signs of additional systems that rest on their expression by members of the orders Solirubrobacterales, Sphingomonadales, Actinomycetales, and Sphingobacteriales were observed. Our study presents the first transcriptomics-based identification of microbes whose xenobiotic degradation activity in soil appears stimulated by a plant. It paints a portrait that contrasts with the current views on these consortia's composition, and opens the door for the development of laboratory test models geared towards the identification of root exudate characteristics that limit the efficiency of current willow-based rhizoremediation applications. PMID:26161539

  9. Bacterial diversity among small-subunit rRNA gene clones and cellular isolates from the same seawater sample.

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, M T; Rappé, M S; Haimberger, Z W; Winfield, H; Adair, N; Ströbel, J; Giovannoni, S J

    1997-01-01

    Numerous investigations applying the cloning and sequencing of rRNA genes (rDNAs) to the study of marine bacterioplankton diversity have shown that the sequences of genes cloned directly from environmental DNA do not correspond to the genes of cultured marine taxa. These results have been interpreted as support for the hypothesis that the most abundant heterotrophic marine bacterioplankton species are not readily culturable by commonly used methods. However, an alternative explanation is that marine bacterioplankton can be easily cultured but are not well represented in sequence databases. To further examine this question, we compared the small-subunit (SSU) rDNAs of 127 cellular clones isolated from a water sample collected off the Oregon coast to 58 bacterial SSU rDNAs cloned from environmental DNAs from the same water sample. The results revealed little overlap between partial SSU rDNA sequences from the cellular clones and the environmental clone library. An exception was the SSU rDNA sequence recovered from a cellular clone belonging to the Pseudomonas subgroup of the gamma subclass of the class Proteobacteria, which was related to a single gene cloned directly from the same water sample (OCS181) (similarity, 94.6%). In addition, partial SSU rDNA sequences from three of the cultured strains matched a novel rDNA clone related to the gamma subclass of the Proteobacteria found previously in an environmental clone library from marine aggregates (AGG53) (similarity, 94.3 to 99.6%). Our results support the hypothesis that many of the most abundant bacterioplankton species are not readily culturable by standard methods but also show that heterotrophic bacterioplankton that are culturable on media with high organic contents include many strains for which SSU rDNA sequences are not available in sequence databases. PMID:9055415

  10. Discrete cyclic di-GMP-dependent control of bacterial predation versus axenic growth in Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus.

    PubMed

    Hobley, Laura; Fung, Rowena K Y; Lambert, Carey; Harris, Maximilian A T S; Dabhi, Jayesh M; King, Simon S; Basford, Sarah M; Uchida, Kaoru; Till, Robert; Ahmad, Rashidah; Aizawa, Shin-Ichi; Gomelsky, Mark; Sockett, R Elizabeth

    2012-02-01

    Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus is a Delta-proteobacterium that oscillates between free-living growth and predation on Gram-negative bacteria including important pathogens of man, animals and plants. After entering the prey periplasm, killing the prey and replicating inside the prey bdelloplast, several motile B. bacteriovorus progeny cells emerge. The B. bacteriovorus HD100 genome encodes numerous proteins predicted to be involved in signalling via the secondary messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP), which is known to affect bacterial lifestyle choices. We investigated the role of c-di-GMP signalling in B. bacteriovorus, focussing on the five GGDEF domain proteins that are predicted to function as diguanylyl cyclases initiating c-di-GMP signalling cascades. Inactivation of individual GGDEF domain genes resulted in remarkably distinct phenotypes. Deletion of dgcB (Bd0742) resulted in a predation impaired, obligately axenic mutant, while deletion of dgcC (Bd1434) resulted in the opposite, obligately predatory mutant. Deletion of dgcA (Bd0367) abolished gliding motility, producing bacteria capable of predatory invasion but unable to leave the exhausted prey. Complementation was achieved with wild type dgc genes, but not with GGAAF versions. Deletion of cdgA (Bd3125) substantially slowed predation; this was restored by wild type complementation. Deletion of dgcD (Bd3766) had no observable phenotype. In vitro assays showed that DgcA, DgcB, and DgcC were diguanylyl cyclases. CdgA lacks enzymatic activity but functions as a c-di-GMP receptor apparently in the DgcB pathway. Activity of DgcD was not detected. Deletion of DgcA strongly decreased the extractable c-di-GMP content of axenic Bdellovibrio cells. We show that c-di-GMP signalling pathways are essential for both the free-living and predatory lifestyles of B. bacteriovorus and that obligately predatory dgcC- can be made lacking a propensity to survive without predation of bacterial pathogens and thus possibly useful in anti-pathogen applications. In contrast to many studies in other bacteria, Bdellovibrio shows specificity and lack of overlap in c-di-GMP signalling pathways. PMID:22319440

  11. A hidden reservoir of integrative elements is the major source of recently acquired foreign genes and ORFans in archaeal and bacterial genomes

    PubMed Central

    Cortez, Diego; Forterre, Patrick; Gribaldo, Simonetta

    2009-01-01

    Background Archaeal and bacterial genomes contain a number of genes of foreign origin that arose from recent horizontal gene transfer, but the role of integrative elements (IEs), such as viruses, plasmids, and transposable elements, in this process has not been extensively quantified. Moreover, it is not known whether IEs play an important role in the origin of ORFans (open reading frames without matches in current sequence databases), whose proportion remains stable despite the growing number of complete sequenced genomes. Results We have performed a large-scale survey of potential recently acquired IEs in 119 archaeal and bacterial genomes. We developed an accurate in silico Markov model-based strategy to identify clusters of genes that show atypical sequence composition (clusters of atypical genes or CAGs) and are thus likely to be recently integrated foreign elements, including IEs. Our method identified a high number of new CAGs. Probabilistic analysis of gene content indicates that 56% of these new CAGs are likely IEs, whereas only 7% likely originated via horizontal gene transfer from distant cellular sources. Thirty-four percent of CAGs remain unassigned, what may reflect a still poor sampling of IEs associated with bacterial and archaeal diversity. Moreover, our study contributes to the issue of the origin of ORFans, because 39% of these are found inside CAGs, many of which likely represent recently acquired IEs. Conclusions Our results strongly indicate that archaeal and bacterial genomes contain an impressive proportion of recently acquired foreign genes (including ORFans) coming from a still largely unexplored reservoir of IEs. PMID:19531232

  12. Application of an extended Kalman filter in a feedback control of a generalized nonlinear bacterial growth system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chun-Yao Lien; Tse-Wei Wang

    1988-01-01

    In previous work by T.W. Wang et al. (1987) the robust multivariable linear quadratic Gaussian\\/loop transfer recovery (LQG\\/LTR) control design methodology was used in designing for the control of the linearized version of a generalized nonlinear bacterial growth system. Here, the effect of applying an extended Kalman filter (EKF) in conjunction with the same linear feedback regulator in the control

  13. Bacterial Biosynthetic Gene Clusters Encoding the Anti-cancer Haterumalide Class of Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Matilla, Miguel A.; Stöckmann, Henning; Leeper, Finian J.; Salmond, George P. C.

    2012-01-01

    Haterumalides are halogenated macrolides with strong antitumor properties, making them attractive targets for chemical synthesis. Unfortunately, current synthetic routes to these molecules are inefficient. The potent haterumalide, oocydin A, was previously identified from two plant-associated bacteria through its high bioactivity against plant pathogenic fungi and oomycetes. In this study, we describe oocydin A (ooc) biosynthetic gene clusters identified by genome sequencing, comparative genomics, and chemical analysis in four plant-associated enterobacteria of the Serratia and Dickeya genera. Disruption of the ooc gene cluster abolished oocydin A production and bioactivity against fungi and oomycetes. The ooc gene clusters span between 77 and 80 kb and encode five multimodular polyketide synthase (PKS) proteins, a hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA synthase cassette and three flavin-dependent tailoring enzymes. The presence of two free-standing acyltransferase proteins classifies the oocydin A gene cluster within the growing family of trans-AT PKSs. The amino acid sequences and organization of the PKS domains are consistent with the chemical predictions and functional peculiarities associated with trans-acyltransferase PKS. Based on extensive in silico analysis of the gene cluster, we propose a biosynthetic model for the production of oocydin A and, by extension, for other members of the haterumalide family of halogenated macrolides exhibiting anti-cancer, anti-fungal, and other interesting biological properties. PMID:23012376

  14. Inference of quantitative models of bacterial promoters from time-series reporter gene data.

    PubMed

    Stefan, Diana; Pinel, Corinne; Pinhal, Stéphane; Cinquemani, Eugenio; Geiselmann, Johannes; de Jong, Hidde

    2015-01-01

    The inference of regulatory interactions and quantitative models of gene regulation from time-series transcriptomics data has been extensively studied and applied to a range of problems in drug discovery, cancer research, and biotechnology. The application of existing methods is commonly based on implicit assumptions on the biological processes under study. First, the measurements of mRNA abundance obtained in transcriptomics experiments are taken to be representative of protein concentrations. Second, the observed changes in gene expression are assumed to be solely due to transcription factors and other specific regulators, while changes in the activity of the gene expression machinery and other global physiological effects are neglected. While convenient in practice, these assumptions are often not valid and bias the reverse engineering process. Here we systematically investigate, using a combination of models and experiments, the importance of this bias and possible corrections. We measure in real time and in vivo the activity of genes involved in the FliA-FlgM module of the E. coli motility network. From these data, we estimate protein concentrations and global physiological effects by means of kinetic models of gene expression. Our results indicate that correcting for the bias of commonly-made assumptions improves the quality of the models inferred from the data. Moreover, we show by simulation that these improvements are expected to be even stronger for systems in which protein concentrations have longer half-lives and the activity of the gene expression machinery varies more strongly across conditions than in the FliA-FlgM module. The approach proposed in this study is broadly applicable when using time-series transcriptome data to learn about the structure and dynamics of regulatory networks. In the case of the FliA-FlgM module, our results demonstrate the importance of global physiological effects and the active regulation of FliA and FlgM half-lives for the dynamics of FliA-dependent promoters. PMID:25590141

  15. [Phytase activity in some groups of bacteria. Search for and cloning of genes for bacterial phytases].

    PubMed

    Shedova, E N; Berezina, O V; Khmel', I A; Lipasova, V A; Borriss, R; Velikodvorskaia, G A

    2004-01-01

    A search for phytase genes in 9 Bacillus strains from the collection of IMGAN was implemented. The growth optimum of strains IX-22, IX-12B, K17-2, K18, IMG I, IMG II, M4 and M8 was 50-60 degrees C; the optimal growth temperature for Bacillus sp. 790 was 45-47 degrees C. According to the sequence data of 16S RNA genes, Bacillus sp. 790 belongs to the B. subtilis/amyloliquefaciens group. The other 8 strains were identified as B. licheniformis. Selection of Bacillus strains, potentially containing the phytase genes, was performed via PCR with primers designed on the basis of the conserved sequence regions of the phyA gene from B. amyloliquefaciens FZB45 with chromosomal DNA being used as the template. The nucleotide sequences of all PCR fragments showed a high level of homology to the known Bacillus phytase genes. The gene libraries of B. licheniformis M8 and B. amyloliquefaciens 790 in E. coli were constructed and phytase-containing clones were selected from them. Twenty-four Pseudomonas strains of different species, 5 Xanthomonas maltophilia strains and 1 Xanthomonas malvacearum (all from the mentioned collection) were tested for phytase activity. Such activity was found in 13 Pseudomonas strains and in 6 Xanthomonas strains. The accumulation of phytase in Pseudomonas was shown to take place at later (over 2 days') growth stages. The optimum pH for phytase from 3 Pseudomonas strains were established. The enzymes were found to be most active at pH 5.5. PMID:15024999

  16. The Influence of DNA Extraction Procedure and Primer Set on the Bacterial Community Analysis by Pyrosequencing of Barcoded 16S rRNA Gene Amplicons

    PubMed Central

    Starke, Ingo C.; Vahjen, Wilfried; Pieper, Robert; Zentek, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the effect of different DNA extraction procedures and primer sets on pyrosequencing results regarding the composition of bacterial communities in the ileum of piglets was investigated. Ileal chyme from piglets fed a diet containing different amounts of zinc oxide was used to evaluate a pyrosequencing study with barcoded 16S rRNA PCR products. Two DNA extraction methods (bead beating versus silica gel columns) and two primer sets targeting variable regions of bacterial 16S rRNA genes (8f-534r versus 968f-1401r) were considered. The SEED viewer software of the MG-RAST server was used for automated sequence analysis. A total of 5.2 × 105 sequences were used for analysis after processing for read length (150?bp), minimum sequence occurrence (5), and exclusion of eukaryotic and unclassified/uncultured sequences. DNA extraction procedures and primer sets differed significantly in total sequence yield. The distribution of bacterial order and main bacterial genera was influenced significantly by both parameters. However, this study has shown that the results of pyrosequencing studies using barcoded PCR amplicons of bacterial 16S rRNA genes depend on DNA extraction and primer choice, as well as on the manner of downstream sequence analysis. PMID:25120931

  17. GenePRIMP: A software quality control tool

    SciTech Connect

    Amrita Pati

    2010-05-05

    Amrita Pati of the DOE Joint Genome Institute's Genome Biology group describes the software tool GenePRIMP and how it fits into the quality control pipeline for microbial genomics. Further details regarding GenePRIMP appear in a paper published online May 2, 2010 in Nature Methods.

  18. Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification of Specific Endoglucanase Gene Sequence for Detection of the Bacterial Wilt Pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum

    PubMed Central

    Pirc, Manca; Llop, Pablo; Ravnikar, Maja; Dreo, Tanja

    2014-01-01

    The increased globalization of crops production and processing industries also promotes the side-effects of more rapid and efficient spread of plant pathogens. To prevent the associated economic losses, and particularly those related to bacterial diseases where their management relies on removal of the infected material from production, simple, easy-to-perform, rapid and cost-effective tests are needed. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assays that target 16S rRNA, fliC and egl genes were compared and evaluated as on-site applications. The assay with the best performance was that targeted to the egl gene, which shows high analytical specificity for diverse strains of the betaproteobacterium Ralstonia solanacearum, including its non-European and non-race 3 biovar 2 strains. The additional melting curve analysis provides confirmation of the test results. According to our extensive assessment, the egl LAMP assay requires minimum sample preparation (a few minutes of boiling) for the identification of pure cultures and ooze from symptomatic material, and it can also be used in a high-throughput format in the laboratory. This provides sensitive and reliable detection of R. solanacearum strains of different phylotypes. PMID:24763488

  19. Differential distribution and abundance of diazotrophic bacterial communities across different soil niches using a gene-targeted clone library approach.

    PubMed

    Yousuf, Basit; Kumar, Raghawendra; Mishra, Avinash; Jha, Bhavanath

    2014-11-01

    Diazotrophs are key players of the globally important biogeochemical nitrogen cycle, having a significant role in maintaining ecosystem sustainability. Saline soils are pristine and unexplored habitats representing intriguing ecosystems expected to harbour potential diazotrophs capable of adapting in extreme conditions, and these implicated organisms are largely obscure. Differential occurrence of diazotrophs was studied by the nifH gene-targeted clone library approach. Four nifH gene clone libraries were constructed from different soil niches, that is saline soils (low and high salinity; EC 3.8 and 7.1 ds m(-1) ), and agricultural and rhizosphere soil. Additionally, the abundance of diazotrophic community members was assessed using quantitative PCR. Results showed environment-dependent metabolic versatility and the presence of nitrogen-fixing bacteria affiliated with a range of taxa, encompassing members of the Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Cyanobacteria and Firmicutes. The analyses unveiled the dominance of Alphaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria (Pseudomonas, Halorhodospira, Ectothiorhodospira, Bradyrhizobium, Agrobacterium, Amorphomonas) as nitrogen fixers in coastal-saline soil ecosystems, and Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria (Bradyrhizobium, Azohydromonas, Azospirillum, Ideonella) in agricultural/rhizosphere ecosystems. The results revealed a repertoire of novel nitrogen-fixing bacterial guilds particularly in saline soil ecosystems. PMID:25196726

  20. Control of gene expression by cell size

    E-print Network

    Wu, Chia-Yung

    2010-01-01

    Polyploidy, increased copy number of whole chromosome sets in the genome, is a common cellular state in evolution, development and disease. Polyploidy enlarges cell size and alters gene expression, producing novel phenotypes ...

  1. Comparative expression analysis of genes induced during development of bacterial rot and induction of hypersensitive cell death in lettuce.

    PubMed

    Kiba, Akinori; Lee, Kyon-Ye; Ohnishi, Kouhei; Hikichi, Yasufumi

    2008-11-28

    The development of bacterial rot disease caused by Pseudomonas cichorii is closely associated with programmed cell death. To investigate the molecular events occurring during the development of bacterial rot, we isolated 20 P. cichorii-responsive genes (PcRGs) in lettuce by differential display. Among these PcRGs, signal transduction-, transcription/translation- and defense/stress responses-related PcRGs were subjected to a comparative expression study. We used RNA samples isolated from lettuce leaves inoculated with P. cichorii and hypersensitive response-inducing Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae. Expression of PcRG1-5-5 (spliceosomal protein), 2-9-2 (protein kinase) and 1-6-2 (ACC oxidase), 7-5 (alternative oxidase) and BI-I (bax inhibitor I) significantly increased in lettuce leaves inoculated with both P. cichorii and P. syringae pv. syringae. Intriguingly, PcRG 1-2-6 (protein phosphatase 2C) and 4-D-5 (protein kinase) were only up-regulated in P. cichorii-inoculated lettuce, whereas expression of PcRG1-3-2 (ribonucleoprotein) was only enhanced in P. syringae pv. syringae-inoculated lettuce. Expressions of PcRG1-3-2, 1-5-5, 1-6-2, 2-9-2, 7-5 and BI-I were induced by treatments with salicylic acid and/or methyl jasmonate. However, expression of PcRG1-2-6 and 4-D-5, which were specifically up-regulated by P. cichorii, were scarcely affected by these chemicals. Pharmacological studies suggested that ethylene and alternative oxidase were commonly related to disease development and hypersensitive responses. By contrast, there may be a different role for protein synthesis and protein kinase during disease development and in hypersensitive responses. These results suggested the overall similarity of genes expressed during disease development and in hypersensitive responses. However, there were differences not only in induction kinetics and the level of gene expression but also in the signal transduction pathway between hypersensitive responses and disease development. PMID:18171591

  2. Gene targets for fungal and mycotoxin control

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. H. Kim; B. C. Campbell; R. Molyneux; N. Mahoney; K. L. Chan; J. Yu; J. Wilkinson; J. Cary; D. Bhatnagar; T. E. Cleveland

    2006-01-01

    It was initially shown that gallic acid, from hydrolysable tannins in the pelliele of walnut kernels, dramatically inhibits\\u000a biosynthesis of aflatoxin byAspergillus flavus. The mechanism of this inhibition was found to take place upstream from the gene cluster, including the regulatory gene,aflR, involved in aflatoxin biosynthesis. Additional research using other antioxidant phenolics showed similar antiaflatoxigenic\\u000a activity to gallic acid. Treatment

  3. Analysis of bacterial community structure in sulfurous-oil-containing soils and detection of species carrying dibenzothiophene desulfurization (dsz) genes.

    PubMed

    Duarte, G F; Rosado, A S; Seldin, L; de Araujo, W; van Elsas, J D

    2001-03-01

    The selective effects of sulfur-containing hydrocarbons, with respect to changes in bacterial community structure and selection of desulfurizing organisms and genes, were studied in soil. Samples taken from a polluted field soil (A) along a concentration gradient of sulfurous oil and from soil microcosms treated with dibenzothiophene (DBT)-containing petroleum (FSL soil) were analyzed. Analyses included plate counts of total bacteria and of DBT utilizers, molecular community profiling via soil DNA-based PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE), and detection of genes that encode enzymes involved in the desulfurization of hydrocarbons, i.e., dszA, dszB, and dszC. Data obtained from the A soil showed no discriminating effects of oil levels on the culturable bacterial numbers on either medium used. Generally, counts of DBT degraders were 10- to 100-fold lower than the total culturable counts. However, PCR-DGGE showed that the numbers of bands detected in the molecular community profiles decreased with increasing oil content of the soil. Analysis of the sequences of three prominent bands of the profiles generated with the highly polluted soil samples suggested that the underlying organisms were related to Actinomyces sp., Arthrobacter sp., and a bacterium of uncertain affiliation. dszA, dszB, and dszC genes were present in all A soil samples, whereas a range of unpolluted soils gave negative results in this analysis. Results from the study of FSL soil revealed minor effects of the petroleum-DBT treatment on culturable bacterial numbers and clear effects on the DBT-utilizing communities. The molecular community profiles were largely stable over time in the untreated soil, whereas they showed a progressive change over time following treatment with DBT-containing petroleum. Direct PCR assessment revealed the presence of dszB-related signals in the untreated FSL soil and the apparent selection of dszA- and dszC-related sequences by the petroleum-DBT treatment. PCR-DGGE applied to sequential enrichment cultures in DBT-containing sulfur-free basal salts medium prepared from the A and treated FSL soils revealed the selection of up to 10 distinct bands. Sequencing a subset of these bands provided evidence for the presence of organisms related to Pseudomonas putida, a Pseudomonas sp., Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, and Rhodococcus erythropolis. Several of 52 colonies obtained from the A and FSL soils on agar plates with DBT as the sole sulfur source produced bands that matched the migration of bands selected in the enrichment cultures. Evidence for the presence of dszB in 12 strains was obtained, whereas dszA and dszC genes were found in only 7 and 6 strains, respectively. Most of the strains carrying dszA or dszC were classified as R. erythropolis related, and all revealed the capacity to desulfurize DBT. A comparison of 37 dszA sequences, obtained via PCR from the A and FSL soils, from enrichments of these soils, and from isolates, revealed the great similarity of all sequences to the canonical (R. erythropolis strain IGTS8) dszA sequence and a large degree of internal conservation. The 37 sequences recovered were grouped in three clusters. One group, consisting of 30 sequences, was minimally 98% related to the IGTS8 sequence, a second group of 2 sequences was slightly different, and a third group of 5 sequences was 95% similar. The first two groups contained sequences obtained from both soil types and enrichment cultures (including isolates), but the last consisted of sequences obtained directly from the polluted A soil. PMID:11229891

  4. Analysis of Bacterial Community Structure in Sulfurous-Oil-Containing Soils and Detection of Species Carrying Dibenzothiophene Desulfurization (dsz) Genes

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Gabriela Frois; Rosado, Alexandre Soares; Seldin, Lucy; de Araujo, Welington; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    2001-01-01

    The selective effects of sulfur-containing hydrocarbons, with respect to changes in bacterial community structure and selection of desulfurizing organisms and genes, were studied in soil. Samples taken from a polluted field soil (A) along a concentration gradient of sulfurous oil and from soil microcosms treated with dibenzothiophene (DBT)-containing petroleum (FSL soil) were analyzed. Analyses included plate counts of total bacteria and of DBT utilizers, molecular community profiling via soil DNA-based PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE), and detection of genes that encode enzymes involved in the desulfurization of hydrocarbons, i.e., dszA, dszB, and dszC.Data obtained from the A soil showed no discriminating effects of oil levels on the culturable bacterial numbers on either medium used. Generally, counts of DBT degraders were 10- to 100-fold lower than the total culturable counts. However, PCR-DGGE showed that the numbers of bands detected in the molecular community profiles decreased with increasing oil content of the soil. Analysis of the sequences of three prominent bands of the profiles generated with the highly polluted soil samples suggested that the underlying organisms were related to Actinomyces sp., Arthrobacter sp., and a bacterium of uncertain affiliation. dszA, dszB, and dszC genes were present in all A soil samples, whereas a range of unpolluted soils gave negative results in this analysis. Results from the study of FSL soil revealed minor effects of the petroleum-DBT treatment on culturable bacterial numbers and clear effects on the DBT-utilizing communities. The molecular community profiles were largely stable over time in the untreated soil, whereas they showed a progressive change over time following treatment with DBT-containing petroleum. Direct PCR assessment revealed the presence of dszB-related signals in the untreated FSL soil and the apparent selection of dszA- and dszC-related sequences by the petroleum-DBT treatment. PCR-DGGE applied to sequential enrichment cultures in DBT-containing sulfur-free basal salts medium prepared from the A and treated FSL soils revealed the selection of up to 10 distinct bands. Sequencing a subset of these bands provided evidence for the presence of organisms related to Pseudomonas putida, a Pseudomonas sp., Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, and Rhodococcus erythropolis. Several of 52 colonies obtained from the A and FSL soils on agar plates with DBT as the sole sulfur source produced bands that matched the migration of bands selected in the enrichment cultures. Evidence for the presence of dszB in 12 strains was obtained, whereas dszA and dszC genes were found in only 7 and 6 strains, respectively. Most of the strains carrying dszA or dszC were classified as R. erythropolis related, and all revealed the capacity to desulfurize DBT. A comparison of 37 dszA sequences, obtained via PCR from the A and FSL soils, from enrichments of these soils, and from isolates, revealed the great similarity of all sequences to the canonical (R. erythropolis strain IGTS8) dszA sequence and a large degree of internal conservation. The 37 sequences recovered were grouped in three clusters. One group, consisting of 30 sequences, was minimally 98% related to the IGTS8 sequence, a second group of 2 sequences was slightly different, and a third group of 5 sequences was 95% similar. The first two groups contained sequences obtained from both soil types and enrichment cultures (including isolates), but the last consisted of sequences obtained directly from the polluted A soil. PMID:11229891

  5. Use of 16S ribosomal RNA gene analyses to characterize the bacterial signature associated with poor oral health in West Virginia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background West Virginia has the worst oral health in the United States, but the reasons for this are unclear. This pilot study explored the etiology of this disparity using culture-independent analyses to identify bacterial species associated with oral disease. Methods Bacteria in subgingival plaque samples from twelve participants in two independent West Virginia dental-related studies were characterized using 16S rRNA gene sequencing and Human Oral Microbe Identification Microarray (HOMIM) analysis. Unifrac analysis was used to characterize phylogenetic differences between bacterial communities obtained from plaque of participants with low or high oral disease, which was further evaluated using clustering and Principal Coordinate Analysis. Results Statistically different bacterial signatures (P < 0.001) were identified in subgingival plaque of individuals with low or high oral disease in West Virginia based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Low disease contained a high frequency of Veillonella and Streptococcus, with a moderate number of Capnocytophaga. High disease exhibited substantially increased bacterial diversity and included a large proportion of Clostridiales cluster bacteria (Selenomonas, Eubacterium, Dialister). Phylogenetic trees constructed using 16S rRNA gene sequencing revealed that Clostridiales were repeated colonizers in plaque associated with high oral disease, providing evidence that the oral environment is somehow influencing the bacterial signature linked to disease. Conclusions Culture-independent analyses identified an atypical bacterial signature associated with high oral disease in West Virginians and provided evidence that the oral environment influenced this signature. Both findings provide insight into the etiology of the oral disparity in West Virginia. PMID:21362199

  6. Towards a tolerance toolkit: Gene expression signatures enabling the emergence of resistant bacterial strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Keesha; Chatterjee, Anushree

    2014-03-01

    Microbial pathogens are able to rapidly acquire tolerance to chemical toxins. Developing next-generation antibiotics that impede the emergence of resistance will help avoid a world-wide health crisis. Conversely, the ability to induce rapid tolerance gains could lead to high-yielding strains for sustainable production of biofuels and commodity chemicals. Achieving these goals requires an understanding of the general mechanisms allowing microbes to become resistant to diverse toxins. We apply top-down and bottom-up methodologies to identify biological network changes leading to adaptation and tolerance. Using a top-down approach, we perform evolution experiments to isolate resistant strains, collect samples for transcriptomic and proteomic analysis, and use the omics data to inform mathematical gene regulatory models. Using a bottom-up approach, we build and test synthetic genetic devices that enable increased or decreased expression of selected genes. Unique patterns in gene expression are identified in cultures actively gaining resistance, especially in pathways known to be involved with stress response, efflux, and mutagenesis. Genes correlated with tolerance could potentially allow the design of resistance-free antibiotics or robust chemical production strains.

  7. Tetracycline Resistance Gene Maintenance under Varying Bacterial Growth Rate, Substrate and Oxygen Availability, and Tetracycline

    E-print Network

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    attenuation. INTRODUCTION Recent studies have shown that antibiotic resistant bacteria and associated infections with resistant strains11,12 as well as foods contaminated with antibiotic resistant bacteria.13 resistance genes are widespread in a multitude of natural environments.1-6 The propagation of antibiotic

  8. Related antimicrobial resistance genes detected in different bacterial species co-isolated from swine fecal samples

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A possible factor leading to the spread of antimicrobial resistance (AR) in bacteria is the horizontal transfer of resistance genes between bacteria in animals or their environment. To investigate this, swine fecal samples were collected on-farm and cultured for Salmonella, Escherichia coli, Campylo...

  9. A Benefit of High Temperature: Increased Effectiveness of a Rice Bacterial Blight Disease Resistance Gene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High temperatures promote development of many plant diseases and reduce effectiveness of disease resistance (R) genes. In many rice producing countries, two crops of rice are produced, with more disease occurring in the season with higher day/night temperatures. While studying the factors that influ...

  10. Controlled delivery of bioactive molecules into live cells using the bacterial mechanosensitive channel MscL

    PubMed Central

    Doerner, Julia F.; Febvay, Sebastien; Clapham, David E.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial mechanosensitive channels are some of the largest pores in nature. In particular, MscL, with a pore diameter > 25 Å, allows passage of large organic ions and small proteins. Functional MscL reconstitution into lipids has been proposed for applications in vesicular-based drug release. Here we show that these channels can be functionally expressed in mammalian cells to afford rapid controlled uptake of membrane impermeable molecules. We first demonstrate that MscL gating in response to increased membrane tension is preserved in mammalian cell membranes. Molecular delivery is controlled by adopting an established method of MscL charge-induced activation. We then determine pore size limitations using fluorescently labeled model cargoes. Finally, we activate MscL to introduce the cell-impermeable bi-cyclic peptide phalloidin, a specific marker for actin filaments, into cells. We propose that MscL will be a useful tool for gated and controlled delivery of bioactive molecules into cells. PMID:22871809

  11. Prevalence of Flavobacterium psychrophilum bacterial cells in farmed rainbow trout: characterization of metallothionein A and interleukin1-? genes as markers overexpressed in spleen and kidney of diseased fish.

    PubMed

    Orieux, Nicolas; Douet, Diane-Gaëlle; Le Hénaff, Michel; Bourdineaud, Jean-Paul

    2013-02-22

    The aim of the present study was to assess the prevalence of the flavobacteria within farmed trout and to quantify their bacterial burden. A total of 61 fish were sampled from seven farms, and were distributed in two groups: (1) visibly diseased fish suffering from the rainbow trout fry syndrome or the bacterial cold water disease caused by the bacteria Flavobacterium psychrophilum and (2) normally appearing fish. F. psychrophilum cells were titered by qPCR, targeting a specific area of the 16S rRNA gene in skin, muscle, gills, liver, spleen and kidney from all fish. The pathogen was detected in these organs whatever the health status, with titers ranging from 10(4) to 6 × 10(7)bacteria/g of tissue in normally appearing fish, thus showing they were bacterial carriers. Two organs allowed differentiation between diseased and normally appearing fish: spleen and kidney, with titers ranging from 10(6) to 10(7)bacteria/g of tissue in normally appearing fish vs 10(11) to 10(12)bacteria/g of tissue in diseased fish. No relationship was found between immunoglobulin M-like titer in plasma and health status. Gene expression analysis in fish organs revealed two genes that were markers of the bacterial infection: mt-a and il-1? genes encoding the metallothionein A and the interleukin1-?, respectively. These genes were both over-expressed in gills, liver, spleen and kidney of diseased fish. Four genes encoding immunity markers were down-regulated in spleen (a key organ implicated in immunity) of diseased fish: tgf-?, cd8-?, mhc2-? and igt, suggesting a weakened immune system in diseased fish. PMID:22989515

  12. PI Control of Gene Expression in Tumorous Cell Lines 

    E-print Network

    Mendonca, Rouella J.

    2010-01-16

    PI CONTROL OF GENE EXPRESSION IN TUMOROUS CELL LINES A Thesis by ROUELLA JOAN MENDONCA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 2009 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering PI CONTROL OF GENE EXPRESSION IN TUMOROUS CELL LINES A Thesis by ROUELLA JOAN MENDONCA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial...

  13. Upregulation of Androgen-Responsive Genes and Transforming Growth Factor-?1 Cascade Genes in a Rat Model of Non-bacterial Prostatic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Funahashi, Yasuhito; O’Malley, Katherine J.; Kawamorita, Naoki; Tyagi, Pradeep; DeFranco, Donald B.; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Gotoh, Momokazu; Wang, Zhou; Yoshimura, Naoki

    2013-01-01

    Background Prostatic inflammation is associated with the development of prostatic hyperplasia. We investigated the effects of prostatic inflammation on expression levels of androgen-responsive genes and growth factors in the prostate. Methods Prostatic inflammation was induced by formalin injection into bilateral ventral lobes of the prostate of male SD rats. After 28 days, the prostate was harvested for analyses of proinflammatory cytokines, androgen-responsive genes in the epithelium and TGF-?1 cascade genes in the stroma. Some rats were given a COX-2 inhibitor (celecoxib; 10 mg/kg/day) by oral gavage for 28 days. Results The formalin-injected prostate exhibited widespread low-grade inflammation (< 50 leukocytes/10,000 ?m2) along with focal high-grade inflammation (> 100 leukocytes/10,000 ?m2) in limited areas. Compared to control, formalin-injected prostate exhibited a 2.5–6 fold increased protein expression of IL-1?, IL-1?, and IL-6. In the low-grade inflammatory regions, 3–9 fold and 2–3 fold upregulations of mRNA levels of androgen receptors/androgen-responsive genes and TGF-?1 cascade genes were respectively observed in the epithelium and stroma obtained by laser-capture microdissection. Positive staining for androgen receptors in the epithelial nuclei, and TGF-?1, IL-6 and COX-2 in the stroma was increased in the low-grade inflammation area. COX-2 inhibitor treatment suppressed these upregulations of cytokines, androgen-responsive and TGF-?1 cascade genes. Conclusions Prostatic inflammation induced increased expression of androgen-responsive genes in the epithelium and TGF-?1 cascade genes in the stroma, which were suppressed by COX-2 inhibitors, suggesting that activation of these genes in the low-grade inflammatory region might be involved in the development of symptomatic BPH. PMID:24446128

  14. Structure-Function Analysis of a Broad Specificity Populus trichocarpa Endo-?-glucanase Reveals an Evolutionary Link between Bacterial Licheninases and Plant XTH Gene Products*

    PubMed Central

    Eklöf, Jens M.; Shojania, Shaheen; Okon, Mark; McIntosh, Lawrence P.; Brumer, Harry

    2013-01-01

    The large xyloglucan endotransglycosylase/hydrolase (XTH) gene family continues to be the focus of much attention in studies of plant cell wall morphogenesis due to the unique catalytic functions of the enzymes it encodes. The XTH gene products compose a subfamily of glycoside hydrolase family 16 (GH16), which also comprises a broad range of microbial endoglucanases and endogalactanases, as well as yeast cell wall chitin/?-glucan transglycosylases. Previous whole-family phylogenetic analyses have suggested that the closest relatives to the XTH gene products are the bacterial licheninases (EC 3.2.1.73), which specifically hydrolyze linear mixed linkage ?(1?3)/?(1?4)-glucans. In addition to their specificity for the highly branched xyloglucan polysaccharide, XTH gene products are distinguished from the licheninases and other GH16 enzyme subfamilies by significant active site loop alterations and a large C-terminal extension. Given these differences, the molecular evolution of the XTH gene products in GH16 has remained enigmatic. Here, we present the biochemical and structural analysis of a unique, mixed function endoglucanase from black cottonwood (Populus trichocarpa), which reveals a small, newly recognized subfamily of GH16 members intermediate between the bacterial licheninases and plant XTH gene products. We postulate that this clade comprises an important link in the evolution of the large plant XTH gene families from a putative microbial ancestor. As such, this analysis provides new insights into the diversification of GH16 and further unites the apparently disparate members of this important family of proteins. PMID:23572521

  15. Case-control comparison of bacterial and protozoan microorganisms associated with gastroenteritis: application of molecular detection.

    PubMed

    Bruijnesteijn van Coppenraet, L E S; Dullaert-de Boer, M; Ruijs, G J H M; van der Reijden, W A; van der Zanden, A G M; Weel, J F L; Schuurs, T A

    2015-06-01

    The introduction of molecular detection of infectious organisms has led to increased numbers of positive findings, as observed for pathogens causing gastroenteritis (GE). However, because little is known about the prevalence of these pathogens in the healthy asymptomatic population, the clinical value of these additional findings is unclear. A case-control study was carried out in a population of patients served by general practitioners in the Netherlands. A total of 2710 fecal samples from case and matched control subjects were subjected to multiplex real-time PCR for the 11 most common bacterial and four protozoal causes of GE. Of 1515 case samples, 818 (54%) were positive for one or more target organisms. A total of 49% of the controls were positive. Higher positivity rates in cases compared to controls were observed for Campylobacter spp., Salmonella spp., Clostridium difficile, enteroinvasive Escherichia coli/Shigella spp., enterotoxigenic E. coli, enteroaggregative E. coli, atypical enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), Cryptosporidium parvum/hominis, and Giardia lamblia. However, Dientamoeba fragilis and Shiga-like toxigenic E. coli were detected significantly less frequent in cases than in controls, while no difference in prevalence was found for typical EPEC and enterohemorrhagic E. coli. The association between the presence of microorganisms and GE was the weakest in children aged 0 to 5 years. Higher relative loads in cases further support causality. This was seen for Campylobacter spp., Salmonella spp., enterotoxigenic E. coli, and C. parvum/hominis, and for certain age categories of those infected with C. difficile, enteroaggregative E. coli, and atypical EPEC. For D. fragilis and Shiga-like toxigenic E. coli/enterohemorrhagic E. coli, pathogen loads were lower in cases. Application of molecular diagnostics in GE is rapid, sensitive and specific, but results should be interpreted with care, using clinical and additional background information. PMID:25700890

  16. Evaluation of real-time PCR endogenous control genes for analysis of gene expression in bovine endometrium

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Caroline G Walker; Susanne Meier; Murray D Mitchell; John R Roche; Mathew Littlejohn

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Quantitative real-time PCR gene expression results are generally normalised using endogenous control genes. These reference genes should be expressed at a constant level across all sample groups in a study, and should not be influenced by study treatments or conditions. There has been no systematic investigation of endogenous control genes for bovine endometrium to date. The suitability of both

  17. Magnetic field-controlled gene expression in encapsulated cells

    PubMed Central

    Ortner, Viktoria; Kaspar, Cornelius; Halter, Christian; Töllner, Lars; Mykhaylyk, Olga; Walzer, Johann; Günzburg, Walter H.; Dangerfield, John A.; Hohenadl, Christine; Czerny, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Cell and gene therapies have an enormous range of potential applications, but as for most other therapies, dosing is a critical issue, which makes regulated gene expression a prerequisite for advanced strategies. Several inducible expression systems have been established, which mainly rely on small molecules as inducers, such as hormones or antibiotics. The application of these inducers is difficult to control and the effects on gene regulation are slow. Here we describe a novel system for induction of gene expression in encapsulated cells. This involves the modification of cells to express potential therapeutic genes under the control of a heat inducible promoter and the co-encapsulation of these cells with magnetic nanoparticles. These nanoparticles produce heat when subjected to an alternating magnetic field; the elevated temperatures in the capsules then induce gene expression. In the present study we define the parameters of such systems and provide proof-of-principle using reporter gene constructs. The fine-tuned heating of nanoparticles in the magnetic field allows regulation of gene expression from the outside over a broad range and within short time. Such a system has great potential for advancement of cell and gene therapy approaches. PMID:22197778

  18. Two HMGB1 genes from grass carp Ctenopharyngodon idella mediate immune responses to viral/bacterial PAMPs and GCRV challenge.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chunrong; Peng, Limin; Su, Jianguo

    2013-03-01

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a nuclear weapon in the immune arsenal and a master regulator of innate immunity, at the crossroads between innate and adaptive immunity. To clarify the immune characterizations of HMGB1 in fishes, two co-orthologs of HMGB1 (CiHMGB1a and CiHMGB1b) were identified in grass carp Ctenopharyngodon idella by local EST database searching and RACE techniques. mRNA expressions of the two HMGB1 genes are widespread in fifteen tissues investigated. The transcripts of CiHMGB1a and CiHMGB1b were significantly up-regulated and reached peak at 24h post GCRV challenge in spleen and head kidney tissues (P<0.05). The modulations are slow post-bacterial PAMP stimulations by contrast with those after viral PAMP or GCRV challenge. They are inhibited by bacterial PAMPs, but are enhanced by viral PAMP or virus. mRNA expression of CiHMGB1a is high and strongly modulated by nucleic acids and transcription of CiHMGB1b is low and mildly regulated by nucleic acids and capsids of GCRV. The over-expression vectors were constructed and transfected into C. idella kidney cell line to obtain stably expressing recombinant proteins. In HMGB1 over-expressed cells, mRNA expressions of IPS-1, MyD88 and Mx1 were down-regulated, whereas TRIF was found to be up-regulated and IFN-I showed no change in its expression. After GCRV challenge, the transcripts of IPS-1, MyD88 and Mx1 were up-regulated, while IFN-I showed down-regulation, and TRIF showed up-regulation after an initial phase of decline. The titer assay demonstrated no antiviral activity of HMGB1s. The results indicated mRNA expressions of HMGB1a and HMGB1b are enhanced by GCRV or viral PAMP, and are inhibited by bacterial PAMPs; HMGB1a and HMGB1b collaborate with each other and play important roles in modulating the innate immune responses, although without direct antiviral effect; the immune network triggered by HMGB1 work together in concert to maintain homeostasis. PMID:23228458

  19. Expression of a bacterial gene in plants by using a viral vector

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. Brisson; J. Paszkowski; J. R. Penswick; B. Gronenborn; I. Potrykus; T. Hohn

    1984-01-01

    Several properties of the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) indicate that it could provide a useful vector for gene transfer in higher plants: (1) it has a relatively small double-stranded genome that can be easily manipulated in vitro1-3 (2) cloned viral DNA is infectious when rubbed onto healthy leaves4,5; (3) virus spreads throughout the plant and can be found in most

  20. Activation of dormant bacterial genes by Nonomuraea sp. strain ATCC 39727 mutant-type RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Talà, Adelfia; Wang, Guojun; Zemanova, Martina; Okamoto, Susumu; Ochi, Kozo; Alifano, Pietro

    2009-02-01

    There is accumulating evidence that the ability of actinomycetes to produce antibiotics and other bioactive secondary metabolites has been underestimated due to the presence of cryptic gene clusters. The activation of dormant genes is therefore one of the most important areas of experimental research for the discovery of drugs in these organisms. The recent observation that several actinomycetes possess two RNA polymerase beta-chain genes (rpoB) has opened up the possibility, explored in this study, of developing a new strategy to activate dormant gene expression in bacteria. Two rpoB paralogs, rpoB(S) and rpoB(R), provide Nonomuraea sp. strain ATCC 39727 with two functionally distinct and developmentally regulated RNA polymerases. The product of rpoB(R), the expression of which increases after transition to stationary phase, is characterized by five amino acid substitutions located within or close to the so-called rifampin resistance clusters that play a key role in fundamental activities of RNA polymerase. Here, we report that rpoB(R) markedly activated antibiotic biosynthesis in the wild-type Streptomyces lividans strain 1326 and also in strain KO-421, a relaxed (rel) mutant unable to produce ppGpp. Site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated that the rpoB(R)-specific missense H426N mutation was essential for the activation of secondary metabolism. Our observations also indicated that mutant-type or duplicated, rpoB often exists in nature among rare actinomycetes and will thus provide a basis for further basic and applied research. PMID:19047343

  1. Variability of bacterial gene-directed enzyme production in human genetically deficient cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jfirgen Horst; Friedrich Kluge; Wolfgang Gerok

    1979-01-01

    Human ß-galactosidase-deficient skin fibroblasts from a patient with generalized gangliosidosis (GM1-gangliosidosis type I) were treated with phage ? plac DNA, coding for Escherichia coli ß-galactosidase (ß-D-galactoside galactohydrolase, EC 3.2.1.23). New ß-galactosidase activity detected in cell extracts of phage DNA-treated GM1-gangliosidosis fibroblasts continued to vary considerably from one experiment to another. It behaved like the E. coliz-gene product upon immunochemical and

  2. Bacterial gene loss as a mechanism for gain of antimicrobial resistance

    PubMed Central

    Török, ME; Chantratita, N; Peacock, SJ

    2012-01-01

    Acquisition of exogenous DNA by pathogenic bacteria represents the basis for much of the acquired antimicrobial resistance in pathogenic bacteria. A more extreme mechanism to avoid the effect of an antibiotic is to delete the drug target, although this would be predicted to be rare since drug targets are often essential genes. Here, we review and discuss the description of a novel mechanism of resistance to the cephalosporin drug ceftazidime caused by loss of a penicillin-binding protein (PBP) in a Gram-negative bacillus (Burkholderia pseudomallei). This organism causes melioidosis across south-east Asia and northern Australia, and is usually treated with two or more weeks of ceftazidime followed by oral antibiotics for three to six months. Comparison of clinical isolates from six patients with melioidosis found initial ceftazidime-susceptible isolates and subsequent ceftazidime-resistant variants. The latter failed to grow on commonly used culture media, rendering these isolates difficult to detect in the diagnostic laboratory. Genomic analysis using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and array based genomic hybridisation revealed a large-scale genomic deletion comprising 49 genes in the ceftazidime-resistant strains. Mutational analysis of wild-type B. pseudomallei demonstrated that ceftazidime resistance was due to deletion of a gene encoding a PBP 3 present within the region of genomic loss. This provides one explanation for ceftazidime treatment failure, and may be a frequent but undetected event in patients with melioidosis. PMID:23022568

  3. Molecular Cell Control of Proinflammatory Gene

    E-print Network

    Higgins, Darren

    lysine 20 (H4K20me3) as a repression checkpoint that restricts expression of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 delivery of the histone demethylase PHF2. Liver X receptors antagonize TLR4-dependent gene activation/2/6), lipopolysaccharide (TLR4), flagellin (TLR5), single-stranded RNA (TLR7/8), double- stranded RNA (TLR3), and double

  4. Antibiotic resistance genes in bacterial and bacteriophage fractions of Tunisian and Spanish wastewaters as markers to compare the antibiotic resistance patterns in each population.

    PubMed

    Colomer-Lluch, Marta; Calero-Cáceres, William; Jebri, Sihem; Hmaied, Fatma; Muniesa, Maite; Jofre, Juan

    2014-12-01

    The emergence and increased prevalence of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in the environment may pose a serious global health concern. This study evaluates the abundance of several ARGs in bacterial and bacteriophage DNA via real-time qPCR in samples from five different sampling points in Tunisia; three wastewater treatment plants (WWTP 1, 2 and 3) and wastewater from two abattoirs slaughtering different animals. Results are compared with those obtained in the Barcelona area, in northeast Spain. Eight ARGs were quantified by qPCR from total and phage DNA fraction from the samples. Three ?-lactamases (bla(TEM), bla(CTX-M) cluster 1 and bla(CTX-M) cluster 9), two quinolone resistance genes (qnrA and qnrS), the mecA gene that confers resistance to methicillin in Staphylococcus aureus, the emerging armA gene, conferring resistance to aminoglycosides and sul1, the most extended gene conferring resistance to sulfonamides, were evaluated. Sul1 and bla(TEM) were the most prevalent ARGs detected at all five Tunisian sampling points, similarly with the observations in Barcelona. bla(CTX-M-9) was more prevalent than bla(CTX-M-1) both in bacterial and DNA within phage particles in all samples analysed. mecA and armA were almost absent in Tunisian waters from human or animal origin in contrast with Barcelona that showed a medium prevalence. qnrA was more prevalent than qnrS in bacterial and phage DNA from all sampling points. In conclusion, our study shows that ARGs are found in the bacterial and is reflected in the phage DNA fraction of human and animal wastewaters. The densities of each ARGs vary depending on the ARGs shed by each population and is determined by the characteristics of each area. Thus, the evaluation of ARGs in wastewaters seems to be suitable as marker reflecting the antibiotic resistance patterns of a population. PMID:25127043

  5. Dynamics of fecal indicator bacteria, bacterial pathogen genes, and organic wastewater contaminants in the Little Calumet River: Portage Burns Waterway, Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haack, Sheridan K.; Duris, Joseph W.

    2013-01-01

    Little information exists on the co-occurrence of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB), bacterial pathogens, and organic wastewater-associated chemicals (OWCs) within Great Lakes tributaries. Fifteen watershed sites and one beach site adjacent to the Little Calumet River–Portage Burns Waterway (LCRPBW) on Lake Michigan were tested on four dates for pH, dissolved oxygen, specific conductance, chloride, color, ammonia- and nitrate-nitrogen, soluble phosphorus, sulfate, turbidity, and atrazine; for concentrations of FIB; and for genes indicating the presence of human-pathogenic enterococci (ENT) and of Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli (EC) from various animal sources. Nineteen samples were also tested for 60 OWCs. Half of the watershed samples met EC recreational water quality standards; none met ENT standards. Human-wastewater-associated OWC detections were correlated with human-influence indicators such as population/km2, chloride concentrations, and the presence of WWTP effluents, but EC and ENT concentrations were not. Bacterial pathogen genes indicated rural human and several potential animal sources. OWCs of human or ecosystem health concern (musk fragrances AHTN and HHCB, alkylphenols, carbamazepine) and 3 bacterial pathogen genes were detected at the mouth of the LCRPBW, but no such OWCs and only 1 pathogen gene were detected at the beach. The LCRPBW has significant potential to deliver FIB, potential bacterial pathogens, and OWCs of human or ecosystem health concern to the nearshore of Lake Michigan, under conditions enhancing nearshore transport of the river plume. Nearshore mixing of lake and river water, and the lack of relationship between OWCs and FIB or pathogen genes, pose numerous challenges for watershed and nearshore assessment and remediation.

  6. Bacterial community structure in the intestinal ecosystem of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) as revealed by pyrosequencing-based analysis of 16S rRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Etyemez, Miray; Balcázar, José Luis

    2015-06-01

    In this study, we determined the diversity and composition of bacterial communities within the intestinal ecosystem of farmed rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Healthy rainbow trout, weighing between 520 and 750?g, were fed a commercial diet. Subsequently, genomic DNA was isolated from the intestinal mucus (n?=?16 fish samples) and combined into groups of four fish samples each for pyrosequencing analysis of bacterial 16S rRNA genes. The results revealed that the most abundant operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were affiliated to the genera Acinetobacter, Cetobacterium, Pseudomonas, and Psychrobacter, and to a lesser extent, the genera Aeromonas, Clostridium, Deefgea, Flavobacterium, Neptuniibacter, and Mycoplasma. These findings could be used as a baseline for further studies about the role of bacterial communities in normal and altered host physiological states. PMID:25843896

  7. A kernel regression approach to gene-gene interaction detection for case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Larson, Nicholas B; Schaid, Daniel J

    2013-11-01

    Gene-gene interactions are increasingly being addressed as a potentially important contributor to the variability of complex traits. Consequently, attentions have moved beyond single locus analysis of association to more complex genetic models. Although several single-marker approaches toward interaction analysis have been developed, such methods suffer from very high testing dimensionality and do not take advantage of existing information, notably the definition of genes as functional units. Here, we propose a comprehensive family of gene-level score tests for identifying genetic elements of disease risk, in particular pairwise gene-gene interactions. Using kernel machine methods, we devise score-based variance component tests under a generalized linear mixed model framework. We conducted simulations based upon coalescent genetic models to evaluate the performance of our approach under a variety of disease models. These simulations indicate that our methods are generally higher powered than alternative gene-level approaches and at worst competitive with exhaustive SNP-level (where SNP is single-nucleotide polymorphism) analyses. Furthermore, we observe that simulated epistatic effects resulted in significant marginal testing results for the involved genes regardless of whether or not true main effects were present. We detail the benefits of our methods and discuss potential genome-wide analysis strategies for gene-gene interaction analysis in a case-control study design. PMID:23868214

  8. Multi-chromatic control of mammalian gene expression and signaling

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Konrad; Engesser, Raphael; Schulz, Simon; Steinberg, Thorsten; Tomakidi, Pascal; Weber, Cornelia C.; Ulm, Roman; Timmer, Jens; Zurbriggen, Matias D.; Weber, Wilfried

    2013-01-01

    The emergence and future of mammalian synthetic biology depends on technologies for orchestrating and custom tailoring complementary gene expression and signaling processes in a predictable manner. Here, we demonstrate for the first time multi-chromatic expression control in mammalian cells by differentially inducing up to three genes in a single cell culture in response to light of different wavelengths. To this end, we developed an ultraviolet B (UVB)-inducible expression system by designing a UVB-responsive split transcription factor based on the Arabidopsis thaliana UVB receptor UVR8 and the WD40 domain of COP1. The system allowed high (up to 800-fold) UVB-induced gene expression in human, monkey, hamster and mouse cells. Based on a quantitative model, we determined critical system parameters. By combining this UVB-responsive system with blue and red light-inducible gene control technology, we demonstrate multi-chromatic multi-gene control by differentially expressing three genes in a single cell culture in mammalian cells, and we apply this system for the multi-chromatic control of angiogenic signaling processes. This portfolio of optogenetic tools enables the design and implementation of synthetic biological networks showing unmatched spatiotemporal precision for future research and biomedical applications. PMID:23625964

  9. Characterization of bacterial community shift in human Ulcerative Colitis patients revealed by Illumina based 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The healthy human intestine is represented by the presence of bacterial communities predominantly belonging to obligate anaerobes; however disparity and dysanaerobiosis in intestinal microflora may lead to the progression of ulcerative colitis (UC). The foremost aim of this study is to consider and compare the gut microbiota composition in patients suffering from different stages of UC. Methods This study represents data from the biopsy samples of six individuals suffering from UC. The samples were collected by colonoscopy and were processed immediately for isolation of DNA. Mucosal microbiota was analyzed by means of 16S rRNA gene-based Illumina high throughput sequencing. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) was performed to determine total bacterial abundances. Results Analysis of 23,927 OTUs demonstrated a significant reduction of bacterial diversity consistently from phylum to species level (p?bacterial count was detected in patients suffering from severe inflammatory stage (2.98 +/-0.49 E?+?09/ml) when compared with patients with moderate (1.03+/-0.29 E?+?08/ml) and mild (1.76 +/-0.34 E?+?08/ml) stages of inflammation. Conclusion The reduction of bacterial diversity with an increase in the total bacterial count indicates a shift of bacterial communities which signifies dysbiosis and dysanaerobiosis at the mucosal level for patients suffering from UC. PMID:25018784

  10. Mechanisms that control bacterial populations in continuous-flow culture models of mouse large intestinal flora.

    PubMed

    Freter, R; Brickner, H; Botney, M; Cleven, D; Aranki, A

    1983-02-01

    A previous study had established that anaerobic continuous-flow (CF) cultures of conventional mouse cecal flora were able to maintain the in vivo ecological balance among the indigenous bacterial species tested. This paper describes experiments designed to determine the mechanisms which control the population sizes of these species in such CF cultures. One strain each of Escherichia coli, Fusobacterium sp., and Eubacterium sp. were studied. Growth of these strains in filtrates of CF cultures was considerably more rapid than in the CF cultures themselves, indicating that the inhibitory activity had been lost in the process of filtration. Growth rates to match those in CF cultures could be obtained, however, by restoring the original levels of H(2)S in the culture filtrates. The inhibitory effect of H(2)S in filtrates and in dialysates of CF cultures could be abolished by adding glucose or pyruvate, but not formate or lactate. The fatty acids present in CF cultures matched those in the cecum of conventional mice in both quality and concentration. These acids could not account for the slow rates of growth of the tested strains in CF cultures, but they did cause a marked increase in the initial lag phase of E. coli growth. The results obtained are compatible with the hypothesis that the populations of most indigenous intestinal bacteria are controlled by one or a few nutritional substrates which a given strain can utilize most efficiently in the presence of H(2)S and at the prevailing conditions of pH and anaerobiosis. This hypothesis consequently implies that the populations of enterobacteria, such as the E. coli strain tested, and those of the predominant anaerobes are controlled by analogous mechanisms. PMID:6339388

  11. Endophytic bacterial diversity in grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.) leaves described by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and length heterogeneity-PCR.

    PubMed

    Bulgari, Daniela; Casati, Paola; Brusetti, Lorenzo; Quaglino, Fabio; Brasca, Milena; Daffonchio, Daniele; Bianco, Piero Attilio

    2009-08-01

    Diversity of bacterial endophytes associated with grapevine leaf tissues was analyzed by cultivation and cultivation-independent methods. In order to identify bacterial endophytes directly from metagenome, a protocol for bacteria enrichment and DNA extraction was optimized. Sequence analysis of 16S rRNA gene libraries underscored five diverse Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs), showing best sequence matches with gamma-Proteobacteria, family Enterobacteriaceae, with a dominance of the genus Pantoea. Bacteria isolation through cultivation revealed the presence of six OTUs, showing best sequence matches with Actinobacteria, genus Curtobacterium, and with Firmicutes genera Bacillus and Enterococcus. Length Heterogeneity-PCR (LH-PCR) electrophoretic peaks from single bacterial clones were used to setup a database representing the bacterial endophytes identified in association with grapevine tissues. Analysis of healthy and phytoplasma-infected grapevine plants showed that LH-PCR could be a useful complementary tool for examining the diversity of bacterial endophytes especially for diversity survey on a large number of samples. PMID:19763412

  12. In situ synthesis of size-controlled, stable silver nanoparticles within ultrashort peptide hydrogels and their anti-bacterial properties.

    PubMed

    Reithofer, Michael R; Lakshmanan, Anupama; Ping, Andy T K; Chin, Jia M; Hauser, Charlotte A E

    2014-08-01

    We have developed a silver-releasing biomaterial with promising potential for wound healing applications. The material is made of ultrashort peptides which can self-assemble in water to form hydrogels. Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) were synthesized in situ within the biomaterial, using only UV irradiation and no additional chemical reducing agents. The synthetic strategy allows precise control of the nanoparticle size, with the network of peptide fibers preventing aggregation of Ag NPs. The biomaterial shows increased mechanical strength compared to the hydrogel control. We observed a sustained release of Ag NPs over a period of 14 days. This is a crucial prerequisite for effective anti-bacterial therapy. The ability to inhibit bacterial growth was tested using different bacterial strains, namely gram-negative Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus. Inhibition of bacterial growth was observed for all strains. The best results were obtained for Pseudomonas aeruginosa which is known for exhibiting multidrug resistance. Biocompatibility studies on HDFa cells, using Ag NP-containing hydrogels, did not show any significant influence on cell viability. We propose this silver-releasing hydrogel as an excellent biomaterial with great potential for applications in wound healing due to its low silver content, sustained silver nanoparticle release and biocompatibility. PMID:24933510

  13. Minimization of chloroplast contamination in 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing of insect herbivore bacterial communities

    PubMed Central

    Hanshew, Alissa S.; Mason, Charles J.; Raffa, Kenneth F.; Currie, Cameron R.

    2014-01-01

    Chloroplast sequence contamination in 16S ribosomal RNA gene (16S) analyses can be particularly problematic when sampling microbial communities in plants and folivorous arthropods. We previously encountered high levels of plastid contamination in herbivorous insect samples when we used the predominant 454 pyrosequencing 16S methodologies described in the literature. 799F, a primer previously found to exclude chloroplast sequences, was modified to enhance its efficacy, and we describe, in detail, our methodology throughout amplicon pyrosequencing. Thirteen versions of 799F were assessed for the exclusion of chloroplast sequences from our samples. We found that a shift in the mismatch between 799F and chloroplast 16S resulted in significant reduction of chloroplast reads. Our results also indicate that amplifying sequences from environmental samples in a two-step PCR process, with the addition of the multiplex identifiers and 454 adapters in a second round of PCR, further improved primer specificity. Primers that included 3? phosphorothioate bonds, which were designed to block primer degradation, did not amplify consistently across samples. The different forward primers do not appear to bias the bacterial communities detected. We provide a methodological framework for reducing chloroplast reads in high-throughput sequencing data sets that can be applied to a number of environmental samples and sequencing techniques. PMID:23968645

  14. Quantifying the sequence–function relation in gene silencing by bacterial small RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Yue; Zhang, Zhongge J.; Erickson, David W.; Huang, Min; Huang, Yingwu; Li, Junbai; Hwa, Terence; Shi, Hualin

    2011-01-01

    Sequence–function relations for small RNA (sRNA)-mediated gene silencing were quantified for the sRNA RyhB and some of its mRNA targets in Escherichia coli. Numerous mutants of RyhB and its targets were generated and their in vivo functions characterized at various levels of target and RyhB expression. Although a core complementary region is required for repression by RyhB, variations in the complementary sequences of the core region gave rise to a continuum of repression strengths, correlated exponentially with the computed free energy of RyhB-target duplex formation. Moreover, sequence variations in the linker region known to interact with the RNA chaperone Hfq also gave rise to a continuum of repression strengths, correlated exponentially with the computed energy cost of keeping the linker region open. These results support the applicability of the thermodynamic model in predicting sRNA–mRNA interaction and suggest that sequences at these locations may be used to fine-tune the degree of repression. Surprisingly, a truncated RyhB without the Hfq-binding region is found to repress multiple targets of the wild-type RyhB effectively, both in the presence and absence of Hfq, even though the former is required for the activity of wild-type RyhB itself. These findings challenge the commonly accepted model concerning the function of Hfq in gene silencing—both in providing stability to the sRNAs and in catalyzing the target mRNAs to take on active conformations—and raise the intriguing question of why many endogenous sRNAs subject their functions to Hfq-dependences. PMID:21742981

  15. Cyclic AMP Receptor Protein Regulates cspD, a Bacterial Toxin Gene, in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Deeksha M.; Jawali, Narendra

    2014-01-01

    cspD, a member of cspA family of cold shock genes in Escherichia coli, is not induced during cold shock. Its expression is induced during stationary phase. CspD inhibits DNA replication, and a high level of the protein is toxic to cells. Recently, CspD was proposed to be associated with persister cell formation in E. coli. Here, we show that cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) upregulates cspD transcription. Sequence analysis of the cspD upstream region revealed two tandem CRP target sites, CRP site-I (the proximal site centered at ?83.5 with respect to the transcription start) and CRP site-II (the distal site centered at ?112.5). The results from electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that CRP indeed binds to these two target sites in PcspD. The promoter-proximal CRP target site was found to play a major role in PcspD activation by CRP, as studied by transcriptional fusions carrying mutations in the target sites. The results from in vitro transcription assays demonstrated that CRP activates PcspD transcription in the absence of additional factors other than RNA polymerase. The requirement for activating region 1 of CRP in PcspD activation, along with the involvement of the 287, 265, and 261 determinants of the ?-CTD, suggest that CRP activates by a class I-type mechanism. However, only moderate activation in vitro was observed compared to high activation in vivo, suggesting there might be additional activators of PcspD. Overall, our findings show that CRP, a global metabolic regulator in E. coli, activates a gene potentially related to persistence. PMID:24509317

  16. Cyclic AMP receptor protein regulates cspD, a bacterial toxin gene, in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Uppal, Sheetal; Shetty, Deeksha M; Jawali, Narendra

    2014-04-01

    cspD, a member of cspA family of cold shock genes in Escherichia coli, is not induced during cold shock. Its expression is induced during stationary phase. CspD inhibits DNA replication, and a high level of the protein is toxic to cells. Recently, CspD was proposed to be associated with persister cell formation in E. coli. Here, we show that cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) upregulates cspD transcription. Sequence analysis of the cspD upstream region revealed two tandem CRP target sites, CRP site-I (the proximal site centered at -83.5 with respect to the transcription start) and CRP site-II (the distal site centered at -112.5). The results from electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that CRP indeed binds to these two target sites in PcspD. The promoter-proximal CRP target site was found to play a major role in PcspD activation by CRP, as studied by transcriptional fusions carrying mutations in the target sites. The results from in vitro transcription assays demonstrated that CRP activates PcspD transcription in the absence of additional factors other than RNA polymerase. The requirement for activating region 1 of CRP in PcspD activation, along with the involvement of the 287, 265, and 261 determinants of the ?-CTD, suggest that CRP activates by a class I-type mechanism. However, only moderate activation in vitro was observed compared to high activation in vivo, suggesting there might be additional activators of PcspD. Overall, our findings show that CRP, a global metabolic regulator in E. coli, activates a gene potentially related to persistence. PMID:24509317

  17. Molecular biology of bacterial bioluminescence.

    PubMed Central

    Meighen, E A

    1991-01-01

    The cloning and expression of the lux genes from different luminescent bacteria including marine and terrestrial species have led to significant advances in our knowledge of the molecular biology of bacterial bioluminescence. All lux operons have a common gene organization of luxCDAB(F)E, with luxAB coding for luciferase and luxCDE coding for the fatty acid reductase complex responsible for synthesizing fatty aldehydes for the luminescence reaction, whereas significant differences exist in their sequences and properties as well as in the presence of other lux genes (I, R, F, G, and H). Recognition of the regulatory genes as well as diffusible metabolites that control the growth-dependent induction of luminescence (autoinducers) in some species has advanced our understanding of this unique regulatory mechanism in which the autoinducers appear to serve as sensors of the chemical or nutritional environment. The lux genes have now been transferred into a variety of different organisms to generate new luminescent species. Naturally dark bacteria containing the luxCDABE and luxAB genes, respectively, are luminescent or emit light on addition of aldehyde. Fusion of the luxAB genes has also allowed the expression of luciferase under a single promoter in eukaryotic systems. The ability to express the lux genes in a variety of prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms and the ease and sensitivity of the luminescence assay demonstrate the considerable potential of the widespread application of the lux genes as reporters of gene expression and metabolic function. Images PMID:2030669

  18. Cotton plants transformed with a bacterial degradation gene are protected from accidental spray drift damage by the herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bruce R. Lyon; Yvonne L. Cousins; Danny J. Llewellyn; Elizabeth S. Dennis

    1993-01-01

    The agronomic performance of broad leaved crop plants such as cotton would be greatly improved if genetically-engineered resistance to broadleaf herbicides could both protect the plants from accidental spray drift damage and allow the suppression of problem broadleaf weeds by chemical means. Followingin vitro modification and the addition of plant expression signals, the gene for 2,4-D monooxygenase, a bacterial enzyme

  19. Analysis of mer Gene Subclasses within Bacterial Communities in Soils and Sediments Resolved by Fluorescent-PCR-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Profiling

    Microsoft Academic Search

    KENNETH D. BRUCE

    1997-01-01

    Bacterial mer (mercury resistance) gene subclasses in mercury-polluted and pristine natural environments have been profiled by Fluorescent-PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (FluRFLP). For FluRFLP, PCR products were amplified from individual mer operons in mercury-resistant bacteria and from DNA isolated directly from bacteria in soil and sediment samples. The primers used to amplify DNA were designed from consensus sequences of the major

  20. EVALUATION OF BIOTIC AND TREATMENT FACTORS RELATING TO BACTERIAL CONTROL OF ZEBRA MUSSELS

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel P. Molloy

    2002-04-30

    Testing over the last quarter has indicated the following regarding control of zebra mussels with bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens strain CL0145A: (1) the concentration of bacteria suspended in water is directly correlated with mussel kill; (2) the ratio of bacterial mass per mussel, if too low, could limit mussel kill; a treatment must be done at a high enough ratio so that mussels do not deplete all the suspended bacteria before the end of the desired exposure period; (3) bacteria appear to lose almost all their toxicity after suspension for 24 hr in highly oxygenated water; (4) in a recirculating pipe system, the same percentage mussel kill will be achieved irrespective of whether all the bacteria are applied at once or divided up and applied intermittently in smaller quantities over a 10-hr period. Since this is the fourth quarterly report, a summation of all test results over the last twelve months is provided as a table in this report. The table includes the above-mentioned fourth-quarter results.

  1. Traffic Control of Bacteria-Derived Molecules: A New System of Host-Bacterial Crosstalk

    PubMed Central

    Konishi, Hiroaki; Fujiya, Mikihiro; Kohgo, Yutaka

    2013-01-01

    Virulent microorganisms, such as pathogenic bacteria and viruses, are recognized by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), including toll-like receptors (TLRs) and nucleotide-binding oligomerization-domain proteins (NODs), and induce inflammatory responses in mammalian hosts. Conversely, commensal bacteria and probiotics, which symbiotically confer health benefits on the host organisms, can lodge in the host intestinal tract without inducing intestinal inflammation. Recent advances in investigations concerning host-microbial interactions have shown that some effector molecules secreted from beneficial bacteria activate cell survival pathways, such as those mediated by p38 MAPK and Akt, and bring health benefits to mammalian hosts. It is noteworthy that such bacteria-derived molecules are taken into the intestinal epithelia through a transport or endocytosis system, thereafter exhibiting their beneficial effects. Understanding this traffic control process can aid in the comprehension of host and microbe interactions and may provide new insight to clarify the pathogenesis of intestinal disorders. This paper highlights the intestinal trafficking systems of bacteria-derived molecules that affect the bacterial functions and modulate epithelial signaling cascades. The latter mechanism may contribute to the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis by improving the host damage induced by virulence factors and various disease states. PMID:23606846

  2. A Novel Bacterial Pathogen of Biomphalaria glabrata: A Potential Weapon for Schistosomiasis Control?

    PubMed Central

    Duval, David; Galinier, Richard; Mouahid, Gabriel; Toulza, Eve; Allienne, Jean François; Portela, Julien; Calvayrac, Christophe; Rognon, Anne; Arancibia, Nathalie; Mitta, Guillaume; Théron, André; Gourbal, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Background Schistosomiasis is the second-most widespread tropical parasitic disease after malaria. Various research strategies and treatment programs for achieving the objective of eradicating schistosomiasis within a decade have been recommended and supported by the World Health Organization. One of these approaches is based on the control of snail vectors in endemic areas. Previous field studies have shown that competitor or predator introduction can reduce snail numbers, but no systematic investigation has ever been conducted to identify snail microbial pathogens and evaluate their molluscicidal effects. Methodology/Principal findings In populations of Biomphalaria glabrata snails experiencing high mortalities, white nodules were visible on snail bodies. Infectious agents were isolated from such nodules. Only one type of bacteria, identified as a new species of Paenibacillus named Candidatus Paenibacillus glabratella, was found, and was shown to be closely related to P. alvei through 16S and Rpob DNA analysis. Histopathological examination showed extensive bacterial infiltration leading to overall tissue disorganization. Exposure of healthy snails to Paenibacillus-infected snails caused massive mortality. Moreover, eggs laid by infected snails were also infected, decreasing hatching but without apparent effects on spawning. Embryonic lethality was correlated with the presence of pathogenic bacteria in eggs. Conclusions/Significance This is the first account of a novel Paenibacillus strain, Ca. Paenibacillus glabratella, as a snail microbial pathogen. Since this strain affects both adult and embryonic stages and causes significant mortality, it may hold promise as a biocontrol agent to limit schistosomiasis transmission in the field. PMID:25719489

  3. Uptake and expression of bacterial and cyanobacterial genes by isolated cucumber etioplasts.

    PubMed Central

    Daniell, H; McFadden, B A

    1987-01-01

    The uptake and expression by plastids isolated from dark-grown cucumber cotyledons (etioplasts) of two pUC derivatives, pCS75 and pUC9-CM, respectively carrying genes for the large small subunits of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase of Anacystis nidulans or chloramphenicol acetyltransferase, is reported. Untreated etioplasts take up only 3% as much DNA as that taken up by EDTA-washed etioplasts after 2 hr of incubation with nick-translated [32P]-pCS75. The presence or absence of light does not affect DNA uptake, binding, or breakdown by etioplasts. Calcium or magnesium ions inhibit DNA uptake by 86% but enhance binding (23-200%) and breakdown (163-235%) of donor DNA by EDTA-treated etioplasts. Uncouplers that abolish membrane potential (delta psi), transmembrane proton gradient (delta pH), or both do not affect DNA uptake, binding, or breakdown by etioplast. However, both DNA uptake and binding are severely inhibited by ATP. Presumably this results from the hydrolysis of ATP, because the poorly hydrolyzable analog adenyl-5'-yl imidodiphosphate does not inhibit the uptake or binding of DNA by etioplasts. beta-Lactamase specified by the ampicillin resistance gene of pCS75 can be detected only in EDTA-treated etioplasts that have been incubated with the plasmid pCS75. After the incubation of EDTA-treated etioplasts with pCS75, immunoprecipitation using antiserum to the small subunit of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from A. nidulans reveals the synthesis of small subunits; these are smaller by 2 kDa than the cucumber small subunit encoded by the nuclear genome. Treatment of etioplasts with 10 mM EDTA shows a 10-min duration to be optimal for the expression of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase encoded by pUC9-CM. A progressive increase in the expression of this enzyme is observed with an increase in the concentration of pUC9-CM in the DNA uptake medium. The plasmid-dependent incorporation of [35S]methionine by EDTA-treated organelles declines markedly during cotyledon greening in vivo. Images PMID:3114748

  4. Evaluation of environmental bacterial contamination and procedures to control cross infection in a sample of Italian dental surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Monarca, S.; Grottolo, M.; Renzi, D.; Paganelli, C.; Sapelli, P.; Zerbini, I.; Nardi, G.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To perform a pilot study on bacterial contamination in some dental surgeries (n=51) in a local health unit in Brescia (Lombardy Region, Italy) and to evaluate the procedures to control cross infection used by the personnel to reduce the risk of infection in dental practice.?METHODS—A survey was carried out by interviewing 133 dental personnel with a questionnaire on the procedures used to control infection. The autoclaves, chemical baths (chemiclaves), and ovens present in the surgeries were tested for sterilisation efficiency with a spore test, and already packed and sterilised instruments were randomly sampled and tested for sterility. Microbial contamination of air, surface, and dental unit water samples were also studied.?RESULTS—The dental personnel did not generally follow the principal procedures for infection control: 30% of personnel were not vaccinated against hepatitis B virus, infected instruments were often not decontaminated, periodic checks of autoclave efficiency were lacking, and the knowledge of disinfection mechanisms and procedures was incomplete. High bacteriological contamination of water at dental surgeries was often found and total bacteriological counts in air samples were high. Surface studies showed widespread bacterial contamination.?CONCLUSIONS—On the basis of these results, an educational programme for the prevention of infective hazards has been prepared and carried out. The results of this pilot study will be used for planning a national survey.???Keywords: dental surgeries; bacterial contamination; cross infection control procedures PMID:11024194

  5. Copper resistance gene homologs in pathogenic and saprophytic bacterial species from tomato.

    PubMed

    Cooksey, D A; Azad, H R; Cha, J S; Lim, C K

    1990-02-01

    Copper-resistant strains of Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria, Pseudomonas cichorii, Pseudomonas putida, Pseudomonas fluorescens, and a yellow Pseudomonas sp. were isolated from tomato plants or seeds. In Southern hybridizations, DNA from each strain showed homology with the copper resistance (cop) operon previously cloned from Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato PT23. Homology was associated with plasmid and chromosomal DNA in X. compestris pv. vesicatoria, P. putida, and the yellow Pseudomonas sp. Homology was detected only in the chromosomal DNA of P. cichorii and P. fluorescens. Homology with cop was also detected in chromosomal DNA from copper-sensitive strains of P. cichorii, P. fluorescens, and P. syringae pv. tomato, suggesting that the cop homolog may be indigenous to certain Pseudomonas species and have some function other than copper resistance. No homology was detected in DNA from a copper-sensitive X. campestris pv. vesicatoria strain. Copper-inducible protein products were detected in each copper-resistant bacterium by immunoblot analysis with antibodies raised to the CopB protein from the cop operon. The role of the homologous DNA in copper resistance was confirmed for the X. campestris pv. vesicatoria strain by cloning and transferring the cop homolog to a copper-sensitive strain of X. campestris pv. vesicatoria. The possibility and implications of copper resistance gene exchange between different species and genera of pathogenic and saprophytic bacteria on tomato plants are discussed. PMID:16348118

  6. Modeling and validation of autoinducer-mediated bacterial gene expression in microfluidic environments

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Caitlin M.; Stoy, William; Su, Peter; Harber, Marie C.; Bardill, J. Patrick; Hammer, Brian K.; Forest, Craig R.

    2014-01-01

    Biosensors exploiting communication within genetically engineered bacteria are becoming increasingly important for monitoring environmental changes. Currently, there are a variety of mathematical models for understanding and predicting how genetically engineered bacteria respond to molecular stimuli in these environments, but as sensors have miniaturized towards microfluidics and are subjected to complex time-varying inputs, the shortcomings of these models have become apparent. The effects of microfluidic environments such as low oxygen concentration, increased biofilm encapsulation, diffusion limited molecular distribution, and higher population densities strongly affect rate constants for gene expression not accounted for in previous models. We report a mathematical model that accurately predicts the biological response of the autoinducer N-acyl homoserine lactone-mediated green fluorescent protein expression in reporter bacteria in microfluidic environments by accommodating these rate constants. This generalized mass action model considers a chain of biomolecular events from input autoinducer chemical to fluorescent protein expression through a series of six chemical species. We have validated this model against experimental data from our own apparatus as well as prior published experimental results. Results indicate accurate prediction of dynamics (e.g., 14% peak time error from a pulse input) and with reduced mean-squared error with pulse or step inputs for a range of concentrations (10??M–30??M). This model can help advance the design of genetically engineered bacteria sensors and molecular communication devices. PMID:25379076

  7. Abundance and diversity of bacterial nitrifiers and denitrifiers and their functional genes in tannery wastewater treatment plants revealed by high-throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhu; Zhang, Xu-Xiang; Lu, Xin; Liu, Bo; Li, Yan; Long, Chao; Li, Aimin

    2014-01-01

    Biological nitrification/denitrification is frequently used to remove nitrogen from tannery wastewater containing high concentrations of ammonia. However, information is limited about the bacterial nitrifiers and denitrifiers and their functional genes in tannery wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) due to the low-throughput of the previously used methods. In this study, 454 pyrosequencing and Illumina high-throughput sequencing, combined with molecular methods, were used to comprehensively characterize structures and functions of nitrification and denitrification bacterial communities in aerobic and anaerobic sludge of two full-scale tannery WWTPs. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes showed that Proteobacteria and Synergistetes dominated in the aerobic and anaerobic sludge, respectively. Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) amoA gene cloning revealed that Nitrosomonas europaea dominated the ammonia-oxidizing community in the WWTPs. Metagenomic analysis showed that the denitrifiers mainly included the genera of Thauera, Paracoccus, Hyphomicrobium, Comamonas and Azoarcus, which may greatly contribute to the nitrogen removal in the two WWTPs. It is interesting that AOB and ammonia-oxidizing archaea had low abundance although both WWTPs demonstrated high ammonium removal efficiency. Good correlation between the qPCR and metagenomic analysis is observed for the quantification of functional genes amoA, nirK, nirS and nosZ, indicating that the metagenomic approach may be a promising method used to comprehensively investigate the abundance of functional genes of nitrifiers and denitrifiers in the environment. PMID:25420093

  8. Proteomic analysis of resistance mediated by Rcm 2.0 and Rcm 5.1, two loci controlling resistance to bacterial canker of tomato.

    PubMed

    Coaker, Gitta L; Willard, Belinda; Kinter, Michael; Stockinger, Eric J; Francis, David M

    2004-09-01

    Two quantitative trait loci from Lycopersicon hirsutum, Rcm 2.0 and Rcm 5.1, control resistance to Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis, the causal agent of bacterial canker of tomato. Lines containing Rcm 2.0 and Rcm 5.1 and a susceptible control line were compared at 72 and 144 h postinoculation, using 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis to identify proteins regulated in response to C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis infection. A total of 47 proteins were subjected to tandem mass spectrometry. Database queries with resulting spectra identified tomato genes for 26 proteins. The remaining 21 proteins were either identified in other species or possessed no homology to known proteins. Spectra were interpreted to deduce peptide amino acid sequences that were then used to query publicly available data. This approach identified tomato genes or expressed sequence tags for 44 of the proteins analyzed. Three superoxide dismutase (SOD) enzymes were differentially regulated among genotypes, and patterns of hydrogen peroxide accumulation were genotype- and tissue-specific, indicating a role for oxidative stress in response to C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis. Steady-state mRNA and protein levels for SOD, thioredoxin M-type, S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase, and pathogenesis-related proteins demonstrated similar patterns of differential regulation. Lines containing Rcm 2.0 and Rcm 5.1 accumulate different proteins and steady-state mRNAs in response to inoculation, suggesting that the two loci may confer resistance through distinct mechanisms. PMID:15384492

  9. Evaluation of real-time PCR endogenous control genes for analysis of gene expression in bovine endometrium

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Caroline G; Meier, Susanne; Mitchell, Murray D; Roche, John R; Littlejohn, Mathew

    2009-01-01

    Background Quantitative real-time PCR gene expression results are generally normalised using endogenous control genes. These reference genes should be expressed at a constant level across all sample groups in a study, and should not be influenced by study treatments or conditions. There has been no systematic investigation of endogenous control genes for bovine endometrium to date. The suitability of both commonly used and novel endogenous control genes was evaluated in this study, with the latter being selected from stably expressed transcripts identified through microarray analysis of bovine endometrium. Fifteen candidate endogenous control genes were assessed across different tissue subtypes in pregnant and cycling Holstein-Friesian dairy cows from two divergent genetic backgrounds. Results The expression profiles of five commonly used endogenous control genes (GAPDH, PPIA, RPS9, RPS15A, and UXT) and 10 experimentally derived candidate endogenous control genes (SUZ12, C2ORF29, ZNF131, ACTR1A, HDAC1, SLC30A6, CNOT7, DNAJC17, BBS2, and RANBP10) were analysed across 44 samples to determine the most stably expressed gene. Gene stability was assessed using the statistical algorithms GeNorm and Normfinder. All genes presented with low overall variability (0.87 to 1.48% CV of Cq). However, when used to normalise a differentially expressed gene (oxytocin receptor - OXTR) in the samples, the reported relative gene expression levels were significantly affected by the control gene chosen. Based on the results of this analysis, SUZ12 is proposed as the most appropriate control gene for use in bovine endometrium during early pregnancy or the oestrus cycle. Conclusion This study establishes the suitability of novel endogenous control genes for comparing expression levels in endometrial tissues of pregnant and cycling bovines, and demonstrates the utility of microarray analysis as a method for identifying endogenous control gene candidates. PMID:19878604

  10. Detection of Pneumocystis DNA in samples from patients suspected of bacterial pneumonia- a case-control study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jannik Helweg-Larsen; Jørgen Skov Jensen; Birthe Dohn; Thomas L Benfield; Bettina Lundgren

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pneumocystis jiroveci (formerly known as P. carinii f.sp. hominis) is an opportunistic fungus that causes Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) in immunocompromised individuals. Pneumocystis jiroveci can be detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). To investigate the clinical importance of a positive Pneumocystis-PCR among HIV-uninfected patients suspected of bacterial pneumonia, a retrospective matched case-control study was conducted. METHODS: Respiratory samples from 367

  11. The role of bacterial biofilm in persistent infections and control strategies

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li; Wen, Yu-mei

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms can be viewed as a specific type of persistent bacterial infection. After initial invasion, microbes can attach to living and non-living surfaces, such as prosthetics and indwelling medical devices, and form a biofilm composed of extracellular polysaccharides, proteins, and other components. In hosts, biofilm formation may trigger drug resistance and inflammation, resulting in persistent infections. The clinical aspects of biofilm formation and leading strategies for biofilm inhibitors will be discussed in this mini-review. PMID:21485310

  12. Resource availability and spatial heterogeneity control bacterial community response to nutrient enrichment in lakes.

    PubMed

    Jankowski, Kathijo; Schindler, Daniel E; Horner-Devine, M Claire

    2014-01-01

    The diversity and composition of ecological communities often co-vary with ecosystem productivity. However, the relative importance of productivity, or resource abundance, versus the spatial distribution of resources in shaping those ecological patterns is not well understood, particularly for the bacterial communities that underlie most important ecosystem functions. Increasing ecosystem productivity in lakes has been shown to influence the composition and ecology of bacterial communities, but existing work has only evaluated the effect of increasing resource supply and not heterogeneity in how those resources are distributed. We quantified how bacterial communities varied with the trophic status of lakes and whether community responses differed in surface and deep habitats in response to heterogeneity in nutrient resources. Using ARISA fingerprinting, we found that bacterial communities were more abundant, richer, and more distinct among habitats as lake trophic state and vertical heterogeneity in nutrients increased, and that spatial resource variation produced habitat specific responses of bacteria in response to increased productivity. Furthermore, changes in communities in high nutrient lakes were not produced by turnover in community composition but from additional taxa augmenting core bacterial communities found in lower productivity lakes. These data suggests that bacterial community responses to nutrient enrichment in lakes vary spatially and are likely influenced disproportionately by rare taxa. PMID:24489823

  13. Bacterial Community Shift in Treated Periodontitis Patients Revealed by Ion Torrent 16S rRNA Gene Amplicon Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Jünemann, Sebastian; Prior, Karola; Szczepanowski, Rafael; Harks, Inga; Ehmke, Benjamin; Goesmann, Alexander; Stoye, Jens; Harmsen, Dag

    2012-01-01

    Periodontitis, one of the most common diseases in the world, is caused by a mixture of pathogenic bacteria and inflammatory host responses and often treated by antimicrobials as an adjunct to scaling and root planing (SRP). Our study aims to elucidate explorative and descriptive temporal shifts in bacterial communities between patients treated by SRP alone versus SRP plus antibiotics. This is the first metagenomic study using an Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine (PGM). Eight subgingival plaque samples from four patients with chronic periodontitis, taken before and two months after intervention were analyzed. Amplicons from the V6 hypervariable region of the 16S rRNA gene were generated and sequenced each on a 314 chip. Sequencing reads were clustered into operational taxonomic units (OTUs, 3% distance), described by community metrics, and taxonomically classified. Reads ranging from 599,933 to 650,416 per sample were clustered into 1,648 to 2,659 non-singleton OTUs, respectively. Increased diversity (Shannon and Simpson) in all samples after therapy was observed regardless of the treatment type whereas richness (ACE) showed no correlation. Taxonomic analysis revealed different microbial shifts between both therapy approaches at all taxonomic levels. Most remarkably, the genera Porphyromonas, Tannerella, Treponema, and Filifactor all harboring periodontal pathogenic species were removed almost only in the group treated with SPR and antibiotics. For the species T. forsythia and P. gingivalis results were corroborated by real-time PCR analysis. In the future, hypothesis free metagenomic analysis could be the key in understanding polymicrobial diseases and be used for therapy monitoring. Therefore, as read length continues to increase and cost to decrease, rapid benchtop sequencers like the PGM might finally be used in routine diagnostic. PMID:22870235

  14. Transgenic gene silencing strategies for virus control

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. G. Dietzgen; N. Mitter

    2006-01-01

    Co-suppression of transgenes and their homologous viral sequences by RNA silencing is a powerful strategy for achieving high-level\\u000a virus resistance in plants. This review provides a brief overview of RNA silencing mechanisms in plants and discusses important\\u000a transgene construct design features underpinning successful RNA silencing-mediated transgenic virus control. Application of\\u000a those strategies to protect horticultural and field crops from virus

  15. Bacterial diversity and real-time PCR based assessment of linA and linB gene distribution at hexachlorocyclohexane contaminated sites.

    PubMed

    Lal, Devi; Jindal, Swati; Kumari, Hansi; Jit, Simran; Nigam, Aeshna; Sharma, Pooja; Kumari, Kirti; Lal, Rup

    2015-03-01

    The disposal of hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) muck has created large number of HCH dumpsites all over the world from where the harmful HCH isomers are leaking into the environment. Bacteria have evolved at such contaminated sites that have the ability to degrade HCH. Degradation of various HCH isomers in bacterial strains is mediated primarily by two genes: linA and linB which encode dehydrochlorinase and haloalkane dehalogenase respectively. In this study we explored one such highly contaminated HCH dumpsite located in Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India. To assess the biostimulation potential of the contaminated site, microbial diversity study and real-time PCR based quantification of lin genes was carried out. The soil samples from dumpsite and surrounding areas were found to be highly contaminated with HCH residue levels as high as 1.8?×?10(5) ?mg?kg(-1). The residues were detected in areas upto 13?km from the dumpsite. Sphingomonads, Chromohalobacter, and Marinobacter were the dominant genera present at the dump-site. Role of Sphingomonads in HCH degradation has been well documented. The highest copy numbers of linA and linB genes as determined using real-time PCR were 6.2?×?10(4) and 5.3?×?10(5), respectively, were found in sample from the dump site. The presence of Sphingomonads, linA, and linB genes from HCH contaminated soil indicates the presence of indigenous bacterial communities capable of HCH degradation. PMID:24002962

  16. Bacterial feeding induces changes in immune-related gene expression and has trans-generational impacts in the cabbage looper (Trichoplusia ni)

    PubMed Central

    Freitak, Dalial; Heckel, David G; Vogel, Heiko

    2009-01-01

    Background Poly- and oligophagous insects are able to feed on various host plants with a wide range of defense strategies. However, diverse food plants are also inhabited by microbiota differing in quality and quantity, posing a potential challenge for immune system mediated homeostasis in the herbivore. Recent studies highlight the complex interactions between environmentally encountered microorganisms and herbivorous insects, pointing to a potential adaptational alteration of the insects' physiology. We performed a differential gene expression analysis in whole larvae and eggs laid by parents grown on different diets to identify potential novel genes related to elevated microbial content in the caterpillars' food. Results We used GeneFishing, a novel differential display method, to study the effects of dietary bacteria on the general gene expression in different life stages and tissues of the cabbage looper (Trichoplusia ni). We were able to visualize several hundred transcripts on agarose gels, one fifth of which were differentially expressed between treatments. The largest number of differentially expressed genes was found in defense-related processes (13) and in recognition and metabolism (16). 21 genes were picked out and further tested for differential gene expression by an independent method (qRT-PCR) in various tissues of larvae grown on bacterial and bacteria-free diet, and also in adults. We detected a number of genes indicative of an altered physiological status of the insect, depending on the diet, developmental stage and tissue. Conclusion Changes in immune status are accompanied by specific changes in the transcript levels of genes connected to metabolism and homeostasis of the organism. Our findings show that larval feeding on bacteria-rich diet leads to substantial gene expression changes, potentially resulting in a reorganization of the insects' metabolism to maintain organismal homeostasis, not only in the larval but also in the adult stage. Furthermore, differences in gene expression levels can also be seen in the next generation, strongly influenced by parental diet. PMID:19422678

  17. Bacterial Community Composition in the Gut Content and Ambient Sediment of Sea Cucumber Apostichopus japonicus Revealed by 16S rRNA Gene Pyrosequencing

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Fei; Li, Fenghui; Tan, Jie; Yan, Jingping; Sun, Huiling

    2014-01-01

    The composition of the bacterial communities in the contents of the foregut and hindgut of the sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus and in the ambient surface sediment was surveyed by 16S rRNA gene 454-pyrosequencing. A total of 188,623 optimized reads and 15,527 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were obtained from the ten gut contents samples and four surface sediment samples. The sequences in the sediments, foregut contents, and hindgut contents were assigned to 38.0±4.7, 31.2±6.2 and 27.8±6.5 phyla, respectively. The bacterial richness and Shannon diversity index were both higher in the ambient sediments than in the gut contents. Proteobacteria was the predominant phylum in both the gut contents and sediment samples. The predominant classes in the foregut, hindgut, and ambient sediment were Holophagae and Gammaproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria, and Gammaproteobacteria and Deltaproteobacteria, respectively. The potential probiotics, including sequences related to Bacillus, lactic acid bacteria (Lactobacillus, Lactococcus, and Streptococcus) and Pseudomonas were detected in the gut of A. japonicus. Principle component analysis and heatmap figure showed that the foregut, hindgut, and ambient sediment respectively harbored different characteristic bacterial communities. Selective feeding of A. japonicus may be the primary source of the different bacterial communities between the foregut contents and ambient sediments. PMID:24967593

  18. A bacterial artificial chromosome contig spanning the major domestication locus Q in wheat and identification of a candidate gene.

    PubMed Central

    Faris, Justin D; Fellers, John P; Brooks, Steven A; Gill, Bikram S

    2003-01-01

    The Q locus played a major role in the domestication of wheat because it confers the free-threshing character and influences many other agronomically important traits. We constructed a physical contig spanning the Q locus using a Triticum monococcum BAC library. Three chromosome walking steps were performed by complete sequencing of BACs and identification of low-copy markers through similarity searches of database sequences. The BAC contig spans a physical distance of approximately 300 kb corresponding to a genetic distance of 0.9 cM. The physical map of T. monococcum had perfect colinearity with the genetic map of wheat chromosome arm 5AL. Recombination data in conjunction with analysis of fast neutron deletions confirmed that the contig spanned the Q locus. The Q gene was narrowed to a 100-kb segment, which contains an APETALA2 (AP2)-like gene that cosegregates with Q. AP2 is known to play a major role in controlling floral homeotic gene expression and thus is an excellent candidate for Q. PMID:12750342

  19. Mountain pine beetles colonizing historical and naive host trees are associated with a bacterial community highly enriched in genes contributing to terpene metabolism.

    PubMed

    Adams, Aaron S; Aylward, Frank O; Adams, Sandye M; Erbilgin, Nadir; Aukema, Brian H; Currie, Cameron R; Suen, Garret; Raffa, Kenneth F

    2013-06-01

    The mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae, is a subcortical herbivore native to western North America that can kill healthy conifers by overcoming host tree defenses, which consist largely of high terpene concentrations. The mechanisms by which these beetles contend with toxic compounds are not well understood. Here, we explore a component of the hypothesis that beetle-associated bacterial symbionts contribute to the ability of D. ponderosae to overcome tree defenses by assisting with terpene detoxification. Such symbionts may facilitate host tree transitions during range expansions currently being driven by climate change. For example, this insect has recently breached the historical geophysical barrier of the Canadian Rocky Mountains, providing access to näive tree hosts and unprecedented connectivity to eastern forests. We use culture-independent techniques to describe the bacterial community associated with D. ponderosae beetles and their galleries from their historical host, Pinus contorta, and their more recent host, hybrid P. contorta-Pinus banksiana. We show that these communities are enriched with genes involved in terpene degradation compared with other plant biomass-processing microbial communities. These pine beetle microbial communities are dominated by members of the genera Pseudomonas, Rahnella, Serratia, and Burkholderia, and the majority of genes involved in terpene degradation belong to these genera. Our work provides the first metagenome of bacterial communities associated with a bark beetle and is consistent with a potential microbial contribution to detoxification of tree defenses needed to survive the subcortical environment. PMID:23542624

  20. Identification of the Streptococcus gordonii glmM gene encoding phosphoglucosamine mutase and its role in bacterial cell morphology, biofilm formation, and sensitivity to antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Shimazu, Kisaki; Takahashi, Yukihiro; Uchikawa, Yoshimori; Shimazu, Yoshihito; Yajima, Ayako; Takashima, Eizo; Aoba, Takaaki; Konishi, Kiyoshi

    2008-07-01

    Phosphoglucosamine mutase (EC 5.4.2.10) catalyzes the interconversion of glucosamine-6-phosphate into glucosamine-1-phosphate, an essential step in the biosynthetic pathway leading to the formation of peptidoglycan precursor uridine 5'-diphospho-N-acetylglucosamine. The gene (glmM) of Escherichia coli encoding the enzyme has been identified previously. We have now identified a glmM homolog in Streptococcus gordonii, an early colonizer on the human tooth and an important cause of infective endocarditis, and have confirmed that the gene encodes phosphoglucosamine mutase by assaying the enzymatic activity of the recombinant GlmM protein. Insertional glmM mutant of S. gordonii did not produce GlmM, and had a growth rate that was approximately half that of the wild type. Morphological analyses clearly indicated that the glmM mutation causes marked elongation of the streptococcal chains, enlargement of bacterial cells, and increased roughness of the bacterial cell surface. Furthermore, the glmM mutation reduces biofilm formation and increases sensitivity to penicillins relative to wild type. All of these phenotypic changes were also observed in a glmM deletion mutant, and were restored by the complementation with plasmid-borne glmM. These results suggest that, in S. gordonii, mutations in glmM appear to influence bacterial cell growth and morphology, biofilm formation, and sensitivity to penicillins. PMID:18462386

  1. Taxonomic Precision of Different Hypervariable Regions of 16S rRNA Gene and Annotation Methods for Functional Bacterial Groups in Biological Wastewater Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Feng; Ju, Feng; Cai, Lin; Zhang, Tong

    2013-01-01

    High throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA gene leads us into a deeper understanding on bacterial diversity for complex environmental samples, but introduces blurring due to the relatively low taxonomic capability of short read. For wastewater treatment plant, only those functional bacterial genera categorized as nutrient remediators, bulk/foaming species, and potential pathogens are significant to biological wastewater treatment and environmental impacts. Precise taxonomic assignment of these bacteria at least at genus level is important for microbial ecological research and routine wastewater treatment monitoring. Therefore, the focus of this study was to evaluate the taxonomic precisions of different ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene hypervariable regions generated from a mix activated sludge sample. In addition, three commonly used classification methods including RDP Classifier, BLAST-based best-hit annotation, and the lowest common ancestor annotation by MEGAN were evaluated by comparing their consistency. Under an unsupervised way, analysis of consistency among different classification methods suggests there are no hypervariable regions with good taxonomic coverage for all genera. Taxonomic assignment based on certain regions of the 16S rRNA genes, e.g. the V1&V2 regions – provide fairly consistent taxonomic assignment for a relatively wide range of genera. Hence, it is recommended to use these regions for studying functional groups in activated sludge. Moreover, the inconsistency among methods also demonstrated that a specific method might not be suitable for identification of some bacterial genera using certain 16S rRNA gene regions. As a general rule, drawing conclusions based only on one sequencing region and one classification method should be avoided due to the potential false negative results. PMID:24146837

  2. Population-based surveillance for bacterial meningitis in the Dominican Republic: implications for control by vaccination.

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, E.; Peguero, M.; Sanchez, J.; Castellanos, P. L.; Feris, J.; Peña, C.; Brudzinski-LaClaire, L.; Levine, O. S.

    2000-01-01

    Quantifying the local burden of disease is an important step towards the introduction of new vaccines, such as Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) conjugate vaccine. We adapted a generic protocol developed by the World Health Organization for population-based surveillance of bacterial meningitis. All hospitals that admit paediatric patients with meningitis in the National District, Dominican Republic were included in the system and standard laboratory methods were used. The system identified 111 cases of confirmed bacterial meningitis. Hib was the leading cause of bacterial meningitis, followed by group B streptococcus, S. pneumoniae, and N. meningitidis. Unlike hospital-based case series, this population-based system was able to calculate incidence rates. The incidence of Hib meningitis was 13 cases per 100,000 children < 5 years old. The data from this study were used by the Ministry of Health to support the introduction of routine Hib vaccination and will be used to monitor its effectiveness. PMID:11218205

  3. Conserved bacterial RNase YbeY plays key roles in 70S ribosome quality control and 16S rRNA maturation.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Asha Ivy; Köhrer, Caroline; Davies, Bryan William; RajBhandary, Uttam Lal; Walker, Graham Charles

    2013-02-01

    Quality control of ribosomes is critical for cellular function since protein mistranslation leads to severe physiological consequences. We report evidence of a previously unrecognized ribosome quality control system in bacteria that operates at the level of 70S to remove defective ribosomes. YbeY, a previously unidentified endoribonuclease, and the exonuclease RNase R act together by a process mediated specifically by the 30S ribosomal subunit, to degrade defective 70S ribosomes but not properly matured 70S ribosomes or individual subunits. Furthermore, there is essentially no fully matured 16S rRNA in a ?ybeY mutant at 45°C, making YbeY the only endoribonuclease to be implicated in the critically important processing of the 16S rRNA 3' terminus. These key roles in ribosome quality control and maturation indicate why YbeY is a member of the minimal bacterial gene set and suggest that it could be a potential target for antibacterial drugs. PMID:23273979

  4. Transcriptomics of the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae in response to the bacterial antagonist Lysobacter enzymogenes reveals candidate fungal defense response genes.

    PubMed

    Mathioni, Sandra M; Patel, Nrupali; Riddick, Bianca; Sweigard, James A; Czymmek, Kirk J; Caplan, Jeffrey L; Kunjeti, Sridhara G; Kunjeti, Saritha; Raman, Vidhyavathi; Hillman, Bradley I; Kobayashi, Donald Y; Donofrio, Nicole M

    2013-01-01

    Plants and animals have evolved a first line of defense response to pathogens called innate or basal immunity. While basal defenses in these organisms are well studied, there is almost a complete lack of understanding of such systems in fungal species, and more specifically, how they are able to detect and mount a defense response upon pathogen attack. Hence, the goal of the present study was to understand how fungi respond to biotic stress by assessing the transcriptional profile of the rice blast pathogen, Magnaporthe oryzae, when challenged with the bacterial antagonist Lysobacter enzymogenes. Based on microscopic observations of interactions between M. oryzae and wild-type L. enzymogenes strain C3, we selected early and intermediate stages represented by time-points of 3 and 9 hours post-inoculation, respectively, to evaluate the fungal transcriptome using RNA-seq. For comparative purposes, we also challenged the fungus with L. enzymogenes mutant strain DCA, previously demonstrated to be devoid of antifungal activity. A comparison of transcriptional data from fungal interactions with the wild-type bacterial strain C3 and the mutant strain DCA revealed 463 fungal genes that were down-regulated during attack by C3; of these genes, 100 were also found to be up-regulated during the interaction with DCA. Functional categorization of genes in this suite included those with roles in carbohydrate metabolism, cellular transport and stress response. One gene in this suite belongs to the CFEM-domain class of fungal proteins. Another CFEM class protein called PTH11 has been previously characterized, and we found that a deletion in this gene caused advanced lesion development by C3 compared to its growth on the wild-type fungus. We discuss the characterization of this suite of 100 genes with respect to their role in the fungal defense response. PMID:24098512

  5. [Isolation and screening of beneficial endophytic bacteria to control bacterial ring rot of potato].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jun; Sun, Fuzai; Tian, Hongxian; Cui, Lin; Zhao, Tingchang

    2002-06-01

    One hundred and thirty-three bacterial strains were isolated from inner tissue of potato tubers collected from Datong, Taiyuan and Inner Mongolia Autonomous regions. On the basis of antagonistic examination in vitro, greenhouse and field tests, five strains named as 069, 085, 110, 116 and 118 were chosen for their suppression of bacterial ring rot or their growth promotion. Strain 118 is an endophytic bacterium with three effects of colonization, growth promotion and suppression of the pathogenic bacteria, showing good prospects for commercial use. PMID:12557365

  6. RNA Binding Proteins that Control Human Papillomavirus Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Kajitani, Naoko; Schwartz, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) life cycle is strictly linked to the differentiation program of the infected mucosal epithelial cell. In the basal and lower levels of the epithelium, early genes coding for pro-mitotic proteins and viral replication factors are expressed, while terminal cell differentiation is required for activation of late gene expression and production of viral particles at the very top of the epithelium. Such productive infections are normally cleared within 18–24 months. In rare cases, the HPV infection is stuck in the early stage of the infection. Such infections may give rise to cervical lesions that can progress to cancer, primarily cancer of the uterine cervix. Since cancer progression is strictly linked to HPV gene expression, it is of interest to understand how HPV gene expression is regulated. Cis-acting HPV RNA elements and cellular RNA-binding proteins control HPV mRNA splicing and polyadenylation. These interactions are believed to play a particularly important role in the switch from early to late gene expression, thereby contributing to the pathogenesis of HPV. Indeed, it has been shown that the levels of various RNA binding proteins change in response to differentiation and in response to HPV induced cervical lesions and cancer. Here we have compiled published data on RNA binding proteins involved in the regulation of HPV gene expression. PMID:25950509

  7. Transgenic regulation of moth chorion gene promoters in Drosophila: tissue, temporal, and quantitative control of four bidirectional promoters.

    PubMed

    Mitsialis, S A; Veletza, S; Kafatos, F C

    1989-12-01

    Bidirectional chorion gene promoter regions from three silkmoth species, Bombyx mori, Antheraea pernyi, or Antheraea polyphemus (members of two different moth families), were tested for their ability to transcriptionally activate a bacterial marker gene (chloramphenicol acetyltransferase) in transformant Drosophila. Relatively short 5' flanking DNA fragments (272-367 bp) of chorion gene pairs are sufficient to confer a high degree of tissue and choriogenic stage specificity of expression to the marker gene. Thus, significant conservation of molecular interactions controlling transcription during choriogenesis is observed between the distantly related orders, Lepidoptera and Diptera. However, quantitative and fine temporal regulation in the Drosophila host does not fully parallel the in situ regulation in moths, indicating that some regulatory protein-DNA interactions have diversified in the approximately 250 million years since the last common ancestor of these insect groups. Limited in vitro mutagenesis of a B. mori promoter DNA has shown that a central 189-bp region includes elements sufficient for the qualitative specificity of chorion-specific expression. The same experiments have shown that a previously identified essential element, centered on the TCACGT hexamer, is not sufficient for chorion-specific expression: an additional essential element or elements are found farther upstream, within a 112-bp DNA region. Comparisons of silkmoth and Drosophila chorion gene promoter sequences have identified some candidates for cis-acting elements involved in the developmental regulation of chorion gene expression. PMID:2559211

  8. Translational Control of Gene Expression in the Gonadotrope

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Taeshin; Do, Minh-Ha T.; Lawson, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    The study of gene expression in gonadotropes has largely focused on the variety of mechanisms regulating transcription of the gonadotropin genes and ancillary factors that contribute to the overall phenotype and function of these cells in reproduction. However, there are aspects of the response to GNRH signaling that are not readily explained by changes at the level of transcription. As our understanding of regulation at the level of mRNA translation has increased, it has become evident that GNRH receptor signaling engages multiple aspects of translational regulation. This includes activation of cap-dependent translation initiation, translational pausing caused by the unfolded protein response and RNA binding protein interaction. Gonadotropin mRNAs and the mRNAs of other factors that control the transcriptional and signaling responses to GNRH have been identified as targets of regulation at the level of translation. In this review we examine the impact of translational control of the expression of gonadotropin genes and other genes relevant to GNRH-mediated control of gonadotrope function. PMID:24035865

  9. Bacterial Community Composition in Central European Running Waters Examined by Temperature Gradient Gel Electrophoresis and Sequence Analysis of 16S rRNA Genes? †

    PubMed Central

    Beier, Sara; Witzel, Karl-Paul; Marxsen, Jürgen

    2008-01-01

    The bacterial community composition in small streams and a river in central Germany was examined by temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TGGE) with PCR products of 16S rRNA gene fragments and sequence analysis. Complex TGGE band patterns suggested high levels of diversity of bacterial species in all habitats of these environments. Cluster analyses demonstrated distinct differences among the communities in stream and spring water, sandy sediments, biofilms on stones, degrading leaves, and soil. The differences between stream water and sediment were more significant than those between sites within the same habitat along the stretch from the stream source to the mouth. TGGE data from an entire stream course suggest that, in the upper reach of the stream, a special suspended bacterial community is already established and changes only slightly downstream. The bacterial communities in water and sediment in an acidic headwater with a pH below 5 were highly similar to each other but deviated distinctly from the communities at the other sites. As ascertained by nucleotide sequence analysis, stream water communities were dominated by Betaproteobacteria (one-third of the total bacteria), whereas sediment communities were composed mainly of Betaproteobacteria and members of the Fibrobacteres/Acidobacteria group (each accounting for about 25% of bacteria). Sequences obtained from bacteria from water samples indicated the presence of typical cosmopolitan freshwater organisms. TGGE bands shared between stream and soil samples, as well as sequences found in bacteria from stream samples that were related to those of soil bacteria, demonstrated the occurrence of some species in both stream and soil habitats. Changes in bacterial community composition were correlated with geographic distance along a stream, but in comparisons of different streams and rivers, community composition was correlated only with environmental conditions. PMID:18024682

  10. Controls on Bacterial Concentrations in Sediment Grab Samples from the Hudson River Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batta, J.; Mailloux, B. J.; Nitsche, F. O.; Kenna, T. C.; Ferguson, A. S.; Cheung, J.; Layton, A.

    2010-12-01

    High levels of fecal bacteria resulting from sewage-related pollution are often present in the Hudson River Estuary. Die-off of the fecal bacteria in surface waters is relatively rapid but the fecal bacteria can also attach to particles and settle. It is known that fecal bacteria are present in the shallow sediments but controls on their distribution have not been closely examined. The goal of this work is to examine the relationship between the concentration of fecal indicator bacteria and sediment properties including estimates of sediment age. Forty sediment surface grabs were obtained from the Hudson River Estuary. Twenty samples were collected from near the George Washington Bridge (GWB) and twenty samples from a 15 mile transect near Hudson New York. Concentrations of fecal indicator bacteria were determined by the cultured based Enterolert and Colilert tests (Idexx Laboratories) and molecular based techniques for E. coli and Bacteroides. Sediments were analyzed for total metals, total organic carbon, grain size, and gamma emitting radionuclides including Beryllium-7, Lead-210, and Cesium-137. Enterococcus was present in the samples with a geometric mean of 88 cells/g and a range of 4 to 817 cells /g. Culturable E. Coli was present in the samples with a geometric mean of 168 cells /g and a range of 5 to 2247 cells /g. Enterococcus concentrations were significantly higher (p<0.05) in the northern transect. Molecular based concentrations were determined for the GWB samples and were significantly higher than culture based concentrations. Bacteroides was present in the samples with a geometric mean of 1.1x106 copies/g and a range of 3.9x104 to 4.7x106 copies /g. Molecular E. Coli was present in the samples with a geometric mean of 3.0x106 copies/g and a range of 8.7x104 to 8.9x107 copies /g. The results clearly show that a significant amount of fecal bacteria are present in the sediments. Simple linear correlations between bacterial concentrations and sediment properties have not been observed, but more complex relationships might exist.

  11. Inconsequential Effect of Nutritional Treatments on Huanglongbing Control, Fruit Quality, Bacterial Titer and Disease Progress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of an enhanced nutritional programs (ENPs) to minimize the deleterious effects of the vector transmitted bacterial disease, citrus huanglongbing (HLB) caused by Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (Las), has been a topic of considerable discussion and debate since the discovery of HLB in Flori...

  12. Automated large-scale control of gene regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Tan, Mehmet; Alhajj, Reda; Polat, Faruk

    2010-04-01

    Controlling gene regulatory networks (GRNs) is an important and hard problem. As it is the case in all control problems, the curse of dimensionality is the main issue in real applications. It is possible that hundreds of genes may regulate one biological activity in an organism; this implies a huge state space, even in the case of Boolean models. This is also evident in the literature that shows that only models of small portions of the genome could be used in control applications. In this paper, we empower our framework for controlling GRNs by eliminating the need for expert knowledge to specify some crucial threshold that is necessary for producing effective results. Our framework is characterized by applying the factored Markov decision problem (FMDP) method to the control problem of GRNs. The FMDP is a suitable framework for large state spaces as it represents the probability distribution of state transitions using compact models so that more space and time efficient algorithms could be devised for solving control problems. We successfully mapped the GRN control problem to an FMDP and propose a model reduction algorithm that helps find approximate solutions for large networks by using existing FMDP solvers. The test results reported in this paper demonstrate the efficiency and effectiveness of the proposed approach. PMID:19858030

  13. Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis Induces a Unique Pulmonary Inflammatory Response: Role of Bacterial Gene Expression in Temporal Regulation of Host Defense Responses

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Kathie-Anne; Olsufka, Rachael; Kuestner, Rolf E.; Cho, Ji Hoon; Li, Hong; Zornetzer, Gregory A.; Wang, Kai; Skerrett, Shawn J.; Ozinsky, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary exposure to Francisella tularensis is associated with severe lung pathology and a high mortality rate. The lack of induction of classical inflammatory mediators, including IL1-? and TNF-?, during early infection has led to the suggestion that F. tularensis evades detection by host innate immune surveillance and/or actively suppresses inflammation. To gain more insight into the host response to Francisella infection during the acute stage, transcriptomic analysis was performed on lung tissue from mice exposed to virulent (Francisella tularensis ssp tularensis SchuS4). Despite an extensive transcriptional response in the lungs of animals as early as 4 hrs post-exposure, Francisella tularensis was associated with an almost complete lack of induction of immune-related genes during the initial 24 hrs post-exposure. This broad subversion of innate immune responses was particularly evident when compared to the pulmonary inflammatory response induced by other lethal (Yersinia pestis) and non-lethal (Legionella pneumophila, Pseudomonas aeruginosa) pulmonary infections. However, the unique induction of a subset of inflammation-related genes suggests a role for dysregulation of lymphocyte function and anti-inflammatory pathways in the extreme virulence of Francisella. Subsequent activation of a classical inflammatory response 48 hrs post-exposure was associated with altered abundance of Francisella-specific transcripts, including those associated with bacterial surface components. In summary, virulent Francisella induces a unique pulmonary inflammatory response characterized by temporal regulation of innate immune pathways correlating with altered bacterial gene expression patterns. This study represents the first simultaneous measurement of both host and Francisella transcriptome changes that occur during in vivo infection and identifies potential bacterial virulence factors responsible for regulation of host inflammatory pathways. PMID:23690939

  14. Motif for controllable toggle switch in gene regulatory networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chen; Bin, Ao; Ye, Weiming; Fan, Ying; Di, Zengru

    2015-02-01

    Toggle switch as a common phenomenon in gene regulatory networks has been recognized important for biological functions. Despite much effort dedicated to understanding the toggle switch and designing synthetic biology circuit to achieve the biological function, we still lack a comprehensive understanding of the intrinsic dynamics behind such phenomenon and the minimum structure that is imperative for producing toggle switch. In this paper, we discover a minimum structure, a motif that enables a controllable toggle switch. In particular, the motif consists of a transformative double negative feedback loop (DNFL) that is regulated by an additional driver node. By enumerating all possible regulatory configurations from the driver node, we identify two types of motifs associated with the toggle switch that is captured by the existence of bistable states. The toggle switch is controllable in the sense that the gap between the bistable states is adjustable as determined by the regulatory strength from the driver nodes. We test the effect of the motifs in self-oscillating gene regulatory network (SON) with respect to the interplay between the motifs and the other genes, and find that the switching dynamics of the whole network can be successfully controlled insofar as the network contains a single motif. Our findings are important to uncover the underlying nonlinear dynamics of controllable toggle switch and can have implications in devising biology circuit in the field of synthetic biology.

  15. Epigenetic control of skin differentiation genes by phytocannabinoids

    PubMed Central

    Pucci, Mariangela; Rapino, Cinzia; Di Francesco, Andrea; Dainese, Enrico; D'Addario, Claudio; Maccarrone, Mauro

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Endocannabinoid signalling has been shown to have a role in the control of epidermal physiology, whereby anandamide is able to regulate the expression of skin differentiation genes through DNA methylation. Here, we investigated the possible epigenetic regulation of these genes by several phytocannabinoids, plant-derived cannabinoids that have the potential to be novel therapeutics for various human diseases. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH The effects of cannabidiol, cannabigerol and cannabidivarin on the expression of skin differentiation genes keratins 1 and 10, involucrin and transglutaminase 5, as well as on DNA methylation of keratin 10 gene, were investigated in human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells). The effects of these phytocannabinoids on global DNA methylation and the activity and expression of four major DNA methyltransferases (DNMT1, 3a, 3b and 3L) were also examined. KEY RESULTS Cannabidiol and cannabigerol significantly reduced the expression of all the genes tested in differentiated HaCaT cells, by increasing DNA methylation of keratin 10 gene, but cannabidivarin was ineffective. Remarkably, cannabidiol reduced keratin 10 mRNA through a type-1 cannabinoid (CB1) receptor-dependent mechanism, whereas cannabigerol did not affect either CB1 or CB2 receptors of HaCaT cells. In addition, cannabidiol, but not cannabigerol, increased global DNA methylation levels by selectively enhancing DNMT1 expression, without affecting DNMT 3a, 3b or 3L. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS These findings show that the phytocannabinoids cannabidiol and cannabigerol are transcriptional repressors that can control cell proliferation and differentiation. This indicates that they (especially cannabidiol) have the potential to be lead compounds for the development of novel therapeutics for skin diseases. PMID:23869687

  16. PCR amplfication on a microarray of gel-immobilized oligonucleotides : detection of bacterial toxin- and drug-resistent genes and their mutations.

    SciTech Connect

    Strizhkov, B. N.; Drobyshev, A. L.; Mikhailovich, V. M.; Mirzabekov, A. D.; Biochip Technology Center; Engelhardt Inst. of Molecular Biology

    2000-10-01

    PCR amplification on a microarray of gel-immobilized primers (microchip) has been developed. One of a pair of PCR primers was immobilized inside a separate microchip polyacrylamide porous gel pad of 0.1 x 0.1 x 0.02 (or 0.04) micron in size and 0.2 (or 0.4) nL in volume. The amplification was carried out simultaneously both in solution covering the microchip array and inside gel pads. Each gel pad contained the immobilized forward primers, while the fluorescently labeled reverse primers, as well as all components of the amplification reaction, diffused into the gel pads from the solution. To increase the amplification efficiency, the forward primers were also added into the solution. The kinetics of amplification was measured in real time in parallel for all gel pads with a fluorescent microscope equipped with a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. The accuracy of the amplification was assessed by using the melting curves obtained for the duplexes formed by the labeled amplification product and the gel-immobilized primers during the amplification process; alternatively, the duplexes were produced by hybridization of the extended immobilized primers with labeled oligonucleotide probes. The on-chip amplification was applied to detect the anthrax toxin genes and the plasmid-borne beta-lactamase gene responsible for bacterial ampicillin resistance. The allele-specific type of PCR amplification was used to identify the Shiga toxin gene and discriminate it from the Shiga-like one. The genomic mutations responsible for rifampicin resistance of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains were detected by the same type of PCR amplification of the rpoB gene fragment isolated from sputum of tuberculosis patients. The on-chip PCR amplification has been shown to be a rapid, inexpensive and powerful tool to test genes responsible for bacterial toxin production and drug resistance, as well as to reveal point nucleotide mutations.

  17. Relationship of eukaryotic DNA replication to committed gene expression: general theory for gene control.

    PubMed Central

    Villarreal, L P

    1991-01-01

    The historic arguments for the participation of eukaryotic DNA replication in the control of gene expression are reconsidered along with more recent evidence. An earlier view in which gene commitment was achieved with stable chromatin structures which required DNA replication to reset expression potential (D. D. Brown, Cell 37:359-365, 1984) is further considered. The participation of nonspecific stable repressor of gene activity (histones and other chromatin proteins), as previously proposed, is reexamined. The possible function of positive trans-acting factors is now further developed by considering evidence from DNA virus models. It is proposed that these positive factors act to control the initiation of replicon-specific DNA synthesis in the S phase (early or late replication timing). Stable chromatin assembles during replication into potentially active (early S) or inactive (late S) states with prevailing trans-acting factors (early) or repressing factors (late) and may asymmetrically commit daughter templates. This suggests logical schemes for programming differentiation based on replicons and trans-acting initiators. This proposal requires that DNA replication precede major changes in gene commitment. Prior evidence against a role for DNA replication during terminal differentiation is reexamined along with other results from terminal differentiation of lower eukaryotes. This leads to a proposal that DNA replication may yet underlie terminal gene commitment, but that for it to do so there must exist two distinct modes of replication control. In one mode (mitotic replication) replicon initiation is tightly linked to the cell cycle, whereas the other mode (terminal replication) initiation is not cell cycle restricted, is replicon specific, and can lead to a terminally differentiated state. Aberrant control of mitotic and terminal modes of DNA replication may underlie the transformed state. Implications of a replicon basis for chromatin structure-function and the evolution of metazoan organisms are considered. Images PMID:1943999

  18. Cloning, gene expression and characterization of a novel bacterial NAD-dependent non-phosphorylating glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from Neisseria meningitidis strain Z2491

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Latifa Fourrat; Abdelghani Iddar; Federico Valverde; Aurelio Serrano; Abdelaziz Soukri

    2007-01-01

    Alignment of the amino acid sequence of some archaeal, bacterial and eukaryotic non-phosphorylating glyceraldehydes-3-phosphate\\u000a dehydrogenases (GAPNs) and aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) with the sequence of a putative GAPN present in the genome of the\\u000a Gram-negative bacterium Neisseria meningitidis strain Z2491 demonstrated the conservation of residues involved in the catalytic activity. The predicted coding sequence\\u000a of the N. meningitidis\\u000a gapN gene was

  19. A research team is using surface-tethered DNA to enhance gene transfer and to spatially control gene delivery.

    E-print Network

    Shull, Kenneth R.

    A research team is using surface-tethered DNA to enhance gene transfer and to spatially control gene delivery. NORTHWESTERN CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING TISSUE ENGINEERING Principal the expression of specific genes has numerous basic science and clinical applications. Although viral vectors can

  20. Planar cell polarity genes control the connectivity of enteric neurons

    PubMed Central

    Sasselli, Valentina; Boesmans, Werend; Vanden Berghe, Pieter; Tissir, Fadel; Goffinet, André M.; Pachnis, Vassilis

    2013-01-01

    A highly complex network of intrinsic enteric neurons is required for the digestive and homeostatic functions of the gut. Nevertheless, the genetic and molecular mechanisms that regulate their assembly into functional neuronal circuits are currently unknown. Here we report that the planar cell polarity (PCP) genes Celsr3 and Fzd3 are required during murine embryogenesis to specifically control the guidance and growth of enteric neuronal projections relative to the longitudinal and radial gut axes. Ablation of these genes disrupts the normal organization of nascent neuronal projections, leading to subtle changes of axonal tract configuration in the mature enteric nervous system (ENS), but profound abnormalities in gastrointestinal motility. Our data argue that PCP-dependent modules of connectivity established at early stages of enteric neurogenesis control gastrointestinal function in adult animals and provide the first evidence that developmental deficits in ENS wiring may contribute to the pathogenesis of idiopathic bowel disorders. PMID:23478408

  1. Production of DAPG and HCN by Pseudomonas sp. LBUM300 contributes to the biological control of bacterial canker of tomato.

    PubMed

    Lanteigne, Carine; Gadkar, Vijay J; Wallon, Thérèse; Novinscak, Amy; Filion, Martin

    2012-10-01

    Bacterial canker caused by Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis is known to cause significant economic losses to tomato production worldwide. Biological control has been proposed as an alternative to current chemical containment methods, which are often inefficient and may leave adverse effects on the environment. However, only little headway has so far been made in developing biocontrol strategies against C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis. To address this knowledge gap, we investigated the antagonistic capacity of PCA, produced by Pseudomonas sp. LBUM223, and DAPG and HCN, both produced by Pseudomonas sp. LBUM300, on C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis under in vitro and in planta conditions. Nonsynthesizing isogenic mutants of the producer strains were also developed to further dissect the role of each individual metabolite on C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis biological control. Novel specific quantitative polymerase chain reaction TaqMan assays allowed quantification of C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis in tomato plants and rhizospheric soil. Pseudomonas spp. LBUM223 and LBUM300 significantly repressed C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis growth in vitro, while their respective nonproducing mutants showed less or no significant antagonistic activity. In planta, only Pseudomonas sp. LBUM300 was capable of significantly reducing disease development and C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis rhizospheric population, suggesting that the production of both DAPG and HCN was involved. In summary, simultaneous DAPG/HCN production by Pseudomonas sp. LBUM300 shows great potential for controlling bacterial canker of tomato. PMID:22713078

  2. Bacterial Polysaccharide Co-Polymerases Share a Common Framework for Control of Polymer Length

    SciTech Connect

    Tocilj,A.; Munger, C.; Proteau, A.; Morona, R.; Purins, L.; Ajamian, E.; Wagner, J.; Papadopoulos, M.; Van Den bosch, L.; et al

    2008-01-01

    The chain length distribution of complex polysaccharides present on the bacterial surface is determined by polysaccharide co-polymerases (PCPs) anchored in the inner membrane. We report crystal structures of the periplasmic domains of three PCPs that impart substantially different chain length distributions to surface polysaccharides. Despite very low sequence similarities, they have a common protomer structure with a long central alpha-helix extending 100 Angstroms into the periplasm. The protomers self-assemble into bell-shaped oligomers of variable sizes, with a large internal cavity. Electron microscopy shows that one of the full-length PCPs has a similar organization as that observed in the crystal for its periplasmic domain alone. Functional studies suggest that the top of the PCP oligomers is an important region for determining polysaccharide modal length. These structures provide a detailed view of components of the bacterial polysaccharide assembly machinery.

  3. NLR-mediated control of inflammasome assembly in the host response against bacterial pathogens

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Igor E. Brodsky; Denise Monack

    2009-01-01

    The host response against diverse bacterial pathogens involves activation of specialized immune cells and elaboration of pro-inflammatory cytokines that help to coordinate appropriate host defense. Members of the interleukin-1 (IL-1) cytokine family, IL-1? and IL-18, are central players in this process. Extracellular release of the mature, active form of these cytokines requires their processing by the cysteine protease caspase-1, which

  4. Remote control of gene function by local translation.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hosung; Gkogkas, Christos G; Sonenberg, Nahum; Holt, Christine E

    2014-03-27

    The subcellular position of a protein is a key determinant of its function. Mounting evidence indicates that RNA localization, where specific mRNAs are transported subcellularly and subsequently translated in response to localized signals, is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism to control protein localization. On-site synthesis confers novel signaling properties to a protein and helps to maintain local proteome homeostasis. Local translation plays particularly important roles in distal neuronal compartments, and dysregulated RNA localization and translation cause defects in neuronal wiring and survival. Here, we discuss key findings in this area and possible implications of this adaptable and swift mechanism for spatial control of gene function. PMID:24679524

  5. Detection of Pneumocystis DNA in samples from patients suspected of bacterial pneumonia- a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Helweg-Larsen, Jannik; Jensen, Jørgen Skov; Dohn, Birthe; Benfield, Thomas L; Lundgren, Bettina

    2002-01-01

    Background Pneumocystis jiroveci (formerly known as P. carinii f.sp. hominis) is an opportunistic fungus that causes Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) in immunocompromised individuals. Pneumocystis jiroveci can be detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). To investigate the clinical importance of a positive Pneumocystis-PCR among HIV-uninfected patients suspected of bacterial pneumonia, a retrospective matched case-control study was conducted. Methods Respiratory samples from 367 patients suspected of bacterial pneumonia were analysed by PCR amplification of Pneumocystis jiroveci. To compare clinical factors associated with carriage of P. jiroveci, a case-control study was done. For each PCR-positive case, four PCR-negative controls, randomly chosen from the PCR-negative patients, were matched on sex and date of birth. Results Pneumocystis-DNA was detected in 16 (4.4%) of patients. The median age for PCR-positive patients was higher than PCR-negative patients (74 vs. 62 years, p = 0.011). PCR-positive cases had a higher rate of chronic or severe concomitant illness (15 (94%)) than controls (32 (50%)) (p = 0.004). Twelve (75%) of the 16 PCR positive patients had received corticosteroids, compared to 8 (13%) of the 64 PCR-negative controls (p < 0.001). Detection of Pneumocystis-DNA was associated with a worse prognosis: seven (44%) of patients with positive PCR died within one month compared to nine (14%) of the controls (p = 0.01). None of the nine PCR-positive patients who survived had developed PCP at one year of follow-up. Conclusions Our data suggest that carriage of Pneumocystis jiroveci is associated with old age, concurrent disease and steroid treatment. PCR detection of P. jiroveci has low specificity for diagnosing PCP among patients without established immunodeficiency. Whether overt infection is involved in the poorer prognosis or merely reflects sub-clinical carriage is not clear. Further studies of P. jiroveci in patients receiving systemic treatment with corticosteroids are warranted. PMID:12445330

  6. 315. Identification and Control of Bacterial Contamination in an Academic Good Manufacturing Practice Facility

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Timothy P. O'Connor; Neil R. Hackett; Robert G. Pergolizzi; Dolan Sondhi; Julie L. Boyer; Stephen M. Kaminsky; Ronald G. Crystal

    2006-01-01

    An ongoing monitoring program is an essential component of operating a Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) facility. To support manufacture of clinical grade viral gene transfer vectors, the Belfer Gene Therapy Core Facility has a Class 100,000 GMP facility with three production laboratories, in which all open operations of production are conducted in Class 100 biological safety cabinets. The routine monitoring

  7. Quantitative Control of Organ Shape by Combinatorial Gene Activity

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Min-Long; Copsey, Lucy; Green, Amelia A.; Bangham, J. Andrew; Coen, Enrico

    2010-01-01

    The development of organs with particular shapes, like wings or flowers, depends on regional activity of transcription factors and signalling molecules. However, the mechanisms that link these molecular activities to the morphogenetic events underlying shape are poorly understood. Here we describe a combination of experimental and computational approaches that address this problem, applying them to a group of genes controlling flower shape in the Snapdragon (Antirrhinum). Four transcription factors are known to play a key role in the control of floral shape and asymmetry in Snapdragon. We use quantitative shape analysis of mutants for these factors to define principal components underlying flower shape variation. We show that each transcription factor has a specific effect on the shape and size of regions within the flower, shifting the position of the flower in shape space. These shifts are further analysed by generating double mutants and lines that express some of the genes ectopically. By integrating these observations with known gene expression patterns and interactions, we arrive at a combinatorial scheme for how regional effects on shape are genetically controlled. We evaluate our scheme by incorporating the proposed interactions into a generative model, where the developing flower is treated as a material sheet that grows according to how genes modify local polarities and growth rates. The petal shapes generated by the model show a good quantitative match with those observed experimentally for each petal in numerous genotypes, thus validating the hypothesised scheme. This article therefore shows how complex shapes can be accounted for by combinatorial effects of transcription factors on regional growth properties. This finding has implications not only for how shapes develop but also for how they may have evolved through tinkering with transcription factors and their targets. PMID:21085695

  8. Bacterial diversity among small-subunit rRNA gene clones and cellular isolates from the same seawater sample

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MARCELINO T. SUZUKI; MICHAEL S. RAPPE; ZARA W. HAIMBERGER

    1997-01-01

    Numerous investigations applying the cloning and sequencing of rRNA genes (rDNAs) to the study of marine bacterioplankton diversity have shown that the sequences of genes cloned directly from environmental DNA do not correspond to the genes of cultured marine taxa. These results have been interpreted as support for the hypothesis that the most abundant heterotrophic marine bacterioplankton species are not

  9. Stimuli-responsive bacterial cellulose-g-poly(acrylic acid-co-acrylamide) hydrogels for oral controlled release drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Mohd Amin, Mohd Cairul Iqbal; Ahmad, Naveed; Pandey, Manisha; Jue Xin, Chong

    2014-10-01

    This study evaluated the potential of stimuli-responsive bacterial cellulose-g-poly(acrylic acid-co-acrylamide) hydrogels as oral controlled-release drug delivery carriers. Hydrogels were synthesized by graft copolymerization of the monomers onto bacterial cellulose (BC) fibers by using a microwave irradiation technique. The hydrogels were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). FT-IR spectroscopy confirmed the grafting. XRD showed that the crystallinity of BC was reduced by grafting, whereas an increase in the thermal stability profile was observed in TGA. SEM showed that the hydrogels exhibited a highly porous morphology, which is suitable for drug loading. The hydrogels demonstrated a pH-responsive swelling behavior, with decreased swelling in acidic media, which increased with increase in pH of the media, reaching maximum swelling at pH 7. The release profile of the hydrogels was investigated in simulated gastric fluid (SGF) and simulated intestinal fluid (SIF). The hydrogels showed lesser release in SGF than in SIF, suggesting that hydrogels may be suitable drug carriers for oral controlled release of drug delivery in the lower gastrointestinal tract. PMID:23875787

  10. Evidence of major genes affecting resistance to bacterial cold water disease in rainbow trout using Bayesian methods of segregation analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial cold water disease (BCWD) causes significant economic loss in salmonid aquaculture. We previously detected genetic variation for BCWD resistance in our rainbow trout population, and a family-based selection program to improve resistance was initiated at the National Center for Cool and Col...

  11. Design of a Comprehensive Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Experiment: Phase Variation Caused by Recombinational Regulation of Bacterial Gene Expression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheng, Xiumei; Xu, Shungao; Lu, Renyun; Isaac, Dadzie; Zhang, Xueyi; Zhang, Haifang; Wang, Huifang; Qiao, Zheng; Huang, Xinxiang

    2014-01-01

    Scientific experiments are indispensable parts of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. In this study, a comprehensive Biochemistry and Molecular Biology experiment about "Salmonella enterica" serovar Typhi Flagellar phase variation has been designed. It consisted of three parts, namely, inducement of bacterial Flagellar phase variation,…

  12. Evidence of major genes affecting bacterial cold water disease resistance in rainbow trout using Bayesian methods of complex segregation analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial cold water disease (BCWD) causes significant economic loss in salmonid aquaculture. We previously detected genetic variation for BCWD resistance in our rainbow trout population, and a family-based selection program to improve resistance was initiated at the NCCCWA in 2005. The main objec...

  13. Identification of quorum sensing-controlled genes in Burkholderia ambifaria

    PubMed Central

    Chapalain, Annelise; Vial, Ludovic; Laprade, Natacha; Dekimpe, Valérie; Perreault, Jonathan; Déziel, Eric

    2013-01-01

    The Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) comprises strains with a virulence potential toward immunocompromised patients as well as plant growth–promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR). Owing to the link between quorum sensing (QS) and virulence, most studies among Bcc species have been directed toward QS of pathogenic bacteria. We have investigated the QS of B. ambifaria, a PGPR only infrequently recovered from patients. The cepI gene, responsible for the synthesis of the main signaling molecule N-octanoylhomoserine lactone (C8-HSL), was inactivated. Phenotypes of the B. ambifaria cepI mutant we observed, such as increased production of siderophores and decreased proteolytic and antifungal activities, are in agreement with those of other Bcc cepI mutants. The cepI mutant was then used as background strain for a whole-genome transposon-insertion mutagenesis strategy, allowing the identification of 20 QS-controlled genes, corresponding to 17 loci. The main functions identified are linked to antifungal and antimicrobial properties, as we have identified QS-controlled genes implicated in the production of pyrrolnitrin, burkholdines (occidiofungin-like molecules), and enacyloxins. This study provides insights in the QS-regulated functions of a PGPR, which could lead to beneficial potential biotechnological applications. PMID:23382083

  14. Mammalian monogamy is not controlled by a single gene

    PubMed Central

    Fink, Sabine; Excoffier, Laurent; Heckel, Gerald

    2006-01-01

    Complex social behavior in Microtus voles and other mammals has been postulated to be under the direct genetic control of a single locus: the arginine vasopressin 1a receptor (avpr1a) gene. Using a phylogenetic approach, we show that a repetitive element in the promoter region of avpr1a, which reportedly causes social monogamy, is actually widespread in nonmonogamous Microtus and other rodents. There was no evidence for intraspecific polymorphism in regard to the presence or absence of the repetitive element. Among 25 rodent species studied, the element was absent in only two closely related nonmonogamous species, indicating that this absence is certainly the result of an evolutionarily recent loss. Our analyses further demonstrate that the repetitive structures upstream of the avpr1a gene in humans and primates, which have been associated with social bonding, are evolutionarily distinct from those in rodents. Our evolutionary approach reveals that monogamy in rodents is not controlled by a single polymorphism in the promoter region of the avpr1a gene. We thus resolve the contradiction between the claims for an evolutionarily conserved genetic programming of social behavior in mammals and the vast evidence for highly complex and flexible mating systems. PMID:16832060

  15. Ajoene, a Sulfur-Rich Molecule from Garlic, Inhibits Genes Controlled by Quorum Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Jakobsen, Tim Holm; van Gennip, Maria; Phipps, Richard Kerry; Shanmugham, Meenakshi Sundaram; Christensen, Louise Dahl; Alhede, Morten; Skindersoe, Mette Eline; Rasmussen, Thomas Bovbjerg; Friedrich, Karlheinz; Uthe, Friedrich; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Moser, Claus; Nielsen, Kristian Fog; Eberl, Leo; Larsen, Thomas Ostenfeld; Tanner, David; Høiby, Niels; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    In relation to emerging multiresistant bacteria, development of antimicrobials and new treatment strategies of infections should be expected to become a high-priority research area. Quorum sensing (QS), a communication system used by pathogenic bacteria like Pseudomonas aeruginosa to synchronize the expression of specific genes involved in pathogenicity, is a possible drug target. Previous in vitro and in vivo studies revealed a significant inhibition of P. aeruginosa QS by crude garlic extract. By bioassay-guided fractionation of garlic extracts, we determined the primary QS inhibitor present in garlic to be ajoene, a sulfur-containing compound with potential as an antipathogenic drug. By comprehensive in vitro and in vivo studies, the effect of synthetic ajoene toward P. aeruginosa was elucidated. DNA microarray studies of ajoene-treated P. aeruginosa cultures revealed a concentration-dependent attenuation of a few but central QS-controlled virulence factors, including rhamnolipid. Furthermore, ajoene treatment of in vitro biofilms demonstrated a clear synergistic, antimicrobial effect with tobramycin on biofilm killing and a cease in lytic necrosis of polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Furthermore, in a mouse model of pulmonary infection, a significant clearing of infecting P. aeruginosa was detected in ajoene-treated mice compared to a nontreated control group. This study adds to the list of examples demonstrating the potential of QS-interfering compounds in the treatment of bacterial infections. PMID:22314537

  16. Structure and Functional Analysis of a Marine Bacterial Carotenoid Biosynthesis Gene Cluster and Astaxanthin Biosynthetic Pathway Proposed at the Gene Level

    Microsoft Academic Search

    NORIHIKO MISAWA; YOSHIKO SATOMI; KEIJI KONDO; AKIHIRO YOKOYAMA; SUSUMU KAJIWARA; TOSHIKO SAITO; TAKESHI OHTANI

    1995-01-01

    A carotenoid biosynthesis gene cluster for the production of astaxanthin was isolated from the marine bacteriumAgrobacterium aurantiacum. This cluster containedfive carotenogenic genes with the same orienta- tion,whichweredesignatedcrtW,crtZ,crtY,crtI,andcrtB.ThestopcodonsofindividualcrtgenesexceptforcrtB overlapped the start codons of the following crt genes. Escherichia coli transformants carrying the Erwinia uredovoracarotenoid biosynthesis genes provide suitable substrates for carotenoid biosynthesis. The functions of thefivecrtgenes ofA. aurantiacumwere determined through chromatographic

  17. The Presence of the DNA Repair Genes mutM, mutY, mutL, and mutS is Related to Proteome Size in Bacterial Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Gonzalez, Aurian; Rivera-Rivera, Ruben J.; Massey, Steven E.

    2012-01-01

    DNA repair is expected to be a modulator of underlying mutation rates, however the major factors affecting the distribution of DNA repair pathways have not been determined. The Proteomic Constraint theory proposes that mutation rates are inversely proportional to the amount of heredity information contained in a genome, which is effectively the proteome. Thus, organisms with larger proteomes are expected to possess more efficient DNA repair. We show that an important factor influencing the presence or absence of four DNA repair genes mutM, mutY, mutL, and mutS is indeed the size of the bacterial proteome. This is true both of intracellular and other bacteria. In addition, the relationship of DNA repair to genome GC content was examined. In principle, if a DNA repair pathway is biased in the types of mutations it corrects, this may alter the genome GC content. The presence of the mismatch repair genes mutL and mutS was not correlated with genome GC content, consistent with their involvement in an unbiased DNA repair pathway. In contrast, the presence of the base excision repair genes mutM and mutY, whose products both correct GC???AT mutations, was positively correlated with genome GC content, consistent with their biased repair mechanism. Phylogenetic analysis however indicates that the relationship between the presence of mutM and mutY genes and genome GC content is not a simple one. PMID:22403581

  18. Enrichment of provitamin A content in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) by introduction of the bacterial carotenoid biosynthetic genes CrtB and CrtI

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cheng; Zeng, Jian; Li, Yin; Yang, Guangxiao; He, Guangyuan

    2014-01-01

    Carotenoid content is a primary determinant of wheat nutritional value and affects its end-use quality. Wheat grains contain very low carotenoid levels and trace amounts of provitamin A content. In order to enrich the carotenoid content in wheat grains, the bacterial phytoene synthase gene (CrtB) and carotene desaturase gene (CrtI) were transformed into the common wheat cultivar Bobwhite. Expression of CrtB or CrtI alone slightly increased the carotenoid content in the grains of transgenic wheat, while co-expression of both genes resulted in a darker red/yellow grain phenotype, accompanied by a total carotenoid content increase of approximately 8-fold achieving 4.76 ?g g–1 of seed dry weight, a ?-carotene increase of 65-fold to 3.21 ?g g–1 of seed dry weight, and a provitamin A content (sum of ?-carotene, ?-carotene, and ?-cryptoxanthin) increase of 76-fold to 3.82 ?g g–1 of seed dry weight. The high provitamin A content in the transgenic wheat was stably inherited over four generations. Quantitative PCR analysis revealed that enhancement of provitamin A content in transgenic wheat was also a result of the highly coordinated regulation of endogenous carotenoid biosynthetic genes, suggesting a metabolic feedback regulation in the wheat carotenoid biosynthetic pathway. These transgenic wheat lines are not only valuable for breeding wheat varieties with nutritional benefits for human health but also for understanding the mechanism regulating carotenoid biosynthesis in wheat endosperm. PMID:24692648

  19. Control of gene expression by modulated self-assembly

    E-print Network

    Jose M. G. Vilar; Leonor Saiz

    2011-05-25

    Numerous transcription factors self-assemble into different order oligomeric species in a way that is actively regulated by the cell. Until now, no general functional role has been identified for this widespread process. Here we capture the effects of modulated self-assembly in gene expression with a novel quantitative framework. We show that this mechanism provides precision and flexibility, two seemingly antagonistic properties, to the sensing of diverse cellular signals by systems that share common elements present in transcription factors like p53, NF-kappaB, STATs, Oct, and RXR. Applied to the nuclear hormone receptor RXR, this framework accurately reproduces a broad range of classical, previously unexplained, sets of gene expression data and corroborates the existence of a precise functional regime with flexible properties that can be controlled both at a genome-wide scale and at the individual promoter level.

  20. Bacterial Antagonists of Fungal Pathogens Also Control Root-Knot Nematodes by Induced Systemic Resistance of Tomato Plants

    PubMed Central

    Adam, Mohamed; Heuer, Holger; Hallmann, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    The potential of bacterial antagonists of fungal pathogens to control the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita was investigated under greenhouse conditions. Treatment of tomato seeds with several strains significantly reduced the numbers of galls and egg masses compared with the untreated control. Best performed Bacillus subtilis isolates Sb4-23, Mc5-Re2, and Mc2-Re2, which were further studied for their mode of action with regard to direct effects by bacterial metabolites or repellents, and plant mediated effects. Drenching of soil with culture supernatants significantly reduced the number of egg masses produced by M. incognita on tomato by up to 62% compared to the control without culture supernatant. Repellence of juveniles by the antagonists was shown in a linked twin-pot set-up, where a majority of juveniles penetrated roots on the side without inoculated antagonists. All tested biocontrol strains induced systemic resistance against M. incognita in tomato, as revealed in a split-root system where the bacteria and the nematodes were inoculated at spatially separated roots of the same plant. This reduced the production of egg masses by up to 51%, while inoculation of bacteria and nematodes in the same pot had only a minor additive effect on suppression of M. incognita compared to induced systemic resistance alone. Therefore, the plant mediated effect was the major reason for antagonism rather than direct mechanisms. In conclusion, the bacteria known for their antagonistic potential against fungal pathogens also suppressed M. incognita. Such “multi-purpose” bacteria might provide new options for control strategies, especially with respect to nematode-fungus disease complexes that cause synergistic yield losses. PMID:24587352

  1. ILG1 : a new integrase-like gene that is a marker of bacterial contamination by the laboratory Escherichia coli strain TOP10F'.

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Wenzhi; Chua, Kevin; Strober, Warren; Chu, Charles C.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Identification of differentially expressed genes between normal and diseased states is an area of intense current medical research that can lead to the discovery of new therapeutic targets. However, isolation of differentially expressed genes by subtraction often suffers from unreported contamination of the resulting subtraction library with clones containing DNA sequences not from the original RNA samples. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Subtraction using cDNA representational difference analysis (RDA) was performed on human B cells from normal or common variable immunodeficiency patients. The material remaining after the subtraction was cloned and individual clones were sequenced. The sequence of one clone with similarity to integrases (ILG1, integrase-like gene-1) was used to obtain the full length cDNA sequence and as a probe for the presence of this sequence in RNA or genomic DNA samples. RESULTS: After five rounds of cDNA RDA, 23.3% of the clones from the resulting subtraction library contained Escherichia coli DNA. In addition, three clones contained the sequence of a new integrase, ILG1. The full length cDNA sequence of ILG1 exhibits prokaryotic, but not eukaryotic, features. At the DNA level, ILG1 is not similar to any known gene. At the protein level, ILG1 has 58% similarity to integrases from the cryptic P4 bacteriophage family (S clade). The catalytic domain of ILG1 contains the conserved features found in site-specific recombinases. The critical residues that form the catalytic active site pocket are conserved, including the highly conserved R-H-R-Y hallmark of these recombinases. Interestingly, ILG1 was not present in the original B cell populations. By probing genomic DNA, ILG1 could only be detected in the E. coli TOP10F' strain used in our laboratory for molecular cloning, but not in any of its precursor strains, including TOP10. Furthermore, bacteria cultured from the mouth of the laboratory worker who performed cDNA RDA were also positive for ILG1. CONCLUSIONS: In the course of our studies using cDNA RDA, we have isolated and identified ILG1, a likely active site-specific recombinase and new member of the bacteriophage P4 family of integrases. This family of integrases is implicated in the horizontal DNA transfer of pathogenic genes between bacterial species, such as those found in pathogenic strains of E. coli, Shigella, Yersinia, and Vibrio cholera. Using ILG1 as a marker of our laboratory E. coli strain TOP10F', our evidence suggests that contaminating bacterial DNA in our subtraction experiment is due to this laboratory bacterial strain, which colonized exposed surfaces of the laboratory worker. Thus, identification of differentially expressed genes between normal and diseased states could be dramatically improved by using extra precaution to prevent bacterial contamination of samples. PMID:12393938

  2. Optimal Control Strategies for Disinfection of Bacterial Populations with Persister and Susceptible Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Jason; Darres, Kyle; Petty, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    It is increasingly clear that bacteria manage to evade killing by antibiotics and antimicrobials in a variety of ways, including mutation, phenotypic variations, and formation of biofilms. With recent advances in understanding the dynamics of the tolerance mechanisms, there have been subsequent advances in understanding how to manipulate the bacterial environments to eradicate the bacteria. This study focuses on using mathematical techniques to find the optimal disinfection strategy to eliminate the bacteria while managing the load of antibiotic that is applied. In this model, the bacterial population is separated into those that are tolerant to the antibiotic and those that are susceptible to disinfection. There are transitions between the two populations whose rates depend on the chemical environment. Our results extend previous mathematical studies to include more realistic methods of applying the disinfectant. The goal is to provide experimentally testable predictions that have been lacking in previous mathematical studies. In particular, we provide the optimal disinfection protocol under a variety of assumptions within the model that can be used to validate or invalidate our simplifying assumptions and the experimental hypotheses that we used to develop the model. We find that constant dosing is not the optimal method for disinfection. Rather, cycling between application and withdrawal of the antibiotic yields the fastest killing of the bacteria. PMID:22751538

  3. GENE CO-EXPRESSION NETWORK DISCOVERY WITH CONTROLLED STATISTICAL AND BIOLOGICAL SIGNIFICANCE

    E-print Network

    Hero, Alfred O.

    GENE CO-EXPRESSION NETWORK DISCOVERY WITH CONTROLLED STATISTICAL AND BIOLOGICAL SIGNIFICANCE as a module of co- expressed genes which can be conveniently viewed as a co- expression network. Genes network. Based on the estimation of pairwise gene profile correlation, the al- gorithm provides an initial

  4. Uncoupling PR Gene Expression from NPR1 and Bacterial Resistance: Characterization of the Dominant Arabidopsis cpr 6-1 Mutant

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joseph D. Clarke; Yidong Liu; Daniel F. Klessig; Xinnian Dong

    1998-01-01

    In Arabidopsis, NPR1 mediates the salicylic acid (SA)-induced expression of pathogenesis-related (PR) genes and sys- temic acquired resistance (SAR). Here, we report the identification of another component, CPR6, that may function with NPR1 in regulating PR gene expression. The dominant CPR6-1 mutant expresses the SA\\/NPR1-regulated PR genes ( PR-1 , BGL2 , and PR-5 ) and displays enhanced resistance to

  5. Transformation of Brassica juncea (L.) Czern with bacterial codA gene enhances its tolerance to salt stress

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. V. S. K. Prasad; P. Pardha Saradhi; P. A. Kumar

    2000-01-01

    The codA gene for biosynthesis of glycinebetaine from Arthrobacter globiformis was used for transforming Brassica juncea cv. Pusa Jaikisan (which lack any means to synthesize glycinebetaine) through Agrobacterium mediated transformation. The stable insertion of the codA gene in the shoots obtained on medium with kanamycin and hygromycin was confirmed by PCR analysis of the nptII gene. Southern hybridization with a

  6. Oxygen regulated gene expression in Escherichia coli: Control of anaerobic respiration by the FNR protein

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gottfried Unden; Martin Trageser

    1991-01-01

    Molecular oxygen is an important regulatory signal in facultative anaerobic bacteria and controles the expression of a great variety of genes positively or negatively. The expression of anaerobic respiration and of related functions of E. coli is controlled by the positive gene regulator FNR, which activates transcription in the absence of O2. The regulated genes carry a FNR consensus sequence

  7. Antiquity and Evolution of the MADS-Box Gene Family Controlling Flower Development in Plants

    E-print Network

    dePamphilis, Claude

    Antiquity and Evolution of the MADS-Box Gene Family Controlling Flower Development in Plants Genetics and Department of Biology, Pennsylvania State University MADS-box genes in plants control various of floral MADS-box genes by conducting molecular evolutionary genetics analyses. Our results suggest

  8. Various pAQU plasmids possibly contribute to disseminate tetracycline resistance gene tet(M) among marine bacterial community

    PubMed Central

    Nonaka, Lisa; Maruyama, Fumito; Onishi, Yuki; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Ogura, Yoshitoshi; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Satoru; Masuda, Michiaki

    2014-01-01

    Emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in the aquaculture environment is a significant problem for disease control of cultured fish as well as in human public health. Conjugative mobile genetic elements (MGEs) are involved in dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) among marine bacteria. In the present study, we first designed a PCR targeting traI gene encoding essential relaxase for conjugation. By this new PCR, we demonstrated that five of 83 strains isolated from a coastal aquaculture site had traI-positive MGEs. While one of the five strains that belonged to Shewanella sp. was shown to have an integrative conjugative element of the SXT/R391 family (ICEVchMex-like), the MGEs of the other four strains of Vibrio spp. were shown to have the backbone structure similar to that of previously described in pAQU1. The backbone structure shared by the pAQU1-like plasmids in the four strains corresponded to a ~100-kbp highly conserved region required for replication, partition and conjugative transfer, suggesting that these plasmids constituted “pAQU group.” The pAQU group plasmids were shown to be capable of conjugative transfer of tet(M) and other ARGs from the Vibrio strains to E. coli. The pAQU group plasmid in one of the examined strains was designated as pAQU2, and its complete nucleotide sequence was determined and compared with that of pAQU1. The results revealed that pAQU2 contained fewer ARGs than pAQU1 did, and most of the ARGs in both of these plasmids were located in the similar region where multiple transposases were found, suggesting that the ARGs were introduced by several events of DNA transposition into an ancestral plasmid followed by drug selection in the aquaculture site. The results of the present study indicate that the “pAQU group” plasmids may play an important role in dissemination of ARGs in the marine environment. PMID:24860553

  9. A pipeline to determine RT-QPCR control genes for evolutionary studies: application to primate gene expression across multiple tissues.

    PubMed

    Fedrigo, Olivier; Warner, Lisa R; Pfefferle, Adam D; Babbitt, Courtney C; Cruz-Gordillo, Peter; Wray, Gregory A

    2010-01-01

    Because many species-specific phenotypic differences are assumed to be caused by differential regulation of gene expression, many recent investigations have focused on measuring transcript abundance. Despite the availability of high-throughput platforms, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-QPCR) is often the method of choice because of its low cost and wider dynamic range. However, the accuracy of this technique heavily relies on the use of multiple valid control genes for normalization. We created a pipeline for choosing genes potentially useful as RT-QPCR control genes for measuring expression between human and chimpanzee samples across multiple tissues, using published microarrays and a measure of tissue-specificity. We identified 13 genes from the pipeline and from commonly used control genes: ACTB, USP49, ARGHGEF2, GSK3A, TBP, SDHA, EIF2B2, GPDH, YWHAZ, HPTR1, RPL13A, HMBS, and EEF2. We then tested these candidate genes and validated their expression stability across species. We established the rank order of the most preferable set of genes for single and combined tissues. Our results suggest that for at least three tissues (cerebral cortex, liver, and skeletal muscle), EIF2B2, EEF2, HMBS, and SDHA are useful genes for normalizing human and chimpanzee expression using RT-QPCR. Interestingly, other commonly used control genes, including TBP, GAPDH, and, especially ACTB do not perform as well. This pipeline could be easily adapted to other species for which expression data exist, providing taxonomically appropriate control genes for comparisons of gene expression among species. PMID:20824057

  10. A bacterial artificial chromosome library for barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) and the identification of clones containing putative resistance genes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y. Yu; J. P. Tomkins; R. Waugh; D. A. Frisch; D. Kudrna; A. Kleinhofs; R. S. Brueggeman; G. J. Muehlbauer; R. P. Wise; R. A. Wing

    2000-01-01

    Modern cultivated barley is an important cereal crop with an estimated genome size of 5000 Mb. To develop the resources for\\u000a positional cloning and structural genomic analyses in barley, we constructed a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library\\u000a for the cultivar Morex using the cloning enzyme HindIII. The library contains 313344 clones (816 384-well plates). A random sampling of 504 clones

  11. Picoliter nDEP traps enable time-resolved contactless single bacterial cell analysis in controlled microenvironments.

    PubMed

    Fritzsch, Frederik S O; Rosenthal, Katrin; Kampert, Anna; Howitz, Steffen; Dusny, Christian; Blank, Lars M; Schmid, Andreas

    2013-02-01

    We present a lab-on-a-chip device, the Envirostat 2.0, which allows for the first time contactless cultivation of a single bacterial cell by negative dielectrophoresis (nDEP) in a precisely controllable microenvironment. Stable trapping in perfusing growth medium was achieved by a miniaturization of octupole electrode geometries, matching the dimensions of bacteria. Temperature sensitive fluorescent measurements showed that these reductions of microelectrode distances led to reduced Joule heating during cell manipulation. The presented miniaturization is not possible with conventional manufacturing processes. Therefore, we present a novel bonding technology, which permits miniaturization of 3D octupole electrode geometry with biocompatible materials. To exclude the influence of other cells and to enable sampling of perfusion medium from the isolated living bacterium under study, computer aided flow simulations were used to develop a microfluidic nDEP isolation procedure. The developed microchannel and microelectrode design integrates for the first time well characterized nDEP cell sorting mechanisms and time-resolved contactless single bacterial cell cultivation in a 1.7 picoliter bioreactor system. The cell type independent trapping is demonstrated with singularized Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Corynebacterium glutamicum and other industrially relevant microbes. The static and precisely controlled microenvironment resulted in a consistent and significant faster growth compared to maximal growth rates observed on population level. Preventing the influence of surfaces and cell-cell interactions, the Envirostat 2.0 chip permits total microenvironmental control by the experimenter and therefore provides major opportunities for microfluidic based cell analysis of bacteria and small eukaryotes. PMID:23223864

  12. Engineering of bacterial phytochromes for near-infrared imaging, sensing, and light-control in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Piatkevich, Kiryl D.; Subach, Fedor V.

    2013-01-01

    Near-infrared light is favourable for imaging in mammalian tissues due to low absorbance of hemoglobin, melanin, and water. Therefore, fluorescent proteins, biosensors and optogenetic constructs for optimal imaging, optical readout and light manipulation in mammals should have fluorescence and action spectra within the near-infrared window. Interestingly, natural Bacterial Phytochrome Photoreceptors (BphPs) utilize the low molecular weight biliverdin, found in most mammalian tissues, as a photoreactive chromophore. Due to their near-infrared absorbance BphPs are preferred templates for designing optical molecular tools for applications in mammals. Moreover, BphPs spectrally complement existing genetically-encoded probes. Several BphPs were already developed into the near-infrared fluorescent variants. Based on analysis of the photochemistry and structure of BphPs we suggest a variety of possible BphP-based fluorescent proteins, biosensors, and optogenetic tools. Putative design strategies and experimental considerations for such probes are discussed. PMID:23361376

  13. Dynamics of Immune System Gene Expression upon Bacterial Challenge and Wounding in a Social Insect (Bombus terrestris)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Silvio Erler; Mario Popp; H. Michael G. Lattorff; Richard Cordaux

    2011-01-01

    The innate immune system which helps individuals to combat pathogens comprises a set of genes representing four immune system pathways (Toll, Imd, JNK and JAK\\/STAT). There is a lack of immune genes in social insects (e.g. honeybees) when compared to Diptera. Potentially, this might be compensated by an advanced system of social immunity (synergistic action of several individuals). The bumble

  14. H-NS is a part of a thermally controlled mechanism for bacterial gene regulation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shusuke Ono; Tjelvar Olsson; Diego Esposito

    2005-01-01

    Temperature is a primary environmental stress to which micro- organisms must be able to adapt and respond rapidly. Whereas some bacteria are restricted to specific niches and have limited abilities to survive changes in their environment, others, such as members of the Enterobacteriaceae, can withstand wide fluctu- ations in temperature. In addition to regulating cellular physio- logy, pathogenic bacteria use

  15. An autonomous molecular computer for logical control of gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benenson, Yaakov; Gil, Binyamin; Ben-Dor, Uri; Adar, Rivka; Shapiro, Ehud

    2004-05-01

    Early biomolecular computer research focused on laboratory-scale, human-operated computers for complex computational problems. Recently, simple molecular-scale autonomous programmable computers were demonstrated allowing both input and output information to be in molecular form. Such computers, using biological molecules as input data and biologically active molecules as outputs, could produce a system for `logical' control of biological processes. Here we describe an autonomous biomolecular computer that, at least in vitro, logically analyses the levels of messenger RNA species, and in response produces a molecule capable of affecting levels of gene expression. The computer operates at a concentration of close to a trillion computers per microlitre and consists of three programmable modules: a computation module, that is, a stochastic molecular automaton; an input module, by which specific mRNA levels or point mutations regulate software molecule concentrations, and hence automaton transition probabilities; and an output module, capable of controlled release of a short single-stranded DNA molecule. This approach might be applied in vivo to biochemical sensing, genetic engineering and even medical diagnosis and treatment. As a proof of principle we programmed the computer to identify and analyse mRNA of disease-related genes associated with models of small-cell lung cancer and prostate cancer, and to produce a single-stranded DNA molecule modelled after an anticancer drug.

  16. Integrons: agents of bacterial evolution

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Didier Mazel

    2006-01-01

    Integrons are assembly platforms — DNA elements that acquire open reading frames embedded in exogenous gene cassettes and convert them to functional genes by ensuring their correct expression. They were first identified by virtue of their important role in the spread of antibiotic-resistance genes. More recently, our understanding of their importance in bacterial genome evolution has broadened with the discovery

  17. From bacterial avirulence genes to effector functions via the hrp delivery system: an overview of 25 years of progress in our understanding of plant innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, John W

    2009-11-01

    Cloning the first avirulence (avr) gene has led not only to a deeper understanding of gene-for-gene interactions in plant disease, but also to fundamental insights into the suppression of basal defences against microbial attack. This article (focusing on Pseudomonas syringae) charts the development of ideas and research progress over the 25 years following the breakthrough achieved by Staskawicz and coworkers. Advances in gene cloning technology underpinned the identification of both avr and hrp genes, the latter being required for the activation of the defensive hypersensitive reaction (HR) and pathogenicity. The delivery of Avr proteins through the type III secretion machinery encoded by hrp gene clusters was demonstrated, and the activity of the proteins inside plant cells as elicitors of the HR was confirmed. Key roles for avr genes in pathogenic fitness have now been established. The rebranding of Avr proteins as effectors, proteins that suppress the HR and cell wall-based defences, has led to the ongoing search for their targets, and is generating new insights into the co-ordination of plant resistance against diverse microbes. Bioinformatics-led analysis of effector gene distribution in genomes has provided a remarkable view of the interchange of effectors and also their functional domains, as the arms race of attack and defence drives the evolution of microbial pathogenicity. The application of our accrued knowledge for the development of disease control strategies is considered. PMID:19849780

  18. Assessing bacterial diversity in a seawater-processing wastewater treatment plant by 454-pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA and amoA genes

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Olga; Ferrera, Isabel; González, Jose M; Mas, Jordi

    2013-01-01

    Summary The bacterial community composition of activated sludge from a wastewater treatment plant (Almería, Spain) with the particularity of using seawater was investigated by applying 454-pyrosequencing. The results showed that Deinococcus-Thermus, Proteobacteria, Chloroflexi and Bacteroidetes were the most abundant retrieved sequences, while other groups, such as Actinobacteria, Chlorobi, Deferribacteres, Firmicutes, Planctomycetes, Spirochaetes and Verrumicrobia were reported at lower proportions. Rarefaction analysis showed that very likely the diversity is higher than what could be described despite most of the unknown microorganisms probably correspond to rare diversity. Furthermore, the majority of taxa could not be classified at the genus level and likely represent novel members of these groups. Additionally, the nitrifiers in the sludge were characterized by pyrosequencing the amoA gene. In contrast, the nitrifying bacterial community, dominated by the genera Nitrosomonas, showed a low diversity and rarefaction curves exhibited saturation. These results suggest that only a few populations of low abundant but specialized bacteria are responsible for removal of ammonia in these saline wastewater systems. PMID:23574645

  19. [Dominant phylotypes in the 16S rRNA gene clone libraries from bacterial mats of the Uzon caldera (Kamchatka, Russia) hydrothermal springs].

    PubMed

    Akimov, V N; Podosokorskaia, O A; Shliapnikov, M G; Gal'chenko, V F

    2013-01-01

    In situ analysis of the 16S rRNA genes form bacterial mats of five hydrothermal springs (36-58 degrees C) in the Uzon caldera (Kamchatka, Russia) was carried out using clone libraries. Eight clone libraries contained 18 dominant phylotypes (over 4-5%). In most clone libraries, the phylotype of the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobaculum sp. was among the dominant ones. The phylotypes of the green nonsulfur bacteria Chloroflexus and Roseiflexus and of purple nonsulfur bacteria Rhodoblastus, Rhodopseudomonas, and Rhodoferax were also among the dominant ones. Cyanobacteria were represented by one dominant phylotype in a single spring. Among nonphototrophic bacteria, the dominant phylotypes belonged to Sulfyrihydrogenibium sp., Geothrixsp., Acidobacterium sp., Meiothermus sp., Thiomonas sp., Thiofaba sp., and Spirochaeta sp. Three phylotypes were not identified at the genus level. Most genera of phototrophic and nonphototrophic organisms corresponding to the phylotypes from Uzon hydrotherms have been previously revealed in the hydrotherms of volcanically active regions of America, Asia, and Europe. These results indicate predominance of bacterial mats carrying out anaerobic photosynthesis in the hydrotherms of the Uzon caldera. PMID:25509409

  20. Inhibition of intracellular bacterial replication in fibroblasts is dependent on the perforin-like protein (Perforin-2) encoded by macrophage expressed gene 1

    PubMed Central

    McCormack, Ryan; de Armas, Lesley R.; Shiratsuchi, Motoaki; Ramos, Jay; Podack, Eckhard R.

    2013-01-01

    Fibroblasts are known to eliminate intracellular bacteria, but the lethal hit of the bactericidal mechanism has not been defined. We show that primary embryonic and established fibroblasts can be induced by interferons or by intracellular bacterial infection to express a perforin-like mRNA previously described as macrophage expressed gene 1 (mpeg1). The presence and level of the perforin-like mRNA correlate with the ability of primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) to eliminate intracellular bacteria. In addition, siRNA knock-down of the perforin-like molecule abolishes bactericidal activity and allows intracellular bacterial replication. Complementation of MEF in which the endogenous perforin-like molecule has been knocked down with an RFP-tagged version restores bactericidal activity. The perforin-like molecule has broad bactericidal specificity for pathogenic and non-pathogenic bacteria including Gram positive, Gram negative and acid fast bacteria. The perforin-like molecule renders previously lysozyme-resistant bacteria sensitive to lysis by lysozyme suggesting physical damage of the outer cell wall by the perforin-like protein. MEFs damage cell walls of intracellular bacteria by insertion, polymerization and pore-formation of the perforin-like protein, analogous to pore-formers of complement and Perforin-1 of cytolytic lymphocytes. We propose the name Perforin-2. PMID:23257510

  1. Inhibition of intracellular bacterial replication in fibroblasts is dependent on the perforin-like protein (perforin-2) encoded by macrophage-expressed gene 1.

    PubMed

    McCormack, Ryan; de Armas, Lesley R; Shiratsuchi, Motoaki; Ramos, Jahir E; Podack, Eckhard R

    2013-01-01

    Fibroblasts are known to eliminate intracellular bacteria, but the lethal hit of the bactericidal mechanism has not been defined. We show that primary embryonic and established fibroblasts can be induced by interferons or by intracellular bacterial infection to express a perforin-like mRNA previously described as macrophage-expressed gene 1 (Mpeg1). The presence and level of the perforin-like mRNA correlate with the ability of primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) to eliminate intracellular bacteria. In addition, siRNA knockdown of the perforin-like molecule abolishes bactericidal activity and allows intracellular bacterial replication. Complementation of MEF in which the endogenous perforin-like molecule has been knocked down with a red fluorescent protein-tagged version restores bactericidal activity. The perforin-like molecule has broad bactericidal specificity for pathogenic and non-pathogenic bacteria, including Gram-positive and -negative, and acid fast bacteria. The perforin-like molecule renders previously lysozyme-resistant bacteria sensitive to lysis by lysozyme suggesting physical damage of the outer cell wall by the perforin-like protein. MEF damage cell walls of intracellular bacteria by insertion, polymerization, and pore formation of the perforin-like protein, analogous to pore formers of complement and perforin-1 of cytolytic lymphocytes. We propose the name perforin-2. PMID:23257510

  2. Gene promoter hypermethylation in ductal lavage fluid from healthy BRCA gene mutation carriers and mutation-negative controls

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Imogen Locke; Zsofia Kote-Jarai; Mary Jo Fackler; Elizabeth Bancroft; Peter Osin; Ashutosh Nerurkar; Louise Izatt; Gabriella Pichert; Gerald PH Gui; Rosalind A Eeles

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Female germline BRCA gene mutation carriers are at increased risk for developing breast cancer. The purpose of our study was to establish whether healthy BRCA mutation carriers demonstrate an increased frequency of aberrant gene promoter hypermethylation in ductal lavage (DL) fluid, compared with predictive genetic test negative controls, that might serve as a surrogate marker of BRCA1\\/2 mutation status

  3. Adenovirus-mediated hypoxia-targeted gene therapy using HSV thymidine kinase and bacterial nitroreductase prodrug-activating genes in vitro and in vivo

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T J Harvey; I M Hennig; S D Shnyder; P A Cooper; N Ingram; G D Hall; P J Selby; J D Chester

    2011-01-01

    Hypoxia is an important factor in tumor growth. It is associated with resistance to conventional anticancer treatments. Gene therapy targeting hypoxic tumor cells therefore has the potential to enhance the efficacy of treatment of solid tumors. Transfection of a panel of tumor cell lines with plasmid constructs containing hypoxia-responsive promoter elements from the genes, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and

  4. PanOCT: automated clustering of orthologs using conserved gene neighborhood for pan-genomic analysis of bacterial strains and closely related species

    PubMed Central

    Fouts, Derrick E.; Brinkac, Lauren; Beck, Erin; Inman, Jason; Sutton, Granger

    2012-01-01

    Pan-genome ortholog clustering tool (PanOCT) is a tool for pan-genomic analysis of closely related prokaryotic species or strains. PanOCT uses conserved gene neighborhood information to separate recently diverged paralogs into orthologous clusters where homology-only clustering methods cannot. The results from PanOCT and three commonly used graph-based ortholog-finding programs were compared using a set of four publicly available strains of the same bacterial species. All four methods agreed on ?70% of the clusters and ?86% of the proteins. The clusters that did not agree were inspected for evidence of correctness resulting in 85 high-confidence manually curated clusters that were used to compare all four methods. PMID:22904089

  5. Bacterial communities of traditional salted and fermented seafoods from Jeju Island of Korea using 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Soo; Park, Eun-Jin

    2014-05-01

    Jeotgal, which is widely consumed as a nutritional supplement in Korea, is traditional type of preserved seafood that is prepared by salting and fermenting. Here, we report on the bacterial community structure and diversity of jeotgal obtained from the Korean island of Jeju, which has a subtropical climate. Two samples of Jeotgal were collected from Jeju, made from either damselfish (Chromis notata; jari-dom-jeot, J1 and J2) or silver-stripe round herring (Spratelloides gracilis; ggot-myulchi-jeot, K1 and K2). The physical characteristics (pH and salinity) were assessed and the bacterial communities characterized using 16S rRNA gene-clone library analysis and cultural isolation. No difference was found in the community composition between the J and K fermented seafoods. Both fermented seafoods had relatively high salinity (26% to 33%) and high pH values (pH 6.08 to 6.72). Based on the 16S rRNA gene sequences, the halophilic lactic-acid bacteria Tetragenococcus halophilus and T. muriaticus were observed to be dominant in the J and K fermented seafoods, accompanied by halophilic bacteria including Halanaerobium spp., Halomonas spp., and Chromohalobacter spp. When compared with 7 other types of fermented seafood from a previous study, the communities of the J and K fermented seafoods were separated by the most influential group, the genus Tetragenococcus. The results suggest that these 2 types of traditional salted fermented seafood from Jeju have distinct communities dominated by Tetragenococcus spp., which are derived from the raw ingredients and are dependent on the physical conditions. This may explain how the seafoods that are made in Jeju may differ from other jeotgals. PMID:24689962

  6. Surface controlled calcium phosphate formation on three-dimensional bacterial cellulose-based nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Luo, Honglin; Xiong, Guangyao; Zhang, Chen; Li, Deying; Zhu, Yong; Guo, Ruisong; Wan, Yizao

    2015-04-01

    Studies on the early calcium phosphate (Ca-P) formation on nanosized substrates may allow us to understand the biomineralization mechanisms at the molecular level. In this work, in situ formation of Ca-P minerals on bacterial cellulose (BC)-based nanofibers was investigated, for the first time, using the X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. In addition, the influence of the surface coating of nanofibers on the formation of Ca-P minerals was determined. Combined with XRD analysis, XANES results revealed that the nascent precursor was ACP (amorphous calcium phosphate) which was converted to TCP (?-tricalcium phosphate), then OCP (octacalcium phosphate), and finally to HAP (hydroxyapatite) when phosphorylated BC nanofibers were the templates. However, the formation of nascent precursor and its transformation process varied depending on the nature of the coating material on nanofibrous templates. These results provide new insights into basic mechanisms of mineralization and can lead to the development of novel bioinspired nanostructured materials. PMID:25686980

  7. Control efficacy of an endophytic Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain BZ6-1 against peanut bacterial Wilt, Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaobing; Liang, Guobin

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to isolate and identify endophytic bacteria that might have efficacy against peanut bacterial wilt (BW) caused by Ralstonia solanacearum. Thirty-seven endophytic strains were isolated from healthy peanut plants in R. solanacearum-infested fields and eight showed antagonistic effects against R. solanacearum. Strain BZ6-1 with the highest antimicrobial activity was identified as Bacillus amyloliquefaciens based on morphology, biochemistry, and 16S rRNA analysis. Culture conditions of BZ6-1 were optimized using orthogonal test method and inhibitory zone diameter in dual culture plate assay reached 34.2 mm. Furthermore, main antimicrobial substances of surfactin and fengycin A homologues produced by BZ6-1 were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. Finally, pot experiments were adopted to test the control efficiency of BZ6-1 against peanut BW. Disease incidence decreased significantly from 84.5% in the control to 12.1% with addition of 15 mL (10(8) cfu mL(-1)) culture broth for each seedling, suggesting the feasibility of strain BZ6-1 in the biological control of peanut plants BW. PMID:24527448

  8. Inter-genomic displacement via lateral gene transfer of bacterial trp operons in an overall context of vertical genealogy

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Gary; Bonner, Carol A; Song, Jian; Keyhani, Nemat O; Jensen, Roy A

    2004-01-01

    Background The growing conviction that lateral gene transfer plays a significant role in prokaryote genealogy opens up a need for comprehensive evaluations of gene-enzyme systems on a case-by-case basis. Genes of tryptophan biosynthesis are frequently organized as whole-pathway operons, an attribute that is expected to facilitate multi-gene transfer in a single step. We have asked whether events of lateral gene transfer are sufficient to have obscured our ability to track the vertical genealogy that underpins tryptophan biosynthesis. Results In 47 complete-genome Bacteria, the genes encoding the seven catalytic domains that participate in primary tryptophan biosynthesis were distinguished from any paralogs or xenologs engaged in other specialized functions. A reliable list of orthologs with carefully ascertained functional roles has thus been assembled and should be valuable as an annotation resource. The protein domains associated with primary tryptophan biosynthesis were then concatenated, yielding single amino-acid sequence strings that represent the entire tryptophan pathway. Lateral gene transfer of several whole-pathway trp operons was demonstrated by use of phylogenetic analysis. Lateral gene transfer of partial-pathway trp operons was also shown, with newly recruited genes functioning either in primary biosynthesis (rarely) or specialized metabolism (more frequently). Conclusions (i) Concatenated tryptophan protein trees are congruent with 16S rRNA subtrees provided that the genomes represented are of sufficiently close phylogenetic spacing. There are currently seven tryptophan congruency groups in the Bacteria. Recognition of a succession of others can be expected in the near future, but ultimately these should coalesce to a single grouping that parallels the 16S rRNA tree (except for cases of lateral gene transfer). (ii) The vertical trace of evolution for tryptophan biosynthesis can be deduced. The daunting complexities engendered by paralogy, xenology, and idiosyncrasies of nomenclature at this point in time have necessitated an expert-assisted manual effort to achieve a correct analysis. Once recognized and sorted out, paralogy and xenology can be viewed as features that enrich evolutionary histories. PMID:15214963

  9. Histone modifications induced by a family of bacterial toxins

    PubMed Central

    Hamon, Mélanie Anne; Batsché, Eric; Régnault, Béatrice; Tham, To Nam; Seveau, Stéphanie; Muchardt, Christian; Cossart, Pascale

    2007-01-01

    Upon infection, pathogens reprogram host gene expression. In eukaryotic cells, genetic reprogramming is induced by the concerted activation/repression of transcription factors and various histone modifications that control DNA accessibility in chromatin. We report here that the bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes induces a dramatic dephosphorylation of histone H3 as well as a deacetylation of histone H4 during early phases of infection. This effect is mediated by the major listerial toxin listeriolysin O in a pore-forming-independent manner. Strikingly, a similar effect also is observed with other toxins of the same family, such as Clostridium perfringens perfringolysin and Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumolysin. The decreased levels of histone modifications correlate with a reduced transcriptional activity of a subset of host genes, including key immunity genes. Thus, control of epigenetic regulation emerges here as an unsuspected function shared by several bacterial toxins, highlighting a common strategy used by intracellular and extracellular pathogens to modulate the host response early during infection. PMID:17675409

  10. Efficacy of a commercial probiotic relative to oxytetracycline as Gram-negative bacterial control agents in a rotifer (Brachionus plicatilis) batch culture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two trials were conducted to evaluate two gram-negative bacterial control strategies in batch cultures of the rotifer Brachionus plicatilis. In the first trial, rotifers at an initial density of 47/mL were cultured for 5 d and dosed with a 10-mg/L solution of either oxytetracycline or a commercial p...

  11. Bacterial Sialidase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Data shows that elevated sialidase in bacterial vaginosis patients correlates to premature births in women. Bacterial sialidase also plays a significant role in the unusual colonization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis patients. Crystals of Salmonella sialidase have been reproduced and are used for studying the inhibitor-enzyme complexes. These inhibitors may also be used to inhibit a trans-sialidase of Trypanosome cruzi, a very similar enzyme to bacterial sialidase, therefore preventing T. cruzi infection, the causitive agent of Chagas' disease. The Center for Macromolecular Crystallography suggests that inhibitors of bacterial sialidases can be used as prophylactic drugs to prevent bacterial infections in these critical cases.

  12. A bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library of Malus floribunda 821 and contig construction for positional cloning of the apple scab resistance gene Vf.

    PubMed

    Xu, M; Song, J; Cheng, Z; Jiang, J; Korban, S S

    2001-12-01

    The apple scab resistance gene Vf, originating from the wild species Malus floribunda 821, has been incorporated into a wide variety of apple cultivars through a classical breeding program. With the aim of isolating the Vf gene, a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library consisting of 31 584 clones has been constructed from M. floribunda 821. From the analysis of 88 randomly selected BAC clones, the average insert size is estimated at 125 kb. If it is assumed that the genome size of M. floribunda 821 is 769 Mb/haploid, the library represents about 5x haploid genome equivalents. This provides a 99% probability of finding any specific sequence from this library. PCR-based screening of the library has been carried out using eight random genomic sequence-characterized amplified regions (SCARs), chloroplast- and mitochondria-specific SCARs, and 13 high-density Vf-linked SCAR markers. An average of five positive BAC clones per random SCAR has been obtained, whereas less than 1% of BAC clones are derived from the chloroplast or mitochondrial genomes. Most BAC clones identified with Vf-linked SCAR markers are physically linked. Three BAC contigs along the Vf region have been obtained by assembling physically linked BAC clones based on their fingerprints. The overlapping relatedness of BAC clones has been further confirmed by cytogenetic mapping using fiber fluorescence in situ hybridization (fiber-FISH). The M. floribunda 821 BAC library provides a valuable genetic resource not only for map-based cloning of the Vf gene, but also for finding many other important genes for improving the cultivated apple. PMID:11768214

  13. Polynucleotide Phosphorylase Negatively Controls spv Virulence Gene Expression in Salmonella enterica

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sofia Eriksson Ygberg; Mark O. Clements; Anne Rytkonen; Arthur Thompson; David W. Holden; Jay C. D. Hinton; Mikael Rhen

    2006-01-01

    Mutational inactivation of the cold-shock-associated exoribonuclease polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase; encoded by the pnp gene) in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium was previously shown to enable the bacteria to cause chronic infection and to affect the bacterial replication in BALB\\/c mice (M. O. Clements et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 99:8784-8789, 2002). Here, we report that PNPase deficiency results in increased

  14. Evaluation of endogenous control gene(s) for gene expression studies in human blood exposed to 60Co ?-rays ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Vaiphei, S Thangminlal; Keppen, Joshua; Nongrum, Saibadaiahun; Chaubey, R C; Kma, L; Sharan, R N

    2015-01-01

    In gene expression studies, it is critical to normalize data using a stably expressed endogenous control gene in order to obtain accurate and reliable results. However, we currently do not have a universally applied endogenous control gene for normalization of data for gene expression studies, particularly those involving (60)Co ?-ray-exposed human blood samples. In this study, a comparative assessment of the gene expression of six widely used housekeeping endogenous control genes, namely 18S, ACTB, B2M, GAPDH, MT-ATP6 and CDKN1A, was undertaken for a range of (60)Co ?-ray doses (0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 4.0 Gy) at 8.4 Gy min(-1) at 0 and 24 h post-irradiation time intervals. Using the NormFinder algorithm, real-time PCR data obtained from six individuals (three males and three females) were analyzed with respect to the threshold cycle (Ct) value and abundance, ?Ct pair-wise comparison, intra- and inter-group variability assessments, etc. GAPDH, either alone or in combination with 18S, was found to be the most suitable endogenous control gene and should be used in gene expression studies, especially those involving qPCR of ?-ray-exposed human blood samples. PMID:25271263

  15. Controls on bacterial gas accumulations in thick Tertiary coal beds and adjacent channel sandstones, Powder River basin, Wyoming and Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, D.D.; Flores, R.M. (U.S. Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States))

    1991-03-01

    Coal beds, as much as 250 ft thick, and adjacent sandstones in the Paleocene Tongue River Member of the Fort Union Formation are reservoirs for coal-derived natural gas in the Powder River basin. The discontinuous coal beds were deposited in raised, ombrotrophic peat bogs about 3 mi{sup 2} in size, adjoining networks of fluvial channels infilled by sand. Coal-bed thickness was controlled by basin subsidence and depositional environments. The average maceral composition of the coals is 88% huminite (vitrinite), 5% liptinite, and 7% inertinite. The coals vary in rank from subbituminous C to A (R{sub o} values of 0.4 to 0.5%). Although the coals are relatively low rank, they display fracture systems. Natural gas desorbed and produced from the coal beds and adjacent sandstones is composed mainly of methane with lesser amount of Co{sub 2} ({lt}10%). The methane is isotopically light and enriched in deuterium. The gases are interpreted to be generated by bacterial processes and the fermentation pathway, prior to the main phase of thermogenic methane generation by devolatilization. Large amounts of bicarbonate water generated during early stages of coalification will have to be removed from the fracture porosity in the coal beds before desorption and commercial gas production can take place. Desorbed amounts of methane-rich, bacterial gas in the Powder River basin are relatively low ({lt}60 Scf/ton) compared to amounts of thermogenic coal-bed gases (hundreds of Scf/ton) from other Rocky Mountain basins. However, the total coal-bed gas resource in both the coal beds and the adjacent sandstones is considered to be large (as much as 40 Tcf) because of the vast coal resources (as much as 1.3 trillion tons).

  16. Optimal finite horizon control in gene regulatory networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qiuli

    2013-06-01

    As a paradigm for modeling gene regulatory networks, probabilistic Boolean networks (PBNs) form a subclass of Markov genetic regulatory networks. To date, many different stochastic optimal control approaches have been developed to find therapeutic intervention strategies for PBNs. A PBN is essentially a collection of constituent Boolean networks via a probability structure. Most of the existing works assume that the probability structure for Boolean networks selection is known. Such an assumption cannot be satisfied in practice since the presence of noise prevents the probability structure from being accurately determined. In this paper, we treat a case in which we lack the governing probability structure for Boolean network selection. Specifically, in the framework of PBNs, the theory of finite horizon Markov decision process is employed to find optimal constituent Boolean networks with respect to the defined objective functions. In order to illustrate the validity of our proposed approach, an example is also displayed.

  17. Post-Transcriptional Control of Chloroplast Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    del Campo, Eva M.

    2009-01-01

    Chloroplasts contain their own genome, organized as operons, which are generally transcribed as polycistronic transcriptional units. These primary transcripts are processed into smaller RNAs, which are further modified to produce functional RNAs. The RNA processing mechanisms remain largely unknown and represent an important step in the control of chloroplast gene expression. Such mechanisms include RNA cleavage of pre-existing RNAs, RNA stabilization, intron splicing, and RNA editing. Recently, several nuclear-encoded proteins that participate in diverse plastid RNA processing events have been characterised. Many of them seem to belong to the pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) protein family that is implicated in many crucial functions including organelle biogenesis and plant development. This review will provide an overview of current knowledge of the post-transcriptional processing in chloroplasts. PMID:19838333

  18. Sequencing and analysis of bacterial genomes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eugene V. Koonin; Arcady R. Mushegian; Kenneth E. Rudd

    1996-01-01

    The complete sequences of two small bacterial genomes have recently become available, and those of several more species should follow within the next two years. Sequence comparisons show that the most bacterial proteins are highly conserved in evolution, allowing predictions to be made about the functions of most products of an uncharacterized genome. Bacterial genomes differ vastly in their gene

  19. Rapid and efficient introduction of a foreign gene into bacterial artificial chromosome-cloned varicella vaccine by Tn7-mediated site-specific transposition

    SciTech Connect

    Somboonthum, Pranee; Koshizuka, Tetsuo; Okamoto, Shigefumi [Laboratory of Virology and Vaccinology, Division of Biomedical Research, National Institute of Biomedical Innovation (Japan); Matsuura, Masaaki [Laboratory of Virology and Vaccinology, Division of Biomedical Research, National Institute of Biomedical Innovation (Japan); Kanonji Institute, the Research Foundation for Microbial Diseases of Osaka University (Japan); Gomi, Yasuyuki [Kanonji Institute, the Research Foundation for Microbial Diseases of Osaka University (Japan); Takahashi, Michiaki [Research Foundation for Microbial Diseases of Osaka University (Japan); Yamanishi, Koichi [Laboratory of Virology and Vaccinology, Division of Biomedical Research, National Institute of Biomedical Innovation (Japan); Mori, Yasuko, E-mail: ymori@med.kobe-u.ac.j [Laboratory of Virology and Vaccinology, Division of Biomedical Research, National Institute of Biomedical Innovation (Japan); Division of Clinical Virology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan)

    2010-06-20

    Using a rapid and reliable system based on Tn7-mediated site-specific transposition, we have successfully constructed a recombinant Oka varicella vaccine (vOka) expressing the mumps virus (MuV) fusion protein (F). The backbone of the vector was our previously reported vOka-BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome) genome. We inserted the transposon Tn7 attachment sequence, LacZ{alpha}-mini-attTn7, into the region between ORF12 and ORF13 to generate a vOka-BAC-Tn genome. The MuV-F expressing cassette was transposed into the vOka-BAC genome at the mini-attTn7 transposition site. MuV-F protein was expressed in recombinant virus, rvOka-F infected cells. In addition, the MuV-F protein was cleaved in the rvOka-F infected cells as in MuV-infected cells. The growth of rvOka-F was similar to that of the original recombinant vOka without the F gene. Thus, we show that Tn7-mediated transposition is an efficient method for introducing a foreign gene expression cassette into the vOka-BAC genome as a live virus vector.

  20. HIV gene expression from intact proviruses positioned in bacterial artificial chromosomes at integration sites previously identified in latently infected T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Eipers, Peter G. [Department of Cell Biology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 802 Kaul Building, 720 20th Street South, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Salazar-Gonzalez, Jesus F. [Department of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Morrow, Casey D., E-mail: caseym@uab.ed [Department of Cell Biology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 802 Kaul Building, 720 20th Street South, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States)

    2011-02-05

    HIV integration predominantly occurs in introns of transcriptionally active genes. To study the impact of the integration site on HIV gene expression, a complete HIV-1 provirus (with GFP as a fusion with Nef) was inserted into bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) at three sites previously identified in latent T cells of patients: topoisomerase II (Top2A), DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1), or basic leucine transcription factor 2 (BACH2). Transfection of BAC-HIV into 293 T cells resulted in a fourfold difference in production of infectious HIV-1. Cell lines were established that contained BAC-Top2A, BAC-DNMT1, or BAC-BACH2, but only BAC-DNMT1 spontaneously produced virus, albeit at a low level. Stimulation with TNF-{alpha} resulted in virus production from four of five BAC-Top2A and all BAC-DNMT1 cell lines, but not from the BAC-BACH2 lines. The results of these studies highlight differences between integration sites identified in latent T cells to support virus production and reactivation from latency.

  1. Regulation of clock-controlled genes in mammals.

    PubMed

    Bozek, Katarzyna; Relógio, Angela; Kielbasa, Szymon M; Heine, Markus; Dame, Christof; Kramer, Achim; Herzel, Hanspeter

    2009-01-01

    The complexity of tissue- and day time-specific regulation of thousands of clock-controlled genes (CCGs) suggests that many regulatory mechanisms contribute to the transcriptional output of the circadian clock. We aim to predict these mechanisms using a large scale promoter analysis of CCGs.Our study is based on a meta-analysis of DNA-array data from rodent tissues. We searched in the promoter regions of 2065 CCGs for highly overrepresented transcription factor binding sites. In order to compensate the relatively high GC-content of CCG promoters, a novel background model to avoid a bias towards GC-rich motifs was employed. We found that many of the transcription factors with overrepresented binding sites in CCG promoters exhibit themselves circadian rhythms. Among the predicted factors are known regulators such as CLOCKratioBMAL1, DBP, HLF, E4BP4, CREB, RORalpha and the recently described regulators HSF1, STAT3, SP1 and HNF-4alpha. As additional promising candidates of circadian transcriptional regulators PAX-4, C/EBP, EVI-1, IRF, E2F, AP-1, HIF-1 and NF-Y were identified. Moreover, GC-rich motifs (SP1, EGR, ZF5, AP-2, WT1, NRF-1) and AT-rich motifs (MEF-2, HMGIY, HNF-1, OCT-1) are significantly overrepresented in promoter regions of CCGs. Putative tissue-specific binding sites such as HNF-3 for liver, NKX2.5 for heart or Myogenin for skeletal muscle were found. The regulation of the erythropoietin (Epo) gene was analysed, which exhibits many binding sites for circadian regulators. We provide experimental evidence for its circadian regulated expression in the adult murine kidney. Basing on a comprehensive literature search we integrate our predictions into a regulatory network of core clock and clock-controlled genes. Our large scale analysis of the CCG promoters reveals the complexity and extensiveness of the circadian regulation in mammals. Results of this study point to connections of the circadian clock to other functional systems including metabolism, endocrine regulation and pharmacokinetics. PMID:19287494

  2. Regulation of Clock-Controlled Genes in Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Kielbasa, Szymon M.; Heine, Markus; Dame, Christof; Kramer, Achim; Herzel, Hanspeter

    2009-01-01

    The complexity of tissue- and day time-specific regulation of thousands of clock-controlled genes (CCGs) suggests that many regulatory mechanisms contribute to the transcriptional output of the circadian clock. We aim to predict these mechanisms using a large scale promoter analysis of CCGs. Our study is based on a meta-analysis of DNA-array data from rodent tissues. We searched in the promoter regions of 2065 CCGs for highly overrepresented transcription factor binding sites. In order to compensate the relatively high GC-content of CCG promoters, a novel background model to avoid a bias towards GC-rich motifs was employed. We found that many of the transcription factors with overrepresented binding sites in CCG promoters exhibit themselves circadian rhythms. Among the predicted factors are known regulators such as CLOCK?BMAL1, DBP, HLF, E4BP4, CREB, ROR? and the recently described regulators HSF1, STAT3, SP1 and HNF-4?. As additional promising candidates of circadian transcriptional regulators PAX-4, C/EBP, EVI-1, IRF, E2F, AP-1, HIF-1 and NF-Y were identified. Moreover, GC-rich motifs (SP1, EGR, ZF5, AP-2, WT1, NRF-1) and AT-rich motifs (MEF-2, HMGIY, HNF-1, OCT-1) are significantly overrepresented in promoter regions of CCGs. Putative tissue-specific binding sites such as HNF-3 for liver, NKX2.5 for heart or Myogenin for skeletal muscle were found. The regulation of the erythropoietin (Epo) gene was analysed, which exhibits many binding sites for circadian regulators. We provide experimental evidence for its circadian regulated expression in the adult murine kidney. Basing on a comprehensive literature search we integrate our predictions into a regulatory network of core clock and clock-controlled genes. Our large scale analysis of the CCG promoters reveals the complexity and extensiveness of the circadian regulation in mammals. Results of this study point to connections of the circadian clock to other functional systems including metabolism, endocrine regulation and pharmacokinetics. PMID:19287494

  3. Circadian control of sweet potato granule-bound starch synthase I gene in Arabidopsis plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shu-Jen Wang; Kai-Wun Yeh; Chia-Yin Tsai

    2004-01-01

    A starch granule-bound starch synthase I (GBSSI) gene is regulated by a circadian clock in sweet potato leaves. In order to examine whether the promoter region is responsible for controlling a circadian expression of the GBSSI gene, the sweet potato GBSSI promoter was isolated and deleted to different lengths for functional analysis with a GUS reporter gene in transgenic Arabidopsis

  4. The Use of EST Expression Matrixes for the Quality Control of Gene Expression Data

    E-print Network

    Sheldon, Nathan D.

    The Use of EST Expression Matrixes for the Quality Control of Gene Expression Data Andrew T differential gene expression, but cDNA libraries' origins and EST data quality are not always known or reported-specific gene expression, assume EST counts to be correct and libraries to be correctly annotated, which

  5. Removal of bacterial contaminants and antibiotic resistance genes by conventional wastewater treatment processes in Saudi Arabia: Is the treated wastewater safe to reuse for agricultural irrigation?

    PubMed

    Al-Jassim, Nada; Ansari, Mohd Ikram; Harb, Moustapha; Hong, Pei-Ying

    2015-04-15

    This study aims to assess the removal efficiency of microbial contaminants in a local wastewater treatment plant over the duration of one year, and to assess the microbial risk associated with reusing treated wastewater in agricultural irrigation. The treatment process achieved 3.5 logs removal of heterotrophic bacteria and up to 3.5 logs removal of fecal coliforms. The final chlorinated effluent had 1.8 × 10(2) MPN/100 mL of fecal coliforms and fulfils the required quality for restricted irrigation. 16S rRNA gene-based high-throughput sequencing showed that several genera associated with opportunistic pathogens (e.g. Acinetobacter, Aeromonas, Arcobacter, Legionella, Mycobacterium, Neisseria, Pseudomonas and Streptococcus) were detected at relative abundance ranging from 0.014 to 21 % of the total microbial community in the influent. Among them, Pseudomonas spp. had the highest approximated cell number in the influent but decreased to less than 30 cells/100 mL in both types of effluent. A culture-based approach further revealed that Pseudomonas aeruginosa was mainly found in the influent and non-chlorinated effluent but was replaced by other Pseudomonas spp. in the chlorinated effluent. Aeromonas hydrophila could still be recovered in the chlorinated effluent. Quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) determined that only chlorinated effluent should be permitted for use in agricultural irrigation as it achieved an acceptable annual microbial risk lower than 10(-4) arising from both P. aeruginosa and A. hydrophila. However, the proportion of bacterial isolates resistant to 6 types of antibiotics increased from 3.8% in the influent to 6.9% in the chlorinated effluent. Examples of these antibiotic-resistant isolates in the chlorinated effluent include Enterococcus and Enterobacter spp. Besides the presence of antibiotic-resistant bacterial isolates, tetracycline resistance genes tetO, tetQ, tetW, tetH, tetZ were also present at an average 2.5 × 10(2), 1.6 × 10(2), 4.4 × 10(2), 1.6 × 10(1) and 5.5 × 10(3) copies per mL of chlorinated effluent. Our study highlighted that potential risks associated with the reuse of treated wastewater arise not only from conventional fecal indicators or known pathogens, but also from antibiotic-resistant bacteria and genes. PMID:25687420

  6. Mechanism of Phenolic Activation of Agrobacterium Virulence Genes: Development of a Specific Inhibitor of Bacterial Sensor\\/Response Systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kathleen M. Hess; Matthew W. Dudley; David G. Lynn; Rolf D. Joerger; Andrew N. Binns

    1991-01-01

    The aglycone of the dihydrodiconiferyl alcohol glycosides, a series of phenolic growth factors able to substitute for some of the hormone requirements of tobacco cell division, are also potent inducers of virulence gene expression in Agrobacterium tumefaciens. However, these factors do not conform to the previously established structural requirements necessary for vir expression. Systematic evaluation of the structural requirements of

  7. Molecular characterization and gene expression of the channel catfish Ferritin H subunit after bacterial infection and iron treatment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ferritins are the major iron storage protein in the cytoplasm of cells, responsible for regulating levels of intracellular iron. Ferritin genes are widely distributed in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. In mammals, ferritin molecules are composed of heavy- (H) and light- (L) chain subunits; amphibia...

  8. Two Genes with Similarity to Bacterial Response Regulators Are Rapidly and Specifically Induced by Cytokinin in Arabidopsis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ingrid Brandstatter; Joseph J. Kieber

    1998-01-01

    Cytokinins are central regulators of plant growth and development, but little is known about their mode of action. By using differential display, we identified a gene, IBC6 (for induced by cytokinin), from etiolated Arabidopsis seedlings, that is induced rapidly by cytokinin. The steady state level of IBC6 mRNA was elevated within 10 min by the exogenous application of cytokinin, and

  9. Prevalence of antibiotic resistance genes and bacterial pathogens in long-term manured greenhouse soils as revealed by metagenomic survey.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hua; Wang, Huifang; Cai, Lin; Yu, Yunlong

    2015-01-20

    Antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs), human pathogenic bacteria (HPB), and HPB carrying ARGs pose a high risk to soil ecology and public health. Here, we used a metagenomic approach to investigate their diversity and abundance in chicken manures and greenhouse soils collected from Guli, Pulangke, and Hushu vegetable bases with different greenhouse planting years in Nanjing, Eastern China. There was a positive correlation between the levels of antibiotics, ARGs, HPB, and HPB carrying ARGs in manures and greenhouse soils. In total, 156.2–5001.4 ?g/kg of antibiotic residues, 22 classes of ARGs, 32 HPB species, and 46 species of HPB carrying ARGs were found. The highest relative abundance was tetracycline resistance genes (manures) and multidrug resistance genes (greenhouse soils). The dominant HPB and HPB carrying ARGs in the manures were Bacillus anthracis, Bordetella pertussis, and B. anthracis (sulfonamide resistance gene, sul1), respectively. The corresponding findings in greenhouse soils were Mycobacterium tuberculosis and M. ulcerans, M. tuberculosis (macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin resistance protein, MLSRP), and B. anthracis (sul1), respectively. Our findings confirmed high levels of antibiotics, ARGs, HPB, and HPB carrying ARGs in the manured greenhouse soils compared with those in the field soils, and their relative abundance increased with the extension of greenhouse planting years. PMID:25514174

  10. Antimicrobial-resistant bacterial populations and antimicrobial resistance genes obtained from environments impacted by livestock and municipal waste

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study compared the populations of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria and the repertoire of antimicrobial resistance genes in four environments: effluent of three municipal waste water treatment facilities, three cattle feedlot runoff catchment ponds, three swine waste lagoons, and two "low impact...

  11. Detection of Bacterial Virulence Genes by Subtractive Hybridization: Identification of Capsular Polysaccharide of Burkholderia pseudomallei as a Major Virulence Determinant

    Microsoft Academic Search

    SHAUNA L. RECKSEIDLER; DAVID DESHAZER; PAMELA A. SOKOL; DONALD E. WOODS

    2001-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, the etiologic agent of melioidosis, is responsible for a broad spectrum of illnesses in humans and animals particularly in Southeast Asia and northern Australia, where it is endemic. Burkhold- eria thailandensis is a nonpathogenic environmental organism closely related to B. pseudomallei. Subtractive hybridization was carried out between these two species to identify genes encoding virulence determinants in B.

  12. Bacterial genome adaptation to niches: Divergence of the potential virulence genes in three Burkholderia species of different survival strategies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H Stanley Kim; Mark A Schell; Yan Yu; Ricky L Ulrich; Saul H Sarria; William C Nierman; David DeShazer

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Two closely related species Burkholderia mallei (Bm) and Burkholderia pseudomallei (Bp) are serious human health hazards and are potential bio-warfare agents, whereas another closely related species Burkholderia thailandensis (Bt) is a non-pathogenic saprophyte. To investigate the genomic factors resulting in such a dramatic difference, we first identified the Bm genes responsive to the mouse environment, and then examined the

  13. Discovery of a gene involved in a third bacterial protoporphyrinogen oxidase activity through comparative genomic analysis and functional complementation.

    PubMed

    Boynton, Tye O; Gerdes, Svetlana; Craven, Sarah H; Neidle, Ellen L; Phillips, John D; Dailey, Harry A

    2011-07-01

    Tetrapyrroles are ubiquitous molecules in nearly all living organisms. Heme, an iron-containing tetrapyrrole, is widely distributed in nature, including most characterized aerobic and facultative bacteria. A large majority of bacteria that contain heme possess the ability to synthesize it. Despite this capability and the fact that the biosynthetic pathway has been well studied, enzymes catalyzing at least three steps have remained "missing" in many bacteria. In the current work, we have employed comparative genomics via the SEED genomic platform, coupled with experimental verification utilizing Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1, to identify one of the missing enzymes, a new protoporphyrinogen oxidase, the penultimate enzyme in heme biosynthesis. COG1981 was identified by genomic analysis as a candidate protein family for the missing enzyme in bacteria that lacked HemG or HemY, two known protoporphyrinogen oxidases. The predicted amino acid sequence of COG1981 is unlike those of the known enzymes HemG and HemY, but in some genomes, the gene encoding it is found neighboring other heme biosynthetic genes. When the COG1981 gene was deleted from the genome of A. baylyi, a bacterium that lacks both hemG and hemY, the organism became auxotrophic for heme. Cultures accumulated porphyrin intermediates, and crude cell extracts lacked protoporphyrinogen oxidase activity. The heme auxotrophy was rescued by the presence of a plasmid-borne protoporphyrinogen oxidase gene from a number of different organisms, such as hemG from Escherichia coli, hemY from Myxococcus xanthus, or the human gene for protoporphyrinogen oxidase. PMID:21642412

  14. Toll-like receptor 4 signalling through MyD88 is essential to control Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection, but not for the initiation of bacterial clearance

    PubMed Central

    Talbot, Suzanne; Tötemeyer, Sabine; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Akira, Shizuo; Hughes, Katherine; Gray, David; Barr, Tom; Mastroeni, Pietro; Maskell, Duncan J; Bryant, Clare E

    2009-01-01

    Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) is important in protection against lethal Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) infection. Control of the early stages of sublethal S. Typhimurium infection in mice depends on TLR4-dependent activation of macrophages and natural killer (NK) cells to drive an inflammatory response. TLR4 signals through the adapter proteins Mal/MyD88 and TRIF-related adaptor molecule (TRAM)/TIR-domain-containing adaptor-inducing interferon-b (TRIF). In the mouse typhoid model we showed that TLR4 and MyD88, but not Mal or TRIF, are essential for the control of exponential S. Typhimurium growth. TRIF?/? mice have a higher bacterial load in comparison with wild-type mice during a sublethal infection because TRIF is important for bacterial killing during the first day of systemic disease. Minimal pro-inflammatory responses were induced by S. Typhimurium infection of macrophages from TLR4?/?, MyD88?/? and TRIF?/? mice in vitro. Pro-inflammatory responses from Mal?/? macrophages were similar to those from wild-type cells. The pro-inflammatory responses of TRIF?/? macrophages were partially restored by the addition of interferon-? (IFN-?), and TRIF?/? mice produced markedly enhanced IFN-? levels, in comparison to wild-type mice, probably explaining why bacterial growth can be controlled in these mice. TLR4?/?, MyD88?/?, TRIF?/? and Mal?/? mice all initiated clearance of S. Typhimurium, suggesting that TLR4 signalling is not important in driving bacterial clearance in comparison to its critical role in controlling early bacterial growth in mouse typhoid. PMID:19930040

  15. Selenium-Dependent Biogenesis of Formate Dehydrogenase in Campylobacter jejuni Is Controlled by the fdhTU Accessory Genes

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Frances L.; Mulholland, Francis; Le Gall, Gwénaëlle; Porcelli, Ida; Hart, Dave J.; Pearson, Bruce M.

    2012-01-01

    The food-borne bacterial pathogen Campylobacter jejuni efficiently utilizes organic acids such as lactate and formate for energy production. Formate is rapidly metabolized via the activity of the multisubunit formate dehydrogenase (FDH) enzyme, of which the FdhA subunit is predicted to contain a selenocysteine (SeC) amino acid. In this study we investigated the function of the cj1500 and cj1501 genes of C. jejuni, demonstrate that they are involved in selenium-controlled production of FDH, and propose the names fdhT and fdhU, respectively. Insertional inactivation of fdhT or fdhU in C. jejuni resulted in the absence of FdhA and FdhB protein expression, reduced fdhABC RNA levels, the absence of FDH enzyme activity, and the lack of formate utilization, as assessed by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance. The fdhABC genes are transcribed from a single promoter located two genes upstream of fdhA, and the decrease in fdhABC RNA levels in the fdhU mutant is mediated at the posttranscriptional level. FDH activity and the ability to utilize formate were restored by genetic complementation with fdhU and by supplementation of the growth media with selenium dioxide. Disruption of SeC synthesis by inactivation of the selA and selB genes also resulted in the absence of FDH activity, which could not be restored by selenium supplementation. Comparative genomic analysis suggests a link between the presence of selA and fdhTU orthologs and the predicted presence of SeC in FdhA. The fdhTU genes encode accessory proteins required for FDH expression and activity in C. jejuni, possibly by contributing to acquisition or utilization of selenium. PMID:22609917

  16. POSTHARVEST CONTROL OF PHYTOPHTHORA INFESTANS BY BACTERIAL ANTAGONISTS OF FUNGAL DRY ROT INCITED BY FUSARIUM SAMBUCINUM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent introduction of US-8 genotypes of P. infestans has coincided with an increase in severity and aggressiveness of potato late blight in Canada and the United States. Interest in developing biological versus chemical disease control methods has increased due to recent environmental and health c...

  17. BIOLOGICAL CONTROL OF RICE BACTERIAL BLIGHT BY PLANT-ASSOCIATED BACTERIA PRODUCING 2,4-DIACETYLPHLOROGLUCINOL.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Certain plant-associated strains of fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. are known to produce the antimicrobial antibiotic 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (DAPG). It has antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, and antihelminthic properties and has played a significant role in the biological control of tobacco, whe...

  18. Bacterial Flagella-Based Propulsion and On/Off Motion Control of Microscale Objects

    E-print Network

    Sitti, Metin

    on their surface. On/off motion control of the bead is achieved by introducing copper ions to stop the bacteria they are much smaller (micro/nanometer overall sizes), and are capable of producing more complicated motions copper ions (Cu+2 ) and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), respectively. The bacterium S. marcescens

  19. EMERGING REGULATORY PARADIGMS FOR CONTROL OF GENE EXPRESSION BY 1,25-DIHYDROXYVITAMIN D3

    PubMed Central

    Pike, J. Wesley; Meyer, Mark B.; Martowicz, Melissa L.; Bishop, Kathleen A.; Lee, Seong Min; Nerenz, Robert D.; Goetsch, Paul D.

    2010-01-01

    1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3) functions as a steroid hormone to modulate the expression of genes. Its actions are mediated by the vitamin D receptor (VDR) which binds to target genes and functions to recruit coregulatory complexes that are essential for transcriptional modulation. ChIP analysis coupled to tiled DNA microarray hybridization (ChIP-chip) or massively parallel DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq) is now providing critical new insight into how genes are regulated. In studies herein, we utilized these techniques as well as gene expression analysis to explore the actions of 1,25(OH)2D3 at the genome-wide and individual target gene levels in cells. We identify a series of overarching principles that likely define the actions of 1,25(OH)2D3 at most target genes. We discover that while VDR binding to target sites is ligand-dependent, RXR binding is ligand-independent. We also show that while VDR/RXR binding can localize to promoters, it occurs more frequently at multiple sites many kilobases from target gene promoters. We then describe a new method whereby the regulatory regions of complex genes can be evaluated using large recombineered bacterial artificial chromosomes. We conclude that these new approaches are likely to replace many of the traditional methods used to explore the regulation of transcription. PMID:20214983

  20. Analysis of extracellular alginate lyase (alyA) expression and its regulatory region in a marine bacterial strain, Pseudoalteromonas atlantica AR06, using a gfp gene reporter system.

    PubMed

    Matsushima, Ryoji; Watanabe, Ryuichi; Tsuda, Masataka; Suzuki, Toshiyuki

    2013-06-01

    Extracellular alginate lyase (alyA) has an important role in the use of alginate in the marine bacterial strain Pseudoalteromonas atlantica AR06. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) is a convenient, useful tool for visualization of gene expression, and here we introduced the gfp gene at the end of alyA by homologous recombination in AR06. The gfp gene was expressed as a polycistronic transcript in reporter strain ARAG (AR06 alyA-gfp). The analysis of GFP fluorescence of ARAG in minimal medium containing a carbon source (sucrose, mannitol, glucose, or glucuronate) revealed that the alyA was induced by alginate and regulated by carbon catabolite repression by the coexistence of each carbon substrate (sucrose, mannitol, and glucose). The transcription start site of alyA was identified 192 bp upstream from translation start site of alyA and the 10-bp sequence was a palindrome in which the transcription start site [G] was at the end. Thirteen kinds of plasmids were constructed for promoter analysis of alyA, which contains between 215 and 618 bp of upstream sequence from the translation start and gfp. Longer sequences than 339 bp were capable to increase the GFP fluorescence responding to alginate in the homologous recombination alyA deletion mutant strain ARA? (AR06 ?alyA). The 339-bp upstream sequence was proved sufficiency for reproduction of the catabolite repression of alyA. These results indicate that (a) transcription of alyA is probably regulated by substrate recognition systems driven by multiple factors and (b) regulation of alyA requires a cis element on the upstream region of alyA. PMID:23179456

  1. ANALYSIS OF BACTERIAL COMMUNITIES IN SEAGRASS BED SEDIMENTS BY DOUBLE-GRADIENT DENATURING GRADIENT GEL ELECTROPHORESIS OF PCR-AMPLIFIED 16SRRNA GENES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bacterial communities associated with seagrass bed sediments are not well studied. The work presented here investigated several factors, including the presence or absence of vegetation, depth into sediment, and season, and their impact on bacterial community diversity. Double gra...

  2. The abundance of functional genes, cbbL, nifH, amoA and apsA, and bacterial community structure of intertidal soil from Arabian Sea.

    PubMed

    Keshri, Jitendra; Yousuf, Basit; Mishra, Avinash; Jha, Bhavanath

    2015-06-01

    The Gulf of Cambay is a trumpet-shaped inlet of the Arabian Sea, located along the west coast of India and confronts a high tidal range with strong water currents. The region belongs to a semi-arid zone and saline alkaline intertidal soils are considered biologically extreme. The selected four soil types (S1-S4) were affected by salinity, alkalinity and sodicity. Soil salinity ranged from 20 to 126dS/m, soil pH 8.6-10.0 with high sodium adsorption ratio (SAR) and exchangeable sodium percentage (ESP). Abundance of the key functional genes like cbbL, nifH, amoA and apsA involved in biogeochemical cycling were targeted using qPCR, which varied from (2.36±0.03)×10(4) to (2.87±0.26)×10(8), (1.18±0.28)×10(6) to (1.01±0.26)×10(9), (1.41±0.21)×10(6) to (1.29±0.05)×10(8) and (8.47±0.23)×10(4) to (1.73±0.01)×10(6) per gram dry weight, respectively. The microbial community structure revealed that soils S1 and S3 were dominated by phylum Firmicutes whereas S4 and S2 showed an abundance of Proteobacterial clones. These soils also represented Bacteroidetes, Chloroflexi, Actinobacteria, Planctomycetes and Acidobacteria clones. Molecular phylogeny showed a significant variation in the bacterial community distribution among the intertidal soil types. A high number of novel taxonomic units were observed which makes the intertidal zone a unique reservoir of unidentified bacterial taxa that may be explored further. PMID:25862282

  3. Dynamics of the functional gene copy number and overall bacterial community during microcystin-LR degradation by a biological treatment facility in a drinking water treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Li, Jieming; Shimizu, Kazuya; Utsumi, Motoo; Nakamoto, Tomoko; Sakharkar, Meena Kishore; Zhang, Zhenya; Sugiura, Norio

    2011-06-01

    Information is limited on the potential for microcystins (MCs) degradation by carrier-attached biofilms obtained in winter that were not exposed to detectable levels of MCs in the preceding months. Under controlled laboratory conditions, we confirmed that microcystin-LR (MCLR) was effectively biodegraded within 5.5 days in cultures of the biofilm sampled in winter. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays revealed that seasonal variations in the MCLR-degradation potential of the biofilm were closely related to the initial MCLR-degrader population in the biofilm. Indigenous MCLR-degraders in the biofilm could accumulate by exposure to natural MCLR in the water column, accelerating MCLR-degradation. The qPCR assay suggested that MCLR may be a primary substrate for the degraders in the presence of another labile organic carbon associated with the biofilm under the present study conditions. qPCR and PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) for 16S rDNA demonstrated that the overall bacterial population from the winter biofilm rapidly increased with the MCLR-degrader population and remained stable after day 3.5, while the overall bacterial community structure shifted throughout the entire biodegradation period. This study is important to the in-depth understanding of microbial degradation of MCs and could facilitate the bioremediation of MCs in polluted habitats. PMID:21402490

  4. Effective control of dental chair unit waterline biofilm and marked reduction of bacterial contamination of output water using two peroxide-based disinfectants.

    PubMed

    Tuttlebee, C M; O'Donnell, M J; Keane, C T; Russell, R J; Sullivan, D J; Falkiner, F; Coleman, D C

    2002-11-01

    Bacterial biofilm in dental unit waterlines (DUWs) is a widespread problem, and poses a potentially significant risk of infection to dental staff and patients, particularly those who are medically compromised or immunocompromised. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the level of bacterial contamination of dental chair unit output water in the Dublin Dental Hospital, and to investigate the efficacy of two hydrogen peroxide-based disinfectants in reducing bacterial loads to < or =200 cfu/mL as recommended by the American Dental Association. The chemical quality of dental chair unit input and output water was well within the limits recommended for potable water. Water supplied to the units yielded an average aerobic heterotrophic bacterial cell density of 184 cfu/mL. However, the corresponding density in output water was considerably higher; the average cell density in water from the three-in-one air/water syringes and cup fillers in 12 chairs was 8200 and 4300 cfu/mL, respectively. Dental unit water obtained from 18 separate reservoir-supplied units in general practices in the Dublin area yielded an average of 66000 cfu/mL. The bacterial species found were predominantly environmental organisms, which were also present at low levels in the input water. Some of the species identified (e.g., Burkholderia cepacia and Pseudomonas fluorescens) are known opportunistic pathogens. The capacity of two disinfectants, Sterilex Ultra and Sanosil, to reduce bacterial contamination to safe levels was compared. In a controlled study, once weekly overnight (15 h) disinfection using either agent reduced the bacterial density to below the American Dental Association recommended level of 200 cfu/mL. However, once disinfection ceased the bacterial loads increased to unacceptably high levels within three weeks. Electron microscopic analysis showed that both disinfectants markedly reduced biofilm in the DUWs, but the biofilm rapidly became extensive again when once weekly disinfection ceased. While both disinfectants were equally effective in lowering the bacterial counts to acceptable levels, Sterilex Ultra was associated with clogging of DUWs in some dental chair units after repeated usage, suggesting that Sanosil is a more suitable agent for routine use. PMID:12419272

  5. Expression of a bacterial gene in transgenic tobacco plants confers resistance to the herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bruce R. Lyon; Danny J. Llewellyn; John L. Huppatz; Elizabeth S. Dennis; W. James Peacock

    1989-01-01

    Plants resistant to the herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) were produced through the genetic engineering of a novel detoxification pathway into the cells of a species normally sensitive to 2,4-D. We cloned the gene for 2,4-D monooxygenase, the first enzyme in the plasmid-encoded 2,4-D degradative pathway of the bacterium Alcaligenes eutrophus, into a caul