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Sample records for convectively stabilised background

  1. Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britz, Dieter

    Convection has long been coupled with electrochemistry, and the name hydrodynamic voltammetry has become standard. In electroanalytical chemistry we mainly seek reproducible conditions. These are almost always attained by systems in which a steady convective state is achieved, although not always. Thus, the once popular dropping mercury electrode (see texts such as [74, 257]) has convection around it, but is never in steady state; it might be called a reproducible periodic dynamic state.

  2. Background Noises Versus Intraseasonal Variation Signals: Small vs. Large Convective Cloud Objects From CERES Aqua Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Kuan-Man

    2015-01-01

    During inactive phases of Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO), there are plenty of deep but small convective systems and far fewer deep and large ones. During active phases of MJO, a manifestation of an increase in the occurrence of large and deep cloud clusters results from an amplification of large-scale motions by stronger convective heating. This study is designed to quantitatively examine the roles of small and large cloud clusters during the MJO life cycle. We analyze the cloud object data from Aqua CERES (Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System) observations between July 2006 and June 2010 for tropical deep convective (DC) and cirrostratus (CS) cloud object types according to the real-time multivariate MJO index, which assigns the tropics to one of the eight MJO phases each day. The cloud object is a contiguous region of the earth with a single dominant cloud-system type. The criteria for defining these cloud types are overcast footprints and cloud top pressures less than 400 hPa, but DC has higher cloud optical depths (=10) than those of CS (<10). The size distributions, defined as the footprint numbers as a function of cloud object diameters, for particular MJO phases depart greatly from the combined (8-phase) distribution at large cloud-object diameters due to the reduced/increased numbers of cloud objects related to changes in the large-scale environments. The medium diameter corresponding to the combined distribution is determined and used to partition all cloud objects into "small" and "large" groups of a particular phase. The two groups corresponding to the combined distribution have nearly equal numbers of footprints. The medium diameters are 502 km for DC and 310 km for cirrostratus. The range of the variation between two extreme phases (typically, the most active and depressed phases) for the small group is 6-11% in terms of the numbers of cloud objects and the total footprint numbers. The corresponding range for the large group is 19-44%. In

  3. Antioxidant Stabilisation of Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shlyapnikov, Yurii A.

    1981-06-01

    Physicochemical aspects of the stabilisation of polymers are discussed. Attention is paid mainly to the aging and stabilisation of polymers under processing conditions. Topics considered are the kinetics and mechanism of the high-temperature oxidation of polymers, critical phenomena in the inhibited oxidation of polymers, the theory of synergism and antagonism among antioxidants, the reasons for differences in efficiency of antioxidants, and certain aspects of the relation between the efficiency of antioxidants and their molecular structure. A list of 132 references is included.

  4. Mast cell stabilisers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Finn, Deirdre Frances; Barlow, James William; Walsh, John Jarlath

    2016-05-01

    Mast cells play a critical role in type 1 hypersensitivity reactions. Indeed, mast cell mediators are implicated in many different conditions including allergic rhinitis, conjunctivitis, asthma, psoriasis, mastocytosis and the progression of many different cancers. Thus, there is intense interest in the development of agents which prevent mast cell mediator release or which inhibit the actions of such mediators once released into the environment of the cell. Much progress into the design of new agents has been made since the initial discovery of the mast cell stabilising properties of khellin from Ammi visnaga and the clinical approval of cromolyn sodium. This review critically examines the progress that has been made in the intervening years from the design of new agents that target a specific signalling event in the mast cell degranulation pathway to those agents which have been developed where the precise mechanism of action remains elusive. Particular emphasis is also placed on clinically used drugs for other indications that stabilise mast cells and how this additional action may be harnessed for their clinical use in disease processes where mast cells are implicated. PMID:26130122

  5. Dynamical stabilisation in optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Philip H.; Richards, Christopher J.; Smart, Thomas J.; Cubero, David

    2015-03-01

    We present a study of dynamical stabilisation of an overdamped, microscopic pendulum realised using optical tweezers. We first derive an analytical expression for the equilibrium dynamically stabilised pendulum position in a regime of high damping and high modulation frequency of the pendulum pivot. This model implies a threshold behavior for stabilisation to occur, and a continuous evolution of the angular position which, unlike the underdamped case, does not reach the fully inverted position. We then test the theoretical predictions using an optically trapped microparticle subject to fluid drag force, finding reasonable agreement with the threshold and equilibrium behavior at high modulation amplitude. Analytical theory and experiments are complemented by Brownian motion simulations.

  6. Protein stabilisation using additives based on multiple electrostatic interactions.

    PubMed

    Gibson, T D

    1996-01-01

    A method of elevating the storage lifetime of purified proteins has been discovered which appears to confer stability to all proteins investigated and may therefore be classed as generic in action. The basic methodology involves the formation of multiple electrostatic complexes between the protein and selected soluble polyelectrolytes to give protein-polyelectrolyte (PP) complexes and then to add solutions of polyalcohols or other compounds containing multiple hydroxyl groups. Dehydration of the resulting solution by vacuum evaporation, freeze drying or forced air convection produces a dry film or powder of stabilised protein. The method has been used mainly in the preparation of active enzymes for analytical tests. It has also been found that the formation of PP complexes also enhances the stability of enzymes in solution and the technique may be applicable to the stabilisation of virus suspensions by polycations. Examples of stabilised enzymes prepared by these methods are given and the proposed mechanism of stabilisation and applicability of the method to shelf-stable vaccine products are discussed. PMID:8854019

  7. Mycorrhizal aspects in slope stabilisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Frank

    2016-04-01

    In order to re-colonise and stabilise slopes affected by superficial soil failure with plants essential requirements have to be met: the plants must grow the plants must survive sustainably plant succession must start and continuously develop These requirements, however, are anything but easy given, particularly under the often hostile environmental conditions dominating on bare and steep slopes. Mycorrhizal fungi, the symbiotic partners of almost all plants used in eco-engineering, are said to improve the plants' ability to overcome periods governed by strongly (growth) limiting factors. Subsequently, results of investigations are presented of mycorrhizal effects on different plant and soil functions related to eco-engineering in general and soil and slope stabilisation in particular. Generally, inoculation yielded higher biomass of the host plants above as well as below ground. Furthermore, the survival rate was higher for mycorrhized compared to non-mycorrhized plants, particularly under extreme environmental conditions. However, the scale of the mycorrhizal impact may be species specific of both the plant host as well as the fungal partner(s) and often becomes evident only after a certain time lag. Depending on the plant-fungus combination the root length per soil volume was found to be between 0 and 2.5 times higher for inoculated compared to non-inoculated specimens. On an alpine graded ski slope the survival of inoculated compared to non-treated Salix herbacea cuttings was significant after one vegetation period only for one of the three added mycorrhizal fungus species. However, after three years all of the inoculated plantlets performed significantly better than the non-inoculated controls. The analysis of the potential for producing and stabilising soil aggregates of five different ectomycorrhizal fungi showed high variation and, for the species Inocybe lacera, no significant difference compared to untreated soil. Furthermore, inoculation of Salix

  8. Reset stabilisation of positive linear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xudong; Yin, Yunfei; Shen, Jun

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, the problems of reset stabilisation for positive linear systems (PLSs) are investigated. Some properties relating to reset control of PLSs are first revealed. It is shown that these properties are different from the corresponding ones of general linear systems. Second, a class of periodic reset scheme is designed to exponentially stabilise an unstable PLS with a prescribed decay rate. Then, for a given PLS with reset control, some discussions on the upper bound of its decay rate are presented. Meanwhile, the reset stabilisation for PLSs in a special case is probed as well. Finally, two numerical examples are used to demonstrate the correctness and effectiveness of the obtained theoretical results.

  9. Bioconjugation and stabilisation of biomolecules in biosensors.

    PubMed

    Liébana, Susana; Drago, Guido A

    2016-06-30

    Suitable bioconjugation strategies and stabilisation of biomolecules on electrodes is essential for the development of novel and commercially viable biosensors. In the present review, the functional groups that comprise the selectable targets for practical bioconjugation methods are discussed. We focus on describing the most common immobilisation techniques used in biosensor construction, which are classified into irreversible and reversible methods. Concerning the stability of proteins, the two main types of stability may be defined as (i) storage or shelf stability, and (ii) operational stability. Both types of stability are explained, as well as the introduction of an electrophoretic technique for predicting protein-polymer interactions. In addition, solution and dry stabilisation as well as stabilisation using the covalent immobilisation of proteins are discussed including possible factors that influence stability. Finally, the integration of nanomaterials, such as magnetic particles, with protein immobilisation is discussed in relation to protein stability studies. PMID:27365036

  10. Bioconjugation and stabilisation of biomolecules in biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Drago, Guido A.

    2016-01-01

    Suitable bioconjugation strategies and stabilisation of biomolecules on electrodes is essential for the development of novel and commercially viable biosensors. In the present review, the functional groups that comprise the selectable targets for practical bioconjugation methods are discussed. We focus on describing the most common immobilisation techniques used in biosensor construction, which are classified into irreversible and reversible methods. Concerning the stability of proteins, the two main types of stability may be defined as (i) storage or shelf stability, and (ii) operational stability. Both types of stability are explained, as well as the introduction of an electrophoretic technique for predicting protein–polymer interactions. In addition, solution and dry stabilisation as well as stabilisation using the covalent immobilisation of proteins are discussed including possible factors that influence stability. Finally, the integration of nanomaterials, such as magnetic particles, with protein immobilisation is discussed in relation to protein stability studies. PMID:27365036

  11. Partial stability and stabilisation of Boolean networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hong-Wei; Sun, Liang-Jie; Liu, Yang

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we investigate the stability of Boolean networks and the stabilisation of Boolean control networks with respect to part of the system's states. First, an algebraic expression of the Boolean (control) network is derived by the semi-tensor product of matrices. Then, some necessary and sufficient conditions for partial stability of Boolean networks are given. Finally, the stabilisation of Boolean control networks by a free control sequence and a state-feedback control is investigated and the respective necessary and sufficient conditions are obtained. Examples are provided to illustrate the efficiency of the obtained results.

  12. Factors that affect stabilisation times of canine spontaneous hypoadrenocorticism.

    PubMed

    Roberts, E; Boden, L A; Ramsey, I K

    2016-07-23

    The objective of this retrospective study was to examine factors that may have affected the stabilisation times of 50 dogs with spontaneous hypoadrenocorticism that were being treated with fludrocortisone acetate, with particular emphasis on dosing frequency and the concurrent use of prednisolone. Stabilisation was defined as an absence of clinical signs with a sodium:potassium ratio >27:1 and both electrolyte concentrations within a laboratory reference range. It was found that the median time till stabilisation was three months. The frequency of fludrocortisone treatment (once, twice or changed from once to twice a day) had no effect on the stabilisation time. The two groups of dogs that were started and stabilised on once a day or twice a day dosing had a median stabilisation time of two months. However, dogs that failed to stabilise on once a day dosing of fludrocortisone and were then changed onto twice a day dosing then stabilised a median of one month later. Concurrent use of prednisolone resulted in significantly faster stabilisation times. It was concluded that dogs with hypoadrenocorticism should be continued on prednisolone therapy until they are stabilised. If a dog is failing to stabilise on once a day fludrocortisone acetate, a change to twice a day administration could be considered. PMID:27269282

  13. [Functional Outcome after Chest Wall Stabilisation].

    PubMed

    Kyriss, T; Lenz, U; Friedel, G

    2016-09-01

    This overview reviews the current literature to compare the functional results after surgical and conservative treatment of patients with flail chest and multiple rib fractures. Regarding functional aspects, patients in the early phase after a thoracic trauma are those that benefit most from the stabilisation of the chest wall by internal fixation of the ribs. Patients recover faster from restrictive respiratory disorders, have less pain and return to the workplace earlier after an operation compared with those that receive conservative treatment. In the medium term, however, patients that are treated conservatively also achieve normal pulmonary function values and become free of pain. The period of convalescence after blunt thoracic trauma is generally underestimated. Future studies of the functional outcome after severe chest injuries should take this into account and the development of functional parameters should be monitored for at least 24 months. A prospective data collection of early and long-term surgical results in registries would be suitable to evaluate benefits and indications of chest wall stabilisation. PMID:27607891

  14. Supergranular Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udayashankar, Paniveni

    2015-12-01

    Observation of the Solar photosphere through high resolution instruments have long indicated that the surface of the Sun is not a tranquil, featureless surface but is beset with a granular appearance. These cellular velocity patterns are a visible manifestation of sub- photospheric convection currents which contribute substantially to the outward transport of energy from the deeper layers, thus maintaining the energy balance of the Sun as a whole.Convection is the chief mode of transport in the outer layers of all cool stars such as the Sun (Noyes,1982). Convection zone of thickness 30% of the Solar radius lies in the sub-photospheric layers of the Sun. Here the opacity is so large that heat flux transport is mainly by convection rather than by photon diffusion. Convection is revealed on four scales. On the scale of 1000 km, it is granulation and on the scale of 8-10 arcsec, it is Mesogranulation. The next hierarchial scale of convection , Supergranules are in the range of 30-40 arcsec. The largest reported manifestation of convection in the Sun are ‘Giant Cells’or ‘Giant Granules’, on a typical length scale of about 108 m.'Supergranules' is caused by the turbulence that extends deep into the convection zone. They have a typical lifetime of about 20hr with spicules marking their boundaries. Gas rises in the centre of the supergranules and then spreads out towards the boundary and descends.Broadly speaking supergranules are characterized by the three parameters namely the length L, the lifetime T and the horizontal flow velocity vh . The interrelationships amongst these parameters can shed light on the underlying convective processes and are in agreement with the Kolmogorov theory of turbulence as applied to large scale solar convection (Krishan et al .2002 ; Paniveni et. al. 2004, 2005, 2010).References:1) Noyes, R.W., The Sun, Our Star (Harvard University Press, 1982)2) Krishan, V., Paniveni U., Singh , J., Srikanth R., 2002, MNRAS, 334/1,2303) Paniveni

  15. Cocoa particles for food emulsion stabilisation.

    PubMed

    Gould, Joanne; Vieira, Josélio; Wolf, Bettina

    2013-09-01

    Emulsifying properties of cocoa particles have been investigated in systems containing purified sunflower oil (PSO) and water at varying pH, concentration and source of cocoa particles including cocoa powders (CP), cocoa fibre (CF) and cocoa mass (CM). The effect of cocoa particle source, pH and cocoa particle concentration on emulsion stability was evaluated by following changes in characteristic droplet diameter. Size distributions acquired on the emulsions and aqueous cocoa particle suspensions overlapped. Based on cryo-SEM imaging of the emulsions, isolation of cocoa particle fines and a process of washing the cocoa particles to remove any water soluble molecules, it was concluded that the cocoa particle fines not captured by the small angle laser diffraction method employed for sizing, act as Pickering particles. This research has demonstrated a universal nature of a natural food particle to stabilise oil-in-water emulsions not requiring particle modification or adjusting of the solution properties of the emulsion phases. PMID:23851644

  16. Foam stabilisation using surfactant exfoliated graphene.

    PubMed

    Sham, Alison Y W; Notley, Shannon M

    2016-05-01

    Liquid-air foams have been stabilised using a suspension of graphene particles at very low particle loadings. The suspension was prepared through the liquid phase exfoliation of graphite in the presence of the non-ionic tri-block surfactant, Pluronic® F108. The graphene particles possess an extremely high aspect ratio, with lateral dimensions of between 0.1 and 1.3 μm as evidenced by TEM imaging. The particles were shown to exhibit a number of other properties known to favour stabilisation of foam structures. Particle surface activity was confirmed through surface tension measurements, suggesting the particles favour adsorption at the air-water interface. The evolution of bubble size distributions over time indicated the presence of particles yielded improvements to foam stability due to a reduction in disproportionation. Foam stability measurements showed a non-linear relationship between foam half-life and graphene concentration, indicative of the rate at which particles adsorb at bubble surfaces. The wettability of the graphene particles was altered upon addition of alkali metal chlorides, with the stability of the foams being enhanced according to the series Na(+)>Li(+)>K(+)>Cs(+). This effect is indicative of the relative hydration capacity of each salt with respect to the surfactant, which is adsorbed along the graphene plane as a result of the exfoliation process. Thus, surfactant exfoliated graphene particles exhibit a number of different features that demonstrate efficient application of high-aspect ratio particles in the customisation and enhancement of foams. PMID:26890385

  17. Convection towers

    DOEpatents

    Prueitt, Melvin L.

    1994-01-01

    Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air and of generating electricity utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity. Other embodiments may also provide fresh water, and operate in an updraft mode.

  18. Convection towers

    DOEpatents

    Prueitt, Melvin L.

    1996-01-01

    Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air, of generating electricity, and of producing fresh water utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity, and condensers produce fresh water.

  19. Convection towers

    DOEpatents

    Prueitt, Melvin L.

    1995-01-01

    Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air, of generating electricity, and of producing fresh water utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity, and condensers produce fresh water.

  20. Convection towers

    DOEpatents

    Prueitt, M.L.

    1996-01-16

    Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air, of generating electricity, and of producing fresh water utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity, and condensers produce fresh water. 6 figs.

  1. Modeling Convection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebert, James R.; Elliott, Nancy A.; Hurteau, Laura; Schulz, Amanda

    2004-01-01

    Students must understand the fundamental process of convection before they can grasp a wide variety of Earth processes, many of which may seem abstract because of the scales on which they operate. Presentation of a very visual, concrete model prior to instruction on these topics may facilitate students' understanding of processes that are largely…

  2. Interactions in lipid stabilised foam films.

    PubMed

    Toca-Herrera, José Luis; Krasteva, Nadejda; Müller, Hans-Joachim; Krastev, Rumen

    2014-05-01

    The interaction between lipid bilayers in water has been intensively studied over the last decades. Osmotic stress was applied to evaluate the forces between two approaching lipid bilayers in aqueous solution. The force-distance relation between lipid mono- or bilayers deposited on mica sheets using a surface force apparatus (SFA) was also measured. Lipid stabilised foam films offer another possibility to study the interactions between lipid monolayers. These films can be prepared comparatively easy with very good reproducibility. Foam films consist usually of two adsorbed surfactant monolayers separated by a layer of the aqueous solution from which the film is created. Their thickness can be conveniently measured using microinterferometric techniques. Studies with foam films deliver valuable information on the interactions between lipid membranes and especially their stability and permeability. Presenting inverse black lipid membrane (BLM) foam films supply information about the properties of the lipid self-organisation in bilayers. The present paper summarises results on microscopic lipid stabilised foam films by measuring their thickness and contact angle. Most of the presented results concern foam films prepared from dispersions of the zwitterionic lipid 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphorylcholine (DMPC) and some of its mixtures with the anionic lipid -- 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-[phospho-rac-(1-glycerol)] (DMPG). The strength of the long range and short range forces between the lipid layers is discussed. The van der Waals attractive force is calculated. The electrostatic repulsive force is estimated from experiments at different electrolyte concentrations (NaCl, CaCl₂) or by modification of the electrostatic double layer surface potential by incorporating charged lipids in the lipid monolayers. The short range interactions are studied and modified by using small carbohydrates (fructose and sucrose), ethanol (EtOH) or dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). Some

  3. Cellulose degradation in alkaline media upon acidic pretreatment and stabilisation.

    PubMed

    Testova, Lidia; Nieminen, Kaarlo; Penttilä, Paavo A; Serimaa, Ritva; Potthast, Antje; Sixta, Herbert

    2014-01-16

    The present study reports on a revised kinetic model for alkaline degradation of cellulose accounting for primary peeling/stopping reactions as well as for alkaline hydrolysis followed by secondary peeling. Oxalic acid pretreated cotton linters was utilised as the model substrate for the prehydrolysis-soda anthraquinone process. The main emphasis was investigating the effect of end-group stabilising additives such as sodium borohydride (BH), anthraquinone (AQ), and anthraquinone-2-sulphonic acid sodium salt (AQS) on the rates of the yield loss reactions. BH and AQS ensured a cellulose yield gain of 13% and 11%, respectively, compared to the reference. Both stabilisation agents decreased the content of the reducing end groups in the samples, while in the case of AQS stabilisation a 25% increase in carboxyl group content compared to the reference was also observed. As expected, the addition of end group stabilisers resulted in a significant decrease in the peeling-to-stopping rate constants ratio. PMID:24188853

  4. States of fragility: stabilisation and its implications for humanitarian action.

    PubMed

    Collinson, Sarah; Elhawary, Samir; Muggah, Robert

    2010-10-01

    This paper explores the evolution of international stabilisation agendas and their significance for humanitarian action. Stabilisation includes a combination of military, humanitarian, political and economic activities to control, contain and manage areas affected by armed conflict and complex emergencies. Encompassing narrow security objectives and broader peace-building efforts, stabilisation is both a conservative and potentially transformative, comprehensive and long-term agenda. The open-ended approach allows for widely varying interpretations and applications in different circumstances and by different actors with an assortment of implications for humanitarian action. The relationship between the two is highly uncertain and contentious, due not only to the controversies surrounding stabilisation policies, but also to deep-seated ambiguities at the heart of humanitarianism. While humanitarian actors are preoccupied with the growing involvement of the military in the humanitarian sphere, the paper argues that it is trends in the humanitarian-political interface that represent the more fundamental dilemma. PMID:20846346

  5. Finding a stabilising switching law for switching nonlinear models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lendek, Zs.; Raica, P.; Lauber, J.; Guerra, T. M.

    2016-09-01

    This paper considers the stabilisation of switching nonlinear models by switching between the subsystems. We assume that arbitrary switching between two subsystems is possible once a subsystem has been active for a predefined number of samples. We use a Takagi-Sugeno representation of the models and a switching Lyapunov function is employed to develop sufficient stability conditions. If the conditions are satisfied, we construct a switching law that stabilises the system. The application of the conditions is illustrated in several examples.

  6. Convection towers

    DOEpatents

    Prueitt, M.L.

    1994-02-08

    Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air and of generating electricity utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity. Other embodiments may also provide fresh water, and operate in an updraft mode. 5 figures.

  7. CONVECTION REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Hammond, R.P.; King, L.D.P.

    1960-03-22

    An homogeneous nuclear power reactor utilizing convection circulation of the liquid fuel is proposed. The reactor has an internal heat exchanger looated in the same pressure vessel as the critical assembly, thereby eliminating necessity for handling the hot liquid fuel outside the reactor pressure vessel during normal operation. The liquid fuel used in this reactor eliminates the necessity for extensive radiolytic gas rocombination apparatus, and the reactor is resiliently pressurized and, without any movable mechanical apparatus, automatically regulates itself to the condition of criticality during moderate variations in temperature snd pressure and shuts itself down as the pressure exceeds a predetermined safe operating value.

  8. Experimental and theoretical investigation of oxygen diffusion in stabilised zirconia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilo, M.; Fundenberger, C.; Argirusis, C.; Taylor, M. A.; Borchardt, G.; Weller, M.; Jackson, R. A.

    Oxygen diffusion in stabilised zirconias is investigated by the simultaneous application of computer modelling and experimental techniques to yttria-stabilised zirconia. Using the Mott-Littleton method, migration pathways for oxygen ions have been calculated in perfect cubic zirconia. The oxygen migration occurs through a straight pathway, but not starting from the ideal lattice positions. The calculated activation energy of migration is about 0.2 eV. Oxygen transport is investigated experimentally in YSZ containing 8-24 mol% Y2O3 as a function of stabiliser content by combining the stable isotope (O-18(2)) method with ionic conductivity measurements. It was found that for a given temperature, diffusion and conductivity are highest for YSZ containing 8-10 mol% yttria, but with differing activation energies which can be compared to the calculated values.

  9. Convective heater

    DOEpatents

    Thorogood, R.M.

    1983-12-27

    A convective heater for heating fluids such as a coal slurry is constructed of a tube circuit arrangement which obtains an optimum temperature distribution to give a relatively constant slurry film temperature. The heater is constructed to divide the heating gas flow into two equal paths and the tube circuit for the slurry is arranged to provide a mixed flow configuration whereby the slurry passes through the two heating gas paths in successive co-current, counter-current and co-current flow relative to the heating gas flow. This arrangement permits the utilization of minimum surface area for a given maximum film temperature of the slurry consistent with the prevention of coke formation. 14 figs.

  10. Convective heater

    DOEpatents

    Thorogood, Robert M.

    1986-01-01

    A convective heater for heating fluids such as a coal slurry is constructed of a tube circuit arrangement which obtains an optimum temperature distribution to give a relatively constant slurry film temperature. The heater is constructed to divide the heating gas flow into two equal paths and the tube circuit for the slurry is arranged to provide a mixed flow configuration whereby the slurry passes through the two heating gas paths in successive co-current, counter-current and co-current flow relative to the heating gas flow. This arrangement permits the utilization of minimum surface area for a given maximum film temperature of the slurry consistent with the prevention of coke formation.

  11. Convective heater

    DOEpatents

    Thorogood, Robert M.

    1983-01-01

    A convective heater for heating fluids such as a coal slurry is constructed of a tube circuit arrangement which obtains an optimum temperature distribution to give a relatively constant slurry film temperature. The heater is constructed to divide the heating gas flow into two equal paths and the tube circuit for the slurry is arranged to provide a mixed flow configuration whereby the slurry passes through the two heating gas paths in successive co-current, counter-current and co-current flow relative to the heating gas flow. This arrangement permits the utilization of minimum surface area for a given maximum film temperature of the slurry consistent with the prevention of coke formation.

  12. Feedback-bounded stabilisation of certain discrete Volterra systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotsios, Stelios

    2016-06-01

    Throughout this paper, we present a method for designing feedback-laws which stabilise nonlinear discrete Volterra systems. Our method is based on a factorisation algorithm which decomposes the original system as a composition of a δ-polynomial and a linear series.

  13. Food-grade Pickering emulsions stabilised with solid lipid particles.

    PubMed

    Pawlik, Aleksandra; Kurukji, Daniel; Norton, Ian; Spyropoulos, Fotis

    2016-06-15

    Aqueous dispersions of tripalmitin particles (with a minimum size of 130 nm) were produced, via a hot sonication method, with and without the addition of food-grade emulsifiers. Depending on their relative size and chemistry, the emulsifiers altered the properties of the fat particles (e.g. crystal form, dispersion state and surface properties) by two proposed mechanisms. Firstly, emulsifiers modify the rate and/or extent of polymorphic transitions, resulting in the formation of fat crystals with a range of polarities. Secondly, the adsorption of emulsifiers at the particle interface modifies crystal surface properties. Such emulsifier-modified fat particles were then used to stabilise emulsions. As the behaviour of these particles was predisposed by the kind of emulsifier employed for their manufacture, the resulting particles showed different preferences to which of the emulsion phases (oil or water) became the continuous one. The polarity of the fat particles decreased as follows: Whey Protein Isolate > Soy Lecithin > Soy Lecithin + Tween 20 > Tween 20 > Polyglycerol Polyricinoleate > no emulsifier. Consequently, particles stabilised with WPI formed oil-in-water emulsions (O/W); particles stabilised solely with lecithin produced a highly unstable W/O emulsion; and particles stabilised with a mixture of lecithin and Tween 20 gave a stable W/O emulsion with drop size up to 30 μm. Coalescence stable, oil-continuous emulsions (W/O) with drop sizes between 5 and 15 μm were produced when the tripalmitin particles were stabilised with solely with Tween 20, solely with polyglycerol polyricinoleate, or with no emulsifier at all. It is proposed that the stability of the latter three emulsions was additionally enhanced by sintering of fat particles at the oil-water interface, providing a mechanical barrier against coalescence. PMID:27198879

  14. Use of Reinforced Lightweight Clay Aggregates for Landslide Stabilisation

    SciTech Connect

    Herle, Vitezslav

    2008-07-08

    In spring 2006 a large landslide combined with rock fall closed a highway tunnel near Svitavy in NE part of Czech Republic and cut the main highway connecting Bohemia with Moravia regions. Stabilisation work was complicated by steep mountainous terrain and large inflow of surface and underground water. The solution was based on formation of a stabilisation fill made of reinforced free draining aggregates at the toe of the slope with overlying lightweight fill up to 10 m high reinforced with PET geogrid and steel mesh protecting soft easily degrading sandstone against weathering. Extensive monitoring made possible to compare the FEM analysis with real values. The finished work fits very well in the environment and was awarded a special prize in the 2007 transport structures contest.

  15. Gas gain stabilisation in the ATLAS TRT detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mindur, B.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Antonov, A.; Arslan, O.; Baker, O. K.; Banas, E.; Bault, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Bendotti, J.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bertelsen, H.; Bingul, A.; Bocci, A.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Brock, I.; Capeáns Garrido, M.; Catinaccio, A.; Celebi, E.; Cetin, S. A.; Choi, K.; Dam, M.; Danielsson, H.; Davis, D.; Degeorge, C.; Derendarz, D.; Desch, K.; Di Girolamo, B.; Dittus, F.; Dixon, N.; Dressnandt, N.; Dubinin, F. A.; Evans, H.; Farthouat, P.; Fedin, O. L.; Froidevaux, D.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gecse, Z.; Godlewski, J.; Grefe, C.; Gurbuz, S.; Hajduk, Z.; Hance, M.; Haney, B.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, P. H.; Hawkins, A. D.; Heim, S.; Holway, K.; Kantserov, V. A.; Katounine, S.; Kayumov, F.; Keener, P. T.; Kisielewski, B.; Klopov, N. V.; Konovalov, S. P.; Koperny, S.; Korotkova, N. A.; Kowalski, T. Z.; Kramarenko, V.; Krasnopevtsev, D.; Kruse, M.; Kudin, L. G.; Lichard, P.; Loginov, A.; Martinez, N. Lorenzo; Lucotte, A.; Luehring, F.; Lytken, E.; Maleev, V. P.; Maevskiy, A. S.; Manjarres Ramos, J.; Mashinistov, R. Y.; Meyer, C.; Mialkovski, V.; Mistry, K.; Mitsou, V. A.; Nadtochi, A. V.; Newcomer, F. M.; Novodvorski, E. G.; Ogren, H.; Oh, S. H.; Oleshko, S. B.; Olszowska, J.; Ostrowicz, W.; Palacino, G.; Patrichev, S.; Penwell, J.; Perez-Gomez, F.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; RØhne, O.; Reilly, M. B.; Rembser, C.; Ricken, O.; Romaniouk, A.; Rousseau, D.; Ryjov, V.; Sasmaz, U.; Schaepe, S.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Shmeleva, A. P.; Shulga, E.; Sivoklokov, S.; Smirnov, S.; Smirnov, Yu.; Smirnova, L. N.; Soldatov, E.; Sulin, V. V.; Tartarelli, G.; Taylor, W.; Thomson, E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tipton, P.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Berg, R.; Vasquez, J.; Vasilyeva, L. F.; Vlazlo, O.; Weinert, B.; Williams, H. H.; Wong, V.; Zhukov, K. I.; Zieminska, D.

    2016-04-01

    The ATLAS (one of two general purpose detectors at the LHC) Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) is the outermost of the three tracking subsystems of the ATLAS Inner Detector. It is a large straw-based detector and contains about 350,000 electronics channels. The performance of the TRT as tracking and particularly particle identification detector strongly depends on stability of the operation parameters with most important parameter being the gas gain which must be kept constant across the detector volume. The gas gain in the straws can vary significantly with atmospheric pressure, temperature, and gas mixture composition changes. This paper presents a concept of the gas gain stabilisation in the TRT and describes in detail the Gas Gain Stabilisation System (GGSS) integrated into the Detector Control System (DCS). Operation stability of the GGSS during Run-1 is demonstrated.

  16. Enzymatically activated emulsions stabilised by interfacial nanofibre networks.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Inês P; Sasselli, Ivan Ramos; Cannon, Daniel A; Hughes, Meghan; Lamprou, Dimitrios A; Tuttle, Tell; Ulijn, Rein V

    2016-03-01

    We report on-demand formation of emulsions stabilised by interfacial nanoscale networks. These are formed through biocatalytic dephosphorylation and self-assembly of Fmoc(9-fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl)dipeptide amphiphiles in aqueous/organic mixtures. This is achieved by using alkaline phosphatase which transforms surfactant-like phosphorylated precursors into self-assembling aromatic peptide amphiphiles (Fmoc-tyrosine-leucine, Fmoc-YL) that form nanofibrous networks. In biphasic organic/aqueous systems, these networks form preferentially at the interface thus providing a means of emulsion stabilisation. We demonstrate on-demand emulsification by enzyme addition, even after storage of the biphasic mixture for several weeks. Experimental (Fluorescence, FTIR spectroscopy, fluorescence microscopy, electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy) and computational techniques (atomistic molecular dynamics) are used to characterise the interfacial self-assembly process. PMID:26905042

  17. The role of particles in stabilising foams and emulsions.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Timothy N; Pugh, Robert J; Franks, George V; Jameson, Graeme J

    2008-03-18

    The use of particles as foam and emulsion stabilising species, with or without surfactants, has received great interest in recent years. The majority of work has studied the effects of particles as stabilisers in emulsion systems, but recent successes has widened consideration into foams, where industries such as flotation and food processing have encountered the effects of particle stabilisation for many years. This review seeks to clarify studies into emulsions, highlighting new research in this area, and relate similarities and differences to foam systems. Past research has focused on defining the interaction mechanisms of stability, such as principles of attachment energies, particle-particle forces at the interface and changes to the interfilm, with a view to ascertain conditions giving optimum stability. Studied conditions include effects of particle contact angle, aggregation formations, concentration, size and interactions of other species (i.e. surfactant). Mechanisms can be complex, but overall the principle of particles creating a steric barrier to coalescence, is a straitforward basis of interaction. Much research in emulsions can be applied to foam systems, however evidence would suggest foam systems are under a number of additional constraints, and the stability 'window' for particles is smaller, in terms of size and contact angle ranges. Also, because of increased density differences and interfilm perturbations in foam systems, retardation of drainage is often as important to stability as inhibiting coalescence. PMID:17904510

  18. Preliminary stabilisation of stormwater biofilters and loss of filter material.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, D N; Mather, P B

    2016-01-01

    Stabilisation affects performance of stormwater biofilters operating under intermittent wetting and drying, mainly due to wash-off of filter material. Understanding the dynamics of solids wash-off is crucial in designing stormwater biofilters. The current study analysed the dynamics of solids wash-off in stormwater biofilters and quantified the loss of solids from the filter. Four Perspex™ bioretention columns (94 mm internal diameter) were fabricated with a filter layer that contained 8% organic material and were fed with tap water with different numbers of antecedent dry days (0-40 day) at 100 mL/min. Samples were collected from the outflow and tested for particle size distribution and total solids and turbidity. Solids of particle size less than 50 microns were washed off from the filter during the stabilisation period, indicating that no sand particles were washed off. The very first event after commissioning the filter resulted in the highest wash-off of solids (approximately 75 g of fines) while a significant drop in wash-off followed from the second event. An empirical model fitted to the data showed that preliminary stabilisation of a filter occurs in the first three events, during which almost 25% of fines are lost from the filter. PMID:27533853

  19. Security for whom? Stabilisation and civilian protection in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Elhawary, Samir

    2010-10-01

    This paper focuses on three periods of stabilisation in Colombia: the Alliance for Progress (1961-73) that sought to stem the threat of communist revolution in Latin America; Plan Colombia and President Alvaro Uribe's 'democratic security' policy (2000-07) aimed at defeating the guerrillas and negotiating a settlement with the paramilitaries; and the current 'integrated approach', adopted from 2007, to consolidate more effectively the state's control of its territory.(1) The paper assesses the extent to which these stabilisation efforts have enhanced the protection of civilians and ultimately finds that in all three periods there has been a disconnect between the discourse and the practice of stabilisation. While they have all sought to enhance security, in actual fact, they have privileged the security of the state and its allies at the expense of the effective protection of the civilian population. This has not only led to widespread human rights abuses but also has undermined the long-term stability being pursued. PMID:20846351

  20. Soret and Dufour effects on thermohaline convection in rotating fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duba, C. T.; Shekar, M.; Narayana, M.; Sibanda, P.

    2016-07-01

    Using linear and weakly nonlinear stability theory, the effects of Soret and Dufour parameters are investigated on thermohaline convection in a horizontal layer of rotating fluid, specifically the ocean. Thermohaline circulation is important in mixing processes and contributes to heat and mass transports and hence the earth's climate. A general conception is that due to the smallness of the Soret and Dufour parameters their effect is negligible. However, it is shown here that the Soret parameter, salinity and rotation stabilise the system, whereas temperature destabilises it and the Dufour parameter has minimal effect on stationary convection. For oscillatory convection, the analysis is difficult as it shows that the Rayleigh number depends on six parameters, the Soret and Dufour parameters, the salinity Rayleigh number, the Lewis number, the Prandtl number, and the Taylor number. We demonstrate the interplay between these parameters and their effects on oscillatory convection in a graphical manner. Furthermore, we find that the Soret parameter enhances oscillatory convection whereas the Dufour parameter, salinity Rayleigh number, the Lewis number, and rotation delay instability. We believe that these results have not been elucidated in this way before for large-scale fluids. Furthermore, we investigate weakly nonlinear stability and the effect of cross diffusive terms on heat and mass transports. We show the existence of new solution bifurcations not previously identified in literature.

  1. From convection rolls to finger convection in double-diffusive turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yantao; Verzicco, Roberto; Lohse, Detlef

    2015-11-01

    The double diffusive convection (DDC), where the fluid density depends on two scalar components with very different molecular diffusivities, is frequently encountered in oceanography, astrophysics, and electrochemistry. In this talk we report a systematic study of vertically bounded DDC for various control parameters. The flow is driven by an unstable salinity difference between two plates and stabilized by a temperature difference. As the relative strength of temperature difference becomes stronger, the flow transits from a state with large-scale convection rolls, which is similar to the Rayleigh-Bénard (RB) flow, to a state with well-organised salt fingers. When the temperature difference increases further, the flow breaks down to a purely conductive state. During this transit the velocity decreases monotonically. Counterintuitively, the salinity transfer can be enhanced when a stabilising temperature field is applied to the system. This happens when convection rolls are replaced by salt fingers. In addition, we show that the Grossmann-Lohse theory originally developed for RB flow can be directly applied to the current problem and accurately predicts the salinity transfer rate for a wide range of control parameters. Supported by Stichting FOM and the National Computing Facilities (NCF), both sponsored by NWO. The simulations were conducted on the Dutch supercomputer Cartesius at SURFsara.

  2. Mechanisms of flame stabilisation at low lifted height in a turbulent lifted slot-jet flame

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Karami, Shahram; Hawkes, Evatt R.; Talei, Mohsen; Chen, Jacqueline H.

    2015-07-23

    A turbulent lifted slot-jet flame is studied using direct numerical simulation (DNS). A one-step chemistry model is employed with a mixture-fraction-dependent activation energy which can reproduce qualitatively the dependence of the laminar burning rate on the equivalence ratio that is typical of hydrocarbon fuels. The basic structure of the flame base is first examined and discussed in the context of earlier experimental studies of lifted flames. Several features previously observed in experiments are noted and clarified. Some other unobserved features are also noted. Comparison with previous DNS modelling of hydrogen flames reveals significant structural differences. The statistics of flow andmore » relative edge-flame propagation velocity components conditioned on the leading edge locations are then examined. The results show that, on average, the streamwise flame propagation and streamwise flow balance, thus demonstrating that edge-flame propagation is the basic stabilisation mechanism. Fluctuations of the edge locations and net edge velocities are, however, significant. It is demonstrated that the edges tend to move in an essentially two-dimensional (2D) elliptical pattern (laterally outwards towards the oxidiser, then upstream, then inwards towards the fuel, then downstream again). It is proposed that this is due to the passage of large eddies, as outlined in Suet al.(Combust. Flame, vol. 144 (3), 2006, pp. 494–512). However, the mechanism is not entirely 2D, and out-of-plane motion is needed to explain how flames escape the high-velocity inner region of the jet. Finally, the time-averaged structure is examined. A budget of terms in the transport equation for the product mass fraction is used to understand the stabilisation from a time-averaged perspective. The result of this analysis is found to be consistent with the instantaneous perspective. The budget reveals a fundamentally 2D structure, involving transport in both the streamwise and transverse

  3. Mechanisms of flame stabilisation at low lifted height in a turbulent lifted slot-jet flame

    SciTech Connect

    Karami, Shahram; Hawkes, Evatt R.; Talei, Mohsen; Chen, Jacqueline H.

    2015-07-23

    A turbulent lifted slot-jet flame is studied using direct numerical simulation (DNS). A one-step chemistry model is employed with a mixture-fraction-dependent activation energy which can reproduce qualitatively the dependence of the laminar burning rate on the equivalence ratio that is typical of hydrocarbon fuels. The basic structure of the flame base is first examined and discussed in the context of earlier experimental studies of lifted flames. Several features previously observed in experiments are noted and clarified. Some other unobserved features are also noted. Comparison with previous DNS modelling of hydrogen flames reveals significant structural differences. The statistics of flow and relative edge-flame propagation velocity components conditioned on the leading edge locations are then examined. The results show that, on average, the streamwise flame propagation and streamwise flow balance, thus demonstrating that edge-flame propagation is the basic stabilisation mechanism. Fluctuations of the edge locations and net edge velocities are, however, significant. It is demonstrated that the edges tend to move in an essentially two-dimensional (2D) elliptical pattern (laterally outwards towards the oxidiser, then upstream, then inwards towards the fuel, then downstream again). It is proposed that this is due to the passage of large eddies, as outlined in Suet al.(Combust. Flame, vol. 144 (3), 2006, pp. 494–512). However, the mechanism is not entirely 2D, and out-of-plane motion is needed to explain how flames escape the high-velocity inner region of the jet. Finally, the time-averaged structure is examined. A budget of terms in the transport equation for the product mass fraction is used to understand the stabilisation from a time-averaged perspective. The result of this analysis is found to be consistent with the instantaneous perspective. The budget reveals a fundamentally 2D structure, involving transport in both

  4. Oil-in-oil emulsions stabilised solely by solid particles.

    PubMed

    Binks, Bernard P; Tyowua, Andrew T

    2016-01-21

    A brief review of the stabilisation of emulsions of two immiscible oils is given. We then describe the use of fumed silica particles coated with either hydrocarbon or fluorocarbon groups in acting as sole stabilisers of emulsions of various vegetable oils with linear silicone oils (PDMS) of different viscosity. Transitional phase inversion of emulsions, containing equal volumes of the two oils, from silicone-in-vegetable (S/V) to vegetable-in-silicone (V/S) occurs upon increasing the hydrophobicity of the particles. Close to inversion, emulsions are stable to coalescence and gravity-induced separation for at least one year. Increasing the viscosity of the silicone oil enables stable S/V emulsions to be prepared even with relatively hydrophilic particles. Predictions of emulsion type from calculated contact angles of a silica particle at the oil-oil interface are in agreement with experiment provided a small polar contribution to the surface energy of the oils is included. We also show that stable multiple emulsions of V/S/V can be prepared in a two-step procedure using two particle types of different hydrophobicity. At fixed particle concentration, catastrophic phase inversion of emulsions from V/S to S/V can be effected by increasing the volume fraction of vegetable oil. Finally, in the case of sunflower oil + 20 cS PDMS, the study is extended to particles other than silica which differ in chemical type, particle size and particle shape. Consistent with the above findings, we find that only sufficiently hydrophobic particles (clay, zinc oxide, silicone, calcium carbonate) can act as efficient V/S emulsion stabilisers. PMID:26549699

  5. Longitudinal stabilisation of bunched beams in a FEL storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migliorati, M.; Palumbo, L.; Dattoli, G.; Mezi, L.; Renieri, A.; Voykov, G. K.

    1997-02-01

    Experimental observations on FEL Storage Rings (Aco, Super-Aco, VEPP3, TERAS) have shown that in a storage ring with an operating FEL there is a mutual effect between the FEL operational mode and the beam longitudinal distribution. The main effects are the birth of a macro-temporal structure of the FEL radiation and a suppression of the synchrotron sidebands, evidence of beam stabilisation against the microwave instabilities. In this paper we discuss the main features of the beam dynamics analysed with a simulation code recently developed, which includes the FEL-beam interaction. Furtherly, we propose an heuristic model which enable to describe in a simple way the overall system.

  6. Viscoelastic properties of sterically stabilised emulsions and their stability.

    PubMed

    Tadros, Tharwat

    2015-08-01

    The interaction forces between emulsion droplets containing adsorbed polymeric surfactants and the theory of steric stabilisation are briefly described. The results for the viscoelastic properties of O/W emulsions that are stabilised with partially hydrolysed poly(vinyl acetate) that is commonly referred to as poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) with 4% vinyl acetate are given. The effect of the oil volume fraction, addition of electrolytes and increasing temperature is described. This allows one to obtain various parameters such as the adsorbed layer thickness, the critical flocculation concentration of electrolyte (CFC) and critical flocculation temperature (CFT) at constant electrolyte concentration. The viscoelastic properties of O/W emulsions stabilised with an A-B-A block copolymer of polyethylene oxide (A) and polypropylene oxide (B) are described. These emulsions behave as viscoelastic liquids showing a cross-over-point between G' (the elastic component of the complex modulus) and G″ (the viscous component of the complex modulus) at a characteristic frequency. Plots of G' and G″ versus oil volume fraction ϕ show the transition from predominantly viscous to predominantly elastic response at a critical volume fraction ϕ(c). The latter can be used to estimate the adsorbed layer thickness of the polymeric surfactants. Results are also shown for W/O emulsions stabilised with an A-B-A block copolymer of polyhydroxystearic acid (PHS, A) and polyethylene oxide (PEO, B). The viscosity volume fraction curves could be fitted to the Dougherty-Krieger equation for hard-spheres. The results could be applied to give an estimate of the adsorbed layer thickness Δ which shows a decrease with increase of the water volume fraction. This is due to the interpenetration and/or compression of the PHS layers on close approach of the water droplets on increasing the water volume fraction. The last section of the review gives an example of O/W emulsion stability using an AB(n) graft

  7. Stabilised electromagnetic levitation at 2-13 MHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danley, T. J.; Schiffman, R. A.; Weber, J. K. R.; Krishnan, S.; Rey, C. A.; Bruno, P. A.; Nordine, P. C.

    1991-01-01

    SEL, the Stabilised Electromagnetic Levitator, has been developed to exploit the unique design opportunities available in containerless microgravity experiments. Efficiency and versatility are obtained with multiple coils driven by individual broadband amplifiers whose phase and frequency are controlled. The heating and positioning fields are decoupled. Specimen translation, spin, and for liquids, shape may be adjusted. An open coil structure provides access for optical and diagnostic probes. Results of experiments with a prototype device are discussed. Levitating and heating materials on earth were demonstrated at frequencies up to 13 MHz.

  8. Modeling ocean deep convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canuto, V. M.; Howard, A.; Hogan, P.; Cheng, Y.; Dubovikov, M. S.; Montenegro, L. M.

    The goal of this study is to assess models for Deep Convection with special emphasis on their use in coarse resolution ocean general circulation models. A model for deep convection must contain both vertical transport and lateral advection by mesoscale eddies generated by baroclinic instabilities. The first process operates mostly in the initial phases while the second dominates the final stages. Here, the emphasis is on models for vertical mixing. When mesoscales are not resolved, they are treated with the Gent and McWilliams parameterization. The model results are tested against the measurements of Lavender, Davis and Owens, 2002 (LDO) in the Labrador Sea. Specifically, we shall inquire whether the models are able to reproduce the region of " deepest convection," which we shall refer to as DC (mixed layer depths 800-1300 m). The region where it was measured by Lavender et al. (2002) will be referred to as the LDO region. The main results of this study can be summarized as follows. 3° × 3° resolution. A GFDL-type OGCM with the GISS vertical mixing model predicts DC in the LDO region where the vertical heat diffusivity is found to be 10 m 2 s -1, a value that is quite close to the one suggested by heuristic studies. No parameter was changed from the original GISS model. However, the GISS model also predicts some DC in a region to the east of the LDO region. 3° × 3° resolution. A GFDL-type OGCM with the KPP model (everything else being the same) does not predict DC in the LDO region where the vertical heat diffusivity is found to be 0.5 × 10 -4 m 2 s -1 which is the background value. The KPP model yields DC only to the east of the LDO region. 1° × 1° resolution. In this case, a MY2.5 mixing scheme predicts DC in the LDO region. However, it also predicts DC to the west, north and south of it, where it is not observed. The behavior of the KPP and MY models are somewhat anti-symmetric. The MY models yield too low a mixing in stably stratified flows since they

  9. Molecular signatures of mood stabilisers highlight the role of the transcription factor REST/NRSF

    PubMed Central

    Warburton, Alix; Savage, Abigail L.; Myers, Paul; Peeney, David; Bubb, Vivien J.; Quinn, John P.

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to address the affects of mood modifying drugs on the transcriptome, in a tissue culture model, using qPCR arrays as a cost effective approach to identifying regulatory networks and pathways that might coordinate the cell response to a specific drug. Methods We addressed the gene expression profile of 90 plus genes associated with human mood disorders using the StellARray™ qPCR gene expression system in the human derived SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cell line. Results Global Pattern Recognition (GPR) analysis identified a total of 9 genes (DRD3⁎, FOS†, JUN⁎, GAD1⁎†, NRG1⁎, PAFAH1B3⁎, PER3⁎, RELN⁎ and RGS4⁎) to be significantly regulated in response to cellular challenge with the mood stabilisers sodium valproate (⁎) and lithium (†). Modulation of FOS and JUN highlights the importance of the activator protein 1 (AP-1) transcription factor pathway in the cell response. Enrichment analysis of transcriptional networks relating to this gene set also identified the transcription factor neuron restrictive silencing factor (NRSF) and the oestrogen receptor as an important regulatory mechanism. Limitations Cell line models offer a window of what might happen in vivo but have the benefit of being human derived and homogenous with regard to cell type. Conclusions This data highlights transcription factor pathways, acting synergistically or separately, in the modulation of specific neuronal gene networks in response to mood stabilising drugs. This model can be utilised in the comparison of the action of multiple drug regimes or for initial screening purposes to inform optimal drug design. PMID:25451397

  10. Convective Available Potential Energy of World Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Z.; Ingersoll, A. P.; Thompson, A. F.

    2012-12-01

    Here, for the first time, we propose the concept of Ocean Convective Available Potential Energy (OCAPE), which is the maximum kinetic energy (KE) per unit seawater mass achievable by ocean convection. OCAPE occurs through a different mechanism from atmospheric CAPE, and involves the interplay of temperature and salinity on the equation of state of seawater. The thermobaric effect, which arises because the thermal coefficient of expansion increases with depth, is an important ingredient of OCAPE. We develop an accurate algorithm to calculate the OCAPE for a given temperature and salinity profile. We then validate our calculation of OCAPE by comparing it with the conversion of OCAPE to KE in a 2-D numerical model. We propose that OCAPE is an important energy source of ocean deep convection and contributes to deep water formation. OCAPE, like Atmospheric CAPE, can help predict deep convection and may also provide a useful constraint for modelling deep convection in ocean GCMs. We plot the global distribution of OCAPE using data from the World Ocean Atlas 2009 (WOA09) and see many important features. These include large values of OCAPE in the Labrador, Greenland, Weddell and Mediterranean Seas, which are consistent with our present observations and understanding, but also identify some new features like the OCAPE pattern in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC). We propose that the diagnosis of OCAPE can improve our understanding of global patterns of ocean convection and deep water formation as well as ocean stratification, the meridional overturning circulation and mixed layer processes. The background of this work is briefly introduced as below. Open-ocean deep convection can significantly modify water properties both at the ocean surface and throughout the water column (Gordon 1982). Open-ocean convection is also an important mechanism for Ocean Deep Water formation and the transport of heat, freshwater and nutrient (Marshall and Schott 1999). Open

  11. Compact atomic clocks and stabilised laser for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mileti, Gaetano; Affolderbach, Christoph; Matthey-de-l'Endroit, Renaud

    2016-07-01

    We present our developments towards next generation compact vapour-cell based atomic frequency standards using a tunable laser diode instead of a traditional discharge lamp. The realisation of two types of Rubidium clocks addressing specific applications is in progress: high performance frequency standards for demanding applications such as satellite navigation, and chip-scale atomic clocks, allowing further miniaturisation of the system. The stabilised laser source constitutes the main technological novelty of these new standards, allowing a more efficient preparation and interrogation of the atoms and hence an improvement of the clock performances. However, before this key component may be employed in a commercial and ultimately in a space-qualified instrument, further studies are necessary to demonstrate their suitability, in particular concerning their reliability and long-term operation. The talk will present our preliminary investigations on this subject. The stabilised laser diode technology developed for our atomic clocks has several other applications on ground and in space. We will conclude our talk by illustrating this for the example of a recently completed ESA project on a 1.6 microns wavelength reference for a future space-borne Lidar. This source is based on a Rubidium vapour cell providing the necessary stability and accuracy, while a second harmonic generator and a compact optical comb generated from an electro-optic modulator allow to transfer these properties from the Rubidium wavelength (780nm) to the desired spectral range.

  12. Modeling ocean deep convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canuto, V. M.; Howard, A.; Hogan, P.; Cheng, Y.; Dubovikov, M. S.; Montenegro, L. M.

    The goal of this study is to assess models for Deep Convection with special emphasis on their use in coarse resolution ocean general circulation models. A model for deep convection must contain both vertical transport and lateral advection by mesoscale eddies generated by baroclinic instabilities. The first process operates mostly in the initial phases while the second dominates the final stages. Here, the emphasis is on models for vertical mixing. When mesoscales are not resolved, they are treated with the Gent and McWilliams parameterization. The model results are tested against the measurements of Lavender, Davis and Owens, 2002 (LDO) in the Labrador Sea. Specifically, we shall inquire whether the models are able to reproduce the region of " deepest convection," which we shall refer to as DC (mixed layer depths 800-1300 m). The region where it was measured by Lavender et al. (2002) will be referred to as the LDO region. The main results of this study can be summarized as follows. 3° × 3° resolution. A GFDL-type OGCM with the GISS vertical mixing model predicts DC in the LDO region where the vertical heat diffusivity is found to be 10 m 2 s -1, a value that is quite close to the one suggested by heuristic studies. No parameter was changed from the original GISS model. However, the GISS model also predicts some DC in a region to the east of the LDO region. 3° × 3° resolution. A GFDL-type OGCM with the KPP model (everything else being the same) does not predict DC in the LDO region where the vertical heat diffusivity is found to be 0.5 × 10 -4 m 2 s -1 which is the background value. The KPP model yields DC only to the east of the LDO region. 1° × 1° resolution. In this case, a MY2.5 mixing scheme predicts DC in the LDO region. However, it also predicts DC to the west, north and south of it, where it is not observed. The behavior of the KPP and MY models are somewhat anti-symmetric. The MY models yield too low a mixing in stably stratified flows since they

  13. Ultrasonic cell disruption of stabilised sludge with subsequent anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Onyeche, T I; Schläfer, O; Bormann, H; Schröder, C; Sievers, M

    2002-05-01

    The world-wide increasing environmental awareness and its subsequent regulations have led to the application of improved technologies in wastewater purification plants. This has resulted in higher wastewater and sludge productions. Sludge is the by-product of such plants and it is not only rich in organic carbon and pathogens but also in heavy metals and other environmental pollutants. In Europe, agricultural application of dried sludge (bio-solids) is confronted with negative reactions from the citizens, governmental organisations, farmers and the food industry. Ultrasonic disruption of sludge is a popular mechanical disruption process in sludge treatment. During ultrasonic treatment, high frequency acoustic signals are used to initiate the cavitation process. The applied ultrasonic field leads to a breakdown of cohesive forces of the liquid molecules resulting in the generation of cavitation bubbles. A shock wave is released by the collapse of the cavitation bubbles and propagates in the surrounding medium forming jet streams that cause the disruption of cells in sludge. Disruption of sludge cells enables the release of light organic substances into the sludge water thereby exposing them for further anaerobic digestion. This paper presents results on the disruption of conventionally stabilised sludge through the application of the ultrasonic field. In order to reduce the specific energy input (i.e. ratio of the consumed energy during ultrasonic disruption to the input sludge mass) and improve biogas production, the total solids content of the stabilised sludge was increased before disruption. The anaerobic digestion of sludge samples was carried out in a set of specially constructed laboratory anaerobic digesters. Results showed that subsequent anaerobic digestion of the ultrasonically disrupted sludge could improve biogas production with reduced sludge quantity that is vital to the economic consideration of the wastewater treatment plants. This process

  14. Stochastic Convection Parameterizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teixeira, Joao; Reynolds, Carolyn; Suselj, Kay; Matheou, Georgios

    2012-01-01

    computational fluid dynamics, radiation, clouds, turbulence, convection, gravity waves, surface interaction, radiation interaction, cloud and aerosol microphysics, complexity (vegetation, biogeochemistry, radiation versus turbulence/convection stochastic approach, non-linearities, Monte Carlo, high resolutions, large-Eddy Simulations, cloud structure, plumes, saturation in tropics, forecasting, parameterizations, stochastic, radiation-clod interaction, hurricane forecasts

  15. Steady-state droplet size in montmorillonite stabilised emulsions.

    PubMed

    Ganley, William J; van Duijneveldt, Jeroen S

    2016-08-14

    The formation of hexadecane-in-water emulsions stabilised by montmorillonite platelets was studied. In this system the platelets form a monolayer around the droplets and the droplet size decreases with increasing platelet volume fraction. However, the number of platelets present exceeds that required for monolayer coverage. The kinetics of emulsification were investigated and coalescence of droplets during turbulent mixing was found to continue even after the droplets had reached their ultimate size. Non-spherical droplets, resulting from arrested coalescence, were not observed suggesting that particles may be desorbing from the interface during the turbulent flow. A kinetic model based on a competition between droplet break-up and coalescence, mediated by particle adsorption and desorption, reproduces experimental trends in droplet diameter. The model can be used to predict the most efficient formulation to minimise droplet diameters for given materials and mixing conditions and sheds light on the processes occurring during emulsification in this system. PMID:27407026

  16. Ammonia volatilisation in waste stabilisation ponds: a cascade of misinterpretations?

    PubMed

    Camargo Valero, M A; Mara, D D

    2010-01-01

    Ammonia volatilisation has generally been reported as, or assumed to be, the main nitrogen removal mechanism in waste stabilisation ponds (WSP). Nitrogen removal via ammonia volatilisation is based on two observations: (a) in-pond pH values can reach high values (>9, even >10), so increasing the proportion of the total ammonia present as the un-ionized form or free ammonia (NH(3)); and (b) in-pond temperatures can also be high, so improving the mass transfer rate of free ammonia to the atmosphere. Consequently, one of the most widely accepted models for ammonia removal in WSP is that reported by Pano & Middlebrooks in 1982, which was developed to reflect the occurrence of these two observations. This work reports how simple mathematical models for ammonia volatilisation in WSP, in spite of the possibility of their giving good predictions, may not accurately describe the main pathways and mechanisms involved in ammonia removal in WSP. PMID:20150690

  17. Stabilising compensators for linear time-varying differential systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberst, Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we describe a constructive test to decide whether a given linear time-varying (LTV) differential system admits a stabilising compensator for the control tasks of tracking, disturbance rejection or model matching and construct and parametrise all of them if at least one exists. In analogy to the linear time-invariant (LTI) case, the ring of stable rational functions, noncommutative in the LTV situation, and the Kučera-Youla parametrisation play prominent parts in the theory. We transfer Blumthaler's thesis from the LTI to the LTV case and sharpen, complete and simplify the corresponding results in the book 'Linear Time-Varying Systems' by Bourlès and Marinescu.

  18. Convection in Condensible-rich Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, F.; Pierrehumbert, R. T.

    2016-05-01

    Condensible substances are nearly ubiquitous in planetary atmospheres. For the most familiar case—water vapor in Earth’s present climate—the condensible gas is dilute, in the sense that its concentration is everywhere small relative to the noncondensible background gases. A wide variety of important planetary climate problems involve nondilute condensible substances. These include planets near or undergoing a water vapor runaway and planets near the outer edge of the conventional habitable zone, for which CO2 is the condensible. Standard representations of convection in climate models rely on several approximations appropriate only to the dilute limit, while nondilute convection differs in fundamental ways from dilute convection. In this paper, a simple parameterization of convection valid in the nondilute as well as dilute limits is derived and used to discuss the basic character of nondilute convection. The energy conservation properties of the scheme are discussed in detail and are verified in radiative-convective simulations. As a further illustration of the behavior of the scheme, results for a runaway greenhouse atmosphere for both steady instellation and seasonally varying instellation corresponding to a highly eccentric orbit are presented. The latter case illustrates that the high thermal inertia associated with latent heat in nondilute atmospheres can damp out the effects of even extreme seasonal forcing.

  19. Production and validation of model iron-tannate dyed textiles for use as historic textile substitutes in stabilisation treatment studies

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background For millennia, iron-tannate dyes have been used to colour ceremonial and domestic objects shades of black, grey, or brown. Surviving iron-tannate dyed objects are part of our cultural heritage but their existence is threatened by the dye itself which can accelerate oxidation and acid hydrolysis of the substrate. This causes many iron-tannate dyed textiles to discolour and decrease in tensile strength and flexibility at a faster rate than equivalent undyed textiles. The current lack of suitable stabilisation treatments means that many historic iron-tannate dyed objects are rapidly crumbling to dust with the knowledge and value they hold being lost forever. This paper describes the production, characterisation, and validation of model iron-tannate dyed textiles as substitutes for historic iron-tannate dyed textiles in the development of stabilisation treatments. Spectrophotometry, surface pH, tensile testing, SEM-EDX, and XRF have been used to characterise the model textiles. Results On application to textiles, the model dyes imparted mid to dark blue-grey colouration, an immediate tensile strength loss of the textiles and an increase in surface acidity. The dyes introduced significant quantities of iron into the textiles which was distributed in the exterior and interior of the cotton, abaca, and silk fibres but only in the exterior of the wool fibres. As seen with historic iron-tannate dyed objects, the dyed cotton, abaca, and silk textiles lost tensile strength faster and more significantly than undyed equivalents during accelerated thermal ageing and all of the dyed model textiles, most notably the cotton, discoloured more than the undyed equivalents on ageing. Conclusions The abaca, cotton, and silk model textiles are judged to be suitable for use as substitutes for cultural heritage materials in the testing of stabilisation treatments. PMID:22616934

  20. Viscoelastic properties of a spinal posterior dynamic stabilisation device.

    PubMed

    Lawless, Bernard M; Barnes, Spencer C; Espino, Daniel M; Shepherd, Duncan E T

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the frequency dependent viscoelastic properties of two types of spinal posterior dynamic stabilisation devices. In air at 37°C, the viscoelastic properties of six BDyn 1 level, six BDyn 2 level posterior dynamic stabilisation devices (S14 Implants, Pessac, France) and its elastomeric components (polycarbonate urethane and silicone) were measured using Dynamic Mechanical Analysis. The viscoelastic properties were measured over the frequency range 0.01-30Hz. The BDyn devices and its components were viscoelastic throughout the frequency range tested. The mean storage stiffness and mean loss stiffness of the BDyn 1 level device, BDyn 2 level device, silicone component and polycarbonate urethane component all presented a logarithmic relationship with respect to frequency. The storage stiffness of the BDyn 1 level device ranged from 95.56N/mm to 119.29N/mm, while the BDyn 2 level storage stiffness ranged from 39.41N/mm to 42.82N/mm. BDyn 1 level device and BDyn 2 level device loss stiffness ranged from 10.72N/mm to 23.42N/mm and 4.26N/mm to 9.57N/mm, respectively. No resonant frequencies were recorded for the devices or its components. The elastic property of BDyn 1 level device is influenced by the PCU and silicone components, in the physiological frequency range. The viscoelastic properties calculated in this study may be compared to spinal devices and spinal structures. PMID:27018832

  1. Magneto-convection.

    PubMed

    Stein, Robert F

    2012-07-13

    Convection is the transport of energy by bulk mass motions. Magnetic fields alter convection via the Lorentz force, while convection moves the fields via the curl(v×B) term in the induction equation. Recent ground-based and satellite telescopes have increased our knowledge of the solar magnetic fields on a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. Magneto-convection modelling has also greatly improved recently as computers become more powerful. Three-dimensional simulations with radiative transfer and non-ideal equations of state are being performed. Flux emergence from the convection zone through the visible surface (and into the chromosphere and corona) has been modelled. Local, convectively driven dynamo action has been studied. The alteration in the appearance of granules and the formation of pores and sunspots has been investigated. Magneto-convection calculations have improved our ability to interpret solar observations, especially the inversion of Stokes spectra to obtain the magnetic field and the use of helioseismology to determine the subsurface structure of the Sun. PMID:22665893

  2. State-feedback stabilisation for stochastic non-holonomic mobile robots with uncertain visual servoing parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dongkai; Wang, Chaoli; Wei, Guoliang; Zhang, Hengjun; Chen, Hua

    2014-07-01

    The stabilising problem of stochastic non-holonomic mobile robots with uncertain parameters based on visual servoing is addressed in this paper. The model of non-holonomic mobile robots based on visual servoing is extended to the stochastic case, where their forward velocity and angular velocity are both subject to some stochastic disturbances. Based on backstepping technique, state-feedback stabilising controllers are designed for stochastic non-holonomic mobile robots. A switching control strategy for the original system is presented. The proposed controllers guarantee that the closed-loop system is asymptotically stabilised at the zero equilibrium point in probability.

  3. Convective dynamics - Panel report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carbone, Richard; Foote, G. Brant; Moncrieff, Mitch; Gal-Chen, Tzvi; Cotton, William; Heymsfield, Gerald

    1990-01-01

    Aspects of highly organized forms of deep convection at midlatitudes are reviewed. Past emphasis in field work and cloud modeling has been directed toward severe weather as evidenced by research on tornadoes, hail, and strong surface winds. A number of specific issues concerning future thrusts, tactics, and techniques in convective dynamics are presented. These subjects include; convective modes and parameterization, global structure and scale interaction, convective energetics, transport studies, anvils and scale interaction, and scale selection. Also discussed are analysis workshops, four-dimensional data assimilation, matching models with observations, network Doppler analyses, mesoscale variability, and high-resolution/high-performance Doppler. It is also noted, that, classical surface measurements and soundings, flight-level research aircraft data, passive satellite data, and traditional photogrammetric studies are examples of datasets that require assimilation and integration.

  4. Deep convection in mesoscale convective systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, S. J.

    1985-01-01

    A study was undertaken to examine the evolution of radar echoes and lightning attending the convective storms in mesoscale convective systems (MCS) and the relationships between the spatial and temporal evolution of deep convection and the storm environment, precipitation, severe weather, and lightning. The total number of ground discharges ranges from 10,000 to 30,000 over the life cycle of the MCS with peak sustained rates (for up to 10 consecutive hours) in excess of 2000 per hour. The peak lightning activity occurs from 5 to 20 hours after the first storms and anywhere from 7 hours prior to 7 hours after the time of the maximum areal extent of the MCS for very similar synoptic environments. Thus, it appears that mesoscale and sub-synoptic scale mechanisms are responsible for these large temporal variation in lightning activity. In addition, we have found that the lightning rates in MCS's are not related to either the size or the duration of the MCS. Preliminary results suggest that the MCA's with embedded squall lines produce the greatest flash rates.

  5. Mean square stabilisation of complex oscillatory regimes in nonlinear stochastic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashkirtseva, Irina; Ryashko, Lev

    2016-04-01

    A problem of stabilisation of the randomly forced periodic and quasiperiodic modes for nonlinear dynamic systems is considered. For this problem solution, we propose a new theoretical approach to consider these modes as invariant manifolds of the stochastic differential equations with control. The aim of the control is to provide the exponential mean square (EMS) stability for these manifolds. A general method of the stabilisation based on the algebraic criterion of the EMS-stability is elaborated. A constructive technique for the design of the feedback regulators stabilising various types of oscillatory regimes is proposed. A detailed parametric analysis of the problem of the stabilisation for stochastically forced periodic and quasiperiodic modes is given. An illustrative example of stochastic Hopf system is included to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed technique.

  6. The United Kingdom's stabilisation model and Afghanistan: the impact on humanitarian actors.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Stuart

    2010-10-01

    'Stabilisation' has emerged as a powerful policy framework since 2004. The United Kingdom has been at the forefront of states adopting and developing a 'stabilisation' model and has adapted government policy, processes and structures in its efforts to deliver 'stability' in Afghanistan's Helmand Province and Iraq--as well as elsewhere, such as in Nepal and Sudan. The experience acquired in Helmand in particular is likely to shape both future UK approaches and those of other donor states. The paper argues that the UK's model has evolved significantly since 2006, from a reconstruction strategy towards one that is based on supporting host-nation governance arrangements. Consequently, this paper addresses three principal themes: the origins and conceptualisation of the stabilisation discourse (and its relationship with state-building and early recovery concepts); the role of the UK's experience in Helmand in shaping the British approach; and the impact of the stabilisation model on the humanitarian community. PMID:20846350

  7. A review of polymeric dispersant stabilisation of titania pigment.

    PubMed

    Farrokhpay, Saeed

    2009-10-30

    A review of past and present published works examining the interaction of polymeric dispersants with titania pigment particles is presented. Titania is the most important white pigments currently used in the world and its suspension properties are very important for consumer industries such as paints, papermaking and plastics; if aggregates are present, the end-use properties including gloss, opacity and storage stability will be highly affected. As polymeric dispersants are generally used to disperse titania pigment particles, it is very important to understand the interactions between the pigment particles and polymeric dispersants of varying functionality. Although, in principle, the adsorption of polymers onto titania pigment and influences on pigment dispersion and stabilisation are fairly known, it is nevertheless hardly possible to forecast the behaviour of a given polymeric dispersant in advance, unless to have a broad knowledge of the interaction occurring between pigment and dispersants and effect of dispersant structure upon adsorption. While only titania pigment is discussed, the issues raised may also apply to other mineral oxides such as alumina or zirconia. PMID:19691945

  8. Stabilising a planning guide in post-mandibulectomy prosthodontic rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Cachalia, H; Howes, D G; Owen, C P

    2012-08-01

    Patients presenting with grafted reconstructions of the mandible often lack anatomical features that allow for the consistent placement of a diagnostic denture and planning guide. The mucosa covering the graft appears flat with no discernible ridge form. A method was therefore adapted to provide stability to a guide for the placement of implants. A diagnostic denture was constructed to the try-in stage and duplicated in clear acrylic, with radio-opaque markers placed into potential implant positions. Three mini-implants (Southern implants, Irene, SA) were then placed under local anaesthetic trans-mucosally into the bone graft at positions corresponding to teeth 46, 31 and 36. Access holes were created in the flanges of the diagnostic denture/planning guide to enable it to seat over the mini implant heads and to allow for final positioning. Auto-polymerising resin was then placed to cover each of these heads, thus stabilising the guide. The patient was then referred for a CT scan, to be taken with the planning guide in situ, and a surgical guide was made from the CT data, which also used the mini implants for orientation. At surgery, this ensured the optimal placement of the definitive implants, and the mini-implants could then be removed. This method thus provides enormous beneft to both the planning for, and the placement of, implants into grafted bone in mandibulectomy patients. PMID:23951802

  9. Moduli stabilisation with nilpotent goldstino: vacuum structure and SUSY breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aparicio, Luis; Quevedo, Fernando; Valandro, Roberto

    2016-03-01

    We study the effective field theory of KKLT and LVS moduli stabilisation scenarios coupled to an anti-D3-brane at the tip of a warped throat. We describe the presence of the anti-brane in terms of a nilpotent goldstino superfield in a supersymmetric effective field theory. The introduction of this superfield produces a term that can lead to a de Sitter minimum. We fix the Kähler moduli dependence of the nilpotent field couplings by matching this term with the anti-D3-brane uplifting contribution. The main result of this paper is the computation, within this EFT, of the soft supersymmetry breaking terms in both KKLT and LVS for matter living on D3-brane (leaving the D7-brane analysis to an appendix). A handful of distinct phenomenological scenarios emerge that could have low energy implications, most of them having a split spectrum of soft masses. Some cosmological and phenomenological properties of these models are discussed. We also check that the attraction between the D3-brane and the anti-D3-brane does not affect the leading contribution to the soft masses and does not destabilise the system.

  10. CO2 dissociation in vortex-stabilised microwave plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welzel, S.; Bongers, W. A.; Graswinckel, M. F.; van de Sanden, M. C. M.

    2014-10-01

    Plasma-assisted gas conversion techniques are widely considered as efficient building blocks in a future energy infrastructure which will be based on intermittent, renewable electricity sources. CO2 dissociation in high-frequency plasmas is of particular interest in carbon capture and utilisation process chains for the production of CO2-neutral fuels. In order to achieve efficient plasma processes of high throughput specifically designed gas flow and power injection regimes are required. In this contribution vortex-stabilised microwave plasmas in undiluted CO2 were studied in a pressure range from 170 to 1000 mbar at up to 1 kW (forward) injected power, respectively. The CO2 depletion was measured downstream, e.g. by means of mass spectrometry. Although the system configuration was entirely not optimised, energy efficiencies of nearly 40%, i.e. close to the thermal dissociation limit, and conversion efficiencies of up to 23% were achieved. Additionally, spatially-resolved emission spectroscopy was applied to map the axial and radial distribution of excited atomic (C, O) and molecular (CO, C2) species along with their rotational temperatures. Eindhoven University of Technology, Postbox 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven.

  11. Interplay between toroidal rotation and flow shear in turbulence stabilisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camenen, Y.; Casson, F. J.; Manas, P.; Peeters, A. G.

    2016-02-01

    The interplay between toroidal rotation u, parallel flow shear u', and perpendicular flow shear γE in the stabilisation of tokamak turbulence is investigated in non-linear flux-tube gyrokinetic simulations. The simulations are performed for a reference L-mode DIII-D plasma (the so-called shortfall case) at r /a =0.8 , varying the flow parameters around their nominal values. Depending on the respective signs of u, u', and γE, turbulence is found to be enhanced, reduced, or unchanged. When the coupling is favorable, the overall effect on the non-linear heat fluxes can be very large, even at moderate flow values. The ion heat flux is, for instance, decreased by a factor of 3 when the direction of the parallel flow shear is reversed with respect to its nominal value. Even more surprising, keeping u' and γE at their nominal values, the ion heat flux decreases by more than 50% when the toroidal flow is reversed. The relevance of this mechanism in the experiments which depends on the ability to decouple u, u', and γE is discussed. The interplay between u and u' observed in the non-linear simulations qualitatively follows the linear stability results and is interpreted in the frame of a simple fluid model.

  12. Thermal characterisation of (bio)polymers with a temperature-stabilised whispering gallery mode microsensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Eugene; Foreman, Matthew R.; Baaske, Martin D.; Vollmer, Frank

    2015-04-01

    In this work, we theoretically and experimentally investigate the thermal response of whispering gallery mode microresonators operating in an aqueous glycerol medium. Thermal stabilisation of the resonance wavelength is realised by appropriate choice of the resonator radius and glycerol concentration, with a 60 fold reduction in thermal sensitivity demonstrated. Finally, we employ our stabilised system to determine the thermal dependence of the molecular polarisability of adsorbed bovine serum albumin molecules and the refractive index of dextran and poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) coatings.

  13. On the Influence of Surface Heterogeneities onto Roll Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gryschka, M.; Drüe, C.; Raasch, S.; Etling, D.

    2009-04-01

    Roll convection is a common phenomenon in atmospheric convective boundary layers (CBL) with background wind. Roll convection is observed both over land and over sea for different synoptic situations. There is still some debate about the different types of roll convection and their causes or rather the necessary conditions for their appearance. The stability parameter ζ = -zi•L (zi: boundary layer height, L: Monin-Obukhov stability length) is widely used as a predictor for roll convection, since numerous studies suggest that convective rolls only appear when 0 < ζ < 20. In other words, roll development becomes unlikely for strong surface heating and weak vertical wind shear. In contrast to those studies the presence of roll convection in almost any polar cold air outbreak (as can be seen in numerous satellite images as cloud streets) reveals that even for large ζ roll convection can develop. Some studies report roll convection in cold air outbreaks for ζ = 250. Our large eddy simulations (LES) on roll convection suggests that the contrasting results concerning the dependency of roll convection on ζ are due to two different types of roll convection: One type which develops purely by self organization if ζ < 20 ("free rolls") and another type which is triggered by heterogeneities in surface temperature and develops also for large ζ ("forced rolls"). We think that most of the cloud streets observed in polar cold air outbreaks over open water are due to rolls of forced type which are tied to upstream located heterogeneities in the sea-ice distribution. The results of this study suggests that the omission of surface inhomogeneities in previous LES is the reason for the absence of rolls in all LES with strong surface heating and weak vertical wind shear so far. In this contribution we will present a large eddy simulation which successfully represents forced rolls under such conditions.

  14. Supergranulation, a convective phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udayashankar, Paniveni

    2015-08-01

    Observation of the Solar photosphere through high resolution instruments have long indicated that the surface of the Sun is not a tranquil, featureless surface but is beset with a granular appearance. These cellular velocity patterns are a visible manifestation of sub- photospheric convection currents which contribute substantially to the outward transport of energy from the deeper layers, thus maintaining the energy balance of the Sun as a whole.Convection is the chief mode of transport in the outer layers of all cool stars such as the Sun (Noyes,1982). Convection zone of thickness 30% of the Solar radius lies in the sub-photospheric layers of the Sun. Convection is revealed on four scales. On the scale of 1000 km, it is granulation and on the scale of 8-10 arcsec, it is Mesogranulation. The next hierarchial scale of convection ,Supergranules are in the range of 30-40 arcsec. The largest reported manifestation of convection in the Sun are ‘Giant Cells’or ‘Giant Granules’, on a typical length scale of about 108 m.'Supergranules' is caused by the turbulence that extends deep into the convection zone. They have a typical lifetime of about 20hr with spicules marking their boundaries. Gas rises in the centre of the supergranules and then spreads out towards the boundary and descends.Broadly speaking supergranules are characterized by the three parameters namely the length L, the lifetime T and the horizontal flow velocity vh . The interrelationships amongst these parameters can shed light on the underlying convective processes and are in agreement with the Kolmogorov theory of turbulence as applied to large scale solar convection (Krishan et al .2002 ; Paniveni et. al. 2004, 2005, 2010).References:1) Noyes, R.W., The Sun, Our Star (Harvard University Press, 1982)2) Krishan, V., Paniveni U., Singh , J., Srikanth R., 2002, MNRAS, 334/1,2303) Paniveni , U., Krishan, V., Singh, J., Srikanth, R., 2004, MNRAS, 347, 1279-12814) Paniveni , U., Krishan, V., Singh, J

  15. Anomalously Weak Solar Convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanasoge, Shravan M.; Duvall, Thomas L.; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.

    2012-01-01

    Convection in the solar interior is thought to comprise structures on a spectrum of scales. This conclusion emerges from phenomenological studies and numerical simulations, though neither covers the proper range of dynamical parameters of solar convection. Here, we analyze observations of the wavefield in the solar photosphere using techniques of time-distance helioseismology to image flows in the solar interior. We downsample and synthesize 900 billion wavefield observations to produce 3 billion cross-correlations, which we average and fit, measuring 5 million wave travel times. Using these travel times, we deduce the underlying flow systems and study their statistics to bound convective velocity magnitudes in the solar interior, as a function of depth and spherical- harmonic degree l..Within the wavenumber band l < 60, convective velocities are 20-100 times weaker than current theoretical estimates. This constraint suggests the prevalence of a different paradigm of turbulence from that predicted by existing models, prompting the question: what mechanism transports the heat flux of a solar luminosity outwards? Advection is dominated by Coriolis forces for wavenumbers l < 60, with Rossby numbers smaller than approximately 10(exp -2) at r/R-solar = 0.96, suggesting that the Sun may be a much faster rotator than previously thought, and that large-scale convection may be quasi-geostrophic. The fact that isorotation contours in the Sun are not coaligned with the axis of rotation suggests the presence of a latitudinal entropy gradient.

  16. Thermodynamics of convective circulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, D. K.; Renno, N. O.

    2003-04-01

    The heat engine framework has proven successful for studies of atmospheric phenomena ranging from small to large scales. At large scales, the heat engine framework provides estimates of convective available potential energy, convective velocities, and fractional area covered by convection. At the smaller end of the spectrum, the framework provides estimates of the intensity of convective vortices such as dust devils and waterspouts. The heat engine framework sheds light on the basic physics of planetary atmospheres. In particular, it allows the calculation of their thermodynamic efficiency. Indeed, this is a fundamental number for atmospheric circulations because it quantifies the amount of heat that is converted into kinetic energy. As such, it is a valuable number not only for comparison of models with nature, but also for the intercomparison of models. In the present study, we generalize the heat engine framework to large-scale circulations, both open (e.g., the Hadley circulation) and closed (e.g., the general circulation) and apply it to an idealized global climate model to ascertain the thermodynamic efficiency of model circulations, both global and regional. Our results show that the thermodynamic efficiency is sensitive to model resolution and provides a baseline for minimum model resolution in climate studies. The value of the thermodynamic efficiency of convective circulations in nature is controversial. It has been suggested that both nature and numerical models are extremely irreversible. We show that both the global and the Hadley circulation of the idealized model are, to a first approximation, reversible.

  17. Simulating deep convection with a shallow convection scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohenegger, C.; Bretherton, C. S.

    2011-03-01

    Convective processes profoundly affect the global water and energy balance of our planet but remain a challenge for global climate modeling. Here we develop and investigate the suitability of a unified convection scheme, capable of handling both shallow and deep convection, to simulate cases of tropical oceanic convection, mid-latitude continental convection, and maritime shallow convection. To that aim, we employ large-eddy simulations (LES) as a benchmark to test and refine a unified convection scheme implemented in the Single-Column Community Atmosphere Model (SCAM). Our approach is motivated by previous cloud-resolving modeling studies, which have documented the gradual transition between shallow and deep convection and its possible importance for the simulated precipitation diurnal cycle. Analysis of the LES reveals that differences between shallow and deep convection, regarding cloud-base properties as well as entrainment/detrainment rates, can be related to the evaporation of precipitation. Parameterizing such effects and accordingly modifying the University of Washington shallow convection scheme, it is found that the new unified scheme can represent both shallow and deep convection as well as tropical and continental convection. Compared to the default SCAM version, the new scheme especially improves relative humidity, cloud cover and mass flux profiles. The new unified scheme also removes the well-known too early onset and peak of convective precipitation over mid-latitude continental areas.

  18. Simulating deep convection with a shallow convection scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohenegger, C.; Bretherton, C. S.

    2011-10-01

    Convective processes profoundly affect the global water and energy balance of our planet but remain a challenge for global climate modeling. Here we develop and investigate the suitability of a unified convection scheme, capable of handling both shallow and deep convection, to simulate cases of tropical oceanic convection, mid-latitude continental convection, and maritime shallow convection. To that aim, we employ large-eddy simulations (LES) as a benchmark to test and refine a unified convection scheme implemented in the Single-column Community Atmosphere Model (SCAM). Our approach is motivated by previous cloud-resolving modeling studies, which have documented the gradual transition between shallow and deep convection and its possible importance for the simulated precipitation diurnal cycle. Analysis of the LES reveals that differences between shallow and deep convection, regarding cloud-base properties as well as entrainment/detrainment rates, can be related to the evaporation of precipitation. Parameterizing such effects and accordingly modifying the University of Washington shallow convection scheme, it is found that the new unified scheme can represent both shallow and deep convection as well as tropical and mid-latitude continental convection. Compared to the default SCAM version, the new scheme especially improves relative humidity, cloud cover and mass flux profiles. The new unified scheme also removes the well-known too early onset and peak of convective precipitation over mid-latitude continental areas.

  19. Gravity wave initiated convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.

    1990-01-01

    The vertical velocity of convection initiated by gravity waves was investigated. In one particular case, the convective motion-initiated and supported by the gravity wave-induced activity (excluding contributions made by other mechanisms) reached its maximum value about one hour before the production of the funnel clouds. In another case, both rawinsonde and geosynchronous satellite imagery were used to study the life cycles of severe convective storms. Cloud modelling with input sounding data and rapid-scan imagery from GOES were used to investigate storm cloud formation, development and dissipation in terms of growth and collapse of cloud tops, as well as, the life cycles of the penetration of overshooting turrets above the tropopause. The results based on these two approaches are presented and discussed.

  20. Active control of convection

    SciTech Connect

    Bau, H.H.

    1995-12-31

    Using stability theory, numerical simulations, and in some instances experiments, it is demonstrated that the critical Rayleigh number for the bifurcation (1) from the no-motion (conduction) state to the motion state and (2) from time-independent convection to time-dependent, oscillatory convection in the thermal convection loop and Rayleigh-Benard problems can be significantly increased or decreased. This is accomplished through the use of a feedback controller effectuating small perturbations in the boundary data. The controller consists of sensors which detect deviations in the fluid`s temperature from the motionless, conductive values and then direct actuators to respond to these deviations in such a way as to suppress the naturally occurring flow instabilities. Actuators which modify the boundary`s temperature/heat flux are considered. The feedback controller can also be used to control flow patterns and generate complex dynamic behavior at relatively low Rayleigh numbers.

  1. A groundwater convection model for Rio Grande rift geothermal resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, P.; Harder, V.; Daggett, P. H.; Swanberg, C. A.

    1981-01-01

    It has been proposed that forced convection, driven by normal groundwater flow through the interconnected basins of the Rio Grande rift is the primary source mechanism for the numerous geothermal anomalies along the rift. A test of this concept using an analytical model indicates that significant forced convection must occur in the basins even if permeabilities are as low as 50-200 millidarcies at a depth of 2 km. Where groundwater flow is constricted at the discharge areas of the basins forced convection can locally increase the gradient to a level where free convection also occurs, generating surface heat flow anomalies 5-15 times background. A compilation of groundwater data for the rift basins shows a strong correlation between constrictions in groundwater flow and hot springs and geothermal anomalies, giving strong circumstantial support to the convection model.

  2. Physics of Stellar Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnett, W. David

    2009-05-01

    We review recent progress using numerical simulations as a testbed for development of a theory of stellar convection, much as envisaged by John von Newmann. Necessary features of the theory, non-locality and fluctuations, are illustrated by computer movies. It is found that the common approximation of convection as a diffusive process presents the wrong physical picture, and improvements are suggested. New observational results discussed at the conference are gratifying in their validation of some of our theoretical ideas, especially the idea that SNIb and SNIc events are related to the explosion of massive star cores which have been stripped by mass loss and binary interactions [1

  3. The challenge of sample-stabilisation in the era of multi-residue analytical methods: a practical guideline for the stabilisation of 46 organic micropollutants in aqueous samples.

    PubMed

    Hillebrand, Olav; Musallam, Shadha; Scherer, Laura; Nödler, Karsten; Licha, Tobias

    2013-06-01

    Water sample storage and stabilisation may affect data quality, if samples are managed improperly. In this study three stabilising strategies are evaluated for 46 relevant organic micro-pollutants: addition of the biocides (i) copper sulphate and (ii) sodium azide to water samples directly after sampling with subsequent sample storage as liquid phase and (iii) direct solid phase extraction (SPE), stabilising the samples by reducing the activity of water. River water and treated effluent were chosen as commonly investigated matrices with a high potential of biotransformation activity. Analyses were carried out for sample storage temperatures of 4 and 28°C for water samples stored as liquid phase and for sample storage temperatures of 4, 20 and 40°C for SPE cartridges. Cooling of water samples alone was not sufficient for longer storage times (>24h). While copper sulphate caused detrimental interferences with nitrogen containing heterocyclic compounds, sodium azide proved to be a suitable stabilising agent. The best results could be obtained for SPE cartridges stored cool. Recommendations for samples preservation are provided. PMID:23562683

  4. Quantum gate generation by T-sampling stabilisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silveira, H. B.; Pereira da Silva, P. S.; Rouchon, P.

    2014-06-01

    This paper considers right-invariant and controllable driftless quantum systems with state X(t) evolving on the unitary group U(n) and m inputs u = (u1, …, um). The T-sampling stabilisation problem is introduced and solved: given any initial condition X0 and any goal state ?, find a control law u = u(X, t) such that ? for the closed-loop system. The purpose is to generate arbitrary quantum gates corresponding to ?. This is achieved by the tracking of T-periodic reference trajectories ? of the quantum system that pass by ? using the framework of Coron's return method. The T-periodic reference trajectories ? are generated by applying controls ? that are a sum of a finite number M of harmonics of sin (2πt/T), whose amplitudes are parameterised by a vector a. The main result establishes that, for M big enough, X(jT) exponentially converges towards ? for almost all fixed a, with explicit and completely constructive control laws. This paper also establishes a stochastic version of this deterministic control law. The key idea is to randomly choose a different parameter vector of control amplitudes a = aj at each t = jT, and keeping it fixed for t ∈ [jT, (j + 1)T). It is shown in the paper that X(jT) exponentially converges towards ? almost surely. Simulation results have indicated that the convergence speed of X(jT) may be significantly improved with such stochastic technique. This is illustrated in the generation of the C-NOT quantum logic gate on U(4).

  5. Stabilisation/solidification of synthetic petroleum drill cuttings.

    PubMed

    Al-Ansary, Marwa S; Al-Tabbaa, Abir

    2007-03-15

    This paper presents the results of an experimental investigation into the use of stabilisation/solidification (S/S) to treat synthetic drill cuttings as a pre-treatment to landfilling or for potential re-use as construction products. Two synthetic mixes were used based on average concentrations of specific contaminates present in typical drill cuttings from the North Sea and the Red Sea areas. The two synthetic drill cuttings contained similar chloride content of 2.03% and 2.13% by weight but different hydrocarbon content of 4.20% and 10.95% by weight, respectively; hence the mixes were denoted as low and high oil content mixes, respectively. A number of conventional S/S binders were tested including Portland cement (PC), lime and blast-furnace slag (BFS), in addition to novel binders such as microsilica and magnesium oxide cement. Physical, chemical and microstructural analyses were used to compare the relative performance of the different binder mixes. The unconfined compressive strength (UCS) values were observed to cover a wide range depending on the binder used. Despite the significant difference in the hydrocarbon content in the two synthetic cuttings, the measured UCS values of the mixes with the same binder type and content were similar. The leachability results showed the reduction of the synthetic drill cuttings to a stable non-reactive hazardous waste, compliant with the UK acceptance criteria for non-hazardous landfills: (a) by most of the binders for chloride concentrations, and (b) by the 20% BFS-PC and 30% PC binders for the low oil content mix. The 30% BFS-PC binder successfully reduced the leached oil concentration of the low oil content mix to inert levels. Finally, the microstructural analysis offered valuable information on the morphology and general behaviour of the mixes that were not depicted by the other tests. PMID:16846687

  6. Convection Compensated Electrophoretic NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qiuhong; Wei, Zhaohui

    2001-06-01

    A novel method of convection compensated ENMR (CC-ENMR) has been developed to detect electrophoretic motion of ionic species in the presence of bulk solution convection. This was accomplished using a gradient moment nulling technique to remove spectral artifacts from heat-induced convection and using the polarity switch of the applied electric field to retain spin phase modulations due to electrophoretic flow. Experiments were carried out with a mixture of 100 mM L-aspartic acid and 100 mM 4,9-dioxa-1,12-dodecanediamine to demonstrate this new method of ENMR. CC-ENMR enhances our previously developed capillary array ENMR (CA-ENMR) in solving the convection problem. The combined CA- and CC-ENMR approach strengthens the potential of multidimensional ENMR in simultaneous structural determination of coexisting proteins and protein conformations in biological buffer solutions of high ionic strength. Structural mapping of interacting proteins during biochemical reactions becomes possible in the future using ENMR techniques, which may have a profound impact on the understanding of biological events, including protein folding, genetic control, and signal transduction in general.

  7. Combined buoyancy-thermocapillary convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homsy, G. M.

    1990-01-01

    Combined buoyancy-thermocapillary convection was studied in 2D and 3D. Fluid motion caused by thermally induced tension gradients on the free surface of a fluid is termed thermocapillary convection. It is well-known that in containerless processing of materials in space, thermocapillary convection is a dominant mechanism of fluid flow. Welding and crystal growth processes are terrestrial applications where thermocapillary convection has direct relevance.

  8. Natural convection in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, V.; Hussain, N.A.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on free convection in porous materials. Topics considered at the conference included heat transfer, nonlinear temperature profiles and magnetic fields, boundary conditions, concentrated heat sources in stratified porous media, free convective flow in a cavity, heat flux, laminar mixed convection flow, and the onset of convection in a porous medium with internal heat generation and downward flow.

  9. On the use of the stabilised Q1P0 element for geodynamical simulations and why this is a bad choice for buyoancy-driven flows.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thieulot, Cedric

    2016-04-01

    Many Finite Element geodynamical codes (Fullsack,1995; Zhong et al., 2000; Thieulot, 2011) are based on bi/tri­-linear velocity constant pressure element (commonly called Q1P0), because of its ease of programming and rather low memory footprint, despite the presence of (pressure) checker­board modes. However, it is long known that the Q1P0 is not inf­-sup stable and does not lend itself to the use of iterative solvers, which makes it a less­ than­ ideal candidate for high resolution 3D models. Other attempts were made more recently (Burstedde et al., 2013; Le Pourhiet et al., 2012) with the use of the stabilised Q1Q1 element (bi/tri­-linear velocity and pressure). This element, while also attractive from an implementation and memory standpoint, suffers a major drawback due to the artificial compressibility introduced by the polynomial projection stabilization. These observations have shifted part of the community towards the Finite Difference Method while the remaining part is now embracing inf­sup stable second­ order elements [May et al., 2015; Kronbichler,2012). Rather surprinsingly, a third option exists when it comes to first ­order elements in the form of the stabilised Q1P0 element, but virtually no literature exists concerning its use for geodynamical applications. I will then recall the specificity of the stabilisation and will carry out a series of benchmark experiments and geodynamical tests to assess its performance. While being shown to work as expected in benchmark experiments, the stabilised Q1P0 element turns out to introduce first-order numerical artefacts in the velocity and pressure solutions in the case of buoyancy-driven flows. Burstedde, C., Stadler, G., Alisic, L., Wilcox, L. C., Tan, E., Gurnis, M., & Ghattas, O. (2013). Large­scale adaptive mantle convection simulation. Geophysical Journal International, 192(3), 889­906. Fullsack, P. (1995). An arbitrary Lagrangian­Eulerian formulation for creeping flows and its application in

  10. Enhancement of free tropospheric ozone production by deep convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickering, Kenneth E.; Thompson, Anne M.; Scala, John R.; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Simpson, Joanne

    1994-01-01

    It is found from model simulations of trace gas and meteorological data from aircraft campaigns that deep convection may enhance the potential for photochemical ozone production in the middle and upper troposphere by up to a factor of 60. Examination of half a dozen individual convective episodes show that the degree of enhancement is highly variable. Factors affecting enhancement include boundary layer NO(x) mixing ratios, differences in the strength and structure of convective cells, as well as variation in the amount of background pollution already in the free troposphere.

  11. Anomalously weak solar convection

    PubMed Central

    Hanasoge, Shravan M.; Duvall, Thomas L.

    2012-01-01

    Convection in the solar interior is thought to comprise structures on a spectrum of scales. This conclusion emerges from phenomenological studies and numerical simulations, though neither covers the proper range of dynamical parameters of solar convection. Here, we analyze observations of the wavefield in the solar photosphere using techniques of time-distance helioseismology to image flows in the solar interior. We downsample and synthesize 900 billion wavefield observations to produce 3 billion cross-correlations, which we average and fit, measuring 5 million wave travel times. Using these travel times, we deduce the underlying flow systems and study their statistics to bound convective velocity magnitudes in the solar interior, as a function of depth and spherical-harmonic degree ℓ. Within the wavenumber band ℓ < 60, convective velocities are 20–100 times weaker than current theoretical estimates. This constraint suggests the prevalence of a different paradigm of turbulence from that predicted by existing models, prompting the question: what mechanism transports the heat flux of a solar luminosity outwards? Advection is dominated by Coriolis forces for wavenumbers ℓ < 60, with Rossby numbers smaller than approximately 10-2 at r/R⊙ = 0.96, suggesting that the Sun may be a much faster rotator than previously thought, and that large-scale convection may be quasi-geostrophic. The fact that isorotation contours in the Sun are not coaligned with the axis of rotation suggests the presence of a latitudinal entropy gradient. PMID:22665774

  12. Effect of particle adsorption rates on the disproportionation process in pickering stabilised bubbles.

    PubMed

    Ettelaie, Rammile; Murray, Brent

    2014-05-28

    The degree of shrinkage of particle stabilised bubbles of various sizes, in a polydisperse bubble dispersion, has been investigated in the light of the finite adsorption times for the particles and the disproportionation kinetics of the bubbles. For the case where the system contains an abundance of particles we find a threshold radius, above which bubbles are stabilised without any significant reduction in their size. Bubbles with an initial radius below this threshold on the other hand undergo a large degree of shrinkage prior to stabilisation. As the ratio of the available particles to the bubbles is reduced, it is shown that the final bubble size, for the larger bubbles in the distribution, becomes increasingly governed by the number of particles, rather than their adsorption time per se. For systems with "adsorption controlled" shrinkage ratio, the final bubble distribution is found to be wider than the initial one, while for a "particle number controlled" case it is actually narrower. Starting from a unimodal bubble size distribution, we predict that at intermediate times, prior to the full stabilisation of all bubbles, the distribution breaks up into a bimodal one. However, the effect is transient and a unimodal final bubble size distribution is recovered, when all the bubbles are stabilised by the particles. PMID:24880317

  13. SDP-based approximation of stabilising solutions for periodic matrix Riccati differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusev, Sergei V.; Shiriaev, Anton S.; Freidovich, Leonid B.

    2016-07-01

    Numerically finding stabilising feedback control laws for linear systems of periodic differential equations is a nontrivial task with no known reliable solutions. The most successful method requires solving matrix differential Riccati equations with periodic coefficients. All previously proposed techniques for solving such equations involve numerical integration of unstable differential equations and consequently fail whenever the period is too large or the coefficients vary too much. Here, a new method for numerical computation of stabilising solutions for matrix differential Riccati equations with periodic coefficients is proposed. Our approach does not involve numerical solution of any differential equations. The approximation for a stabilising solution is found in the form of a trigonometric polynomial, matrix coefficients of which are found solving a specially constructed finite-dimensional semidefinite programming (SDP) problem. This problem is obtained using maximality property of the stabilising solution of the Riccati equation for the associated Riccati inequality and sampling technique. Our previously published numerical comparisons with other methods shows that for a class of problems only this technique provides a working solution. Asymptotic convergence of the computed approximations to the stabilising solution is proved below under the assumption that certain combinations of the key parameters are sufficiently large. Although the rate of convergence is not analysed, it appeared to be exponential in our numerical studies.

  14. Finite-time stabilisation of simple mechanical systems using continuous feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanyal, Amit K.; Bohn, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Stabilisation of simple mechanical systems in finite time with continuous state feedback is considered here. The dynamics are represented by generalised (local) coordinates. A general methodology to construct control Lyapunov functions that are Hölder continuous and that can be used to show finite-time stability of the feedback controlled system, is presented. This construction also gives the feedback control law, and results in the feedback system being Hölder continuous as well. Unlike Lipschitz continuous feedback control systems, the feedback control scheme given here converges to the desired equilibrium in finite time. Moreover, unlike discontinuous and hybrid control schemes, the feedback control law does not lead to chattering in the presence of measurement noise, does not excite unmodelled high-frequency dynamics, and can be implemented with actuators that can only deliver continuous control inputs. The advantages of continuous finite-time stabilisation over continuous asymptotic stabilisation of mechanical systems, has been described in some prior research on finite-time stabilisation of the double integrator. The finite-time stabilisation scheme given here generalises this prior research to multiple degree-of-freedom mechanical systems. A numerical comparison is carried out through numerical simulations on two example systems that are representative of a broad class of simple mechanical systems.

  15. Interaction Between Convection and Pulsation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houdek, Günter; Dupret, Marc-Antoine

    2015-12-01

    This article reviews our current understanding of modelling convection dynamics in stars. Several semi-analytical time-dependent convection models have been proposed for pulsating one-dimensional stellar structures with different formulations for how the convective turbulent velocity field couples with the global stellar oscillations. In this review we put emphasis on two, widely used, time-dependent convection formulations for estimating pulsation properties in one-dimensional stellar models. Applications to pulsating stars are presented with results for oscillation properties, such as the effects of convection dynamics on the oscillation frequencies, or the stability of pulsation modes, in classical pulsators and in stars supporting solar-type oscillations.

  16. Thermocapillary Convection in Liquid Droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this video is to understand the effects of surface tension on fluid convection. The fluid system chosen is the liquid sessile droplet to show the importance in single crystal growth, the spray drying and cooling of metal, and the advance droplet radiators of the space stations radiators. A cross sectional representation of a hemispherical liquid droplet under ideal conditions is used to show internal fluid motion. A direct simulation of buoyancy-dominant convection and surface tension-dominant convection is graphically displayed. The clear differences between two mechanisms of fluid transport, thermocapillary convection, and bouncy dominant convection is illustrated.

  17. Solidification/stabilisation of liquid oil waste in metakaolin-based geopolymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantarel, V.; Nouaille, F.; Rooses, A.; Lambertin, D.; Poulesquen, A.; Frizon, F.

    2015-09-01

    The solidification/stabilisation of liquid oil waste in metakaolin based geopolymer was studied in the present work. The process consists of obtaining a stabilised emulsion of oil in a water-glass solution and then adding metakaolin to engage the setting of a geopolymer block with an oil emulsion stabilised in the material. Geopolymer/oil composites have been made with various oil fraction (7, 14 and 20 vol.%). The rigidity and the good mechanical properties have been demonstrated with compressive strength tests. Leaching tests evidenced the release of oil from the composite material is very limited whereas the constitutive components of the geopolymer (Na, Si and OH-) are involved into diffusion process.

  18. Early Spin-Stabilised Rockets - the Rockets of Bergrat Heinrich Gottlob Kuhn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fricke, H.-D.

    19th century's war rockets were at first stabilised by sticks, but these sticks produced a very uncertain flight path and it often happened that rockets changed their direction and even flew back to their firing position. So very many early inventors in Europe, America, and British-India tried to stabilise the rocket's flight in a better way. They tried fins and even rotation but they did not succeed. It is said in history that William Hale was the first who succeeded in constructing a spin stabilised (i.e. rotating) rocket which worked. But before him, in the thirties of that century, a German amateur rocket inventor succeeded as well and secretly proved his stickless rotating rockets in trials for Prussian officers and some years later officially for Saxon artillery officers. His invention was then bought by the kingdom of Saxony, but these were never use in the field because of lack of money.

  19. Delay-dependent stability and stabilisation of continuous 2D delayed systems with saturating control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hmamed, Abdelaziz; Kririm, Said; Benzaouia, Abdellah; Tadeo, Fernando

    2016-09-01

    This paper deals with the stabilisation problem of continuous two-dimensional (2D) delayed systems, in the presence of saturations on the control signals. For this, a new delay decomposition approach is proposed to deal with the stability and stabilisation issues. The idea is that the range of variation of each delay is divided into segments, and a specific Lyapunov- Krasovskii functional is used that contains different weight matrices in each segment. Then, based on this approach, new delay-dependent stability and stabilisation criteria for continuous 2D delayed systems are derived. These criteria are less conservative and include some existing results as special cases. Some numerical examples are provided to show that a significant improvement is achieved using the proposed approach.

  20. Addressing symptoms but not causes: stabilisation and humanitarian action in Timor-Leste.

    PubMed

    Lothe, Elisabeth; Peake, Gordon

    2010-10-01

    Asia's newest nation--Timor-Leste--has an unenviable track record of two Australian-led military stabilisation missions, five United Nations (UN) missions, and a vast humanitarian and international response over the course of the past decade. Two distinct approaches to stabilisation can be observed on this small half-island. The first is a 'security-first' approach, where development activities are complementary and serve to support security sector assistance, while the second emphasises traditional development activities and institution-building as the foundation for a stable country. Whereas these different approaches highlight various interpretations of the underlying problems and the task at hand, efforts aimed at stabilisation have crystallised the challenges of coordinating and integrating activities that are clearly interlinked and interdependent, whether within a UN integrated mission or implemented by bilateral actors. Consequently, the question of whether, or how, to measure progress towards this shared objective has gone largely unaddressed. PMID:20846353

  1. Stabilising a victor's peace? Humanitarian action and reconstruction in eastern Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Goodhand, Jonathan

    2010-10-01

    This paper focuses on the 'Sri Lankan model' of counter-insurgency and stabilisation and its implications for humanitarian and development actors. The Sri Lanka case shows that discourses, policies and practices associated with 'stabilisation' are not confined to 'fragile state' contexts in which there is heavy (and often militarised) international engagement--even though exemplars such as Afghanistan and Iraq have tended to dominate debates on this issue. Rather than being a single template, the 'stabilisation agenda' takes on very different guises in different contexts, presenting quite specific challenges to humanitarian and development actors. This is particularly true in settings like Sri Lanka, where there is a strong state, which seeks to make aid 'coherent' with its own vision of a militarily imposed political settlement. Working in such environments involves navigating a highly-charged domestic political arena, shaped by concerns about sovereignty, nationalism and struggles for legitimacy. PMID:20846349

  2. Oxygen abundance and convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van't Veer, C.; Cayrel, R.

    The triplet IR lines of O I near 777 nm are computed with the Kurucz's code, modified to accept several convection models. The program has been run with the MLT algorithm, with l/H = 1.25 and 0.5, and with the Canuto-Mazzitelli and Canuto-Goldman-Mazzitelli approaches, on a metal-poor turnoff-star model atmosphere with Teff=6200 K, log g = 4.3, [Fe/H]= -1.5. The results show that the differences in equivalent widths for the 4 cases do not exceed 2 per cent (0.3 mA). The convection treatment is therefore not an issue for the oxygen abundance derived from the permitted lines.

  3. Granular convection in microgravity.

    PubMed

    Murdoch, N; Rozitis, B; Nordstrom, K; Green, S F; Michel, P; de Lophem, T-L; Losert, W

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the role of gravity on convection in a dense granular shear flow. Using a microgravity-modified Taylor-Couette shear cell under the conditions of parabolic flight microgravity, we demonstrate experimentally that secondary, convective-like flows in a sheared granular material are close to zero in microgravity and enhanced under high-gravity conditions, though the primary flow fields are unaffected by gravity. We suggest that gravity tunes the frictional particle-particle and particle-wall interactions, which have been proposed to drive the secondary flow. In addition, the degree of plastic deformation increases with increasing gravitational forces, supporting the notion that friction is the ultimate cause. PMID:23383851

  4. Effective solidification/stabilisation of mercury-contaminated wastes using zeolites and chemically bonded phosphate ceramics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shaoqing; Zhang, Xinyan; Xiong, Ya; Wang, Guoping; Zheng, Na

    2015-02-01

    In this study, two kinds of zeolites materials (natural zeolite and thiol-functionalised zeolite) were added to the chemically bonded phosphate ceramic processes to treat mercury-contaminated wastes. Strong promotion effects of zeolites (natural zeolite and thiol-functionalised zeolite) on the stability of mercury in the wastes were obtained and these technologies showed promising advantages toward the traditional Portland cement process, i.e. using Portland cement as a solidification agent and natural or thiol-functionalised zeolite as a stabilisation agent. Not only is a high stabilisation efficiency (lowered the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure Hg by above 10%) obtained, but also a lower dosage of solidification (for thiol-functionalised zeolite as stabilisation agent, 0.5 g g(-1) and 0.7 g g(-1) for chemically bonded phosphate ceramic and Portland cement, respectively) and stabilisation agents (for natural zeolite as stabilisation agent, 0.35 g g(-1) and 0.4 g g(-1) for chemically bonded phosphate ceramic and Portland cement, respectively) were used compared with the Portland cement process. Treated by thiol-functionalised zeolite and chemically bonded phosphate ceramic under optimum parameters, the waste containing 1500 mg Hg kg(-1) passed the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure test. Moreover, stabilisation/solidification technology using natural zeolite and chemically bonded phosphate ceramic also passed the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure test (the mercury waste containing 625 mg Hg kg(-1)). Moreover, the presence of chloride and phosphate did not have a negative effect on the chemically bonded phosphate ceramic/thiol-functionalised zeolite treatment process; thus, showing potential for future application in treatment of 'difficult-to-manage' mercury-contaminated wastes or landfill disposal with high phosphate and chloride content. PMID:25568090

  5. The Solar Convection Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachmann, Kurt T.

    2000-01-01

    I helped to complete a research project with NASA scientists Dr. David Hathaway (my mentor), Rick Bogart, and John Beck from the SOHO/SOI collaboration. Our published paper in 'Solar Physics' was titled 'The Solar Convection Spectrum' (April 2000). Two of my undergraduate students were named on the paper--Gavrav Khutri and Josh Petitto. Gavrav also wrote a short paper for the National Conference of Undergraduate Research Proceedings in 1998 using a preliminary result. Our main result was that we show no evidence of a scale of convection named 'mesogranulation'. Instead, we see only direct evidence for the well-known scales of convection known as graduation and supergranulation. We are also completing work on vertical versus horizontal flow fluxes at the solar surface. I continue to work on phase relationships of solar activity indicators, but I have not yet written a paper with my students on this topic. Along with my research results, I have developed and augmented undergraduate courses at Birmingham-Southern College by myself and with other faculty. We have included new labs and observations, speakers from NASA and elsewhere, new subject material related to NASA and space science. I have done a great deal of work in outreach, mostly as President and other offices in the Birmingham Astronomical Society. My work includes speaking, attracting speakers, giving workshops, and governing.

  6. Robust stabilisation and L2 -gain analysis for switched systems with actuator saturation under asynchronous switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Juan; Zhao, Jun

    2016-09-01

    Robust stabilisation and L2-gain analysis for a class of switched systems with actuator saturation are studied in this paper. The switching signal of the controllers lags behind that of the system modes, which leads to the asynchronous switching between the candidate controllers and the subsystems. By combining the piecewise Lyapunov function method with the convex hull technique, sufficient conditions in terms of LMIs for the solvability of the robust stabilisation and weighted L2-gain problems are presented respectively under the dwell time scheme. Finally, a numerical example is given to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed results.

  7. Vertebral stabilisation and selective decompression for the management of triple thoracolumbar disc protrusions.

    PubMed

    McKee, W M; Downes, C J

    2008-10-01

    Triple adjacent thoracolumbar disc protrusions causing moderate to severe spinal cord compression were diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging in two German shepherd dogs with marked paraparesis and pelvic limb ataxia. Both cases were managed by selective hemilaminectomy, partial annulectomy and bilateral quadruple vertebral body stabilisation using novel canine locking fixation plates (SOP). The stabilisation of multiple vertebrae in the thoracolumbar spine was possible because the plates could be contoured with six degrees of freedom. Spinal pain resolved and neurological function improved in both dogs. Screw breakage was evident in one dog five months following surgery. PMID:18631222

  8. Defining Mesoscale Convective Systems by Their 85-GHz Ice-Scattering Signatures.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohr, Karen I.; Zipser, Edward J.

    1996-06-01

    Mesoseale Convective systems are composed of numerous deep convective cells with varying amounts of large, convectively produced ice particles aloft. The magnitude of the 85-GHz brightness temperature depression resulting from scattering by large ice is believed to be related to the convective intensity and to the magnitude of the convective fluxes through a deep layer. The 85-GHz ice-scattering signature can be used to map the distribution of organized mesoscale regions of convectively produced large ice particles. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate the usefulness of the 85-GHz ice-scattering signature for describing the frequency, convective intensity, and geographic distribution of mesoscale convective systems.Objective criteria were developed to identify mesoscale convective systems from raw data from January, April, July, and October 1993. To minimize the effects of background contamination and to ensure that bounded areas contained convective elements, a "mesoscale convective system" was defined as an area bounded by 250 K of at least 2000 km2 of 85 GHz, with a minimum brightness temperature 225 K. Mesoscale convective systems extracted from the raw data were sorted and plotted by their areas and by their minimum brightness temperatures. Four area and brightness temperature classes were used to account for a spectrum of organized convection ranging from small to very large and from less organized to highly organized. The populations of mesoscale convective systems by this study's definition were consistent with infrared-based climatologies and large-scale seasonal dynamics. Land/water differences were high-lighted by the plots of minimum brightness temperature. Most of the intense mesoscale convective systems were located on or near land and seemed to occur most frequently in particular areas in North America, South America, Africa, and India.

  9. Towards a General Understanding of Carbonyl-Stabilised Ammonium Ylide-Mediated Epoxidation Reactions.

    PubMed

    Novacek, Johanna; Roiser, Lukas; Zielke, Katharina; Robiette, Raphaël; Waser, Mario

    2016-08-01

    The key factors for carbonyl-stabilised ammonium ylide-mediated epoxidation reactions were systematically investigated by experimental and computational means and the hereby obtained energy profiles provide explanations for the observed experimental results. In addition, we were able to identify the first tertiary amine-based chiral auxiliary that allows for high enantioselectivities and high yields for such epoxidation reactions. PMID:27381752

  10. Stabilisation of proteins via mixtures of amino acids during spray drying.

    PubMed

    Ajmera, Ankur; Scherließ, Regina

    2014-03-10

    Biologicals are often formulated as solids in an effort to preserve stability which generally requires stabilising excipients for proper drying. The purpose of this study was to screen amino acids and their combinations for their stabilising effect on proteins during spray drying. Catalase, as model protein, was spray dried in 1+1 or 1+2 ratios with amino acids. Some amino acids namely arginine, glycine and histidine showed good retention of catalase functionality after spray drying and subsequent storage stress. A 1+1 combination of arginine and glycine in a 1+2 ratio with catalase resulted in a tremendously good stabilising effect. Storage at high temperature/humidity also showed beneficial effects of this combination. To evaluate whether this was a general principle, these findings were transferred to an antigenic protein of comparable size and supramolecular structure (haemagglutinin) as well as to a smaller enzyme (lysozyme). Upon spray drying with the combination of amino acids it could be shown that both proteins remain more stable especially after storage compared to the unprotected protein. The combination of arginine and glycine is tailored to the needs of protein stabilisation during spray drying and may hence be utilised in dry powder formulation of biomolecules with superior stability characteristics. PMID:24412336

  11. Measurement of wind profiles by motion-stabilised ship-borne Doppler lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achtert, P.; Brooks, I. M.; Brooks, B. J.; Moat, B. I.; Prytherch, J.; Persson, P. O. G.; Tjernström, M.

    2015-09-01

    Three months of Doppler lidar wind measurements were obtained during the Arctic Cloud Summer Experiment on the icebreaker Oden during the summer of 2014. Such ship-borne measurements require active stabilisation to remove the effects of ship motion. We demonstrate that the combination of a commercial Doppler lidar with a custom-made motion-stabilisation platform enables the retrieval of wind profiles in the Arctic boundary layer during both cruising and ice-breaking with statistical uncertainties comparable to land-based measurements. This holds particularly within the planetary boundary layer even though the overall aerosol load was very low. Motion stabilisation was successful for high wind speeds in open water and the resulting wave conditions. It allows for the retrieval of winds with a random error below 0.2 m s-1, comparable to the measurement error of standard radiosondes. The combination of a motion-stabilised platform with a low-maintenance autonomous Doppler lidar has the potential to enable continuous long-term high-resolution ship-based wind profile measurements over the oceans.

  12. Measurement of wind profiles by motion-stabilised ship-borne Doppler lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achtert, P.; Brooks, I. M.; Brooks, B. J.; Moat, B. I.; Prytherch, J.; Persson, P. O. G.; Tjernström, M.

    2015-11-01

    Three months of Doppler lidar wind measurements were obtained during the Arctic Cloud Summer Experiment on the icebreaker Oden during the summer of 2014. Such ship-borne Doppler measurements require active stabilisation to remove the effects of ship motion. We demonstrate that the combination of a commercial Doppler lidar with a custom-made motion-stabilisation platform enables the retrieval of wind profiles in the Arctic atmospheric boundary layer during both cruising and ice-breaking with statistical uncertainties comparable to land-based measurements. This held true particularly within the atmospheric boundary layer even though the overall aerosol load was very low. Motion stabilisation was successful for high wind speeds in open water and the resulting wave conditions. It allows for the retrieval of vertical winds with a random error below 0.2 m s-1. The comparison of lidar-measured wind and radio soundings gives a mean bias of 0.3 m s-1 (2°) and a mean standard deviation of 1.1 m s-1 (12°) for wind speed (wind direction). The agreement for wind direction degrades with height. The combination of a motion-stabilised platform with a low-maintenance autonomous Doppler lidar has the potential to enable continuous long-term high-resolution ship-based wind profile measurements over the oceans.

  13. Zoned mantle convection.

    PubMed

    Albarède, Francis; Van Der Hilst, Rob D

    2002-11-15

    We review the present state of our understanding of mantle convection with respect to geochemical and geophysical evidence and we suggest a model for mantle convection and its evolution over the Earth's history that can reconcile this evidence. Whole-mantle convection, even with material segregated within the D" region just above the core-mantle boundary, is incompatible with the budget of argon and helium and with the inventory of heat sources required by the thermal evolution of the Earth. We show that the deep-mantle composition in lithophilic incompatible elements is inconsistent with the storage of old plates of ordinary oceanic lithosphere, i.e. with the concept of a plate graveyard. Isotopic inventories indicate that the deep-mantle composition is not correctly accounted for by continental debris, primitive material or subducted slabs containing normal oceanic crust. Seismological observations have begun to hint at compositional heterogeneity in the bottom 1000 km or so of the mantle, but there is no compelling evidence in support of an interface between deep and shallow mantle at mid-depth. We suggest that in a system of thermochemical convection, lithospheric plates subduct to a depth that depends - in a complicated fashion - on their composition and thermal structure. The thermal structure of the sinking plates is primarily determined by the direction and rate of convergence, the age of the lithosphere at the trench, the sinking rate and the variation of these parameters over time (i.e. plate-tectonic history) and is not the same for all subduction systems. The sinking rate in the mantle is determined by a combination of thermal (negative) and compositional buoyancy and as regards the latter we consider in particular the effect of the loading of plates with basaltic plateaux produced by plume heads. Barren oceanic plates are relatively buoyant and may be recycled preferentially in the shallow mantle. Oceanic plateau-laden plates have a more pronounced

  14. An introduction to thermal convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieutord, M.

    In this lecture I propose a little tour of thermal convection and its applications in astrophysics. The first part of the lecture is devoted to a qualitative introduction to the convective instability using the Schwarzschild criterion; then, concentrating on the equations governing the fluid motions, I introduce the Boussinesq and anelastic approximations which are so often used in these problems. The following part focuses on the Rayleigh-Bénard model which is worked out in detail up to the Landau equation and the Lorenz strange attractor. Finally, I briefly sketch out some results on turbulent convection and end the lecture with the case of stellar convection.

  15. Rotating convection in elliptical geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evonuk, M.

    2014-12-01

    Tidal interactions between hot jupiter planets and their host stars are likely to result in non-spherical geometries. These elliptical instabilities may have interesting effects on interior fluid convective patterns, which in turn influence the nature of the magnetic dynamo within these planets. Simulations of thermal convection in the 2D rotating equatorial plane are conducted to determine to first order the effect of ellipticity on convection for varying density contrasts with differing convective vigor and rotation rate. This survey is conducted in two dimensions in order to simulate a broad range of ellipticities and to maximize the parameter space explored.

  16. Rapid stabilisation of atherosclerotic plaque with 5-aminolevulinic acid-mediated sonodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhitao; Sun, Xin; Guo, Shuyuan; Wang, Liping; Wang, Tengyu; Peng, Chenghai; Wang, Wei; Tian, Zhen; Zhao, Ruibo; Cao, Wenwu; Tian, Ye

    2015-10-01

    5-Aminolevulinic acid-mediated sonodynamic therapy (ALA-SDT) effectively induces the apoptosis of atherogenic macrophages, but whether it can stabilise atherosclerotic plaque in vivo is unclear. Here, we used an animal model to evaluate the effects of ALA-SDT on plaque stabilisation. Sixty rabbits were induced atherosclerotic plaques in the femoral artery with a combination of silastic tube placement with atherogenic diet, and randomly assigned into control (n = 12) and SDT (n = 48) groups. In the SDT group, after intravenous injected with ALA (60 mg/kg) animals underwent the treatment of ultrasound with intensities of 0.75, 1.00, 1.50 and 2.00 W/cm(²) (n = 12 for each intensity). Seven days after the treatment, the plaque disruption assay was performed to test plaque stability. We found that ALA-SDT with ultrasound intensity of 1.5 W/cm(²) showed the strongest efficacy to stabilise plaques. Under this condition, the frequency of plaque disruption decreased by 88% (p<0.01), positive area of macrophages reduced by 94% (p<0.001) and percentage content of lipids dropped by 60% (p < 0.001), while percentage content of collagens increased by 127% (p<0.001). We also found that the plaque stabilisation by ALA-SDT was associated with increased macrophage apoptosis and apoptotic cell clearance. Moreover, ALA-SDT decreased the contents and activities of matrix metalloproteinase-2,9 and increased the levels of tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinase-1,2 in plaques. Our studies demonstrate that ALA-SDT promotes plaque stabilisation by inducing macrophage elimination and inhibiting matrix degradation. This method might be a promising regimen for atherosclerosis therapy. PMID:26179778

  17. Towards 12% stabilised efficiency in single junction polymorphous silicon solar cells: experimental developments and model predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abolmasov, Sergey; Cabarrocas, Pere Roca i.; Chatterjee, Parsathi

    2016-01-01

    We have combined recent experimental developments in our laboratory with modelling to devise ways of maximising the stabilised efficiency of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) PIN solar cells. The cells were fabricated using the conventional plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) technique at various temperatures, pressures and gas flow ratios. A detailed electrical-optical simulator was used to examine the effect of using wide band gap P-and N-doped μc-SiOx:H layers, as well as a MgF2 anti-reflection coating (ARC) on cell performance. We find that with the best quality a-Si:H so far produced in our laboratory and optimised deposition parameters for the corresponding solar cell, we could not attain a 10% stabilised efficiency due to the high stabilised defect density of a-Si:H, although this landmark has been achieved in some laboratories. On the other hand, a close cousin of a-Si:H, hydrogenated polymorphous silicon (pm-Si:H), a nano-structured silicon thin film produced by PECVD under conditions close to powder formation, has been developed in our laboratory. This material has been shown to have a lower initial and stabilised defect density as well as higher hole mobility than a-Si:H. Modelling indicates that it is possible to attain stabilised efficiencies of 12% when pm-Si:H is incorporated in a solar cell, deposited in a NIP configuration to reduce the P/I interface defects and combined with P- and N-doped μc-SiOx:H layers and a MgF2 ARC.

  18. [Stabilisation of post-acute stage schizophrenics: from the hospital to the city].

    PubMed

    Dammak, A; Stiti, M; Vacheron, M N

    2014-10-01

    Schizophrenia is a debilitating disease that usually begins in young adulthood, at a time when a person would usually make the transition to independent living, but it can occur at any age. The symptoms and behaviour associated with psychosis and schizophrenia have a distressing impact on the individual, and the family. The course of schizophrenia varies considerably. Although most patients will recover, some will have persisting difficulties or remain vulnerable to future episodes. Therefore, stabilisation of patients in acute phases and avoidance of relapse are major objectives of management throughout the course of this disease. The purpose of this article is to clarify the stabilisation, to study the contributing factors and strategies to implement to achieve stability, through a literature review and key guidelines. Thus, the patient is stabilised when productive symptoms and behavioural problems have decreased. So, the stable phase represents a prolonged period of treatment and rehabilitation during which symptoms are under adequate control and the focus is on improving functioning and recovery. Important predictive criteria of stabilisation include: positive symptoms, the number of previous relapses, cooperation with the patient and family, good adherence to treatment and the use of long acting injectable second-generation antipsychotics. After an acute relapse, the careful organization of the discharge and the development of a proposed ambulatory care in tailored care structures will help consolidate stabilisation and obtain remission. Accepting the idea of continuing treatment is a complex decision in which the psychiatrist plays a central role beside patients and their families. The course of integrated actions on modifiable risk factors such as psychosocial support, addictive comorbidities, identification of prodromes, active information for the therapeutic education of patients and families and access to care will also be supported. This would improve

  19. Conservative bounds on heat transport in turbulent convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittenberg, Ralf; Whitehead, Jared

    2012-11-01

    The scaling dependence of the Nusselt number measuring heat transport in turbulent convection with the driving force remains incompletely understood, despite considerable effort in experiment, direct numerical simulation and theory. Variational upper bounds derived systematically from the governing partial differential equations provide a constraint on the possible scaling behaviors. We survey conservative analytical bounds on turbulent heat transport derived via the background flow method, both those obtained rigorously and semi-optimal upper bounds computed by numerical solution of the variational problem over a restricted class of backgrounds. We consider a range of scenarios, including the effects of plate conductivity, velocity boundary conditions and/or infinite Prandtl number in Rayleigh-Bénard convection, as well as related problems such as internal-heating-driven and porous medium convection.

  20. Multicloud parametrization of mesoscale convective systems for the ITCZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khouider, B.; Moncrieff, M. W.

    2014-12-01

    Mesoscale convective systems (MCS), aligned approximately parallel to the background low-level wind shear, are ubiquitous in the Eastern Pacific intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ). They are believed to control the local Hadley circulation and have a nontrivial momentum feedback on the ambient shear. They also play a central role in the two-way interactions between convection and the synoptic and planetary scale waves. They do so by serving as both the building block for organized convection, which involves congestus cloud decks that moisten and precondition the environment for deep convection which in turn is lagged by stratiform anvils, and as a conveyer belt for convective momentum transport (CMT). Here, we propose an extension of the multicloud model of Khouider and Majda (2006) to make the stratiform anvils more sensitive to the background wind shear profile. We do so by invoking two layers of moisture in the free troposphere instead of one, in addition to the boundary layer. Linear stability, in a wind shear background consisting of both mid-level and low-level easterly jets, representing, simultaneously, the Tropical Easterly and African Easterly jets, features the usual synoptic scale instability of the multicloud model plus two new instability bands at the meso-alpha and meso-beta scales, respectively. The meso-alpha and meso-beta modes constitute a paradigm for the dynamics of shear parallel convective systems with the meso-alpha waves being the quasi-stationary systems. In this talk we will present limited domain 3D simulations, without rotation, of realistic shear parallel lines of convection with parallel stratifrom anvils moving eastward, with a steering level in the upper troposphere, as a mesoscale envelope of the individual convective cells moving inwards, with a steering level in the lower troposphere. This provides, among other things, an excellent example of nontrivial CMT effect on the background low-level wind. It results in a narrow channel

  1. Stochastic Thermal Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venturi, Daniele

    2005-11-01

    Stochastic bifurcations and stability of natural convective flows in 2d and 3d enclosures are investigated by the multi-element generalized polynomial chaos (ME-gPC) method (Xiu and Karniadakis, SISC, vol. 24, 2002). The Boussinesq approximation for the variation of physical properties is assumed. The stability analysis is first carried out in a deterministic sense, to determine steady state solutions and primary and secondary bifurcations. Stochastic simulations are then conducted around discontinuities and transitional regimes. It is found that these highly non-linear phenomena can be efficiently captured by the ME-gPC method. Finally, the main findings of the stochastic analysis and their implications for heat transfer will be discussed.

  2. Scale-free convection theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasetto, Stefano; Chiosi, Cesare; Cropper, Mark; Grebel, Eva K.

    2015-08-01

    Convection is one of the fundamental mechanism to transport energy, e.g., in planetology, oceanography as well as in astrophysics where stellar structure customarily described by the mixing-length theory, which makes use of the mixing-length scale parameter to express the convective flux, velocity, and temperature gradients of the convective elements and stellar medium. The mixing-length scale is taken to be proportional to the local pressure scale height of the star, and the proportionality factor (the mixing-length parameter) must be determined by comparing the stellar models to some calibrator, usually the Sun.No strong arguments exist to claim that the mixing-length parameter is the same in all stars and all evolutionary phases. Because of this, all stellar models in literature are hampered by this basic uncertainty.In a recent paper (Pasetto et al 2014) we presented the first fully analytical scale-free theory of convection that does not require the mixing-length parameter. Our self-consistent analytical formulation of convection determines all the properties of convection as a function of the physical behaviour of the convective elements themselves and the surrounding medium (being it a either a star, an ocean, a primordial planet). The new theory of convection is formulated starting from a conventional solution of the Navier-Stokes/Euler equations, i.e. the Bernoulli equation for a perfect fluid, but expressed in a non-inertial reference frame co-moving with the convective elements. In our formalism, the motion of convective cells inside convective-unstable layers is fully determined by a new system of equations for convection in a non-local and time dependent formalism.We obtained an analytical, non-local, time-dependent solution for the convective energy transport that does not depend on any free parameter. The predictions of the new theory in astrophysical environment are compared with those from the standard mixing-length paradigm in stars with

  3. Geothermal Heating, Convective Flow and Ice Thickness on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberg, N. D.; Travis, B. J.; Cuzzi, J.

    2001-01-01

    Our 3D calculations suggest that hydrothermal circulation may occur in the martian regolith and may significantly thin the surface ice layer on Mars at some locations due to the upwelling of warm convecting fluids driven solely by background geothermal heating. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  4. α Centauri and convection theories.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, J.; Neuforge, C.

    1995-03-01

    The metallicity of the alpha Centauri system, Z, suffers from uncertainties. For this reason, different methods are used to calibrate the system: calibrations performed in YALE (Edmonds et al. 1992) use a fixed value for Z: Z=0.026 and a convection parameter for each star, while those made in Meudon and Liege (Noels et al. 1991; Neuforge 1993a) make the hypothesis of a unique convection parameter for the two components of the system and consider Z as a free parameter. We discuss these two techniques, both using models calculated with mixing length convection theory, (MLT), and we explain our solution through the behaviour of the convection parameter with chemical composition. We also compare our results with those of Lydon (1993) and find consistency. With a precise observational value of Z, of the effective temperatures and of the luminosities, our results provide a test for the unicity of α, if, in the frame of the same physics, a precise atmosphere treatment can be used and low-temperature opacities are known with sufficient accuracy. Finally, we perform calibrations with models calculated with the convection treatment of Canuto & Mazzitelli (1991, 1992), where we use {LAMBDA}=z, z being the distance to the top of the convective envelope. We avoid thus problems raised by the MLT convection parameter. In this frame, satisfactory solutions can be found for 0.024<=Z<=0.040.

  5. Convection in Type 2 supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.S.

    1993-10-15

    Results are presented here from several two dimensional numerical calculations of events in Type II supernovae. A new 2-D hydrodynamics and neutrino transport code has been used to compute the effect on the supernova explosion mechanism of convection between the neutrinosphere and the shock. This convection is referred to as exterior convection to distinguish it from convection beneath the neutrinosphere. The model equations and initial and boundary conditions are presented along with the simulation results. The 2-D code was used to compute an exterior convective velocity to compare with the convective model of the Mayle and Wilson 1-D code. Results are presented from several runs with varying sizes of initial perturbation, as well as a case with no initial perturbation but including the effects of rotation. The M&W code does not produce an explosion using the 2-D convective velocity. Exterior convection enhances the outward propagation of the shock, but not enough to ensure a successful explosion. Analytic estimates of the growth rate of the neutron finger instability axe presented. It is shown that this instability can occur beneath the neutrinosphere of the proto-neutron star in a supernova explosion with a growth time of {approximately} 3 microseconds. The behavior of the high entropy bubble that forms between the shock and the neutrinosphere in one dimensional calculations of supernova is investigated. It has been speculated that this bubble is a site for {gamma}-process generation of heavy elements. Two dimensional calculations are presented of the time evolution of the hot bubble and the surrounding stellar material. Unlike one dimensional calculations, the 2D code fails to achieve high entropies in the bubble. When run in a spherically symmetric mode the 2-D code reaches entropies of {approximately} 200. When convection is allowed, the bubble reaches {approximately} 60 then the bubble begins to move upward into the cooler, denser material above it.

  6. Observer-based stabilisation of a class of nonlinear systems in the presence of measurement delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qing; Liu, Jinkun

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, the stabilising control problem for a class of nonlinear system in the presence of measurement delay is addressed. A full-order observer is designed to eliminate the effect of variable output time delay, which is bounded and known. Then, the estimated states are utilised for the state feedback control law to stabilise the considered control system. Lyapunov-Razumikhin approach is employed to analyse the stability of the closed-loop system. Unlike the previous work, the exponential convergence of the estimation error is ensured, rather than asymptotic convergence, by designing a delay-dependent gain of the observer. Moreover, comparison with similar work is also made in simulation to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed strategy.

  7. Steady-state entanglement of distant transmons, stabilised against high transmission loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motzoi, Felix; Halperin, Eli; Wang, Xiaoting; Whaley, Birgitta; Schirmer, Sophie

    2015-03-01

    Being able to stabilise entanglement over long distances and long times provides numerous advantages over pulsed experiments (avoiding variability, synchronisation, and calibration issues) while providing an important resource on-demand, which can then be potentially distilled and used to construct a quantum network. We show how existing superconducting technologies can be entangled over distances of tens of meters providing resilient stabilisation even in the presence of high inefficiency of the transmission channel. This can be achieved both in the dispersive and near-resonant cavity regimes using simple protocols that employ correlated environmental interactions and symmetry breaking. These require only a single-frequency drive that interacts sequentially with each cavity-qubit system. The dispersive regime protocol uses feedback while the near-resonant regime protocol is autonomous.

  8. A sol-powder coating technique for fabrication of yttria stabilised zirconia

    SciTech Connect

    Wattanasiriwech, Darunee . E-mail: darunee@mfu.ac.th; Wattanasiriwech, Suthee; Stevens, Ron

    2006-08-10

    Yttria stabilised zirconia has been prepared using a simple sol-powder coating technique. The polymeric yttria sol, which was prepared using 1,3 propanediol as a network modifier, was homogeneously mixed with nanocrystalline zirconia powder and it showed a dual function: as a binder which promoted densification and a phase modifier which stabilised zirconia in the tetragonal and cubic phases. Thermal analysis and X-ray diffraction revealed that the polymeric yttria sol which decomposed at low temperature into yttrium oxide could change the m {sup {yields}} t phase transformation behaviour of the zirconia, possibly due to the small particle size and very high surface area of both yttria and zirconia particles allowing rapid alloying. The sintered samples exhibited three crystalline phases: monoclinic, tetragonal and cubic, in which cubic and tetragonal are the major phases. The weight fractions of the individual phases present in the selected specimens were determined using quantitative Rietveld analysis.

  9. Head roll stabilisation in the nocturnal bull ant Myrmecia pyriformis: implications for visual navigation.

    PubMed

    Raderschall, Chloé A; Narendra, Ajay; Zeil, Jochen

    2016-05-15

    Ant foragers are known to memorise visual scenes that allow them to repeatedly travel along idiosyncratic routes and to return to specific places. Guidance is provided by a comparison between visual memories and current views, which critically depends on how well the attitude of the visual system is controlled. Here we show that nocturnal bull ants stabilise their head to varying degrees against locomotion-induced body roll movements, and this ability decreases as light levels fall. There are always un-compensated head roll oscillations that match the frequency of the stride cycle. Head roll stabilisation involves both visual and non-visual cues as ants compensate for body roll in complete darkness and also respond with head roll movements when confronted with visual pattern oscillations. We show that imperfect head roll control degrades navigation-relevant visual information and discuss ways in which navigating ants may deal with this problem. PMID:26994172

  10. Accessible Mannitol-Based Amphiphiles (MNAs) for Membrane Protein Solubilisation and Stabilisation.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Hazrat; Du, Yang; Scull, Nicola J; Mortensen, Jonas S; Tarrasch, Jeffrey; Bae, Hyoung Eun; Loland, Claus J; Byrne, Bernadette; Kobilka, Brian K; Chae, Pil Seok

    2016-05-17

    Integral membrane proteins are amphipathic molecules crucial for all cellular life. The structural study of these macromolecules starts with protein extraction from the native membranes, followed by purification and crystallisation. Detergents are essential tools for these processes, but detergent-solubilised membrane proteins often denature and aggregate, resulting in loss of both structure and function. In this study, a novel class of agents, designated mannitol-based amphiphiles (MNAs), were prepared and characterised for their ability to solubilise and stabilise membrane proteins. Some of MNAs conferred enhanced stability to four membrane proteins including a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), the β2 adrenergic receptor (β2 AR), compared to both n-dodecyl-d-maltoside (DDM) and the other MNAs. These agents were also better than DDM for electron microscopy analysis of the β2 AR. The ease of preparation together with the enhanced membrane protein stabilisation efficacy demonstrates the value of these agents for future membrane protein research. PMID:27072057

  11. Robust stabilisation of time-varying delay systems with probabilistic uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Ning; Xiong, Junlin; Lam, James

    2016-09-01

    For robust stabilisation of time-varying delay systems, only sufficient conditions are available to date. A natural question is as follows: if the existing sufficient conditions are not satisfied, and hence no controllers can be found, what can one do to improve the stability performance of time-varying delay systems? This question is addressed in this paper when there is a probabilistic structure on the parameter uncertainty set. A randomised algorithm is proposed to design a state-feedback controller, which stabilises the system over the uncertainty domain in a probabilistic sense. The capability of the designed controller is quantified by the probability of stability of the resulting closed-loop system. The accuracy of the solution obtained from the randomised algorithm is also analysed. Finally, numerical examples are used to illustrate the effectiveness and advantages of the developed controller design approach.

  12. Nonlinear Convection in Mushy Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worster, M. Grae; Anderson, Daniel M.; Schulze, T. P.

    1996-01-01

    When alloys solidify in a gravitational field there are complex interactions between solidification and natural, buoyancy-driven convection that can alter the composition and impair the structure of the solid product. The particular focus of this project has been the compositional convection within mushy layers that occurs in situations where the lighter component of the alloy is rejected into the melt during solidification by cooling from below. The linear stability of such a situation was previously described and has been further elucidated in a number of published articles. Here we describe some recent developments in the study of nonlinear evolution of convection in mushy layers.

  13. Heat distribution by natural convection

    SciTech Connect

    Balcomb, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    Natural convection can provide adequate heat distribution in many situtations that arise in buildings. This is appropriate, for example, in passive solar buildings where some rooms tend to be more strongly solar heated than others or to reduce the number of heating units required in a building. Natural airflow and heat transport through doorways and other internal building apertures is predictable and can be accounted for in the design. The nature of natural convection is described, and a design chart is presented appropriate to a simple, single-doorway situation. Natural convective loops that can occur in buildings are described and a few design guidelines are presented.

  14. Convective adjustment in baroclinic atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emanuel, Kerry A.

    1986-01-01

    Local convection in planetary atmospheres is generally considered to result from the action of gravity on small regions of anomalous density. That in rotating baroclinic fluids the total potential energy for small scale convection contains a centrifugal as well as a gravitational contribution is shown. Convective adjustment in such an atmosphere results in the establishment of near adiabatic lapse rates of temperature along suitably defined surfaces of constant angular momentum, rather than in the vertical. This leads in general to sub-adiabatic vertical lapse rates. That such an adjustment actually occurs in the earth's atmosphere is shown by example and the magnitude of the effect for several other planetary atmospheres is estimated.

  15. Dynamics of convective scale interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purdom, James F. W.; Sinclair, Peter C.

    1988-01-01

    Several of the mesoscale dynamic and thermodynamic aspects of convective scale interaction are examined. An explanation of how sounding data can be coupled with satellite observed cumulus development in the warm sector and the arc cloud line's time evolution to develop a short range forecast of expected convective intensity along an arc cloud line. The formative, mature and dissipating stages of the arc cloud line life cycle are discussed. Specific properties of convective scale interaction are presented and the relationship between arc cloud lines and tornado producing thunderstorms is considered.

  16. A group-based approach to stabilisation and symptom management in a phased treatment model for refugees and asylum seekers

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Mary E. A.; Blumberg, Jocelyn M.; Gratton, Jacqui L.; Walsh, Eileen G.; Kayal, Hamodi

    2013-01-01

    Background Traumatised asylum seekers and refugees may present with significant and complex mental health problems as a result of prolonged, extreme, and multiple traumatic events. This is further complicated by ongoing complex social circumstances. Concepts In our work at the Traumatic Stress Clinic (TSC), the understanding afforded by the concept of complex posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) together with the related notion of a phased treatment model, provides a useful framework for organising our work with this population. Clinical Applications An explication of complex PTSD as it applies to our client group is presented, followed by a description of our phased treatment model and an outline of the core principles, which guide our clinical approach. Our symptom management and stabilisation groups have been developed and refined over time and draw on techniques from a variety of cognitive behavioural therapies. These are described in some detail with illustrative clinical case vignettes. Conclusion This paper concludes with some reflections on the challenges inherent to working with this complex client group. PMID:24371509

  17. Arsenic and copper stabilisation in a contaminated soil by coal fly ash and green waste compost.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Daniel C W; Yip, Alex C K; Olds, William E; Weber, Paul A

    2014-09-01

    In situ metal stabilisation by amendments has been demonstrated as an appealing low-cost remediation strategy for contaminated soil. This study investigated the short-term leaching behaviour and long-term stability of As and Cu in soil amended with coal fly ash and/or green waste compost. Locally abundant inorganic (limestone and bentonite) and carbonaceous (lignite) resources were also studied for comparison. Column leaching experiments revealed that coal fly ash outperformed limestone and bentonite amendments for As stabilisation. It also maintained the As stability under continuous leaching of acidic solution, which was potentially attributed to high-affinity adsorption, co-precipitation, and pozzolanic reaction of coal fly ash. However, Cu leaching in the column experiments could not be mitigated by any of these inorganic amendments, suggesting the need for co-addition of carbonaceous materials that provides strong chelation with oxygen-containing functional groups for Cu stabilisation. Green waste compost suppressed the Cu leaching more effectively than lignite due to the difference in chemical composition and dissolved organic matter. After 9-month soil incubation, coal fly ash was able to minimise the concentrations of As and Cu in the soil solution without the addition of carbonaceous materials. Nevertheless, leachability tests suggested that the provision of green waste compost and lignite augmented the simultaneous reduction of As and Cu leachability in a fairly aggressive leaching environment. These results highlight the importance of assessing stability and remobilisation of sequestered metals under varying environmental conditions for ensuring a plausible and enduring soil stabilisation. PMID:24859701

  18. The Stabilisation Potential of Individual and Mixed Assemblages of Natural Bacteria and Microalgae

    PubMed Central

    Lubarsky, Helen V.; Hubas, Cédric; Chocholek, Melanie; Larson, Fredrik; Manz, Werner; Paterson, David M.; Gerbersdorf, Sabine U.

    2010-01-01

    It is recognized that microorganisms inhabiting natural sediments significantly mediate the erosive response of the bed (“ecosystem engineers”) through the secretion of naturally adhesive organic material (EPS: extracellular polymeric substances). However, little is known about the individual engineering capability of the main biofilm components (heterotrophic bacteria and autotrophic microalgae) in terms of their individual contribution to the EPS pool and their relative functional contribution to substratum stabilisation. This paper investigates the engineering effects on a non-cohesive test bed as the surface was colonised by natural benthic assemblages (prokaryotic, eukaryotic and mixed cultures) of bacteria and microalgae. MagPI (Magnetic Particle Induction) and CSM (Cohesive Strength Meter) respectively determined the adhesive capacity and the cohesive strength of the culture surface. Stabilisation was significantly higher for the bacterial assemblages (up to a factor of 2) than for axenic microalgal assemblages. The EPS concentration and the EPS composition (carbohydrates and proteins) were both important in determining stabilisation. The peak of engineering effect was significantly greater in the mixed assemblage as compared to the bacterial (x 1.2) and axenic diatom (x 1.7) cultures. The possibility of synergistic effects between the bacterial and algal cultures in terms of stability was examined and rejected although the concentration of EPS did show a synergistic elevation in mixed culture. The rapid development and overall stabilisation potential of the various assemblages was impressive (x 7.5 and ×9.5, for MagPI and CSM, respectively, as compared to controls). We confirmed the important role of heterotrophic bacteria in “biostabilisation” and highlighted the interactions between autotrophic and heterotrophic biofilm consortia. This information contributes to the conceptual understanding of the microbial sediment engineering that represents an

  19. Finite-time state feedback stabilisation of stochastic high-order nonlinear feedforward systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xue-Jun; Zhang, Xing-Hui; Zhang, Kemei

    2016-07-01

    This paper studies the finite-time state feedback stabilisation of stochastic high-order nonlinear feedforward systems. Based on the stochastic Lyapunov theorem on finite-time stability, by using the homogeneous domination method, the adding one power integrator and sign function method, constructing a ? Lyapunov function and verifying the existence and uniqueness of solution, a continuous state feedback controller is designed to guarantee the closed-loop system finite-time stable in probability.

  20. Cooling and thermal stabilisation of Faraday rotators in the temperature range 300 - 200 K using Peltier elements

    SciTech Connect

    Palashov, O V; Ievlev, Ivan V; Perevezentsev, E A; Katin, E V; Khazanov, Efim A

    2011-09-30

    A new method for cooling and thermal stabilisation of Faraday rotators using Peltier elements is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The scheme of thermal stabilisation of the magnetooptical elements ensures reliable operation of the device at the absorbed power {approx}2 W, which corresponds to the transmitted laser radiation power 1.5 kW. The results of the work make it possible to predict high efficiency of this method at the laser power of tens of kilowatts.

  1. [Failed compression osteosynthesis of the dens axis treated by anterior C1-C2 transarticular stabilisation. Case report].

    PubMed

    Kočiš, J; Kelbl, M

    2011-01-01

    We describe the case of an 80-year-old female patient who had undergone anterior C1-C2 transarticular stabilisation and was subsequently treated by the triple-screw method for failed compression osteosynthesis of a AO type III dens axis fracture. Key words: dens axis, upper cervical spine fracture, eldery, triple screw technique, anterior transarticular C1-C2 stabilisation. PMID:21729645

  2. High-performance electronic image stabilisation for shift and rotation correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Steve C. J.; Hickman, D. L.; Wu, F.

    2014-06-01

    A novel low size, weight and power (SWaP) video stabiliser called HALO™ is presented that uses a SoC to combine the high processing bandwidth of an FPGA, with the signal processing flexibility of a CPU. An image based architecture is presented that can adapt the tiling of frames to cope with changing scene dynamics. A real-time implementation is then discussed that can generate several hundred optical flow vectors per video frame, to accurately calculate the unwanted rigid body translation and rotation of camera shake. The performance of the HALO™ stabiliser is comprehensively benchmarked against the respected Deshaker 3.0 off-line stabiliser plugin to VirtualDub. Eight different videos are used for benchmarking, simulating: battlefield, surveillance, security and low-level flight applications in both visible and IR wavebands. The results show that HALO™ rivals the performance of Deshaker within its operating envelope. Furthermore, HALO™ may be easily reconfigured to adapt to changing operating conditions or requirements; and can be used to host other video processing functionality like image distortion correction, fusion and contrast enhancement.

  3. Stabilisation of Na,K-ATPase structure by the cardiotonic steroid ouabain

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, Andrew J.; Fedosova, Natalya U.; Hoffmann, Søren V.; Wallace, B.A.; Esmann, Mikael

    2013-05-31

    Highlights: •Ouabain binding to pig and shark Na,K-ATPase enhances thermal stability. •Ouabain stabilises both membrane-bound and solubilised Na,K-ATPase. •Synchrotron radiation circular dichroism is used for structure determination. •Secondary structure in general is not affected by ouabain binding. •Stabilisation is due to re-arrangement of tertiary structure. -- Abstract: Cardiotonic steroids such as ouabain bind with high affinity to the membrane-bound cation-transporting P-type Na,K-ATPase, leading to complete inhibition of the enzyme. Using synchrotron radiation circular dichroism spectroscopy we show that the enzyme-ouabain complex is less susceptible to thermal denaturation (unfolding) than the ouabain-free enzyme, and this protection is observed with Na,K-ATPase purified from pig kidney as well as from shark rectal glands. It is also shown that detergent-solubilised preparations of Na,K-ATPase are stabilised by ouabain, which could account for the successful crystallisation of Na,K-ATPase in the ouabain-bound form. The secondary structure is not significantly affected by the binding of ouabain. Ouabain appears however, to induce a reorganization of the tertiary structure towards a more compact protein structure which is less prone to unfolding; recent crystal structures of the two enzymes are consistent with this interpretation. These circular dichroism spectroscopic studies in solution therefore provide complementary information to that provided by crystallography.

  4. Global stabilisation of a class of generalised cascaded systems by homogeneous method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Shihong; Zheng, Wei Xing

    2016-04-01

    This paper considers the problem of global stabilisation of a class of generalised cascaded systems. By using the extended adding a power integrator technique, a global controller is first constructed for the driving subsystem. Then based on the homogeneous properties and polynomial assumption, it is shown that the stabilisation of the driving subsystem implies the stabilisation of the overall cascaded system. Meanwhile, by properly choosing some control parameters, the global finite-time stability of the closed-loop cascaded system is also established. The proposed control method has several new features. First, the nonlinear cascaded systems considered in the paper are more general than the conventional ones, since the powers in the nominal part of the driving subsystem are not required to be restricted to ratios of positive odd numbers. Second, the proposed method has some flexible parameters which provide the possibility for designing continuously differentiable controllers for cascaded systems, while the existing designed controllers for such kind of cascaded systems are only continuous. Third, the homogenous and polynomial conditions adopted for the driven subsystem are easier to verify when compared with the matching conditions that are widely used previously. Furthermore, the efficiency of the proposed control method is validated by its application to finite-time tracking control of non-holonomic wheeled mobile robot.

  5. High-pulse-repetition-rate UV lasers with the inductance-capacitance discharge stabilisation

    SciTech Connect

    Andramanov, A V; Kabaev, S A; Lazhintsev, B V; Nor-Arevyan, V A; Pisetskaya, A V; Selemir, Victor D

    2009-02-28

    Compact high-pulse-repetition-rate XeF and KrF excimer lasers and an N{sub 2} laser with plate electrodes and the inductive-capacitance discharge stabilisation are studied. The composition and pressure of the active medium of lasers are optimised for obtaining the maximum output energy and maximum pulse repetition rate at comparatively low (no more than 19 m s{sup -1}) active-medium flow rates in the interelectrode gap. The pulse repetition rate achieved 4-5 kHz for the relative root-mean-square deviation of the laser pulse energy less than 2%. It is found that the energy of the N{sub 2}-laser pulses changes periodically under the action of acoustic perturbations appearing at high pulse repetition rates. It is shown that the use of the inductance-capacitance stabilisation of the discharge provides the increase in the maximum pulse repetition rate by 0.5-1.5 kHz (depending on the active medium type). It is found that the stability of the output energy and maximum pulse repetition rate depend on the location of preionisation sparks with respect to the gas flow direction. Some ways for the development of the technology of plate electrodes and inductance-capacitance discharge stabilisation are proposed. (lasers)

  6. Effects of electron beam irradiation on the property behaviour of poly(ether-block-amide) blended with various stabilisers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Kieran A.; Kennedy, James E.; Barron, Valerie; McEvoy, Brian; Vrain, Olivier; Ryan, Damien; Cowman, Richard; Higginbotham, Clement L.

    2015-05-01

    Radiosterilisation can induce modifications and/or degradation to transpire in poly(ether-block-amide) (PEBA) following irradiation. The current investigation utilises combined synergistic mixtures of stabilisers to minimise these effects, by melt blending them with the PEBA material. Hindered amine stabilisers (HAS), primary antioxidants and secondary antioxidants were the stabilisers incorporate to reduce/eliminate the effects of 50 kGy electron beam irradiation dose on the material. Results were discussed by comparing the stabilising efficiency of mixtures on the PEBA material in contrast to the control sample. Dynamic frequency sweeps demonstrated the formation of crosslinks, where the degree of crosslinking was dependent on the combination of stabilisers mixed in the base material (PEBA). The storage modulus displayed that PEBA blended with Irganox 565 had very slight changes in contrast to all other samples following irradiation. However, since this sample is a phenol containing system, severe discolouration was observed in comparison to other samples due to the oxidation of the hindered phenol. Overall, this study provides compelling evidence that a combined synergistic mixture of Irganox 565 (multifunctional phenolic antioxidant) and Tinuvin 783 (hindered amide light stabiliser) with PEBA, resulted in the best radiation stability.

  7. Polycarboxylate ethers: The key towards non-toxic TiO2 nanoparticle stabilisation in physiological solutions.

    PubMed

    Koch, S; Kessler, M; Mandel, K; Dembski, S; Heuzé, K; Hackenberg, S

    2016-07-01

    Stable, non-agglomerated TiO2 nanoparticle (NP) dispersions are a crucial requirement for an accurate NP dosing in in vitro and in vivo experiments. In this study self-synthesised TiO2 NPs were stabilised in three different cell culture media (DMEM, RPMI, BEGM) with the help of stabilising agents. Cell culture tested stabilisers (bovine serum albumin, fetal bovine serum) were compared to non-tested commercial products which are commonly utilized in the cement industry (Melflux(®) 4930 F, Melpers(®) 4343, Sika(®) ViscoCrete(®)-10110178). For a quantitative evaluation and comparison of the degree of stabilisation, a sedimentation study using UV absorbance spectroscopy was carried out and the agglomerate size was measured via dynamic light scattering. The cytotoxicity of the novel surfactants and stabilised NPs was examined in a head and neck squamous cell carcinoma-derived FaDu cell line and in human mesenchymal stem cells. We successfully stabilised TiO2 NPs with Melflux(®) 4930 F in each cell culture medium, achieving perfect stability over at least one day and agglomerate sizes of less than 100nm, while the cytotoxicity of the NPs was not affected. PMID:26998862

  8. Convective heat flow probe

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, J.C.; Hardee, H.C.; Striker, R.P.

    1984-01-09

    A convective heat flow probe device is provided which measures heat flow and fluid flow magnitude in the formation surrounding a borehole. The probe comprises an elongate housing adapted to be lowered down into the borehole; a plurality of heaters extending along the probe for heating the formation surrounding the borehole; a plurality of temperature sensors arranged around the periphery of the probe for measuring the temperature of the surrounding formation after heating thereof by the heater elements. The temperature sensors and heater elements are mounted in a plurality of separate heater pads which are supported by the housing and which are adapted to be radially expanded into firm engagement with the walls of the borehole. The heat supplied by the heater elements and the temperatures measured by the temperature sensors are monitored and used in providing the desired measurements. The outer peripheral surfaces of the heater pads are configured as segments of a cylinder and form a full cylinder when taken together. A plurality of temperature sensors are located on each pad so as to extend along the length and across the width thereof, with a heating element being located in each pad beneath the temperature sensors. An expansion mechanism driven by a clamping motor provides expansion and retraction of the heater pads and expandable packet-type seals are provided along the probe above and below the heater pads.

  9. Convective heat flow probe

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, James C.; Hardee, Harry C.; Striker, Richard P.

    1985-01-01

    A convective heat flow probe device is provided which measures heat flow and fluid flow magnitude in the formation surrounding a borehole. The probe comprises an elongate housing adapted to be lowered down into the borehole; a plurality of heaters extending along the probe for heating the formation surrounding the borehole; a plurality of temperature sensors arranged around the periphery of the probe for measuring the temperature of the surrounding formation after heating thereof by the heater elements. The temperature sensors and heater elements are mounted in a plurality of separate heater pads which are supported by the housing and which are adapted to be radially expanded into firm engagement with the walls of the borehole. The heat supplied by the heater elements and the temperatures measured by the temperature sensors are monitored and used in providing the desired measurements. The outer peripheral surfaces of the heater pads are configured as segments of a cylinder and form a full cylinder when taken together. A plurality of temperature sensors are located on each pad so as to extend along the length and across the width thereof, with a heating element being located in each pad beneath the temperature sensors. An expansion mechanism driven by a clamping motor provides expansion and retraction of the heater pads and expandable packer-type seals are provided along the probe above and below the heater pads.

  10. DNS of Horizontal Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Brian; Scotti, Alberto

    2014-11-01

    We perform three-dimensional DNS of Horizontal Convection in a rectangular tank with idealized boundary conditions. The flow is driven by imposing the profile for the buoyancy b at the surface, where it ranges from b0 to b0 + Δb and the transition region is confined to a very small area. The Rayleigh based on the domain depth ranges from 105 to 1012. The scaling observed for the Nusselt number and the strength of the circulation is consistent with Rossby's scaling across the range of Rayleigh numbers considered, indicating that the dynamics in the boundary layer under the ``warming'' side throttles the flow. Energetically, we find that Available Potential Energy (APE) is generated along the surface, and converted to Kinetic Energy (KE). Along the descending plume energy goes from APE to KE up to Ra ~1011 . For higher Rayleigh numbers the plume becomes a net sink of APE. When the switch occurs, a stagnant layer develops near the bottom, and the overall circulation becomes characterized by a narrow plume which retroflects rapidly towards the surface, with a shallow recirculation to close the flow. This may indicate the beginning of a Sandström regime characterized by a stagnant abyssal region and a shallow circulation. Work supported by the National Science Foundation.

  11. Realistic Solar Surface Convection Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, Robert F.; Nordlund, Ake

    2000-01-01

    We perform essentially parameter free simulations with realistic physics of convection near the solar surface. We summarize the physics that is included and compare the simulation results with observations. Excellent agreement is obtained for the depth of the convection zone, the p-mode frequencies, the p-mode excitation rate, the distribution of the emergent continuum intensity, and the profiles of weak photospheric lines. We describe how solar convection is nonlocal. It is driven from a thin surface thermal boundary layer where radiative cooling produces low entropy gas which forms the cores of the downdrafts in which most of the buoyancy work occurs. We show that turbulence and vorticity are mostly confined to the intergranular lanes and underlying downdrafts. Finally, we illustrate our current work on magneto-convection.

  12. Convection, nucleosynthesis, and core collapse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bazan, Grant; Arnett, David

    1994-01-01

    We use a piecewise parabolic method hydrodynamics code (PROMETHEUS) to study convective burning in two dimensions in an oxygen shell prior to core collapse. Significant mixing beyond convective boundaries determined by mixing-length theory brings fuel (C-12) into the convective regon, causing hot spots of nuclear burning. Plumes dominate the velocity structure. Finite perturbations arise in a region in which O-16 will be explosively burned to Ni-56 when the star explodes; the resulting instabilities and mixing are likely to distribute Ni-56 throughout the supernova envelope. Inhomogeneities in Y(sub e) may be large enough to affect core collapse and will affect explosive nucleosynthesis. The nature of convective burning is dramatically different from that assumed in one-dimensional simulations; quantitative estimates of nucleosynthetic yields, core masses, and the approach to core collapse will be affected.

  13. Parameterization of precipitating shallow convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, Axel

    2015-04-01

    Shallow convective clouds play a decisive role in many regimes of the atmosphere. They are abundant in the trade wind regions and essential for the radiation budget in the sub-tropics. They are also an integral part of the diurnal cycle of convection over land leading to the formation of deeper modes of convection later on. Errors in the representation of these small and seemingly unimportant clouds can lead to misforecasts in many situations. Especially for high-resolution NWP models at 1-3 km grid spacing which explicitly simulate deeper modes of convection, the parameterization of the sub-grid shallow convection is an important issue. Large-eddy simulations (LES) can provide the data to study shallow convective clouds and their interaction with the boundary layer in great detail. In contrast to observation, simulations provide a complete and consistent dataset, which may not be perfectly realistic due to the necessary simplifications, but nevertheless enables us to study many aspects of those clouds in a self-consistent way. Today's supercomputing capabilities make it possible to use domain sizes that not only span several NWP grid boxes, but also allow for mesoscale self-organization of the cloud field, which is an essential behavior of precipitating shallow convection. By coarse-graining the LES data to the grid of an NWP model, the sub-grid fluctuations caused by shallow convective clouds can be analyzed explicitly. These fluctuations can then be parameterized in terms of a PDF-based closure. The necessary choices for such schemes like the shape of the PDF, the number of predicted moments, etc., will be discussed. For example, it is shown that a universal three-parameter distribution of total water may exist at scales of O(1 km) but not at O(10 km). In a next step the variance budgets of moisture and temperature in the cloud-topped boundary layer are studied. What is the role and magnitude of the microphysical correlation terms in these equations, which

  14. Natural convection in nonvertical wells

    SciTech Connect

    Denbow, D.A.; Murphy, H.D.; McEligot, D.M.

    1985-01-01

    Convective instabilities and the shapes of the ensuing convection cells were experimentally studied for nonvertical wellbores. Steady-state temperature distributions were measured for three inclination angles over a wide range of heating rates to demonstrate the effects of drilling angle and Rayleigh number. In addition, velocities were estimated by measuring the time-of-flight of tracers formed by the Thymol blue technique. 8 refs., 6 figs.

  15. Pattern Formation in Convective Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, R.; Bestehorn, M.; Haken, H.

    The present article reviews recent progress in the study of pattern formation in convective instabilities. After a brief discussion of the relevant basic hydrodynamic equations as well as a short outline of the mathematical treatment of pattern formation in complex systems the self-organization of spatial and spatio-temporal structures due to convective instabilities is considered. The formation of various forms of convective patterns arising in the Bénard experiment, i.e. in a horizontal fluid layer heated from below, is discussed. Then the review considers pattern formation in the Bénard instability in spherical geometries. In that case it can be demonstrated how the interaction among several convective cells may lead to time dependent as well as chaotic evolution of the spatial structures. Finally, the convective instability in a binary fluid mixture is discussed. In contrast to the instability in a single component fluid the instability may be oscillatory. In that case convection sets in in the form of travelling wave patterns which in addition to a complicated and chaotic temporal behaviour exhibit more or less spatial irregularity already close to threshold.

  16. Isentropic Analysis of Convective Motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pauluis, Olivier M.; Mrowiec, Agnieszka A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyzes the convective mass transport by sorting air parcels in terms of their equivalent potential temperature to determine an isentropic streamfunction. By averaging the vertical mass flux at a constant value of the equivalent potential temperature, one can compute an isentropic mass transport that filters out reversible oscillatory motions such as gravity waves. This novel approach emphasizes the fact that the vertical energy and entropy transports by convection are due to the combination of ascending air parcels with high energy and entropy and subsiding air parcels with lower energy and entropy. Such conditional averaging can be extended to other dynamic and thermodynamic variables such as vertical velocity, temperature, or relative humidity to obtain a comprehensive description of convective motions. It is also shown how this approach can be used to determine the mean diabatic tendencies from the three-dimensional dynamic and thermodynamic fields. A two-stream approximation that partitions the isentropic circulation into a mean updraft and a mean downdraft is also introduced. This offers a straightforward way to identify the mean properties of rising and subsiding air parcels. The results from the two-stream approximation are compared with two other definitions of the cloud mass flux. It is argued that the isentropic analysis offers a robust definition of the convective mass transport that is not tainted by the need to arbitrarily distinguish between convection and its environment, and that separates the irreversible convective overturning fromoscillations associated with gravity waves.

  17. Observation of deep convection initiation from shallow convection environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lothon, Marie; Couvreux, Fleur; Guichard, Françoise; Campistron, Bernard; Chong, Michel; Rio, Catherine; Williams, Earle

    2010-05-01

    In the afternoon of 10 July 2006, deep convective cells initiated right in the field of view of the Massachusetts Institute Technology (MIT) C-band Doppler radar. This radar, with its 3D exploration at 10 min temporal resolution and 250 m radial resolution, allows us to track the deep convective cells and also provides clear air observations of the boundary layer structure prior to deep convection initiation. Several other observational platforms were operating then which allow us to thoroughly analyse this case: Vertically pointing aerosol lidar, W-band radar and ceilometer from the ARM Mobile Facility, along with radiosoundings and surface measurements enable us to describe the environment, from before their initiation to after the propagation of of one propagating cell that generated a circular gust front very nicely caught by the MIT radar. The systems considered here differ from the mesoscale convective systems which are often associated with African Easterly Waves, increasing CAPE and decreasing CIN. The former have smaller size, and initiate more locally, but there are numerous and still play a large role in the atmospheric circulation and scalar transport. Though, they remain a challenge to model. (See the presentation by Guichard et al. in the same session, for a model set up based on the same case, with joint single-column model and Large Eddy Simulation, which aims at better understanding and improving the parametrisation of deep convection initiation.) Based on the analysis of the observations mentioned above, we consider here the possible sources of deep convection initiation that day, which showed a typical boundary-layer growth in semi-arid environment, with isolated deep convective events.

  18. Convection wave studies over land and sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuettner, Joachim; Grossmann, Robert

    1991-01-01

    Preliminary results of recent case studies conducted over land and sea are given. Two dimensional convection (roll vortex/cloudstreet) and three dimensional convection in the underlying boundary layer are dealt with. Vertical momentum flux profiles and time series of important parameters and vertical soundings taken in the experiment area are shown. The three cases described show that convection waves occur over land and over ocean, over three dimensional convection and over two dimensional convection.

  19. The effect of external heat transfer on thermal explosion in a spherical vessel with natural convection.

    PubMed

    Campbell, A N

    2015-07-14

    When any exothermic reaction proceeds in an unstirred vessel, natural convection may develop. This flow can significantly alter the heat transfer from the reacting fluid to the environment and hence alter the balance between heat generation and heat loss, which determines whether or not the system will explode. Previous studies of the effects of natural convection on thermal explosion have considered reactors where the temperature of the wall of the reactor is held constant. This implies that there is infinitely fast heat transfer between the wall of the vessel and the surrounding environment. In reality, there will be heat transfer resistances associated with conduction through the wall of the reactor and from the wall to the environment. The existence of these additional heat transfer resistances may alter the rate of heat transfer from the hot region of the reactor to the environment and hence the stability of the reaction. This work presents an initial numerical study of thermal explosion in a spherical reactor under the influence of natural convection and external heat transfer, which neglects the effects of consumption of reactant. Simulations were performed to examine the changing behaviour of the system as the intensity of convection and the importance of external heat transfer were varied. It was shown that the temporal development of the maximum temperature in the reactor was qualitatively similar as the Rayleigh and Biot numbers were varied. Importantly, the maximum temperature in a stable system was shown to vary with Biot number. This has important consequences for the definitions used for thermal explosion in systems with significant reactant consumption. Additionally, regions of parameter space where explosions occurred were identified. It was shown that reducing the Biot number increases the likelihood of explosion and reduces the stabilising effect of natural convection. Finally, the results of the simulations were shown to compare favourably with

  20. Flux Emergence in a Magnetized Convection Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, R. F.; Brun, A. S.

    2013-07-01

    We study the influence of a dynamo magnetic field on the buoyant rise and emergence of twisted magnetic flux ropes and their influence on the global external magnetic field. We ran three-dimensional MHD numerical simulations using the ASH code (anelastic spherical harmonics) and analyzed the dynamical evolution of such buoyant flux ropes from the bottom of the convection zone until the post-emergence phases. The global nature of this model can only very crudely and inaccurately represent the local dynamics of the buoyant rise of the implanted magnetic structure, but nonetheless allows us to study the influence of global effects, such as self-consistently generated differential rotation and meridional circulation, and of Coriolis forces. Although motivated by the solar context, this model cannot be thought of as a realistic model of the rise of magnetic structures and their emergence in the Sun, where the local dynamics are completely different. The properties of initial phases of the buoyant rise are determined essentially by the flux-rope's properties and the convective flows and consequently are in good agreement with previous studies. However, the effects of the interaction of the background dynamo field become increasingly strong as the flux ropes evolve. During the buoyant rise across the convection zone, the flux-rope's magnetic field strength scales as Bvpropρα, with α <~ 1. An increase of radial velocity, density, and current density is observed to precede flux emergence at all longitudes. The geometry, latitude, and relative orientation of the flux ropes with respect to the background magnetic field influences the resulting rise speeds, zonal flow amplitudes (which develop within the flux ropes), and the corresponding surface signatures. This influences the morphology, duration and amplitude of the surface shearing, and the Poynting flux associated with magnetic flux-rope emergence. The emerged magnetic flux influences the system's global polarity

  1. FLUX EMERGENCE IN A MAGNETIZED CONVECTION ZONE

    SciTech Connect

    Pinto, R. F.; Brun, A. S.

    2013-07-20

    We study the influence of a dynamo magnetic field on the buoyant rise and emergence of twisted magnetic flux ropes and their influence on the global external magnetic field. We ran three-dimensional MHD numerical simulations using the ASH code (anelastic spherical harmonics) and analyzed the dynamical evolution of such buoyant flux ropes from the bottom of the convection zone until the post-emergence phases. The global nature of this model can only very crudely and inaccurately represent the local dynamics of the buoyant rise of the implanted magnetic structure, but nonetheless allows us to study the influence of global effects, such as self-consistently generated differential rotation and meridional circulation, and of Coriolis forces. Although motivated by the solar context, this model cannot be thought of as a realistic model of the rise of magnetic structures and their emergence in the Sun, where the local dynamics are completely different. The properties of initial phases of the buoyant rise are determined essentially by the flux-rope's properties and the convective flows and consequently are in good agreement with previous studies. However, the effects of the interaction of the background dynamo field become increasingly strong as the flux ropes evolve. During the buoyant rise across the convection zone, the flux-rope's magnetic field strength scales as B{proportional_to}{rho}{sup {alpha}}, with {alpha} {approx}< 1. An increase of radial velocity, density, and current density is observed to precede flux emergence at all longitudes. The geometry, latitude, and relative orientation of the flux ropes with respect to the background magnetic field influences the resulting rise speeds, zonal flow amplitudes (which develop within the flux ropes), and the corresponding surface signatures. This influences the morphology, duration and amplitude of the surface shearing, and the Poynting flux associated with magnetic flux-rope emergence. The emerged magnetic flux

  2. Year of Tropical Convection (YOTC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moncrieff, M. W.; Waliser, D. E.

    2009-05-01

    Tropical convection and the multi-scale organization of precipitating convection are associated with scale interactions that are fundamental to the atmospheric circulation and its interaction with the ocean. The realistic representation of tropical convection and its multi-scale organization is a long-standing challenge for numerical weather prediction and climate models. Incomplete knowledge and practical issues disadvantage the representation of important phenomena and processes in global models, such as the ITCZ, monsoons, MJO, and easterly waves and tropical cyclones. The tropical-extratropical interactions of tropical convection are key aspects of the Predictability and Dynamical Processes of THORPEX. The WCRP and WWRP/THORPEX are jointly coordinating a year of observing, modeling, and forecasting with a focus on the multi-scale organization of tropical convection, prediction, and predictability: Year of Tropical Convection (YOTC). Satellite, in-situ, and field-campaign measurements (e.g., TPARC), operational prediction, and cloud-system resolving models will be utilized. The temporal scales addressed, up to seasonal, enables the above phenomena to be modeled at high resolution, and seamless prediction issues at the intersection of weather and climate addressed. The 'Year', the period 1 May 2008 - 31 October 2009, began with the archiving of ECMWF T799 (i.e., 25 km) products: i) complete global analysis; ii) deterministic forecasts; and iii) special diagnostics. Plans are underway to obtain similar NCEP and NASA GEOS-5 data, and to integrate various multi-sensor satellite products. The YOTC Science Plan, which is available at http://www.wmo.int/pages/prog/arep/wwrp/new/documents/ YOTC_Science_Plan.pdf, has been published as a WMO Technical Document. The YOTC Implementation Plan, presently being drafted, will be discussed and finalized at an international workshop in July 2009. This talk summarizes programmatic aspects; science issues involving the multiscale

  3. Dissolution driven convection for carbon dioxide sequestration: the stability problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandre, Shreyas; Guo, Xinjun; Slim, Anja

    2013-11-01

    The dissolution-driven convection in porous media is potentially a rate limiting process for sequestering carbon dioxide in underground aquifers. Super critical carbon dioxide introduced in the aquifer is lighter than the water that fills the surrounding porous rock, and hence quickly rises to the top. However, the solution of carbon dioxide in water is heavier than water. Hence, as the layer of carbon dioxide dissolves in the water, convection may ensue. The threshold criteria for convection is obscured by the continually changing background density profile as the carbon dioxide diffuses through the pores. Commonly used techniques such as frozen coefficient analysis or non-modal theories using transient amplifications yield substantially different results for the threshold, which has been the cause of a debate in the scientific community. We present a general theory for the linear stability of non-autonomous systems and apply it to dissolution driven convection. The theory unifies the classical modal stability theory using eigenvalues, the non-modal approaches using optimal growth of energy and the frozen coefficient analysis. We settle the debate, and demonstrate the existence of a threshold time for convection to commence.

  4. Influence of convection on microstructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, William R.; Eisa, Gaber Faheem; Chandrasekhar, S.; Larrousse, Mark; Banan, Mohsen

    1988-01-01

    The influence was studied of convection during directional solidification on the resulting microstructure of eutectics, specifically lead/tin and manganese/bismuth. A theory was developed for the influence of convection on the microstructure of lamellar and fibrous eutectics, through the effect of convection on the concentration field in the melt in front of the growing eutectic. While the theory agrees with the experimental spin-up spin-down results, it predicts that the weak convection expected due to buoyancy will not produce a measurable change in eutectic microstructure. Thus, this theory does not explain the two fold decrease in MnBi fiber size and spacing observed when MnBi-Bi is solidified in space or on Earth with a magnetic field applied. Attention was turned to the morphology of the MnBi-Bi interface and to the generation of freezing rate fluctuations by convection. Decanting the melt during solidification of MnBi-Bi eutectic showed that the MnBi phase projects into the melt ahead of the Bi matrix. Temperature measurements in a Bi melt in the vertical Bridgman-Stockbarger configuration showed temperature variations of up to 25 C. Conclusions are drawn and discussed.

  5. Mantle Convection on Modern Supercomputers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weismüller, J.; Gmeiner, B.; Huber, M.; John, L.; Mohr, M.; Rüde, U.; Wohlmuth, B.; Bunge, H. P.

    2015-12-01

    Mantle convection is the cause for plate tectonics, the formation of mountains and oceans, and the main driving mechanism behind earthquakes. The convection process is modeled by a system of partial differential equations describing the conservation of mass, momentum and energy. Characteristic to mantle flow is the vast disparity of length scales from global to microscopic, turning mantle convection simulations into a challenging application for high-performance computing. As system size and technical complexity of the simulations continue to increase, design and implementation of simulation models for next generation large-scale architectures is handled successfully only in an interdisciplinary context. A new priority program - named SPPEXA - by the German Research Foundation (DFG) addresses this issue, and brings together computer scientists, mathematicians and application scientists around grand challenges in HPC. Here we report from the TERRA-NEO project, which is part of the high visibility SPPEXA program, and a joint effort of four research groups. TERRA-NEO develops algorithms for future HPC infrastructures, focusing on high computational efficiency and resilience in next generation mantle convection models. We present software that can resolve the Earth's mantle with up to 1012 grid points and scales efficiently to massively parallel hardware with more than 50,000 processors. We use our simulations to explore the dynamic regime of mantle convection and assess the impact of small scale processes on global mantle flow.

  6. Convective Excitation of Internal Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecoanet, Daniel; Le Bars, Michael; Burns, Keaton; Vasil, Geoffrey; Quataert, Eliot; Brown, Benjamin; Oishi, Jeffrey

    2015-11-01

    We will present a joint experimental & computational study of internal wave generation by convection. First we describe an experiment using the peculiar property of water that its density maximum is at 4° C . A tank of water cooled from below and heated from above develops a cold, convective layer near 4° C at the bottom of the tank, adjacent to a hot stably stratified layer at the top of the tank. We simulate this setup in 2D using the open-source Dedalus code (dedalus-project.org). Our simulations show that waves are excited from within the convection zone, opposed to at the interface between the convective and stably stratified regions. Finally, we will present 3D simulations of internal wave excitation by convection in a fully compressible atmosphere with multiple density scaleheights. These simulations provide greater freedom in choosing the thermal equilibrium of the system, and are run at higher Rayleigh number. The simulated waves are then compared to analytic predictions of the bulk excitation model.

  7. Mantle convection on modern supercomputers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weismüller, Jens; Gmeiner, Björn; Mohr, Marcus; Waluga, Christian; Wohlmuth, Barbara; Rüde, Ulrich; Bunge, Hans-Peter

    2015-04-01

    Mantle convection is the cause for plate tectonics, the formation of mountains and oceans, and the main driving mechanism behind earthquakes. The convection process is modeled by a system of partial differential equations describing the conservation of mass, momentum and energy. Characteristic to mantle flow is the vast disparity of length scales from global to microscopic, turning mantle convection simulations into a challenging application for high-performance computing. As system size and technical complexity of the simulations continue to increase, design and implementation of simulation models for next generation large-scale architectures demand an interdisciplinary co-design. Here we report about recent advances of the TERRA-NEO project, which is part of the high visibility SPPEXA program, and a joint effort of four research groups in computer sciences, mathematics and geophysical application under the leadership of FAU Erlangen. TERRA-NEO develops algorithms for future HPC infrastructures, focusing on high computational efficiency and resilience in next generation mantle convection models. We present software that can resolve the Earth's mantle with up to 1012 grid points and scales efficiently to massively parallel hardware with more than 50,000 processors. We use our simulations to explore the dynamic regime of mantle convection assessing the impact of small scale processes on global mantle flow.

  8. Effect of duckweed cover on greenhouse gas emissions and odour release from waste stabilisation ponds.

    PubMed

    van der Steen, N P; Nakiboneka, P; Mangalika, L; Ferrer, A V M; Gijzen, H J

    2003-01-01

    Treatment of wastewater in stabilisation pond systems prevents the negative environmental impact of uncontrolled disposal of sewage. However, even a natural treatment system may generate secondary negative environmental impacts in terms of energy consumption, emission of greenhouse gases and emission of odorous compounds. Whereas natural systems have an advantage over electro-mechanical systems in that they use less hardware and less energy, it is not yet known whether secondary environmental effects in the form of greenhouse gas emissions are lower for these systems. This research intends to be a first step in the direction of answering this question by assessing gas emissions from two types of natural systems, namely algae-based and duckweed-based stabilisation ponds. The H2S volatilisation from laboratory scale pond-reactors has been determined by drawing the air above the water surface continuously through a solution of 1 M NaOH for absorption of sulphide. The amount of H2S that volatilised from the algae pond-reactor, and was trapped in the NaOH trap, was found to be 2.5-86 mg/m2/day. The H2S volatilisation from the duckweed pond-reactor was found to be negligible, even though the sulphide concentration was 9.7 mg/l S(2-). The duckweed cover was a physical barrier for volatilisation, since bubbles were trapped in the cover. In addition the duckweed layer was found to be afavourable environment for both aerobic sulphide oxidisers (Beggiatoa gigantae) as well as for photosynthetic purple sulphur bacteria belonging to the genus Chromatium. These may also have contributed to the prevention of H2S volatilisation. Results on methane emissions were not conclusive so far, but the same mechanisms that prevent H2S volatilisation may also prevent methane volatilisation. Therefore it was concluded that duckweed covers on stabilisation ponds may reduce the emission of both odorous and greenhouse gases. PMID:14510229

  9. Phase stabilisation of hexagonal barium titanate doped with transition metals: A computational study

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, J.A.; Freeman, C.L.; Harding, J.H.; Sinclair, D.C.

    2013-04-15

    Interatomic potentials recently developed for the modelling of BaTiO{sub 3} have been used to explore the stabilisation of the hexagonal polymorph of BaTiO{sub 3} by doping with transition metals (namely Mn, Co, Fe and Ni) at the Ti-site. Classical simulations have been completed on both the cubic and hexagonal polymorphs to investigate the energetic consequences of transition metal doping on each polymorph. Ti-site charge compensation mechanisms have been used for the multi-valent transition metal ions and cluster binding energies have been considered. Simulations show a significant energetic gain when doping occurs at Ti sites in the face sharing dimers (Ti{sub 2} sites) of the hexagonal polymorph compared with the doping of the cubic polymorph. This energetic difference between the two polymorphs is true for all transition metals tested and all charge states and in the case of tri- and tetra-valent dopants negative solution energies are found for the hexagonal polymorph suggesting actual polymorph stabilisation occurs with the incorporation of these ions as observed experimentally. Oxidation during incorporation of Ni{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+} ions has also been considered. - Graphical abstract: The representation of the strongest binding energy clusters for tri-valent dopants—(a) Ti{sub 2}/O{sub 1} cluster and (b) Ti{sub 2}/O{sub 2} cluster. Highlights: ► Classical simulations show a significant energetic gain when doping occurs at Ti sites in the face sharing dimers (Ti2 sites) of the hexagonal polymorph compared with the doping of the cubic polymorph. ► This energetic difference between the two polymorphs is true for all transition metals tested and all charge states. ► In the case of tri- and tetra- valent dopants negative solution energies are found for the hexagonal polymorph suggesting actual polymorph stabilisation occurs with the incorporation of these ions.

  10. Stabilisation of strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa Duch.) anthocyanins by different pectins.

    PubMed

    Buchweitz, M; Speth, M; Kammerer, D R; Carle, R

    2013-12-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effects of different pectins on strawberry anthocyanins in viscous model solutions at pH 3.0. For this purpose, low esterified amidated, low and high methyl esterified citrus and apple pectins, and a sugar beet pectin (SBP), respectively, were added to strawberry extracts. The latter were predominantly composed of pelargonidin-glycosides, containing either reduced (E-1) or original amounts of non-anthocyanin phenolics (E-2). Model systems were stored for 18 weeks at 20±0.5 °C protected from light, and anthocyanins were quantitated in regular intervals by HPLC-DAD analyses. Half-life (t1/2) and destruction (D) values were calculated based on first-order kinetics. Generally, significant differences in pigment retention could be ascribed to differing pectin sources, while variation in the degree of esterification and amidation, respectively, had negligible effects. Compared to systems without added pectin, apple pectins and SPB enhanced anthocyanin stability moderately, while stabilising effects of citrus pectins were poor or even imperceptible. Generally, the amount of non-anthocyanin phenolics and the addition of citrate did not markedly affect anthocyanin stability. However, pectins had no influence on total phenolic contents (Folin-Ciocalteu assay) and antioxidant capacities (FRAP and TEAC assay) of strawberry phenolics over time. For pelargonidin-3-glucoside and -rutinoside largely consistent stabilities were found in all model systems. In contrast, pelargonidin-3-malonylglucoside was less stable in the blank, and stabilisation by pectins was always negligible. The findings of the present study are contrary to results reported previously for the stabilisation of cyanidin- and delphinidin-glycosides in similar model systems prepared with black currant extracts, indicating a high impact of the number of hydroxyl groups in the anthocyanin B-ring. PMID:23871051

  11. Convective Stirring in Liquid Lithium (LTX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassin, Margaret; Kearns, Eugene; Majeski, Richard

    2011-10-01

    LTX is a spherical tokamak with R=0.4 m, a=0.26 m, and elongation=1.5. LTX has a heated (300 - 400 C) liner, designed to be coated with lithium. During experiments in 2010, oxidation of the lithium surface was observed when the liner was heated to 300 C, above the melting point of lithium (182 C). A pumping system is being installed to absorb and pump background gasses which react with lithium, similar to a getter pump, using liquid and solid lithium. Lithium will be loaded into a yttria crucible heated from below by a small, HeatWave model TB175 300W cartridge heater to produce convective currents in order to maintain a clean lithium surface and decrease the time for oxide formation. This system was tested in an argon glove box using a copper heat concentrator - instead of the HeatWave vacuum-compatible unit. Infrared thermometry and thermocouples were used to monitor the surface temperature of the molten lithium, and convective flow patterns. A 200 FPS high speed camera was also employed to monitor flows, using the motion of residual oxide patches. Results from the measurements will be presented. Supported by US DOE contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  12. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds

    DOE Data Explorer

    Jensen, Mike; Bartholomew, Mary Jane; Genio, Anthony Del; Giangrande, Scott; Kollias, Pavlos

    2012-01-19

    Convective processes play a critical role in the Earth's energy balance through the redistribution of heat and moisture in the atmosphere and their link to the hydrological cycle. Accurate representation of convective processes in numerical models is vital towards improving current and future simulations of Earths climate system. Despite improvements in computing power, current operational weather and global climate models are unable to resolve the natural temporal and spatial scales important to convective processes and therefore must turn to parameterization schemes to represent these processes. In turn, parameterization schemes in cloud-resolving models need to be evaluated for their generality and application to a variety of atmospheric conditions. Data from field campaigns with appropriate forcing descriptors have been traditionally used by modelers for evaluating and improving parameterization schemes.

  13. Spectroscopic properties of erbium-doped yttria-stabilised zirconia crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Ryabochkina, P A; Sidorova, N V; Ushakov, S N; Lomonova, E E

    2014-02-28

    Yttria-stabilised zirconia crystals ZrO{sub 2} – Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} (6 mol %) – Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} (5.85 mol %) are grown by directional crystallisation in a cold container using direct RF melting. The spectral and luminescent properties of these crystals are studied in order to use them as active media of solid state lasers emitting in the wavelength range 1.5 – 1.7 μm. (active media)

  14. Stabilisation of a class of 2-DOF underactuated mechanical systems via direct Lyapunov approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turker, Turker; Gorgun, Haluk; Cansever, Galip

    2013-06-01

    This paper represents an alternative stabilisation procedure for a class of two degree-of-freedom underactuated mechanical systems based on a set of transformations and a Lyapunov function. After simplifying dynamic equations of the system via partial feedback linearisation and coordinate changes, the stability of the system is provided with Lyapunov's direct method. Proposed control scheme is used on two different examples and asymptotic convergence for each system is proven by means of La Salle's invariance principle. The designed controller is successfully illustrated through numerical simulations for each example.

  15. Penetration below a convective zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurlburt, Neal E.; Toomre, Juri; Massaguer, Josep M.; Zahn, Jean-Paul

    1994-01-01

    Two-dimensional numerical simulations are used to investigate how fully compressible nonlinear convection penetrates into a stably stratified zone beneath a stellar convection zone. Estimates are obtained of the extent of penetration as the relative stability S of the stable to the unstable zone is varied over a broad range. The model deals with a perfect gas possessing a constant dynamic viscosity. The dynamics is dominated by downward-directed plumes which can extend far into the stable material and which can lead to the excitation of a broad spectrum of internal gravity waves in the lower stable zone. The convection is highly time dependent, with the close coupling between the lateral swaying of the plumes and the internal gravity waves they generate serving to modulate the strength of the convection. The depth of penetration delta, determined by the position where the time-averaged kinetic flux has its first zero in the stable layer, is controlled by a balance between the kinetic energy carried into the stable layer by the plumes and the buoyancy braking they experience there. A passive scalar is introduced into the unstable layer to evaluate the transport of chemical species downward. Such a tracer is effectively mixed within a few convective overturning times down to a depth of delta within the stable layer. Analytical estimates based on simple scaling laws are used to interpret the variation of delta with S, showing that it first involves an interval of adiabatic penetration if the local Peclet number of the convection exceeds unity, followed by a further thermal adjustment layer, the depths of each interval scaling in turn as S-1 and S-1/4. These estimates are in accord with the penetration results from the simulations.

  16. Mathematical modelling of postbuckling in a slender beam column for active stabilisation control with respect to uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enss, Georg C.; Platz, Roland; Hanselka, Holger

    2012-04-01

    Buckling is an important design constraint in light-weight structures as it may result in the collapse of an entire structure. When a mechanical beam column is loaded above its critical buckling load, it may buckle. In addition, if the actual loading is not fully known, stability becomes highly uncertain. To control uncertainty in buckling, an approach is presented to actively stabilise a slender flat column sensitive to buckling. For this purpose, actively controlled forces applied by piezoelectric actuators located close to the column's clamped base stabilise the column against buckling at critical loading. In order to design a controller to stabilise the column, a mathematical model of the postcritically loaded system is needed. Simulating postbuckling behaviour is important to study the effect of axial loads above the critical axial buckling load within active buckling control. Within this postbuckling model, different kinds of uncertainty may occur: i) error in estimation of model parameters such as mass, damping and stiffness, ii) non-linearities e. g. in the assumption of curvature of the column's deflection shapes and many more. In this paper, numerical simulations based on the mathematical model for the postcritically axially loaded column are compared to a mathematical model based on experiments of the actively stabilised postcritically loaded real column system using closed loop identification. The motivation to develop an experimentally validated mathematical model is to develop of a model based stabilising control algorithm for a real postcritically axially loaded beam column.

  17. Evolution of Soil Moisture-Convection Interactions against the Backdrop of Global Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tawfik, A. B.; Dirmeyer, P.

    2014-12-01

    Interannual changes in how soil moisture can trigger convection are explored within the context of known global-scale oscillations, such as ENSO. Because soil moisture-convection interactions are a local phenomenon that require a sufficiently moist and unstable atmosphere to initiate convection, any systematic changes to water vapor produced by these global circulation changes may manifest in disrupting or promoting the soil moisture-precipitation feedback chain. Using a new framework, the Heated Condensation Framework (HCF; Tawfik and Dirmeyer 2014), local land-atmosphere coupling can be examined by separating the atmospheric background state from the land surface state in terms of convective initiation. The current work explores how the soil moisture-convection relationship changes from year-to-year and during influential El Nino and La Nina events. This is done using several global and regional reanalysis products, as well as observations where available.

  18. Mesoscale aspects of convective storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujita, T. T.

    1981-01-01

    The structure, evolution and mechanisms of mesoscale convective disturbances are reviewed and observation techniques for "nowcasting" their nature are discussed. A generalized mesometeorological scale is given, classifying both low and high pressure systems. Mesoscale storms are shown often to induce strong winds, but their wind speeds are significantly less than those accompanied by submesoscale disturbances, such as tornadoes, downbursts, and microbursts. Mesoscale convective complexes, severe storm wakes, and flash floods are considered. The understanding of the evolution of supercells is essential for improving nowcasting capabilities and a very accurate combination of radar and satellite measurements is required.

  19. Report of convective phenomena team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orville, H.; Koenig, R.; Miller, J.; Telford, J.; Jones, B.; Alger, G.; Lee, R.; Boudle, D.

    1980-01-01

    A group meeting was assembled to focus on the planning of specific experiments, to establish some priorities, identify interested scientists who would like to participate, establish any special requirements, make recommendations on data processing, and to prepare flight plan outlines. Since the number of convective storms in the CCOPE (Cooperative Convective Precipitation Experiment) field experiment area are limited to only a few days during the operational time period the flight plans must be designed with a hierarchy of abort experiments so that the easily identified and lowest probability events should take priority until their quota is filled.

  20. Simulating Convection in Stellar Envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, Joel

    Understanding convection in stellar envelopes, and providing a mathematical description of it, would represent a substantial advance in stellar astrophysics. As one of the largest sources of uncertainty in stellar models, existing treatments of convection fail to account for many of the dynamical effects of convection, such as turbulent pressure and asymmetry in the velocity field. To better understand stellar convection, we must be able to study and examine it in detail, and one of the best tools for doing so is numerical simulation. Near the stellar surface, both convective and radiative process play a critical role in determining the structure and gas dynamics. By following these processes from first principles, convection can be simulated self-consistently and accurately, even in regions of inefficient energy transport where existing descriptions of convection fail. Our simulation code includes two radiative transfer solvers that are based on different assumptions and approximations. By comparing simulations that differ only in their respective radiative transfer methods, we are able to isolate the effect that radiative efficiency has on the structure of the superadiabatic layer. We find the simulations to be in good general agreement, but they show distinct differences in the thermal structure in the superadiabatic layer and atmosphere. Using the code to construct a grid of three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic simulations, we investigate the link between convection and various chemical compositions. The stellar parameters correspond to main-sequence stars at several surface gravities, and span a range in effective temperatures (4500 < Teff < 6400). Different chemical compositions include four metallicities (Z = 0.040, 0.020, 0.010, 0.001), three helium abundances (Y = 0.1, 0.2, 0.3) and several levels of alpha-element enhancement. Our grid of simulations shows that various convective properties, such as velocity and the degree of superadiabaticity, are

  1. Wavenumber selection in Benard convection

    SciTech Connect

    Catton, I.

    1988-11-01

    The results of three related studies dealing with wavenumber selection in Rayleigh--Benard convection are reported. The first, an extension of the power integral method, is used to argue for the existence of multi-wavenumbers at all supercritical wavenumbers. Most existing closure schemes are shown to be inadequate. A thermodynamic stability criterion is shown to give reasonable results but requires empirical measurement of one parameter for closure. The third study uses an asymptotic approach based in part on geometric considerations and requires no empiricism to obtain good predictions of the wavenumber. These predictions, however, can only be used for certain planforms of convection.

  2. A Direct Comparison between the Negative and Positive Effects of Throughflow on the Thermal Convection in an Anisotropy and Symmetry Porous Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harfash, Akil J.; Alshara, Ahmed K.

    2015-05-01

    The linear and nonlinear stability analysis of the motionless state (conduction solution) and of a vertical throughflow in an anisotropic porous medium are tested. In particular, the effect of a nonhomogeneous porosity and a constant anisotropic thermal diffusivity have been taken into account. Then, the accuracy of the linear instability thresholds are tested using a three dimensional simulation. It is shown that the strong stabilising effect of gravity field. Moreover, the results support the assertion that the linear theory, in general, is accurate in predicting the onset of convective motion, and thus, regions of stability.

  3. The Role of the Velocity Gradient in Laminar Convective Heat Transfer through a Tube with a Uniform Wall Heat Flux

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Liang-Bi; Zhang, Qiang; Li, Xiao-Xia

    2009-01-01

    This paper aims to contribute to a better understanding of convective heat transfer. For this purpose, the reason why thermal diffusivity should be placed before the Laplacian operator of the heat flux, and the role of the velocity gradient in convective heat transfer are analysed. The background to these analyses is that, when the energy…

  4. Convective Overshoot in Stellar Interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q. S.

    2015-07-01

    In stellar interiors, the turbulent thermal convection transports matters and energy, and dominates the structure and evolution of stars. The convective overshoot, which results from the non-local convective transport from the convection zone to the radiative zone, is one of the most uncertain and difficult factors in stellar physics at present. The classical method for studying the convective overshoot is the non-local mixing-length theory (NMLT). However, the NMLT bases on phenomenological assumptions, and leads to contradictions, thus the NMLT was criticized in literature. At present, the helioseismic studies have shown that the NMLT cannot satisfy the helioseismic requirements, and have pointed out that only the turbulent convection models (TCMs) can be accepted. In the first part of this thesis, models and derivations of both the NMLT and the TCM were introduced. In the second part, i.e., the work part, the studies on the TCM (theoretical analysis and applications), and the development of a new model of the convective overshoot mixing were described in detail. In the work of theoretical analysis on the TCM, the approximate solution and the asymptotic solution were obtained based on some assumptions. The structure of the overshoot region was discussed. In a large space of the free parameters, the approximate/asymptotic solutions are in good agreement with the numerical results. We found an important result that the scale of the overshoot region in which the thermal energy transport is effective is 1 HK (HK is the scale height of turbulence kinetic energy), which does not depend on the free parameters of the TCM. We applied the TCM and a simple overshoot mixing model in three cases. In the solar case, it was found that the temperature gradient in the overshoot region is in agreement with the helioseismic requirements, and the profiles of the solar lithium abundance, sound speed, and density of the solar models are also improved. In the low-mass stars of open

  5. Label-free in vitro toxicity and uptake assessment of citrate stabilised gold nanoparticles in three cell lines

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Reliable in vitro toxicity testing is needed prior to the commencement of in vivo testing necessary for hazard identification and risk assessment of nanoparticles. In this study, the cytotoxicity and uptake of 14 nm and 20 nm citrate stabilised gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) in the bronchial epithelial cell line BEAS-2B, the Chinese hamster ovary cell line CHO, and the human embryonic kidney cell line HEK 293 were investigated. Methods Cytotoxicity of the AuNPs was assessed via traditional XTT-, LDH-, and ATP-based assays, followed by cell impedance studies. Dark-field imaging and hyperspectral imaging were used to confirm the uptake of AuNPs into the cells. Results Interference of the AuNPs with the XTT- and ATP-based assays was overcome through the use of cell impedance technology. AuNPs were shown to be relatively non-toxic using this methodology; nevertheless CHO cells were the most sensitive cell type with 20 nm AuNPs having the highest toxicity. Uptake of both 14 nm and 20 nm AuNPs was observed in all cell lines in a time- and cell type-dependent manner. Conclusions Using the cell impedance and dark-field hyperspectral imaging technologies, it was possible to study the toxicity of AuNPs in different cell lines and show that these cells could internalize AuNPs with their subsequent intracellular aggregation. It was also possible to show that this toxicity would not correlate with the level of uptake but it would correlate with cell-type and the size of the AuNPs. Therefore, these two label-free methodologies used in this study are suitable for in vitro studies on the effects of AuNPs, and could present themselves as appropriate and valuable methodologies for future nanoparticle toxicity and uptake studies. PMID:24103467

  6. Convection induced by radiative cooling of a layer of participating medium

    SciTech Connect

    Prasanna, Swaminathan; Venkateshan, S. P.

    2014-05-15

    Simulations and experiments have been conducted to study the effect of radiative cooling on natural convection in a horizontal layer of a participating medium enclosed between isothermal opaque wall and radiatively transparent wall and exposed to a cold background. The study is of relevance to a nocturnal boundary layer under clear and calm conditions. The focus of the study is to capture the onset of convection caused by radiative cooling. The experiments have been designed to mimic the atmospheric radiative boundary conditions, and hence decoupling convection and radiation boundary conditions. Planck number Pl and optical thickness of the layer τ{sub H} are the two important parameters that govern the interaction between radiation and convection. The radiation-convection coupling is a strong function of length scale. Convection sets up within first few seconds for all the experiments. Strong plume like convection is observed for the experimental conditions used in the present study. Both simulations and experiments confirm that radiative cooling increases substantially with decrease in emissivity of the bottom wall. Radiative cooling is strongly influenced by the nongray nature of the participating medium, especially when strong emission from the medium escapes to space, in the window region of the atmosphere. Accurate representation of radiative properties is critical. Linear stability analysis of onset of convection indicates that radiation stabilizes convection as Pl decreases. The observations are similar to the case of Rayleigh Bénard convection in a radiating gas. However, for both experimental and numerical conditions, the observed Rayleigh numbers are much greater than the critical Rayleigh number. To conclude, the role of radiation is to drive and sustain convection in the unstable layer.

  7. Segregation and convection in dendritic alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poirier, D. R.

    1990-01-01

    Microsegregation in dentritic alloys is discussed, including solidification with and without thermal gradient, the convection of interdendritic liquid. The conservation of momentum, energy, and solute is considered. Directional solidification and thermosolutal convection are discussed.

  8. Ray-tracing simulation and SABER satellite observations of convective gravity waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalisch, Silvio; Eckermann, Stephen; Ern, Manfred; Preusse, Peter; Riese, Martin; Trinh, Quang Thai; Kim, Young-Ha; Chun, Hye-Yeong

    Gravity waves (GWs) are known as a coupling mechanism between different atmospheric layers. They contribute to the wave-driving of the QBO and are also responsible for driving large scale circulations like the Brewer-Dobson circulation. One major and highly variable source of GWs is convection. Deep convection in the tropics excites GWs with prominent amplitudes and horizontal phase speeds of up to 90 m/s. These GWs propagate upward and, when breaking, release the wave's momentum, thus accelerate the background flow. Direction and magnitude of the acceleration strongly depends on wind filtering between the convective GW source and the considered altitude. Both, the generation mechanism of GWs close to the top of deep convective towers and the wind filtering process during GW propagation largely influence the GW spectrum found in the tropical middle atmosphere and therefore magnitude and direction of the acceleration. We present the results of GW ray-tracing calculations from tropospheric (convective) sources up to the mesosphere. The Gravity wave Regional Or Global RAy-Tracer (GROGRAT) was used to perform the GW trajectory calculations. The convective GW source scheme from Yonsei University (South Korea) served as the lower boundary condition to quantify the GW excitation from convection. Heating rates, cloud top data, and atmospheric background data were provided by the MERRA dataset for the calculation of convective forcing from deep convection and for the atmospheric background of the ray-tracing calculations afterwards. In order to validate our ray-tracing simulation results, we compare them to satellite measurements of temperature amplitudes and momentum fluxes from the SABER instrument. Therefore, observational constrains from limb-sounding instruments have been quantified. Influences of orbit geometry, the instrument's observational filter, and the wavelength shift in the observed GW spectrum are discussed. Geographic structures in the observed global

  9. On asymptotic stabilisation of a chain of integrators with nonlinearity and an uncertain input delay by output feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Ho-Lim

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we provide an output feedback solution over one given by Choi and Lim [Systems & Control Letters, 59(6), 374-379 (2010)] under more generalised system set-up. More specifically, we consider a stabilisation problem of a chain of integrators that has nonlinearity and an uncertain delay in the input by output feedback. The nonlinearity is classified into four types. Then, we propose a memoryless output feedback controller which contains a gain-scaling factor to adjust controller gains depending on the given nonlinearity type. Our stability analysis shows that the controlled system has unique stabilisation result associated with each type of nonlinearity. Our result provides a new aspect to the stabilisation problem of nonlinear time-delay systems and broadens the existing control results of time-delay systems. Two examples are given for illustration.

  10. Stochastic microhertz gravitational radiation from stellar convection

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, M. F.; Melatos, A.

    2014-09-01

    High Reynolds-number turbulence driven by stellar convection in main-sequence stars generates stochastic gravitational radiation. We calculate the wave-strain power spectral density as a function of the zero-age main-sequence mass for an individual star and for an isotropic, universal stellar population described by the Salpeter initial mass function and redshift-dependent Hopkins-Beacom star formation rate. The spectrum is a broken power law, which peaks near the turnover frequency of the largest turbulent eddies. The signal from the Sun dominates the universal background. For the Sun, the far-zone power spectral density peaks at S(f {sub peak}) = 5.2 × 10{sup –52} Hz{sup –1} at frequency f {sub peak} = 2.3 × 10{sup –7} Hz. However, at low observing frequencies f < 3 × 10{sup –4} Hz, the Earth lies inside the Sun's near zone and the signal is amplified to S {sub near}(f {sub peak}) = 4.1 × 10{sup –27} Hz{sup –1} because the wave strain scales more steeply with distance (∝d {sup –5}) in the near zone than in the far zone (∝d {sup –1}). Hence the Solar signal may prove relevant for pulsar timing arrays. Other individual sources and the universal background fall well below the projected sensitivities of the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna and next-generation pulsar timing arrays. Stellar convection sets a fundamental noise floor for more sensitive stochastic gravitational-wave experiments in the more distant future.

  11. Immobilised native plant cysteine proteases: packed-bed reactor for white wine protein stabilisation.

    PubMed

    Benucci, Ilaria; Lombardelli, Claudio; Liburdi, Katia; Acciaro, Giuseppe; Zappino, Matteo; Esti, Marco

    2016-02-01

    This research presents a feasibility study of using a continuous packed-bed reactor (PBR), containing immobilised native plant cysteine proteases, as a specific and mild alternative technique relative to the usual bentonite fining for white wine protein stabilisation. The operational parameters for a PBR containing immobilised bromelain (PBR-br) or immobilised papain (PBR-pa) were optimised using model wine fortified with synthetic substrate (Bz-Phe-Val-Arg-pNA). The effectiveness of PBR-br, both in terms of hazing potential and total protein decrease, was significantly higher than PBR-pa, in all the seven unfined, white wines used. Among the wines tested, Sauvignon Blanc, given its total protein content as well as its very high intrinsic instability, was selected as a control wine to evaluate the effect of the treatment on wine as to its soluble protein profile, phenolic composition, mineral component, and sensory properties. The treatment in a PBR containing immobilised bromelain appeared effective in decreasing both wine hazing potential and total protein amount, while it did not significantly affect the phenol compounds, the mineral component nor the sensory quality of wine. The enzymatic treatment in PBR was shown to be a specific and mild technique for use as an alternative to bentonite fining for white wine protein stabilisation. PMID:27162393

  12. Visually controlled spatial stabilisation of the human head: compensation for the eye's limited ability to roll.

    PubMed

    Gresty, M A; Bronstein, A M

    1992-06-01

    During movements of the head in pitch (yes-yes) or in yaw (no-no) the visual scene appears stable whereas rolling the head (ear down to shoulder) induces an apparent swinging of the world in the opposite direction. This visual instability is due to the inadequacy, in the roll plane, of the reflex eye movements which are effective in stabilising the eyes in space during pitch and yaw. We investigated whether head is stabilised in roll to protect against visual instability. Human subjects were fixed in a gimbal with their heads free and were exposed to unpredictable oscillatory movement in pitch and, for comparison roll, about axes aligned with the head. With vision, during roll motion, the head was displaced from upright by approximately half the amplitude of the gimbal motion. In comparison, with eyes closed relying on vestibular and proprioceptive cues and during pitch stimuli with or without vision, the magnitude of head displacement from upright was approximately equal to that to the gimbal. The superior head stability in roll, dependent on a visual frame of reference, compensates for poverty of eye movement in this plane. PMID:1407702

  13. Metastable SUSY breaking, de Sitter moduli stabilisation and Kähler moduli inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krippendorf, Sven; Quevedo, Fernando

    2009-11-01

    We study the influence of anomalous U(1) symmetries and their associated D-terms on the vacuum structure of global field theories once they are coupled to Script N = 1 supergravity and in the context of string compactifications with moduli stabilisation. In particular, we focus on a IIB string motivated construction of the ISS scenario and examine the influence of one additional U(1) symmetry on the vacuum structure. We point out that in the simplest one-Kähler modulus compactification, the original ISS vacuum gets generically destabilised by a runaway behaviour of the potential in the modulus direction. In more general compactifications with several Kähler moduli, we find a novel realisation of the LARGE volume scenario with D-term uplifting to de Sitter space and both D-term and F-term supersymmetry breaking. The structure of soft supersymmetry breaking terms is determined in the preferred scenario where the standard model cycle is not stabilised non-perturbatively and found to be flavour universal. Our scenario also provides a purely supersymmetric realisation of Kähler moduli (blow-up and fibre) inflation, with similar observational properties as the original proposals but without the need to include an extra (non-SUSY) uplifting term.

  14. A Scott bench with ergonomic thorax stabilisation pad improves body posture during preacher arm curl exercise.

    PubMed

    Biscarini, Andrea; Benvenuti, Paolo; Busti, Daniele; Zanuso, Silvano

    2016-05-01

    We assessed whether the use of an ergonomic thorax stabilisation pad, during the preacher arm curl exercise, could significantly reduce the excessive shoulder protraction and thoracic kyphosis induced by the standard flat pad built into the existing preacher arm curl equipment. A 3D motion capture system and inclinometers were used to measure shoulder protraction and thoracic kyphosis in 15 subjects performing preacher arm curl with a plate-loaded machine provided with the standard flat pad. The same measures were repeated after replacing the flat pad with a new ergonomic pad, specifically designed to accommodate the thorax profile and improve body posture. Pad replacement significantly (p < 0.001) reduced shoulder protraction (from [Formula: see text] to [Formula: see text]) and thoracic kyphosis (from [Formula: see text] to [Formula: see text]), enabling postural and functional improvements within the entire spine, shoulder girdle and rib cage. The ergonomic pad may potentially allow a more effective training, prevent musculoskeletal discomfort and reduce the risk of injury. Practitioner summary: We have designed an ergonomic thorax stabilisation pad for the preacher arm curl exercise. The new ergonomic pad improves the poor posture conditions induced by the standard flat pad and may potentially allow a more effective training, prevent musculoskeletal discomfort, improve the breathing function and reduce the risk of injury. PMID:26226165

  15. Benefits of helmet-mounted display image stabilisation under whole-body vibration.

    PubMed

    Wells, M J; Griffin, M J

    1984-01-01

    The effects of whole-body vertical vibration in the range 2.5-25 Hz on visual performance with two types of raster scan helmet-mounted display have been determined. The benefit of an image stabilisation system on numeral reading performance during vibration was also assessed with both display systems. Increases in mean reading time of over 130%/m . s-2 R.M.S. and increases in percentage reading error of more than 30%/m . s-2 R.M.S. were recorded with unstabilised displays. With vertical and horizontal image stabilisation, these decrements in performance were reduced to less than 40%/m . s-2 R.M.S. increase in reading time and less than 10%/m . s-2 R.M.S. increase in reading error. Data on the transmission of vibration from the seat to the head and from the head to the helmet were also obtained. These indicate a relation between biodynamic behaviour and visual performance during vibration. PMID:6696690

  16. Sludge digestion instead of aerobic stabilisation - a cost benefit analysis based on experiences in Germany.

    PubMed

    Gretzschel, Oliver; Schmitt, Theo G; Hansen, Joachim; Siekmann, Klaus; Jakob, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    As a consequence of a worldwide increase of energy costs, the efficient use of sewage sludge as a renewable energy resource must be considered, even for smaller wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) with design capacities between 10,000 and 50,000 population equivalent (PE). To find the lower limit for an economical conversion of an aerobic stabilisation plant into an anaerobic stabilisation plant, we derived cost functions for specific capital costs and operating cost savings. With these tools, it is possible to evaluate if it would be promising to further investigate refitting aerobic plants into plants that produce biogas. By comparing capital costs with operation cost savings, a break-even point for process conversion could be determined. The break-even point varies depending on project specific constraints and assumptions related to future energy and operation costs and variable interest rates. A 5% increase of energy and operation costs leads to a cost efficient conversion for plants above 7,500 PE. A conversion of WWTPs results in different positive effects on energy generation and plant operations: increased efficiency, energy savings, and on-site renewable power generation by digester gas which can be used in the plant. Also, the optimisation of energy efficiency results in a reduction of primary energy consumption. PMID:24473316

  17. Stabilisation of amorphous furosemide increases the oral drug bioavailability in rats.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Line Hagner; Rades, Thomas; Müllertz, Anette

    2015-07-25

    A glass solution of the amorphous sodium salt of furosemide (ASSF) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) (80:20 w/w%) was prepared by spray drying. It was investigated if PVP was able to stabilise ASSF during storage and dissolution and whether this influenced the in vivo performance of the glass solution after oral dosing to rats. The glass solution had a glass transition temperature of 121.3 ± 0.5°C, which was significantly higher than that of the pure drug (101.2°C). ASSF in the glass solution was stable for at least 168 days when stored at 20°C and 0% relative humidity. The glass solution exhibited fast dissolution in simulated intestinal medium, pH 6.5; the intrinsic dissolution rate was found to be 10.1 ± 0.6 mg/cm(2)/min, which was significantly faster than the pure ASSF. When investigating the stability during dissolution in stimulated intestinal medium at pH 6.5, the ASSF in the glass solution showed signs of crystallinity after 1 min of dissolution, but crystallised to a lesser extent than pure ASSF. The stabilising effect of PVP on ASSF, led to improved relative oral bioavailability in rats of 263%, when compared to the pure ASSF. PMID:26026252

  18. Deformation and stabilisation mechanisms of slow rock slides in crystalline bedrock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zangerl, C.; Prager, C.

    2009-04-01

    Deep-seated rock slides are slope instabilities which are characterised by deformation along one or several shear zones where most of the measured total slope displacement localizes. Generally, a high danger potential is given when rock slides fail in a rapid manner characterised by very high sliding velocities and/or when they develop into long run-out rock avalanches. However several field surveys and deformation monitoring data show that numerous deep-seated rock slides do not fail in a high velocity regime. In fact, many slides creep downwards at rates of some centimetres per year or even less and do not show any evidence for non-reversible acceleration in the past or in the future. Furthermore some of these slope instabilities are actually inactive (dormant) or have even reached a stabilised final state. Deformation monitoring on active rock slides show that acceleration phases characterised by velocities up to meters per day can occur. The trigger for these phases can be manifold and include heavy rainfall, snow melt, water level fluctuations of reservoirs at the slope foot, changes in the slope's equilibrium state due to antecedent slow creeping processes, changes in the material behaviour within the sliding zone, erosion along the foot of the slope, etc. Whereas the role of these triggers in promoting phases of acceleration are generally understood, the same can not be said regarding the kinematics and dynamic processes/mechanisms by which rock slide masses re-stabilise once the trigger impetus has been removed. In the context of this study the term "stabilisation" is used for rock slides which decelerate from high velocities to slow base activities or even stop moving after a certain amount of displacement. Given that reliable rock slide forecasts require the fundamental understanding of possible slope stabilisation mechanisms this study focuses on field-based and numerically obtained key-properties which influence the long-term slope deformation behaviour

  19. D-branes at del Pezzo singularities: global embedding and moduli stabilisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicoli, Michele; Krippendorf, Sven; Mayrhofer, Christoph; Quevedo, Fernando; Valandro, Roberto

    2012-09-01

    In the context of type IIB string theory we combine moduli stabilisation and model building on branes at del Pezzo singularities in a fully consistent global compactification. By means of toric geometry, we classify all the Calabi-Yau manifolds with 3 < h 1,1 < 6 which admit two identical del Pezzo singularities mapped into each other under the orientifold involution. This effective singularity hosts the visible sector containing the Standard Model while the Kähler moduli are stabilised via a combination of D-terms, perturbative and non-perturbative effects supported on hidden sectors. We present concrete models where the visible sector, containing the Standard Model, gauge and matter content, is built via fractional D3-branes at del Pezzo singularities and all the Kähler moduli are fixed providing an explicit realisation of both KKLT and LARGE volume scenarios, the latter with D-term uplifting to de Sitter minima. We perform the consistency checks for global embedding such as tadpole, K-theory charges and Freed-Witten anomaly cancellation. We briefly discuss phenomenological and cosmological implications of our models.

  20. Lipid oxidation in minced beef meat with added Krebs cycle substrates to stabilise colour.

    PubMed

    Yi, G; Grabež, V; Bjelanovic, M; Slinde, E; Olsen, K; Langsrud, O; Phung, V T; Haug, A; Oostindjer, M; Egelandsdal, B

    2015-11-15

    Krebs cycle substrates (KCS) can stabilise the colour of packaged meat by oxygen reduction. This study tested whether this reduction releases reactive oxygen species that may lead to lipid oxidation in minced meat under two different storage conditions. KCS combinations of succinate and glutamate increased peroxide forming potential (PFP, 1.18-1.32 mmol peroxides/kg mince) and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS, 0.30-0.38 mg malondialdehyde (MDA) equivalents/kg mince) under low oxygen storage conditions. Both succinate and glutamate were metabolised. Moreover, under high oxygen (75%) storage conditions, KCS combinations of glutamate, citrate and malate increased PFP (from 1.22 to 1.29 mmol peroxides/kg) and TBARS (from 0.37 to 0.40 mg MDA equivalents/kg mince). Only glutamate was metabolised. The KCS combinations that were added to stabilise colour were metabolised during storage, and acted as pro-oxidants that promoted lipid oxidation in both high and low oxygen conditions. PMID:25977064

  1. Comparisons of operating envelopes for contaminated soil stabilised/solidified with different cementitious binders.

    PubMed

    Kogbara, Reginald B; Al-Tabbaa, Abir; Stegemann, Julia A

    2014-03-01

    This work initiated the development of operating envelopes for stabilised/solidified contaminated soils. The operating envelopes define the range of operating variables for acceptable performance of the treated soils. The study employed a soil spiked with 3,000 mg/kg each of Cd, Cu, Pb, Ni and Zn, and 10,000 mg/kg of diesel. The binders used for treatment involved Portland cement (CEMI), pulverised fuel ash (PFA), ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBS) and hydrated lime (hlime). The specific binder formulations were CEMI, CEMI/PFA = 1:4, CEMI/GGBS = 1:9 and hlime/GGBS = 1:4. The water contents employed ranged from 13 % to 21 % (dry weight), while binder dosages ranged from 5 % to 20 % (w/w). We monitored the stabilised/solidified soils for up to 84 days using different performance tests. The tests include unconfined compressive strength (UCS), hydraulic conductivity, acid neutralisation capacity (ANC) and pH-dependent leachability of contaminants. The water content range resulted in adequate workability of the mixes but had no significant effect on leachability of contaminants. We produced design charts, representing operating envelopes, from the results generated. The charts establish relationships between water content, binder dosage and UCS; and binder dosage, leachant pH and leachability of contaminants. The work also highlights the strengths and weaknesses of the different binder formulations. PMID:24243092

  2. Chemistry of guanidinate-stabilised diboranes: transition-metal-catalysed dehydrocoupling and hydride abstraction.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Arne; Litters, Sebastian; Elias, Jana; Kaifer, Elisabeth; Himmel, Hans-Jörg

    2014-09-22

    Herein, we analyse the catalytic boron-boron dehydrocoupling reaction that leads from the base-stabilised diborane(6) [H2 B(hpp)]2 (hpp=1,3,4,6,7,8-hexahydro-2H-pyrimido[1,2-a]pyrimidinate) to the base-stabilised diborane(4) [H2 B(hpp)]2 . A number of potential transition-metal precatalysts was studied, including transition-metal complexes of the product diborane(4). The synthesis and structural characterisation of two further examples of such complexes is presented. The best results for the dehydrocoupling reactions were obtained with precatalysts of Group 9 metals in the oxidation state of +I. The active catalyst is formed in situ through a multistep process that involves reduction of the precatalyst by the substrate [H2 B(hpp)]2 , and mechanistic investigations indicate that both heterogeneous and (slower) homogeneous reaction pathways play a role in the dehydrocoupling reaction. In addition, hydride abstraction from [H2 B(hpp)]2 and related diboranes is analysed and the possibility for subsequent deprotonation is discussed by probing the protic character of the cationic boron-hydrogen compounds with NMR spectroscopic analysis. PMID:25168516

  3. Stabilisation of biodried municipal solid waste fine fraction in landfill bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Grilli, Selene; Giordano, Andrea; Spagni, Alessandro

    2012-09-01

    The biodrying process of solid waste is a pre-treatment for the bio-stabilisation of the municipal solid waste. This study aims to investigate the fate of the municipal solid waste fine fraction (MSWFF) resulting from a biodrying treatment when disposed in landfills that are operated as bioreactors. Biodried MSWFF was apparently stable due to its low moisture content that slows down the microbial activity. The lab-scale anaerobic bioreactors demonstrated that a proper moisture content leads to a complete biodegradation of the organic matter contained in the biodried MSWFF. Using a pilot-scale landfill bioreactor (LBR), MSWFF stabilisation was achieved, suggesting that the leachate recirculation could be an effective approach to accomplish the anaerobic biodegradation and biostabilisation of biodried MSWFF after landfilling. The biostabilisation of the material resulting from the LBR treatment was confirmed using anaerobic and aerobic stability indices. All anaerobic and aerobic indices showed a stability increase of approximately 80% of the MSWFF after treatment in the LBR. The similar values of OD7 and BMP stability indices well agree with the relationship between the aerobic and anaerobic indices reported in literature. PMID:22633467

  4. Hippo Stabilises Its Adaptor Salvador by Antagonising the HECT Ubiquitin Ligase Herc4

    PubMed Central

    Aerne, Birgit L.; Gailite, Ieva; Sims, David; Tapon, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Signalling through the Hippo (Hpo) pathway involves a kinase cascade, which leads to the phosphorylation and inactivation of the pro-growth transcriptional co-activator Yorkie (Yki). Despite the identification of a large number of pathway members and modulators, our understanding of the molecular events that lead to activation of Hpo and the downstream kinase Warts (Wts) remain incomplete. Recently, targeted degradation of several Hpo pathway components has been demonstrated as a means of regulating pathway activity. In particular, the stability of scaffold protein Salvador (Sav), which is believed to promote Hpo/Wts association, is crucially dependent on its binding partner Hpo. In a cell-based RNAi screen for ubiquitin regulators involved in Sav stability, we identify the HECT domain protein Herc4 (HECT and RLD domain containing E3 ligase) as a Sav E3 ligase. Herc4 expression promotes Sav ubiquitylation and degradation, while Herc4 depletion stabilises Sav. Interestingly, Hpo reduces Sav/Herc4 interaction in a kinase-dependent manner. This suggests the existence of a positive feedback loop, where Hpo stabilises its own positive regulator by antagonising Herc4-mediated degradation of Sav. PMID:26125558

  5. Convection in Uranus and Neptune

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podolak, Morris; Helled, Ravit; Schubert, Gerald

    2015-11-01

    It is a common assumption of interior models that the outer planets of our solar system are convective, and that the internal temperature distributions are therefore adiabatic. If this assumption is not correct, the inferred internal structures of these planets can be different than typically thought. Therefore, exploring this topic is crucial for planetary characterization. We investigate how the internal temperature profiles of Uranus and Neptune depend on the treatment of layered-convection. We then use a set of possible temperature profiles associated with layered-convection together with density profiles derived from interior models that match the measured gravitational fields to derive the compositions of the planets. We find that the inferred compositions of both Uranus and Neptune are not very sensitive to the thermal profile. In addition, we show that calculating the thermal flux is important for understanding the energy transport mechanism in giant planets. Finally, we suggest that Neptune’s interior is just at the boundary between being convective or conductive and both configurations are consistent with its thermal flux, while Uranus’ interior is mostly conductive. This result is consistent with recent dynamo models and useful for understanding the origin of the magnetic fields of the planets.

  6. Synthesis : Convection, structure and evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schatzman, E.

    1997-12-01

    Lectures and discussions at the SCORe workshop have given a general idea of our present understanding of convection and oscillations and its application to the special case of the Sun. This {\\it SYNTHESIS} is just an attempt to present what seems to me to be the most important results, to draw attention to forgotten physical processes and to approach some important unsolved questions.

  7. Convective organization in the super-parameterized community atmosphere model with constant surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Organization in a moist convecting atmosphere is investigated using the super-parameterized community atmosphere model (SPCAM) in aquaplanet setting with constant surface temperature, with and without planetary rotation. Without radiative and surface feedbacks, convective organization is dominated by convectively coupled gravity waves without planetary rotation and convectively coupled equatorial waves when there is planetary rotation. This behavior is well captured when the cloud resolving model (CRM) in SPCAM is replaced by its linear response function, computed following Kuang (2010), for the state of radiative convective equilibrium (RCE). With radiative feedback, however, convection self-aggregates, and with planetary rotation, the tropical zonal wavenumber-frequency spectrum features a red noise background. These behaviors in the presence of the radiative feedback are not captured when the CRM is replaced by its linear response function around the RCE state with radiative feedback included in the construction. Implications to organization in a moist convecting atmosphere will be discussed. Kuang, Z., Linear response functions of a cumulus ensemble to temperature and moisture perturbations and implication to the dynamics of convectively coupled waves, J. Atmos. Sci., 67, 941-962, (2010)

  8. Three-dimensional spherical models of layered and whole mantle convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glatzmaier, Gary A.; Schubert, Gerald

    1993-01-01

    We present numerical calculations of three-dimensional spherical shell thermal convection for constant viscosity and stratified viscosity models of whole-layer and two-layer mantle convection. These four examples are intended to provide theoretical guidance for determining the style of convection that is occurring in Earth's mantle. An impermeable interface between the upper and lower convecting shells in the two-layer solutions is placed at a depth of 670 km to coincide with the mantle seismic discontinuity that divides the upper and lower mantle. The interface results in an internal thermal boundary layer that raises the mean temperature in the lower shell by about 1400 K compared to the whole-layer solutions. The patterns of convection in the upper part of the whole-layer solutions are dominated by narrow arcuate sheetlike downflows in a background of weak upflow. In contrast, the upper shells of the two-layer solutions have complicated networks of convective rolls with the upflows and downflows having very similar structure. The structure of convection in the lower shells is similar to that in the lower part of the whole-layer solutions. Based on the horizontal structure of subduction zones on Earth's surface and on tomographic images of temperature variations in Earth's mantle, we conclude that the style of convection in Earth's mantle is more like that of the whole-mantle models.

  9. The effect of environmental conditions and soil physicochemistry on phosphate stabilisation of Pb in shooting range soils.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, Peter; Naidu, Ravi; Bolan, Nanthi

    2016-04-01

    The stabilisation of Pb in the soil by phosphate is influenced by environmental conditions and physicochemical properties of the soils to which it is applied. Stabilisation of Pb by phosphate was examined in four soils under different environmental conditions. The effect of soil moisture and temperature on stabilisation of Pb by phosphate was examined by measurement of water extractable and bioaccessible Pb, sequential fractionation and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The addition of humic acid, ammonium nitrate and chloride was also examined for inhibition or improvement of Pb stability with phosphate treatment. The effect of moisture level varied between soils. In soil MB and DA a soil moisture level of 50% water holding capacity was sufficient to maximise stabilisation of Pb, but in soil TV and PE reduction in bioaccessible Pb was inhibited at this moisture level. Providing moisture at twice the soil water holding capacity did not enhance the effect of phosphate on Pb stabilisation. The difference of Pb stability as a result of incubating phosphate treated soils at 18 °C and 37 °C was relatively small. However wet-dry cycles decreased the effectiveness of phosphate treatment. The reduction in bioaccessible Pb obtained was between 20 and 40% with the most optimal treatment conditions. The reduction in water extractable Pb by phosphate was substantial regardless of incubation conditions and the effect of different temperature and soil moisture regimes was not significant. Selective sequential extraction showed phosphate treatment converted Pb in fraction 1 (exchangeable, acid and water soluble) to fraction 2 (reducible). There were small difference in fraction 4 (residual) Pb and fraction 1 as a result of treatment conditions. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of stabilised PE soil revealed small differences in Pb speciation under varying soil moisture and temperature treatments. The addition of humic acid and chloride produced the greatest effect on Pb speciation in

  10. Mantle convection, topography and geoid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golle, Olivia; Dumoulin, Caroline; Choblet, Gaël.; Cadek, Ondrej

    2010-05-01

    The internal evolution of planetary bodies often include solid-state convection. This phenomenon may have a large impact on the various interfaces of these bodies (dynamic topography occurs). It also affects their gravity field (and the geoid). Since both geoid and topography can be measured by a spacecraft, and are therefore available for several planetary bodies (while seismological measurements are still lacking for all of them but the Moon and the Earth), these are of the first interest for the study of internal structures and processes. While a classical approach now is to combine gravity and altimetry measurements to infer the internal structure of a planet [1], we propose to complement it by the reverse problem, i.e., producing synthetic geoid and dynamic topography from numerical models of convection as proposed by recent studies (e.g. for the CMB topography of the Earth,[2]). This procedure first include a simple evaluation of the surface topography and geoid from the viscous flow obtained by the 3D numerical tool OEDIPUS [3] modeling convection in a spherical shell. An elastic layer will then be considered and coupled to the viscous model - one question being whether the elastic shell shall be included 'on top' of the convective domain or within it, in the cold 'lithospheric' outer region. What we will present here corresponds to the first steps of this work: the comparison between the response functions of the topography and the geoid obtained from the 3D convection program to the results evaluated by a spectral method handling radial variations of viscosity [4]. We consider the effect of the elastic layer whether included in the convective domain or not. The scale setting in the context of a full thermal convection model overlaid by an elastic shell will be discussed (thickness of the shell, temperature at its base...). References [1] A.M. Wieczorek, (2007), The gravity and topography of the terrestrial planets, Treatise on Geophysics, 10, 165-206. [2

  11. How stratified is mantle convection?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puster, Peter; Jordan, Thomas H.

    1997-04-01

    We quantify the flow stratification in the Earth's mid-mantle (600-1500 km) in terms of a stratification index for the vertical mass flux, Sƒ (z) = 1 - ƒ(z) / ƒref (z), in which the reference value ƒref(z) approximates the local flux at depth z expected for unstratified convection (Sƒ=0). Although this flux stratification index cannot be directly constrained by observations, we show from a series of two-dimensional convection simulations that its value can be related to a thermal stratification index ST(Z) defined in terms of the radial correlation length of the temperature-perturbation field δT(z, Ω). ST is a good proxy for Sƒ at low stratifications (Sƒ<0.2), where it rises with stratification strength much more rapidly than Sƒ. Assuming that the shear-speed variations δβ(z, Ω) imaged by seismic tomography are primarily due to convective temperature fluctuations, we can approximate ST by Sβ, the analogous index for the radial correlation length of δβ, and thereby construct bounds on Sƒ. We discuss several key issues regarding the implementation of this strategy, including finite resolution of the seismic data, biases due to the parameterization of the tomographic models, and the bias and variance due to noise. From the comparison of the numerical simulations with recent tomographic structures, we conclude that it is unlikely that convection in the Earth's mantle has Sƒ≳0.15. We consider the possibility that this estimate is biased because mantle convection is intermittent and therefore that the present-day tomographic snapshot may differ from its time average. Although this possibility cannot be dismissed completely, we argue that values of Sƒ≳0.2 can be discounted under a weak version of the Uniformitarian Principle. The bound obtained here from global tomography is consistent with local seismological evidence for slab flux into the lower mantle; however, the total material flux has to be significantly greater (by a factor of 2-3) than that

  12. The use of biogas plant fermentation residue for the stabilisation of toxic metals in agricultural soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geršl, Milan; Šotnar, Martin; Mareček, Jan; Vítěz, Tomáš; Koutný, Tomáš; Kleinová, Jana

    2015-04-01

    Our department has been paying attention to different methods of soil decontamination, including the in situ stabilisation. Possible reagents to control the toxic metals mobility in soils include a fermentation residue (FR) from a biogas plant. Referred to as digestate, it is a product of anaerobic decomposition taking place in such facilities. The fermentation residue is applied to soils as a fertiliser. A new way of its use is the in situ stabilisation of toxic metals in soils. Testing the stabilisation of toxic metals made use of real soil samples sourced from five agriculturally used areas of the Czech Republic with 3 soil samples taken from sites contaminated with Cu, Pb and Zn and 2 samples collected at sites of natural occurrence of Cu, Pb and Zn ores. All the samples were analysed using the sequential extraction procedure (BCR) (determine the type of Cu, Pb and Zn bonds). Stabilisation of toxic metals was tested in five soil samples by adding reagents as follows: dolomite, slaked lime, goethite, compost and fermentation residue. A single reagent was added at three different concentrations. In the wet state with the added reagents, the samples were left for seven days, shaken twice per day. After seven days, metal extraction was carried out: samples of 10 g soil were shaken for 2 h in a solution of 0.1M NH4NO3 at a 1:2.5 (g.ml-1), centrifuged for 15 min at 5,000 rpm and then filtered through PTFE 0.45 μm mesh filters. The extracts were analysed by ICP-OES. Copper The best reduction of Cu concentration in the extract was obtained at each of the tested sites by adding dolomite (10 g soil + 0.3 g dolomite). The concentration of Cu in the leachate decreased to 2.1-18.4% compare with the leachate without addition. Similar results were also shown for the addition of fermentation residue (10 g soil + 1 g FR). The Cu concentration in the leachate decreased to 16.7-26.8% compared with the leachate without addition. Lead The best results were achieved by adding

  13. Convective storms in planetary atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hueso, R.; Sánchez-Lavega, A.

    2013-05-01

    The atmospheres of the planets in the Solar System have different physical properties that in some cases can be considered as extreme when compared with our own planet's more familiar atmosphere. From the tenuous and cold atmosphere of Mars to the dense and warm atmosphere of Venus in the case of the terrestrial planets, to the gigantic atmospheres of the outer planets, or the nitrogen and methane atmosphere of Saturn's moon Titan, we can find a large variety of physical environments. The comparative study of these atmospheres provides a better understanding of the physics of a geophysical fluid. In many of these worlds convective storms of different intensity appear. They are analogous to terrestrial atmospheres fed by the release of latent heat when one of the gases in the atmosphere condenses and they are therefore called moist convective storms. In many of these planets they can produce severe meteorological phenomena and by studying them in a comparative way we can aspire to get a further insight in the dynamics of these atmospheres even beyond the scope of moist convection. A classical example is the structure of the complex systems of winds in the giant planets Jupiter and Saturn. These winds are zonal and alternate in latitude but their deep structure is not accessible to direct observation. However the behaviour of large--scale convective storms vertically extending over the "weather layer" allows to study the buried roots of these winds. Another interesting atmosphere with a rather different structure of convection is Titan, a world where methane is close to its triple point in the atmosphere and can condense in bright clouds with large precipitation fluxes that may model part of the orography of the surface making Titan a world with a methane cycle similar to the hydrological cycle of Earth's atmosphere.

  14. Disc extrusion in a Rottweiler dog with caudal cervical spondylomyelopathy after failure of intervertebral distraction/stabilisation.

    PubMed

    Marchevsky, A M; Richardson, J L

    1999-05-01

    A Rottweiler dog was presented with an 8 week history of hindlimb ataxia. Neurological examination localised the lesion to the cervical spinal cord. Myelography demonstrated dynamic compressive lesions at C5-6 and C6-7 consistent with a diagnosis of caudal cervical spondylomyelopathy. Distraction/stabilisation of both discs was performed using interbody polymethyl methacrylate. Both implants subsequently failed leading to extrusion of the remaining dorsal annulus fibrosus of the C5-6 intervertebral disc and nonambulatory tetraparesis. A ventral slot combined with distraction/stabilisation using screws and polymethyl methacrylate was performed and resulted in nearly full neurological recovery. PMID:10376097

  15. Background sources at PEP

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, H.; Schwitters, R.F.; Toner, W.T.

    1988-01-01

    Important sources of background for PEP experiments are studied. Background particles originate from high-energy electrons and positrons which have been lost from stable orbits, ..gamma..-rays emitted by the primary beams through bremsstrahlung in the residual gas, and synchrotron radiation x-rays. The effect of these processes on the beam lifetime are calculated and estimates of background rates at the interaction region are given. Recommendations for the PEP design, aimed at minimizing background are presented. 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Bounds on heat transport in Rayleigh's and related models of Bénard convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doering, Charles R.; Souza, Andre N.; Wen, Baole; Chini, Gregory P.; Kerswell, Richard R.

    2015-11-01

    We present new upper limits on convective heat transport in both the full and several low-dimensional Galerkin truncations of Rayleigh's 1916 model of buoyancy-driven Bénard convection using both the so-called background method as well as optimal control variational techniques. Research supported in part by by NSF Awards PHY-1205219, PHY-1338407, PHY-1443836, PHY-1533555 and DMS-1515161.

  17. Building Background Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neuman, Susan B.; Kaefer, Tanya; Pinkham, Ashley

    2014-01-01

    This article make a case for the importance of background knowledge in children's comprehension. It suggests that differences in background knowledge may account for differences in understanding text for low- and middle-income children. It then describes strategies for building background knowledge in the age of common core standards.

  18. Ionospheric convection signatures and magnetic field topology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coley, W. R.; Heelis, R. A.; Hanson, W. B.; Reiff, P. H.; Sharber, J. R.

    1987-01-01

    A statistical study of signatures of the high-latitude ionospheric convection pattern and the simultaneously observed energetic electron precipitation is presented. Most often found are convection cells in which the sunward flowing region contains auroral particle precipitation but the antisunward flowing region does not. However, observations also show the frequent occurrence of convection cells in which neither the antisunward nor the sunward flowing plasma region contains auroral particle precipitation. These findings may appear within the dawnside or duskside convection pattern and strongly suggest that such convection cells may be associated with open magnetic field lines that thread the magnetotail lobes.

  19. Tropical Convection's Roles in Tropical Tropopause Cirrus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehm, Matthew T.; Starr, David OC.; Verlinde, Johannes; Lee, Sukyoung

    2002-01-01

    The results presented here show that tropical convection plays a role in each of the three primary processes involved in the in situ formation of tropopause cirrus. First, tropical convection transports moisture from the surface into the upper troposphere. Second, tropical convection excites Rossby waves that transport zonal momentum toward the ITCZ, thereby generating rising motion near the equator. This rising motion helps transport moisture from where it is detrained from convection to the cold-point tropopause. Finally, tropical convection excites vertically propagating tropical waves (e.g. Kelvin waves) that provide one source of large-scale cooling near the cold-point tropopause, leading to tropopause cirrus formation.

  20. A transilient matrix for moist convection

    SciTech Connect

    Romps, D.; Kuang, Z.

    2011-08-15

    A method is introduced for diagnosing a transilient matrix for moist convection. This transilient matrix quantifies the nonlocal transport of air by convective eddies: for every height z, it gives the distribution of starting heights z{prime} for the eddies that arrive at z. In a cloud-resolving simulation of deep convection, the transilient matrix shows that two-thirds of the subcloud air convecting into the free troposphere originates from within 100 m of the surface. This finding clarifies which initial height to use when calculating convective available potential energy from soundings of the tropical troposphere.

  1. The shadowgraph method in convection experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasenat, S.; Hartung, G.; Winkler, B. L.; Rehberg, I.

    1989-06-01

    The shadowgraph method is applied to thermal convection experiments and electro-hydrodynamic convection (EHC) in nematic liquid crystals. In both cases convection leads to a spatially periodic field of the refractive index causing a spatially periodic intensity modulation of parallel light passing the cell. Close to the onset of convection the temperature or director field is given by linear stability analysis. Knowing these functions the determination of their amplitudes becomes possible by means of the shadowgraph method. The method is demostrated using various examples of thermal and EHC convection experiments.

  2. Granular convection observed by magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrichs, E. E.; Jaeger, H. M.; Karczmar, Greg S.; Knight, James B.; Kuperman, Vadim Yu.; Nagel, Sidney R.

    1995-03-01

    Vibrations in a granular material can spontaneously produce convection rolls reminiscent of those seen in fluids. Magnetic resonance imaging provides a sensitive and noninvasive probe for the detection of these convection currents, which have otherwise been difficult to observe. A magnetic resonance imaging study of convection in a column of poppy seeds yielded data about the detailed shape of the convection rolls and the depth dependence of the convection velocity. The velocity was found to decrease exponentially with depth; a simple model for this behavior is presented here.

  3. Granular convection observed by magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrichs, E.E.; Jaeger, H.M.; Knight, J.B.; Nagel, S.R.; Karczmar, G.S.; Kuperman, V.Yu.

    1995-03-17

    Vibrations in a granular material can spontaneously produce convection rolls reminiscent of those seen in fluids. Magnetic resonance imaging provides a sensitive and noninvasive probe for the detection of these convection currents, which have otherwise been difficult to observe. A magnetic resonance imaging study of convection in a column of poppy seeds yielded data about the detailed shape of the convection rolls and the depth dependence of the convection velocity. The velocity was found to decrease exponentially with depth; a simple model for this behavior is presented here. 31 refs., 4 figs.

  4. Convective shutdown of CO2 in saline aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neufeld, J. A.; Hewitt, D. R.; Lister, J. R.

    2013-12-01

    Convective flow in a porous medium, driven by a buoyancy source along one boundary, is common in active geothermal aquifers and in the presence of evaporation in saline aquifers. More recently, convection driven by the dissolution of injected CO2 in saline aquifers has been shown to reduce the volume of mobile CO2 in carbon sequestration sites and analogues, thus reducing any concomitant risks of leakage. For carbon sequestration the rates of dissolution can depend strongly on the background CO2 concentration, and hence might be expected to wane in time. Here we present a simple analytic box model of the shutdown of convection in a closed aquifer, and compare these reduced model results against high-resolution numerical and analogue experiments. We find that the box model accurately captures the dynamics of the convective fluxes, and provides time scale over which free-phase CO2 may be completely removed. Furthermore, the model may provide insight into the geochemical record of dissolution in the deep carbon cycle.

  5. Finite-time observer-based output-feedback control for the global stabilisation of the PVTOL aircraft with bounded inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavala-Río, A.; Fantoni, I.; Sanahuja, G.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, an output-feedback scheme for the global stabilisation of the planar vertical take-off and landing aircraft with bounded inputs is developed taking into account the positive nature of the thrust. The global stabilisation objective is proven to be achieved avoiding input saturation and by exclusively considering the system positions in the feedback. To cope with the lack of velocity measurements, the proposed algorithm involves a finite-time observer. The generalised versions of the involved finite-time stabilisers have not only permitted to solve the output-feedback stabilisation problem avoiding input saturation, but also provide additional flexibility in the control design that may be used in aid of performance improvements. With respect to previous approaches, the developed finite-time observer-based scheme guarantees the global stabilisation objective disregarding velocity measurements in a bounded input context. Simulation tests corroborate the analytical developments. The study includes further experimental results on an actual flying device.

  6. Anisotropic modulus stabilisation: strings at LHC scales with micron-sized extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicoli, M.; Burgess, C. P.; Quevedo, F.

    2011-10-01

    We construct flux-stabilised Type IIB string compactifications whose extra dimensions have very different sizes, and use these to describe several types of vacua with a TeV string scale. Because we can access regimes where two dimensions are hierarchically larger than the other four, we find examples where two dimensions are micron-sized while the other four are at the weak scale in addition to more standard examples with all six extra dimensions equally large. Besides providing ultraviolet completeness, the phenomenology of these models is richer than vanilla large-dimensional models in several generic ways: ( i) they are supersymmetric, with supersymmetry broken at sub-eV scales in the bulk but only nonlinearly realised in the Standard Model sector, leading to no MSSM superpartners for ordinary particles and many more bulk missing-energy channels, as in supersymmetric large extra dimensions (SLED); ( ii) small cycles in the more complicated extra-dimensional geometry allow some KK states to reside at TeV scales even if all six extra dimensions are nominally much larger; ( iii) a rich spectrum of string and KK states at TeV scales; and ( iv) an equally rich spectrum of very light moduli exist having unusually small (but technically natural) masses, with potentially interesting implications for cosmology and astrophysics that nonetheless evade new-force constraints. The hierarchy problem is solved in these models because the extra-dimensional volume is naturally stabilised at exponentially large values: the extra dimensions are Calabi-Yau geometries with a 4D K3 or T 4-fibration over a 2D base, with moduli stabilised within the well-established LARGE-Volume scenario. The new technical step is the use of poly-instanton corrections to the superpotential (which, unlike for simpler models, are likely to be present on K3 or T 4-fibered Calabi-Yau compactifications) to obtain a large hierarchy between the sizes of different dimensions. For several scenarios we identify

  7. Seismic Constraints on Interior Solar Convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanasoge, Shravan M.; Duvall, Thomas L.; DeRosa, Marc L.

    2010-01-01

    We constrain the velocity spectral distribution of global-scale solar convective cells at depth using techniques of local helioseismology. We calibrate the sensitivity of helioseismic waves to large-scale convective cells in the interior by analyzing simulations of waves propagating through a velocity snapshot of global solar convection via methods of time-distance helioseismology. Applying identical analysis techniques to observations of the Sun, we are able to bound from above the magnitudes of solar convective cells as a function of spatial convective scale. We find that convection at a depth of r/R(solar) = 0.95 with spatial extent l < 30, where l is the spherical harmonic degree, comprise weak flow systems, on the order of 15 m/s or less. Convective features deeper than r/R(solar) = 0.95 are more difficult to image due to the rapidly decreasing sensitivity of helioseismic waves.

  8. Seismology of Convection in the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanasoge, Shravan

    2015-08-01

    Solar convection lies in extraordinary regime of dynamical parameters. Convective processes in the Sun drive global fluid circulations and magnetic fields, which in turn affect its visible outer layers (solar activity) and, more broadly, the heliosphere (space weather). The precise determination of the depth of solar convection zone, departures from adiabaticity of the temperature gradient, and the internal rotation rate as a function of latitude and depth are among the seminal contributions of helioseismology towards understanding convection in the Sun. Contemporary helioseismology, which is focused on inferring the properties of three-dimensional convective features, suggests that transport velocities are substantially smaller than theoretical predictions. Furthermore, helioseismology provides important constraints on the anisotropic Reynolds stresses that control the global dynamics of the solar convection zone. In this review, I will discuss the state of our understanding of convection in the Sun, with a focus on helioseismic diagnostics.

  9. Modelling natural convection of fluid in cuvette

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucher, D.; Manukhin, B.; Andreeva, O.; Chivilikhin, S.

    2014-09-01

    Convection is a process of transfer liquid from a hot region to a cool region. This phenomenon is involved in many physical processes. The main characteristic of convection is a temperature field. Modelling of convection allows to get the information about temperature field at any time of process. In this paper the results of modelling natural convection of fluid in cuvette are presented. All results are approved by experimental data. For modelling the process of natural convection Navier-Stokes equations under Boussinesq approximation were used. An experimental setup based on digital holographic interferometry was developedin order to make an experiment. The results for three stadiums of convection, such as: jet initiation, initial jet formation, jet development with formation of mushroom-shaped convective stream, are presented.

  10. Natural convection in low-g environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grodzka, P. G.; Bannister, T. C.

    1974-01-01

    The present state of knowledge in the area of low-g natural convection is reviewed, taking into account a number of experiments conducted during the Apollo 14, 16, and 17 space flights. Convections due to steady low-g accelerations are considered. Steady g-levels result from spacecraft rotation, gravity gradients, solar wind, and solar pressure. Varying g-levels are produced by engine burns, attitude control maneuvers, and onboard vibrations from machinery or astronaut movement. Thermoacoustic convection in a low-g environment is discussed together with g-jitter convection, surface tension-driven convection, electrohydrodynamics under low-g conditions, phase change convection, and approaches for the control and the utilization of convection in space.

  11. Aerosol-radiation-cloud interactions in a regional coupled model: the effects of convective parameterisation and resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archer-Nicholls, Scott; Lowe, Douglas; Schultz, David M.; McFiggans, Gordon

    2016-05-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting model with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) has been used to simulate a region of Brazil heavily influenced by biomass burning. Nested simulations were run at 5 and 1 km horizontal grid spacing for three case studies in September 2012. Simulations were run with and without fire emissions, convective parameterisation on the 5 km domain, and aerosol-radiation interactions in order to explore the differences attributable to the parameterisations and to better understand the aerosol direct effects and cloud responses. Direct aerosol-radiation interactions due to biomass burning aerosol resulted in a net cooling, with an average short-wave direct effect of -4.08 ± 1.53 Wm-2. However, around 21.7 Wm-2 is absorbed by aerosol in the atmospheric column, warming the atmosphere at the aerosol layer height, stabilising the column, inhibiting convection, and reducing cloud cover and precipitation. The changes to clouds due to radiatively absorbing aerosol (traditionally known as the semi-direct effects) increase the net short-wave radiation reaching the surface by reducing cloud cover, producing a secondary warming that counters the direct cooling. However, the magnitude of the semi-direct effect was found to be extremely sensitive to the model resolution and the use of convective parameterisation. Precipitation became organised in isolated convective cells when not using a convective parameterisation on the 5 km domain, reducing both total cloud cover and total precipitation. The SW semi-direct effect varied from 6.06 ± 1.46 with convective parameterisation to 3.61 ± 0.86 Wm-2 without. Convective cells within the 1 km domain are typically smaller but with greater updraft velocity than equivalent cells in the 5 km domain, reducing the proportion of the domain covered by cloud in all scenarios and producing a smaller semi-direct effect. Biomass burning (BB) aerosol particles acted as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), increasing the droplet number

  12. The continental drift convection cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehead, J. A.; Behn, Mark D.

    2015-06-01

    Continents on Earth periodically assemble to form supercontinents and then break up again into smaller continental blocks (the Wilson cycle). Previous highly developed numerical models incorporate fixed continents while others indicate that continent movement modulates flow. Our simplified numerical model suggests that continental drift is fundamental. A thermally insulating continent is anchored at its center to mantle flow on an otherwise stress-free surface for infinite Prandtl number cellular convection with constant material properties. Rayleigh numbers exceed 107, while continent widths and chamber lengths approach Earth's values. The Wilson cycle is reproduced by a unique, rugged monopolar "continental drift convection cell." Subduction occurs at the cell's upstream end with cold slabs dipping at an angle beneath the moving continent (as found in many continent/subduction regions on Earth). Drift enhances vertical heat transport up to 30%, especially at the core-mantle boundary, and greatly decreases lateral mantle temperature differences.

  13. Fluid convection, constraint and causation

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    Complexity—nonlinear dynamics for my purposes in this essay—is rich with metaphysical and epistemological implications but is receiving sustained philosophical analysis only recently. I will explore some of the subtleties of causation and constraint in Rayleigh–Bénard convection as an example of a complex phenomenon, and extract some lessons for further philosophical reflection on top-down constraint and causation particularly with respect to causal foundationalism. PMID:23386955

  14. A novel approach for biomechanical spine analysis: Mechanical response of vertebral bone augmentation by kyphoplasty to stabilise thoracolumbar burst fractures.

    PubMed

    Germaneau, A; Vendeuvre, T; Saget, M; Doumalin, P; Dupré, J C; Brémand, F; Hesser, F; Couvertier, M; Brèque, C; Maxy, P; Roulaud, M; Monlezun, O; Rigoard, P

    2016-06-01

    Kyphoplasty has been shown as a well-established technique for spinal injuries. This technique allows a vertebral bone augmentation with a reduction of morbidity and does not involve any adjacent segment immobilisation. There is a lack of biomechanical information resulting in major gaps of knowledge such as: the evaluation of the "quality" of stabilisation provided by kyphoplasty as a standalone procedure in case of unstable fracture. Our objective is to analyse biomechanical response of spine segments stabilised by Kyphoplasty and PMMA cement after experiencing burst fractures. Six fresh-frozen cadaveric spine specimens constituted by five vertebra (T11-L3) and four disks were tested. A specific loading setup has been developed to impose pure moments corresponding to loadings of flexion-extension, lateral bending and axial rotation. Tests were performed on each specimen in an intact state and post kyphoplasty following a burst fracture. Strain measurements and motion variations of spinal unit are measured by a 3D optical method. Strain measurements on vertebral bodies after kyphoplasty shows a great primary stabilisation. Comparisons of mobility and angles variations between the intact and post kyphoplasty states do not highlight significant difference. Percutaneous kyphoplasty offers a good primary stability in case of burst fracture. Kinematics analysis during physiological movements shows that this stabilisation solution preserve disk mobility in each adjacent spinal unit. PMID:26896762

  15. Vegetation forcing and convective motion

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, X.; Leach, M.J.; Raman, S.

    1995-04-01

    A large irrigated vegetation area in a semiarid or relatively dry location is a strong surface forcing of thermal circulations. Several observational studies have found that such thermally induced mesoscale circulation may contribute to the triggering and development of convective clouds. In the western United States, extensive areas of irrigated farmland are surrounded by hot, dry surfaces, such as a steppe. Substantial gradients of sensible heating in the horizontal direction lead to a {open_quotes}farm breeze{close_quotes} circulation from the cooler agricultural area to the warmer steppes found at Boardman, Oregon. These thermally forced circulations may trigger convection by the related convergence and updraft motion under favorable atmospheric conditions. The role of vegetative covering in convective motion is investigated using a mesoscale numerical model. Two- and three-dimensional simulations are described. The effects of atmospheric stability, moisture in the lower atmosphere, moisture in the upper atmosphere, and horizontal heating scale on thermally induced clouds are studied. The horizontal scale of inhomogeneity is also studied using the two-dimensional model. Finally, a realistic vegetation distribution similar to that of the Boardman Regional Flux Experiment is used in the three-dimensional simulations.

  16. Influence of convection on microstructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, William R.; Caram, Rubens; Mohanty, A. P.; Seth, Jayshree

    1990-01-01

    The mechanism responsible for the difference in microstructure caused by solidifying the MnBi-Bi eutectic in space is sought. The objectives for the three year period are as follows: (1) completion of the following theoretical analyses - determination of the influence of the Soret effect on the average solid composition versus distance of off-eutectic mixtures directionally solidified in the absence of convection, determination of the influence of convection on the microstructure of off-eutectic mixtures using a linear velocity profile in the adjacent melt, determination of the influence of volumetric changes during solidification on microconvection near the freezing interface and on microstructure, and determination of the influence of convection on microstructure when the MnBi fibers project out in front of the bismuth matrix; (2) search for patterns in the effect of microgravity on different eutectics (for example, eutectic composition, eutectic temperature, usual microstructure, densities of pure constituents, and density changes upon solidification); and (3) determination of the Soret coefficient and the diffusion coefficient for Mn-Bi melts near the eutectic composition, both through laboratory experiements to be performed here and from data from Shuttle experiments.

  17. Instability of spiral convective vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evgrafova, Anna; Andrey, Sukhanovsky; Elena, Popova

    2014-05-01

    Formation of large-scale vortices in atmosphere is one of the interesting problems of geophysical fluid dynamics. Tropical cyclones are examples of atmospheric spiral vortices for which convection plays an important role in their formation and evolution. Our study is focused on intensive cyclonic vortex produced by heating in the central part of the rotating layer. The previous studies made by Bogatyrev et al, showed that structure of such vortex is very similar to the structure of tropical cyclones. Qualitative observations described in (Bogatyrev, 2009) showed that the evolution of large-scale vortex in extreme regimes can be very complicated. Our main goal is the study of evolution of convective cyclonic vortex at high values of Grasshof number by PIV system. Experimental setup is a rotating cylindrical tank of fluid (radius 150 mm, depth 30 mm, free upper surface). Velocity fields for different values of heat flux were obtained and temporal and spatial structure of intensive convective vortex were studied in details. With the use of PIV data vorticity fields were reconstructed in different horizontal cross-sections. Physical interpretation of mechanisms that lead to the crucial change in the vortex structure with the growth of heat rate is described. Financial support from program of UD RAS, the International Research Group Program supported by Perm region Government is gratefully acknowledged.

  18. Magnetohydrodynamic convection in liquid gallium.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juel, Anne; Mullin, Tom

    1996-11-01

    Results are presented from a study of convective flow of liquid gallium confined in a rectangular cavity of length/depth ratio 4, subject to a horizontal temperature gradient. The origin of the problem lies in the area of crystal growth, where it is known that the dynamics of the fluid flow in semiconductor geometries are of vital importance in determining the quality of the crystal. Application of a magnetic field, for instance, damps out the time-dependent convection in the liquid phase that creates striations in the crystal and reduces its quality. Prior to the study of dynamical phenomena, the nature of the steady flow is investigated. In the absence of a magnetic field, a direct comparison between experimental results, the Hadley cell model and two and three-dimensional numerical simulations clearly shows that the flow is three-dimensional in nature. The effect of a uniform transverse magnetic field is then examined. Direct comparison between experimental results and three dimensional simulations shows identical damping of the convective circulation. Numerically, it is found that the magnetic field restricts the flow to 2d motion. Experimentally, this is confirmed from the measurement of isotherms. Hence, the detailed knowledge of the steady flow provides us with a robust basis for studies of time dependent behaviour.

  19. Bifurcation phenomena in cylindrical convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuckerman, Laurette; Boronska, K.; Bordja, L.; Martin-Witkowski, L.; Navarro, M. C.

    2008-11-01

    We present two bifurcation scenarios occurring in Rayleigh-Benard convection in a small-aspect-ratio cylinder. In water (Pr=6.7) with R/H=2, Hof et al. (1999) observed five convective patterns at Ra=14200. We have computed 14 stable and unstable steady branches, as well as novel time-dependent branches. The resulting complicated bifurcation diagram, can be partitioned according to azimuthal symmetry. For example, three-roll and dipole states arise from an m=1 bifurcation, four-roll and ``pizza'' branches from m=2, and the ``mercedes'' state from an m=3 bifurcation after successive saddle-node bifurcations via ``marigold'', ``mitsubishi'' and ``cloverleaf'' states. The diagram represents a compromise between the physical tendency towards parallel rolls and the mathematical requirement that primary bifurcations be towards trigonometric states. Our second investigation explores the effect of exact counter-rotation of the upper and lower bounding disks on axisymmetric flows with Pr=1 and R/H=1. The convection threshold increases and, for sufficiently high rotation, the instability becomes oscillatory. Limit cycles originating at the Hopf bifurcation are annihilated when their period becomes infinite at saddle-node-on-periodic-orbit (SNOPER) bifurcations.

  20. Atmospheric Vortices in Shallow Convection.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, G. D.; Spillane, K. T.; Lourensz, R. S.

    1988-03-01

    Observations of funnel clouds over Port Phillip Bay, Victoria, Australia, indicate that they occur during outbreaks of cool air from the Southern Ocean advecting over the relatively warm bay waters. These clouds act as tracers for shallow convection vortices with dynamics similar to large dust devils. The related phenomena of waterspouts and tornadoes differ from these vortices by requiring deep convection and downdraft and updraft interactions associated with rain processes.Deardorff (1978a) suggests that a necessary condition for the formation of dust devils is /L of the order of 100 or more, where h is the convective boundary layer height and L the Obukhov length. Calculations of /L over the bay and over land for the days of observation are consistent with this suggestion. They indicate that significant rotation may occur at /L as low as 50. This information, if confirmed, may make it possible to use boundary layer numerical models to forecast likely conditions of dust devil occurrence over mesoscale regions, which would be of benefit to pilots of light aircraft and helicopters.

  1. Ice Nucleation in Deep Convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Eric; Ackerman, Andrew; Stevens, David; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The processes controlling production of ice crystals in deep, rapidly ascending convective columns are poorly understood due to the difficulties involved with either modeling or in situ sampling of these violent clouds. A large number of ice crystals are no doubt generated when droplets freeze at about -40 C. However, at higher levels, these crystals are likely depleted due to precipitation and detrainment. As the ice surface area decreases, the relative humidity can increase well above ice saturation, resulting in bursts of ice nucleation. We will present simulations of these processes using a large-eddy simulation model with detailed microphysics. Size bins are included for aerosols, liquid droplets, ice crystals, and mixed-phase (ice/liquid) hydrometers. Microphysical processes simulated include droplet activation, freezing, melting, homogeneous freezing of sulfate aerosols, and heterogeneous ice nucleation. We are focusing on the importance of ice nucleation events in the upper part of the cloud at temperatures below -40 C. We will show that the ultimate evolution of the cloud in this region (and the anvil produced by the convection) is sensitive to these ice nucleation events, and hence to the composition of upper tropospheric aerosols that get entrained into the convective column.

  2. Thermosolutal convection during dendritic solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinrich, J. C.; Nandapurkar, P.; Poirier, D. R.; Felicelli, S.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents a mathematical model for directional solidification of a binary alloy including a dendritic region underlying an all-liquid region. It is assumed initially that there exists a nonconvecting state with planar isotherms and isoconcentrates solidifying at a constant velocity. The stability of this system has been analyzed and nonlinear calculations are performed that show the effect of convection in the solidification process when the system is unstable. Results of calculations for various cases defined by the initial temperature gradient at the dendrite tips and varying strength of the gravitational field are presented for systems involving lead-tin alloys. The results show that the systems are stable for a gravitational constant of 0.0001 g(0) and that convection can be suppressed by appropriate choice of the container's size for higher values of the gravitational constant. It is also concluded that for the lead-tin systems considered, convection in the mushy zone is not significant below the upper 20 percent of the dendritic zone, if al all.

  3. A constructive method to static output stabilisation of Markov jump systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Mouquan; Fei, Shumin

    2015-05-01

    This paper is concerned with the static output feedback stabilisation of Markov jump systems. Transition probabilities are assumed to be incomplete, namely, they may be known, uncertain with known lower and upper bounds and unknown. To linearise the nonlinearities induced by unknown transition probabilities, a linearisation is developed. To solve the static output feedback problem by means of linear matrix inequalities, a constructive method is proposed to separate the controller gain matrices from Lyapunov variables. Based on the linearisation and the separation, sufficient conditions are established to guarantee that the closed-loop system is stochastically stable by the designed static output feedback controller. The obtained results are further extended to deal with norm-bounded or polytopic uncertainties on system matrices. Numerical examples are given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  4. Inacessible Andean sites reveal land-use induced stabilisation of soil organic carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heitkamp, Felix; Maqsood, Shafique; Sylvester, Steven; Kessler, Michael; Jungkunst, Hermann

    2015-04-01

    Human activity affects properties and development of ecosystems across the globe to such a degree that it is challenging to get baseline values for undisturbed ecosystems. This is especially true for soils, which are affected by land-use history and hold a legacy of past human interventions. Therefore, it is still largely unknown how soil would have developed "naturally" and if processes of organic matter stabilisation would be different in comparison to managed soils. Here, we show undisturbed soil development, i.e., the processes of weathering and accumulation of soil organic carbon (SOC), by comparing pristine with grazed sites in the high Andes (4500 m) of southern Peru. We located study plots on a large ledge (0.2 km²) that is only accessible with mountaineering equipment. Plots with pristine vegetation were compared to rangeland plots that were constantly under grazing management for at least four millennia. All "state factors"; climate, potential biota, topography, parent material and time; besides "land-use" were, therefore, identical. Vegetation change, induced by grazing management, led to lower vegetation cover of the soil, thereby increasing soil surface temperatures and soil acidification. Both factors increased weathering in rangeland soils, as indicated by the presence of pedogenic oxides, especially amorphous Al-(oxy)hydroxides (oxalate-extractable Al). Higher losses of base cations (K, Na, Ca) and lower pH-values were related to a low base saturation of exchange sites in rangelands. Therefore, rangeland soils were classified as Umbrisol, whereas soils under pristine vegetation were classified as Phaeozeme. All profiles were rich in SOC (100 to 126 g kg-1) with no significant differences in concentrations or stocks. SOC of rangeland soils was, however, less available for microorganisms (proportion of microbial C on SOC: 1.8 vs. 0.6% in pristine and rangeland soils, respectively) and showed higher stability against thermal degradation. Reasons for

  5. Post-/γ-irradiation reactions in vitamin E stabilised and unstabilised HDPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallégol, J.; Carlsson, D. J.; Deschênes, L.

    2001-12-01

    The oxidation of high density polyethylene (HDPE), both unstabilised and vitamin E stabilised, has been studied by infrared (IR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopies in the period following γ-irradiation at doses from 1 to 60 kGy (range of food sterilisation). Derivatisation by reaction with sulphur tetrafluoride was used to identify macro-ketone and carboxylic acid components of the overlapped IR carbonyl region. Oxidation continued for several hundred hours after the cessation of irradiation as shown by the increase in hydroxyl, ketone and acid groups. Carboxylic acid groups are particularly important as a direct indication of backbone scission. Vitamin E, although an effective antioxidant during γ-irradiation, was less effective in reducing the post-irradiation changes, which are probably driven by migration of radical sites along the polymer backbone from within the crystalline phase to the amorphous/crystalline inter-phase, where they become oxygen accessible.

  6. Influence of interface stabilisers and surrounding aqueous phases on nematic liquid crystal shells.

    PubMed

    Noh, JungHyun; Reguengo De Sousa, Kevin; Lagerwall, Jan P F

    2016-01-14

    We investigate the nematic-isotropic (N-I) transition in shells of the liquid crystal 5CB, surrounded by aqueous phases that conventionally are considered to be immiscible with 5CB. The aqueous phases contain either sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) or polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) as stabiliser, the former additionally promoting homeotropic director alignment. For all shell configurations we find a depression of the clearing point compared to pure 5CB, indicating that a non-negligible fraction of the constituents of the surrounding phases enter the shell, predominantly water. In hybrid-aligned shells, with planar outer and homeotropic inner boundary (or vice versa), the N-I transition splits into two steps, with a consequent three-step textural transformation. We explain this as a result of the order-enhancing effect of a monolayer of radially aligned SDS molecules adsorbed at the homeotropic interface. PMID:26512764

  7. Stabilisation of bank slopes that are prone to liquefaction in ecologically sensitive areas.

    PubMed

    Nestler, P; Stoll, R D

    2001-01-01

    A consequence of lignite stripping in the Lusatia mining district (East Germany) is the backfilling of dumps that mainly consist of low-compacted fine and medium-grained sands. When the ground-water table, which had been lowered while stripping the coal, is rising again, these dumps might be affected by a settlement flow due to the liquefaction of soils. Common methods for stabilisation as, for instance, blasting or vibrator-jetting deep compaction, are not very useful in ecologically sensitive areas, where dumps have been afforested and embankment areas of residual lakes have developed into highly valuable biotopes. A new so-called air-impulse method in combination with directional horizontal drilling has been developed, which does not have a considerably negative impact on the vegetation during compaction. The experience gained during the first employment of this method at the lake "Katja", a residual lake of lignite stripping, is presented in this paper. PMID:11220180

  8. Input-output finite-time stabilisation of nonlinear stochastic system with missing measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jun; Niu, Yugang; Jia, Tinggang

    2016-09-01

    This paper considers the problem of the input-output finite-time stabilisation for a class of nonlinear stochastic system with state-dependent noise. The phenomenon of the missing measurements may occur when state signals are transmitted via communication networks. An estimating method is proposed to compensate the lost state information. And then, a compensator-based controller is designed to ensure the input-output finite-time stochastic stability (IO-FTSS) of the closed-loop system. Some parameters-dependent sufficient conditions are derived and the corresponding solving approach is given. Finally, numerical simulations are provided to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the developed IO-FTSS scheme.

  9. Comparing and validating models of driver steering behaviour in collision avoidance and vehicle stabilisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markkula, G.; Benderius, O.; Wahde, M.

    2014-12-01

    A number of driver models were fitted to a large data set of human truck driving, from a simulated near-crash, low-friction scenario, yielding two main insights: steering to avoid a collision was best described as an open-loop manoeuvre of predetermined duration, but with situation-adapted amplitude, and subsequent vehicle stabilisation could to a large extent be accounted for by a simple yaw rate nulling control law. These two phenomena, which could be hypothesised to generalise to passenger car driving, were found to determine the ability of four driver models adopted from the literature to fit the human data. Based on the obtained results, it is argued that the concept of internal vehicle models may be less valuable when modelling driver behaviour in non-routine situations such as near-crashes, where behaviour may be better described as direct responses to salient perceptual cues. Some methodological issues in comparing and validating driver models are also discussed.

  10. Remediation by in-situ solidification/stabilisation of Ardeer landfill, Scotland

    SciTech Connect

    Wyllie, M.; Esnault, A.; Barker, P.

    1997-12-31

    The Ardeer Landfill site at ICI Explosives factory on the west coast of Scotland had been a repository for waste from the site for 40 years. In order to safeguard the local environment ICI Explosives, with approval of Local Authorities and the Clyde River Purification Board put into action a programme of investigation and planning which culminated in the in-situ treatment of 10,000 m3 of waste within the landfill by a deep mixing method using the {open_quotes}Colmix{close_quotes} system. The paper describes in varying degrees of detail the remediation from investigation to the execution of the in-situ stabilisation and presents the post construction monitoring results.