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  1. AECT Convention, Orlando, Florida 2008 Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vega, Eddie

    2009-01-01

    This article presents several reports that highlight the events at the 2008 Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) International Convention in Orlando, Florida. At the annual convention this year, the Multimedia Production Division goal was to continue to share information about the latest tools in multimedia production,…

  2. Annual Proceedings of Selected Research and Development Papers Presented at the National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (28th, Orlando, Florida, 2005). Volume 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonson, Michael, Ed.; Crawford, Margaret, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    For the twenty-eighth year, the Research and Theory Division of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) is sponsoring the publication of these Proceedings. Papers published in this volume were presented at the National AECT Convention in Orlando, Florida. The Proceedings of AECT's Convention are published in two…

  3. Annual Proceedings of Selected Research and Development Papers Presented at the National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (28th, Orlando, Florida, 2005). Volume 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonson, Michael, Ed.; Crawford, Margaret, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    For the twenty-eighth year, the Research and Theory Division of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) is sponsoring the publication of these Proceedings. Papers published in this volume were presented at the National AECT Convention in Orlando, Florida. The Proceedings of AECT's Convention are published in two…

  4. Annual Proceedings of Selected Research and Development Papers Presented at the Annual Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (31st, Orlando, FL, 2008)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonson, Michael, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    For the thirty-first year, the Research and Theory Division of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) sponsored the publication of these Proceedings. Papers were presented at the annual AECT Convention in Orlando, Florida. This year's Proceedings has two sections--Section 1 includes research and development papers and…

  5. Orlando, Florida, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Much of central Florida, including this detailed view of Orlando (28.5N, 81.0W) can be seen in this single photo. Disney World is at the top center of the scene and the crescent shaped Lake Tohopekaliga is near the bottom. The large round lakes are believed to be sinkholes formed during glacial times when ocean levels were several hundred feet lower than the present. Linear patterns east of Orlando are thought to be ancient shoreline ridges.

  6. 737 Windshear Sensor Flight Tests, Orlando

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center's Boeing 737 test aircraft on the ramp at Orlando International Airport following a day of flight tests evaluating the performance of radar, lidar, and infrared wind shear detection sensors

  7. Orlando, FL, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    This color infrared photo of the Orlando, FL area (28.5N,81.5W) shows the extensive citrus tree orchards as neat bright red field patterns. The extensive road and highway network in the central Florida region is clearly visible. Also, the recent urban growth caused by the opening of the Disney World amusement complex just southwest of Orlando is clearly evident. This view spans the width of the state from Tampa Bay to the Atlantic coast.

  8. The Greening of the David L. Lawrence Pittsburgh Convention Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leahy, Mark

    2009-03-01

    The David L. Lawrence Convention Center is the largest Gold LEED NC (new construction) certified convention center in the USA and the first of its kind in the world. The designation has been awarded by the United States Green Building Council through its Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Green Building Rating System. In this talk we discuss the unique green properties of this 1.5 million square foot Convention Center including the design and use of daylight, natural ventilation and other sustainable design and practices. No other building the size of the Convention Center (1.5 million square feet), uses natural ventilation or can illuminate an exhibition hall entirely through its windows and skylights. Approximately 75% of the convention center's exhibition space is lit by natural daylight. The use of natural ventilation and extensive day lighting is designed to reduce energy consumption by nearly 35% compared to traditional ventilated and lit buildings of a similar size.

  9. Stained glass solar windows for the swiss tech convention center.

    PubMed

    Barraud, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    As a world first, 300 m² of dye-sensitized solar cells will be integrated into the facade of the EPFL's Convention Center. This prototype will constitute the first application of such technology to a public building. The translucent panels are constructed and assembled by local small and medium businesses and make use of an invention by EPFL researcher Michael Grätzel. This project is embedded within the framework of the partnership established in 2009 between EPFL and Romande Energie - whose aim is to create one of the largest solar energy parks in Switzerland. PMID:23574959

  10. 77 FR 4394 - Release of Airport Property: Orlando Executive Airport, Orlando, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-27

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Release of Airport Property: Orlando Executive Airport, Orlando, FL AGENCY... provides notice of intent to release certain airport properties 12.4 acres at the Orlando Executive Airport, Orlando, FL from the conditions, release certain properties from all terms, conditions, reservations...

  11. An evaluation of rain chemistry data for the John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida and the University of Central Florida, Orlando

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madsen, Brooks C.; Dreschel, Thomas W.; Hinkle, C. Ross

    1986-01-01

    Concern over the effects of Space Shuttle launches prompted the initiation of a rather intense environmental monitoring program. The program included a precipitation monitoring network with 13 precipitation collection sites which were operated for various time periods to baseline precipitation chemistry at the John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC). One additional site was also established as a remote background site on the Univ. of Central Florida (UCF) campus. One of the 13 sites was converted to a National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP) station. Collections and analyses of samples were performed using a number of methodologies during the monitoring period. An evaluation of the data for comparability and utility for acid rain research was performed using the anion/cation, measured conductivity, calculated conductivity, Cl/Na, and Mg/Na ratios. Data collected at all KSC sites between 1977 and 1981, from 1983 to 1985 at the NADP site and at UCF to 1985 are comparable and appropriate for determining acid rain trends. Examination of those comparable data showed a fairly stable pH between 1977 and 1982 and an increase of 0.2 pH units which was observed as an incremental increase between 1982 and 1983 at KSC and UCF.

  12. USGS Gulf Coast Science Conference and Florida Integrated Science Center Meeting: Proceedings with Abstracts, October 20-23, 2008, Orlando, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edited and compiled by Lavoie, Dawn; Rosen, Barry; Sumner, Dave; Haag, Kim; Tihansky, Ann; Boynton, Betsy; Koenig, Renee

    2008-01-01

    Welcome! The USGS is the Nation's premier source of information in support of science-based decision making for resource management. We are excited to have the opportunity to bring together a diverse array of USGS scientists, managers, specialists, and others from science centers around the Gulf working on biologic, geologic, and hydrologic issues related to the Gulf of Mexico and the State of Florida. We've organized the meeting around the major themes outlined in the USGS Circular 1309, Facing Tomorrow's Challenges - U.S. Geological Survey Science in the Decade 2007-2017. USGS senior leadership will provide a panel discussion about the Gulf of Mexico and Integrated Science. Capstone talks will summarize major topics and key issues. Interactive poster sessions each evening will provide the opportunity for you to present your results and talk with your peers. We hope that discussions and interactions at this meeting will help USGS scientists working in Florida and the Gulf Coast region find common interests, forge scientific collaborations and chart a direction for the future. We hope that the meeting environment will encourage interaction, innovation and stimulate ideas among the many scientists working throughout the region. We'd like to create a community of practice across disciplines and specialties that will help us address complex scientific and societal issues. Please take advantage of this opportunity to visit with colleagues, get to know new ones, share ideas and brainstorm about future possibilities. It is our pleasure to provide this opportunity. We are glad you're here.

  13. Prone to pregnancy: Orlando, Virginia Woolf and Sally Potter represent the gestating body.

    PubMed

    Maher, Jane Maree

    2007-03-01

    The visibility of pregnancy in contemporary societies through various forms of medical imaging has often been interpreted by feminist critics as negative for the autonomy and experience of pregnant women. Here, I consider the representation of pregnancy in Virginia Woolf's novel, Orlando, and Sally Potter's film of the same name arguing that, despite limited critical attention to Orlando's pregnancy, these texts offer a productive interpretation of gestation that counters conventionally reductive cultural images of that embodied state. In particular, I argue that Potter's translation of Woolf's novel to the screen gives us a useful model for thinking through the new visibility of pregnancy in contemporary Western culture. PMID:17205400

  14. Looking for a Person-Centered Medicine: Non Conventional Medicine in the Conventional European and Italian Setting

    PubMed Central

    Roberti di Sarsina, Paolo; Iseppato, Ilaria

    2011-01-01

    In Italy, the use of non conventional medicines (NCMs) is spreading among people as in the rest of Europe. Sales of alternative remedies are growing, and likewise the number of medical doctors (MDs) who practise NCM/complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). However, in Italy as in other countries of the European Union, at the present time the juridical/legal status of NCM/CAM is not well established, mainly due to the lack of any national law regulating NCM/CAM professional training, practice and public supply and the absence of government-promoted scientific research in this field. This is an obstacle to safeguarding the patient's interests and freedom of choice, especially now that dissatisfaction with biomedicine is inclining more and more people to look for a holistic and patient-centered form of medicine. PMID:19505973

  15. Variable Rate Irrigation Management for Humid Climates Using a Conventional Center Pivot System

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study investigates suitability of a standard commercial center pivot system for variable-rate water application under Mid-South conditions. The objective was to determine if field variability data can be applied to conventional moving sprinkler systems to optimize irrigation management on non-u...

  16. Orlando, Florida: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of Orlando, FL, a 2008 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  17. Selective extra levator versus conventional abdomino perineal resection: experience from a tertiary-care center

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Vishwas D.; Engineer, Reena; Patil, Prachi S.; Arya, Supreeta; Desouza, Ashwin L.

    2016-01-01

    Background To compare extra levator abdomino perineal resection (ELAPER) with conventional abdominoperineal resection (APER) in terms of short-term oncological and clinical outcomes. Methods This is a retrospective review of a prospectively maintained database including all the patients of rectal cancer who underwent APER at Tata Memorial Center between July 1, 2013, and January 31, 2015. Short-term oncological parameters evaluated included circumferential resection margin involvement (CRM), tumor site perforation, and number of nodes harvested. Peri operative outcomes included blood loss, length of hospital stay, postoperative perineal wound complications, and 30-day mortality. The χ2-test was used to compare the results between the two groups. Results Forty-two cases of ELAPER and 78 cases of conventional APER were included in the study. Levator involvement was significantly higher in the ELAPER compared with the conventional group; otherwise, the two groups were comparable in all the aspects. CRM involvement was seen in seven patients (8.9%) in the conventional group compared with three patients (7.14%) in the ELAPER group. Median hospital stay was significantly longer with ELAPER. The univariate analysis of the factors influencing CRM positivity did not show any significance. Conclusions ELAPER should be the preferred approach for low rectal tumors with involvement of levators. For those cases in which levators are not involved, as shown in preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the current evidence is insufficient to recommend ELAPER over conventional APER. This stresses the importance of preoperative MRI in determining the best approach for an individual patient. PMID:27284466

  18. 78 FR 43197 - Duke Energy Florida, Inc.; Florida Power & Light Company; Tampa Electric Company; Orlando...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-19

    ... Company; Orlando Utilities Commission; Notice of Compliance Filings Take notice that on July 10, 2013, Duke Energy Florida, Inc., Florida Power & Light Company, Tampa Electric Company, and Orlando...

  19. 76 FR 49469 - Orlando Utilities Commission; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Orlando Utilities Commission; Notice of Filing Take notice that on July 29, 2011, Orlando Utilities Commission (OUC), pursuant to section 205 of the Federal Power Act (FPA)...

  20. 76 FR 35209 - Orlando Utilities Commission; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Orlando Utilities Commission; Notice of Filing Take notice that on May 26, 2011, Orlando Utilities Commission submitted its tariff filing per 35.17(b): Amendment to...

  1. 75 FR 37789 - Orlando Utilities Commission; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Orlando Utilities Commission; Notice of Filing June 23, 2010. Take notice that on June 11, 2010, the Orlando Utilities Commission filed, pro forma revised tariff sheets...

  2. 78 FR 78352 - Orlando Utilities Commission; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Orlando Utilities Commission; Notice of Filing Take notice that on December 18, 2013, Orlando Utilities Commission submitted its tariff filing per 35.28(e): Order No....

  3. 76 FR 25685 - Orlando Utilities Commission; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Orlando Utilities Commission; Notice of Filing Take notice that on April 15, 2011, Orlando Utilities Commission submitted its tariff filing per 35.25(e): Order 890 compliance to...

  4. The Teaching of Afro-Asian Literature: A Comparison between the Nonconventional Learner-Centered and the Conventional Teacher-Centered Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong Gonzales, Wilkinson Daniel O.

    2014-01-01

    In the past few decades, nonconventional learner-centered (NLC) trends in ELT have emerged amidst the current and probably dominant conventional teacher-centered (CTC) approaches used by majority of private and public schools in the Philippines. With the implementation of the K-12 curriculum, Afro-Asian literature remained the focus of the eighth…

  5. Rejecting conventional wisdom: how academic medical centers can regain their leadership positions.

    PubMed

    Krauss, K; Smith, J

    1997-07-01

    Academic medical centers (i.e., medical schools and their principal hospitals) are following very similar strategies in attempts to secure their futures. It is likely that these undifferentiated strategies will fail, since most of them have been copied from the lower-cost, geographically better-positioned hospitals and health systems. Despite a wealth of innovative, entrepreneurial talent and the potential to reshape the world that AMCs live in, most AMCs are in reactive modes. Future directions and strategies are almost always shaped, forced, and justified by external pressures. The major problem with the strategic plans of most AMCs is that they are based on conventional industry wisdom. Strategic plans tend not to be analytically driven. The insight and understanding of those factors that drive the demand for AMCs' services and determine the performances of AMCs are lacking. The authors note some questions that are critical to the formulation of strategies for AMCs. For example, how can the research mission be changed from a cost-based to a value-based endeavor? Most AMCs cannot answer these questions, and if they do address them in the planning process, they do so superficially. Several examples of the factors that need to be understood are also given, such as patients' purposes and needs in seeking specialty care. Alternative strategies are listed, such as maintaining and exploiting the economic irrationality of the market rather than acting as if it were economically rational or forcing it to become so. Last, the authors outline the scope of the changes that are required and urge AMCs to reject conventional wisdom, determine their own unique situations, and work from there. PMID:9236466

  6. Division Reports from the 2005 AECT Convention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    TechTrends: Linking Research & Practice to Improve Learning, 2006

    2006-01-01

    The Association for Educational Communication & Technology held its International Convention in Orlando, Florida, October 18-22, 2005. The convention theme was "Exploring the Vision". Division report highlights include: (1) Reflections on a Convention: A Vision Explored (Wes Miller); (2) Definition and Terminology Committee (Al Januszewski); (3)…

  7. 76 FR 13642 - Town Hall Discussion With the Director of the Center for Devices and Radiological Health and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-14

    ... Radiological Health and Other Senior Center Management.'' The purpose of this public meeting in the Orlando, FL....m. to 12 noon EST. Location: The public meeting will be held at the Sheraton Orlando Downtown Hotel, 400 West Livingston St., Orlando, FL 32801. Attendees requiring sleeping rooms should call...

  8. Air Corrosivity in U.S. Outdoor-Air-Cooled Data Centers is Similar to That in Conventional Data Centers

    SciTech Connect

    Coles, Henry C.; Han, Taewon; Price, Phillip N.; Gadgil, Ashok J.; Tschudi, William F.

    2011-07-17

    There is a concern that environmental-contamination caused corrosion may negatively affect Information Technology (IT) equipment reliability. Nineteen data centers in the United States and two in India were evaluated using Corrosion Classification Coupons (CCC) to assess environmental air quality as it may relate IT equipment reliability. The data centers were of two basic types: closed and outside-air cooled. A closed data center provides cool air to the IT equipment using air conditioning in which only a small percent age of the recirculation air is make-up air continuously supplied from outside to meet human health requirements. An outside-air cooled data center uses outside air directly as the primary source for IT equipment cooling. Corrosion measuring coupons containing copper and silver metal strips were placed in both closed and outside-air cooled data centers. The coupons were placed at each data center (closed and outside-air cooled types) with the location categorized into three groups: (1) Outside - coupons sheltered, located near or at the supply air inlet, but located before any filtering, (2) Supply - starting just after initial air filtering continuing inside the plenums and ducts feeding the data center rooms, and (3) Inside located inside the data center rooms near the IT equipment. Each coupon was exposed for thirty days and then sent to a laboratory for a corrosion rate measurement analysis. The goal of this research was to investigate whether gaseous contamination is a concern for U.S. data center operators as it relates to the reliability of IT equipment. More specifically, should there be an increased concern if outside air for IT equipment cooling is used To begin to answer this question limited exploratory measurements of corrosion rates in operating data centers in various locations were undertaken. This study sought to answer the following questions: (1) What is the precision of the measurements (2) What are the approximate statistical

  9. Cooperative Mmonitoring Center Occasional Paper/5: Propspects of Conventional Arms Control in South Asia

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Amit; Kamal, Nazir

    1998-11-01

    The intensely adversarial relationship between India and Pakistan is marked by military rivalry, mutual distrust, and suspicion. The most dividing disagreement has been over the Kashmir region. An inability to discuss the Kashmir issue has prevented discussion on other important issues. Since there is little prospect of detente, at least in the near-term, the question is whether this rivalry can be contained by other means, such as arms control approaches. Conventional arms control has been applied flexibly and successfully in some regions to reduce threat-perceptions and achieve reassuring military stability. Some lessons from other international models might be applied to the India/Pakistan context. This paper discusses the status of conventional arms control in South Asia, the dominant Indian and Pakistani perceptions about arms control, the benefits that could be derived from arms control, as well as the problems and prospects of arms control. It also discusses existing conventional arms control agreements at the regional and global levels as well as the potential role of cooperative monitoring technology.

  10. 77 FR 34210 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Orlando, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-11

    ... E airspace at Orlando, FL (77 FR 16783). Interested parties were invited to participate in this... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of a... continues to read as follows: Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g); 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565,...

  11. Some propulsion system noise data handling conventions and computer programs used at the Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montegani, F. J.

    1974-01-01

    Methods of handling one-third-octave band noise data originating from the outdoor full-scale fan noise facility and the engine acoustic facility at the Lewis Research Center are presented. Procedures for standardizing, retrieving, extrapolating, and reporting these data are explained. Computer programs are given which are used to accomplish these and other noise data analysis tasks. This information is useful as background for interpretation of data from these facilities appearing in NASA reports and can aid data exchange by promoting standardization.

  12. Single Center Retrospective Analysis of Conventional and Radial TIG Catheters for Transradial Diagnostic Coronary Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Vorpahl, Marc; Koehler, Till; Foerst, Jason; Panagiotopoulos, Spyridon; Schleiting, Heinrich; Koss, Klaus; Ziegler, Gunda; Brinkmann, Hilmar; Seyfarth, Melchior; Tiroch, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Current guidelines favor the radial approach for coronary angiography. Therefore, specialty radial diagnostic catheters were designed to engage both coronary arteries with a single device. However, it is unclear if single catheters are superior to conventional catheters. A retrospective analysis was performed of consecutive right radial coronary angiographies to determine catheter use, fluoroscopy time, radiation dosage, and consumption of contrast. Procedures were performed with a single TIG catheter or conventional catheters (CONV). Procedures with coronary artery bypass grafts or ventricular angiographies were excluded. 273 transradial procedures were performed successfully. 95 procedures were performed with CONV and 178 procedures with a TIG. Crossover to additional catheters was higher in TIG (15.2%) compared to CONV (5.3%, p = 0.02). Fluoroscopy time was comparable between CONV and TIG, without crossover (2.2 ± 1.2 min versus 2.3 ± 1.2 min; n.s.), however, greater in the case of crossover for CONV (5.8 ± 0.7) and TIG (7.6 ± 3.0; p = 0.0001). Radiation dosage was similar in CONV and the TIG, without crossover (1419 ± 1075, cGy∗cm2 versus 1690 ± 1138; n.s.), however, greater for CONV (2374 ± 620) and TIG (3733 ± 2281, p = 0.05) with crossover. Overall, the amount of contrast was greater in TIG (56 ± 13 mL) versus CONV (48 ± 3 mL; p = 0.0003). CONV femoral catheters may be the primary choice for radial approach. PMID:26435876

  13. Orlando 737 Windshear Sensor Flight Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center's 737 'flying laboratory' flight tested three advance warning windshear sensors. The laser beams seen in the photograph were used to align the optical hardware of the infrared (located in front of the windows) and LIDAR (Light Detecting And Ranging) systems. In addition, a microwave doppler radar system is installed in the aircraft nose.

  14. 77 FR 50759 - Noise Exposure Map Notice, Orlando Sanford International Airport, Sanford, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-22

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Noise Exposure Map Notice, Orlando Sanford International Airport, Sanford... Authority for Orlando Sanford International Airport under the provisions of 49 U.S.C. 47501 et seq... August 16, 2012. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Allan Nagy, Federal Aviation Administration,...

  15. 75 FR 52860 - Final Airworthiness Design Standards for Acceptance Under the Primary Category Rule; Orlando...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-30

    ... Register on June 21, 2010, 75 FR 34953. No comments were received, and the airworthiness design standards... Under the Primary Category Rule; Orlando Helicopter Airways (OHA), Inc., Models Cessna 172I, 172K, 172L... Proposed Airworthiness Design Standards for Acceptance Under the Primary Category Rule; Orlando...

  16. 76 FR 53479 - Center for Scientific Review; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-26

    ... Health, 6701 Rockledge Drive, Bethesda, MD 20892. (Virtual Meeting.) Contact Person: Nywana Sizemore, PhD... World Center Marriott, 8701 World Center Drive, Orlando, FL 32821. Contact Person: Fungai Chanetsa,...

  17. Computer Center/DP Management. Papers Presented at the Association for Educational Data Systems Annual Convention (Phoenix, Arizona, May 3-7, 1976).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Educational Data Systems, Washington, DC.

    Fifteen papers on computer centers and data processing management presented at the Association for Educational Data Systems (AEDS) 1976 convention are included in this document. The first two papers review the recent controversy for proposed licensing of data processors, and they are followed by a description of the Institute for Certification of…

  18. An Analysis of the Effectiveness of a Learner-Centered Teaching System Compared to That of a Conventional Teaching of Basic Electricity to University Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiter, William Wallace

    Two teaching methods (learner-centered vs. conventional) were investigated as related to achievement and content covered in a basic electricity course in which 65 students were enrolled. All students participating in the study were given the Bell Laboratories Electricity Examination as a pretest and as a final test. The Otis Test of Mental Ability…

  19. The Orlando TDWR testbed and airborne wind shear date comparison results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Steven; Berke, Anthony; Matthews, Michael

    1992-01-01

    The focus of this talk is on comparing terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) and airborne wind shear data in computing a microburst hazard index called the F factor. The TDWR is a ground-based system for detecting wind shear hazards to aviation in the terminal area. The Federal Aviation Administration will begin deploying TDWR units near 45 airports in late 1992. As part of this development effort, M.I.T. Lincoln Laboratory operates under F.A.A. support a TDWR testbed radar in Orlando, FL. During the past two years, a series of flight tests has been conducted with instrumented aircraft penetrating microburst events while under testbed radar surveillance. These tests were carried out with a Cessna Citation 2 aircraft operated by the University of North Dakota (UND) Center for Aerospace Sciences in 1990, and a Boeing 737 operated by NASA Langley Research Center in 1991. A large data base of approximately 60 instrumented microburst penetrations has been obtained from these flights.

  20. Ernest Orlando Lawrence (1901-1958), Cyclotron and Medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, William T.

    2005-09-01

    On August 8, 2001, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory celebrated the centennial of the birth of its founder (and namesake), Ernest Orlando Lawrence. For the occasion, many speeches were given and old speeches were remembered. We recall the words of the late Luis Alvarez, a Nobel Laureate and one of the Lawrence's closest colleagues: ''Lawrence will always be remembered as the inventor of the cyclotron, but more importantly, he should be remembered as the inventor of the modern way of doing science''. J. L. Heilbron and R. W. Seidel, in the introduction of their book, ''Lawrence and His Laboratory'' stated, ''The motives and mechanisms that shaped the growth of the Laboratory helped to force deep changes in the scientific estate and in the wider society. In the entrepreneurship of its founder, Ernest Orlando Lawrence, these motives, mechanisms, and changes came together in a tight focus. He mobilized great and small philanthropists, state and local governments, corporations, and plutocrats, volunteers and virtuosos. The work they supported, from astrophysics and atomic bombs, from radiochemistry to nuclear medicine, shaped the way we observe, control, and manipulate our environment.'' Indeed, all over the civilized world, the ways we do science changed forever after Lawrence built his famed Radiation Laboratory. In this editorial, we epitomize his legacy of changing the way we do medicine, thereby affecting the health and well being of all humanity. This year marks the 75th anniversary of the invention of the cyclotron by Ernest Orlando Lawrence at the University of California at Berkeley. Lawrence conceived the idea of the cyclotron early in 1929 after reading an article by Rolf Wideroe on high-energy accelerators. In the spring of 1930 one of his students, Nels Edlefsen, constructed two crude models of a cyclotron. Later in the fall of the same year, another student, M. Stanley Livingston, constructed a 13-cm diameter model that had all the features of early

  1. Ernest Orlando Berkeley National Laboratory - Fundamental and applied research on lean premixed combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Robert K.

    1999-07-07

    Ernest Orland Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) is the oldest of America's national laboratories and has been a leader in science and engineering technology for more than 65 years, serving as a powerful resource to meet Us national needs. As a multi-program Department of Energy laboratory, Berkeley Lab is dedicated to performing leading edge research in the biological, physical, materials, chemical, energy, environmental and computing sciences. Ernest Orlando Lawrence, the Lab's founder and the first of its nine Nobel prize winners, invented the cyclotron, which led to a Golden Age of particle physics and revolutionary discoveries about the nature of the universe. To this day, the Lab remains a world center for accelerator and detector innovation and design. The Lab is the birthplace of nuclear medicine and the cradle of invention for medical imaging. In the field of heart disease, Lab researchers were the first to isolate lipoproteins and the first to determine that the ratio of high density to low density lipoproteins is a strong indicator of heart disease risk. The demise of the dinosaurs--the revelation that they had been killed off by a massive comet or asteroid that had slammed into the Earth--was a theory developed here. The invention of the chemical laser, the unlocking of the secrets of photosynthesis--this is a short preview of the legacy of this Laboratory.

  2. The Reading Writing Center: What We Can Do

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spillane, Lee Ann

    2006-01-01

    Writing centers offer students the means to success. The Reading Writing Center (RWC) at University High School in Orlando, Florida, serves a diverse population of more than 3,700 students. The center serves dual purposes. A classroom side operates as a demonstration space where the author, who is the center's director, leads and sometimes…

  3. Building America Case Study: Field Testing an Unvented Roof with Fibrous Insulation and Tiles, Orlando, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    2015-11-01

    This research is a test implementation of an unvented tile roof assembly in a hot-humid climate (Orlando, FL; Zone 2A), insulated with air permeable insulation (netted and blown fiberglass). Given the localized moisture accumulation and failures seen in previous unvented roof field work, it was theorized that a 'diffusion vent' (water vapor open, but air barrier 'closed') at the highest points in the roof assembly might allow for the wintertime release of moisture, to safe levels. The 'diffusion vent' is an open slot at the ridge and hips, covered with a water-resistant but vapor open (500+ perm) air barrier membrane. As a control comparison, one portion of the roof was constructed as a typical unvented roof (self-adhered membrane at ridge). The data collected to date indicate that the diffusion vent roof shows greater moisture safety than the conventional, unvented roof design. The unvented roof had extended winter periods of 95-100% RH, and wafer (wood surrogate RH sensor) measurements indicating possible condensation; high moisture levels were concentrated at the roof ridge. In contrast, the diffusion vent roofs had drier conditions, with most peak MCs (sheathing) below 20%. In the spring, as outdoor temperatures warmed, all roofs dried well into the safe range (10% MC or less). Some roof-wall interfaces showed moderately high MCs; this might be due to moisture accumulation at the highest point in the lower attic, and/or shading of the roof by the adjacent second story. Monitoring will be continued at least through spring 2016 (another winter and spring).

  4. NASA airborne radar wind shear detection algorithm and the detection of wet microbursts in the vicinity of Orlando, Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britt, Charles L.; Bracalente, Emedio M.

    1992-01-01

    The algorithms used in the NASA experimental wind shear radar system for detection, characterization, and determination of windshear hazard are discussed. The performance of the algorithms in the detection of wet microbursts near Orlando is presented. Various suggested algorithms that are currently being evaluated using the flight test results from Denver and Orlando are reviewed.

  5. SGML and the Orlando Project: Descriptive Markup for an Electronic History of Women's Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Susan; Fisher, Sue; Clements, Patricia; Binhammer, Katherine; Butler, Terry; Carter, Kathryn; Grundy, Isobel; Hockey, Susan

    1998-01-01

    Describes novel ways in which the Orlando Project, based at the Universities of Alberta and Guelph, is using Standardized General Markup Language (SGML) to create an integrated electronic history of British women's writing in English. Discusses the types of documents being created and the related SGML requirements. (DSK)

  6. Goodbye, Orlando? Heat and Hot Issues, Theme Parks, and a Busy Show Floor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, John; Blumenstein, Lynn; DiMattia, Susan; Kenney, Brian; Oder, Norman; Rogers, Michael

    2004-01-01

    The American Library Association's (ALA) Annual Conference, June 24?30, in steamy Orlando, drew 19,575 people, including 5,739 exhibitors, the lowest total since Miami in 1994, not counting the SARS-shadowed conference in Toronto last year (see statistics, p. 15). Although this years conference was filled with exciting events, this abstract is…

  7. 77 FR 16783 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Orlando, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-22

    ... not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26.... 106(g); 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71.1 2. The... TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Orlando,...

  8. Utility of conventional transbronchial needle aspiration with rapid on-site evaluation (c-TBNA-ROSE) at a tertiary care center with endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) facility

    PubMed Central

    Madan, Neha Kawatra; Madan, Karan; Jain, Deepali; Walia, Ritika; Mohan, Anant; Hadda, Vijay; Mathur, Sandeep; Iyer, Venkateswaran K; Khilnani, Gopi C; Guleria, Randeep

    2016-01-01

    Background: Conventional transbronchial needle aspiration (c-TBNA) is an underutilized bronchoscopic modality. Endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) guided-TBNA though efficacious is an expensive modality, facilities of which are available at only limited centers. c-TBNA is cost-effective and has potential for wide utilization especially in resource-limited settings. Rapid on-site evaluation (ROSE) improves the yield of c-TBNA. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of the bronchoscopy records (May 2012 to July 2014) was performed. The patients who underwent c-TBNA with ROSE were included in the study and their clinical details were extracted. Convex probe EBUS-TBNA was being regularly performed during the study period by the operators performing c-TBNA. Results: c-TBNA with ROSE was performed in 41 patients with mean age of 42.4 (16.2) years. The most frequently sampled node stations (>90% patients) were the subcarinal and lower right paratracheal. Representative samples could be obtained in 33 out of the 41 patients (80.4%). c-TBNA was diagnostic in 32 [tuberculosis (TB)-8, sarcoidosis-9, and malignancy-15] patients out of the 41 patients. The overall diagnostic yield (sensitivity) of c-TBNA with ROSE was 78%. Mean procedure duration was 18.4 (3.1) min and there were no procedural complications. Conclusion: c-TBNA with ROSE is a safe, efficacious, and cost-effective bronchoscopic modality. When it was performed by operators routinely performing EBUS-TBNA, diagnostic yields similar to that of EBUS-TBNA can be obtained. Even at the centers where EBUS facilities are available, c-TBNA should be routinely performed. PMID:27011437

  9. Annual Proceedings of Selected Research and Development Papers Presented at the National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (29th, Dallas, Texas, 2006). Volume 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonson, Michael, Ed.; Crawford, Margaret, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    For the twenty-ninth year, the Research and Theory Division of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) is sponsoring the publication of these Proceedings. Papers published in this volume were presented at the National AECT Convention in Orlando, Florida. The Proceedings of AECT's Convention are published in two…

  10. Annual Proceedings of Selected Research and Development Papers Presented at the National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (29th, Dallas, Texas, 2006). Volume 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonson, Michael, Ed.; Crawford, Margaret, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    For the twenty-ninth year, the Research and Theory Division of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) is sponsoring the publication of these Proceedings. Papers published in this volume were presented at the National AECT Convention in Orlando, Florida. The Proceedings of AECT's Convention are published in two…

  11. The classification of LANDSAT data for the Orlando, Florida, urban fringe area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walthall, C. L.; Knapp, E. M.

    1978-01-01

    Procedures used to map residential land cover on the Orlando, Florida, Urban fringe zone are detailed. The NASA Bureau of the Census Applications Systems Verification and Transfer project and the test site are described as well as the LANDSAT data used as the land cover information sources. Both single-date LANDSAT data processing and multitemporal principal components LANDSAT data processing are described. A summary of significant findings is included.

  12. Orlando Magic: report from the 57th meeting of the American Society of Haematology, 5–7 December 2015, Orlando, USA

    PubMed Central

    Mazzarella, Luca

    2016-01-01

    The 57th American Society of Haematology (ASH) meeting held in Orlando, FL was certainly the year when myeloma management changed for good, with a plethora of newly Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs showing impressive outcome improvements and the introduction of new techniques for disease monitoring. Also, chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells continued their triumphal march, consolidating their success in lymphoma and chronic lymhocytic leukaemia (CLL) and venturing into new fields such as again multiple myeloma. Some experimental drugs showed long-awaited results (midostaurin in FLT3-mutated acute myeloid leukaemia (AML)) and some brand new drugs showed promising results in the clinic after extensive preclinical studies, such as those targeting new epigenetic factors (histone methyltransferases) and apoptosis. PMID:26823681

  13. 75 FR 19941 - Manufacturing Extension Partnership Advisory Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-16

    .... ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at Orlando World Center Marriott Resort & Convention Center, 8701 World Center Drive, Orlando, Florida 32821. Anyone wishing to attend this meeting should submit name, e-mail... MEP's National Conference in Orlando, FL. The MEP Advisory Board is composed of 10 members,...

  14. 76 FR 22674 - Manufacturing Extension Partnership Advisory Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-22

    .... ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the Orlando World Center Marriott Resort and Convention Center, 8701 World Center Drive, Orlando, Florida 32821. Anyone wishing to attend this meeting should submit their... conjunction with MEP's Manufacturing Innovations 2011 Conference in Orlando, Florida. The MEP Advisory...

  15. Updating census urban area maps with LANDSAT data. [Orlando, Florida case study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, S. Z.

    1981-01-01

    The use of LANDSAT data for updating census maps of urbanized areas by identification of a fringe of suburban territory to be considered for inclusion within a revised urban area map is described. Methodologies of the application system verification and transfer project are evaluated. These include manual analysis of color photographs, line printer maps, and land cover classifications; change detection using an image differencing routine to depict changes in reflectance values between the two anniversary LANDSAT images; and use of the IBIS/VICAR digital image processing system. Application of IBIS/VICAR to mapping the Orlando, Florida area is described in detail.

  16. Acquisition and use of Orlando, Florida and Continental Airbus radar flight test data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eide, Michael C.; Mathews, Bruce

    1992-01-01

    Westinghouse is developing a lookdown pulse Doppler radar for production as the sensor and processor of a forward looking hazardous windshear detection and avoidance system. A data collection prototype of that product was ready for flight testing in Orlando to encounter low level windshear in corroboration with the FAA-Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR). Airborne real-time processing and display of the hazard factor were demonstrated with TDWR facilitated intercepts and penetrations of over 80 microbursts in a three day period, including microbursts with hazard factors in excess of .16 (with 500 ft. PIREP altitude loss) and the hazard factor display at 6 n.mi. of a visually transparent ('dry') microburst with TDWR corroborated outflow reflectivities of +5 dBz. Range gated Doppler spectrum data was recorded for subsequent development and refinement of hazard factor detection and urban clutter rejection algorithms. Following Orlando, the data collection radar was supplemental type certified for in revenue service on a Continental Airlines Airbus in an automatic and non-interferring basis with its ARINC 708 radar to allow Westinghouse to confirm its understanding of commercial aircraft installation, interface realities, and urban airport clutter. A number of software upgrades, all of which were verified at the Receiver-Transmitter-Processor (RTP) hardware bench with Orlando microburst data to produce desired advanced warning hazard factor detection, included some preliminary loads with automatic (sliding window average hazard factor) detection and annunciation recording. The current (14-APR-92) configured software is free from false and/or nuisance alerts (CAUTIONS, WARNINGS, etc.) for all take-off and landing approaches, under 2500 ft. altitude to weight-on-wheels, into all encountered airports, including Newark (NJ), LAX, Denver, Houston, Cleveland, etc. Using the Orlando data collected on hazardous microbursts, Westinghouse has developed a lookdown pulse Doppler

  17. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Awards Ceremony for 2011 Award Winners (Presentations, including remarks by Energy Secretary, Dr. Steven Chu)

    ScienceCinema

    Chu, Steven (U.S. Energy Secretary)

    2012-06-28

    The winners for 2011 of the Department of Energy's Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award were recognized in a ceremony held May 21, 2012. Dr. Steven Chu and others spoke of the importance of the accomplishments and the prestigious history of the award. The recipients of the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award for 2011 are: Riccardo Betti (University of Rochester); Paul C. Canfield (Ames Laboratory); Mark B. Chadwick (Los Alamos National Laboratory); David E. Chavez (Los Alamos National Laboratory); Amit Goyal (Oak Ridge National Laboratory); Thomas P. Guilderson (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory); Lois Curfman McInnes (Argonne National Laboratory); Bernard Matthew Poelker (Thomas Jeffereson National Accelerator Facility); and Barry F. Smith (Argonne National Laboratory).

  18. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Awards Ceremony for 2011 Award Winners (Presentations, including remarks by Energy Secretary, Dr. Steven Chu)

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Steven

    2012-05-21

    The winners for 2011 of the Department of Energy's Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award were recognized in a ceremony held May 21, 2012. Dr. Steven Chu and others spoke of the importance of the accomplishments and the prestigious history of the award. The recipients of the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award for 2011 are: Riccardo Betti (University of Rochester); Paul C. Canfield (Ames Laboratory); Mark B. Chadwick (Los Alamos National Laboratory); David E. Chavez (Los Alamos National Laboratory); Amit Goyal (Oak Ridge National Laboratory); Thomas P. Guilderson (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory); Lois Curfman McInnes (Argonne National Laboratory); Bernard Matthew Poelker (Thomas Jeffereson National Accelerator Facility); and Barry F. Smith (Argonne National Laboratory).

  19. Directed and Direct: Changing Conventions in the American Documentary; University Film Study Center Research Program: A Symposium on The American Documentary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conrad, Randall

    This article discusses the history of American documentary films and examines several specific films. Any documentary has the primary job of reacting a virtual reality and maintaining an impression of immediate experience. While this has remained a constant requirement, the formal conventions which filmmakers use to create the virtual reality have…

  20. 78 FR 22363 - Environmental Impact Statement for the All Aboard Florida Miami-Orlando Passenger Rail Project

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-15

    .... 4321 et seq.) (NEPA) and FRA's Procedures for Considering Environmental Impacts (64 FR 28545, May 26... Federal Railroad Administration Environmental Impact Statement for the All Aboard Florida Miami-- Orlando... service proposed by the private company, All Aboard Florida--Operations LLC (AAF), between Miami...

  1. Mandibular changes during initial alignment with SmartClip self-ligating and conventional brackets: A single-center prospective randomized controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Bayram, Mehmet; Nur, Metin; Kilkis, Dogan

    2015-01-01

    Objective To test the null hypothesis that SmartClip self-ligating brackets are more effective than conventional brackets for initial mandibular alignment and identify influential factors. Methods Fifty patients were randomly allocated to two equal treatment groups by using an online randomization program: self-ligating group (SmartClip brackets) and conventional group (Gemini brackets). The archwire sequence was standardized. Changes in anterior irregularity index, intercanine width, and intermolar width were assessed on plaster models at 8th and 16th weeks. Changes in incisor position and inclination were assessed on lateral cephalometric radiographs at 16 weeks. Intragroup and intergroup comparisons were performed with paired t-test and Student's t-test, respectively. Multiple linear regression was performed to identify variables affecting improvement in anterior ambiguity. Results Data of 46 patients were analyzed; those missing an appointment (n = 2) or showing bracket breakage (n = 2) were excluded. Incisor inclination (p < 0.05), intercanine width (p < 0.05), and intermolar width (p > 0.05) increased at 8 and 16 weeks in both the groups; no significant intergroup differences were noted (p > 0.05). Initial anterior irregularity index and intercanine width change were significantly associated with improvement in anterior irregularity (p < 0.001). Conclusions The null hypothesis was rejected. Bracket type has little effect on improvement in anterior ambiguity during initial mandibular alignment. PMID:25798415

  2. Cryoplasty Versus Conventional Balloon Angioplasty of the Femoropopliteal Artery in Diabetic Patients: Long-Term Results from a Prospective Randomized Single-Center Controlled Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Spiliopoulos, Stavros Katsanos, Konstantinos; Karnabatidis, Dimitris; Diamantopoulos, Athanasios; Kagadis, George C.; Christeas, Nikolaos; Siablis, Dimitris

    2010-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the immediate and long-term results of cryoplasty versus conventional balloon angioplasty in the femoropopliteal artery of diabetic patients. Fifty diabetic patients (41 men, mean age 68 years) were randomized to cryoplasty (group CRYO; 24 patients with 31 lesions) or conventional balloon angioplasty (group COBA; 26 patients with 34 lesions) of the femoropopliteal artery. Technical success was defined as <30% residual stenosis without any adjunctive stenting. Primary end points included technical success, primary patency, binary in-lesion restenosis (>50%), and freedom from target lesion recanalization. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was performed to adjust for confounding factors of heterogeneity. In total, 61.3% (19 of 31) in group CRYO and 52.9% (18 of 34) in group COBA were de novo lesions. More than 70% of the lesions were Transatlantic Inter-Society Consensus (TASC) B and C in both groups, and 41.4% of the patients in group CRYO and 38.7% in group COBA suffered from critical limb ischemia. Immediate technical success rate was 58.0% in group CRYO versus 64.0% in group COBA (p = 0.29). According to 3-year Kaplan-Meier estimates, there were no significant differences with regard to patient survival (86.8% in group CRYO vs. 87.0% in group COBA, p = 0.54) and limb salvage (95.8 vs. 92.1% in groups CRYO and COBA, respectively, p = 0.60). There was a nonsignificant trend of increased binary restenosis in group CRYO (hazard ratio [HR] 1.3; 95% CI 0.6-2.6, p = 0.45). Primary patency was significantly lower in group CRYO compared with group COBA (HR 2.2; 95% CI 1.1-4.3, p = 0.02). Significantly more repeat intervention events because of recurrent symptoms were required in group CRYO (HR 2.5; 95% CI 1.2-5.3, p = 0.01). Cryoplasty was associated with lower primary patency and more clinically driven repeat procedures after long-term follow-up compared with conventional balloon angioplasty.

  3. From the application of antibiotics to antibiotic residues in liquid manures and digestates: A screening study in one European center of conventional pig husbandry.

    PubMed

    Widyasari-Mehta, Arum; Hartung, Susen; Kreuzig, Robert

    2016-07-15

    In conventional pig husbandry, antibiotics are frequently applied. Together with excreta, antibiotic residues enter liquid manures finally used as organic soil fertilizers or input materials for biogas plants. Therefore, this first screening study was performed to survey the application patterns of antibiotics from fall 2011 until spring 2013. Manures and digestates were then analyzed for selected antibiotic residues from spring 2012 to 2013. The data analysis of veterinary drug application documents revealed the use of 34 different antibiotics belonging to 11 substance classes at 21 farms under study. Antibiotics, particularly tetracyclines, frequently administered to larger pig groups were detected in manure samples up to higher mg kg(-1) dry weight (DW) concentrations. Antibiotic residues in digestates, furthermore, show that a full removal capacity cannot be guaranteed through the anaerobic digestion process in biogas plants. PMID:27088209

  4. Clinical, patient-related, and economic outcomes of home-based high-dose hemodialysis versus conventional in-center hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Mitsides, Nicos; Mitra, Sandip; Cornelis, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Despite technological advances in renal replacement therapy, the preservation of health and quality of life for individuals on dialysis still remains a challenge. The high morbidity and mortality in dialysis warrant further research and insight into the clinical domains of the technique and practice of this therapy. In the last 20 years, the focus of development in the field of hemodialysis (HD) has centered around adequate removal of urea and other associated toxins. High-dose HD offers an opportunity to improve mortality, morbidity, and quality of life of patients with end-stage kidney disease. However, the uptake of this modality is low, and the risk associated with the therapy is not fully understood. Recent studies have highlighted the evidence base and improved our understanding of this technique of dialysis. This article provides a review of high-dose and home HD, its clinical impact on patient outcome, and the controversies that exist. PMID:27462173

  5. Program review of the USDA Center for Medical, Agricultural and Veterinary Entomology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The USDA-ARS Center for Medical, Agricultural and Veterinary Entomology (CMAVE) has a history that starts in 1932 in Orlando to develop methods to control mosquitoes, including malaria vectors under conditions simulating those of the south Pacific jungles, and other insects affecting man and animals...

  6. Effects of recharge from drainage wells on quality of water in the Floridan Aquifer in the Orlando area, central Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schiner, G.R.; German, E.R.

    1983-01-01

    Approximately 400 drainage wells in the Orlando area inject, by gravity, large quantities of stormwater runoff that may or may not be suitable for most purposes without treatment into the same freshwater zones of the Floridan aquifer tapped for public supply. The wells are used mostly to control lake levels and dispose of urban storm runoff. Recharge from drainage wells compensates for heavy withdrawals from the Floridan aquifer and helps maintain aquifer pressures that retard upward saltwater encroachment. Sixty-five supply wells and 21 drainage wells within a 16-mile radius of Orlando were sampled from September 1977 to June 1979. Most constituent concentrations were slightly higher in water from drainage wells than in water from supply wells. The most notable differences were in bacteria colony count and total nitrogen concentrations. With the exception of bacteria, water from drainage wells would generally meet the maximum contaminant levels established by the National Interim Primary and Proposed Secondary Drinking Water Regulations. (USGS)

  7. An in-vitro Evaluation of canal transportation and centering ability of two rotary Nickel Titanium systems (Twisted Files and Hyflex files) with conventional stainless Steel hand K-flexofiles by using Spiral Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, B Shiva; Pattanshetty, Spoorti; Prasad, Manju; Soni, Sunny; Pattanshetty, Kirti S; Prasad, Shiva

    2013-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this in-vitro study was to compare canal transportation and centering ability of Twisted and Hyflex Rotary Files with stainless steel hand k-flexofiles by using Spiral Computed Tomography. Materials & Methods: A total of 90 freshly extracted human mandibular single rooted Premolar teeth were selected. The crowns were flattened with steel disks and a final dimension of 18-mm WL was achieved for each tooth. Canals were divided randomly into 3 groups of 30 teeth each. Group I:Hyflex files, Group II:Twisted files, Group III:stainless steel hand k-flexofiles. Three sections from apical, mid-root, and coronal levels of the canal were recorded. All the teeth were scanned before and after instrumentation by using Spiral Computed Tomography. Results: K-files showed highest transportation and less centered when compared to the Twisted and Hyflex rotary files. No significant difference was found between TF and Hyflex CM instruments. Conclusion: TF and Hyflex files shaped curved root canals without significant shaping errors when compared to the Hand stainless steel k-flexofiles. How to cite this article: Kumar BS, Pattanshetty S, Prasad M, Soni S, Pattanshetty KS, Prasad S. An in-vitro Evaluation of canal transportation and centering ability of two rotary Nickel Titanium systems (Twisted Files and Hyflex files) with conventional stainless Steel hand K-flexofiles by using Spiral Computed Tomography. J Int Oral Health 2013;5(5):108-15. PMID:24324313

  8. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory institutional plan, FY 1996--2001

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    The FY 1996--2001 Institutional Plan provides an overview of the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory mission, strategic plan, core business areas, critical success factors, and the resource requirements to fulfill its mission in support of national needs in fundamental science and technology, energy resources, and environmental quality. The Laboratory Strategic Plan section identifies long-range conditions that will influence the Laboratory, as well as potential research trends and management implications. The Core Business Areas section identifies those initiatives that are potential new research programs representing major long-term opportunities for the Laboratory, and the resources required for their implementation. It also summarizes current programs and potential changes in research program activity, science and technology partnerships, and university and science education. The Critical Success Factors section reviews human resources; work force diversity; environment, safety, and health programs; management practices; site and facility needs; and communications and trust. The Resource Projections are estimates of required budgetary authority for the Laboratory`s ongoing research programs. The Institutional Plan is a management report for integration with the Department of Energy`s strategic planning activities, developed through an annual planning process. The plan identifies technical and administrative directions in the context of the national energy policy and research needs and the Department of Energy`s program planning initiatives. Preparation of the plan is coordinated by the Office of Planning and Communications from information contributed by the Laboratory`s scientific and support divisions.

  9. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Institutional Plan FY 2000-2004

    SciTech Connect

    Chartock, Mike; Hansen, Todd

    1999-08-01

    The FY 2000-2004 Institutional Plan provides an overview of the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab, the Laboratory) mission, strategic plan, initiatives, and the resources required to fulfill its role in support of national needs in fundamental science and technology, energy resources, and environmental quality. To advance the Department of Energy's ongoing efforts to define the Integrated Laboratory System, the Berkeley Lab Institutional Plan reflects the strategic elements of our planning efforts. The Institutional Plan is a management report that supports the Department of Energy's mission and programs and is an element of the Department of Energy's strategic management planning activities, developed through an annual planning process. The Plan supports the Government Performance and Results Act of 1993 and complements the performance-based contract between the Department of Energy and the Regents of the University of California. It identifies technical and administrative directions in the context of the national energy policy and research needs and the Department of Energy's program planning initiatives. Preparation of the plan is coordinated by the Office of Planning and Communications from information contributed by Berkeley Lab's scientific and support divisions.

  10. Preliminary appraisal of the geohydrologic aspects of drainage wells, Orlando area, central Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kimrey, Joel O.

    1978-01-01

    The Floridan aquifer contains two highly transmissive cavernous zones in the Orlando area: an upper producing zone about 150-600 feet below land surface and a lower producing zone about 1,100-1 ,500 feet below land surface. Natural head differences are downward and there is hydraulic connection between the two producing zones. Drainage wells are finished open-end into the upper producing zone and emplace surface waters directly into that zone by gravity. Quantitatively, their use constitutes an effective method of artificial recharge. Their negative aspects relate to the probably poor, but unknown, quality of the recharge water. Caution is suggested in drawing definite and final conclusions on the overall geohydrologic and environmental effects of drainage wells prior to the collection and interpretation of a considerable quantity of new data. Though few ground-water pollution problems have been documented, the potential for pollution should be seriously considered in light of the probable continuing need to use drainage wells; the probable volumes and quality of water involved; and the hydraulic relations between the two producing zones. (Woodard-USGS)

  11. MEETING REPORT: OMG Technical Committee Meeting in Orlando, FL, sees significant enhancement to CORBA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-06-01

    The Object Management Group (OMG) Platform Technology Committee (PTC) ratified its support for a new asynchronous messaging service for CORBA at OMG's recent Technical Committee Meeting in Orlando, FL. The meeting, held from 8 - 12 June, saw the PTC send the Messaging Service out for a final vote among the OMG membership. The Messaging Service, which will integrate Message Oriented Middleware (MOM) with CORBA, will give CORBA a true asynchronous messaging capability - something of great interest to users and developers. Formal adoption of the specification will most likely occur by the end of the year. The Messaging Service The Messaging Service, when adopted, will be the world's first standard for Message Oriented Middleware and will give CORBA a true asynchronous messaging capability. Asynchronous messaging allows developers to build simpler, richer client environments. With asynchronous messaging there is less need for multi-threaded clients because the Asynchronous Method Invocation is non-blocking, meaning the client thread can continue work while the application waits for a reply. David Curtis, Director of Platform Technology for OMG, said: `This messaging service is one of the more valuable additions to CORBA. It enhances CORBA's existing asynchronous messaging capabilities which is a feature of many popular message oriented middleware products. This service will allow better integration between ORBs and MOM products. This enhanced messaging capability will only make CORBA more valuable for builders of distributed object systems.' The Messaging Service is one of sixteen technologies currently being worked on by the PTC. Additionally, seventeen Revision Task Forces (RTFs) are working on keeping OMG specifications up to date. The purpose of these Revision Task Forces is to take input from the implementors of OMG specifications and clarify or make necessary changes based on the implementor's input. The RTFs also ensure that the specifications remain up to date

  12. Three-dimensional numerical simulation of the 20 June 1991, Orlando microburst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Fred H.

    1992-01-01

    On 20 June 1991, NASA's Boeing 737, equipped with in-situ and look-ahead wind-shear detection systems, made direct low-level penetrations (300-350 m AGL) through a microburst during several stages of its evolution. This microburst was located roughly 20 km northeast of Orlando International Airport and was monitored by a Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) located about 10 km south of the airport. The first NASA encounter with this microburst (Event 142), at approximately 2041 UTC, was during its intensification phase. At flight level, in-situ measurements indicated a peak 1-km (averaged) F-factor of approximately 0.1. The second NASA encounter (Event 143) occurred at approximately 2046 UTC, about the time of microburst peak intensity. It was during this penetration that a peak 1-km F-factor of approximately 17 was encountered, which was the largest in-situ measurement of the 1991 summer deployment. By the third encounter (Event 144), at approximately 2051 UTC, the microburst had expanded into a macroburst. During this phase of evolution, an in-situ 1-km F-factor of 0.08 was measured. The focus of this paper is to examine this microburst via numerical simulation from an unsteady, three-dimensional meteorological cloud model. The simulated high-resolution data fields of wind, temperature, radar reflectivity factor, and precipitation are closely examined so as to derive information not readily available from 'observations' and to enhance our understanding of the actual event. Characteristics of the simulated microburst evolution are compared with TDWR and in-situ measurements.

  13. Conventional and stuffed Bergman-type phases in the Na-Au-T (T = Ga, Ge, Sn) systems: syntheses, structures, coloring of cluster centers, and Fermi sphere-brillouin zone interactions.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qisheng; Smetana, Volodymyr; Miller, Gordon J; Corbett, John D

    2012-08-20

    Bergman-type phases in the Na-Au-T (T = Ga, Ge, and Sn) systems were synthesized by solid-state means and structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies. Two structurally related (1/1) Bergman phases were found in the Na-Au-Ga system: (a) a conventional Bergman-type (CB) structure, Na(26)Au(x)Ga(54-x), which features empty innermost icosahedra, as refined with x = 18.1 (3), Im3, a = 14.512(2) Å, and Z = 2; (b) a stuffed Bergman-type (SB) structure, Na(26)Au(y)Ga(55-y), which contains Ga-centered innermost icosahedra, as refined with y = 36.0 (1), Im3, a = 14.597(2) Å, and Z = 2. Although these two subtypes have considerable phase widths along with respective tie lines at Na ≈ 32.5 and 32.1 atom %, they do not merge into a continuous solid solution. Rather, a quasicrystalline phase close to the Au-poor CB phase and an orthorhombic derivative near the Au-rich SB phase lie between them. In contrast, only Au-rich SB phases exist in the Ge and Sn systems, in which the innermost icosahedra are centered by Au rather than Ge or Sn. These were refined for Na(26)Au(40.93(5))Ge(14.07(5)) (Im3, a = 14.581(2) Å, and Z = 2) and Na(26)Au(39.83(6))Sn(15.17(6)) (Im3, a = 15.009(2) Å, and Z = 2), respectively. Occupations of the centers of Bergman clusters are rare. Such centering and coloring correlate with the sizes of the neighboring icosahedra, the size ratios between electropositive and electronegative components, and the values of the average valence electron count per atom (e/a). Theoretical calculations revealed that all of these phases are Hume-Rothery phases, with evident pseudogaps in the density of states curves that arise from the interactions between Fermi surface and Brillouin zone boundaries corresponding to a strong diffraction intensity. PMID:22862775

  14. Conventional and Stuffed Bergman-Type Phases in the Na-Au-T (T=Ga, Ge, Sn) Systems: Synthesis, Structures, Coloring of Cluster Centers, and Fermi Sphere - Brillouin Zone Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Qisheng; Smetana, Volodymur; Miller, Gordon J.; Corbett, John D

    2012-08-03

    Bergman-type phases in the Na−Au−T (T = Ga, Ge, and Sn) systems were synthesized by solid-state means and structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies. Two structurally related (1/1) Bergman phases were found in the Na− Au−Ga system: (a) a conventional Bergman-type (CB) structure, Na26AuxGa54−x, which features empty innermost icosahedra, as refined with x = 18.1 (3), Im3̅, a = 14.512(2) Å, and Z = 2; (b) a stuffed Bergman-type (SB) structure, Na26AuyGa55−y, which contains Gacentered innermost icosahedra, as refined with y = 36.0 (1), Im3̅, a = 14.597(2) Å, and Z = 2. Although these two subtypes have considerable phase widths along with respective tie lines at Na ≈ 32.5 and 32.1 atom %, they do not merge into a continuous solid solution. Rather, a quasicrystalline phase close to the Au-poor CB phase and an orthorhombic derivative near the Au-rich SB phase lie between them. In contrast, only Au-rich SB phases exist in the Ge and Sn systems, in which the innermost icosahedra are centered by Au rather than Ge or Sn. These were refined for Na26Au40.93(5)Ge14.07(5) (Im3̅, a = 14.581(2) Å, and Z = 2) and Na26Au39.83(6)Sn15.17(6) (Im3̅, a = 15.009(2) Å, and Z = 2), respectively. Occupations of the centers of Bergman clusters are rare. Such centering and coloring correlate with the sizes of the neighboring icosahedra, the size ratios between electropositive and electronegative components, and the values of the average valence electron count per atom (e/a). Theoretical calculations revealed that all of these phases are Hume−Rothery phases, with evident pseudogaps in the density of states curves that arise from the interactions between Fermi surface and Brillouin zone boundaries corresponding to a strong diffraction intensity.

  15. Proceedings of the RESNA 2000 Annual Conference: Technology for the New Millennium (Orlando, Florida, June 28-July 2, 2000). Volume 20.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winters, Jack, Ed.

    This text contains papers presented at the annual conference of the Rehabilitation Engineering and Assistive Technology Society of North America (RESNA) held on June 28-July 2, 2000, in Orlando, Florida. Papers are divided into the following sections: (1) technology for special populations, which includes papers that discuss using…

  16. Evaluation of Gust and Draft Velocities from Flights of P-61c Airplanes within Thunderstorms August 7, 1946 to August 13, 1946 at Orlando, Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolefson, Harold B.

    1946-01-01

    This report presents the results obtained from gust and draft velocity measurements within thunderstorms for the period August 7, 1946 to August, 13, 1946 at Orlando Florida. In several of the surveys, indications of ambient air temperature were obtained from photo-observer records. These data are summarized in the report.

  17. Floridas Miami Tequesta Indian Site, Its Calusa Indian Locations, the Matacumbe Keys, and Orlandos Wikiwa Springs Generate Environmentally Significant EMFs.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mac Dougall, Jean S.; Mc Leod, Roger D.; Mc Leod, David M.

    2003-10-01

    Florida purchased the Tequesta ([Langue] doc Christ Spirit-signal) Indian site along the Miami River site that vigorously pulsates with even minor rainstorms entering or leaving the area. Although there is a laughable chimera of a fountain of youth associated with Ponce de Leons discovery of the Florida peninsula in about AD 1513, the Calusa (Royal Christ Jesus Spirit-signal) Indian Nation has an associated significance with EMF signals they possibly monitored throughout their area of activity. Our efforts have also led to the investigation of cultural and other influences implied by the Matacumbe Keys that indicate a shared commonality of awareness with Native Americans of the northeast such as Metacomet, or regions like Maines Grand Lake Matagamon and its associated electromagnetic Spirit Signal. Wikiwa Springs near Orlando shares much with Massachusetts (adherent of serpent Jesus Christ Spirit-signal) Natick, and New Hampshires Naticook Island. These are the locales of environmentally sensitive instrumentation.

  18. The ATC evaluation of the prototype Airport Surveillance Radar Wind Shear Processor (ASR-WSP) at Orlando International Airport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Radame

    1993-03-01

    The Airport Surveillance Radar Wind Shear Processor (ASR-WSP), also known as Airport Surveillance Radar-9 (ASR-9) modification for low altitude wind shear detection, is a production ASR-9 with an expanded weather channel for added processing capabilities. The primary mission of the ASR-WSP is to enhance the safety of air travel through the timely detection and reporting of hazardous wind shear in and near the terminal approach and departure zones of the airport. It will also improve the management of air traffic (AT) in the terminal area through the forecast of precipitation, and ultimately the detection of other hazardous weather phenomena. The ASR-WSP may be used as a stand-alone system at airports without a Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) or Enhanced-Low Level Wind Shear Alert System (E-LLWAS), or in an integrated mode with either or both the TDWR and E-LLWAS. An operational evaluation of a prototype ASR-WSP, developed by Massachusetts Institute of Technology Lincoln Laboratories (MIT/LL), was conducted at the Orlando International Airport (MCO) in Orlando, Florida, during the period 29 Jun. to 31 Aug. 1992. The objective of the evaluation was to obtain Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) air traffic controller reaction to the prototype ASR-WSP weather data and display equipment. The following are highlights of the evaluation: (1) the ASW-WSP is very useful when making runway configuration changes; (2) the ASR-WSP is not perceived to be as accurate as the prototype TDWR; (3) the gust front prediction feature is not reliable; and (4) the information provided on both the RDT and the GSD is very useful.

  19. Evaluation of Gust and Draft Velocities from Flights of P-61C Airplanes within Thunderstorms July 22, 1946 to July 23, 1946 at Orlando, Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolefson, H. B.

    1947-01-01

    The results obtained from measurements of gust and draft velocities within thunderstorms for the period July 22, 1946 to July 23, 1946 at Orlando, Florida, are presented herein. These data are summarized in tables I and II, respectively, and are of the type presented in reference 1 for previous flights. Inspection of photo-observer records for the flights indicated that no data on ambient air temperature variations within thunderstorms were obtained.

  20. Evaluation of Gust and Draft Velocities from Flights of P-61C Airplanes within Thunderstorms July 24, 1946 to August 6, 1946 at Orlando, Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolefson, Harold B.

    1947-01-01

    The results obtained from gust and draft velocity measurements within thunderstorms for the period July 24, 1946 to August 6, 1946 at Orlando, Florida are presented herein. These data are summarized in tables I and II and are of the type presented in reference 1 for previous flights. In two thunderstorm traverses, indications of ambient-air temperature were obtained from photo-observer records. These data are summarized in table III.

  1. A report from the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions 2011 (November 12-16, 2011, Orlando, Florida, USA).

    PubMed

    Rabasseda, X

    2012-01-01

    Diet and lifestyle have a direct impact on cardiovascular health and may help improve the condition in many patients suffering from or at risk for cardiac diseases, and remote and in-person behavioral interventions were shown to prompt weight loss in obese individuals (Appel, L.J., Late-Breaking Clinical Trial presentation), thus helping reduce the cardiovascular risk. In that regard, and as an example, kiwifruit was noted to lower 24-hour blood pressure (Svendsen, M. et al., Abst 16175), whereas alcoholic beverages (at least red wine and vodka) were reported to improve the cardiovascular risk by increasing collateral perfusion and, in the case of red wine, to enhance antioxidant cardioprotection (Chu, L.M. et al., Abst 16380), drug therapy is required for treating a vast array of medical conditions affecting the heart and vessels, as well as many cardiovascular risk factors very common in the general population. These issues were widely discussed in the context of new findings with improved therapies tested in clinical or preclinical studies during AHA's scientific sessions in Orlando, as summarized in the following report. PMID:22384460

  2. Estimating Carbon Stocks Along Depressional Wetlands Using Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) in the Disney Wilderness Preserve (Orlando, Florida)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClellan, M. D.; Comas, X.; Wright, W. J.; Mount, G. J.

    2014-12-01

    Peat soils store a large fraction of the global carbon (C) in soil. It is estimated that 95% of carbon in peatlands is stored in the peat soil, while less than 5% occurs in the vegetation. The majority of studies related to C stocks in peatlands have taken place in northern latitudes leaving the tropical and subtropical latitudes clearly understudied. In this study we use a combination of indirect non-invasive geophysical methods (mainly ground penetrating radar, GPR) as well as direct measurements (direct coring) to calculate total C stocks within subtropical depressional wetlands in the Disney Wilderness Preserve (DWP, Orlando, FL). A set of three-dimensional (3D) GPR surveys were used to detect variability of the peat layer thickness and the underlying peat-sand mix layer across several depressional wetlands. Direct samples collected at selected locations were used to confirm depth of each interface and to estimate C content in the laboratory. Layer thickness estimated from GPR and direct C content were used to estimate total peat volume and C content for the entire depressional wetland. Through the use of aerial photos a relationship between surface area along the depressional wetlands and total peat thickness (and thus C content) was established for the depressions surveyed and applied throughout the entire preserve. This work shows the importance of depressional wetlands as critical contributors of the C budget at the DWP.

  3. Inventory of drainage wells and potential sources of contaminants to drainage-well inflow in Southwest Orlando, Orange County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, George Fred

    1993-01-01

    Potential sources of contaminants that could pose a threat to drainage-well inflow and to water in the Floridan aquifer system in southwest Orlando, Florida, were studied between October and December 1990. Drainage wells and public-supply wells were inventoried in a 14-square-mile area, and available data on land use and activities within each drainage well basin were tabulated. Three public-supply wells (tapping the Lower Floridan aquifer) and 38 drainage wells (open to the Upper Floridan aquifer) were located in 17 drainage basins within the study area. The primary sources of drainage-well inflow are lake overflow, street runoff, seepage from the surficial aquifer system, and process-wastewater disposal. Drainage-well inflow from a variety of ares, including resi- dential, commercial, undeveloped, paved, and industrial areas, are potential sources of con- taminants. The four general types of possible contaminants to drainage-well inflow are inorganic chemicals, organic compounds, turbidity, and microbiological contaminants. Potential contami- nant sources include plant nurseries, citrus groves, parking lots, plating companies, auto- motive repair shops, and most commonly, lake- overflow water. Drainage wells provide a pathway for contaminants to enter the Upper Floridan aquifer and there is a potential for contaminants to move downward from the Upper Floridan to the Lower Floridan aquifer.

  4. A comparison of the detectability of microbursts in Orlando, Florida, by two c-band Doppler radars

    SciTech Connect

    Rinehart, R.E.; Borho, A. )

    1993-03-01

    Microbursts continue to pose a serious problem to the aviation industry. Fortunately, Doppler weather radars are capable of detecting microbursts quite successfully. This study gives the results of a comparison of 84 microbursts detected by a pair of C-band Doppler radars near Orlando during the summer of 1991. The study shows that microbursts were detectable at nearly the same locations (average positional difference of 1 km) and times (average time of detection differed by only 23 s) by both radars. The differential wind velocity detected by each of the radars was also quite similar (average difference of only 0.01 m s[sup [minus]1]) as were the radar reflectivity factors (average difference was 1 dB). The conclusion from this is that a C-band radar located anywhere near an airport should be fully capable of detecting hazardous wet-microburst events. Attenuation of the C-band signals was never strong enough to make microbursts undetectable. Because all events were wet microbursts (average reflectivity was 47 dBZ) and the maximum reflectivity difference seen for any microburst was only 10 dB, all events would have been much stronger than the minimum detectable reflectivity at the relatively short ranges used in this study. Attenuation might, however, be a problem for the detection of weak gust fronts. 11 refs., 17 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Center for beam physics 1996-1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-02-01

    The Center for Beam Physics (CBP) is a multidisciplinary research and development unit in the Accelerator and Fusion Research Division at the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory of the University of California. At the heart of the Center`s mission is the fundamental quest for mechanisms of acceleration, radiation, transport, and focusing of energy and information. Special features of the Center`s program include addressing R&D issues needing long development time and providing a platform for conception, initiation, and support of institutional projects based on beams. The Center brings to bear a significant amount of diverse, complementary, and self-sufficient expertise in accelerator physics, synchrotron radiation, advanced microwave techniques, plasma physics, optics, and lasers on the forefront R&D issues in particle and photon beam research. In addition to functioning as a clearinghouse for novel ideas and concepts and related R&D (e.g., various theoretical and experimental studies in beam physics such as nonlinear dynamics, phase space control, laser-beam-plasma interaction, free-electron lasers, optics, and instrumentation), the Center provides significant support to Laboratory facilities and initiatives. This roster and annual report provides a glimpse of the scientists, engineers, technical support, students, and administrative staff that make up the CBP`s outstanding team and gives a flavor of their multifaceted activities during 1996 and 1997.

  6. Display system optics II; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, Mar. 30, 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Assenheim, H.M.

    1989-01-01

    Papers on display system optics are presented covering topics such as human factors and night vision systems flight, a peripheral vision display, cockpit vertical situation displays, a prototype near-IR projection system, the effect of a helmet-mounted display on the operator, radial parallax binocular three-dimensional imaging, telepresence systems, and the cockpit man-machine interface. Additional topics include eye-centered interferometric laser projection, laser filters, thin film technologies in active matrix addressing systems of LCDs, supertwisted nematic LCD geometry with improved response times and characteristics, a full color active-matrix LCD in the cockpit environment, polysilicon active-matrix LCDs for cockpit applications, and a dynamic color model for a liquid crystal shutter display. Other topics include a flat fluorescent lamp for LCD back-lighting, holographic combiner design to obtain uniform symbol brightness at a head-up display video camera, vision restriction devices, passive binarization methods for image display and computer-generated holograms, a prismatic combiner for head-up displays, holographic optical elements, multifunction displays optimized for viewability, and technologies for brighter color CRT displays.

  7. Decontamination and decommissioning of rooms 62-248 and 62-250 at Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Garabedian, G.

    1996-05-01

    This document details the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) process of Rooms 248 and 250 of Building 62 at the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The document describes the D&D efforts for the rooms, their contents, and adjacent areas containing ancillary equipment. The rooms and equipment, before being released, were required to meet the unrestricted release criteria and requirements set forth in DOE orders 5400.5 and 5480.11, LBNL`s internal release-criteria procedure (EH&S Procedure 708), and the LBNL Radiological Control Manual. The radioactive material and items not meeting the release criteria were either sent to the Hazardous Waste Handling Facility (HWHF) for disposal or transferred to other locations approved for radioactive material. The D&D was undertaken by the Radiation Protection Group of LBNL`s Environment, Health and Safety (EH&S) Division at the request of the Materials Sciences Division. Current and past use of radioactive material in both Rooms 248 and 250 necessitated the D&D in order to release both rooms for nonradioactive work. (1) Room 248 was designated a {open_quotes}controlled area.{close_quotes} There was contained radioactive material in some of the equipment. The previous occupants of Room 248 had worked with radioactive materials. (2) Room 250 was designated a {open_quotes}Radioactive Materials Management Area{close_quotes} (RMMA) because the current occupants used potentially dispersible radioisotopes. Both laboratories, during the occupancy of U.C. Berkeley Professor Leo Brewer and Ms. Karen Krushwitz, were kept in excellent condition. There was a detailed inventory of all radioactive materials and chemicals. All work and self surveys were documented. The labs were kept extremely orderly, clean, and in compliance. In October 1993 Ms. Krushwitz received an award in recognition of her efforts in Environmental Protection, Health, and Safety at LBNL.

  8. Decomposing Composing Conventions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beers, Terry

    Recent research has invited critiques of the authoritative descriptions of composing found in many rhetoric textbooks. The concept of "convention" may be especially useful in rethinking the teleological basis of these textbook descriptions. Conventions found in composition textbooks need to be unmasked as arbitrary concepts which serve to…

  9. Tokamak coordinate conventions: COCOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauter, O.; Medvedev, S. Yu.

    2013-02-01

    Dealing with electromagnetic fields, in particular current and related magnetic fields, yields "natural" physical vector relations in 3-D. However, when it comes to choosing local coordinate systems, the "usual" right-handed systems are not necessarily the best choices, which means that there are several options being chosen. In the magnetic fusion community such a difficulty exists for the choices of the cylindrical and of the toroidal coordinate systems. In addition many codes depend on knowledge of an equilibrium. In particular, the Grad-Shafranov axisymmetric equilibrium solution for tokamak plasmas, ψ, does not depend on the sign of the plasma current Ip nor that of the magnetic field B0. This often results in ill-defined conventions. Moreover the sign, amplitude and offset of ψ are of less importance, since the free sources in the equation depend on the normalized radial coordinate. The signs of the free sources, dp/dψ and dF2/dψ (p being the pressure, ψ the poloidal magnetic flux and F=RBφ), must be consistent to generate the current density profile. For example, RF and CD calculations (Radio Frequency heating and Current Drive) require an exact sign convention in order to calculate a co- or counter-CD component. It is shown that there are over 16 different coordinate conventions. This paper proposes a unique identifier, the COCOS convention, to distinguish between the 16 most-commonly used options. Given the present worldwide efforts towards code integration, the proposed new index COCOS defining uniquely the COordinate COnventionS required as input by a given code or module is particularly useful. As codes use different conventions, it is useful to allow different sign conventions for equilibrium code input and output, equilibrium being at the core of any calculations in magnetic fusion. Additionally, given two different COCOS conventions, it becomes simple to transform between them. The relevant transformations are described in detail.

  10. Quantity and quality of stormwater runoff recharged to the Floridan aquifer system through two drainage wells in the Orlando, Florida area

    SciTech Connect

    German, E.R.

    1989-01-01

    Quantity and quality of inflow to two drainage wells in the Orlando, Fla., area were determined for the period April 1982 through March 1983. The wells, located at Lake Midget and at Park Lake, are used to control the lake levels during rainy periods. The lakes receive stormwater runoff from mixed residential-commercial areas of about 64 acres (Lake Midget) and 96 acres (Park Lake) and would frequently flood adjacent areas if the wells did not drain the excess stormwater. These lakes and wells are typical of stormwater drainage systems in the area.

  11. A Quiet Convention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suggs, Welch

    2003-01-01

    Describes how discussion of governance and academic standards dominated the proceedings at the first NCAA convention of Myles Brand's presidency. The new president also offered a qualified endorsement of Title IX. (EV)

  12. Cincinnati; Our Convention City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borchin, Anna

    1970-01-01

    During Easter week, 1971, Cincinnati will be the hostess of the 50th anniversary convention of the Catholic Library Association. Items of historical interest concerning the city are briefly described. (NH)

  13. Conventional and Non-Conventional Drosophila Toll Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, Scott A.; Wasserman, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of Toll in Drosophila and of the remarkable conservation in pathway composition and organization catalyzed a transformation in our understanding of innate immune recognition and response. At the center of that picture is a cascade of interactions in which specific microbial cues activate Toll receptors, which then transmit signals driving transcription factor nuclear localization and activity. Experiments gave substance to the vision of pattern recognition receptors, linked phenomena in development, gene regulation, and immunity into a coherent whole, and revealed a rich set of variations for identifying non-self and responding effectively. More recently, research in Drosophila has illuminated the positive and negative regulation of Toll activation, the organization of signaling events at and beneath membranes, the sorting of information flow, and the existence of non-conventional signaling via Toll-related receptors. Here, we provide an overview of the Toll pathway of flies and highlight these ongoing realms of research. PMID:23632253

  14. 737 Windshear Tests, Orlando

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    NASA researchers evaluating wind shear sensor displays in the experimental flight deck at NASA's Boeing 737 research aircraft. During this flight test program, over 75 microbursts were penetrated at altitudes from 800-1100 ft to test the performance of radar, lidar and infrared wind shear sensors. Pictured from left to right are Wind Shear Program Manager Roland Bowles, NASA research pilot Lee Person, Wind Shear Program Deputy Manager Michael Lewis, NASA research engineer David Hinton, NASA research engineer Emedio Bracalante.

  15. Convention Problems - 1787.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Deroy L.

    Designed to motivate eighth-grade civics students in the study of the United States Constitution, this game is intended to simulate the basic problems faced by the delegates to the Philadelphia Convention of 1787. The four parts of the game introduce the governmental concepts of the bicameral legislature, the executive branch, the judicial branch,…

  16. Hole-Center Locating Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Senter, H. F.

    1984-01-01

    Tool alines center of new hold with existing hole. Tool marks center of new hole drilled while workpiece is in place. Secured with bolts while hole center marked with punch. Used for field installations where reference points unavailable or work area cramped and not easily accessible with conventional tools.

  17. Closing the Achievement Gap by Improving Reading Instruction. Hearing before the Committee on Education and the Workforce. House of Representatives, One Hundred Seventh Congress, First Session (Orlando, Florida, November 13, 2001).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Education and the Workforce.

    A field hearing of the United States House of Representatives' Committee on Education and the Workforce, entitled "Closing the Achievement Gap by Improving Reading Instruction," was held at Lancaster Elementary School in Orlando, Florida, on November 13, 2001. The hearing begins with welcoming statements by the committee chairman and one of the…

  18. Transcriptional analysis of four family 4 P450s in a Puerto Rico strain of Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) compared with an Orlando strain and their possible functional roles in permethrin resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A field strain of Aedes aegypti was collected from Puerto Rico (PR) in October 2008. Based on LD50 values by topical application, the PR strain was 73-fold resistant to permethrin compared to a susceptible Orlando strain. In the presence of piperonyl butoxide (PBO), the resistance of Puerto Rico str...

  19. Hydrogeologic conditions and simulation of ground-water flow in the Greater Orlando Metropolitan Area, East-Central Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murray, L.C.; Halford, K.J.

    1996-01-01

    A finite-difference ground-water flow model was used to simulate the effects of both modern-day (1988) and projected 2010 ground-water withdrawals on the Floridan aquifer system in the greater Orlando metropolitan area. This area covers about 2,500 square miles and includes all of Orange and Seminole Counties and parts of Lake, Volusia, Brevard, Osceola, and Polk Counties. The hydrogeology of the area is characterized by a thin surficial aquifer underlain by the thick, highly productive rocks of the Floridan aquifer system. Water in the Upper Floridan aquifer is brackish (chloride concentrations greater than 1,000 milligrams per liter) in discharge areas beneath and near the St. Johns and Wekiva Rivers and is freshest (chloride concentrations less than 100 milligrams per liter) inrecharge areas. A slight trend toward increasing concentrations of dissolved solids, chloride, and sulfate has been observed at Upper Floridan aquifer springs. Chloride concentrations in the Upper Floridan aquifer measured between 1966 and 1993 at the Cocoa well field have increased from 50 milligrams per liter to 120 milligrams per liter; concentrations measured in the Lower Floridan aquifer between 1966 and 1993 have increasedfrom 600 milligrams per liter to 3,000 milligrams per liter. The flow model was calibrated by comparing (a) simulated and estimated Upper Floridan aquifer predevelopment (unstressed) potentiometric surfaces, (b) simulated and measured heads at 142 Upper Floridan aquifer monitoring wells in 1988 (averageabsolute error of 1.8 feet), (c) simulated and measured discharge rates at 15 Upper Floridan aquifer springs in 1988 (306 cubic feet per second), and (d) simulated and measured drawdowns at 134 Upper Floridan aquifer monitoring wells between 1988 and May 1990 (58 and 95 percent of simulated drawdowns were within plus or minus 25and 50 percent of measured drawdowns, respectively). Relative to predevelopment conditions, model simulations indicate that about half of the

  20. Optimizing Dam Operations for Power and for Fish: an Overview of the US Department of Energy and US Army Corps of Engineers ADvanced Turbine Development R&D. A Pre-Conference Workshop at HydroVision 2006, Oregon Convention Center, Portland, Oregon July 31, 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Dauble, Dennis D.

    2006-08-01

    This booklet contains abstracts of presentations made at a preconference workshop on the US Department of Energy and US Army Corps of Engineers hydroturbine programs. The workshop was held in conjunction with Hydrovision 2006 July 31, 2006 at the Oregon Convention Center in Portland Oregon. The workshop was organized by the Corps of Engineers, PNNL, and the DOE Wind and Hydropower Program. Presenters gave overviews of the Corps' Turbine Survival Program and the history of the DOE Advanced Turbine Development Program. They also spoke on physical hydraulic models, biocriteria for safe fish passage, pressure investigations using the Sensor Fish Device, blade strike models, optimization of power plant operations, bioindex testing of turbine performance, approaches to measuring fish survival, a systems view of turbine performance, and the Turbine Survival Program design approach.

  1. Conventional magnetic superconductors

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wolowiec, C. T.; White, B. D.; Maple, M. B.

    2015-07-01

    We discuss several classes of conventional magnetic superconductors including the ternary rhodium borides and molybdenum chalcogenides (or Chevrel phases), and the quaternary nickel-borocarbides. These materials exhibit some exotic phenomena related to the interplay between superconductivity and long-range magnetic order including: the coexistence of superconductivity and antiferromagnetic order; reentrant and double reentrant superconductivity, magnetic field induced superconductivity, and the formation of a sinusoidally-modulated magnetic state that coexists with superconductivity. We introduce the article with a discussion of the binary and pseudobinary superconducting materials containing magnetic impurities which at best exhibit short-range “glassy” magnetic order. Early experiments on these materials led tomore » the idea of a magnetic exchange interaction between the localized spins of magnetic impurity ions and the spins of the conduction electrons which plays an important role in understanding conventional magnetic superconductors. Furthermore, these advances provide a natural foundation for investigating unconventional superconductivity in heavy-fermion compounds, cuprates, and other classes of materials in which superconductivity coexists with, or is in proximity to, a magnetically-ordered phase.« less

  2. Conventional magnetic superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Wolowiec, C. T.; White, B. D.; Maple, M. B.

    2015-07-01

    We discuss several classes of conventional magnetic superconductors including the ternary rhodium borides and molybdenum chalcogenides (or Chevrel phases), and the quaternary nickel-borocarbides. These materials exhibit some exotic phenomena related to the interplay between superconductivity and long-range magnetic order including: the coexistence of superconductivity and antiferromagnetic order; reentrant and double reentrant superconductivity, magnetic field induced superconductivity, and the formation of a sinusoidally-modulated magnetic state that coexists with superconductivity. We introduce the article with a discussion of the binary and pseudobinary superconducting materials containing magnetic impurities which at best exhibit short-range “glassy” magnetic order. Early experiments on these materials led to the idea of a magnetic exchange interaction between the localized spins of magnetic impurity ions and the spins of the conduction electrons which plays an important role in understanding conventional magnetic superconductors. Furthermore, these advances provide a natural foundation for investigating unconventional superconductivity in heavy-fermion compounds, cuprates, and other classes of materials in which superconductivity coexists with, or is in proximity to, a magnetically-ordered phase.

  3. Convention Center Management: A Systems Analysis & Design Course Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guidry, Brandi N.; Totaro, Michael W.

    2011-01-01

    A challenge faced by many instructors of systems analysis and design courses is the selection or development of projects that provide challenging, yet suitable, learning experiences for the students. Employing a system development project case in undergraduate MIS courses offers students a multitude of opportunities to experientially examine…

  4. Biodiesel from conventional feedstocks.

    PubMed

    Du, Wei; Liu, De-Hua

    2012-01-01

    At present, traditional fossil fuels are used predominantly in China, presenting the country with challenges that include sustainable energy supply, energy efficiency improvement, and reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. In 2007, China issued The Strategic Plan of the Mid-and-Long Term Development of Renewable Energy, which aims to increase the share of clean energy in the country's energy consumption to 15% by 2020 from only 7.5% in 2005. Biodiesel, an important renewable fuel with significant advantages over fossil diesel, has attracted great attention in the USA and European countries. However, biodiesel is still in its infancy in China, although its future is promising. This chapter reviews biodiesel production from conventional feedstocks in the country, including feedstock supply and state of the art technologies for the transesterification reaction through which biodiesel is made, particularly the enzymatic catalytic process developed by Chinese scientists. Finally, the constraints and perspectives for China's biodiesel development are highlighted. PMID:22085921

  5. Conventional therapies for psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Rebora, A

    2007-01-01

    Conventional treatments of psoriasis include topical and systemic drugs. For sake of brevity, the presentation will deal only with systemic therapy. Three drugs are presently available in Italy: methotrexate, acitretin and cyclosporin A. Their efficacy is almost identical, all of them achieving PASI 75 in about 60% of cases in 12 weeks The indications (which, in Italy, do not include psoriasis for methotrexate), the contraindications, the interactions, the adverse effects and the precautions in their use will be discussed. Methotrexate side effects account for more than 10% of cases and include nausea and vomiting and chiefly increase of blood levels of liver enzymes. Acitretin side effects are numerous and varied, the most severe being increase of liver enzymes and blood lipids, renal impairment, and teratogenicity. Cyclosporin side effects are chiefly hypertension and renal failure. The Author concludes that cyclosporin is the drug with the best efficacy/side effect ratio, though it should be used in selected cases. PMID:17828351

  6. ESD and the Rio Conventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarabhai, Kartikeya V.; Ravindranath, Shailaja; Schwarz, Rixa; Vyas, Purvi

    2012-01-01

    Chapter 36 of Agenda 21, a key document of the 1992 Earth Summit, emphasised reorienting education towards sustainable development. While two of the Rio conventions, the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) and the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), developed communication, education and public awareness (CEPA)…

  7. Structure determination of a complex tubular uranyl phenylphosphonate, (UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(HO{sub 3}PC{sub 6}H{sub 5}){sub 2}(O{sub 3}PC{sub 6}H{sub 5}){sub 2}{center_dot}H{sub 2}O, from conventional x-ray powder diffraction data

    SciTech Connect

    Poojary, D.M.; Cabeza, A.; Aranda, A.G.

    1996-03-13

    The three-dimensional structure of a complex tubular uranyl phosphonate, (UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(HO{sub 3}PC{sub 6}H{sub 5}){sub 2}(O{sub 3}PC{sub 6}H{sub 5}){sub 2}(O{sub 3}PC{sub 6}H{sub 5}){sub 2} {center_dot} H{sub 2}O, was determined ab initio from laboratory X-ray powder diffraction data and refined by the Rietveld method. The crystals belong to the space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with {alpha} = 17.1966(2) {Angstrom}, b = 7.2125(2) {Angstrom}, c = 27.8282(4) {Angstrom}, and Z = 4. The structure consists of three independent uranium atoms, among which two are seven-coordinated and the third is eight-coordinated. These metal atoms are connected by four different phosphonate groups to form a one-dimensional channel structure along the b axis. The phenyl groups are arranged on the outer periphery of the channels, and their stacking forces keep the channels intact in the lattice. The determination of this structure which contains 50 non-hydrogen atoms in the asymmetric unit, from conventional X-ray powder data, represents significant progress in the application of powder techniques to structure of complex inorganic compounds, including organometallic compounds.

  8. Simulated effects of projected ground-water withdrawals in the Floridan aquifer system, greater Orlando metropolitan area, east-central Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murray, Louis C., Jr.; Halford, Keith J.

    1999-01-01

    Ground-water levels in the Floridan aquifer system within the greater Orlando metropolitan area are expected to decline because of a projected increase in the average pumpage rate from 410 million gallons per day in 1995 to 576 million gallons per day in 2020. The potential decline in ground-water levels and spring discharge within the area was investigated with a calibrated, steady-state, ground-water flow model. A wetter-than-average condition scenario and a drought-condition scenario were simulated to bracket the range of water-levels and springflow that may occur in 2020 under average rainfall conditions. Pumpage used to represent the drought-condition scenario totaled 865 million gallons per day, about 50 percent greater than the projected average pumpage rate in 2020. Relative to average 1995 steady-state conditions, drawdowns simulated in the Upper Floridan aquifer exceeded 10 and 25 feet for wet and dry conditions, respectively, in parts of central and southwest Orange County and in north Osceola County. In Seminole County, drawdowns of up to 20 feet were simulated for dry conditions, compared with 5 to 10 feet simulated for wet conditions. Computed springflow was reduced by 10 percent for wet conditions and by 38 percent for dry conditions, with the largest reductions (28 and 76 percent) occurring at the Sanlando Springs group. In the Lower Floridan aquifer, drawdowns simulated in southwest Orange County exceeded 20 and 40 feet for wet and dry conditions, respectively.

  9. Current Scientific and Regulatory Approaches for Development of Orally Inhaled and Nasal Drug Products: Overview of the IPAC-RS/University of Florida Orlando Inhalation Conference.

    PubMed

    Hochhaus, Guenther; Davis-Cutting, Craig; Oliver, Martin; Lee, Sau L; Lyapustina, Svetlana

    2015-09-01

    This article summarizes discussions at the March 2014 conference organized by the University of Florida (UF) and International Pharmaceutical Aerosol Consortium on Regulation and Science (IPAC-RS), entitled "Orlando Inhalation Conference: Approaches in International Regulation." The special focus of the conference was on global scientific and regulatory issues associated with the testing and demonstration of equivalence for the registration of orally inhaled drug products (OIDPs) in the United States, Europe, Brazil, China, and India. The scope included all types of OIDPs throughout their lifecycle, e.g., innovator/brand-name products, generics, modifications due to lifecycle management, device changes, etc. Details were presented for the U.S. "weight of evidence approach" for registration of generic products (which includes demonstration of in vitro and in vivo equivalence, as well as quantitative and qualitative sameness, and device similarity). The European "stepwise" approach was elucidated, and the thinking of regulatory agencies in the major emerging markets was clarified. The conference also highlighted a number of areas that would benefit from further research and discussion, especially around patient/device interface and human factor studies, statistical methods and criteria for demonstrating equivalence, the relative roles of in vivo and in vitro tests, and appropriate designs and metrics for in vivo studies of inhaled drugs. PMID:26033698

  10. Hastings Center

    MedlinePlus

    ... Events October 19, Hastings Center Seminar, Garrison : Human Genetic Engineering: Wh at Can We Do? What Should We ... Events October 19, Hastings Center Seminar, Garrison : Human Genetic Engineering: Wh at Can We Do? What Should We ...

  11. Job center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    To better meet the needs of AGU members, a program has been started to increase the effectiveness of the Job Center activity at the Spring and Fall Meetings. As a result, participation in the Job Center at the 1988 AGU Spring Meeting in Baltimore increased substantially compared to previous Spring Meetings. The number of employers, applicants, and interviews scheduled more than doubled compared to the 1987 Spring Job Center.In order to make the meeting Job Centers even better, a survey is being conducted of employers and applicants who participated in the 1988 Spring Job Center. Evaluation of this survey will be useful in continuing increased participation in and the effectiveness of the Job Center at the 1988 Fall Meeting. Past participants and those interested in the future of the Job Center are encouraged to forward comments and suggestions to AGU, Member Programs Division, 2000 Florida Ave., N.W., Washington, DC 20009.

  12. FRAMEWORK CONVENTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The United Nations Framework Convention on ClimateChange is the first binding international legal instrument that deals directly with climate change. The Convention was adopted on 9 May 1992 after negotiations by the UN-sponsored Intergovernmental Negotiating Committee for aFra...

  13. Constraining fault activity by investigating tectonically-deformed Quaternary palaeoshorelines using a synchronous correlation method: the Capo D'Orlando Fault as a case study (NE Sicily, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meschis, Marco; Roberts, Gerald P.; Robertson, Jennifer

    2016-04-01

    Long-term curstal extension rates, accommodated by active normal faults, can be constrained by investigating Late Quaternary vertical movements. Sequences of marine terraces tectonically deformed by active faults mark the interaction between tectonic activity, sea-level changes and active faulting throughout the Quaternary (e.g. Armijo et al., 1996, Giunta et al, 2011, Roberts et al., 2013). Crustal deformation can be calculated over multiple seismic cycles by mapping Quaternary tectonically-deformed palaeoshorelines, both in the hangingwall and footwall of active normal faults (Roberts et al., 2013). Here we use a synchronous correlation method between palaeoshorelines elevations and the ages of sea-level highstands (see Roberts et al., 2013 for further details) which takes advantage of the facts that (i) sea-level highstands are not evenly-spaced in time, yet must correlate with palaeoshorelines that are commonly not evenly-spaced in elevation, and (ii) that older terraces may be destroyed and/or overprinted by younger highstands, so that the next higher or lower paleoshoreline does not necessarily correlate with the next older or younger sea-level highstand. We investigated a flight of Late Quaternary marine terraces deformed by normal faulting as a result of the Capo D'Orlando Fault in NE Sicily (e.g. Giunta et al., 2011). This fault lies within the Calabrian Arc which has experienced damaging seismic events such as the 1908 Messina Straits earthquake ~ Mw 7. Our mapping and previous mapping (Giunta et al. (2011) demonstrate that the elevations of marine terraces inner edges change along the strike the NE - SW oriented normal fault. This confirms active deformation on the Capo D'Orlando Fault, strongly suggesting that it should be added into the Database of Individual Seismogenic Sources (DISS, Basili et al., 2008). Giunta et al. (2011) suggested that uplift rates and hence faults lip-rates vary through time for this examples. We update the ages assigned to

  14. High Temperature Superconductors: From Delivery to Applications (Presentation from 2011 Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award-winner, Dr. Amit Goyal, and including introduction by Energy Secretary, Dr. Steven Chu)

    ScienceCinema

    Goyal, Amit (Oak Ridge National Laboratory)

    2012-06-28

    Dr. Amit Goyal, a high temperature superconductivity (HTS) researcher at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, was named a 2011 winner of the Department of Energy's Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award honoring U.S. scientists and engineers for exceptional contributions in research and development supporting DOE and its mission. Winner of the award in the inaugural category of Energy Science and Innovation, Dr. Goyal was cited for his work in 'pioneering research and transformative contributions to the field of applied high temperature superconductivity, including fundamental materials science advances and technical innovations enabling large-scale applications of these novel materials.' Following his basic research in grain-to-grain supercurrent transport, Dr. Goyal focused his energy in transitioning this fundamental understanding into cutting-edge technologies. Under OE sponsorship, Dr. Goyal co-invented the Rolling Assisted Bi-Axially Textured Substrate technology (RABiTS) that is used as a substrate for second generation HTS wires. OE support also led to the invention of Structural Single Crystal Faceted Fiber Substrate (SSIFFS) and the 3-D Self Assembly of Nanodot Columns. These inventions and associated R&D resulted in 7 R&D 100 Awards including the 2010 R&D Magazine's Innovator of the Year Award, 3 Federal Laboratory Consortium Excellence in Technology Transfer National Awards, a DOE Energy100 Award and many others. As a world authority on HTS materials, Dr. Goyal has presented OE-sponsored results in more than 150 invited talks, co-authored more than 350 papers and is a fellow of 7 professional societies.

  15. High Temperature Superconductors: From Delivery to Applications (Presentation from 2011 Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award-winner, Dr. Amit Goyal, and including introduction by Energy Secretary, Dr. Steven Chu)

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, Amit

    2012-05-22

    Dr. Amit Goyal, a high temperature superconductivity (HTS) researcher at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, was named a 2011 winner of the Department of Energy's Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award honoring U.S. scientists and engineers for exceptional contributions in research and development supporting DOE and its mission. Winner of the award in the inaugural category of Energy Science and Innovation, Dr. Goyal was cited for his work in 'pioneering research and transformative contributions to the field of applied high temperature superconductivity, including fundamental materials science advances and technical innovations enabling large-scale applications of these novel materials.' Following his basic research in grain-to-grain supercurrent transport, Dr. Goyal focused his energy in transitioning this fundamental understanding into cutting-edge technologies. Under OE sponsorship, Dr. Goyal co-invented the Rolling Assisted Bi-Axially Textured Substrate technology (RABiTS) that is used as a substrate for second generation HTS wires. OE support also led to the invention of Structural Single Crystal Faceted Fiber Substrate (SSIFFS) and the 3-D Self Assembly of Nanodot Columns. These inventions and associated R&D resulted in 7 R&D 100 Awards including the 2010 R&D Magazine's Innovator of the Year Award, 3 Federal Laboratory Consortium Excellence in Technology Transfer National Awards, a DOE Energy100 Award and many others. As a world authority on HTS materials, Dr. Goyal has presented OE-sponsored results in more than 150 invited talks, co-authored more than 350 papers and is a fellow of 7 professional societies.

  16. American Vocational Education Research Association (AVERA) Annual Research Meeting in Conjunction with the Annual Convention of the Association for Career and Technical Education. Proceedings (Orlando, Florida, December 11-13, 1999).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camp, William G., Ed.

    This document contains 14 research papers presented at the American Vocational Education Research Association (AVERA) annual meeting. The following papers are included: "Factors that Influence Students to Attend 4-Year Automotive Programs" (Gregory G. Belcher, Robert L. Frisbee); "The Training Needs of Vocational Teachers for Working with Special…

  17. The inappropriateness of conventional cephalometrics.

    PubMed

    Moyers, R E; Bookstein, F L

    1979-06-01

    1. Cephalometric conventions today may have little basis in either biology or biometrics. 2. There is no theory of cephalometrics, only conventions which involve landmarks and straight lines only. These fail to capture the curving of form and its changes, exclude proper measures of size for bent structures, and misrepresent growth, portraying it as vector displacement rather than a generalized distortion. 3. Conventional cephalometric procedures misinform by fabrication of misleading geometric quantities, by camouflage, particularly of remodeling, by confusion about what is happening (analysis of rotations, treating shape separately from size, and registering angles on landmarks as vertices), and by subtraction as a representation of growth. 4. We suggest that the present systems offer little real hope of improvement sufficient to meet our needs in craniofacial growth research. We call attention to three possible techniques to be included in future cephalometric conventions: (1) tangents and curvatures, (2) Blum's medial axis ("skeleton"), and (3) biorthogonal grids. PMID:287374

  18. Skills Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canter, Patricia; And Others

    The services of the Living Skills Center for the Visually Handicapped, a habilitative service for blind young adults, are described. It is explained that the Center houses its participants in their own apartments in a large complex and has served over 70 young people in 4 years. The evaluation section describes such assessment instruments as an…

  19. Senior Centers

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... something many older adults would like to do as long as they can. Senior centers, adult day care, transportation, ... adults who live independently can go to find a variety of social and recreational activities. [Karen Albers] ...

  20. NULL convention floating point multiplier.

    PubMed

    Albert, Anitha Juliette; Ramachandran, Seshasayanan

    2015-01-01

    Floating point multiplication is a critical part in high dynamic range and computational intensive digital signal processing applications which require high precision and low power. This paper presents the design of an IEEE 754 single precision floating point multiplier using asynchronous NULL convention logic paradigm. Rounding has not been implemented to suit high precision applications. The novelty of the research is that it is the first ever NULL convention logic multiplier, designed to perform floating point multiplication. The proposed multiplier offers substantial decrease in power consumption when compared with its synchronous version. Performance attributes of the NULL convention logic floating point multiplier, obtained from Xilinx simulation and Cadence, are compared with its equivalent synchronous implementation. PMID:25879069

  1. NULL Convention Floating Point Multiplier

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Seshasayanan

    2015-01-01

    Floating point multiplication is a critical part in high dynamic range and computational intensive digital signal processing applications which require high precision and low power. This paper presents the design of an IEEE 754 single precision floating point multiplier using asynchronous NULL convention logic paradigm. Rounding has not been implemented to suit high precision applications. The novelty of the research is that it is the first ever NULL convention logic multiplier, designed to perform floating point multiplication. The proposed multiplier offers substantial decrease in power consumption when compared with its synchronous version. Performance attributes of the NULL convention logic floating point multiplier, obtained from Xilinx simulation and Cadence, are compared with its equivalent synchronous implementation. PMID:25879069

  2. When Teacher-Centered Instructors Are Assigned to Student-Centered Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lasry, Nathaniel; Charles, Elizabeth; Whittaker, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Technology-rich student-centered classrooms such as SCALE-UP and TEAL are designed to actively engage students. We examine what happens when the design of the classroom (conventional or teacher-centered versus student-centered classroom spaces) is consistent or inconsistent with the teacher's epistemic beliefs about learning and teaching…

  3. The effects of flow-path modification on water-quality constituent retention in an urban stormwater detention pond and wetland system, Orlando, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gain, W.S.

    1996-01-01

    Changes in constituent retention in a wet stormwater-detention pond and wetland system in Orlando, Florida, were evaluated following the 1988 installation of a flow barrier which approximately doubled the flow path and increased detention time in the pond. The pond and wetland were arranged in series so that stormwater first enters the pond and overflows into the wetland before spilling over to the regional stream system. Several principal factors that contribute to constituent retention were examined, including changes in pond-water quality between storms, stormwater quality, and pond-water flushing during storms. A simple, analytical pond-water mixing model was used as the basis for interpreting changes in retention efficiencies caused by pond modification. Retention efficiencies were calculated by a modified event-mean concentration efficiency method using a minimum variance unbiased estimator approach. The results of this study generally support the hypothesis that changes in the geometry of stormwater treatment systems can significantly affect the constituent retention efficiency of the pond and wetland system. However, the results also indicate that these changes in efficiency are caused not only by changes in residence time, but also by changes in stormwater mixing and pond water flushing during storms. Additionally, the use of average efficiencies as indications of treatment effectiveness may fail to account for biases associated with sample distribution and independent physical properties of the system, such as the range and concentrations of constituents in stormwater inflows and stormwater volume. Changes in retention efficiencies varied among chemical constituents and were significantly different in the pond and wetland. Retention efficiency was related to inflow concentration for most constituents. Increased flushing of the pond after modification caused decreases in retention efficiencies for constituents that concentrate in the pond between storms

  4. Theme: FFA Conventions and Contests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garten, Stacy A.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Theme articles focus on FFA (Future Farmers of America) conventions and contests. They examine FFA as an extracurricular versus intracurricular activity, keeping competition in perspective, contests as student motivators, how a sponsor views FFA, improving the teaching of leadership, benefits of FFA participation, the needs of disadvantaged and…

  5. Hydrogen storage: beyond conventional methods.

    PubMed

    Dalebrook, Andrew F; Gan, Weijia; Grasemann, Martin; Moret, Séverine; Laurenczy, Gábor

    2013-10-01

    The efficient storage of hydrogen is one of three major hurdles towards a potential hydrogen economy. This report begins with conventional storage methods for hydrogen and broadly covers new technology, ranging from physical media involving solid adsorbents, to chemical materials including metal hydrides, ammonia borane and liquid precursors such as alcohols and formic acid. PMID:23964360

  6. Ability Measurement: Conventional or Adaptive?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, David J.; Betz, Nancy E.

    Research to date on adaptive (sequential, branched, individualized, tailored, programmed, response-contingent) ability testing is reviewed and summarized, following a brief review of problems inherent in conventional individual and group approaches to ability measurement. Research reviewed includes empirical, simulation and theoretical studies of…

  7. Carolinas Energy Career Center

    SciTech Connect

    Classens, Anver; Hooper, Dick; Johnson, Bruce

    2013-03-31

    Central Piedmont Community College (CPCC), located in Charlotte, North Carolina, established the Carolinas Energy Career Center (Center) - a comprehensive training entity to meet the dynamic needs of the Charlotte region's energy workforce. The Center provides training for high-demand careers in both conventional energy (fossil) and renewable energy (nuclear and solar technologies/energy efficiency). CPCC completed four tasks that will position the Center as a leading resource for energy career training in the Southeast: • Development and Pilot of a New Advanced Welding Curriculum, • Program Enhancement of Non-Destructive Examination (NDE) Technology, • Student Support through implementation of a model targeted toward Energy and STEM Careers to support student learning, • Project Management and Reporting. As a result of DOE funding support, CPCC achieved the following outcomes: • Increased capacity to serve and train students in emerging energy industry careers; • Developed new courses and curricula to support emerging energy industry careers; • Established new training/laboratory resources; • Generated a pool of highly qualified, technically skilled workers to support the growing energy industry sector.

  8. The Craft of Writing: Breaking Conventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paraskevas, Cornelia

    2004-01-01

    The rhetorical power of punctuation conventions as well as the effect of violating those conventions should be explained to the students. The craft in conventions can be found anywhere and all good writers use it in their work.

  9. Standardizing Naming Conventions in Radiation Oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Santanam, Lakshmi; Hurkmans, Coen; Mutic, Sasa; Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine van; Brame, Scott; Straube, William; Galvin, James; Tripuraneni, Prabhakar; Michalski, Jeff; Bosch, Walter

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to report on the development of a standardized target and organ-at-risk naming convention for use in radiation therapy and to present the nomenclature for structure naming for interinstitutional data sharing, clinical trial repositories, integrated multi-institutional collaborative databases, and quality control centers. This taxonomy should also enable improved plan benchmarking between clinical institutions and vendors and facilitation of automated treatment plan quality control. Materials and Methods: The Advanced Technology Consortium, Washington University in St. Louis, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Dutch Radiation Oncology Society, and the Clinical Trials RT QA Harmonization Group collaborated in creating this new naming convention. The International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements guidelines have been used to create standardized nomenclature for target volumes (clinical target volume, internal target volume, planning target volume, etc.), organs at risk, and planning organ-at-risk volumes in radiation therapy. The nomenclature also includes rules for specifying laterality and margins for various structures. The naming rules distinguish tumor and nodal planning target volumes, with correspondence to their respective tumor/nodal clinical target volumes. It also provides rules for basic structure naming, as well as an option for more detailed names. Names of nonstandard structures used mainly for plan optimization or evaluation (rings, islands of dose avoidance, islands where additional dose is needed [dose painting]) are identified separately. Results: In addition to its use in 16 ongoing Radiation Therapy Oncology Group advanced technology clinical trial protocols and several new European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer protocols, a pilot version of this naming convention has been evaluated using patient data sets with varying treatment sites. All structures in these data sets were

  10. Children's cancer centers

    MedlinePlus

    Pediatric cancer center; Pediatric oncology center; Comprehensive cancer center ... from getting the care your child needs. The Pediatric Oncology Resource Center has links and contact information ...

  11. 10 CFR 429.23 - Conventional cooking tops, conventional ovens, microwave ovens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Conventional cooking tops, conventional ovens, microwave... Conventional cooking tops, conventional ovens, microwave ovens. (a) Sampling plan for selection of units for testing. (1) The requirements of § 429.11 are applicable to conventional cooking tops, conventional...

  12. 10 CFR 429.23 - Conventional cooking tops, conventional ovens, microwave ovens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Conventional cooking tops, conventional ovens, microwave... Conventional cooking tops, conventional ovens, microwave ovens. (a) Sampling plan for selection of units for testing. (1) The requirements of § 429.11 are applicable to conventional cooking tops, conventional...

  13. 10 CFR 429.23 - Conventional cooking tops, conventional ovens, microwave ovens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Conventional cooking tops, conventional ovens, microwave... Conventional cooking tops, conventional ovens, microwave ovens. (a) Sampling plan for selection of units for testing. (1) The requirements of § 429.11 are applicable to conventional cooking tops, conventional...

  14. Dilution Confusion: Conventions for Defining a Dilution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fishel, Laurence A.

    2010-01-01

    Two conventions for preparing dilutions are used in clinical laboratories. The first convention defines an "a:b" dilution as "a" volumes of solution A plus "b" volumes of solution B. The second convention defines an "a:b" dilution as "a" volumes of solution A diluted into a final volume of "b". Use of the incorrect dilution convention could affect…

  15. Implementing the chemical weapons convention

    SciTech Connect

    Kellman, B.; Tanzman, E. A.

    1999-12-07

    In 1993, as the CWC ratification process was beginning, concerns arose that the complexity of integrating the CWC with national law could cause each nation to implement the Convention without regard to what other nations were doing, thereby causing inconsistencies among States as to how the CWC would be carried out. As a result, the author's colleagues and the author prepared the Manual for National Implementation of the Chemical Weapons Convention and presented it to each national delegation at the December 1993 meeting of the Preparatory Commission in The Hague. During its preparation, the Committee of CWC Legal Experts, a group of distinguished international jurists, law professors, legally-trained diplomats, government officials, and Parliamentarians from every region of the world, including Central Europe, reviewed the Manual. In February 1998, they finished the second edition of the Manual in order to update it in light of developments since the CWC entered into force on 29 April 1997. The Manual tries to increase understanding of the Convention by identifying its obligations and suggesting methods of meeting them. Education about CWC obligations and available alternatives to comply with these requirements can facilitate national response that are consistent among States Parties. Thus, the Manual offers options that can strengthen international realization of the Convention's goals if States Parties act compatibly in implementing them. Equally important, it is intended to build confidence that the legal issues raised by the Convention are finite and addressable. They are now nearing competition of an internet version of this document so that interested persons can access it electronically and can view the full text of all of the national implementing legislation it cites. The internet address, or URL, for the internet version of the Manual is http: //www.cwc.ard.gov. This paper draws from the Manual. It comparatively addresses approximately thirty

  16. "Nonverbal Variables in the Convention Information System" or "An Inquiry into Some Broader Perspectives" or "Can Communication Research Help?"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Randall P.; Crouch, Wayne W.

    An examination of the scholarly convention as an information system reveals two problems: the word orientation of the usual convention format, excluding other communication variables; and the extent to which suggestions, complaints, or comments are isolated from an overall system orientation. Information gathering on conventions has centered on…

  17. Conventionalism and integrable Weyl geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pucheu, M. L.

    2015-03-01

    Since the appearance of Einstein's general relativity, gravitation has been associated to the space-time curvature. This theory introduced a geometrodynamic language which became a convenient tool to predict matter behaviour. However, the properties of space-time itself cannot be measurable by experiments. Taking Poincaré idea that the geometry of space-time is merely a convention, we show that the general theory of relativity can be completely reformulated in a more general setting, a generalization of Riemannian geometry, namely, the Weyl integrable geometry. The choice of this new mathematical language implies, among other things, that the path of particles and light rays should now correspond to Weylian geodesies. Such modification in the dynamic of bodies brings a new perception of physical phenomena that we will explore.

  18. National Health Information Center

    MedlinePlus

    ... About ODPHP National Health Information Center National Health Information Center The National Health Information Center (NHIC) is ... of interest View the NHO calendar . Federal Health Information Centers and Clearinghouses Federal Health Information Centers and ...

  19. [Daily difficulties associated with full conventional dentures].

    PubMed

    Machado, Flávia Christiane de Azevedo; da Costa, Anna Paula Serêjo; Pontes, Anna Lepríncia Bezerra; Lima, Kenio Costa; Ferreira, Maria Ângela Fernandes

    2013-10-01

    The effectiveness of health services can be evaluated from the quality of life (QOL) standpoint. Thus, this study evaluated rehabilitation services using full conventional dentures (FCD) of Specialized Dental Care Centers (SDCC) in Rio Grande do Norte (RN) regarding daily difficulties associated with these dentures made between 2007 and 2009. A cross-sectional study was conducted with 138 users of these FCD, collecting data by clinical examination and a questionnaire based on the Oral Impacts on Daily Performances index. The Fisher and chi-square tests were used to test the association between the variables. The result was that 42% of users reported difficulties in executing oral activities due to FCDs. These difficulties were more frequent and intense in the activities of eating, speaking and smiling. In general, 58.7% of users did not have functional teeth. In relation to the clinical evaluation of FCDs, 57.2% of upper and 9.2% of lower FCDs were satisfactory. There was an association between difficulty and the absence of functional teeth, but not with inadequate FCDs. Thus, the SDCCs were effective in upper FCD rehabilitation, since the difficulties encountered are within the standard limitations of this type of rehabilitation. On the other hand, the cost-benefit of rehabilitation of lower FCDs must be evaluated. PMID:24061036

  20. Engineering challenges of the acoustics of a political convention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randorff, Jack E.

    2002-05-01

    The acoustical challenges encountered during the 2000 Republican Convention are discussed. The convention has held in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania's First Union Center. This venue is a dual-purpose facility catering to professional basketball and professional ice hockey. The acoustical needs of the delegates and the broadcast audience are discussed. The technical performance requirements of convention sound reinforcement and media network broadcast feed are outlined. The necessary technical and performance trade-offs are enumerated with respect to the physical constraints, schedule requirements, budget limitations, and technical planning committee expectations. The conversion of a major sporting arena to a large-scale meeting room with reverberation times and general room conditions conducive to good listening was a significant undertaking. The site had been chosen for a preliminary screening visit approximately 2 years before. This presentation is a followup to ``Acoustics of Political Conventions-A Review,'' delivered at the Acoustical Society of America 139th Meeting in Atlanta in June 2000, 2 months before the convention in Philadelphia.

  1. Conventional treatments for ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Dougados, M; Dijkmans, B; Khan, M; Maksymowych, W; van der Linden, S.; Brandt, J

    2002-01-01

    Management of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is challenged by the progressive nature of the disease. To date, no intervention is available that alters the underlying mechanism of inflammation in AS. Currently available conventional treatments are palliative at best, and often fail to control symptoms in the long term. Current drug treatment may perhaps induce a spurious state of "disease remission," which is merely a low level of disease activity. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are first line treatment, but over time, the disease often becomes refractory to these agents. Disease modifying antirheumatic drugs are second line treatment and may offer some clinical benefit. However, conclusive evidence of the efficacy of these drugs from large placebo controlled trials is lacking. Additionally, these drugs can cause treatment-limiting adverse effects. Intra-articular corticosteroid injection guided by arthrography, computed tomography, or magnetic resonance imaging is an effective means of reducing inflammatory back pain, but controlled studies are lacking. A controlled study has confirmed moderate but significant efficacy of intravenous bisphosphonate (pamidronate) treatment in patients with AS; further evaluation of bisphosphonate treatment is warranted. Physical therapy and exercise are necessary adjuncts to pharmacotherapy; however, the paucity of controlled data makes it difficult to identify the best way to administer these interventions. Surgical intervention may be required to support severe structural damage. Thus, for patients with AS, the future of successful treatment lies in the development of pharmacological agents capable of both altering the disease course through intervention at sites of disease pathogenesis, and controlling symptoms. PMID:12381510

  2. Conventional terrorism and critical care.

    PubMed

    Singer, Pierre; Cohen, Jonathan D; Stein, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Incidents of conventional weapons terror are increasingly part of the reality of the modern world, and in Israel, 19,948 incidents have been reported from September 2000 to December 2003. Most victims are injured in explosions resulting from suicide bombings. Exposure to the blast (primary mechanism of injury) may produce unique injuries affecting gas-containing organs, including perforation of the eardrums (most common injury); pulmonary blast injury, characterized by alveolar capillary disruption and bronchopleural fistulas; and bowel perforation, which is uncommon and may be delayed from 1 to 14 days after the injury. However, most injuries are the result of penetrating trauma (secondary mechanism) resulting from bomb fragments and nails, bolts, and steel pellets embedded in the bomb striking the victim, and blunt trauma (tertiary mechanism) sustained when the victim is propelled against an object by the blast wind. The severity of the injuries is increased when the blast occurs in a confined space. Victims of terror-inflicted injuries have a high Injury Severity Score (30% >16), a high requirement for intensive care unit admission (22.8% in Israel), and have a more prolonged hospital course and higher mortality than victims of any other form of trauma. PMID:15640681

  3. 40 CFR 401.16 - Conventional pollutants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Conventional pollutants. 401.16 Section... STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS § 401.16 Conventional pollutants. The following comprise the list of conventional pollutants designated pursuant to section 304(a)(4) of the Act: 1. Biochemical oxygen demand...

  4. 32 CFR 643.128 - Veterans' conventions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Veterans' conventions. 643.128 Section 643.128... ESTATE Additional Authority of Commanders § 643.128 Veterans' conventions. Without reference to higher... veterans' organizations for use at State or national conventions or for national youth, athletic,...

  5. 32 CFR 643.128 - Veterans' conventions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Veterans' conventions. 643.128 Section 643.128... ESTATE Additional Authority of Commanders § 643.128 Veterans' conventions. Without reference to higher... veterans' organizations for use at State or national conventions or for national youth, athletic,...

  6. 32 CFR 643.128 - Veterans' conventions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Veterans' conventions. 643.128 Section 643.128... ESTATE Additional Authority of Commanders § 643.128 Veterans' conventions. Without reference to higher... veterans' organizations for use at State or national conventions or for national youth, athletic,...

  7. 32 CFR 643.128 - Veterans' conventions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Veterans' conventions. 643.128 Section 643.128... ESTATE Additional Authority of Commanders § 643.128 Veterans' conventions. Without reference to higher... veterans' organizations for use at State or national conventions or for national youth, athletic,...

  8. 32 CFR 643.128 - Veterans' conventions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Veterans' conventions. 643.128 Section 643.128... ESTATE Additional Authority of Commanders § 643.128 Veterans' conventions. Without reference to higher... veterans' organizations for use at State or national conventions or for national youth, athletic,...

  9. Prospects of Performance-Based Vocational Teacher Education. Proceedings of the National Invitational Conference on Performance-Based Teacher Education (Orlando, Florida, March 20-21, 1980).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fardig, Glen E., Ed.

    This compilation of presentations given at the National Conference on Performance Based Teacher Education (PBTE) centers around two main themes: the present state of the scene in performance-based vocational teacher education, and changes in the educational setting in both schools and colleges that will affect PBTE in the near future. Among the…

  10. Holographic center high-mounted stoplight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Ronald T.

    1991-07-01

    The holographic center high mounted stoplight achieves the required performance of a conventional center high mounted stoplight, but without the obstruction to the driver's view through the rear window. A lamp located in the roof illuminates a transmission image hologram mounted on the inner surface of the automobile rear window. The hologram strongly diffracts the incident light rearward but is transparent to the driver looking in his rearview mirror.

  11. Complexed metals in hazardous waste: Limitations of conventional chemical oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Diel, B.N.; Kuchynka, D.J.; Borchert, J.

    1994-12-31

    In the management of hazardous waste, more is known regarding the treatment of metals than about the fixation, destruction and/or immobilization of any other hazardous constituent group. Metals are the only hazardous constituents which cannot be destroyed, and so must be converted to their least soluble and/or reactive form to prevent reentry into the environment. The occurrence of complexed metals, e.g., metallocyanides, and/or chelated metals, e.g., M{center_dot}EDTA in hazardous waste streams presents formidable challenges to conventional waste treatment practices. This paper presents the results of extensive research into the destruction (chemical oxidation) of metallocyanides and metal-chelates, defines the utility and limitations of conventional chemical oxidation approaches, illustrates some of the waste management difficulties presented by such species, and presents preliminary data on the UV/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} photodecomposition of chelated metals.

  12. SINGLE-INCISION VIDEOLAPAROSCOPIC APPENDECTOMY WITH CONVENTIONAL VIDEOLAPAROSCOPY EQUIPMENT

    PubMed Central

    PINHEIRO, Rodrigo Nascimento; SOUSA, Renato Costa; CASTRO, Fernanda Mesquita de Brito; de ALMEIDA, Roberta Oliveira; GOUVEIA, Gustavo de Castro; de OLIVEIRA, Viviane Rezende

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute appendicitis is the most common surgical emergency in daily practice, and is approached laparoscopically in many centers. Efforts have been undertaken for the development of minimally invasive techniques that reduce tissue trauma and offer improved cosmetic results, one of such being the single-incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS). Aim To present a minimally invasive technique for appendectomy (SILS) undertaken with conventional instruments. Method Eleven patients were treated in the emergency care center presenting abdominal pain in the right iliac fossa that was suggestive of appendicitis. Diagnostic investigation was subsequently conducted, including physical examination, laboratory and imaging exams (CT scan with intravenous contrast or total abdominal ultrasound), and the results were consistent with acute appendicitis. Thus, after consent, these patients underwent SILS appendectomy under general anesthesia with three trocars (two 10 mm and one 5 mm), using conventional and optical laparoscopic tweezers (10 mm, 30º). The base and pedicle of the appendix were ligated with titanium LT 400 clips. The procedure occurred uneventfully. Inclusion criteria were absence of diffuse peritonitis, BMI (body mass index) less than 35 and absence of serious comorbidities or sepsis. Results Seven men and four women were operated with average age of 25.7 years and underwent appendectomy through this technique. Mean procedure duration was of 37.2 min. Regarding surgical findings, three had appendicitis in stage 1, four in stage 2 and four in stage 3. All patients improved well, without surgical complications, and did not require conversion to open surgery or conventional laparoscopy technique. Conclusion Appendectomy conducted through Single Incision Laparoscopic Surgery is a feasible and promising technique that can be performed with conventional laparoscopic instruments. PMID:24676296

  13. XTOD to Conventional Facilities Interface Control Document

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, D

    2005-09-29

    This document describes the interface between the LCLS X-ray Transport and Diagnostics (XTOD) (WBS 1.5) and the LCLS Conventional Facilities (CF) (WBS 1.1). The interface locations ranging from the beam dump to the far experimental hall are identified. Conventional Facilities provides x-ray, beamline and equipment enclosures, mounting surfaces, conventional utilities, compressed (clean, dry) air, process and purge gases, exhaust systems, power, and environmental conditions for the XTOD components and controls.

  14. Consequences of Frequent Hemodialysis: Comparison to Conventional Hemodialysis and Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Stokes, John B.

    2011-01-01

    The average life expectancy of a person on hemodialysis is less than 3 years and hasn't changed in 20 years. The Hemodialysis (HEMO) trial, a randomized trial to determine whether increasing urea removal to the maximum practical degree through a 3-times-a-week schedule, showed no difference in mortality in the treatment and control groups. Investigators speculated that the increment in functional waste removal in the HEMO study was too small to produce improvements in mortality. To test this hypothesis, the NIDDK funded the Frequent Hemodialysis Network, a consortium of centers testing whether patients randomized to intensive dialysis would demonstrate improved (reduced) left ventricular LV mass and quality of life. The trial has two arms: the daily (in-center) and the home (nocturnal) arms. Each arm has patients randomized to conventional dialysis or 6 days (or nights) of dialysis. The results of the HEMO trial will be reported in the fall of 2010. PMID:21686215

  15. Challenges of Meeting CF-conventions in NASA HDF Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H.; Yang, M.

    2012-12-01

    Many NASA Earth Science data centers distribute and archive remote sensing satellite data in HDF/HDF-EOS file format as a standard. Although the HDF and HDF-EOS are standard data storage formats, the way on how data products are stored may vary significantly, especially for older data products. Since 2007, The HDF Group has developed some software products to help the easy access of various NASA HDF/HDF-EOS products via OPeNDAP. The major development centers the transforming the HDF data to OPeNDAP by following the widely used CF conventions. Such development work revealed many challenges spanning from understanding the various data products to the requirement of popular visualization tools to display a data field. This poster will present those challenges that can arise from data production level to data access level.

  16. TESOL Today--A View from the Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohannessian, Sirarpi

    1969-01-01

    The author is Director of the English for Speakers of Other Languages Program at the Center for Applied Linguistics, Washington, D.C. Paper presented at the TESOL Convention, Chicago, March 1969. (FWB)

  17. ACTE Convention a Big Success in Nashville

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Techniques: Connecting Education and Careers (J1), 2010

    2010-01-01

    This article features the 2009 Association for Career and Technical Education's (ACTE) Annual Convention and Career Tech Expo which was held in Nashville in November. Despite somber economic times, the Annual Convention drew thousands of attendees, more than 200 exhibitors, offered engaging sessions and speakers, and the new chief of the Office of…

  18. The European Convention on Human Rights. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castberg, Frede

    This book outlines the contents of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms and its Protocols 1 and 4. The major goal of the Convention, which constitutes an innovation in international law, is to guarantee the protection of "human rights" by allowing both member states and individuals to institute proceedings…

  19. Conventional Expressions. Investigating Pragmatics and Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmonds, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    Conventional expressions, a subset of multiword units, are the target of the current study, which aims to address questions concerning native and nonnative speakers' knowledge and processing of a set of such strings. To this end, 13 expressions identified as conventional in the southwest of France were tested in an online contextualized…

  20. 40 CFR 401.16 - Conventional pollutants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Conventional pollutants. 401.16 Section 401.16 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS § 401.16 Conventional pollutants. The following comprise the list...

  1. 40 CFR 401.16 - Conventional pollutants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2014-07-01 2012-07-01 true Conventional pollutants. 401.16 Section 401.16 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS § 401.16 Conventional pollutants. The following comprise the list...

  2. Using Conventional Sequences in L2 French

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forsberg, Fanny

    2010-01-01

    By means of a phraseological identification method, this study provides a general description of the use of conventional sequences (CSs) in interviews at four different levels of spoken L2 French as well as in interviews with native speakers. Use of conventional sequences is studied with regard to overall quantity, category distribution and type…

  3. 47 CFR 32.20 - Numbering convention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Numbering convention. 32.20 Section 32.20 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES UNIFORM SYSTEM OF ACCOUNTS FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES General Instructions § 32.20 Numbering convention. (a) The number...

  4. 47 CFR 32.20 - Numbering convention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Numbering convention. 32.20 Section 32.20 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES UNIFORM SYSTEM OF ACCOUNTS FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES General Instructions § 32.20 Numbering convention. (a) The number...

  5. 47 CFR 32.20 - Numbering convention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Numbering convention. 32.20 Section 32.20 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES UNIFORM SYSTEM OF ACCOUNTS FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES General Instructions § 32.20 Numbering convention. (a) The number...

  6. 47 CFR 32.20 - Numbering convention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Numbering convention. 32.20 Section 32.20 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES UNIFORM SYSTEM OF ACCOUNTS FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES General Instructions § 32.20 Numbering convention. (a) The number...

  7. 47 CFR 32.20 - Numbering convention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Numbering convention. 32.20 Section 32.20 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES UNIFORM SYSTEM OF ACCOUNTS FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES General Instructions § 32.20 Numbering convention. (a) The number...

  8. 48 CFR 1.108 - FAR conventions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false FAR conventions. 1.108 Section 1.108 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION GENERAL FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM Purpose, Authority, Issuance 1.108 FAR conventions. The following...

  9. 40 CFR 401.16 - Conventional pollutants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Conventional pollutants. 401.16 Section 401.16 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS § 401.16 Conventional pollutants. The following comprise the list...

  10. 40 CFR 401.16 - Conventional pollutants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Conventional pollutants. 401.16 Section 401.16 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS § 401.16 Conventional pollutants. The following comprise the list...

  11. Morality vs. Convention: Is Kohlberg Right?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradt, Jean M.

    A pertinent problem in the area of moral development is whether most people can distinguish moral from conventional issues. Some research has shown children and adolescents consider moral (intrinsic) transgressions more serious than violations of convention. To expand this research by examining in detail the role of intrinsicality in moral…

  12. The Woodlands Metro Center energy study. Case studies of project planning and design for energy conservation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-03-01

    Appendix II of The Woodlands Metro Center Energy Study near Houston consists of the following: Metro Center Program, Conventional Plan Building Prototypes and Detail Parcel Analysis, Energy Plan Building Prototypes, and Energy Plan Detail Parcel Analysis.

  13. William Beaumont Hospital Imaging Center design update.

    PubMed

    Brovold, R; Farah, J

    1992-12-01

    The William Beaumont Imaging Center is designed to bridge the gap between conventional and totally digital imaging technology. Reverse capacity and flexibility are designed into the building and it's systems to facilitate the transition at minimal cost and disruption to daily operations. PMID:1490473

  14. Minimally Invasive Versus Conventional Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Attia, Rizwan Q.; Hickey, Graeme L.; Grant, Stuart W.; Bridgewater, Ben; Roxburgh, James C.; Kumar, Pankaj; Ridley, Paul; Bhabra, Moninder; Millner, Russell W. J.; Athanasiou, Thanos; Casula, Roberto; Chukwuemka, Andrew; Pillay, Thasee; Young, Christopher P.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement (MIAVR) has been demonstrated as a safe and effective option but remains underused. We aimed to evaluate outcomes of isolated MIAVR compared with conventional aortic valve replacement (CAVR). Methods Data from The National Institute for Cardiovascular Outcomes Research (NICOR) were analyzed at seven volunteer centers (2006–2012). Primary outcomes were in-hospital mortality and midterm survival. Secondary outcomes were postoperative length of stay as well as cumulative bypass and cross-clamp times. Propensity modeling with matched cohort analysis was used. Results Of 307 consecutive MIAVR patients, 151 (49%) were performed during the last 2 years of study with a continued increase in numbers. The 307 MIAVR patients were matched on a 1:1 ratio. In the matched CAVR group, there was no statistically significant difference in in-hospital mortality [MIAVR, 4/307,(1.3%); 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.4%–3.4% vs CAVR, 6/307 (2.0%); 95% CI, 0.8%–4.3%; P = 0.752]. One-year survival rates in the MIAVR and CAVR groups were 94.4% and 94.6%, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference in midterm survival (P = 0.677; hazard ratio, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.56–1.46). Median postoperative length of stay was lower in the MIAVR patients by 1 day (P = 0.009). The mean cumulative bypass time (94.8 vs 91.3 minutes; P = 0.333) and cross-clamp time (74.6 vs 68.4 minutes; P = 0.006) were longer in the MIAVR group; however, this was significant only in the cross-clamp time comparison. Conclusions Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement is a safe alternative to CAVR with respect to operative and 1-year mortality and is associated with a shorter postoperative stay. Further studies are required in high-risk (logistic EuroSCORE > 10) patients to define the role of MIAVR. PMID:26926521

  15. The Propulsion Center at MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerrish, Harold; Schmidt, George R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Propulsion Research Center at MSFC serves as a national resource for research of advanced, revolutionary propulsion technologies. Our mission is to move the nation's capabilities beyond the confines of conventional chemical propulsion into an era of aircraft like access to earth-orbit, rapid travel throughout the solar system, and exploration of interstellar space. Current efforts cover a wide range of exciting areas, including high-energy plasma thrusters, advanced fission and fusion engines, antimatter propulsion systems, beamed energy rockets and sails, and fundamental motive physics. Activities involve concept investigation, proof-of-concept demonstration, and breadboard validation of new propulsion systems. The Propulsion Research Center at MSFC provides an environment where NASA, national laboratories, universities, and industry researchers can pool their skills together to perform landmark propulsion achievements. We offer excellent educational opportunities to students and young researchers-fostering a wellspring of innovation that will revolutionize space transportation.

  16. Children's cancer centers

    MedlinePlus

    Pediatric cancer center; Pediatric oncology center; Comprehensive cancer center ... Treating childhood cancer is not the same as treating adult cancer. The cancers are different. So are the treatments and the ...

  17. The Watergate Learning Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Training in Business and Industry, 1971

    1971-01-01

    The Watergate Learning Center, recently opened by Sterling Learning Center in Washington, D. C., blueprints the plan established by Sterling and Marriott Hotels for a national chain of learning centers with much the same facilities. (EB)

  18. Fireworks Information Center

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home / Safety Education / Safety Education Centers En Español Fireworks Information Center This is an information center on ... Video Put Safety First This Fourth of July Fireworks Information What are consumer fireworks and where are ...

  19. Achieving Parent-Child Coordination through Convention: Fixed- and Variable-Sequence Conventions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Starkey, Jr.; Farley, Anne M.

    1990-01-01

    Considers aspects of the structural design of conventions observed in parent-child interaction. Examines kinds of design differences that occur in conventions and the consequences of those differences, particularly for parent-child coordination. (PCB)

  20. Adapting conventional cancer treatment for immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Jian; Liu, Zhida; Fu, Yang-Xin

    2016-05-01

    The efficacy of directly killing tumors by conventional cancer therapies, such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy, has been for several decades well established. But, a suppressed immune response might become a lethal side effect after repeated cycles of intensive treatment. Recently, achievements in immune checkpoint inhibitors and adoptive T cell-mediated immunotherapies have resulted in changes in frontline management of advanced cancer diseases. However, accumulated evidence indicates that immunotherapeutic and conventional strategies alone are often ineffective to eradicate big tumors or metastasis. To improve the outcomes of treatment for advanced cancer diseases, the combination of conventional cancer treatment with various immunotherapeutic approaches has been attempted and has shown potential synergistic effects. Recent studies have unexpectedly demonstrated that some strategies of conventional cancer treatment can regulate the immune response positively, thus the understanding of how to adapt conventional treatment for immunotherapy is crucial to the design of effective combination therapy of conventional treatment with immunotherapy. Here, we review both experimental and clinical studies on the therapeutic effect and its mechanisms of combining conventional therapy with immunotherapy in treatment of cancer. PMID:26910191

  1. The Symmetry and Packing Fraction of the Body Centered Tetragonal Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunlap, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    It is shown that for different ratios of lattice parameters, "c/a," the body centered tetragonal structure may be view as body centered tetragonal, body centered cubic, face centered cubic or hexagonal. This illustrates that the apparent symmetry of a lattice depends on the choice of the conventional unit cell.

  2. [New challenges in the biological weapons convention].

    PubMed

    Sissonen, Susanna; Raijas, Tiina; Haikala, Olli; Hietala, Heikki; Virri, Markku; Nikkari, Simo

    2012-01-01

    Microbes and their toxins are biological weapons that can cause disease in humans, animals or plants, and which can be used with hostile intent in warfare and terrorism. Biological agents can be used as weapons of mass destruction and therefore, immense human and social and major economical damage can be caused. Rapid development of life sciences and technologies during the recent decades has posed new challenges to the Biological Weapons Convention. The Convention states that the States Parties to the BWC strive to ensure that the Convention remains relevant and effective, despite changes in science, technology or politics. PMID:22428382

  3. The improvement and the effect of IERS conventions (2003)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Na; Shi, Chuang; Li, Min; Rong, Zou

    2008-12-01

    The new generation of space datum in China should comply with the latest IERS (International Earth Rotation and Reference System Service) convention as much as possible. This paper has deeply addressed and researched the main improvements of the current version IERS Conventions (2003), including the changes of the Terrestrial Reference System, the Celestial Reference System, and the transformation between them, the tide correction and so on, which would undoubtedly benefit the realization and maintenance of our space datum. Based on PANDA (Position And Navigation Data Analyst) software developed by GNSS Center of Wuhan University, we analyzed the effect of improvements of the IERS Conventions (2003) on precise orbit determination and precise positioning. The results show that the effect of improvements of models of the coordinate transformation between the celestial and the terrestrial reference system and tide correction (including solid earth tide, ocean tide and polar tide) on precise orbit determination are 4mm, 9mm and 5mm in terms of RMS in along, cross and radial direction of the track; and the effect of the improvement of the tide models on positioning is basically under 0.6mm, and the RMS of the differences are 0.3mm, 0.3mm and 0.2mm in X, Y and Z.

  4. A Proposed Convention for Writing FITS Data Tapes: DRAFT 0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ROSAT/ASCA/Xte Development Team

    Even with today's advances in networking, file system capacities and CD technology it is often necessary to transport and store scientific data sets on magnetic tape. The FITS data format standard contains guidelines on how to write FITS files to magnetic tape but does not address the problem of indexing or organizing tape files. Currently available magnetic tape media can store multiple gigabytes of information on a single tape, which translates into thousands of FITS files per tape. Thus, the lack of a standard tape indexing and organizing scheme can, in many instances, become a serious problem. Faced with the above dilemma, the Astrophysics Data Facility at Goddard Space Flight Center has developed a simple in-house convention for indexing the contents of FITS data tapes that allows software to quickly and easily inventory tape contents. This paper describes the convention used by our organization. We propose that this convention be adopted into the FITS standard as the way to index and organize the contents of magnetic tape media.

  5. 15 CFR 742.18 - Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC or Convention).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC or... Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE EXPORT ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS CONTROL POLICY-CCL BASED CONTROLS § 742.18 Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC or Convention)....

  6. 15 CFR 742.18 - Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC or Convention).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC or... Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE EXPORT ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS CONTROL POLICY-CCL BASED CONTROLS § 742.18 Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC or Convention)....

  7. 15 CFR 742.18 - Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC or Convention).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC or... Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE EXPORT ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS CONTROL POLICY-CCL BASED CONTROLS § 742.18 Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC or Convention)....

  8. 15 CFR 742.18 - Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC or Convention).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC or... Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE EXPORT ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS CONTROL POLICY-CCL BASED CONTROLS § 742.18 Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC or Convention)....

  9. 15 CFR 742.18 - Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC or Convention).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC or... Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE EXPORT ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS CONTROL POLICY-CCL BASED CONTROLS § 742.18 Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC or Convention)....

  10. The conventional ultrasonic nebulizer proved inefficient in nebulizing a suspension.

    PubMed

    Nikander, K; Turpeinen, M; Wollmer, P

    1999-01-01

    A study was undertaken to compare the amount of nebulized budesonide suspension and nebulized terbutaline sulphate solution inhaled by healthy adult subjects when conventional jet and ultrasonic nebulizers were used. Ten healthy subjects (5 male; age range, 16-52 years) used two conventional nebulizers: the Spira Elektro 4 jet nebulizer (Respiratory Care Center, Hämeenlinna, Finland) and the Spira Ultra ultrasonic nebulizer (Respiratory Care Center) in a breath-synchronized mode with each drug. The amount of drug inhaled, the inhaled mass, was defined as the amount of drug deposited on a filter between the inspiratory port of the nebulizer and the mouthpiece. The amount of budesonide and terbutaline sulphate was determined by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Single-dose respules were used (0.5 mg of budesonide and 5.0 mg of terbutaline sulphate), and nebulization time up to the defined gravimetric output was recorded. The inhaled mass of budesonide varied depending on the nebulizer used, whereas the inhaled mass of terbutaline was unaffected by the choice of nebulizer. The median inhaled mass of budesonide was 31.4% of the nominal dose (i.e., dose of drug in the respule per label claim) with the Spira Elektro 4 and 9.9% with the Spira Ultra, whereas the median inhaled mass of terbutaline was 50% with the Spira Elektro 4 and 52% with the Spira Ultra. It appears that a suspension is generally more difficult to nebulize than a solution and that the budesonide suspension should not be used in conventional ultrasonic nebulizers. PMID:10539706

  11. High-temperature superconductivity: A conventional conundrum

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Božović, Ivan

    2016-01-07

    High-temperature superconductivity in ultrathin films of iron selenide deposited on strontium titanate has been attributed to various exotic mechanisms, and new experiments indicate that it may be conventional, with broader implications.

  12. CONVENTIONAL COMBUSTION ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT PROGRAM, EXECUTIVE BRIEFING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The brochure gives an executive briefing of EPA's Conventional Combustion Environmental Assessment (CCEA) Program. The CCEA Program was established recently to coordinate and integrate EPA's research and development efforts for assessing the environmental effects of pollutants fr...

  13. Predictive Assessments of Non-conventional Pollutants

    EPA Science Inventory

    In some situations, ecoepidemiological methods are the reasonable choice for setting effect benchmarks (e.g., protective criteria), especially for non-conventional pollutants. Ecoepidemiological methods are becoming more common because of advances in computational power and data...

  14. Nanoporous films: From conventional to the conformal

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Allendorf, Mark D.; Stavila, Vitalie

    2015-12-14

    Here, thin and continuous films of porous metal-organic frameworks can now be conformally deposited on various substrates using a vapor-phase synthesis approach that departs from conventional solution-based routes.

  15. Conventional management of inappropriate sinus tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Olshansky, Brian; Sullivan, Renee M

    2016-06-01

    Inappropriate sinus tachycardia is a challenging problem to manage. There are limited data on the best method to evaluate and treat the problem. Here, we consider a conventional approach to inappropriate sinus tachycardia. PMID:26164138

  16. Nanoporous films: From conventional to conformal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allendorf, Mark D.; Stavila, Vitalie

    2016-03-01

    Thin and continuous films of porous metal-organic frameworks can now be conformally deposited on various substrates using a vapour-phase synthesis approach that departs from conventional solution-based routes.

  17. Complementary and conventional medicine: a concept map

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, Carol M; Kroesen, Kendall; Trochim, William M; Bell, Iris R

    2004-01-01

    Background Despite the substantive literature from survey research that has accumulated on complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in the United States and elsewhere, very little research has been done to assess conceptual domains that CAM and conventional providers would emphasize in CAM survey studies. The objective of this study is to describe and interpret the results of concept mapping with conventional and CAM practitioners from a variety of backgrounds on the topic of CAM. Methods Concept mapping, including free sorts, ratings, and multidimensional scaling was used to organize conceptual domains relevant to CAM into a visual "cluster map." The panel consisted of CAM providers, conventional providers, and university faculty, and was convened to help formulate conceptual domains to guide the development of a CAM survey for use with United States military veterans. Results Eight conceptual clusters were identified: 1) Self-assessment, Self-care, and Quality of Life; 2) Health Status, Health Behaviors; 3) Self-assessment of Health; 4) Practical/Economic/ Environmental Concerns; 5) Needs Assessment; 6) CAM vs. Conventional Medicine; 7) Knowledge of CAM; and 8) Experience with CAM. The clusters suggest panelists saw interactions between CAM and conventional medicine as a critical component of the current medical landscape. Conclusions Concept mapping provided insight into how CAM and conventional providers view the domain of health care, and was shown to be a useful tool in the formulation of CAM-related conceptual domains. PMID:15018623

  18. Dryden Flight Research Center: Center Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratnayake, Nalin

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes a general overview of Dryden Flight Research Center. Strategic partnerships, Dryden's mission activity, exploration systems and aeronautics research programs are also described.

  19. Student Success Center Toolkit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jobs For the Future, 2014

    2014-01-01

    "Student Success Center Toolkit" is a compilation of materials organized to assist Student Success Center directors as they staff, launch, operate, and sustain Centers. The toolkit features materials created and used by existing Centers, such as staffing and budgeting templates, launch materials, sample meeting agendas, and fundraising…

  20. Opportunities Center. Concept Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimeldorf, Martin

    The opportunities center is a new school service concept that can help students find opportunities related to their talents and interests in work, education, leisure, small business, or community service. The opportunities center model expands the career center model into an information search center offering multiple services that link academic…

  1. 22 CFR 98.2 - Preservation of Convention records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Preservation of Convention records. 98.2...-CONVENTION RECORD PRESERVATION § 98.2 Preservation of Convention records. Once the Convention has entered..., Convention records for a period of not less than 75 years. For Convention records involving a child who...

  2. Comparison of Vessel Sealing Systems with Conventional

    PubMed Central

    Peker, Kemal; İnal, Abdullah; Güllü, Huriye; Gül, Düriye; Şahin, Murat; Ozcan, Ayca Dumanli; Kılıç, Kemal

    2013-01-01

    Background Haemorrhoids are cushions of submucosal vascular tissue located in the anal canal starting just distal to the dentate line. Haemorrhoidal disease is a common anorectal disorder which has symptoms of bleeding, prolapse, pain, thrombosis, mucus discharge, and pruritus. Haemorrhoidectomy is one of most frequently performed anorectal operation worldwide. Objectives The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of the LigaSure tissue sealing device, Harmonic Scalpel and conventional MM open haemorrhoidectomy. Materials and Methods Sixty-nine patients with newly diagnosed symptomatic grade three or grade four haemorrhoidal disease, from July 2011 to December 2011 were recruited for the study. Patients were prospectively randomized to LigaSure, Harmonic Scalpel and conventional haemorrhoidectomy. Patients were evaluated on the basis of the mean operative time, postoperative pain, day of discharge, early and late complications. Results Each group has twenty-three patients. Ten (14.5 %) were female and fifty-nine (85.5 %) were male. Mean age were 44.5 ± 10.8 for LigaSure group, 39.5±14.4 for Harmonic Scalpel group and 39.8 ± 13.6 for conventional haemorrhoidectomy group. Mean operative time was 12.6 ± 2.9 for LigaSure group, 12.6 ± 2.5 for Harmonic Scalpel group and 22.3 ± 4.5 for conventional haemorrhoidectomy group. Postoperative pain and required analgesic dose were significantly lower for conventional haemorrhoidectomy. Wound healing was also more rapid in conventional haemorrhoidectomy than both LigaSure and Harmonic Scalpel. Conclusions Lateral heat dissipation of energy based cautery such as Harmonel Scalpel and LigaSure is considerably high when compared with conventional methods. More thermal damage which is generated on tissue seems to be the reason for increased degree of postoperative pain and delay in wound healing. PMID:24349747

  3. Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Construction and Operation of the Molecular Foundry at Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, California

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2003-03-07

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) proposes to build a six-story, approximately 86,500 gross square foot (gsf) Molecular Foundry building; and an adjacent 8,000 gsf, partly below-grade Central Utility Plant building (for a combined 94,500 gsf), to be funded and operated by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences. The buildings would be located on an approximately 2 1/2-acre site in the southeastern portion of the LBNL facility in the Oakland-Berkeley hills. The site is on mostly undeveloped slopes between Building 72, which is the National Center for Electron Microscopy (NCEM), and Building 66, which is the Surface Science and Catalysis Laboratory (SSCL). The Molecular Foundry building would include laboratories, offices, and conference and seminar rooms; the Central Utility Plant would also serve as the foundation for 16 surface parking spaces. A new plaza and pedestrian bridges would connect or provide ready access between the proposed Molecular Foundry building and adjacent scientific buildings. The Proposed Action would extend Lee Road approximately 350 feet, and widen a portion of the road to accommodate two-way traffic. The Molecular Foundry would be staffed and/or used by an estimated 137 persons, of whom an estimated 59 would be staff persons, 36 would be students, and 42 would be visitors (i.e., visiting scientists) to the Center. The Proposed Action would require removal of an existing paved 18-space parking lot and retaining walls, as well as excavation into an undeveloped hillside. Approximately two-dozen mature trees would be removed along with approximately one-dozen saplings. The Proposed Action would replant or replace trees, generally in-kind and in or around the site. LBNL anticipates it would reuse all soil excavated for the Molecular Foundry to construct the new Lee Road extension and widen the existing roadway. This Proposed Action would be a resource for the Department of Energy's participation in the National

  4. Teaching and Learning the Basics: Writing Mechanics, Language Conventions, and Spelling (ERIC).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Beth

    1994-01-01

    Describes ERIC as an up-to-date database that has relatively few items that center on conventions and mechanics, and yet there are hundreds of citations including ERIC descriptors such as spelling, grammar, and syntax. Presents a seven-item annotated bibliography of journal articles and books (published in ERIC between 1991 and 1993). (PA)

  5. Unfavorable situation: NATO and the conventional balance

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, J.A.

    1988-11-01

    The view, long and widely held, that NATO conventional military forces are inferior to Warsaw Pact forces is one of the most important factors shaping postwar history. It influenced the size and nature of the American military commitment to Europe. It is at the heart of the extended deterrence strategy, in which the U.S. commitment to use nuclear weapons in the defense of Europe offsets the Warsaw Pact's perceived conventional superiority. The notion of Western inferiority runs through much of today's public debate on security policy-the INF Treaty, the future of nuclear and conventional arms control, U.S. and Allied defense programs, the burden-sharing debate, and so forth. The debates have spawned a new round of discussions on the nature of the conventional military balance in Europe and will affect U.S. and Western policies. The term balance conjures up the image of a scale, with the Warsaw Pacts military power placed on one side and NATO's on the other. This reflects the normal bean count approach to the military balance: Total number of tanks, artillery, combat aircraft, etc. is the surrogate for military power. The image of the scale conveys a deeper meaning, however: If the Warsaw Pact were military superior or the balance were unfavorable to NATO, NATO would, by implication, lose a military conflict in Central Europe fought with purely conventional weapons. The perception is the one that has shaped the broader Western policy debate.

  6. 75 FR 81678 - Aeronautics Science and Technology Subcommittee; Committee on Technology; National Science and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-28

    ... conjunction with the 49th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting at the Orlando World Center Marriott, 8701 World Center Drive, Orlando, Florida 32821 on Friday, January 7, 2011, from 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. in...

  7. Knee bone tumors: findings on conventional radiology*

    PubMed Central

    Andrade Neto, Francisco; Teixeira, Manuel Joaquim Diógenes; Araújo, Leonardo Heráclio do Carmo; Ponte, Carlos Eduardo Barbosa

    2016-01-01

    The knee is a common site for bone tumors, whether clinically painful or not. Conventional radiology has been established as the first line of investigation in patients with knee pain and can reveal lesions that often generate questions not only for the generalist physician but also for the radiologist or general orthopedist. History, image examination, and histopathological analysis compose the essential tripod of the diagnosis of bone tumors, and conventional radiology is an essential diagnostic tool in patients with knee pain. This pictorial essay proposes to depict the main conventional radiography findings of the most common bone tumors around the knee, including benign and malignant tumors, as well as pseudo-tumors. PMID:27403019

  8. Knee bone tumors: findings on conventional radiology.

    PubMed

    Andrade Neto, Francisco; Teixeira, Manuel Joaquim Diógenes; Araújo, Leonardo Heráclio do Carmo; Ponte, Carlos Eduardo Barbosa

    2016-01-01

    The knee is a common site for bone tumors, whether clinically painful or not. Conventional radiology has been established as the first line of investigation in patients with knee pain and can reveal lesions that often generate questions not only for the generalist physician but also for the radiologist or general orthopedist. History, image examination, and histopathological analysis compose the essential tripod of the diagnosis of bone tumors, and conventional radiology is an essential diagnostic tool in patients with knee pain. This pictorial essay proposes to depict the main conventional radiography findings of the most common bone tumors around the knee, including benign and malignant tumors, as well as pseudo-tumors. PMID:27403019

  9. Unsteady aerodynamics of conventional and supercritical airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, S. S.; Malcolm, G. N.

    1980-01-01

    The unsteady aerodynamics of a conventional and a supercritical airfoil are compared by examining measured chordwise unsteady pressure time-histories from four selected flow conditions. Although an oscillating supercritical airfoil excites more harmonics, the strength of the airfoil's shock wave is the more important parameter governing the complexity of the unsteady flow. Whether they are conventional or supercritical, airfoils that support weak shock waves induce unsteady loads that are qualitatively predictable with classical theories; flows with strong shock waves are sensitive to details of the shock-wave and boundary-layer interaction and cannot be adequately predicted.

  10. [Conventional dental radiography and future prospectives].

    PubMed

    Youssefzadeh, S; Gahleitner, A; Bernhart, D; Bernhart, T

    1999-12-01

    Until recently, conventional dental radiology was performed by dentists and orofacial surgeons. Due to the rapid development of radiological technique, the demand of radiological advice is increasing. The radiologists see more and more dental patients in their daily routine. The aim of this article is to give an overview on established dental radiology and a glimpse into the future. Conventional dental radiology and digital radiography are presently in use. Intraoral technique comprises dental films, bite-wing views and occlusal radiographs. Panoramic views and cephalometric radiographs are done with extraoral technique. Digital radiography lacks all processes in behalf of film development. It leads to dose reduction and enables image manipulation. PMID:10643025

  11. 1985 CSEG/CGU National Convention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peirce, John W.; Millington, Graham

    The Canadian Society of Exploration Geophysicists (CSEG) and the Canadian Geophysical Union (CGU) held their first joint national meeting in Calgary, Canada, May 7-10, 1985. As the CSEG represents primarily the oil exploration side of geophysics and the CGU represents mainly the academic side, both groups felt that a joint convention would broaden their perspectives. Some 1750 delegates and over 100 students registered for the meeting. The Convention Committee was chaired by Ian Baker (Atlantis Resources Ltd.), and CGU was represented by Peter Savage (Pan Canadian Petroleum Ltd.). The Technical Committee was chaired by John Peirce (Petro-Canada Inc.) for CGU and Graham Millington (Canadian Superior Oil Ltd.) for CSEG

  12. Robotic versus conventional laparoscopic colorectal operations: a-single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Bozkurt, Mehmet Abdussamet; Kocataş, Ali; Gemici, Eyüp; Kalaycı, Mustafa Uygar; Alış, Halil

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Robotic surgery was first introduced in 2000 especially to overcome the limitations of low rectum cancer surgery. There is still no consensus regarding the standard method for colorectal surgery. The aim of this study was to compare robotic surgery with laparoscopic colorectal surgery. Material and Methods: This is a retrospective study. Data of patients with a diagnosis of colon or rectal cancer were analyzed for robotic colorectal surgery and laparoscopic colorectal surgery. Results: The cost of robotic surgery group was statistically higher than the laparoscopic surgery group (p=0.032). The average operation duration was 178 minutes in the laparoscopic surgery group and 228 minutes in the robotic surgery group, and this difference was statistically significant (p=0.044). There was no statistically significant difference between the groups regarding other parameters. Discussion: Disadvantages of robotic surgery seem to be its higher cost and longer operation duration as compared to laparoscopic surgery. We claim that an increase in the number of cases and experience may shorten the operation time while the increase in commercial interest may decrease the cost disadvantage of robotic surgery. PMID:27436931

  13. Improving the quality and efficiency of conventional in-center hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Hingwala, Jay; Tangri, Navdeep; Rigatto, Claudio; Komenda, Paul

    2015-01-01

    There is substantial variability at international, national, and regional levels in how effective dialysis providers are in the implementation of well-accepted interventions to deliver better health outcomes at reduced costs to payers. The growing number of dialysis patients within a finite pool of resources has led to searches for more efficient methods to provide patient care without compromising or diminishing quality. We review here some contemporary concepts surrounding quality improvement and operations research that may provide clinician administrators to both improve efficiency and quality in facility based hemodialysis units. The creation of balanced scorecards, utilization of process mapping techniques, and the application of LEAN principles may readily improve how hemodialysis care is delivered in an environment of increasing patient volumes and reduced operating resources. PMID:25752482

  14. Conventional renal cancer in a patient with fumarate hydratase mutation.

    PubMed

    Lehtonen, Heli J; Blanco, Ignacio; Piulats, Jose M; Herva, Riitta; Launonen, Virpi; Aaltonen, Lauri A

    2007-05-01

    Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC) is a tumor predisposition syndrome caused by mutations in the fumarate hydratase (FH) gene. HLRCC is characterized by uterine and cutaneous leiomyomas, renal cell cancer, and uterine leiomyosarcoma. Typically, renal cell cancers in HLRCC are unilateral and display a papillary type 2 or ductal histology. We describe here a 23-year-old patient carrying a novel FH mutation (N330S) with a bilateral renal cell center. Carcinoma of the right kidney showed papillary structure, but the left tumor was diagnosed as a conventional (clear cell) renal carcinoma, a type not previously described in HLRCC. The clear cell renal carcinoma also displayed loss of the normal FH allele and the FH immunostaining. Our finding extends the number of cases in which HLRCC can be suspected, and the FH immunohistochemistry may serve as a useful tool to screen for HLRCC in young individuals with clear cell renal carcinoma. PMID:17270241

  15. BKG Data Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorandt, Volkmar; Wojdziak, Reiner

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities and background information of the IVS Data Center for the year 2012. Included is information about functions, structure, technical equipment, and staff members of the BKG Data Center.

  16. ACTS data center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Syed, Ali; Vogel, Wolfhard J.

    1993-01-01

    Viewgraphs on ACTS Data Center status report are included. Topics covered include: ACTS Data Center Functions; data flow overview; PPD flow; RAW data flow; data compression; PPD distribution; RAW Data Archival; PPD Audit; and data analysis.

  17. ACTS data center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syed, Ali; Vogel, Wolfhard J.

    1993-08-01

    Viewgraphs on ACTS Data Center status report are included. Topics covered include: ACTS Data Center Functions; data flow overview; PPD flow; RAW data flow; data compression; PPD distribution; RAW Data Archival; PPD Audit; and data analysis.

  18. Taking Center Stage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Andrew

    1995-01-01

    Describes Ohio's 390,000 square-foot Perry High School and Community Fitness Center and its ability to accommodate all segments of both school and community group activities. A list of companies that supply the center is included. (GR)

  19. Tornadoes: A Center Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christman-Rothlein, Liz; Meinbach, Anita M.

    1981-01-01

    Information is given on how to put together a learning center. Discusses information and activity packets for a complete learning center on tornadoes including objectives, directions, materials, photographs of physical arrangements, and posttest. (DC)

  20. National Health Information Center

    MedlinePlus

    ... About ODPHP Dietary Guidelines Physical Activity Guidelines Health Literacy and Communication Health Care Quality and Patient Safety Healthy People healthfinder health.gov About ODPHP National Health Information Center National Health Information Center The National Health ...

  1. Regional Instrumentation Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cromie, William J.

    1980-01-01

    Focuses on the activities of regional instrumentation centers that utilize the state-of-the-art instruments and methodology in basic scientific research. The emphasis is on the centers involved in mass spectroscopy, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, lasers, and accelerators. (SA)

  2. Marketing Your Advising Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flickinger, Jan

    1989-01-01

    A tour of centralized university advising centers revealed that the busiest centers had done an excellent job of marketing themselves to their campus clientele. Factors affecting successful marketing include image, location, service, advertising, and innovative problem-solving. (MSE)

  3. NIST Diffusion Data Center

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    NIST Diffusion Data Center (Web, free access)   The NIST Diffusion Data Center is a collection of over 14,100 international papers, theses, and government reports on diffusion published before 1980.

  4. 7 CFR 58.316 - Conventional churns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Conventional churns. 58.316 Section 58.316 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946...

  5. Teaching the Conventions of Academic Discourse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thonney, Teresa

    2011-01-01

    Given the current emphasis on disciplinary discourses, it's not surprising that so little recent attention has been devoted to identifying conventions that are universal in academic discourse. In this essay, the author argues that there are shared features that unite academic writing, and that by introducing these features to first-year students…

  6. ACTE Annual Convention Revs up Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Techniques: Connecting Education and Careers (J1), 2009

    2009-01-01

    This article highlights the annual Association for Career and Technical Education (ACTE) Convention held at Charlotte, North Carolina. It was the first time that the premiere professional development event for career and technical educators had come to Charlotte and the city did not disappoint. In fact, Charlotte proved to be the perfect place for…

  7. The Burning Plasma Experiment conventional facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Commander, J.C.

    1991-12-01

    The Burning Program Plasma Experiment (BPX) is phased to start construction of conventional facilities in July 1994, in conjunction with the conclusion of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) project. This paper deals with the conceptual design of the BPX Conventional Facilities, for which Functional and Operational Requirements (F&ORs) were developed. Existing TFTR buildings and utilities will be adapted and used to satisfy the BPX Project F&ORs to the maximum extent possible. However, new conventional facilities will be required to support the BPX project. These facilities include: The BPX building; Site improvements and utilities; the Field Coil Power Conversion (FCPC) building; the TFTR modifications; the Motor Generation (MG) building; Liquid Nitrogen (LN{sub 2}) building; and the associated Instrumentation and Control (I&C) systems. The BPX building will provide for safe and efficient shielding, housing, operation, handling, maintenance and decontamination of the BPX and its support systems. Site improvements and utilities will feature a utility tunnel which will provide a space for utility services--including pulse power duct banks and liquid nitrogen coolant lines. The FCPC building will house eight additional power supplied for the Toroidal Field (TF) coils. The MG building will house the two MG sets larger than the existing TFTR MG sets. This paper also addresses the conventional facility cost estimating methodology and the rationale for the construction schedule developed. 6 figs., 1 tab.

  8. The Burning Plasma Experiment conventional facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Commander, J.C.

    1991-01-01

    The Burning Program Plasma Experiment (BPX) is phased to start construction of conventional facilities in July 1994, in conjunction with the conclusion of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) project. This paper deals with the conceptual design of the BPX Conventional Facilities, for which Functional and Operational Requirements (F ORs) were developed. Existing TFTR buildings and utilities will be adapted and used to satisfy the BPX Project F ORs to the maximum extent possible. However, new conventional facilities will be required to support the BPX project. These facilities include: The BPX building; Site improvements and utilities; the Field Coil Power Conversion (FCPC) building; the TFTR modifications; the Motor Generation (MG) building; Liquid Nitrogen (LN{sub 2}) building; and the associated Instrumentation and Control (I C) systems. The BPX building will provide for safe and efficient shielding, housing, operation, handling, maintenance and decontamination of the BPX and its support systems. Site improvements and utilities will feature a utility tunnel which will provide a space for utility services--including pulse power duct banks and liquid nitrogen coolant lines. The FCPC building will house eight additional power supplied for the Toroidal Field (TF) coils. The MG building will house the two MG sets larger than the existing TFTR MG sets. This paper also addresses the conventional facility cost estimating methodology and the rationale for the construction schedule developed. 6 figs., 1 tab.

  9. 7 CFR 58.316 - Conventional churns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Conventional churns. 58.316 Section 58.316 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946...

  10. The Economics of Organics versus Conventional Peanuts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The demand for organically produced peanuts and cotton represent the fastest growing sector for each of these commodities. Significant price premiums at the producer level are associated certified organic commodities. However, such incentives to convert a field or farm from conventional production...

  11. James Madison and the Constitutional Convention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scanlon, Thomas M.

    1987-01-01

    Part 1 of this three-part article traces James Madison's life and focuses primarily on those events that prepared him for leadership in the U.S. Constitutional Convention of 1787. It describes his early love of learning, education, and public service efforts. Part 2 chronicles Madison's devotion to study and preparation prior to the Constitutional…

  12. Conventional occlusion versus pharmacologic penalization for amblyopia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tianjing; Shotton, Kate

    2013-01-01

    Background Amblyopia is defined as defective visual acuity in one or both eyes without demonstrable abnormality of the visual pathway, and is not immediately resolved by wearing glasses. Objectives To assess the effectiveness and safety of conventional occlusion versus atropine penalization for amblyopia. Search methods We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, preference lists, science citation index and ongoing trials up to June 2009. Selection criteria We included randomized/quasi-randomized controlled trials comparing conventional occlusion to atropine penalization for amblyopia. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently screened abstracts and full text articles, abstracted data, and assessed the risk of bias. Main results Three trials with a total of 525 amblyopic eyes were included. One trial was assessed as having a low risk of bias among these three trials, and one was assessed as having a high risk of bias. Evidence from three trials suggests atropine penalization is as effective as conventional occlusion. One trial found similar improvement in vision at six and 24 months. At six months, visual acuity in the amblyopic eye improved from baseline 3.16 lines in the occlusion and 2.84 lines in the atropine group (mean difference 0.034 logMAR; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.005 to 0.064 logMAR). At 24 months, additional improvement was seen in both groups; but there continued to be no meaningful difference (mean difference 0.01 logMAR; 95% CI −0.02 to 0.04 logMAR). The second trial reported atropine to be more effective than occlusion. At six months, visual acuity improved 1.8 lines in the patching group and 3.4 lines in the atropine penalization group, and was in favor of atropine (mean difference −0.16 logMAR; 95% CI −0.23 to −0.09 logMAR). Different occlusion modalities were used in these two trials. The third trial had inherent methodological flaws and limited inference could

  13. Data Center Tasking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temares, M. Lewis; Lutheran, Joseph A.

    Operations tasking for data center management is discussed. The original and revised organizational structures of the data center at the University of Miami are also described. The organizational strategy addresses the functions that should be performed by the data center, anticipates the specialized skills required, and addresses personnel…

  14. Center for Instructional Computing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of State Colleges and Universities, Washington, DC.

    The Center for Instructional Computing (CIC) at Eastern Michigan University is described in this report. The center serves as a model for making the infusion of innovative uses of microcomputers within instruction a faculty-centered effort. CIC provides a physical facility with IBM and Apple microcomputers dedicated to faculty use, both as a…

  15. Nuclear Reaction Data Centers

    SciTech Connect

    McLane, V.; Nordborg, C.; Lemmel, H.D.; Manokhin, V.N.

    1988-01-01

    The cooperating Nuclear Reaction Data Centers are involved in the compilation and exchange of nuclear reaction data for incident neutrons, charged particles and photons. Individual centers may also have services in other areas, e.g., evaluated data, nuclear structure and decay data, reactor physics, nuclear safety; some of this information may also be exchanged between interested centers. 20 refs., 1 tab.

  16. Language Resource Centers Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Postsecondary Education, US Department of Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The Language Resource Centers (LRC) program provides grants to institutions of higher education to establish, strengthen, and operate resource centers that serve to improve the nation's capacity to teach and learn foreign languages. Eligible applicants are institutions of higher education. Duration of the grant is four years. Center activities…

  17. Data center cooling method

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Dang, Hien P.; Parida, Pritish R.; Schultz, Mark D.; Sharma, Arun

    2015-08-11

    A method aspect for removing heat from a data center may use liquid coolant cooled without vapor compression refrigeration on a liquid cooled information technology equipment rack. The method may also include regulating liquid coolant flow to the data center through a range of liquid coolant flow values with a controller-apparatus based upon information technology equipment temperature threshold of the data center.

  18. Music therapy in a comprehensive cancer center.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Michael M; Babiak-Vazquez, Adriana E; Frenkel, Moshe A

    2008-01-01

    The use of music as a therapeutic tool in health and medicine dates back to ancient times. In modern Western medicine, music therapy has been available since the 1950s and is now often incorporated into conventional medicine care. Music therapy is a common modality that is used in hospital settings as part of complementary and integrative medicine programs. It is also a key therapeutic tool used within most integrative medicine programs at large cancer centers in the United States. When used in conjunction with conventional cancer treatments, music therapy has been found to help patients promote a better quality of life; better communicate their fear, sadness, or other feelings; and better manage stress, while alleviating physical pain and discomfort. In this article, we review the literature on the value of integrating music therapy in cancer care and describe the experience of music therapy at a large comprehensive cancer center and the benefits that patients with cancer obtain from this service. PMID:18544287

  19. Implications of Minimizing Trauma During Conventional Cochlear Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Matthew L.; Driscoll, Colin L. W.; Gifford, René H.; Service, Geoffrey J.; Tombers, Nicole M.; Hughes-Borst, Becky J.; Neff, Brian A.; Beatty, Charles W.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe the relationship between implantation-associated trauma and postoperative speech perception scores among adult and pediatric patients undergoing cochlear implantation using conventional length electrodes and minimally traumatic surgical techniques. Study Design Retrospective chart review (2002–2010). Setting Tertiary academic referral center. Patients All subjects with significant preoperative low-frequency hearing (≤70 dB HL at 250 Hz) who underwent cochlear implantation with a newer generation implant electrode (Nucleus Contour Advance, Advanced Bionics HR90K [1J and Helix], and Med El Sonata standard H array) were reviewed. Intervention(s) Preimplant and postimplant audiometric thresholds and speech recognition scores were recorded using the electronic medical record. Main Outcome Measure(s) Postimplantation pure tone threshold shifts were used as a surrogate measure for extent of intracochlear injury and correlated with postoperative speech perception scores. Results Between 2002 and 2010, 703 cochlear implant (CI) operations were performed. Data from 126 implants were included in the analysis. The mean preoperative low-frequency pure-tone average was 55.4 dB HL. Hearing preservation was observed in 55% of patients. Patients with hearing preservation were found to have significantly higher postoperative speech perception performance in the cochlear implantation-only condition than those who lost all residual hearing. Conclusion Conservation of acoustic hearing after conventional length cochlear implantation is unpredictable but remains a realistic goal. The combination of improved technology and refined surgical technique may allow for conservation of some residual hearing in more than 50% of patients. Germane to the conventional length CI recipient with substantial hearing loss, minimizing trauma allows for improved speech perception in the electric condition. These findings support the use of minimally traumatic techniques in all CI

  20. Conventional Expressions as a Pragmalinguistic Resource: Recognition and Production of Conventional Expressions in L2 Pragmatics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bardovi-Harlig, Kathleen

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates the source of second language (L2) learners' low use of conventional expressions--one part of pragmalinguistic competence--by investigating the relationship between recognition and production of conventional expressions in L2 pragmatics. Two tasks--an aural recognition task and an oral production task--were completed by 122…

  1. The Conventional and Unconventional about Disability Conventions: A Reflective Analysis of United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umeasiegbu, Veronica I.; Bishop, Malachy; Mpofu, Elias

    2013-01-01

    This article presents an analysis of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) in relation to prior United Nations conventions on disability and U.S. disability policy law with a view to identifying the conventional and also the incremental advances of the CRPD. Previous United Nations conventions related to…

  2. Unreflected Ideology and the Subversion of Conventional Critique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lanigan, Richard L.; Deetz, Stanley A.

    The examination of the conventionality of discourse at speech communication conventions reveals the ideological commitments of these conventions. The symposium, conference, and congress differ from the convention in that at such meetings the participants are interested in generating concrete experience, while at conventions, participants are…

  3. The Adult Literacy League and the Center for Adult Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hooks, William Michael; Nelson, Floride

    Since its foundation in 1968, the Adult Literacy League of Orlando, Florida, has dedicated itself to eradicating the educational handicaps of more than 2,575 local residents. The League, which in 1975 became part of the Open Campus of Valencia Community College (VCC), offers two courses: (1) a Literacy Tutor Training Workshop, a 10-hour program to…

  4. Conventional forces and arms control: Technology and strategy in a changing world

    SciTech Connect

    Pilat, J.F.; White, P.C.

    1990-06-01

    To address the implications of changes for future roles of conventional forces and to assess the technology implications of future strategies, force requirements, and conventional arms control agreements, the Center for National Security Studies in cooperation with the Defense Research and Applications Directorate of the Los Alamos National Laboratory held a conference on Conventional Forces and Arms Control: Technology and Strategy in a Changing World'' at Los Alamos from September 25--27, 1989. The distinguished participants from government, industry, and academia in the United States and Western Europe addressed such issues as: What are the implications of geopolitical and technological trends for international security and stability How will these global changes affect US and allied strategies and force structure, especially the requirements for conventional, nonnuclear forces What will be the role of and rationale for conventional forces in the context of current and prospective allied security requirements How can the West assure it will have the forces necessary for its security How will technological developments influence the structure of tomorrow's conventional forces What impacts will arms reductions have on future systems and force structures What are the prospects for the development and deployment in weapon systems of future conventional military technologies, in light of existing and potential political, economic, bureaucratic, and other impediments

  5. Perceptions of conventional war: late adolescents' views.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, B W; Roscoe, B; Kennedy, D

    1988-01-01

    Late adolescents' views concerning conventional war were assessed in order to better understand the thinking of today's youth and to compare their views with those of early adolescents previously reported in the literature. Three hundred ninety-nine college undergraduates from two universities were surveyed regarding conventional warfare in general and United States military involvement in Latin America specifically. Results suggest that attitudes toward war were related to sex, socioeconomic status, and political affiliation. Although two-thirds of the respondents believed wars were sometimes needed, there was little support for United States military involvement in Latin America and much skepticism of President Reagan's honesty on the issue. Overall, late adolescents' views were less positive and less extreme than were those of early adolescents. PMID:3195377

  6. 1. GENERAL STREET VIEW LOOKING SOUTH ON CONVENT AVE. FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. GENERAL STREET VIEW LOOKING SOUTH ON CONVENT AVE. FROM INTERSECTION OF SOUTH CONVENT AVE. AND WEST KENNEDY ST. - Barrio Libre, West Kennedy & West Seventeenth Streets, Meyer & Convent Avenues, Tucson, Pima County, AZ

  7. Non-conventional mesons at PANDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacosa, Francesco

    2015-04-01

    Non-conventional mesons, such as glueballs and tetraquarks, will be in the focus of the PANDA experiment at the FAIR facility. In this lecture we recall the basic properties of QCD and describe some features of unconventional states. We focus on the search of the not-yet discovered glueballs and the use of the extended Linear Sigma Model for this purpose, and on the already discovered but not-yet understood X, Y, Z states.

  8. Emergency Operations Center at Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caylor, Gary C.

    1997-01-01

    In June 1966, at the start of the Gulf Coast hurricane season, the Johnson Space Center (JSC) celebrated the opening of its new 4,000-square foot, state-of-the-art Emergency Operations Center (EOC). The new EOC has been upgraded and enhanced to support a wide spectrum of emergencies affecting JSC and neighboring communities. One of the main features of the EOC is its premier computerized dispatch center. The new system unites many of JSC's critical emergency functions into one integrated network. It automatically monitors fire alarms, security entrances, and external cameras. It contains the JSC inventory of hazardous materials, by building and room, and can call up Material Safety Data Sheets for most of the generic hazardous materials used on-site. The EOC is available for community use during area emergencies such as hurricanes and is a welcome addition to the Clear Lake/Galveston Bay Area communities' emergency response resources.

  9. From conventional to advanced environmental sanitation.

    PubMed

    Schertenleib, R

    2005-01-01

    The basic concept of collecting domestic liquid waste in water-borne sewer systems goes back more than 100 years and became in the last century the conventional approach to sanitation in urban areas. Over the years, these sewage disposal systems had to be successively upgraded by additional sewage treatment plants increasing investment, operating and maintenance costs. Although these conventional sanitation systems could improve significantly the public health situation in those countries who could afford to install and operate them, it is highly questionable, if they are economically and ecologically sustainable. The large number of people in the developing world who still do not have access to adequate sanitation is a clear indication that the conventional approach to sanitation is not adapted to the socio-economic condition prevailing in most countries of Africa, Asia and Latin America. Advanced environmental sanitation is aiming not only to protect public health and the integrity of aquatic ecosystems but also to conserve precious freshwater and non-renewable resources. The Bellagio Principles and the Household Centred Environmental Sanitation Approach (HCES) are suggested as guiding principles and a new approach for planing and designing advanced (sustainable) environmental sanitation systems. PMID:16104400

  10. Designing Interoperable Data Products with Community Conventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habermann, T.; Jelenak, A.; Lee, H.

    2015-12-01

    The HDF Product Designer (HPD) is a cloud-based client-server collaboration tool that can bring existing netCDF-3/4/CF, HDF4/5, and HDF-EOS2/5 products together to create new interoperable data products that serve the needs of the Earth Science community. The tool is designed to reduce the burden of creating and storing data in standards-compliant, interoperable HDF5 files and lower the technical and programming skill threshold needed to design such products by providing a user interface that combines the netCDF-4/HDF5 interoperable feature set with applicable metadata conventions. Users can collaborate quickly to devise new HDF5 products while at the same time seamlessly incorporating the latest best practices and conventions in their community by importing existing data products. The tool also incorporates some expert system features through CLIPS, allowing custom approaches in the file design, as well as easy transfer of preferred conventions as they are being developed. The current state of the tool and the plans for future development will be presented. Constructive input from any interested parties is always welcome.

  11. Capsule endoscopy in patients refusing conventional endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Romero-Vázquez, Javier; Argüelles-Arias, Federico; García-Montes, Josefa Maria; Caunedo-Álvarez, Ángel; Pellicer-Bautista, Francisco Javier; Herrerías-Gutiérrez, Juan Manuel

    2014-06-21

    Capsule endoscopy is nowadays the diagnostic technique of choice in the study of small bowel pathologies, allowing the non-invasive study of the entire mucosa. This has led, together with new technical advances, to the creation of two new models (PillCam ESO and PillCam Colon) for the study of esophageal and colonic diseases. These two new capsules offer an interesting alternative to conventional endoscopy in the study of the upper and lower digestive tracts, because traditional endoscopy is often unpleasant and uncomfortable for the patient, can be painful, often requires moderate or deep sedation and is not without complications (hemorrhage, perforation, etc.). PillCam Colon is particularly important for its usefulness in the diagnosis of colonic polyps, and is a potentially useful tool in cases of incomplete colonoscopy or in colorectal cancer screening, even more when most patients are reluctant to undergo screening programs due to the said disadvantages of conventional colonoscopy. This article discusses the advantages of capsule endoscopy over conventional endoscopy, its current application possibilities and indications in routine clinical practice. In the various sections of the work, we assess the application of endoscopic capsule in different sections of the digestive tract (esophagus, stomach, and colon) and finally the potential role of panendoscopy with PillCam Colon. PMID:24966612

  12. Canada and the Ramsar Convention: The Convention on the Conservation of Wetlands of International importance

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    This brochure describes Canadian wetlands of international importance that come under the Convention on the Conservation of Wetlands of International Importance, known as the Ramsar Convention. A brief introduction to Canada's role under the Convention is given followed by a brief description of six of the 17 designated wetland areas: Mary's Point Unit - Shepody National Wildlife Area; Cap Tourmente National Wildlife Area; Long Point National Wildlife Area; Last Mountain Lake Sanctuary and Wildlife Area; Alaksen National Wildlife Area; and Polar Bear Pass National Wildlife Area.

  13. When teacher-centered instructors are assigned to student-centered classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasry, Nathaniel; Charles, Elizabeth; Whittaker, Chris

    2014-06-01

    Technology-rich student-centered classrooms such as SCALE-UP and TEAL are designed to actively engage students. We examine what happens when the design of the classroom (conventional or teacher-centered versus student-centered classroom spaces) is consistent or inconsistent with the teacher's epistemic beliefs about learning and teaching (traditional or teacher-centered versus student-centered pedagogies). We compare two types of pedagogical approaches and two types of classroom settings through a quasiexperimental 2×2 factorial design. We collected data from 214 students registered in eight sections of an introductory calculus-based mechanics course given at a Canadian publicly funded two-year college. All students were given the Force Concept Inventory at the beginning and at the end of the 15-week-long course. We then focused on six teachers assigned to teach in the student-centered classroom spaces. We used qualitative observations and the Approaches to Teaching Inventory (ATI), a self-reported questionnaire, to determine the teachers' epistemic beliefs (teacher-centered or student-centered) and how these beliefs affected their use of the space and their students' conceptual learning. We report four main findings. First, the student-centered classroom spaces are most effective when used with student-centered pedagogies. Second, student-centered classrooms are ineffective when used with teacher-centered pedagogies and may have negative effects for students with low prior knowledge. Third, we find a strong correlation between six instructors' self-reported epistemic beliefs of student centeredness and their classes' average normalized gain (r =0.91; p =0.012). Last, we find that some instructors are more willing to adopt student-centered teaching practices after using student-centered classroom spaces. These data suggest that student-centered classrooms are effective only when instructors' epistemic framework of teaching and learning is consistent with a student-centered

  14. Measures to implement the Chemical Weapons Convention

    SciTech Connect

    Tanzman, E.; Kellman, B.

    1999-11-05

    This seminar is another excellent opportunity for those involved in preventing chemical weapons production and use to learn from each other about how the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) can become a foundation of arms control in Africa and around the world. The author is grateful to the staff of the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) for inviting him to address this distinguished seminar. The views expressed in this paper are those of the authors alone, and do not represent the position of the government of the US nor or of any other institution. In 1993, as the process of CWC ratification was beginning, concerns arose that the complexity of integrating the treaty with national law would cause each nation to implement the Convention without regard to what other nations were doing, thereby causing inconsistencies among States Parties in how the Convention would be carried out. As a result the Manual for National Implementation of the Chemical Weapons Convention was prepared and presented it to each national delegation at the December 1993 meeting of the Preparatory Commission in The Hague. During its preparation, the Manual was reviewed by the Committee of Legal Experts on National Implementation of the Chemical Weapons Convention, a group of distinguished international jurists, law professors, legally-trained diplomats, government officials, and Parliamentarians from every region of the world, including Mica. In February 1998, the second edition of the Manual was published in order to update it in light of developments since the CWC entered into force on 29 April 1997. The second edition 1998 clarified the national implementation options to reflect post-entry-into-force thinking, added extensive references to national implementing measures that had been enacted by various States Parties, and included a prototype national implementing statute developed by the authors to provide a starting point for those whose national implementing

  15. 13. SAC command center, weather center, underground structure, building 501, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. SAC command center, weather center, underground structure, building 501, undated - Offutt Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command Headquarters & Command Center, Command Center, 901 SAC Boulevard, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  16. Relativistic Guiding Center Equations

    SciTech Connect

    White, R. B.; Gobbin, M.

    2014-10-01

    In toroidal fusion devices it is relatively easy that electrons achieve relativistic velocities, so to simulate runaway electrons and other high energy phenomena a nonrelativistic guiding center formalism is not sufficient. Relativistic guiding center equations including flute mode time dependent field perturbations are derived. The same variables as used in a previous nonrelativistic guiding center code are adopted, so that a straightforward modifications of those equations can produce a relativistic version.

  17. Test Control Center exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Have you ever wondered how the engineers at John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., test fire a Space Shuttle Main Engine? The Test Control Center exhibit at StenniSphere can answer your questions by simulating the test firing of a Space Shuttle Main Engine. A recreation of one of NASA's test control centers, the exhibit explains and portrays the 'shake, rattle and roar' that happens during a real test firing.

  18. Forensic Science Center

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, B.; Grant, P.M.

    1994-03-01

    Since 1991, the Laboratory's Forensic Science Center has focused a comprehensive range of analytical expertise on issues related to non proliferation, counterterrorism, and domestic law enforcement. During this short period, LLNL's singular combination of human and technological resources has made the Center among the best of its kind in the world. The Forensic Science Center houses a variety of state-of-the-art analytical tools ranging from gas chromatograph/mass spectrometers to ultratrace DNA detection techniques. The Center's multidisciplinary staff provides expertise in organic and inorganic analytical chemistry, nuclear science, biochemistry, and genetics useful for supporting law enforcement and for verifying compliance with international treaties and agreements.

  19. Data Center at NICT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ichikawa, Ryuichi; Sekido, Mamoru

    2013-01-01

    The Data Center at the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) archives and releases the databases and analysis results processed at the Correlator and the Analysis Center at NICT. Regular VLBI sessions of the Key Stone Project VLBI Network were the primary objective of the Data Center. These regular sessions continued until the end of November 2001. In addition to the Key Stone Project VLBI sessions, NICT has been conducting geodetic VLBI sessions for various purposes, and these data are also archived and released by the Data Center.

  20. The New American Home 2007 Orlando, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    2006-12-01

    The New American Home demonstrates use of innovative building materials, cutting-edge design, and the latest construction techniques, providing production homebuilders with a model for producing more energy efficient, durable homes.

  1. The New American Home 2007, Orlando, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2006-12-01

    Each year, The New American Home (R) demonstrates use of innovative building materials, cutting-edge design, and the latest construction techniques, providing production homebuilders with a model for producing more energy efficient, durable homes without sacrificing style. Cosponsored by The National Council of the Housing Industry and BUILDER Magazine, The New American Home (R) is not only the official showcase house of the annual International Builders' Show, but is also a for-sale product. The majority of features and innovations in the home are accessible to both builders and consumers for integration into their own homes.

  2. New American Home 2008: Orlando, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2007-12-01

    Each year, The New American home demonstrates innovative building materials, cutting-edge design, and the latest construction techniques. It provides production homebuilders with an example for producing more energy-efficient, durable homes without sacrificing style. This year, The New American Home celebrates its 25th anniversary. The New American Home is the official showcase house of the annual International Builders' Show, and is a for-sale product. Most features and innovations in the home are accessible to builders and consumers for integration into their own home.

  3. Simulating a Guitar with a Conventional Sonometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burstein, Zily; Gower, Christina M.; Varieschi, Gabriele U.

    Musical acoustics is an interesting sub-field of physics which is usually able to engage students in a dual perspective, by combining science and art together. The physics principles involved in most musical instruments can be easily demonstrated with standard laboratory equipment and can become part of lecture or lab activities. In particular, we will show in this paper how to simulate a guitar using a conventional sonometer, in relation to the problem of the instrument intonation, i.e., how to obtain correctly tuned notes on a guitar or similar string instruments.

  4. B-1B excels in conventional role

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, W.B.

    1992-07-01

    A report is presented of an observational flight performed in a USAF B-1B to better understand the operational aspects of the aircraft's new conventional bombing mission as an integral element of a multiaircraft tactical strike package. The basic flight plan consisted of a standard takeoff and climb, cruising to the training area at 22,000 ft, descending for a 400 ft low-level run, making two simulated bomb drops, and climbing back to 25,000 ft for the return to base. Attention is given the new/enhanced avionics, the ALQ-161 defensive electronic warfare system and ripple-release Mk. 82 bombing procedures.

  5. Trauma: Conventional radiologic study in spine injury

    SciTech Connect

    Dosch, J.

    1985-01-01

    This book includes a discussion of the anatomy of the spinal cord and descriptions of methods for tailored radiologic investigation of spine trauma. Most of the text is devoted to the analysis and classification of spinal injury by radiologic signs and mode of injury. The author addresses injury to the entire spine but emphasizes the cervical spine. Plain radiography and conventional tomography are the only imaging methods discussed. The author stresses the active role of the attending radiologist in directing every phase of the x-ray study. Many subtle variations in patient positioning plus beam direction and angulation are described.

  6. Dialysis centers - what to expect

    MedlinePlus

    ... treatment. Many people have dialysis in a treatment center. This article focuses on hemodialysis at a treatment center. ... Artificial kidneys - dialysis centers - what to expect; Dialysis - what to expect; Renal replacement therapy - dialysis centers - what to expect

  7. Funding Opportunity: Genomic Data Centers

    Cancer.gov

    Funding Opportunity CCG, Funding Opportunity Center for Cancer Genomics, CCG, Center for Cancer Genomics, CCG RFA, Center for cancer genomics rfa, genomic data analysis network, genomic data analysis network centers,

  8. 25 CFR 90.30 - Nominating conventions and petitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nominating conventions and petitions. 90.30 Section 90.30... OSAGE TRIBE Elections § 90.30 Nominating conventions and petitions. Conventions shall be held on or... written reports of such conventions, duly certified by the secretary or presiding officer showing...

  9. GSFC VLBI Analysis Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, David; Ma, Chopo; MacMillan, Dan; Gipson, John; Bolotin, Sergei; Le Bail, Karine; Baver, Karen

    2013-01-01

    This report presents the activities of the GSFC VLBI Analysis Center during 2012. The GSFC VLBI Analysis Center analyzes all IVS sessions, makes regular IVS submissions of data and analysis products, and performs research and software development aimed at improving the VLBI technique.

  10. National Resource Centers Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Postsecondary Education, US Department of Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The National Resource Centers Program provides grants to institutions of higher education to establish, strengthen, and operate comprehensive and undergraduate centers that are national resources for: (1) Teaching modern foreign languages, especially the less and least commonly taught languages; (2) Disciplinary instruction to provide a thorough…

  11. Johnson Space Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston is NASA's lead center for the space shuttle and the International Space Station programs and for biomedical research. Areas of study include Earth sciences and solar system exploration, astromaterials and space medicine. About 14 000 people, including 3000 civil servants, work at JSC....

  12. Developing a Teacher Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, Theodore W.

    This paper begins by outlining six functions of a teacher center that are seen as generally accepted and by remarking on certain realities, like the overworked teacher and dearth of funds, that are pertinent to establishing a teacher center. The majority of the text is devoted to an explanation of a large number of specific principles that should…

  13. Learning Resources Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Len S.

    1974-01-01

    A learning resources center has three roles: storage and retrieval of learning media, creation and production of learning materials, and instruction and advice in the utilization of the facilities available. The design, purpose, and staffing of a resources center are discussed in detail in this article. (DS)

  14. Simple Machine Science Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chessin, Debby

    2007-01-01

    Science centers can engage students; accommodate different learning styles and individual interests; help students become independent and confident learners; and encourage social skills among students. In this article, the author worked with third-grade students as they completed activities at learning centers during a week-long unit on simple…

  15. NASA Propagation Information Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Ernest K.; Flock, Warren L.

    1989-01-01

    The NASA Propagation Information Center became formally operational in July 1988. It is located in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering of the University of Colorado at Boulder. The Center is several things: a communications medium for the propagation with the outside world, a mechanism for internal communication within the program, and an aid to management.

  16. NASA propagation information center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Ernest K.; Flock, Warren L.

    1990-01-01

    The NASA Propagation Information Center became formally operational in July 1988. It is located in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering of the University of Colorado at Boulder. The center is several things: a communications medium for the propagation with the outside world, a mechanism for internal communication within the program, and an aid to management.

  17. Science Center and Attitude

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daneshamooz, Saeed; Alamolhodaei, Hassan; Darvishian, Saeed; Daneshamooz, Soniya

    2013-01-01

    The project team gathered data with the assistance of Recreational and Cultural Organization of Mashhad Municipality, Organization of Mashhad Municipality and Science and Astronomy Science Center of Mashhad Municipality, Khorasan Razavi, Islamic Republic of Iran. This paper discusses the effect of science center on attitude of students who visit…

  18. Natural Science Centers: Directory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Natural Science for Youth Foundation, Roswell, GA.

    A nature center is defined as an organized and permanent nonprofit institution which is essentially educational, scientific, and cultural in purpose with professional staff, and open to the public on some regular schedule. A nature center manages and interprets its lands, native plants and animals and facilities to promote an understanding of…

  19. About the ADEAR Center

    MedlinePlus

    ... and news updates How to Contact the ADEAR Center Call toll-free at: 1-800-438-4380 (8: ... To give you the best possible service, ADEAR Center staff abide by the following customer service standards: We will answer your telephone calls promptly between 8:30 a.m. and 5: ...

  20. National Technology Transfer Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, Lee W.

    1992-01-01

    Viewgraphs on the National Technology Transfer Center (NTTC) are provided. The NTTC mission is to serve as a hub for the nationwide technology-transfer network to expedite the movement of federally developed technology into the stream of commerce. A description of the Center is provided.

  1. Early Childhood Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butin, Dan; Woolums, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    Early childhood centers have become a common and necessary part of millions of Americans' lives. More women in the workforce, longer workweeks, and educational research supporting the importance of early education have all contributed to the rise of early childhood centers throughout the United States. Today, more than 30 percent of children under…

  2. Finding Treatment Centers

    MedlinePlus

    ... to pull together and focus many kinds of research approaches on the cancer problem. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer Center Program has chosen more than 65 cancer centers that take part in research to help reduce cancer rates and deaths from ...

  3. URBAN STUDIES CENTER.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HEBOUT, JOHN E.

    THE CENTER WORKS WITH RUTGERS UNIVERSITY TO MAKE USE OF URBAN STUDIES IN APPROPRIATE RESEARCH AND TEACHING PROGRAMS AND IN OTHER INTELLECTUAL SERVICES TO THE COMMUNITY. THE FIVE MAIN RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE CENTER - EXTENSION, RESEARCH AND EDUCATION, LIBRARY SERVICES, OPPORTUNITIES EXPANSION PROJECT, AND THE URBAN FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM - ARE…

  4. Learner-Centered Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neil, Robert M.

    There is no clear consensus of the term "learner-centered reform." Learner-centered reform has become by implication either the cause or the consequence of inflated grades, lowered admission requirements, affirmative action, elimination of language and other requirements, student evaluation of teaching, abandonment of research, and many other ills…

  5. GSFC VLBI Analysis center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, David; Ma, Chopo; MacMillan, Dan; Petrov, Leonid; Baver, Karen

    2005-01-01

    This report presents the activities of the GSFC VLBI Analysis Center during 2004. The GSFC Analysis Center analyzes all IVS sessions, makes regular IVS submissions of data and analysis products, and performs research and software development activities aimed at improving the VLBI technique.

  6. Non-conventional sources for ethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, J.P.; Weiss, L.H.

    1981-12-01

    Two processes for conversion of methanol to ethylene are reviewed as to economic attractiveness at about 1990. The processes are homologation of methane to ethanol with dehydration to ethylene and direct catalytic cracking of methanol to ethylene using Mobil zeolite catalysts. For the economic projections, synthesis gas is assumed to be available from a large leverage-financed, synthetis gas unit based on a pressurized, entrained bed, coal-gasifier, built on the US Gulf Coast in 1990 at a cost of $0.19/m/sup 3/, and methane is valued at $650/metric ton in 1990 based on continuous operation of natural gas-based methanol plants in the US. The economics of ethylene production via conventional steam cracking of naphtha/gas oil are compared with those of the new technology. The methanol homologation/ethanol dehydration route to ethylene is more attractive than catalytic cracking at 40% carbon selectivity to ethylene. At higher selectivities, the methanol cracking scheme becomes economically competitive. However, with an assumption of a price of $650/metric ton for methanol in 1990, neiter methanol-based route is competitive with conventional steam cracking on the Gulf Coast in 1990. A methanol price of $500/metric ton would make the methanol-based oriduction routes attractive. 23 references.

  7. The Chemical Weapons Convention -- Legal issues

    SciTech Connect

    1997-08-01

    The Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) offers a unique challenge to the US system of constitutional law. Its promise of eliminating what is the most purely genocidal type of weapon from the world`s arsenals as well as of destroying the facilities for producing these weapons, brings with it a set of novel legal issues. The reservations about the CWC expressed by US business people are rooted in concern about safeguarding confidential business information and protecting the constitutional right to privacy. The chief worry is that international verification inspectors will misuse their power to enter commercial property and that trade secrets or other private information will be compromised as a result. It has been charged that the Convention is probably unconstitutional. The author categorically disagrees with that view and is aware of no scholarly writing that supports it. The purpose of this presentation is to show that CWC verification activities can be implemented in the US consistently with the traditional constitutional regard for commercial and individual privacy. First, he very briefly reviews the types of verification inspections that the CWC permits, as well as some of its specific privacy protections. Second, he explains how the Fourth Amendment right to privacy works in the context of CWC verification inspections. Finally, he reviews how verification inspections can be integrated into these constitutional requirements in the SU through a federal implementing statute.

  8. Conventional spin current in Dirac equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Soo Yong; Lee, Hyun-Woo

    2007-03-01

    The spin current has been one of main concerns in the field of the spintronics. Recently Rashba [PRB 68, 241315 (2003)] pointed out that in certain nonmagnetic systems with the spin-orbit coupling, the conventional definition of the spin current leads to a rather strange prediction, namely a nonzero spin current should flow even without external biases. Though the nonvanishing equilibrium spin current does not violate the time reversal symmetry, it still led many scientists to reexamine the definition of the spin current. Recalling that the spin-orbit coupling arises due to the relativistic effects, we examine in this work properties of the conventionally-defined spin current for a Dirac electron subject to an electrostatic potential V(r). Interestingly it is found that in this fully relativistic treatment, the equilibrium spin current vanishes for a wide class of V(r) including those representing the zincblende structure and the asymmetric quantum well, which is in clear contrast with the nonvanishing equilibrium spin current obtained from some effective nonrelativistic Hamiltonians. The origin of this difference is also examined.

  9. Muzzle shunt augmentation of conventional railguns

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, J.V.

    1990-01-01

    Augmentation is a well-known technique for reducing the armature current and hence the armature power dissipation in a plasma armature railgun. In spite of the advantages, no large augmented railguns have been built, primarily due to the mechanical and electrical complexity introduce by the extra conductors required. It is possible to achieve some of the benefits of augmentation in conventional railgun by diverting a fraction {phi} of the input current through a shunt path at the muzzle of the railgun. In particular, the relation between force and armature current is the same as that obtained in an n-turn, series connected augmented railgun with n = 1/(1-{phi}). The price of this simplification is a reduction in electrical efficiency and some additional complexity in the external electrical system. Additions to the electrical system are required to establish the shunt current and to control its magnitude during projectile acceleration. The relationship between muzzle shunt augmentation and conventional series augmentation is developed and various techniques is developed and various techniques for establishing and controlling the shunt current are illustrated with a practical example. 5 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Accuracy of Digital vs. Conventional Implant Impressions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang J.; Betensky, Rebecca A.; Gianneschi, Grace E.; Gallucci, German O.

    2015-01-01

    The accuracy of digital impressions greatly influences the clinical viability in implant restorations. The aim of this study is to compare the accuracy of gypsum models acquired from the conventional implant impression to digitally milled models created from direct digitalization by three-dimensional analysis. Thirty gypsum and 30 digitally milled models impressed directly from a reference model were prepared. The models were scanned by a laboratory scanner and 30 STL datasets from each group were imported to an inspection software. The datasets were aligned to the reference dataset by a repeated best fit algorithm and 10 specified contact locations of interest were measured in mean volumetric deviations. The areas were pooled by cusps, fossae, interproximal contacts, horizontal and vertical axes of implant position and angulation. The pooled areas were statistically analysed by comparing each group to the reference model to investigate the mean volumetric deviations accounting for accuracy and standard deviations for precision. Milled models from digital impressions had comparable accuracy to gypsum models from conventional impressions. However, differences in fossae and vertical displacement of the implant position from the gypsum and digitally milled models compared to the reference model, exhibited statistical significance (p<0.001, p=0.020 respectively). PMID:24720423

  11. Children's conceptions of conventional and nuclear war

    SciTech Connect

    Boone, R.P.

    1985-01-01

    The general objective of this study was to investigate the development of the conceptions of conventional and nuclear war in the preadolescent and adolescent child. Subjects consisted of children in three age groups: 5-6, 9-10, and 13-14 year olds (N = 63) drawn from public and private schools in the metropolitan Los Angeles area. Children were administered an interview and supplementary measures. Parents were administered questionnaires examining related areas. The principal findings were as follows: (1) The development of the war concepts. Regarding the concept of conventional war, by the age of five or six, the child usually can recognize the word war and indicate that the word has to do with fighting between two or more parties. However, the notion of nationality is evidently not solidly grasped until around the ages of 8-11 years old. In this study, 45% of the 5 and 6 year olds were minimally aware of the concept of nuclear war. By the time the child reaches the age of 9 or 10, the proportion of those with minimal awareness rises to about 80%. By 13 and 14 years old, 100% are familiar with the concept. (2) Levels of Worry. Of the children aware of the subject of nuclear war, 76% indicated that they were very worried by its possibility.

  12. The Ad Hoc process to strengthen the framework convention on climate change

    SciTech Connect

    Ramakrishna, K.; Deutz, A.M.; Jacobsen, L.A.

    1995-11-01

    The Woods Hole Research Center convened an International Conference on The Ad Hoc Process to Strengthen the Framework Convention on Climate Change in Woods Hole, MA, on October 7-9, 1995. The conference was conducted to examine the prospects for successful adoption of a protocol to the Framework Convention on Climate Change by 1997. In preparation for the Second session of the Ad Hoc Group on the Berlin Mandate, several governmental and nongovernmental representatives met in Woods Hole to discuss the process and possible outcome of the Berlin Mandate negotiations for a protocol or other legal instrument to strengthen the Convention. The conference was by invitation and all participants attended in their personal capacities.

  13. Energy efficient data centers

    SciTech Connect

    Tschudi, William; Xu, Tengfang; Sartor, Dale; Koomey, Jon; Nordman, Bruce; Sezgen, Osman

    2004-03-30

    Data Center facilities, prevalent in many industries and institutions are essential to California's economy. Energy intensive data centers are crucial to California's industries, and many other institutions (such as universities) in the state, and they play an important role in the constantly evolving communications industry. To better understand the impact of the energy requirements and energy efficiency improvement potential in these facilities, the California Energy Commission's PIER Industrial Program initiated this project with two primary focus areas: First, to characterize current data center electricity use; and secondly, to develop a research ''roadmap'' defining and prioritizing possible future public interest research and deployment efforts that would improve energy efficiency. Although there are many opinions concerning the energy intensity of data centers and the aggregate effect on California's electrical power systems, there is very little publicly available information. Through this project, actual energy consumption at its end use was measured in a number of data centers. This benchmark data was documented in case study reports, along with site-specific energy efficiency recommendations. Additionally, other data center energy benchmarks were obtained through synergistic projects, prior PG&E studies, and industry contacts. In total, energy benchmarks for sixteen data centers were obtained. For this project, a broad definition of ''data center'' was adopted which included internet hosting, corporate, institutional, governmental, educational and other miscellaneous data centers. Typically these facilities require specialized infrastructure to provide high quality power and cooling for IT equipment. All of these data center types were considered in the development of an estimate of the total power consumption in California. Finally, a research ''roadmap'' was developed through extensive participation with data center professionals, examination of case

  14. Open Rotor Aeroacoustic Installation Effects for Conventional and Unconventional Airframes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czech, Michael J.; Thomas, Russell H.

    2013-01-01

    As extensive experimental campaign was performed to study the aeroacoustic installation effects of an open rotor with respect to both a conventional tube and wing type airframe and an unconventional hybrid wing body airframe. The open rotor rig had two counter rotating rows of blades each with eight blades of a design originally flight tested in the 1980s. The aeroacoustic installation effects measured in an aeroacoustic wind tunnel included those from flow effects due to inflow distortion or wake interaction and acoustic propagation effects such as shielding and reflection. The objective of the test campaign was to quantify the installation effects for a wide range of parameters and configurations derived from the two airframe types. For the conventional airframe, the open rotor was positioned in increments in front of and then over the main wing and then in positions representative of tail mounted aircraft with a conventional tail, a T-tail and a U-tail. The interaction of the wake of the open rotor as well as acoustic scattering results in an increase of about 10 dB when the rotor is positioned in front of the main wing. When positioned over the main wing a substantial amount of noise reduction is obtained and this is also observed for tail-mounted installations with a large U-tail. For the hybrid wing body airframe, the open rotor was positioned over the airframe along the centerline as well as off-center representing a twin engine location. A primary result was the documentation of the noise reduction from shielding as a function of the location of the open rotor upstream of the trailing edge of the hybrid wing body. The effects from vertical surfaces and elevon deflection were also measured. Acoustic lining was specially designed and inserted flush with the elevon and airframe surface, the result was an additional reduction in open rotor noise propagating to the far field microphones. Even with the older blade design used, the experiment provided

  15. 10 CFR Appendix I to Subpart B of... - Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Conventional Ranges, Conventional...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... as it appeared at 10 CFR part 430, subpart B, appendix I as contained in the 10 CFR parts 200 to 499... of Conventional Ranges, Conventional Cooking Tops, Conventional Ovens, and Microwave Ovens I Appendix... Cooking Tops, Conventional Ovens, and Microwave Ovens Note: Any representation made after April 29,...

  16. Perioperative Outcomes of Robotic Assisted Laparoscopic Surgery Versus Conventional Laparoscopy Surgery for Advanced-Stage Endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Sirota, Ido

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: To determine perioperative outcome differences in patients undergoing robotic-assisted laparoscopic surgery (RALS) versus conventional laparoscopic surgery (CLS) for advanced-stage endometriosis. Methods: This retrospective cohort study at a minimally invasive gynecologic surgery center at 2 academically affiliated, urban, nonprofit hospitals included all patients treated by either robotic-assisted or conventional laparoscopic surgery for stage III or IV endometriosis (American Society for Reproductive Medicine criteria) between July 2009 and October 2012 by 1 surgeon experienced in both techniques. The main outcome measures were extent of surgery, estimated blood loss, operating room time, intraoperative and postoperative complications, and length of stay, with medians for continuous measures and distributions for categorical measures, stratified by body mass index values. Robotically assisted laparoscopy and conventional laparoscopy were then compared by use of the Wilcoxon rank sum, χ2, or Fisher exact test, as appropriate. Results: Among 86 conventional laparoscopic and 32 robotically assisted cases, the latter had a higher body mass index (27.36 kg/m2 [range, 23.90–34.09 kg/m2] versus 24.53 kg/m2 [range, 22.27–26.96 kg/m2]; P < .0079) and operating room time (250.50 minutes [range, 176–328.50 minutes] versus 173.50 minutes [range, 123–237 minutes]; P < .0005) than did conventional laparoscopy patients. After body mass index stratification, obese patients varied in operating room time (282.5 minutes [range, 224–342 minutes] for robotic-assisted laparoscopy versus 174 minutes [range, 130–270 minutes] for conventional laparoscopy; P < .05). No other significant differences were noted between the robotic-assisted and conventional laparoscopy groups. Conclusion: Despite a higher operating room time, robotic-assisted laparoscopy appears to be a safe minimally invasive approach for patients, with all other perioperative

  17. Differences between conventional and non-conventional MRI techniques in Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Baglieri, Annalisa; Marino, Maria Adele; Morabito, Rosa; Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe; Bramanti, Placido; Marino, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    Summary Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides an in vivo assessment of cortical and subcortical regions affected in Parkinson’s disease (PD). This review summarizes the most important conventional and non-conventional MRI techniques applied in this field. Standard neuroimaging techniques have played a marginal role in the diagnosis and follow-up of PD, essentially being used only to discriminate atypical syndromes from PD, to exclude secondary causes such as vascular lesions, and to confirm the absence of specific imaging features found in atypical parkinsonisms. However, non-conventional MRI techniques, i.e. new neuroimaging approaches such as magnetic resonance spectroscopy, diffusion tensor imaging, and functional MRI, may allow the detection of structural, functional and metabolic changes useful not only for differential diagnosis, but also for early diagnosis and outcome and treatment monitoring in PD. In addition, we illustrate the advantages of high-field MRI over lower magnetic fields, highlighting the great potential of advanced neuroimaging techniques. PMID:24125556

  18. Conventional, Bayesian, and Modified Prony's methods for characterizing fast and slow waves in equine cancellous bone

    PubMed Central

    Groopman, Amber M.; Katz, Jonathan I.; Holland, Mark R.; Fujita, Fuminori; Matsukawa, Mami; Mizuno, Katsunori; Wear, Keith A.; Miller, James G.

    2015-01-01

    Conventional, Bayesian, and the modified least-squares Prony's plus curve-fitting (MLSP + CF) methods were applied to data acquired using 1 MHz center frequency, broadband transducers on a single equine cancellous bone specimen that was systematically shortened from 11.8 mm down to 0.5 mm for a total of 24 sample thicknesses. Due to overlapping fast and slow waves, conventional analysis methods were restricted to data from sample thicknesses ranging from 11.8 mm to 6.0 mm. In contrast, Bayesian and MLSP + CF methods successfully separated fast and slow waves and provided reliable estimates of the ultrasonic properties of fast and slow waves for sample thicknesses ranging from 11.8 mm down to 3.5 mm. Comparisons of the three methods were carried out for phase velocity at the center frequency and the slope of the attenuation coefficient for the fast and slow waves. Good agreement among the three methods was also observed for average signal loss at the center frequency. The Bayesian and MLSP + CF approaches were able to separate the fast and slow waves and provide good estimates of the fast and slow wave properties even when the two wave modes overlapped in both time and frequency domains making conventional analysis methods unreliable. PMID:26328678

  19. Microtearing modes in spherical and conventional tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, S.; Pusztai, I.; Guttenfelder, W.; Fülöp, T.; Mollén, A.

    2013-06-01

    The onset and characteristics of microtearing modes (MTM) in the core of spherical (NSTX) and conventional tokamaks (ASDEX Upgrade and JET) are studied through local linear gyrokinetic simulations with GYRO (Candy and Belli 2011 General Atomics Report GA-A26818). For experimentally relevant core plasma parameters in the NSTX and ASDEX Upgrade tokamaks, in agreement with previous works, we find MTMs as the dominant linear instability. Also, for JET-like core parameters considered in our study an MTM is found as the most unstable mode. In all of these plasmas, finite collisionality is needed for MTMs to become unstable and the electron temperature gradient is found to be the fundamental drive. However, a significant difference is observed in the dependence of the linear growth rate of MTMs on electron temperature gradient. While it varies weakly and non-monotonically in JET and ASDEX Upgrade plasmas, in NSTX it increases with the electron temperature gradient.

  20. Are cobaltates conventional? An ARPES viewpoint

    SciTech Connect

    Hasan, M.Z. . E-mail: mzhasan@Princeton.edu; Qian, D.; Foo, M.L.; Cava, R.J.

    2006-07-15

    Recently discovered class of cobaltate superconductors (Na{sub 0.3}CoO{sub 2}.nH{sub 2}O) is a novel realization of interacting quantum electron system in a triangular network with low-energy degrees of freedom. We employ angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to study the quasiparticle parameters in the parent superconductors. Results reveal a large hole-like Fermi surface generated by the crossing of heavy quasiparticles. The measured quasiparticle parameters collectively suggest two orders of magnitude departure from the conventional weak coupling (such as Al) Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer electron dynamics paradigm and unveils cobaltates as a rather hidden class of relatively high temperature superconductors. These parameters also form the basis for a microscopic Hamiltonian of the system.

  1. Feldenkrais versus conventional exercises for the elderly.

    PubMed

    Gutman, G M; Herbert, C P; Brown, S R

    1977-09-01

    Tenants in retirement housing given a 6-week program of Feldenkrais exercises were compared with a group given conventional exercises and with control groups given no exercises. Analysis of covariance of preliminary and subsequent measurements failed to yield any significant differences between groups. Measurements included height, weight, blood pressure, heart rate, balance, flexibility, morale, self-perceived health status and level of performance of activities of daily living, also the number of body parts difficult to move or giving rise to pain. Several possible reasons are given for the results. Attention is drawn to the necessity of medically screening and monitoring elderly registrants for exercise programs since it is apparent that some sign up who should not. PMID:886162

  2. Formalizing Linguistic Conventions for Conceptual Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Jörg; Delfmann, Patrick; Herwig, Sebastian; Lis, Łukasz; Stein, Armin

    A precondition for the appropriate analysis of conceptual models is not only their syntactic correctness but also their semantic comparability. Assuring comparability is challenging especially when models are developed by different persons. Empirical studies show that such models can vary heavily, especially in model element naming, even if they express the same issue. In contrast to most ontology-driven approaches proposing the resolution of these differences ex-post, we introduce an approach that avoids naming differences in conceptual models already during modeling. Therefore we formalize naming conventions combining domain thesauri and phrase structures based on a lin-guistic grammar. This allows for guiding modelers automatically during the modeling process using standardized labels for model elements. Our approach is generic, making it applicable for any modeling language.

  3. Conventional radiological strategy of common gastrointestinal neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi-Zhuo; Wu, Pei-Hong

    2015-01-01

    This article summarizes the clinical characteristics and imaging features of common gastrointestinal (GI) neoplasms in terms of conventional radiological imaging methods. Barium studies are readily available for displaying primary malignancies and are minimally or not at all invasive. A neoplasm may be manifested as various imaging findings, including mucosal disruption, soft mass, ulcer, submucosal invasion and lumen stenosis on barium studies. Benign tumors typically appear as smoothly marginated intramural masses. Malignant neoplasms most often appear as irregular infiltrative lesions on barium examination. Tumor extension to adjacent GI segments may be indistinct on barium images. Cross-sectional images such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging may provide more accurate details of the adjacent organ invasion, omental or peritoneal spread. PMID:25628800

  4. Muzzle shunt augmentation of conventional railguns

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, J.V. . Physics Div.)

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on augmentation which is a technique for reducing the armature current and hence the armature power dissipation in a plasma armature railgun. In spite of the advantages, no large augmented railguns have been built, primarily due to the mechanical and electrical complexity introduced by the extra conductors required. it is possible to achieve some of the benefits of augmentation in a conventional railgun by diverting a fraction {phi} of the input current through a shunt path at the muzzle of the railgun. In particular, the relation between force and armature current is the same as that obtained in an n-turn, series-connected augmented railgun with n = 1/(1 {minus} {phi}). The price of this simplification is a reduction in electrical efficiency and some additional complexity in the external electrical system.

  5. Suggested notation conventions for rotational seismology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, J.R.

    2009-01-01

    We note substantial inconsistency among authors discussing rotational motions observed with inertial seismic sensors (and much more so in the broader topic of rotational phenomena). Working from physics and other precedents, we propose standard terminology and a preferred reference frame for inertial sensors (Fig. 1) that may be consistently used in discussions of both finite and infinitesimal observed rotational and translational motions in seismology and earthquake engineering. The scope of this article is limited to observations because there are significant differences in the analysis of finite and infinitesimal rotations, though such discussions should remain compatible with those presented here where possible. We recommend the general use of the notation conventions presented in this tutorial, and we recommend that any deviations or alternatives be explicitly defined.

  6. Anammox enrichment from different conventional sludges.

    PubMed

    Chamchoi, Nutchanat; Nitisoravut, Suwanchai

    2007-02-01

    Three sets of sequencing batch reactor (SBR) were used for Anammox enrichment from conventional sludges including upflow anaerobic sludge blanket, activated sludge, and anaerobic digestion sludge. After four months of operation, the Anammox activity occurred in all reactors allowing continuous removal of ammonium and nitrite. The morphology of the cultivated Anammox sludge was observed using scanning electron microscope. The photographs showed that the obtained culture was mostly spherical in shape, presumably Anammox culture. There were also filamentous-like bacteria co-existing in the system. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis using 16S rRNA targeting oligonucleotide probes PLA46 and Amx820 showed that the dominant population developed in all SBRs was hybridized with both PLA46 and Amx820 gene probes. It means that the cultivated biomass in all SBRs was classified in the group of Planctomycetales bacteria with respect to the anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria, Candidatus Brocadia anammoxidans and Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis. Numerous time sequences were tested in this experiment. The shortest workable reaction time was found in the range from 5 to 7 h. Good quiescence of sludge was obtained at 30 min of settle period followed by a discharge period of 15 min. A long-term performance showed a near perfect removal of nitrite based on the influent NO2(-)-N concentration of 50-70 mg l(-1). The maximum ammonia removal efficiency was 80% with the influent NH4(+)-N concentration of 40-60 mg l(-1). It is, therefore, concluded that Anammox cultivation from conventional sludges was highly possible under control environment within four months. PMID:17207839

  7. Bimatoprost, Prostamide Activity and Conventional Drainage

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Z.; Woodward, D.F.; Cornell, C.; Fliri, H.; Martos, J.; Petit, S.; Wang, J.W.; Kharlamb, A.B.; Wheeler, L.A.; Garst, M.E.; Landsverk, K.; Struble, C.S.; Stamer, W.D.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Despite structural similarity with prostaglandin F2α, the ocular hypotensive agent, bimatoprost (Lumigan), shows unique pharmacology in vitro and functional activity in vivo. Unfortunately, the precise mechanisms that underlie bimatoprost's distinctive impact on aqueous humor dynamics are unclear. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the effects of bimatoprost and a novel prostamide-selective antagonist, AGN 211334, on human conventional drainage. Methods: Two model systems were employed to test the consequences of bimatoprost and/or AGN 211334 treatment on conventional drainage. Human anterior segments in organ culture were perfused at a constant flow rate of 2.5μl/min while pressure was recorded continuously. After stable baseline facilities were established, segments were treated with drug(s) and pressure was monitored for an additional three days. In parallel, drug(s) effects on hydraulic conductivity of human trabecular meshwork (TM) cell monolayers were evaluated. Pharmacological properties of AGN 211334 were characterized using isolated feline iris preparations in organ culture and heterologously expressed G-protein coupled receptors in vitro. Results: Bimatoprost increased outflow facility by an average of 40 ± 10 % within 48 hours of treatment (n=10, p<0.001). Preincubation or coincubation with AGN 211334 significantly blunted bimatoprost effects by 95% or 43%, respectively. Similar results were obtained in cell culture experiments where bimatoprost increased hydraulic conductivity of TM cell monolayers by 78 ± 25 %. Pretreatment with AGN 211334 completely blocked bimatoprost effects while coincubation decreased bimatoprost effects on average by 74%. Interestingly, in both models AGN 211334 alone significantly decreased fluid flux across trabecular tissues/cells. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that bimatoprost interacts with a prostamide receptor in the trabecular meshwork to increase outflow facility. PMID:17724194

  8. Visitors Center activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    More than 2,000 children and adults from Mississippi, Louisiana and Alabama recently build a 12-foot tall Space Shuttle made entirely from tiny LEGO bricks at the John C. Stennis Space Center Visitors Center in South Mississippi. The shuttle was part of an exhibit titled 'Travel in Space' World Show which depicts the history of flight and space travel from the Wright brothers to future generations of space vehicles. For more information concerning hours of operation or Visitors Center educational programs, call 1-800-237-1821 in Mississippi and Louisiana or (601) 688-2370.

  9. Visitors Center activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Astronaut Katherine Hire and LEGO-Master Model Builders assisted children from Mississippi, Louisiana and Mississippi in the building of a 12-foot tall Space Shuttle made entirely from tiny LEGO bricks at the John C. Stennis Space Center Visitors Center in South Mississippi. The shuttle was part of an exhibit titled ' Travel in Space' World Show which depicts the history of flight and space travel from the Wright brothers to future generations of space vehicles. For more information concerning hours of operation or Visitors Center educational programs, call 1-800-237-1821 in Mississippi and Louisiana or (601) 688-2370.

  10. Accredited Birth Centers

    MedlinePlus

    ... 59803 406-541-7115 Accredited Since February 2010 60 Interior Birthing Center Accredited 1636 30th Avenue, Suite ... Boulder Accredited 2800 Folsom Street, Suite C Boulder, CO 80304 303-443-3993 Accredited since July 2014 ...

  11. Reliability Centered Maintenance - Methodologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kammerer, Catherine C.

    2009-01-01

    Journal article about Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM) methodologies used by United Space Alliance, LLC (USA) in support of the Space Shuttle Program at Kennedy Space Center. The USA Reliability Centered Maintenance program differs from traditional RCM programs because various methodologies are utilized to take advantage of their respective strengths for each application. Based on operational experience, USA has customized the traditional RCM methodology into a streamlined lean logic path and has implemented the use of statistical tools to drive the process. USA RCM has integrated many of the L6S tools into both RCM methodologies. The tools utilized in the Measure, Analyze, and Improve phases of a Lean Six Sigma project lend themselves to application in the RCM process. All USA RCM methodologies meet the requirements defined in SAE JA 1011, Evaluation Criteria for Reliability-Centered Maintenance (RCM) Processes. The proposed article explores these methodologies.

  12. Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpkins, Patrick A.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the importance of the Kennedy Space Center both in terms to the economy of Florida and to spaceflight. It reviews the general NASA direction,the challenges of the coming year and the accomplishments.

  13. Soviet Mission Control Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This photo is an overall view of the Mission Control Center in Korolev, Russia during the Expedition Seven mission. The Expedition Seven crew launched aboard a Soyez spacecraft on April 26, 2003. Photo credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls

  14. Mental Health Screening Center

    MedlinePlus

    ... Center For Clinicians resources, publications Publications for Your Office Resources for Your Patients Information about Depression Information about Bipolar Disorder Wellness Tools DBSA Support Groups Active Research Studies Mood Disorders ...

  15. Proteome Characterization Centers - TCGA

    Cancer.gov

    The centers, a component of NCI’s Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium, will analyze a subset of TCGA samples to define proteins translated from cancer genomes and their related biological processes.

  16. Precision Joining Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, John W.

    1991-01-01

    The establishment of a Precision Joining Center (PJC) is proposed. The PJC will be a cooperatively operated center with participation from U.S. private industry, the Colorado School of Mines, and various government agencies, including the Department of Energy's Nuclear Weapons Complex (NWC). The PJC's primary mission will be as a training center for advanced joining technologies. This will accomplish the following objectives: (1) it will provide an effective mechanism to transfer joining technology from the NWC to private industry; (2) it will provide a center for testing new joining processes for the NWC and private industry; and (3) it will provide highly trained personnel to support advance joining processes for the NWC and private industry.

  17. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Center The Invisible Killer Carbon monoxide, also known as CO, is called the "Invisible Killer" because it's ... used or incorrectly-vented fuel-burning appliances such as furnaces, stoves, water heaters and fireplaces. Watch This ...

  18. Fermi Galactic Center Zoom

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation zooms into an image of the Milky Way, shown in visible light, and superimposes a gamma-ray map of the galactic center from NASA's Fermi. Raw data transitions to a view with all known...

  19. NCI Designated Cancer Centers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Laboratory for Cancer Research Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer ... Cancer Center History Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research Partners ... Profiles in Cancer Research Outstanding Investigator Award Recipients ...

  20. Science Center Goes Underground

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Modern Schools, 1977

    1977-01-01

    A unique underground science center at Bluffton College, designed to save energy and preserve trees, rolling landscape, and other environmental features of the campus, is under construction in Bluffton, Ohio. (Author)

  1. NMA Analysis Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kierulf, Halfdan Pascal; Andersen, Per Helge

    2013-01-01

    The Norwegian Mapping Authority (NMA) has during the last few years had a close cooperation with Norwegian Defence Research Establishment (FFI) in the analysis of space geodetic data using the GEOSAT software. In 2012 NMA has taken over the full responsibility for the GEOSAT software. This implies that FFI stopped being an IVS Associate Analysis Center in 2012. NMA has been an IVS Associate Analysis Center since 28 October 2010. NMA's contributions to the IVS as an Analysis Centers focus primarily on routine production of session-by-session unconstrained and consistent normal equations by GEOSAT as input to the IVS combined solution. After the recent improvements, we expect that VLBI results produced with GEOSAT will be consistent with results from the other VLBI Analysis Centers to a satisfactory level.

  2. Tsukuba VLBI Analysis Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurihara, Shinobu; Nozawa, Kentaro

    2013-01-01

    The Tsukuba Analysis Center is funded by the Geospatial Information Authority of Japan (GSI). The c5++ analysis software is regularly used for the IVS-INT2 analysis and the ultra-rapid EOP experiments.

  3. Transportation Systems Center

    SciTech Connect

    Greer, G.S.

    1992-07-01

    The Transportation Systems Center at Sandia Laboratory performs research, development, and implementation of technologies that enhance the safe movement of people, goods, and information. Our focus is on systems engineering. However, we realize that to understand the puzzle, you must also understand the pieces. This brochure describes some of the activities currently underway at the Center and presents the breadth and depth of our capabilities. Please contact the noted, individuals for more, information.

  4. Data center cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J; Dang, Hien P; Parida, Pritish R; Schultz, Mark D; Sharma, Arun

    2015-03-17

    A data center cooling system may include heat transfer equipment to cool a liquid coolant without vapor compression refrigeration, and the liquid coolant is used on a liquid cooled information technology equipment rack housed in the data center. The system may also include a controller-apparatus to regulate the liquid coolant flow to the liquid cooled information technology equipment rack through a range of liquid coolant flow values based upon information technology equipment temperature thresholds.

  5. Ocular Proton Therapy Centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacperek, Andrzej

    This chapter describes a review of proton therapy (PT) centers and the techniques used for the treatment of ocular lesions. The role of ion beam therapy (IBT) for eye treatments, principally choroidal melanomas, has become well established among the competing treatment modalities. More national centers now offer PT for these lesions, but not necessarily in a hospital environment. Significant improvements in eye treatment planning, patient positioning, and QA dosimetry have been realized, to the benefit of treatment efficiency and accuracy of dose delivery.

  6. Center for Space Construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Renjeng

    1998-01-01

    The Center for Space Construction (CSC) at University of Colorado at Boulder is one of eight University Space Engineering Research Centers established by NASA in 1988. The mission of the Center is to conduct research into space technology and to directly contribute to space engineering education. The Center reports to the Department of Aerospace Engineering Sciences and resides in the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences. The College has a long and successful track record of cultivating multi-disciplinary research and education programs. The Center for Space Construction represents prominent evidence of this record. The basic concept on which the Center was founded is the in-space construction of large space systems, such as space stations, interplanetary space vehicles, and extraterrestrial space structures. Since 1993, the scope of CSC research has evolved to include the design and construction of all spacecraft, large and small. With the broadened scope our research projects seek to impact the technological basis for spacecraft such as remote sensing satellites, communication satellites and other special-purpose spacecraft, as well as large space platforms. A summary of accomplishments, including student participation and degrees awarded, during the contract period is presented.

  7. NASA InterCenter Collaboration Increases ROI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lankford, Kimberly; Best, Susan; Felton, Larry; Newhouse, Marilyn

    2012-01-01

    Funding for National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) space mission operations is tighter than ever in the current environment of federal government deficit reductions. Conventional wisdom would expect this environment to drive increasing competition between NASA centers for the limited available funds. However, recent inter-center activities at the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center emphasize collaboration rather than competition and demonstrate the value of partnerships to increase the return on shrinking investments. These efforts cover a variety of activities and potential returns. To facilitate sharing data from test and verification through operations without levying requirements on data format or software tools, the HOSC is working with multiple centers on an evolutionary path toward a distributed data architecture and archive. The approach reduces the required investment by allowing the partners to reuse their existing formats and tools, while facilitating gone ]stop h user visibility into and controlled access to the full complement of data regardless of user or data location. The HOSC is also working on two activities to promote sharing operations implementations and leveraging the experts and expertise across multiple NASA sites. In one, the use of Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) standards for the message abstraction layer provides an interoperability layer on top of existing ground data system communication architectures. This allows missions to select the most appropriate solutions for their requirements with a minimal investment in rehosting the components in a coherent operational environment. The other emphasizes shared tools and increased remote access to minimize travel for tests and critical activities and reduce the floor space required for a dedicated operations center. This paper summarizes these and other inter-center collaboration activities at the HOSC and the

  8. Comprehensive review of conventional and non-conventional methods of management of recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Watson, Cathy; Calabretto, Helen

    2007-08-01

    Recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) is a condition what causes women a great deal of discomfort, inconvenience, and sometimes has psychological sequelae.(1) This condition is notoriously difficult to manage. Conventional management is generally favoured by medical practitioners. Some practitioners prefer not to offer other options because of significant possible side-effects and the lack of research supporting alternative treatments. There are many studies and much available information surrounding uncomplicated VVC, including two systematic reviews.(2,3) In the area of recurrent VVC however, quality conclusive studies are scarce, and recurrent VVC is featured infrequently in randomised controlled trials (RCTs). Systematic reviews that strongly support a particular pharmacological method of conventional management of recurrent VVC over another are absent from medical literature. Recommendations are largely formed on the basis of scanty RCTs and expert opinion. There is even less conclusive evidence in the area of alternative therapies; yet despite this, anecdotally many practitioners (both alternative and mainstream) continue to advocate certain treatments in the absence of any reliable cure that can be confidently prescribed. As the use of methods other than mainstream medicine becomes more widespread, it is important to be aware of both conventional and non-conventional management of recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis. Practitioners need to ascertain their patient's preference and treatment history. It is difficult to find comprehensive literature assessing both approaches. Giving women the most up-to-date and relevant information, and different management options, is essential in allowing them to make informed decisions. This review critically assesses both mainstream and less conventional approaches in the management of recurrent VVC. PMID:17627679

  9. Assessing urbanized area expansion through the integration of Landsat and conventional data /79052/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J. B.; Friedman, S. Z.

    1979-01-01

    An image base information system (IBIS) is utilized to integrate Landsat and census data for the purpose of mapping urban land and updating urbanized-area outer lines. IBIS is a subset of the video image communication and retrieval digital image processing system developed at JPL. IBIS is used to analyze three urban areas: Orlando, Florida; Seattle, Washington; and Boston, Massachusetts. In all three applications the primary objective is to map the expansion of urban land cover in the urban fringe. Pertinent tabular reports are produced.

  10. NESTA Revolutionizing Teacher's Experiences at NSTA Conventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireton, F.

    2002-05-01

    National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) conventions are traditionally composed of short workshops, half or full day workshops, and lectures on science teaching or education research. Occasional science lectures such as the AGU lecture offer science content information. The National Earth Science Teachers Association (NESTA) will join the National Association of Geoscience Teachers (NAGT), American Geophysical Union (AGU), and the American Geological Institute (AGI) to bring teachers a suite of exciting and informative events at the (NSTA) 2002 convention. Events begin with a guided learning field trip to Mission Trails Regional Park and Torrey Pines State Reserve where Earth and space science teachers experience a model of constructivist leaning techniques. Most field trips are a "show and tell" experience, designed to transmit knowledge from the field trip leader to the field trip participants. In the "guided learning" environment, the leader serves as a facilitator, asking questions, guiding participants to discover concepts for themselves. Participants examine selected processes and features that constitute a constructivist experience in which knowledge acquired at any given location builds on knowledge brought to the site. Employing this strategy involves covering less breadth but greater depth, modeling the concept of "less is more." On Thursday NESTA will host two Share-a-thons. These are not what a person would think of as a traditional workshop where presenter makes a presentation then the participants work on an activity. They could be called the flea market of teaching ideas. Tables are set around the perimeter of a room where the presenters are stationed. Teachers move from table to table picking up information and watching short demonstrations. The Earth and Space Science Resource Day on Friday will focus on teachers needs. Starting with breakfast, teachers will hear from Soames Summerhays, Naturalist and President of Summerhays Films, about how he

  11. Static rear stability of conventional and lightweight variable-axle-position wheelchairs.

    PubMed

    Loane, T D; Kirby, R L

    1985-03-01

    Wheelchair users with high or posteriorly placed centers of mass often complain of rear tipping on inclines or when accelerating. In this study we compared the rear stability of occupied conventional and lightweight wheelchairs and determined the effect of various rear axle positions. Ten normal subjects were studied in both a conventional (22.6 kg) and a lightweight (12.3 kg) wheelchair. Twenty-one experienced wheelchair users were also studied in their own wheelchairs. Stability points were determined with brakes unlocked on a tilt platform. Inter- and intraobserver test-retest reliabilities were 0.97 and 0.974, respectively. For the normal subjects the mean (+/- 1SD) stability point in the conventional chair was 28.6 (+/- 2.7) degrees. In the lightweight chair their mean stability points ranged from 21.7 (+/- 2.6) degrees to 9.4 (+/- 2.9) degrees, depending upon axle position. The mean difference between the conventional chair and the lightweight chair in its most stable position was 6.9 (+/- 1.7) degrees (t = 13.04, p less than 0.0001) and in its least stable position 19.3 (+/- 2.4) degrees (t = 24.97, p less than 0.0001). Experienced wheelchair users in their own lightweight wheelchairs were less stable than users of conventional chairs (t = 2.16, p less than 0.05) or chairs with posteriorly offset axles (t = 3.64, p less than 0.01). PMID:3977572

  12. Evidence-Centered Design: Recommendations for Implementation and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrickson, Amy; Ewing, Maureen; Kaliski, Pamela; Huff, Kristen

    2013-01-01

    Evidence-centered design (ECD) is an orientation towards assessment development. It differs from conventional practice in several ways and consists of multiple activities. Each of these activities results in a set of useful documentation: domain analysis, domain modeling, construction of the assessment framework, and assessment…

  13. Nitrogen fertilization on center pivot sprinkler irrigated rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three rice (Oryza sativa) experiments were conducted to determine the effects of nitrogen (N) form and timing of application on growth and yield of sprinkler irrigated rice compared to flood irrigated rice. Three rice cultivars (two conventional, one hybrid) were grown under a center pivot irrigatio...

  14. Stafford Technical Center: Designing a Future for Architects and Builders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucci, William, Jr.

    2005-01-01

    The Engineering Technology Academy (ETA) program at Stafford Technical Center in Rutland, Vermont, offers benefits beyond the conventional high school learning experience. In September, at the beginning of the program, students learn the traditional skills of using tools, line weights and lettering. Once they develop these basic skills, students…

  15. Coming on Center: Essays in English Education. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moffett, James

    This revised edition contains seven of James Moffett's talks and articles written since the original edition of "Coming on Center" was published in 1981, along with several of the earlier articles that are still timely. The book provides practical recommendations for specific ways of teaching reading and writing, shows why some conventional means…

  16. Conventional therapy for Crohn’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Büning, Carsten; Lochs, Herbert

    2006-01-01

    Crohn’s disease (CD) is a multifactorial disorder of unknown cause. Outstanding progress regarding the pathophysiology of CD has led to the development of innovative therapeutic concepts. Numerous controlled trials have been performed in CD over the last years. However, many drugs have not been approved by regulatory authorities due to lack of efficacy or severe side effects. Therefore, well-known drugs, including 5-ASA, systemic or topical corticosteroids, and immunosuppressants such as azathioprine, are still the mainstay of CD therapy. Importantly, biologicals such as infliximab have shown to be efficacious in problematic settings such as fistulizing or steroid-dependent CD. This review is intended to give practical guidelines to clinicians for the conventional treatment of CD. We concentrated on the results of randomized, placebo-controlled trials and meta-analyses, when available, that provide the highest degree of evidence. We provide evidence-based treatment algorithms whenever possible. However, many clinical situations have not been answered by controlled clinical trials and it is important to fill these gaps through expert opinions. We hope that this review offers a useful tool for clinicians in the challenging treatment of CD. PMID:16937460

  17. Non-conventional therapeutics for oral infections

    PubMed Central

    Allaker, Robert P; Ian Douglas, CW

    2015-01-01

    As our knowledge of host-microbial interactions within the oral cavity increases, future treatments are likely to be more targeted. For example, efforts to target a single species or key virulence factors that they produce, while maintaining the natural balance of the resident oral microbiota that acts to modulate the host immune response would be an advantage. Targeted approaches may be directed at the black-pigmented anaerobes, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia, associated with periodontitis. Such pigments provide an opportunity for targeted phototherapy with high-intensity monochromatic light. Functional inhibition approaches, including the use of enzyme inhibitors, are also being explored to control periodontitis. More general disruption of dental plaque through the use of enzymes and detergents, alone and in combination, shows much promise. The use of probiotics and prebiotics to improve gastrointestinal health has now led to an interest in using these approaches to control oral disease. More recently the potential of antimicrobial peptides and nanotechnology, through the application of nanoparticles with biocidal, anti-adhesive and delivery capabilities, has been explored. The aim of this review is to consider the current status as regards non-conventional treatment approaches for oral infections with particular emphasis on the plaque-related diseases. PMID:25668296

  18. Conventional treatment of actinic keratosis: an overview.

    PubMed

    Peris, Ketty; Fargnoli, Maria Concetta

    2015-01-01

    Nonsurgical procedures are the first-line treatment for actinic keratosis (AK). The choice of therapy is based on AK features and patient characteristics. Numerous randomized clinical trials and open-label studies have provided robust data on the efficacy and tolerability of conventional topical therapies, such as cryotherapy, photodynamic therapy, or treatment with 5-fluorouracil, diclofenac, or imiquimod. Cryotherapy is recommended to treat single AK lesions (lesion-directed therapy), while topical medical therapies are used to treat multiple lesions on an entire sun-damaged area (field therapy) and have the advantage of highlighting and treating both visible and invisible lesions. Combined or sequential therapies have been proposed to improve treatment efficacy, while medication breaks between treatment cycles or lowering drug concentrations is used to increase treatment tolerability/adherence. The use of a field therapy to treat multiple lesions on a large area (the entire face or a balding scalp), followed by a lesion-targeted therapy for a specific recurrent or resistant AK lesion, is becoming an increasingly popular approach. Regarding surgical procedures, curettage with or without electrodessication and dermabrasion are seldom used, while excision is indicated when AK progression to invasive squamous cell carcinoma is clinically suspected. Despite the availability of most such treatments for more than a decade and their common use in clinical practice, there is still a need for long-term follow-up studies to better determine the recurrence rate and for comparative studies to develop a truly patient-tailored therapy. PMID:25561214

  19. Non-conventional therapeutics for oral infections.

    PubMed

    Allaker, Robert P; Ian Douglas, C W

    2015-01-01

    As our knowledge of host-microbial interactions within the oral cavity increases, future treatments are likely to be more targeted. For example, efforts to target a single species or key virulence factors that they produce, while maintaining the natural balance of the resident oral microbiota that acts to modulate the host immune response would be an advantage. Targeted approaches may be directed at the black-pigmented anaerobes, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia, associated with periodontitis. Such pigments provide an opportunity for targeted phototherapy with high-intensity monochromatic light. Functional inhibition approaches, including the use of enzyme inhibitors, are also being explored to control periodontitis. More general disruption of dental plaque through the use of enzymes and detergents, alone and in combination, shows much promise. The use of probiotics and prebiotics to improve gastrointestinal health has now led to an interest in using these approaches to control oral disease. More recently the potential of antimicrobial peptides and nanotechnology, through the application of nanoparticles with biocidal, anti-adhesive and delivery capabilities, has been explored. The aim of this review is to consider the current status as regards non-conventional treatment approaches for oral infections with particular emphasis on the plaque-related diseases. PMID:25668296

  20. Josephson current between topological and conventional superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioselevich, P. A.; Ostrovsky, P. M.; Feigel'man, M. V.

    2016-03-01

    We study the stationary Josephson current in a junction between a topological and an ordinary (topologically trivial) superconductor. Such an S-TS junction hosts a Majorana zero mode that significantly influences the current-phase relation. The presence of the Majorana state is intimately related with the breaking of the time-reversal symmetry in the system. We derive a general expression for the supercurrent for a class of short topological junctions in terms of the normal-state scattering matrix. The result is strongly asymmetric with respect to the superconducting gaps in the ordinary (Δ0) and topological (Δtop) leads. We apply the general result to a simple model of a nanowire setup with strong spin-orbit coupling in an external magnetic field and proximity-induced superconductivity. The system shows parametrically strong suppression of the critical current Ic∝Δtop/RN2 in the tunneling limit (RN is the normal-state resistance). This is in strong contrast with the Ambegaokar-Baratoff relation applicable to junctions with preserved time-reversal symmetry. We also consider the case of a generic junction with a random scattering matrix and obtain a more conventional scaling law Ic∝Δtop/RN .

  1. Conventional anticancer therapeutics and telomere maintenance mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Uziel, Orit; Lahav, Meir

    2014-01-01

    The telomere-telomerase system has a unique role in the biology of cancer. Telomere maintenance, mostly affected by the up regulation of telomerase activity, is a prerequisite for perpetuation of malignant cells. This fundamental biologic feature defines telomere maintenance as an attractive therapeutic target for most types of cancer. This review summarizes some critical aspects of telomere biology with special emphasis on the connection to anticancer therapy. In particular, the effects on the telomere - telomerase system of conventional anticancer treatments, including various cytotoxic drugs, targeted biological agents and radiotherapy, and their possible combination with telomerase-directed therapy are discussed. Several potential problems, including side effects and complications inherent to perturbations of telomere biology in normal cells, are also highlighted. In spite of significant progress in this field, there are still several issues that have to be addressed and ultimately resolved in order to obtain a better characterization of the pros and cons of telomerase-directed therapies and, consequently, their clinical relevance. PMID:24975606

  2. Chemical weapons convention verifiability assessment. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mengel, R.W.; Meselson, M.; Dee, W.C.; Palarino, R.N.; Eimers, F.

    1994-01-18

    The U.S. is in the process of the ratification of the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC). A significant element of this process is the evaluation of the verifiability of the CWC. In addition to U.S. Government assessment a separate independent evaluation has been conducted by a group of recognized non-governmental CWC experts. This report documents the findings, conclusions and recommendations of these experts. The verifiability assessment evaluated the kinds of violations that might be carried out undetected, the difficulty in accomplishing each violation, and he overall strengths and weaknesses of the CWC with regard to verification. Principle conclusions are: (1) reporting and routine inspection provisions of the CWC are adequate for verification of declarations; (2) restrictions on challenge inspection facility access and sampling and analysis limit verification; (3) difficulty in discriminating between permitted and prohibited activities at commercial facilities complicates verifiability; (4) fundamental to achieving verification aims is a highly qualified and trained corps of CWC inspectors; and, (5) technology to support improved verification will evolve into the future.

  3. Lens auto-centering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamontagne, Frédéric; Desnoyers, Nichola; Doucet, Michel; Côté, Patrice; Gauvin, Jonny; Anctil, Geneviève; Tremblay, Mathieu

    2015-09-01

    In a typical optical system, optical elements usually need to be precisely positioned and aligned to perform the correct optical function. This positioning and alignment involves securing the optical element in a holder or mount. Proper centering of an optical element with respect to the holder is a delicate operation that generally requires tight manufacturing tolerances or active alignment, resulting in costly optical assemblies. To optimize optical performance and minimize manufacturing cost, there is a need for a lens mounting method that could relax manufacturing tolerance, reduce assembly time and provide high centering accuracy. This paper presents a patent pending lens mounting method developed at INO that can be compared to the drop-in technique for its simplicity while providing the level of accuracy close to that achievable with techniques using a centering machine (usually < 5 μm). This innovative auto-centering method is based on the use of geometrical relationship between the lens diameter, the lens radius of curvature and the thread angle of the retaining ring. The autocentering principle and centering test results performed on real optical assemblies are presented. In addition to the low assembly time, high centering accuracy, and environmental robustness, the INO auto-centering method has the advantage of relaxing lens and barrel bore diameter tolerances as well as lens wedge tolerances. The use of this novel lens mounting method significantly reduces manufacturing and assembly costs for high performance optical systems. Large volume productions would especially benefit from this advancement in precision lens mounting, potentially providing a drastic cost reduction.

  4. 2005 ACTE Convention--A Lesson in Persistence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Techniques: Connecting Education and Careers, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This article features the 2005 ACTE Annual Convention and Career Tech Expo held in Kansas City. The 2005 ACTE Convention had its share of challenges, but in the end, it was an amazing professional development experience.

  5. Nanoscale Sensing with Nitrogen Vacancy Centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbach, Elana; Lovchinsky, Igor; Sushkov, Alex; Park, Hongkun; Lukin, Mikhail

    2015-05-01

    In the last several decades Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has emerged as a powerful tool in science and technology. Conventional MRI technology, however, relies on measuring magnetic fields from a large (macroscopic) number of molecules, for example tissues in specific areas of the brain. Extending these techniques to the nanoscale could enable revolutionary advances in the physical, biological and medical sciences. Here we report on recent progress in using Nitrogen-Vacancy (NV) centers in diamond to detect small numbers of nuclear spins in biological molecules. In particular, we have demonstrated detection of single proteins attached to the diamond surface.

  6. "Infotonics Technology Center"

    SciTech Connect

    Fritzemeier, L.; Boysel, M. B.; Smith, D. R.

    2004-09-30

    During this grant period July 15, 2002 thru September 30, 2004, the Infotonics Technology Center developed the critical infrastructure and technical expertise necessary to accelerate the development of sensors, alternative lighting and power sources, and other specific subtopics of interest to Department of Energy. Infotonics fosters collaboration among industry, universities and government and operates as a national center of excellence to drive photonics and microsystems development and commercialization. A main goal of the Center is to establish a unique, world-class research and development facility. A state-of-the-art microsystems prototype and pilot fabrication facility was established to enable rapid commercialization of new products of particular interest to DOE. The Center has three primary areas of photonics and microsystems competency: device research and engineering, packaging and assembly, and prototype and pilot-scale fabrication. Center activities focused on next generation optical communication networks, advanced imaging and information sensors and systems, micro-fluidic systems, assembly and packaging technologies, and biochemical sensors. With targeted research programs guided by the wealth of expertise of Infotonics business and scientific staff, the fabrication and packaging facility supports and accelerates innovative technology development of special interest to DOE in support of its mission and strategic defense, energy, and science goals.

  7. UCSF Center for HIV Information

    MedlinePlus

    ... Program For providers and patients VA National Viral Hepatitis Program For providers and patients TARGET Center Technical assistance tools for the Ryan White Community AETC National Resource Center Education and training for clinicians UCSF-Gladstone Center for ...

  8. Assessment of undiscovered conventional oil and gas resources of Thailand

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schenk, Chris

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey estimated mean volumes of 1.6 billion barrels of undiscovered conventional oil and 17 trillion cubic feet of undiscovered conventional natural gas in three geologic provinces of Thailand using a geology-based methodology. Most of the undiscovered conventional oil and gas resource is estimated to be in the area known as offshore Thai Basin province.

  9. 46 CFR 15.701 - Officers Competency Certificates Convention, 1936.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Officers Competency Certificates Convention, 1936. 15... SEAMEN MANNING REQUIREMENTS Limitations and Qualifying Factors § 15.701 Officers Competency Certificates Convention, 1936. (a) This section implements the Officers Competency Certificates Convention, 1936,...

  10. 15 CFR 743.4 - Conventional arms reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Conventional arms reporting. 743.4... REPORTING AND NOTIFICATION § 743.4 Conventional arms reporting. (a) Scope. This section outlines special... the UN Register of Conventional Arms. Participating States of the Wassenaar Arrangement...

  11. 46 CFR 189.60-40 - Duration of Convention certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Duration of Convention certificates. 189.60-40 Section... VESSELS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Certificates Under International Convention for Safety of Life at Sea, 1974 § 189.60-40 Duration of Convention certificates. (a) The following certificates are valid for...

  12. 46 CFR 91.60-40 - Duration of Convention certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Duration of Convention certificates. 91.60-40 Section 91... VESSELS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Certificates Under International Convention for Safety of Life at Sea, 1974 § 91.60-40 Duration of Convention certificates. (a) The following certificates are valid for...

  13. 29 CFR 452.22 - Delegates to a convention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Delegates to a convention. 452.22 Section 452.22 Labor... DISCLOSURE ACT OF 1959 Coverage of Election Provisions § 452.22 Delegates to a convention. Under certain circumstances, delegates to a convention of a national or international labor organization, or to...

  14. 29 CFR 452.63 - Nominations at conventions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nominations at conventions. 452.63 Section 452.63 Labor... DISCLOSURE ACT OF 1959 Nominations for Office § 452.63 Nominations at conventions. In elections at conventions at which nominations are also made, delegates who have been elected by secret ballot must be...

  15. 46 CFR 71.75-15 - Posting of Convention certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Posting of Convention certificates. 71.75-15 Section 71... AND CERTIFICATION Certificates Under the International Convention for Safety of Life at Sea, 1960 § 71.75-15 Posting of Convention certificates. (a) The certificates described in this subpart,...

  16. Biodegradable and compostable alternatives to conventional plastics

    PubMed Central

    Song, J. H.; Murphy, R. J.; Narayan, R.; Davies, G. B. H.

    2009-01-01

    Packaging waste forms a significant part of municipal solid waste and has caused increasing environmental concerns, resulting in a strengthening of various regulations aimed at reducing the amounts generated. Among other materials, a wide range of oil-based polymers is currently used in packaging applications. These are virtually all non-biodegradable, and some are difficult to recycle or reuse due to being complex composites having varying levels of contamination. Recently, significant progress has been made in the development of biodegradable plastics, largely from renewable natural resources, to produce biodegradable materials with similar functionality to that of oil-based polymers. The expansion in these bio-based materials has several potential benefits for greenhouse gas balances and other environmental impacts over whole life cycles and in the use of renewable, rather than finite resources. It is intended that use of biodegradable materials will contribute to sustainability and reduction in the environmental impact associated with disposal of oil-based polymers. The diversity of biodegradable materials and their varying properties makes it difficult to make simple, generic assessments such as biodegradable products are all ‘good’ or petrochemical-based products are all ‘bad’. This paper discusses the potential impacts of biodegradable packaging materials and their waste management, particularly via composting. It presents the key issues that inform judgements of the benefits these materials have in relation to conventional, petrochemical-based counterparts. Specific examples are given from new research on biodegradability in simulated ‘home’ composting systems. It is the view of the authors that biodegradable packaging materials are most suitable for single-use disposable applications where the post-consumer waste can be locally composted. PMID:19528060

  17. Reconsidering "The inappropriateness of conventional cephalometrics".

    PubMed

    Bookstein, Fred L

    2016-06-01

    Of all the articles on cephalometrics this journal has published over the last half-century, the one most cited across the scientific literature is the 1979 lecture "The inappropriateness of conventional cephalometrics" by Robert Moyers and me. But the durable salience of this article is perplexing, as its critique was misdirected (it should have been aimed at the craniometrics of the early twentieth century, not merely the roentgenographic extension used in the orthodontic clinic) and its proposed remedies have all failed to establish themselves as methods of any broad utility. When problems highlighted by Moyers and me have been resolved at all, the innovations that resolved them owe to tools very different from those suggested in our article and imported from fields quite a bit farther from biometrics than we expected back in 1979. One of these tools was the creation de novo of a new abstract mathematical construction, statistical shape space, in the 1980s and 1990s; another was a flexible and intuitive new graphic, the thin-plate spline, for meaningfully and suggestively visualizing a wide variety of biological findings in these spaces. On the other hand, many of the complaints Moyers and I enunciated back in 1979, especially those stemming from the disarticulation of morphometrics from the explanatory styles and purposes of clinical medicine, remain unanswered even today. The present essay, a retrospective historical meditation, reviews the context of the 1979 publication, its major themes, and its relevance today. This essay is dedicated to the memory of Robert E. Moyers on the 100th anniversary of the American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics. PMID:27241987

  18. A naming convention for atmospheric organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, B. N.; Donahue, N. M.; Robinson, A. L.; Pandis, S. N.

    2014-06-01

    While the field of atmospheric organic aerosol scientific research has experienced thorough and insightful progress over the last half century, this progress has been accompanied by the evolution of a communicative and detailed yet, at times, complex and inconsistent language. The menagerie of detailed classification that now exists to describe organic compounds in our atmosphere reflects the wealth of observational techniques now at our disposal as well as the rich information provided by state-of-the-science instrumentation. However, the nomenclature in place to communicate these scientific gains is growing disjointed to the point that effective communication within the scientific community and to the public may be sacrificed. We propose standardizing a naming convention for organic aerosol classification that is relevant to laboratory studies, ambient observations, atmospheric models, and various stakeholders for air-quality problems. Because a critical aspect of this effort is to directly translate the essence of complex physico-chemical phenomena to a much broader, policy-oriented audience, we recommend a framework that maximizes comprehension among scientists and non-scientists alike. For example, to classify volatility, it relies on straightforward alphabetic terms (e.g., semivolatile, SV; intermediate volatility, IV; etc.) rather than possibly ambiguous numeric indices. This framework classifies organic material as primary or secondary pollutants and distinguishes among fundamental features important for science and policy questions including emission source, chemical phase, and volatility. Also useful is the addition of an alphabetic suffix identifying the volatility of the organic material or its precursor for when emission occurred. With this framework, we hope to introduce into the community a consistent connection between common notation for the general public and detailed nomenclature for highly specialized discussion. In so doing, we try to maintain

  19. MARS Mission research center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Mars Mission Research Center (M2RC) is one of nine University Space Engineering Research Centers established by NASA in June 1988. It is a cooperative effort between NCSU and A&T in Greensboro. The goal of the Center is to focus on research and educational technologies for planetary exploration with particular emphasis on Mars. The research combines Mission Analysis and Design, Hypersonic Aerodynamics and Propulsion, Structures and Controls, Composite Materials, and Fabrication Methods in a cross-disciplined program directed towards the development of space transportation systems for lunar and planetary travel. The activities of the students and faculty in the M2RC for the period 1 Jul. 1990 to 30 Jun. 1991 are described.

  20. Virtual center arraying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deutsch, L. J.; Lipes, R. G.; Miller, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    Methods to increase the amount of data that can be received from outer planet missions are described with emphasis on antenna arraying systems designed to increase the total effective aperture of the receiving system. One such method is virtual center arraying (VCA). In VCA, a combined carrier reference is derived at a point that is, conceptually, the geometric center of the array. This point need not coincide with any of the actual antennas of the array. A noise analysis of the VCA system is given along with formulas for the phase jitter as a function of loop bandwidths and the amount of loop damping. If the ratio of the loop bandwidths of the center loop to the vertex loops is greater than 100, then the jitter is very nearly equal to that expected for ideal combined carrier referencing.

  1. Survey: National Meteorological Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The National Meteorological Center (NMC) is comprised of three operational divisions (Development, Automation, and Forecast) and an Administrative Division. The Development Division develops and implements mathematical models for forecasting the weather. The Automation Division provides the software and processing services to accommodate the models used in daily forecasts. The Forecasting Division applies a combination of numerical and manual techniques to produce analyses and prognoses up to 120 hr into the future. This guidance material is combined with severe storm information from the National Hurricane Center and the National Severe Storms Forecasting Center to develop locally tailored forecasts by the Weather Service Forecast Offices and, in turn, by the local Weather Service Offices. A very general flow of this information is shown. A more detailed illustration of data flow into, within, and from the NMC is given. The interrelations are depicted between the various meteorological organizations and activities.

  2. Growth and metabolic activity of conventional and non-conventional yeasts immobilized in foamed alginate.

    PubMed

    Kregiel, Dorota; Berlowska, Joanna; Ambroziak, Wojciech

    2013-09-10

    The aim of this research was to study how the cell immobilization technique of forming foamed alginate gels influences the growth, vitality and metabolic activity of different yeasts. Two distinct strains were used, namely conventional yeast (exemplified by Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and a non-conventional strain (exemplified by Debaryomyces occidentalis). The encapsulation of the yeast cells was performed by the traditional process of droplet formation, but from a foamed alginate solution. The activities of two key enzymes, succinate dehydrogenase and pyruvate decarboxylase, together with the ATP content were measured in both the free and immobilized cells. This novel method of yeast cell entrapment had some notable effects. The number of living immobilized cells reached the level of 10(6)-10(7) per single bead, and was stable during the fermentation process. Reductions in both enzyme activity and ATP content were observed in all immobilized yeasts. However, S. cerevisiae showed higher levels of ATP and enzymatic activity than D. occidentalis. Fermentation trials with immobilized repitching cells showed that the tested yeasts adapted to the specific conditions. Nevertheless, the mechanical endurance of the carriers and the internal structure of the gel need to be improved to enable broad applications of alginate gels in industrial fermentation processes, especially with conventional yeasts. This is one of the few papers and patents that describe the technique of cell immobilization in foamed alginate and shows the fermentative capacities and activities of key enzymes in immobilized yeast cells. PMID:23931687

  3. Patient-centered Care.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, April

    2009-01-01

    Patient-centered care focuses on the patient and the individual's particular health care needs. The goal of patient-centered health care is to empower patients to become active participants in their care. This requires that physicians, radiologic technologists and other health care providers develop good communication skills and address patient needs effectively. Patient-centered care also requires that the health care provider become a patient advocate and strive to provide care that not only is effective but also safe. For radiologic technologists, patient-centered care encompasses principles such as the as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) concept and contrast media safety. Patient-centered care is associated with a higher rate of patient satisfaction, adherence to suggested lifestyle changes and prescribed treatment, better outcomes and more cost-effective care. This article is a Directed Reading. Your access to Directed Reading quizzes for continuing education credit is determined by your area of interest. For access to other quizzes, go to www.asrt.org/store. According to one theory, most patients judge the quality of their healthcare much like they rate an airplane flight. They assume that the airplane is technically viable and is being piloted by competent people. Criteria for judging a particular airline are personal and include aspects like comfort, friendly service and on-time schedules. Similarly, patients judge the standard of their healthcare on nontechnical aspects, such as a healthcare practitioner's communication and "soft skills." Most are unable to evaluate a practitioner's level of technical skill or training, so the qualities they can assess become of the utmost importance in satisfying patients and providing patient-centered care.(1). PMID:19901351

  4. Control Center Technology Conference Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Conference papers and presentations are compiled and cover evolving architectures and technologies applicable to flight control centers. Advances by NASA Centers and the aerospace industry are presented.

  5. Lied Transplant Center

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    The Department of Energy has prepared an Environmental Assessment (DOE/EA-1143) evaluating the construction, equipping and operation of the proposed Lied Transplant Center at the University of Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha, Nebraska. Based on the analysis in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Statement in not required.

  6. Mars mission research center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The Mars Mission Research Center is one of nine University Space Engineering Research Centers established by NASA to broaden the nation's engineering capability to meet the critical needs of the civilian space program. It has the goal of focusing on research and training technologies for planetary exploration with particular emphasis on Mars. The research combines: (1) composite materials and fabrication, (2) light weight structures and controls, and (3) hypersonic aerodynamics and propulsion in a cross disciplined program directed towards the development of the space transportation system for planetary travel.

  7. Towards cheaper control centers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baize, Lionel

    1994-01-01

    Today, any approach to the design of new space systems must take into consideration an important constraint, namely costs. This approach is our guideline for new missions and also applies to the ground segment, and particularly to the control center. CNES has carried out a study on a recent control center for application satellites in order to take advantage of the experience gained. This analysis, the purpose of which is to determine, a posteriori, the costs of architecture needs and choices, takes hardware and software costs into account and makes a number of recommendations.

  8. Emergency Operation Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chinea, Anoushka Z.

    1995-01-01

    The Emergency Operation Center (EOC) is a site from which NASA LaRC Emergency Preparedness Officials exercise control and direction in an emergency. Research was conducted in order to determine what makes an effective EOC. Specifically information concerning the various types of equipment and communication capability that an efficient EOC should contain (i.e., computers, software, telephone systems, radio systems, etc.) was documented. With this information a requirements document was written stating a brief description of the equipment and required quantity to be used in an EOC and then compared to current capabilities at the NASA Langley Research Center.

  9. Ocean Pollution Research Center

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    The Ocean Pollution Research Center (OPRC) is a University of Miami center based at the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science (RSMAS) and with significant involvement by the College of Engineering. It was formed in 1992 out of concerns for potential oil spills placing at risk the fragile ecosystems of the Florida Keys. OPRC's scope also includes the Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico, and the South Atlantic Bight. Focus is on the physical transport of oil spills and information management for response operations. Studies of the fates and effects of oil spills are also undertaken.

  10. Vet Centers. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-03-01

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) adopts as final an interim final rule that amends its medical regulation that governs Vet Center services. The National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2013 (the 2013 Act) requires Vet Centers to provide readjustment counseling services to broader groups of veterans, members of the Armed Forces, including a member of a reserve component of the Armed Forces, and family members of such veterans and members. This final rule adopts as final the regulatory criteria to conform to the 2013 Act, to include new and revised definitions. PMID:26934755

  11. Guiding center equations for ideal magnetohydrodynamic modes

    SciTech Connect

    White, R. B.

    2013-04-15

    Guiding center simulations are routinely used for the discovery of mode-particle resonances in tokamaks, for both resistive and ideal instabilities and to find modifications of particle distributions caused by a given spectrum of modes, including large scale avalanches during events with a number of large amplitude modes. One of the most fundamental properties of ideal magnetohydrodynamics is the condition that plasma motion cannot change magnetic topology. The conventional representation of ideal magnetohydrodynamic modes by perturbing a toroidal equilibrium field through {delta}B-vector={nabla} Multiplication-Sign ({xi}-vector Multiplication-Sign B-vector), however, perturbs the magnetic topology, introducing extraneous magnetic islands in the field. A proper treatment of an ideal perturbation involves a full Lagrangian displacement of the field due to the perturbation and conserves magnetic topology as it should. In order to examine the effect of ideal magnetohydrodynamic modes on particle trajectories, the guiding center equations should include a correct Lagrangian treatment. Guiding center equations for an ideal displacement {xi}-vector are derived which preserve the magnetic topology and are used to examine mode particle resonances in toroidal confinement devices. These simulations are compared to others which are identical in all respects except that they use the linear representation for the field. Unlike the case for the magnetic field, the use of the linear field perturbation in the guiding center equations does not result in extraneous mode particle resonances.

  12. Guiding Center Equations for Ideal Magnetohydrodynamic Modes

    SciTech Connect

    Roscoe B. White

    2013-02-21

    Guiding center simulations are routinely used for the discovery of mode-particle resonances in tokamaks, for both resistive and ideal instabilities and to find modifications of particle distributions caused by a given spectrum of modes, including large scale avalanches during events with a number of large amplitude modes. One of the most fundamental properties of ideal magnetohydrodynamics is the condition that plasma motion cannot change magnetic topology. The conventional representation of ideal magnetohydrodynamic modes by perturbing a toroidal equilibrium field through δ~B = ∇ X (ξ X B) however perturbs the magnetic topology, introducing extraneous magnetic islands in the field. A proper treatment of an ideal perturbation involves a full Lagrangian displacement of the field due to the perturbation and conserves magnetic topology as it should. In order to examine the effect of ideal magnetohydrodynamic modes on particle trajectories the guiding center equations should include a correct Lagrangian treatment. Guiding center equations for an ideal displacement ξ are derived which perserve the magnetic topology and are used to examine mode particle resonances in toroidal confinement devices. These simulations are compared to others which are identical in all respects except that they use the linear representation for the field. Unlike the case for the magnetic field, the use of the linear field perturbation in the guiding center equations does not result in extraneous mode particle resonances.

  13. The semantics of Chemical Markup Language (CML): dictionaries and conventions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The semantic architecture of CML consists of conventions, dictionaries and units. The conventions conform to a top-level specification and each convention can constrain compliant documents through machine-processing (validation). Dictionaries conform to a dictionary specification which also imposes machine validation on the dictionaries. Each dictionary can also be used to validate data in a CML document, and provide human-readable descriptions. An additional set of conventions and dictionaries are used to support scientific units. All conventions, dictionaries and dictionary elements are identifiable and addressable through unique URIs. PMID:21999509

  14. 26 CFR 1.168(d)-1 - Applicable conventions-half-year and mid-quarter conventions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... conventions. 1.168(d)-1 Section 1.168(d)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... and Corporations § 1.168(d)-1 Applicable conventions—half-year and mid-quarter conventions. (a) In general. Under section 168(d), the half-year convention applies to depreciable property (other...

  15. 26 CFR 1.168(d)-1 - Applicable conventions-half-year and mid-quarter conventions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... conventions. 1.168(d)-1 Section 1.168(d)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... and Corporations § 1.168(d)-1 Applicable conventions—half-year and mid-quarter conventions. (a) In general. Under section 168(d), the half-year convention applies to depreciable property (other...

  16. Unbiased quantitative testing of conventional orthodontic beliefs.

    PubMed

    Baumrind, S

    1998-03-01

    This study used a preexisting database to test in hypothesis from the appropriateness of some common orthodontic beliefs concerning upper first molar displacement and changes in facial morphology associated with conventional full bonded/banded treatment in growing subjects. In an initial pass, the author used data from a stratified random sample of 48 subjects drawn retrospectively from the practice of a single, experienced orthodontist. This sample consisted of 4 subgroups of 12 subjects each: Class I nonextraction, Class I extraction, Class II nonextraction, and Class II extraction. The findings indicate that, relative to the facial profile, chin point did not, on average, displace anteriorly during treatment, either overall or in any subgroup. Relative to the facial profile, Point A became significantly less prominent during treatment, both overall and in each subgroup. The best estimate of the mean displacement of the upper molar cusp relative to superimposition on Anterior Cranial Base was in the mesial direction in each of the four subgroups. In only one extraction subject out of 24 did the cusp appear to be displaced distally. Mesial molar cusp displacement was significantly greater in the Class II extraction subgroup than in the Class II nonextraction subgroup. Relative to superimposition on anatomical "best fit" of maxillary structures, the findings for molar cusp displacement were similar, but even more dramatic. Mean mesial migration was highly significant in both the Class II nonextraction and Class II extraction subgroups. In no subject in the entire sample was distal displacement noted relative to this superimposition. Mean increase in anterior Total Face Height was significantly greater in the Class II extraction subgroup than in the Class II nonextraction subgroup. (This finding was contrary to the author's original expectation.) The generalizability of the findings from the initial pass to other treated growing subjects was then assessed by

  17. User-Centered Design through Learner-Centered Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altay, Burçak

    2014-01-01

    This article initially demonstrates the parallels between the learner-centered approach in education and the user-centered approach in design disciplines. Afterward, a course on human factors that applies learner-centered methods to teach user-centered design is introduced. The focus is on three tasks to identify the application of theoretical and…

  18. The Precarious Question of Black Cultural Centers Versus Multicultural Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Princes, Carolyn D. W.

    This paper discusses the role of black cultural centers on university campuses, focusing on whether black cultural centers or multicultural centers best meet the needs of an increasingly diverse student body and society. It examines the historical role of black cultural centers as vehicles to promote educational opportunity, student retention, and…

  19. Economics of data center optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huff, Lisa

    2016-03-01

    Traffic to and from data centers is now reaching Zettabytes/year. Even the smallest of businesses now rely on data centers for revenue generation. And, the largest data centers today are orders of magnitude larger than the supercomputing centers of a few years ago. Until quite recently, for most data center managers, optical data centers were nice to dream about, but not really essential. Today, the all-optical data center - perhaps even an all-single mode fiber (SMF) data center is something that even managers of medium-sized data centers should be considering. Economical transceivers are the key to increased adoption of data center optics. An analysis of current and near future data center optics economics will be discussed in this paper.

  20. The dependence of Islamic and conventional stocks: A copula approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razak, Ruzanna Ab; Ismail, Noriszura

    2015-09-01

    Recent studies have found that Islamic stocks are dependent on conventional stocks and they appear to be more risky. In Asia, particularly in Islamic countries, research on dependence involving Islamic and non-Islamic stock markets is limited. The objective of this study is to investigate the dependence between financial times stock exchange Hijrah Shariah index and conventional stocks (EMAS and KLCI indices). Using the copula approach and a time series model for each marginal distribution function, the copula parameters were estimated. The Elliptical copula was selected to present the dependence structure of each pairing of the Islamic stock and conventional stock. Specifically, the Islamic versus conventional stocks (Shariah-EMAS and Shariah-KLCI) had lower dependence compared to conventional versus conventional stocks (EMAS-KLCI). These findings suggest that the occurrence of shocks in a conventional stock will not have strong impact on the Islamic stock.

  1. Nicolaus Copernicus Astronomical Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Nicolaus Copernicus Astronomical Center is the largest astronomical institution in Poland, located in Warsaw and founded in 1956. At present it is a government-funded research institute supervised by the Polish Academy of Sciences and licensed by the government of Poland to award PhD and doctor habilitatus degrees in astronomy and astrophysics. In September 1999 staff included 21 senior scientist...

  2. Johnson Space Center Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gafka, Tammy; Terrier, Doug; Smith, James

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation is a review of the work of Johnson Space Center. It includes a section on technology development areas, (i.e., composite structures, non-destructive evaluation, applied nanotechnology, additive manufacturing, and fracture and fatigue analytical methods), a section on structural analysis capabilities within NASA/JSC and a section on Friction stir welding and laser peening.

  3. Community Educational Resource Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, Michael J.

    Described is the community educational resource center (CERC), defined to be a multipurpose, community-based facility that delivers a coordinated system of special educational resources, human and nonhuman, to instructional and administrative personnel confronted by educationally handicapped children. Covered in the description are program need in…

  4. Vocabulary at the Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benjamin, Amy; Crow, John T.

    2009-01-01

    In "Vocabulary at the Center," Amy Benjamin and John T. Crow identify the most effective methods for extending the use of new words--in every grade level and across all subjects. This book shows teachers how to use context-driven exercises to incorporate new words into other areas of study. This book contains information about the authors, an…

  5. Evaluating NPS Visitor Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zube, E. H.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    The recent efforts of the National Park Service to assess the quality of their design programs through a comprehensive evaluation of twelve visitor centers are detailed. Overall findings provide strong support for the design programs employed by the National Park Service. (BT)

  6. Libraries/Media Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School & University, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Presents K-12 and college libraries/media centers considered outstanding in a competition, which judged the most outstanding learning environments at educational institutions nationwide. Jurors spent two days reviewing projects, highlighting concepts and ideas that made them exceptional. For each citation, the article offers information on the…

  7. Science and Technology Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danilov, Victor J.

    Science and technology centers, which are relative newcomers to the museum field, differ from traditional museums in a number of respects. They are concerned with furthering public understanding and appreciation of the physical and biological sciences, engineering, technology, and health and seek to accomplish this goal by making museums both…

  8. Media Center: Operations Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dependents Schools (DOD), Washington, DC.

    This guide to basic technical procedures recommended in the operation of within-school media centers is intended for all Department of Defense Dependent Schools (DoDDS) media specialists, clerks, aides, and technicians. The first four sections refer to the general media program functions identified in the related manual, "A is for Apple:…

  9. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    SciTech Connect

    2013-06-01

    Fact sheet describes the Alternative Fuels Data Center, which provides information, data, and tools to help fleets and other transportation decision makers find ways to reduce petroleum consumption through the use of alternative and renewable fuels, advanced vehicles, and other fuel-saving measures.

  10. Precision Joining Center

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, J.W.; Westphal, D.A.

    1991-08-01

    A workshop to obtain input from industry on the establishment of the Precision Joining Center (PJC) was held on July 10--12, 1991. The PJC is a center for training Joining Technologists in advanced joining techniques and concepts in order to promote the competitiveness of US industry. The center will be established as part of the DOE Defense Programs Technology Commercialization Initiative, and operated by EG G Rocky Flats in cooperation with the American Welding Society and the Colorado School of Mines Center for Welding and Joining Research. The overall objectives of the workshop were to validate the need for a Joining Technologists to fill the gap between the welding operator and the welding engineer, and to assure that the PJC will train individuals to satisfy that need. The consensus of the workshop participants was that the Joining Technologist is a necessary position in industry, and is currently used, with some variation, by many companies. It was agreed that the PJC core curriculum, as presented, would produce a Joining Technologist of value to industries that use precision joining techniques. The advantage of the PJC would be to train the Joining Technologist much more quickly and more completely. The proposed emphasis of the PJC curriculum on equipment intensive and hands-on training was judged to be essential.

  11. INTERMOUNTAIN INDUSTRIAL ASSESSMENT CENTER

    SciTech Connect

    MELINDA KRAHENBUHL

    2010-05-28

    The U. S. Department of Energy’s Intermountain Industrial Assessment Center (IIAC) at the University of Utah has been providing eligible small- and medium-sized manufacturers with no-cost plant assessments since 2001, offering cost-effective recommendations for improvements in the areas of energy efficiency, pollution prevention, and productivity improvement.

  12. Organizing a Learning Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Harold S.

    The organization and development of instructional materials centers (IMC's) as a part of a program of educational improvement is discussed. Analysis is made of the advantages, disadvantages, and organization of centralized IMC's, decentralized IMC's, and coordinated IMC's, with recommendations being made for their development. The operation of…

  13. Employability Skills Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweetwater Union High School District, Chula Vista, CA.

    The Employability Skills Center (ESC) of the Division of Adult and Continuing Education (DACE) of the Sweetwater Union High School District (California) was created out of a need to help adult students develop the basic skills that are required for success in their chosen vocational programs but not taught in regular adult basic education classes.…

  14. HARVARD PARTICLE CENTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Center encompassed four highly interdisciplinary and integrated projects designed to address the four scientific questions presented above. Project 1 investigated the health effects of PM in the Normative Aging Study cohort, in Eastern Massachusetts; 

  15. Learning Center Unlimited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vivrette, Lyndon

    Cuesta College's Learning Center is designed to totally support the instructional methods of each instructor, to meet the individual learning and study needs of each student, and to provide cultural and educational resource opportunities to the community. The facility is to be a traditional library, whose total media storage and retrieval capacity…

  16. A Learner Centered Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballard, Florence N.

    This paper proposes a learner-centered educational system, focusing on aspects that are intrinsically associated with the modern educational system, such as the curriculum, school community, parents, learners, and educational support personnel. It examines: primary level preparation (literacy, numeracy, and basic knowledge; examination and…

  17. Research: Hyperactivity, Placement Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nation's Schools and Colleges, 1975

    1975-01-01

    A diet that emphasizes the elimination of food containing artificial coloring and flavoring from meals served to hyperactive children has met with success in preliminary studies; college placement centers are advised to shift their emphasis from job research and counseling. (Author/MLF)

  18. Starting a sleep center.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Lawrence J; Valentine, Paul S

    2010-05-01

    The demand for sleep medicine services has grown tremendously during the last decade and will likely continue. To date, growth in demand has been met by growth in the number of new sleep centers. The need for more new centers will be dependent on market drivers that include increasing regulatory requirements, personnel shortages, integration of home sleep testing, changes in reimbursement, a shift in emphasis from diagnostics to treatment, and an increased consumer focus on sleep. The decision to open a new center should be based on understanding the market dynamics, completing a market analysis, and developing a business plan. The business plan should include an overview of the facility, a personnel and organizational structure, an evaluation of the business environment, a financial plan, a description of services provided, and a strategy for obtaining, managing, and extending a referral base. Implementation of the business plan and successful operation require ongoing planning and monitoring of operational parameters. The need for new sleep centers will likely continue, but the shifting market dynamics indicate a greater need for understanding the marketplace and careful planning. PMID:20442123

  19. School Based Health Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children's Aid Society, 2012

    2012-01-01

    School Based Health Centers (SBHC) are considered by experts as one of the most effective and efficient ways to provide preventive health care to children. Few programs are as successful in delivering health care to children at no cost to the patient, and where they are: in school. For many underserved children, The Children's Aid Society's…

  20. A University Learning Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levinson, Betty; Pfeffer, Carol

    The Learning Center, established one year ago to serve the Special Entry Students at U.C.L.A., is described. The development of a staff capable of responding to the particular needs of this population is briefly discussed and the resultimg teamwork informally evaluated. In learning how to assist these students to survive in their new university…

  1. Queering the Writing Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denny, Harry

    2010-01-01

    Composition classrooms and writing centers are spaces where negotiation of academic, social, cultural, and political identities are ubiquitous, yet research has not produced adequate theory and practice to help tutors and writers navigate identity production and its politics. This article seeks to begin conversations that might lead to better…

  2. DISABILITY STATISTICS CENTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the Disability Statistics Center is to produce and disseminate statistical information on disability and the status of people with disabilities in American society and to establish and monitor indicators of how conditions are changing over time to meet their health...

  3. The Rural Information Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John, Patricia La Caille

    1989-01-01

    Describes the events that led to the creation of the Rural Information Center (RIC), a joint venture between the Extension Service and the National Agricultural Library to provide information to government officials involved in rural development. The databases accessed by RIC are described, and plans for a gateway system and network of all…

  4. Clonal Tests of Conventional Kinesin Function during Cell Proliferation and Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Brendza, Robert P.; Sheehan, Kathy B.; Turner, F.R.; Saxton, William M.

    2000-01-01

    Null mutations in the Drosophila Kinesin heavy chain gene (Khc), which are lethal during the second larval instar, have shown that conventional kinesin is critical for fast axonal transport in neurons, but its functions elsewhere are uncertain. To test other tissues, single imaginal cells in young larvae were rendered null for Khc by mitotic recombination. Surprisingly, the null cells produced large clones of adult tissue. The rates of cell proliferation were not reduced, indicating that conventional kinesin is not essential for cell growth or division. This suggests that in undifferentiated cells vesicle transport from the Golgi to either the endoplasmic reticulum or the plasma membrane can proceed at normal rates without conventional kinesin. In adult eye clones produced by null founder cells, there were some defects in differentiation that caused mild ultrastructural changes, but they were not consistent with serious problems in the positioning or transport of endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria, or vesicles. In contrast, defective cuticle deposition by highly elongated Khc null bristle shafts suggests that conventional kinesin is critical for proper secretory vesicle transport in some cell types, particularly ones that must build and maintain long cytoplasmic extensions. The ubiquity and evolutionary conservation of kinesin heavy chain argue for functions in all cells. We suggest interphase organelle movements away from the cell center are driven by multilayered transport mechanisms; that is, individual organelles can use kinesin-related proteins and myosins, as well as conventional kinesin, to move toward the cell periphery. In this case, other motors can compensate for the loss of conventional kinesin except in cells that have extremely long transport tracks. PMID:10749933

  5. The framework convention on climate change a convention for sustainable energy development

    SciTech Connect

    Hassing, P.; Mendis, M.S.; Menezes, L.M.; Gowen, M.M.

    1996-12-31

    In 1992, over 165 countries signed the United Nation`s Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC). These countries have implicitly agreed to alter their `anthropogenic activities` that increase the emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs) into the atmosphere and deplete the natural sinks for these same greenhouse gases. The energy sector is the major source of the primary anthropogenic GHGs, notably carbon dioxide and methane. The Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries presently account for the major share of GHG emissions from the energy sector. However, the developing countries are also rapidly increasing their contribution to global GHG emissions as a result of their growing consumption of fossil-based energy. Implementation of this global climate change convention, if seriously undertaken by the signatory countries, will necessitate changes in the energy mix and production processes in both the OECD and developing countries. International actions also will be needed to put the world on a sustainable energy path. By adoption of the FCCC, representatives of the world`s populations have indicated their desire to move toward such a path. The Conference of Parties to the Convention has just concluded its second meeting, at which the Parties endorsed a U.S. proposal that legally binding and enforceable emissions targets be adopted. It is clearly evident that the FCCC, as presently operating, cannot achieve the objective of stabilizing GHG concentrations in the atmosphere unless it adopts a major protocol to significantly reduce anthropogenic GHG emissions. As demonstrated here, a good starting point in determining the steps the Parties to the FCCC should take in designing a protocol is to remember that the primary source of anthropogenic GHG emissions is the consumption of fossil fuels and the future growth of GHG emissions will derive primarily from the ever-increasing demand for and consumption of these fuels.

  6. American Overseas Research Centers Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Postsecondary Education, US Department of Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The American Overseas Research Centers Program provides grants to overseas research centers that are consortia of U.S. institutions of higher education to enable the centers to promote postgraduate research, exchanges, and area studies. Eligible applicants are those consortia of U.S. institutions of higher education centers that: (1) Receive more…

  7. Writing Centers: Theory and Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Gary A., Ed.

    Prepared by writing center directors, the articles in this book examine the pedagogical theories of tutorial services and relate them to actual center practices. The 19 articles are arranged into three categories: writing center theory, writing center administration, and special concerns. Specific topics discussed in the articles include the…

  8. Teachers' Centers Exchange Directory. 1982.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piper, Barbara

    The 198 teacher centers listed in this directory comprise a network of teacher center practitioners who communicate with the Teachers' Centers Exchange (Far West Laboratory for Educational Research and Development, San Francisco, California). Centers in the United States and Canada are listed alphabetically by state. Information on each center…

  9. 78 FR 64516 - Center for Scientific Review; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-29

    ... Panel, October 24, 2013, 08:00 a.m. to October 25, 2013, 05:00 p.m., Embassy Suites DC Convention Center..., 2013, 78 FR 60298. The meeting will be held at the National Institutes of Health, 6701 Rockledge Drive... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Center for Scientific Review; Amended Notice of...

  10. 78 FR 66018 - Center for Scientific Review; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-04

    ..., 78 FR 59361. The meeting will be held at the Embassy Suites DC Convention Center Hotel, 900 10th... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Center for Scientific Review; Amended Notice of...

  11. The consistency of the current conventional celestial and terrestrial reference frames and the conventional EOP series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinkelmann, R.; Belda-Palazon, S.; Ferrándiz, J.; Schuh, H.

    2015-08-01

    For applications in Earth sciences, navigation, and astronomy the celestial (ICRF) and terrestrial (ITRF) reference frames as well as the orientation among them, the Earth orientation parameters (EOP), have to be consistent at the level of 1 mm and 0.1 mm/yr (GGOS recommendations). We assess the effect of unmodelled geophysical signals in the regularized coordinates and the sensitivity with respect to different a priori EOP and celestial reference frames. The EOP are determined using the same VLBI data but with station coordinates fixed on different TRFs. The conclusion is that within the time span of data incorporated into ITRF2008 (Altamimi, et al., 2011) the ITRF2008 and the IERS 08 C04 are consistent. This consistency involves that non-linear station motion such as unmodelled geophysical signals partly affect the IERS 08 C04 EOP. There are small but not negligible inconsistencies between the conventional celestial reference frame, ICRF2 (Fey, et al., 2009), the ITRF2008 and the conventional EOP that are quantified by comparing VTRF2008 (Böckmann, et al., 2010) and ITRF2008.

  12. Microdosimetric comparison of scanned and conventional proton beams used in radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Dicello, John F; Gersey, Bradford B; Gridley, Daila S; Coutrakon, George B; Lesyna, David; Pisacane, Vincent L; Robertson, James B; Schulte, Reinhard W; Slater, Jerry D; Wroe, Andrew J; Slater, James M

    2011-02-01

    Multiple groups have hypothesised that the use of scanning beams in proton therapy will reduce the neutron component of secondary radiation in comparison with conventional methods with a corresponding reduction in risks of radiation-induced cancers. Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) has had FDA marketing clearance for scanning beams since 1988 and an experimental scanning beam has been available at the LLUMC proton facility since 2001. The facility has a dedicated research room with a scanning beam and fast switching that allows its use during patient treatments. Dosimetric measurements and microdosimetric distributions for a scanned beam are presented and compared with beams produced with the conventional methods presently used in proton therapy. PMID:21362697

  13. Test Results of a Compact Conventional Modulator for Two-Klystron Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, S

    2004-05-04

    Modulator technology has not advanced greatly over the last 30 years. Today, with the advent of the High Voltage, High Power IGBT there are several approaches for a solid state ON/OFF switched modulator. Klystron and accelerator technology is forcing voltages and peak powers higher such as the demand for 500 kV and 500 amperes peak to power two X-Band klystrons. Conventional technology (line-type modulators) were never overly concerned about rise time and efficiency. A few years ago, the klystron department at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) undertook an investigation into what could be done in a conventional modulator at 500 kV. We have reported on test bed measurements and shown both conceptual and hardware pictures during design and construction. We have now completed the modulator tank.

  14. Aperture center energy showcase

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, J. J.

    2012-03-01

    Sandia and Forest City have established a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA), and the partnership provides a unique opportunity to take technology research and development from demonstration to application in a sustainable community. A project under that CRADA, Aperture Center Energy Showcase, offers a means to develop exhibits and demonstrations that present feedback to community members, Sandia customers, and visitors. The technologies included in the showcase focus on renewable energy and its efficiency, and resilience. These technologies are generally scalable, and provide secure, efficient solutions to energy production, delivery, and usage. In addition to establishing an Energy Showcase, support offices and conference capabilities that facilitate research, collaboration, and demonstration were created. The Aperture Center project focuses on establishing a location that provides outreach, awareness, and demonstration of research findings, emerging technologies, and project developments to Sandia customers, visitors, and Mesa del Sol community members.

  15. The Guiding Center Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, Thomas Sunn

    The guiding center approximation for charged particles in strong magnetic fields is introduced here. This approximation is very useful in situations where the charged particles are very well magnetized, such that the gyration (Larmor) radius is small compared to relevant length scales of the confinement device, and the gyration is fast relative to relevant timescales in an experiment. The basics of motion in a straight, uniform, static magnetic field are reviewed, and are used as a starting point for analyzing more complicated situations where more forces are present, as well as inhomogeneities in the magnetic field -- magnetic curvature as well as gradients in the magnetic field strength. The first and second adiabatic invariant are introduced, and slowly time-varying fields are also covered. As an example of the use of the guiding center approximation, the confinement concept of the cylindrical magnetic mirror is analyzed.

  16. National Data Buoy Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC), part of the National Weather Service, is an agency within the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and is supported by personnel and ships of the U.S. Coast Guard. NDBC operates automated observing systems that measure environmental conditions from coastal and remote marine areas. These measurements support the requirements of national and international scope and are used for forecasting, public advisories and warning, and in climate and research programs.

  17. Center for Functional Nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect

    BNL

    2008-08-12

    Staff from Brookhaven's new Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) describe how this advanced facility will focus on the development and understanding of nanoscale materials. The CFN provides state-of-the-art capabilities for the fabrication and study of nanoscale materials, with an emphasis on atomic-level tailoring to achieve desired properties and functions. The overarching scientific theme of the CFN is the development and understanding of nanoscale materials that address the Nation's challenges in energy security.

  18. COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE CENTER

    SciTech Connect

    DAVENPORT,J.

    2004-11-01

    The Brookhaven Computational Science Center brings together researchers in biology, chemistry, physics, and medicine with applied mathematicians and computer scientists to exploit the remarkable opportunities for scientific discovery which have been enabled by modern computers. These opportunities are especially great in computational biology and nanoscience, but extend throughout science and technology and include for example, nuclear and high energy physics, astrophysics, materials and chemical science, sustainable energy, environment, and homeland security.

  19. Center for Functional Nanomaterials

    ScienceCinema

    BNL

    2009-09-01

    Staff from Brookhaven's new Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) describe how this advanced facility will focus on the development and understanding of nanoscale materials. The CFN provides state-of-the-art capabilities for the fabrication and study of nanoscale materials, with an emphasis on atomic-level tailoring to achieve desired properties and functions. The overarching scientific theme of the CFN is the development and understanding of nanoscale materials that address the Nation's challenges in energy security.

  20. IAA Correlator Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surkis, Igor; Ken, Voitsekh; Melnikov, Alexey; Mishin, Vladimir; Sokolova, Nadezda; Shantyr, Violet; Zimovsky, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    The activities of the six-station IAA RAS correlator include regular processing of national geodetic VLBI programs Ru-E, Ru-U, and Ru-F. The Ru-U sessions have been transferred in e-VLBI mode and correlated in the IAA Correlator Center automatically since 2011. The DiFX software correlator is used at the IAA in some astrophysical experiments.

  1. Deoxynivalenol contents in foodstuffs of organical and conventional production.

    PubMed

    Schollenberger, M; Müller, H-M; Drochner, W

    2003-03-01

    Samples of wheat flour, bread, noodles, rice, corn and corn based foods as well as oats and oats based foods of conventional and organical production were analysed for trichothecene toxins. In wheat flour, bread and noodels the median deoxynivalenol (DON) contents were lower in ecological than in conventional products with significant differences for what flour and bread. To estimate toxin uptake of the consumer a corrected mean of DON concentration was calculated, which was lower in wheat flour and bread for ecological than for conventional products. In noodles the corrected mean of organical products was higher than that of conventional ones. PMID:23604666

  2. Environmental and safety obligations of the Chemical Weapons Convention

    SciTech Connect

    Tanzman, E.A.

    1994-04-07

    Among its many unique and precedent-setting provisions, the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) includes important requirements for States Parties to protect the public safety and the environment in the course of carrying out the treaty. These obligations will apply to the destruction of chemical weapons, of former chemical weapons production facilities, and to other activities under the Convention such as the verification scheme. This morning, I will briefly discuss the Convention`s safety and environmental obligations, concentrating on their effects in this country as the United States chemical weapons stockpile is destroyed.

  3. Initial comparisons of modular-sized, integrated utility systems and conventional systems for several building types

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, H. E.; Monford, L. G., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The results of a study of the application of a modular integrated utility system to six typical building types are compared with the application of a conventional utility system to the same facilities. The effects of varying the size and climatic location of the buildings and the size of the powerplants are presented. Construction details of the six building types (garden apartments, a high rise office building, high rise apartments, a shopping center, a high school, and a hospital) and typical site and floor plans are provided. The environmental effects, the unit size determination, and the market potential are discussed. The cost effectiveness of the various design options is not considered.

  4. Emissions and new technology programs for conventional spark-ignition aircraft engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintucky, W. T.

    1976-01-01

    A long-range technology plan in support of general aviation engines was formulated and is being implemented at the Lewis Research Center. The overall program was described, and that part of the program that represents the in-house effort at Lewis was presented in detail. Three areas of government and industry effort involving conventional general-aviation piston engines were part of a coordinated overall plan: (1) FAA/NASA joint program, (2) NASA contract exhaust emissions pollution reduction program, and (3) NASA in-house emissions reduction and new technology program.

  5. 3. FLAME DEFLECTOR AT CENTER, CONNECTING TUNNEL AT CENTER RIGHT, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. FLAME DEFLECTOR AT CENTER, CONNECTING TUNNEL AT CENTER RIGHT, VIEW TOWARDS SOUTHWEST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-1, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  6. CUPOLA, CENTER RIGHT; GONDOLA LIFT MECHANISM, CENTER LEFT. NOTE PARTIAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CUPOLA, CENTER RIGHT; GONDOLA LIFT MECHANISM, CENTER LEFT. NOTE PARTIAL VIEW OF LAMELLA DOME FRAMING COMPRESSION RING AT CROWN AT LOWER RIGHT. - Houston Astrodome, 8400 Kirby Drive, Houston, Harris County, TX

  7. 17. Station Power Center 1 and Load Center 1, view ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Station Power Center 1 and Load Center 1, view to the northwest. The power center is the cabinet on the right and the load center is the cabinet on the left of the photograph. A door to the generator barrel of Unit 1 is visible in the background. - Washington Water Power Clark Fork River Cabinet Gorge Hydroelectric Development, Powerhouse, North Bank of Clark Fork River at Cabinet Gorge, Cabinet, Bonner County, ID

  8. Solar Technology Center

    SciTech Connect

    Boehm, Bob

    2011-04-27

    The Department of Energy, Golden Field Office, awarded a grant to the UNLV Research Foundation (UNLVRF) on August 1, 2005 to develop a solar and renewable energy information center. The Solar Technology Center (STC) is to be developed in two phases, with Phase I consisting of all activities necessary to determine feasibility of the project, including design and engineering, identification of land access issues and permitting necessary to determine project viability without permanently disturbing the project site, and completion of a National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Environmental Assessment. Phase II is the installation of infrastructure and related structures, which leads to commencement of operations of the STC. The STC is located in the Boulder City designated 3,000-acre Eldorado Valley Energy Zone, approximately 15 miles southwest of downtown Boulder City and fronting on Eldorado Valley Drive. The 33-acre vacant parcel has been leased to the Nevada Test Site Development Corporation (NTSDC) by Boulder City to accommodate a planned facility that will be synergistic with present and planned energy projects in the Zone. The parcel will be developed by the UNLVRF. The NTSDC is the economic development arm of the UNLVRF. UNLVRF will be the entity responsible for overseeing the lease and the development project to assure compliance with the lease stipulations established by Boulder City. The STC will be operated and maintained by University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) and its Center for Energy Research (UNLV-CER). Land parcels in the Eldorado Valley Energy Zone near the 33-acre lease are committed to the construction and operation of an electrical grid connected solar energy production facility. Other projects supporting renewable and solar technologies have been developed within the energy zone, with several more developments in the horizon.

  9. COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE CENTER

    SciTech Connect

    DAVENPORT, J.

    2005-11-01

    The Brookhaven Computational Science Center brings together researchers in biology, chemistry, physics, and medicine with applied mathematicians and computer scientists to exploit the remarkable opportunities for scientific discovery which have been enabled by modern computers. These opportunities are especially great in computational biology and nanoscience, but extend throughout science and technology and include, for example, nuclear and high energy physics, astrophysics, materials and chemical science, sustainable energy, environment, and homeland security. To achieve our goals we have established a close alliance with applied mathematicians and computer scientists at Stony Brook and Columbia Universities.

  10. Financing a Simulation Center.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Shawn; Mohsin, Adnan; Jones, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    As simulation-based training has become established within medical and health professional disciplines, skills training laboratories have become a standard in surgery training programs. In 2008, the American College of Surgeons and Association of Program Directors in Surgery developed a simulation-based surgical skills curriculum; the Residency Review Committee for Surgery of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education mandated access to skills laboratories for all surgery programs. Establishing a surgical skills laboratory and adapting the training curriculum requires a significant amount of resources. This article discusses the financial aspects of establishing a training center, from funding opportunities to budgeting considerations. PMID:26210971

  11. European drug information centers.

    PubMed

    Markind, J E; Stachnik, J M

    1996-09-01

    Drug information is a clinical specialty throughout the United States and Europe. This professional support service not only addresses drug information requests, but also provides pharmacy (drug) and therapeutics support, newsletter publication, fee-for-service consultation, education, drug policy development, and research. Although the primary services of drug information centers (DICs) in Europe are similar to those in the United States, substantial differences have been reported. Recent surveys have compared the locations, resources, staff, and services of the DICs throughout Europe. DICs in the United States and Europe play a pivotal role in the provision of pharmaceutical care to patients as well as providing support to hospital functions. PMID:9025433

  12. Interferometry science center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sargent, A. I.

    2002-01-01

    The Interferometry Science Center (ISC) is operated jointly by Caltech and JPL and is part of NASA's Navigator Program. The ISC has been created to facilitate the timely and successful execution of scientific investigations within the Navigator program, particularly those that rely on observations from NASA's interferometer projects. Currently, ISC is expected to provide full life cycle support for the Keck Interferometer, the Starlight mission, the Space Interferometry Mission, and the Terrestrial Planet Finder Mission. The nature and goals of ISc will be described.

  13. PMD IVS Analysis Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tornatore, Vincenza

    2013-01-01

    The main activities carried out at the PMD (Politecnico di Milano DIIAR) IVS Analysis Center during 2012 are briefly higlighted, and future plans for 2013 are sketched out. We principally continued to process European VLBI sessions using different approaches to evaluate possible differences due to various processing choices. Then VLBI solutions were also compared to the GPS ones as well as the ones calculated at co-located sites. Concerning the observational aspect, several tests were performed to identify the most suitable method to achieve the highest possible accuracy in the determination of GNSS (GLOBAL NAVIGATION SATELLITE SYSTEM) satellite positions using the VLBI technique.

  14. INDUSTRIAL ASSESSMENT CENTER PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    ASFAW BEYENE

    2008-09-29

    Since its establishment in 1990, San Diego State University’s Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) has served close to 400 small and medium-sized manufacturing plants in Southern California. SDSU/IAC’s efforts to transfer state-of-the-art technologies to industry have increased revenues, cultivated creativity, improved efficiencies, and benefited the environment. A substantial benefit from the program has been the ongoing training of engineering faculty and students. During this funding cycle, SDSU/IAC has trained 31 students, 7 of the graduate. A total of 92 assessments and 108 assessment days were completed, resulting in 638 assessment recommendations.

  15. A Learning Resource Center for International Education: The Heritage Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, Dorothy Prince; And Others

    The Heritage Center, located at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical University, is a learning resource center which provides an international dimension in teacher education. Serving North Carolina and southern Virginia, the Heritage Center houses a collection of more than 3,500 art and craft items from more than 30 African nations, New…

  16. 3. CONNECTING TUNNEL AT BOTTOM CENTER TO CENTER, CONTROL BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. CONNECTING TUNNEL AT BOTTOM CENTER TO CENTER, CONTROL BUILDING B AT CENTER, WATER TANK TO UPPER LEFT, VIEW TOWARDS WEST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Control Building B, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  17. Self-Access Centers: Maximizing Learners' Access to Center Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMurry, Benjamin L.; Tanner, Mark W.; Anderson, Neil J.

    2009-01-01

    Although some students have discovered how to use self-access centers effectively, the majority appear to be unaware of available resources. A website and database of materials were created to help students locate materials and use the Self-Access Study Center (SASC) at Brigham Young University's English Language Center (ELC) more effectively.…

  18. Energy Demands and Efficiency Strategies in Data Center Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Shehabi, Arman

    2009-09-01

    Information technology (IT) is becoming increasingly pervasive throughout society as more data is digitally processed, stored, and transferred. The infrastructure that supports IT activity is growing accordingly, and data center energy demands haveincreased by nearly a factor of four over the past decade. Data centers house IT equipment and require significantly more energy to operate per unit floor area thanconventional buildings. The economic and environmental ramifications of continued data center growth motivate the need to explore energy-efficient methods to operate these buildings. A substantial portion of data center energy use is dedicated to removing the heat that is generated by the IT equipment. Using economizers to introduce large airflow rates of outside air during favorable weather could substantially reduce the energy consumption of data center cooling. Cooling buildings with economizers is an established energy saving measure, but in data centers this strategy is not widely used, partly owing to concerns that the large airflow rates would lead to increased indoor levels of airborne particles, which could damage IT equipment. The environmental conditions typical of data centers and the associated potential for equipment failure, however, are not well characterized. This barrier to economizer implementation illustrates the general relationship between energy use and indoor air quality in building design and operation. This dissertation investigates how building design and operation influence energy use and indoor air quality in data centers and provides strategies to improve both design goals simultaneously.As an initial step toward understanding data center air quality, measurements of particle concentrations were made at multiple operating northern California data centers. Ratios of measured particle concentrations in conventional data centers to the corresponding outside concentrations were significantly lower than those reported in the literature

  19. 40 CFR 80.90 - Conventional gasoline baseline emissions determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Conventional gasoline baseline... gasoline baseline emissions determination. (a) Annual average baseline values. For any facility of a refiner or importer of conventional gasoline, the annual average baseline values of the facility's...

  20. 40 CFR 80.90 - Conventional gasoline baseline emissions determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Conventional gasoline baseline... gasoline baseline emissions determination. (a) Annual average baseline values. For any facility of a refiner or importer of conventional gasoline, the annual average baseline values of the facility's...

  1. 19 CFR 114.2 - Customs Conventions and Agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Customs Conventions and Agreements. 114.2 Section 114.2 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY CARNETS General Provisions § 114.2 Customs Conventions and Agreements....

  2. 26 CFR 521.103 - Scope of the convention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Danish Corporations § 521.103 Scope of the convention. (a) The primary purposes of the convention, to be... having no permanent establishment in the United States (Article III); (2) Income derived by a nonresident... registered in Denmark (Article V); (3) Interest and royalties (including motion picture film rentals)...

  3. 26 CFR 509.103 - Scope of the convention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... convention. The primary purposes of the convention, to be accomplished on a reciprocal basis, are to avoid... profits of a Swiss enterprise having no permanent establishment in the United States (Article III); (2... (Article V); (3) Patent and copyright royalties, and other like amounts, including motion picture...

  4. 19 CFR 114.2 - Customs Conventions and Agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Customs Conventions and Agreements. 114.2 Section 114.2 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY CARNETS General Provisions § 114.2 Customs Conventions and Agreements....

  5. 19 CFR 114.2 - Customs Conventions and Agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Customs Conventions and Agreements. 114.2 Section 114.2 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY CARNETS General Provisions § 114.2 Customs Conventions and Agreements....

  6. 77 FR 2270 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Firearms Convention

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-17

    ... Bureau of Industry and Security Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Firearms Convention... the Illicit Manufacturing of and Trafficking in Firearms Ammunition, Explosives, and Other Related Materials (Firearms Convention). Sections 742.17 and 748.14 of the Export Administration Regulations...

  7. TRACE METALS AND STATIONARY CONVENTIONAL COMBUSTION PROCESSES: VOLUME 2. BIBLIOGRAPHY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a search of U.S. literature to identify published information about trace metals and Stationary Conventional Combustion Processes (SCCPs). It summarizes what has been published about ambient trace metals in air, water, and soils, and reviews convention...

  8. But: Do Age and Working Memory Influence Conventional Implicature Processing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janssens, Leen; Drooghmans, Stephanie; Schaeken, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Conventional implicatures are omnipresent in daily life communication but experimental research on this topic is sparse, especially research with children. The aim of this study was to investigate if eight- to twelve-year-old children spontaneously make the conventional implicature induced by "but," "so," and…

  9. 19 CFR 114.2 - Customs Conventions and Agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Customs Conventions and Agreements. 114.2 Section 114.2 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY CARNETS General Provisions § 114.2 Customs Conventions and Agreements....

  10. 19 CFR 114.2 - Customs Conventions and Agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Customs Conventions and Agreements. 114.2 Section 114.2 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY CARNETS General Provisions § 114.2 Customs Conventions and Agreements....

  11. Response of conventional chondrosarcoma to gemcitabine alone: a case report.

    PubMed

    Provenzano, Salvatore; Hindi, Nadia; Morosi, Carlo; Ghilardi, Mara; Collini, Paola; Casali, Paolo G; Stacchiotti, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Conventional skeletal chondrosarcoma is a bone neoplasm, which is poorly sensitive to anthracyclines-based chemotherapy. We report on an 18-month-long tumour response to gemcitabine as single agent in a young patient with an advanced secondary peripheral conventional chondrosarcoma, previously treated unsuccessfully with anthracyclines, ifosfamide, platinum, etoposide. PMID:25793102

  12. ACTE Convention and Career-Tech Expo: Racing toward Charlotte

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tech Directions, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This article reports on Association for Career and Technical Education's (ACTE's) annual convention to be held this year in Charlotte, North Carolina, from December 4-6. To provide the greatest benefits to attending educators, ACTE will again partner with several other associations at this year's convention. ACTE has lined up three speakers for…

  13. Defect Detectability Improvement for Conventional Friction Stir Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Chris

    2013-01-01

    This research was conducted to evaluate the effects of defect detectability via phased array ultrasound technology in conventional friction stir welds by comparing conventionally prepped post weld surfaces to a machined surface finish. A machined surface is hypothesized to improve defect detectability and increase material strength.

  14. Parametric Investigations of Non-Conventional Hall Thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Raitses, Y.; Fisch, N.J.

    2001-01-12

    Hall thrusters might better scale to low power with non-conventional geometry. A 9 cm cylindrical, ceramic-channel, Hall thruster with a cusp-type magnetic field distribution has been investigated. It exhibits discharge characteristics similar to conventional coaxial Hall thrusters, but does not expose as much channel surface. Significantly, its operation is not accompanied by large amplitude discharge low frequency oscillations.

  15. COMPARISON OF CONVENTIONAL AND PROGRAMED INSTRUCTION IN TEACHING AVIONICS FUNDAMENTALS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LONGO, ALEXANDER A.; MAYO, G. DOUGLAS

    THIS STUDY, PART OF A SERIES INVOLVING A VARIETY OF COURSE CONTENT AND TRAINING CONDITIONS, COMPARED PROGRAMED INSTRUCTION WITH CONVENTIONAL INSTRUCTION TO GAIN INFORMATION ABOUT THE GENERAL UTILITY OF PROGRAMED METHODS. THE PERFORMANCE OF 200 NAVY TRAINEES TAKING 26 HOURS OF CONVENTIONAL INSTRUCTION IN ELECTRICAL CALCULATIONS, DIRECT CURRENT…

  16. 7 CFR 7.10 - Conduct of county convention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Conduct of county convention. 7.10 Section 7.10... CONSERVATION STATE, COUNTY AND COMMUNITY COMMITTEES § 7.10 Conduct of county convention. (a) The county committee serving at the time shall be responsible for designating the place at which the county...

  17. Exploring Shakespeare: Dynamic Drama Conventions in Teaching "Romeo and Juliet."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Sophie

    1999-01-01

    Outlines a Year 10 unit on teaching "Romeo and Juliet" based on standard experiential conventions which include the following: (1) Teacher in Role, (2) Soundscaping, (3) Freeze Frames, (4) Alter Egos, (5) Hot Seating, and (6) Role Playing. Suggests that these conventions can be applied to the study of any Shakespearean play. (NH)

  18. Basin Centered Gas Systems of the U.S.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Popov, Marin A.; Nuccio, Vito F.; Dyman, Thaddeus S.; Gognat, Timothy A.; Johnson, Ronald C.; Schmoker, James W.; Wilson, Michael S.; Bartberger, Charles

    2001-01-01

    Basin-center accumulations, a type of continuous accumulation, have spatial dimensions equal to or exceeding those of conventional oil and gas accumulations, but unlike conventional fields, cannot be represented in terms of discrete, countable units delineated by downdip hydrocarbon-water contacts. Common geologic and production characteristics of continuous accumulations include their occurrence downdip from water-saturated rocks, lack of traditional trap or seal, relatively low matrix permeability, abnormal pressures (high or low), local interbedded source rocks, large in-place hydrocarbon volumes, and low recovery factors. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown, West Virginia, is currently re-evaluating the resource potential of basin-center gas accumulations in the U.S. in light of changing geologic perceptions about these accumulations (such as the role of subtle structures to produce sweet spots), and the availability of new data. Better geologic understanding of basin-center gas accumulations could result in new plays or revised plays relative to those of the U.S. Geological Survey 1995 National Assessment (Gautier and others, 1995). For this study, 33 potential basin-center gas accumulations throughout the U.S. were identified and characterized based on data from the published literature and from well and reservoir databases (Figure 1). However, well-known or established basin-center accumulations such as the Green River Basin, the Uinta Basin, and the Piceance Basin are not addressed in this study.

  19. Disc Motor: Conventional and Superconductor Simulated Results Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inácio, David; Martins, João; Neves, Mário Ventim; Álvarez, Alfredo; Rodrigues, Amadeu Leão

    Taking into consideration the development and integration of electrical machines with lower dimensions and higher performance, this paper presents the design and development of a three-phase axial flux disc motor, with 50 Hz frequency supply. It is made with two conventional semi-stators and a rotor, which can be implemented with a conventional aluminum disc or a high temperature-superconducting disc. The analysis of the motor characteristics is done with a 2D commercial finite elements package, being the modeling performed as a linear motor. The obtained results allow concluding that the superconductor motor provides a higher force than the conventional one. The conventional disc motor presents an asynchronous behavior, like a conventional induction motor, while the superconductor motor presents both synchronous and asynchronous behaviors.

  20. Italy INAF Data Center Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Negusini, M.; Sarti, P.

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Italian INAF VLBI Data Center. Our Data Center is located in Bologna, Italy and belongs to the Institute of Radioastronomy, which is part of the National Institute of Astrophysics.

  1. National Center for Assisted Living

    MedlinePlus

    ... AHCA/NCAL Advocacy Center Congressional Hearings Medicaid and Finance Policy Medicare Part D Policy Community Operations Accreditation/ ... Webinars Advocacy AHCA/NCAL Advocacy Center Medicaid and Finance Policy Medicare Part D Policy Congressional Hearings Community ...

  2. Dialysis centers - what to expect

    MedlinePlus

    ... what to expect; Renal replacement therapy - dialysis centers; End-stage renal disease - dialysis centers; Kidney failure - dialysis ... swells and the hand on that side feels cold Your hand gets cold, numb, or weak Also ...

  3. Center for Beam Physics, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    This report contains the following information on the center for beam physics: Facilities; Organizational Chart; Roster; Profiles of Staff; Affiliates; Center Publications (1991--1993); and 1992 Summary of Activities.

  4. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services

    MedlinePlus

    ... Websites Visit other Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services & Health and Human Services Websites section Expand Medicare.gov Link to the ... helpful links for all Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services websites section Expand Web Policies & Important Links Privacy ...

  5. The Backgrounds Data Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, W. A.; Gursky, H.; Heckathorn, H. M.; Lucke, R. L.; Berg, S. L.; Dombrowski, E. G.; Kessel, R. A.

    1993-01-01

    The Strategic Defense Initiative Organization has created data centers for midcourse, plumes, and backgrounds phenomenologies. The Backgrounds Data Center (BDC) has been designated as the prime archive for data collected by SDIO programs. The BDC maintains a Summary Catalog that contains 'metadata,' that is, information about data, such as when the data were obtained, what the spectral range of the data is, and what region of the Earth or sky was observed. Queries to this catalog result in a listing of all data sets (from all experiments in the Summary Catalog) that satisfy the specified criteria. Thus, the user can identify different experiments that made similar observations and order them from the BDC for analysis. On-site users can use the Science Analysis Facility (SAFE for this purpose. For some programs, the BDC maintains a Program Catalog, which can classify data in as many ways as desired (rather than just by position, time, and spectral range as in the Summary Catalog). For example, data sets could be tagged with such diverse parameters as solar illumination angle, signal level, or the value of a particular spectral ratio, as long as these quantities can be read from the digital record or calculated from it by the ingest program. All unclassified catalogs and unclassified data will be remotely accessible.

  6. Sustainable Biofuels Development Center

    SciTech Connect

    Reardon, Kenneth F.

    2015-03-01

    The mission of the Sustainable Bioenergy Development Center (SBDC) is to enhance the capability of America’s bioenergy industry to produce transportation fuels and chemical feedstocks on a large scale, with significant energy yields, at competitive cost, through sustainable production techniques. Research within the SBDC is organized in five areas: (1) Development of Sustainable Crops and Agricultural Strategies, (2) Improvement of Biomass Processing Technologies, (3) Biofuel Characterization and Engine Adaptation, (4) Production of Byproducts for Sustainable Biorefining, and (5) Sustainability Assessment, including evaluation of the ecosystem/climate change implication of center research and evaluation of the policy implications of widespread production and utilization of bioenergy. The overall goal of this project is to develop new sustainable bioenergy-related technologies. To achieve that goal, three specific activities were supported with DOE funds: bioenergy-related research initiation projects, bioenergy research and education via support of undergraduate and graduate students, and Research Support Activities (equipment purchases, travel to attend bioenergy conferences, and seminars). Numerous research findings in diverse fields related to bioenergy were produced from these activities and are summarized in this report.

  7. Patient-centered Radiology.

    PubMed

    Itri, Jason N

    2015-10-01

    Patient-centered care (ie, care organized around the patient) is a model in which health care providers partner with patients and families to identify and satisfy patients' needs and preferences. In this model, providers respect patients' values and preferences, address their emotional and social needs, and involve them and their families in decision making. Radiologists have traditionally been characterized as "doctor-to-doctor" consultants who are distanced from patients and work within a culture that does not value patient centeredness. As medicine becomes more patient driven and the trajectory of health care is toward increasing patient self-reliance, radiologists must change the perception that they are merely consultants and become more active participants in patient care by embracing greater patient interaction. The traditional business model for radiology practices, which devalues interaction between patients and radiologists, must be transformed into a patient-centered model in which radiologists are reintegrated into direct patient care and imaging processes are reorganized around patients' needs and preferences. Expanding radiology's core assets to include direct patient care may be the most effective deterrent to the threat of commoditization. As the assault on the growth of Medicare spending continues, with medical imaging as a highly visible target, radiologists must adapt to the changing landscape by focusing on their most important consumer: the patient. This may yield substantial benefits in the form of improved quality and patient safety, reduced costs, higher-value care, improved patient outcomes, and greater patient and provider satisfaction. PMID:26466190

  8. Distributed Active Archive Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodden, Lee; Pease, Phil; Bedet, Jean-Jacques; Rosen, Wayne

    1993-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center Version 0 Distributed Active Archive Center (GSFC V0 DAAC) is being developed to enhance and improve scientific research and productivity by consolidating access to remote sensor earth science data in the pre-EOS time frame. In cooperation with scientists from the science labs at GSFC, other NASA facilities, universities, and other government agencies, the DAAC will support data acquisition, validation, archive and distribution. The DAAC is being developed in response to EOSDIS Project Functional Requirements as well as from requirements originating from individual science projects such as SeaWiFS, Meteor3/TOMS2, AVHRR Pathfinder, TOVS Pathfinder, and UARS. The GSFC V0 DAAC has begun operational support for the AVHRR Pathfinder (as of April, 1993), TOVS Pathfinder (as of July, 1993) and the UARS (September, 1993) Projects, and is preparing to provide operational support for SeaWiFS (August, 1994) data. The GSFC V0 DAAC has also incorporated the existing data, services, and functionality of the DAAC/Climate, DAAC/Land, and the Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) Systems.

  9. Backgrounds Data Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, William A.; Gursky, Herbert; Heckathorn, Harry M.; Lucke, Bob L.; Dorland, Bryan N.; Kessel, R. A.; Berg, S. L.; Dombrowski, E. G.

    1994-09-01

    The Backgrounds Data Center (BDC) is the designated archive for backgrounds data collected by Ballistic Missile Defense Organization (BMDO) programs, some of which include ultraviolet sensors. Currently, the BDC holds ultraviolet data from the IBSS, UVPI, UVLIM, and FUVCAM sensors. The BDC will also be the prime archive for Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) data and is prepared to negotiate with program managers to handle other datasets. The purpose of the BDC is to make data accessible to users and to assist them in analyzing it. The BDC maintains the Science Catalog Information Exchange System (SCIES) allowing remote users to log in, read or post notices about current programs, search the catalogs for datasets of interest, and submit orders for data. On-site facilities are also available for the analysis of data, and consist of VMS and UNIX workstations with access to software analysis packages such as IDL, IRAF, and Khoros. Either on-site or remotely, users can employ the BDC-developed graphical user interface called the Visual Interface for Space and Terrestrial Analysis (VISTA) to generate catalog queries and to display and analyze data. SCIES and VISTA permit nearly complete access to BDC services and capabilities without the need to be physically present at the data center.

  10. Data center coolant switch

    SciTech Connect

    Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Parida, Pritish R.; Schultz, Mark D.

    2015-10-06

    A data center cooling system is operated in a first mode; it has an indoor portion wherein heat is absorbed from components in the data center, and an outdoor heat exchanger portion wherein outside air is used to cool a first heat transfer fluid (e.g., water) present in at least the outdoor heat exchanger portion of the cooling system during the first mode. The first heat transfer fluid is a relatively high performance heat transfer fluid (as compared to the second fluid), and has a first heat transfer fluid freezing point. A determination is made that an appropriate time has been reached to switch from the first mode to a second mode. Based on this determination, the outdoor heat exchanger portion of the data cooling system is switched to a second heat transfer fluid, which is a relatively low performance heat transfer fluid, as compared to the first heat transfer fluid. It has a second heat transfer fluid freezing point lower than the first heat transfer fluid freezing point, and the second heat transfer fluid freezing point is sufficiently low to operate without freezing when the outdoor air temperature drops below a first predetermined relationship with the first heat transfer fluid freezing point.

  11. Rapid guiding center calculations

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.B.; Boozer, A.H. |

    1995-04-01

    Premature loss of high energy particles, and in particular fusion alpha particles, is very deleterious in a fusion reactor. Because of this it is necessary to make long-time simulations, on the order of the alpha particle slowing down time, with a number of test particles sufficient to give predictions with reasonable statistical accuracy. Furthermore it is desirable to do this for a large number of equilibria with different characteristic magnetic field ripple, to best optimize engineering designs. In addition, modification of the particle distribution due to magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes such as the saw tooth mode present in the plasma can be important, and this effect requires additional simulation. Thus the large number of necessary simulations means any increase of computing speed in guiding center codes is an important improvement in predictive capability. Previous guiding center codes using numerical equilibria such as ORBIT evaluated the local field strength and ripple magnitude using Lagrangian interpolation on a grid. Evaluation of these quantities four times per time step (using a fourth order Runge-Kutta routine) constitutes the major computational effort of the code. In the present work the authors represent the field quantities through an expansion in terms of pseudo-cartesian coordinates formed from the magnetic coordinates. The simplicity of the representation gives four important advantages over previous methods.

  12. Cryogenic Information Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohling, Robert A.; Marquardt, Eric D.; Fusilier, Fred C.; Fesmire, James E.

    2003-01-01

    The Cryogenic Information Center (CIC) is a not-for-profit corporation dedicated to preserving and distributing cryogenic information to government, industry, and academia. The heart of the CIC is a uniform source of cryogenic data including analyses, design, materials and processes, and test information traceable back to the Cryogenic Data Center of the former National Bureau of Standards. The electronic database is a national treasure containing over 146,000 specific bibliographic citations of cryogenic literature and thermophysical property data dating back to 1829. A new technical/bibliographic inquiry service can perform searches and technical analyses. The Cryogenic Material Properties (CMP) Program consists of computer codes using empirical equations to determine thermophysical material properties with emphasis on the 4-300K range. CMP's objective is to develop a user-friendly standard material property database using the best available data so government and industry can conduct more accurate analyses. The CIC serves to benefit researchers, engineers, and technologists in cryogenics and cryogenic engineering, whether they are new or experienced in the field.

  13. Core Research Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hicks, Joshua; Adrian, Betty

    2009-01-01

    The Core Research Center (CRC) of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), located at the Denver Federal Center in Lakewood, Colo., currently houses rock core from more than 8,500 boreholes representing about 1.7 million feet of rock core from 35 States and cuttings from 54,000 boreholes representing 238 million feet of drilling in 28 States. Although most of the boreholes are located in the Rocky Mountain region, the geologic and geographic diversity of samples have helped the CRC become one of the largest and most heavily used public core repositories in the United States. Many of the boreholes represented in the collection were drilled for energy and mineral exploration, and many of the cores and cuttings were donated to the CRC by private companies in these industries. Some cores and cuttings were collected by the USGS along with other government agencies. Approximately one-half of the cores are slabbed and photographed. More than 18,000 thin sections and a large volume of analytical data from the cores and cuttings are also accessible. A growing collection of digital images of the cores are also becoming available on the CRC Web site Internet http://geology.cr.usgs.gov/crc/.

  14. Psychiatric comorbidity in adolescent electronic and conventional cigarette use.

    PubMed

    Leventhal, Adam M; Strong, David R; Sussman, Steve; Kirkpatrick, Matthew G; Unger, Jennifer B; Barrington-Trimis, Jessica L; Audrain-McGovern, Janet

    2016-02-01

    The popularity of electronic (e-) cigarettes has greatly increased recently, particularly in adolescents. However, the extent of psychiatric comorbidity with adolescent e-cigarette use and dual use of conventional (combustible) and e-cigarettes is unknown. This study characterized psychiatric comorbidity in adolescent conventional and e-cigarette use. Ninth grade students attending high schools in Los Angeles, CA (M age = 14) completed self-report measures of conventional/e-cigarette use, emotional disorders, substance use/problems, and transdiagnostic psychiatric phenotypes consistent with the NIMH-Research Domain Criteria Initiative. Outcomes were compared by lifetime use of: (1) neither conventional nor e-cigarettes (non-use; N = 2557, 77.3%); (2) e-cigarettes only (N = 412, 12.4%); (3) conventional cigarettes only (N = 152, 4.6%); and (4) conventional and e-cigarettes (dual use; N = 189, 5.6%). In comparison to adolescents who used conventional cigarettes only, e-cigarette only users reported lower levels of internalizing syndromes (depression, generalized anxiety, panic, social phobia, and obsessive-compulsive disorder) and transdiagnostic phenotypes (i.e., distress intolerance, anxiety sensitivity, rash action during negative affect). Depression, panic disorder, and anhedonia were higher in e-cigarette only vs. non-users. For several externalizing outcomes (mania, rash action during positive affect, alcohol drug use/abuse) and anhedonia, an ordered pattern was observed, whereby comorbidity was lowest in non-users, moderate in single product users (conventional or e-cigarette), and highest in dual users. These findings: (1) raise question of whether emotionally-healthier ('lower-risk') adolescents who are not interested in conventional cigarettes are being attracted to e-cigarettes; (2) indicate that research, intervention, and policy dedicated to adolescent tobacco-psychiatric comorbidity should distinguish conventional cigarette, e-cigarette, and dual use

  15. Endoscopic Hands-Off Technique versus Conventional Technique for Conversion from an Orobiliary to a Nasobiliary Tube

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Miyeon; Kim, Soon Sun; Yoo, Byung Moo; Kim, Jin Hong

    2016-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to compare the outcomes of the endoscopic hands-off technique and the conventional technique when repositioning an endoscopic nasobiliary drainage (ENBD) tube from the mouth to the nose. Methods. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of all endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatographies (ERCPs) performed between July 2013 and May 2015 at a single tertiary referral center. A total of 1187 ERCPs were performed during the study period. Among them, 114 patients who underwent ENBD were enrolled in this study. In those patients, we used the endoscopic hands-off technique between July 2013 and May 2014 (endoscopy group) and the conventional technique between June 2014 and May 2015 (conventional group). Results. Technical success was achieved in 100% (58/58) of the endoscopy group and 94.6% (53/56) of the conventional group (P = 0.115). In the 3 cases of failed conventional technique, the endoscopic hands-off technique was then performed, and conversion of the ENBD tube was successful in all of these patients. The procedure time was significantly shorter in the endoscopy group than in the conventional group (124 s versus 149 s, P = 0.001). Conclusion. The endoscopic hands-off technique was feasible and effective for oral-nasal conversion of an ENBD tube. PMID:27462348

  16. Chapin Hall Center for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chicago Univ., IL. Chapin Hall Center for Children.

    This document consists of two separate publications: (1) "The Power of Knowing", a brief 12-page description of the Chapin Hall Center for Children, and (2) "Projects and Publications", a 67-page list of the center's projects and publications as of Autumn 1997. "The Power of Knowing" describes the Chapin Hall Center for Children at the University…

  17. Industry Invests in Research Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ploch, Margie

    1983-01-01

    Universities and industry are forging new relationships to support academic research and industrial research and development, including the establishment of university/cooperative research centers. Discusses various cooperative projects at these research centers. Includes a list of representative R&D centers in biotechnology, building…

  18. CURRICULUM GUIDE, CHILD CARE CENTERS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento.

    CALIFORNIA CHILD CARE CENTERS WERE ESTABLISHED IN 1943 TO SUPPLY SERVICES TO CHILDREN OF WORKING MOTHERS. THE CHILD CARE PROGRAM PROVIDES, WITHIN NURSERY AND SCHOOLAGE CENTERS, CARE AND EDUCATIONAL SUPERVISION FOR PRESCHOOL AND ELEMENTARY SCHOOL AGE CHILDREN. THE PHILOSOPHY OF THE CHILD CENTER PROGRAM IS BASED UPON THE BELIEF THAT EACH CHILD…

  19. Credentialing complementary practitioners in a large academic cancer center.

    PubMed

    Baynham-Fletcher, Laura; Babiak-Vazquez, Adriana E; Cuello, Deanna; Frenkel, Moshe A

    2008-01-01

    One of the key obstacles to the complete integration of complementary and integrative medicine (CIM) into standard care in the United States is the lack of between-state and between-institution standards for credentialing. Also, a formal framework for the scope of CIM practitioner's practice is not available for assessing CIM integration into conventional patient care. Although many cancer centers do have some CIM programming under way, the scope of practice for CIM practitioners who may or may not fall within any formal licensing body and for non-CIM practitioners continues to vary among centers. This variation can result in inconsistent outcomes, difficulties in educating cancer patients about the role CIM can play in their cancer care, and a lack of true integration of CIM therapies into conventional treatment planning for the patient and those who care about and for them. PMID:19134449

  20. 26 CFR 1.168(d)-1 - Applicable conventions-half-year and mid-quarter conventions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Applicable conventions-half-year and mid-quarter conventions. 1.168(d)-1 Section 1.168(d)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Itemized Deductions for Individuals and Corporations § 1.168(d)-1...

  1. COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE CENTER

    SciTech Connect

    DAVENPORT, J.

    2006-11-01

    Computational Science is an integral component of Brookhaven's multi science mission, and is a reflection of the increased role of computation across all of science. Brookhaven currently has major efforts in data storage and analysis for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the ATLAS detector at CERN, and in quantum chromodynamics. The Laboratory is host for the QCDOC machines (quantum chromodynamics on a chip), 10 teraflop/s computers which boast 12,288 processors each. There are two here, one for the Riken/BNL Research Center and the other supported by DOE for the US Lattice Gauge Community and other scientific users. A 100 teraflop/s supercomputer will be installed at Brookhaven in the coming year, managed jointly by Brookhaven and Stony Brook, and funded by a grant from New York State. This machine will be used for computational science across Brookhaven's entire research program, and also by researchers at Stony Brook and across New York State. With Stony Brook, Brookhaven has formed the New York Center for Computational Science (NYCCS) as a focal point for interdisciplinary computational science, which is closely linked to Brookhaven's Computational Science Center (CSC). The CSC has established a strong program in computational science, with an emphasis on nanoscale electronic structure and molecular dynamics, accelerator design, computational fluid dynamics, medical imaging, parallel computing and numerical algorithms. We have been an active participant in DOES SciDAC program (Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing). We are also planning a major expansion in computational biology in keeping with Laboratory initiatives. Additional laboratory initiatives with a dependence on a high level of computation include the development of hydrodynamics models for the interpretation of RHIC data, computational models for the atmospheric transport of aerosols, and models for combustion and for energy utilization. The CSC was formed to bring together

  2. Industrial Assessment Center Program

    SciTech Connect

    Kolarik, William J.

    2007-02-26

    Over the five-year period (2002-2006) the Oklahoma State University Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) performed energy assessments for 106 different clients, writing 835 recommendations, for a total of $23,937,099 in potential estimated annual savings. IAC clients served consisted of small and medium-sized manufacturers ranging from food manufactures to foundries. The OSU IAC served clients in Oklahoma, Kansas, Missouri, Arkansas, and Texas. In addition to client service, student training and instruction was a major accomplishment. The OSU IAC employed (and trained) 12 baccalaureate-level students, 17 masters-level graduate students, and 7 doctoral-level graduate students. Most are practicing in the energy management area. Training was focused on both energy assessment and safety. Safety training was both center-based training as well as on-site training. Energy management related training was focused on classroom (for academic credit) work at both the undergraduate and graduate level. IEM 4923 (Energy and Water Management) was developed to serve both the IAC as well as non-IAC students. It was delivered once per year, with enrollments of typically 10 to 20 students. This course was required for IAC student employees, both undergraduate and graduate. This course was patterned after the AEE CEM (five-day) course for practicing professionals. IEM 4923 required each student to attend at least one on-site assessment and write at least one recommendation for their client’s report. Hence, a hands-on approach was practiced. Advance level courses were used to train graduate students. Two courses played major roles here: IEM 5923 (Advanced Energy and Water Management) and IEM 5943 (Hazardous Material and Waste). Graduate student participation in these courses helped the IAC to gain additional perspectives in on-site assessment and resulting recommendations. Numerous hands-on demonstration/training was conducted by directors and graduate students in order to gain

  3. Numerical and experimental investigation of conventional and un-conventional preswirl duct for VLCC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Hyun-Joon; Lee, Jong-Seung; Lee, Kang-Hoon; Han, Myung-Ryun; Hur, Eui-Beom; Shin, Sung-Chul

    2013-09-01

    This paper shows the study of preswirl duct as an effective energy saving devices that have been devised and reviewed to support the propeller performance, especially for the ship of VLCC with large block coefficients. From the bare hull wake measurements, typical upper/lower asymmetry of hull wake at the propeller disk was found. The 2 kinds of pre-swirl duct, Unconventional half circular duct and Conventional circular pre-swirl duct have been designed and reviewed to recover the loss of propeller running in that condition. The general function of the pre-swirl duct was set to work against this asymmetry of wake and generate pre-swirled flow into the propeller against the propeller rotating direction. The optimum self propulsion tests with various angle configurations were carried out and the best configuration was decided. Accordingly, cavitation test was carried out with best configuration of unconventional half circular duct. The blade surface and tip vortex cavitation behaved smoother when the duct was mounted. The hull pressure amplitudes reflected this difference, so the hull pressure amplitude with duct was smaller than that of without duct.

  4. Substitutes or complements? Diagnosis and treatment with non-conventional and conventional medicine

    PubMed Central

    Tavares, Aida Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Background: Portugal has a strong tradition of conventional western healthcare. So it provides a natural case study for the relationship between Complementary/Alternative Medicine (CAM) and Western Medicine (WM). This work aims to test the relationship between CAM and WM users in the diagnosis and treatment stages and to estimate the determinants of CAM choice. Methods: The forth Portuguese National Health Survey is employed to estimate two single probit models and obtain the correlation between the consumption of CAM and WM medicines in the diagnosis and treatment stages. Results: Firstly, both in the diagnosis and the treatment stage, CAM and WM are seen to be complementary choices for individuals. Secondly, self-medication also shows complementarity with the choice of CAM treatment. Thirdly, education has a non-linear relationship with the choice of CAM. Finally, working status, age, smoking and chronic disease are determinant factors in the decision to use CAM. Conclusion: The results of this work are relevant to health policy-makers and for insurance companies. Patients need freedom of choice and, for the sake of safety and efficacy of treatment, WM and CAM healthcare ought to be provided in a joint and integrated health system. PMID:25844385

  5. Massive information sharing among global data centers based on satellite laser communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Longteng; Li, Cong; Liu, Naijin

    2015-10-01

    With the development of big data and information globalization, the requirements of massive information transmitting and sharing among data centers are expanding, especially among those data centers which are extremely far away from each other. In the above field, conventional optical fiber transmission faces many problems such as complex networking, poor security, long node switching delay, high lease and maintain cost and low migration flexibility. Besides, in the near future, data centers may tend to be built in the remote Polar Regions or on the sea for natural cooling. For the above situation, sharing the massive information among global data centers based on satellite laser communication is proposed in this paper. This proposal includes advantage analysis, research of restraining atmosphere interference, etc. At last, by comparison with conventional technology, the research result shows that massive information transmitting and sharing among global data centers based on satellite laser communication has far reaching application potential.

  6. Supernova Science Center

    SciTech Connect

    S. E. Woosley

    2008-05-05

    The Supernova Science Center (SNSC) was founded in 2001 to carry out theoretical and computational research leading to a better understanding of supernovae and related transients. The SNSC, a four-institutional collaboration, included scientists from LANL, LLNL, the University of Arizona (UA), and the University of California at Santa Cruz (UCSC). Intitially, the SNSC was funded for three years of operation, but in 2004 an opportunity was provided to submit a renewal proposal for two years. That proposal was funded and subsequently, at UCSC, a one year no-cost extension was granted. The total operational time of the SNSC was thus July 15, 2001 - July 15, 2007. This document summarizes the research and findings of the SNSC and provides a cummulative publication list.

  7. Concurrent engineering research center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callahan, John R.

    1995-01-01

    The projects undertaken by The Concurrent Engineering Research Center (CERC) at West Virginia University are reported and summarized. CERC's participation in the Department of Defense's Defense Advanced Research Project relating to technology needed to improve the product development process is described, particularly in the area of advanced weapon systems. The efforts committed to improving collaboration among the diverse and distributed health care providers are reported, along with the research activities for NASA in Independent Software Verification and Validation. CERC also takes part in the electronic respirator certification initiated by The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, as well as in the efforts to find a solution to the problem of producing environment-friendly end-products for product developers worldwide. The 3M Fiber Metal Matrix Composite Model Factory Program is discussed. CERC technologies, facilities,and personnel-related issues are described, along with its library and technical services and recent publications.

  8. RIKEN BNL Research Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samios, Nicholas

    2014-09-01

    Since its inception in 1997, the RIKEN BNL Research Center (RBRC) has been a major force in the realms of Spin Physics, Relativistic Heavy Ion Physics, large scale Computing Physics and the training of a new generation of extremely talented physicists. This has been accomplished through the recruitment of an outstanding non-permanent staff of Fellows and Research associates in theory and experiment. RBRC is now a mature organization that has reached a steady level in the size of scientific and support staff while at the same time retaining its vibrant youth. A brief history of the scientific accomplishments and contributions of the RBRC physicists will be presented as well as a discussion of the unique RBRC management structure.

  9. The Satellite Situation Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teague, M. J.; Sawyer, D. M.; Vette, J. I.

    1982-01-01

    Considerations related to the early planning for the International Magnetospheric Study (IMS) took into account the desirability of an establishment of specific entities for generating and disseminating coordination information for both retrospective and predictive periods. The organizations established include the IMS/Satellite Situation Center (IMS/SSC) operated by NASA. The activities of the SSC are related to the preparation of reports on predicted and actually achieved satellite positions, the response to inquiries, the compilation of information on satellite experiments, and the issue of periodic status summaries. Attention is given to high-altitude satellite services, other correlative satellite services, non-IMS activities of the SSC, a summary of the SSC request activity, and post-IMS and future activities.

  10. Interactive design center.

    SciTech Connect

    Pomplun, Alan R. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA)

    2005-07-01

    Sandia's advanced computing resources provide researchers, engineers and analysts with the ability to develop and render highly detailed large-scale models and simulations. To take full advantage of these multi-million data point visualizations, display systems with comparable pixel counts are needed. The Interactive Design Center (IDC) is a second generation visualization theater designed to meet this need. The main display integrates twenty-seven projectors in a 9-wide by 3-high array with a total display resolution of more than 35 million pixels. Six individual SmartBoard displays offer interactive capabilities that include on-screen annotation and touch panel control of the facility's display systems. This report details the design, implementation and operation of this innovative facility.

  11. Industrial Assessment Center

    SciTech Connect

    J. Kelly Kissock; Becky Blust

    2007-04-17

    The University of Dayton (UD) performed energy assessments, trained students and supported USDOE objectives. In particular, the UD Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) performed 96 industrial energy assessment days for mid-sized manufacturers. The average identified and implemented savings on each assessment were $261,080 per year and $54,790 per year. The assessments served as direct training in industrial energy efficiency for 16 UD IAC students. The assessments also served as a mechanism for the UD IAC to understand manufacturing energy use and improve upon the science of manufacturing energy efficiency. Specific research results were published in 16 conference proceedings and journals, disseminated in 22 additional invited lectures, and shared with the industrial energy community through the UD IAC website.

  12. Relationship-centered Care

    PubMed Central

    Beach, Mary Catherine; Inui, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    All illness, care, and healing processes occur in relationship—relationships of an individual with self and with others. Relationship-centered care (RCC) is an important framework for conceptualizing health care, recognizing that the nature and the quality of relationships are central to health care and the broader health care delivery system. RCC can be defined as care in which all participants appreciate the importance of their relationships with one another. RCC is founded upon 4 principles: (1) that relationships in health care ought to include the personhood of the participants, (2) that affect and emotion are important components of these relationships, (3) that all health care relationships occur in the context of reciprocal influence, and (4) that the formation and maintenance of genuine relationships in health care is morally valuable. In RCC, relationships between patients and clinicians remain central, although the relationships of clinicians with themselves, with each other and with community are also emphasized. PMID:16405707

  13. The Galactic center wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chevalier, Roger A.

    1992-01-01

    The combined effect of winds from a cluster of stars in the central 0.8 pc of the Galaxy is modeled as uniform power and mass input over the central region. The flow becomes supersonic outside the central region, and the expected decrease in pressure is in approximate accord with observations. The pressure variations on a larger scale suggest that the Galactic center wind passes through a shock front at a radius of a few pc, leading to a shocked wind bubble on a scale of 100 pc. The tangential magnetic field can come to dominate the pressure in the shocked wind flow even if the energy density of the magnetic field in the initial wind is only 0.1 percent of the wind kinetic energy density. The magnetic region produced in this way may be related to some of the apparently magnetized structures observed in the central region of the Galaxy.

  14. Industrial Assessment Center Program

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Dereje Agonafer

    2007-11-30

    The work described in this report was performed under the direction of the Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) at University of Texas at Arlington. The IAC at The University of Texas at Arlington is managed by Rutgers University under agreement with the United States Department of Energy Office of Industrial Technology, which financially supports the program. The objective of the IAC is to identify, evaluate, and recommend, through analysis of an industrial plant’s operations, opportunities to conserve energy and prevent pollution, thereby reducing the associated costs. IAC team members visit and survey the plant. Based upon observations made in the plant, preventive/corrective actions are recommended. At all times we try to offer specific and quantitative recommendations of cost savings, energy conservation, and pollution prevention to the plants we serve.

  15. Family-centered rounds.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Vineeta

    2014-08-01

    Family-centered rounds (FCRs) are multidisciplinary rounds that involve medical teams partnering with patients and families in daily medical decision-making. Multiple FCR benefits have been identified including improving patient satisfaction, communication, discharge planning, medical education, and patient safety. Main barriers to FCRs are variability in attending rounding, duration of rounds, physical constrains of large teams and small rooms, specific and sensitive patient conditions, and lack of training of residents, students, and faculty on how to conduct effective and effecient FCRs. In the last decade, many programs have incorporated FCRs into daily practice due to their multiple perceived benefits. Future FCRs should focus on better operationalizing of FCRs and reporting on objective outcomes measures such as improved communication, coordination, and patient satisfaction that are crucial for healthcare. PMID:25084715

  16. Management practices on organic and conventional dairy herds in Minnesota.

    PubMed

    Sorge, U S; Moon, R; Wolff, L J; Michels, L; Schroth, S; Kelton, D F; Heins, B

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to describe and compare husbandry practices on organic and conventional dairy farms of similar sizes in Minnesota. Organic (ORG, n=35), same-sized conventional (SC, n=15, <200 cows) and medium-sized conventional (MC, n=13, ≥200 cows) dairy herds were visited in 2012, and farmers were interviewed once about their farm, herd demographics, and herd management practices concerning nutrition, housing, and reproductive programs. Organic farms had been established as long as conventional farms, and ORG producers had most commonly selected ORG farming because of a negative perception of pesticides for human health. The distribution of cattle breeds and ages differed across farm types. Organic farms had more crossbred cows and a greater number of older cows than conventional farms, who had mainly Holstein cattle. Organic farms did not dock tails, were more likely to use breeding bulls, and were less likely to conduct pregnancy diagnoses in cattle. All conventional farmers fed corn, corn silage, and hay, but no forage or feed supplement was fed by all ORG farms with the exception of pasture. Kelp was supplemented on most ORG farms but on none of the conventional farms. In summary, although there were differences across farm types regarding the use of pasture, feeds, and feed additives, breed and age distribution, reproductive management, and the use of tail docking, observations in other management areas showed large overlap across herd types. PMID:26830734

  17. Comparison of conventional radiography and MDCT in suspected scaphoid fractures

    PubMed Central

    Behzadi, Cyrus; Karul, Murat; Henes, Frank Oliver; Laqmani, Azien; Catala-Lehnen, Philipp; Lehmann, Wolfgang; Nagel, Hans-Dieter; Adam, Gerhard; Regier, Marc

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine the diagnostic accuracy and radiation dose of conventional radiography and multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) in suspected scaphoid fractures. METHODS: One hundred twenty-four consecutive patients were enrolled in our study who had suffered from a wrist trauma and showed typical clinical symptoms suspicious of an acute scaphoid fracture. All patients had initially undergone conventional radiography. Subsequent MDCT was performed within 10 d because of persisting clinical symptoms. Using the MDCT data as the reference standard, a fourfold table was used to classify the test results. The effective dose and impaired energy were assessed in order to compare the radiation burden of the two techniques. The Wilcoxon test was performed to compare the two diagnostic modalities. RESULTS: Conventional radiography showed 34 acute fractures of the scaphoid in 124 patients (42.2%). Subsequent MDCT revealed a total of 42 scaphoid fractures. The sensitivity of conventional radiography for scaphoid fracture detection was 42.8% and its specificity was 80% resulting in an overall accuracy of 59.6%. Conventional radiography was significantly inferior to MDCT (P < 0.01) concerning scaphoid fracture detection. The mean effective dose of MDCT was 0.1 mSv compared to 0.002 mSv of conventional radiography. CONCLUSION: Conventional radiography is insufficient for accurate scaphoid fracture detection. Regarding the almost negligible effective dose, MDCT should serve as the first imaging modality in wrist trauma. PMID:25628802

  18. Primary tasks to implement the Chemical Weapons Convention

    SciTech Connect

    Kellman, B.; Tanzman, E.A.

    1997-12-31

    The Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) is an unprecedented multilateral effort to eradicate an entire category of weapons of mass destruction and assure their continued absence through international verification. In 1993, concerns arose that the complexity of integrating the treaty with national law could cause some nations to implement the Convention without regard to what others nations were doing, thereby causing inconsistencies among States Parties in how the Conventional would be carried out. As a result, the Manual for National Implementation of the Chemical Weapons Convention was prepared. The Manual is designed to assist States Parties by increasing understanding of the Convention and identifying its obligations as well as suggesting methods to meet them, duly taking into account the distinctive aspects of their legal systems. It acknowledges areas of ambiguity that States Parties should address, and it analyzes legal initiatives that may be undertaken to strengthen the Convention`s enforcement. This paper draws from the Manual and briefly addresses the two tasks that every CWC State Party must undertake first in order to effectively fulfill its extensive requirements. First, each State Party must establish a National Authority. Second, each State Party must enact implementing measures to ensure that its government as well as its businesses and citizens comply with the treaty. As this paper generally discusses how States Parties from different legal backgrounds can accomplish these two tasks, it cannot address every detail of how each State Party should proceed.

  19. Abramovo Counterterrorism Training Center

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, Christopher M; Ross, Larry; Lingenfelter, Forrest E; Sokolnikov, Pavel I; Kaldenbach, Karen Yvonne; Estigneev, Yuri; Murievav, Andrey

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. government has been assisting the Russian Federation (RF) Ministry of Defense (MOD) for many years with nuclear weapons transportation security (NWTS) through the provision of specialized guard escort railcars and cargo railcars with integrated physical security and communication systems, armored transport vehicles, and armored escort vehicles. As a natural continuation of the NWTS program, a partnership has been formed to construct a training center that will provide counterterrorism training to personnel in all branches of the RF MOD. The Abramovo Counterterrorism Training Center (ACTC) is a multinational, multiagency project with funding from Canada, RF and the U.S. Departments of Defense and Energy. ACTC will be a facility where MOD personnel can conduct basic through advanced training in various security measures to protect Category IA material against the threat of terrorist attack. The training will enhance defense-in-depth principles by integrating MOD guard force personnel into the overall physical protection systems and improving their overall response time and neutralization capabilities. The ACTC project includes infrastructure improvements, renovation of existing buildings, construction of new buildings, construction of new training facilities, and provision of training and other equipment. Classroom training will be conducted in a renovated training building. Basic and intermediate training will be conducted on three different security training areas where various obstacles and static training devices will be constructed. The central element of ACTC, where advanced training will be held, is the 'autodrome,' a 3 km road along which various terrorist events can be staged to challenge MOD personnel in realistic and dynamic nuclear weapons transportation scenarios. This paper will address the ACTC project elements and the vision for training development and integrating this training into actual nuclear weapons transportation operations.

  20. Regional Warning Center Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundstedt, Henrik

    RWC-Sweden is operated by the Lund division of the Swedish Institute of Space Physics located at IDEON, a Science Research Technology Park. The Institute of Technology of Lund and Lund University are just adjacent to IDEON. This creates a lot of synergy effects. Copenhagen, with the Danish National Space Center DNSC), and Atmosphere Space Research Division of Danish Meteorological Institute (DMI), is 45 min away via the bridge. The new LOIS Space Centre is located two hours away by car, north of Lund and just outside V¨xj¨. The IRF Lund a o division is aiming at becoming a "Solar and Space Weather Center". We focus on solar magnetic activity, its influence on climate and on space weather effects such the effect of geomagnetically induced currents (GIC). Basic research: A PostDoc position on "Solar Magnetic Activity: Topology and Predictions has recently been created. Research is carried on to improve predictions of solar magnetic activity. Preparations for using upcoming SDO vector magnetic fields are ongoing. Predictions: RWC-Sweden offers real-time forecasts of space weather and space weather effects based on neural networks. We participated in the NASA/NOAA Cycle 24 Prediction Panel. We have also participated in several ESA/EU solar-climate projects New observation facilities: Distributed, wide-area radio facility (LOIS) for solar (and other space physics) observations and a guest prof: Radio facility about 200 km distant, outside V¨xj¨ (Sm˚ a o aland), in Ronneby (Blekinge) and Lund (Sk˚ ane) is planned to be used for tracking of CMEs and basic solar physics studies of the corona. The LOIS station outside V¨xj¨ has a o been up and running for the past three years. Bo Thidé has joined the Lund division e as a guest prof. A new magnetometer at Risinge LOIS station has been installed an calibrated and expected to be operational in March, 2008.