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Sample records for convective complex development

  1. Convective cell development and propagation in a mesoscale convective complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahn, Yoo-Shin; Brundidge, Kenneth C.

    1987-01-01

    A case study was made of the mesoscale convective complex (MCC) which occurred over southern Oklahoma and northern Texas on 27 May 1981. This storm moved in an eastsoutheasterly direction and during much of its lifetime was observable by radars at Oklahoma City, Ok. and Stephenville, Tx. It was found that the direction of cell (VIP level 3 or more reflectivity) propagation was somewhat erratic but approximately the same as the system (VIP level 1 reflectivity) movement and the ambient wind. New cells developed along and behind the gust front make it appear that once the MCC is initiated, a synergistic relationship exists between the gust front and the MCC. The relationship between rainfall patterns and amounts and the infrared (IR) temperature field in the satellite imagery were examined. The 210 K isotherm of GOES IR imagery was found to encompass the rain area of the storm. The heaviest rainfall was in the vicinity of the VIP level 3 cells and mostly contained within the 205 K isotherm of GOES IR imagery.

  2. Mesoscale convective complexes in Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Laing, A.G.; Fritsch, J.M. )

    1993-08-01

    Digitized full-disk infrared satellite imagery from the European geostationary satellite (Meteosat) for 1986 and 1987 was used to construct a climatology of mesoscale convective complexes (MCCs) in Africa. One hundred ninety-five systems formed over Africa and its near vicinity during the two-year study period. From this database, characteristics of Africa MCCs were calculated. The results indicate that these MCCs display many of the same characteristics as those found in the Americas, the Indian subcontinent, and the western Pacific region. The systems are predominantly nocturnal and tend to form over or in the immediate vicinity of land. The average lifetime of African MCCs is about 11.5 h. The size distributions of the African systems are also extremely similar to those of the Americas, the Indian subcontinent, and the western Pacific region with most systems exhibiting areas between 2 [times] 10[sup 5] and 3 [times] 10[sup 5] km[sup 2]. The monthly frequency distribution of African systems indicates that peak activity tends to occur during the period of most intense insolation. Like the MCCs in the western Pacific region and the Americas, the African MCCs tend to propagate toward the low-level high-[theta][sub e] air that feeds the convective systems. Systems over northern Africa moved toward the west-southwest, with a few developing into tropical cyclones over the Atlantic. Systems over southeastern Africa generally moved toward the northeast and east. It is concluded that the satellite-observed systems over Africa are essentially the same phenomena as the MCC populations observed over the Americas, the Indian monsoon region, and the western Pacific region. In addition, the large number of MCCs found worldwide (approximately 300-400 per year) indicate that they may be significant contributors to the global tropospheric energy budget and hydrological cycle. 46 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Complex Convective Thermal Fluxes and Vorticity Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redondo, Jose M.; Tellez, Jackson; Sotillos, Laura; Lopez Gonzalez-Nieto, Pilar; Sanchez, Jesus M.; Furmanek, Petr; Diez, Margarita

    2015-04-01

    Local Diffusion and the topological structure of vorticity and velocity fields is measured in the transition from a homogeneous linearly stratified fluid to a cellular or layered structure by means of convective cooling and/or heating[1,2]. Patterns arise by setting up a convective flow generated by an array of Thermoelectric devices (Peltier/Seebeck cells) these are controlled by thermal PID generating a buoyant heat flux [2]. The experiments described here investigate high Prandtl number mixing using brine and fresh water in order to form density interfaces and low Prandtl number mixing with temperature gradients. The set of dimensionless parameters define conditions of numeric and small scale laboratory modeling of environmental flows. Fields of velocity, density and their gradients were computed and visualized [3,4]. When convective heating and cooling takes place the combination of internal waves and buoyant turbulence is much more complicated if the Rayleigh and Reynolds numbers are high in order to study entrainment and mixing. Using ESS and selfsimilarity structures in the velocity and vorticity fieds and intermittency [3,5] that forms in the non-homogeneous flow is related to mixing and stiring. The evolution of the mixing fronts are compared and the topological characteristics of the merging of plumes and jets in different configurations presenting detailed comparison of the evolution of RM and RT, Jets and Plumes in overall mixing. The relation between structure functions, fractal analysis and spectral analysis can be very useful to determine the evolution of scales. Experimental and numerical results on the advance of a mixing or nonmixing front occurring at a density interface due to body forces [6]and gravitational acceleration are analyzed considering the fractal and spectral structure of the fronts like in removable plate experiments for Rayleigh-Taylor flows. The evolution of the turbulent mixing layer and its complex configuration is studied

  4. Complex Convective Thermal Fluxes and Vorticity Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redondo, Jose M.; Tellez, Jackson; Sotillos, Laura; Lopez Gonzalez-Nieto, Pilar; Sanchez, Jesus M.; Furmanek, Petr; Diez, Margarita

    2015-04-01

    Local Diffusion and the topological structure of vorticity and velocity fields is measured in the transition from a homogeneous linearly stratified fluid to a cellular or layered structure by means of convective cooling and/or heating[1,2]. Patterns arise by setting up a convective flow generated by an array of Thermoelectric devices (Peltier/Seebeck cells) these are controlled by thermal PID generating a buoyant heat flux [2]. The experiments described here investigate high Prandtl number mixing using brine and fresh water in order to form density interfaces and low Prandtl number mixing with temperature gradients. The set of dimensionless parameters define conditions of numeric and small scale laboratory modeling of environmental flows. Fields of velocity, density and their gradients were computed and visualized [3,4]. When convective heating and cooling takes place the combination of internal waves and buoyant turbulence is much more complicated if the Rayleigh and Reynolds numbers are high in order to study entrainment and mixing. Using ESS and selfsimilarity structures in the velocity and vorticity fieds and intermittency [3,5] that forms in the non-homogeneous flow is related to mixing and stiring. The evolution of the mixing fronts are compared and the topological characteristics of the merging of plumes and jets in different configurations presenting detailed comparison of the evolution of RM and RT, Jets and Plumes in overall mixing. The relation between structure functions, fractal analysis and spectral analysis can be very useful to determine the evolution of scales. Experimental and numerical results on the advance of a mixing or nonmixing front occurring at a density interface due to body forces [6]and gravitational acceleration are analyzed considering the fractal and spectral structure of the fronts like in removable plate experiments for Rayleigh-Taylor flows. The evolution of the turbulent mixing layer and its complex configuration is studied

  5. Soil Moisture and Mesoscale Convective Complex Development During the 1993 US Midwest Flood: Results from the MM5-PLACE Atmosphere/Land-Surface Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, R. David; Wang, Yansen; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Wetzel, Peter; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The 1993 US Midwest Flood produced record levels of flooding, in the Mississippi River Basin. This flooding resulted from repeated frontal passages and mesoscale convective complexes (MCCs) during the months of June and July. A better understanding of processes that influenced MCC development during the 1993 Flood may lead to improved forecasts of heavy precipitation and flooding. Here, we consider the impact of soil moisture on MCC development during a two-day period (June 23-24) of the 1993 US Midwest Flood. The purpose of this study is to assess the importance of soil moisture distribution on the timing, intensity, and location of heavy precipitation. In this study, the MM5-PLACE Atmosphere/Land-Surface Model is utilized. The atmospheric component consists of the Penn State/NCAR MM5 mesoscale model, and the land-surface component consists of the Goddard Parameterization for Land Atmosphere-Cloud Exchange (PLACE). Initial soil moisture is provided from two sources: 1) NCEP reanalysis, and 2) Antecedent Precipitation Index (API) using NOAA rain gauge measurements as a proxy for soil moisture. NCEP reanalysis provides coarse resolution initial soil moisture (2.5 degree), while API provides high resolution initial soil moisture (10-200 km depending on NOAA rain gauge spacing). Initial results indicate that the distribution of soil moisture has a significant impact on the timing and location of heavy precipitation during this two-day flood event. Precipitation in simulations with high resolution initial soil moisture agrees more closely with observed precipitation. These results suggest that high resolution soil moisture observations are necessary to accurately predict severe storm development, heavy precipitation, and subsequent flooding.

  6. Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britz, Dieter

    Convection has long been coupled with electrochemistry, and the name hydrodynamic voltammetry has become standard. In electroanalytical chemistry we mainly seek reproducible conditions. These are almost always attained by systems in which a steady convective state is achieved, although not always. Thus, the once popular dropping mercury electrode (see texts such as [74, 257]) has convection around it, but is never in steady state; it might be called a reproducible periodic dynamic state.

  7. A modeling study of an East Asian convective complex during March 2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitchman, Matthew H.; Buker, Marcus L.; Tripoli, Gregory J.; Pierce, R. B.; Al-Saadi, J. A.; Browell, E. V.; Avery, Melody A.

    2004-08-01

    During March-April 2001 the University of Wisconsin Nonhydrostatic Modeling System (UWNMS) was used to provide flight planning and estimation of ozone flux into the troposphere over East Asia in support of the Transport and Chemical Evolution over the Pacific (TRACE-P) mission. On 24 March a convective complex developed in eastern China and propagated eastward over the Pacific south of Japan. Aircraft and satellite observations, together with the UWNMS simulations, captured this convective event, which first entrained urban boundary layer air over Asia and then marine boundary layer air over the Pacific. The convective updraft split the subtropical westerly jet, deformed the tropopause upward, radiated gravity waves into the stratosphere, and induced a ring of stratospheric ozone to descend around its periphery into the middle troposphere. The DC-8 observations and UWNMS show a vault of moderate ozone (˜65 ppbv) in the 8-12 km layer within the convection, with high stratospheric values (˜100 ppbv) subsiding around the periphery into the troposphere near 6.5 km. A new two-scale method for diagnosing cross-tropopause ozone flux is compared with an annular volume estimate. During this 24 hour convective event, ˜0.8 Tg ozone entered the troposphere from the stratosphere, comparable in magnitude to ozone fluxes in midlatitude cyclones.

  8. Convective scale interaction: Arc cloud lines and the development and evolution of deep convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purdom, James Francis Whitehurst

    1986-01-01

    Information is used from satellite data and research aircraft data to provide new insights concerning the mesoscale development and evolution of deep convection in an atmosphere typified by weak synoptic-scale forcing. The importance of convective scale interaction in the development and evolution of deep convection is examined. This interaction is shown to manifest itself as the merger and intersection of thunderstorm outflow boundaries (arc cloud lines) with other convective lines, areas or boundaries. Using geostationary satellite visible and infrared data convective scale interaction is shown to be responsible for over 85 percent of the intense convection over the southeast U.S. by late afternoon, and a majority of that area's afternoon rainfall. The aircraft observations provided valuable information concerning critically important regions of the arc cloud line: (1) the cool outflow region, (2) the density surge line interface region; and (3) the sub-cloud region above the surge line. The observations when analyzed with rapid scan satellite data, helped in defining the arc cloud line's life cycle as 3 evolving stages.

  9. A long-lived mesoscale convective complex. I - The mountain-generated component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cotton, W. R.; George, R. L.; Wetzel, P. J.; Mcanelly, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    The South Park Area Cumulus Experiment (SPACE) was conducted during the summer of 1977, and takes into account meteorological developments in a broad, elevated basin called South Park, which is located northeast of Colorado Springs, Colorado. The experiment was designed to investigate the organization of the mesoscale and storm-scale systems in detail over South Park. Many of the convective storms which were observed in the developing stages over South Park participated in the genesis of mesoscale convective complexes (MCCs) on the meso-alpha-scale. The present investigation is concerned with the evolution of the second MCC of this episode, which matured on the evening of August 4, 1977. Attention is given to the events from the preconvective stage early on August 4 to the incipient MCC stage in the early evening.

  10. Mechanisms initiating deep convection over complex terrain during COPS.

    SciTech Connect

    Kottmeier, C.; Kalthoff, N.; Barthlott, C.; Corsmeier, U.; Van Baelen, J.; Coulter, R.; Environmental Science Division; Inst. for Meteorology and Climate Research; Lab. de Meteorologie Physique; Inst. of Physics and Meteorology

    2008-12-01

    Precipitating convection in a mountain region of moderate topography is investigated, with particular emphasis on its initiation in response to boundary-layer and mid- and upper-tropospheric forcing mechanisms. The data used in the study are from COPS (Convective and Orographically-induced Precipitation Study) that took place in southwestern Germany and eastern France in the summer of 2007. It is found that the initiation of precipitating convection can be roughly classified as being due to either: (i) surface heating and low-level flow convergence; (ii) surface heating and moisture supply overcoming convective inhibition during latent and/or potential instability; or (iii) mid-tropospheric dynamical processes due to mesoscale convergence lines and forced mean vertical motion. These phenomena have to be adequately represented in models in order to improve quantitative precipitation forecast. Selected COPS cases are analyzed and classified into these initiation categories. Although only a subset of COPS data (mainly radiosondes, surface weather stations, radar and satellite data) are used here, it is shown that convective systems are captured in considerable detail by sensor synergy. Convergence lines were observed by Doppler radar in the location where deep convection is triggered several hours later. The results suggest that in many situations, observations of the location and timing of convergence lines will facilitate the nowcasting of convection. Further on, forecasting of the initiation of convection is significantly complicated if advection of potentially convective air masses over changing terrain features plays a major role. The passage of a frontal structure over the Vosges - Rhine valley - Black Forest orography was accompanied by an intermediate suppression of convection over the wide Rhine valley. Further downstream, an intensification of convection was observed over the Black Forest due to differential surface heating, a convergence line, and the flow

  11. Barotropic and baroclinic processes associated with convective development in the tropical deep convective regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tingting; Li, Xiaofan

    2016-06-01

    The budget of perturbation kinetic energy is calculated to study barotropic and baroclinic processes associated with convective development in the tropical deep convective regime. The barotropic kinetic-energy conversion is further examined through the derivation and analysis of budget of vertical transport of zonal momentum. The two-dimensional cloud-resolving model simulation data during TOGA COARE are analyzed in this budget study. The analysis of the energy budget shows that while baroclinic conversion from perturbation available potential energy is a major source for the growth of perturbation kinetic energy, barotropic conversion from the mean kinetic energy has significant modification on the variation of perturbation kinetic energy. The general evolution of barotropic conversion is associated with that of the vertical wind shear of the mean circulations, but the significant change in barotropic conversion corresponds to the change in the vertical transport of zonal momentum. Zonal transport of cloud hydrometeor is responsible for the variation of vertical transport of zonal momentum.

  12. Investigating an Automated Method to Explore Mesoscale Convective Complexes in West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehall, Kim Dionne

    Mesoscale convective complexes are convectively driven, high impact weather systems with durations of approximately 10-12 hours, and are large contributors to daily and monthly rainfall totals. In West Africa, approximately 40 mesoscale convective complexes contribute an estimated one-quarter of the total rainfall amounts between July and September annually. As such, an understanding of the lifecycle, characteristics, frequency, and seasonality of these weather features is important for climate studies, agricultural and hydrological studies, and disaster management. Identification criteria of mesoscale convective complexes exist for infrared satellite data, but the spatial expanse and the spatio-temporal variability of the convective characteristics of these mesoscale convective complexes make rainfall characterization difficult, even in dense networks of radars and / or surface gauges. Hence, fully automated methods are required to explore mesoscale convective complexes in long-term infrared satellite data, and to determine their characteristics from other datasets, such as precipitation rate satellite datasets. Automated identification methods of mesoscale convective complexes are based on forward- and / or backward-in-time spatial-temporal analyses of infrared satellite data, and usually incorporate a manual component to verify the features and / or characterize the associated precipitation. These existing identification and precipitation characterization methods are not readily transferable to voluminous data or other satellite-derived datasets, thus hindering comprehensive studies of these features, both at weather and climate timescales. In recognizing these limitations and the growing volume of satellite data, this study explores the applicability of graph theory to creating a fully automated method for identifying mesoscale convective systems in satellite datasets. The framework for such a method is provided in this work. The results indicate that applying

  13. Development of Ensemble Neural Network Convection Parameterizations for Climate Models

    SciTech Connect

    Fox-Rabinovitz, M. S.; Krasnopolsky, V. M.

    2012-05-02

    The novel neural network (NN) approach has been formulated and used for development of a NN ensemble stochastic convection parametrization for climate models. This fast parametrization is built based on data from Cloud Resolving Model (CRM) simulations initialized with and forced by TOGA-COARE data. The SAM (System for Atmospheric Modeling), developed by D. Randall, M. Khairoutdinov, and their collaborators, has been used for CRM simulations. The observational data are also used for validation of model simulations. The SAM-simulated data have been averaged and projected onto the GCM space of atmospheric states to implicitly define a stochastic convection parametrization. This parametrization is emulated using an ensemble of NNs. An ensemble of NNs with different NN parameters has been trained and tested. The inherent uncertainty of the stochastic convection parametrization derived in such a way is estimated. Due to these inherent uncertainties, NN ensemble is used to constitute a stochastic NN convection parametrization. The developed NN convection parametrization have been validated in a diagnostic CAM (CAM-NN) run vs. the control CAM run. Actually, CAM inputs have been used, at every time step of the control/original CAM integration, for parallel calculations of the NN convection parametrization (CAM-NN) to produce its outputs as a diagnostic byproduct. Total precipitation (P) and cloudiness (CLD) time series, diurnal cycles, and P and CLD distributions for the large Tropical Pacific Ocean for the parallel CAM-NN and CAM runs show similarity and consistency with the NCEP reanalysis. The P and CLD distributions for the tropical area for the parallel runs have been analyzed first for the TOGA-COARE boreal winter season (November 1992 through February 1993) and then for the winter seasons of the follow-up parallel decadal simulations. The obtained results are encouraging and practically meaningful. They show the validity of the NN approach. This constitutes an

  14. An infrared thermography imaging system for convective heat transfer measurements in complex flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargent, S. R.; Hedlund, C. R.; Ligrani, P. M.

    1998-12-01

    An infrared thermography imaging system is described for spatially resolved convective heat transfer measurements when used in conjunction with thermocouples, energy balances, digital image processing, zinc-selenide windows, and unique in situ calibration procedures. The usefulness of the system and the techniques developed are demonstrated by measurements made in two different environments with complex, three-dimensional flow features. First, spatial variations of surface Nusselt numbers are measured along the concave surfaces of a swirl chamber whose geometry models an internal passage used to cool the leading edge of a turbine blade. Second, spatially resolved distributions of the adiabatic film-cooling effectiveness are measured downstream of film-cooling holes on a symmetric turbine blade in transonic flow.

  15. Front waves and complex spatiotemporal patterns in a reaction-diffusion-convection system with thermokinetic autocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Trávnícková, Tereza; Kohout, Martin; Schreiber, Igor; Kubícek, Milan

    2009-12-01

    We analyze dynamics of stationary nonuniform patterns, traveling waves, and spatiotemporal chaos in a simple model of a tubular cross-flow reactor. The reactant is supplied continuously via convective flow and/or by diffusion through permeable walls of the reactor. First order exothermic reaction kinetics is assumed and the system is described by mass and energy balances forming coupled reaction-diffusion-convection equations. Dynamical regimes of the reaction-diffusion subsystem range from pulses and fronts to periodic waves and complex chaotic behavior. Two distinct types of chaotic patterns are identified and characterized by Lyapunov dimension. Next we examine the effects of convection on various types of the reaction-diffusion regimes. Remarkable zigzag fronts and steady state patterns are found despite the absence of differential flow. We employ continuation techniques to elucidate the existence and form of these patterns. PMID:20059221

  16. Front waves and complex spatiotemporal patterns in a reaction-diffusion-convection system with thermokinetic autocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trávníčková, Tereza; Kohout, Martin; Schreiber, Igor; Kubíček, Milan

    2009-12-01

    We analyze dynamics of stationary nonuniform patterns, traveling waves, and spatiotemporal chaos in a simple model of a tubular cross-flow reactor. The reactant is supplied continuously via convective flow and/or by diffusion through permeable walls of the reactor. First order exothermic reaction kinetics is assumed and the system is described by mass and energy balances forming coupled reaction-diffusion-convection equations. Dynamical regimes of the reaction-diffusion subsystem range from pulses and fronts to periodic waves and complex chaotic behavior. Two distinct types of chaotic patterns are identified and characterized by Lyapunov dimension. Next we examine the effects of convection on various types of the reaction-diffusion regimes. Remarkable zigzag fronts and steady state patterns are found despite the absence of differential flow. We employ continuation techniques to elucidate the existence and form of these patterns.

  17. Evaluation and development of satellite inferences of convective storm intensity using combined case study analysis and thunderstorm model simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cotton, W. R.; Tripoli, G. J.

    1980-01-01

    Major research accomplishments which were achieved during the first year of the grant are summarized. The research concentrated in the following areas: (1) an examination of observational requirements for predicting convective storm development and intensity as suggested by recent numerical experiments; (2) interpretation of recent 3D numerical experiments with regard to the relationship between overshooting tops and surface wind gusts; (3) the development of software for emulating satellite-inferred cloud properties using 3D cloud model predicted data; and (4) the development of a conceptual/semi-quantitative model of eastward propagating, mesoscale convective complexes forming to the lee of the Rocky Mountains.

  18. Evaluation and development of satellite inferences of convective storm intensity using combined case study and thunderstorm model simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cotton, W. R.; Tripoli, G. J.

    1982-01-01

    Observational requirements for predicting convective storm development and intensity as suggested by recent numerical experiments are examined. Recent 3D numerical experiments are interpreted with regard to the relationship between overshooting tops and surface wind gusts. The development of software for emulating satellite inferred cloud properties using 3D cloud model predicted data and the simulation of Heymsfield (1981) Northern Illinois storm are described as well as the development of a conceptual/semi-quantitative model of eastward propagating, mesoscale convective complexes forming to the lee of the Rocky Mountains.

  19. Transitional dispersive scenarios driven by mesoscale flows on complex terrain under strong dry convective conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palau, J. L.; Pérez-Landa, G.; Millán, M. M.

    2009-01-01

    By experimentation and modelling, this paper analyses the atmospheric dispersion of the SO2 emissions from a power plant on complex terrain under strong convective conditions, describing the main dispersion features as an ensemble of "stationary dispersive scenarios" and reformulating some "classical" dispersive concepts to deal with the systematically monitored summer dispersive scenarios in inland Spain. The results and discussions presented arise from a statistically representative study of the physical processes associated with the multimodal distribution of pollutants aloft and around a 343-m-tall chimney under strong dry convective conditions in the Iberian Peninsula. This paper analyses the importance of the identification and physical implications of transitional periods for air quality applications. The indetermination of a transversal plume to the preferred transport direction during these transitional periods implies a small (or null) physical significance of the classical definition of horizontal standard deviation of the concentration distribution.

  20. Model representation of boundary-layer convergence triggering deep convection over complex terrain: A case study from COPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthlott, Christian; Schipper, Janus Willem; Kalthoff, Norbert; Adler, Bianca; Kottmeier, Christoph; Blyth, Alan; Mobbs, Stephen

    2010-02-01

    An isolated thunderstorm from the Convective and Orographically-induced Precipitation Study in southwest Germany and east France in 2007 is analyzed. On July 15, deep convection developed east of the Black Forest crest, although convective available potential energy (CAPE) was only moderate and convective inhibition (CIN) was high. Data analysis revealed that convection was triggered by updrafts penetrating the capping inversion of the planetary boundary layer as a result of low-level convergence. Although the numerical weather prediction model COSMO-DE of the German Weather Service (2.8 km grid resolution) simulated a convergence line and the evolution of a line of low clouds in good agreement with radar and satellite observations, no precipitating deep convection developed from this line of clouds. For an improved representation of orographic effects, simulations with a finer grid resolution of 1 km were performed. Despite almost optimal conditions, i.e. moderate amount of CAPE and almost vanishing CIN, the updrafts required to overcome CIN were not reached in both model configurations. Although both simulations did not initiate deep convection, the results suggest that in an air mass convection situation without mid-tropospheric forcing, the simulated location and timing of convergence lines with coexistent large values of CAPE and low values of CIN can be used as diagnostic parameters for deep convection nowcasting.

  1. Development of a mechanistic model for forced convection subcooled boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaver, Dillon R.

    The focus of this work is on the formulation, implementation, and testing of a mechanistic model of subcooled boiling. Subcooled boiling is the process of vapor generation on a heated wall when the bulk liquid temperature is still below saturation. This is part of a larger effort by the US DoE's CASL project to apply advanced computational tools to the simulation of light water reactors. To support this effort, the formulation of the dispersed field model is described and a complete model of interfacial forces is formulated. The model has been implemented in the NPHASE-CMFD computer code with a K-epsilon model of turbulence. The interfacial force models are built on extensive work by other authors, and include novel formulations of the turbulent dispersion and lift forces. The complete model of interfacial forces is compared to experiments for adiabatic bubbly flows, including both steady-state and unsteady conditions. The same model is then applied to a transient gas/liquid flow in a complex geometry of fuel channels in a sodium fast reactor. Building on the foundation of the interfacial force model, a mechanistic model of forced-convection subcooled boiling is proposed. This model uses the heat flux partitioning concept and accounts for condensation of bubbles attached to the wall. This allows the model to capture the enhanced heat transfer associated with boiling before the point of net generation of vapor, a phenomenon consistent with existing experimental observations. The model is compared to four different experiments encompassing flows of light water, heavy water, and R12 at different pressures, in cylindrical channels, an internally heated annulus, and a rectangular channel. The experimental data includes axial and radial profiles of both liquid temperature and vapor volume fraction, and the agreement can be considered quite good. The complete model is then applied to simulations of subcooled boiling in nuclear reactor subchannels consistent with the

  2. Flow reversal of fully developed double diffusive mixed convection in a vertical channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makhatar, Nur Asiah Mohd; Saleh, Habibis; Hashim, Ishak

    2015-10-01

    The mixed convection flow within a vertical channel having internal heat generation at a rate proportional to a power of the temperature difference is considered. The analysis is concerning the studies of occurrence of flow reversal and the effects of three dimensionless parameters, identified as the internal heat parameter (G), a mixed convection parameter (λ) and the exponent (p) in the local heating term on the fully developed double diffusive mixed convection flow in a vertical channel. The governing equations are solved numerically via MAPLE. It was found that flow reversal occurs with larger values of internal heat parameter and mixed convection parameter, but smaller values of local-heating exponent. They also show that, unlike the internal heat parameter and the local-heating exponent, the mixed convection parameter do not give any significant effect on the temperature.

  3. Mode decomposition as a methodology for developing convective-scale representations in global models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Jun-Ichi; Redelsperger, Jean-Luc; Bechtold, Peter; Guichard, Françoise

    2005-07-01

    Mode decomposition is proposed as a methodology for developing subgrid-scale physical representations in global models by a systematic reduction of an originally full system such as a cloud-resolving model (CRM). A general formulation is presented, and also discussed are mathematical requirements that make this procedure possible. Features of this general methodology are further elucidated by the two specific examples: mass fluxes and wavelets.The traditional mass-flux formulation for convective parametrizations is derived as a special case from this general formulation. It is based on the decomposition of a horizontal domain into an approximate sum of piecewise-constant segments. Thus, a decomposition of CRM outputs on this basis is crucial for their direct verification. However, this decomposition is mathematically not well-posed nor unique due to the lack of admissibility. A classification into cloud types, primarily based on precipitation characteristics of the atmospheric columns, that has been used as its substitute, does not necessarily provide a good approximation for a piecewiseconstant segment decomposition. This difficulty with mass-flux decomposition makes a verification of the formulational details of parametrizations based on mass fluxes by a CRM inherently difficult.The wavelet decomposition is an alternative possibility that can more systematically decompose the convective system. Its completeness and orthogonality also allow a prognostic description of a CRM system in wavelet space in the same manner as is done in Fourier space. The wavelets can, furthermore, efficiently represent the various convective coherencies by a limited number of modes due to their spatial localizations. Thus, the degree of complexity of the wavelet-based prognostic representation of a CRM can be extensively reduced. Such an extensive reduction may allow its use in place of current cumulus parametrizations. This wavelet-based scheme can easily be verified from the full

  4. Using Satellite Observations to Infer the Relationship between Cold Pools and Subsequent Convection Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsaesser, G.

    2015-12-01

    Cold pools are increasingly being recognized as important players in the evolution of both shallow and deep convection; hence, the incorporation of cold pool processes into a number of recently developed convective parameterizations. Unfortunately, observations serving to inform cold pool parameterization development are limited to select field programs and limited radar domains. However, a number of recent studies have noted that cold pools are often associated with arcs/lines of shallow clouds traversing 10 - 100 km in visible satellite imagery. Boundary layer thermodynamic perturbations are plausible at such scales, coincident with such mesoscale features. Atmospheric signatures of features at these spatial scales are potentially observable from satellites. In this presentation, we discuss recent work that uses multi-sensor, high-resolution satellite products for observing mesoscale wind vector fluctuations and boundary layer temperature depressions attributed to cold pools produced by antecedent convection. The relationship to subsequent convection as well as convective system longevity is discussed. As improvements in satellite technology occur and efforts to reduce noise in high-resolution orbital products progress, satellite pixel level (~10 km) thermodynamic and dynamic (e.g. mesoscale convergence) parameters can increasingly serve as useful benchmarks for constraining convective parameterization development, including for regimes where organized convection contributes substantially to the cloud and rainfall climatology.

  5. Using Satellite Observations to Infer the Relationship Between Cold Pools and Subsequent Convection Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsaesser, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Cold pools are increasingly being recognized as important players in the evolution of both shallow and deep convection; hence, the incorporation of cold pool processes into a number of recently developed convective parameterizations. Unfortunately, observations serving to inform cold pool parameterization development are limited to select field programs and limited radar domains. However, a number of recent studies have noted that cold pools are often associated with arcs-lines of shallow clouds traversing 10 100 km in visible satellite imagery. Boundary layer thermodynamic perturbations are plausible at such scales, coincident with such mesoscale features. Atmospheric signatures of features at these spatial scales are potentially observable from satellites. In this presentation, we discuss recent work that uses multi-sensor, high-resolution satellite products for observing mesoscale wind vector fluctuations and boundary layer temperature depressions attributed to cold pools produced by antecedent convection. The relationship to subsequent convection as well as convective system longevity is discussed. As improvements in satellite technology occur and efforts to reduce noise in high-resolution orbital products progress, satellite pixel level (10 km) thermodynamic and dynamic (e.g. mesoscale convergence) parameters can increasingly serve as useful benchmarks for constraining convective parameterization development, including for regimes where organized convection contributes substantially to the cloud and rainfall climatology.

  6. Changes in Stratiform Clouds of Mesoscale Convective Complex Introduced by Dust Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, B.; Min, Q.-L.; Li, R.

    2010-01-01

    Aerosols influence the earth s climate through direct, indirect, and semi-direct effects. There are large uncertainties in quantifying these effects due to limited measurements and observations of aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions. As a major terrestrial source of atmospheric aerosols, dusts may serve as a significant climate forcing for the changing climate because of its effect on solar and thermal radiation as well as on clouds and precipitation processes. Latest satellites measurements enable us to determine dust aerosol loadings and cloud distributions and can potentially be used to reduce the uncertainties in the estimations of aerosol effects on climate. This study uses sensors on various satellites to investigate the impact of mineral dust on cloud microphysical and precipitation processes in mesoscale convective complex (MCC). A trans-Atlantic dust outbreak of Saharan origin occurring in early March 2004 is considered. For the observed MCCs under a given convective strength, small hydrometeors were found more prevalent in the dusty stratiform regions than in those regions that were dust free. Evidence of abundant cloud ice particles in the dust regions, particularly at altitudes where heterogeneous nucleation of mineral dust prevails, further supports the observed changes of clouds and precipitation. The consequences of the microphysical effects of the dust aerosols were to shift the size spectrum of precipitation-sized hydrometeors from heavy precipitation to light precipitation and ultimately to suppress precipitation and increase the lifecycle of cloud systems, especially over stratiform areas.

  7. Convective thermal fluxes in unsteady non-homogeneous flows generating complex three dimensional vorticity patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tellez Alvarez, Jackson David; Redondo, Jose Manuel; Sanchez, Jesu Mary

    2016-04-01

    fresh water in order to form density interfaces. The Reynolds number can be reduced adding Glicerine the set of dimensionless parameters define different conditions of both numeric and small scale laboratory applied often in modeling environmental flows. Fields of velocity, density and their gradients are computed using advanced visualization [8 9]. Visualizations are performed by PIV, Particle tracking and shadowgraph. When convective heating and cooling takes place the patterns depend on the parameter space region of the initial conditions We also map the different transitions between two and three dimensional convection in an enclosure with several complex driven flows. The size of the water tank is of 0.2 x 0.2 x 0.1 m and the heat sources or sinks can be regulated both in power and sign [2-4]. The thermal convective driven flows are generated by Seebeck and Peltier effects in 4 wall extended positions of 0.05 x 0.05 cm each. The parameter range of convective cell array varies strongly with the Topology of the boundary conditions. At present side heat fluxes are considered and estimated as a function of Rayleigh, Peclet and Nusselt numbers, [4-6] The evolution of the mixing fronts are compared and the topological characteristics of the merging of plumes and jets in different configurations presenting detailed comparison of the evolution of RM and RT, Jets and Plumes in overall mixing. The relation between structure functions, fractal analysis and spectral analysis can be very useful to determine the evolution of scales. Experimental and numerical results on the advance of a mixing or non-mixing front occurring at a density interface due to body forces [12] can be compared with the convective fronts. The evolution of the turbulent mixing layer and its complex configuration is studied taking into account the dependence on the initial modes at the early stages, Self-similar information [13]. Spectral and Fractal analysis on the images seems very useful in order to

  8. The interactive role of subsynoptic scale jet streak and planetary boundary layer processes in organizing an isolated convective complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, M. L.; Zack, J. W.; Wong, V. C.; Coats, G. D.

    1984-01-01

    Surface analyses and numerical simulation sensitivity studies are compared in order to determine the role played by deep, well-mixed, and well-heated boundary layers in perturbing a weak jet streak in proximity to the development of an isolated but intense convective complex associated with the Grand Island, Nebraska tornado outbreak of June 3-4, 1980. A brief description of the case is first presented, emphasizing three-hourly surface analyses, radar, and satellite data. The results of numerical experiments comparing differences in the runs with and without diurnal surface sensible heating are discussed and related to observations. The dynamical processes responsible for these simulation differences are discussed, and the significance of these differences are considered in terms of their effect on the preconvective environment.

  9. Convective thermal fluxes in unsteady non-homogeneous flows generating complex three dimensional vorticity patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tellez Alvarez, Jackson David; Redondo, Jose Manuel; Sanchez, Jesu Mary

    2016-04-01

    fresh water in order to form density interfaces. The Reynolds number can be reduced adding Glicerine the set of dimensionless parameters define different conditions of both numeric and small scale laboratory applied often in modeling environmental flows. Fields of velocity, density and their gradients are computed using advanced visualization [8 9]. Visualizations are performed by PIV, Particle tracking and shadowgraph. When convective heating and cooling takes place the patterns depend on the parameter space region of the initial conditions We also map the different transitions between two and three dimensional convection in an enclosure with several complex driven flows. The size of the water tank is of 0.2 x 0.2 x 0.1 m and the heat sources or sinks can be regulated both in power and sign [2-4]. The thermal convective driven flows are generated by Seebeck and Peltier effects in 4 wall extended positions of 0.05 x 0.05 cm each. The parameter range of convective cell array varies strongly with the Topology of the boundary conditions. At present side heat fluxes are considered and estimated as a function of Rayleigh, Peclet and Nusselt numbers, [4-6] The evolution of the mixing fronts are compared and the topological characteristics of the merging of plumes and jets in different configurations presenting detailed comparison of the evolution of RM and RT, Jets and Plumes in overall mixing. The relation between structure functions, fractal analysis and spectral analysis can be very useful to determine the evolution of scales. Experimental and numerical results on the advance of a mixing or non-mixing front occurring at a density interface due to body forces [12] can be compared with the convective fronts. The evolution of the turbulent mixing layer and its complex configuration is studied taking into account the dependence on the initial modes at the early stages, Self-similar information [13]. Spectral and Fractal analysis on the images seems very useful in order to

  10. An Automated Method to Identify Mesoscale Convective Complexes (MCCs) Implementing Graph Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehall, K. D.; Mattmann, C. A.; Jenkins, G. S.; Waliser, D. E.; Rwebangira, R.; Demoz, B.; Kim, J.; Goodale, C. E.; Hart, A. F.; Ramirez, P.; Joyce, M. J.; Loikith, P.; Lee, H.; Khudikyan, S.; Boustani, M.; Goodman, A.; Zimdars, P. A.; Whittell, J.

    2013-12-01

    Mesoscale convective complexes (MCCs) are convectively-driven weather systems with a duration of ~10 - 12 hours and contributions of large amounts to the rainfall daily and monthly totals. More than 400 MCCs occur annually over various locations on the globe. In West Africa, ~170 MCCs occur annually during the 180 days representing the summer months (June - November), and contribute ~75% of the annual wet season rainfall. The main objective of this study is to improve automatic identification of MCC over West Africa. The spatial expanse of MCCs and the spatio-temporal variability in their convective characteristics make them difficult to characterize even in dense networks of radars and/or surface gauges. As such there exist criteria for identifying MCCs with satellite images - mostly using infrared (IR) data. Automated MCC identification methods are based on forward and/or backward in time spatial-temporal analysis of the IR satellite data and characteristically incorporate a manual component as these algorithms routinely falter with merging and splitting cloud systems between satellite images. However, these algorithms are not readily transferable to voluminous data or other satellite-derived datasets (e.g. TRMM), thus hindering comprehensive studies of these features both at weather and climate timescales. Recognizing the existing limitations of automated methods, this study explores the applicability of graph theory to creating a fully automated method for deriving a West African MCC dataset from hourly infrared satellite images between 2001- 2012. Graph theory, though not heavily implemented in the atmospheric sciences, has been used for the predicting (nowcasting) of thunderstorms from radar and satellite data by considering the relationship between atmospheric variables at a given time, or for the spatial-temporal analysis of cloud volumes. From these few studies, graph theory appears to be innately applicable to the complexity, non-linearity and inherent

  11. Development of lidar sensor for cloud-based measurements during convective conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishnu, R.; Bhavani Kumar, Y.; Rao, T. Narayana; Nair, Anish Kumar M.; Jayaraman, A.

    2016-05-01

    Atmospheric convection is a natural phenomena associated with heat transport. Convection is strong during daylight periods and rigorous in summer months. Severe ground heating associated with strong winds experienced during these periods. Tropics are considered as the source regions for strong convection. Formation of thunder storm clouds is common during this period. Location of cloud base and its associated dynamics is important to understand the influence of convection on the atmosphere. Lidars are sensitive to Mie scattering and are the suitable instruments for locating clouds in the atmosphere than instruments utilizing the radio frequency spectrum. Thunder storm clouds are composed of hydrometers and strongly scatter the laser light. Recently, a lidar technique was developed at National Atmospheric Research Laboratory (NARL), a Department of Space (DOS) unit, located at Gadanki near Tirupati. The lidar technique employs slant path operation and provides high resolution measurements on cloud base location in real-time. The laser based remote sensing technique allows measurement of atmosphere for every second at 7.5 m range resolution. The high resolution data permits assessment of updrafts at the cloud base. The lidar also provides real-time convective boundary layer height using aerosols as the tracers of atmospheric dynamics. The developed lidar sensor is planned for up-gradation with scanning facility to understand the cloud dynamics in the spatial direction. In this presentation, we present the lidar sensor technology and utilization of its technology for high resolution cloud base measurements during convective conditions over lidar site, Gadanki.

  12. The development of convective instability, wind shear, and vertical motion in relation to convection activity and synoptic systems in AVE 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J. G.; Scoggins, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    Data from the Fourth Atmospheric Variability Experiment were used to investigate conditions/factors responsible for the development (local time rate-of-change) of convective instability, wind shear, and vertical motion in areas with varying degrees of convective activity. AVE IV sounding data were taken at 3 or 6 h intervals during a 36 h period on 24-25 April 1975 over approximately the eastern half of the United States. An error analysis was performed for each variable studied.

  13. Exploring the Development of Conceptual Ecologies: Communities of Concepts Related to Convection and Heat.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, M. Gail; Carter, Glenda; Rua, Melissa J.

    2000-01-01

    Examines the relationships and development of communities of concepts related to heat and convection among fifth grade students. Discusses the influence of familial and cultural experiences on conceptual development as well as the extent to which competing phenomena affect the development of new conceptual understandings. (Contains 49 references.)…

  14. Recent developments in complex scaling

    SciTech Connect

    Rescigno, T.N.

    1980-12-15

    Some recent developments in the use of complex basis function techniques to study resonance as well as certain types of non-resonant, scattering phenomena are discussed. Complex scaling techniques and other closely related methods have continued to attract the attention of computational physicists and chemists and have now reached a point of development where meaningful calculations on many-electron atoms and molecules are beginning to appear feasible.

  15. IL-GLOBO (1.0) - development and verification of the moist convection module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Daniele; Maurizi, Alberto; Fantini, Maurizio

    2016-02-01

    The development and verification of the convective module of IL-GLOBO, a Lagrangian transport model coupled online with the Eulerian general circulation model GLOBO, is described. The online-coupling promotes the full consistency between the Eulerian and the Lagrangian components of the model. The Lagrangian convective scheme is based on the Kain-Fritsch convective parametrization used in GLOBO. A transition probability matrix is computed using the fluxes provided by the Eulerian KF parametrization. Then, the convective redistribution of Lagrangian particles is implemented via a Monte Carlo scheme. The formal derivation is described in details and, consistently with the Eulerian module, includes the environmental flux in the transition probability matrix to avoid splitting of the convection and subsidence processes. Consistency of the Lagrangian implementation with its Eulerian counterpart is verified by computing environment fluxes from the transition probability matrix and comparing them to those computed by the Eulerian module. Assessment of the impact of the module is made for different latitudinal belts, showing that the major impact is found in the Tropics, as expected. Concerning vertical distribution, the major impact is observed in the boundary layer at every latitude, while in the tropical area, the influence extends to very high levels.

  16. Geometric aspect and buoyancy effects on nature convection flow in the complex annuli filled with micropolar fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wen Ruey

    2015-11-01

    This paper studies the steady laminar natural convection of micropolar fluids in the complex annuli between the inner sphere and outer vertical cylinder to present a numerical analysis of the flow and heat transfer characteristics with buoyancy effects. Computations were carried out systematically by the several different parameters of geometric ratio, micropolar material parameter and Rayleigh number to determine the average Nusselt number and the skin friction coefficient on the flow and the thermal fields.

  17. Multiscale Precipitation Processes Over Mountain Terrain - Landform and Vegetation Controls of Microphysics and Convection in Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barros, A. P.; Wilson, A. M.; Sun, X.; Duan, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Recent precipitation observations in mountainous regions do not exhibit the classical orographic enhancement with elevation, especially where fog and multi-layer clouds are persistent. The role of landform in modulating moisture convergence patterns and constraining the thermodynamic environment that supports the development of complex vertical structures of clouds and precipitation is discussed first using observations and model results from the IPHEx (Integrated Precipitation and Hydrology Experiment) field campaign in the Southern Appalachian Mountains (SAM). Analysis of the complex spatial heterogeneity of precipitation microphysics in the SAM suggests that seeder-feeder interactions (SFI) among stratiform precipitation, low level clouds (LLC), and fog play a governing role on the diurnal and seasonal cycles of observed precipitation regimes. Further, in the absence of synoptic-scale forcing, results suggest that evapotranspiration makes a significant contribution to the moisture budget in the lower atmosphere, creating super-saturation conditions favorable to CCN activation, LLC formation, and light rainfall. To investigate the role of evapotranspiration on the diurnal cycle of mountain precipitation further, range-scale modeling studies were conducted in the Central Andes. Specifically, high resolution WRF simulations for realistic and quasi-idealized ET withdrawal case-studies show that evapotranspiration fluxes modulated by landform govern convective activity in the lower troposphere, including cloud formation and precipitation processes that account for daily precipitation amounts as high as 50-70% depending on synoptic conditions and season. These studies suggest multiscale vegetation controls of orographic precipitation processes via atmospheric instability on the one hand, and low level super-saturation and local microphysics on the other. A conceptual model of multiscale interactions among vegetation, landform and moist processes over complex

  18. Exploring the magnetic field complexity in M dwarfs at the boundary to full convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulyak, D.; Reiners, A.; Seemann, U.; Kochukhov, O.; Piskunov, N.

    2014-03-01

    Context. Magnetic fields play a pivotal role in the formation and evolution of low-mass stars, but the dynamo mechanisms generating these fields are poorly understood. Measuring cool star magnetism is a complicated task because of the complexity of cool star spectra and the subtle signatures of magnetic fields. Aims: Based on detailed spectral synthesis, we carry out quantitative measurements of the strength and complexity of surface magnetic fields in the four well-known M dwarfs GJ 388, GJ 729, GJ 285, and GJ 406 that populate the mass regime around the boundary between partially and fully convective stars. Very high-resolution (R = 100 000), high signal-to-noise (up to 400), near-infrared Stokes I spectra were obtained with CRIRES at ESO's Very Large Telescope covering regions of the FeH Wing-Ford transitions at 1μm and Na i lines at 2.2μm. Methods: A modified version of the Molecular Zeeman Library (MZL) was used to compute Landé g-factors for FeH lines. We determined the distribution of magnetic fields by magnetic spectral synthesis performed with the Synmast code. We tested two different magnetic geometries to probe the influence of field orientation effects. Results: Our analysis confirms that FeH lines are excellent indicators of surface magnetic fields in low-mass stars of type M, particularly in comparison to profiles of Na i lines that are heavily affected by water lines and that suffer problems with continuum normalization. The field distributions in all four stars are characterized by three distinct groups of field components, and the data are consistent neither with a smooth distribution of different field strengths nor with one average field strength covering the full star. We find evidence of a subtle difference in the field distribution of GJ 285 compared to the other three targets. GJ 285 also has the highest average field of 3.5 kG and the strongest maximum field component of 7-7.5 kG. The maximum local field strengths in our sample seem to be

  19. The development of small-scale convection below evolving oceanic plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coltice, N.; Garnero, E.

    2015-12-01

    Seafloor of older ages shows a constancy of heat flow, and bathymetry that is different from what is expected for a half-space cooling model. These observations led to consideration of the existence of small-scale convection below the lithosphere (Parsons and McKenzie, 1978). Previous studies have characterized the detailed physics of such processes (Davaille and Jaupart, 1994; Choblet and Sotin, 2000; Solomatov and Moresi, 2000; Korenaga and Jordan, 2003 among others). However, questions remain for applications to the Earth: what is the shape of developed small-scale convection, what length-scales are involved, how does associated small-scale convection depend on the plate layout and its time-dependence. Using 3D spherical models of mantle convection with plate-like behaviour (Tackley, 2008), we will present a study of developed small-scale convection in a context of self-organization of plates and mantle flow. Small-scale convection depends on the resistance of the lithosphere, and its development beneath large plates produce network shapes with specific length-scales and orientations (see figure). We will show the impact of the size of plates and the evolution of subduction on the small-scale convection, and characterize how the age-heat flow relationship can change with time. The potential for seismic detection of the spatiotemporal patterns of temperature heterogeneity will also be discussed. ReferencesChoblet, G., and C. Sotin, Phys. Earth Planet. Inter. 119, 321-336 (2000). Davaille, A., and C. Jaupart, J. Geophys. Res. 99, 19,853-19,866 (1994). Korenaga, J., and T. H. Jordan, J. Geophys. Res. 108, 2333, (2003). Parsons, B., and D. McKenzie, J. Geophys. Res. 83, 4485-4496 (1978). Solomatov, V. S., and L. N. Moresi, J. Geophys. Res. 105, 21,795-21,817 (2000). Tackley, P. J., Phys. Earth Planet. Inter. 171, 7-18 (2008). Figure: Age of the seafloor in Myrs and white countour of a cold temperature isotherm showing the network of small-scale convection.

  20. Nonlinear Convection in Mushy Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worster, M. Grae; Anderson, Daniel M.; Schulze, T. P.

    1996-01-01

    When alloys solidify in a gravitational field there are complex interactions between solidification and natural, buoyancy-driven convection that can alter the composition and impair the structure of the solid product. The particular focus of this project has been the compositional convection within mushy layers that occurs in situations where the lighter component of the alloy is rejected into the melt during solidification by cooling from below. The linear stability of such a situation was previously described and has been further elucidated in a number of published articles. Here we describe some recent developments in the study of nonlinear evolution of convection in mushy layers.

  1. On the impact of spatial heterogeneous permeability distributions on the development of free convection cells in the Perth Basin, Australia.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niederau, Jan; Ebigbo, Anozie; Freitag, Sebastian; Marquart, Gabriele; Clauser, Christoph

    2014-05-01

    Recent increase in exploration of the geothermal energy potential of the Perth Metropolitan Area (PMA) results in the need for reliable and robust reservoir models in order to explore rock properties and temperature distributions in the subsurface, where free convection in the main reservoir (Yarragadee Aquifer) is likely to occur [1]. While the structure of the Perth Basin has been refined recently, the heterogeneity and spatial complexity of permeability was up till now mainly neglected. An integrated, three dimensional tectonostratigraphic model of the PMA is constructed, using the modeling software '3D GeoModeller' and data of numerous artesian and petroleum wells. Comprising the region around the city of Perth, the model covers an area of about 5000 km2 up to a depth of 4.5 km, with focus on adequate representation of the main reservoir. We further construct a numerical model for fluid flow and heat transport in the Yarragadee Aquifer. Porosity distributions are deduced from well logs and linked to permeability by a calibrated correlation, based on a fractal approach. Three different cases are simulated using the FD code SHEMAT-Suite, in order to assess the influence of spatial heterogeneity of porosity and permeability on the development of free convection cells. constant porosity and permeability for the entire aquifer porosity and permeability decreasing with depth, thus reflecting compaction a conditional random permeability field within prescribed limits and for given correlation length In order to improve understanding of model correctness, as well as identification and comparison of convection cells in different simulations, we are developing a specialized visualization tool tailored to this purpose. The three different scenarios show distinctions in the distribution of convection cells. Where the Yarragadee Aquifer is in contact with overlying aquifers, regions of downflow develop. These in turn have a strong impact on the regional flow field and

  2. Development of a Mantle Convection Physical Model to Assist with Teaching about Earth's Interior Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glesener, G. B.; Aurnou, J. M.

    2010-12-01

    The Modeling and Educational Demonstrations Laboratory (MEDL) at UCLA is developing a mantle convection physical model to assist educators with the pedagogy of Earth’s interior processes. Our design goal consists of two components to help the learner gain conceptual understanding by means of visual interactions without the burden of distracters, which may promote alternative conceptions. Distracters may be any feature of the conceptual model that causes the learner to use inadequate mental artifact to help him or her understand what the conceptual model is intended to convey. The first component, and most important, is a psychological component that links properties of “everyday things” (Norman, 1988) to the natural phenomenon, mantle convection. Some examples of everyday things may be heat rising out from a freshly popped bag of popcorn, or cold humid air falling from an open freezer. The second component is the scientific accuracy of the conceptual model. We would like to simplify the concepts for the learner without sacrificing key information that is linked to other natural phenomena the learner will come across in future science lessons. By taking into account the learner’s mental artifacts in combination with a simplified, but accurate, representation of what scientists know of the Earth’s interior, we expect the learner to have the ability to create an adequate qualitative mental simulation of mantle convection. We will be presenting some of our prototypes of this mantle convection physical model at this year’s poster session and invite constructive input from our colleagues.

  3. Convective gas flow development and the maximum depths achieved by helophyte vegetation in lakes

    PubMed Central

    Sorrell, Brian K.; Hawes, Ian

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims Convective gas flow in helophytes (emergent aquatic plants) is thought to be an important adaptation for the ability to colonize deep water. In this study, the maximum depths achieved by seven helophytes were compared in 17 lakes differing in nutrient enrichment, light attenuation, shoreline exposure and sediment characteristics to establish the importance of convective flow for their ability to form the deepest helophyte vegetation in different environments. Methods Convective gas flow development was compared amongst the seven species, and species were allocated to ‘flow absent’, ‘low flow’ and ‘high flow’ categories. Regression tree analysis and quantile regression analysis were used to determine the roles of flow category, lake water quality, light attenuation and shoreline exposure on maximum helophyte depths. Key Results Two ‘flow absent’ species were restricted to very shallow water in all lakes and their depths were not affected by any environmental parameters. Three ‘low flow’ and two ‘high flow’ species had wide depth ranges, but ‘high flow’ species formed the deepest vegetation far more frequently than ‘low flow’ species. The ‘low flow’ species formed the deepest vegetation most commonly in oligotrophic lakes where oxygen demands in sediments were low, especially on exposed shorelines. The ‘high flow’ species were almost always those forming the deepest vegetation in eutrophic lakes, with Eleocharis sphacelata predominant when light attenuation was low, and Typha orientalis when light attenuation was high. Depths achieved by all five species with convective flow were limited by shoreline exposure, but T. orientalis was the least exposure-sensitive species. Conclusions Development of convective flow appears to be essential for dominance of helophyte species in >0·5 m depth, especially under eutrophic conditions. Exposure, sediment characteristics and light attenuation frequently constrain them

  4. Grey zone simulations of the morning convective boundary layer development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efstathiou, G. A.; Beare, R. J.; Osborne, S.; Lock, A. P.

    2016-05-01

    Numerical simulations of two cases of morning boundary layer development are conducted to investigate the impact of grid resolution on mean profiles and turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) partitioning from the large eddy simulation (LES) to the mesoscale limit. Idealized LES, using the 3-D Smagorinsky scheme, is shown to be capable of reproducing the boundary layer evolution when compared against measurements. However, increasing grid spacing results in the damping of resolved TKE and the production of superadiabatic temperature profiles in the boundary layer. Turbulence initiation is significantly delayed, exhibiting an abrupt onset at intermediate resolutions. Two approaches, the bounding of vertical diffusion coefficient and the blending of the 3-D Smagorinsky with a nonlocal 1D scheme, are used to model subgrid diffusion at grey zone resolutions. Simulations are compared against the coarse-grained fields from the validated LES results for each case. Both methods exhibit particular strengths and weaknesses, indicating the compromise that needs to be made currently in high-resolution numerical weather prediction. The blending scheme is able to reproduce the adiabatic profiles although turbulence is underestimated in favor of the parametrized heat flux, and the spin-up of TKE remains delayed. In contrast, the bounding approach gives an evolution of TKE that follows the coarse-grained LES very well, relying on the resolved motions for the nonlocal heat flux. However, bounding gives unrealistic static instability in the early morning temperature profiles (similar to the 3-D Smagorinsky scheme) because model dynamics are unable to resolve TKE when the boundary layer is too shallow compared to the grid spacing.

  5. Cultural complexities and scientific development.

    PubMed

    Branco, Angela Uchoa

    2007-03-01

    Methodological issues in psychology consist of a key aspect for the scientific development of the discipline. In this paper I elaborate on the reasons why I partially agree with Toomela's ideas, and why I also disagree with some of his arguments. The convergence refers to the need for a radical change concerning the widespread use of methodologies that has been typical of mainstream psychology, which still flavors too positivist and pseudo-quantitative, overlooking the central relevance of theory for scientific development. The divergence resides in Toomela's insistence to oppose what he designates as "the North American" to "the German-Austrian" scientific thinking: from my perspective, the misuse of cultural categories can only lead to misguided and unconstructive dichotomies that entails a naive concept of culture, and do not contribute to scientific development. From a contemporary systemic approach, complex issues deserve more sophisticated analysis. PMID:17992868

  6. High-resolution modelling of interactions between soil moisture and convection development in mountain enclosed Tibetan basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerken, T.; Babel, W.; Herzog, M.; Fuchs, K.; Sun, F.; Ma, Y.; Foken, T.; Graf, H.-F.

    2015-05-01

    The Tibetan Plateau plays a significant role in the atmospheric circulation and the Asian monsoon system. Turbulent surface fluxes and the evolution of boundary layer clouds to deep and moist convection provide a feedback system that modifies the Plateau's surface energy balance on scales that are currently unresolved in mesoscale models. This work analyses the land surface's role and specifically the influence of soil moisture on the triggering of convection at a cross-section of the Nam Co Lake basin, 150 km north of Lhasa using a cloud resolving atmospheric model with a fully coupled surface. The modelled turbulent fluxes and development of convection compare reasonably well with the observed weather. The simulations span Bowen-ratios of 0.5 to 2.5. It is found that convection development is strongest at intermediate soil moistures. Dry cases with soils close to the permanent wilting point are moisture limited in the convection development, while convection in wet soil moisture cases is limited by cloud cover reducing incoming solar radiation and sensible heat fluxes. This has a strong impact on the surface energy balance. This study also shows that local development of convection is an important mechanism for the upward transport of water vapour that originates from the lake basin that can then be transported to dryer regions of the plateau. Both processes demonstrate the importance of soil moisture and surface-atmosphere interactions on the energy and hydrological cycles of the Tibetan Plateau.

  7. High-resolution modelling of interactions between soil moisture and convective development in a mountain enclosed Tibetan Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerken, T.; Babel, W.; Herzog, M.; Fuchs, K.; Sun, F.; Ma, Y.; Foken, T.; Graf, H.-F.

    2015-09-01

    The Tibetan Plateau plays a significant role in atmospheric circulation and the Asian monsoon system. Turbulent surface fluxes and the evolution of boundary-layer clouds to deep and moist convection provide a feedback system that modifies the plateau's surface energy balance on scales that are currently unresolved in mesoscale models. This work analyses the land surface's role and specifically the influence of soil moisture on the triggering of convection at a cross section of the Nam Co Lake basin, 150 km north of Lhasa using a cloud-resolving atmospheric model with a fully coupled surface. The modelled turbulent fluxes and development of convection compare reasonably well with the observed weather. The simulations span Bowen ratios of 0.5 to 2.5. It is found that convective development is the strongest at intermediate soil moisture. Dry cases with soils close to the permanent wilting point are moisture limited in convective development, while convection in wet soil moisture cases is limited by cloud cover reducing incoming solar radiation and sensible heat fluxes, which has a strong impact on the surface energy balance. This study also shows that local development of convection is an important mechanism for the upward transport of water vapour, which originates from the lake basin that can then be transported to dryer regions of the plateau. Both processes demonstrate the importance of soil moisture and surface-atmosphere interactions on the energy and hydrological cycles of the Tibetan Plateau.

  8. Development of a Convection Risk Index to forecast severe weather, and application to predict maximum wind speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhuiyan, M. A. E.; Wanik, D. W.; Scerbo, D.; Anagnostou, E. N.

    2015-12-01

    We have developed a tool, the Convection Risk Index (CRI), to represent the severity, timing and location of convection for select geographic areas. The CRI is calculated from the Convection Risk Matrix (CRM), a tabulation of numerous meteorological parameters which are categorized into four broad factors that contribute to convection (surface and lower level moisture, atmospheric instability, vertical wind shear, and lift); each of these factors have historically been utilized by meteorologists to predict the likelihood for development of thunderstorms. The CRM ascribes a specific threshold value to each parameter in such a way that it creates a unique tool used to calculate the risk for seeing the development of thunderstorms. The parameters were combined using a weighted formula and which when calculated, yields the Convection Risk Index 1 to 4 scale, with 4 being the highest risk for seeing strong convection. In addition, we also evaluated the performance of the parameters in the CRM and CRI for predicting the maximum wind speed in areas where we calculated the CRI using nonparametric tree-based model, Bayesian additive trees (BART). The use of the CRI and the predicted wind speeds from BART can be used to better inform emergency preparedness efforts in government and industry.We have developed a tool, the Convection Risk Index (CRI), to represent the severity, timing and location of convection for select geographic areas. The CRI is calculated from the Convection Risk Matrix (CRM), a tabulation of numerous meteorological parameters which are categorized into four broad factors that contribute to convection (surface and lower level moisture, atmospheric instability, vertical wind shear, and lift); each of these factors have historically been utilized by meteorologists to predict the likelihood for development of thunderstorms. The CRM ascribes a specific threshold value to each parameter in such a way that it creates a unique tool used to calculate the risk for

  9. Propagation of Convective Complexes Observed by TRMM in the Eastern Tropical Atlantic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Druyan, Leonard M.; Fulazeka, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Precipitation maxima during the West African summer monsoon propagate generally westward in tandem with African easterly waves. A heretofore unreported, repeating pattern of northward drift of precipitation maxima is detected on Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM satellite) time-latitude distributions of daily accumulations over the eastern tropical Atlantic. Corresponding 3-hourly TRMM accumulations show that the northward drifting envelopes of precipitation during August 2006 are often comprised of individual swaths propagating towards the southwest, presumably as mesoscale squall lines. The implied northward drift on the time-latitude distribution is a component of a resultant northwestward movement. The study examines the entire available record of TRMM precipitation observations, 1998-2010, to summarize TRMM maxima propagation over the eastern tropical Atlantic. Meridional displacements of precipitation maxima are most prevalent in June-September 2006, occurring less frequently during other summers. An investigation of geopotential and circulation fields, limited to two case studies, suggests mechanisms to explain some of the observed propagation of TRMM maxima. In one event, northward drift of the precipitation envelope is consistent with the corresponding displacement of the intertropical convergence zone trough, although the southwest propagation of individual mesoscale convection maxima does not correspond to any synoptic feature on reanalysis circulation or reanalysis downscaled by a regional model. One speculation is that southwestward propagation of precipitation maxima could be caused by regeneration of convection at outflow boundaries of mature thunderstorms.

  10. Contrasting a non-developing African mesoscale convective system with the precursor to Hurricane Helene (2006)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, G.; Fuentes, J. D.; Evans, J. L.; Hamilton, H. L.

    2015-12-01

    Mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) in West Africa traverse strong thermodynamic gradients during their westward propagation from land to ocean. Some of the systems continue to develop after crossing the coastline and may ultimately develop into tropical cyclones, while others do not. Understanding the lifecycle behavior of these convective systems and the factors that contribute to their continuous development as they transition from a continental environment to a marine environment poses a challenge. We examine the difference between two MCSs, one that continued to develop when it crossed the West African coast and one that did not, using European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Re-Analysis (ERA Interim) and Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) 3B42 data. The non-developing MCS that intensified briefly while over land, weakened as soon as it crossed the coast. Preliminary results show that the developing MCS interacted with two cyclonic vortices, one associated with an African Easterly Wave that was propagating towards the coast and the other vortex generated by the topography near the coast.

  11. Viking observations of a reverse convection cell developing in response to a northward turning of the interplanetary magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, M.G.; Murphree, J.S.

    1996-04-15

    The authors report the development of a reverse sense convection cell in the polar ionosphere from auroral images coming from UV Viking probes. The cell was observed to grow on the dusk side of the north polar oval, near the transpolar arcs. As it grew it seemed to displace the arc system toward dawn. They compare their observations with a model in which magnetic merging in the magnetopause produces such convection cells, typically associated with horse-collar or teardrop auroral features.

  12. 'Electrically-Hot' Convection and Tropical Cyclone Development in the Eastern Atlantic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leppert, Kenneth, II; Petersen, Walter A.; Williams, Earle

    2008-01-01

    The depth and intensity of convective-scale "hot" towers in intensifying tropical disturbances has been hypothesized to play a role in tropical cyclogenesis via dynamic and thermodynamic feedbacks on the larger meso-to-synoptic scale circulation. In this investigation we investigate the role that widespread and/or intense lightning-producing convection (i.e., "electrically-hot towers") resident in African Easterly Waves (AEW) may play in tropical cyclogenesis over the eastern Atlantic Ocean. NCEP reanalysis data for the months of July to November for the years 2004, 2006, and 2007 are analyzed for the domain of 5 N - 15 N and 500W - 300 E. Specifically, NCEP data for individual AEWs are partitioned into northerly, southerly, trough, and ridge phases using the 700 hPa meridional winds. Subsequently, information from National Hurricane Center storm reports were divided up into developing and non-developing waves (i.e. tropical cyclogenesis). Finally, composites were created of developing and non-developing waves using the NCEP variables, but with the inclusion of lightning flash count and infrared brightness temperature information. The Zeus and World Wide Lightning Location Network lightning data were used for the lightning information, and the IR brightness temperature data was extracted from the NASA global-merged infrared brightness temperature dataset.

  13. Effect of convective transport in porous media on the conditions of organic matter maturation and generation of hydrocarbons in trap rocks complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurie Khachay, Professor; Mindubaev, Mansur

    2016-04-01

    One of the main problems of the study of the intrusion thermal effects on the maturation of the organic matter is to estimate the volume, intensity, thermal effects of the intrusion and its redistribution in porous media by convection. A numerical algorithm for solving the problem of the developed convection in two-dimensional and three-dimensional models of the porous medium depending on the incline angle is developed. It is defined that the convective stability in the medium decreases with increasing incline angle. It was found that depending on the incline angle the structure of convection from many cells for a flat horizontal layer changes and it transfers to more elongated structures along the layer. It is shown that depending on the incline angles, invading sill and imbedding volume of the porous medium it can be realized either stationary or non-stationary convection that provides a principal different thermal conditions of hydrocarbons maturation in the motherboard porous medium. We give numerical examples of the influence of the incline angle on the flow structure inside the porous inclusion. By the stationary convection the volume of the boundary layers between the convective sells increases. That can lead to increasing of the part of motherboard rocks that are outer the temperature conditions of oil catalysis and as a consequence to the overestimation of the deposits.

  14. Study of Ardmore, Oklahoma storm clouds. I - Convective storm cloud initiation and development based on the remote sensing gravity-wave-induced convection. II - Satellite infrared remote sensing and numerical simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Tsao, Y. D.

    1991-01-01

    The role of gravity waves is discussed with respect to the vertical velocity of convection. Specific attention is given to wave-induced convection which contributes to the fractions of formation and the development of severe convective storms. Large-amplitude gravity waves and convective instability were investigated in storm clouds above Ardmore, Oklahoma. Rapid-scan satellite imagery and radar summaries provide evidence of water-vapor condensation related to convection which is introduced by gravity waves. Gravity wave periods of 35 minutes are found to initiate weak convection, which can be intensified by gravity waves with periods of 20 minutes. The convective motion reaches a maximum about one hour before funnel clouds develop. Other mechanisms which contribute to convective motion are considered, but gravity waves are the major contributor to the initiation, formation, and development of mesoscale storm clouds. Cloud modeling based on satellite imagery and sounding data showed that by overshooting cloud tops that penetrated the tropopause, storm clouds mature; that these clouds collapse about 9 minutes before the touchdown of tornadoes; and that cloud tops collapse at a high rate about 6 minutes before tornadoes lift off.

  15. Evaluating and Understanding Parameterized Convective Processes and their Role in the Development of Mesoscale Precipitation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritsch, J. Michael; Kain, John S.

    1997-01-01

    Research efforts during the second year have centered on improving the manner in which convective stabilization is achieved in the Penn State/NCAR mesoscale model MM5. Ways of improving this stabilization have been investigated by (1) refining the partitioning between the Kain-Fritsch convective parameterization scheme and the grid scale by introducing a form of moist convective adjustment; (2) using radar data to define locations of subgrid-scale convection during a dynamic initialization period; and (3) parameterizing deep-convective feedbacks as subgrid-scale sources and sinks of mass. These investigations were conducted by simulating a long-lived convectively-generated mesoscale vortex that occurred during 14-18 Jul. 1982 and the 10-11 Jun. 1985 squall line that occurred over the Kansas-Oklahoma region during the PRE-STORM experiment. The long-lived vortex tracked across the central Plains states and was responsible for multiple convective outbreaks during its lifetime.

  16. Hardware development for the surface tension driven convection experiment aboard the USML-1 spacelab mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pline, A. D.; Jacobson, T. P.; Wanhainen, J. S.; Petrarca, D. A.

    1988-01-01

    The Surface Tension Driven Convection Experiment is a Space Transportation System flight experiment to study both transient and steady thermocapillary fluid flows aboard the USML-1 Spacelab mission planned for March 1992. Hardware is under development to establish the experimental conditions and perform the specified measurements, for both ground based research and the flight experiment in a Spacelab single rack. Major development areas include an infrared thermal imaging system for surface temperature measurement, a CO2 laser and control system for surface heating, and for flow visualization, a He-Ne laser and optical system in conjunction with an intensified video camera. For ground based work the components of each system were purchased or designed, and tested individually. The three systems will be interfaced with the balance of the experimental hardware and will constitute a working engineering model. A description of the three systems and examples of the component performance is given along with the plans for the development of flight hardware.

  17. Hardware development for the Surface Tension Driven Convection Experiment aboard the USML-1 Spacelab mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pline, A. D.; Jacobson, T. P.; Wanhainen, J. S.; Petrarca, D. A.

    1989-01-01

    The Surface Tension Driven Convection Experiment is a Space Transportation System flight experiment to study both transient and steady thermocapillary fluid flows aboard the USML-1 Spacelab mission planned for March 1992. Hardware is under development to establish the experimental conditions and perform the specified measurements, for both ground based research and the flight experiment in a Spacelab single rack. Major development areas include an infrared thermal imaging system for surface temperature measurement, a CO2 laser and control system for surface heating, and for flow visualization, a He-Ne laser and optical system in conjunction with an intensified video camera. For ground based work the components of each system were purchased or designed, and tested individually. The three systems will be interfaced with the balance of the experimental hardware and will constitute a working engineering model. A description of the three systems and examples of the component performance is given along with the plans for the development of flight hardware.

  18. Developing natural convection in a fluid layer with localized heating and large viscosity variation

    SciTech Connect

    Hickox, C.E.; Chu, Tze Yao.

    1991-01-01

    Numerical simulations and laboratory experiments are used to elucidate aspects of transient natural convection in a magma chamber. The magma chamber is modeled as a horizontal fluid layer confined within an enclosure of square planform and heated from below by a strip heater centered on the lower boundary of the enclosure. The width of the strip heater and the depth of the fluid layer are one-fourth of the layer width. Corn syrup is used as the working fluid in order to approximate the large viscosity variation with temperature and the large Prandtl number typical of magma. The quiescent, uniform, fluid layer is subjected to instantaneous heating from the strip heater producing a transient flow which is dominated by two counter-rotating convective cells. Experimentally determined characteristics of the developing flow are compared with numerical simulations carried out with a finite element computer program. The results of numerical simulations are in essential agreement with experimental data. Differences between the numerical simulations and experimental measurements are conjectured to result from non-ideal effects present in the experiment which are difficult to represent accurately in a numerical simulation.

  19. Developing natural convection in a fluid layer with localized heating and large viscosity variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickox, C. E.; Chu, Tze Yao

    Numerical simulations and laboratory experiments are used to elucidate aspects of transient natural convection in a magma chamber. The magma chamber is modeled as a horizontal fluid layer confined within an enclosure of square planform and heated from below by a strip heater centered on the lower boundary of the enclosure. The width of the strip heater and the depth of the fluid layer are one-fourth of the layer width. Corn syrup is used as the working fluid in order to approximate the large viscosity variation with temperature and the large Prandtl number typical of magma. The quiescent, uniform, fluid layer is subjected to instantaneous heating from the strip heater producing a transient flow which is dominated by two counter-rotating convective cells. Experimentally determined characteristics of the developing flow are compared with numerical simulations carried out with a finite element computer program. The results of numerical simulations are in essential agreement with experimental data. Differences between the numerical simulations and experimental measurements are conjectured to result from non-ideal effects present in the experiment which are difficult to represent accurately in a numerical simulation.

  20. Flow reversal and heat transfer of fully developed mixed convection in vertical channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chin-Hsiang; Kou, Hong-Sen; Huang, Wen-Hsiung

    1990-07-01

    The present analysis is concerned with flow reversal phenomena and heat transfer characteristics of the fully developed laminar combined free and forced convection in the heated vertical channels. Three fundamental combinations of thermal boundary conditions on the respective wall surface (namely isoflux-isoflux, isoflux-isothermal, and isothermal-isothermal) are considered separately so as to investigate extensively their distinct influence on the flow pattern. Results of the velocity distribution and temperature distribution as well as the Nusselt number in terms of bulk mean temperature are carried out. Based on the analytical solutions obtained, flow reversal adjacent to the relatively colder wall is found to exist within the channel as Re/Gr is below a threshold value related to the thermal boundary conditions. Parameter zones for the occurrence of reversed flow are presented. Comparisons and verification are made using the existing numerical solutions at locations far downstream of developing flow.

  1. Finite difference analysis for developing laminar flow in circular tubes applied to forced and combined convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, M. W.

    1980-03-01

    The complete two-dimensional partial differential equations for developing laminar flow in a circular tube have been treated by a finite difference analysis. Property variation with temperature, especially that of viscosity, is allowed for in a flexible manner. The continuity and momentum equations, and then the energy equations, are solved by direct elimination at each axial step, and a marching procedure used in the axial direction. The stepwise energy balance is rigidly satisfied throughout by using it as a constituent equation in place of the 'explicit' wall thermal boundary condition normally used. The analysis predicts the complete developing hydrodynamic and thermal fields, together with friction factors and heat transfer coefficients. It has been tested for a range of fluid velocity and thermal boundary conditions and for various fluids, including high viscosity oils, water and air. Predictions for constant wall temperature presented here are for forced and combined convection and are compared with experimental data of Test and Zeldin and Schmidt.

  2. Stochastic Convection Parameterizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teixeira, Joao; Reynolds, Carolyn; Suselj, Kay; Matheou, Georgios

    2012-01-01

    computational fluid dynamics, radiation, clouds, turbulence, convection, gravity waves, surface interaction, radiation interaction, cloud and aerosol microphysics, complexity (vegetation, biogeochemistry, radiation versus turbulence/convection stochastic approach, non-linearities, Monte Carlo, high resolutions, large-Eddy Simulations, cloud structure, plumes, saturation in tropics, forecasting, parameterizations, stochastic, radiation-clod interaction, hurricane forecasts

  3. Chemical and chronologic complexity in the convecting upper mantle: Evidence from the Taitao ophiolite, southern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulte, Ruth F.; Schilling, Manuel; Anma, Ryo; Farquhar, James; Horan, Mary F.; Komiya, Tsuyoshi; Piccoli, Philip M.; Pitcher, Lynnette; Walker, Richard J.

    2009-10-01

    initial 187Os/ 188Os ratios, calculated for 6 Ma, that range from 0.126 ( γOs = -1) to as high as 0.561 ( γOs = +342). The Os isotopic systematics of each of these rocks may reflect derivation from mixed lithologies that include the peridotites, but may also include pyroxenites with considerably more radiogenic Os than the peridotites. This observation supports the view that suprachondritic Os present in MORB derives from mixed mantle source lithologies, accounting for some of the worldwide dichotomy in 187Os/ 188Os between MORB and abyssal peridotites. The collective results of this study suggest that this >500 km 3 block of the mantle underwent at least two stages of melting. The first stage occurred at ˜1.6 Ga, after which the block remained isolated and unmixed within the DMM. A final stage of melting recently occurred at or near the Chile Ridge, resulting in the production of at least some of the mafic rocks. Convective stirring of this mantle domain during a >1 Ga period was remarkably inefficient, at least with regard to Os isotopes.

  4. Development of a new device to measure local heat exchange by evaporation and convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakitsuba, N.; Katsuura, T.

    1992-06-01

    According to the principles of heat and mass transfer, the rate of local heat exchange by convection (C) and local heat loss by evaporation (E) can be estimated if temperature and vapor concentration profiles in the boundary layer are measured. In addition, temperature (Ts) and vapor concentration (rho s) at the surface may be predicted from the measured profiles. On this basis, a new device was developed to measure parabolic profiles by incorporating three relative humidity sensors coupled with thermistors into its probe. It has been evaluated from various tests including human experiments. The results showed that the device, with humidity sensors arranged perpendicular to the surface, could estimate C, E, Ts, and rho s in closer agreement with direct measurements when compared with the conventional gradient method. This confirmed that our method had clear advantages over the conventional gradient method under laminar air flow conditions.

  5. Development of a laser-induced heat flux technique for measurement of convective heat transfer coefficients in a supersonic flowfield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porro, A. Robert; Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Hingst, Warren R.; Chriss, Randall M.; Seablom, Kirk D.

    1991-01-01

    A technique is developed to measure the local convective heat transfer coefficient on a model surface in a supersonic flow field. The technique uses a laser to apply a discrete local heat flux at the model test surface, and an infrared camera system determines the local temperature distribution due to heating. From this temperature distribution and an analysis of the heating process, a local convective heat transfer coefficient is determined. The technique was used to measure the load surface convective heat transfer coefficient distribution on a flat plate at nominal Mach numbers of 2.5, 3.0, 3.5, and 4.0. The flat plate boundary layer initially was laminar and became transitional in the measurement region. The experimental results agreed reasonably well with theoretical predictions of convective heat transfer of flat plate laminar boundary layers. The results indicate that this non-intrusive optical measurement technique has the potential to obtain high quality surface convective heat transfer measurements in high speed flowfields.

  6. Mantle Convection on Modern Supercomputers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weismüller, J.; Gmeiner, B.; Huber, M.; John, L.; Mohr, M.; Rüde, U.; Wohlmuth, B.; Bunge, H. P.

    2015-12-01

    Mantle convection is the cause for plate tectonics, the formation of mountains and oceans, and the main driving mechanism behind earthquakes. The convection process is modeled by a system of partial differential equations describing the conservation of mass, momentum and energy. Characteristic to mantle flow is the vast disparity of length scales from global to microscopic, turning mantle convection simulations into a challenging application for high-performance computing. As system size and technical complexity of the simulations continue to increase, design and implementation of simulation models for next generation large-scale architectures is handled successfully only in an interdisciplinary context. A new priority program - named SPPEXA - by the German Research Foundation (DFG) addresses this issue, and brings together computer scientists, mathematicians and application scientists around grand challenges in HPC. Here we report from the TERRA-NEO project, which is part of the high visibility SPPEXA program, and a joint effort of four research groups. TERRA-NEO develops algorithms for future HPC infrastructures, focusing on high computational efficiency and resilience in next generation mantle convection models. We present software that can resolve the Earth's mantle with up to 1012 grid points and scales efficiently to massively parallel hardware with more than 50,000 processors. We use our simulations to explore the dynamic regime of mantle convection and assess the impact of small scale processes on global mantle flow.

  7. Mantle convection on modern supercomputers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weismüller, Jens; Gmeiner, Björn; Mohr, Marcus; Waluga, Christian; Wohlmuth, Barbara; Rüde, Ulrich; Bunge, Hans-Peter

    2015-04-01

    Mantle convection is the cause for plate tectonics, the formation of mountains and oceans, and the main driving mechanism behind earthquakes. The convection process is modeled by a system of partial differential equations describing the conservation of mass, momentum and energy. Characteristic to mantle flow is the vast disparity of length scales from global to microscopic, turning mantle convection simulations into a challenging application for high-performance computing. As system size and technical complexity of the simulations continue to increase, design and implementation of simulation models for next generation large-scale architectures demand an interdisciplinary co-design. Here we report about recent advances of the TERRA-NEO project, which is part of the high visibility SPPEXA program, and a joint effort of four research groups in computer sciences, mathematics and geophysical application under the leadership of FAU Erlangen. TERRA-NEO develops algorithms for future HPC infrastructures, focusing on high computational efficiency and resilience in next generation mantle convection models. We present software that can resolve the Earth's mantle with up to 1012 grid points and scales efficiently to massively parallel hardware with more than 50,000 processors. We use our simulations to explore the dynamic regime of mantle convection assessing the impact of small scale processes on global mantle flow.

  8. Development of a regional rain retrieval algorithm for exclusive mesoscale convective systems over peninsular India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Devajyoti; Sharma, Sanjay; Das, Jyotirmay; Gairola, R. M.

    2012-06-01

    The present study emphasize the development of a region specific rain retrieval algorithm by taking into accounts the cloud features. Brightness temperatures (Tbs) from various TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) channels are calibrated with near surface rain intensity as observed from the TRMM - Precipitation Radar. It shows that Tb-R relations during exclusive-Mesoscale Convective System (MCS) events have greater dynamical range compared to combined events of non-MCS and MCS. Increased dynamical range of Tb-R relations for exclusive-MCS events have led to the development of an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) based regional algorithm for rain intensity estimation. By using the exclusive MCSs algorithm, reasonably good improvement in the accuracy of rain intensity estimation is observed. A case study of a comparison of rain intensity estimation by the exclusive-MCS regional algorithm and the global TRMM 2A12 rain product with a Doppler Weather Radar shows significant improvement in rain intensity estimation by the developed regional algorithm.

  9. Vertical transport and processing of aerosols in a mixed-phase convective cloud and the feedback on cloud development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Y.; Carslaw, K. S.; Feingold, G.

    2005-01-01

    A modelling study of vertical transport and processing of sulphate aerosol by a mixed-phase convective cloud, and the feedback of the cloud-processed aerosols on the development of cloud microphysical properties and precipitation is presented. An axisymmetric dynamic cloud model with bin-resolved microphysics and aqueousphase chemistry is developed and is used to examine the relative importance of microphysical and chemical processes on the aerosol budget, the fate of the aerosol material inside hydrometeors, and the size distributions of cloud-processed sulphate aerosols. Numerical simulations are conducted for a moderately deep convective cloud observed during the Cooperative Convective Precipitation Experiments. The results show that aerosol particles that have been transported from the boundary layer, detrained, and then re-entrained at midcloud levels account for a large fraction of the aerosol inside hydrometeors (~40% by mass). Convective transport by the simulated cloud enhances upper-tropospheric aerosol number and mass concentrations by factors of 2-3 and 3-4, respectively. Sensitivity studies suggest that, for the simulated case, aqueous chemistry does not modify the evolution of the cloud significantly. Finally, ice-phase hydrometeor development is very sensitive to aerosol concentrations at midcloud levels. The latter result suggests that the occurrence of mid-tropospheric aerosol layers that have been advected through long-range transport could strongly affect cloud microphysical processes and precipitation formation.

  10. Numerical Simulations of the Effect of Soil Moisture and Vegetation Cover on the Development of Deep Convection.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Craig A.; Arritt, Paymond W.

    1995-09-01

    A one-dimensional (column) version of a primitive equations model has been used to study the impact of soil moisture and vegetation cover on the development of deep cumulus convection in the absence of dynamical forcing. The model includes parameterizations of radiation, turbulent exchange, deep convection, shallow boundary layer convective clouds, vegetation, and soil temperature and moisture. Multiple one-dimensional experiments were performed using the average July sounding for Topeka, Kansas, as the initial condition. A range of volumetric soil moisture from one-half of the wilting point to saturation and vegetation cover ranging from bare soil to full cover were considered.Vegetation cover was found to promote convection, both by extraction of soil moisture and by shading the soil so that conduction of heat into the soil was reduced (thereby increasing the available energy). The larger values of initial soil moisture were found to delay the onset of precipitation and to increase the precipitation amount. The greatest rainfall amounts were generally predicted to occur for moist, fully vegetated surfaces. Vegetation cover also had a pronounced moderating influence, decreasing the sensitivity of the results to the soil moisture content. The general nature of the results prevailed for modest variations in the initial summertime atmospheric profile and changes in the details of the surface parameterization. The inclusion of shading by shallow cumulus clouds tended to reduce the convection for moist, bare (or partly bare) soil. The nonlinearity of the interaction between the land surface and convective precipitation implies that the effects of subgrid landscape heterogeneity in climate models cannot accurately be represented by linear averages of the contributions from the different surface types.

  11. Progress in developing the ASPECT Mantle Convection Code - New Features, Benchmark Comparisons and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dannberg, Juliane; Bangerth, Wolfgang; Sobolev, Stephan

    2014-05-01

    Since there is no direct access to the deep Earth, numerical simulations are an indispensible tool for exploring processes in the Earth's mantle. Results of these models can be compared to surface observations and, combined with constraints from seismology and geochemistry, have provided insight into a broad range of geoscientific problems. In this contribution we present results obtained from a next-generation finite-element code called ASPECT (Advanced Solver for Problems in Earth's ConvecTion), which is especially suited for modeling thermo-chemical convection due to its use of many modern numerical techniques: fully adaptive meshes, accurate discretizations, a nonlinear artificial diffusion method to stabilize the advection equation, an efficient solution strategy based on a block triangular preconditioner utilizing an algebraic multigrid, parallelization of all of the steps above and finally its modular and easily extensible implementation. In particular the latter features make it a very versatile tool applicable also to lithosphere models. The equations are implemented in the form of the Anelastic Liquid Approximation with temperature, pressure, composition and strain rate dependent material properties including associated non-linear solvers. We will compare computations with ASPECT to common benchmarks in the geodynamics community such as the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (van Keken et al., 1997) and demonstrate recently implemented features such as a melting model with temperature, pressure and composition dependent melt fraction and latent heat. Moreover, we elaborate on a number of features currently under development by the community such as free surfaces, porous flow and elasticity. In addition, we show examples of how ASPECT is applied to develop sophisticated simulations of typical geodynamic problems. These include 3D models of thermo-chemical plumes incorporating phase transitions (including melting) with the accompanying density changes, Clapeyron

  12. Developments in convective heat transfer models featuring seamless and selected detail surfaces, employing electroless plating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stalmach, C. J., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Several model/instrument concepts employing electroless metallic skin were considered for improvement of surface condition, accuracy, and cost of contoured-geometry convective heat transfer models. A plated semi-infinite slab approach was chosen for development and evaluation in a hypersonic wind tunnel. The plated slab model consists of an epoxy casting containing fine constantan wires accurately placed at specified surface locations. An electroless alloy was deposited on the plastic surface that provides a hard, uniformly thick, seamless skin. The chosen alloy forms a high-output thermocouple junction with each exposed constantan wire, providing means of determining heat transfer during tunnel testing of the model. A selective electroless plating procedure was used to deposit scaled heatshield tiles on the lower surface of a 0.0175-scale shuttle orbiter model. Twenty-five percent of the tiles were randomly selected and plated to a height of 0.001-inch. The purpose was to assess the heating effects of surface roughness simulating misalignment of tiles that may occur during manufacture of the spacecraft.

  13. Wavelike Structures in the Turbulent Layer During the Morning Development of Convection at Dome C, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petenko, Igor; Argentini, Stefania; Casasanta, Giampietro; Kallistratova, Margarita; Sozzi, Roberto; Viola, Angelo

    2016-06-01

    In the period January-February 2014, observations were made at the Concordia station, Dome C, Antarctica to study atmospheric turbulence in the boundary layer using a high-resolution sodar. The turbulence structure was observed beginning from the lowest height of about 2 m, with a vertical resolution of less than 2 m. Typical patterns of the diurnal evolution of the spatio-temporal structure of turbulence detected by the sodar are analyzed. Here, we focus on the wavelike processes observed within the transition period from stable to unstable stratification occurring in the morning hours. Thanks to the high-resolution sodar measurements during the development of the convection near the surface, clear undulations were detected in the overlying turbulent layer for a significant part of the time. The wavelike pattern exhibits a regular braid structure, with undulations associated with internal gravity waves attributed to Kelvin-Helmholtz shear instability. The main spatial and temporal scales of the wavelike structures were determined, with predominant periodicity of the observed wavy patterns estimated to be 40-50 s. The horizontal scales roughly estimated using Taylor's frozen turbulence hypothesis are about 250-350 m.

  14. Budget study of a mesoscale convective system - Model simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Simpson, Joanne; Mccumber, Michael

    1988-01-01

    A tropical squall-type cloud cluster is examined as an example of a mesoscale convective complex. The precipitation growth processes and air circulations that develop in the convective and stratiform regions are studied using a data set generated from a time-dependent numerical cloud model. The relationship of the stratiform region of the mesoscale convective complex is discussed. The vertical profiles of heating and drying are calculated. Comparisons are made between simulations with and without ice-phase microphysical processes and a simulation with forcing by weaker lifting at middle and upper levels.

  15. Development of The Convective-boundary Layer On A Coastal Site: Summer and Winter Field Measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantilla, E.; Sanz, M. J.; Millán., M. M.

    Within the framework of the EU project RECAB ("Regional Assessment and Model- ing of the Carbon Balance of Europe", EVK2-1999-00236), during July and December of 2001, convective boundary-layer measurements were performed systematically for several days at the coastline near El Saler (Valencia, Spain). A tethersonde sound- ing system was used, with a 1000 m maximum altitude. The measurement strategy included the realization of different profiles during the day: before or about sunrise to determine the characteristics of the drainage flow; at about the time of maximum boundary-layer development after noon; and in the afternoon-evening, to show the collapse of the diurnal flow. The objective was to document experimentally the struc- ture and daily evolution of the coastal boundary layer in the area, as well as to show seasonal variability in response to differences in mesoscale forcing. One of the most important aspects registered in the profiles, and expanding the previous evidences on the western Mediterranean coast, is the intense compensatory sinking on the coast oc- curring within the general subsidence process related to the persistent high pressure system in these latitudes during the summer period in response to the development of the sea breeze coastal cycles. This extra sinking, not present in the winter mea- surements (due to the fact that in this period meteorological processes are dominated by higher scale structures), gives rise to a rich thermal structure in the first hundreds meters of the atmosphere, creating intense superadiabatic lapse rates (a very strati- fied structure can often be appreciated, where different more-or-less uncoupled layers persist), which suppose an important barrier to the vertical diffusion of any surface emissions. This fact is very important for understanding the general process of the surface-atmosphere interchange mechanisms, and especially for modeling such pro- cesses with simple mixing layer schemes.

  16. Evaluating and Understanding Parameterized Convective Processes and Their Role in the Development of Mesoscale Precipitation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritsch, J. Michael (Principal Investigator); Kain, John S.

    1995-01-01

    Research efforts during the first year focused on numerical simulations of two convective systems with the Penn State/NCAR mesoscale model. The first of these systems was tropical cyclone Irma, which occurred in 1987 in Australia's Gulf of Carpentaria during the AMEX field program. Comparison simulations of this system were done with two different convective parameterization schemes (CPS's), the Kain-Fritsch (1993 - KF) and the Betts-Miller (Betts 1986- BM) schemes. The second system was the June 10-11 1985 squall line simulation, which occurred over the Kansas-Oklahoma region during the PRE-STORM experiment. Simulations of this system using the KF scheme were examined in detail.

  17. Evaluating and Understanding Parameterized Convective Processes and Their Role in the Development of Mesoscale Precipitation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritsch, J. Michael; Kain, John S.

    1996-01-01

    Research efforts focused on numerical simulations of two convective systems with the Penn State/NCAR mesoscale model. The first of these systems was tropical cyclone Irma, which occurred in 1987 in Australia's Gulf of Carpentaria during the AMEX field program. Comparison simulations of this system were done with two different convective parameterization schemes (CPS's), the Kain-Fritsch (KF) and the Betts-Miller (BM) schemes. The second system was the June 10-11, 1985 squall line simulation, which occurred over the Kansas-Oklahoma region during the PRE-STORM experiment. Simulations of this system using the KF scheme were examined in detail.

  18. Simulating deep convection with a shallow convection scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohenegger, C.; Bretherton, C. S.

    2011-03-01

    Convective processes profoundly affect the global water and energy balance of our planet but remain a challenge for global climate modeling. Here we develop and investigate the suitability of a unified convection scheme, capable of handling both shallow and deep convection, to simulate cases of tropical oceanic convection, mid-latitude continental convection, and maritime shallow convection. To that aim, we employ large-eddy simulations (LES) as a benchmark to test and refine a unified convection scheme implemented in the Single-Column Community Atmosphere Model (SCAM). Our approach is motivated by previous cloud-resolving modeling studies, which have documented the gradual transition between shallow and deep convection and its possible importance for the simulated precipitation diurnal cycle. Analysis of the LES reveals that differences between shallow and deep convection, regarding cloud-base properties as well as entrainment/detrainment rates, can be related to the evaporation of precipitation. Parameterizing such effects and accordingly modifying the University of Washington shallow convection scheme, it is found that the new unified scheme can represent both shallow and deep convection as well as tropical and continental convection. Compared to the default SCAM version, the new scheme especially improves relative humidity, cloud cover and mass flux profiles. The new unified scheme also removes the well-known too early onset and peak of convective precipitation over mid-latitude continental areas.

  19. Simulating deep convection with a shallow convection scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohenegger, C.; Bretherton, C. S.

    2011-10-01

    Convective processes profoundly affect the global water and energy balance of our planet but remain a challenge for global climate modeling. Here we develop and investigate the suitability of a unified convection scheme, capable of handling both shallow and deep convection, to simulate cases of tropical oceanic convection, mid-latitude continental convection, and maritime shallow convection. To that aim, we employ large-eddy simulations (LES) as a benchmark to test and refine a unified convection scheme implemented in the Single-column Community Atmosphere Model (SCAM). Our approach is motivated by previous cloud-resolving modeling studies, which have documented the gradual transition between shallow and deep convection and its possible importance for the simulated precipitation diurnal cycle. Analysis of the LES reveals that differences between shallow and deep convection, regarding cloud-base properties as well as entrainment/detrainment rates, can be related to the evaporation of precipitation. Parameterizing such effects and accordingly modifying the University of Washington shallow convection scheme, it is found that the new unified scheme can represent both shallow and deep convection as well as tropical and mid-latitude continental convection. Compared to the default SCAM version, the new scheme especially improves relative humidity, cloud cover and mass flux profiles. The new unified scheme also removes the well-known too early onset and peak of convective precipitation over mid-latitude continental areas.

  20. Growth and property development of convection pass deposits in recovery boilers : final project project.

    SciTech Connect

    Lien, Steve J.; Baxter, Larry L.; Frederick, W. James Jr.; Wessel, Richard A.

    2004-11-01

    As part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) Industries of the Future (IOF) Forest Products research program, the mechanisms of particle deposition and properties of deposits that form in the convection passes of recovery boilers were investigated. Research from experimental facilities at Sandia National Laboratories, the Institute of Paper Science and Technology (IPST), and the University of Toronto (U of T) was coordinated into a single effort to define the controlling mechanisms and rates of deposition. Deposition rates were recorded on a volumetric and mass basis in a Sandia facility for particle sizes in the range of 0.1 to 150 {micro}m. Deposit thickness, mass, spectral emissivity, thermal conductivity, surface temperature, and apparent density were monitored simultaneously and in situ on instrumented probes that allow determination of heat flux and probe surface temperature. Particle composition and mass deposition rates were also recorded in a U of T facility for particle sizes in the range of 100 to 600 {micro}m. These measurements allowed determination of the liquid content and sticking efficiency of carryover particles that inertially impact on a deposition probe. In addition, information on particulates, stable gas species, gas temperature and velocity were obtained from field tests in an operating recovery boiler. The results were used to develop algorithms appropriate for use in computer codes that simulate recovery boilers. Representative calculations were performed using B&W's comprehensive recovery boiler model to demonstrate the use of the algorithms in such computer codes. Comparisons between observations in commercial systems and model predictions were made to identify algorithm strengths and weaknesses.

  1. An evaluation of satellite-derived humidity and its relationship to convective development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuelberg, Henry E.

    1993-01-01

    An aircraft prototype of the High-Resolution Interferometer Sounder (HIS) was flown over Tennessee and northern Alabama during summer 1986. The HIS temperature and dewpoint soundings were examined on two flight days to determine their error characteristics and utility in mesoscale analyses. Random errors were calculated from structure functions while total errors were obtained by pairing the HIS soundings with radiosonde-derived profiles. Random temperature errors were found to be less than 1 C at most levels, but random dewpoint errors ranged from 1 to 5 C. Total errors of both parameters were considerably greater, with dewpoint errors especially large on the day having a pronounced subsidence inversion. Cumulus cloud cover on 15 June limited HIS mesoscale analyses on that day. Previously undetected clouds were found in many HIS fields of view, and these probably produced the low-level horizontal temperature and dewpoint variations observed in the retrievals. HIS dewpoints at 300 mb indicated a strong moisture gradient that was confirmed by GOES 6.7-micron imagery. HIS mesoscale analyses on 19 June revealed a tongue of humid air stretching across the study area. The moist region was confirmed by radiosonde data and imagery from the Multispectral Atmospheric Mapping Sensor (MAMS). Convective temperatures derived from HIS retrievals helped explain the cloud formation that occurred after the HIS overflights. Crude estimates of Bowen ratio were obtained from HIS data using a mixing-line approach. Values indicated that areas of large sensible heat flux were the areas of first cloud development. These locations were also suggested by GOES visible and infrared imagery. The HIS retrievals indicated that areas of thunderstorm formation were regions of greatest instability. Local landscape variability and atmospheric temperature and humidity fluctuations were found to be important factors in producing the cumulus clouds on 19 June. HIS soundings were capable of detecting

  2. NEW DEVELOPMENT IN DISPERSION EXPERIMENTS AND MODELS FOR THE CONVECTIVE BOUNDARY LAYER

    EPA Science Inventory

    We present recent experiments and modeling studies of dispersion in the convective boundary layer (CBL) with focus on highly-buoyant plumes that "loft" near the CBL top and resist downward mixing. Such plumes have been a significant problem in earlier dispersion models; they a...

  3. Can complexity science inform physician leadership development?

    PubMed

    Grady, Colleen Marie

    2016-07-01

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to describe research that examined physician leadership development using complexity science principles. Design/methodology/approach Intensive interviewing of 21 participants and document review provided data regarding physician leadership development in health-care organizations using five principles of complexity science (connectivity, interdependence, feedback, exploration-of-the-space-of-possibilities and co-evolution), which were grouped in three areas of inquiry (relationships between agents, patterns of behaviour and enabling functions). Findings Physician leaders are viewed as critical in the transformation of healthcare and in improving patient outcomes, and yet significant challenges exist that limit their development. Leadership in health care continues to be associated with traditional, linear models, which are incongruent with the behaviour of a complex system, such as health care. Physician leadership development remains a low priority for most health-care organizations, although physicians admit to being limited in their capacity to lead. This research was based on five principles of complexity science and used grounded theory methodology to understand how the behaviours of a complex system can provide data regarding leadership development for physicians. The study demonstrated that there is a strong association between physician leadership and patient outcomes and that organizations play a primary role in supporting the development of physician leaders. Findings indicate that a physician's relationship with their patient and their capacity for innovation can be extended as catalytic behaviours in a complex system. The findings also identified limiting factors that impact physicians who choose to lead, such as reimbursement models that do not place value on leadership and medical education that provides minimal opportunity for leadership skill development. Practical Implications This research provides practical

  4. Using satellite data to aid in diagnosing and forecasting convective development and intensity along arc cloud lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purdom, James F. W.; Sinclair, Peter C.

    1988-01-01

    The convective scale interactions associated with the arc cloud line are studied using GOES data. Studies of convective scale interactions are reviewed and the convective scale interaction phenomena is described. The use of satellite data in nowcasting and forecasting convective storms is discussed.

  5. High order WENO and DG methods for time-dependent convection-dominated PDEs: A brief survey of several recent developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Chi-Wang

    2016-07-01

    For solving time-dependent convection-dominated partial differential equations (PDEs), which arise frequently in computational physics, high order numerical methods, including finite difference, finite volume, finite element and spectral methods, have been undergoing rapid developments over the past decades. In this article we give a brief survey of two selected classes of high order methods, namely the weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) finite difference and finite volume schemes and discontinuous Galerkin (DG) finite element methods, emphasizing several of their recent developments: bound-preserving limiters for DG, finite volume and finite difference schemes, which address issues in robustness and accuracy; WENO limiters for DG methods, which address issues in non-oscillatory performance when there are strong shocks, and inverse Lax-Wendroff type boundary treatments for finite difference schemes, which address issues in solving complex geometry problems using Cartesian meshes.

  6. Effects of vertical wind shear on convective development during a landfall of severe tropical storm Bilis (2006)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Donghai; Li, Xiaofan; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Wang, Yuan

    2009-10-01

    Effects of vertical wind shear on convective development during the landfall of tropical storm Bilis (2006) are investigated with a pair of sensitivity experiments using a two-dimensional cloud-resolving model. The validated simulation data from Wang et al. [Wang, D., Li, X., Tao, W.-K., Liu, Y., Zhou, H., 2009: Torrential rainfall processes associated with a landfall of severe tropical storm Bilis (2006): A two-dimensional cloud-resolving modeling study. Atmos. Res., 91, 94-104.] are used as the control experiment. The difference between the control and sensitivity experiments is that vertically varying zonal winds in the control experiment are replaced by their mass-weighted means in the sensitivity experiment. The imposed vertical velocity with ascending motion in the upper troposphere and descending motion in the lower troposphere is responsible for dominant stratiform rainfall on 15 July. The vertical wind shear does not have important impacts on development of stratiform rainfall. One day later, imposed upward motion extends to the lower troposphere. The inclusion of negative vertical wind shear produces well-organized convection and strong convective rainfall because it causes kinetic energy transfer from large-scale forcing to perturbation circulations.

  7. Automatic remote sensing detection of the convective boundary layer structure over flat and complex terrain using the novel PathfinderTURB algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poltera, Yann; Martucci, Giovanni; Hervo, Maxime; Haefele, Alexander; Emmenegger, Lukas; Brunner, Dominik; Henne, stephan

    2016-04-01

    We have developed, applied and validated a novel algorithm called PathfinderTURB for the automatic and real-time detection of the vertical structure of the planetary boundary layer. The algorithm has been applied to a year of data measured by the automatic LIDAR CHM15K at two sites in Switzerland: the rural site of Payerne (MeteoSwiss station, 491 m, asl), and the alpine site of Kleine Scheidegg (KSE, 2061 m, asl). PathfinderTURB is a gradient-based layer detection algorithm, which in addition makes use of the atmospheric variability to detect the turbulent transition zone that separates two low-turbulence regions, one characterized by homogeneous mixing (convective layer) and one above characterized by free tropospheric conditions. The PathfinderTURB retrieval of the vertical structure of the Local (5-10 km, horizontal scale) Convective Boundary Layer (LCBL) has been validated at Payerne using two established reference methods. The first reference consists of four independent human-expert manual detections of the LCBL height over the year 2014. The second reference consists of the values of LCBL height calculated using the bulk Richardson number method based on co-located radio sounding data for the same year 2014. Based on the excellent agreement with the two reference methods at Payerne, we decided to apply PathfinderTURB to the complex-terrain conditions at KSE during 2014. The LCBL height retrievals are obtained by tilting the CHM15K at an angle of 19 degrees with respect to the horizontal and aiming directly at the Sphinx Observatory (3580 m, asl) on the Jungfraujoch. This setup of the CHM15K and the processing of the data done by the PathfinderTURB allows to disentangle the long-transport from the local origin of gases and particles measured by the in-situ instrumentation at the Sphinx Observatory. The KSE measurements showed that the relation amongst the LCBL height, the aerosol layers above the LCBL top and the gas + particle concentration is all but

  8. Development of a flow visualization apparatus. [to study convection flow patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spradley, L. W.

    1975-01-01

    The use of an optical flow visualization device for studying convection flow patterns was investigated. The investigation considered use of a shadowgraph, schlieren and other means for visualizing the flow. A laboratory model was set up to provide data on the proper optics and photography procedures to best visualize the flow. A preliminary design of a flow visualization system is provided as a result of the study. Recommendations are given for a flight test program utilizing the flow visualization apparatus.

  9. Mantle Convection in a Microwave Oven: New Perspectives for the Internally Heated Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limare, A.; Fourel, L.; Surducan, E.; Neamtu, C.; Surducan, V.; Vilella, K.; Farnetani, C. G.; Kaminski, E. C.; Jaupart, C. P.

    2015-12-01

    The thermal evolution of silicate planets is primarily controlled by the balance between internal heating - due to radioactive decay - and heat transport by mantle convection. In the Earth, the problem is particularly complex due to the heterogeneous distribution of heat sources in the mantle and the non-linear coupling between this distribution and convective mixing. To investigate the behaviour of such systems, we have developed a new technology based on microwave absorption to study internally-heated convection in the laboratory. This prototype offers the ability to reach the high Rayleigh-Roberts and Prandtl numbers that are relevant for planetary convection. Our experimental results obtained for a uniform distribution of heat sources were compared to numerical calculations reproducing exactly experimental conditions (3D Cartesian geometry and temperature-dependent physical properties), thereby providing the first cross validation of experimental and numerical studies of convection in internally-heated systems. We find that the thermal boundary layer thickness and interior temperature scale with RaH-1/4, where RaH is the Rayleigh-Roberts number, as theoretically predicted by scaling arguments on the dissipation of kinetic energy. Our microwave-based method offers new perspectives for the study of internally-heated convection in heterogeneous systems which have been out of experimental reach until now. We are able to selectively heat specific regions in the convecting layer, through the careful control of the absorption properties of different miscible fluids. This is analogous to convection in the presence of chemical reservoirs with different concentration of long-lived radioactive isotopes. We shall show results for two different cases: the stability of continental lithosphere over a convective fluid and the evolution of a hidden enriched reservoir in the lowermost mantle.

  10. Complex Dynamic Development of Poliovirus Membranous Replication Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Vinod; Hansen, Bryan T.; Hoyt, Forrest H.; Fischer, Elizabeth R.; Ehrenfeld, Ellie

    2012-01-01

    Replication of all positive-strand RNA viruses is intimately associated with membranes. Here we utilize electron tomography and other methods to investigate the remodeling of membranes in poliovirus-infected cells. We found that the viral replication structures previously described as “vesicles” are in fact convoluted, branching chambers with complex and dynamic morphology. They are likely to originate from cis-Golgi membranes and are represented during the early stages of infection by single-walled connecting and branching tubular compartments. These early viral organelles gradually transform into double-membrane structures by extension of membranous walls and/or collapsing of the luminal cavity of the single-membrane structures. As the double-membrane regions develop, they enclose cytoplasmic material. At this stage, a continuous membranous structure may have double- and single-walled membrane morphology at adjacent cross-sections. In the late stages of the replication cycle, the structures are represented mostly by double-membrane vesicles. Viral replication proteins, double-stranded RNA species, and actively replicating RNA are associated with both double- and single-membrane structures. However, the exponential phase of viral RNA synthesis occurs when single-membrane formations are predominant in the cell. It has been shown previously that replication complexes of some other positive-strand RNA viruses form on membrane invaginations, which result from negative membrane curvature. Our data show that the remodeling of cellular membranes in poliovirus-infected cells produces structures with positive curvature of membranes. Thus, it is likely that there is a fundamental divergence in the requirements for the supporting cellular membrane-shaping machinery among different groups of positive-strand RNA viruses. PMID:22072780

  11. 2-D traveling-wave patterns in binary fluid convection

    SciTech Connect

    Surko, C.M.; Porta, A.L.

    1996-12-31

    An overview is presented of recent experiments designed to study two-dimensional traveling-wave convection in binary fluid convection in a large aspect ratio container. Disordered patterns are observed when convection is initiated. As time proceeds, they evolve to more ordered patterns, consisting of several domains of traveling-waves separated by well-defined domain boundaries. The detailed character of the patterns depends sensitively on the Rayleigh number. Numerical techniques are described which were developed to provide a quantitative characterization of the traveling-wave patterns. Applications of complex demodulation techniques are also described, which make a detailed study of the structure and dynamics of the domain boundaries possible.

  12. Development of simulation computer complex specification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The Training Simulation Computer Complex Study was one of three studies contracted in support of preparations for procurement of a shuttle mission simulator for shuttle crew training. The subject study was concerned with definition of the software loads to be imposed on the computer complex to be associated with the shuttle mission simulator and the development of procurement specifications based on the resulting computer requirements. These procurement specifications cover the computer hardware and system software as well as the data conversion equipment required to interface the computer to the simulator hardware. The development of the necessary hardware and software specifications required the execution of a number of related tasks which included, (1) simulation software sizing, (2) computer requirements definition, (3) data conversion equipment requirements definition, (4) system software requirements definition, (5) a simulation management plan, (6) a background survey, and (7) preparation of the specifications.

  13. Modeling the Dynamical Coupling of Solar Convection with the Radiative Interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brun, Allan Sacha; Miesch, Mark S.; Toomre, Juri

    2011-12-01

    The global dynamics of a rotating star like the Sun involves the coupling of a highly turbulent convective envelope overlying a seemingly benign radiative interior. We use the anelastic spherical harmonic code to develop a new class of three-dimensional models that nonlinearly couple the convective envelope to a deep stable radiative interior. The numerical simulation assumes a realistic solar stratification from r = 0.07 up to 0.97R (with R the solar radius), thus encompassing part of the nuclear core up through most of the convection zone. We find that a tachocline naturally establishes itself between the differentially rotating convective envelope and the solid body rotation of the interior, with a slow spreading that is here diffusively controlled. The rapid angular momentum redistribution in the convective envelope leads to a fast equator and slow poles, with a conical differential rotation achieved at mid-latitudes, much as has been deduced by helioseismology. The convective motions are able to overshoot downward about 0.04R into the radiative interior. However, the convective meridional circulation there is confined to a smaller penetration depth and is directed mostly equatorward at the base of the convection zone. Thermal wind balance is established in the lower convection zone and tachocline but departures are evident in the upper convection zone. Internal gravity waves are excited by the convective overshooting, yielding a complex wave field throughout the radiative interior.

  14. MODELING THE DYNAMICAL COUPLING OF SOLAR CONVECTION WITH THE RADIATIVE INTERIOR

    SciTech Connect

    Brun, Allan Sacha; Toomre, Juri

    2011-12-01

    The global dynamics of a rotating star like the Sun involves the coupling of a highly turbulent convective envelope overlying a seemingly benign radiative interior. We use the anelastic spherical harmonic code to develop a new class of three-dimensional models that nonlinearly couple the convective envelope to a deep stable radiative interior. The numerical simulation assumes a realistic solar stratification from r = 0.07 up to 0.97R (with R the solar radius), thus encompassing part of the nuclear core up through most of the convection zone. We find that a tachocline naturally establishes itself between the differentially rotating convective envelope and the solid body rotation of the interior, with a slow spreading that is here diffusively controlled. The rapid angular momentum redistribution in the convective envelope leads to a fast equator and slow poles, with a conical differential rotation achieved at mid-latitudes, much as has been deduced by helioseismology. The convective motions are able to overshoot downward about 0.04R into the radiative interior. However, the convective meridional circulation there is confined to a smaller penetration depth and is directed mostly equatorward at the base of the convection zone. Thermal wind balance is established in the lower convection zone and tachocline but departures are evident in the upper convection zone. Internal gravity waves are excited by the convective overshooting, yielding a complex wave field throughout the radiative interior.

  15. The feasibility of thermal and compositional convection in Earth's inner core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lythgoe, Karen H.; Rudge, John F.; Neufeld, Jerome A.; Deuss, Arwen

    2015-05-01

    Inner core convection, and the corresponding variations in grain size and alignment, has been proposed to explain the complex seismic structure of the inner core, including its anisotropy, lateral variations and the F-layer at the base of the outer core. We develop a parametrized convection model to investigate the possibility of convection in the inner core, focusing on the dominance of the plume mode of convection versus the translation mode. We investigate thermal and compositional convection separately so as to study the end-members of the system. In the thermal case the dominant mode of convection is strongly dependent on the viscosity of the inner core, the magnitude of which is poorly constrained. Furthermore recent estimates of a large core thermal conductivity result in stable thermal stratification, hindering convection. However, an unstable density stratification may arise due to the pressure dependant partition coefficient of certain light elements. We show that this unstable stratification leads to compositionally driven convection, and that inner core translation is likely to be the dominant convective mode due to the low compositional diffusivity. The style of convection resulting from a combination of both thermal and compositional effects is not easy to understand. For reasonable parameter estimates, the stabilizing thermal buoyancy is greater than the destabilizing compositional buoyancy. However we anticipate complex double diffusive processes to occur given the very different thermal and compositional diffusivities.

  16. Controlling Complex Systems and Developing Dynamic Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avizienis, Audrius Victor

    In complex systems, control and understanding become intertwined. Following Ilya Prigogine, we define complex systems as having control parameters which mediate transitions between distinct modes of dynamical behavior. From this perspective, determining the nature of control parameters and demonstrating the associated dynamical phase transitions are practically equivalent and fundamental to engaging with complexity. In the first part of this work, a control parameter is determined for a non-equilibrium electrochemical system by studying a transition in the morphology of structures produced by an electroless deposition reaction. Specifically, changing the size of copper posts used as the substrate for growing metallic silver structures by the reduction of Ag+ from solution under diffusion-limited reaction conditions causes a dynamical phase transition in the crystal growth process. For Cu posts with edge lengths on the order of one micron, local forces promoting anisotropic growth predominate, and the reaction produces interconnected networks of Ag nanowires. As the post size is increased above 10 microns, the local interfacial growth reaction dynamics couple with the macroscopic diffusion field, leading to spatially propagating instabilities in the electrochemical potential which induce periodic branching during crystal growth, producing dendritic deposits. This result is interesting both as an example of control and understanding in a complex system, and as a useful combination of top-down lithography with bottom-up electrochemical self-assembly. The second part of this work focuses on the technological development of devices fabricated using this non-equilibrium electrochemical process, towards a goal of integrating a complex network as a dynamic functional component in a neuromorphic computing device. Self-assembled networks of silver nanowires were reacted with sulfur to produce interfacial "atomic switches": silver-silver sulfide junctions, which exhibit

  17. Observations of Convective Development from Repeat Pass Radiometry during CalWaters 2015: Outlook for the TEMPEST Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, S. T.

    2015-12-01

    The Temporal Experiment for Storms and Tropical Systems (TEMPEST), which was recently selected as a NASA Earth Ventures technology demonstration mission, uses a constellation of five CubeSats flying in formation to provide observations of developing precipitation with a temporal resolution of 5 minutes. The observations are made using small mm-wave radiometers with frequencies ranging from 90 to 183 GHz which are sensitive to the integrated ice water path above the precipitation layer in the storm. This paper describes TEMPEST like observations that were made with the High Altitude MMIC Sounding Radiometer (HAMSR) on the ER-2 during CalWaters 2015. HAMSR is a mm-wave airborne radiometer with 25 channels in three bands; 50, 118 and 183 GHz. During the campaign, a small isolated area of convection was identified by the ER-2 pilot and 5 overpasses of the area were made with about 5 minutes between each pass. The HAMSR data reveal two convective cells, one which was diminishing and one which was developing. The mm-wave channels near the 183 GHz water vapor line clearly show the change in the vertical extent of the storm with time, a proxy for vertical velocity. These data demonstrate the potential for TEMPEST like observations from an orbital vantage point. This paper will provide an overview of the measurements, an analysis of the observations and offer perspectives for the TEMPEST mission.

  18. Solid waste management complex site development plan

    SciTech Connect

    Greager, T.M.

    1994-09-30

    The main purpose of this Solid Waste Management Complex Site Development Plan is to optimize the location of future solid waste treatment and storage facilities and the infrastructure required to support them. An overall site plan is recommended. Further, a series of layouts are included that depict site conditions as facilities are constructed at the SWMC site. In this respect the report serves not only as the siting basis for future projects, but provides siting guidance for Project W-112, as well. The plan is intended to function as a template for expected growth of the site over the next 30 years so that future facilities and infrastructure will be properly integrated.

  19. Supergranular Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udayashankar, Paniveni

    2015-12-01

    Observation of the Solar photosphere through high resolution instruments have long indicated that the surface of the Sun is not a tranquil, featureless surface but is beset with a granular appearance. These cellular velocity patterns are a visible manifestation of sub- photospheric convection currents which contribute substantially to the outward transport of energy from the deeper layers, thus maintaining the energy balance of the Sun as a whole.Convection is the chief mode of transport in the outer layers of all cool stars such as the Sun (Noyes,1982). Convection zone of thickness 30% of the Solar radius lies in the sub-photospheric layers of the Sun. Here the opacity is so large that heat flux transport is mainly by convection rather than by photon diffusion. Convection is revealed on four scales. On the scale of 1000 km, it is granulation and on the scale of 8-10 arcsec, it is Mesogranulation. The next hierarchial scale of convection , Supergranules are in the range of 30-40 arcsec. The largest reported manifestation of convection in the Sun are ‘Giant Cells’or ‘Giant Granules’, on a typical length scale of about 108 m.'Supergranules' is caused by the turbulence that extends deep into the convection zone. They have a typical lifetime of about 20hr with spicules marking their boundaries. Gas rises in the centre of the supergranules and then spreads out towards the boundary and descends.Broadly speaking supergranules are characterized by the three parameters namely the length L, the lifetime T and the horizontal flow velocity vh . The interrelationships amongst these parameters can shed light on the underlying convective processes and are in agreement with the Kolmogorov theory of turbulence as applied to large scale solar convection (Krishan et al .2002 ; Paniveni et. al. 2004, 2005, 2010).References:1) Noyes, R.W., The Sun, Our Star (Harvard University Press, 1982)2) Krishan, V., Paniveni U., Singh , J., Srikanth R., 2002, MNRAS, 334/1,2303) Paniveni

  20. Development of an infrared imaging system for the surface tension driven convection experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pline, Alexander D.

    1989-01-01

    An infrared imaging system is used to quantify the imposed surface temperature distribution along a liquid/gas free surface in support of the Surface Tension Driven Convection Experiment, a planned Space Transportation System flight experiment. For ground-based work a commercially available instrument was used to determine the feasibility of using this type of imaging system for this experiment. The ground-based work was used as a baseline for compiling specifications for a flight qualified imager to be designed, fabricated, tested and qualified for flight. The requirements and the specifications for the flight model are given along with the reasons for departures from the ground-based equipment. The flight qualification requirements discussed are a representative sample of the necessary procedures which must be followed to flight qualify diagnostic equipment for use aboard the STS. The potential problems and concerns associated with operating an imaging system on orbit are also discussed.

  1. Development of an infrared imaging system for the surface tension driven convection experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pline, Alexander D.

    1989-01-01

    An infrared imaging system is used to quantify the imposed surface temperature distribution along a liquid/gas free surface in support of the Surface Tension Driven Convection Experiment, a planned Space Transportation System flight experiment. For ground-based work a commercially available instrument was used to determine the feasibility of using the type of imaging system for this experiment. The ground-based work was used as a baseline for compiling specifications for a flight qualified imager to be designed, fabricated, tested and qualified for flight. The requirements and specifications for the flight model are given along with the reasons for departures from the ground-based equipment. The flight qualification requirements discussed are a representative sample of the necessary procedures which must be followed to flight qualify diagnostic equipment for use aboard the STS. The potential problems and concerns associated with operating an imaging system in orbit are also discussed.

  2. Active control of convection

    SciTech Connect

    Bau, H.H.

    1995-12-31

    Using stability theory, numerical simulations, and in some instances experiments, it is demonstrated that the critical Rayleigh number for the bifurcation (1) from the no-motion (conduction) state to the motion state and (2) from time-independent convection to time-dependent, oscillatory convection in the thermal convection loop and Rayleigh-Benard problems can be significantly increased or decreased. This is accomplished through the use of a feedback controller effectuating small perturbations in the boundary data. The controller consists of sensors which detect deviations in the fluid`s temperature from the motionless, conductive values and then direct actuators to respond to these deviations in such a way as to suppress the naturally occurring flow instabilities. Actuators which modify the boundary`s temperature/heat flux are considered. The feedback controller can also be used to control flow patterns and generate complex dynamic behavior at relatively low Rayleigh numbers.

  3. Microwave-based, internally-heated convection: New perspectives for the heterogeneous case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limare, A.; Fourel, L.; Surducan, E.; Neamtu, C.; Surducan, V.; Vilella, K.; Farnetani, C. G.; Kaminski, E.; Jaupart, C.

    2015-12-01

    The thermal evolution of telluric planets is primarily controlled by the balance between internal heating - due to ra-dioactive decay - and effciency of convective heat transfer in their mantle. In the Earth, the problem is particularly complex due to the heterogeneous distribution of heat sources in the mantle and the non-linear coupling between this distribution and convective mixing. To tackle this issue, we have developed a new technology to produce internally-heated convection based on microwaves absorption. This technology has the unique capability to selectively heat different zones of a convective fluid (heterogeneous convection) through the careful control of the absorption properties of the different fluids. Here we illustrate with two examples the new geophysical perspectives offered by microwave-based internally-heated convection: the problem of lithosphere stability and the evolution of a hidden enriched reservoir in the lowermost mantle.

  4. Internal fabric development in complex lava domes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Závada, Prokop; Kratinová, Zuzana; Kusbach, Vladimír; Schulmann, Karel

    2009-03-01

    Viscous lava extrusions were modeled using plaster of Paris with admixed magnetite dust which served as a tracer of the internal anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility fabric in model lava domes. Used analogue material showed pseudoplastic behavior and yield strength level proportional to increasing mixing ratio of plaster powder and water. A series of models ranging from simple gravity flows to complex lava domes showing combined endogenous and exogenous growth were created by intrusion of plaster into a sandbox. The similarity of model bodies is compared with natural lava domes on the basis of dynamic scaling analysis. Growth dynamics, exogenous growth and internal fabric development in natural lava domes is critically discussed using the experimental results.

  5. GOES Infrared and Reflectance 0-1 hour Lightning Initiation Indicators: Development and Initial Testing within a Convective Nowcasting System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mecikalski, J. R.; Harris, R.; MacKenzie, W.; Durkee, P. A.; Iskenderian, H.; Bickmeier, L.; Nielsen, K. E.

    2010-12-01

    Within cumulus cloud fields that develop in conditionally unstable air masses, only a fraction of the cumuli may eventually develop into deep convection. Identifying which of these convective clouds most likely to generate lightning often starts with little more than a qualitative visual satellite analysis. The goal of this study is to identify the observed satellite infrared (IR) signatures associated with growing cumulus clouds prior to the first lightning strike, so-called lightning initiation (LI). This study quantifies the behavior of ten Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES-12) IR interest fields in the 1-hour in advance of LI. A total of 172 lightning-producing storms that occurred during the 2009 convective season are manually tracked and studied over four regions: Northern Alabama, Central Oklahoma, the Kennedy Space Center and Washington D.C. Four-dimensional and cloud-to-ground lightning array data provide a total cloud lightning picture (in-cloud, cloud-to-cloud, cloud-to-air, cloud-to-ground) and thus precise LI points for each storm in both time and space. Statistical significance tests are conducted on observed trends for each of the ten LI fields to determine the unique information each field provides in terms of behavior prior to LI. Eight out of ten LI fields exhibited useful information at least 15 min in advance of LI, with 35 min being the average. Statistical tests on these eight fields are compared for separate large geographical areas. IR temperature thresholds are then determined as an outcome, which may be valuable when implementing a LI prediction algorithm into real-time satellite-based systems. The key LI indicators from GOES IR data (as well as 3.9 μm reflectance) will be presented. Beginning in 2010, the feasibility of using the satellite-based LI indicators found in the above analysis to forecast first lightning will be assessed within the Federal Aviation Administration’s (FAA) CoSPA nowcasting system. The goal

  6. Experimental measurements and CFD simulation of convective boiling during subcooled developing flow of R-11 within vertical annulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouaichaoui, Y.; Kibboua, R.; Matkovič, M.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper a convective flow boiling of refrigerant R-11 in a vertical annular channel has been investigated. Measurements were performed under various conditions of mass flux, heat flux, and inlet subcooling, which enabled to study the influence of different boundary conditions on the development of local flow parameters. Also, some measurements have been compared to the predictions by the three-dimensional two-fluid model of subcooled boiling flow carried out with the computer code ANSYS-CFX-13. Simulation results successfully predict the main experimental tendencies associated with the heat flux and Reynolds number variation. A sensitivity analysis of several modelling parameters on the radial distribution of flow quantities has highlighted the importance of correct description of the boiling boundary layer. In general a good quantitative and qualitative agreement with experimental data was obtained.

  7. Development of the Communication Complexity Scale

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Nancy C.; Fleming, Kandace; Thiemann-Bourque, Kathy; Olswang, Lesley; Dowden, Patricia; Saunders, Muriel D.

    2011-01-01

    Accurate description of an individual's communication status is critical in both research and practice. Describing the communication status of individuals with severe intellectual and developmental disabilities is difficult because these individuals often communicate with presymbolic means that may not be readily recognized. Our goal was to design a communication scale and summary score for interpretation that could be applied across populations of children and adults with limited (often presymbolic) communication forms. Methods The Communication Complexity Scale (CCS) was developed by a team of researchers and tested with 178 participants with varying levels of presymbolic and early symbolic communication skills. Correlations between standardized and informant measures were completed, and expert opinions were obtained regarding the CCS. Results CCS scores were within expected ranges for the populations studied and inter-rater reliability was high. Comparison across other measures indicated significant correlations with standardized tests of language. Scores on informant report measures tended to place children at higher levels of communication. Expert opinions generally favored the development of the CCS. Clinical implications The scale appears to be useful for describing a given individual's level of presymbolic or early symbolic communication. Further research is needed to determine if it is sensitive to developmental growth in communication. PMID:22049404

  8. Complex subduction and small-scale convection revealed by body-wave tomography of the western United States upper mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmandt, Brandon; Humphreys, Eugene

    2010-09-01

    New high-resolution P- and S-wave tomography of the United States upper mantle from the Pacific Coast to the Great Plains reveals strong multi-scale heterogeneity closely correlated with tectonic and magmatic activity. We invert teleseismic travel-time residuals from the EarthScope Transportable Array and more than 1700 additional temporary and permanent stations for 3-D velocity perturbations to a depth of 1000 km. The inversion uses recent advances in western U.S. crust models to better isolate the mantle component of travel-time residuals, and frequency-dependent 3-D sensitivity kernels to map travel-time residuals, measured in multiple frequency bands, into velocity structure. In addition to separate V P and V S models, we jointly invert the two datasets for V P/V S perturbations by imposing a smoothness constraint on the δ lnV S/δ lnV P field. The joint inversion helps us identify regions where partial melt is probable. The amplitude of V P, V S, and V P/V S variations is greatest in the upper 200 km of the mantle and the form of velocity anomalies suggests a provincially heterogeneous lithosphere and the occurrence of widespread small-scale convection. Partially molten mantle is inferred beneath Yellowstone and the eastern Snake River Plain (SRP), the Salton Trough, and the Clear Lake volcanic field. The inferred depth extent of partial melt is consistent with a generally hydrated upper mantle and elevated temperatures beneath the eastern SRP and Yellowstone. Despite continuous subduction since the Cretaceous, the distribution of sub-lithospheric high-velocity anomalies is dissected (similar to other recent studies). Based on our new tomography models, western U.S. geologic history, and plate-tectonic reconstructions, we infer patchy and incomplete removal of the flat-subducting Laramide slab and slab tearing associated with Eocene accretion in the northwestern U.S.

  9. Convection towers

    DOEpatents

    Prueitt, Melvin L.

    1994-01-01

    Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air and of generating electricity utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity. Other embodiments may also provide fresh water, and operate in an updraft mode.

  10. Convection towers

    DOEpatents

    Prueitt, Melvin L.

    1996-01-01

    Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air, of generating electricity, and of producing fresh water utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity, and condensers produce fresh water.

  11. Convection towers

    DOEpatents

    Prueitt, Melvin L.

    1995-01-01

    Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air, of generating electricity, and of producing fresh water utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity, and condensers produce fresh water.

  12. Convection towers

    DOEpatents

    Prueitt, M.L.

    1996-01-16

    Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air, of generating electricity, and of producing fresh water utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity, and condensers produce fresh water. 6 figs.

  13. Modeling Convection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebert, James R.; Elliott, Nancy A.; Hurteau, Laura; Schulz, Amanda

    2004-01-01

    Students must understand the fundamental process of convection before they can grasp a wide variety of Earth processes, many of which may seem abstract because of the scales on which they operate. Presentation of a very visual, concrete model prior to instruction on these topics may facilitate students' understanding of processes that are largely…

  14. Spontaneous development of arcuate single-sided subduction in global 3-D mantle convection models with a free surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crameri, Fabio; Tackley, Paul

    2014-05-01

    The work presented aims at a better understanding of plate tectonics, a crucial dynamical feature within the global framework of mantle convection. Special focus is given to the interaction of subduction-related mantle flow and surface topography. Thereby, the application of a numerical model with two key functional requirements is essential: an evolution over a long time period to naturally model mantle flow and a physically correct topography calculation. The global mantle convection model presented in Crameri et al. (2012a) satisfies both of these requirements. First, it is efficiently calculated by the finite-volume code Stag-YY (e.g., Tackley 2008) using a multi-grid method on a fully staggered grid. Second, it applies the sticky-air method (Matsumoto and Tomoda 1983; Schmeling et al, 2008) and thus approximates a free surface when the sticky-air parameters are chosen carefully (Crameri et al., 2012b). This leads to dynamically self-consistent mantle convection with realistic, single-sided subduction. New insights are thus gained into the interplay of obliquely sinking plates, toroidal mantle flow and the arcuate shape of slabs and trenches. Numerous two-dimensional experiments provide optimal parameter setups that are applied to three-dimensional models in Cartesian and fully spherical geometries. Features observed and characterised in the latter experiments give important insight into the strongly variable behaviour of subduction zones along their strike. This includes (i) the spontaneous development of arcuate trench geometry, (ii) regional subduction polarity reversals and slab tearing, and the newly discovered features (iii) 'slab tunnelling' and (iv) 'back-slab spiral flow'. Overall, this study demonstrates the strong interaction between surface topography and mantle currents and highlights the variability of subduction zones and their individual segments. REFERENCES Crameri, F., P. J. Tackley, I. Meilick, T. V. Gerya, and B. J. P. Kaus (2012a), A free

  15. Development of the convective boundary layer capping with a thick neutral layer in Badanjilin: Observations and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Bo; Lü, Shihua; Ao, Yinhuan

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the development of a convective boundary layer (CBL) in the Badanjilin region was investigated by comparing the observation data of two cases. A deep neutral layer capped a CBL that occurred on 30 August 2009. This case was divided into five sublayers from the surface to higher atmospheric elevations: surface layer, mixed layer, inversion layer, neutral layer, and sub-inversion layer. The development process of the CBL was divided into three stages: S1, S2, and S3. This case was quite different from the development of the three-layer CBL observed on 31 August 2009 because the mixed layer of the five-layer CBL (CBL5) eroded the neutral layer during S2. The specific initial structure of the CBL5 was correlated to the synoptic background of atmosphere during nighttime. The three-stage development process of the CBL5 was confirmed by six simulations using National Center for Atmospheric Research (USA) large-eddy simulation (NCAR-LES), and some of its characteristics are presented in detail.

  16. Gravity wave initiated convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.

    1990-01-01

    The vertical velocity of convection initiated by gravity waves was investigated. In one particular case, the convective motion-initiated and supported by the gravity wave-induced activity (excluding contributions made by other mechanisms) reached its maximum value about one hour before the production of the funnel clouds. In another case, both rawinsonde and geosynchronous satellite imagery were used to study the life cycles of severe convective storms. Cloud modelling with input sounding data and rapid-scan imagery from GOES were used to investigate storm cloud formation, development and dissipation in terms of growth and collapse of cloud tops, as well as, the life cycles of the penetration of overshooting turrets above the tropopause. The results based on these two approaches are presented and discussed.

  17. Physics of Stellar Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnett, W. David

    2009-05-01

    We review recent progress using numerical simulations as a testbed for development of a theory of stellar convection, much as envisaged by John von Newmann. Necessary features of the theory, non-locality and fluctuations, are illustrated by computer movies. It is found that the common approximation of convection as a diffusive process presents the wrong physical picture, and improvements are suggested. New observational results discussed at the conference are gratifying in their validation of some of our theoretical ideas, especially the idea that SNIb and SNIc events are related to the explosion of massive star cores which have been stripped by mass loss and binary interactions [1

  18. Convection towers

    DOEpatents

    Prueitt, M.L.

    1994-02-08

    Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air and of generating electricity utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity. Other embodiments may also provide fresh water, and operate in an updraft mode. 5 figures.

  19. The retromer complex in development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shiuan; Bellen, Hugo J.

    2015-01-01

    The retromer complex is a multimeric protein complex involved in recycling proteins from endosomes to the trans-Golgi network or plasma membrane. It thus regulates the abundance and subcellular distribution of its cargo within cells. Studies using model organisms show that the retromer complex is involved in specific developmental processes. Moreover, a number of recent studies implicate aberrant retromer function in photoreceptor degeneration, Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Here, and in the accompanying poster, we provide an overview of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of retromer-mediated protein trafficking, highlighting key examples of retromer function in vivo. PMID:26199408

  20. Spontaneous development of arcuate single-sided subduction in global 3-D mantle convection models with a free surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crameri, Fabio; Tackley, Paul J.

    2014-07-01

    We present temporally evolving 3-D global mantle convection models with single-sided subduction and a free surface in both 3-D Cartesian and fully spherical geometry. Special focus is given to the spontaneous development of three-dimensional structures at the surface and in the upper mantle. We find that an arcuate shape is the natural form for trenches and slabs. Cartesian models are used first to study the dynamic evolution of subduction zones, spreading ridges, and interconnected transform features. These experiments highlight the strong variation of spontaneously developing, arcuate slab curvature and subduction polarity along the trench strike. The spontaneous development of spreading ridges leads to lateral offsets between separated segments that are characterized by normal transform motion. Spherical models then allow insights into the evolution of plate tectonics on a sphere. Investigated are the spontaneous evolution of slab geometry, trench motion, and subduction-induced mantle flow. Two new dynamical features are discovered: "back-slab spiral flow" and "slab tunneling." 2014. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Global tectonics from mantle convection models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coltice, N.

    2015-12-01

    The motions of the surface of the Earth are described using the theory of Plate Tectonics. Despite the fact that this theory has shaped modern geosciences it has some limitations, and among them the impossibility to evaluate the forces at the origin of the surface displacements and deformations. Hence important questions remain difficult to solve like the origin of the sizes of plates, forces driving mountain building or supercontinent dispersal... Tremendous progresses have been made in the past 15 years in mantle convection modelling. Especially, modern convection codes can solve for motion equations with complex material properties. Since the early 2000's, the development of pseudo-plastic rheologies contributed to produce convection models with plate-like behaviour: plates naturally emerge and interact with the flow in a self-organized manner. Using such models in 3D spherical geometry (computed with StagYY - Tackley, 2008), I will show that important questions on the global tectonics of the planet can be addressed now: the distribution of seafloor ages, the distribution of plate area, the lifetime of small and large plates or modes of plate reorganizations. Tackley, P.J., Modellng compressible mantle convection with large viscosity contrasts in a three-dimensional spherical shell using the yin-yang grid, Phys. Earth Planet. Inter, 171, 7-18 (2008).

  2. Interactions Between Convective Storms and Their Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddox, R. A.; Hoxit, L. R.; Chappell, C. F.

    1979-01-01

    The ways in which intense convective storms interact with their environment are considered for a number of specific severe storm situations. A physical model of subcloud wind fields and vertical wind profiles was developed to explain the often observed intensification of convective storms that move along or across thermal boundaries. A number of special, unusually dense, data sets were used to substantiate features of the model. GOES imagery was used in conjunction with objectively analyzed surface wind data to develop a nowcast technique that might be used to identify specific storm cells likely to become tornadic. It was shown that circulations associated with organized meso-alpha and meso-beta scale storm complexes may, on occasion, strongly modify tropospheric thermodynamic patterns and flow fields.

  3. Sequential Development of Interfering Metamorphic Core Complexes: Numerical Experiments and Comparison to the Cyclades, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirel, C.; Gautier, P.; van Hinsbergen, D.; Wortel, R.

    2007-12-01

    The Cycladic extensional province (Greece) contains classical examples of metamorphic core complexes (MCCs), where exhumation was accommodated along multiple interfering and/or sequentially developed syn- and antithetic extensional detachment zones. Previous studies on the development of MCCs did not take into account the possible interference between multiple and closely spaced MCCs. In the present study, we have performed new lithosphere-scale experiments in which the deformation is not a priori localized so as to explore the conditions of the development of several MCCs in a direction parallel to extension. In a narrow range of conditions, MCCs are closely spaced, interfere with each other, and develop in sequence. From a comparison between numerical results and geological observations, we find that the Cyclades metamorphic core complexes are in good agreement with the model in terms of Moho geometry and depth, kinematic and structural history, timing and duration of core complex formation and metamorphic history. We infer that, for Cycladic MCC-type to develop, an initial crustal thickness prior to the onset of post-orogenic extension between 40 and 44 km, a boundary velocity close to 2 cm/yr and an initial thermal lithospheric thickness of about 60 km are required. The latter may be explained by a significant heating due to delamination of subducting continental crust or vigorous small-scale thermal convection.

  4. CONVECTION REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Hammond, R.P.; King, L.D.P.

    1960-03-22

    An homogeneous nuclear power reactor utilizing convection circulation of the liquid fuel is proposed. The reactor has an internal heat exchanger looated in the same pressure vessel as the critical assembly, thereby eliminating necessity for handling the hot liquid fuel outside the reactor pressure vessel during normal operation. The liquid fuel used in this reactor eliminates the necessity for extensive radiolytic gas rocombination apparatus, and the reactor is resiliently pressurized and, without any movable mechanical apparatus, automatically regulates itself to the condition of criticality during moderate variations in temperature snd pressure and shuts itself down as the pressure exceeds a predetermined safe operating value.

  5. Formation and dynamics of hazardous convective weather events in Ukraine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balabukh, Vera; Malytska, Liudmyla; Bazalieieva, Iuliana

    2013-04-01

    Atmospheric circulation change observed from the middle of the 70s of the twentieth century in the Northern Hemisphere resulted in changes of weather events formation conditions in different regions. The degree of influence of various factors on the formation of weather events also has changed. This eventually led to an increase in number and intensity of weather events and their variations in time and space. Destructions and damages associated with these events have increased recently and the biggest damages are mainly results of complex convective weather events: showers, hail, squall. Therefore, one of the main tasks of climatology is to study the mechanisms of change repeatability and intensity of these events. The paper considers the conditions of formation of hazardous convective weather phenomena (strong showers, hail, squalls, tornadoes) in Ukraine and their spatial and temporal variability during 1981 - 2010. Research of convection processes was based on daily radiosonde data for the warm season (May-September 1981 - 2010s), reanalysis ERA-Interim ECMWF data for 1989 - 2010 years , daily observations at 187 meteorological stations in Ukraine, as well as observations of the natural phenomena in other regions (different from the meteorological stations). Indices of atmospheric instability, the magnitude of the Convective Available Potential Energy (CAPE), the moisture, the height of the condensation and equilibrium level was used to quantify the intensity of convection. The criteria for the intensity of convection for Ukrainian territory were refined on the basis of these data. Features of the development of convection for various hazardous convective weather events were investigated and identified the necessary conditions for the occurrence of showers, hail, tornadoes and squall in Ukraine. Spatio-temporal variability of convection intensity in Ukraine, its regional characteristics and dynamics for the past 30 year was analyzed. Significant tendency to an

  6. Convection Compensated Electrophoretic NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qiuhong; Wei, Zhaohui

    2001-06-01

    A novel method of convection compensated ENMR (CC-ENMR) has been developed to detect electrophoretic motion of ionic species in the presence of bulk solution convection. This was accomplished using a gradient moment nulling technique to remove spectral artifacts from heat-induced convection and using the polarity switch of the applied electric field to retain spin phase modulations due to electrophoretic flow. Experiments were carried out with a mixture of 100 mM L-aspartic acid and 100 mM 4,9-dioxa-1,12-dodecanediamine to demonstrate this new method of ENMR. CC-ENMR enhances our previously developed capillary array ENMR (CA-ENMR) in solving the convection problem. The combined CA- and CC-ENMR approach strengthens the potential of multidimensional ENMR in simultaneous structural determination of coexisting proteins and protein conformations in biological buffer solutions of high ionic strength. Structural mapping of interacting proteins during biochemical reactions becomes possible in the future using ENMR techniques, which may have a profound impact on the understanding of biological events, including protein folding, genetic control, and signal transduction in general.

  7. Convective Weather Avoidance with Uncertain Weather Forecasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karahan, Sinan; Windhorst, Robert D.

    2009-01-01

    Convective weather events have a disruptive impact on air traffic both in terminal area and in en-route airspaces. In order to make sure that the national air transportation system is safe and efficient, it is essential to respond to convective weather events effectively. Traffic flow control initiatives in response to convective weather include ground delay, airborne delay, miles-in-trail restrictions as well as tactical and strategic rerouting. The rerouting initiatives can potentially increase traffic density and complexity in regions neighboring the convective weather activity. There is a need to perform rerouting in an intelligent and efficient way such that the disruptive effects of rerouting are minimized. An important area of research is to study the interaction of in-flight rerouting with traffic congestion or complexity and developing methods that quantitatively measure this interaction. Furthermore, it is necessary to find rerouting solutions that account for uncertainties in weather forecasts. These are important steps toward managing complexity during rerouting operations, and the paper is motivated by these research questions. An automated system is developed for rerouting air traffic in order to avoid convective weather regions during the 20- minute - 2-hour time horizon. Such a system is envisioned to work in concert with separation assurance (0 - 20-minute time horizon), and longer term air traffic management (2-hours and beyond) to provide a more comprehensive solution to complexity and safety management. In this study, weather is dynamic and uncertain; it is represented as regions of airspace that pilots are likely to avoid. Algorithms are implemented in an air traffic simulation environment to support the research study. The algorithms used are deterministic but periodically revise reroutes to account for weather forecast updates. In contrast to previous studies, in this study convective weather is represented as regions of airspace that pilots

  8. Validation and development of existing and new RAOB-based warm-season convective wind forecasting tools for Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCue, Mitchell Hollis

    Using a 15-year (1995 to 2009) climatology of 1500 UTC warm-season (May through September) rawinsonde observation (RAOB) data from the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) Skid Strip (KXMR) and 5 minute wind data from 36 wind towers on CCAFS and Kennedy Space Center (KSC), several convective wind forecasting techniques currently employed by the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) were evaluated. Present forecasting methods under evaluation include examining the vertical equivalent potential temperature (theta e) profile, vertical profiles of wind spend and direction, and several wet downburst forecasting indices. Although previous research found that currently used wet downburst forecasting methods showed little promise for forecasting convective winds, it was carried out with a very small sample, limiting the reliability of the results. Evaluation versus a larger 15-year dataset was performed to truly assess the forecasting utility of these methods in the central Florida warm-season convective environment. In addition, several new predictive analytic based forecast methods for predicting the occurrence of warm-season convection and its associated wind gusts were developed and validated. This research was performed in order to help the 45 WS better forecast not only which days are more likely to produce convective wind gusts, but also to better predict which days are more likely to yield warning criteria wind events of 35 knots or greater, should convection be forecasted. Convective wind forecasting is a very challenging problem that requires new statistically based modeling techniques since conventional meteorologically based methods do not perform well. New predictive analytic based forecasting methods were constructed using R statistical software and incorporate several techniques including multiple linear regression, logistic regression, multinomial logistic regression, classification and regression trees (CART), and ensemble CART using bootstrapping. All of

  9. Dynamics of convective scale interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purdom, James F. W.; Sinclair, Peter C.

    1988-01-01

    Several of the mesoscale dynamic and thermodynamic aspects of convective scale interaction are examined. An explanation of how sounding data can be coupled with satellite observed cumulus development in the warm sector and the arc cloud line's time evolution to develop a short range forecast of expected convective intensity along an arc cloud line. The formative, mature and dissipating stages of the arc cloud line life cycle are discussed. Specific properties of convective scale interaction are presented and the relationship between arc cloud lines and tornado producing thunderstorms is considered.

  10. Making Educational Development and Change Sustainable: Insights from Complexity Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Mark

    2009-01-01

    This article considers the challenge of sustainable change and development in education from the perspective of complexity theory. Complexity theory's concept of emergence implies that, given a significant degree of complexity in a particular environment, new properties and behaviours emerge that are not necessarily contained in the essence of the…

  11. Comparisons of the Vertical Development of Deep Tropical Convection and Associated Lightning Activity on a Global Basis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, E.; Lin, S.; Labrada, C.; Christian, H.; Goodman, S.; Boccippio, D.; Driscoll, K.

    1999-01-01

    Simultaneous radar (13.8 Ghz) and lightning (Lightning Imaging Sensor) observations from the NASA TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission) spacecraft afford a new opportunity to examine differences in tropical continental and oceanic convection on a global basis, The 250 meter vertical resolution of the radar data and the approximately 17 dBZ sensitivity are well suited to providing vertical profiles of radar reflectivity over the entire tropical belt. The reflectivity profile has been shown in numerous local ground-based studies to be a good indicator of both updraft velocity and electrical activity. The radar and lightning observations for multiple satellite orbits have been integrated to produce global CAPPI's for various altitudes. At 7 km altitude, where mixed phase microphysics is known to be active, the mean reflectivity in continental convection is 10-15 dB greater than the value in oceanic convection. These results provide a sound physical basis for the order-of-magnitude contrast in lightning counts between continental and oceanic convection. These observations still beg the question, however, about the contrast in updraft velocity in these distinct convective regimes.

  12. A Quantitative Investigation of Entrainment and Detrainment in Numerically Simulated Convective Clouds. Pt. 1; Model Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Charles

    1998-01-01

    A method is developed which uses numerical tracers to make accurate diagnoses of entraimnent and detrainment rates and of the properties of the entrained and detrained air in numerically simulated clouds. The numerical advection scheme is modified to make it nondispersive, as required by the use of the tracers. Tests of the new method are made, and an appropriate definition of clouds is selected. Distributions of mixing fractions in the model consistently show maximums at the end points, for nearly undilute environmental air or nearly undilute cloud air, with a uniform distribution between. The cumulonimbus clouds simulated here entrain air that had been substantially changed by the clouds, and detrained air that is not necessarily representative of the cloud air at the same level.

  13. Convective heater

    DOEpatents

    Thorogood, R.M.

    1983-12-27

    A convective heater for heating fluids such as a coal slurry is constructed of a tube circuit arrangement which obtains an optimum temperature distribution to give a relatively constant slurry film temperature. The heater is constructed to divide the heating gas flow into two equal paths and the tube circuit for the slurry is arranged to provide a mixed flow configuration whereby the slurry passes through the two heating gas paths in successive co-current, counter-current and co-current flow relative to the heating gas flow. This arrangement permits the utilization of minimum surface area for a given maximum film temperature of the slurry consistent with the prevention of coke formation. 14 figs.

  14. Convective heater

    DOEpatents

    Thorogood, Robert M.

    1986-01-01

    A convective heater for heating fluids such as a coal slurry is constructed of a tube circuit arrangement which obtains an optimum temperature distribution to give a relatively constant slurry film temperature. The heater is constructed to divide the heating gas flow into two equal paths and the tube circuit for the slurry is arranged to provide a mixed flow configuration whereby the slurry passes through the two heating gas paths in successive co-current, counter-current and co-current flow relative to the heating gas flow. This arrangement permits the utilization of minimum surface area for a given maximum film temperature of the slurry consistent with the prevention of coke formation.

  15. Convective heater

    DOEpatents

    Thorogood, Robert M.

    1983-01-01

    A convective heater for heating fluids such as a coal slurry is constructed of a tube circuit arrangement which obtains an optimum temperature distribution to give a relatively constant slurry film temperature. The heater is constructed to divide the heating gas flow into two equal paths and the tube circuit for the slurry is arranged to provide a mixed flow configuration whereby the slurry passes through the two heating gas paths in successive co-current, counter-current and co-current flow relative to the heating gas flow. This arrangement permits the utilization of minimum surface area for a given maximum film temperature of the slurry consistent with the prevention of coke formation.

  16. Fully developed turbulence and complex time singularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dombre, T.; Gagne, Y.; Hopfinger, E.

    The hypothesis of Frisch and Morf (1981), relating intermittent bursts observed in high-pass-filtered turbulent-flow data to complex time singularities in the solution of the Navier-Stokes equations, is tested experimentally. Velocity signals filtered at high-pass frequency 1 kHz and low-pass frequency 6 kHz are recorded for 7 min at sampling frequency 20 kHz in a flow of mean velocity 6.1 m/s, with mesh length d = 7.5 cm, observation point x/d = 40, R sub lambda = 67, dissipation length eta = 0.5 mm, and Kolmogorov frequency fK = about 2 kHz. The results are presented in graphs, and it is shown that the exponential behavior of the energy spectrum settles well before fK, the spectra of individual bursts having exponential behavior and delta(asterisk) values consistent with the Frisch-Morf hypothesis, at least for high-amplitude events.

  17. Pattern Formation in Convective Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, R.; Bestehorn, M.; Haken, H.

    The present article reviews recent progress in the study of pattern formation in convective instabilities. After a brief discussion of the relevant basic hydrodynamic equations as well as a short outline of the mathematical treatment of pattern formation in complex systems the self-organization of spatial and spatio-temporal structures due to convective instabilities is considered. The formation of various forms of convective patterns arising in the Bénard experiment, i.e. in a horizontal fluid layer heated from below, is discussed. Then the review considers pattern formation in the Bénard instability in spherical geometries. In that case it can be demonstrated how the interaction among several convective cells may lead to time dependent as well as chaotic evolution of the spatial structures. Finally, the convective instability in a binary fluid mixture is discussed. In contrast to the instability in a single component fluid the instability may be oscillatory. In that case convection sets in in the form of travelling wave patterns which in addition to a complicated and chaotic temporal behaviour exhibit more or less spatial irregularity already close to threshold.

  18. Introductory Analysis of Benard-Marangoni Convection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maroto, J. A.; Perez-Munuzuri, V.; Romero-Cano, M. S.

    2007-01-01

    We describe experiments on Benard-Marangoni convection which permit a useful understanding of the main concepts involved in this phenomenon such as, for example, Benard cells, aspect ratio, Rayleigh and Marangoni numbers, Crispation number and critical conditions. In spite of the complexity of convection theory, we carry out a simple and…

  19. Development and Testing of Coupled Land-surface, PBL and Shallow/Deep Convective Parameterizations within the MM5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stauffer, David R.; Seaman, Nelson L.; Munoz, Ricardo C.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to study the role of shallow convection on the regional water cycle of the Mississippi and Little Washita Basins using a 3-D mesoscale model, the PSUINCAR MM5. The underlying premise of the project was that current modeling of regional-scale climate and moisture cycles over the continents is deficient without adequate treatment of shallow convection. It was hypothesized that an improved treatment of the regional water cycle can be achieved by using a 3-D mesoscale numerical model having a detailed land-surface parameterization, an advanced boundary-layer parameterization, and a more complete shallow convection parameterization than are available in most current models. The methodology was based on the application in the MM5 of new or recently improved parameterizations covering these three physical processes. Therefore, the work plan focused on integrating, improving, and testing these parameterizations in the MM5 and applying them to study water-cycle processes over the Southern Great Plains (SGP): (1) the Parameterization for Land-Atmosphere-Cloud Exchange (PLACE) described by Wetzel and Boone; (2) the 1.5-order turbulent kinetic energy (TKE)-predicting scheme of Shafran et al.; and (3) the hybrid-closure sub-grid shallow convection parameterization of Deng. Each of these schemes has been tested extensively through this study and the latter two have been improved significantly to extend their capabilities.

  20. Development of a Fully Coupled Transient Double-Diffusive Convective Model: Application to a Salinity-Gradient Solar Pond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez, F.; Tyler, S. W.; Childress, A. E.

    2008-12-01

    A solar pond is a water body which is heated by absorption of solar radiation and which can provide long- term thermal storage for collected energy. To avoid large heat losses, convection must be suppressed close to the top of the pond. A salinity-gradient solar pond (SGSP) is an artificially stratified solar pond consisting of three thermally distinctive layers: the upper convective zone (UCZ), the non-convective zone (NCZ), and the lower convective zone (LCZ). The UCZ is a relatively thin layer of "cold" and "fresh" water. In the NCZ, the salt gradient suppresses convection within the pond, and thus, the NCZ acts as insulation for the LCZ. The LCZ is the layer where the salt concentration and temperature are the highest. The solar radiation that penetrates the pond's upper layers reaches the LCZ, which can approach temperatures greater than 90°C. Modeling the fluid dynamics of this system is difficult because it requires solution of a set of three second- order non-linear partial differential equations. In order to evaluate the thermal performance and stability of an SGSP, numerical simulation of both heat and mass are required but challenging as double-diffusive convection is likely to occur. Previous approaches have typically assumed no convective transport of solutes, which led to static salinity boundaries of the layers within the SGSP. A 2-D fully coupled numerical model that evaluates the transient performance of an SGSP is introduced. The model simulates the coupled momentum, heat, and mass transfer within the pond. The model can evaluate the influence of meteorological conditions on pond performance by properly describing the heat fluxes through the surface and the solar radiation absorption within the pond, which are typically not well included. Preliminary results show that in a one-week period, for a 1.0 m depth SGSP under summer conditions and without heat extraction, the thicknesses of the UCZ and LCZ increases from 0.1 to 0.2 m, and from 0.5 to 0

  1. Modelling natural convection of fluid in cuvette

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucher, D.; Manukhin, B.; Andreeva, O.; Chivilikhin, S.

    2014-09-01

    Convection is a process of transfer liquid from a hot region to a cool region. This phenomenon is involved in many physical processes. The main characteristic of convection is a temperature field. Modelling of convection allows to get the information about temperature field at any time of process. In this paper the results of modelling natural convection of fluid in cuvette are presented. All results are approved by experimental data. For modelling the process of natural convection Navier-Stokes equations under Boussinesq approximation were used. An experimental setup based on digital holographic interferometry was developedin order to make an experiment. The results for three stadiums of convection, such as: jet initiation, initial jet formation, jet development with formation of mushroom-shaped convective stream, are presented.

  2. Properties of semi-convection and convective overshooting for massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, C. Y.; Li, Y.

    2014-02-01

    The properties of semi-convection and core convective overshooting of stars with masses of 15 and 30 M⊙ are calculated in the present article. New methods are used to deal with semi-convection. Different entropy gradients are used when adopting the Schwarzschild and Ledoux methods, which are used to confine the convective boundary and calculate the turbulent quantities: {{partial } overline{s}}/{{partial } r}=-({c_p}/{H_P})(nabla -nabla _ad) when the Schwarzschild method is adopted and {{partial } overline{s}}/{{partial } r}=-({c_p}/{H_P})(nabla -nabla _ad-nabla _{μ }) when the Ledoux method is adopted. Core convective overshooting and semi-convection are treated as a whole and their development is found to present almost opposing tendencies: more intensive core convective overshooting leads to weaker semi-convection. The influence of different parameters and convection processing methods on the turbulent quantities is analysed in this article. Increasing the mixing-length parameter α leads to more turbulent dynamic energy in the convective core and prolongs the overshooting distance but depresses the development of semi-convection. Adoption of the Ledoux method leads to overshooting extending further and semi-convection development being suppressed.

  3. Research Methodology on Language Development from a Complex Systems Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larsen-Freeman, Diane; Cameron, Lynne

    2008-01-01

    Changes to research methodology motivated by the adoption of a complexity theory perspective on language development are considered. The dynamic, nonlinear, and open nature of complex systems, together with their tendency toward self-organization and interaction across levels and timescales, requires changes in traditional views of the functions…

  4. Development and validation of a new LBM-MRT hybrid model with enthalpy formulation for melting with natural convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda Fuentes, Johann; Kuznik, Frédéric; Johannes, Kévyn; Virgone, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a new model to simulate melting with natural convection of a phase change material. For the phase change problem, the enthalpy formulation is used. Energy equation is solved by a finite difference method, whereas the fluid flow is solved by the multiple relaxation time (MRT) lattice Boltzmann method. The model is first verified and validated using the data from the literature. Then, the model is applied to a tall brick filled with a fatty acid eutectic mixture and the results are presented. The main results are (1) the spatial convergence rate is of second order, (2) the new model is validated against data from the literature and (3) the natural convection plays an important role in the melting process of the fatty acid mixture considered in our work.

  5. Application of Complex Systems Research To Efforts of International Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, Hans-Peter

    Fundamental research on complex systems has shown relevance to efforts of international development. This paper canvasses some practitioner friendly approaches to international development. Development is about interventions in a highly complex system, the society. Complex systems research tells us that development interventions should not be overly planned, rather the fundamental uncertainty of a changing social system requires a diversity of interventions, and rapid learning from development success and failure. Developing economies are functioning at a low level of effectiveness and resource use. Complex systems are change resistant, and intervention requires understanding the autocatalytic nature of a process of change. International development is about the stimulation of a society's innate autocatalytic / self-organizing processes through interventions that stimulate enough to overcome change resistance, but which do not overwhelm the system. Since the size of financial interventions may in some cases be a substantial fraction of the existing economic activity, disruption is a likely outcome. Crucially, one must avoid having the socio-economic activity organized around the intervention itself, since then an undesirable dependency of the economy on the intervention arises. Stimulation of the innate modes of activity results in the development of socio-economic organization around energy, material and financial flows. The primary generator of effectiveness is an appropriate network structure of interactions and relationships. This paper summarizes traditional development efforts and their outcomes as well as a plausible description of the process of complex systems motivated interventions. Examples are given of recent approaches which aim to appropriately stimulate international development.

  6. Mesoscale aspects of convective storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujita, T. T.

    1981-01-01

    The structure, evolution and mechanisms of mesoscale convective disturbances are reviewed and observation techniques for "nowcasting" their nature are discussed. A generalized mesometeorological scale is given, classifying both low and high pressure systems. Mesoscale storms are shown often to induce strong winds, but their wind speeds are significantly less than those accompanied by submesoscale disturbances, such as tornadoes, downbursts, and microbursts. Mesoscale convective complexes, severe storm wakes, and flash floods are considered. The understanding of the evolution of supercells is essential for improving nowcasting capabilities and a very accurate combination of radar and satellite measurements is required.

  7. The study and development of the empirical correlations equation of natural convection heat transfer on vertical rectangular sub-channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamajaya, Ketut; Umar, Efrizon; Sudjatmi, K. S.

    2012-06-01

    This study focused on natural convection heat transfer using a vertical rectangular sub-channel and water as the coolant fluid. To conduct this study has been made pipe heaters are equipped with thermocouples. Each heater is equipped with five thermocouples along the heating pipes. The diameter of each heater is 2.54 cm and 45 cm in length. The distance between the central heating and the pitch is 29.5 cm. Test equipment is equipped with a primary cooling system, a secondary cooling system and a heat exchanger. The purpose of this study is to obtain new empirical correlations equations of the vertical rectangular sub-channel, especially for the natural convection heat transfer within a bundle of vertical cylinders rectangular arrangement sub-channels. The empirical correlation equation can support the thermo-hydraulic analysis of research nuclear reactors that utilize cylindrical fuel rods, and also can be used in designing of baffle-free vertical shell and tube heat exchangers. The results of this study that the empirical correlation equations of natural convection heat transfer coefficients with rectangular arrangement is Nu = 6.3357 (Ra.Dh/x)0.0740.

  8. The Solar Convection Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachmann, Kurt T.

    2000-01-01

    I helped to complete a research project with NASA scientists Dr. David Hathaway (my mentor), Rick Bogart, and John Beck from the SOHO/SOI collaboration. Our published paper in 'Solar Physics' was titled 'The Solar Convection Spectrum' (April 2000). Two of my undergraduate students were named on the paper--Gavrav Khutri and Josh Petitto. Gavrav also wrote a short paper for the National Conference of Undergraduate Research Proceedings in 1998 using a preliminary result. Our main result was that we show no evidence of a scale of convection named 'mesogranulation'. Instead, we see only direct evidence for the well-known scales of convection known as graduation and supergranulation. We are also completing work on vertical versus horizontal flow fluxes at the solar surface. I continue to work on phase relationships of solar activity indicators, but I have not yet written a paper with my students on this topic. Along with my research results, I have developed and augmented undergraduate courses at Birmingham-Southern College by myself and with other faculty. We have included new labs and observations, speakers from NASA and elsewhere, new subject material related to NASA and space science. I have done a great deal of work in outreach, mostly as President and other offices in the Birmingham Astronomical Society. My work includes speaking, attracting speakers, giving workshops, and governing.

  9. Educational Development in the UK: A Complex and Contradictory Reality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gosling, David

    2009-01-01

    At a time when questions are being asked about the identity and purpose of academic development, this paper seeks to address these questions within the context of one country in which educational development has been actively supported. This study considers a narrative of the complex and contradictory reality of educational development in the…

  10. Limit of Predictability in Mantle Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bello, L.; Coltice, N.; Rolf, T.; Tackley, P. J.

    2013-12-01

    Linking mantle convection models with Earth's tectonic history has received considerable attention in recent years: modeling the evolution of supercontinent cycles, predicting present-day mantle structure or improving plate reconstructions. Predictions of future supercontinents are currently being made based on seismic tomography images, plate motion history and mantle convection models, and methods of data assimilation for mantle flow are developing. However, so far there are no studies of the limit of predictability these models are facing. Indeed, given the chaotic nature of mantle convection, we can expect forecasts and hindcasts to have a limited range of predictability. We propose here to use an approach similar to those used in dynamic meteorology, and more recently for the geodynamo, to evaluate the predictability limit of mantle dynamics forecasts. Following the pioneering works in weather forecast (Lorenz 1965), we study the time evolution of twin experiments, started from two very close initial temperature fields and monitor the error growth. We extract a characteristic time of the system, known as the e-folding timescale, which will be used to estimate the predictability limit. The final predictability time will depend on the imposed initial error and the error tolerance in our model. We compute 3D spherical convection solutions using StagYY (Tackley, 2008). We first evaluate the influence of the Rayleigh number on the limit of predictability of isoviscous convection. Then, we investigate the effects of various rheologies, from the simplest (isoviscous mantle) to more complex ones (plate-like behavior and floating continents). We show that the e-folding time increases with the wavelength of the flow and reaches 10Myrs with plate-like behavior and continents. Such an e-folding time together with the uncertainties in mantle temperature distribution suggests prediction of mantle structure from an initial given state is limited to <50 Myrs. References: 1

  11. Convective cell formation in a Z pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesner, J.

    2003-03-01

    Closed field line confinement systems can develop convective cells when the magnetohydrodynamic interchange stability criterion is violated. Using a previously derived set of reduced equations [V. P. Pastukhov and N. V. Chudin, Plasma Phys. Rep. 27, 907 (2001)] it is shown that a true steady state solution can exist. For an assumed large-scale vortex pattern, the plasma pressure profile that is implied by these convective flows as well as the nonlocal heat flux resulting from the convective flows is calculated.

  12. Dust devil vortex generation from convective cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onishchenko, O.; Pokhotelov, O.; Horton, W.; Fedun, V.

    2015-11-01

    We have developed a hydrodynamic theory of the nonlinear stage of dust devil generation in a convectively unstable atmosphere with large-scale seed vertical vorticity. It is shown that convective motion in such an atmosphere transforms into dust devils extremely fast. The strong vortical structure of the dust devils can be formed in a few minutes or even in a fraction of a minute. The formation process strongly depends on the convective instability growth rate and horizontal vorticity.

  13. How cold pool triggers deep convection?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Jun-Ichi

    2014-05-01

    The cold pool in the boundary layer is often considered a major triggering mechanism of convection. Here, presented are basic theoretical considerations on this issue. Observations suggest that cold pool-generated convective cells is available for shallow maritime convection (Warner et al. 1979; Zuidema et al. 2012), maritime deep convection (Barnes and Garstang 1982; Addis et al. 1984; Young et al. 1995) and continental deep convection (e.g., Lima and Wilson 2008; Flamant 2009; Lothon et al. 2011; Dione et al. 2013). Moreover, numerical studies appear to suggest that cold pools promote the organization of clouds into larger structures and thereby aid the transition from shallow to deep convection (Khairoutdinov and Randall 2006, Boing et al. 2012, Schlemmer and Hohenegger, 2014). Even a cold--pool parameterization coupled with convection is already proposed (Grandpeix and Lafore 2010: but see also Yano 2012). However, the suggested link between the cold pool and deep convection so far is phenomenological at the best. A specific process that the cold pool leads to a trigger of deep convection must still to be pinned down. Naively, one may imagine that a cold pool lifts up the air at the front as it propagates. Such an uplifting leads to a trigger of convection. However, one must realize that a shift of air along with its propagation does not necessarily lead to an uplifting, and even if it may happen, it would not far exceed a depth of the cold pool itself. Thus, the uplifting can never be anything vigorous. Its thermodynamic characteristics do help much either for inducing convection. The cold-pool air is rather under rapid recovering process before it can induce convection under a simple parcel-lifting argument. The most likely reason that the cold pool may induce convection is its gust winds that may encounter an air mass from an opposite direction. This induces a strong convergence, also leading to a strong uplifting. This is an argument essentially developed

  14. Numerical modelling of thermal convection related to fracture permeability in Dinantian carbonate platform, Luttelgeest, the Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipsey, Lindsay; Pluymaekers, Maarten; van Wees, Jan-Diederik; Limberger, Jon; Cloetingh, Sierd

    2016-04-01

    The presence of convective fluid flow in permeable layers can create zones of anomalously high temperature which can be exploited for geothermal energy. Temperature measurements from the Luttelgeest-01 (LTG-01) well in the northern onshore region of the Netherlands indicate variations in the thermal regime that could be indicative of convection. This thermal anomaly coincides with a 600 m interval (4600 - 5200 m) of Dinantian carbonates showing signs of increased fracture permeability of ~60 mD. For the purpose of geothermal energy exploration, it is of interest to know whether or not convection can occur in a particular reservoir, where convection cells are likely to develop and the temperature enhancements in convective upwellings. Three-dimensional numerical simulations provide insight on possible flow and thermal structures within the fractured carbonate interval. The development and number of convection cells is very much a time dependent process. First longitudinal rolls fill the domain, increasing in width until ultimately transforming into a more complex polyhedral structure. The model relaxes into a steady-state five-cell convection pattern. Furthermore, geometric aspects of the carbonate platform itself likely control the shape and location of upwellings. Convective upwellings can create significant temperature enhancements relative to the conductive profile and in agreement with the observations in the Luttelgeest carbonate platform. This enhancement is critically dependent on the aquifer thickness and geothermal gradient. Given a gradient of 39 °C/km and an aquifer thickness of 600 m, a temperature of 203 °C can be obtained at a depth of 4600 m directly above upwelling zones. Contrarily, downwelling zones result in a temperature of 185 °C at the same depth. This demonstrates the strong spatial variability of thermal anomalies in convective fractures aquifers at large depth, which can have a strong effect on exploration opportunity and risk of

  15. Subgrid Scale Modeling in Solar Convection Simulations using the ASH Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Y.-N.; Miesch, M.; Mansour, N. N.

    2003-01-01

    The turbulent solar convection zone has remained one of the most challenging and important subjects in physics. Understanding the complex dynamics in the solar con- vection zone is crucial for gaining insight into the solar dynamo problem. Many solar observatories have generated revealing data with great details of large scale motions in the solar convection zone. For example, a strong di erential rotation is observed: the angular rotation is observed to be faster at the equator than near the poles not only near the solar surface, but also deep in the convection zone. On the other hand, due to the wide range of dynamical scales of turbulence in the solar convection zone, both theory and simulation have limited success. Thus, cutting edge solar models and numerical simulations of the solar convection zone have focused more narrowly on a few key features of the solar convection zone, such as the time-averaged di erential rotation. For example, Brun & Toomre (2002) report computational finding of differential rotation in an anelastic model for solar convection. A critical shortcoming in this model is that the viscous dissipation is based on application of mixing length theory to stellar dynamics with some ad hoc parameter tuning. The goal of our work is to implement the subgrid scale model developed at CTR into the solar simulation code and examine how the differential rotation will be a affected as a result. Specifically, we implement a Smagorinsky-Lilly subgrid scale model into the ASH (anelastic spherical harmonic) code developed over the years by various authors. This paper is organized as follows. In x2 we briefly formulate the anelastic system that describes the solar convection. In x3 we formulate the Smagorinsky-Lilly subgrid scale model for unstably stratifed convection. We then present some preliminary results in x4, where we also provide some conclusions and future directions.

  16. Development and Application of Agglomerated Multigrid Methods for Complex Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, Hiroaki; Diskin, Boris; Thomas, James L.

    2010-01-01

    We report progress in the development of agglomerated multigrid techniques for fully un- structured grids in three dimensions, building upon two previous studies focused on efficiently solving a model diffusion equation. We demonstrate a robust fully-coarsened agglomerated multigrid technique for 3D complex geometries, incorporating the following key developments: consistent and stable coarse-grid discretizations, a hierarchical agglomeration scheme, and line-agglomeration/relaxation using prismatic-cell discretizations in the highly-stretched grid regions. A signi cant speed-up in computer time is demonstrated for a model diffusion problem, the Euler equations, and the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations for 3D realistic complex geometries.

  17. Mediator Complex Dependent Regulation of Cardiac Development and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Grueter, Chad E.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. The risk factors for CVD include environmental and genetic components. Human mutations in genes involved in most aspects of cardiovascular function have been identified, many of which are involved in transcriptional regulation. The Mediator complex serves as a pivotal transcriptional regulator that functions to integrate diverse cellular signals by multiple mechanisms including recruiting RNA polymerase II, chromatin modifying proteins and non-coding RNAs to promoters in a context dependent manner. This review discusses components of the Mediator complex and the contribution of the Mediator complex to normal and pathological cardiac development and function. Enhanced understanding of the role of this core transcriptional regulatory complex in the heart will help us gain further insights into CVD. PMID:23727265

  18. Development of Onboard Computer Complex for Russian Segment of ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Branets, V.; Brand, G.; Vlasov, R.; Graf, I.; Clubb, J.; Mikrin, E.; Samitov, R.

    1998-01-01

    Report present a description of the Onboard Computer Complex (CC) that was developed during the period of 1994-1998 for the Russian Segment of ISS. The system was developed in co-operation with NASA and ESA. ESA developed a new computation system under the RSC Energia Technical Assignment, called DMS-R. The CC also includes elements developed by Russian experts and organizations. A general architecture of the computer system and the characteristics of primary elements of this system are described. The system was integrated at RSC Energia with the participation of American and European specialists. The report contains information on software simulators, verification and de-bugging facilities witch were been developed for both stand-alone and integrated tests and verification. This CC serves as the basis for the Russian Segment Onboard Control Complex on ISS.

  19. Measuring system complexity to support development cost estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malone, P.; Wolfarth, L.

    Systems and System-of-Systems (SoS) are being used more frequently either as a design element of stand alone systems or architectural frameworks. Consequently, a programmatic need has arisen to understand and measure systems complexity in order to estimate more accurately development plans and life-cycle costs. In a prior paper, we introduced the System Readiness Level (SRL) concept as a composite function of both Technology Readiness Levels (TRLs) and Integration Readiness Levels (IRLs) and touched on system complexity. While the SRL approach provides a repeatable, process-driven method to assess the maturity of a system or SoS, it does not capture all aspects of system complexity. In this paper we assess the concept of cyclomatic complexity as a system complexity metric and consider its utility as an approach for estimating the life-cycle costs and cost growth of complex systems. We hypothesize that the greater the number of technologies and integration tasks, the more complex the system and the higher its cost to develop and maintain. We base our analysis on historical data from DoD programs that have experienced significant cost growth, including some that have been cancelled due to unsustainable cost (and schedule) growth. We begin by describing the original implementation of the cyclomatic method, which was developed to estimate the effort to maintain system software. We then describe how the method can be generalized and applied to systems. Next, we show how to estimate the cyclomatic number (CN) and show the statistical significance between a system's CN metric and its cost. We illustrate the method with an example. Last, we discuss opportunities for future research.

  20. A Study of Detrainment from Deep Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glenn, I. B.; Krueger, S. K.

    2014-12-01

    Uncertainty in the results of Global Climate Model simulations has been attributed to errors and simplifications in how parameterizations of convection coarsely represent the processes of entrainment, detrainment, and mixing between convective clouds and their environment. Using simulations of convection we studied these processes at a resolution high enough to explicitly resolve them. Two of several recently developed analysis techniques that allow insight into these processes at their appropriate scale are an Eulerian method of directly measuring entrainment and detrainment, and a Lagrangian method that uses particle trajectories to map convective mass flux over height and a cloud variable of interest. The authors of the Eulerian technique used it to show that the dynamics of shells of cold, humid air that surround shallow convective updrafts have important effects on the properties of air entrained and detrained from the updrafts. There is some evidence for the existence of such shells around deep convective updrafts as well, and that detrainment is more important than entrainment in determining the ultimate effect of the deep convection on the large scale environment. We present results from analyzing a simulation of deep convection through the Eulerian method as well as using Lagrangian particle trajectories to illustrate the role of the shell in the process of detrainment and mixing between deep convection and its environment.

  1. Influence of convection on microstructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, William R.; Eisa, Gaber Faheem; Chandrasekhar, S.; Larrousse, Mark; Banan, Mohsen

    1988-01-01

    The influence was studied of convection during directional solidification on the resulting microstructure of eutectics, specifically lead/tin and manganese/bismuth. A theory was developed for the influence of convection on the microstructure of lamellar and fibrous eutectics, through the effect of convection on the concentration field in the melt in front of the growing eutectic. While the theory agrees with the experimental spin-up spin-down results, it predicts that the weak convection expected due to buoyancy will not produce a measurable change in eutectic microstructure. Thus, this theory does not explain the two fold decrease in MnBi fiber size and spacing observed when MnBi-Bi is solidified in space or on Earth with a magnetic field applied. Attention was turned to the morphology of the MnBi-Bi interface and to the generation of freezing rate fluctuations by convection. Decanting the melt during solidification of MnBi-Bi eutectic showed that the MnBi phase projects into the melt ahead of the Bi matrix. Temperature measurements in a Bi melt in the vertical Bridgman-Stockbarger configuration showed temperature variations of up to 25 C. Conclusions are drawn and discussed.

  2. Convective Excitation of Internal Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecoanet, Daniel; Le Bars, Michael; Burns, Keaton; Vasil, Geoffrey; Quataert, Eliot; Brown, Benjamin; Oishi, Jeffrey

    2015-11-01

    We will present a joint experimental & computational study of internal wave generation by convection. First we describe an experiment using the peculiar property of water that its density maximum is at 4° C . A tank of water cooled from below and heated from above develops a cold, convective layer near 4° C at the bottom of the tank, adjacent to a hot stably stratified layer at the top of the tank. We simulate this setup in 2D using the open-source Dedalus code (dedalus-project.org). Our simulations show that waves are excited from within the convection zone, opposed to at the interface between the convective and stably stratified regions. Finally, we will present 3D simulations of internal wave excitation by convection in a fully compressible atmosphere with multiple density scaleheights. These simulations provide greater freedom in choosing the thermal equilibrium of the system, and are run at higher Rayleigh number. The simulated waves are then compared to analytic predictions of the bulk excitation model.

  3. Developing a complex endovascular fenestrated and branched aortic program.

    PubMed

    Schanzer, Andres; Baril, Donald; Robinson, William P; Simons, Jessica P; Aiello, Francesco A; Messina, Louis M

    2015-03-01

    In 2008, the top priority in our division's 5-year strategic plan was "to become an internationally recognized center of excellence for the endovascular treatment of complex aortic pathology extending from the aortic valve to the external iliac artery." Five components were identified as "most critical" to achieve this strategic priority: (1) training at centers of excellence in complex endovascular repair; (2) industry partnership to improve access to developing technologies; (3) a fully integrated team approach with one leader involved in all steps of all cases; (4) prospective data collection; and (5) development and implementation of a physician-sponsored investigational device exemption for juxtarenal, pararenal, and thoracoabdominal aneurysms. We have now performed 49 repairs (16 commercially manufactured devices, 33 physician-modified devices) for 3 common iliac, 20 juxtarenal, 9 pararenal, and 17 thoracoabdominal aneurysms, using 142 fenestrations, branches, and scallops. All patients had complete 30-day follow-up for calculation of 30-day events. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to calculate 1-year events. In 5 years, we developed a successful complex endovascular aortic program that uses fenestrated/branched repair techniques. A focused team strategic planning approach to program development is an effective way for vascular surgery divisions to gain experience and expertise with new complex technologies while ensuring acceptable patient outcomes. PMID:25595400

  4. Development of Three-Dimensional Completion of Complex Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soska, Kasey C.; Johnson, Scott P.

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) object completion, the ability to perceive the backs of objects seen from a single viewpoint, emerges at around 6 months of age. Yet, only relatively simple 3D objects have been used in assessing its development. This study examined infants' 3D object completion when presented with more complex stimuli. Infants…

  5. Environmental Complexity and Central Nervous System Development and Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Mark H.

    2004-01-01

    Environmental restriction or deprivation early in development can induce social, cognitive, affective, and motor abnormalities similar to those associated with autism. Conversely, rearing animals in larger, more complex environments results in enhanced brain structure and function, including increased brain weight, dendritic branching,…

  6. Skylab M518 multipurpose furnace convection analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourgeois, S. V.; Spradley, L. W.

    1975-01-01

    An analysis was performed of the convection which existed on ground tests and during skylab processing of two experiments: vapor growth of IV-VI compounds growth of spherical crystals. A parallel analysis was also performed on Skylab experiment indium antimonide crystals because indium antimonide (InSb) was used and a free surface existed in the tellurium-doped Skylab III sample. In addition, brief analyses were also performed of the microsegregation in germanium experiment because the Skylab crystals indicated turbulent convection effects. Simple dimensional analysis calculations and a more accurate, but complex, convection computer model, were used in the analysis.

  7. Fluid convection, constraint and causation

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    Complexity—nonlinear dynamics for my purposes in this essay—is rich with metaphysical and epistemological implications but is receiving sustained philosophical analysis only recently. I will explore some of the subtleties of causation and constraint in Rayleigh–Bénard convection as an example of a complex phenomenon, and extract some lessons for further philosophical reflection on top-down constraint and causation particularly with respect to causal foundationalism. PMID:23386955

  8. Finite element thermal analysis of convectively-cooled aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieting, A. R.; Thornton, E. A.

    1981-01-01

    The design complexity and size of convectively-cooled engine and airframe structures for hypersonic transports necessitate the use of large general purpose computer programs for both thermal and structural analyses. Generally thermal analyses are based on the lumped-parameter finite difference technique, and structural analyses are based on the finite element technique. Differences in these techniques make it difficult to achieve an efficient interface. It appears, therefore, desirable to conduct an integrated analysis based on a common technique. A summary is provided of efforts by NASA concerned with the development of an integrated thermal structural analysis capability using the finite element method. Particular attention is given to the development of conduction/forced-convection finite element methodology and applications which illustrate the capabilities of the developed concepts.

  9. Regulation of flower development in Arabidopsis by SCF complexes.

    PubMed

    Ni, Weimin; Xie, Daoxin; Hobbie, Lawrence; Feng, Baomin; Zhao, Dazhong; Akkara, Joseph; Ma, Hong

    2004-04-01

    SCF complexes are the largest and best studied family of E3 ubiquitin protein ligases that facilitate the ubiquitylation of proteins targeted for degradation. The SCF core components Skp1, Cul1, and Rbx1 serve in multiple SCF complexes involving different substrate-specific F-box proteins that are involved in diverse processes including cell cycle and development. In Arabidopsis, mutations in the F-box gene UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS (UFO) result in a number of defects in flower development. However, functions of the core components Cul1 and Rbx1 in flower development are poorly understood. In this study we analyzed floral phenotypes caused by altering function of Cul1 or Rbx1, as well as the effects of mutations in ASK1 and ASK2. Plants homozygous for a point mutation in the AtCUL1 gene showed reduced floral organ number and several defects in each of the four whorls. Similarly, plants with reduced AtRbx1 expression due to RNA interference also exhibited floral morphological defects. In addition, compared to the ask1 mutant, plants homozygous for ask1 and heterozygous for ask2 displayed enhanced reduction of B function, as well as other novel defects of flower development, including carpelloid sepals and an inhibition of petal development. Genetic analyses demonstrate that AGAMOUS (AG) is required for the novel phenotypes observed in the first and second whorls. Furthermore, the genetic interaction between UFO and AtCUL1 supports the idea that UFO regulates multiple aspects of flower development as a part of SCF complexes. These results suggest that SCF complexes regulate several aspects of floral development in Arabidopsis. PMID:15047903

  10. Developing a complex approach to health phenomena (step 1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cifuentes, Myriam Patricia

    Health is a complex object for science and operative levels, partly because there are many approaches defining it but not scientifically sufficient or operatively accepted. This is relevant for health understanding but also for decision making on health related problems. "Determinants of Health" as a widely accepted theoretical proposal, identifies as problematic the reductionist view of health as the disease opposite, attempting to develop it positively according to WHO's definition, proposing a set of factors determining health outcomes. Though this allows a larger comprehension of health causes and effects, still has insufficiently defined theoretical statements and unproved assumptions which difficult understanding and effective actions orientation. Complexity deductive modeling since the insufficiently formalized frameworks, implies incorporating unmanageable object assumptions or reducing health broadness. Taking profit of Bogotá government adherence to DH proposal leading a health information system development, was possible inductive modeling since a systemic massive database (690.000 registries). In this way, DH theoretical statements about health components connectedness were explored by classic statistic approach, and by learning Bayesian networks from data (data mining). First approach showed understanding difficulties. Second was advantageous in approximating within and between determinants relationship structure. However, though DH introduces a systemic approach in considering diverse interacting elements is not empirically satisfactory to exhibit all the meaning of health complexity, because just matches analytic fashioned constructs depending on data expression. A strong networked model developing health complexity, needs the orientation by theoretical constructs as human agency and organization, to explore and understand emergent patterns of health.

  11. The EYA-SO/SIX complex in development and disease.

    PubMed

    Xu, Pin-Xian

    2013-06-01

    Eyes absent (EYA) and Sine oculis (SO/SIX) proteins function as transcriptional activation complexes and play essential roles in organogenesis during embryonic development in regulating cell proliferation and survival and coordination of particular differentiation programs. Mutations of the Eya and So/Six genes cause profound developmental defects in organisms as diverse as flies, frogs, fish, mice, and humans. EYA proteins also possess an intrinsic phosphatase activity, which is essential for normal development. Here, we review crucial roles of EYA and SO/SIX in development and disease in mice and humans. PMID:22806561

  12. Development of the Neurochemical Architecture of the Central Complex

    PubMed Central

    Boyan, George S.; Liu, Yu

    2016-01-01

    The central complex represents one of the most conspicuous neuroarchitectures to be found in the insect brain and regulates a wide repertoire of behaviors including locomotion, stridulation, spatial orientation and spatial memory. In this review article, we show that in the grasshopper, a model insect system, the intricate wiring of the fan-shaped body (FB) begins early in embryogenesis when axons from the first progeny of four protocerebral stem cells (called W, X, Y, Z, respectively) in each brain hemisphere establish a set of tracts to the primary commissural system. Decussation of subsets of commissural neurons at stereotypic locations across the brain midline then establishes a columnar neuroarchitecture in the FB which is completed during embryogenesis. Examination of the expression patterns of various neurochemicals in the central complex including neuropeptides, a neurotransmitter and the gas nitric oxide (NO), show that these appear progressively and in a substance-specific manner during embryogenesis. Each neuroactive substance is expressed by neurons located at stereotypic locations in a given central complex lineage, confirming that the stem cells are biochemically multipotent. The organization of axons expressing the various neurochemicals within the central complex is topologically related to the location, and hence birthdate, of the neurons within the lineages. The neurochemical expression patterns within the FB are layered, and so reflect the temporal topology present in the lineages. This principle relates the neuroanatomical to the neurochemical architecture of the central complex and so may provide insights into the development of adaptive behaviors.

  13. Insect Antimicrobial Peptide Complexes Prevent Resistance Development in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Chernysh, Sergey; Gordya, Natalia; Suborova, Tatyana

    2015-01-01

    In recent decades much attention has been paid to antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) as natural antibiotics, which are presumably protected from resistance development in bacteria. However, experimental evolution studies have revealed prompt resistance increase in bacteria to any individual AMP tested. Here we demonstrate that naturally occurring compounds containing insect AMP complexes have clear advantage over individual peptide and small molecule antibiotics in respect of drug resistance development. As a model we have used the compounds isolated from bacteria challenged maggots of Calliphoridae flies. The compound isolated from blow fly Calliphora vicina was found to contain three distinct families of cell membrane disrupting/permeabilizing peptides (defensins, cecropins and diptericins), one family of proline rich peptides and several unknown antimicrobial substances. Resistance changes under long term selective pressure of the compound and reference antibiotics cefotaxime, meropenem and polymyxin B were tested using Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumonia and Acinetobacter baumannii clinical strains. All the strains readily developed resistance to the reference antibiotics, while no signs of resistance growth to the compound were registered. Similar results were obtained with the compounds isolated from 3 other fly species. The experiments revealed that natural compounds containing insect AMP complexes, in contrast to individual AMP and small molecule antibiotics, are well protected from resistance development in bacteria. Further progress in the research of natural AMP complexes may provide novel solutions to the drug resistance problem. PMID:26177023

  14. Mapping high-latitude plasma convection with coherent HF radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Greenwald, R. A.; Baker, K. B.; Villain, J.-P.; Hanuise, C.

    1989-01-01

    Several methods developed for mapping high-latitude plasma convection with a high-latitude HF radar are described, which utilize coherent backscatter from electron density irregularities at F-region altitudes to observe convective plasma motion. Several examples of two-dimensional convection-velocity maps are presented, showing instances of L-shell-aligned flow in the dusk sector, the reversal of convection near magnetic midnight, and counterstreaming in the dayside cleft.

  15. Managing Programmatic Risk for Complex Space System Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panetta, Peter V.; Hastings, Daniel; Brumfield, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Risk management strategies have become a recent important research topic to many aerospace organizations as they prepare to develop the revolutionary complex space systems of the future. Future multi-disciplinary complex space systems will make it absolutely essential for organizations to practice a rigorous, comprehensive risk management process, emphasizing thorough systems engineering principles to succeed. Project managers must possess strong leadership skills to direct high quality, cross-disciplinary teams for successfully developing revolutionary space systems that are ever increasing in complexity. Proactive efforts to reduce or eliminate risk throughout a project's lifecycle ideally must be practiced by all technical members in the organization. This paper discusses some of the risk management perspectives that were collected from senior managers and project managers of aerospace and aeronautical organizations by the use of interviews and surveys. Some of the programmatic risks which drive the success or failure of projects are revealed. Key findings lead to a number of insights for organizations to consider for proactively approaching the risks which face current and future complex space systems projects.

  16. Numerical Simulations of Texture Development and Associated Rheological Anisotropy in Regions of Complex Mantle Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackman, D. K.; Castelnau, O.; Becker, T. W.

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the predictions of different micromechanical approaches that have been employed recently to study mineral alignment during flow in the upper mantle. Computational capabilities are reaching a point where the potential rheological effects of such lattice-preferred orientation (LPO) can be considered as an integral part of determining the flow pattern and evolution. But, in order to have confidence in taking this next step, the detailed behavior of the different micromechanical models needs to be understood. An important consequence of LPO development is the subsequent anisotropy of the mechanical properties. Curiously, most published geophysical studies only address the elastic anisotropy, probably because of its link with the observed seismic anisotropy. The viscoplastic (or rheological) anisotropy has received much less attention, although it may have a notable influence on regional and global convective flow pattern, which in turn controls the LPO development. Micromechanical approaches aim at linking the rheological behaviour at the grain scale, associated with the activate deformation mechanisms (dislocation glide and climb, diffusion creep, "), with the overall rheology at the sample scale, including also other mechanisms such as recrystallization. This is achieved by an evaluation of the internal stress generated by the (strong) mechanical interaction between neighbour grains. All models proposed in the literature (kinematic model, finite strain model, tangent self-consistent model, lower bound model, ") make simplifying assumptions, since the mechanical problem is very complicated. One can distinguish between rather simple models that allow some freedom in deformation of individual grains, and more advanced techniques (and generally more accurate) that require a minimum number (=4) of independent slip systems (or directional deformation mechanisms) for the plastic strain to occur. In respect to this, unlike all other models

  17. Shallow Convection along the Sea Breeze Front and its Interaction with Horizontal Convective Rolls and Convective Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, B. A.; Stenchikov, G. L.; Abualnaja, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Shallow convection has been studied in the sea breeze frontal zone along the Arabian Red Sea coast. This convection is forced by thermal and dynamic instabilities and generally is capped below 500 hPa. The thermally induced sea breeze modifies the desert Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) and propagates inland as a density current. The leading edge of the denser marine air rapidly moves inland undercutting the hot and dry desert air mass. The warm air lifts up along the sea breeze front (SBF). Despite large moisture flux from the sea, the shallow convection in SBF does not cause precipitation on the most part of the Arabian coastal plane. The main focus of this research is to study the vertical structure and extent of convective activity in SBF and to differentiate flow regimes that lead to dry and wet convection. The Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF) has been employed at a high spatial resolution of 500 m to investigate the thermodynamic structure of the atmospheric column along the SBF. We found that convection occurs during offshore and cross-shore mean wind conditions; precipitation in SBF frequently develops in the southern region of the Red Sea along the high terrain of Al-Sarawat Mountains range, while on most of the days convection is dry in the middle region and further north of the Red Sea. The coherent structures in the PBL, horizontal convective rolls (HCRs) and open convective cells (OCCs), play an important role shaping interaction of SBF with the desert boundary layer. The HCRs develop in the midmorning along the mean wind vector and interact with the SBF. Later in the afternoon HCRs evolve into OCCs. The convection is strongest, where the HCR and OCC updrafts overlap with SBF and is weakest in their downdraft regions.

  18. Convective storms in planetary atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hueso, R.; Sánchez-Lavega, A.

    2013-05-01

    The atmospheres of the planets in the Solar System have different physical properties that in some cases can be considered as extreme when compared with our own planet's more familiar atmosphere. From the tenuous and cold atmosphere of Mars to the dense and warm atmosphere of Venus in the case of the terrestrial planets, to the gigantic atmospheres of the outer planets, or the nitrogen and methane atmosphere of Saturn's moon Titan, we can find a large variety of physical environments. The comparative study of these atmospheres provides a better understanding of the physics of a geophysical fluid. In many of these worlds convective storms of different intensity appear. They are analogous to terrestrial atmospheres fed by the release of latent heat when one of the gases in the atmosphere condenses and they are therefore called moist convective storms. In many of these planets they can produce severe meteorological phenomena and by studying them in a comparative way we can aspire to get a further insight in the dynamics of these atmospheres even beyond the scope of moist convection. A classical example is the structure of the complex systems of winds in the giant planets Jupiter and Saturn. These winds are zonal and alternate in latitude but their deep structure is not accessible to direct observation. However the behaviour of large--scale convective storms vertically extending over the "weather layer" allows to study the buried roots of these winds. Another interesting atmosphere with a rather different structure of convection is Titan, a world where methane is close to its triple point in the atmosphere and can condense in bright clouds with large precipitation fluxes that may model part of the orography of the surface making Titan a world with a methane cycle similar to the hydrological cycle of Earth's atmosphere.

  19. Macrocyclic metal complexes for metalloenzyme mimicry and sensor development.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Tanmaya; Graham, Bim; Spiccia, Leone

    2015-08-18

    Examples of proteins that incorporate one or more metal ions within their structure are found within a broad range of classes, including oxidases, oxidoreductases, reductases, proteases, proton transport proteins, electron transfer/transport proteins, storage proteins, lyases, rusticyanins, metallochaperones, sporulation proteins, hydrolases, endopeptidases, luminescent proteins, iron transport proteins, oxygen storage/transport proteins, calcium binding proteins, and monooxygenases. The metal coordination environment therein is often generated from residues inherent to the protein, small exogenous molecules (e.g., aqua ligands) and/or macrocyclic porphyrin units found, for example, in hemoglobin, myoglobin, cytochrome C, cytochrome C oxidase, and vitamin B12. Thus, there continues to be considerable interest in employing macrocyclic metal complexes to construct low-molecular weight models for metallobiosites that mirror essential features of the coordination environment of a bound metal ion without inclusion of the surrounding protein framework. Herein, we review and appraise our research exploring the application of the metal complexes formed by two macrocyclic ligands, 1,4,7-triazacyclononane (tacn) and 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane (cyclen), and their derivatives in biological inorganic chemistry. Taking advantage of the kinetic inertness and thermodynamic stability of their metal complexes, these macrocyclic scaffolds have been employed in the development of models that aid the understanding of metal ion-binding natural systems, and complexes with potential applications in biomolecule sensing, diagnosis, and therapy. In particular, the focus has been on "coordinatively unsaturated" metal complexes that incorporate a kinetically inert and stable metal-ligand moiety, but which also contain one or more weakly bound ligands, allowing for the reversible binding of guest molecules via the formation and dissociation of coordinate bonds. With regards to mimicking

  20. Systematic multiscale models for deep convection on mesoscales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Rupert; Majda, Andrew J.

    2006-11-01

    This paper builds on recent developments of a unified asymptotic approach to meteorological modeling [ZAMM, 80: 765 777, 2000, SIAM Proc. App. Math. 116, 227 289, 2004], which was used successfully in the development of Systematic multiscale models for the tropics in Majda and Klein [J. Atmosph. Sci. 60: 393 408, 2003] and Majda and Biello [PNAS, 101: 4736 4741, 2004]. Biello and Majda [J. Atmosph. Sci. 62: 1694 1720, 2005]. Here we account for typical bulk microphysics parameterizations of moist processes within this framework. The key steps are careful nondimensionalization of the bulk microphysics equations and the choice of appropriate distinguished limits for the various nondimensional small parameters that appear. We are then in a position to study scale interactions in the atmosphere involving moist physics. We demonstrate this by developing two systematic multiscale models that are motivated by our interest in mesoscale organized convection. The emphasis here is on multiple length scales but common time scales. The first of these models describes the short-time evolution of slender, deep convective hot towers with horizontal scale ~ 1 km interacting with the linearized momentum balance on length and time scales of (10 km/3 min). We expect this model to describe how convective inhibition may be overcome near the surface, how the onset of deep convection triggers convective-scale gravity waves, and that it will also yield new insight into how such local convective events may conspire to create larger-scale strong storms. The second model addresses the next larger range of length and time scales (10 km, 100 km, and 20 min) and exhibits mathematical features that are strongly reminiscent of mesoscale organized convection. In both cases, the asymptotic analysis reveals how the stiffness of condensation/evaporation processes induces highly nonlinear dynamics. Besides providing new theoretical insights, the derived models may also serve as a theoretical devices

  1. Spatial localization in rotating convection and magnetoconvection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kao, H.-C.; Knobloch, E.

    2014-01-01

    Stationary spatially localized states are present in both rotating convection and magnetoconvection. In two-dimensional convection with stress-free boundary conditions, the formation of such states is due to the interaction between convection and a large scale mode: zonal velocity in rotating convection and magnetic potential in magnetoconvection. We develop a higher order theory, a nonlocal fifth order Ginzburg-Landau equation, to describe the effects of spatial modulation near a codimension-two point. Two different bifurcation scenarios are identified. Our results shed light on numerical studies of two-dimensional convective systems with stress-free boundary conditions. This paper is dedicated to Professor Helmut Brand on the occasion of his 60th birthday.

  2. The development of complex tooth shape in reptiles

    PubMed Central

    Zahradnicek, Oldrich; Buchtova, Marcela; Dosedelova, Hana; Tucker, Abigail S.

    2014-01-01

    Reptiles have a diverse array of tooth shapes, from simple unicuspid to complex multicuspid teeth, reflecting functional adaptation to a variety of diets and eating styles. In addition to cusps, often complex longitudinal labial and lingual enamel crests are widespread and contribute to the final shape of reptile teeth. The simplest shaped unicuspid teeth have been found in piscivorous or carnivorous ancestors of recent diapsid reptiles and they are also present in some extant carnivores such as crocodiles and snakes. However, the ancestral tooth shape for squamate reptiles is thought to be bicuspid, indicating an insectivorous diet. The development of bicuspid teeth in lizards has recently been published, indicating that the mechanisms used to create cusps and crests are very distinct from those that shape cusps in mammals. Here, we introduce the large variety of tooth shapes found in lizards and compare the morphology and development of bicuspid, tricuspid, and pentacuspid teeth, with the aim of understanding how such tooth shapes are generated. Next, we discuss whether the processes used to form such morphologies are conserved between divergent lizards and whether the underlying mechanisms share similarities with those of mammals. In particular, we will focus on the complex teeth of the chameleon, gecko, varanus, and anole lizards using SEM and histology to compare the tooth crown morphology and embryonic development. PMID:24611053

  3. The development of complex tooth shape in reptiles.

    PubMed

    Zahradnicek, Oldrich; Buchtova, Marcela; Dosedelova, Hana; Tucker, Abigail S

    2014-01-01

    Reptiles have a diverse array of tooth shapes, from simple unicuspid to complex multicuspid teeth, reflecting functional adaptation to a variety of diets and eating styles. In addition to cusps, often complex longitudinal labial and lingual enamel crests are widespread and contribute to the final shape of reptile teeth. The simplest shaped unicuspid teeth have been found in piscivorous or carnivorous ancestors of recent diapsid reptiles and they are also present in some extant carnivores such as crocodiles and snakes. However, the ancestral tooth shape for squamate reptiles is thought to be bicuspid, indicating an insectivorous diet. The development of bicuspid teeth in lizards has recently been published, indicating that the mechanisms used to create cusps and crests are very distinct from those that shape cusps in mammals. Here, we introduce the large variety of tooth shapes found in lizards and compare the morphology and development of bicuspid, tricuspid, and pentacuspid teeth, with the aim of understanding how such tooth shapes are generated. Next, we discuss whether the processes used to form such morphologies are conserved between divergent lizards and whether the underlying mechanisms share similarities with those of mammals. In particular, we will focus on the complex teeth of the chameleon, gecko, varanus, and anole lizards using SEM and histology to compare the tooth crown morphology and embryonic development. PMID:24611053

  4. Organic aerosol processing in tropical deep convective clouds: Development of a new model (CRM-ORG) and implications for sources of particle number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, B. N.; Julin, J.; Riipinen, I.; Ekman, A. M. L.

    2015-10-01

    The difficulty in assessing interactions between atmospheric particles and clouds is due in part to the chemical complexity of the particles and to the wide range of length and timescales of processes occurring simultaneously during a cloud event. The new Cloud-Resolving Model with Organics (CRM-ORG) addresses these interactions by explicitly predicting the formation, transport, uptake, and re-release of surrogate organic compounds consistent with the volatility basis set framework within a nonhydrostatic, three-dimensional cloud-resolving model. CRM-ORG incorporates photochemical production, explicit condensation/evaporation of organic and inorganic vapors, and a comprehensive set of four different mechanisms describing particle formation from organic vapors and sulfuric acid. We simulate two deep convective cloud events over the Amazon rain forest in March 1998 and compare modeled particle size distributions with airborne observations made during the time period. The model predictions agree well with the observations for Aitken mode particles in the convective outflow (10-14 km) but underpredict nucleation mode particles by a factor of 20. A strong in-cloud particle formation process from organic vapors alone is necessary to reproduce even relatively low ultrafine particle number concentrations (~1500 cm-3). Sensitivity tests with variable initial aerosol loading and initial vertical aerosol profile demonstrate the complexity of particle redistribution and net gain or loss in the cloud. In-cloud particle number concentrations could be enhanced by as much as a factor of 3 over the base case simulation in the cloud outflow but were never reduced by more than a factor of 2 lower than the base. Additional sensitivity cases emphasize the need for constrained estimates of surface tension and affinity of organic vapors to ice surfaces. When temperature-dependent organic surface tension is introduced to the new particle formation mechanisms, the number concentration of

  5. Time-implicit hydrodynamical simulations of stellar interiors: Application to turbulent convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viallet, M.

    2012-12-01

    The talk described the first results on turbulent convection in the envelope of a red giant star obtained with the MUSIC code, a new multi-dimensional time-implicit code devoted to stellar interiors (Viallet, Baraffe & Walder, A&A, 2011). Currently, most of our physical understanding of stellar interiors and evolution largely relies on one-dimensional calculations. The description of complex physical processes like time-dependent turbulent convection, rotation or MHD processes mostly relies on simplified, phenomenological approaches, with a predictive power hampered by the use of several free parameters. These approaches have now reached their limits in the understanding of stellar structure and evolution. The development of multi-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations becomes crucial to progress in the field of stellar physics and to meet the enormous observational efforts aimed at producing data of unprecedented quality (COROT, Kepler GAIA). The MUSIC code solves the hydrodynamical equations in spherical geometry and is based on the finite volume method. The talk presented implicit large eddy simulations of the turbulent convection in a cold giant envelope both in 2D and 3D and covering 80% in radius of the stellar structure. The computational domain includes both the convective envelope and a significant fraction of the radiative zone, allowing for convective penetration. These simulations provide valuable insight to improve the description of turbulent convection in 1D models

  6. Sensitivity of Orographic Moist Convection to Landscape Variability: A Study of the Buffalo Creek, Colorado, Flash Flood Case of 1996.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fei; Warner, Thomas T.; Manning, Kevin

    2001-11-01

    A number of numerical experiments with a high-resolution mesoscale model were conducted to study the convective rainfall event that caused the 1996 Buffalo Creek, Colorado, flash flood. Different surface conditions and treatments of land surface physics were utilized to assess the sensitivity of this orographic moist convection to local and regional landscape forcing.Given accurate large-scale synoptic conditions at the lateral boundaries, the mesoscale model with a convection-resolving grid shows reasonably good skill in simulating this convective event with a lead time of up to 12 h. Sensitivity experiments show that a primary reason for this success is the use of an advanced land surface model that provides time-varying soil-moisture fields. This land surface model plays an important role in capturing the complex interactions among the land surface, the PBL, cloud-modulated radiation, and precipitation. For the case simulated, such interactions contribute to the temporal and spatial distribution of surface heating at small scales, and the convective triggering and development.Tests show that the landscape variability at small and large scales significantly affects the location and intensity of the moist convection. For example, on timescales of 6 to 12 h, differences in initial soil moisture associated with irrigation in the plains affect the evolution of the convection near the Continental Divide. Also, the surface modification by a wildfire burn influences the path of the major convective event that caused the flash flood.A watershed-based quantitative-precipitation-forecast skill score is proposed and employed. The relative success with which this severe thunderstorm is simulated over complex terrain provides some hope that the careful treatment of land surface physics in convection-resolving models can perhaps provide some useful level of predictability.

  7. The Development and Study of Surface Bound Ruthenium Organometallic Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, Geoffrey Reuben

    The focus of this project has been on the use of mono-diimine ruthenium organometallic complexes, of the general structure [H(Ru)(CO)(L)2(L') 2][PF6] (L=PPh3, DPPENE and L'=Bpy, DcBpy, MBpyC, Phen, AminoPhen) bound to surfaces as luminescent probes. Both biological and inorganic/organic hybrid surfaces have been studied. The complexes were characterized both bound and unbound using standard analytical techniques such as NMR, IR and X-ray crystallography, as well as through several photophysical methods as well. Initially the study focused on how the photophyscial properties of the complexes were affected by incorporation into biological membranes. It was found that by conjugating the probes to a more rigid cholesterol moiety that luminescence was conserved, compared to conjugation with a far more flexible lipid moiety, where luminescence was either lost or reduced. Both the cholesterol and lipid conjugates were able to insert into a lipid membrane, and in the more rigid environment some of the lipid conjugates regained some of their luminescence, but often blue shifted and reduced, depending on the conjugation site. Silica Polyamine Composites (SPCs) were a hybrid material developed in the Rosenberg Lab as useful metal separation materials, that could be easily modified, and had several benefits over current commercially available polymers, or inorganic materials. These SPCs also provided an opportunity for the development of a heterogeneous platform for luminescent complexes as either catalysts or sensors. Upon binding of the luminescent Ru complexes to the surface no loss, or major change in luminescence was seen, however, when bound to the rigid surface a significant increase in excited state lifetime was measured. It is likely that through binding and interacting with the surface that the complexes lost non-radiative decay pathways, resulting in the increase in lifetime, however, these interactions do not seem to affect the energy level of the MLCT band in a

  8. Evaluation of conductive, radiative, chemical, and convective heat transfer in complex systems using a fast-running, implicit, lumped-capacitance formulation

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin, A.S.; Beraun, R.; Brown, N.N.; Sherman, M.P.

    1995-05-01

    Accurate finite-element simulation of 3-D nonlinear heat transfer in complex systems may require meshes composed of tens of thousands of finite elements and hours of CPU time on today`s fastest computers. To treat applications in which thousands of calculations may be necessary such as for risk assessment or design of high-temperature manufacturing processes, methods are needed which can solve these problems far more efficiently and maintain an acceptably high degree of accuracy. For this purpose, we developed the Thermal Evaluation and Matching Program for Risk Applications (TEMPRA). The primary differentiator between TEMPRA and comparable codes is its numerical formulation, which is designed to be unconditionally stable even with very large time steps, to afford good accuracy even with relatively coarse meshing, and to facilitate benchmarking/calibration through the use of adjustable parameters. Analysis for a sample problem shows that TEMPRA can obtain temperature response solutions with errors of less than 10% using approximately 1/1000 of the computer time required by a typical finite element code.

  9. Convective Overshoot in Stellar Interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q. S.

    2015-07-01

    In stellar interiors, the turbulent thermal convection transports matters and energy, and dominates the structure and evolution of stars. The convective overshoot, which results from the non-local convective transport from the convection zone to the radiative zone, is one of the most uncertain and difficult factors in stellar physics at present. The classical method for studying the convective overshoot is the non-local mixing-length theory (NMLT). However, the NMLT bases on phenomenological assumptions, and leads to contradictions, thus the NMLT was criticized in literature. At present, the helioseismic studies have shown that the NMLT cannot satisfy the helioseismic requirements, and have pointed out that only the turbulent convection models (TCMs) can be accepted. In the first part of this thesis, models and derivations of both the NMLT and the TCM were introduced. In the second part, i.e., the work part, the studies on the TCM (theoretical analysis and applications), and the development of a new model of the convective overshoot mixing were described in detail. In the work of theoretical analysis on the TCM, the approximate solution and the asymptotic solution were obtained based on some assumptions. The structure of the overshoot region was discussed. In a large space of the free parameters, the approximate/asymptotic solutions are in good agreement with the numerical results. We found an important result that the scale of the overshoot region in which the thermal energy transport is effective is 1 HK (HK is the scale height of turbulence kinetic energy), which does not depend on the free parameters of the TCM. We applied the TCM and a simple overshoot mixing model in three cases. In the solar case, it was found that the temperature gradient in the overshoot region is in agreement with the helioseismic requirements, and the profiles of the solar lithium abundance, sound speed, and density of the solar models are also improved. In the low-mass stars of open

  10. Aircraft stress sequence development: A complex engineering process made simple

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrader, K. H.; Butts, D. G.; Sparks, W. A.

    1994-01-01

    Development of stress sequences for critical aircraft structure requires flight measured usage data, known aircraft loads, and established relationships between aircraft flight loads and structural stresses. Resulting cycle-by-cycle stress sequences can be directly usable for crack growth analysis and coupon spectra tests. Often, an expert in loads and spectra development manipulates the usage data into a typical sequence of representative flight conditions for which loads and stresses are calculated. For a fighter/trainer type aircraft, this effort is repeated many times for each of the fatigue critical locations (FCL) resulting in expenditure of numerous engineering hours. The Aircraft Stress Sequence Computer Program (ACSTRSEQ), developed by Southwest Research Institute under contract to San Antonio Air Logistics Center, presents a unique approach for making complex technical computations in a simple, easy to use method. The program is written in Microsoft Visual Basic for the Microsoft Windows environment.

  11. Impact assessment procedures for sustainable development: A complexity theory perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Nooteboom, Sibout

    2007-10-15

    The author assumes that effective Impact Assessment procedures should somehow contribute to sustainable development. There is no widely agreed framework for evaluating such effectiveness. The author suggests that complexity theories may offer criteria. The relevant question is 'do Impact Assessment Procedures contribute to the 'requisite variety' of a social system for it to deal with changing circumstances?' Requisite variety theoretically relates to the capability of a system to deal with changes in its environment. The author reconstructs how thinking about achieving sustainable development has developed in a sequence of discourses in The Netherlands since the 1970s. Each new discourse built on the previous ones, and is supposed to have added to 'requisite variety'. The author asserts that Impact Assessment procedures may be a necessary component in such sequences and derives possible criteria for effectiveness.

  12. Time-reversal Techniques in Ultrasound-assisted Convection-enhanced Drug Delivery to the Brain: Technology Development and In Vivo Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, George K.; Guarino, Sabrina; Gandhi, Gaurav; Filinger, Laurent; Lewis, George K.; Olbricht, Willam L.; Sarvazyan, Armen

    2011-01-01

    We describe a drug delivery method that combines Time-Reversal Acoustics (TRA) with Convection-Enhanced Delivery (CED) to improve the delivery of therapeutics to the interstitium of the brain. The Ultrasound-assisted CED approach (UCED) circumvents the blood-brain barrier by infusing compounds through a cannula that is inserted into the brain while simultaneously delivering ultrasound to improve the penetration of pharmaceuticals. CED without ultrasound-assistance has been used to treat a variety of neural disorders, including glioblastoma multiforme, a malignancy that presents a very poor prognosis for patients. We describe a novel system that is used to infuse fluids into the brain parenchyma while simultaneously exposing the tissue to safe levels of 1-MHz, low intensity, ultrasound energy. The system includes a combined infusion needle-hydrophone, a 10-channel ultralow-output impedance amplifier, a broad-band ultrasound resonator, and MatLab®-based TRA control and user-interface. TRA allows easy coupling of ultrasound therapy through the skull without complex phase-correction and array design. The smart targeting UCED system has been tested in vivo and results show it provides 1.5-mm spatial resolution for UCED and improves tracer distribution in the brain over CED alone. PMID:21881622

  13. Convective Available Potential Energy of World Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Z.; Ingersoll, A. P.; Thompson, A. F.

    2012-12-01

    Here, for the first time, we propose the concept of Ocean Convective Available Potential Energy (OCAPE), which is the maximum kinetic energy (KE) per unit seawater mass achievable by ocean convection. OCAPE occurs through a different mechanism from atmospheric CAPE, and involves the interplay of temperature and salinity on the equation of state of seawater. The thermobaric effect, which arises because the thermal coefficient of expansion increases with depth, is an important ingredient of OCAPE. We develop an accurate algorithm to calculate the OCAPE for a given temperature and salinity profile. We then validate our calculation of OCAPE by comparing it with the conversion of OCAPE to KE in a 2-D numerical model. We propose that OCAPE is an important energy source of ocean deep convection and contributes to deep water formation. OCAPE, like Atmospheric CAPE, can help predict deep convection and may also provide a useful constraint for modelling deep convection in ocean GCMs. We plot the global distribution of OCAPE using data from the World Ocean Atlas 2009 (WOA09) and see many important features. These include large values of OCAPE in the Labrador, Greenland, Weddell and Mediterranean Seas, which are consistent with our present observations and understanding, but also identify some new features like the OCAPE pattern in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC). We propose that the diagnosis of OCAPE can improve our understanding of global patterns of ocean convection and deep water formation as well as ocean stratification, the meridional overturning circulation and mixed layer processes. The background of this work is briefly introduced as below. Open-ocean deep convection can significantly modify water properties both at the ocean surface and throughout the water column (Gordon 1982). Open-ocean convection is also an important mechanism for Ocean Deep Water formation and the transport of heat, freshwater and nutrient (Marshall and Schott 1999). Open

  14. Complex geology spurs intensive development in Zhongyuan fields

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, R.W. )

    1990-04-01

    The Zhongyuan producing region of Eastern China is located some 310 mi south of Beijing and 60 mi southeast of the city of Anyang in Henan Province. An intensive infill drilling program utilizing 78 rigs is underway in the area to maximize production. Continuing development drilling in the 10 oil fields scattered over the area is required because reservoirs are highly faulted. The resulting small fault blocks also have a high water content (water production appears quickly in a new well), resulting in a relatively short producing life. This article presents details of the Zhongyuan complex.

  15. Prospects of the complex development of highly parameter geothermal brines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkhasov, A. B.; Alkhasova, D. A.; Ramazanov, A. Sh.; Kasparova, M. A.

    2015-06-01

    The high efficiency of complex processing of high-temperature hydrothermal brines with utilization of heat energy in a binary geothermal power plant and subsequent extraction of solved chemical compounds is shown. Promising technological schemes are given, where electric power, which is generated in the binary geothermal power plant, is used in a block to recover chemistry components. The technology for integrated processing of geothermal brines of the chloride-sodium-calcium type is developed, which provides the manufacture not only of marketable products but also of practically overall reagents of processed water that are necessary to realize the technology. Priority areas for development are indicated, and the preliminary estimates for a Berikey geothermal deposit are given. It is shown that only established resources of thermal brines of the Berikey deposit make it possible to produce more than 2000 t of lithium carbonate and, thereby, to completely provide Russian industry requirements for it.

  16. Development of the nuclear weapons complex EP architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, C.; Halbleib, L.

    1996-07-01

    The Nuclear Weapons Guidance Team is an interagency committee led by Earl Whiteman, DOE that chartered the generation of EP40100, Concurrent Qualification and its successor EP401099, Concurrent Engineering and Qualification. As this new philosophy of concurrent operations has evolved and as implementation has been initiated, conflicts and insufficiencies in the remaining Engineering Procedures (EPs) have become more apparent. At the Guidance Team meeting in November 1995, this issue was explored and several approaches were considered. It was concluded at this meeting, that a smaller set of interagency EPs described in a hierarchical system could provide the necessary interagency direction to support complex-wide implementation. This set consolidates many existing EP processes where consistency and commonality are critical to success of the extended enterprise. The Guidance Team subsequently chartered an interagency team to initiate development activity associated with the envisioned new EP set. This team had participation from seven Nuclear Weapons Complex (NWC) sites as well as DOE/AL and DP-14 (team members are acknowledged later in this report). Per the Guidance Team, this team, referred to as the Architecture Subcommittee, was to map out and define an EP Architecture for the interagency EPs, make recommendations regarding a more agile process for EP approval and suggest an aggressive timeline to develop the combined EPs. The Architecture Subcommittee was asked to brief their output at the February Guidance Team meeting. This SAND report documents the results of the Architecture Subcommittee`s recommendations.

  17. Magneto-convection.

    PubMed

    Stein, Robert F

    2012-07-13

    Convection is the transport of energy by bulk mass motions. Magnetic fields alter convection via the Lorentz force, while convection moves the fields via the curl(v×B) term in the induction equation. Recent ground-based and satellite telescopes have increased our knowledge of the solar magnetic fields on a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. Magneto-convection modelling has also greatly improved recently as computers become more powerful. Three-dimensional simulations with radiative transfer and non-ideal equations of state are being performed. Flux emergence from the convection zone through the visible surface (and into the chromosphere and corona) has been modelled. Local, convectively driven dynamo action has been studied. The alteration in the appearance of granules and the formation of pores and sunspots has been investigated. Magneto-convection calculations have improved our ability to interpret solar observations, especially the inversion of Stokes spectra to obtain the magnetic field and the use of helioseismology to determine the subsurface structure of the Sun. PMID:22665893

  18. Characterization of SCF-Complex during Bovine Preimplantation Development

    PubMed Central

    Benesova, Veronika; Kinterova, Veronika; Kanka, Jiri; Toralova, Tereza

    2016-01-01

    The degradation of maternal proteins is one of the most important events during early development, and it is presumed to be essential for embryonic genome activation (EGA), but the precise mechanism is still not known. It is thought that a large proportion of the degradation of maternal proteins is mediated by the ubiquitin-proteolytic system. In this study we focused on the expression of the Skp1-Cullin1-F-box (SCF) complex, a modular RING-type E3 ubiquitin-ligase, during bovine preimplantation development. The complex consists of three invariable components—Cul1, Skp1, Rbx1 and F-box protein, which determines the substrate specificity. The protein level and mRNA expression of all three invariable members were determined. Cul1 and Skp1 mRNA synthesis was activated at early embryonic stages, at the 4c and early 8c stage, respectively, which suggests that these transcripts are necessary for preparing the embryo for EGA. CUL1 protein level increased from MII to the morula stage, with a significant difference between MII and L8c, and between MII and the morula. The CUL1 protein was localized primarily to nuclei and to a lesser extent to the cytoplasm, with a lower signal in the inner cell mass (ICM) compared to the trophectoderm (TE) at the blastocyst stage. The level of SKP1 protein significantly increased from MII oocytes to 4c embryos, but then significantly decreased again. The localization of the SKP1 protein was analysed throughout the cell and similarly to CUL1 at the blastocyst stage, the staining was less intensive in the ICM. There were no statistical differences in RBX1 protein level and localization. The active SCF-complex, which is determined by the interaction of Cul1 and Skp1, was found throughout the whole embryo during preimplantation development, but there was a difference at the blastocyst stage, which exhibits a much stronger signal in the TE than in the ICM. These results suggest that all these genes could play an important role during

  19. Electrodynamics of convection in the inner magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiro, R. W.; Wolf, R. A.

    1984-01-01

    During the past ten years, substantial progress has been made in the development of quantitative models of convection in the magnetosphere and of the electrodynamic processes that couple that magnetosphere and ionosphere. Using a computational scheme first proposed by Vasyliunas, the convection models under consideration separate the three-dimensional problem of convection in the inner magnetosphere/ionosphere into a pair of two-dimensional problems coupled by Birkeland currents flowing between the two regions. The logic, development, and major results of the inner magnetosphere convection model are reviewed with emphasis on ionospheric and magnetospheric currents. A major theoretical result of the models has been the clarification of the relationship between the region 1/region 2 picture of field-aligned currents and the older partial ring current/tail current interruption picture of substorm dynamics.

  20. Arabidopsis flower development-of protein complexes, targets, and transport.

    PubMed

    Becker, Annette; Ehlers, Katrin

    2016-03-01

    Tremendous progress has been achieved over the past 25 years or more of research on the molecular mechanisms of floral organ identity, patterning, and development. While collections of floral homeotic mutants of Antirrhinum majus laid the foundation already at the beginning of the previous century, it was the genetic analysis of these mutants in A. majus and Arabidopsis thaliana that led to the development of the ABC model of floral organ identity more than 20 years ago. This intuitive model kick-started research focused on the genetic mechanisms regulating flower development, using mainly A. thaliana as a model plant. In recent years, interactions among floral homeotic proteins have been elucidated, and their direct and indirect target genes are known to a large extent. Here, we provide an overview over the advances in understanding the molecular mechanism orchestrating A. thaliana flower development. We focus on floral homeotic protein complexes, their target genes, evidence for their transport in floral primordia, and how these new results advance our view on the processes downstream of floral organ identity, such as organ boundary formation or floral organ patterning. PMID:25845756

  1. The influence of embedded convection on orographic precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannon, D. J.

    An in-depth analysis of the dynamical and microphysical processes by which embedded convection influences orographic precipitation, and the representation of these processes in numerical models, is presented. Benchmark idealised convection-permitting simulations are conducted to quantify the impact of embedded convection on orographic precipitation over a broad range of parameter space. Clouds that form over tall and wide mountains (e.g., the Washington Cascades) are found to be highly efficient at forming precipitations even in the absence of embedded convection. When embedded convection develops in such clouds, it produces competing effects that cancel to yield little change in the area-averaged precipitation rate. In contrast, for short and narrow mountains (e.g., the UK Pennines), stratiform precipitation formation is highly inefficient and so rapid precipitation formation within convective updraughts significantly enhances the area-averaged precipitation rate (by up to 133%). A novel analytical model of convective orographic precipitation is developed which successfully reproduces many of the benchmark simulation trends. Simplified representations of the dynamical and microphysical processes governing mixed-phase stratiform and convective clouds are developed to represent a flow with embedded convection. Finally, the representation of embedded convection in idealised simulations employing a commonly-used convection parameterisation scheme is evaluated relative to the benchmark simulations. Significant over-predictions (of up to 90%) in the area-averaged precipitation accumulations are found. Inexpensive modifications to the parameterisation such as changes to both the treatment of precipitation and the trigger function, as well as the introduction of convective memory (representing convective cell advection), may significantly improve the parameterisation of embedded convection in operational numerical weather prediction models.

  2. Development of a two-dimensional zonally averaged statistical-dynamical model. I - The parameterization of moist convection and its role in the general circulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, Mao-Sung; Stone, Peter H.

    1987-01-01

    The moist convection parameterization used in the GISS 3-D GCM is adapted for use in a two-dimensional (2-D) zonally averaged statistical-dynamical model. Experiments with different versions of the parameterization show that its impact on the general circulation in the 2-D model does not parallel its impact in the 3-D model unless the effect of zonal variations is parameterized in the moist convection calculations. A parameterization of the variations in moist static energy is introduced in which the temperature variations are calculated from baroclinic stability theory, and the relative humidity is assumed to be constant. Inclusion of the zonal variations of moist static energy in the 2-D moist convection parameterization allows just a fraction of a latitude circle to be unstable and enhances the amount of deep convection. This leads to a 2-D simulation of the general circulation very similar to that in the 3-D model. The experiments show that the general circulation is sensitive to the parameterized amount of deep convection in the subsident branch of the Hadley cell. The more there is, the weaker are the Hadley cell circulations and the westerly jets. The experiments also confirm the effects of momentum mixing associated with moist convection found by earlier investigators and, in addition, show that the momentum mixing weakens the Ferrel cell. An experiment in which the moist convection was removed while the hydrological cycle was retained and the eddy forcing was held fixed shows that moist convection by itself stabilizes the tropics, reduces the Hadley circulation, and reduces the maximum speeds in the westerly jets.

  3. Subcooled forced convection boiling of trichlorotrifluoroethane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dougall, R. S.; Panian, D. J.

    1972-01-01

    Experimental heat-transfer data were obtained for the forced-convection boiling of trichlorotrifluoroethane (R-113 or Freon-113) in a vertical annular test annular test section. The 97 data points obtained covered heat transfer by forced convection, local boiling, and fully-developed boiling. Correlating methods were obtained which accurately predicted the heat flux as a function of wall superheat (boiling curve) over the range of parameters studied.

  4. Convective dynamics - Panel report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carbone, Richard; Foote, G. Brant; Moncrieff, Mitch; Gal-Chen, Tzvi; Cotton, William; Heymsfield, Gerald

    1990-01-01

    Aspects of highly organized forms of deep convection at midlatitudes are reviewed. Past emphasis in field work and cloud modeling has been directed toward severe weather as evidenced by research on tornadoes, hail, and strong surface winds. A number of specific issues concerning future thrusts, tactics, and techniques in convective dynamics are presented. These subjects include; convective modes and parameterization, global structure and scale interaction, convective energetics, transport studies, anvils and scale interaction, and scale selection. Also discussed are analysis workshops, four-dimensional data assimilation, matching models with observations, network Doppler analyses, mesoscale variability, and high-resolution/high-performance Doppler. It is also noted, that, classical surface measurements and soundings, flight-level research aircraft data, passive satellite data, and traditional photogrammetric studies are examples of datasets that require assimilation and integration.

  5. Deep convection in mesoscale convective systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, S. J.

    1985-01-01

    A study was undertaken to examine the evolution of radar echoes and lightning attending the convective storms in mesoscale convective systems (MCS) and the relationships between the spatial and temporal evolution of deep convection and the storm environment, precipitation, severe weather, and lightning. The total number of ground discharges ranges from 10,000 to 30,000 over the life cycle of the MCS with peak sustained rates (for up to 10 consecutive hours) in excess of 2000 per hour. The peak lightning activity occurs from 5 to 20 hours after the first storms and anywhere from 7 hours prior to 7 hours after the time of the maximum areal extent of the MCS for very similar synoptic environments. Thus, it appears that mesoscale and sub-synoptic scale mechanisms are responsible for these large temporal variation in lightning activity. In addition, we have found that the lightning rates in MCS's are not related to either the size or the duration of the MCS. Preliminary results suggest that the MCA's with embedded squall lines produce the greatest flash rates.

  6. The continental drift convection cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehead, J. A.; Behn, Mark D.

    2015-06-01

    Continents on Earth periodically assemble to form supercontinents and then break up again into smaller continental blocks (the Wilson cycle). Previous highly developed numerical models incorporate fixed continents while others indicate that continent movement modulates flow. Our simplified numerical model suggests that continental drift is fundamental. A thermally insulating continent is anchored at its center to mantle flow on an otherwise stress-free surface for infinite Prandtl number cellular convection with constant material properties. Rayleigh numbers exceed 107, while continent widths and chamber lengths approach Earth's values. The Wilson cycle is reproduced by a unique, rugged monopolar "continental drift convection cell." Subduction occurs at the cell's upstream end with cold slabs dipping at an angle beneath the moving continent (as found in many continent/subduction regions on Earth). Drift enhances vertical heat transport up to 30%, especially at the core-mantle boundary, and greatly decreases lateral mantle temperature differences.

  7. Effects of Deep Convection on Atmospheric Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickering, Kenneth E.

    2007-01-01

    This presentation will trace the important research developments of the last 20+ years in defining the roles of deep convection in tropospheric chemistry. The role of deep convection in vertically redistributing trace gases was first verified through field experiments conducted in 1985. The consequences of deep convection have been noted in many other field programs conducted in subsequent years. Modeling efforts predicted that deep convection occurring over polluted continental regions would cause downstream enhancements in photochemical ozone production in the middle and upper troposphere due to the vertical redistribution of ozone precursors. Particularly large post-convective enhancements of ozone production were estimated for convection occurring over regions of pollution from biomass burning and urban areas. These estimates were verified by measurements taken downstream of biomass burning regions of South America. Models also indicate that convective transport of pristine marine boundary layer air causes decreases in ozone production rates in the upper troposphere and that convective downdrafts bring ozone into the boundary layer where it can be destroyed more rapidly. Additional consequences of deep convection are perturbation of photolysis rates, effective wet scavenging of soluble species, nucleation of new particles in convective outflow, and the potential fix stratosphere-troposphere exchange in thunderstorm anvils. The remainder of the talk will focus on production of NO by lightning, its subsequent transport within convective clouds . and its effects on downwind ozone production. Recent applications of cloud/chemistry model simulations combined with anvil NO and lightning flash observations in estimating NO Introduction per flash will be described. These cloud-resolving case-study simulations of convective transport and lightning NO production in different environments have yielded results which are directly applicable to the design of lightning

  8. Thermally optimum spacing of vertical, natural convection cooled, parallel plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar-Cohen, A.; Rohsenow, W. M.

    Vertical two-dimensional channels formed by parallel plates or fins are a frequently encountered configuration in natural convection cooling in air of electronic equipment. In connection with the complexity of heat dissipation in vertical parallel plate arrays, little theoretical effort is devoted to thermal optimization of the relevant packaging configurations. The present investigation is concerned with the establishment of an analytical structure for analyses of such arrays, giving attention to useful relations for heat distribution patterns. The limiting relations for fully-developed laminar flow, in a symmetric isothermal or isoflux channel as well as in a channel with an insulated wall, are derived by use of a straightforward integral formulation.

  9. EFFECTS OF PENETRATIVE CONVECTION ON SOLAR DYNAMO

    SciTech Connect

    Masada, Youhei; Yamada, Kohei; Kageyama, Akira

    2013-11-20

    Spherical solar dynamo simulations are performed. A self-consistent, fully compressible magnetohydrodynamic system with a stably stratified layer below the convective envelope is numerically solved with a newly developed simulation code based on the Yin-Yang grid. The effects of penetrative convection are studied by comparing two models with and without the stable layer. The differential rotation profile in both models is reasonably solar-like with equatorial acceleration. When considering the penetrative convection, a tachocline-like shear layer is developed and maintained beneath the convection zone without assuming any forcing. While the turbulent magnetic field becomes predominant in the region where the convective motion is vigorous, mean-field components are preferentially organized in the region where the convective motion is less vigorous. Particularly in the stable layer, the strong, large-scale field with a dipole symmetry is spontaneously built up. The polarity reversal of the mean-field component takes place globally and synchronously throughout the system regardless of the presence of the stable layer. Our results suggest that the stably stratified layer is a key component for organizing the large-scale strong magnetic field, but is not essential for the polarity reversal.

  10. Convective Draft Structure and Transport Over the Amazonian Rain Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scala, John Richard

    1990-01-01

    Field observations acquired during two expeditions to the Amazon rain forest of Brazil (ABLE-2A, ABLE-2B), and two-dimensional moist cloud model simulations are used to determine: (1) the vertical structure of convective up- and downdrafts, (2) the major levels of entrainment and detrainment, and (3) the role of temperature and moisture in convective scale transport over the continental tropics. The thermodynamic and kinematic structure of the convective troposphere is obtained from aircraft surveys flown during the dry season and a surface-based network triangle designed for wet season multi-instrumental sampling. Dry season deep convection develops in an environment marked by a mid-tropospheric minimum in equivalent potential temperature. The available supply of cool, dry air supports penetrating downdrafts which feed propagating gust fronts at the surface. Model results indicate the existence of organized cloud fields characterized by multiple updraft cores. The upward vertical transport of air from the subcloud layer to a broad anvil is accomplished without extensive mid-level detrainment. Undilute cores are required to perform the vertical exchange in the presence of mid-tropospheric heat and moisture sinks. Marked moisture gradients are absent in the well -mixed environment of the wet season. Model predicted column heating budgets suggest the evaporation of rainwater into a rear inflow is insufficient to sustain strong downdrafts or an extensive surface cool pool. Complex mid-tropospheric circulations, particularly the existence of a rotor, account for the observed redistribution of a conservative tracer. Undilute transport of boundary layer air to the upper troposphere is markedly reduced by multiple levels of detrainment. In one case, greater than 50% of the air transported to the anvil region originated at or above 6 km rather than directly from the boundary layer. The vertical distribution of boundary layer aerosols in the presence of convection is

  11. Recent development of glacier complex Adygine and resulting risks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falatkova, Kristyna; Sobr, Miroslav; Engel, Zbynek; Jansky, Bohumir

    2015-04-01

    Recent development of glacier complex Adygine and resulting risks Falátková, K., Šobr, M., Engel, Z., Janský, B. Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Science, Prague, Czech republic Glacier complex Adygine (3,400-4,200 m asl) is situated on the northern flank of the Kyrgyz Range, Tien Shan, Kyrgyzstan. The valley downstream is part of National Park Ala Archa, which is popular with tourists, and is heading towards the country's capital - Bishkek. At the study site there is a glacier which is observed since 1960's. The glacier has been monitored by satellite imagery and in last 10 years by on-site geodetic measurement as well. Due to glacier shrinkage several glacial lakes of different genetic types (moraine-dammed, moraine- and rock-dammed, termokarst) have appeared at the site. Nowadays, the lakes are situated on three levels in front of the glacier's terminus and form a cascade, they are also hydrologically connected. The lakes were subjected to detailed bathymetric measurement and some parts of the dams were surveyed by geophysical methods. Especially the newest lakes in proximity of the terminus has been undergoing dynamic changes and may pose a threat in the near future. The risks arising together with changing climatic conditions and retreat of the glacier are associated with mainly three of the lakes. The largest one with area of 3.2 ha is dammed by a rock step overlaid by a moraine. Geophysical research of the dam revealed buried ice and seepage channels in its western part. It is the capacity of these subsurface channels, which are draining the lake throughout the year that represents a weak point in terms of dam stability. The second lake, a termokarst one, is a similar case but drained solely by subsurface channels. Very steep slopes of the lake basin are covered with loose material which could slide down and block the drainage channels. The lake would then fill all the basin (approx. 50,000 m3) very quickly as it is supplied with water from the

  12. Vorticity imbalance and stability in relation to convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Read, W. L.; Scoggins, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    A complete synoptic-scale vorticity budget was related to convection storm development in the eastern two-thirds of the United States. The 3-h sounding interval permitted a study of time changes of the vorticity budget in areas of convective storms. Results of analyses revealed significant changes in values of terms in the vorticity equation at different stages of squall line development. Average budgets for all areas of convection indicate systematic imbalance in the terms in the vorticity equation. This imbalance resulted primarily from sub-grid scale processes. Potential instability in the lower troposphere was analyzed in relation to the development of convective activity. Instability was related to areas of convection; however, instability alone was inadequate for forecast purposes. Combinations of stability and terms in the vorticity equation in the form of indices succeeded in depicting areas of convection better than any one item separately.

  13. DNS of Horizontal Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Brian; Scotti, Alberto

    2014-11-01

    We perform three-dimensional DNS of Horizontal Convection in a rectangular tank with idealized boundary conditions. The flow is driven by imposing the profile for the buoyancy b at the surface, where it ranges from b0 to b0 + Δb and the transition region is confined to a very small area. The Rayleigh based on the domain depth ranges from 105 to 1012. The scaling observed for the Nusselt number and the strength of the circulation is consistent with Rossby's scaling across the range of Rayleigh numbers considered, indicating that the dynamics in the boundary layer under the ``warming'' side throttles the flow. Energetically, we find that Available Potential Energy (APE) is generated along the surface, and converted to Kinetic Energy (KE). Along the descending plume energy goes from APE to KE up to Ra ~1011 . For higher Rayleigh numbers the plume becomes a net sink of APE. When the switch occurs, a stagnant layer develops near the bottom, and the overall circulation becomes characterized by a narrow plume which retroflects rapidly towards the surface, with a shallow recirculation to close the flow. This may indicate the beginning of a Sandström regime characterized by a stagnant abyssal region and a shallow circulation. Work supported by the National Science Foundation.

  14. Conditions of the Asthenosphere Layer Appearance during Upper-Mantle Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharapov, V. N.; Perepechko, Y. V.; Sorokin, K.

    2012-12-01

    The upper mantle parameters responsible to the asthenosphere appearance during convection have been studied. Many geophysical models of the earth mantle have a continuous layer of a partially melted upper-mantle material under the lithosphere plate. From the period of the early earth this structure is possible only if there is the upper-mantle convection due to 660 km depth phase transition. The previous research considered hydrodynamic conditions of the general mantle convective systems taking into account phase boundaries within the upper mantle. In this work, based on numerical modeling, we discuss thermodynamic conditions of the asthenosphere layer evolution under a homogeneous lithospheric plate. Convection in the upper mantle is modeled using the Boussinesq approximation provided spatially distributed phase transitions within the upper mantle. The problem was solved using the control volume method, which provides integral conservation laws. The results of modeling show that the convective instability is possible when the temperature at the mantle boundary is Tb~1410÷1450°C. Decompression melting of the upper mantle rocks take place if Tb>1650°C. The starting temperatures at the lower boundary of the upper mantle are 1700÷1950°C result in the appearance of the asthenosphere layer existing for 30÷100 Ma. In this case the development of complex, separated asthenosphere zones with additional convective cells is typical. Further evolution results in decay of the melting elements and their final disappearance. The initial phase of the evolution of the asthenosphere zones lasts for about 30÷100 Ma. The second, longer phase of decompression melting contains periodical melting elements with the sizes coextensive to lava sheets of intraplate volcanoes. If Tb>1950°C, the evolution of the asthenosphere is different: after the decay of large asthenosphere zones we observe a reconstruction of convective cells; in this case spatial 'wandering' of varying melting

  15. Modeling for Convective Heat Transport Based on Mixing Length Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagishi, Y.; Yanagisawa, T.

    2002-12-01

    Convection is the most important mechanism for the Earth's internal dynamics, and plays a substantial role on its evolution. On investigating the thermal history of the Earth, convective heat transport should be taken into account. However, it is difficult to treat full convective flow throughout the Earth's entire history. Therefore, the parameterized convection has been developed and widely used. Convection occurring in the Earth's interior has some complicated aspects. It has large variation of viscosity, internal heating, phase boundaries, etc. Especially, the viscosity contrast has significant effect on the efficiency of the heat transport of the convection. The parameterized convection treats viscosity variation artificially, so it has many limitations. We developed an alternative method based on the concept of "mixing length theory". We can relate local thermal gradient with local convective velocity of fluid parcel. Convective heat transport is identified with effective thermal diffusivity, and we can calculate horizontally averaged temperature profile and heat flux by solving a thermal conduction problem. On estimating the parcel's velocity, we can include such as the effect of variable viscosity. In this study, we confirm that the temperature profile can be calculated correctly by this method, on comparing the experimental and 2D calculation results. We further show the effect of the viscosity contrast on the thermal structure of the convective fluid, and calculate the relationship between Nusselt number and modified Rayleigh number.

  16. Vegetation forcing and convective motion

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, X.; Leach, M.J.; Raman, S.

    1995-04-01

    A large irrigated vegetation area in a semiarid or relatively dry location is a strong surface forcing of thermal circulations. Several observational studies have found that such thermally induced mesoscale circulation may contribute to the triggering and development of convective clouds. In the western United States, extensive areas of irrigated farmland are surrounded by hot, dry surfaces, such as a steppe. Substantial gradients of sensible heating in the horizontal direction lead to a {open_quotes}farm breeze{close_quotes} circulation from the cooler agricultural area to the warmer steppes found at Boardman, Oregon. These thermally forced circulations may trigger convection by the related convergence and updraft motion under favorable atmospheric conditions. The role of vegetative covering in convective motion is investigated using a mesoscale numerical model. Two- and three-dimensional simulations are described. The effects of atmospheric stability, moisture in the lower atmosphere, moisture in the upper atmosphere, and horizontal heating scale on thermally induced clouds are studied. The horizontal scale of inhomogeneity is also studied using the two-dimensional model. Finally, a realistic vegetation distribution similar to that of the Boardman Regional Flux Experiment is used in the three-dimensional simulations.

  17. Magmatic accretion and thermal convection at the sheeted dike complex-gabbro boundary in superfast spreading crust, ODP Hole 1256D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trela, Jarek; Ferré, Eric C.; Launeau, Patrick; Bartz, Daniel M.; Morris, Antony

    2015-10-01

    The magmatic processes responsible for accretion of new oceanic plutonic crust at fast-spreading centers remain unclear. Expedition 312, at Ocean Drilling Program Hole 1256D, on the eastern flank of the East Pacific Rise, barely drilled through the uppermost gabbros but offers unparalleled opportunities to constrain deep magmatic processes and the mode of construction of the gabbroic layer. Gabbro 1 and gabbro 2, respectively 52 and 24 m-thick, were intruded in an altered and baked sheeted dike complex. Both gabbros lack a macroscopic fabric and were until now considered isotropic. Here, we use digital 3-D fabric analysis of plagioclase phenocrysts in 33 non-azimuthally oriented samples. In contrast with previous observations, the two gabbros display a distinct and consistent shape-preferred orientation. Both gabbros exhibit magmatic, equilibrated microstructures, with minor submagmatic microstructures. The calculated Rayleigh numbers range between 1015 and 1018, proving that the gabbroic magma was initially undergoing turbulent magmatic flow. Magmatic foliations dip moderately, with a mean of 48° in gabbro 1 and 61° in gabbro 2. Magmatic lineations plunge in gabbro 1 between 1 and 44° (mean 28°), while in Gabbro 2, plunges range from 6 to 69° (mean 41°). These inclined magmatic structures, combined with the inclined magmatic contacts between the gabbros and their host-rock, show that these two gabbro bodies, instead of being horizontal sills, more likely are inclined intrusions that cut obliquely through the sheeted dike complex. Seismic reflection data around Hole 1256D shows inclined reflectors similar to those produced by gabbroic saucer-shaped intrusions in passive margins. On the basis of the inclined fabrics, inclined contacts and the regional seismic data, we propose that the uppermost gabbroic intrusions at fast-spreading centers form with a saucer-shape. This new shape of intrusion, never reported before in the oceanic environment, may constitute a

  18. Supergranulation, a convective phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udayashankar, Paniveni

    2015-08-01

    Observation of the Solar photosphere through high resolution instruments have long indicated that the surface of the Sun is not a tranquil, featureless surface but is beset with a granular appearance. These cellular velocity patterns are a visible manifestation of sub- photospheric convection currents which contribute substantially to the outward transport of energy from the deeper layers, thus maintaining the energy balance of the Sun as a whole.Convection is the chief mode of transport in the outer layers of all cool stars such as the Sun (Noyes,1982). Convection zone of thickness 30% of the Solar radius lies in the sub-photospheric layers of the Sun. Convection is revealed on four scales. On the scale of 1000 km, it is granulation and on the scale of 8-10 arcsec, it is Mesogranulation. The next hierarchial scale of convection ,Supergranules are in the range of 30-40 arcsec. The largest reported manifestation of convection in the Sun are ‘Giant Cells’or ‘Giant Granules’, on a typical length scale of about 108 m.'Supergranules' is caused by the turbulence that extends deep into the convection zone. They have a typical lifetime of about 20hr with spicules marking their boundaries. Gas rises in the centre of the supergranules and then spreads out towards the boundary and descends.Broadly speaking supergranules are characterized by the three parameters namely the length L, the lifetime T and the horizontal flow velocity vh . The interrelationships amongst these parameters can shed light on the underlying convective processes and are in agreement with the Kolmogorov theory of turbulence as applied to large scale solar convection (Krishan et al .2002 ; Paniveni et. al. 2004, 2005, 2010).References:1) Noyes, R.W., The Sun, Our Star (Harvard University Press, 1982)2) Krishan, V., Paniveni U., Singh , J., Srikanth R., 2002, MNRAS, 334/1,2303) Paniveni , U., Krishan, V., Singh, J., Srikanth, R., 2004, MNRAS, 347, 1279-12814) Paniveni , U., Krishan, V., Singh, J

  19. Anomalously Weak Solar Convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanasoge, Shravan M.; Duvall, Thomas L.; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.

    2012-01-01

    Convection in the solar interior is thought to comprise structures on a spectrum of scales. This conclusion emerges from phenomenological studies and numerical simulations, though neither covers the proper range of dynamical parameters of solar convection. Here, we analyze observations of the wavefield in the solar photosphere using techniques of time-distance helioseismology to image flows in the solar interior. We downsample and synthesize 900 billion wavefield observations to produce 3 billion cross-correlations, which we average and fit, measuring 5 million wave travel times. Using these travel times, we deduce the underlying flow systems and study their statistics to bound convective velocity magnitudes in the solar interior, as a function of depth and spherical- harmonic degree l..Within the wavenumber band l < 60, convective velocities are 20-100 times weaker than current theoretical estimates. This constraint suggests the prevalence of a different paradigm of turbulence from that predicted by existing models, prompting the question: what mechanism transports the heat flux of a solar luminosity outwards? Advection is dominated by Coriolis forces for wavenumbers l < 60, with Rossby numbers smaller than approximately 10(exp -2) at r/R-solar = 0.96, suggesting that the Sun may be a much faster rotator than previously thought, and that large-scale convection may be quasi-geostrophic. The fact that isorotation contours in the Sun are not coaligned with the axis of rotation suggests the presence of a latitudinal entropy gradient.

  20. Thermodynamics of convective circulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, D. K.; Renno, N. O.

    2003-04-01

    The heat engine framework has proven successful for studies of atmospheric phenomena ranging from small to large scales. At large scales, the heat engine framework provides estimates of convective available potential energy, convective velocities, and fractional area covered by convection. At the smaller end of the spectrum, the framework provides estimates of the intensity of convective vortices such as dust devils and waterspouts. The heat engine framework sheds light on the basic physics of planetary atmospheres. In particular, it allows the calculation of their thermodynamic efficiency. Indeed, this is a fundamental number for atmospheric circulations because it quantifies the amount of heat that is converted into kinetic energy. As such, it is a valuable number not only for comparison of models with nature, but also for the intercomparison of models. In the present study, we generalize the heat engine framework to large-scale circulations, both open (e.g., the Hadley circulation) and closed (e.g., the general circulation) and apply it to an idealized global climate model to ascertain the thermodynamic efficiency of model circulations, both global and regional. Our results show that the thermodynamic efficiency is sensitive to model resolution and provides a baseline for minimum model resolution in climate studies. The value of the thermodynamic efficiency of convective circulations in nature is controversial. It has been suggested that both nature and numerical models are extremely irreversible. We show that both the global and the Hadley circulation of the idealized model are, to a first approximation, reversible.

  1. The Knowledges of Teacher Education: Developing a Critical Complex Epistemology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kincheloe, Joe L.

    2004-01-01

    The complexity of the pedagogical process and the intricacies of a rigorous teacher education are central concerns of this article. What is a critical complex teacher education? What types of knowledges should professional educators possess? The author states that, in a climate as hostile as the first decade of the twenty-first century, the…

  2. Development of Peralkaline Rhythmic Layering, Ilimaussaq Complex, S. Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Emma J.; Finch, Adrian A.; Donaldson, Colin H.

    2014-05-01

    The Ilímaussaq alkaline complex, S. Greenland is a peralkaline layered intrusion within the Gardar (1280-1180 Ma) igneous province. It is considered as a potential deposit of rare-earth elements, Ta, Nb and Zr. One of the places where these elements are concentrated is in the kakortokite layered series (KLS), which forms the floor sequence of the complex and is a spectacular example of macrorhythmic (i.e. typically >5 m in thickness) igneous layering. The KLS is composed of 29 exposed units numbered -11 to +17 [1], each composed of three layers distinguished by modal mineralogy: a basal arfvedsonite-rich black kakortokite, overlain by eudialyte-rich red kakortokite, in turn overlain by alkali feldspar- and nepheline-rich white kakortokite. Despite much work on the layered series, there is no consensus on the physico-chemical processes that led to the formation of the macrorhythmic layering, although most hypotheses suggest that the separation of minerals to form the tripartite units included the processes of gravitational settling and density sorting. Here we use detailed petrographic studies, quantitative textural analysis (crystal size distributions [CSDs]) and mineral chemistry to interpret processes of nucleation and crystal growth within the marker horizon unit 0 and the lowest exposed units (-8 to -11) of the KLS. Sharp boundaries occur between each of the studied units (-11/10, -10/-9, -9/-8 and -1/0) while the intra-unit boundaries between the black to red and red to white kakortokites grade over 2-5 cm. The CSD data suggest that multiple modes of crystallisation (in situ, in suspension and through accumulation) contributed to the crystallisation of the main modal minerals in each layer, with in situ crystallisation being of greatest importance in the black and red kakortokites, while suspension and accumulation processes were of more importance in the white kakortokites. The key control on unit development was the rate of undercooling, potentially

  3. On the Influence of Surface Heterogeneities onto Roll Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gryschka, M.; Drüe, C.; Raasch, S.; Etling, D.

    2009-04-01

    Roll convection is a common phenomenon in atmospheric convective boundary layers (CBL) with background wind. Roll convection is observed both over land and over sea for different synoptic situations. There is still some debate about the different types of roll convection and their causes or rather the necessary conditions for their appearance. The stability parameter ζ = -zi•L (zi: boundary layer height, L: Monin-Obukhov stability length) is widely used as a predictor for roll convection, since numerous studies suggest that convective rolls only appear when 0 < ζ < 20. In other words, roll development becomes unlikely for strong surface heating and weak vertical wind shear. In contrast to those studies the presence of roll convection in almost any polar cold air outbreak (as can be seen in numerous satellite images as cloud streets) reveals that even for large ζ roll convection can develop. Some studies report roll convection in cold air outbreaks for ζ = 250. Our large eddy simulations (LES) on roll convection suggests that the contrasting results concerning the dependency of roll convection on ζ are due to two different types of roll convection: One type which develops purely by self organization if ζ < 20 ("free rolls") and another type which is triggered by heterogeneities in surface temperature and develops also for large ζ ("forced rolls"). We think that most of the cloud streets observed in polar cold air outbreaks over open water are due to rolls of forced type which are tied to upstream located heterogeneities in the sea-ice distribution. The results of this study suggests that the omission of surface inhomogeneities in previous LES is the reason for the absence of rolls in all LES with strong surface heating and weak vertical wind shear so far. In this contribution we will present a large eddy simulation which successfully represents forced rolls under such conditions.

  4. Geothermal reservoirs in hydrothermal convection systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sorey, M.L.

    1982-01-01

    Geothermal reservoirs commonly exist in hydrothermal convection systems involving fluid circulation downward in areas of recharge and upwards in areas of discharge. Because such reservoirs are not isolated from their surroundings, the nature of thermal and hydrologic connections with the rest of the system may have significant effects on the natural state of the reservoir and on its response to development. Conditions observed at numerous developed and undeveloped geothermal fields are discussed with respect to a basic model of the discharge portion of an active hydrothermal convection system. Effects of reservoir development on surficial discharge of thermal fluid are also delineated.

  5. A heat engine based moist convection parametrization for Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuchowski, L. C.; Read, P. L.; Yamazaki, Y. H.; Renno, N. O.

    2009-11-01

    We have developed a parametrization of Jovian moist convection based on a heat engine model of moist convection. In comparison to other moist convection schemes, this framework allows the computation of the total available convective energy TCAPE and the corresponding mass flux M as dynamic variables from the mean atmospheric state. The effects of this parametrization have been investigated both analytically and numerically. In agreement with previous numerical experiments and observations, the inclusion of moist convection leads to heat and water vapor transport from the water condensation level into higher altitudes. The time development of the modeled convective events was found to be strongly influenced by a rapid reduction of kinetic energy and a subsequent lowering of the cumulus tower's top in response to convective heating. We have tested the sensitivity of the scheme to different variations in the fractional cloud coverage and under the inclusion of external radiative forcing towards a stable/unstable temperature profile. While the time development of convective events differs in response to these variations, the general moist convective heating and moistening of the upper troposphere was a robust feature observed in all experiments.

  6. Eocene Structural Development of the Valhalla Complex, Southeastern British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Sharon D.; Parrish, Randall R.; Brown, Richard L.

    1987-04-01

    The Valhalla complex, a Cordilleran metamorphic core complex, is a 100 km by 30 km structural culmination within the Omineca belt of southeastern British Columbia. It comprises sheets of granitic orthogneiss ranging in age from 100 to 59 Ma with intervening paragneiss of uncertain age and stratigraphic correlation. The complex is roofed by the ductile Valkyr shear zone and the ductile/brittle Slocan Lake fault zone; the upper plate comprises lower grade metasedimentary rocks intruded by middle Jurassic plutons. The Valkyr shear zone and the Slocan Lake fault zone deform 62 and 59 Ma granitic sheets in their footwalls. The easterly directed Valkyr shear zone is a 2 to 3 km thick zone of distributed ductile strain which is arched over the complex and is exposed around the periphery on the northern, western, and southern margins. The shear zone was active between 59 and 54 Ma under amphibolite facies conditions. The juxtaposition of upper and lower plates with different structural and metamorphic histories indicates that the Valkyr shear zone is a significant structure with large displacement. There is evidence to support an easterly rooting direction consistent with an extensional origin; its surface breakaway is suggested to be west of the Valhalla complex. The Slocan Lake fault zone on the eastern side of the complex is a gently (30°), easterly dipping ductile/brittle normal fault which roots to the east. It was active between 54 and approximately 45 Ma and truncates the Valkyr shear zone. Timing and structural relationships indicate that the Valkyr shear zone and the Slocan Lake fault zone are genetically related. Movement on the ductile Valkyr shear zone, arching of the complex, and displacement on the Slocan Lake fault zone occurred as a continuum in Early to Middle Eocene time. This paper documents the presence of significant Eocene ductile strain in the Valhalla complex and suggests that the role of extension in this region is more profound than had been

  7. Development of Orodispersible Tablets of Candesartan Cilexetil- β -cyclodextrin Complex.

    PubMed

    Sravya, Maddukuri; Deveswaran, Rajamanickam; Bharath, Srinivasan; Basavaraj, Basappa Veerbadraiah; Madhavan, Varadharajan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the use of inclusion complexation technique employing β-cyclodextrin in improving the dissolution profile of candesartan cilexetil, a BCS class-II drug, and to formulate the inclusion complex into orodispersible tablets. The inclusion complexes were formed by physical mixing, kneading, coevaporation, and lyophilisation methods. Inclusion complexes were characterized by FTIR, DSC, XRD, NMR, and mass spectral studies. Inclusion complexes prepared using kneading, and lyophilisation techniques in the molar ratio 1 : 5 with β-cyclodextrin were used for formulating orodispersible tablets by direct compression with different superdisintegrants like croscarmellose sodium, crospovidone, sodium starch glycolate, and low substituted hydroxypropyl cellulose in varying concentrations. The directly compressible powder was evaluated for precompression parameters, and the prepared orodispersible tablets were evaluated for postcompression parameters. Drug-excipient compatibility studies showed no interaction, and characterization proved the formation of inclusion complex. In vitro disintegration time was found to be within 3 minutes, and all the formulations showed complete drug release of 100% within 20 minutes. The optimized formulation was found to be stable after 6 months and showed no significant change in drug content. This work proved β-cyclodextrins to be effective solubilizing agent in improving the solubility of poorly water soluble drugs. PMID:26555987

  8. Dynamiical layering in mantle convection - impact on the viscoisity structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Ulrich; Stein, Claudia; Dude, Sabine

    2016-04-01

    Thermal boundary layers play a key role for the dynamics of the Earth's mantle. They mark the transition between the core and the mantle and , at least locally and transient, the transition between the upper- and the lower mantle at a depth of 670 km. There is much evidence that these boundary layers do not resemble the picture of a simple thermal boundary layer, as known from thermal convection at high Rayleigh number. Especially the lower boundary seems to be of complex structure, possible induced by compositionally dense material. Present models of mantle convection, aiming at simulating the complex structure and dynamics of the lower boundary layer require several ad hoc assumptions. Especially the density excess and the mass of compositionally distinct need to be assumed. Both conditions are critical for the dynamics but hardly constrained. The internal boundary at 670 is usually implemented by specifying a density jump through a phase boundary, We have developed models where the internal boundary as well as a thermochemical CMB , displaying topography which result from compositionally distinct piles , develop self consistently without the named ad hoc assumptions. As a starting condition we assume that a chemically stratified mantle, as resulting from fractional crystallization in an early magma ocean , is heated by the hot core. Double diffusive convection in material with strongly temperature dependent viscosity leads then to layering and, in a later state to the formation of a rough lower thermochemical boundary layer. Especially the viscosity profiles, as emerging from this configuration are investigated and compared with recent results from inversion studies.

  9. Moisture processes accompanying convective activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sienkiewicz, M. E.; Scoggins, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    A moisture budget analysis was performed on data collected during the AVE 7 (May 2 to 3, 1978) and AVE-SESAME1 (April 10 to 11, 1979) experiments. Local rates-of-change of moisture were compared with average moisture divergence in the same time period. Results were presented as contoured plots in the horizontal and as vertical cross sections. These results were used to develop models of the distribution of moisture processes in the vicinity of convective areas in two layers representing lower and middle tropospheric conditions. Good correspondence was found between the residual term of the moisture budget and actual precipitation.

  10. Combined buoyancy-thermocapillary convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homsy, G. M.

    1990-01-01

    Combined buoyancy-thermocapillary convection was studied in 2D and 3D. Fluid motion caused by thermally induced tension gradients on the free surface of a fluid is termed thermocapillary convection. It is well-known that in containerless processing of materials in space, thermocapillary convection is a dominant mechanism of fluid flow. Welding and crystal growth processes are terrestrial applications where thermocapillary convection has direct relevance.

  11. Natural convection in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, V.; Hussain, N.A.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on free convection in porous materials. Topics considered at the conference included heat transfer, nonlinear temperature profiles and magnetic fields, boundary conditions, concentrated heat sources in stratified porous media, free convective flow in a cavity, heat flux, laminar mixed convection flow, and the onset of convection in a porous medium with internal heat generation and downward flow.

  12. MITT writer and MITT writer advanced development: Developing authoring and training systems for complex technical domains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiederholt, Bradley J.; Browning, Elica J.; Norton, Jeffrey E.; Johnson, William B.

    1991-01-01

    MITT Writer is a software system for developing computer based training for complex technical domains. A training system produced by MITT Writer allows a student to learn and practice troubleshooting and diagnostic skills. The MITT (Microcomputer Intelligence for Technical Training) architecture is a reasonable approach to simulation based diagnostic training. MITT delivers training on available computing equipment, delivers challenging training and simulation scenarios, and has economical development and maintenance costs. A 15 month effort was undertaken in which the MITT Writer system was developed. A workshop was also conducted to train instructors in how to use MITT Writer. Earlier versions were used to develop an Intelligent Tutoring System for troubleshooting the Minuteman Missile Message Processing System.

  13. Investigate the MM5 model ability to simulate and predict convective precipitation over soutwest of Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghandhari, S.; Meshkatee, A.; Mazraee Farahani, M.; Jafari, S.; Khazanehdari, L.

    2009-09-01

    Among weather phenomena, convection, due to its complexity and destructive nature, has been subject of many studies and researches through out the world. For decades, generating different types of models were attempted by scientists to provide possibility of abating or at least reducing convective weather phenomena effects on people's life. People in south and southwest of Iran are familiar with convective phenomena and their effects. Due to Socio-Economic importance of convective phenomena and availability of a meso-scale (MM5) model in Iranian meteorological Organization it has been tried to investigate the model ability to simulate and to predict convective precipitation in south and southwest of the country. Outcome of the study indicates that the model produces acceptable results on convection that arises from sharp baroclinic conditions; but it has failed to produce acceptable results where convection is due to local conditions. Keywords: Convection, Numerical Weather Prediction, MM5 model, Baroclinic

  14. Mixed convection flow of nanofluid in a square enclosure with an intruded rectangular fin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Ran; Zhou, Xuanyu; De Souza Machado, Bruno; Das, Prodip K.

    2016-07-01

    Mixed convection flow in enclosures has been a subject of interest for many years due to their ever increasing applications in solar collectors, electronic cooling, lubrication technologies, food processing, and nuclear reactors. In comparison, little effort has been given to the problem of mixed convection in enclosures filled with nanofluids, while the addition of nanoparticles in a fluid base to alter specific material properties is considered a feasible solution for many heat transfer problems. Mixed convection of nanofluids is a challenging problem as the addition of nanoparticles changes the fluid's thermo-physical properties as well as due to the complex interactions among inertia, viscous, and buoyancy forces. In this study, a two-dimensional steady-state numerical model has been developed to investigate mixed convection flow of nanofluids in a square enclosure with an intruded rectangular fin and to optimize the fin geometry for maximizing the heat transfer using the Constructal design. The model has been developed using ANSYS-FLUENT for various fin geometries. Flow fields, temperature fields, and heat transfer rates are examined for different values of Rayleigh and Reynolds numbers for several geometries of the fin with the aim of maximizing the heat transfer from the fin to the surrounding flow. Outcome of this study provides important insight into the heat transfer behavior of nanofluids, which will help in developing novel geometries with enhanced and controlled heat transfer for solar collectors and electronic devices.

  15. Anomalously weak solar convection

    PubMed Central

    Hanasoge, Shravan M.; Duvall, Thomas L.

    2012-01-01

    Convection in the solar interior is thought to comprise structures on a spectrum of scales. This conclusion emerges from phenomenological studies and numerical simulations, though neither covers the proper range of dynamical parameters of solar convection. Here, we analyze observations of the wavefield in the solar photosphere using techniques of time-distance helioseismology to image flows in the solar interior. We downsample and synthesize 900 billion wavefield observations to produce 3 billion cross-correlations, which we average and fit, measuring 5 million wave travel times. Using these travel times, we deduce the underlying flow systems and study their statistics to bound convective velocity magnitudes in the solar interior, as a function of depth and spherical-harmonic degree ℓ. Within the wavenumber band ℓ < 60, convective velocities are 20–100 times weaker than current theoretical estimates. This constraint suggests the prevalence of a different paradigm of turbulence from that predicted by existing models, prompting the question: what mechanism transports the heat flux of a solar luminosity outwards? Advection is dominated by Coriolis forces for wavenumbers ℓ < 60, with Rossby numbers smaller than approximately 10-2 at r/R⊙ = 0.96, suggesting that the Sun may be a much faster rotator than previously thought, and that large-scale convection may be quasi-geostrophic. The fact that isorotation contours in the Sun are not coaligned with the axis of rotation suggests the presence of a latitudinal entropy gradient. PMID:22665774

  16. Tropical Convection's Roles in Tropical Tropopause Cirrus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehm, Matthew T.; Starr, David OC.; Verlinde, Johannes; Lee, Sukyoung

    2002-01-01

    Remote sensing observations reveal the frequent occurrence of tropopause cirrus, thin cirrus layers located near the tropical cold-point tropopause. Here, we present a theory in which tropical convection plays several important roles in tropopause cirrus formation. First, tropical convection is the primary means by which the moisture required for tropopause cirrus formation is transported into the upper troposphere. However, previous studies suggest that this convection rarely penetrates to the altitudes at which tropopause cirrus layers are observed, suggesting that additional vertical moisture transport is required to explain tropopause cirrus formation. We propose a mechanism for explaining this transport in which tropical convection plays the key role. According to this hypothesis, the transport is accomplished by meridional circulations that develop within the tropopause transition layer (TTL) in response to momentum transport by Rossby waves generated by tropical convection. Results of a series of global scale model runs designed to test this hypothesis will be presented. In addition, reanalyses vertical velocity data will be examined for evidence of the expected correlation between large-scale rising motion within the TTL and tropical convection. Once moisture is present near the cold-point tropopause, large-scale cooling is required to initiate tropopause cirrus formation. One source of this cooling is stratospheric tropical waves induced by tropical convection, as we will show using a time series of radiosonde temperature data superimposed with data on cloud occurrence from the DOE ARM Nauru99 field experiment. Observations of the global characteristics of these waves from a longer time series of reanalysis data will also be presented.

  17. A Cognitive Complexity Metric Applied to Cognitive Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Glenda; Halford, Graeme S.

    2002-01-01

    Two experiments tested predictions from a theory in which processing load depends on relational complexity (RC), the number of variables related in a single decision. Tasks from six domains (transitivity, hierarchical classification, class inclusion, cardinality, relative-clause sentence comprehension, and hypothesis testing) were administered to…

  18. The Role of Habitat Complexity in Community Development Is Mediated by Resource Availability

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Rachel S.; Johnston, Emma L.; Clark, Graeme F.

    2014-01-01

    Habitat complexity strongly affects the structure and dynamics of ecological communities, with increased complexity often leading to greater species diversity and abundance. However, habitat complexity changes as communities develop, and some species alter their environment to themselves provide habitat for other species. Most experimental studies manipulate basal substrate complexity, and while the importance of complexity likely changes during community development, few studies have examined the temporal dynamics of this variable. We used two experiments to quantify the importance of basal substrate complexity to sessile marine invertebrate community development through space and time. First, we compared effects of substrate complexity at 70 sites across ten estuaries. Sites differed in recruitment and community development rates, and after three months provided spatial variation in community development stage. Second, we tested for effects of substrate complexity at multiple times at a single site. In both experiments, complexity affected marine sessile invertebrate community composition in the early stages of community development when resource availability was high. Effects of complexity diminished through time as the amount of available space (the primary limiting resource) declined. Our work suggests the presence of a bare-space threshold, at which structural complexity of the basal substrate is overwhelmed by secondary biotic complexity. This threshold will be met at different times depending on local recruitment and growth rates and is likely to vary with productivity gradients. PMID:25054325

  19. Convection Heat Transfer in Three-Dimensional Turbulent Separated/Reattached Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Bassem F. Armaly

    2007-10-31

    The measurements and the simulation of convective heat transfer in separated flow have been a challenge to researchers for many years. Measurements have been limited to two-dimensional flow and simulations failed to predict accurately turbulent heat transfer in the separated and reattached flow region (prediction are higher than measurements by more than 50%). A coordinated experimental and numerical effort has been initiated under this grant for examining the momentum and thermal transport in three-dimensional separated and reattached flow in an effort to provide new measurements that can be used for benchmarking and for improving the simulation capabilities of 3-D convection in separated/reattached flow regime. High-resolution and non-invasive measurements techniques are developed and employed in this study to quantify the magnitude and the behavior of the three velocity components and the resulting convective heat transfer. In addition, simulation capabilities are developed and employed for improving the simulation of 3-D convective separated/reattached flow. Such basic measurements and simulation capabilities are needed for improving the design and performance evaluation of complex (3-D) heat exchanging equipment. Three-dimensional (3-D) convective air flow adjacent to backward-facing step in rectangular channel is selected for the experimental component of this study. This geometry is simple but it exhibits all the complexities that appear in any other separated/reattached flow, thus making the results generated in this study applicable to any other separated and reattached flow. Boundary conditions, inflow, outflow, and wall thermal treatment in this geometry can be well measured and controlled. The geometry can be constructed with optical access for non-intrusive measurements of the flow and thermal fields. A three-component laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) is employed to measure simultaneously the three-velocity components and their turbulent fluctuations

  20. Granular convection and its application to asteroidal resurfacing timescale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Tomoya; Ando, Kosuke; Morota, Tomokatsu; Katsuragi, Hiroaki

    2016-04-01

    A model for the asteroid resurfacing resulting from regolith convection is built to estimate its timescale. The regolith convection by impact-induced global seismic shaking could be a possible reason for regolith migration and resultant segregated terrain which were found on the asteroids Itokawa [1]. Some recent studies [2, 3] experimentally investigated the convective velocity of the vibrated granular bed to discuss the feasibility of regolith convection under the microgravity condition such as small asteroids. These studies found that the granular convective velocity is almost proportional to the gravitational acceleration [2, 3]. Namely, the granular (regolith) convective velocity would be very low under the microgravity condition. Therefore, the timescale of resurfacing by regolith convection would become very long. In order to examine the feasibility of the resurfacing by regolith convection on asteroids, its timescale have to be compared with the surface age or the lifetime of asteroids. In this study, we aim at developing a model of asteroid resurfacing process induced by regolith convection. The model allows us to estimate the resurfacing timescale for various-sized asteroids covered with regolith. In the model, regolith convection is driven by the impact-induced global seismic shaking. The model consists of three phases, (i) Impact phase: An impactor intermittently collides with a target asteroid [4], (ii) Vibration phase: The collision results in a global seismic shaking [5], (iii) Convection phase: The global seismic shaking induces the regolith convection on the asteroid [3]. For the feasibility assessment of the resurfacing process driven by regolith convection, we estimate the regolith-convection-based resurfacing timescale T as a function of the size of a target asteroid Da. According to the estimated result, the resurfacing time scale is 40 Myr for the Itokawa-sized asteroid, and this value is shorter than the mean collisional lifetime of Itokawa

  1. Interaction Between Convection and Pulsation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houdek, Günter; Dupret, Marc-Antoine

    2015-12-01

    This article reviews our current understanding of modelling convection dynamics in stars. Several semi-analytical time-dependent convection models have been proposed for pulsating one-dimensional stellar structures with different formulations for how the convective turbulent velocity field couples with the global stellar oscillations. In this review we put emphasis on two, widely used, time-dependent convection formulations for estimating pulsation properties in one-dimensional stellar models. Applications to pulsating stars are presented with results for oscillation properties, such as the effects of convection dynamics on the oscillation frequencies, or the stability of pulsation modes, in classical pulsators and in stars supporting solar-type oscillations.

  2. Thermocapillary Convection in Liquid Droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this video is to understand the effects of surface tension on fluid convection. The fluid system chosen is the liquid sessile droplet to show the importance in single crystal growth, the spray drying and cooling of metal, and the advance droplet radiators of the space stations radiators. A cross sectional representation of a hemispherical liquid droplet under ideal conditions is used to show internal fluid motion. A direct simulation of buoyancy-dominant convection and surface tension-dominant convection is graphically displayed. The clear differences between two mechanisms of fluid transport, thermocapillary convection, and bouncy dominant convection is illustrated.

  3. Mantle convection and the state of the earth's interior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hager, Bradford H.; Gurnis, Michael

    1987-01-01

    During 1983 to 1986 emphasis in the study of mantle convection shifted away from fluid mechanical analysis of simple systems with uniform material properties and simple geometries, toward analysis of the effects of more complicated, presumably more realistic models. The important processes related to mantle convection are considered. The developments in seismology are discussed.

  4. Mantle convection and the state of the Earth's interior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hager, Bradford H.

    1987-01-01

    During 1983 to 1986 emphasis in the study of mantle convection shifted away from fluid mechanical analysis of simple systems with uniform material properties and simple geometries, toward analysis of the effects of more complicated, presumably more realistic models. The important processes related to mantle convection are considered. The developments in seismology are discussed.

  5. Period doubling in magnetospheric convection cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W. William

    2012-04-01

    A gedanken investigation is performed on magnetospheric complexity. In an attempt to separate complexities due to external (solar wind) and internal (magnetospheric) dynamics, we hold the solar wind condition constant and investigate how the open flux in the magnetosphere changes from one convection cycle to the next. The change of open flux is related to the time integral of the tail electric field. This field, in turn, is proportional to the product of the normal (x) and tangential (z) components of the tail magnetic field. As the magnetosphere evolves, the magnetic components typically vary in opposite directions. We show that this competition leads to a magnetic flux cycle described by the classical logistic equation xn+1 = r(1 - xn)xn, where x is a linear function of open flux, the much researched route to chaos through period-doubling. The result could provide a possible explanation of the steady magnetospheric convection, sawtooth events, and other observed manifestations of nonlinearity.

  6. Heterogeneous nanofluids: natural convection heat transfer enhancement

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Convective heat transfer using different nanofluid types is investigated. The domain is differentially heated and nanofluids are treated as heterogeneous mixtures with weak solutal diffusivity and possible Soret separation. Owing to the pronounced Soret effect of these materials in combination with a considerable solutal expansion, the resulting solutal buoyancy forces could be significant and interact with the initial thermal convection. A modified formulation taking into account the thermal conductivity, viscosity versus nanofluids type and concentration and the spatial heterogeneous concentration induced by the Soret effect is presented. The obtained results, by solving numerically the full governing equations, are found to be in good agreement with the developed solution based on the scale analysis approach. The resulting convective flows are found to be dependent on the local particle concentration φ and the corresponding solutal to thermal buoyancy ratio N. The induced nanofluid heterogeneity showed a significant heat transfer modification. The heat transfer in natural convection increases with nanoparticle concentration but remains less than the enhancement previously underlined in forced convection case. PMID:21711755

  7. Heterogeneous nanofluids: natural convection heat transfer enhancement.

    PubMed

    Oueslati, Fakhreddine Segni; Bennacer, Rachid

    2011-01-01

    Convective heat transfer using different nanofluid types is investigated. The domain is differentially heated and nanofluids are treated as heterogeneous mixtures with weak solutal diffusivity and possible Soret separation. Owing to the pronounced Soret effect of these materials in combination with a considerable solutal expansion, the resulting solutal buoyancy forces could be significant and interact with the initial thermal convection. A modified formulation taking into account the thermal conductivity, viscosity versus nanofluids type and concentration and the spatial heterogeneous concentration induced by the Soret effect is presented. The obtained results, by solving numerically the full governing equations, are found to be in good agreement with the developed solution based on the scale analysis approach. The resulting convective flows are found to be dependent on the local particle concentration φ and the corresponding solutal to thermal buoyancy ratio N. The induced nanofluid heterogeneity showed a significant heat transfer modification. The heat transfer in natural convection increases with nanoparticle concentration but remains less than the enhancement previously underlined in forced convection case. PMID:21711755

  8. Heterogeneous nanofluids: natural convection heat transfer enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oueslati, Fakhreddine Segni; Bennacer, Rachid

    2011-12-01

    Convective heat transfer using different nanofluid types is investigated. The domain is differentially heated and nanofluids are treated as heterogeneous mixtures with weak solutal diffusivity and possible Soret separation. Owing to the pronounced Soret effect of these materials in combination with a considerable solutal expansion, the resulting solutal buoyancy forces could be significant and interact with the initial thermal convection. A modified formulation taking into account the thermal conductivity, viscosity versus nanofluids type and concentration and the spatial heterogeneous concentration induced by the Soret effect is presented. The obtained results, by solving numerically the full governing equations, are found to be in good agreement with the developed solution based on the scale analysis approach. The resulting convective flows are found to be dependent on the local particle concentration φ and the corresponding solutal to thermal buoyancy ratio N. The induced nanofluid heterogeneity showed a significant heat transfer modification. The heat transfer in natural convection increases with nanoparticle concentration but remains less than the enhancement previously underlined in forced convection case.

  9. Transition to turbulent thermal convection beyond Ra=1010 detected in numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, Alain P.; Yuen, David A.

    2000-05-01

    We have conducted high-resolution two-dimensional calculations for a Boussinesq convection model with a Prandtl number of unity in an aspect-ratio 3 box, going from Rayleigh numbers between 108 to 1014. A grid of 1024×3076 grid points consisting of a cosine-sine basis set has been employed for free-slip boundary conditions. We have found evidence for a transition involving the branching of plumes at a Rayleigh number of 1010. Inside the core of these ``superplumes,'' the structure is extremely complex. There may be another transition at Ra of 1012, where a secondary instability may develop in regions of the local Rayleigh number which becomes supercritical inside the core of the complex ``superplumes.'' For Ra of 108 to 1010, Ra follows a 13 power law in the Nusselt-Rayleigh number relationship. From Ra of 1010 to 1012, Ra follows a 12 power law. Above this value the Nusselt number becomes insensitive to the variation in the global Rayleigh number and this is due to the development of small-scale convection cells vertically aligned in the interior of the extremely high Ra number flow. The global Reynolds number scales as Re~Ra1/4 up to Ra of 1014. Scaling relationships based on global properties would not work in extremely high Ra situations beyond Ra of 1012 because of the complex turbulent layered convection in the core of the flow and the severe degradation of the boundary layers.

  10. A high-latitude convective cloud feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbot, Dorian Schuyler

    Available data suggest that during the late Cretaceous and early Paleogene (˜100 to ˜35 million years ago) Earth had an "equable" climate: the equator to pole surface temperature difference and seasonal cycle in high-latitude surface temperature were both much smaller than they are today. The combination of much warmer high latitudes, particularly during winter, and only somewhat warmer tropics has traditionally been difficult to model in global climate models and to explain physically. In this thesis a positive feedback on high-latitude surface temperatures based on the onset of convection and convective clouds is proposed and investigated using a hierarchy of climate models. This feedback mechanism is based on an initial warming leading to destabilization of the high-latitude atmosphere to convection, causing convection, which results in convective clouds and increased atmospheric moisture, both of which trap outgoing longwave radiation and lead to further warming. It is also shown that this convective cloud feedback could be active in a future atmosphere with increased greenhouse gasses, increasing high-latitude climate uncertainty under global warming scenarios. A variety of climate models are used to understand the convective cloudfeedback in this thesis. Simple, analytical models are used in two chapters to understand more complex models and their underlying physics. A zonally-averaged, two-level model of the atmosphere without a seasonal cycle, but containing a hydrological cycle and parameterizations of convection, precipitation, and clouds, and a longwave radiation scheme that explicitly depends on CO 2, water vapor, and cloud fraction is constructed and used as an initial test of the feedback mechanism. The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) single column model (SCAM), which contains state-of-the-art atmospheric physics parameterizations, high vertical resolution, a full seasonal cycle, a thermodynamic sea ice model, and a mixed layer ocean