Science.gov

Sample records for converging media environments

  1. Mass Media: The Invisible Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glessing, Robert J.; White, William P.

    This anthology for students of media consists of essays and articles grouped under four topics: media forms, media content, media environments, and "the last word." Media forms deals with the nature of these kinds of media: electronic, print, film, music, and comics, graffiti, and clothing. Media content contains articles on the news, advertising,…

  2. Implication for Media Convergence on News Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gumus, Agah; Ozad, Bahire

    2011-01-01

    Over the last decade, comparisons of the effects of the traditional news media and the Internet have been made in relation to comprehension and remembering. This study aims at assessing the effects of single and compound presentational elements, and making predictions for the future. One of the two main aims of this study is to measure…

  3. Converged Social Media: Identity Management and Engagement on Facebook Mobile and Blogs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rambe, Patient

    2013-01-01

    There is scant evidence to demonstrate that researchers grasp the social dimensions of convergence, and particularly, the academic and social implications of converged media on students' lives. Despite a surge in student appropriation of social media-enabled mobile phones for exchanging educational resources and social practices, little is…

  4. Convergence and Divergence in Basque, Irish and Sami Media Language Policing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly-Holmes, Helen; Moriarty, Mairead; Pietikainen, Sari

    2009-01-01

    The language policies adopted, imposed, or rejected in minority language media highlight the complexities of multilingualism and its regulation or ordering in contemporary contexts. In this article, we discuss convergence and divergence in the language policing of three minority language media contexts, namely Basque, Irish and Sami. All of the…

  5. Convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darcie, Thomas E.; Doverspike, Robert; Zirngibl, Martin; Korotky, Steven K.

    2005-09-01

    Call for Papers: Convergence The Journal of Optical Networking (JON) invites submissions to a special issue on Convergence. Convergence has become a popular theme in telecommunications, one that has broad implications across all segments of the industry. Continual evolution of technology and applications continues to erase lines between traditionally separate lines of business, with dramatic consequences for vendors, service providers, and consumers. Spectacular advances in all layers of optical networking-leading to abundant, dynamic, cost-effective, and reliable wide-area and local-area connections-have been essential drivers of this evolution. As services and networks continue to evolve towards some notion of convergence, the continued role of optical networks must be explored. One vision of convergence renders all information in a common packet (especially IP) format. This vision is driven by the proliferation of data services. For example, time-division multiplexed (TDM) voice becomes VoIP. Analog cable-television signals become MPEG bits streamed to digital set-top boxes. T1 or OC-N private lines migrate to Ethernet virtual private networks (VPNs). All these packets coexist peacefully within a single packet-routing methodology built on an optical transport layer that combines the flexibility and cost of data networks with telecom-grade reliability. While this vision is appealing in its simplicity and shared widely, specifics of implementation raise many challenges and differences of opinion. For example, many seek to expand the role of Ethernet in these transport networks, while massive efforts are underway to make traditional TDM networks more data friendly within an evolved but backward-compatible SDH/SONET (synchronous digital hierarchy and synchronous optical network) multiplexing hierarchy. From this common underlying theme follow many specific instantiations. Examples include the convergence at the physical, logical, and operational levels of voice and

  6. Effect of Convergent and Divergent Boundaries on Flow Resistance through Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhanu Prakasham Reddy, N.; Krishnaiah, S.; Ramakrishna Reddy, M.

    2015-12-01

    An experimental investigation on the effect of convergent and divergent streamlines on the total energy loss in the porous medium and the effect on linear parameter, a, and non-linear parameter, b, for different ratios of radii of the test section was studied in a convergent and divergent permeameter. This paper presents the results of applying dimensional analysis to obtain a relationship between friction factor (fd) and Reynolds number (Rd) for flow in porous media with convergent and divergent boundaries, using pore size of the media (d) as characteristic length. Using friction factor (fd) and Reynolds number (Rd) relationship, theoretical curves, are developed and verified with the help of existing experimental data. In the present case, Mc Corquodale data of size 1.66 cm was used as media and water as fluid, to develop curves relating friction factor (fd) and Reynolds number (Rd) for different ratios of radii of the test section of convergent permeameter and divergent permeameter with the same convergent and divergent angle of 0.328 rad.

  7. Convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darcie, Thomas E.; Doverspike, Robert; Zirngibl, Martin; Korotky, Steven K.

    2005-09-01

    Call for Papers: Convergence The Journal of Optical Networking (JON) invites submissions to a special issue on Convergence. Convergence has become a popular theme in telecommunications, one that has broad implications across all segments of the industry. Continual evolution of technology and applications continues to erase lines between traditionally separate lines of business, with dramatic consequences for vendors, service providers, and consumers. Spectacular advances in all layers of optical networking-leading to abundant, dynamic, cost-effective, and reliable wide-area and local-area connections-have been essential drivers of this evolution. As services and networks continue to evolve towards some notion of convergence, the continued role of optical networks must be explored. One vision of convergence renders all information in a common packet (especially IP) format. This vision is driven by the proliferation of data services. For example, time-division multiplexed (TDM) voice becomes VoIP. Analog cable-television signals become MPEG bits streamed to digital set-top boxes. T1 or OC-N private lines migrate to Ethernet virtual private networks (VPNs). All these packets coexist peacefully within a single packet-routing methodology built on an optical transport layer that combines the flexibility and cost of data networks with telecom-grade reliability. While this vision is appealing in its simplicity and shared widely, specifics of implementation raise many challenges and differences of opinion. For example, many seek to expand the role of Ethernet in these transport networks, while massive efforts are underway to make traditional TDM networks more data friendly within an evolved but backward-compatible SDH/SONET (synchronous digital hierarchy and synchronous optical network) multiplexing hierarchy. From this common underlying theme follow many specific instantiations. Examples include the convergence at the physical, logical, and operational levels of voice and

  8. Convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darcie, Thomas E.; Doverspike, Robert; Zirngibl, Martin; Korotky, Steven K.

    2005-08-01

    Call for Papers: Convergence The Journal of Optical Networking (JON) invites submissions to a special issue on Convergence. Convergence has become a popular theme in telecommunications, one that has broad implications across all segments of the industry. Continual evolution of technology and applications continues to erase lines between traditionally separate lines of business, with dramatic consequences for vendors, service providers, and consumers. Spectacular advances in all layers of optical networking-leading to abundant, dynamic, cost-effective, and reliable wide-area and local-area connections-have been essential drivers of this evolution. As services and networks continue to evolve towards some notion of convergence, the continued role of optical networks must be explored. One vision of convergence renders all information in a common packet (especially IP) format. This vision is driven by the proliferation of data services. For example, time-division multiplexed (TDM) voice becomes VoIP. Analog cable-television signals become MPEG bits streamed to digital set-top boxes. T1 or OC-N private lines migrate to Ethernet virtual private networks (VPNs). All these packets coexist peacefully within a single packet-routing methodology built on an optical transport layer that combines the flexibility and cost of data networks with telecom-grade reliability. While this vision is appealing in its simplicity and shared widely, specifics of implementation raise many challenges and differences of opinion. For example, many seek to expand the role of Ethernet in these transport networks, while massive efforts are underway to make traditional TDM networks more data friendly within an evolved but backward-compatible SDH/SONET (synchronous digital hierarchy and synchronous optical network) multiplexing hierarchy. From this common underlying theme follow many specific instantiations. Examples include the convergence at the physical, logical, and operational levels of voice and

  9. Convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darcie, Thomas E.; Doverspike, Robert; Zirngibl, Martin; Korotky, Steven K.

    2005-06-01

    Call for Papers: Convergence The Journal of Optical Networking (JON) invites submissions to a special issue on Convergence. Convergence has become a popular theme in telecommunications, one that has broad implications across all segments of the industry. Continual evolution of technology and applications continues to erase lines between traditionally separate lines of business, with dramatic consequences for vendors, service providers, and consumers. Spectacular advances in all layers of optical networking-leading to abundant, dynamic, cost-effective, and reliable wide-area and local-area connections-have been essential drivers of this evolution. As services and networks continue to evolve towards some notion of convergence, the continued role of optical networks must be explored. One vision of convergence renders all information in a common packet (especially IP) format. This vision is driven by the proliferation of data services. For example, time-division multiplexed (TDM) voice becomes VoIP. Analog cable-television signals become MPEG bits streamed to digital set-top boxes. T1 or OC-N private lines migrate to Ethernet virtual private networks (VPNs). All these packets coexist peacefully within a single packet-routing methodology built on an optical transport layer that combines the flexibility and cost of data networks with telecom-grade reliability. While this vision is appealing in its simplicity and shared widely, specifics of implementation raise many challenges and differences of opinion. For example, many seek to expand the role of Ethernet in these transport networks, while massive efforts are underway to make traditional TDM networks more data friendly within an evolved but backward-compatible SDH/SONET (synchronous digital hierarchy and synchronous optical network) multiplexing hierarchy. From this common underlying theme follow many specific instantiations. Examples include the convergence at the physical, logical, and operational levels of voice and

  10. Convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darcie, Thomas E.; Doverspike, Robert; Zirngibl, Martin; Korotky, Steven K.

    2005-05-01

    Call for Papers: Convergence The Journal of Optical Networking (JON) invites submissions to a special issue on Convergence. Convergence has become a popular theme in telecommunications, one that has broad implications across all segments of the industry. Continual evolution of technology and applications continues to erase lines between traditionally separate lines of business, with dramatic consequences for vendors, service providers, and consumers. Spectacular advances in all layers of optical networking-leading to abundant, dynamic, cost-effective, and reliable wide-area and local-area connections-have been essential drivers of this evolution. As services and networks continue to evolve towards some notion of convergence, the continued role of optical networks must be explored. One vision of convergence renders all information in a common packet (especially IP) format. This vision is driven by the proliferation of data services. For example, time-division multiplexed (TDM) voice becomes VoIP. Analog cable-television signals become MPEG bits streamed to digital set-top boxes. T1 or OC-N private lines migrate to Ethernet virtual private networks (VPNs). All these packets coexist peacefully within a single packet-routing methodology built on an optical transport layer that combines the flexibility and cost of data networks with telecom-grade reliability. While this vision is appealing in its simplicity and shared widely, specifics of implementation raise many challenges and differences of opinion. For example, many seek to expand the role of Ethernet in these transport networks, while massive efforts are underway to make traditional TDM networks more data friendly within an evolved but backward-compatible SDH/SONET (synchronous digital hierarchy and synchronous optical network) multiplexing hierarchy. From this common underlying theme follow many specific instantiations. Examples include the convergence at the physical, logical, and operational levels of voice and

  11. Convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darcie, Thomas E.; Doverspike, Robert; Zirngibl, Martin; Korotky, Steven K.

    2005-04-01

    Call for Papers: Convergence The Journal of Optical Networking (JON) invites submissions to a special issue on Convergence. Convergence has become a popular theme in telecommunications, one that has broad implications across all segments of the industry. Continual evolution of technology and applications continues to erase lines between traditionally separate lines of business, with dramatic consequences for vendors, service providers, and consumers. Spectacular advances in all layers of optical networking-leading to abundant, dynamic, cost-effective, and reliable wide-area and local-area connections-have been essential drivers of this evolution. As services and networks continue to evolve towards some notion of convergence, the continued role of optical networks must be explored. One vision of convergence renders all information in a common packet (especially IP) format. This vision is driven by the proliferation of data services. For example, time-division multiplexed (TDM) voice becomes VoIP. Analog cable-television signals become MPEG bits streamed to digital set-top boxes. T1 or OC-N private lines migrate to Ethernet virtual private networks (VPNs). All these packets coexist peacefully within a single packet-routing methodology built on an optical transport layer that combines the flexibility and cost of data networks with telecom-grade reliability. While this vision is appealing in its simplicity and shared widely, specifics of implementation raise many challenges and differences of opinion. For example, many seek to expand the role of Ethernet in these transport networks, while massive efforts are underway to make traditional TDM networks more data friendly within an evolved but backward-compatible SDH/SONET (synchronous digital hierarchy and synchronous optical network) multiplexing hierarchy. From this common underlying theme follow many specific instantiations. Examples include the convergence at the physical, logical, and operational levels of voice and

  12. Convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darcie, Thomas E.; Doverspike, Robert; Zirngibl, Martin; Korotky, Steven K.

    2005-01-01

    Call for Papers: Convergence

    Guest Editors: Thomas E. Darcie, University of Victoria Robert Doverspike, AT&T Martin Zirngibl, Lucent Technologies

    Coordinating Associate Editor: Steven K. Korotky, Lucent Technologies

    The Journal of Optical Networking (JON) invites submissions to a special issue on Convergence. Convergence has become a popular theme in telecommunications, one that has broad implications across all segments of the industry. Continual evolution of technology and applications continues to erase lines between traditionally separate lines of business, with dramatic consequences for vendors, service providers, and consumers. Spectacular advances in all layers of optical networking-leading to abundant, dynamic, cost-effective, and reliable wide-area and local-area connections-have been essential drivers of this evolution. As services and networks continue to evolve towards some notion of convergence, the continued role of optical networks must be explored. One vision of convergence renders all information in a common packet (especially IP) format. This vision is driven by the proliferation of data services. For example, time-division multiplexed (TDM) voice becomes VoIP. Analog cable-television signals become MPEG bits streamed to digital set-top boxes. T1 or OC-N private lines migrate to Ethernet virtual private networks (VPNs). All these packets coexist peacefully within a single packet-routing methodology built on an optical transport layer that combines the flexibility and cost of data networks with telecom-grade reliability. While this vision is appealing in its simplicity and shared widely, specifics of implementation raise many challenges and differences of opinion. For example, many seek to expand the role of Ethernet in these transport networks, while massive efforts are underway to make traditional TDM networks more data friendly

  13. Convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darcie, Thomas E.; Doverspike, Robert; Zirngibl, Martin; Korotky, Steven K.

    2004-12-01

    Convergence has become a popular theme in telecommunications, one that has broad implications across all segments of the industry. Continual evolution of technology and applications continues to erase lines between traditionally separate lines of business, with dramatic consequences for vendors, service providers, and consumers. Spectacular advances in all layers of optical networking-leading to abundant, dynamic, cost-effective, and reliable wide-area and local-area connections-have been essential drivers of this evolution. As services and networks continue to evolve towards some notion of convergence, the continued role of optical networks must be explored. One vision of convergence renders all information in a common packet (especially IP) format. This vision is driven by the proliferation of data services. For example, time-division multiplexed (TDM) voice becomes VoIP. Analog cable-television signals become MPEG bits streamed to digital set-top boxes. T1 or OC-N private lines migrate to Ethernet virtual private networks (VPNs). All these packets coexist peacefully within a single packet-routing methodology built on an optical transport layer that combines the flexibility and cost of data networks with telecom-grade reliability. While this vision is appealing in its simplicity and shared widely, specifics of implementation raise many challenges and differences of opinion. For example, many seek to expand the role of Ethernet in these transport networks, while massive efforts are underway to make traditional TDM networks more data friendly within an evolved but backward-compatible SDH/SONET (synchronous digital hierarchy and synchronous optical network) multiplexing hierarchy. From this common underlying theme follow many specific instantiations. Examples include the convergence at the physical, logical, and operational levels of voice and data, video and data, private-line and virtual private-line, fixed and mobile, and local and long-haul services. These

  14. Convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darcie, Thomas E.; Doverspike, Robert; Zirngibl, Martin; Korotky, Steven K.

    2004-12-01

    Convergence has become a popular theme in telecommunications, one that has broad implications across all segments of the industry. Continual evolution of technology and applications continues to erase lines between traditionally separate lines of business, with dramatic consequences for vendors, service providers, and consumers. Spectacular advances in all layers of optical networking-leading to abundant, dynamic, cost-effective, and reliable wide-area and local-area connections-have been essential drivers of this evolution. As services and networks continue to evolve towards some notion of convergence, the continued role of optical networks must be explored. One vision of convergence renders all information in a common packet (especially IP) format. This vision is driven by the proliferation of data services. For example, time-division multiplexed (TDM) voice becomes VoIP. Analog cable-television signals become MPEG bits streamed to digital set-top boxes. T1 or OC-N private lines migrate to Ethernet virtual private networks (VPNs). All these packets coexist peacefully within a single packet-routing methodology built on an optical transport layer that combines the flexibility and cost of data networks with telecom-grade reliability. While this vision is appealing in its simplicity and shared widely, specifics of implementation raise many challenges and differences of opinion. For example, many seek to expand the role of Ethernet in these transport networks, while massive efforts are underway to make traditional TDM networks more data friendly within an evolved but backward-compatible SDH/SONET (synchronous digital hierarchy and synchronous optical network) multiplexing hierarchy. From this common underlying theme follow many specific instantiations. Examples include the convergence at the physical, logical, and operational levels of voice and data, video and data, private-line and virtual private-line, fixed and mobile, and local and long-haul services. These

  15. Convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darcie, Thomas E.; Doverspike, Robert; Zirngibl, Martin; Korotky, Steven K.

    2005-03-01

    Call for Papers: Convergence Convergence has become a popular theme in telecommunications, one that has broad implications across all segments of the industry. Continual evolution of technology and applications continues to erase lines between traditionally separate lines of business, with dramatic consequences for vendors, service providers, and consumers. Spectacular advances in all layers of optical networking-leading to abundant, dynamic, cost-effective, and reliable wide-area and local-area connections-have been essential drivers of this evolution. As services and networks continue to evolve towards some notion of convergence, the continued role of optical networks must be explored. One vision of convergence renders all information in a common packet (especially IP) format. This vision is driven by the proliferation of data services. For example, time-division multiplexed (TDM) voice becomes VoIP. Analog cable-television signals become MPEG bits streamed to digital set-top boxes. T1 or OC-N private lines migrate to Ethernet virtual private networks (VPNs). All these packets coexist peacefully within a single packet-routing methodology built on an optical transport layer that combines the flexibility and cost of data networks with telecom-grade reliability. While this vision is appealing in its simplicity and shared widely, specifics of implementation raise many challenges and differences of opinion. For example, many seek to expand the role of Ethernet in these transport networks, while massive efforts are underway to make traditional TDM networks more data friendly within an evolved but backward-compatible SDH/SONET (synchronous digital hierarchy and synchronous optical network) multiplexing hierarchy. From this common underlying theme follow many specific instantiations. Examples include the convergence at the physical, logical, and operational levels of voice and data, video and data, private-line and virtual private-line, fixed and mobile, and local and

  16. Convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darcie, Thomas E.; Doverspike, Robert; Zirngibl, Martin; Korotky, Steven K.

    2005-02-01

    Call for Papers: Convergence Convergence has become a popular theme in telecommunications, one that has broad implications across all segments of the industry. Continual evolution of technology and applications continues to erase lines between traditionally separate lines of business, with dramatic consequences for vendors, service providers, and consumers. Spectacular advances in all layers of optical networking-leading to abundant, dynamic, cost-effective, and reliable wide-area and local-area connections-have been essential drivers of this evolution. As services and networks continue to evolve towards some notion of convergence, the continued role of optical networks must be explored. One vision of convergence renders all information in a common packet (especially IP) format. This vision is driven by the proliferation of data services. For example, time-division multiplexed (TDM) voice becomes VoIP. Analog cable-television signals become MPEG bits streamed to digital set-top boxes. T1 or OC-N private lines migrate to Ethernet virtual private networks (VPNs). All these packets coexist peacefully within a single packet-routing methodology built on an optical transport layer that combines the flexibility and cost of data networks with telecom-grade reliability. While this vision is appealing in its simplicity and shared widely, specifics of implementation raise many challenges and differences of opinion. For example, many seek to expand the role of Ethernet in these transport networks, while massive efforts are underway to make traditional TDM networks more data friendly within an evolved but backward-compatible SDH/SONET (synchronous digital hierarchy and synchronous optical network) multiplexing hierarchy. From this common underlying theme follow many specific instantiations. Examples include the convergence at the physical, logical, and operational levels of voice and data, video and data, private-line and virtual private-line, fixed and mobile, and local and

  17. Convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darcie, Thomas E.; Doverspike, Robert; Zirngibl, Martin; Korotky, Steven K.

    2005-01-01

    Call for Papers: Convergence

    Guest Editors: Thomas E. Darcie, University of Victoria Robert Doverspike, AT&T Martin Zirngibl, Lucent Technologies

    Coordinating Associate Editor: Steven K. Korotky, Lucent Technologies

    The Journal of Optical Networking (JON) invites submissions to a special issue on Convergence. Convergence has become a popular theme in telecommunications, one that has broad implications across all segments of the industry. Continual evolution of technology and applications continues to erase lines between traditionally separate lines of business, with dramatic consequences for vendors, service providers, and consumers. Spectacular advances in all layers of optical networking-leading to abundant, dynamic, cost-effective, and reliable wide-area and local-area connections-have been essential drivers of this evolution. As services and networks continue to evolve towards some notion of convergence, the continued role of optical networks must be explored. One vision of convergence renders all information in a common packet (especially IP) format. This vision is driven by the proliferation of data services. For example, time-division multiplexed (TDM) voice becomes VoIP. Analog cable-television signals become MPEG bits streamed to digital set-top boxes. T1 or OC-N private lines migrate to Ethernet virtual private networks (VPNs). All these packets coexist peacefully within a single packet-routing methodology built on an optical transport layer that combines the flexibility and cost of data networks with telecom-grade reliability. While this vision is appealing in its simplicity and shared widely, specifics of implementation raise many challenges and differences of opinion. For example, many seek to expand the role of Ethernet in these transport networks, while massive efforts are underway to make traditional TDM networks more data friendly

  18. Phenotypic and genotypic convergences are influenced by historical contingency and environment in yeast

    PubMed Central

    NIDELET, Thibault; MARTIN, Juliette; LEGRAND, Judith; DILLMANN, Christine; BOURGAIS, Aurélie; de VIENNE, Dominique; SHERLOCK, Gavin; SICARD, Delphine

    2015-01-01

    Different organisms have independently and recurrently evolved similar phenotypic traits at different points throughout history. This phenotypic convergence may be caused by genotypic convergence and constrained by historical contingency. To investigate how convergence may be driven by selection in a particular environment and constrained by history, we analyzed nine life-history traits and four metabolic traits during an experimental evolution of six yeast strains in four different environments. In each of the environments, the population converged towards a different life-history strategy. However, phenotypic convergence was partly associated with the selection of mutations in genes involved in the same pathway. In a fifth of our evolution experiments, mutations in the same gene, BMH1, were selected, in three out of the six ancestral genotypes. Two types of BMH1 mutation with opposite phenotypic effects on several traits were found. The evolution of most traits, as well as the occurrence of BMH1 mutations, was significantly influenced by the ancestral strain. However, this effect could not be easily predicted from ancestors’ phylogeny or past-selection. All together, our data demonstrate that phenotypic and its underlying genotypic convergence depends on a complex interplay between the evolutionary environment, pleiotropy and the ancestor genetic background but are not straightforwardly predicable. PMID:24164389

  19. Complex-plane generalization of scalar Levin transforms: A robust, rapidly convergent method to compute potentials and fields in multi-layered media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sainath, Kamalesh; Teixeira, Fernando L.; Donderici, Burkay

    2014-07-01

    We propose the complex-plane generalization of a powerful algebraic sequence acceleration algorithm, the method of weighted averages (MWA), to guarantee exponential-cum-algebraic convergence of Fourier and Fourier-Hankel (F-H) integral transforms. This “complex-plane” MWA, effected via a linear-path detour in the complex plane, results in rapid, absolute convergence of field and potential solutions in multi-layered environments regardless of the source-observer geometry and anisotropy/loss of the media present. In this work, we first introduce a new integration path used to evaluate the field contribution arising from the radiation spectra. Subsequently, we (1) exhibit the foundational relations behind the complex-plane extension to a general Levin-type sequence convergence accelerator, (2) specialize this analysis to one member of the Levin transform family (the MWA), (3) address and circumvent restrictions, arising for two-dimensional integrals associated with wave dynamics problems, through minimal complex-plane detour restrictions and a novel partition of the integration domain, (4) develop and compare two formulations based on standard/real-axis MWA variants, and (5) present validation results and convergence characteristics for one of these two formulations.

  20. Complex-plane generalization of scalar Levin transforms: A robust, rapidly convergent method to compute potentials and fields in multi-layered media

    SciTech Connect

    Sainath, Kamalesh; Teixeira, Fernando L.; Donderici, Burkay

    2014-07-15

    We propose the complex-plane generalization of a powerful algebraic sequence acceleration algorithm, the method of weighted averages (MWA), to guarantee exponential-cum-algebraic convergence of Fourier and Fourier–Hankel (F–H) integral transforms. This “complex-plane” MWA, effected via a linear-path detour in the complex plane, results in rapid, absolute convergence of field and potential solutions in multi-layered environments regardless of the source-observer geometry and anisotropy/loss of the media present. In this work, we first introduce a new integration path used to evaluate the field contribution arising from the radiation spectra. Subsequently, we (1) exhibit the foundational relations behind the complex-plane extension to a general Levin-type sequence convergence accelerator, (2) specialize this analysis to one member of the Levin transform family (the MWA), (3) address and circumvent restrictions, arising for two-dimensional integrals associated with wave dynamics problems, through minimal complex-plane detour restrictions and a novel partition of the integration domain, (4) develop and compare two formulations based on standard/real-axis MWA variants, and (5) present validation results and convergence characteristics for one of these two formulations.

  1. The convergence of gambling and digital media: implications for gambling in young people.

    PubMed

    King, Daniel; Delfabbro, Paul; Griffiths, Mark

    2010-06-01

    Adolescents' use of the Internet and other digital media for the purpose of gambling represents a serious concern in modern society. This paper overviews some of the available monetary and non-monetary forms of gambling within new digital and online media and monetary forms of games with gambling-like experiences. With reference to current psychological knowledge on the risk factors that promote adolescent gambling, it is suggested that new gambling technologies may: (a) make gambling more accessible and attractive to young people, (b) may promote factually incorrect information about gambling, (c) provide an easy escape from real world problems such as depression and social isolation, (d) create a gambling environment that easily facilitates peer pressures to gamble, (e) ease parental transmission of gambling attitudes and beliefs, and (f) make gambling more ubiquitous and socially acceptable. The unique risks of Internet gambling for young people are critically discussed, as well as the lack of restricted classification for video games and other media that feature interactive, non-monetary forms of gambling. PMID:19756979

  2. Money Management in a Media Resources Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kent, Alvin

    1983-01-01

    Director of Iowa State University's Media Resources Center argues that fiscal progress is the most reliable measure of functional progress or growth. How money is controlled to allow for allocation of funds and manipulation of service priorities is described as well as how service functions are managed. (MBR)

  3. Note-Taking and Memory in Different Media Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Lin; Bigenho, Chris

    2011-01-01

    Through this study the authors investigated undergraduate students' memory recall in three media environments with three note-taking options, following an A x B design with nine experiments. The three environments included no-distraction, auditory-distraction, and auditory-visual-distraction; while the three note-taking options included…

  4. Media wrapper in adaptation of multimedia content for mobile environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metso, Maija; Sauvola, Jaakko J.

    2001-03-01

    "Accessing information anytime, anywhere, with any device" is a widely used slogan. The problem, however, is how to bring multimedia services to terminals with limited capabilities. Our approach offers a solution for delivering multimedia presentations to terminals connected to mobile or fixed networks with varying capabilities. Our media wrapper is used to adapt the original presentation according to end-to-end environment characteristics; e.g., the user, terminal, and network type. This paper presents a technique called 'media wrapper' that controls and models the media adaptation process. Using this approach, it is possible to scale and convert multimedia presentations to suit the end user's terminal by making only one original presentation and letting the media wrapper to scale it for the different environments. The adaptation is performed using special algorithms that are defined by dedicated software agents. The algorithms are implemented as agents and are controlled by the media wrapper management module. The agent control is managed based on knowledge base information that contains, e.g., logical rules consisting of the combinations of the needed adaptation parameters. The media wrapper uses CC/PP profiling for defining the parameters that affect the adaptation. These parameters concern terminal, network, and client behavior.

  5. Advancing cancer control research in an emerging news media environment.

    PubMed

    Smith, Katherine C; Niederdeppe, Jeff; Blake, Kelly D; Cappella, Joseph N

    2013-12-01

    Cancer is both highly feared and highly newsworthy, and there is a robust body of research documenting the content and effects of cancer news coverage on health behaviors and policy. Recent years have witnessed ongoing, transformative shifts in American journalism alongside rapid advances in communication technology and the public information environment. These changes create a pressing need to consider a new set of research questions, sampling strategies, measurement techniques, and theories of media effects to ensure continued relevance and adaptation of communication research to address critical cancer control concerns. This paper begins by briefly reviewing what we know about the role of cancer news in shaping cancer-related beliefs, attitudes, behaviors, and policies. We then outline challenges and opportunities, both theoretical and methodological, posed by the rapidly changing news media environment and the nature of audience engagement. We organize our discussion around three major shifts associated with the emerging news media environment as it relates to health communication: 1) speed and dynamism of news diffusion, 2) increased narrowcasting of media content for specialized audiences, and 3) broadened participation in shaping media content. In so doing, we articulate a set of questions for future theory and research, in an effort to catalyze innovative communication scholarship to improve cancer prevention and control. PMID:24395988

  6. Reduction of Perceived Social Distance as an Explanation for Media's Influence on Personal Risk Perceptions: A Test of the Risk Convergence Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    So, Jiyeon; Nabi, Robin

    2013-01-01

    The risk convergence model proposes reduction of perceived social distance to a mediated personality as a mechanism through which the mass media can influence audiences' personal risk perceptions. As an initial test of the model, this study examined whether 5 audience variables known to facilitate media effects on personal risk…

  7. Flirting, Dating, and Breaking up within New Media Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meenagh, Joni

    2015-01-01

    Although romantic and sexual relationships are an important aspect of young people's lives, research on how young people negotiate their love/sex relationships is lacking. New media environments provide a new context within which young people negotiate their love/sex relationships; however, what is negotiated is often not all that different from…

  8. Indiva: a middleware for managing distributed media environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ooi, Wei-Tsang; Pletcher, Peter; Rowe, Lawrence A.

    2003-12-01

    This paper presents a unified set of abstractions and operations for hardware devices, software processes, and media data in a distributed audio and video environment. These abstractions, which are provided through a middleware layer called Indiva, use a file system metaphor to access resources and high-level commands to simplify the development of Internet webcast and distributed collaboration control applications. The design and implementation of Indiva are described and examples are presented to illustrate the usefulness of the abstractions.

  9. Optimal order convergence of a modified BDM1 mixed finite element scheme for reactive transport in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, Fabian; Radu, Florin A.; Bause, Markus; Knabner, Peter

    2012-01-01

    We present a mass conservative finite element approach of second order accuracy for the numerical approximation of reactive solute transport in porous media modeled by a coupled system of advection-diffusion-reaction equations. The lowest order Brezzi-Douglas-Marini ( BDM1) mixed finite element method is used. A modification based on the hybrid form of the approach is suggested for the discretization of the advective term. It is demonstrated numerically that this leads to optimal second order convergence of the flux variable. The modification improves the convergence behavior of the classical BDM1 scheme, which is known to be suboptimal of first order accuracy only for advection-diffusion problems; cf. [8]. Moreover, the new scheme shows more robustness for high Péclet numbers than the classical approach. A comparison with the Raviart-Thomas element ( RT1) of second order accuracy for the approximation of the flux variable is also presented. For the case of strongly advection-dominated problems we propose a full upwind scheme. Various numerical studies, including also a nonlinear test problem, are presented to illustrate the numerical performance properties of the considered numerical methods.

  10. Convergent life-history shifts: toxic environments result in big babies in two clades of poeciliids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riesch, Rüdiger; Plath, Martin; García de León, Francisco J.; Schlupp, Ingo

    2010-02-01

    The majority of studies on ecological speciation in animals have investigated the divergence caused by biotic factors like divergent food sources or predatory regimes. Here, we examined a system where ecological speciation can clearly be ascribed to abiotic environmental gradients of naturally occurring toxic hydrogen sulfide (H2S). In southern Mexico, two genera of livebearing fishes (Poeciliidae: Poecilia and Gambusia) thrive in various watercourses with different concentrations of H2S. Previous studies have revealed pronounced genetic differentiation between different locally adapted populations in one species ( Poecilia mexicana), pointing towards incipient speciation. In the present study, we examined female reproductive life-history traits in two species pairs: Gambusia sexradiata (from a nonsulfidic and a sulfidic habitat) and Gambusia eurystoma (sulfide-endemic), as well as P. mexicana (nonsulfidic and sulfidic) and Poecilia sulphuraria (sulfide endemic). We found convergent divergence of life-history traits in response to sulfide; most prominently, extremophile poeciliids exhibit drastically increased offspring size coupled with reduced fecundity. Furthermore, within each genus, this trend increased with increasing sulfide concentrations and was most pronounced in the two endemic sulfur-adapted species. We discuss the adaptive significance of large offspring size in toxic environments and propose that divergent life-history evolution may promote further ecological divergence through isolation by adaptation.

  11. Extreme environments as potential drivers of convergent evolution by exaptation: the Atacama Desert Coastal Range case

    PubMed Central

    Azua-Bustos, Armando; González-Silva, Carlos; Arenas-Fajardo, Cristián; Vicuña, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    We have recently discovered a variety of unrelated phototrophic microorganisms (two microalgae and one cyanobacteria) in specialized terrestrial habitats at The Coastal Range of the Atacama Desert. Interestingly, morphological and molecular evidence suggest that these three species are all recent colonists that came from aquatic habitats. The first case is Cyanidiales inhabiting coastal caves. Cyanidiales are microalgae that are commonly found in warm acid springs, but have also been recently discovered as cave flora in Italy. The case is Dunaliella biofilms colonizing spider webs in coastal caves; Dunaliella are microalgae typically found in hypersaline habitats. The third case is Chroococcidiopsis, a genus of Cyanobacteria commonly found in deserts around the world that has also been described in warm springs. Thus, we show that the traits found in the closest ancestors of the aforementioned species (which inhabited other unrelated extreme environments) seem to be now useful for the described species in their current subaerial habitats and may likely correspond to cases of exaptations. Altogether, the Coastal Range of the Atacama Desert may be considered as a place where key steps on the colonization of land by phototrophic organisms seem to be being repeated by convergent evolution of extant microalgae and Cyanobacteria. PMID:23267354

  12. The General Environment Fit Scale: A Factor Analysis and Test of Convergent Construct Validity

    PubMed Central

    Beasley, Christopher; Jason, Leonard; Miller, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Person-environment fit (P-E fit) was initially espoused as an important construct in the field of community psychology; however, most of the theoretical and empirical development of the construct has been conducted by industrial/organizational (I/O) psychologists. In the current study, the GEFS—a P-E fit measure was developed from I/O and business management perspectives on fit—was administered to 246 attendees of an annual convention for residents and alumni of Oxford House (OH), a network of over 1400 mutual-help recovery homes. The authors conducted confirmatory factor and convergent construct validity analyses on the GEFS. The results suggested that the theoretical factor structure of the measure adequately fit the data, suggesting that the GEFS is a valid measure of P-E fit. OH resident fit with their recovery home was related to satisfaction, but not expected tenure. Exploratory analyses revealed that the sufficient supply of resident needs by the recovery home and similarity between residents and their housemates predicted satisfaction with the recovery home, but only similarity with housemates predicted how long residents intended to stay in the OHs. PMID:22071911

  13. Converging indicators for assessing individual differences in adaptation to extreme environments.

    PubMed

    Cowings, Patricia; Toscano, William; Deroshia, Charles; Taylor, Bruce; Hines, A'Liah; Bright, Andrew; Dodds, Anika

    2007-05-01

    It is well known that microgravity results in various physiological alterations, for example, head-ward fluid shifts which can impede physiological adaptation. Other factors that may affect crew operational efficiency include disruption of sleep-wake cycles, high workload, isolation, confinement, stress, and fatigue. From an operational perspective, it is difficult to predict which individuals will be most or least affected in this unique environment given that most astronauts are first-time flyers. During future lunar and Mars missions space crews will include both men and women of multi-national origins, different professional backgrounds, and various states of physical condition. Therefore, new methods or technologies are needed to monitor and predict astronaut performance and health, and to evaluate the effects of various countermeasures on crew during long-duration missions. Herein we describe the development and validation of a new methodology for assessing the deleterious effects of spaceflight on crew health and performance. We reviewed several studies conducted in both laboratory and operational environments with men and women ranging in age between 18 to 50 yr. The studies included the following: soldiers performing command and control functions during mobile operations in enclosed armored vehicles; subjects participating in laboratory tests of an anti-motion sickness medication; subjects exposed to chronic hypergravity aboard a centrifuge; and subject responses to 36-h of sleep deprivation. Physiological measurements, performance metrics, and subjective self-reports were collected in each study. The results demonstrate that multivariate converging indicators provide a significantly more reliable method for assessing environmental effects on performance and health than any single indicator. PMID:17547321

  14. Converging Indicators for Assessing Individual Differences in Adaptation to Extreme Environments: Preliminary Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowings, Patricia S.; Toscano, William B.; DeRoshia, Charles W.; Taylor, Bruce; Hines, Seleimah; Bright, Andrew; Dodds, Anika

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the development and validation of a new methodology for assessing the deleterious effects of spaceflight on crew health and performance. It is well known that microgravity results in various physiological alterations, e.g., headward fluid shifts which can impede physiological adaptation. Other factors that may affect crew operational efficiency include disruption of sleep-wake cycles, high workload, isolation, confinement, stress and fatigue. From an operational perspective, it is difficult to predict which individuals will be most or least affected in this unique environment given that most astronauts are first-time flyers. During future lunar and Mars missions space crews will include both men and women of multi-national origins, different professional backgrounds, and various states of physical condition. Therefore, new methods or technologies are needed to monitor and predict astronaut performance and health, and to evaluate the effects of various countermeasures on crew during long duration missions. This paper reviews several studies conducted in both laboratory and operational environments with men and women ranging in age between 18 to 50 years. The studies included the following: soldiers performing command and control functions during mobile operations in enclosed armored vehicles; subjects participating in laboratory tests of an anti-motion sickness medication; subjects exposed to chronic hypergravity aboard a centrifuge, and subject responses to 36-hours of sleep deprivation. Physiological measurements, performance metrics, and subjective self-reports were collected in each study. The results demonstrate that multivariate converging indicators provide a significantly more reliable method for assessing environmental effects on performance and health than any single indicator.

  15. Initiation of deep convection along boundary layer convergence lines in a semitropical environment

    SciTech Connect

    Fankhauser, J.C.; Crook, N.A.; Tuttle, J.; Miller, L.J.; Wade, C.G.

    1995-02-01

    The initiation of deep convection through forcing along boundary layer convergence lines is examined using observations from the Convection and Precipitation/Electrification (CaPE) Experiment conducted in east-central Florida during the summer of 1991. The study is concerned with the evolution and interaction of two converging air masses that were initially separated by an intervening boundary layer characterized by neutral stability and horizontal convective rolls. As anticipated, major thunderstorms erupt when the east coast breeze eventually collides with thunderstorm outflows from the west, but unexpected convection takes place prior to their merger along a well-defined confluence zone associated with a persistent quasi-stationary roll vortex signature. In this study, complementary interactions between roll vortex convergence lines and the sea-breeze front are not sufficient to trigger deep convection. However, organized convergence along the eastward-spreading thunderstorm outflows did interact periodically with roll vortex convergence maxima to initiate a new series of new storms. Results from two-dimensional numerical model simulations replicate many of the observed boundary layer features. Surface heating produces circulations similar to sea-breeze frontal zones that appear near the coastlines and progress steadily toward each other as the interior boundary layer deepens. Vertical velocity maxima develop over the associated convergence zones, but weaker periodic maxima also occur within the interior air mass at intervals similar to the spacing of observed horizontal roll vortices.

  16. The Convergence of Text and Graphics in an Online Learning Environment: A Case Study in Economics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingram, Deborah; Thompson, Eileen; Tcha, MoonJoong

    While much visually oriented teaching material that uses the new technologies is being developed, there is little understanding or research into the demands such material makes on students' information processing. This paper outlines an innovative approach to teaching complex economic models that incorporates the convergence of text and graphics…

  17. Cognition and the Media-ted Curriculum: Effects of Growing Up in an Electronic Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiarelott, Leigh

    1984-01-01

    Examines forms of media in today's electronic environment including television, microcomputers, video games, and music television, and considers these media forms and their effects on cognitive processing. Implications for teachers and instructional designers in achieving curricular balance between print and electronic media are discussed. (MBR)

  18. Immersive Media Environments for Special Education: Developing Agency in Communication for Youth with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tolentino, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation describes the development of a state-of-the-art immersive media environment and its potential to motivate high school youth with autism to vocally express themselves. Due to the limited availability of media environments in public education settings, studies on the use of such systems in special education contexts are rare. A…

  19. A Study of Learning and Motivation in a New Media Enriched Environment for Middle School Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Min; Horton, Lucas; Olmanson, Justin; Toprac, Paul

    2011-01-01

    This study examines middle school students' learning and motivation as they engaged in a new media enriched problem-based learning (PBL) environment for middle school science. Using a mixed-method design with both quantitative and qualitative data, we investigated the effect of a new media environment on sixth graders' science learning, their…

  20. The Convergence of Gaming Practices with Other Media Forms: What Potential for Learning? A Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Freitas, Sara; Griffiths, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Nowhere in the current digital technology landscape is the process of "blurring the lines between media" more apparent than with the uses and applications of gaming practices and technologies. Here the overlaps between new media and media interfaces are becoming significant as games technologies and practices are becoming more pervasive as…

  1. The Media Environment: Mass Communications in American Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanley, Robert H.; Steinberg, Charles S.

    The purpose of this book is to provide the reader with an informational frame of reference that will permit the formation of critical judgments concerning America's mass media institutions. The book covers the broad spectrum of the communications media in terms of their impact on American society. Such topics are discussed as social aspects of…

  2. Social Media and the New Academic Environment: Pedagogical Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patrut, Bogdan; Patrut, Monica; Cmeciu, Camelia

    2013-01-01

    As web applications play a vital role in our society, social media has emerged as an important tool in the creation and exchange of user-generated content and social interaction. The benefits of these services have entered in the educational areas to become new means by which scholars communicate, collaborate and teach. Social Media and the New…

  3. Toward faster OPC convergence: advanced analysis for OPC iterations and simulation environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahnas, Mohamed; Al-Imam, Mohamed; Tawfik, Tamer

    2008-10-01

    Achieving faster Turn-Around-Time (TAT) is one of the most attractive objectives for the silicon wafer manufacturers despite the technology node they are processing. This is valid for all the active technology nodes from 130nm till the cutting edge technologies. There have been several approaches adopted to cut down the OPC simulation runtime without sacrificing the OPC output quality, among them is using stronger CPU power and Hardware acceleration which is a good usage for the advancing powerful processing technology. Another favorable approach for cutting down the runtime is to look deeper inside the used OPC algorithm and the implemented OPC recipe. The OPC algorithm includes the convergence iterations and simulation sites distribution, and the OPC recipe is in definition how to smartly tune the OPC knobs to efficiently use the implemented algorithm. Many previous works were exposed to monitoring the OPC convergence through iterations and analyze the size of the shift per iteration, similarly several works tried to calculate the amount of simulation capacity needed for all these iterations and how to optimize it for less amount. The scope of the work presented here is an attempt to decrease the number of optical simulations by reducing the number of control points per site and without affecting OPC accuracy. The concept is proved by many simulation results and analysis. Implementing this flow illustrated the achievable simulation runtime reduction which is reflected in faster TAT. For its application, it is not just runtime optimization, additionally it puts some more intelligence in the sparse OPC engine by eliminating the headache of specifying the optimum simulation site length.

  4. Genetics and the environment converge to dysregulate N-glycosylation in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Mkhikian, Haik; Grigorian, Ani; Li, Carey F.; Chen, Hung-Lin; Newton, Barbara; Zhou, Raymond W.; Beeton, Christine; Torossian, Sevan; Tatarian, Gevork Grikor; Lee, Sung-Uk; Lau, Ken; Walker, Erin; Siminovitch, Katherine A.; Chandy, K. George; Yu, Zhaoxia; Dennis, James W.; Demetriou, Michael

    2011-01-01

    How environmental factors combine with genetic risk at the molecular level to promote complex trait diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS) is largely unknown. In mice, N-glycan branching by the Golgi enzymes Mgat1 and/or Mgat5 prevents T cell hyperactivity, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) endocytosis, spontaneous inflammatory demyelination and neurodegeneration, the latter pathologies characteristic of MS. Here we show that MS risk modulators converge to alter N-glycosylation and/or CTLA-4 surface retention conditional on metabolism and vitamin D3, including genetic variants in interleukin-7 receptor-α (IL7RA*C), interleukin-2 receptor-α (IL2RA*T), MGAT1 (IVAVT−T) and CTLA-4 (Thr17Ala). Downregulation of Mgat1 by IL7RA*C and IL2RA*T is opposed by MGAT1 (IVAVT−T) and vitamin D3, optimizing branching and mitigating MS risk when combined with enhanced CTLA-4 N-glycosylation by CTLA-4 Thr17. Our data suggest a molecular mechanism in MS whereby multiple environmental and genetic inputs lead to dysregulation of a final common pathway, namely N-glycosylation. PMID:21629267

  5. Molecular Specificity, Convergence and Constraint Shape Adaptive Evolution in Nutrient-Poor Environments

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jungeui; Gresham, David

    2014-01-01

    One of the central goals of evolutionary biology is to explain and predict the molecular basis of adaptive evolution. We studied the evolution of genetic networks in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (budding yeast) populations propagated for more than 200 generations in different nitrogen-limiting conditions. We find that rapid adaptive evolution in nitrogen-poor environments is dominated by the de novo generation and selection of copy number variants (CNVs), a large fraction of which contain genes encoding specific nitrogen transporters including PUT4, DUR3 and DAL4. The large fitness increases associated with these alleles limits the genetic heterogeneity of adapting populations even in environments with multiple nitrogen sources. Complete identification of acquired point mutations, in individual lineages and entire populations, identified heterogeneity at the level of genetic loci but common themes at the level of functional modules, including genes controlling phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate metabolism and vacuole biogenesis. Adaptive strategies shared with other nutrient-limited environments point to selection of genetic variation in the TORC1 and Ras/PKA signaling pathways as a general mechanism underlying improved growth in nutrient-limited environments. Within a single population we observed the repeated independent selection of a multi-locus genotype, comprised of the functionally related genes GAT1, MEP2 and LST4. By studying the fitness of individual alleles, and their combination, as well as the evolutionary history of the evolving population, we find that the order in which these mutations are acquired is constrained by epistasis. The identification of repeatedly selected variation at functionally related loci that interact epistatically suggests that gene network polymorphisms (GNPs) may be a frequent outcome of adaptive evolution. Our results provide insight into the mechanistic basis by which cells adapt to nutrient-limited environments and suggest that

  6. Detecting Rumors Through Modeling Information Propagation Networks in a Social Media Environment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Xu, Songhua; Tourassi, Georgia

    2015-01-01

    In the midst of today's pervasive influence of social media content and activities, information credibility has increasingly become a major issue. Accordingly, identifying false information, e.g. rumors circulated in social media environments, attracts expanding research attention and growing interests. Many previous studies have exploited user-independent features for rumor detection. These prior investigations uniformly treat all users relevant to the propagation of a social media message as instances of a generic entity. Such a modeling approach usually adopts a homogeneous network to represent all users, the practice of which ignores the variety across an entire user population in a social media environment. Recognizing this limitation of modeling methodologies, this study explores user-specific features in a social media environment for rumor detection. The new approach hypothesizes that whether a user tends to spread a rumor is dependent upon specific attributes of the user in addition to content characteristics of the message itself. Under this hypothesis, information propagation patterns of rumors versus those of credible messages in a social media environment are systematically differentiable. To explore and exploit this hypothesis, we develop a new information propagation model based on a heterogeneous user representation for rumor recognition. The new approach is capable of differentiating rumors from credible messages through observing distinctions in their respective propagation patterns in social media. Experimental results show that the new information propagation model based on heterogeneous user representation can effectively distinguish rumors from credible social media content. PMID:26623445

  7. Segmenting Broadcast News Audiences in the New Media Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wicks, Robert H.

    1989-01-01

    Examines the "benefit segmentation model," a marketing strategy for local news media which is capable of sorting consumers into discrete segments interested in similar salient product attributes or benefits. Concludes that benefit segmentation may provide a means by which news programmers may respond to their audience. (RS)

  8. Introduction of Mobile Media into Formal Classroom Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laskin, Alexander V.; Avena, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Among all the technological changes in the society, smartphones have become one of the most adopted innovations. Yet, in the classroom a common response to phones in students' hands is to ban them! This study uses Social Construction of Technology theory to investigate whether mobile media can have a place in the classroom. Using in-depth…

  9. Children and Their Changing Media Environment: A European Comparative Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livingstone, Sonia, Ed.; Bovill, Moira, Ed.

    Integrating broadcasting, video, computing, games, and the Internet, the domestic television screen is being transformed into the site of a multimedia culture. To address questions about the meaning and uses of such new media, this volume brings together work by researchers in 12 countries--Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, the United…

  10. The convergence of neomillennial learning styles and a multi-user virtual environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieterle, Edward Robert, II

    Learning styles influenced and cultivated by immersive technologies have spawned a new area of research, "neomillennial" learning styles (NLS). The present study utilizes a quantitative approach, including principal components analysis and multiple regression/correlation analysis, to investigate NLS. Evidence supporting the arguments laid out in this study derives from a sample of 574 middle grades students from urban, suburban, and rural school settings in North America that participated in the River City Project (RCP) in academic year 2006-07. Central to RCP is an immersive simulation for teaching inquiry-based science and 21st century skills, where success is measured across five dimensions: (a) collaboration, (b) science content understanding, (c) self-efficacy in science, (d) self-efficacy in scientific inquiry, and (e) thoughtfulness of inquiry. Besides taking part in RCP, participating students completed an instrument that generates a profile of their NLS. The resulting profile includes measures of students' fluency in multiple media; the extent to which they prefer learning based on collectively seeking, sieving, and synthesizing experiences; and their tendency toward expression through webs of representations. This study revealed that, on average, a student who prefers: (1) engaging tasks that require creative strategies and seeing and doing things in new ways, while avoiding tasks that involve details, is well suited for learning disease transmission and the scientific method in RCP; (2) distributing attention across multiple tasks that have been prioritized will further his or her belief in their ability to do science by participating via RCP whereas the same conditions may undercut a student who avoids distributing attention across multiple tasks that have been prioritized; (3) to read books, magazines, and newspapers by choice and who score high on measures of their general connectedness with the media is well suited for increasing his or her belief in

  11. Convergence Insufficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Eye Terms Conditions Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Convergence Insufficiency En Español Read in Chinese What is convergence insufficiency? Convergence insufficiency is the ...

  12. The PACA Project: Convergence of Scientific Research, Social Media and Citizen Science in the Era of Astronomical Big Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanamandra-Fisher, Padma A.

    2015-08-01

    The Pro-Am Collaborative Astronomy (PACA) project promotes and supports the professional-amateur astronomer collaboration in scientific research via social media and has been implemented in several comet observing campaigns. In 2014, two comet observing campaigns involving pro-am collaborations were initiated: (1) C/2013 A1 (C/SidingSpring) and (2) 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (CG), target for ESA/Rosetta mission. The evolving need for individual customized observing campaigns has been incorporated into the evolution of The PACA Project that currently is focused on comets: from supporting observing campaigns of current comets, legacy data, historical comets; interconnected with social media and a set of shareable documents addressing observational strategies; consistent standards for data; data access, use, and storage, to align with the needs of professional observers in the era of astronmical big data. The empowerment of amateur astronomers vis-à-vis their partnerships with the professional scientists creates a new demographic of data scientists, enabling citizen science of the integrated data from both the professional and amateur communities.While PACA identifies a consistent collaborative approach to pro-am collaborations, given the volume of data generated for each campaign, new ways of rapid data analysis, mining access and storage are needed. Several interesting results emerged from the synergistic inclusion of both social media and amateur astronomers. The PACA Project is expanding to include pro-am collaborations on other solar system objects; allow for immersive outreach and include various types of astronomical communities, ranging from individuals, to astronmical societies and telescopic networks. Enabling citizen science research in the era of astronomical big data is a challenge which requires innovative approaches and integration of professional and amateur astronomers with data scientists and some examples of recent projects will be highlighted.

  13. Engaging Learners through Interactive Media: Findings and Implications from a Technology Enhanced Problem-Based Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horton, Lucas; Liu, Min; Olmanson, Justin; Toprac, Paul

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we explore students' engagement in a new media enhanced problem-based learning (PBL) environment and investigate the characteristics of these environments that facilitate learning. We investigated both student experiences using a new media enhanced PBL environment and the specific elements students found most supportive of their…

  14. Guaranteeing QoS of media-based applications in virtualized environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Like; Wu, Song; Shi, Xuanhua; Jin, Hai; Zhou, Jiangfu

    2013-12-01

    With the rapid development of web technology and smart phone, multimedia contents spread all over the Internet. The prevalence of virtualization technology enables multimedia service providers to run media servers in virtualized servers or rented virtual machines (VMs) in a cloud environment. Although server consolidation using virtualization can substantially increase the efficient use of server resources, it introduces resources competition among VMs running different applications. Recently, hypervisors do not make any Quality of Service (QoS) guarantee for media-based applications if they are consolidated with other network-intensive applications, which leads to significant performance degradation. For example, Xen only offers a static method to allocate network bandwidth. In this paper, we find that the performance of media-based applications running in VMs degrades seriously when they are consolidated with other VMs running network-intensive applications and argues that dynamic network bandwidth allocation is essential to guarantee the QoS of media-based applications. Then, we present a dynamic network bandwidth allocation system in virtualized environment, which allocates network bandwidth dynamically and effectively, and does not interrupt running services in VMs. The experiments show that our system can not only guarantee the QoS of media-based applications well but also maximize the system's the overall performance while ensuring the QoS of media-based applications.

  15. Media, Tourism, Environment, and Cultural Issues in Australia: A Case Study of a Study Abroad Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freedman, Eric

    2010-01-01

    A multidisciplinary study abroad program developed by a U.S. journalism school and cosponsored by a college of agriculture and natural resources interweaves the themes of mass media, tourism, environment, and cultural issues in Australia. This article traces the development and evolution of the faculty-led program and discusses its curriculum,…

  16. Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Lee E., Ed.

    1974-01-01

    Intended for secondary English teachers, the materials and ideas presented here suggest ways to use media in the classroom in teaching visual and auditory discrimination while enlivening classes and motivating students. Contents include "Media Specialists Need Not Apply," which discusses the need for preparation of media educators with…

  17. Convergence Among Multiple Methods of Measuring Positivity and Negativity in the Family Environment: Relation to Depression inMothers and Their Children

    PubMed Central

    Park, Irene J. Kim; Garber, Judy; Ciesla, Jeffrey A.; Ellis, Bruce J.

    2010-01-01

    The present study addressed the following questions: (a) To what extent do different methods of measuring the family environment converge onto a single latent construct? (b) How are the constructs of positive and of negative family environment related? (c) Do the associations among various methods of measuring the family environment differ as a function of children's gender or of risk? and (d) How are the latent constructs of family environment related to depression in mothers and their children? Participants were 240 children (mean age = 11.86 years, SD = 0.57) and their mothers, who varied with regard to their history of depression. Family environment was measured with self-report questionnaires completed separately by mothers and by children, observations of mother–child interactions, and a 5-min speech sample of each mother talking about her child. Confirmatory factor analyses revealed that different methods for assessment of the family environment converged and that the constructs of positive and of negative family environments were significantly related to each other and to depression in both mothers and their children. These findings may help inform future intervention efforts by highlighting specific parenting dimensions that are strongly associated with maternal and with child depression. PMID:18266539

  18. The Convergence Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolodzy, Janet; Grant, August E.; DeMars, Tony R.; Wilkinson, Jeffrey S.

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of the Internet, social media, and digital technologies in the twenty-first century accelerated an evolution in journalism and communication that fit under the broad term of convergence. That evolution changed the relationship between news producers and consumers. It broke down the geographical boundaries in defining our communities,…

  19. Selection and Transmission Processes for Information in the Emerging Media Environment: Psychological Motives and Message Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Cappella, Joseph N.; Kim, Hyun Suk; Albarracín, Dolores

    2014-01-01

    The emerging media environment introduced fundamental changes in the quality and format of information available to the public, which can now flexibly seek, alter, and disseminate the information they receive. Therefore, the two processes of information selection and information retransmission are crucial for understanding the reach of any information available in the online information environment. From this starting point, we examine the common psychological motives driving information selection and transmission of attitude-relevant information: Defense and accuracy motives adding a focus on interpersonal motives. We also review message factors that can activate psychological motives leading to selection of retransmission of information, such as the desire for novelty and emotional stimulation. We speculate about the directions for the next generation of research necessary to understand exposure as a core outcome in media effects research and theory. PMID:26190944

  20. Adolescents' perceptions of caring in family, media, school, peer, and religious environments.

    PubMed

    Jensen, L C; Jensen, L N

    1998-06-01

    Adolescents were asked to select from two-word pairs the one that was emphasized more in their experiences with the environments of school, church, family, friends, or media. One of the word pairs was an indicator of caring, the other of justice. Analysis of responses of 87 adolescents indicated school was perceived as very low in caring compared to family, church, and friends. PMID:9676493

  1. Neuronal connectivity as a convergent target of gene-environment interactions that confer risk for Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Stamou, Marianna; Streifel, Karin M.; Goines, Paula E.; Lein, Pamela J.

    2013-01-01

    Evidence implicates environmental factors in the pathogenesis of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). However, the identity of specific environmental chemicals that influence ASD risk, severity or treatment outcome remains elusive. The impact of any given environmental exposure likely varies across a population according to individual genetic substrates, and this increases the difficulty of identifying clear associations between exposure and ASD diagnoses. Heritable genetic vulnerabilities may amplify adverse effects triggered by environmental exposures if genetic and environmental factors converge to dysregulate the same signaling systems at critical times of development. Thus, one strategy for identifying environmental risk factors for ASD is to screen for environmental factors that modulate the same signaling pathways as ASD susceptibility genes. Recent advances in defining the molecular and cellular pathology of ASD point to altered patterns of neuronal connectivity in the developing brain as the neurobiological basis of these disorders. Studies of syndromic ASD and rare highly penetrant mutations or CNVs in ASD suggest that ASD risk genes converge on several major signaling pathways linked to altered neuronal connectivity in the developing brain. This review briefly summarizes the evidence implicating dysfunctional signaling via Ca2+-dependent mechanisms, extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK)/phosphatidylinositol-3-kinases (PI3K) and neuroligin-neurexin-SHANK as convergent molecular mechanisms in ASD, and then discusses examples of environmental chemicals for which there is emerging evidence of their potential to interfere with normal neuronal connectivity via perturbation of these signaling pathways. PMID:23269408

  2. From ABCs to DVDs: Profiles of Infants' Home Media Environments in the First Two Years of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mol, Suzanne E.; Neuman, Susan B.; Strouse, Gabrielle A.

    2014-01-01

    The very definition of print exposure has evolved in recent years as has the production of new media for infants and toddlers. Recognising that parents now have a confluence of media to select from, our study was designed to provide a richer understanding of home-literacy environments among 100 infants. Three profiles of families' home media…

  3. Using social media to facilitate knowledge transfer in complex engineering environments: a primer for educators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Glen; Salomone, Sonia

    2013-03-01

    While highly cohesive groups are potentially advantageous they are also often correlated with the emergence of knowledge and information silos based around those same functional or occupational clusters. Consequently, an essential challenge for engineering organisations wishing to overcome informational silos is to implement mechanisms that facilitate, encourage and sustain interactions between otherwise disconnected groups. This paper acts as a primer for those seeking to gain an understanding of the design, functionality and utility of a suite of software tools generically termed social media technologies in the context of optimising the management of tacit engineering knowledge. Underpinned by knowledge management theory and using detailed case examples, this paper explores how social media technologies achieve such goals, allowing for the transfer of knowledge by tapping into the tacit and explicit knowledge of disparate groups in complex engineering environments.

  4. Molecular Optical Simulation Environment (MOSE): A Platform for the Simulation of Light Propagation in Turbid Media

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Shenghan; Chen, Xueli; Wang, Hailong; Qu, Xiaochao; Wang, Ge; Liang, Jimin; Tian, Jie

    2013-01-01

    The study of light propagation in turbid media has attracted extensive attention in the field of biomedical optical molecular imaging. In this paper, we present a software platform for the simulation of light propagation in turbid media named the “Molecular Optical Simulation Environment (MOSE)”. Based on the gold standard of the Monte Carlo method, MOSE simulates light propagation both in tissues with complicated structures and through free-space. In particular, MOSE synthesizes realistic data for bioluminescence tomography (BLT), fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT), and diffuse optical tomography (DOT). The user-friendly interface and powerful visualization tools facilitate data analysis and system evaluation. As a major measure for resource sharing and reproducible research, MOSE aims to provide freeware for research and educational institutions, which can be downloaded at http://www.mosetm.net. PMID:23577215

  5. Convergence Insufficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... insufficiency? Symptoms of convergence insufficiency include diplopia (double vision) and headaches when reading. Many patients will complain that they have difficulty concentrating on near work (computer, reading, etc.) and that the written word blurs ...

  6. Media Choice for Intra-School Communication: The Role of Environment, User, and Medium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caspi, Avner; Blau, Ina

    2011-01-01

    The influence of media richness, media attentional load, social influence and users' prior experience with media on selection of media to transmit different messages to peers within an educational organization was tested. Media were discriminated by all potential variables. Support was found for the role of prior experience and social influence in…

  7. Media Literacy, Social Networking, and the Web 2.0 Environment for the K-12 Educator. Minding the Media: Critical Issues for Learning and Teaching. Volume 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Abreu, Belinha S.

    2011-01-01

    This book, a resource for educators, uses the theme of media literacy as a lens through which to view and discuss social networking and Web 2.0 environments. There is ongoing and positive research on the participatory culture created by youth who are heavily involved in the new digital technologies, yet schools tend to avoid these mediums for fear…

  8. Application of social media in the environment and health professional community

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the EU FP6 funded coordination action HENVINET was to create a permanent network of environment and health professionals. The main outcome is a networking portal (http://www.henvinet.eu), based on the concepts of social media to support communication between professional stakeholders in the environment and health fields. Its aim is to enable sharing of relevant information in an innovative and interactive manner to eventually support policy making. A social networking tool is not necessarily a typical platform for communication in the professional context, or between scientists and decision-makers. The aim of this paper is to look upon the use of social media in relevant professional communities in the light of the HENVINET experience, and to reflect on the acceptance and usefulness of such a new approach. The portal was designed over the course of HENVINET through intensive interactions by a multi-disciplinary group, involving environmental as well as health scientists, but with only limited access to decision-makers’ opinions. After the social networking portal was launched, a recruitment campaign was run during the last six months of the project, taking every opportunity to present the portal and to get feedback from users. This feedback was used to improve the functionalities of the tool. Additionally, a feedback session was organized at the final event of the project, attended by over 50 professionals, about half of whom participated from the beginning in the entire HENVINET project. We have also compared the HENVINET portal with similar tools employed by other related communities, and made a literature-based survey on the use of social media for scientific communication. At the end of the project, the portal had more than 300 members with registered professional profile, over 10 topics and 15 discussion groups. The HENVINET consortium members were the most active group of users. The quality of the portal content was considered more important

  9. Personal Learning Environments, Social Media, and Self-Regulated Learning: A Natural Formula for Connecting Formal and Informal Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dabbagh, Nada; Kitsantas, Anastasia

    2012-01-01

    A Personal Learning Environment or PLE is a potentially promising pedagogical approach for both integrating formal and informal learning using social media and supporting student self-regulated learning in higher education contexts. The purpose of this paper is to (a) review research that support this claim, (b) conceptualize the connection…

  10. Childhood family psychosocial environment and carotid intima media thickness: the CARDIA study.

    PubMed

    Loucks, Eric B; Taylor, Shelley E; Polak, Joseph F; Wilhelm, Aude; Kalra, Preety; Matthews, Karen A

    2014-03-01

    Little is known about whether the childhood family psychosocial environment (characterized by cold, unaffectionate interactions, conflict, aggression, neglect and/or low nurturance) affects coronary heart disease (CHD) risk. Objectives were to evaluate associations of childhood family psychosocial environment with carotid intima media thickness (IMT), a subclinical measure of atherosclerosis. The study population included 2659 CARDIA study participants, aged 37-52 years. Childhood family psychosocial environment was measured using a risky family questionnaire via self-report. Carotid IMT was calculated using the average of 20 measurements of mean common carotid, bulb and internal carotid IMT, assessed using high-resolution B-mode ultrasound images. Utilizing linear regression analyses adjusted for age, a 1-unit (range 0-21) increase in risky family score was associated with 0.0036 (95% CI: 0.0006,0.0066 mm) and 0.0020 (95% CI: 0.0002,0.0038) mm increase in mean IMT in white males and females, respectively. Formal mediation analyses and covariate adjustments suggested childhood socioeconomic position and smoking may be important mechanisms in white males and females, as well as education and depressive symptomatology in white males. No associations were found in black participants. Formal statistical tests for interaction between risky family score and sex, and between risky family score and race/ethnicity, demonstrated borderline evidence of interactions for both sex (p = 0.12) and race/ethnicity (p = 0.14) with risky family score for associations with mean IMT. In conclusion, childhood family psychosocial environment was positively associated with IMT in white participants, with little evidence of association in black participants. Mechanisms in white participants may include potential negative impacts of socioeconomic constraints on parenting quality, potentially influencing offspring's cardiovascular risk factors (e.g. smoking), socioeconomic position (e

  11. Do convergent developmental mechanisms underlie convergent phenotypes?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wray, Gregory A.

    2002-01-01

    Convergence is a pervasive evolutionary process, affecting many aspects of phenotype and even genotype. Relatively little is known about convergence in developmental processes, however, nor about the degree to which convergence in development underlies convergence in anatomy. A switch in the ecology of sea urchins from feeding to nonfeeding larvae illustrates how convergence in development can be associated with convergence in anatomy. Comparisons to more distantly related taxa, however, suggest that this association may be limited to relatively close phylogenetic comparisons. Similarities in gene expression during development provide another window into the association between convergence in developmental processes and convergence in anatomy. Several well-studied transcription factors exhibit likely cases of convergent gene expression in distantly related animal phyla. Convergence in regulatory gene expression domains is probably more common than generally acknowledged, and can arise for several different reasons. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Japanese Communication Research: The Emphasis on Macro Theories of Media in an "Information-Based" Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Roger

    1997-01-01

    Most mass media research in Japan focuses on the influence of mass communication on society as a whole; these "macro" theories typically employ traditional social science techniques. Reasons for this situation are examined, as well as how media researchers outside of Japan might learn from the Japanese perspectives about the role and function of…

  13. The Media Environment of the '90s: A Period of Danger for Newspaper Journalism?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McManus, John

    The news media of the 1990s will probably not use videotext systems or three-dimensional holograms to replace the newspaper. Instead, simpler combinations of news media that mimic the characteristics of print may replace advertising in newspapers, causing them to downgrade journalism or increase subscription cost, thereby decreasing circulation…

  14. Media Use and Child Sleep: The Impact of Content, Timing, and Environment

    PubMed Central

    Liekweg, Kimberly; Christakis, Dimitri A.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Media use has been shown to negatively affect a child's sleep, especially in the context of evening use or with a television in the child's bedroom. However, little is known about how content choices and adult co-use affect this relationship. OBJECTIVE: To describe the impact of media content, timing, and use behaviors on child sleep. METHODS: These data were collected in the baseline survey and media diary of a randomized controlled trial on media use in children aged 3 to 5 years. Sleep measures were derived from the Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire. Media diaries captured time, content title, and co-use of television, video-game, and computer usage; titles were coded for ratings, violence, scariness, and pacing. Nested linear regression models were built to examine the impact of timing, content, and co-use on the sleep problem score. RESULTS: On average, children consumed 72.9 minutes of media screen time daily, with 14.1 minutes occurring after 7:00 pm. Eighteen percent of parents reported at least 1 sleep problem; children with a bedroom television consumed more media and were more likely to have a sleep problem. In regression models, each additional hour of evening media use was associated with a significant increase in the sleep problem score (0.743 [95% confidence interval: 0.373–1.114]), as was daytime use with violent content (0.398 [95% confidence interval: 0.121–0.676]). There was a trend toward greater impact of daytime violent use in the context of a bedroom television (P = .098) and in low-income children (P = .07). CONCLUSIONS: Violent content and evening media use were associated with increased sleep problems. However, no such effects were observed with nonviolent daytime media use. PMID:21708803

  15. From Augmentation Media to Meme Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanaka, Yuzuru

    Computers as meta media are now evolving from augmentation media vehicles to meme media vehicles. While an augmentation media system provides a seamlessly integrated environment of various tools and documents, meme media system provides further functions to edit and distribute tools and documents. Documents and tools on meme media can easily…

  16. Social Media in the Dental School Environment, Part A: Benefits, Challenges, and Recommendations for Use.

    PubMed

    Spallek, Heiko; Turner, Sharon P; Donate-Bartfield, Evelyn; Chambers, David; McAndrew, Maureen; Zarkowski, Pamela; Karimbux, Nadeem

    2015-10-01

    Social media consist of powerful tools that impact not only communication but relationships among people, thus posing an inherent challenge to the traditional standards of who we are as dental educators and what we can expect of each other. This article examines how the world of social media has changed dental education. Its goal is to outline the complex issues that social media use presents for academic dental institutions and to examine these issues from personal, professional, and legal perspectives. After providing an update on social media, the article considers the advantages and risks associated with the use of social media at the interpersonal, professional, and institutional levels. Policies and legal issues of which academic dental institutions need to be aware from a compliance perspective are examined, along with considerations and resources needed to develop effective social media policies. The challenge facing dental educators is how to capitalize on the benefits that social media offer, while minimizing risks and complying with the various forms of legal constraint. PMID:26427774

  17. Converging Interests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nance, Molly

    2009-01-01

    When the first Earth Day was celebrated in 1970, millions of Americans--many of whom were college and university students--participated in an effort that sought to improve the quality of the environment and conserve natural resources. Since then, environmental studies programs have popped up throughout the nation, creating jobs for ecologists,…

  18. Volume serving and media management in a networked, distributed client/server environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, Ralph H.; Tefend, Linda L.

    1993-01-01

    The E-Systems Modular Automated Storage System (EMASS) is a family of hierarchical mass storage systems providing complete storage/'file space' management. The EMASS volume server provides the flexibility to work with different clients (file servers), different platforms, and different archives with a 'mix and match' capability. The EMASS design considers all file management programs as clients of the volume server system. System storage capacities are tailored to customer needs ranging from small data centers to large central libraries serving multiple users simultaneously. All EMASS hardware is commercial off the shelf (COTS), selected to provide the performance and reliability needed in current and future mass storage solutions. All interfaces use standard commercial protocols and networks suitable to service multiple hosts. EMASS is designed to efficiently store and retrieve in excess of 10,000 terabytes of data. Current clients include CRAY's YMP Model E based Data Migration Facility (DMF), IBM's RS/6000 based Unitree, and CONVEX based EMASS File Server software. The VolSer software provides the capability to accept client or graphical user interface (GUI) commands from the operator's console and translate them to the commands needed to control any configured archive. The VolSer system offers advanced features to enhance media handling and particularly media mounting such as: automated media migration, preferred media placement, drive load leveling, registered MediaClass groupings, and drive pooling.

  19. Mass Media and the Environment: Volume One, San Francisco and Monterey Bay Water Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sachs, David Peter; Rubin, David Mark

    In an interdisciplinary project graduate students from several fields--including medicine and communication--conducted an assessment and critique of media performance in the are of environmental problems. The project had no direct faculty supervision--the first such student project funded by the National Science Foundation. This volume presents an…

  20. Social Media in the Classroom: A Simple yet Complex Hybrid Environment for Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, Gail

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on part of the author's PhD action research study. It examines the complexity of features that social media and Web 2.0 offer when combined with face-to-face teaching and learning. Action research was used to help redesign the learning programs of XXX's thirteen Middle Years classes over an eighteen month period. These…

  1. Social Media in the Dental School Environment, Part B: Curricular Considerations.

    PubMed

    Spallek, Heiko; Turner, Sharon P; Donate-Bartfield, Evelyn; Chambers, David; McAndrew, Maureen; Zarkowski, Pamela; Karimbux, Nadeem

    2015-10-01

    The goal of this article is to describe the broad curricular constructs surrounding teaching and learning about social media in dental education. This analysis takes into account timing, development, and assessment of the knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors needed to effectively use social media tools as a contemporary dentist. Three developmental stages in a student's path to becoming a competent professional are described: from undergraduate to dental student, from the classroom and preclinical simulation laboratory to the clinical setting, and from dental student to licensed practitioner. Considerations for developing the dental curriculum and suggestions for effective instruction at each stage are offered. In all three stages in the future dentist's evolution, faculty members need to educate students about appropriate professional uses of social media. Faculty members should provide instruction on the beneficial aspects of this communication medium and help students recognize the potential pitfalls associated with its use. The authors provide guidelines for customizing instruction to complement each stage of development, recognizing that careful timing is not only important for optimal learning but can prevent inappropriate use of social media as students are introduced to novel situations. PMID:26427775

  2. An Analysis of Electronic Media to Prepare Children for Safe and Ethical Practices in Digital Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berson, Ilene R.; Berson, Michael J.; Desai, Shreya; Falls, Donald; Fenaughty, John

    2008-01-01

    A range of electronic resources, including video-based instruction, are used to promote cybersafety to young people at school. This evaluation analyzed seven distinct programs that use electronic media in Internet safety initiatives in schools. The findings highlight emerging evidence on successful approaches to engage children in assessing risky…

  3. Learning Science in Virtual Reality Multimedia Environments: Role of Methods and Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreno, Roxana; Mayer, Richard E.

    2002-01-01

    College students learned about botany through an agent-based multimedia game. Students received either spoken or identical on-screen text explanations. Results reveal that students scored higher on retention, transfer, and program ratings in narration conditions than in text conditions. The media--desktop displays or headmounted displays--did not…

  4. Gas in Scattering Media Absorption Spectroscopy -- Laser Spectroscopy in Unconventional Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svanberg, Sune

    2010-02-01

    An overview of the new field of Gas in Scattering Media Absorption Spectroscopy (GASMAS) is presented. The GASMAS technique combines narrow-band diode-laser spectroscopy with optical propagation in diffuse media. Whereas solids and liquids have broad absorption features, free gas in pores and cavities in the material is characterized by sharp spectral signatures. These are typically 10,000 times sharper than those of the host material. Many applications in materials science, food packaging, pharmaceutics and medicine have been demonstrated. Molecular oxygen and water vapor have been studied around 760 and 935 nm, respectively. Liquid water, an important constituent in many natural materials, such as tissue, has a low absorption at such wavelengths, allowing propagation. Polystyrene foam, wood, fruits, food-stuffs, pharmaceutical tablets, and human sinus cavities have been studied, demonstrating new possibilities for characterization and diagnostics. Transport of gas in porous media can readily be studied by first immersing the material in, e.g., pure nitrogen gas, and then observing the rate at which normal air, containing oxygen, reinvades the material. The conductance of the human sinus connective passages can be measured in this way by flushing the nasal cavity with nitrogen, while breathing normally through the mouth. A clinical study comprising 40 patients has been concluded.

  5. Constructing Media Artifacts in a Social Constructivist Environment to Enhance Students' Environmental Awareness and Activism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karahan, Engin; Roehrig, Gillian

    2015-02-01

    Current science education reforms and policy documents highlight the importance of environmental awareness and perceived need for activism. As "environmental problems are socially constructed in terms of their conceptualized effects on individuals, groups, other living things and systems research based on constructivist principles provides not only a coherent framework in which to theorize about learning, but also a context for understanding socially constructed issues" (Palmer and Suggate in Res Pap Educ 19(2), 2004, p. 208). This research study investigated the impacts of the learning processes structured based on the theories of constructionism and social constructivism on students' environmental awareness and perceived need for activism. Students constructed multimedia artifacts expressing their knowledge, attitudes, awareness, and activism about environmental issues through a constructionist design process. In addition, a social networking site was designed and used to promote social interaction among students. Twenty-two high school environmental science students participated in this study. A convergent mixed methods design was implemented to allow for the triangulation of methods by directly comparing and contrasting quantitative results with qualitative findings for corroboration and validation purposes. Using a mixed method approach, quantitative findings are supported with qualitative data (student video projects, writing prompts, blog entries, video projects of the students, observational field notes, and reflective journals) including spontaneous responses in both synchronous and asynchronous conversations on the social network to provide a better understanding of the change in students' environmental awareness and perceived need for activism. The findings of the study indicated that students' environmental awareness and perceived need for activism were improved at different scales (personal, community, global) throughout the constructionist and social

  6. Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) in Educational Environments: Implications of Understanding Computers as Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Gary A.

    2000-01-01

    Reviews literature in the field of human-computer interaction (HCI) as it applies to educational environments. Topics include the origin of HCI; human factors; usability; computer interface design; goals, operations, methods, and selection (GOMS) models; command language versus direct manipulation; hypertext; visual perception; interface…

  7. USE OF TECHNICAL MEDIA FOR SIMULATING ENVIRONMENTS TO PROVIDE INDIVIDUALIZED INSTRUCTION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    WING, RICHARD L.

    AN ESTIMATE WAS OBTAINED OF THE EFFECTIVENESS WITH WHICH THE SIMULATED ENVIRONMENT MODE CAN BE USED TO TEACH CERTAIN UNITS IN EIGHT DIFFERENT SUBJECT AREAS--ART, BIOLOGY, CHEMISTRY, ELECTRONICS, ELEMENTARY PHYSICS, FRENCH, MUSIC, AND ECONOMICS. THE SPECIFIC MODE USED WAS A SPECIAL CASE OF SIMULATION IN WHICH THE USEFUL FEATURES OF VARIOUS LEARNING…

  8. Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning in a Multi-Media Distance Education Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaye, Tony

    The design issues involved in the effective use of computer-mediated communication in a multimedia distance education environment are examined, with particular reference to recent and current initiatives at the Open University in Great Britain. A description of the components of the Open University's electronic campus (the conferencing system and…

  9. Home Musical Environment of Children in Singapore: On Globalization, Technology, and Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lum, Chee-Hoo

    2008-01-01

    The home musical environments of a class of 28 first-grade children in Singapore were examined in this ethnographic study. Technology was an integral part of the soundscape in the home. The musical repertoire gathered was closely associated with electronic and pop-influenced music, approaching the styles favored by teens and adults. Particular…

  10. Convergence Is Real

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enyeart, Mike; Staman, E. Michael; Valdes, Jose J., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    The concept of convergence has evolved significantly during recent years. Today, "convergence" refers to the integration of the communications and computing resources and services that seamlessly traverse multiple infrastructures and deliver content to multiple platforms or appliances. Convergence is real. Those in higher education, and especially…

  11. A network-based distributed, media-rich computing and information environment

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, R.L.

    1995-12-31

    Sunrise is a Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) project started in October 1993. It is intended to be a prototype National Information Infrastructure development project. A main focus of Sunrise is to tie together enabling technologies (networking, object-oriented distributed computing, graphical interfaces, security, multi-media technologies, and data-mining technologies) with several specific applications. A diverse set of application areas was chosen to ensure that the solutions developed in the project are as generic as possible. Some of the application areas are materials modeling, medical records and image analysis, transportation simulations, and K-12 education. This paper provides a description of Sunrise and a view of the architecture and objectives of this evolving project. The primary objectives of Sunrise are three-fold: (1) To develop common information-enabling tools for advanced scientific research and its applications to industry; (2) To enhance the capabilities of important research programs at the Laboratory; (3) To define a new way of collaboration between computer science and industrially-relevant research.

  12. Changing learning with new interactive and media-rich instruction environments: virtual labs case study report.

    PubMed

    Huang, Camillan

    2003-01-01

    Technology has created a new dimension for visual teaching and learning with web-delivered interactive media. The Virtual Labs Project has embraced this technology with instructional design and evaluation methodologies behind the simPHYSIO suite of simulation-based, online interactive teaching modules in physiology for the Stanford students. In addition, simPHYSIO provides the convenience of anytime web-access and a modular structure that allows for personalization and customization of the learning material. This innovative tool provides a solid delivery and pedagogical backbone that can be applied to developing an interactive simulation-based training tool for the use and management of the Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS) image information system. The disparity in the knowledge between health and IT professionals can be bridged by providing convenient modular teaching tools to fill the gaps in knowledge. An innovative teaching method in the whole PACS is deemed necessary for its successful implementation and operation since it has become widely distributed with many interfaces, components, and customizations. This paper will discuss the techniques for developing an interactive-based teaching tool, a case study of its implementation, and a perspective for applying this approach to an online PACS training tool. PMID:12620306

  13. Gender on the Brain: A Case Study of Science Communication in the New Media Environment

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, Cliodhna; Joffe, Helene

    2014-01-01

    Neuroscience research on sex difference is currently a controversial field, frequently accused of purveying a ‘neurosexism’ that functions to naturalise gender inequalities. However, there has been little empirical investigation of how information about neurobiological sex difference is interpreted within wider society. This paper presents a case study that tracks the journey of one high-profile study of neurobiological sex differences from its scientific publication through various layers of the public domain. A content analysis was performed to ascertain how the study was represented in five domains of communication: the original scientific article, a press release, the traditional news media, online reader comments and blog entries. Analysis suggested that scientific research on sex difference offers an opportunity to rehearse abiding cultural understandings of gender. In both scientific and popular contexts, traditional gender stereotypes were projected onto the novel scientific information, which was harnessed to demonstrate the factual truth and normative legitimacy of these beliefs. Though strains of misogyny were evident within the readers’ comments, most discussion of the study took pains to portray the sexes’ unique abilities as equal and ‘complementary’. However, this content often resembled a form of benevolent sexism, in which praise of women’s social-emotional skills compensated for their relegation from more esteemed trait-domains, such as rationality and productivity. The paper suggests that embedding these stereotype patterns in neuroscience may intensify their rhetorical potency by lending them the epistemic authority of science. It argues that the neuroscience of sex difference does not merely reflect, but can actively shape the gender norms of contemporary society. PMID:25354280

  14. Gender on the brain: a case study of science communication in the new media environment.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Cliodhna; Joffe, Helene

    2014-01-01

    Neuroscience research on sex difference is currently a controversial field, frequently accused of purveying a 'neurosexism' that functions to naturalise gender inequalities. However, there has been little empirical investigation of how information about neurobiological sex difference is interpreted within wider society. This paper presents a case study that tracks the journey of one high-profile study of neurobiological sex differences from its scientific publication through various layers of the public domain. A content analysis was performed to ascertain how the study was represented in five domains of communication: the original scientific article, a press release, the traditional news media, online reader comments and blog entries. Analysis suggested that scientific research on sex difference offers an opportunity to rehearse abiding cultural understandings of gender. In both scientific and popular contexts, traditional gender stereotypes were projected onto the novel scientific information, which was harnessed to demonstrate the factual truth and normative legitimacy of these beliefs. Though strains of misogyny were evident within the readers' comments, most discussion of the study took pains to portray the sexes' unique abilities as equal and 'complementary'. However, this content often resembled a form of benevolent sexism, in which praise of women's social-emotional skills compensated for their relegation from more esteemed trait-domains, such as rationality and productivity. The paper suggests that embedding these stereotype patterns in neuroscience may intensify their rhetorical potency by lending them the epistemic authority of science. It argues that the neuroscience of sex difference does not merely reflect, but can actively shape the gender norms of contemporary society. PMID:25354280

  15. Home media server content management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokmakoff, Andrew A.; van Vliet, Harry

    2001-07-01

    With the advent of set-top boxes, the convergence of TV (broadcasting) and PC (Internet) is set to enter the home environment. Currently, a great deal of activity is occurring in developing standards (TV-Anytime Forum) and devices (TiVo) for local storage on Home Media Servers (HMS). These devices lie at the heart of convergence of the triad: communications/networks - content/media - computing/software. Besides massive storage capacity and being a communications 'gateway', the home media server is characterised by the ability to handle metadata and software that provides an easy to use on-screen interface and intelligent search/content handling facilities. In this paper, we describe a research prototype HMS that is being developed within the GigaCE project at the Telematica Instituut . Our prototype demonstrates advanced search and retrieval (video browsing), adaptive user profiling and an innovative 3D component of the Electronic Program Guide (EPG) which represents online presence. We discuss the use of MPEG-7 for representing metadata, the use of MPEG-21 working draft standards for content identification, description and rights expression, and the use of HMS peer-to-peer content distribution approaches. Finally, we outline explorative user behaviour experiments that aim to investigate the effectiveness of the prototype HMS during development.

  16. Independent molecular basis of convergent highland adaptation in maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Convergent evolution is the independent evolution of similar traits in different species or lineages of the same species; this often is a result of adaptation to similar environments, a process referred to as convergent adaptation. We investigate here the molecular basis of convergent adaptation in ...

  17. Bacterial Colonies in Solid Media and Foods: A Review on Their Growth and Interactions with the Micro-Environment

    PubMed Central

    Jeanson, Sophie; Floury, Juliane; Gagnaire, Valérie; Lortal, Sylvie; Thierry, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria, either indigenous or added, are immobilized in solid foods where they grow as colonies. Since the 80's, relatively few research groups have explored the implications of bacteria growing as colonies and mostly focused on pathogens in large colonies on agar/gelatine media. It is only recently that high resolution imaging techniques and biophysical characterization techniques increased the understanding of the growth of bacterial colonies, for different sizes of colonies, at the microscopic level and even down to the molecular level. This review covers the studies on bacterial colony growth in agar or gelatine media mimicking the food environment and in model cheese. The following conclusions have been brought to light. Firstly, under unfavorable conditions, mimicking food conditions, the immobilization of bacteria always constrains their growth in comparison with planktonic growth and increases the sensibility of bacteria to environmental stresses. Secondly, the spatial distribution describes both the distance between colonies and the size of the colonies as a function of the initial level of population. By studying the literature, we concluded that there systematically exists a threshold that distinguishes micro-colonies (radius < 100–200 μm) from macro-colonies (radius >200 μm). Micro-colonies growth resembles planktonic growth and no pH microgradients could be observed. Macro-colonies growth is slower than planktonic growth and pH microgradients could be observed in and around them due to diffusion limitations which occur around, but also inside the macro-colonies. Diffusion limitations of milk proteins have been demonstrated in a model cheese around and in the bacterial colonies. In conclusion, the impact of immobilization is predominant for macro-colonies in comparison with micro-colonies. However, the interaction between the colonies and the food matrix itself remains to be further investigated at the microscopic scale. PMID:26648910

  18. Decomposable decoding and display structure for scalable media visualization over advanced collaborative environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, JaeYoun; Kim, JongWon

    2005-10-01

    In this paper, we propose a scalable visualization system to offer high-resolution visualization on multiparty collaborative environments. The proposed system treats with a coordination technique to employ large-scale high-resolution display system and to display multiple high-quality videos effectively on systems with limited resources. To handle these, the proposed system includes the distributed visualization application under generic structure to enable high-resolution video format, such as DV (digital video) and HDV (high definition video) streaming, and under decomposable decoding and display structure to assign the separated visualization task (decoding/display) to different system resources. The system is based on high-performance local area network and the high-performance network between decoding and display task is utilized as the system bus to transfer the decoded large pixel data. The main focus in this paper is the decoupling technique of decoding and display based on high-performance network to handle multiple high-resolution videos effectively. We explore the possibility of the proposed system by implementing a prototype and evaluating it over a high-performance network. Finally, the experiment results verify the improved scalable display system through the proposed structure.

  19. Glycoprotein and protein markers for strain differentiation and growth environment or media attribution

    SciTech Connect

    Wunschel, David S.; Fox, Alvin; Wahl, Karen L.

    2012-01-01

    Recent experience with Bacillus spore characterization has demonstrated that protein markers can provide potentially vital identifying and bioforensic information. The masses of constitutively expressed proteins and their peptide fragments can be used to identify bacterial isolates. Protein marker mass variation information reflects the underlying amino acid sequence variation to provide complementary information to genetic sequence analysis. Protein markers (identified by mass or sequence) that are conserved or variable can be readily selected. In contrast, genetic primers, as used in PCR, target conserved genetic regions. Furthermore, protein markers are relatively stable compared to nucleic acids and may remain in samples for longer periods of time. This is important to consider when the source, age and condition of samples may vary in a forensic investigation. Examples of constitutively expressed proteins that have been extensively characterized include the exosporium BclA and BclB proteins and small acid soluble proteins (SASPs). Finally, gene expression (usually assessed at the mRNA level) can vary in response to different environmental conditions. As a result, the profile of protein markers of the organism also reflects the culture environment. Mass spectrometric tools can be used to access the same information on culture-related protein expression variation. However, unlike genetic methods, with proteomic methodology there is the potential to define exactly which medium was employed for organism growth. This potential could provide additional clues for forensic attribution

  20. Geosciences in an Immersive Fulldome Environment: Developing Science and Communication Skills by Creating Digital Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alley, K. E.; Crawford, A.; Eakin, J.

    2011-12-01

    The Ho Tung Visualization Laboratory and Planetarium at Colgate University provides an opportunity for students of diverse backgrounds to learn scientific concepts and communication techniques through the creation of fulldome digital animations. Students give presentations to classes, school groups, and the public in the planetarium setting, and enhance learning by creating digital content appropriate to these audiences. The immersive environment is well-suited for showing large-scale geologic processes that may not be easily seen in the field. Geoscience projects include fly-bys of the Hudson River Valley, Cascade Mountain Range, Grand Canyon, and Basin and Range province, animation of the advance of the Laurentide Ice Sheet, evolution of continental positions since the late Precambrian, and comparisons of volcanic eruption styles. In order to create a digital animation, students must have a detailed understanding of the subject matter as well as all aspects of presentation, ranging from intended audience to relevant production technologies. This encourages students to explore material at a depth beyond conventional learning methods while integrating the skills necessary to effectively communicate scientific concepts to varied audiences. Based on these explorations, it appears beneficial to promote scientific visualization creation as a tool in itself to help students develop both scientific knowledge and communication skills.

  1. New Media, Evolving Multimodal Literacy Practices and the Potential Impact of Increased Use of the Visual Mode in the Urban Environment on Young Children's Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yamada-Rice, Dylan

    2011-01-01

    This article looks at the way in which the changing visual environment affects education at two levels: in communication patterns and research methodologies. The research considers differences in the variance and quantity of types of visual media and their relationship to the written mode in the urban landscapes of Tokyo and London, using "Google…

  2. The Home Literacy Environment: Exploring How Media and Parent-Child Interactions Are Associated with Children's Language Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liebeskind, Kara G.; Piotrowski, Jessica T.; Lapierre, Matthew A.; Linebarger, Deborah L.

    2014-01-01

    Children who start school with strong language skills initiate a trajectory of academic success, while children with weaker skills are likely to struggle. Research has demonstrated that media and parent-child interactions, both characteristics of the home literacy environment, influence children's language skills. Using a national sample of…

  3. When New Media Meet the Strong Web of Connected Learning Environments: A New Vision of Progressive Education in the Digital Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nam, Chaebong

    2013-01-01

    This paper shows how the legacy of Jane Addams' socialized education can live on in today's progressive education, especially in the digital age. Discussion is drawn from a case study of an anti-underage drinking campaign conducted by urban youth of color in an afterschool program. The media ecology environment in the campaign--the…

  4. Convergence in Multispecies Interactions.

    PubMed

    Bittleston, Leonora S; Pierce, Naomi E; Ellison, Aaron M; Pringle, Anne

    2016-04-01

    The concepts of convergent evolution and community convergence highlight how selective pressures can shape unrelated organisms or communities in similar ways. We propose a related concept, convergent interactions, to describe the independent evolution of multispecies interactions with similar physiological or ecological functions. A focus on convergent interactions clarifies how natural selection repeatedly favors particular kinds of associations among species. Characterizing convergent interactions in a comparative context is likely to facilitate prediction of the ecological roles of organisms (including microbes) in multispecies interactions and selective pressures acting in poorly understood or newly discovered multispecies systems. We illustrate the concept of convergent interactions with examples: vertebrates and their gut bacteria; ectomycorrhizae; insect-fungal-bacterial interactions; pitcher-plant food webs; and ants and ant-plants. PMID:26858111

  5. Micelle dynamic simulation and physicochemical characterization of biorelevant media to reflect gastrointestinal environment in fasted and fed states.

    PubMed

    Xie, XiaoYu; Cardot, Jean-Michel; Garrait, Ghislain; Thery, Vincent; El-Hajji, Mohamed; Beyssac, Eric

    2014-10-01

    The characterization of biorelevant media simulating the upper part of the gastrointestinal tract in the fasted and fed states was investigated by classical determination of physicochemical parameters such as pH, osmolality, surface tension and results were compared to in vivo physiological data. Incorporation of fatty material, in order to better simulate the influence of high fat meal was also performed. Stability and characterization of this medium was studied and compared to classical FeSSIF. Micelle characterization and computer dynamic simulation were performed in order to understand the interaction between lecithin and taurocholate and possible interactions between mixed micelle and drugs. The addition of NaTc, lecithin, and/or fatty materials has no influence on pH and osmolality, whereas the presence of fatty material modifies the surface tension. Values of FaSSIF and FeSSIF are in accordance with in vivo parameters and the presence of micelles can simulate the gastrointestinal environment. Modelization of micelles by computer simulation led to a model of mixed micelles in which structures of NaTc interact either by their hydrophilic or hydrophobic phase to give a bilayer stable model in which the lecithin molecule can insert its long carbon chain. The micelle structure is stable and can enhance dissolution of hydrophobic molecules by hydrophobic interaction with the numerous hydrophobic spaces available in the multilayer hydrophilic/hydrophobic layer. PMID:24954150

  6. Convergent flow stove

    SciTech Connect

    Engblom, D.W.

    1986-02-25

    An apparatus for burning combustible solid organic material such as wood is described in a environment in which combustion is directed downwardly. The apparatus consists of: A. A fuel chamber having a closed upper portion and a major dimension in the vertical direction such that the fuel chamber is generally upright, B. A combustion zone in the lower portion of the fuel chamber defined by a convergent outflow passage at the bottom of the fuel chamber and a pair of walls on opposite sides of the lower portion, the walls being sloped inwardly toward one another at the outflow passage, and the outflow passage comprising a gap between the walls, C. A Hearth element forming each the sloping wall, the hearth element including I. At least one row of spaced slots extending into the interior of the hearth element and a lateral air inlet channel connected to the slots of each row and a source of combustion air, and II. A flue outlet communicating with the outflow passage, the flue outlet including spaced, parallel tubes in the hearth element, with the tubes being juxtaposed the slots and extending perpendicular to the air inlet channels, D. Means connected to the flue outlet to permit exhaustion of flue gases from the apparatus, and E. means for loading fuel into the fuel chamber.

  7. Media Violence and Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groebel, Jo

    1998-01-01

    Presents the results of the UNESCO global study on media violence and children which was conducted between 1996 and 1997. Highlights include the role of the media, media heroes as role models, media violence and aggression, differences by gender, rural versus urban environments, the pervasiveness of television, and recommendations. (Author/LRW)

  8. Re-Examination of Mixed Media Communication: The Impact of Voice, Data Link, and Mixed Air Traffic Control Environments on the Flight Deck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunbar, Melisa; McGann, Alison; Mackintosh, Margaret-Anne; Lozito, Sandra; Ashford, Rose (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A simulation in the B747-400 was conducted at NASA Ames Research Center that compared how crews handled voice and data link air traffic control (ATC) messages in a single medium versus a mixed voice and data link ATC environment The interval between ATC messages was also varied to examine the influence of time pressure in voice, data link, and mixed ATC environments. For messages sent via voice, transaction times were lengthened in the mixed media environment for closely spaced messages. The type of environment did not affect data link times. However, messages times were lengthened in both single and mixed-modality environments under time pressure. Closely spaced messages also increased the number of requests for clarification for voice messages in the mixed environment and review menu use for data link messages. Results indicated that when time pressure is introduced, the mix of voice and data link does not necessarily capitalize on the advantages of both media. These findings emphasize the need to develop procedures for managing communication in mixed voice and data link environments.

  9. Crossroads on the Information Highway: Convergence and Diversity in Communications Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Institute for Information Studies, Falls Church, VA.

    The convergence of the telecommunications, computer, and cable television industries is beginning to take place. Each of the seven articles in this volume provides a perspective on either the forces that are influencing the convergence of media or on the impact that this convergence is having on the rest of the world. They address the issues of…

  10. Media Presentation Mode, English Listening Comprehension and Cognitive Load in Ubiquitous Learning Environments: Modality Effect or Redundancy Effect?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Chi-Cheng; Lei, Hao; Tseng, Ju-Shih

    2011-01-01

    Although ubiquitous learning enhances students' access to learning materials, it is crucial to find out which media presentation modes produce the best results for English listening comprehension. The present study examined the effect of media presentation mode (sound and text versus sound) on English listening comprehension and cognitive load.…

  11. Converging shear rheometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Hyung M.; Mix, Adam W.; Giacomin, A. Jeffrey

    2014-05-01

    For highly viscous fluids that slip in parallel sliding plate rheometers, we want to use a slightly converging flow to suppress this wall slip. In this work, we first attack the steady shear flow of a highly viscous Newtonian fluid between two gently converging plates with no slip boundaries using the equation of motion in cylindrical coordinates, which yields no analytical solution. Then we treat the same problem using the lubrication approximation in Cartesian coordinates to yield exact, explicit solutions for dimensionless velocity, pressure and shear stress. This work deepens our understanding of a drag flow through a gently converging slit of arbitrary convergence angle. We also employ the corotational Maxwell model to explore the role of viscoelasticity in this converging shear flow. We then compare these analytical solutions to finite element calculations for both Newtonian and corotational Maxwell cases. A worked example for determining the Newtonian viscosity using a converging shear rheometer is also included. With this work, we provide the framework for exploring other constitutive equations or other boundary conditions in future work. Our results can also be used to design the linear bearings used for the parallel sliding plate rheometer (SPR). This work can also be used to evaluate the error in the shear stress that is caused by bearing misalignment and specify the parallelism tolerance for the linear bearings incorporated into a SPR.

  12. Comparison of biorelevant simulated media mimicking the intestinal environment to assess the solubility profiles of poorly soluble drugs.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Dev; Gu, Chong-Hui; Kuldipkumar, Anuj

    2016-01-01

    During the discovery stage in lead identification/optimization, compounds are characterized for their solubilities in biorelevant media and these data are often used to model the in vivo behavior of the compounds and predict the fraction absorbed. These media are selected to closely approximate the composition of human intestinal fluid. Owing to the complexity and variability in human intestinal fluid composition, it is essential that the chosen simulated media mimic the in vivo condition as closely as possible. Several recipes have been developed and are routinely used in assessing the solubilities of compounds. It is necessary to revisit these recipes and modify them as the understanding of the human GI tract increases. In the present work, we have evaluated the solubilities of six model compounds in several media and have proposed slight modifications to the currently used recipes based on our own data and that reported in the literature. PMID:25703029

  13. Media Culture 2020: Collaborative Teaching and Blended Learning Using Social Media and Cloud-Based Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vickers, Richard; Field, James; Melakoski, Cai

    2015-01-01

    In 2013 five universities from across Europe undertook an innovative project "Media Culture 2020", combining skills and forces to develop new practices that would face the challenge of the convergence of digital media, taking full advantage of social media and cloud-based technologies. The aim of the Media Culture 2020 project was to…

  14. Convergent evolution of the genomes of marine mammals.

    PubMed

    Foote, Andrew D; Liu, Yue; Thomas, Gregg W C; Vinař, Tomáš; Alföldi, Jessica; Deng, Jixin; Dugan, Shannon; van Elk, Cornelis E; Hunter, Margaret E; Joshi, Vandita; Khan, Ziad; Kovar, Christie; Lee, Sandra L; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Mancia, Annalaura; Nielsen, Rasmus; Qin, Xiang; Qu, Jiaxin; Raney, Brian J; Vijay, Nagarjun; Wolf, Jochen B W; Hahn, Matthew W; Muzny, Donna M; Worley, Kim C; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Gibbs, Richard A

    2015-03-01

    Marine mammals from different mammalian orders share several phenotypic traits adapted to the aquatic environment and therefore represent a classic example of convergent evolution. To investigate convergent evolution at the genomic level, we sequenced and performed de novo assembly of the genomes of three species of marine mammals (the killer whale, walrus and manatee) from three mammalian orders that share independently evolved phenotypic adaptations to a marine existence. Our comparative genomic analyses found that convergent amino acid substitutions were widespread throughout the genome and that a subset of these substitutions were in genes evolving under positive selection and putatively associated with a marine phenotype. However, we found higher levels of convergent amino acid substitutions in a control set of terrestrial sister taxa to the marine mammals. Our results suggest that, whereas convergent molecular evolution is relatively common, adaptive molecular convergence linked to phenotypic convergence is comparatively rare. PMID:25621460

  15. Convergent evolution of the genomes of marine mammals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foote, Andrew D.; Liu, Yue; Thomas, Gregg W.C.; Vinař, Tomáš; Alföldi, Jessica; Deng, Jixin; Dugan, Shannon; van Elk, Cornelis E.; Hunter, Margaret; Joshi, Vandita; Khan, Ziad; Kovar, Christie; Lee, Sandra L.; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Mancia, Annalaura; Nielsen, Rasmus; Qin, Xiang; Qu, Jiaxin; Raney, Brian J.; Vijay, Nagarjun; Wolf, Jochen B. W.; Hahn, Matthew W.; Muzny, Donna M.; Worley, Kim C.; Gilbert, M. Thomas P.; Gibbs, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Marine mammals from different mammalian orders share several phenotypic traits adapted to the aquatic environment and therefore represent a classic example of convergent evolution. To investigate convergent evolution at the genomic level, we sequenced and performed de novo assembly of the genomes of three species of marine mammals (the killer whale, walrus and manatee) from three mammalian orders that share independently evolved phenotypic adaptations to a marine existence. Our comparative genomic analyses found that convergent amino acid substitutions were widespread throughout the genome and that a subset of these substitutions were in genes evolving under positive selection and putatively associated with a marine phenotype. However, we found higher levels of convergent amino acid substitutions in a control set of terrestrial sister taxa to the marine mammals. Our results suggest that, whereas convergent molecular evolution is relatively common, adaptive molecular convergence linked to phenotypic convergence is comparatively rare.

  16. Convergent evolution of the genomes of marine mammals

    PubMed Central

    Foote, Andrew D.; Liu, Yue; Thomas, Gregg W.C.; Vinař, Tomáš; Alföldi, Jessica; Deng, Jixin; Dugan, Shannon; van Elk, Cornelis E.; Hunter, Margaret E.; Joshi, Vandita; Khan, Ziad; Kovar, Christie; Lee, Sandra L.; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Mancia, Annalaura; Nielsen, Rasmus; Qin, Xiang; Qu, Jiaxin; Raney, Brian J.; Vijay, Nagarjun; Wolf, Jochen B. W.; Hahn, Matthew W.; Muzny, Donna M.; Worley, Kim C.; Gilbert, M. Thomas P.; Gibbs, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Marine mammals from different mammalian orders share several phenotypic traits adapted to the aquatic environment and are therefore a classic example of convergent evolution. To investigate convergent evolution at the genomic level, we sequenced and de novo assembled the genomes of three species of marine mammals (the killer whale, walrus and manatee) from three mammalian orders that share independently evolved phenotypic adaptations to a marine existence. Our comparative genomic analyses found that convergent amino acid substitutions were widespread throughout the genome, and that a subset were in genes evolving under positive selection and putatively associated with a marine phenotype. However, we found higher levels of convergent amino acid substitutions in a control set of terrestrial sister taxa to the marine mammals. Our results suggest that while convergent molecular evolution is relatively common, adaptive molecular convergence linked to phenotypic convergence is comparatively rare. PMID:25621460

  17. Collaborative Instructional Strategies to Enhance Knowledge Convergence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draper, Darryl C.

    2015-01-01

    To promote knowledge convergence through collaborative learning activities in groups, this qualitative case study involved a layered approach for the design and delivery of a highly collaborative learning environment incorporating various instructional technologies grounded in learning theory. In a graduate-level instructional technology course,…

  18. Converging or Diverging Lens?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branca, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Why does a lens magnify? Why does it shrink objects? Why does this happen? The activities that we propose here are useful in helping us to understand how lenses work, and they show that the same lens can have different magnification capabilities. A converging lens can also act as a diverging lens. (Contains 4 figures.)

  19. Convergence of Arnoldi method

    SciTech Connect

    Nevanlinna, O.

    1994-12-31

    This note summarizes some results on (a monitored version of) the Arnoldi method in Hilbert spaces. The interest in working in infinite dimensional spaces comes partly from the fact that only then can one have meaningful asymptotical statements (which hopefully give some light to the convergence of Arnoldi in large dimensional problems with iteration indices far less than the dimension).

  20. Twin Convergence Zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    NASA's QuikSCAT satellite has confirmed a 30-year old largely unproven theory that there are two areas near the equator where the winds converge year after year and drive ocean circulation south of the equator. By analyzing winds, QuikSCAT has found a year-round southern and northern Intertropical Convergence Zone. This find is important to climate modelers and weather forecasters because it provides more detail on how the oceans and atmosphere interact near the equator. The Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) is the region that circles the Earth near the equator, where the trade winds of both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres come together. North of the equator, strong sun and warm water of the equator heats the air in the ITCZ, drawing air in from north and south and causing the air to rise. As the air rises it cools, releasing the accumulated moisture in an almost perpetual series of thunderstorms. Satellite data, however, has confirmed that there is an ITCZ north of the equator and a parallel ITCZ south of the equator. Variation in the location of the ITCZ is important to people around the world because it affects the north-south atmospheric circulation, which redistributes energy. It drastically affects rainfall in many equatorial nations, resulting in the wet and dry seasons of the tropics rather than the cold and warm seasons of higher latitudes. Longer term changes in the ITCZ can result in severe droughts or flooding in nearby areas. 'The double ITCZ is usually only identified in the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans on a limited and seasonal basis,' said Timothy Liu, of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, Calif., and lead researcher on the project. In the eastern Pacific Ocean, the southern ITCZ is usually seen springtime. In the western Atlantic Ocean, the southern ITCZ was recently clearly identified only in the summertime. However, QuikSCAT's wind data has seen the southern ITCZ in all seasons across the

  1. Cosmic Convergence: Art and Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayo, Elizabeth A.; Zisholtz, E.; Hilton, H.

    2010-01-01

    The I.P. Stanback Museum and Planetarium is a major educational and teaching resource for South Carolina State University, K-12 schools, other universities and the community of Orangeburg and well beyond. The concept of creating a museum with a planetarium on the campus of SC State was ahead of its time. Today scholars are writing about the unity of creative disciplines. Through its integration of the arts, humanities and sciences, the Stanback, the only art museum with a planetarium at any of the Historically Black Colleges and Universities and one of the few in the nation, stands in the forefront of modern thinking. Cosmic Convergence: Art and Science, opening at the I.P. Stanback Museum and Planetarium in February 2010, will feature the works of Mildred Thompson (1936-2003), a prominent African American artist who worked in the media of painting, drawing, print making, sculpture, and photography. Thompson’s artwork shows the strong influences of her interest in physics, astronomy, and metaphysics as well as music and spiritualism. “My work in the visual arts is, and has always been, a continuous search for understanding. It is an expression of purpose and reflects a personal interpretation of the Universe.” Cosmic Convergence will explore the meeting of Art and Science through Mildred Thompson's work and the scientific basis of that work. The paintings and sculptures of the exhibit will be combined with astronomical images showing both the reality and interpretation of the surrounding Universe. Support for this work was provided by the NSF PAARE program to South Carolina State University under award AST-0750814.

  2. Media Literacy Education at the University Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Hans

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, the media literacy education movement has developed to help individuals of all ages acquire the competencies necessary to fully participate in the modern world of media convergence. Yet media literacy education is not practiced uniformly at all educational levels. This study used a survey to compare the extent to which students…

  3. From Gutenberg to Gates: Media Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Considine, David M.

    2009-01-01

    Media consolidation and convergence have increasingly changed the way individuals as both consumers and citizens access, process, and communicate information at the local, national, and global levels. Media industries and institutions influence public perception and occupy our time at work and at home more and more. Media literacy has become…

  4. Bioprecipitation of Calcium Carbonate Crystals by Bacteria Isolated from Saline Environments Grown in Culture Media Amended with Seawater and Real Brine.

    PubMed

    Silva-Castro, G A; Uad, I; Gonzalez-Martinez, A; Rivadeneyra, A; Gonzalez-Lopez, J; Rivadeneyra, M A

    2015-01-01

    The precipitation of calcium carbonate and calcium sulphate by isolated bacteria from seawater and real brine obtained in a desalination plant growth in culture media containing seawater and brine as mineral sources has been studied. However, only bioprecipitation was detected when the bacteria were grown in media with added organic matter. Biomineralization process started rapidly, crystal formation taking place in the beginning a few days after inoculation of media; roughly 90% of total cultivated bacteria showed. Six major colonies with carbonate precipitation capacity dominated bacterial community structure cultivated in heterotrophic platable bacteria medium. Taxonomic identification of these six strains through partial 16S rRNA gene sequences showed their affiliation with Gram-positive Bacillus and Virgibacillus genera. These strains were able to form calcium carbonate minerals, which precipitated as calcite and aragonite crystals and showed bacterial fingerprints or bacteria calcification. Also, carbonic anhydrase activity was observed in three of these isolated bacteria. The results of this research suggest that microbiota isolated from sea water and brine is capable of precipitation of carbonate biominerals, which can occur in situ with mediation of organic matter concentrations. Moreover, calcium carbonate precipitation ability of this microbiota could be of importance in bioremediation of CO2 and calcium in certain environments. PMID:26273646

  5. Bioprecipitation of Calcium Carbonate Crystals by Bacteria Isolated from Saline Environments Grown in Culture Media Amended with Seawater and Real Brine

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Castro, G. A.; Uad, I.; Gonzalez-Martinez, A.; Rivadeneyra, A.; Gonzalez-Lopez, J.; Rivadeneyra, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    The precipitation of calcium carbonate and calcium sulphate by isolated bacteria from seawater and real brine obtained in a desalination plant growth in culture media containing seawater and brine as mineral sources has been studied. However, only bioprecipitation was detected when the bacteria were grown in media with added organic matter. Biomineralization process started rapidly, crystal formation taking place in the beginning a few days after inoculation of media; roughly 90% of total cultivated bacteria showed. Six major colonies with carbonate precipitation capacity dominated bacterial community structure cultivated in heterotrophic platable bacteria medium. Taxonomic identification of these six strains through partial 16S rRNA gene sequences showed their affiliation with Gram-positive Bacillus and Virgibacillus genera. These strains were able to form calcium carbonate minerals, which precipitated as calcite and aragonite crystals and showed bacterial fingerprints or bacteria calcification. Also, carbonic anhydrase activity was observed in three of these isolated bacteria. The results of this research suggest that microbiota isolated from sea water and brine is capable of precipitation of carbonate biominerals, which can occur in situ with mediation of organic matter concentrations. Moreover, calcium carbonate precipitation ability of this microbiota could be of importance in bioremediation of CO2 and calcium in certain environments. PMID:26273646

  6. Astronomical Ice: The Effects of Treating Ice as a Porous Media on the Dynamics and Evolution of Extraterrestrial Ice-Ocean Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buffo, J.; Schmidt, B. E.

    2015-12-01

    With the prevalence of water and ice rich environments in the solar system, and likely the universe, becoming more apparent, understanding the evolutionary dynamics and physical processes of such locales is of great importance. Piqued interest arises from the understanding that the persistence of all known life depends on the presence of liquid water. As in situ investigation is currently infeasible, accurate numerical modeling is the best technique to demystify these environments. We will discuss an evolving model of ice-ocean interaction aimed at realistically describing the behavior of the ice-ocean interface by treating basal ice as a porous media, and its possible implications on the formation of astrobiological niches. Treating ice as a porous media drastically affects the thermodynamic properties it exhibits. Thus inclusion of this phenomenon is critical in accurately representing the dynamics and evolution of all ice-ocean environments. This model utilizes equations that describe the dynamics of sea ice when it is treated as a porous media (Hunke et. al. 2011), coupled with a basal melt and accretion model (Holland and Jenkins 1999). Combined, these two models produce the most accurate description of the processes occurring at the base of terrestrial sea ice and ice shelves, capable of resolving variations within the ice due to environmental pressures. While these models were designed for application to terrestrial environments, the physics occurring at any ice-water interface is identical, and these models can be used to represent the evolution of a variety of icy astronomical bodies. As terrestrial ice shelves provide a close analog to planetary ice-ocean environments, we truth test the models validity against observations of ice shelves. We apply this model to the ice-ocean interface of the icy Galilean moon Europa. We include profiles of temperature, salinity, solid fraction, and Darcy velocity, as well as temporally and spatially varying melt and

  7. Knowledge Convergence and Collaborative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeong, Heisawn; Chi, Michelene T. H.

    2007-01-01

    This paper operationalized the notion of knowledge convergence and assessed quantitatively how much knowledge convergence occurred during collaborative learning. Knowledge convergence was defined as an increase in common knowledge where common knowledge referred to the knowledge that all collaborating partners had. Twenty pairs of college students…

  8. Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Gilbert F.

    1980-01-01

    Presented are perspectives on the emergence of environmental problems. Six major trends in scientific thinking are identified including: holistic approaches to examining environments, life support systems, resource management, risk assessment, streamlined methods for monitoring environmental change, and emphasis on the global framework. (Author/SA)

  9. Convergent Flows: Humanities Scholars and Their Interactions with Electronic Texts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sukovic, Suzana

    2008-01-01

    This article reports research findings related to converging formats, media, practices, and ideas in the process of academics' interaction with electronic texts during a research project. The findings are part of the results of a study that explored interactions of scholars in literary and historical studies with electronic texts as primary…

  10. The Influence of Media Violence on Youth.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Craig A; Berkowitz, Leonard; Donnerstein, Edward; Huesmann, L Rowell; Johnson, James D; Linz, Daniel; Malamuth, Neil M; Wartella, Ellen

    2003-12-01

    Research on violent television and films, video games, and music reveals unequivocal evidence that media violence increases the likelihood of aggressive and violent behavior in both immediate and long-term contexts. The effects appear larger for milder than for more severe forms of aggression, but the effects on severe forms of violence are also substantial (r = .13 to .32) when compared with effects of other violence risk factors or medical effects deemed important by the medical community (e.g., effect of aspirin on heart attacks). The research base is large; diverse in methods, samples, and media genres; and consistent in overall findings. The evidence is clearest within the most extensively researched domain, television and film violence. The growing body of video-game research yields essentially the same conclusions. Short-term exposure increases the likelihood of physically and verbally aggressive behavior, aggressive thoughts, and aggressive emotions. Recent large-scale longitudinal studies provide converging evidence linking frequent exposure to violent media in childhood with aggression later in life, including physical assaults and spouse abuse. Because extremely violent criminal behaviors (e.g., forcible rape, aggravated assault, homicide) are rare, new longitudinal studies with larger samples are needed to estimate accurately how much habitual childhood exposure to media violence increases the risk for extreme violence. Well-supported theory delineates why and when exposure to media violence increases aggression and violence. Media violence produces short-term increases by priming existing aggressive scripts and cognitions, increasing physiological arousal, and triggering an automatic tendency to imitate observed behaviors. Media violence produces long-term effects via several types of learning processes leading to the acquisition of lasting (and automatically accessible) aggressive scripts, interpretational schemas, and aggression-supporting beliefs

  11. Educational Multi-media in a Networked Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, A. W.

    Multimedia is developing fast due to the convergence of different media (text, data. graphics, video, audio) into a common digital platform, and due to the convergence of telecommunications, television, and computing. Parallel to these technical convergencies is another set of developments in work and leisure that is opening up new markets for…

  12. Situated Cognition and Learning Environments: Implications for Teachers On- and Offline in the New Digital Media Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomez, Kimberley; Lee, Ung-Sang

    2015-01-01

    John Seely Brown suggested that learning environments should be spaces in which all work is public, is subject to iterative critique by instructors and peers, and in which social interaction is primary. In such spaces, students and teachers engage in a situated cognition approach to teaching and learning where "cognitive accomplishments rely…

  13. "Get Some Secured Credit Cards Homey": Hip Hop Discourse, Financial Literacy and the Design of Digital Media Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devane, Ben

    2009-01-01

    In the midst of the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression, there exists a deficit of compelling financial education curricula in urban schools that serve financially vulnerable working-class students. Part of a design-based research investigation aimed at creating culturally-relevant financial literacy learning environments, this study…

  14. Human health risks from TNT, RDX, and HMX in environmental media and consideration of the US Regulatory Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, J.I.; Knezovich, J.P.

    1994-12-01

    Although the most economical method for disposing of unwanted energetic high explosives [HEs; e.g., 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-triazine (RDX, also known as Cyclonite), and octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX, also known as Octogen)] involves open burning and open or underground detonation [OB/O(U)D]; federal, state, and even local government agencies in the United States (U.S.) are implementing stricter environmental regulations that eventually may prevent such activities. These stricter regulations will promote alternative technologies that are designed to be environmentally benign. However, past HE-waste disposal practices at manufacturing and fabrication facilities in the U.S. have included uncontrolled OB/O(U)D, as well as direct surface discharge of HE-contaminated waste water, resulting in contaminated environmental media (e.g., ground water, soil, and perhaps even edible vegetation) near residential areas. Using TNT, RDX, and HMX as examples, this paper describes how risk-based standards for HEs can be derived that account for potential multimedia exposures (associated with contaminated air, water, food, and soil) by individuals near a contaminated site, and used to (1) protect public health and safety; (2)prevent limited resources from being dedicated to unnecessary cleanup activities; and (3) identify the most cost-effective, practical, and environmentally benign technologies suitable for integrating with the handling of the large quantity of high explosives scheduled for demilitarization.

  15. Homology, convergence and parallelism.

    PubMed

    Ghiselin, Michael T

    2016-01-01

    Homology is a relation of correspondence between parts of parts of larger wholes. It is used when tracking objects of interest through space and time and in the context of explanatory historical narratives. Homologues can be traced through a genealogical nexus back to a common ancestral precursor. Homology being a transitive relation, homologues remain homologous however much they may come to differ. Analogy is a relationship of correspondence between parts of members of classes having no relationship of common ancestry. Although homology is often treated as an alternative to convergence, the latter is not a kind of correspondence: rather, it is one of a class of processes that also includes divergence and parallelism. These often give rise to misleading appearances (homoplasies). Parallelism can be particularly hard to detect, especially when not accompanied by divergences in some parts of the body. PMID:26598721

  16. Series that Converge Absolutely but Don't Converge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kantrowitz, Robert; Schramm, Michael

    2012-01-01

    If a series of real numbers converges absolutely, then it converges. The usual proof requires completeness in the form of the Cauchy criterion. Failing completeness, the result is false. We provide examples of rational series that illustrate this point. The Cantor set appears in connection with one of the examples.

  17. Some Observations on Grid Convergence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salas, manuel D.

    2006-01-01

    It is claimed that current practices in grid convergence studies, particularly in the field of external aerodynamics, are flawed. The necessary conditions to properly establish grid convergence are presented. A theoretical model and a numerical example are used to demonstrate these ideas.

  18. Convergent ablator performance measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, D. G.; Spears, B. K.; Braun, D. G.; Sorce, C. M.; Celliers, P. M.; Collins, G. W.; Landen, O. L.; Olson, R. E.

    2010-10-15

    The velocity and remaining ablator mass of an imploding capsule are critical metrics for assessing the progress toward ignition of an inertially confined fusion experiment. These and other convergent ablator performance parameters have been measured using a single streaked x-ray radiograph. Traditional Abel inversion of such a radiograph is ill-posed since backlighter intensity profiles and x-ray attenuation by the ablated plasma are unknown. To address this we have developed a regularization technique which allows the ablator density profile {rho}(r) and effective backlighter profile I{sub 0}(y) at each time step to be uniquely determined subject to the constraints that {rho}(r) is localized in radius space and I{sub 0}(y) is delocalized in object space. Moments of {rho}(r) then provide the time-resolved areal density, mass, and average radius (and thus velocity) of the remaining ablator material. These results are combined in the spherical rocket model to determine the ablation pressure and mass ablation rate during the implosion. The technique has been validated on simulated radiographs of implosions at the National Ignition Facility [Miller et al., Nucl. Fusion 44, 228 (2004)] and implemented on experiments at the OMEGA laser facility [Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)].

  19. Convergent ablator performance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, D. G.; Spears, B. K.; Braun, D. G.; Olson, R. E.; Sorce, C. M.; Celliers, P. M.; Collins, G. W.; Landen, O. L.

    2010-10-01

    The velocity and remaining ablator mass of an imploding capsule are critical metrics for assessing the progress toward ignition of an inertially confined fusion experiment. These and other convergent ablator performance parameters have been measured using a single streaked x-ray radiograph. Traditional Abel inversion of such a radiograph is ill-posed since backlighter intensity profiles and x-ray attenuation by the ablated plasma are unknown. To address this we have developed a regularization technique which allows the ablator density profile ρ(r ) and effective backlighter profile I0(y) at each time step to be uniquely determined subject to the constraints that ρ(r ) is localized in radius space and I0(y) is delocalized in object space. Moments of ρ(r ) then provide the time-resolved areal density, mass, and average radius (and thus velocity) of the remaining ablator material. These results are combined in the spherical rocket model to determine the ablation pressure and mass ablation rate during the implosion. The technique has been validated on simulated radiographs of implosions at the National Ignition Facility [Miller et al., Nucl. Fusion 44, 228 (2004)] and implemented on experiments at the OMEGA laser facility [Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)].

  20. Giant lobelias exemplify convergent evolution

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Giant lobeliads on tropical mountains in East Africa and Hawaii have highly unusual, giant-rosette growth forms that appear to be convergent on each other and on those of several independently evolved groups of Asteraceae and other families. A recent phylogenetic analysis by Antonelli, based on sequencing the widest selection of lobeliads to date, raises doubts about this paradigmatic example of convergent evolution. Here I address the kinds of evidence needed to test for convergent evolution and argue that the analysis by Antonelli fails on four points. Antonelli's analysis makes several important contributions to our understanding of lobeliad evolution and geographic spread, but his claim regarding convergence appears to be invalid. Giant lobeliads in Hawaii and Africa represent paradigmatic examples of convergent evolution. PMID:20074322

  1. Digital Media and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, 2012

    2012-01-01

    MacArthur launched the digital media and learning initiative in 2006 to explore how digital media are changing the way young people learn, socialize, communicate, and play. Since 2006, the Foundation has awarded grants totaling more than $100 million for research, development of innovative new technologies, new learning environments for youth,…

  2. Library Media Specialists: Doing the News!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barron, Daniel D.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses Newspapers in Education (NIE) Week and how it can relate to school library media specialists. Highlights include the convergence of news media, including news on the Web; ERIC (Educational Resources Information Center) resources, including lesson plans; relevant books; Web sites; and Web journalism. (LRW)

  3. The Convergence of Intelligences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diederich, Joachim

    Minsky (1985) argued an extraterrestrial intelligence may be similar to ours despite very different origins. ``Problem- solving'' offers evolutionary advantages and individuals who are part of a technical civilisation should have this capacity. On earth, the principles of problem-solving are the same for humans, some primates and machines based on Artificial Intelligence (AI) techniques. Intelligent systems use ``goals'' and ``sub-goals'' for problem-solving, with memories and representations of ``objects'' and ``sub-objects'' as well as knowledge of relations such as ``cause'' or ``difference.'' Some of these objects are generic and cannot easily be divided into parts. We must, therefore, assume that these objects and relations are universal, and a general property of intelligence. Minsky's arguments from 1985 are extended here. The last decade has seen the development of a general learning theory (``computational learning theory'' (CLT) or ``statistical learning theory'') which equally applies to humans, animals and machines. It is argued that basic learning laws will also apply to an evolved alien intelligence, and this includes limitations of what can be learned efficiently. An example from CLT is that the general learning problem for neural networks is intractable, i.e. it cannot be solved efficiently for all instances (it is ``NP-complete''). It is the objective of this paper to show that evolved intelligences will be constrained by general learning laws and will use task-decomposition for problem-solving. Since learning and problem-solving are core features of intelligence, it can be said that intelligences converge despite very different origins.

  4. Why does continental convergence stop

    SciTech Connect

    Hynes, A.

    1985-01-01

    Convergence between India and Asia slowed at 45 Ma when they collided, but continues today. This requires that substantial proportions of the Indian and/or Asian lithospheric mantle are still being subducted. The resulting slab-pull is probably comparable with that from complete lithospheric slabs and may promote continued continental convergence even after collision. Since descending lithospheric slabs are present at all collision zones at the time of collision such continued convergence may be general after continental collisions. It may cease only when there is a major (global) plate reorganization which results in new forces on the convergent continents that may counteract the slab-pull. These inferences may be tested on the late Paleozoic collision between Gondwanaland and Laurasia. This is generally considered to have been complete by mid-Permian time (250 Ma). However, this may be only the time of docking of Gondwanaland with North America, not that of the cessation of convergence. Paleomagnetic polar-wander paths for the Gondwanide continents exhibit consistently greater latitudinal shifts from 250 Ma to 200 Ma than those of Laurasia when corrected for post-Triassic drift, suggesting that convergence continued through late Permian well into the Triassic. It may have been accommodated by crustal thickening under what is now the US Coastal Plain, or by strike-slip faulting. Convergence may have ceased only when Pangea began to fragment again, in which case the cause for its cessation may be related to the cause of continental fragmentation.

  5. Sounding of Groundwater Through Conductive Media in Mars Analog Environments Using Transient Electromagnetics and Low Frequency GPR.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jernsletten, J. A.; Heggy, E.

    2004-05-01

    INTRODUCTION: This study compares the use of (diffusive) Transient Electromagnetics (TEM) for sounding of subsurface water in conductive Mars analog environments to the use of (propagative) Ground-Penetrating Radar (GPR) for the same purpose. We show data from three field studies: 1) Radar sounding data (GPR) from the Nubian aquifer, Bahria Oasis, Egypt; 2) Diffusive sounding data (TEM) from Pima County, Arizona; and 3) Shallower sounding data using the Fast-Turnoff TEM method from Peña de Hierro in the Rio Tinto area, Spain. The latter is data from work conducted under the auspices of the Mars Analog Research and Technology Experiment (MARTE). POTENTIAL OF TEM: A TEM survey was carried out in Pima County, Arizona, in January 2003. Data was collected using 100 m Tx loops, a ferrite-cored magnetic coil Rx antenna, and a sounding frequency of 16 Hz. The dataset has ~500 m depth of investigation, shows a ~120 m depth to the water table (confirmed by several USGS test wells in the area), and a conductive (~20-40 Ω m) clay-rich soil above the water table. The Rio Tinto Fast-Turnoff TEM data was collected using 40 m Tx loops, 10 m Rx loops, and a 32 Hz sounding frequency. Note ~200 m depth of investigation and a conductive high at ~80 m depth (interpreted as water table). Data was also collected using 20 m Tx loops (10 m Rx loops) in other parts of the area. Note ~50 m depth of investigation and a conductive high at ~15 m depth (interpreted as subsurface water flow under mine tailings matching surface flows seen coming out from under the tailings, and shown on maps). Both of these interpretations were roughly confirmed by preliminary results from the MARTE ground truth drilling campaign carried out in September and October 2003. POTENTIAL OF GPR: A GPR experiment was carried out in February 2003 in the Bahria Oasis in the western Egyptian desert, using a 2 MHz monostatic GPR, mapping the Nubian Aquifer at depths of 100-900 m, beneath a thick layer of homogenous marine

  6. Unstable resonators with excited converging wave

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgson, N. ); Weber, H. )

    1990-04-01

    This paper reports the properties of unstable resonators with an additional mirror inside or outside the resonator investigated, both experimentally and theoretically. The additional mirror excites the converging wave, and by this, output coupling is decreased without affecting beam quality. Experiments were performed with a pulsed Nd:YAG system. The theoretical model was based on the coupled Kirchhoff integrals and solved numerically. Agreement between theory and experiments indicates that this kind of resonator provides high focusability and maximum extraction efficiency simultaneously, even with low-gain media. This enables one to apply unstable resonators to solid-state lasers with low small-signal gain, like alexandrite or CW-pumped Nd:YAG.

  7. CVD Prevention Through Policy: a Review of Mass Media, Food/Menu Labeling, Taxation/Subsidies, Built Environment, School Procurement, Worksite Wellness, and Marketing Standards to Improve Diet.

    PubMed

    Afshin, Ashkan; Penalvo, Jose; Del Gobbo, Liana; Kashaf, Michael; Micha, Renata; Morrish, Kurtis; Pearson-Stuttard, Jonathan; Rehm, Colin; Shangguan, Siyi; Smith, Jessica D; Mozaffarian, Dariush

    2015-11-01

    Poor diet is the leading cause of cardiovascular disease in the USA and globally. Evidence-based policies are crucial to improve diet and population health. We reviewed the effectiveness for a range of policy levers to alter diet and diet-related risk factors. We identified evidence to support benefits of focused mass media campaigns (especially for fruits, vegetables, salt), food pricing strategies (both subsidies and taxation, with stronger effects at lower income levels), school procurement policies (for increasing healthful or reducing unhealthful choices), and worksite wellness programs (especially when comprehensive and multicomponent). Evidence was inconclusive for food and menu labeling (for consumer or industry behavior) and changes in local built environment (e.g., availability or accessibility of supermarkets, fast food outlets). We found little empiric evidence evaluating marketing restrictions, although broad principles and large resources spent on marketing suggest utility. Widespread implementation and evaluation of evidence-based policy strategies, with further research on other strategies with mixed/limited evidence, are essential "population medicine" to reduce health and economic burdens and inequities of diet-related illness worldwide. PMID:26370554

  8. Entertainment-education in a media-saturated environment: examining the impact of single and multiple exposures to breast cancer storylines on two popular medical dramas.

    PubMed

    Hether, Heather J; Huang, Grace C; Beck, Vicki; Murphy, Sheila T; Valente, Thomas W

    2008-12-01

    In the United States, entertainment-education (E-E) initiatives in primetime television that provide public health information are at risk for diminished impact due to the media-saturated environment in which they must compete. One strategy to overcome this limitation is to use multiple primetime TV shows to reinforce similar health messages in multiple storylines. The current study explores such an approach by evaluating the impact of two separate breast cancer genetics storylines featured on two different TV programs as the result of outreach to writers and producers. These storylines aired within approximately 3 weeks of each other on the popular medical dramas, ER (NBC) and Grey's Anatomy (ABC), and included information about the BRCA1 breast cancer gene mutation and the risks it poses to women who test positive for it. The evaluation used data collected from a panel sample of 599 female survey respondents at three points in time. Results show that while the individual storylines had a modest impact on viewers' knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors related to breast cancer, combined exposure seemed to be most effective at changing outcomes. Implications of our findings for future E-E interventions and evaluations are discussed. PMID:19051115

  9. Media Clips

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vennebush, G. Patrick

    2004-01-01

    Media Clips aims to offer readers contemporary, authentic applications of quantitative reasoning based on print or electronic media. Clips may be in text or graphic format, and clip sources may be either print or electronic media.

  10. Data Convergence - An Australian Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, S. S.; Howell, B.

    2012-12-01

    Coupled numerical physical, biogeochemical and sediment models are increasingly being used as integrators to help understand the cumulative or far field effects of change in the coastal environment. This reliance on modeling has forced observations to be delivered as data streams ingestible by modeling frameworks. This has made it easier to create near real-time or forecasting models than to try to recreate the past, and has lead in turn to the conversion of historical data into data streams to allow them to be ingested by the same frameworks. The model and observation frameworks under development within Australia's Commonwealth and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) are now feeding into the Australian Ocean Data Network's (AODN's) MARine Virtual Laboratory (MARVL) . The sensor, or data stream, brokering solution is centred around the "message" and all data flowing through the gateway is wrapped as a message. Messages consist of a topic and a data object and their routing through the gateway to pre-processors and listeners is determined by the topic. The Sensor Message Gateway (SMG) method is allowing data from different sensors measuring the same thing but with different temporal resolutions, units or spatial coverage to be ingested or visualized seamlessly. At the same time the model output as a virtual sensor is being explored, this again being enabled by the SMG. It is only for two way communications with sensor that rigorous adherence to standards is needed, by accepting existing data in less than ideal formats, but exposing them though the SMG we can move a step closer to the Internet Of Things by creating an Internet of Industries where each vested interest can continue with business as usual, contribute to data convergence and adopt more open standards when investment seems appropriate to that sector or business.Architecture Overview

  11. Reliability enhancement of Navier-Stokes codes through convergence acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merkle, Charles L.; Dulikravich, George S.

    1995-01-01

    Methods for enhancing the reliability of Navier-Stokes computer codes through improving convergence characteristics are presented. The improving of these characteristics decreases the likelihood of code unreliability and user interventions in a design environment. The problem referred to as a 'stiffness' in the governing equations for propulsion-related flowfields is investigated, particularly in regard to common sources of equation stiffness that lead to convergence degradation of CFD algorithms. Von Neumann stability theory is employed as a tool to study the convergence difficulties involved. Based on the stability results, improved algorithms are devised to ensure efficient convergence in different situations. A number of test cases are considered to confirm a correlation between stability theory and numerical convergence. The examples of turbulent and reacting flow are presented, and a generalized form of the preconditioning matrix is derived to handle these problems, i.e., the problems involving additional differential equations for describing the transport of turbulent kinetic energy, dissipation rate and chemical species. Algorithms for unsteady computations are considered. The extension of the preconditioning techniques and algorithms derived for Navier-Stokes computations to three-dimensional flow problems is discussed. New methods to accelerate the convergence of iterative schemes for the numerical integration of systems of partial differential equtions are developed, with a special emphasis on the acceleration of convergence on highly clustered grids.

  12. Intercontinental community convergence of ecology and morphology in desert lizards

    PubMed Central

    Melville, Jane; Harmon, Luke J; Losos, Jonathan B

    2005-01-01

    Evolutionary ecologists have long debated the extent to which communities in similar environments but different geographic regions exhibit convergence. On the one hand, if species' adaptations and community structure are determined by environmental features, convergence would be expected. However, if historical contingencies have long-lasting effects convergence would be unlikely. Most studies to date have emphasized the differences between communities in similar environments and little quantitative evidence for convergence exists. The application of comparative phylogenetic methods to ecological studies provides an opportunity to further investigate hypotheses of convergence. We compared the evolutionary patterns of structural ecology and morphology of 42 species of iguanian lizards from deserts of Australia and North America. Using a comparative approach, we found that evolutionary convergence of ecology and morphology occurs both in overall, community-wide patterns and in terms of pairs of highly similar intercontinental pairs of species. This result indicates that in these desert lizards, deterministic adaptive evolution shapes community patterns and overrides the historical contingencies unique to particular lineages. PMID:16537126

  13. Convergence and non-convergence in ecological, phenotypic, and genetic divergence across replicate population pairs of lake and stream stickleback

    PubMed Central

    Kaeuffer, Renaud; Peichel, Catherine L.; Bolnick, Daniel I.; Hendry, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    Convergent (or parallel) evolution provides strong evidence for a deterministic role of natural selection: similar phenotypes evolve when independent populations colonize similar environments. In reality, however, independent populations in similar environments always show some differences: some non-convergent evolution is present. It is therefore important to explicitly quantify the convergent and non-convergent aspects of trait variation, and to investigate the ecological and genetic explanations for each. We performed such an analysis for threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) populations inhabiting lake and stream habitats in independent watersheds. Morphological traits differed in the degree to which lake-stream divergence was convergent across watersheds. Some aspects of this variation were correlated with ecological variables related to diet, presumably reflecting the strength and specifics of divergent selection. Furthermore, a genetic scan revealed some markers that diverged between lakes and streams in many of the watersheds and some that diverged in only a few watersheds. Moreover, some of the lake-stream divergence in genetic markers was associated within some of the lake-stream divergence in morphological traits. Our results suggest that convergent evolution, and deviations from it, are primarily the result of natural selection, which corresponds in only some respect to the dichotomous habitat classifications frequently used in such studies. PMID:22276537

  14. Engagement with Novel Virtual Environments: The Role of Perceived Novelty and Flow in the Development of the Deficient Self-Regulation of Internet Use and Media Habits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tokunaga, Robert Shota

    2013-01-01

    This article extends theory on the deficient self-regulation (DSR) of Internet use and media habits by integrating predictors relevant to technology use. It introduces novelty perceptions of a technology and flow as conditions that increase the likelihood of experiencing DSR and media habits. An experiment, with between- and within-subjects…

  15. Trophic convergence drives morphological convergence in marine tetrapods.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Neil P; Motani, Ryosuke

    2015-01-01

    Marine tetrapod clades (e.g. seals, whales) independently adapted to marine life through the Mesozoic and Caenozoic, and provide iconic examples of convergent evolution. Apparent morphological convergence is often explained as the result of adaptation to similar ecological niches. However, quantitative tests of this hypothesis are uncommon. We use dietary data to classify the feeding ecology of extant marine tetrapods and identify patterns in skull and tooth morphology that discriminate trophic groups across clades. Mapping these patterns onto phylogeny reveals coordinated evolutionary shifts in diet and morphology in different marine tetrapod lineages. Similarities in morphology between species with similar diets-even across large phylogenetic distances-are consistent with previous hypotheses that shared functional constraints drive convergent evolution in marine tetrapods. PMID:25631228

  16. Trophic convergence drives morphological convergence in marine tetrapods

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Neil P.; Motani, Ryosuke

    2015-01-01

    Marine tetrapod clades (e.g. seals, whales) independently adapted to marine life through the Mesozoic and Caenozoic, and provide iconic examples of convergent evolution. Apparent morphological convergence is often explained as the result of adaptation to similar ecological niches. However, quantitative tests of this hypothesis are uncommon. We use dietary data to classify the feeding ecology of extant marine tetrapods and identify patterns in skull and tooth morphology that discriminate trophic groups across clades. Mapping these patterns onto phylogeny reveals coordinated evolutionary shifts in diet and morphology in different marine tetrapod lineages. Similarities in morphology between species with similar diets—even across large phylogenetic distances—are consistent with previous hypotheses that shared functional constraints drive convergent evolution in marine tetrapods. PMID:25631228

  17. The benefits of convergence.

    PubMed

    Chang, Gee-Kung; Cheng, Lin

    2016-03-01

    A multi-tier radio access network (RAN) combining the strength of fibre-optic and radio access technologies employing adaptive microwave photonics interfaces and radio-over-fibre (RoF) techniques is envisioned for future heterogeneous wireless communications. All-band radio spectrum from 0.1 to 100 GHz will be used to deliver wireless services with high capacity, high link speed and low latency. The multi-tier RAN will improve the cell-edge performance in an integrated heterogeneous environment enabled by fibre-wireless integration and networking for mobile fronthaul/backhaul, resource sharing and all-layer centralization of multiple standards with different frequency bands and modulation formats. In essence, this is a 'no-more-cells' architecture in which carrier aggregation among multiple frequency bands can be easily achieved with seamless handover between cells. In this way, current and future mobile network standards such as 4G and 5G can coexist with optimized and continuous cell coverage using multi-tier RoF regardless of the underlying network topology or protocol. In terms of users' experience, the future-proof approach achieves the goals of system capacity, link speed, latency and continuous heterogeneous cell coverage while overcoming the bandwidth crunch in next-generation communication networks. PMID:26809570

  18. Rainfall Morphology in Semi-Tropical Convergence Zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, J. Marshall; Ferrier, Brad S.; Ray, Peter S.

    2000-01-01

    Central Florida is the ideal test laboratory for studying convergence zone-induced convection. The region regularly experiences sea breeze fronts and rainfall-induced outflow boundaries. The focus of this study is the common yet poorly-studied convergence zone established by the interaction of the sea breeze front and an outflow boundary. Previous studies have investigated mechanisms primarily affecting storm initiation by such convergence zones. Few have focused on rainfall morphology yet these storms contribute a significant amount precipitation to the annual rainfall budget. Low-level convergence and mid-tropospheric moisture have both been shown to correlate with rainfall amounts in Florida. Using 2D and 3D numerical simulations, the roles of low-level convergence and mid-tropospheric moisture in rainfall evolution are examined. The results indicate that time-averaged, vertical moisture flux (VMF) at the sea breeze front/outflow convergence zone is directly and linearly proportional to initial condensation rates. This proportionality establishes a similar relationship between VMF and initial rainfall. Vertical moisture flux, which encompasses depth and magnitude of convergence, is better correlated to initial rainfall production than surface moisture convergence. This extends early observational studies which linked rainfall in Florida to surface moisture convergence. The amount and distribution of mid-tropospheric moisture determines how rainfall associated with secondary cells develop. Rainfall amount and efficiency varied significantly over an observable range of relative humidities in the 850- 500 mb layer even though rainfall evolution was similar during the initial or "first-cell" period. Rainfall variability was attributed to drier mid-tropospheric environments inhibiting secondary cell development through entrainment effects. Observationally, 850-500 mb moisture structure exhibits wider variability than lower level moisture, which is virtually always

  19. Media education.

    PubMed

    Strasburger, Victor C

    2010-11-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics recognizes that exposure to mass media (eg, television, movies, video and computer games, the Internet, music lyrics and videos, newspapers, magazines, books, advertising) presents health risks for children and adolescents but can provide benefits as well. Media education has the potential to reduce the harmful effects of media and accentuate the positive effects. By understanding and supporting media education, pediatricians can play an important role in reducing harmful effects of media on children and adolescents. PMID:20876180

  20. Convergent Creativity: From Arthur Cropley (1935-) Onwards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Ai-Girl

    2015-01-01

    Arthur Cropley's view on convergent thinking is reviewed, with reflections on the relations of divergent and convergent processes and the roles of knowledge and convergent creativity. While divergence is about considering and generating multiplicity, possibility, difference, originality, and so on; convergence is about relating, associating,…

  1. Converging paradigms for environmental health theory and practice.

    PubMed Central

    Parkes, Margot; Panelli, Ruth; Weinstein, Philip

    2003-01-01

    Converging themes from the fields of environmental health, ecology and health, and human ecology highlight opportunities for innovation and advancement in environmental health theory and practice. In this commentary we outline the role of research and applied programs that integrate biophysical and social sciences with environmental health practice in order to address deficiencies in each field when taken on its own. New opportunities for environmental health protection and promotion are outlined based on the three converging themes: integrated approaches to research and policy, methodological acknowledgment of the synergies between the social and biophysical environments, and incorporation of core ecosystem principles into research and practice. These converging themes are discussed in relation to their implications for new types of intervention to achieve health gains across different spatial and temporal scales at the interface between biophysical and social environments. PMID:12727592

  2. Convergence demands by spectacle magnifiers.

    PubMed

    Katz, M

    1996-08-01

    A general equation, c delta = k1b + k2sF, for finding the binocular convergence demands by spectacle magnifiers to view images at any distance is presented. Factor k1 in the equation yields the accommodative demand to view the image; factor k2 determines the actual reduction in convergence demand provided by the vendors' incorporation of base-in prism. When magnifiers from virtual images at finite distances, such as at the least distance of distinct vision or 25 cm, the interpupiliary distance (b), the separation between the lenses and the eyes (d), and the distance between the optical centers of the lenses (s) are basic quantities, according to this equation. The fundamental datum that the vendors should specify is the distance (s) between the optical centers of the lenses, rather than base-in prism. The specification of base-in prism is unrellable when images are formed at finite distances and the frame PD is not equal to the distance IPD. When the image is formed at infinity, that is when the angular magnification M = F/4, the convergence demand by spectacle magnifiers only depends on the separation between the optical centers of the lenses and the lens power, that is, c delta = sF. It is independent of the interpupillary distance (b) and the separation between the lenses and the eyes (d). We also present an equation, to find the disparity of the accommodative/convergence relation caused by spectacle magnifiers. Knowing the demands on convergence and accommodation, the practitioner can probably evaluate the potential for successful adaptation to spectacle magnifiers from routine measurements of positive and negative relative convergence and accommodation. PMID:8869985

  3. From SuperGoo to Scratch: Exploring Creative Digital Media Production in Informal Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peppler, Kylie A.; Kafai, Yasmin B.

    2007-01-01

    Based on work in media studies, new literacy studies, applied linguistics, the arts and empirical research on the experiences of urban youths' informal media arts practices, we articulate a new vision for media education in the digital age that encompasses new genres, convergence, media mixes and participation. We first outline the history of how…

  4. Interactive Patterns and Conceptual Convergence during Student Collaborations in Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliveira, Alandeom W.; Sadler, Troy D.

    2008-01-01

    This study examines cognitive and social processes in group interactions that shape collaborative learning in science classrooms. Three small groups of students were observed while working collaboratively on explaining the burning of a candle under a jar. The learning environment served as a context for examination of conceptual convergence, a…

  5. Evolution: convergence in dinosaur crests.

    PubMed

    Hone, David W E

    2015-06-15

    The horned, ceratopsid dinosaurs can be easily split into two major groups based on their cranial structures, but now a new discovery shows that at least one genus 'switched sides' and convergently evolved the form of the other clade. PMID:26079078

  6. Converging shocks in elastic-plastic solids.

    PubMed

    Ortega, A López; Lombardini, M; Hill, D J

    2011-11-01

    We present an approximate description of the behavior of an elastic-plastic material processed by a cylindrically or spherically symmetric converging shock, following Whitham's shock dynamics theory. Originally applied with success to various gas dynamics problems, this theory is presently derived for solid media, in both elastic and plastic regimes. The exact solutions of the shock dynamics equations obtained reproduce well the results obtained by high-resolution numerical simulations. The examined constitutive laws share a compressible neo-Hookean structure for the internal energy e=e(s)(I(1))+e(h)(ρ,ς), where e(s) accounts for shear through the first invariant of the Cauchy-Green tensor, and e(h) represents the hydrostatic contribution as a function of the density ρ and entropy ς. In the strong-shock limit, reached as the shock approaches the axis or origin r=0, we show that compression effects are dominant over shear deformations. For an isothermal constitutive law, i.e., e(h)=e(h)(ρ), with a power-law dependence e(h) is proportional to ρ(α), shock dynamics predicts that for a converging shock located at r=R(t) at time t, the Mach number increases as M is proportional to [log(1/R)](α), independently of the space index s, where s=2 in cylindrical geometry and 3 in spherical geometry. An alternative isothermal constitutive law with p(ρ) of the arctanh type, which enforces a finite density in the strong-shock limit, leads to M is proportional to R(-(s-1)) for strong shocks. A nonisothermal constitutive law, whose hydrostatic part e(h) is that of an ideal gas, is also tested, recovering the strong-shock limit M is proportional to R(-(s-1)/n(γ)) originally derived by Whitham for perfect gases, where γ is inherently related to the maximum compression ratio that the material can reach, (γ+1)/(γ-1). From these strong-shock limits, we also estimate analytically the density, radial velocity, pressure, and sound speed immediately behind the shock. While the

  7. Converging shocks in elastic-plastic solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López Ortega, A.; Lombardini, M.; Hill, D. J.

    2011-11-01

    We present an approximate description of the behavior of an elastic-plastic material processed by a cylindrically or spherically symmetric converging shock, following Whitham's shock dynamics theory. Originally applied with success to various gas dynamics problems, this theory is presently derived for solid media, in both elastic and plastic regimes. The exact solutions of the shock dynamics equations obtained reproduce well the results obtained by high-resolution numerical simulations. The examined constitutive laws share a compressible neo-Hookean structure for the internal energy e=es(I1)+eh(ρ,ς), where es accounts for shear through the first invariant of the Cauchy-Green tensor, and eh represents the hydrostatic contribution as a function of the density ρ and entropy ς. In the strong-shock limit, reached as the shock approaches the axis or origin r=0, we show that compression effects are dominant over shear deformations. For an isothermal constitutive law, i.e., eh=eh(ρ), with a power-law dependence eh∝ρα, shock dynamics predicts that for a converging shock located at r=R(t) at time t, the Mach number increases as M∝[log(1/R)]α, independently of the space index s, where s=2 in cylindrical geometry and 3 in spherical geometry. An alternative isothermal constitutive law with p(ρ) of the arctanh type, which enforces a finite density in the strong-shock limit, leads to M∝R-(s-1) for strong shocks. A nonisothermal constitutive law, whose hydrostatic part eh is that of an ideal gas, is also tested, recovering the strong-shock limit M∝R-(s-1)/n(γ) originally derived by Whitham for perfect gases, where γ is inherently related to the maximum compression ratio that the material can reach, (γ+1)/(γ-1). From these strong-shock limits, we also estimate analytically the density, radial velocity, pressure, and sound speed immediately behind the shock. While the hydrostatic part of the energy essentially commands the strong-shock behavior, the shear

  8. New Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downtown Business Quarterly, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This theme issue explores lower Manhattan's burgeoning "New Media" industry, a growing source of jobs in lower Manhattan. The first article, "New Media Manpower Issues" (Rodney Alexander), addresses manpower, training, and workforce demands faced by new media companies in New York City. The second article, "Case Study: Hiring @ Dynamid" (John…

  9. Media Panel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marklund, Inger, Ed.; Hanse, Mona-Britt, Ed.

    1984-01-01

    The Swedish Media Panel is a research program about children and young persons and their use of mass media. The aim of the ten-year (1975-1985) project is to explain how media habits originate, how they change as children grow older, what factors on the part of children themselves and in their surroundings may be connected with a certain use of…

  10. Sliding mode control method having terminal convergence in finite time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkataraman, Subramanian T. (Inventor); Gulati, Sandeep (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An object of this invention is to provide robust nonlinear controllers for robotic operations in unstructured environments based upon a new class of closed loop sliding control methods, sometimes denoted terminal sliders, where the new class will enforce closed-loop control convergence to equilibrium in finite time. Improved performance results from the elimination of high frequency control switching previously employed for robustness to parametric uncertainties. Improved performance also results from the dependence of terminal slider stability upon the rate of change of uncertainties over the sliding surface rather than the magnitude of the uncertainty itself for robust control. Terminal sliding mode control also yields improved convergence where convergence time is finite and is to be controlled. A further object is to apply terminal sliders to robot manipulator control and benchmark performance with the traditional computed torque control method and provide for design of control parameters.

  11. Network management convergence of multiple subnetworks in GSM infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong, Baiqing; Su, Jiang; Zhong, Tao; Dong, Hui; Zhong, Shuangli; Zhou, Weiming; Chen, Wansheng

    2001-10-01

    Network convergence, including service, timing and management convergence, is a trend of future telecommunication networks. Because network convergence can provide carriers with cost reduction, highly integrated applications as well as greater flexibility and functionality, new technologies and standards have driven this convergence tide. However, network management convergence, managing disparate networks with a unified platform, has been a challenging task in sophisticated telecommunication network environments. Administrators are faced with the task of managing various devices with several different applications, without an effective tool set to provide visibility across the network. In general, multiple transmission networks such as SDH, PON, HDSL and digital microwave are adopted in GSM infrastructure to transport mobile traffic between BTS and BSC. Traditional method of managing these devices is that GSM network (MSC, BSC and BTS), SDH, PON, HDSL and digital microwave are managed independently. In this paper, a converged network management platform, named OMConvergence, is proposed and demonstrated. The platform aims at managing the whole GSM network covering SDH, PON, HDSL or digital microwave sub-networks within it. The OMConvergence comprises of remote access methods of OAM message, as well as processing of multiple network management protocol such as ECC (Embedded Control Channel), Q3 and simple network management protocol (SNMP). The management and maintenance message of various devices physically converges to E1 timeslots at the sides of BTS, and then convert to unified IP packages before it is terminated at the side of BSC or network administration center. In addition, extended applications of OMConvergence in image monitoring of BTS surroundings are also demonstrated.

  12. Converging shocks for DSD modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matignon, Christophe

    2013-06-01

    Modelling of pyrotechnic systems requires both, a good understanding and precise prediction capabilities of the dynamics of detonation. When using insensitive high explosives IHE (such as TATB-based explosives) the interaction of the detonation front with the confinement can lead to very different detonation velocities. One of the most popular engineering tools used to model this behaviour is the Detonation Shock Dynamics (DSD). In the DSD assumption, the detonation front propagates at a normal shock velocity (Dn) which depends only on its local curvature (κ). For divergent detonations, the DSD limit is very well established both experimentally and theoretically and one can easily propose a model (which obeys the 1D quasi-steady weakly curved detonation theory) to reproduce this behavior. We propose to extend the DSD theory to slightly convergent detonation fronts and to validate it against experimental data. Two series of experiments were carried out. The first series was designed to collect precise information regarding converging detonation. Usually, in such configurations, the detonation is non steady, making precise and simultaneous measurements of velocity and curvature difficult to achieve. The originality of the proposed setup is to drive a self similar convergent detonation at constant speed in an IHE rod by an external explosive tube of greater detonation velocity (allowing an accurate recording of both velocity and curvature). A wide range EOS/reaction rate model (inspired from previous works of Wescott et al.) was then calibrated to reproduce both the strong shock initiation and the newly extended (Dn- κ) law. This model can be used to perform either direct numerical simulation (DNS) on fine resolved mesh grid, or its reduced PZR model (DSD based) on a much coarser grid. This model was then successfully validated against the second series of experiments involving a detonation propagating around an obstacle and exhibiting a non steady converging front

  13. "Nanoselves": NBIC and the Culture of Convergence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venkatesan, Priya

    2010-01-01

    The subject of this essay is NBIC convergence (nanotechnology, biotechnology, information technology and cognitive science convergence). NBIC convergence is a recurring trope that is dominated by the paradigm of integration of the sciences. It is largely influenced by the considerations of social and economic impact, and it assumes positivism in…

  14. Convergence analysis of combinations of different methods

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Y.

    1994-12-31

    This paper provides a convergence analysis for combinations of different numerical methods for solving systems of differential equations. The author proves that combinations of two convergent linear multistep methods or Runge-Kutta methods produce a new convergent method of which the order is equal to the smaller order of the two original methods.

  15. A/sub n/ method in monokinetic neutron transport theory: Convergence and numerical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Coppa, G.; Ravetto, P.; Sumini, M.

    1981-10-01

    The convergence of the approximate method, referred to as A/sub n/, to study the solution of the monokinetic transport equation is fully investigated, when it is applied to the description of the neutron population in both infinite and finite media.

  16. Modeling and convergence analysis of distributed coevolutionary algorithms.

    PubMed

    Subbu, Raj; Sanderson, Arthur C

    2004-04-01

    A theoretical foundation is presented for modeling and convergence analysis of a class of distributed coevolutionary algorithms applied to optimization problems in which the variables are partitioned among p nodes. An evolutionary algorithm at each of the p nodes performs a local evolutionary search based on its own set of primary variables, and the secondary variable set at each node is clamped during this phase. An infrequent intercommunication between the nodes updates the secondary variables at each node. The local search and intercommunication phases alternate, resulting in a cooperative search by the p nodes. First, we specify a theoretical basis for a class of centralized evolutionary algorithms in terms of construction and evolution of sampling distributions over the feasible space. Next, this foundation is extended to develop a model for a class of distributed coevolutionary algorithms. Convergence and convergence rate analyzes are pursued for basic classes of objective functions. Our theoretical investigation reveals that for certain unimodal and multimodal objectives, we can expect these algorithms to converge at a geometrical rate. The distributed coevolutionary algorithms are of most interest from the perspective of their performance advantage compared to centralized algorithms, when they execute in a network environment with significant local access and internode communication delays. The relative performance of these algorithms is therefore evaluated in a distributed environment with realistic parameters of network behavior. PMID:15376831

  17. Libraries/Media Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School & University, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Presents K-12 and college libraries/media centers considered outstanding in a competition, which judged the most outstanding learning environments at educational institutions nationwide. Jurors spent two days reviewing projects, highlighting concepts and ideas that made them exceptional. For each citation, the article offers information on the…

  18. Media Embedded Interactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, J. David

    A review of literature and two surveys, one of college students and one of a random sample of adults, were used to examine four aspects of media embedded interactions (social behavior in front of a TV or radio): their functions, their environment, their effects, and the reactions of the interactants to them. Television is seen as performing a…

  19. Weak {}^* convergence of operator means

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanov, Alexandr V.

    2011-12-01

    For a linear operator U with \\Vert U^n\\Vert \\le \\operatorname{const} on a Banach space X we discuss conditions for the convergence of ergodic operator nets T_\\alpha corresponding to the adjoint operator U^* of U in the {W^*O}-topology of the space \\operatorname{End} X^*. The accumulation points of all possible nets of this kind form a compact convex set L in \\operatorname{End} X^*, which is the kernel of the operator semigroup G=\\overline{\\operatorname{co}}\\,\\Gamma_0, where \\Gamma_0=\\{U_n^*, n \\ge 0\\}. It is proved that all ergodic nets T_\\alpha weakly {}^* converge if and only if the kernel L consists of a single element. In the case of X=C(\\Omega) and the shift operator U generated by a continuous transformation \\varphi of a metrizable compactum \\Omega we trace the relationships among the ergodic properties of U, the structure of the operator semigroups L, G and \\Gamma=\\overline{\\Gamma}_0, and the dynamical characteristics of the semi-cascade (\\varphi,\\Omega). In particular, if \\operatorname{card}L=1, then a) for any \\omega \\in\\Omega the closure of the trajectory \\{\\varphi^n\\omega, n \\ge 0\\} contains precisely one minimal set m, and b) the restriction (\\varphi,m) is strictly ergodic. Condition a) implies the {W^*O}-convergence of any ergodic sequence of operators T_n \\in \\operatorname{End} X^* under the additional assumption that the kernel of the enveloping semigroup E(\\varphi,\\Omega) contains elements obtained from the `basis' family of transformations \\{\\varphi^n, n \\ge 0\\} of the compact set \\Omega by using some transfinite sequence of sequential passages to the limit.

  20. Ecomorphological convergence in planktivorous surgeonfishes.

    PubMed

    Friedman, S T; Price, S A; Hoey, A S; Wainwright, P C

    2016-05-01

    Morphological convergence plays a central role in the study of evolution. Often induced by shared ecological specialization, homoplasy hints at underlying selective pressures and adaptive constraints that deterministically shape the diversification of life. Although midwater zooplanktivory has arisen in adult surgeonfishes (family Acanthuridae) at least four independent times, it represents a clearly specialized state, requiring the capacity to swiftly swim in midwater locating and sucking small prey items. Whereas this diet has commonly been associated with specific functional adaptations in fishes, acanthurids present an interesting case study as all nonplanktivorous species feed by grazing on benthic algae and detritus, requiring a vastly different functional morphology that emphasizes biting behaviours. We examined the feeding morphology in 30 acanthurid species and, combined with a pre-existing phylogenetic tree, compared the fit of evolutionary models across two diet regimes: zooplanktivores and nonzooplanktivorous grazers. Accounting for phylogenetic relationships, the best-fitting model indicates that zooplanktivorous species are converging on a separate adaptive peak from their grazing relatives. Driving this bimodal landscape, zooplanktivorous acanthurids tend to develop a slender body, reduced facial features, smaller teeth and weakened jaw adductor muscles. However, despite these phenotypic changes, model fitting suggests that lineages have not yet reached the adaptive peak associated with plankton feeding even though some transitions appear to be over 10 million years old. These findings demonstrate that the selective demands of pelagic feeding promote repeated - albeit very gradual - ecomorphological convergence within surgeonfishes, while allowing local divergences between closely related species, contributing to the overall diversity of the clade. PMID:26809907

  1. Corporate Schooling Meets Corporate Media: Standards, Testing, and Technophilia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saltman, Kenneth J.

    2016-01-01

    Educational publishing corporations and media corporations in the United States have been converging, especially through the promotion of standardization, testing, and for-profit educational technologies. Media and technology companies--including News Corp, Apple, and Microsoft--have significantly expanded their presence in public schools to sell…

  2. Curating Media Learning: Towards a Porous Expertise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDougall, Julian; Potter, John

    2015-01-01

    This article combines research results from a range of projects with two consistent themes. Firstly, we explore the potential for curation to offer a productive metaphor for the convergence of digital media learning across and between home/lifeworld and formal educational/system-world spaces--or between the public and private spheres. Secondly, we…

  3. Earned Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sunshine, Alice

    2011-01-01

    "Earned media" is exactly what one thinks it is. The people who do the necessary work to earn coverage of their issue or battle are the ones who will get their story out to the public. Earning media coverage involves giving careful attention to the mechanics of reaching out to news outlets. Most people can learn the mechanics through workshops,…

  4. Media Now.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Ron

    Developed by the Southwest Iowa Learning Resources Center, Media Now is a course for secondary students in media studies. Curriculum concentration is on television, film, radio, and recorded sound. Individualization of instruction, behavioral science, and mediated learning packages are employed with each module interrelated through printed…

  5. Mixed Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Erin

    2010-01-01

    While institutions do not often have a hook as compelling as an eagerly awaited movie, great content is critical for media relations success--and coupling it with the right distribution channel can ensure the story finds the right audience. Even better, retooling it for several media platforms can extend the life and reach of a story. The changes…

  6. Media Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potter, W. James

    Written to appeal to a general audience that wants to think more deeply about the nature of the media, their messages, and their effects on both individuals and society, this book serves as a broad introduction to the thinking that ties educators together in the common goal of educating a media literate generation. It is written from a critical…

  7. Media Effects: Theory and Research.

    PubMed

    Valkenburg, Patti M; Peter, Jochen; Walther, Joseph B

    2016-01-01

    This review analyzes trends and commonalities among prominent theories of media effects. On the basis of exemplary meta-analyses of media effects and bibliometric studies of well-cited theories, we identify and discuss five features of media effects theories as well as their empirical support. Each of these features specifies the conditions under which media may produce effects on certain types of individuals. Our review ends with a discussion of media effects in newer media environments. This includes theories of computer-mediated communication, the development of which appears to share a similar pattern of reformulation from unidirectional, receiver-oriented views, to theories that recognize the transactional nature of communication. We conclude by outlining challenges and promising avenues for future research. PMID:26331344

  8. Convergent Validity of the PUTS.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Valerie Cathérine; Beck, Christian; Sajin, Valeria; Anders, Silke; Münchau, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Premonitory urges are a cardinal feature in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome. Severity of premonitory urges can be assessed with the "Premonitory Urge for Tic Disorders Scale" (PUTS). However, convergent validity of the measure has been difficult to assess due to the lack of other urge measures. We investigated the relationship between average real-time urge intensity assessed by an in-house developed real-time urge monitor (RUM), measuring urge intensity continuously for 5 min on a visual analog scale, and general urge intensity assessed by the PUTS in 22 adult Tourette patients (mean age 29.8 ± 10.3 SD, 19 males). Additionally, underlying factors of premonitory urges assessed by the PUTS were investigated in the adult sample using factor analysis and were replicated in 40 children and adolescents diagnosed with Tourette syndrome (mean age 12.05 ± 2.83 SD, 31 males). Cronbach's α for the PUTS 10 was acceptable (α = 0.79) in the adult sample. Convergent validity between average real-time urge intensity scores (as assessed with the RUM) and the 10-item version of the PUTS (r = 0.64) and the 9-item version of the PUTS (r = 0.66) was good. A factor analysis including the 10 items of the PUTS and average real-time urge intensity scores revealed three factors. One factor included the average real-time urge intensity score and appeared to measure urge intensity, whereas the other two factors can be assumed to reflect the (sensory) quality of urges and subjective control, respectively. The factor structure of the 10 PUTS items alone was replicated in a sample of children and adolescents. The results indicate that convergent validity between the PUTS and the real-time urge assessment monitor is good. Furthermore, the results suggest that the PUTS might assess more than one dimension of urges, and it may be worthwhile developing different subscales of the PUTS assessing premonitory urges in terms of intensity and quality, as well as subjectively

  9. Convergent Validity of the PUTS

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Valerie Cathérine; Beck, Christian; Sajin, Valeria; Anders, Silke; Münchau, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Premonitory urges are a cardinal feature in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome. Severity of premonitory urges can be assessed with the “Premonitory Urge for Tic Disorders Scale” (PUTS). However, convergent validity of the measure has been difficult to assess due to the lack of other urge measures. We investigated the relationship between average real-time urge intensity assessed by an in-house developed real-time urge monitor (RUM), measuring urge intensity continuously for 5 min on a visual analog scale, and general urge intensity assessed by the PUTS in 22 adult Tourette patients (mean age 29.8 ± 10.3 SD, 19 males). Additionally, underlying factors of premonitory urges assessed by the PUTS were investigated in the adult sample using factor analysis and were replicated in 40 children and adolescents diagnosed with Tourette syndrome (mean age 12.05 ± 2.83 SD, 31 males). Cronbach’s α for the PUTS 10 was acceptable (α = 0.79) in the adult sample. Convergent validity between average real-time urge intensity scores (as assessed with the RUM) and the 10-item version of the PUTS (r = 0.64) and the 9-item version of the PUTS (r = 0.66) was good. A factor analysis including the 10 items of the PUTS and average real-time urge intensity scores revealed three factors. One factor included the average real-time urge intensity score and appeared to measure urge intensity, whereas the other two factors can be assumed to reflect the (sensory) quality of urges and subjective control, respectively. The factor structure of the 10 PUTS items alone was replicated in a sample of children and adolescents. The results indicate that convergent validity between the PUTS and the real-time urge assessment monitor is good. Furthermore, the results suggest that the PUTS might assess more than one dimension of urges, and it may be worthwhile developing different subscales of the PUTS assessing premonitory urges in terms of intensity and quality, as well as

  10. Mosaic Convergence of Rodent Dentitions

    PubMed Central

    Lazzari, Vincent; Charles, Cyril; Tafforeau, Paul; Vianey-Liaud, Monique; Aguilar, Jean-Pierre; Jaeger, Jean-Jacques; Michaux, Jacques; Viriot, Laurent

    2008-01-01

    Background Understanding mechanisms responsible for changes in tooth morphology in the course of evolution is an area of investigation common to both paleontology and developmental biology. Detailed analyses of molar tooth crown shape have shown frequent homoplasia in mammalian evolution, which requires accurate investigation of the evolutionary pathways provided by the fossil record. The necessity of preservation of an effective occlusion has been hypothesized to functionally constrain crown morphological changes and to also facilitate convergent evolution. The Muroidea superfamily constitutes a relevant model for the study of molar crown diversification because it encompasses one third of the extant mammalian biodiversity. Methodology/Principal Findings Combined microwear and 3D-topographic analyses performed on fossil and extant muroid molars allow for a first quantification of the relationships between changes in crown morphology and functionality of occlusion. Based on an abundant fossil record and on a well resolved phylogeny, our results show that the most derived functional condition associates longitudinal chewing and non interlocking of cusps. This condition has been reached at least 7 times within muroids via two main types of evolutionary pathways each respecting functional continuity. In the first type, the flattening of tooth crown which induces the removal of cusp interlocking occurs before the rotation of the chewing movement. In the second type however, flattening is subsequent to rotation of the chewing movement which can be associated with certain changes in cusp morphology. Conclusion/Significance The reverse orders of the changes involved in these different pathways reveal a mosaic evolution of mammalian dentition in which direction of chewing and crown shape seem to be partly decoupled. Either can change in respect to strong functional constraints affecting occlusion which thereby limit the number of the possible pathways. Because convergent

  11. Media Publics and Media Trust.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaziano, Cecilie; McGrath, Kristin

    To gain a perspective on the kinds of people who find newspapers and television to be high or low in credibility, a two-phase study combined demographic and other characteristics, media behavior, and attitudes toward the media. The first phase involved a series of focused group discussions, while the second was a national, representative sampling…

  12. Media violence.

    PubMed

    Cantor, J

    2000-08-01

    Research on the effects of media violence is not well understood by the general public. Despite this fact, there is an overwhelming consensus in the scientific literature about the unhealthy effects of media violence. Meta-analyses show that media-violence viewing consistently is associated with higher levels of antisocial behavior, ranging from the trivial (imitative violence directed against toys) to the serious (criminal violence), with many consequential outcomes in between (acceptance of violence as a solution to problems, increased feelings of hostility, and the apparent delivery of painful stimulation to another person). Desensitization is another well-documented effect of viewing violence, which is observable in reduced arousal and emotional disturbance while witnessing violence, the reduced tendency to intervene in a fight, and less sympathy for the victims of violence. Although there is evidence that youth who are already violent are more likely to seek out violent entertainment, there is strong evidence that the relationship between violence viewing and antisocial behavior is bidirectional. There is growing evidence that media violence also engenders intense fear in children which often lasts days, months, and even years. The media's potential role in solutions to these problems is only beginning to be explored, in investigations examining the uses and effects of movie ratings, television ratings, and the V-chip, and the effects of media literacy programs and public education efforts. Future research should explore important individual differences in responses to media violence and effective ways to intervene in the negative effects. PMID:10904203

  13. Convergence of broad-scale migration strategies in terrestrial birds.

    PubMed

    La Sorte, Frank A; Fink, Daniel; Hochachka, Wesley M; Kelling, Steve

    2016-01-27

    Migration is a common strategy used by birds that breed in seasonal environments. Selection for greater migration efficiency is likely to be stronger for terrestrial species whose migration strategies require non-stop transoceanic crossings. If multiple species use the same transoceanic flyway, then we expect the migration strategies of these species to converge geographically towards the most optimal solution. We test this by examining population-level migration trajectories within the Western Hemisphere for 118 migratory species using occurrence information from eBird. Geographical convergence of migration strategies was evident within specific terrestrial regions where geomorphological features such as mountains or isthmuses constrained overland migration. Convergence was also evident for transoceanic migrants that crossed the Gulf of Mexico or Atlantic Ocean. Here, annual population-level movements were characterized by clockwise looped trajectories, which resulted in faster but more circuitous journeys in the spring and more direct journeys in the autumn. These findings suggest that the unique constraints and requirements associated with transoceanic migration have promoted the spatial convergence of migration strategies. The combination of seasonal atmospheric and environmental conditions that has facilitated the use of similar broad-scale migration strategies may be especially prone to disruption under climate and land-use change. PMID:26791618

  14. Convergent evolution of 'creepers' in the Hawaiian honeycreeper radiation.

    PubMed

    Reding, Dawn M; Foster, Jeffrey T; James, Helen F; Pratt, H Douglas; Fleischer, Robert C

    2009-04-23

    Natural selection plays a fundamental role in the ecological theory of adaptive radiation. A prediction of this theory is the convergent evolution of traits in lineages experiencing similar environments. The Hawaiian honeycreepers are a spectacular example of adaptive radiation and may demonstrate convergence, but uncertainty about phylogenetic relationships within the group has made it difficult to assess such evolutionary patterns. We examine the phylogenetic relationships of the Hawaii creeper (Oreomystis mana), a bird that in a suite of morphological, ecological and behavioural traits closely resembles the Kauai creeper (Oreomystis bairdi), but whose mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and osteology suggest a relationship with the amakihis (Hemignathus in part) and akepas (Loxops). We analysed nuclear DNA sequence data from 11 relevant honeycreeper taxa and one outgroup to test whether the character contradiction results from historical hybridization and mtDNA introgression, or convergent evolution. We found no evidence of past hybridization, a phenomenon that remains undocumented in Hawaiian honeycreepers, and confirmed mtDNA and osteological evidence that the Hawaii creeper is most closely related to the amakihis and akepas. Thus, the morphological, ecological and behavioural similarities between the evolutionarily distant Hawaii and Kauai creepers represent an extreme example of convergent evolution and demonstrate how natural selection can lead to repeatable evolutionary outcomes. PMID:19087923

  15. Convergence of large-deviation estimators.

    PubMed

    Rohwer, Christian M; Angeletti, Florian; Touchette, Hugo

    2015-11-01

    We study the convergence of statistical estimators used in the estimation of large-deviation functions describing the fluctuations of equilibrium, nonequilibrium, and manmade stochastic systems. We give conditions for the convergence of these estimators with sample size, based on the boundedness or unboundedness of the quantity sampled, and discuss how statistical errors should be defined in different parts of the convergence region. Our results shed light on previous reports of "phase transitions" in the statistics of free energy estimators and establish a general framework for reliably estimating large-deviation functions from simulation and experimental data and identifying parameter regions where this estimation converges. PMID:26651644

  16. Quantitative comparison between simulations of seismic wave propagation in heterogeneous poro-elastic media and equivalent visco-elastic solids for marine-type environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidler, Rolf; Rubino, J. Germán; Holliger, Klaus

    2013-04-01

    There is increasing evidence to suggest that the presence of mesoscopic heterogeneities constitutes an important seismic attenuation mechanism in porous rocks. As a consequence, centimetre-scale perturbations of the rock physical properties should be taken into account for seismic modelling whenever detailed and accurate responses of specific target structures are desired, which is, however, computationally prohibitive. A convenient way to circumvent this problem is to use an upscaling procedure to replace each of the heterogeneous porous media composing the geological model by corresponding equivalent visco-elastic solids and to solve the visco-elastic equations of motion for the inferred equivalent model. While the overall qualitative validity of this procedure is well established, there are as of yet no quantitative analyses regarding the equivalence of the seismograms resulting from the original poro-elastic and the corresponding upscaled visco-elastic models. To address this issue, we compare poro-elastic and visco-elastic solutions for a range of marine-type models of increasing complexity. We found that despite the identical dispersion and attenuation behaviour of the heterogeneous poro-elastic and the equivalent visco-elastic media, the seismograms may differ substantially due to diverging boundary conditions, where there exist additional options for the poro-elastic case. In particular, we observe that at the fluid/porous-solid interface, the poro- and visco-elastic seismograms agree for closed-pore boundary conditions, but differ significantly for open-pore boundary conditions. This is an important result which has potentially far-reaching implications for wave-equation-based algorithms in exploration geophysics involving fluid/porous-solid interfaces, such as, for example, wavefield decomposition.

  17. Comprehensive Proteomic and Metabolomic Signatures of Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae-Induced Acute Otitis Media Reveal Bacterial Aerobic Respiration in an Immunosuppressed Environment.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Alistair; Dubois, Laura G; St John-Williams, Lisa; Moseley, M Arthur; Hardison, Rachael L; Heimlich, Derek R; Stoddard, Alexander; Kerschner, Joseph E; Justice, Sheryl S; Thompson, J Will; Mason, Kevin M

    2016-03-01

    A thorough understanding of the molecular details of the interactions between bacteria and host are critical to ultimately prevent disease. Recent technological advances allow simultaneous analysis of host and bacterial protein and metabolic profiles from a single small tissue sample to provide insight into pathogenesis. We used the chinchilla model of human otitis media to determine, for the first time, the most expansive delineation of global changes in protein and metabolite profiles during an experimentally induced disease. After 48 h of infection with nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae, middle ear tissue lysates were analyzed by high-resolution quantitative two-dimensional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Dynamic changes in 105 chinchilla proteins and 66 metabolites define the early proteomic and metabolomic signature of otitis media. Our studies indicate that establishment of disease coincides with actin morphogenesis, suppression of inflammatory mediators, and bacterial aerobic respiration. We validated the observed increase in the actin-remodeling complex, Arp2/3, and experimentally showed a role for Arp2/3 in nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae invasion. Direct inhibition of actin branch morphology altered bacterial invasion into host epithelial cells, and is supportive of our efforts to use the information gathered to modify outcomes of disease. The twenty-eight nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae proteins identified participate in carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism, redox homeostasis, and include cell wall-associated metabolic proteins. Quantitative characterization of the molecular signatures of infection will redefine our understanding of host response driven developmental changes during pathogenesis. These data represent the first comprehensive study of host protein and metabolite profiles in vivo in response to infection and show the feasibility of extensive characterization of host protein profiles during disease. Identification of

  18. Media violence.

    PubMed

    Willis, E; Strasburger, V C

    1998-04-01

    American media are the most violent in the world, and American society is now paying a high price in terms of real life violence. Research has confirmed that mass media violence contributes to aggressive behavior, fear, and desensitization of violence. Television, movies, music videos, computer/video games are pervasive media and represent important influences on children and adolescents. Portraying rewards and punishments and showing the consequences of violence are probably the two most essential contextual factors for viewers as they interpret the meaning of what they are viewing on television. Public health efforts have emphasized public education, media literacy campaign for children and parents, and an increased use of technology to prevent access to certain harmful medial materials. PMID:9568012

  19. Bat echolocation calls: adaptation and convergent evolution

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Gareth; Holderied, Marc W

    2007-01-01

    Bat echolocation calls provide remarkable examples of ‘good design’ through evolution by natural selection. Theory developed from acoustics and sonar engineering permits a strong predictive basis for understanding echolocation performance. Call features, such as frequency, bandwidth, duration and pulse interval are all related to ecological niche. Recent technological breakthroughs have aided our understanding of adaptive aspects of call design in free-living bats. Stereo videogrammetry, laser scanning of habitat features and acoustic flight path tracking permit reconstruction of the flight paths of echolocating bats relative to obstacles and prey in nature. These methods show that echolocation calls are among the most intense airborne vocalizations produced by animals. Acoustic tracking has clarified how and why bats vary call structure in relation to flight speed. Bats using broadband echolocation calls adjust call design in a range-dependent manner so that nearby obstacles are localized accurately. Recent phylogenetic analyses based on gene sequences show that particular types of echolocation signals have evolved independently in several lineages of bats. Call design is often influenced more by perceptual challenges imposed by the environment than by phylogeny, and provides excellent examples of convergent evolution. Now that whole genome sequences of bats are imminent, understanding the functional genomics of echolocation will become a major challenge. PMID:17251105

  20. Bat echolocation calls: adaptation and convergent evolution.

    PubMed

    Jones, Gareth; Holderied, Marc W

    2007-04-01

    Bat echolocation calls provide remarkable examples of 'good design' through evolution by natural selection. Theory developed from acoustics and sonar engineering permits a strong predictive basis for understanding echolocation performance. Call features, such as frequency, bandwidth, duration and pulse interval are all related to ecological niche. Recent technological breakthroughs have aided our understanding of adaptive aspects of call design in free-living bats. Stereo videogrammetry, laser scanning of habitat features and acoustic flight path tracking permit reconstruction of the flight paths of echolocating bats relative to obstacles and prey in nature. These methods show that echolocation calls are among the most intense airborne vocalizations produced by animals. Acoustic tracking has clarified how and why bats vary call structure in relation to flight speed. Bats using broadband echolocation calls adjust call design in a range-dependent manner so that nearby obstacles are localized accurately. Recent phylogenetic analyses based on gene sequences show that particular types of echolocation signals have evolved independently in several lineages of bats. Call design is often influenced more by perceptual challenges imposed by the environment than by phylogeny, and provides excellent examples of convergent evolution. Now that whole genome sequences of bats are imminent, understanding the functional genomics of echolocation will become a major challenge. PMID:17251105

  1. Information and Communication: The New Convergence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beniger, James R.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the isolation of the field of communications from other disciplines and the inattention of communications to the increasing convergence on information and communication in other disciplines. Maps the convergence by surveying the authors commonly cited in the fields of cognitive science, humanities, and semiotics. (MS)

  2. New concurrent iterative methods with monotonic convergence

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Qingchuan

    1996-12-31

    This paper proposes the new concurrent iterative methods without using any derivatives for finding all zeros of polynomials simultaneously. The new methods are of monotonic convergence for both simple and multiple real-zeros of polynomials and are quadratically convergent. The corresponding accelerated concurrent iterative methods are obtained too. The new methods are good candidates for the application in solving symmetric eigenproblems.

  3. Converging finite-strength shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axford, R. A.; Holm, D. D.

    1981-01-01

    The converging shock problem was first solved by Guderley and later by Landau and Stanyukovich for infinitely strong shocks in an ideal gas with spherical and cylindrical symmetry. This problem is solved herein for finite-strength shocks and a non-ideal-gas equation of state with an adiabatic bulk modulus of the type Bs= {- v∂ p}/{∂ v| s} = ( p +B) f( v) , where B is a constant with the dimensions of pressure, and f(v) is an arbitrary function of the specific volume. Self-similar profiles of the particle velocity and thermodynamic variables are studied explicitly for two cases with constant specific heat at constant volume; the Tait-Kirkwood-Murnaghan equation, f(v) = constant, and the Walsh equation, f(v) = v/A, where A = constant. The first case reduces to the ideal gas when B = 0. In both cases the flow behind the shock front exhibits an unbalanced buoyant force instability at a critical Mach number which depends upon equation-of-state parameters.

  4. Measuring phonetic convergence in speech production

    PubMed Central

    Pardo, Jennifer S.

    2013-01-01

    Phonetic convergence is defined as an increase in the similarity of acoustic-phonetic form between talkers. Previous research has demonstrated phonetic convergence both when a talker listens passively to speech and while talkers engage in social interaction. Much of this research has focused on a diverse array of acoustic-phonetic attributes, with fewer studies incorporating perceptual measures of phonetic convergence. The current paper reviews research on phonetic convergence in both non-interactive and conversational settings, and attempts to consolidate the diverse array of findings by proposing a paradigm that models perceptual and acoustic measures together. By modeling acoustic measures as predictors of perceived phonetic convergence, this paradigm has the potential to reconcile some of the diverse and inconsistent findings currently reported in the literature. PMID:23986738

  5. Formation of polarity convergences underlying shoot outgrowths.

    PubMed

    Abley, Katie; Sauret-Güeto, Susanna; Marée, Athanasius Fm; Coen, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    The development of outgrowths from plant shoots depends on formation of epidermal sites of cell polarity convergence with high intracellular auxin at their centre. A parsimonious model for generation of convergence sites is that cell polarity for the auxin transporter PIN1 orients up auxin gradients, as this spontaneously generates convergent alignments. Here we test predictions of this and other models for the patterns of auxin biosynthesis and import. Live imaging of outgrowths from kanadi1 kanadi2 Arabidopsis mutant leaves shows that they arise by formation of PIN1 convergence sites within a proximodistal polarity field. PIN1 polarities are oriented away from regions of high auxin biosynthesis enzyme expression, and towards regions of high auxin importer expression. Both expression patterns are required for normal outgrowth emergence, and may form part of a common module underlying shoot outgrowths. These findings are more consistent with models that spontaneously generate tandem rather than convergent alignments. PMID:27478985

  6. Media Education and the End of the Critical Consumer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckingham, David

    2003-01-01

    Postmodern media culture widens the gap between school and children's external environments; it challenges the critical objective of media education. Students' efforts at media production manifest a more playful concept of knowledge and learning, requiring a more comprehensive postmodern approach to media education. (Contains 47 references.) (SK)

  7. A Collaborative Media Production Project on Human Rights: Bridging Everyday and Media Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haydari, Nazan; Kara, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Given the importance of media institutions and universities as spaces of knowledge productions, development of "critical media pedagogy" becomes crucial for the establishment of a responsible and ethical media environment. Drawing from the collaborative project of The First Step into Human Rights: I do not do it!--A Short Film Project on…

  8. Media Training

    SciTech Connect

    2009-12-11

    With the LHC starting up soon, the world's media are again turning their attention to CERN. We're all likely to be called upon to explain what is happening at CERN to media, friends and neighbours. The seminar will be given by BBC television news journalists Liz Pike and Nadia Marchant, and will deal with the kind of questions we're likely to be confronted with through the restart period. The training is open for everybody. Make sure you arrive early enough to get a seat - there are only 200 seats in the Globe. The session will also be webcast: http://webcast.cern.ch/

  9. Media Training

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-10-06

    With the LHC starting up soon, the world's media are again turning their attention to CERN. We're all likely to be called upon to explain what is happening at CERN to media, friends and neighbours. The seminar will be given by BBC television news journalists Liz Pike and Nadia Marchant, and will deal with the kind of questions we're likely to be confronted with through the restart period. The training is open for everybody. Make sure you arrive early enough to get a seat - there are only 200 seats in the Globe. The session will also be webcast: http://webcast.cern.ch/

  10. On the Local Convergence of Pattern Search

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolan, Elizabeth D.; Lewis, Robert Michael; Torczon, Virginia; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We examine the local convergence properties of pattern search methods, complementing the previously established global convergence properties for this class of algorithms. We show that the step-length control parameter which appears in the definition of pattern search algorithms provides a reliable asymptotic measure of first-order stationarity. This gives an analytical justification for a traditional stopping criterion for pattern search methods. Using this measure of first-order stationarity, we analyze the behavior of pattern search in the neighborhood of an isolated local minimizer. We show that a recognizable subsequence converges r-linearly to the minimizer.

  11. Streaming Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pulley, John

    2009-01-01

    At a time when the evolutionary pace of new media resembles the real-time mutation of certain microorganisms, the age-old question of how best to connect with constituents can seem impossibly complex--even for an elite institution plugged into the motherboard of Silicon Valley. Identifying the most effective vehicle for reaching a particular…

  12. Media Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Kenneth J.; Pyrillis, Rita; Rosario, Ruben; Stuart, Reginald; Zinngrabe, Elaine

    2007-01-01

    This article presents five vignettes, written by veteran journalists, that focus on the current and future state of journalism. Despite almost daily reports of media consolidation and newspaper layoffs, the journalists sound a cautionary but optimistic tone about the industry. They weigh in on everything from the threats to diversity to the future…

  13. Acceleration of convergence of vector sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidi, A.; Ford, W. F.; Smith, D. A.

    1986-01-01

    A general approach to the construction of convergence acceleration methods for vector sequence is proposed. Using this approach, one can generate some known methods, such as the minimal polynomial extrapolation, the reduced rank extrapolation, and the topological epsilon algorithm, and also some new ones. Some of the new methods are easier to implement than the known methods and are observed to have similar numerical properties. The convergence analysis of these new methods is carried out, and it is shown that they are especially suitable for accelerating the convergence of vector sequences that are obtained when one solves linear systems of equations iterative. A stability analysis is also given, and numerical examples are provided. The convergence and stability properties of the topological epsilon algorithm are likewise given.

  14. Acceleration of convergence of vector sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidi, A.; Ford, W. F.; Smith, D. A.

    1983-01-01

    A general approach to the construction of convergence acceleration methods for vector sequence is proposed. Using this approach, one can generate some known methods, such as the minimal polynomial extrapolation, the reduced rank extrapolation, and the topological epsilon algorithm, and also some new ones. Some of the new methods are easier to implement than the known methods and are observed to have similar numerical properties. The convergence analysis of these new methods is carried out, and it is shown that they are especially suitable for accelerating the convergence of vector sequences that are obtained when one solves linear systems of equations iteratively. A stability analysis is also given, and numerical examples are provided. The convergence and stability properties of the topological epsilon algorithm are likewise given.

  15. Morphological and molecular convergences in mammalian phylogenetics.

    PubMed

    Zou, Zhengting; Zhang, Jianzhi

    2016-01-01

    Phylogenetic trees reconstructed from molecular sequences are often considered more reliable than those reconstructed from morphological characters, in part because convergent evolution, which confounds phylogenetic reconstruction, is believed to be rarer for molecular sequences than for morphologies. However, neither the validity of this belief nor its underlying cause is known. Here comparing thousands of characters of each type that have been used for inferring the phylogeny of mammals, we find that on average morphological characters indeed experience much more convergences than amino acid sites, but this disparity is explained by fewer states per character rather than an intrinsically higher susceptibility to convergence for morphologies than sequences. We show by computer simulation and actual data analysis that a simple method for identifying and removing convergence-prone characters improves phylogenetic accuracy, potentially enabling, when necessary, the inclusion of morphologies and hence fossils for reliable tree inference. PMID:27585543

  16. Low-Convergence Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slutz, Stephen; Vesey, Roger; Sinars, Daniel; Sefkow, Adam

    2013-10-01

    Numerical simulations indicate that pulsed-power driven liner-implosions could produce substantial fusion yields if the deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel is first magnetized and preheated [S.A. Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)]. As with all inertial fusion, the implosions could be degraded by the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Since highly convergent implosions are more susceptible to this instability, we have explored the necessary conditions to obtain significant fusion yield with low-convergence liner-implosions. Such low-convergence implosions can be obtained if the fuel is sufficiently preheated and magnetized. We present analytic and numerical studies of laser plasma heating, which indicate that low convergence implosions should be possible with sufficient laser energy. Sandia National Laboratories is a multiprogram laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contra.

  17. Speeding Convergence In Simulations Of Hypersonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flores, J.; Cheung, S.; Cheer, A.; Hafez, M.

    1991-01-01

    Report describes study aimed at accelerating rates of convergence of iterative schemes for numerical integration of equations of hypersonic flow of viscous and inviscid fluids. Richardson-type overrelaxation method applied.

  18. On Convergent Probability of a Random Walk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Y.-F.; Ching, W.-K.

    2006-01-01

    This note introduces an interesting random walk on a straight path with cards of random numbers. The method of recurrent relations is used to obtain the convergent probability of the random walk with different initial positions.

  19. New convergence estimates for multigrid algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Bramble, J.H.; Pasciak, J.E.

    1987-10-01

    In this paper, new convergence estimates are proved for both symmetric and nonsymmetric multigrid algorithms applied to symmetric positive definite problems. Our theory relates the convergence of multigrid algorithms to a ''regularity and approximation'' parameter ..cap alpha.. epsilon (0, 1) and the number of relaxations m. We show that for the symmetric and nonsymmetric ..nu.. cycles, the multigrid iteration converges for any positive m at a rate which deteriorates no worse than 1-cj/sup -(1-//sup ..cap alpha..//sup )///sup ..cap alpha../, where j is the number of grid levels. We then define a generalized ..nu.. cycle algorithm which involves exponentially increasing (for example, doubling) the number of smoothings on successively coarser grids. We show that the resulting symmetric and nonsymmetric multigrid iterations converge for any ..cap alpha.. with rates that are independent of the mesh size. The theory is presented in an abstract setting which can be applied to finite element multigrid and finite difference multigrid methods.

  20. Borrowed alleles and convergence in serpentine adaptation.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Brian J; Lahner, Brett; DaCosta, Jeffrey M; Weisman, Caroline M; Hollister, Jesse D; Salt, David E; Bomblies, Kirsten; Yant, Levi

    2016-07-19

    Serpentine barrens represent extreme hazards for plant colonists. These sites are characterized by high porosity leading to drought, lack of essential mineral nutrients, and phytotoxic levels of metals. Nevertheless, nature forged populations adapted to these challenges. Here, we use a population-based evolutionary genomic approach coupled with elemental profiling to assess how autotetraploid Arabidopsis arenosa adapted to a multichallenge serpentine habitat in the Austrian Alps. We first demonstrate that serpentine-adapted plants exhibit dramatically altered elemental accumulation levels in common conditions, and then resequence 24 autotetraploid individuals from three populations to perform a genome scan. We find evidence for highly localized selective sweeps that point to a polygenic, multitrait basis for serpentine adaptation. Comparing our results to a previous study of independent serpentine colonizations in the closely related diploid Arabidopsis lyrata in the United Kingdom and United States, we find the highest levels of differentiation in 11 of the same loci, providing candidate alleles for mediating convergent evolution. This overlap between independent colonizations in different species suggests that a limited number of evolutionary strategies are suited to overcome the multiple challenges of serpentine adaptation. Interestingly, we detect footprints of selection in A. arenosa in the context of substantial gene flow from nearby off-serpentine populations of A. arenosa, as well as from A. lyrata In several cases, quantitative tests of introgression indicate that some alleles exhibiting strong selective sweep signatures appear to have been introgressed from A. lyrata This finding suggests that migrant alleles may have facilitated adaptation of A. arenosa to this multihazard environment. PMID:27357660

  1. Borrowed alleles and convergence in serpentine adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Brian J.; Lahner, Brett; DaCosta, Jeffrey M.; Weisman, Caroline M.; Hollister, Jesse D.; Salt, David E.; Bomblies, Kirsten; Yant, Levi

    2016-01-01

    Serpentine barrens represent extreme hazards for plant colonists. These sites are characterized by high porosity leading to drought, lack of essential mineral nutrients, and phytotoxic levels of metals. Nevertheless, nature forged populations adapted to these challenges. Here, we use a population-based evolutionary genomic approach coupled with elemental profiling to assess how autotetraploid Arabidopsis arenosa adapted to a multichallenge serpentine habitat in the Austrian Alps. We first demonstrate that serpentine-adapted plants exhibit dramatically altered elemental accumulation levels in common conditions, and then resequence 24 autotetraploid individuals from three populations to perform a genome scan. We find evidence for highly localized selective sweeps that point to a polygenic, multitrait basis for serpentine adaptation. Comparing our results to a previous study of independent serpentine colonizations in the closely related diploid Arabidopsis lyrata in the United Kingdom and United States, we find the highest levels of differentiation in 11 of the same loci, providing candidate alleles for mediating convergent evolution. This overlap between independent colonizations in different species suggests that a limited number of evolutionary strategies are suited to overcome the multiple challenges of serpentine adaptation. Interestingly, we detect footprints of selection in A. arenosa in the context of substantial gene flow from nearby off-serpentine populations of A. arenosa, as well as from A. lyrata. In several cases, quantitative tests of introgression indicate that some alleles exhibiting strong selective sweep signatures appear to have been introgressed from A. lyrata. This finding suggests that migrant alleles may have facilitated adaptation of A. arenosa to this multihazard environment. PMID:27357660

  2. Convergent Evolution of Health Information Management and Health Informatics

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, C. J.; Abrams, K.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Clearly defined boundaries are disappearing among the activities, sources, and uses of health care data and information managed by health information management (HIM) and health informatics (HI) professionals. Definitions of the professional domains and scopes of practice for HIM and HI are converging with the proliferation of information and communication technologies in health care settings. Convergence is changing both the roles that HIM and HI professionals serve in their organizations as well as the competencies necessary for training future professionals. Many of these changes suggest a blurring of roles and responsibilities with increasingly overlapping curricula, job descriptions, and research agendas. Blurred lines in a highly competitive market create confusion for students and employers. In this essay, we provide some perspective on the changing landscape and suggest a course for the future. First we review the evolving definitions of HIM and HI. We next compare the current domains and competencies, review the characteristics as well as the education and credentialing of both disciplines, and examine areas of convergence. Given the current state, we suggest a path forward to strengthen the contributions HIM and HI professionals and educators make to the evolving health care environment. PMID:25848421

  3. International Convergence on Geoscience Cyberinfrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, M. L.; Atkinson, R.; Arctur, D. K.; Cox, S.; Jackson, I.; Nativi, S.; Wyborn, L. A.

    2012-04-01

    There is growing international consensus on addressing the challenges to cyber(e)-infrastructure for the geosciences. These challenges include: Creating common standards and protocols; Engaging the vast number of distributed data resources; Establishing practices for recognition of and respect for intellectual property; Developing simple data and resource discovery and access systems; Building mechanisms to encourage development of web service tools and workflows for data analysis; Brokering the diverse disciplinary service buses; Creating sustainable business models for maintenance and evolution of information resources; Integrating the data management life-cycle into the practice of science. Efforts around the world are converging towards de facto creation of an integrated global digital data network for the geosciences based on common standards and protocols for data discovery and access, and a shared vision of distributed, web-based, open source interoperable data access and integration. Commonalities include use of Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) and ISO specifications and standardized data interchange mechanisms. For multidisciplinarity, mediation, adaptation, and profiling services have been successfully introduced to leverage the geosciences standards which are commonly used by the different geoscience communities -introducing a brokering approach which extends the basic SOA archetype. Principal challenges are less technical than cultural, social, and organizational. Before we can make data interoperable, we must make people interoperable. These challenges are being met by increased coordination of development activities (technical, organizational, social) among leaders and practitioners in national and international efforts across the geosciences to foster commonalities across disparate networks. In doing so, we will 1) leverage and share resources, and developments, 2) facilitate and enhance emerging technical and structural advances, 3) promote

  4. Efficient Controls for Finitely Convergent Sequential Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Herman, Gabor T.

    2010-01-01

    Finding a feasible point that satisfies a set of constraints is a common task in scientific computing: examples are the linear feasibility problem and the convex feasibility problem. Finitely convergent sequential algorithms can be used for solving such problems; an example of such an algorithm is ART3, which is defined in such a way that its control is cyclic in the sense that during its execution it repeatedly cycles through the given constraints. Previously we found a variant of ART3 whose control is no longer cyclic, but which is still finitely convergent and in practice it usually converges faster than ART3 does. In this paper we propose a general methodology for automatic transformation of finitely convergent sequential algorithms in such a way that (i) finite convergence is retained and (ii) the speed of convergence is improved. The first of these two properties is proven by mathematical theorems, the second is illustrated by applying the algorithms to a practical problem. PMID:20953327

  5. Fixing convergence of Gaussian belief propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Jason K; Bickson, Danny; Dolev, Danny

    2009-01-01

    Gaussian belief propagation (GaBP) is an iterative message-passing algorithm for inference in Gaussian graphical models. It is known that when GaBP converges it converges to the correct MAP estimate of the Gaussian random vector and simple sufficient conditions for its convergence have been established. In this paper we develop a double-loop algorithm for forcing convergence of GaBP. Our method computes the correct MAP estimate even in cases where standard GaBP would not have converged. We further extend this construction to compute least-squares solutions of over-constrained linear systems. We believe that our construction has numerous applications, since the GaBP algorithm is linked to solution of linear systems of equations, which is a fundamental problem in computer science and engineering. As a case study, we discuss the linear detection problem. We show that using our new construction, we are able to force convergence of Montanari's linear detection algorithm, in cases where it would originally fail. As a consequence, we are able to increase significantly the number of users that can transmit concurrently.

  6. Otitis media with effusion

    MedlinePlus

    OME; Secretory otitis media; Serous otitis media; Silent otitis media; Silent ear infection; Glue ear ... drains from the tube and is swallowed. Otitis media with effusion (OME) and ear infections are connected ...

  7. On Media Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fedorov, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    This monograph analyzes the theory and practice of media education and media literacy. The book also includes the list of Russian media education literature and addresses of websites of the associations for media education.

  8. Approaches to Media Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macciocca, Julie

    1996-01-01

    Describes how media/technology specialists organize and monitor instructional resources in schools. Topics include technology coordinators, decentralization of resources, media specialists in each school, and media retrieval systems to schedule the use of media and technology in classrooms. (LRW)

  9. ADSORPTIVE MEDIA TECHNOLOGIES: MEDIA SELECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation provides information on six items to be considered when selecting an adsorptive media for removing arsenic from drinking water; performance, EBCT, pre-treatment, regeneration, residuals, and cost. Each item is discussed in general and data and photographs from th...

  10. Convergent evolution of marine mammals is associated with distinct substitutions in common genes

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xuming; Seim, Inge; Gladyshev, Vadim N.

    2015-01-01

    Phenotypic convergence is thought to be driven by parallel substitutions coupled with natural selection at the sequence level. Multiple independent evolutionary transitions of mammals to an aquatic environment offer an opportunity to test this thesis. Here, whole genome alignment of coding sequences identified widespread parallel amino acid substitutions in marine mammals; however, the majority of these changes were not unique to these animals. Conversely, we report that candidate aquatic adaptation genes, identified by signatures of likelihood convergence and/or elevated ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous nucleotide substitution rate, are characterized by very few parallel substitutions and exhibit distinct sequence changes in each group. Moreover, no significant positive correlation was found between likelihood convergence and positive selection in all three marine lineages. These results suggest that convergence in protein coding genes associated with aquatic lifestyle is mainly characterized by independent substitutions and relaxed negative selection. PMID:26549748

  11. Otitis Media

    PubMed Central

    Bain, John

    1992-01-01

    Otitis media remains one of the least understood conditions seen by a family physician. More attention to follow up instead of widespread use of antibiotics and decongestant mixtures could improve family practice care of children with middle ear disorders. Greater selection in resorting to surgical management would be helpful. Unnecessary interference is unlikely to be of long-term benefit to either children or their families. ImagesFigures 1-3Figures 4-5 PMID:21221314

  12. Otitis media.

    PubMed

    Schilder, Anne G M; Chonmaitree, Tasnee; Cripps, Allan W; Rosenfeld, Richard M; Casselbrant, Margaretha L; Haggard, Mark P; Venekamp, Roderick P

    2016-01-01

    Otitis media (OM) or middle ear inflammation is a spectrum of diseases, including acute otitis media (AOM), otitis media with effusion (OME; 'glue ear') and chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM). OM is among the most common diseases in young children worldwide. Although OM may resolve spontaneously without complications, it can be associated with hearing loss and life-long sequelae. In developing countries, CSOM is a leading cause of hearing loss. OM can be of bacterial or viral origin; during 'colds', viruses can ascend through the Eustachian tube to the middle ear and pave the way for bacterial otopathogens that reside in the nasopharynx. Diagnosis depends on typical signs and symptoms, such as acute ear pain and bulging of the tympanic membrane (eardrum) for AOM and hearing loss for OME; diagnostic modalities include (pneumatic) otoscopy, tympanometry and audiometry. Symptomatic management of ear pain and fever is the mainstay of AOM treatment, reserving antibiotics for children with severe, persistent or recurrent infections. Management of OME largely consists of watchful waiting, with ventilation (tympanostomy) tubes primarily for children with chronic effusions and hearing loss, developmental delays or learning difficulties. The role of hearing aids to alleviate symptoms of hearing loss in the management of OME needs further study. Insertion of ventilation tubes and adenoidectomy are common operations for recurrent AOM to prevent recurrences, but their effectiveness is still debated. Despite reports of a decline in the incidence of OM over the past decade, attributed to the implementation of clinical guidelines that promote accurate diagnosis and judicious use of antibiotics and to pneumococcal conjugate vaccination, OM continues to be a leading cause for medical consultation, antibiotic prescription and surgery in high-income countries. PMID:27604644

  13. Media Education Initiatives by Media Organizations: The Uses of Media Literacy in Hong Kong Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, Donna; Lee, Alice Y. L.

    2014-01-01

    As more media organizations have engaged in media education, this paper investigates the goals and practices of these activities. This article coins media education initiatives by media organizations with the term "media-organization media literac"y (MOML). Four MOML projects in Hong Kong were selected for examination. Built on critical…

  14. Convergence of gut microbiomes in myrmecophagous mammals.

    PubMed

    Delsuc, Frédéric; Metcalf, Jessica L; Wegener Parfrey, Laura; Song, Se Jin; González, Antonio; Knight, Rob

    2014-03-01

    Mammals have diversified into many dietary niches. Specialized myrmecophagous (ant- and termite-eating) placental mammals represent a textbook example of evolutionary convergence driven by extreme diet specialization. Armadillos, anteaters, aardvarks, pangolins and aardwolves thus provide a model system for understanding the potential role of gut microbiota in the convergent adaptation to myrmecophagy. Here, we expand upon previous mammalian gut microbiome studies by using high-throughput barcoded Illumina sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene to characterize the composition of gut microbiota in 15 species representing all placental myrmecophagous lineages and their close relatives from zoo- and field-collected samples. We confirm that both diet and phylogeny drive the evolution of mammalian gut microbiota, with cases of convergence in global composition, but also examples of phylogenetic inertia. Our results reveal specialized placental myrmecophages as a spectacular case of large-scale convergence in gut microbiome composition. Indeed, neighbour-net networks and beta-diversity plots based on UniFrac distances show significant clustering of myrmecophagous species (anteaters, aardvarks and aardwolves), even though they belong to phylogenetically distant lineages representing different orders. The aardwolf, which diverged from carnivorous hyenas only in the last 10 million years, experienced a convergent shift in the composition of its gut microbiome to become more similar to other myrmecophages. These results confirm diet adaptation to be a major driving factor of convergence in gut microbiome composition over evolutionary timescales. This study sets the scene for future metagenomic studies aiming at evaluating potential convergence in functional gene content in the microbiomes of specialized mammalian myrmecophages. PMID:24118574

  15. Beethoven: architecture for media telephony

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keskinarkaus, Anja; Ohtonen, Timo; Sauvola, Jaakko J.

    1999-11-01

    This paper presents a new architecture and techniques for media-based telephony over wireless/wireline IP networks, called `Beethoven'. The platform supports complex media transport and mobile conferencing for multi-user environments having a non-uniform access. New techniques are presented to provide advanced multimedia call management over different media types and their presentation. The routing and distribution of the media is rendered over the standards based protocol. Our approach offers a generic, distributed and object-oriented solution having interfaces, where signal processing and unified messaging algorithms are embedded as instances of core classes. The platform services are divided into `basic communication', `conferencing' and `media session'. The basic communication form platform core services and supports access from scalable user interface to network end-points. Conferencing services take care of media filter adaptation, conversion, error resiliency, multi-party connection and event signaling, while the media session services offer resources for application-level communication between the terminals. The platform allows flexible attachment of any number of plug-in modules, and thus we use it as a test bench for multiparty/multi-point conferencing and as an evaluation bench for signal coding algorithms. In tests, our architecture showed the ability to easily be scaled from simple voice terminal to complex multi-user conference sharing virtual data.

  16. Numerical Convergence In Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Qirong; Hernquist, Lars; Li, Yuexing

    2015-02-01

    We study the convergence properties of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) using numerical tests and simple analytic considerations. Our analysis shows that formal numerical convergence is possible in SPH only in the joint limit N → ∞, h → 0, and Nnb → ∞, where N is the total number of particles, h is the smoothing length, and Nnb is the number of neighbor particles within the smoothing volume used to compute smoothed estimates. Previous work has generally assumed that the conditions N → ∞ and h → 0 are sufficient to achieve convergence, while holding Nnb fixed. We demonstrate that if Nnb is held fixed as the resolution is increased, there will be a residual source of error that does not vanish as N → ∞ and h → 0. Formal numerical convergence in SPH is possible only if Nnb is increased systematically as the resolution is improved. Using analytic arguments, we derive an optimal compromise scaling for Nnb by requiring that this source of error balance that present in the smoothing procedure. For typical choices of the smoothing kernel, we find Nnb vpropN 0.5. This means that if SPH is to be used as a numerically convergent method, the required computational cost does not scale with particle number as O(N), but rather as O(N 1 + δ), where δ ≈ 0.5, with a weak dependence on the form of the smoothing kernel.

  17. Grid Convergence for Turbulent Flows(Invited)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diskin, Boris; Thomas, James L.; Rumsey, Christopher L.; Schwoppe, Axel

    2015-01-01

    A detailed grid convergence study has been conducted to establish accurate reference solutions corresponding to the one-equation linear eddy-viscosity Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model for two dimensional turbulent flows around the NACA 0012 airfoil and a flat plate. The study involved three widely used codes, CFL3D (NASA), FUN3D (NASA), and TAU (DLR), and families of uniformly refined structured grids that differ in the grid density patterns. Solutions computed by different codes on different grid families appear to converge to the same continuous limit, but exhibit different convergence characteristics. The grid resolution in the vicinity of geometric singularities, such as a sharp trailing edge, is found to be the major factor affecting accuracy and convergence of discrete solutions, more prominent than differences in discretization schemes and/or grid elements. The results reported for these relatively simple turbulent flows demonstrate that CFL3D, FUN3D, and TAU solutions are very accurate on the finest grids used in the study, but even those grids are not sufficient to conclusively establish an asymptotic convergence order.

  18. Strong convergence for reduced free products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisier, Gilles

    2016-06-01

    Using an inequality due to Ricard and Xu, we give a different proof of Paul Skoufranis’s recent result showing that the strong convergence of possibly non-commutative random variables X(k) → X is stable under reduced free product with a fixed non-commutative random variable Y. In fact we obtain a more general fact: assuming that the families X(k) = {X i(k)} and Y(k) = {Y j(k)} are ∗-free as well as their limits (in moments) X = {Xi} and Y = {Yj}, the strong convergences X(k) → X and Y(k) → Y imply that of {X(k),Y(k)} to {X,Y }. Phrased in more striking language: the reduced free product is “continuous” with respect to strong convergence. The analogue for weak convergence (i.e. convergence of all moments) is obvious. Our approach extends to the amalgamated free product, left open by Skoufranis.

  19. Formation of polarity convergences underlying shoot outgrowths

    PubMed Central

    Abley, Katie; Sauret-Güeto, Susanna; Marée, Athanasius FM; Coen, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    The development of outgrowths from plant shoots depends on formation of epidermal sites of cell polarity convergence with high intracellular auxin at their centre. A parsimonious model for generation of convergence sites is that cell polarity for the auxin transporter PIN1 orients up auxin gradients, as this spontaneously generates convergent alignments. Here we test predictions of this and other models for the patterns of auxin biosynthesis and import. Live imaging of outgrowths from kanadi1 kanadi2 Arabidopsis mutant leaves shows that they arise by formation of PIN1 convergence sites within a proximodistal polarity field. PIN1 polarities are oriented away from regions of high auxin biosynthesis enzyme expression, and towards regions of high auxin importer expression. Both expression patterns are required for normal outgrowth emergence, and may form part of a common module underlying shoot outgrowths. These findings are more consistent with models that spontaneously generate tandem rather than convergent alignments. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18165.001 PMID:27478985

  20. Screen Media and Young Children: Who Benefits?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardany, Audrey Berger

    2010-01-01

    Since the airing of "Sesame Street" in 1985, television produced for children has expanded to more television shows and educational media that includes videos, DVDs, and computer products. Viewing screen media is pervasive in the environments of young children, and companies are designing products for our youngest viewers--infants and toddlers.…

  1. Incorporating Social Media in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMeans, April

    2015-01-01

    Incorporating social media into the classroom will provide a positive, upbeat learning environment that students are engaged in on a regular basis. In doing this, educators will be ensuring discussion, collaboration, critical thinking, and creativity amongst their students. Social media is a knowledgeable topic for our students, and it is an…

  2. Toward Global Content Analysis and Media Criticism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordenstreng, Kaarle

    1995-01-01

    Presents the background, rationale, and implementation prospects for an international system of monitoring media coverage of global problems such as peace and war, human rights, and the environment. Outlines the monitoring project carried out in January 1995 concerning the representation and portrayal of women in news media. (SR)

  3. Colloid transport in dual-permeability media

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It has been widely reported that colloids can travel faster and over longer distances in natural structured porous media than in uniform structureless media used in laboratory studies. The presence of preferential pathways for colloids in the subsurface environment is of concern because of the incre...

  4. Multicloud: Multigrid convergence with a meshless operator

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, Aaron Jameson, Antony

    2009-08-01

    The primary objective of this work is to develop and test a new convergence acceleration technique we call multicloud. Multicloud is well-founded in the mathematical basis of multigrid, but relies on a meshless operator on coarse levels. The meshless operator enables extremely simple and automatic coarsening procedures for arbitrary meshes using arbitrary fine level discretization schemes. The performance of multicloud is compared with established multigrid techniques for structured and unstructured meshes for the Euler equations on two-dimensional test cases. Results indicate comparable convergence rates per unit work for multicloud and multigrid. However, because of its mesh and scheme transparency, multicloud may be applied to a wide array of problems with no modification of fine level schemes as is often required with agglomeration techniques. The implication is that multicloud can be implemented in a completely modular fashion, allowing researchers to develop fine level algorithms independent of the convergence accelerator for complex three-dimensional problems.

  5. Convergence studies in meshfree peridynamic simulations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Seleson, Pablo; Littlewood, David J.

    2016-04-15

    Meshfree methods are commonly applied to discretize peridynamic models, particularly in numerical simulations of engineering problems. Such methods discretize peridynamic bodies using a set of nodes with characteristic volume, leading to particle-based descriptions of systems. In this article, we perform convergence studies of static peridynamic problems. We show that commonly used meshfree methods in peridynamics suffer from accuracy and convergence issues, due to a rough approximation of the contribution to the internal force density of nodes near the boundary of the neighborhood of a given node. We propose two methods to improve meshfree peridynamic simulations. The first method uses accuratemore » computations of volumes of intersections between neighbor cells and the neighborhood of a given node, referred to as partial volumes. The second method employs smooth influence functions with a finite support within peridynamic kernels. Numerical results demonstrate great improvements in accuracy and convergence of peridynamic numerical solutions, when using the proposed methods.« less

  6. Convergence Estimates for Multidisciplinary Analysis and Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arian, Eyal

    1997-01-01

    A quantitative analysis of coupling between systems of equations is introduced. This analysis is then applied to problems in multidisciplinary analysis, sensitivity, and optimization. For the sensitivity and optimization problems both multidisciplinary and single discipline feasibility schemes are considered. In all these cases a "convergence factor" is estimated in terms of the Jacobians and Hessians of the system, thus it can also be approximated by existing disciplinary analysis and optimization codes. The convergence factor is identified with the measure for the "coupling" between the disciplines in the system. Applications to algorithm development are discussed. Demonstration of the convergence estimates and numerical results are given for a system composed of two non-linear algebraic equations, and for a system composed of two PDEs modeling aeroelasticity.

  7. Mnemonic convergence in the human hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Backus, Alexander R.; Bosch, Sander E.; Ekman, Matthias; Grabovetsky, Alejandro Vicente; Doeller, Christian F.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to form associations between a multitude of events is the hallmark of episodic memory. Computational models have espoused the importance of the hippocampus as convergence zone, binding different aspects of an episode into a coherent representation, by integrating information from multiple brain regions. However, evidence for this long-held hypothesis is limited, since previous work has largely focused on representational and network properties of the hippocampus in isolation. Here we identify the hippocampus as mnemonic convergence zone, using a combination of multivariate pattern and graph-theoretical network analyses of functional magnetic resonance imaging data from humans performing an associative memory task. We observe overlap of conjunctive coding and hub-like network attributes in the hippocampus. These results provide evidence for mnemonic convergence in the hippocampus, underlying the integration of distributed information into episodic memory representations. PMID:27325442

  8. Mnemonic convergence in the human hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Backus, Alexander R; Bosch, Sander E; Ekman, Matthias; Grabovetsky, Alejandro Vicente; Doeller, Christian F

    2016-01-01

    The ability to form associations between a multitude of events is the hallmark of episodic memory. Computational models have espoused the importance of the hippocampus as convergence zone, binding different aspects of an episode into a coherent representation, by integrating information from multiple brain regions. However, evidence for this long-held hypothesis is limited, since previous work has largely focused on representational and network properties of the hippocampus in isolation. Here we identify the hippocampus as mnemonic convergence zone, using a combination of multivariate pattern and graph-theoretical network analyses of functional magnetic resonance imaging data from humans performing an associative memory task. We observe overlap of conjunctive coding and hub-like network attributes in the hippocampus. These results provide evidence for mnemonic convergence in the hippocampus, underlying the integration of distributed information into episodic memory representations. PMID:27325442

  9. Global Eco-Communication: Assessing the Communication and Information Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rush, Ramona R.

    It is no longer "new" news that the "new" media, separately or in convergence with the traditional mass media, are often reinforcing old ways and traditional patterns. Concentration of ownership; under- or misappropriate employment patterns for certain groups and classes of people; and inadequate, inappropriate, and inaccurate content have been…

  10. Testing Convergence Versus History: Convergence Dominates Phenotypic Evolution for over 150 Million Years in Frogs.

    PubMed

    Moen, Daniel S; Morlon, Hélène; Wiens, John J

    2016-01-01

    Striking evolutionary convergence can lead to similar sets of species in different locations, such as in cichlid fishes and Anolis lizards, and suggests that evolution can be repeatable and predictable across clades. Yet, most examples of convergence involve relatively small temporal and/or spatial scales. Some authors have speculated that at larger scales (e.g., across continents), differing evolutionary histories will prevent convergence. However, few studies have compared the contrasting roles of convergence and history, and none have done so at large scales. Here we develop a two-part approach to test the scale over which convergence can occur, comparing the relative importance of convergence and history in macroevolution using phylogenetic models of adaptive evolution. We apply this approach to data from morphology, ecology, and phylogeny from 167 species of anuran amphibians (frogs) from 10 local sites across the world, spanning ~160 myr of evolution. Mapping ecology on the phylogeny revealed that similar microhabitat specialists (e.g., aquatic, arboreal) have evolved repeatedly across clades and regions, producing many evolutionary replicates for testing for morphological convergence. By comparing morphological optima for clades and microhabitat types (our first test), we find that convergence associated with microhabitat use dominates frog morphological evolution, producing recurrent ecomorphs that together encompass all sampled species in each community in each region. However, our second test, which examines whether and how much species differ from their inferred optima, shows that convergence is incomplete: that is, phenotypes of most species are still somewhat distant from the estimated optimum for each microhabitat, seemingly because of insufficient time for more complete adaptation (an effect of history). Yet, these effects of history are related to past ecologies, and not clade membership. Overall, our study elucidates the dominant drivers of

  11. Unconditionally convergent nonlinear solver for hyperbolic conservation laws with S-shaped flux functions

    SciTech Connect

    Jenny, Patrick Tchelepi, Hamdi A.; Lee, Seong H.

    2009-11-01

    This paper addresses the convergence properties of implicit numerical solution algorithms for nonlinear hyperbolic transport problems. It is shown that the Newton-Raphson (NR) method converges for any time step size, if the flux function is convex, concave, or linear, which is, in general, the case for CFD problems. In some problems, e.g., multiphase flow in porous media, the nonlinear flux function is S-shaped (not uniformly convex or concave); as a result, a standard NR iteration can diverge for large time steps, even if an implicit discretization scheme is used to solve the nonlinear system of equations. In practice, when such convergence difficulties are encountered, the current time step is cut, previous iterations are discarded, a smaller time step size is tried, and the NR process is repeated. The criteria for time step cutting and selection are usually based on heuristics that limit the allowable change in the solution over a time step and/or NR iteration. Here, we propose a simple modification to the NR iteration scheme for conservation laws with S-shaped flux functions that converges for any time step size. The new scheme allows one to choose the time step size based on accuracy consideration only without worrying about the convergence behavior of the nonlinear solver. The proposed method can be implemented in an existing simulator, e.g., for CO{sub 2} sequestration or reservoir flow modeling, quite easily. The numerical analysis is confirmed with simulation studies using various test cases of nonlinear multiphase transport in porous media. The analysis and numerical experiments demonstrate that the modified scheme allows for the use of arbitrarily large time steps for this class of problems.

  12. Experience and convergence in spiritual direction.

    PubMed

    Evans, Jean

    2015-02-01

    The practice of spiritual direction concerns the human experience of God. As praxis, spiritual direction has a long tradition in Western Christianity. It is a process rooted in spirituality with theology as its foundation. This paper explores the convergences between aspects of philosophy (contemplative awareness), psychology (Rogerian client-centered approach) and phenomenology. There are significant points of convergence between phenomenology and spiritual direction: first, in Ignatius of Loyola's phenomenological approach to his religious experience; second, in the appropriation by spiritual directors of concepts of epochē and empathy; third, in the process of "unpacking" religious experience within a spiritual direction interview. PMID:24469918

  13. Deterministic convergence in iterative phase shifting

    SciTech Connect

    Luna, Esteban; Salas, Luis; Sohn, Erika; Ruiz, Elfego; Nunez, Juan M.; Herrera, Joel

    2009-03-10

    Previous implementations of the iterative phase shifting method, in which the phase of a test object is computed from measurements using a phase shifting interferometer with unknown positions of the reference, do not provide an accurate way of knowing when convergence has been attained. We present a new approach to this method that allows us to deterministically identify convergence. The method is tested with a home-built Fizeau interferometer that measures optical surfaces polished to {lambda}/100 using the Hydra tool. The intrinsic quality of the measurements is better than 0.5 nm. Other possible applications for this technique include fringe projection or any problem where phase shifting is involved.

  14. Educational Media and Technology: The State of the Profession.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gustafson, Kent L.

    1996-01-01

    Discussion of the field of educational media and technology focuses on external forces in society that will shape its destiny. Highlights include demographic and cultural changes; family structure; globalization; changing nature of the workplace; technological developments including digitization, communication, technical convergence, and…

  15. The Mass Media Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmgren, Rod, Ed.; Norton, William, Ed.

    This anthology consists of two major sections, "The News Media" and "The Entertainment Media." Both feature essays by critics, working professionals, and professional observers of the media. One aim of the anthology is to show the pervasive effect of the media on us. The section on news media comments on such topics as credibility gap, Vice…

  16. Geographic Media Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukinbeal, Chris

    2014-01-01

    While the use of media permeates geographic research and pedagogic practice, the underlying literacies that link geography and media remain uncharted. This article argues that geographic media literacy incorporates visual literacy, information technology literacy, information literacy, and media literacy. Geographic media literacy is the ability…

  17. Adolescents and media literacy.

    PubMed

    McCannon, Robert

    2005-06-01

    In the face of media industry consolidation, fewer people control media content which makes it harder for parents and citizens to know the research about media-related issues, such as video game violence, nutrition, and sexual risk-taking. Media literacy offers a popular and potentially successful way to counter the misinformation that is spread by Big Media public relations. PMID:16111628

  18. Measuring News Media Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maksl, Adam; Ashley, Seth; Craft, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    News media literacy refers to the knowledge and motivations needed to identify and engage with journalism. This study measured levels of news media literacy among 500 teenagers using a new scale measure based on Potter's model of media literacy and adapted to news media specifically. The adapted model posits that news media literate individuals…

  19. Cultivation in the Newer Media Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perse, Elizabeth M.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Tests the impact of cable, VCRs, and remote control devices on fear of crime and interpersonal mistrust. Finds that interpersonal mistrust was linked to greater exposure to cable's broadcast-type channels, but fear of crime and mistrust were negatively related to increased exposure to specialized cable channels. Finds fear of crime linked…

  20. Cultivation in the Newer Media Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perse, Elizabeth M.; And Others

    Researchers who study television's cultivation effects believe that heavy television viewing exposes people to consistent messages that lead them to be more fearful and mistrustful of others. The widespread adoption and use of new television technologies, such as cable, VCR, and remote control devices (RCD), however, have the potential to alter…

  1. Governance Challenges of Technological Systems Convergence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitman, Jim

    2006-01-01

    The convergence of several technological systems (especially nanotechnology, biotechnology, information technology, and robotics) has now been adopted as a strategic goal by several countries, most notably the United States and those of the European Union. The anticipated benefits and related fears of competitive disadvantage have brought together…

  2. Phonological Convergence in a Contracting Language Variety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bullock, Barbara E.; Gerfen, Chip

    2004-01-01

    Most work investigating the role of convergence in situations of language attrition has focused on the morpho-syntactic restructuring of the dying language variety. A central concern of such research has been untangling the factors driving the restructuring with an eye towards establishing whether the changes observed are best viewed as externally…

  3. The Convergence Coefficient across Political Systems

    PubMed Central

    Schofield, Norman

    2013-01-01

    Formal work on the electoral model often suggests that parties or candidates should locate themselves at the electoral mean. Recent research has found no evidence of such convergence. In order to explain nonconvergence, the stochastic electoral model is extended by including estimates of electoral valence. We introduce the notion of a convergence coefficient, c. It has been shown that high values of c imply that there is a significant centrifugal tendency acting on parties. We used electoral surveys to construct a stochastic valence model of the the elections in various countries. We find that the convergence coefficient varies across elections in a country, across countries with similar regimes, and across political regimes. In some countries, the centripetal tendency leads parties to converge to the electoral mean. In others the centrifugal tendency dominates and some parties locate far from the electoral mean. In particular, for countries with proportional electoral systems, namely, Israel, Turkey, and Poland, the centrifugal tendency is very high. In the majoritarian polities of the United States and Great Britain, the centrifugal tendency is very low. In anocracies, the autocrat imposes limitations on how far from the origin the opposition parties can move. PMID:24385886

  4. Convergence as a Mechanism of Language Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Backus, Ad

    2004-01-01

    This issue of "Bilingualism: Language and Cognition" is about convergence, a type of language change that is contact-induced and results in greater similarity between two languages that are in contact with each other. In Backus (forthcoming), I have attempted an overview of contact-induced language change, focusing on causal factors, on mechanisms…

  5. Culture and Social Psychology: Converging Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dimaggio, Paul; Markus, Hazel Rose

    2010-01-01

    Views of culture in psychology and sociology have converged markedly in the past two decades. Both have rejected what Adams and Markus (2004) refer to as the "entity" conception of culture--the view that culture is coherent, stable, and located in the heads of collectivities' members--in favor of more supple and dynamic constructs. Culture, in…

  6. Convergence behavior of a new DSMC algorithm.

    SciTech Connect

    Gallis, Michail A.; Rader, Daniel John; Torczynski, John Robert; Bird, Graeme A.

    2008-10-01

    The convergence rate of a new direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method, termed 'sophisticated DSMC', is investigated for one-dimensional Fourier flow. An argon-like hard-sphere gas at 273.15K and 266.644Pa is confined between two parallel, fully accommodating walls 1mm apart that have unequal temperatures. The simulations are performed using a one-dimensional implementation of the sophisticated DSMC algorithm. In harmony with previous work, the primary convergence metric studied is the ratio of the DSMC-calculated thermal conductivity to its corresponding infinite-approximation Chapman-Enskog theoretical value. As discretization errors are reduced, the sophisticated DSMC algorithm is shown to approach the theoretical values to high precision. The convergence behavior of sophisticated DSMC is compared to that of original DSMC. The convergence of the new algorithm in a three-dimensional implementation is also characterized. Implementations using transient adaptive sub-cells and virtual sub-cells are compared. The new algorithm is shown to significantly reduce the computational resources required for a DSMC simulation to achieve a particular level of accuracy, thus improving the efficiency of the method by a factor of 2.

  7. Converging Oceaniac Internal Waves, Somalia, Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The arculate fronts of these apparently converging internal waves off the northeast coast of Somalia (11.5N, 51.5E) probably were produced by interaction with two parallel submarine canyons off the Horn of Africa. Internal waves are packets of tidally generated waves traveling within the ocean at varying depths and are not detectable by any surface disturbance.

  8. Professionalization in Universities and European Convergence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vivas, Amparo Jimenez; Hevia, David Menendez Alvarez

    2009-01-01

    The constant assessment of the quality of higher education within the framework of European convergence is a challenge for all those universities that wish their degrees and diplomas to reflect a unified Europe. As is the case in any assessment, change and review process, the quest to improve quality implies measuring achievement of the objectives…

  9. Another Perspective: A Response to "Toward Convergence"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regelski, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    This response by Thomas A. Regelski was solicited to complement the lead article in this issue, "Toward Convergence: Adapting Music Education to Contemporary Society and Participatory Culture" by Evan S. Tobias. The author notes that many interesting and vital questions and alternatives that are often studiously ignored, overlooked, or taken for…

  10. A Monotonically Convergent Algorithm for FACTALS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiers, Henk A. L.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A new procedure is proposed for handling nominal variables in the analysis of variables of mixed measurement levels, and a procedure is developed for handling ordinal variables. Using these procedures, a monotonically convergent algorithm is constructed for the FACTALS method for any mixture of variables. (SLD)

  11. Potential Interrelationships Between Library and Other Mass Media Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Edwin B.

    The function of libraries is to make it easy for the people in their community to obtain information from other people or environments that may be distant is space, time or imagination. To perform this function libraries require communication media. Storage media are essential, but duplication and transmission media can improve the service of…

  12. NUMERICAL CONVERGENCE IN SMOOTHED PARTICLE HYDRODYNAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Qirong; Li, Yuexing; Hernquist, Lars

    2015-02-10

    We study the convergence properties of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) using numerical tests and simple analytic considerations. Our analysis shows that formal numerical convergence is possible in SPH only in the joint limit N → ∞, h → 0, and N{sub nb} → ∞, where N is the total number of particles, h is the smoothing length, and N{sub nb} is the number of neighbor particles within the smoothing volume used to compute smoothed estimates. Previous work has generally assumed that the conditions N → ∞ and h → 0 are sufficient to achieve convergence, while holding N{sub nb} fixed. We demonstrate that if N{sub nb} is held fixed as the resolution is increased, there will be a residual source of error that does not vanish as N → ∞ and h → 0. Formal numerical convergence in SPH is possible only if N{sub nb} is increased systematically as the resolution is improved. Using analytic arguments, we derive an optimal compromise scaling for N{sub nb} by requiring that this source of error balance that present in the smoothing procedure. For typical choices of the smoothing kernel, we find N{sub nb} ∝N {sup 0.5}. This means that if SPH is to be used as a numerically convergent method, the required computational cost does not scale with particle number as O(N), but rather as O(N {sup 1} {sup +} {sup δ}), where δ ≈ 0.5, with a weak dependence on the form of the smoothing kernel.

  13. Convergent Evolution During Local Adaptation to Patchy Landscapes.

    PubMed

    Ralph, Peter L; Coop, Graham

    2015-11-01

    Species often encounter, and adapt to, many patches of similar environmental conditions across their range. Such adaptation can occur through convergent evolution if different alleles arise in different patches, or through the spread of shared alleles by migration acting to synchronize adaptation across the species. The tension between the two reflects the constraint imposed on evolution by the underlying genetic architecture versus how effectively selection and geographic isolation act to inhibit the geographic spread of locally adapted alleles. This paper studies the balance between these two routes to adaptation in a model of continuous environments with patchy selection pressures. We address the following questions: How long does it take for a novel allele to appear in a patch where it is locally adapted through mutation? Or, through migration from another, already adapted patch? Which is more likely to occur, as a function of distance between the patches? What population genetic signal is left by the spread of migrant alleles? To answer these questions we examine the family structure underlying migration-selection equilibrium surrounding an already adapted patch, treating those rare families that reach new patches as spatial branching processes. A main result is that patches further apart than a critical distance will likely evolve independent locally adapted alleles; this distance is proportional to the spatial scale of selection ([Formula: see text], where σ is the dispersal distance and sm is the selective disadvantage of these alleles between patches), and depends linearly on log(sm/μ), where μ is the mutation rate. This provides a way to understand the role of geographic separation between patches in promoting convergent adaptation and the genomic signals it leaves behind. We illustrate these ideas using the convergent evolution of cryptic coloration in the rock pocket mouse, Chaetodipus intermedius, as an empirical example. PMID:26571125

  14. Convergent Evolution During Local Adaptation to Patchy Landscapes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Species often encounter, and adapt to, many patches of similar environmental conditions across their range. Such adaptation can occur through convergent evolution if different alleles arise in different patches, or through the spread of shared alleles by migration acting to synchronize adaptation across the species. The tension between the two reflects the constraint imposed on evolution by the underlying genetic architecture versus how effectively selection and geographic isolation act to inhibit the geographic spread of locally adapted alleles. This paper studies the balance between these two routes to adaptation in a model of continuous environments with patchy selection pressures. We address the following questions: How long does it take for a novel allele to appear in a patch where it is locally adapted through mutation? Or, through migration from another, already adapted patch? Which is more likely to occur, as a function of distance between the patches? What population genetic signal is left by the spread of migrant alleles? To answer these questions we examine the family structure underlying migration–selection equilibrium surrounding an already adapted patch, treating those rare families that reach new patches as spatial branching processes. A main result is that patches further apart than a critical distance will likely evolve independent locally adapted alleles; this distance is proportional to the spatial scale of selection (σ/sm, where σ is the dispersal distance and s m is the selective disadvantage of these alleles between patches), and depends linearly on log(s m/μ), where μ is the mutation rate. This provides a way to understand the role of geographic separation between patches in promoting convergent adaptation and the genomic signals it leaves behind. We illustrate these ideas using the convergent evolution of cryptic coloration in the rock pocket mouse, Chaetodipus intermedius, as an empirical example. PMID:26571125

  15. Kids & Media @ the New Millennium: A Kaiser Family Foundation Report [with] Appendices. A Comprehensive National Analysis of Children's Media Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Donald F.

    This report presents details of a study which gathered information about all kinds of media behaviors from a nationally representative sample of American youth--the study asked: In this modern media environment, how much time do American children devote to each of the different media? According to the report. The data for the study came from two…

  16. Undesirable Effects of Media on Children: Why Limitation is Necessary?

    PubMed

    Karaagac, Aysu Turkmen

    2015-06-01

    Pervasive media environment is a social problem shared by most of the countries around the world. Several studies have been performed to highlight the undesired effects of media on children. Some of these studies have focused on the time spent by children watching television, playing with computers or using mobile media devices while some others have tried to explain the associations between the obesity, postural abnormalities or psychological problems of children, and their media use. This article discusses the recent approaches to curb influence of media on children, and the importance of family media literacy education programs with particular relevance to developing countries. PMID:26121718

  17. Convergence of Newton's method for a single real equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, C. W.

    1985-01-01

    Newton's method for finding the zeroes of a single real function is investigated in some detail. Convergence is generally checked using the Contraction Mapping Theorem which yields sufficient but not necessary conditions for convergence of the general single point iteration method. The resulting convergence intervals are frequently considerably smaller than actual convergence zones. For a specific single point iteration method, such as Newton's method, better estimates of regions of convergence should be possible. A technique is described which, under certain conditions (frequently satisfied by well behaved functions) gives much larger zones where convergence is guaranteed.

  18. Media delivery and media service overlays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wee, Susie

    2005-03-01

    Multimedia communication and streaming media services will become mainstream network infrastructure applications in the coming decade. However, there are many challenges that must be overcome. These challenges include the Internet"s limited ability to handle real-time, low-latency media streams, the need for media security, and an uncertainty of the killer app. The nature of these challenges lends itself to enabling technology innovations in the media delivery and media processing space. Specifically, we envision an overlay infrastructure that supports networked media services that couple media delivery with in-network media processing. The media overlay should be programmable to allow rapid deployment of new applications and services and manageable so as to support the evolving requirements of the resulting usage models. Furthermore, the media overlay should allow for the delivery of protected media content for applications that have security requirements. A properly architected infrastructure can enable real-time multimedia communication and streaming media services in light of the inherent challenges.

  19. Phenotypic convergence along a gradient of predation risk.

    PubMed

    Dennis, S R; Carter, Mauricio J; Hentley, W T; Beckerman, A P

    2011-06-01

    A long-standing question in ecology is whether phenotypic plasticity, rather than selection per se, is responsible for phenotypic variation among populations. Plasticity can increase or decrease variation, but most previous studies have been limited to single populations, single traits and a small number of environments assessed using univariate reaction norms. Here, examining two genetically distinct populations of Daphnia pulex with different predation histories, we quantified predator-induced plasticity among 11 traits along a fine-scale gradient of predation risk by a predator (Chaoborus) common to both populations. We test the hypothesis that plasticity can be responsible for convergence in phenotypes among different populations by experimentally characterizing multivariate reaction norms with phenotypic trajectory analysis (PTA). Univariate analyses showed that all genotypes increased age and size at maturity, and invested in defensive spikes (neckteeth), but failed to quantitatively describe whole-organism response. In contrast, PTA quantified and qualified the phenotypic strategy the organism mobilized against the selection pressure. We demonstrate, at the whole-organism level, that the two populations occupy different areas of phenotypic space in the absence of predation but converge in phenotypic space as predation threat increases. PMID:21084350

  20. On domains of convergence in optimization problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diaz, Alejandro R.; Shaw, Steven S.; Pan, Jian

    1990-01-01

    Numerical optimization algorithms require the knowledge of an initial set of design variables. Starting from an initial design x(sup 0), improved solutions are obtained by updating the design iteratively in a way prescribed by the particular algorithm used. If the algorithm is successful, convergence is achieved to a local optimal solution. Let A denote the iterative procedure that characterizes a typical optimization algorithm, applied to the problem: Find x belonging to R(sup n) that maximizes f(x) subject to x belonging to Omega contained in R(sup n). We are interested in problems with several local maxima (x(sub j))(sup *), j=1, ..., m, in the feasible design space Omega. In general, convergence of the algorithm A to a specific solution (x(sub j))(sup *) is determined by the choice of initial design x(sup 0). The domain of convergence D(sub j) of A associated with a local maximum (x(sub j))(sup *) is a subset of initial designs x(sup 0) in Omega such that the sequence (x(sup k)), k=0,1,2,... defined by x(sup k+1) = A(x(sup k)), k=0,1,... converges to (x(sub j))(sup *). The set D(sub j) is also called the basin of attraction of (x(sub j))(sup *). Cayley first proposed the problem of finding the basin of attraction for Newton's method in 1897. It has been shown that the basin of attraction for Newton's method exhibits chaotic behavior in problems with polynomial objective. This implies that there may be regions in the feasible design space where arbitrarily close starting points will converge to different local optimal solutions. Furthermore, the boundaries of the domains of convergence may have a very complex, even fractal structure. In this paper we show that even simple structural optimization problems solved using standard gradient based (first order) algorithms exhibit similar features.

  1. American Academy of Pediatrics. Media violence. Committee on Public Education.

    PubMed

    2001-11-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics recognizes exposure to violence in media, including television, movies, music, and video games, as a significant risk to the health of children and adolescents. Extensive research evidence indicates that media violence can contribute to aggressive behavior, desensitization to violence, nightmares, and fear of being harmed. Pediatricians should assess their patients' level of media exposure and intervene on media-related health risks. Pediatricians and other child health care providers can advocate for a safer media environment for children by encouraging media literacy, more thoughtful and proactive use of media by children and their parents, more responsible portrayal of violence by media producers, and more useful and effective media ratings. PMID:11694708

  2. Non-surgical interventions for convergence insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Scheiman, Mitchell; Gwiazda, Jane; Li, Tianjing

    2014-01-01

    Background Convergence insufficiency is a common eye muscle co-ordination problem in which the eyes have a strong tendency to drift outward (exophoria) when reading or doing close work. Symptoms may include eye strain, headaches, double vision, print moving on the page, frequent loss of place when reading, inability to concentrate, and short attention span. Objectives To systematically assess and synthesize evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the effectiveness of non-surgical interventions for convergence insufficiency. Search strategy We searched The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Citation Index, the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com) and ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) on 7 October 2010. We manually searched reference lists and optometric journals. Selection criteria We included RCTs examining any form of non-surgical intervention against placebo, no treatment, sham treatment, or each other. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently assessed eligibility, risk of bias, and extracted data. We performed meta-analyses when appropriate. Main results We included six trials (three in children, three in adults) with a total of 475 participants. We graded four trials at low risk of bias. Evidence from one trial (graded at low risk of bias) suggests that base-in prism reading glasses was no more effective than placebo reading glasses in improving clinical signs or symptoms in children. Evidence from one trial (graded at high risk of bias) suggests that base-in prism glasses using a progressive addition lens design was more effective than progressive addition lens alone in decreasing symptoms in adults. At three weeks of therapy, the mean difference in Convergence Insufficiency Symptoms Survey (CISS) score was −10.24 points (95% confidence interval (CI) −15.45 to −5.03). Evidence from two trials (graded at low risk of bias) suggests that outpatient (or office-based as used in the

  3. Stability of spherical converging shock wave

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, M.; Sanz, J.; Iwamoto, Y.

    2015-07-15

    Based on Guderley's self-similar solution, stability of spherical converging shock wave is studied. A rigorous linear perturbation theory is developed, in which the growth rate of perturbation is given as a function of the spherical harmonic number ℓ and the specific heats ratio γ. Numerical calculation reveals the existence of a γ-dependent cut-off mode number ℓ{sub c}, such that all the eigenmode perturbations for ℓ > ℓ{sub c} are smeared out as the shock wave converges at the center. The analysis is applied to partially spherical geometries to give significant implication for different ignition schemes of inertial confinement fusion. Two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations are performed to verify the theory.

  4. Molecular mechanisms involved in convergent crop domestication.

    PubMed

    Lenser, Teresa; Theißen, Günter

    2013-12-01

    Domestication has helped to understand evolution. We argue that, vice versa, novel insights into evolutionary principles could provide deeper insights into domestication. Molecular analyses have demonstrated that convergent phenotypic evolution is often based on molecular changes in orthologous genes or pathways. Recent studies have revealed that during plant domestication the causal mutations for convergent changes in key traits are likely to be located in particular genes. These insights may contribute to defining candidate genes for genetic improvement during the domestication of new plant species. Such efforts may help to increase the range of arable crops available, thus increasing crop biodiversity and food security to help meet the predicted demands of the continually growing global population under rapidly changing environmental conditions. PMID:24035234

  5. Technologies for convergence in the metro network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankel, Michael Y.

    2005-02-01

    Traditional metro network architectures comprise multiple layers of networking equipment supporting a wide array of services and packet-oriented applications. Among others, these include WDM, SDH, ATM, Ethernet and IP, each requiring its own network elements and associated management solutions to perform its own independent networking functions. While these work well individually, the combined network is cumbersome and inefficient. Recent advancements in network technologies are now changing the way metro networks are designed. Multi-functional consolidation through technology integration and the standardization of protocol inter-networking methods are leading to a converged network solution in support of a diverse set of packet-aware service offerings. This presentation will explore new technologies that are enabling convergence in the metro network, both across layers and across services.

  6. Convergent strand array liquid pumping system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Earl R., Jr. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A surface-tension liquid pumping system is provided by one or more arrays of converging solid monofilament fibers or metal wires (strands) spaced apart at an input end to gather liquid, and gathered close together at the opposite end where menisci forms between wetted strands to force liquid in the direction of convergence of the strands. The liquid pumping system is independent of gravity. It is illustrated as being used in a heat pump having a heating box to vaporize the liquid and a condensing chamber. Condensed liquid is returned by the pumping system to the heating box where it is again vaporized. A vapor tube carries the vapor to the condensing chamber. In that way, a closed system pumps heat from the heating box to the evaporating chamber and from there radiated to the atmosphere.

  7. Antibiotics From Microbes: Converging To Kill

    PubMed Central

    Fischbach, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary As genetically encoded small molecules, antibiotics are phenotypes that have resulted from mutation and natural selection. Advances in genetics, biochemistry, and bioinformatics have connected hundreds of antibiotics to the gene clusters that encode them, allowing these molecules to be analyzed using the tools of evolutionary biology. This review surveys examples of convergent evolution from microbially produced antibiotics, including the convergence of distinct gene clusters on similar phenotypes and the merger of distinct gene clusters into a single functional unit. Examining antibiotics through an evolutionary lens highlights the versatility of biosynthetic pathways, reveals lessons for combating antibiotic resistance, and provides an entry point for studying the natural roles of these natural products. PMID:19695947

  8. The genetic causes of convergent evolution.

    PubMed

    Stern, David L

    2013-11-01

    The evolution of phenotypic similarities between species, known as convergence, illustrates that populations can respond predictably to ecological challenges. Convergence often results from similar genetic changes, which can emerge in two ways: the evolution of similar or identical mutations in independent lineages, which is termed parallel evolution; and the evolution in independent lineages of alleles that are shared among populations, which I call collateral genetic evolution. Evidence for parallel and collateral evolution has been found in many taxa, and an emerging hypothesis is that they result from the fact that mutations in some genetic targets minimize pleiotropic effects while simultaneously maximizing adaptation. If this proves correct, then the molecular changes underlying adaptation might be more predictable than has been appreciated previously. PMID:24105273

  9. Stability of spherical converging shock wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, M.; Sanz, J.; Iwamoto, Y.

    2015-07-01

    Based on Guderley's self-similar solution, stability of spherical converging shock wave is studied. A rigorous linear perturbation theory is developed, in which the growth rate of perturbation is given as a function of the spherical harmonic number ℓ and the specific heats ratio γ. Numerical calculation reveals the existence of a γ-dependent cut-off mode number ℓc, such that all the eigenmode perturbations for ℓ > ℓc are smeared out as the shock wave converges at the center. The analysis is applied to partially spherical geometries to give significant implication for different ignition schemes of inertial confinement fusion. Two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations are performed to verify the theory.

  10. METAL MEDIA FILTERS, AG-1 SECTION FI

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, D.

    2012-05-23

    One application of metal media filters is in various nuclear air cleaning processes including applications for protecting workers, the public and the environment from hazardous and radioactive particles. To support this application the development of the ASME AG-1 FI Standard on Metal Media has been under way for more than ten years. Development of the proposed section has required resolving several difficult issues associated with operating conditions (media velocity, pressure drop, etc.), qualification testing, and quality acceptance testing. Performance characteristics of metal media are dramatically different than the glass fiber media with respect to parameters like differential pressures, operating temperatures, media strength, etc. These differences make existing data for a glass fiber media inadequate for qualifying a metal media filter for AG-1. In the past much work has been conducted on metal media filters at facilities such as Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to qualify the media as High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) Filters. Particle retention testing has been conducted at Oak Ridge Filter Test Facility and at Air Techniques International (ATI) to prove that the metal media meets or exceeds the 99.97% particle retention required for a HEPA Filter. Even with his testing, data was lacking to complete an AG-1 FI Standard on metal media. With funding secured by Mississippi State University (MSU) from National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), a research test stand is being designed and fabricated at MSU's Institute for Clean Energy Technology (ICET) Facility to obtain qualification data on metal media. This in turn will support required data needed for the FI Standard. The paper will discuss in detail how the test stand at MSU will obtain the necessary data to complete the FI Standard.

  11. Arieti and Bowlby: convergence and direct influence.

    PubMed

    Bacciagaluppi, Marco

    2015-09-01

    Arieti was a great specialist of schizophrenia and Bowlby was the initiator of attachment theory. Working independently on the two sides of the Atlantic, they converged on a range of topics, such as evolutionary theory, mourning, trauma, violence, and therapy as art and science. Later, Bowlby exerted a direct influence on Arieti, which Arieti acknowledged in his Love Can Be Found. Finally, the two authors cooperated in the second edition of the American Handbook of Psychiatry. PMID:26356777

  12. Guaranteed convergence of the Hough transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soffer, Menashe; Kiryati, Nahum

    1995-01-01

    The straight-line Hough Transform using normal parameterization with a continuous voting kernel is considered. It transforms the colinearity detection problem to a problem of finding the global maximum of a two dimensional function above a domain in the parameter space. The principle is similar to robust regression using fixed scale M-estimation. Unlike standard M-estimation procedures the Hough Transform does not rely on a good initial estimate of the line parameters: The global optimization problem is approached by exhaustive search on a grid that is usually as fine as computationally feasible. The global maximum of a general function above a bounded domain cannot be found by a finite number of function evaluations. Only if sufficient a-priori knowledge about the smoothness of the objective function is available, convergence to the global maximum can be guaranteed. The extraction of a-priori information and its efficient use are the main challenges in real global optimization problems. The global optimization problem in the Hough Transform is essentially how fine should the parameter space quantization be in order not to miss the true maximum. More than thirty years after Hough patented the basic algorithm, the problem is still essentially open. In this paper an attempt is made to identify a-priori information on the smoothness of the objective (Hough) function and to introduce sufficient conditions for the convergence of the Hough Transform to the global maximum. An image model with several application dependent parameters is defined. Edge point location errors as well as background noise are accounted for. Minimal parameter space quantization intervals that guarantee convergence are obtained. Focusing policies for multi-resolution Hough algorithms are developed. Theoretical support for bottom- up processing is provided. Due to the randomness of errors and noise, convergence guarantees are probabilistic.

  13. Convergence acceleration of viscous flow computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, G. M.

    1982-01-01

    A multiple-grid convergence acceleration technique introduced for application to the solution of the Euler equations by means of Lax-Wendroff algorithms is extended to treat compressible viscous flow. Computational results are presented for the solution of the thin-layer version of the Navier-Stokes equations using the explicit MacCormack algorithm, accelerated by a convective coarse-grid scheme. Extensions and generalizations are mentioned.

  14. Design Calculations For NIF Convergent Ablator Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, R E; Hicks, D G; Meezan, N B; Callahan, D A; Landen, O L; Jones, O S; Langer, S H; Kline, J L; Wilson, D C; Rinderknecht, H; Zylstra, A; Petrasso, R D

    2011-10-25

    The NIF convergent ablation tuning effort is underway. In the early experiments, we have discovered that the design code simulations over-predict the capsule implosion velocity and shock flash rhor, but under-predict the hohlraum x-ray flux measurements. The apparent inconsistency between the x-ray flux and radiography data implies that there are important unexplained aspects of the hohlraum and/or capsule behavior.

  15. Sequences of Rational Numbers Converging to Surds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Rodney

    2010-01-01

    In this sequence 1/1, 7/5, 41/29, 239/169 and so on, Thomas notes that the sequence converges to square root of 2. By observation, the sequence of numbers in the numerator of the above sequence, have a pattern of generation which is the same as that in the denominator. That is, the next term is found by multiplying the previous term by six and…

  16. Convergent Coarseness Regulation for Segmented Images

    SciTech Connect

    Paglieroni, D W

    2004-05-27

    In segmentation of remotely sensed images, the number of pixel classes and their spectral representations are often unknown a priori. Even with prior knowledge, pixels with spectral components from multiple classes lead to classification errors and undesired small region artifacts. Coarseness regulation for segmented images is proposed as an efficient novel technique for handling these problems. Beginning with an over-segmented image, perceptually similar connected regions are iteratively merged using a method reminiscent of region growing, except the primitives are regions, not pixels. Interactive coarseness regulation is achieved by specifying the area {alpha} of the largest region eligible for merging. A region with area less than {alpha} is merged with the most spectrally similar connected region, unless the regions are perceived as spectrally dissimilar. In convergent coarseness regulation, which requires no user interaction, {alpha} is specified as the total number of pixels in the image, and the coarseness regulation output converges to a steady-state segmentation that remains unchanged as {alpha} is further increased. By applying convergent coarseness regulation to AVIRIS, IKONOS and DigitalGlobe images, and quantitatively comparing computer-generated segmentations to segmentations generated manually by a human analyst, it was found that the quality of the input segmentations was consistently and dramatically improved.

  17. Disparity and convergence in bipedal archosaur locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Bates, K. T.; Schachner, E. R.

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to investigate functional disparity in the locomotor apparatus of bipedal archosaurs. We use reconstructions of hindlimb myology of extant and extinct archosaurs to generate musculoskeletal biomechanical models to test hypothesized convergence between bipedal crocodile-line archosaurs and dinosaurs. Quantitative comparison of muscle leverage supports the inference that bipedal crocodile-line archosaurs and non-avian theropods had highly convergent hindlimb myology, suggesting similar muscular mechanics and neuromuscular control of locomotion. While these groups independently evolved similar musculoskeletal solutions to the challenges of parasagittally erect bipedalism, differences also clearly exist, particularly the distinct hip and crurotarsal ankle morphology characteristic of many pseudosuchian archosaurs. Furthermore, comparative analyses of muscle design in extant archosaurs reveal that muscular parameters such as size and architecture are more highly adapted or optimized for habitual locomotion than moment arms. The importance of these aspects of muscle design, which are not directly retrievable from fossils, warns against over-extrapolating the functional significance of anatomical convergences. Nevertheless, links identified between posture, muscle moments and neural control in archosaur locomotion suggest that functional interpretations of osteological changes in limb anatomy traditionally linked to postural evolution in Late Triassic archosaurs could be constrained through musculoskeletal modelling. PMID:22112652

  18. Architecture of orogenic belts and convergent zones in Western Ishtar Terra, Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Head, James W.; Vorderbruegge, R. W.; Crumpler, L. S.

    1989-01-01

    Linear mountain belts in Ishtar Terra were recognized from Pioneer-Venus topography, and later Arecibo images showed banded terrain interpreted to represent folds. Subsequent analyses showed that the mountains represented orogenic belts, and that each had somewhat different features and characteristics. Orogenic belts are regions of focused shortening and compressional deformation and thus provide evidence for the nature of such deformation, processes of crustal thickening (brittle, ductile), and processes of crustal loss. Such information is important in understanding the nature of convergent zones on Venus (underthrusting, imbrication, subduction), the implications for rates of crustal recycling, and the nature of environments of melting and petrogenesis. The basic elements of four convergent zones and orogenic belts in western Ishtar Terra are identified and examined, and then assess the architecture of these zones (the manner in which the elements are arrayed), and their relationships. The basic nomenclature of the convergent zones is shown.

  19. Accelerating Wave Function Convergence in Interactive Quantum Chemical Reactivity Studies.

    PubMed

    Mühlbach, Adrian H; Vaucher, Alain C; Reiher, Markus

    2016-03-01

    The inherently high computational cost of iterative self-consistent field (SCF) methods proves to be a critical issue delaying visual and haptic feedback in real-time quantum chemistry. In this work, we introduce two schemes for SCF acceleration. They provide a guess for the initial density matrix of the SCF procedure generated by extrapolation techniques. SCF optimizations then converge in fewer iterations, which decreases the execution time of the SCF optimization procedure. To benchmark the proposed propagation schemes, we developed a test bed for performing quantum chemical calculations on sequences of molecular structures mimicking real-time quantum chemical explorations. Explorations of a set of six model reactions employing the semi-empirical methods PM6 and DFTB3 in this testing environment showed that the proposed propagation schemes achieved speedups of up to 30% as a consequence of a reduced number of SCF iterations. PMID:26788887

  20. GLOBE Science and GLOBE Education: Convergence or Divergence?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McWilliams, H.

    2003-12-01

    The GLOBE Program is a partnership between scientists, classroom teachers, and students collaborating to monitor and study the global environment. GLOBE has trained more than 20,000 teachers. Yet only a small percentage of K-12 teachers who are trained in GLOBE consistently submit data to the program's data base and thereby actively contribute to the science goals of GLOBE. Based on a study of New England GLOBE teachers, this report argues that the goals of GLOBE, including consistent data submission, can be accomplished only when there is a greater congruence between the scientific goals of the program and the educational goals of the classroom. The results are discussed in terms of current educational policies and mandates, specifically the No Child Left Behind legislation. Some ideas are offered regarding how to achieve greater convergence between the goals of GLOBE scientists and the educational goals of classroom teachers.

  1. On lacunary statistical convergence of order α in probability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Işık, Mahmut; Et, Kübra Elif

    2015-09-01

    In this study, we examine the concepts of lacunary statistical convergence of order α in probability and Nθ—convergence of order α in probability. We give some relations connected to these concepts.

  2. A Waterfall Design Strategy for Using Social Media for Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahern, Terence C.

    2016-01-01

    Using social media can create a rich learning environment that crosses all content areas. The key to creating this environment is for instructors and designers to match appropriate social media software with the intended learning outcome. This article describes an instructional design strategy that helps educators create learning activities that…

  3. Hundreds of Genes Experienced Convergent Shifts in Selective Pressure in Marine Mammals.

    PubMed

    Chikina, Maria; Robinson, Joseph D; Clark, Nathan L

    2016-09-01

    Mammal species have made the transition to the marine environment several times, and their lineages represent one of the classical examples of convergent evolution in morphological and physiological traits. Nevertheless, the genetic mechanisms of their phenotypic transition are poorly understood, and investigations into convergence at the molecular level have been inconclusive. While past studies have searched for convergent changes at specific amino acid sites, we propose an alternative strategy to identify those genes that experienced convergent changes in their selective pressures, visible as changes in evolutionary rate specifically in the marine lineages. We present evidence of widespread convergence at the gene level by identifying parallel shifts in evolutionary rate during three independent episodes of mammalian adaptation to the marine environment. Hundreds of genes accelerated their evolutionary rates in all three marine mammal lineages during their transition to aquatic life. These marine-accelerated genes are highly enriched for pathways that control recognized functional adaptations in marine mammals, including muscle physiology, lipid-metabolism, sensory systems, and skin and connective tissue. The accelerations resulted from both adaptive evolution as seen in skin and lung genes, and loss of function as in gustatory and olfactory genes. In regard to sensory systems, this finding provides further evidence that reduced senses of taste and smell are ubiquitous in marine mammals. Our analysis demonstrates the feasibility of identifying genes underlying convergent organism-level characteristics on a genome-wide scale and without prior knowledge of adaptations, and provides a powerful approach for investigating the physiological functions of mammalian genes. PMID:27329977

  4. Living within the Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, Erin

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author shares how media affects her as a teenager. The author says that media has such a relationship with the world today, specifically with teenagers like her. Media gives off so much information that can be valid or invalid, positive or negative. The media can persuade anyone to do something or to think a certain way.…

  5. Promoting Media Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Alice Yuet Lin

    1997-01-01

    The "critical viewing" model for teaching media studies is based on the assumptions that mass media spread evil influences and viewers are mindless and passive media consumers. In contrast, a "cultural reflective" model of media studies would enhance cultural understanding by enabling students to seek alternative ways to think about culture and…

  6. How the Media Teach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cortes, Carlos E.

    2005-01-01

    The mass media teach whether or not mediamakers intend to or realize it, and users learn from the media whether or not they try or are even aware of it. This means all of the media, including newspapers, magazines, movies, television, radio, and the new cyberspace media serve as informal yet omnipresent nonschool textbooks. This raises an…

  7. Why Media Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Locatis, Craig

    2007-01-01

    Whether media affect learning has been debated for decades. The discussion of media's effectiveness has raised questions about the usefulness of comparison studies, not only in assessing applications of technology but in other areas as well. Arguments that media do not affect learning are re-examined and issues concerning media effects on expert…

  8. Selecting Media for Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, L. J.

    This study was conducted to determine the effects of instruction on using a formal media selection procedure on the media selection choices made by novice instructional designers. Twenty-nine male and female graduate students enrolled in a media design course at Arizona State University participated in the study. Media design problems were used…

  9. The Media Teacher's Handbook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scarratt, Elaine, Ed.; Davison, Jon, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    "The Media Teacher's Handbook" is an indispensible guide for all teachers, both specialist and non-specialist, delivering Media Studies and media education in secondary schools and colleges. It is the first text to draw together the three key elements of secondary sector teaching in relation to media study--the "theoretical", the "practical" and…

  10. Business and the Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barchie, Lisa

    By virtue of the different natures of the two institutions, the relationship between business and the media is simultaneously adversarial and symbiotic: the media see themselves as society's watchdog while business sees itself as society's driving economic force. Meanwhile, business relies on the media for information, and the media rely on…

  11. Social media for lifelong learning.

    PubMed

    Kind, Terry; Evans, Yolanda

    2015-04-01

    Learning is ongoing, and can be considered a social activity. In this paper we aim to provide a review of the use of social media for lifelong learning. We start by defining lifelong learning, drawing upon principles of continuous professional development and adult learning theory. We searched Embase and MEDLINE from 2004-2014 for search terms relevant to social media and learning. We describe examples of lifelong learners using social media in medical education and healthcare that have been reported in the peer-reviewed literature. Medical or other health professions students may have qualities consistent with being a lifelong learner, yet once individuals move beyond structured learning environments they will need to recognize their own gaps in knowledge and skills over time and be motivated to fill them, thereby incorporating lifelong learning principles into their day-to-day practice. Engagement with social media can parallel engagement in the learning process over time, to the extent that online social networking fosters feedback and collaboration. The use of social media and online networking platforms are a key way to continuously learn in today's information sharing society. Additional research is needed, particularly rigorous studies that extend beyond learner satisfaction to knowledge, behaviour change, and outcomes. PMID:25906988

  12. Convergent and Divergent Thinking in the Context of Narrative Mysteries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wenzel, William G.; Gerrig, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    This project demonstrates how narrative mysteries provide a context in which readers engage in creative cognition. Drawing on the concepts of convergent and divergent thinking, we wrote stories that had either convergent or divergent outcomes. For example, one story had a character give his girlfriend a ring (a convergent outcome), whereas the…

  13. Perception as a closed-loop convergence process

    PubMed Central

    Ahissar, Ehud; Assa, Eldad

    2016-01-01

    Perception of external objects involves sensory acquisition via the relevant sensory organs. A widely-accepted assumption is that the sensory organ is the first station in a serial chain of processing circuits leading to an internal circuit in which a percept emerges. This open-loop scheme, in which the interaction between the sensory organ and the environment is not affected by its concurrent downstream neuronal processing, is strongly challenged by behavioral and anatomical data. We present here a hypothesis in which the perception of external objects is a closed-loop dynamical process encompassing loops that integrate the organism and its environment and converging towards organism-environment steady-states. We discuss the consistency of closed-loop perception (CLP) with empirical data and show that it can be synthesized in a robotic setup. Testable predictions are proposed for empirical distinction between open and closed loop schemes of perception. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12830.001 PMID:27159238

  14. The Convergent Cancer Evolution toward a Single Cellular Destination.

    PubMed

    Chen, Han; He, Xionglei

    2016-01-01

    The essence of Darwin's theory is that evolution is driven by purposeless mutations that are subsequently selected by natural environments, so there is often no predefined destination in organismal evolution. Using gene expressions of 107 cell types, we built a functional space of human cells to trace the evolutionary trajectory of 18 types of solid tumor cancers. We detected a dominant evolving trend toward the functional status of embryonic stem cells (ESC) for approximately 3,000 tumors growing in distinct tissue environments. This pattern remained the same after excluding known cancer/ESC signature genes (∼ 3,000 genes) or excluding all oncogenic gene sets (∼ 12,000 genes) annotated in MSigDB, suggesting a convergent evolution of the overall functional status in cancers. In support of this, the functional distance to ESC served as a common prognostic indicator for cancers of various types, with shorter distance corresponding to poor prognosis, which was true even when randomly selected gene sets were considered. Thus, regardless of the external environments, cancer evolution is a directional process toward a defined cellular destination, a finding reconciling development and evolution, the two seemingly incompatible philosophies both adopted by the cancer research community, and also raising new questions to evolutionary biology. PMID:26464125

  15. Reading while Watching Video: The Effect of Video Content on Reading Comprehension and Media Multitasking Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Lin; Lee, Jennifer; Robertson, Tip

    2011-01-01

    Media multitasking, or engaging in multiple media and tasks simultaneously, is becoming an increasingly popular phenomenon with the development and engagement in social media. This study examines to what extent video content affects students' reading comprehension in media multitasking environments. One hundred and thirty university students were…

  16. Study on the Use of Social Media and Its Reflections on Turkish Regarding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bulut, Mesut

    2013-01-01

    The way of communication has developed on social media, an environment where informal education occurs, and the social media language or social media Turkish which has emerged as a result of this communication is an important subject which needs to be discussed in terms of Turkish teaching. The reflections of the use of social media on Turkish in…

  17. Using immersive media and digital technology to communicate Earth Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapur, Ravi

    2016-04-01

    A number of technologies in digital media and interactivity have rapidly advanced and are now converging to enable rich, multi-sensoral experiences which create opportunities for both digital art and science communication. Techniques used in full-dome film-making can now be deployed in virtual reality experiences; gaming technologies can be utilised to explore real data sets; and collaborative interactivity enable new forms of public artwork. This session will explore these converging trends through a number of emerging and forthcoming projects dealing with Earth science, climate change and planetary science.

  18. Test methods for optical disk media characteristics (for 356 mm ruggedized magneto-optic media)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podio, Fernando L.

    1991-01-01

    Standard test methods for computer storage media characteristics are essential and allow for conformance to media interchange standards. The test methods were developed for 356 mm two-sided laminated glass substrate with a magneto-optic active layer media technology. These test methods may be used for testing other media types, but in each case their applicability must be evaluated. Test methods are included for a series of different media characteristics, including operational, nonoperational, and storage environments; mechanical and physical characteristics; and substrate, recording layer, and preformat characteristics. Tests for environmental qualification and media lifetimes are also included. The best methods include testing conditions, testing procedures, a description of the testing setup, and the required calibration procedures.

  19. Rapid convergent evolution in wild crickets.

    PubMed

    Pascoal, Sonia; Cezard, Timothee; Eik-Nes, Aasta; Gharbi, Karim; Majewska, Jagoda; Payne, Elizabeth; Ritchie, Michael G; Zuk, Marlene; Bailey, Nathan W

    2014-06-16

    The earliest stages of convergent evolution are difficult to observe in the wild, limiting our understanding of the incipient genomic architecture underlying convergent phenotypes. To address this, we capitalized on a novel trait, flatwing, that arose and proliferated at the start of the 21st century in a population of field crickets (Teleogryllus oceanicus) on the Hawaiian island of Kauai. Flatwing erases sound-producing structures on male forewings. Mutant males cannot sing to attract females, but they are protected from fatal attack by an acoustically orienting parasitoid fly (Ormia ochracea). Two years later, the silent morph appeared on the neighboring island of Oahu. We tested two hypotheses for the evolutionary origin of flatwings in Hawaii: (1) that the silent morph originated on Kauai and subsequently introgressed into Oahu and (2) that flatwing originated independently on each island. Morphometric analysis of male wings revealed that Kauai flatwings almost completely lack typical derived structures, whereas Oahu flatwings retain noticeably more wild-type wing venation. Using standard genetic crosses, we confirmed that the mutation segregates as a single-locus, sex-linked Mendelian trait on both islands. However, genome-wide scans using RAD-seq recovered almost completely distinct markers linked with flatwing on each island. The patterns of allelic association with flatwing on either island reveal different genomic architectures consistent with the timing of two mutational events on the X chromosome. Divergent wing morphologies linked to different loci thus cause identical behavioral outcomes--silence--illustrating the power of selection to rapidly shape convergent adaptations from distinct genomic starting points. PMID:24881880

  20. Convergent Margin Structure and a Unifying Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Huene, R.; Ranero, C. R.; Scholl, D. W.

    2008-12-01

    Marine observations of the past decade resolve 3 domains of different mechanics in space that probably respond differently from each other during an earthquake cycle. Accretion is common along thickly (>1 km) sedimented trenches and slowly (<50km/myr) converging margins. Erosion is common where convergence is greater which also reduces trench sediment thickness by rapid subduction. However erosion and accretion can be coeval, for instance, subducted seamounts erode the upper plate as adjacent sediment accretes. Trench sediment abundance appears to be a master control of tectonic erosion or accretion. Subducting plate relief and bending, fluid systems, input plate temperature, and material differences seem less important. From recent observations a unifying framework concept to aid interpretations of both accreting and eroding margins is proposed. Over a long term (Ma) the subduction channel accepts a finite amount of material. The excess amount will accrete and a shortage of trench sediment enhances erosion (Cloos and Shreve, 1988). If conditions remain consistent over ~1 Ma periods, the margin configuration becomes typically accretionary or erosional. In each margin segment the short term inter plate friction and material strength changes during the earthquake cycle as proposed by Wang and Hu, 2006. Mechanics probably changes locally during the cycle as well. K. Wang, Y. Hu, Accretionary prisms in subduction earthquake cycles: the theory of dynamic Coulomb wedge, J. Geophys. Res. 111 (2006) B06410, doi:10.1029/2005JB004094. Cloos, M., and R.L. Shreve, (1988), Subduction channel model of prism accretion, melange formation, sediment subduction, and subduction erosion at convergent plate margins: 2. Implications and discussion, Pageoph, v. 129, n. ¾ 501-545

  1. High convergence implosion symmetry in cylindrical hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Amendt, P A; Bradley, D K; Hammel, B A; Landen, O L; Suter, L J; Turner, R E; Wallace, R J

    1999-09-01

    High convergence, hohlraum-driven implosions will require control of time-integrated drive asymmetries to 1% levels for ignition to succeed on the NIF. We review how core imaging provides such asymmetry measurement accuracy for the lowest order asymmetry modes, and describe recent improvements in imaging techniques that should allow detection of higher order asymmetry modes. We also present a simple analytic model explaining how the sensitivity of symmetry control to beam pointing scales as we progress from single ring per side Nova cylindrical hohlraum illumination geometries to NIF-like multiple rings per side Omega hohlraum illumination geometries and ultimately to NIF-scale hohlraums.

  2. Convergence Analysis of a Domain Decomposition Paradigm

    SciTech Connect

    Bank, R E; Vassilevski, P S

    2006-06-12

    We describe a domain decomposition algorithm for use in several variants of the parallel adaptive meshing paradigm of Bank and Holst. This algorithm has low communication, makes extensive use of existing sequential solvers, and exploits in several important ways data generated as part of the adaptive meshing paradigm. We show that for an idealized version of the algorithm, the rate of convergence is independent of both the global problem size N and the number of subdomains p used in the domain decomposition partition. Numerical examples illustrate the effectiveness of the procedure.

  3. Convergence of multi-channel effective interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, M.; Schaefer, B.-J.; Wambach, J.; Kuo, T. T. S.; Brown, G. E.

    2006-11-01

    A detailed analysis of the convergence properties of the Andreozzi-Lee-Suzuki iteration method, which is used for the calculation of low-momentum effective potentials Vlowk, is presented. After summarizing different modifications of the iteration method for one-flavor channels we introduce a simple model to study the generalization of the iteration method to multi-flavor channels. The failure of a straightforward generalization is discussed. The introduction of a channel-dependent cutoff cures the conceptual and technical problems. This novel method has already been applied successfully for realistic hyperon-nucleon interactions.

  4. On Convergence Acceleration Techniques for Unstructured Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, Dimitri J.

    1998-01-01

    A discussion of convergence acceleration techniques as they relate to computational fluid dynamics problems on unstructured meshes is given. Rather than providing a detailed description of particular methods, the various different building blocks of current solution techniques are discussed and examples of solution strategies using one or several of these ideas are given. Issues relating to unstructured grid CFD problems are given additional consideration, including suitability of algorithms to current hardware trends, memory and cpu tradeoffs, treatment of non-linearities, and the development of efficient strategies for handling anisotropy-induced stiffness. The outlook for future potential improvements is also discussed.

  5. Adaptive control: Stability, convergence, and robustness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sastry, Shankar; Bodson, Marc

    1989-01-01

    The deterministic theory of adaptive control (AC) is presented in an introduction for graduate students and practicing engineers. Chapters are devoted to basic AC approaches, notation and fundamental theorems, the identification problem, model-reference AC, parameter convergence using averaging techniques, and AC robustness. Consideration is given to the use of prior information, the global stability of indirect AC schemes, multivariable AC, linearizing AC for a class of nonlinear systems, AC of linearizable minimum-phase systems, and MIMO systems decouplable by static state feedback.

  6. Cubature on Wiener Space: Pathwise Convergence

    SciTech Connect

    Bayer, Christian Friz, Peter K.

    2013-04-15

    Cubature on Wiener space (Lyons and Victoir in Proc. R. Soc. Lond. A 460(2041):169-198, 2004) provides a powerful alternative to Monte Carlo simulation for the integration of certain functionals on Wiener space. More specifically, and in the language of mathematical finance, cubature allows for fast computation of European option prices in generic diffusion models.We give a random walk interpretation of cubature and similar (e.g. the Ninomiya-Victoir) weak approximation schemes. By using rough path analysis, we are able to establish weak convergence for general path-dependent option prices.

  7. Convergence analysis of particle swarm optimization (PSO) method on the with-in host dengue infection treatment model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handayani, D.; Nuraini, N.; Tse, O.; Saragih, R.; Naiborhu, J.

    2016-04-01

    PSO is a computational optimization method motivated by the social behavior of organisms like bird flocking, fish schooling and human social relations. PSO is one of the most important swarm intelligence algorithms. In this study, we analyze the convergence of PSO when it is applied to with-in host dengue infection treatment model simulation in our early research. We used PSO method to construct the initial adjoin equation and to solve a control problem. Its properties of control input on the continuity of objective function and ability of adapting to the dynamic environment made us have to analyze the convergence of PSO. With the convergence analysis of PSO we will have some parameters that ensure the convergence result of numerical simulations on this model using PSO.

  8. No Genome-Wide Protein Sequence Convergence for Echolocation

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Zhengting; Zhang, Jianzhi

    2015-01-01

    Toothed whales and two groups of bats independently acquired echolocation, the ability to locate and identify objects by reflected sound. Echolocation requires physiologically complex and coordinated vocal, auditory, and neural functions, but the molecular basis of the capacity for echolocation is not well understood. A recent study suggested that convergent amino acid substitutions widespread in the proteins of echolocators underlay the convergent origins of mammalian echolocation. Here, we show that genomic signatures of molecular convergence between echolocating lineages are generally no stronger than those between echolocating and comparable nonecholocating lineages. The same is true for the group of 29 hearing-related proteins claimed to be enriched with molecular convergence. Reexamining the previous selection test reveals several flaws and invalidates the asserted evidence for adaptive convergence. Together, these findings indicate that the reported genomic signatures of convergence largely reflect the background level of sequence convergence unrelated to the origins of echolocation. PMID:25631925

  9. No genome-wide protein sequence convergence for echolocation.

    PubMed

    Zou, Zhengting; Zhang, Jianzhi

    2015-05-01

    Toothed whales and two groups of bats independently acquired echolocation, the ability to locate and identify objects by reflected sound. Echolocation requires physiologically complex and coordinated vocal, auditory, and neural functions, but the molecular basis of the capacity for echolocation is not well understood. A recent study suggested that convergent amino acid substitutions widespread in the proteins of echolocators underlay the convergent origins of mammalian echolocation. Here, we show that genomic signatures of molecular convergence between echolocating lineages are generally no stronger than those between echolocating and comparable nonecholocating lineages. The same is true for the group of 29 hearing-related proteins claimed to be enriched with molecular convergence. Reexamining the previous selection test reveals several flaws and invalidates the asserted evidence for adaptive convergence. Together, these findings indicate that the reported genomic signatures of convergence largely reflect the background level of sequence convergence unrelated to the origins of echolocation. PMID:25631925

  10. Diurnal cycle in convergence patterns in the boundary layer east of the Andes and convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolini, Matilde; Skabar, Yanina García

    2011-06-01

    The South American Low-Level Jet Experiment (SALLJEX) provided a unique dataset to investigate the existence of a mesoscale low-level circulation and of a diurnal cycle in its related convergence pattern over the Southeastern South American region east of the Andes, as well as its relationship with deep convection during the warm season. The present paper builds upon high-resolution analyses produced, assimilating the data collected during the SALLJEX field campaign using BRAMS, and explores their capability to reproduce mesoscale circulations not resolved by the low density observational network available in this region. Results of the analyses show a diurnal oscillation signal in the mean boundary layer convergence pattern over the plains with a nocturnal (daytime) convergence (divergence) maximum. These results are coherent with previous findings of a nocturnal phase in the mature stage of organized deep convection and related precipitation in subtropical latitudes east of the Andes during the warm season. The diurnal cycle of convergence/divergence in the boundary layer is described over a 15-day period, during which different synoptic conditions occurred. During weakly forced environments a regime characterized by nocturnal eastward anomaly flow and convergence and daytime westward anomaly flow and divergence related to a mesoscale northwestern mountain-central plain flow regime dominates over the plains between the Andes Mountains, the Parana River Valley, and the southern Brazil mountain range. In contrast, during synoptic conditions dominated by the presence of a deep thermal low over northwestern Argentina and a related low-level jet, convergence at night is mainly accomplished by the predominantly meridional low-level jet, which exhibits an anomalous weak wind speed diurnal cycle with respect to its summer climatological mean. On the other hand daytime divergence is completely produced by the zonal wind component as in the previous synoptic situation

  11. Cognitive Styles and Virtual Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Nigel

    2000-01-01

    Discussion of navigation through virtual information environments focuses on the need for robust user models that take into account individual differences. Considers Pask's information processing styles and strategies; deep (transformational) and surface (reproductive) learning; field dependence/independence; divergent/convergent thinking;…

  12. Interactive Multimodal Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreno, Roxana; Mayer, Richard

    2007-01-01

    What are interactive multimodal learning environments and how should they be designed to promote students' learning? In this paper, we offer a cognitive-affective theory of learning with media from which instructional design principles are derived. Then, we review a set of experimental studies in which we found empirical support for five design…

  13. Morf - Towards Next Generation Digital Media Management

    SciTech Connect

    Almquist, Justin P.; Connell, Linda M.; Johns, Zoe C.; Dillon, Heather E.; Elliott, Geoffrey

    2005-07-27

    The Morf project is developing next generation digital media management technologies by incorporating features of traditional systems such as digital libraries, knowledge bases, and content management systems. In particular, Morf supports fine-grained content management by allowing text, graphics, or any media to be reused throughout the system, which creates for a ?change once, permeate everywhere? environment. Additionally, Morf provides searching and browsing capabilities of multiple media types across internal and external content. This paper describes the requirements, design, and implementation of Morf and presents three web tools currently driven by the Morf platform.

  14. Design Calculations for NIF Convergent Ablator Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, R. E.; Callahan, D. A.; Hicks, D. G.; Landen, O. L.; Langer, S. H.; Meezan, N. B.; Spears, B. K.; Widmann, K.; Kline, J. L.; Wilson, D. C.; Petrasso, R. D.; Leeper, R. J.

    2010-11-01

    Design calculations for NIF convergent ablator experiments will be described. The convergent ablator experiments measure the implosion trajectory, velocity, and ablation rate of an x-ray driven capsule and are a important component of the U. S. National Ignition Campaign at NIF. The design calculations are post-processed to provide simulations of the key diagnostics -- 1) Dante measurements of hohlraum x-ray flux and spectrum, 2) streaked radiographs of the imploding ablator shell, 3) wedge range filter measurements of D-He3 proton output spectra, and 4) GXD measurements of the imploded core. The simulated diagnostics will be compared to the experimental measurements to provide an assessment of the accuracy of the design code predictions of hohlraum radiation temperature, capsule ablation rate, implosion velocity, shock flash areal density, and x-ray bang time. Post-shot versions of the design calculations are used to enhance the understanding of the experimental measurements and will assist in choosing parameters for subsequent shots and the path towards optimal ignition capsule tuning. *SNL, LLNL, and LANL are operated under US DOE contracts DE-AC04-94AL85000. DE-AC52-07NA27344, and DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  15. Exceptional Convergent Evolution in a Virus

    PubMed Central

    Bull, J. J.; Badgett, M. R.; Wichman, H. A.; Huelsenbeck, J. P.; Hillis, D. M.; Gulati, A.; Ho, C.; Molineux, I. J.

    1997-01-01

    Replicate lineages of the bacteriophage φX 174 adapted to growth at high temperature on either of two hosts exhibited high rates of identical, independent substitutions. Typically, a dozen or more substitutions accumulated in the 5.4-kilobase genome during propagation. Across the entire data set of nine lineages, 119 independent substitutions occurred at 68 nucleotide sites. Over half of these substitutions, accounting for one third of the sites, were identical with substitutions in other lineages. Some convergent substitutions were specific to the host used for phage propagation, but others occurred across both hosts. Continued adaptation of an evolved phage at high temperature, but on the other host, led to additional changes that included reversions of previous substitutions. Phylogenetic reconstruction using the complete genome sequence not only failed to recover the correct evolutionary history because of these convergent changes, but the true history was rejected as being a significantly inferior fit to the data. Replicate lineages subjected to similar environmental challenges showed similar rates of substitution and similar rates of fitness improvement across corresponding times of adaptation. Substitution rates and fitness improvements were higher during the initial period of adaptation than during a later period, except when the host was changed. PMID:9409816

  16. Design calculations for NIF convergent ablator experiments.

    SciTech Connect

    Callahan, Debra; Leeper, Ramon Joe; Spears, B. K.; Zylstra, A.; Seguin, F.; Landen, Otto L.; Petrasso, R. D.; Rinderknecht, H.; Kline, J. L.; Frenje, J.; Wilson, D. C.; Langer, S. H.; Widmann, K.; Meezan, Nathan B.; Hicks, Damien G.; Olson, Richard Edward

    2010-11-01

    Design calculations for NIF convergent ablator experiments will be described. The convergent ablator experiments measure the implosion trajectory, velocity, and ablation rate of an x-ray driven capsule and are a important component of the U. S. National Ignition Campaign at NIF. The design calculations are post-processed to provide simulations of the key diagnostics: (1) Dante measurements of hohlraum x-ray flux and spectrum, (2) streaked radiographs of the imploding ablator shell, (3) wedge range filter measurements of D-He3 proton output spectra, and (4) GXD measurements of the imploded core. The simulated diagnostics will be compared to the experimental measurements to provide an assessment of the accuracy of the design code predictions of hohlraum radiation temperature, capsule ablation rate, implosion velocity, shock flash areal density, and x-ray bang time. Post-shot versions of the design calculations are used to enhance the understanding of the experimental measurements and will assist in choosing parameters for subsequent shots and the path towards optimal ignition capsule tuning.

  17. Divergence and Convergence in Enzyme Evolution*

    PubMed Central

    Galperin, Michael Y.; Koonin, Eugene V.

    2012-01-01

    Comparative analysis of the sequences of enzymes encoded in a variety of prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes reveals convergence and divergence at several levels. Functional convergence can be inferred when structurally distinct and hence non-homologous enzymes show the ability to catalyze the same biochemical reaction. In contrast, as a result of functional diversification, many structurally similar enzyme molecules act on substantially distinct substrates and catalyze diverse biochemical reactions. Here, we present updates on the ATP-grasp, alkaline phosphatase, cupin, HD hydrolase, and N-terminal nucleophile (Ntn) hydrolase enzyme superfamilies and discuss the patterns of sequence and structural conservation and diversity within these superfamilies. Typically, enzymes within a superfamily possess common sequence motifs and key active site residues, as well as (predicted) reaction mechanisms. These observations suggest that the strained conformation (the entatic state) of the active site, which is responsible for the substrate binding and formation of the transition complex, tends to be conserved within enzyme superfamilies. The subsequent fate of the transition complex is not necessarily conserved and depends on the details of the structures of the enzyme and the substrate. This variability of reaction outcomes limits the ability of sequence analysis to predict the exact enzymatic activities of newly sequenced gene products. Nevertheless, sequence-based (super)family assignments and generic functional predictions, even if imprecise, provide valuable leads for experimental studies and remain the best approach to the functional annotation of uncharacterized proteins from new genomes. PMID:22069324

  18. Metabolic Potential of the Deep Subseafloor at Selected Convergent Margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardace, D.; Amend, J. P.; Morris, J. D.

    2005-12-01

    The cold subseafloor is an extreme environment in which microbial metabolism appears to operate slowly but persistently over space and time. At convergent margins, subseafloor microbial communities experience diffuse flow of aqueous fluids through sediment interstices and variable flow of deeply sourced, advecting fluids. When these fluids mix, geochemical disequilibria are established, and may serve as energy sources in microbial metabolism. This study contrasts the metabolic potential of four near trench sedimentary environments associated with the Costa Rica, Cascadia, Nankai, and Izu-Bonin-Marianas subduction zones, which span much of the global range of water depths (~ 2500 to ~ 5800 m) and thermal structure (heat flow at seafloor ~ 15 to ~ 140 mW/m2) outboard of subduction zones. Geochemical data (pH, NH4+, Na+, K+, Fe2+, Ca2+, Mg2+, HCO3-, Cl-, SO42-, SiO2 (aq), CH4 (aq), H2 (aq), PO43-, HS-, and CH3COO-) collected during Ocean Drilling Program Legs 146, 170, 185, 190, and 201 are used in Gibbs free energy minimization calculations to model the bioenergetic potential of key metabolic reactions. At the four sites, pH values are 7.3-8.2, alkalinity values are 1 to 24 mM, and sulfate values are 0 to 30 mM. Notable site-specific differences exist in NH4+ (ranging two orders of magnitude in concentration) and salinity (with reported values up to 40 psu at Izu). The specific reactions considered are: (1) CO2 driven methanogenesis, (2) acetate driven methanogenesis, (3) methanotrophy coupled to sulfate reduction, (4) acetate oxidation coupled to sulfate reduction, (5) acetate oxidation coupled with nitrate reduction, (6) acetate oxidation coupled with ferric iron reduction. The standard Gibbs free energies are combined with the in situ geochemical parameters to calculate overall Gibbs free energies in deep subseafloor environments. In all cases, ferric iron reduction coupled with acetate oxidation yields the greatest energy (~-1600 kJ/mol), followed by nitrate

  19. Building an Effective Social Media Strategy for Science Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohon, Wendy; Robinson, Sarah; Arrowsmith, Ramon; Semken, Steven

    2013-07-01

    Social media has emerged as a popular mode of communication, with more than 73% of the teenage and adult population in the United States using it on a regular basis [Lenhart et al., 2010]. Young people in particular (ages 12-29) are deeply involved in the rapidly evolving social media environment and have an expectation of communication through these media. This engagement creates a valuable opportunity for scientific organizations and programs to use the wide reach, functionality, and informal environment of social media to create brand recognition, establish trust with users, and disseminate scientific information.

  20. Using Social Media to Teach Social Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rheingold, Howard

    2008-01-01

    By showing students how to use Web-based channels to inform publics, advocate positions, contest claims, and organize action around issues they care about, participatory media education can influence civic behavior positively throughout their lives. Participatory media literacy is necessarily a hands-on enterprise, requiring active use of digital…

  1. Media Directors Help Plan a Media Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowley, John H.

    In an effort to plan a more useful media course for advertising majors at Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, a survey was conducted, along with a series of informal interviews, of media directors with large and small advertising firms. The five participating directors completed broad questionnaires on which they rated on a five-point…

  2. Afterword: Instruments as media, media as instruments.

    PubMed

    Rheinberger, Hans-Jörg

    2016-06-01

    The collection of essays comes under the heading of two catchwords: instruments and media. This Afterword looks at their interaction and roles in exploring the characteristics of living beings throughout history, especially their melding and gliding into each other. Before turning to the papers, I will make some more general remarks on instruments and media in scientific, and in particular, biological research. PMID:27053536

  3. Epididymitis: revelations at the convergence of clinical and basic sciences

    PubMed Central

    Michel, Vera; Pilatz, Adrian; Hedger, Mark P; Meinhardt, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Acute epididymitis represents a common medical condition in the urological outpatient clinic. Mostly, epididymitis is caused by bacterial ascent through the urogenital tract, with pathogens originating either from sexually transmitted diseases or urinary tract infections. Although conservative antimicrobial therapy is possible in the majority of patients and is usually sufficient to eradicate the pathogen, studies have shown persistent oligozoospermia and azoospermia in up to 40% of these patients. Animal models of epididymitis are created to delineate the underlying reasons for this observation and the additional impairment of sperm function that is often associated with the disease. Accumulated data provide evidence of a differential expression of immune cells, immunoregulatory genes and pathogen-sensing molecules along the length of the epididymal duct. The evidence suggests that a tolerogenic environment exists in the caput epididymidis, but that inflammatory responses are most intense toward the cauda epididymidis. This is consistent with the need to provide protection for the neo-antigens of spermatozoa emerging from the testis, without compromising the ability to respond to ascending infections. However, severe inflammatory responses, particularly in the cauda, may lead to collateral damage to the structure and function of the epididymis. Convergence of the clinical observations with appropriate animal studies should lead to better understanding of the immunological environment throughout the epididymis, the parameters underlying susceptibility to epididymitis, and to therapeutic approaches that can mitigate epididymal damage and subsequent fertility problems. PMID:26112484

  4. Endemism and functional convergence across the North American soil mycobiome

    PubMed Central

    Talbot, Jennifer M.; Bruns, Thomas D.; Taylor, John W.; Smith, Dylan P.; Branco, Sara; Glassman, Sydney I.; Erlandson, Sonya; Vilgalys, Rytas; Liao, Hui-Ling; Smith, Matthew E.; Peay, Kabir G.

    2014-01-01

    Identifying the ecological processes that structure communities and the consequences for ecosystem function is a central goal of ecology. The recognition that fungi, bacteria, and viruses control key ecosystem functions has made microbial communities a major focus of this field. Because many ecological processes are apparent only at particular spatial or temporal scales, a complete understanding of the linkages between microbial community, environment, and function requires analysis across a wide range of scales. Here, we map the biological and functional geography of soil fungi from local to continental scales and show that the principal ecological processes controlling community structure and function operate at different scales. Similar to plants or animals, most soil fungi are endemic to particular bioregions, suggesting that factors operating at large spatial scales, like dispersal limitation or climate, are the first-order determinants of fungal community structure in nature. By contrast, soil extracellular enzyme activity is highly convergent across bioregions and widely differing fungal communities. Instead, soil enzyme activity is correlated with local soil environment and distribution of fungal traits within the community. The lack of structure–function relationships for soil fungal communities at continental scales indicates a high degree of functional redundancy among fungal communities in global biogeochemical cycles. PMID:24733885

  5. Convergent Evolution of Rumen Microbiomes in High-Altitude Mammals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhigang; Xu, Dongming; Wang, Li; Hao, Junjun; Wang, Jinfeng; Zhou, Xin; Wang, Weiwei; Qiu, Qiang; Huang, Xiaodan; Zhou, Jianwei; Long, Ruijun; Zhao, Fangqing; Shi, Peng

    2016-07-25

    Studies of genetic adaptation, a central focus of evolutionary biology, most often focus on the host's genome and only rarely on its co-evolved microbiome. The Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (QTP) offers one of the most extreme environments for the survival of human and other mammalian species. Yaks (Bos grunniens) and Tibetan sheep (T-sheep) (Ovis aries) have adaptations for living in this harsh high-altitude environment, where nomadic Tibetan people keep them primarily for food and livelihood [1]. Adaptive evolution affects energy-metabolism-related genes in a way that helps these ruminants live at high altitude [2, 3]. Herein, we report convergent evolution of rumen microbiomes for energy harvesting persistence in two typical high-altitude ruminants, yaks and T-sheep. Both ruminants yield significantly lower levels of methane and higher yields of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) than their low-altitude relatives, cattle (Bos taurus) and ordinary sheep (Ovis aries). Ultra-deep metagenomic sequencing reveals significant enrichment in VFA-yielding pathways of rumen microbial genes in high-altitude ruminants, whereas methanogenesis pathways show enrichment in the cattle metagenome. Analyses of RNA transcriptomes reveal significant upregulation in 36 genes associated with VFA transport and absorption in the ruminal epithelium of high-altitude ruminants. Our study provides novel insights into the contributions of microbiomes to adaptive evolution in mammals and sheds light on the biological control of greenhouse gas emissions from livestock enteric fermentation. PMID:27321997

  6. Mass media, secular trends, and the future of cardiovascular disease health promotion: an interpretive analysis.

    PubMed

    Finnegan, J R; Viswanath, K; Hertog, J

    1999-12-01

    Mass media roles in promoting cardiovascular health in the context of lessons learned from major U.S. community studies, changing media technology, and emergent models of media-community partnerships are discussed. Three principal issues are explored: (1) implications of the current expansion, convergence, and harmonization of mass media technology;(2) recent trends in media coverage of heart disease and population practices; and (3) implications for the future relationship between the media and public health in cardiovascular health promotion. It is concluded that classic campaign models focusing on individual-level change have evolved to recognize environmental-level influences on behavior. Emergent public health campaign models have moved toward "agenda-building," in which the focus is on a more unified approach to influencing public and community agendas for social, behavioral, and policy change. Recent developments among the commercial mass media may offer new opportunities for public health partnerships to promote cardiovascular health. PMID:10641818

  7. Trends in media use.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Donald F; Foehr, Ulla G

    2008-01-01

    American youth are awash in media. They have television sets in their bedrooms, personal computers in their family rooms, and digital music players and cell phones in their backpacks. They spend more time with media than any single activity other than sleeping, with the average American eight- to eighteen-year-old reporting more than six hours of daily media use. The growing phenomenon of "media multitasking"--using several media concurrently--multiplies that figure to eight and a half hours of media exposure daily. Donald Roberts and Ulla Foehr examine how both media use and media exposure vary with demographic factors such as age, race and ethnicity, and household socioeconomic status, and with psychosocial variables such as academic performance and personal adjustment. They note that media exposure begins early, increases until children begin school, drops off briefly, then climbs again to peak at almost eight hours daily among eleven- and twelve-year-olds. Television and video exposure is particularly high among African American youth. Media exposure is negatively related to indicators of socioeconomic status, but that relationship may be diminishing. Media exposure is positively related to risk-taking behaviors and is negatively related to personal adjustment and school performance. Roberts and Foehr also review evidence pointing to the existence of a digital divide--variations in access to personal computers and allied technologies by socioeconomic status and by race and ethnicity. The authors also examine how the recent emergence of digital media such as personal computers, video game consoles, and portable music players, as well as the media multitasking phenomenon they facilitate, has increased young people's exposure to media messages while leaving media use time largely unchanged. Newer media, they point out, are not displacing older media but are being used in concert with them. The authors note which young people are more or less likely to use several

  8. What Does a Safe Sleep Environment Look Like?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Page Skip sharing on social media links What Does a Safe Sleep Environment Look Like? Page Content ... safe sleep environment information are available below: What does a safe sleep environment look like? Reduce the ...

  9. Finite volume hydromechanical simulation in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordbotten, Jan Martin

    2014-05-01

    Cell-centered finite volume methods are prevailing in numerical simulation of flow in porous media. However, due to the lack of cell-centered finite volume methods for mechanics, coupled flow and deformation is usually treated either by coupled finite-volume-finite element discretizations, or within a finite element setting. The former approach is unfavorable as it introduces two separate grid structures, while the latter approach loses the advantages of finite volume methods for the flow equation. Recently, we proposed a cell-centered finite volume method for elasticity. Herein, we explore the applicability of this novel method to provide a compatible finite volume discretization for coupled hydromechanic flows in porous media. We detail in particular the issue of coupling terms, and show how this is naturally handled. Furthermore, we observe how the cell-centered finite volume framework naturally allows for modeling fractured and fracturing porous media through internal boundary conditions. We support the discussion with a set of numerical examples: the convergence properties of the coupled scheme are first investigated; second, we illustrate the practical applicability of the method both for fractured and heterogeneous media.

  10. Finite volume hydromechanical simulation in porous media

    PubMed Central

    Nordbotten, Jan Martin

    2014-01-01

    Cell-centered finite volume methods are prevailing in numerical simulation of flow in porous media. However, due to the lack of cell-centered finite volume methods for mechanics, coupled flow and deformation is usually treated either by coupled finite-volume-finite element discretizations, or within a finite element setting. The former approach is unfavorable as it introduces two separate grid structures, while the latter approach loses the advantages of finite volume methods for the flow equation. Recently, we proposed a cell-centered finite volume method for elasticity. Herein, we explore the applicability of this novel method to provide a compatible finite volume discretization for coupled hydromechanic flows in porous media. We detail in particular the issue of coupling terms, and show how this is naturally handled. Furthermore, we observe how the cell-centered finite volume framework naturally allows for modeling fractured and fracturing porous media through internal boundary conditions. We support the discussion with a set of numerical examples: the convergence properties of the coupled scheme are first investigated; second, we illustrate the practical applicability of the method both for fractured and heterogeneous media. PMID:25574061

  11. Creating Quality Media Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hortin, John A.; Bailey, Gerald D.

    1982-01-01

    Innovation, imagination, and student creativity are key ingredients in creating quality media materials for the small school. Student-produced media materials, slides without a camera, personalized slide programs and copy work, self-made task cards, self-made overhead transparencies, graphic materials, and utilization of the mass media are some of…

  12. Mass Media: A Casebook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hixson, Richard F., Ed.

    Recognizing that mass media--now at a stage of viewing critically its effects and responsibilities--and society at large are interdependent, this casebook reviews the many facets of the media and mass communication as they relate to both producers and consumers of messages. The 23 chapters include discussions of the media's responsibility toward…

  13. Youth Media and Agency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hauge, Chelsey

    2014-01-01

    This article addresses how capacity is conceived of and understood in youth media/civic education programming, and how beliefs about agency, development, relationality and youth manifests in the discourses, programmes, and practices of organizations operating youth media programmes. Through attention to a youth media and development programme in…

  14. Media Center: Operations Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dependents Schools (DOD), Washington, DC.

    This guide to basic technical procedures recommended in the operation of within-school media centers is intended for all Department of Defense Dependent Schools (DoDDS) media specialists, clerks, aides, and technicians. The first four sections refer to the general media program functions identified in the related manual, "A is for Apple:…

  15. School Media Specialist Certification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bender, David R.

    The American Association of School Librarians (AASL) supports the development by media specialists of the competencies and skills they need, whether derived from training in general and professional education, or from media specialization. The "Certification Model for Professional School Media Personnel," developed and designed by an AASL…

  16. The Electric Media Conspiracy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loveless, Richard L.

    1983-01-01

    Media defines a process of marking time. I can only make my own marks as producer and consumer of my own media forms. Man is, all at once, life sound and life motion--a mark through time, leaving a trail of images behind. Media is a natural extension of being human. (SR)

  17. Modern Media Education Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fedorov, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    The author supposed that media education models can be divided into the following groups: (1) educational-information models (the study of the theory, history, language of media culture, etc.), based on the cultural, aesthetic, semiotic, socio-cultural theories of media education; (2) educational-ethical models (the study of moral, religions,…

  18. Adolescents and the Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strasburgber, Victor C., Ed.; Comstock, George A., Ed.

    1993-01-01

    In the 1990s, the media represent the single most easily modifiable influence on children and adolescents. This series of articles offers medically oriented practitioners a review of current research on the influence of the media on children and adolescents. The 13 articles are: (1) "Children, Adolescents, and the Media: Five Crucial Issues"…

  19. Sizing Up Social Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearson, Jerold

    2010-01-01

    Most people are aware of the increasing importance of social media to institutional advancement, and many colleges and universities have started investing resources in these media. The next step is to measure the impact of social media on the institution and evaluate the success of one's efforts. Every advancement leader should understand how…

  20. Media Education: Sociology Surveys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fedorov, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    In Russia as well as in foreign countries we can witness sort of the confusion of the terms of "media education" and "media literacy". There are quite a few differences in theoretical approaches to media education, to distinguishing of the most important aims, objectives, means of introduction into the teaching process, etc.…

  1. Media in the Netherlands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klaver, Franca

    This 2-part report summarizes Dutch policy on mass media and reviews the status of cable television in the Netherlands. The first part defines the underlying principles of a national policy on mass media in relation to the press, commercial and educational television broadcasting, radio, cable television, and media research. Parliamentary debate…

  2. Children's Media Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Amy B.

    2008-01-01

    Amy Jordan addresses the need to balance the media industry's potentially important contributions to the healthy development of America's children against the consequences of excessive and age-inappropriate media exposure. Much of the philosophical tension regarding how much say the government should have about media content and delivery stems…

  3. Guidelines for Media Selection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heeren, Elske; Verwijs, Carla; Moonen, Jef

    This paper presents two types of approaches to media selection--rational-choice approaches and social-influence approaches. It is argued that designers should combine the two types of approaches in a bottom-up/top-down media-selection process. As examples of the two types of approaches, two conceptual frameworks are described--task/media fit and…

  4. Spherically-Convergent, Advanced-Fuel Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, D. C.; Nebel, R. A.; Schauer, M. M.; Umstadter, K. R.

    1998-11-01

    Combining nonneutral electron confinement with spherical ion convergence leads to a cm sized reactor volume with high power density.(R. A. Nebel and D. C. Barnes, Fusion Technol.), to appear (1998); D. C. Barnes and R. A. Nebel, Phys. of Plasmas 5, 2498 (1998). This concept is being investigated experimentally,(D. C. Barnes, T. B. Mitchell, and M. M. Schauer, Phys. Plasmas) 4, 1745 (1997). and results will be reported. We argue that D-D operation of such a system offers all the advantages of aneutronic fusion cycles. In particular, no breeding or large tritium inventory is required, and material problems seem tractable based on previous LWR experience. In addition the extremely small unit size leads to a massively modular system which is easily maintained and repaired, suggesting a very high availability. It may also be possible to operate such a system with low or aneutronic fuels. Preliminary work in this direction will be presented.

  5. Converging Intracranial Markers of Conscious Access

    PubMed Central

    Gaillard, Raphaël; Dehaene, Stanislas; Adam, Claude; Clémenceau, Stéphane; Hasboun, Dominique; Baulac, Michel; Cohen, Laurent; Naccache, Lionel

    2009-01-01

    We compared conscious and nonconscious processing of briefly flashed words using a visual masking procedure while recording intracranial electroencephalogram (iEEG) in ten patients. Nonconscious processing of masked words was observed in multiple cortical areas, mostly within an early time window (<300 ms), accompanied by induced gamma-band activity, but without coherent long-distance neural activity, suggesting a quickly dissipating feedforward wave. In contrast, conscious processing of unmasked words was characterized by the convergence of four distinct neurophysiological markers: sustained voltage changes, particularly in prefrontal cortex, large increases in spectral power in the gamma band, increases in long-distance phase synchrony in the beta range, and increases in long-range Granger causality. We argue that all of those measures provide distinct windows into the same distributed state of conscious processing. These results have a direct impact on current theoretical discussions concerning the neural correlates of conscious access. PMID:19296722

  6. Convergent solid-phase synthesis of hirudin.

    PubMed

    Goulas, Spyros; Gatos, Dimitrios; Barlos, Kleomenis

    2006-02-01

    Hirudin variant 1 (HV1), a small protein consisting of 65 amino acids and three disulfide bonds, was synthesized by using Fmoc-based convergent methods on 2-chlorotrityl resin (CLTR). The linear sequence was assembled by the sequential condensation of 7 protected fragments, on the resin-bound 55-65 fragment. The conditions of fragment assembly were carefully studied to determine the most efficient synthetic protocol. Crude reduced [Cys(16, 28)(Acm)]-HV1 thus obtained was easily purified to homogeneity by RP-HPLC. Disulfide bridges were successfully formed by a two-step procedure, involving an oxidative folding step to form Cys(6)-Cys(14) and Cys(22)-Cys(39) linkages, followed by iodine oxidation to form the Cys(16)-Cys(28) bond. The correct disulfide bond alignment was established by peptide mapping using Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease at pH 4.5. PMID:15952245

  7. Relative entropy convergence for depolarizing channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller-Hermes, Alexander; Stilck França, Daniel; Wolf, Michael M.

    2016-02-01

    We study the convergence of states under continuous-time depolarizing channels with full rank fixed points in terms of the relative entropy. The optimal exponent of an upper bound on the relative entropy in this case is given by the log-Sobolev-1 constant. Our main result is the computation of this constant. As an application, we use the log-Sobolev-1 constant of the depolarizing channels to improve the concavity inequality of the von Neumann entropy. This result is compared to similar bounds obtained recently by Kim and we show a version of Pinsker's inequality, which is optimal and tight if we fix the second argument of the relative entropy. Finally, we consider the log-Sobolev-1 constant of tensor-powers of the completely depolarizing channel and use a quantum version of Shearer's inequality to prove a uniform lower bound.

  8. Nonlinear Resonance Cones and Converging Plasma Blobs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agmon, Nathan; Pribyl, Patrick; Gekelman, Walter; Wise, Joe; Katz, Cami; Ha, Chis; Baker, Bob

    2013-10-01

    Electric field resonance cones have been shown to create density disturbances in cold, magnetized plasmas. Two circular antennas in the LAPTAG experimental plasma device were used to create converging, nonlinear resonance cones. The nonlinear electrostatic field is produced by large amplitude RF (ERF/nkTe >> 1). A movable probe, powered by a computerized motor and consisting of three mutually orthogonal electric dipoles, is used to measure the electric field of the cones which become distorted at large amplitudes. A 2D movable Langmuir probe was used to determine localized density perturbations after turn-off of the RF power. A density blob moving at 3-5 times the ion sound speed has been observed to propagate away (for at least 20 cm) from the focus of the cone. Two ring antennas produced colliding blobs. The physics of the collision will be described. Work performed at the Basic Plasma Science Facility supported by DOE and NSF.

  9. Positive Cardiovascular Health: A Timely Convergence.

    PubMed

    Labarthe, Darwin R; Kubzansky, Laura D; Boehm, Julia K; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M; Berry, Jarett D; Seligman, Martin E P

    2016-08-23

    Two concepts, positive health and cardiovascular health, have emerged recently from the respective fields of positive psychology and preventive cardiology. These parallel constructs are converging to foster positive cardiovascular health and a growing collaboration between psychologists and cardiovascular scientists to achieve significant improvements in both individual and population cardiovascular health. We explore these 2 concepts and note close similarities in the measures that define them, the health states that they aim to produce, and their intended long-term clinical and public health outcomes. We especially examine subjective health assets, such as optimism, that are a core focus of positive psychology, but have largely been neglected in preventive cardiology. We identify research to date on positive cardiovascular health, discuss its strengths and limitations thus far, and outline directions for further engagement of cardiovascular scientists with colleagues in positive psychology to advance this new field. PMID:27539179

  10. The 1977 intertropical convergence zone experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poppoff, I. G. (Editor); Page, W. A. (Editor); Margozzi, A. P. (Editor)

    1979-01-01

    Data are presented from the 1977 Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) Experiment conducted in the Panama Canal Zone in July 1977. Measurements were made daily over a 16-day period when the ITCZ moved across the Canal Zone. Two aircraft (Learjet and U-2) flew daily and provided data from horizontal traverses at several altitudes to 21.3 km of ozone, temperature, pressure, water vapor, aerosols, fluorocarbons, methane, nitrous oxide, nitric oxide, and nitric acid. Balloonsondes flown four times per day provided data on ozone, wind fields, pressure, temperature, and humidities to altitudes near 30 km. Rocketsondes provided daily data to altitudes near 69 km. Satellite photography provided detailed cloud information. Descriptions of individual experiments and detailed compilations of all results are provided.

  11. Convergent evolution in primates and an insectivore

    SciTech Connect

    Boffelli, Dario; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Rubin, Edward M.

    2003-04-16

    The cardiovascular risk factor apolipoprotein(a) (apo(a)) has a puzzling distribution among mammals, its presence being limited to a subset of primates and a member of the insectivore lineage, the hedgehog. To explore the evolutionary history of apo(a), we performed extensive genomic sequence comparisons of multiple species with and without an apo(a) gene product, such as human, baboon, hedgehog, lemurand mouse. This analysis indicated that apo(a) arose independently in a subset of primates, including baboon and human, and an insectivore, the hedgehog, and was not simply lost by species lacking it. The similar structural domains shared by the hedgehog and primate apo(a) indicate that they were formed by a unique molecular mechanism involving the convergent evolution of paralogous genes in these distantspecies.

  12. Improving the Convergence of Reversible Samplers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey-Bellet, Luc; Spiliopoulos, Konstantinos

    2016-06-01

    In Monte-Carlo methods the Markov processes used to sample a given target distribution usually satisfy detailed balance, i.e. they are time-reversible. However, relatively recent results have demonstrated that appropriate reversible and irreversible perturbations can accelerate convergence to equilibrium. In this paper we present some general design principles which apply to general Markov processes. Working with the generator of Markov processes, we prove that for some of the most commonly used performance criteria, i.e., spectral gap, asymptotic variance and large deviation functionals, sampling is improved for appropriate reversible and irreversible perturbations of some initially given reversible sampler. Moreover we provide specific constructions for such reversible and irreversible perturbations for various commonly used Markov processes, such as Markov chains and diffusions. In the case of diffusions, we make the discussion more specific using the large deviations rate function as a measure of performance.

  13. Parallel C/C++: Convergence or divergence?

    SciTech Connect

    Stanberry, L.

    1993-12-31

    C has been noted for its wide portability. C++ is touted as the next generation C. Both languages, however, have multiple proposals for parallel extensions. For C, this includes two different ANSI sponsored efforts, X3H5 and X3J11.1. Since C++ is itself in the throes of standardization, parallel C++ proposals are finding their audience among MPP vendors and C++ users in an ARPA-sponsored HPC++ consortium. The number of proposals is large and still growing, and questions arise of whether and how these proposals can converge in order to extend/preserve/protect the investment of the user community. In this panel the authors will bring together representatives from the ANSI committees, MPP vendors, and from independent research efforts to discuss the motivation for their respective proposals, to determine the interoperability of the proposals, and to argue for or against merging of proposals for a standard.

  14. Improving the Convergence of Reversible Samplers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey-Bellet, Luc; Spiliopoulos, Konstantinos

    2016-08-01

    In Monte-Carlo methods the Markov processes used to sample a given target distribution usually satisfy detailed balance, i.e. they are time-reversible. However, relatively recent results have demonstrated that appropriate reversible and irreversible perturbations can accelerate convergence to equilibrium. In this paper we present some general design principles which apply to general Markov processes. Working with the generator of Markov processes, we prove that for some of the most commonly used performance criteria, i.e., spectral gap, asymptotic variance and large deviation functionals, sampling is improved for appropriate reversible and irreversible perturbations of some initially given reversible sampler. Moreover we provide specific constructions for such reversible and irreversible perturbations for various commonly used Markov processes, such as Markov chains and diffusions. In the case of diffusions, we make the discussion more specific using the large deviations rate function as a measure of performance.

  15. Cylindrically converging blast waves in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, H.; Nakamura, Y.

    1981-07-01

    Cylindrically converging shock waves are produced by utilizing the detonation of cylindrical explosive shells. The production and the propagation of shock waves are observed by framing and streak camera photographs, and the trajectory of shock propagations is determined by using an electrical ionization probing system. The effect of the quantity of explosives on the stability, or the axial symmetry, of shock fronts and on the strength of shocks produced is investigated. It has been shown that, for practical purposes, the approximation of shock trajectories by Guderley's formulas would be sufficiently acceptable in an unexpectedly wide region near the implosion center, and that the axial symmetry of the shock front is improved by increasing the quantity of explosives, and thus, strong shocks are produced by merely increasing the quantity of explosives. The reflected diverging shock seems to be very stable. Piezoelectric elements have also been used to detect reflected diverging waves.

  16. The Converged Experience of Risk and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Aronowitz, Robert A

    2009-01-01

    Context: One underappreciated consequence of modern clinical and public health practices is that the experience of being at risk for disease has been converging with the experience of disease itself. This is especially true for certain chronic diseases, in which early diagnosis and aggressive treatment have led to symptom-less and sign-less disease and in which treatments have largely been aimed at altering the disease's future course. Methods: This article reviews the historical scholarship and medical literature pertinent to transformations in the chronic disease and risk experiences. Findings: The experience of chronic disease increasingly resembles or has become indistinguishable from risk because of (1) new clinical interventions that have directly changed the natural history of disease; (2) increased biological, clinical, and epidemiological knowledge about the risk of chronic disease; (3) the recruitment of larger numbers into chronic disease diagnoses via new screening and diagnostic technology and disease definitions; (4) new ways of conceptualizing efficacy; and (5) intense diagnostic testing and medical interventions. Conclusions: The converged experience of risk and disease has led to some unsettling and generally underappreciated consequences that might be subjected to more clinical and policy reflection and response: (1) some puzzling trends in medical decision making, such as the steep and uniform increase in the numbers of women across a broad spectrum of risk/disease in breast cancer who have opted for prophylactic mastectomies; (2) a larger and highly mobilized disease/risk population, resulting in an expanded market for interventions and greater clout for disease advocates; (3) shifts in the perceived severity of the disease, with ripple effects on how people experience and understand their illness and risk of disease; and (4) interventions that promise both to reduce the risk of disease and to treat its symptoms. PMID:19523124

  17. Cooperative target convergence using multiple agents

    SciTech Connect

    Kwok, K.S.; Driessen, B.J.

    1997-10-01

    This work considers the problem of causing multiple (100`s) autonomous mobile robots to converge to a target and provides a follow-the-leader approach to the problem. Each robot has only a limited-range sensor for sending the target and also larger but also limited-range robot-to-robot communication capability. Because of the small amount of information available to the robots, a practical approach to improve convergence to the target is to have a robot follow the robot with the best quality of information. Specifically, each robot emits a signal that informs in-range robots what its status is. A robot has a status value of 0 if it is itself in range of the target. A robot has a status of 1 if it is not in range of the target but is in communication range of a robot that is in range of the target. A robot has a status of 2 if it is not in range of the target but is within range of another robot that has status 1, and so on. Of all the mobile robots that any given robot is in range of, it follows the one with the best status. The emergent behavior is the ant-like trails of robots following each other toward the target. If the robot is not in range of another robot that is either in range of the target or following another robot, the robot will assign-1 to its quality-of-information, and will execute an exhaustive search. The exhaustive search will continue until it encounters either the target or another robot with a nonnegative quality-of-information. The quality of information approach was extended to the case where each robot only has two-bit signals informing it of distance to in-range robots.

  18. Demons deformable registration for CBCT-guided procedures in the head and neck: Convergence and accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Nithiananthan, S.; Brock, K. K.; Daly, M. J.; Chan, H.; Irish, J. C.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2009-10-15

    52 s for the cadaveric head and in an average time of 270 s for the larger FOV patient images. Conclusions: Appropriate selection of convergence and multiscale parameters in Demons registration was shown to reduce computational expense without sacrificing registration performance. For intraoperative CBCT imaging with deformable registration, the ability to perform accurate registration within the stringent time requirements of the operating environment could offer a useful clinical tool allowing integration of preoperative information while accurately reflecting changes in the patient anatomy. Similarly for CBCT-guided radiation therapy, fast accurate deformable registration could further augment high-precision treatment strategies.

  19. Convergent perturbation theory for lattice models with fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazonov, V. K.

    2016-05-01

    The standard perturbation theory in QFT and lattice models leads to the asymptotic expansions. However, an appropriate regularization of the path or lattice integrals allows one to construct convergent series with an infinite radius of the convergence. In the earlier studies, this approach was applied to the purely bosonic systems. Here, using bosonization, we develop the convergent perturbation theory for a toy lattice model with interacting fermionic and bosonic fields.

  20. Linear perturbations of a Schwarzschild blackhole by thin disc - convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čížek, P.; Semerák, O.

    2012-07-01

    In order to find the perturbation of a Schwarzschild space-time due to a rotating thin disc, we try to adjust the method used by [4] in the case of perturbation by a one-dimensional ring. This involves solution of stationary axisymmetric Einstein's equations in terms of spherical-harmonic expansions whose convergence however turned out questionable in numerical examples. Here we show, analytically, that the series are almost everywhere convergent, but in some regions the convergence is not absolute.

  1. [Convergent Care Research: use in developing models of nursing care].

    PubMed

    Rocha, Patrícia Kuerten; do Prado, Marta Lenise; da Silva, Denise Maria Guerreiro Vieira

    2012-01-01

    The present text is a theoretical reflection upon the importance of Nursing care models for the consolidation of this discipline, concerning the contribution of Convergent Care Research (Pesquisa Convergente Assistencial -PCA) in elaborating such models. Beyond this, this article discusses the importance of Convergent Care Research in the convergence of the academic and practical worlds of nursing, which aid towards a safe practice, systematize care, and establish connections between pragmatism and scientism, leading nurses to adopt more solid knowledge construction postures. PMID:23559182

  2. A new look at the convergence of a famous sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrescu, Mihaela

    2010-12-01

    A new proof for the monotonicity of the sequence ? is given as a special case of a large family of monotomic and bounded, hence convergent sequences. The new proof is based on basic calculus results rather than induction, which makes it accessible to a larger audience including business and life sciences students and faculty. The slow rate of convergence of the two sequences is also discussed, and convergence bounds are found.

  3. Visibility of speech articulation enhances auditory phonetic convergence.

    PubMed

    Dias, James W; Rosenblum, Lawrence D

    2016-01-01

    Talkers automatically imitate aspects of perceived speech, a phenomenon known as phonetic convergence. Talkers have previously been found to converge to auditory and visual speech information. Furthermore, talkers converge more to the speech of a conversational partner who is seen and heard, relative to one who is just heard (Dias & Rosenblum Perception, 40, 1457-1466, 2011). A question raised by this finding is what visual information facilitates the enhancement effect. In the following experiments, we investigated the possible contributions of visible speech articulation to visual enhancement of phonetic convergence within the noninteractive context of a shadowing task. In Experiment 1, we examined the influence of the visibility of a talker on phonetic convergence when shadowing auditory speech either in the clear or in low-level auditory noise. The results suggest that visual speech can compensate for convergence that is reduced by auditory noise masking. Experiment 2 further established the visibility of articulatory mouth movements as being important to the visual enhancement of phonetic convergence. Furthermore, the word frequency and phonological neighborhood density characteristics of the words shadowed were found to significantly predict phonetic convergence in both experiments. Consistent with previous findings (e.g., Goldinger Psychological Review, 105, 251-279, 1998), phonetic convergence was greater when shadowing low-frequency words. Convergence was also found to be greater for low-density words, contrasting with previous predictions of the effect of phonological neighborhood density on auditory phonetic convergence (e.g., Pardo, Jordan, Mallari, Scanlon, & Lewandowski Journal of Memory and Language, 69, 183-195, 2013). Implications of the results for a gestural account of phonetic convergence are discussed. PMID:26358471

  4. Sustainable development induction in organizations: a convergence analysis of ISO standards management tools' parameters.

    PubMed

    Merlin, Fabrício Kurman; Pereira, Vera Lúciaduarte do Valle; Pacheco, Waldemar

    2012-01-01

    Organizations are part of an environment in which they are pressured to meet society's demands and acting in a sustainable way. In an attempt to meet such demands, organizations make use of various management tools, among which, ISO standards are used. Although there are evidences of contributions provided by these standards, it is questionable whether its parameters converge for a possible induction for sustainable development in organizations. This work presents a theoretical study, designed on structuralism world view, descriptive and deductive method, which aims to analyze the convergence of management tools' parameters in ISO standards. In order to support the analysis, a generic framework for possible convergence was developed, based on systems approach, linking five ISO standards (ISO 9001, ISO 14001, OHSAS 18001, ISO 31000 and ISO 26000) with sustainable development and positioning them according to organization levels (strategic, tactical and operational). The structure was designed based on Brundtland report concept. The analysis was performed exploring the generic framework for possible convergence based on Nadler and Tushman model. The results found the standards can contribute to a possible sustainable development induction in organizations, as long as they meet certain minimum conditions related to its strategic alignment. PMID:22317134

  5. Prosocial effects of media.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Marjorie J

    2012-06-01

    Parents, teachers, health care providers, and other caring adults worry about the harmful influence of media messages and images on children and teens and wonder how to recognize and encourage positive and healthy use of media. For decades, experts have commented on the power of media. Media depictions can lead to negative attitudes and behavior in some young viewers. This article discusses whether prosocial, tolerant, and cooperative attitudes and behavior can be learned and imitated by children and adolescents and whether media can nurture or stimulate creativity or actively promote health and well-being in young consumers. PMID:22643170

  6. Chronic silent otitis media.

    PubMed

    Paparella, Michael M; Schachern, Patricia A; Cureoglu, Sebahattin

    2002-01-01

    Otitis media occurs along a continuum. For example, otitis media with effusion characterized by fluid pathology can lead to chronic otitis media plus chronic mastoiditis, characterized by the presence of intractable tissue pathology such as cholesteatoma, cholesterol granuloma or granulation tissue. The literature defines chronic otitis media as having a tympanic membrane perforation and otorrhea. Amongst many other sequelae, which can result from the continuum, an important common one is chronic silent otitis media. This overlooked entity which includes pathology beneath an intact tympanic membrane is commonly seen in our human temporal bone laboratory and in patients. The clinical pathological correlates of this important disease are discussed herein. PMID:12021496

  7. Trait convergence and diversification arising from a complex evolutionary history in Hawaiian species of Scaevola.

    PubMed

    McKown, Athena D; Akamine, Michelle Elmore; Sack, Lawren

    2016-08-01

    Species variation in functional traits may reflect diversification relating to convergence and/or divergence depending on environmental pressures and phylogenetic history. We tested trait-environment relationships and their basis in finer-scale evolutionary processes among nine extant Hawaiian species of Scaevola L. (Goodeniaceae), a taxon with a complex history of three independent colonizations by different phylogenetic lineages, parallel ecological specialization, and homoploid hybridization events in Hawai'i. Using a wild population for each species, we evaluated traits related to plant function (morphology, leaf and wood anatomy, nutrient and carbon isotope composition). Hawaiian Scaevola species were distributed across coastal, dry forest and wet forest environments; multivariate environmental analysis using abiotic and biotic factors further showed that species from distantly related lineages inhabited similar environments. Many traits correlated with environment (based on the multivariate environmental analysis), considering both distantly related species and more closely related species. Scaevola species within shared habitats generally showed trait convergence across distantly related lineages, particularly among wet forest species. Furthermore, trait diversification through divergence was extensive among closely related Scaevola species that radiated into novel environments, especially in plant morphology and traits affecting water relations. Homoploid hybrid-origin species were "intermediate" compared to their ancestral parent species, and possessed trait combinations relevant for their current habitat. The diversity in functional traits reflected strong influences of both ecology and evolutionary history in native Hawaiian Scaevola species, and trait correspondence with environment was due to the combination of multiple processes within the taxon: trait pre-adaptation and filtering, evolutionary convergence, divergence, and hybridization. PMID:27142283

  8. Coefficients of convergent multiple Walsh-Paley series

    SciTech Connect

    Plotnikov, Mikhail G

    2012-09-30

    The paper is concerned with the behaviour of the coefficients of multiple Walsh-Paley series that are cube convergent to a finite sum. It is shown that even an everywhere convergent series of this kind may contain coefficients with numbers from a sufficiently large set that grow faster than any preassigned sequence. By Cohen's theorem, this sort of thing cannot happen for multiple trigonometric series that are cube convergent on a set of full measure - their coefficients cannot grow even exponentially. Null subsequences of coefficients are determined for multiple Walsh-Paley series that are cube convergent on a set of definite measure. Bibliography: 18 titles.

  9. Turbulent boundary layer over a convergent and divergent superhydrophobic surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeem, Muhammad; Hwang, Jinyul; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2015-11-01

    Direct numerical simulation (DNS) of spatially developing turbulent boundary layer (TBL) over a convergent and divergent superhydrophobic surface (SHS) was performed. The convergent and divergent SHS was aligned in the streamwise direction. The SHS was modeled as a pattern of slip and no-slip surfaces. For comparison, DNS of TBL over a straight SHS was also carried out. The momentum thickness Reynolds number was varied from 800 to 1400. The gas fraction of the convergent and divergent SHS was the same as that of the straight SHS, keeping the slip area constant. The slip velocity in the convergent SHS was higher than that of the straight SHS. An optimal streamwise length of the convergent and divergent SHS was obtained. The convergent and divergent SHS gave more drag reduction than the straight SHS. The convergent and divergent SHS led to the modification of near wall-turbulent structures, resembling the narrowing and widening streaky structures near the wall. The convergent and divergent SHS had a relatively larger damping effect on near-wall turbulence than the straight SHS. These observations will be further analyzed statistically to demonstrate the effect of the convergent and divergent SHS on the interaction of inner and outer regions of TBL.

  10. Fractal aspects and convergence of Newton`s method

    SciTech Connect

    Drexler, M.

    1996-12-31

    Newton`s Method is a widely established iterative algorithm for solving non-linear systems. Its appeal lies in its great simplicity, easy generalization to multiple dimensions and a quadratic local convergence rate. Despite these features, little is known about its global behavior. In this paper, we will explain a seemingly random global convergence pattern using fractal concepts and show that the behavior of the residual is entirely explicable. We will also establish quantitative results for the convergence rates. Knowing the mechanism of fractal generation, we present a stabilization to the orthodox Newton method that remedies the fractal behavior and improves convergence.

  11. The convergence of health care expenditure in the US states.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zijun

    2009-01-01

    In response to rising health care costs, many have called for more effective regional health policy coordination. In this paper, we address the issue by examining the degree of convergence in per capita health care expenditure and its nine components across the US states from 1980 to 2004. The major finding is the moderate evidence of convergence in total health care expenditure and the diverse performance of the expenditure components regarding convergence. We also find hospital care to be responsible for the bulk of cross-state convergence in total expenditure. The expenditure on prescription drugs is the most important diverging factor. Policy implications of these empirical results are discussed. PMID:18273915

  12. EarthCubed: Community Convergence and Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, J. C.; Black, R.; Davis, R.; Dick, C.; Lee, T.; Allison, M. L.

    2015-12-01

    What drives engagement across a diverse community with the common goal of creating a robust cyberinfrastructure for the geosciences? Which applications, social media venues and outreach mechanisms solicit the most valuable feedback? Of the dizzying toolkit available for community-building, which tools should receive time, attention and dedication? Finally, how does it all relate to better geoscience research? Research projects in the geosciences are rapidly becoming more interdisciplinary, requiring use of broader data-sets and a multitude of data-types in an effort to explain questions important to both the scientific community and the general public. Effective use of the data and tools available requires excellent community communication and engagement across disciplines, as well as a manner to easily obtain and access those data and tools. For over two years, the EarthCube project has sought to create the most active and engaged community possible, bringing together experts from all across the NSF GEO directorate and its many-faceted disciplines. Initial efforts focused on collecting insight and opinions at in-person "end-user workshops," and informal organization of interest groups and teams. Today, efforts feature an organizational structure with dedicated internal communication and outreach groups. The EarthCube Office has been largely responsible for coordination of these groups and the social media and Internet presence of the project to date, through the creation and curation of the EarthCube.org website, social media channels, live-streaming of meetings, and newsletters. Measures of the effectiveness of these efforts will be presented, to serve as potential reference and guidance for other projects seeking to grow their own communities. In addition, we will discuss how the Office's role in outreach and engagement has changed over the past year with the creation of the Engagement and Liaison Teams, and what it signifies for the Office's role in Earth

  13. Monte Carlo simulations of converging laser beam propagating in turbid media with parallel computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Di; Lu, Jun Q.; Hu, Xin H.; Zhao, S. S.

    1999-11-01

    Due to its flexibility and simplicity, Monte Carlo method is often used to study light propagation in turbid medium where the photons are treated like classic particles being scattered and absorbed randomly based on a radiative transfer theory. However, due to the need of large number of photons to produce statistically significance results, this type of calculations requires large computing resources. To overcome such difficulty, we implemented parallel computing technique into our Monte Carlo simulations. The algorithm is based on the fact that the classic particles are uncorrelated, and the trajectories of multiple photons can be tracked simultaneously. When a beam of focused light incident to the medium, the incident photons are divided into groups according to the available processes on a parallel machine and the calculations are carried out in parallel. Utilizing PVM (Parallel Virtual Machine, a parallel computing software), the parallel programs in both C and FORTRAN are developed on the massive parallel computer Cray T3E at the North Carolina Supercomputer Center and a local PC-cluster network running UNIX/Sun Solaris. The parallel performances of our codes have been excellent on both Cray T3E and the PC clusters. In this paper, we present results on a focusing laser beam propagating through a highly scattering and diluted solution of intralipid. The dependence of the spatial distribution of light near the focal point on the concentration of intralipid solution is studied and its significance is discussed.

  14. Convergence Insufficiency/Divergence Insufficiency Convergence Excess/Divergence Excess: Some Facts and Fictions

    PubMed Central

    Khawam, Edward; Abiad, Bachir; Boughannam, Alaa; Saade, Joanna; Alameddine, Ramzi

    2015-01-01

    Great discrepancies are often encountered between the distance fixation and the near-fixation esodeviations and exodeviations. They are all attributed to either anomalies of the AC/A ratio or anomalies of the fusional convergence or divergence amplitudes. We report a case with pseudoconvergence insufficiency and another one with pseudoaccommodative convergence excess. In both cases, conv./div. excess and insufficiency were erroneously attributed to anomalies of the AC/A ratio or to anomalies of the fusional amplitudes. Our purpose is to show that numerous factors, other than anomalies in the AC/A ratio or anomalies in the fusional conv. or divergence amplitudes, can contaminate either the distance or the near deviations. This results in significant discrepancies between the distance and the near deviations despite a normal AC/A ratio and normal fusional amplitudes, leading to erroneous diagnoses and inappropriate treatment models. PMID:26351603

  15. Strong convergence and convergence rates of approximating solutions for algebraic Riccati equations in Hilbert spaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ito, Kazufumi

    1987-01-01

    The linear quadratic optimal control problem on infinite time interval for linear time-invariant systems defined on Hilbert spaces is considered. The optimal control is given by a feedback form in terms of solution pi to the associated algebraic Riccati equation (ARE). A Ritz type approximation is used to obtain a sequence pi sup N of finite dimensional approximations of the solution to ARE. A sufficient condition that shows pi sup N converges strongly to pi is obtained. Under this condition, a formula is derived which can be used to obtain a rate of convergence of pi sup N to pi. The results of the Galerkin approximation is demonstrated and applied for parabolic systems and the averaging approximation for hereditary differential systems.

  16. The Impact of Converging Information Technologies. Proceedings of the CAUSE National Conference (Monterey, California, December 9-12, 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CAUSE, Boulder, CO.

    Proceedings of a 1986 CAUSE conference on the impact of converging information technologies are presented. Topics of conference papers include: policy issues in higher education, planning and information technology, people issues in information technology, telecommunications/networking, special environments, microcomputer issues and applications,…

  17. Culture et medias (Culture and the Media).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abastado, Claude

    1982-01-01

    The traditional conception of pluralistic culture is contrasted with a new, separate form of culture: mass media culture. Its components are noted: medium, message, "mosaic," and strategy, and methodology for its study is discussed. (MSE)

  18. Media-Augmented Exercise Machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, T.

    2002-01-01

    Cardio-vascular exercise has been used to mitigate the muscle and cardiac atrophy associated with adaptation to micro-gravity environments. Several hours per day may be required. In confined spaces and long duration missions this kind of exercise is inevitably repetitive and rapidly becomes uninteresting. At the same time, there are pressures to accomplish as much as possible given the cost- per-hour for humans occupying orbiting or interplanetary. Media augmentation provides a the means to overlap activities in time by supplementing the exercise with social, recreational, training or collaborative activities and thereby reducing time pressures. In addition, the machine functions as an interface to a wide range of digital environments allowing for spatial variety in an otherwise confined environment. We hypothesize that the adoption of media augmented exercise machines will have a positive effect on psycho-social well-being on long duration missions. By organizing and supplementing exercise machines, data acquisition hardware, computers and displays into an interacting system this proposal increases functionality with limited additional mass. This paper reviews preliminary work on a project to augment exercise equipment in a manner that addresses these issues and at the same time opens possibilities for additional benefits. A testbed augmented exercise machine uses a specialty built cycle trainer as both input to a virtual environment and as an output device from it using spatialized sound, and visual displays, vibration transducers and variable resistance. The resulting interactivity increases a sense of engagement in the exercise, provides a rich experience of the digital environments. Activities in the virtual environment and accompanying physiological and psychological indicators may be correlated to track and evaluate the health of the crew.

  19. Intercontinental convergence of stream fish community traits along geomorphic and hydraulic gradients

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lamouroux, N.; Poff, N.L.; Angermeier, P.L.

    2002-01-01

    Community convergence across biogeographically distinct regions suggests the existence of key, repeated, evolutionary mechanisms relating community characteristics to the environment. However, convergence studies at the community level often involve only qualitative comparisons of the environment and may fail to identify which environmental variables drive community structure. We tested the hypothesis that the biological traits of fish communities on two continents (Europe and North America) are similarly related to environmental conditions. Specifically, from observations of individual fish made at the microhabitat scale (a few square meters) within French streams, we generated habitat preference models linking traits of fish species to local scale hydraulic conditions (Froude number), Using this information, we then predicted how hydraulics and geomorphology at the larger scale of stream reaches (several pool-riffle sequences) should quantitatively influence the trait composition of fish communities. Trait composition for fishes in stream reaches with low Froude number at low flow or high proportion of pools was predicted as nonbenthic, large, fecund, long-lived, nonstreamlined, and weak swimmers. We tested our predictions in contrasting stream reaches in France (n = 11) and Virginia, USA (n = 76), using analyses of covariance to quantify the relative influence of continent vs. physical habitat variables on fish traits. The reach-scale convergence analysis indicated that trait proportions in the communities differed between continents (up to 55% of the variance in each trait was explained by "continent"), partly due to distinct evolutionary histories. However, within continents, trait proportions were comparably related to the hydraulic and geomorphic variables (up to 54% of the variance within continents explained). In particular, a synthetic measure of fish traits in reaches was well explained (50% of its variance) by the Froude number independently of the

  20. The definition, recognition, and interpretation of convergent evolution, and two new measures for quantifying and assessing the significance of convergence.

    PubMed

    Stayton, C Tristan

    2015-08-01

    Convergent evolution is an important phenomenon in the history of life. Despite this, there is no common definition of convergence used by biologists. Instead, several conceptually different definitions are employed. The primary dichotomy is between pattern-based definitions, where independently evolved similarity is sufficient for convergence, and process-based definitions, where convergence requires a certain process to produce this similarity. The unacknowledged diversity of definitions can lead to problems in evolutionary research. Process-based definitions may bias researchers away from studying or recognizing other sources of independently evolved similarity, or lead researchers to interpret convergent patterns as necessarily caused by a given process. Thus, pattern-based definitions are recommended. Existing measures of convergence are reviewed, and two new measures are developed. Both are pattern based and conceptually minimal, quantifying nothing but independently evolved similarity. One quantifies the amount of phenotypic distance between two lineages that is closed by subsequent evolution; the other simply counts the number of lineages entering a region of phenotypic space. The behavior of these measures is explored in simulations; both show acceptable Type I and Type II error. The study of convergent evolution will be facilitated if researchers are explicit about working definitions of convergence and adopt a standard toolbox of convergence measures. PMID:26177938

  1. Sustained Fixation Induced Changes in Phoria and Convergence Peak Velocity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun H.; Vicci, Vincent R.; Han, Sang J.; Alvarez, Tara L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose This study sought to investigate the influence of phoria adaptation on convergence peak velocity from responses located at different initial vergence positions. Methods Symmetrical 4° convergence step responses and near dissociated phoria (measured at 40 cm from the subject's midline) were recorded from six subjects with normal binocular vision using an infrared limbus tracking system with a haploscope. Two different sustained fixations (1° and 16° convergent rotation along the subject's midline) were used to study whether phoria had an influence on the peak velocity of convergence responses located at two initial vergence positions (1° or ‘far’ steps and 12° or ‘near’ steps). Results Phoria was significantly adapted after a sustained fixation task at near (16°) and far (1°) (p<0.002). A repeated measures ANOVA showed that convergence far steps were significantly faster than the near steps (p<0.03). When comparing convergence steps with the same initial vergence position, steps measured after near phoria adaptation were faster than responses after far adaptation (p<0.02). A regression analysis demonstrated that the change in phoria and the change in convergence peak velocity were significantly correlated for the far convergence steps (r = 0.97, p = 0.001). A weaker correlation was observed for the near convergence steps (r = 0.59, p = 0.20). Conclusion As a result of sustained fixation, phoria was adapted and the peak velocity of the near and far convergence steps was modified. This study has clinical considerations since prisms, which evoke phoria adaptation, can be prescribed to help alleviate visual discomfort. Future investigations should include a systematic study of how prisms may influence convergence and divergence eye movements for those prescribed with prisms within their spectacles. PMID:21698110

  2. Genome-wide signatures of convergent evolution in echolocating mammals

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Joe; Tsagkogeorga, Georgia; Cotton, James A.; Liu, Yuan; Provero, Paolo; Stupka, Elia; Rossiter, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Evolution is typically thought to proceed through divergence of genes, proteins, and ultimately phenotypes1-3. However, similar traits might also evolve convergently in unrelated taxa due to similar selection pressures4,5. Adaptive phenotypic convergence is widespread in nature, and recent results from a handful of genes have suggested that this phenomenon is powerful enough to also drive recurrent evolution at the sequence level6-9. Where homoplasious substitutions do occur these have long been considered the result of neutral processes. However, recent studies have demonstrated that adaptive convergent sequence evolution can be detected in vertebrates using statistical methods that model parallel evolution9,10 although the extent to which sequence convergence between genera occurs across genomes is unknown. Here we analyse genomic sequence data in mammals that have independently evolved echolocation and show for the first time that convergence is not a rare process restricted to a handful of loci but is instead widespread, continuously distributed and commonly driven by natural selection acting on a small number of sites per locus. Systematic analyses of convergent sequence evolution in 805,053 amino acids within 2,326 orthologous coding gene sequences compared across 22 mammals (including four new bat genomes) revealed signatures consistent with convergence in nearly 200 loci. Strong and significant support for convergence among bats and the dolphin was seen in numerous genes linked to hearing or deafness, consistent with an involvement in echolocation. Surprisingly we also found convergence in many genes linked to vision: the convergent signal of many sensory genes was robustly correlated with the strength of natural selection. This first attempt to detect genome-wide convergent sequence evolution across divergent taxa reveals the phenomenon to be much more pervasive than previously recognised. PMID:24005325

  3. Genome-wide signatures of convergent evolution in echolocating mammals.

    PubMed

    Parker, Joe; Tsagkogeorga, Georgia; Cotton, James A; Liu, Yuan; Provero, Paolo; Stupka, Elia; Rossiter, Stephen J

    2013-10-10

    Evolution is typically thought to proceed through divergence of genes, proteins and ultimately phenotypes. However, similar traits might also evolve convergently in unrelated taxa owing to similar selection pressures. Adaptive phenotypic convergence is widespread in nature, and recent results from several genes have suggested that this phenomenon is powerful enough to also drive recurrent evolution at the sequence level. Where homoplasious substitutions do occur these have long been considered the result of neutral processes. However, recent studies have demonstrated that adaptive convergent sequence evolution can be detected in vertebrates using statistical methods that model parallel evolution, although the extent to which sequence convergence between genera occurs across genomes is unknown. Here we analyse genomic sequence data in mammals that have independently evolved echolocation and show that convergence is not a rare process restricted to several loci but is instead widespread, continuously distributed and commonly driven by natural selection acting on a small number of sites per locus. Systematic analyses of convergent sequence evolution in 805,053 amino acids within 2,326 orthologous coding gene sequences compared across 22 mammals (including four newly sequenced bat genomes) revealed signatures consistent with convergence in nearly 200 loci. Strong and significant support for convergence among bats and the bottlenose dolphin was seen in numerous genes linked to hearing or deafness, consistent with an involvement in echolocation. Unexpectedly, we also found convergence in many genes linked to vision: the convergent signal of many sensory genes was robustly correlated with the strength of natural selection. This first attempt to detect genome-wide convergent sequence evolution across divergent taxa reveals the phenomenon to be much more pervasive than previously recognized. PMID:24005325

  4. On two parabolic systems: Convergence and blowup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yamin

    1998-12-01

    This dissertation studies two parabolic systems. It consists of two parts. In part one (chapter one), we prove a convergence result, namely, the solution (AK,/ BK) of a system of chemical diffusion-reaction equations (with reaction rate K) converges to the solution (A, B) of a diffusion- instantaneous-reaction equation. To prove our main result, we use some L1 and L2 'energy' estimates and a compactness result due to Aubin (1). As a by-product we also prove that as K approaches infinity, the limit solution exhibits phase separation between A and B. In part two (chapter two), we study the blowup rate for a system of heat equations ut=/Delta u,/ vt=/Delta v in a bounded domain Ωtimes(0,T) coupled in the nonlinear Neumann boundary conditions [/partial u/over/partial n]=vp,/ [/partial v/over/partial n]=uq on ∂Omega×[ 0,T), where p>0,/ q>0,/ pq>1 and n is the exterior normal vector on ∂Omega. Under certain assumptions, we establish exact blowup rate which generalizes the corresponding results of some authors' recent work including Deng (2), Deng-Fila-Levine (3) and Hu-Yin (4). ftn (1) J. P. A scUBIN, Un theoreme de compacite, C. R. Acad. Sci., 256(1963), pp. 5042-5044. (2) K. D scENG, Blow-up rates for parabolic systems, Z. Angew. Math. Phys., 47(1996), No. 1, pp. 132-143. (3) K. D scENG, M. F scILA AND H. A. L scEVINE, On critical exponents for a system of heat equations coupled in the boundary conditions, Acta Math. Univ. Comenian. (N.S.), 36(1994), No. 2, pp. 169-192. (4) B. H scU scAND H. M. Y scIN, The profile near blowup time for solutions of the heat equation with a nonlinear boundary condition, Trans. Amer. Math. Soc., 346(1994), pp. 117-135.

  5. Converging cylindrical shocks in ideal magnetohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Pullin, D. I.; Mostert, W.; Wheatley, V.; Samtaney, R.

    2014-09-15

    We consider a cylindrically symmetrical shock converging onto an axis within the framework of ideal, compressible-gas non-dissipative magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). In cylindrical polar co-ordinates we restrict attention to either constant axial magnetic field or to the azimuthal but singular magnetic field produced by a line current on the axis. Under the constraint of zero normal magnetic field and zero tangential fluid speed at the shock, a set of restricted shock-jump conditions are obtained as functions of the shock Mach number, defined as the ratio of the local shock speed to the unique magnetohydrodynamic wave speed ahead of the shock, and also of a parameter measuring the local strength of the magnetic field. For the line current case, two approaches are explored and the results compared in detail. The first is geometrical shock-dynamics where the restricted shock-jump conditions are applied directly to the equation on the characteristic entering the shock from behind. This gives an ordinary-differential equation for the shock Mach number as a function of radius which is integrated numerically to provide profiles of the shock implosion. Also, analytic, asymptotic results are obtained for the shock trajectory at small radius. The second approach is direct numerical solution of the radially symmetric MHD equations using a shock-capturing method. For the axial magnetic field case the shock implosion is of the Guderley power-law type with exponent that is not affected by the presence of a finite magnetic field. For the axial current case, however, the presence of a tangential magnetic field ahead of the shock with strength inversely proportional to radius introduces a length scale R=√(μ{sub 0}/p{sub 0}) I/(2 π) where I is the current, μ{sub 0} is the permeability, and p{sub 0} is the pressure ahead of the shock. For shocks initiated at r ≫ R, shock convergence is first accompanied by shock strengthening as for the strictly gas-dynamic implosion. The

  6. Converging cylindrical shocks in ideal magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pullin, D. I.; Mostert, W.; Wheatley, V.; Samtaney, R.

    2014-09-01

    We consider a cylindrically symmetrical shock converging onto an axis within the framework of ideal, compressible-gas non-dissipative magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). In cylindrical polar co-ordinates we restrict attention to either constant axial magnetic field or to the azimuthal but singular magnetic field produced by a line current on the axis. Under the constraint of zero normal magnetic field and zero tangential fluid speed at the shock, a set of restricted shock-jump conditions are obtained as functions of the shock Mach number, defined as the ratio of the local shock speed to the unique magnetohydrodynamic wave speed ahead of the shock, and also of a parameter measuring the local strength of the magnetic field. For the line current case, two approaches are explored and the results compared in detail. The first is geometrical shock-dynamics where the restricted shock-jump conditions are applied directly to the equation on the characteristic entering the shock from behind. This gives an ordinary-differential equation for the shock Mach number as a function of radius which is integrated numerically to provide profiles of the shock implosion. Also, analytic, asymptotic results are obtained for the shock trajectory at small radius. The second approach is direct numerical solution of the radially symmetric MHD equations using a shock-capturing method. For the axial magnetic field case the shock implosion is of the Guderley power-law type with exponent that is not affected by the presence of a finite magnetic field. For the axial current case, however, the presence of a tangential magnetic field ahead of the shock with strength inversely proportional to radius introduces a length scale R=sqrt{μ _0/p_0} I/(2 π ) where I is the current, μ0 is the permeability, and p0 is the pressure ahead of the shock. For shocks initiated at r ≫ R, shock convergence is first accompanied by shock strengthening as for the strictly gas-dynamic implosion. The diverging magnetic field

  7. Homology and Convergence in Vertebrate and Invertebrate Nervous Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandeman, David

    Each year the meeting of the American Neuroscience Society attracts over 20,000 members, reflecting the explosion of interest in this field that has occurred over the past few decades. Researchers from many disciplines are focusing their skills on the investigation of every aspect of nervous systems, and neuroscience now encompasses the entire range of endeavour from the study of the single molecules that make up neural membranes to the non-invasive observation of neural function in animals behaving in their natural environments. Advances over the past three decades in our understanding of nervous systems are impressive and come from a multifaceted approach to the study of both vertebrate and invertebrate animals. An almost unexpected by-product of the parallel investigation of vertebrate and invertebrate nervous systems that is explored in this article is the emergent view of an intricate web of evolutionary homology and convergence exhibited in the structure and function of the nervous systems of these two large, paraphyletic groups of animals.

  8. Convergent tapering of xylem conduits in different woody species.

    PubMed

    Anfodillo, Tommaso; Carraro, Vinicio; Carrer, Marco; Fior, Claudio; Rossi, Sergio

    2006-01-01

    A recent theoretical model (the West, Brown and Enquist, WBE model) hypothesized that plants have evolved a network of xylem conduits with a tapered structure (narrower conduits distally) which should minimize the cost of water transport from roots to leaves. Specific measurements are required to test the model predictions. We sampled both angiosperms and gymnosperms (50 trees) growing in different environments with heights ranging from 0.5 to 44.4 m, measuring variations of the xylem-conduit diameter from tree top to stem base. In all trees measured, mean hydraulically weighted conduit diameters (Dh) at the tree top were narrower than those at the stem base. In actively growing trees, the longitudinal variation of Dh showed a degree of tapering in agreement with WBE predictions, while trees close to their maximum height showed slightly lower conduit tapering. Comparing different species, a very good correlation was observed between degree of xylem tapering and tree height (r2 = 0.88; P < 0.0001) independently of any other variable (age, site, altitude, etc.). As predicted by WBE, sampled trees seemed to converge towards similar xylem conduit tapering. However, trees approaching their maximum height had a nonoptimal tapering which appeared insufficient to compensate for the progressive increase in tree height. PMID:16411931

  9. Critical Literacy and the Ethical Responsibilities of Student Media Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Jessica K.

    2013-01-01

    Today's complex literate environments require contemporary authors to focus on the ethical responsibilities of media creation. This study highlights 12th graders in California who produced a documentary on Latino immigration and chronicles the complex interactions between student-generated media, critical literacy, and ethics. Findings…

  10. Deathscapes, Topocide, Domicide: The Plains in Contemporary Print Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dando, Christina E.

    2009-01-01

    The American print media are a powerful mechanism for communicating information about places and environment to the American public. When it comes to a landscape such as the Great Plains, experienced by many Americans as either sleep-through land in a car or flyover land in a plane, the print media may be their only real source of information…

  11. Limitless Learning: Assessing Social Media Use for Global Workplace Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breunig, Karl Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This empirical paper aims to assess how social media can foster workplace learning within a globally dispersed project environment. In general, there are few studies on the use of social media in organizations, and many of these emphasize on issues related to knowledge transfer. Although learning traditionally has been as acquisition of…

  12. Promoting Resilience: Ways Library Media Specialists Strengthen Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Jami L.

    2005-01-01

    As students file into the library media center for orientation during the hectic first weeks of school, Mrs. Greene, a veteran media specialist with fifteen years experience, wonders how she can make a difference in an environment governed by No Child Left Behind and state-mandated tests. Some students are disadvantaged because they are struggling…

  13. Investigating Language and the Media: The Case of Newswriting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perrin, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Drawing on a case study of newswriting, this article presents media linguistics as a subdiscipline of applied linguistics (AL), dealing with a distinctive field of language use. Language in the media is characterized by specific environments, functions, and structures. Medialinguistic research, however, tends to overcome disciplinary boundaries.…

  14. Electronic Media: A Motivational Strategy for Student Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finamore, Dora C. D.; Hochanadel, Aaron J.; Hochanadel, Cathleen E.; Millam, Loretta A.; Reinhardt, Michelle M.

    2012-01-01

    Motivation, engagement, goal attainment and effective interaction are essential components for college students to be successful in the online educational environment. The popularity and influx of electronic media applications has allowed educators the opportunity to incorporate social media (Facebook, Twitter), and volitional messages (Simple…

  15. The Media Specialist and Children: An Open Classroom Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Mark W.

    1973-01-01

    Before an elementary school media specialist can function effectively in an open classroom environment, he or she must understand and accept some basic assumptions about children, assumptions which form the basis of open education. The media center should reflect this common core of basic beliefs about children's growth and development. (Related…

  16. Convergence and Commonality Challenge Business Communication Research: Outstanding Researcher Lecture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Priscilla S.

    2001-01-01

    Considers some ways that past research equips educators to tackle research challenges they are now facing. Suggests two challenges for consideration, convergence and commonality. Notes that convergence and commonality challenge educators to let go of the search for disciplinary identity, to stop seeking uniformity in methods, and to use diversity…

  17. Influence of Role-Switching on Phonetic Convergence in Conversation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pardo, Jennifer S.; Jay, Isabel Cajori; Hoshino, Risa; Hasbun, Sara Maria; Sowemimo-Coker, Chantal; Krauss, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    The current study examined phonetic convergence when talkers alternated roles during conversational interaction. The talkers completed a map navigation task in which they alternated instruction Giver and Receiver roles across multiple map pairs. Previous studies found robust effects of the role of a talker on phonetic convergence, and it was…

  18. Development of the Scale for "Convergence Thinking" in Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Sungmi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to define the concept of "convergence thinking" as a trading zone for knowledge fusion in the engineering field, and develops its measuring scale. Design/ Methodology/Approach: Based on results from literature review, this study clarifies a theoretical ground for "convergence thinking."…

  19. Convergent evolution as natural experiment: the tape of life reconsidered.

    PubMed

    Powell, Russell; Mariscal, Carlos

    2015-12-01

    Stephen Jay Gould argued that replaying the 'tape of life' would result in radically different evolutionary outcomes. Recently, biologists and philosophers of science have paid increasing attention to the theoretical importance of convergent evolution-the independent origination of similar biological forms and functions-which many interpret as evidence against Gould's thesis. In this paper, we examine the evidentiary relevance of convergent evolution for the radical contingency debate. We show that under the right conditions, episodes of convergent evolution can constitute valid natural experiments that support inferences regarding the deep counterfactual stability of macroevolutionary outcomes. However, we argue that proponents of convergence have problematically lumped causally heterogeneous phenomena into a single evidentiary basket, in effect treating all convergent events as if they are of equivalent theoretical import. As a result, the 'critique from convergent evolution' fails to engage with key claims of the radical contingency thesis. To remedy this, we develop ways to break down the heterogeneous set of convergent events based on the nature of the generalizations they support. Adopting this more nuanced approach to convergent evolution allows us to differentiate iterated evolutionary outcomes that are probably common among alternative evolutionary histories and subject to law-like generalizations, from those that do little to undermine and may even support, the Gouldian view of life. PMID:26640647

  20. Economic Growth and the Ehrenfest Fleas:. the Convergence among Countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Gennaro, Luca; Garibaldi, Ubaldo

    The aim of this work is to predict the economic convergence among countries by using a generalization of Ehrenfest's urn. In particular this work shows that the Ehrenfest model captures the convergence among countries. A empirical analysis is presented on the European Union countries, the G7 countries and the emerging countries.

  1. A Monotonically Convergent Algorithm for Orthogonal Congruence Rotation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiers, Henk A. L.; Groenen, Patrick

    1996-01-01

    An iterative majorization algorithm is proposed for orthogonal congruence rotation that is guaranteed to converge from every starting point. In addition, the algorithm is easier to program than the algorithm proposed by F. B. Brokken, which is not guaranteed to converge. The derivation of the algorithm is traced in detail. (SLD)

  2. Convergent antibody signatures in human dengue.

    PubMed

    Parameswaran, Poornima; Liu, Yi; Roskin, Krishna M; Jackson, Katherine K L; Dixit, Vaishali P; Lee, Ji-Yeun; Artiles, Karen L; Zompi, Simona; Vargas, Maria José; Simen, Birgitte B; Hanczaruk, Bozena; McGowan, Kim R; Tariq, Muhammad A; Pourmand, Nader; Koller, Daphne; Balmaseda, Angel; Boyd, Scott D; Harris, Eva; Fire, Andrew Z

    2013-06-12

    Dengue is the most prevalent mosquito-borne viral disease in humans, and the lack of early prognostics, vaccines, and therapeutics contributes to immense disease burden. To identify patterns that could be used for sequence-based monitoring of the antibody response to dengue, we examined antibody heavy-chain gene rearrangements in longitudinal peripheral blood samples from 60 dengue patients. Comparing signatures between acute dengue, postrecovery, and healthy samples, we found increased expansion of B cell clones in acute dengue patients, with higher overall clonality in secondary infection. Additionally, we observed consistent antibody sequence features in acute dengue in the highly variable major antigen-binding determinant, complementarity-determining region 3 (CDR3), with specific CDR3 sequences highly enriched in acute samples compared to postrecovery, healthy, or non-dengue samples. Dengue thus provides a striking example of a human viral infection where convergent immune signatures can be identified in multiple individuals. Such signatures could facilitate surveillance of immunological memory in communities. PMID:23768493

  3. Convergent evolution of anti-bat sounds.

    PubMed

    Corcoran, Aaron J; Hristov, Nickolay I

    2014-09-01

    Bats and their insect prey rely on acoustic sensing in predator prey encounters--echolocation in bats, tympanic hearing in moths. Some insects also emit sounds for bat defense. Here, we describe a previously unknown sound-producing organ in Geometrid moths--a prothoracic tymbal in the orange beggar moth (Eubaphe unicolor) that generates bursts of ultrasonic clicks in response to tactile stimulation and playback of a bat echolocation attack sequence. Using scanning electron microscopy and high-speed videography, we demonstrate that E. unicolor and phylogenetically distant tiger moths have evolved serially homologous thoracic tymbal organs with fundamentally similar functional morphology, a striking example of convergent evolution. We compared E. unicolor clicks to that of five sympatric tiger moths and found that 9 of 13 E. unicolor clicking parameters were within the range of sympatric tiger moths. Remaining differences may result from the small size of the E. unicolor tymbal. Four of the five sympatric clicking tiger moth species were unpalatable to bats (0-20% eaten), whereas E. unicolor was palatable to bats (86% eaten). Based on these results, we hypothesize that E. unicolor evolved tymbal organs that mimic the sounds produced by toxic tiger moths when attacked by echolocating bats. PMID:24980483

  4. Enhanced Primary Productivity at the Subtropical Convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llido, J.; Garcon, V.; Lutjeharms, J.; Sudre, J.

    2004-12-01

    The Subtropical Convergence is one of the major frontal systems in the world ocean. It is not just simply a biogeographical boundary, but forms a unique biological habitat of its own. Ocean colour satellite data indicate that it is a region of enhanced chlorophyll a and thus a potential key region of carbon drawdown from the atmosphere. Ship crossings sometimes show peaks in chlorophyll a at the front, but at other times these peaks are absent. If the normal mode of primary productivity at the front consists of intermittent bloom events, as these observations suggest, organisms endemic to this habitat may have to be adapted to a boom-or-bust situation. We have studied the presence of chlorophyll a using daily SeaWiFS images and showed that bloom events with limited spatial and temporal scales are indeed the norm. A coupled physical-biological model simulates this process with a fair degree of verisimilitude. We use this model to investigate the physico-biogeochemical requirements for bloom events and demonstrate that in most cases the limiting factor is intensity of vertical stratification combined with light availability.

  5. Convergence of Hamiltonian systems to billiards.

    PubMed

    Collas, Peter; Klein, David; Schwebler, Hans-Peter

    1998-06-01

    We examine in detail a physically natural and general scheme for gradually deforming a Hamiltonian to its corresponding billiard, as a certain parameter k varies from one to infinity. We apply this limiting process to a class of Hamiltonians with homogeneous potential-energy functions and further investigate the extent to which the limiting billiards inherit properties from the corresponding sequences of Hamiltonians. The results are mixed. Using theorems of Yoshida for the case of two degrees of freedom, we prove a general theorem establishing the "inheritability" of stability properties of certain orbits. This result follows naturally from the convergence of the traces of appropriate monodromy matrices to the billiard analog. However, in spite of the close analogy between the concepts of integrability for Hamiltonian systems and billiards, integrability properties of Hamiltonians in a sequence are not necessarily inherited by the limiting billiard, as we show by example. In addition to rigorous results, we include numerical examples of certain interesting cases, along with computer simulations. (c) 1998 American Institute of Physics. PMID:12779750

  6. Value Creation Through Integrated Networks and Convergence

    SciTech Connect

    De Martini, Paul; Taft, Jeffrey D.

    2015-04-01

    Customer adoption of distributed energy resources and public policies are driving changes in the uses of the distribution system. A system originally designed and built for one-way energy flows from central generating facilities to end-use customers is now experiencing injections of energy from customers anywhere on the grid and frequent reversals in the direction of energy flow. In response, regulators and utilities are re-thinking the design and operations of the grid to create more open and transactive electric networks. This evolution has the opportunity to unlock significant value for customers and utilities. Alternatively, failure to seize this potential may instead lead to an erosion of value if customers seek to defect and disconnect from the system. This paper will discuss how current grid modernization investments may be leveraged to create open networks that increase value through the interaction of intelligent devices on the grid and prosumerization of customers. Moreover, even greater value can be realized through the synergistic effects of convergence of multiple networks. This paper will highlight examples of the emerging nexus of non-electric networks with electricity.

  7. Cylindrical converging shock initiation of reactive materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Charles M.; Horie, Yasuyuki; Lindsay, Christopher Michael; Butler, George C.; Lambert, David; Welle, Eric

    2012-03-01

    Recent research has been conducted that builds on the Forbes et al. (1997) study of inducing a rapid solid state reaction in a highly porous core using a converging cylindrical shock driven by a high explosive. The high explosive annular charge used in this research to compress the center reactive core was comparable to PBXN-110. Some modifications were made on the physical configuration of the test item for scale-up and ease of production. The reactive materials (I2O5/Al and I2O5/Al/Teflon) were hand mixed and packed to a tap density of about 32 percent. Data provided by a Cordon 114 high speed framing camera and a Photon Doppler Velocimetry instrument provided exit gas expansion, core particle and cylinder wall velocities. Analysis indicates that the case expansion velocity differs according to the core formulation and behaved similar to the baseline high explosive core with the exit gas of the reactive materials producing comparable velocities. Results from CTH hydrocode used to model the test item compares favorably to the experimental results.

  8. Convergent syntheses of LeX analogues

    PubMed Central

    Wang, An; Hendel, Jenifer

    2010-01-01

    Summary The synthesis of three Lex derivatives from one common protected trisaccharide is reported. These analogues will be used respectively for competitive binding experiments, conjugation to carrier proteins and immobilization on gold. An N-acetylglucosamine monosaccharide acceptor was first glycosylated at O-4 with a galactosyl imidate. This coupling was performed at 40 °C under excess of BF3·OEt2 activation and proceeded best if the acceptor carried a 6-chlorohexyl rather than a 6-azidohexyl aglycon. The 6-chlorohexyl disaccharide was then converted to an acceptor and submitted to fucosylation yielding the corresponding protected 6-chlorohexyl Lex trisaccharide. This protected trisaccharide was used as a precursor to the 6-azidohexyl, 6-acetylthiohexyl and 6-benzylthiohexyl trisaccharide analogues which were obtained in excellent yields (70–95%). In turn, we describe the deprotection of these intermediates in one single step using dissolving metal conditions. Under these conditions, the 6-chlorohexyl and 6-azidohexyl intermediates led respectively to the n-hexyl and 6-aminohexyl trisaccharide targets. Unexpectedly, the 6-acetylthiohexyl analogue underwent desulfurization and gave the n-hexyl glycoside product, whereas the 6-benzylthiohexyl analogue gave the desired disulfide trisaccharide dimer. This study constitutes a particularly efficient and convergent preparation of these three Lex analogues. PMID:20485599

  9. Conformal mapping and convergence of Krylov iterations

    SciTech Connect

    Driscoll, T.A.; Trefethen, L.N.

    1994-12-31

    Connections between conformal mapping and matrix iterations have been known for many years. The idea underlying these connections is as follows. Suppose the spectrum of a matrix or operator A is contained in a Jordan region E in the complex plane with 0 not an element of E. Let {phi}(z) denote a conformal map of the exterior of E onto the exterior of the unit disk, with {phi}{infinity} = {infinity}. Then 1/{vert_bar}{phi}(0){vert_bar} is an upper bound for the optimal asymptotic convergence factor of any Krylov subspace iteration. This idea can be made precise in various ways, depending on the matrix iterations, on whether A is finite or infinite dimensional, and on what bounds are assumed on the non-normality of A. This paper explores these connections for a variety of matrix examples, making use of a new MATLAB Schwarz-Christoffel Mapping Toolbox developed by the first author. Unlike the earlier Fortran Schwarz-Christoffel package SCPACK, the new toolbox computes exterior as well as interior Schwarz-Christoffel maps, making it easy to experiment with spectra that are not necessarily symmetric about an axis.

  10. Biosynthesis of fosfazinomycin is a convergent process†

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zedu; Wang, Kwo-Kwang A.; Lee, Jaeheon; van der Donk, Wilfred A.

    2014-01-01

    Fosfazinomycin A is a phosphonate natural product in which the C-terminal carboxylate of a Val-Arg dipeptide is connected to methyl 2-hydroxy-2-phosphono-acetate (Me-HPnA) via a unique hydrazide linkage. We report here that Me-HPnA is generated from phosphonoacetaldehyde (PnAA) in three biosynthetic steps through the combined action of an O-methyltransferase (FzmB) and an α-ketoglutarate (α-KG) dependent non-heme iron dioxygenase (FzmG). Unexpectedly, the latter enzyme is involved in two different steps, oxidation of the PnAA to phosphonoacetic acid as well as hydroxylation of methyl 2-phosphonoacetate. The N-methyltransferase (FzmH) was able to methylate Arg-NHNH2 (3) to give Arg-NHNHMe (4), constituting the second segment of the fosfazinomycin molecule. Methylation of other putative intermediates such as desmethyl fosfazinomycin B was not observed. Collectively, our current data support a convergent biosynthetic pathway to fosfazinomycin. PMID:25621145

  11. Improved convergence of electromechanical transducer element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sattler, Robert; Wachutka, Gerhard

    2002-04-01

    Electrostatic attraction is a favored principle of actuation in MEMS (e.g. mirrors, relays, membrane devices). In this work we use an electrostatically actuated membrane as demonstrator. Physically based device models require the coupling of the electrostatic and the two domains. One way to reduce this expense consists in reduced order modeling by introducing a local approximation of the electric field using the Differential-Plate-Capacitor-Approximation (DPCA). This semi-analytical approximation can be directly (matrix coupled transducer element) or sequentially (load vector coupling) coupled with the mechanical solver. Both approaches yield results which agree well with those of coupled 3D-field solvers. It turns out that the transducer element converges much faster than the sequentially coupled relaxation scheme, as ong as the voltage is not close to the pull-in voltage. If this is the case then the transducer element has problems to find the equilibrium state at all. To avoid this difficulty we propose the use of a homotopy method to give the transducer element the same accuracy and robustness in the stable and the unstable regions of the operating area. The electrostatic charge and the electrostatic force turn out to be proper homotopy parameters for the given example.

  12. Learning in 3-D Virtual Worlds: Rethinking Media Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qian, Yufeng

    2008-01-01

    3-D virtual worlds, as a new form of learning environments in the 21st century, hold great potential in education. Learning in such environments, however, demands a broader spectrum of literacy skills. This article identifies a new set of media literacy skills required in 3-D virtual learning environments by reviewing exemplary 3-D virtual…

  13. Dictionary Learning for Sparse Coding: Algorithms and Convergence Analysis.

    PubMed

    Bao, Chenglong; Ji, Hui; Quan, Yuhui; Shen, Zuowei

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, sparse coding has been widely used in many applications ranging from image processing to pattern recognition. Most existing sparse coding based applications require solving a class of challenging non-smooth and non-convex optimization problems. Despite the fact that many numerical methods have been developed for solving these problems, it remains an open problem to find a numerical method which is not only empirically fast, but also has mathematically guaranteed strong convergence. In this paper, we propose an alternating iteration scheme for solving such problems. A rigorous convergence analysis shows that the proposed method satisfies the global convergence property: the whole sequence of iterates is convergent and converges to a critical point. Besides the theoretical soundness, the practical benefit of the proposed method is validated in applications including image restoration and recognition. Experiments show that the proposed method achieves similar results with less computation when compared to widely used methods such as K-SVD. PMID:26452248

  14. The evil twin of Agenor: tectonic convergence on Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenberg, Richard

    2004-02-01

    The dilemma of the surface-area budget on Europa is resolved by identification of sites of crustal convergence, which have balanced the continual and common creation of new surface along dilational bands and pull-aparts. Convergence bands are characterized by a distinctive, albeit subdued, morphology. The prominent, unusual lineament Agenor is one of several examples. We also find diametrically opposite Agenor a similar bright linear feature surrounded by markings that allow reconstruction, which shows it to be a convergence feature. Until recently, identification of convergence sites was difficult because these features are subtle and do not exhibit structures (like the Himalayas or plate subduction) familiar from convergence of thick solid crusts on terrestrial planets.

  15. Pervasive media violence.

    PubMed

    Schooler, C; Flora, J A

    1996-01-01

    In this review, we focus our discussion on studies examining effects on children and young adults. We believe that the current epidemic of youth violence in the United States justifies a focus on this vulnerable segment of society. We consider media effects on individual children's behaviors, such as imitating aggressive acts. In addition, we examine how the media influence young people's perceptions of norms regarding interpersonal relationships. Next, we assess mass media effects on societal beliefs, or what children and adolescents think the "real world" is like. We suggest these media influences are cumulative and mutually reinforcing, and discuss the implications of repeated exposure to prominent and prevalent violent media messages. Finally, we catalog multiple intervention possibilities ranging from education to regulation. From a public health perspective, therefore, we evaluate the effects that pervasive media messages depicting violence have on young people and present multiple strategies to promote more healthful outcomes. PMID:8724228

  16. Teaching Critical Thinking through Media Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sperry, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Today more than ever, students want their school experience to be relevant. They live and learn in a media-saturated environment where information abounds, but wisdom is often lacking. Teachers must tie their science curricula to students' real-life experiences: When their students see the utility of scientific thought and reason in helping them…

  17. Online Social Media in Crisis Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palen, Leysia

    2008-01-01

    As social media--which includes blogs, social networking environments, person-to-person and broadcast messaging, and other Web 2.0 applications--becomes more pervasive, their use has significant implications for emergency management practice and policy. Information and communication technology (ICT) enables people--disaster survivors, curious…

  18. Media Ecology Comes into Its Own

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salas, Alexandra

    2007-01-01

    The study of communication systems catalysts and influence has taken on a newer form--media ecology. Participants have emerged from many disciplines in order to create this new field of inquiry that explores and posits human communication, culture, communication environments, and their evolution and interconnectedness from pre-literacy to the…

  19. Orchestrating the Media Collage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohler, Jason

    2009-01-01

    Modern literacy has always meant being able to both read and write narrative in the media forms of the day, whatever they may be. Just being able to read is not sufficient. A new dimension of literacy is now in play--namely, the ability to adapt to new media forms and fit them into the overall media collage quickly and effectively. A strong case…

  20. The role of standing variation in geographic convergent adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Ralph, Peter L.; Coop, Graham

    2016-01-01

    The extent to which populations experiencing shared selective pressures adapt through a shared genetic response is relevant to many questions in evolutionary biology. In a number of well studied traits and species, it appears that convergent evolution within species is common. In this paper, we explore how standing, genetic variation contributes to convergent genetic responses in a geographically spread population, extending our previous work on the topic. Geographically limited dispersal slows the spread of each selected allele, hence allowing other alleles – newly arisen mutants or present as standing variation – to spread before any one comes to dominate the population. When such alleles meet, their progress is substantially slowed – if the alleles are selectively equivalent, they mix slowly, dividing the species range into a random tessellation, which can be well understood by analogy to a Poisson process model of crystallization. In this framework, we derive the geographic scale over which a typical allele is expected to dominate, the time it takes the species to adapt as a whole, and the proportion of adaptive alleles that arise from standing variation. Finally, we explore how negative pleiotropic effects of alleles before an environment change can bias the subset of alleles that contribute to the species’ adaptive response. We apply the results to the many geographically localized G6PD deficiency alleles thought to confer resistance to malaria, where the large mutational target size makes it a likely candidate for adaptation from standing variation, despite the selective cost of G6PD deficiency alleles in the absence of malaria. We find the numbers and geographic spread of these alleles matches our predictions reasonably well, consistent with the view that they arose from a combination of standing variation and new mutations since the advent of malaria. Our results suggest that much of adaptation may be geographically local even when selection

  1. Media Monopoly in Brazil.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amaral, Roberto; Guimaraes, Cesar

    1994-01-01

    Documents the process of broadcasting media development in Brazil, the failure of new technologies to produce democratization, and the barriers to democratization erected by monopolization and "metastasis." (SR)

  2. Overview: new media.

    PubMed

    O'Keeffe, Gwenn Schurgin

    2012-06-01

    Pediatricians care for children's growth and development from the time they are born until they become adults. In addition, pediatricians must be vigilant for external influences. Technology influences children of all ages. Seventy-five percent of teenagers own cell phones, with 25% using them for social media. Technology can lead to an increase in skills and social benefits but there is also the potential for harm such as sexting, cyberbullying, privacy issues, and Internet addiction, all of which can affect health. Pediatricians must become well versed in the new media to provide media-oriented anticipatory guidance and advice on media-related issues. PMID:22643166

  3. The media and suicide.

    PubMed

    Tor, Phern Chern; Ng, Beng Yeong; Ang, Yong Guan

    2008-09-01

    Suicide is a common and preventable event that is often reported by the media when there are sensationalistic elements or if the suicide involves a celebrity. Media reports of suicide can induce a copycat or "Werther effect". There is increasing evidence that sensationalistic reporting of suicides has a direct effect on increasing suicide rates. Responsible reporting guidelines drawn up in consultation with media professionals have been shown to improve reporting of suicides. Local reporting on suicides tends to be sensationalistic but also has a strong educational slant. The media should educate both the public and the medical professional about their role in suicide prevention. PMID:18989499

  4. Parallel sites implicate functional convergence of the hearing gene prestin among echolocating mammals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen; Qi, Fei-Yan; Zhou, Xin; Ren, Hai-Qing; Shi, Peng

    2014-09-01

    Echolocation is a sensory system whereby certain mammals navigate and forage using sound waves, usually in environments where visibility is limited. Curiously, echolocation has evolved independently in bats and whales, which occupy entirely different environments. Based on this phenotypic convergence, recent studies identified several echolocation-related genes with parallel sites at the protein sequence level among different echolocating mammals, and among these, prestin seems the most promising. Although previous studies analyzed the evolutionary mechanism of prestin, the functional roles of the parallel sites in the evolution of mammalian echolocation are not clear. By functional assays, we show that a key parameter of prestin function, 1/α, is increased in all echolocating mammals and that the N7T parallel substitution accounted for this functional convergence. Moreover, another parameter, V1/2, was shifted toward the depolarization direction in a toothed whale, the bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) and a constant-frequency (CF) bat, the Stoliczka's trident bat (Aselliscus stoliczkanus). The parallel site of I384T between toothed whales and CF bats was responsible for this functional convergence. Furthermore, the two parameters (1/α and V1/2) were correlated with mammalian high-frequency hearing, suggesting that the convergent changes of the prestin function in echolocating mammals may play important roles in mammalian echolocation. To our knowledge, these findings present the functional patterns of echolocation-related genes in echolocating mammals for the first time and rigorously demonstrate adaptive parallel evolution at the protein sequence level, paving the way to insights into the molecular mechanism underlying mammalian echolocation. PMID:24951728

  5. Divergent and Convergent Evolution of Fungal Pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Yanfang; Xiao, Guohua; Zheng, Peng; Cen, Kai; Zhan, Shuai; Wang, Chengshu

    2016-01-01

    Fungal pathogens of plants and animals have multifarious effects; they cause devastating damages to agricultures, lead to life-threatening diseases in humans, or induce beneficial effects by reducing insect pest populations. Many virulence factors have been determined in different fungal pathogens; however, the molecular determinants contributing to fungal host selection and adaptation are largely unknown. In this study, we sequenced the genomes of seven ascomycete insect pathogens and performed the genome-wide analyses of 33 species of filamentous ascomycete pathogenic fungi that infect insects (12 species), plants (12), and humans (9). Our results revealed that the genomes of plant pathogens encode more proteins and protein families than the insect and human pathogens. Unexpectedly, more common orthologous protein groups are shared between the insect and plant pathogens than between the two animal group pathogens. We also found that the pathogenicity of host-adapted fungi evolved multiple times, and that both divergent and convergent evolutions occurred during pathogen–host cospeciation thus resulting in protein families with similar features in each fungal group. However, the role of phylogenetic relatedness on the evolution of protein families and therefore pathotype formation could not be ruled out due to the effect of common ancestry. The evolutionary correlation analyses led to the identification of different protein families that correlated with alternate pathotypes. Particularly, the effector-like proteins identified in plant and animal pathogens were strongly linked to fungal host adaptation, suggesting the existence of similar gene-for-gene relationships in fungus–animal interactions that has not been established before. These results well advance our understanding of the evolution of fungal pathogenicity and the factors that contribute to fungal pathotype formation. PMID:27071652

  6. Divergent and Convergent Evolution of Fungal Pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Shang, Yanfang; Xiao, Guohua; Zheng, Peng; Cen, Kai; Zhan, Shuai; Wang, Chengshu

    2016-01-01

    Fungal pathogens of plants and animals have multifarious effects; they cause devastating damages to agricultures, lead to life-threatening diseases in humans, or induce beneficial effects by reducing insect pest populations. Many virulence factors have been determined in different fungal pathogens; however, the molecular determinants contributing to fungal host selection and adaptation are largely unknown. In this study, we sequenced the genomes of seven ascomycete insect pathogens and performed the genome-wide analyses of 33 species of filamentous ascomycete pathogenic fungi that infect insects (12 species), plants (12), and humans (9). Our results revealed that the genomes of plant pathogens encode more proteins and protein families than the insect and human pathogens. Unexpectedly, more common orthologous protein groups are shared between the insect and plant pathogens than between the two animal group pathogens. We also found that the pathogenicity of host-adapted fungi evolved multiple times, and that both divergent and convergent evolutions occurred during pathogen-host cospeciation thus resulting in protein families with similar features in each fungal group. However, the role of phylogenetic relatedness on the evolution of protein families and therefore pathotype formation could not be ruled out due to the effect of common ancestry. The evolutionary correlation analyses led to the identification of different protein families that correlated with alternate pathotypes. Particularly, the effector-like proteins identified in plant and animal pathogens were strongly linked to fungal host adaptation, suggesting the existence of similar gene-for-gene relationships in fungus-animal interactions that has not been established before. These results well advance our understanding of the evolution of fungal pathogenicity and the factors that contribute to fungal pathotype formation. PMID:27071652

  7. Aeroacoustic Resonance with Convergent-Divergent Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, K. B. M. Q.; Dahl, M. D.

    1999-01-01

    Convergent-divergent nozzles, when run at off-design conditions, often undergo flow resonance accompanied by the emission of a tone. Apart from screech occurring at higher operating pressures, resonance is also common at lower Mach numbers near transonic as well as subsonic conditions. With data from six nozzles of different size and design Mach number, the present paper documents the characteristics of the latter phenomenon that is morphologically quite different from conventional screech. The resonance is due to a feedback loop internal to the nozzle and is apparently driven by unsteady laminar boundary layer separation near the throat of the nozzle. Appropriate boundary layer tripping prior to the throat is found to eliminate or alter most of the tones. The Helmholtz number of the resonance, based on the throat-to-exit length, is found to attain a value of approximately 0.15 at M(sub j)=1 for all nozzles. However, its variation with M(sub j) may be different and depend on the nozzle geometry. With nozzles having larger throat-to-exit angle of divergence, the frequency is found to increase, in some cases having stage jumps to lower frequencies, with increasing operating pressure. With nozzles having smaller angle of divergence, the frequency variation exhibits an increase followed by a decrease involving one prominent stage occurring around transonic (M(sub j)= 1) condition. While the mechanisms remain far from completely clear, a model involving downstream propagating aerodynamic disturbance together with acoustic feedback explains the overall frequency characteristics for most cases.

  8. Culture camp: Examining teaching and learning at the convergence of Traditional Knowledge and Western Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Bree Camus

    With mounting environmental problems facing our society, there is an increasing need for an environmentally and scientifically literate citizenry with knowledge, skills, values and confidence to make informed environmental decisions. Currently, many education programs fail to build an understanding of the interconnected nature of culture, science and the environment. One approach to address the educational needs of our multicultural society, and better link culture and the environment, is the weaving of Indigenous Knowledge, also known as Traditional Knowledge, into environmental and science curriculum. This thesis explores the learning and teaching that occur during the convergence of Traditional Knowledge and Western Science during two summer camps in Seldovia, Alaska. This descriptive study is informed by the field of multicultural science education and, in particular, the dialogue around the role of Traditional Knowledge in science and environmental education. A participatory action research approach was used to conduct semi-structured interviews, focus groups, document review and participant observations. The findings revealed various teaching methods that instructors used in this learning environment. The evidence from this study points to participants learning largely about values, plants, animal behavior, habitats, and subsistence practices. The findings also present a dynamic array of social, cultural, and historical factors shaping the learning environment and are related to the way participants are navigating the integration, overlap, and convergence of Western Science and Traditional Knowledge.

  9. Some Media Relations Success Stories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sperbeck, John M.

    1997-01-01

    A panel of 29 extension faculty/staff members who work well with the media were interviewed to identify ways to improve their media relations. Reasons for working with the media, ways to develop relationships with media representatives, and suggestions for creating a more favorable climate for media relations in universities were noted. (JOW)

  10. 3′ Untranslated Regions Mediate Transcriptional Interference between Convergent Genes Both Locally and Ectopically in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Luwen; Jiang, Ning; Wang, Lin; Fang, Ou; Leach, Lindsey J.; Hu, Xiaohua; Luo, Zewei

    2014-01-01

    Paired sense and antisense (S/AS) genes located in cis represent a structural feature common to the genomes of both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, and produce partially complementary transcripts. We used published genome and transcriptome sequence data and found that over 20% of genes (645 pairs) in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome are arranged in convergent pairs with overlapping 3′-UTRs. Using published microarray transcriptome data from the standard laboratory strain of S. cerevisiae, our analysis revealed that expression levels of convergent pairs are significantly negatively correlated across a broad range of environments. This implies an important role for convergent genes in the regulation of gene expression, which may compensate for the absence of RNA-dependent mechanisms such as micro RNAs in budding yeast. We selected four representative convergent gene pairs and used expression assays in wild type yeast and its genetically modified strains to explore the underlying patterns of gene expression. Results showed that convergent genes are reciprocally regulated in yeast populations and in single cells, whereby an increase in expression of one gene produces a decrease in the expression of the other, and vice-versa. Time course analysis of the cell cycle illustrated the functional significance of this relationship for the three pairs with relevant functional roles. Furthermore, a series of genetic modifications revealed that the 3′-UTR sequence plays an essential causal role in mediating transcriptional interference, which requires neither the sequence of the open reading frame nor the translation of fully functional proteins. More importantly, transcriptional interference persisted even when one of the convergent genes was expressed ectopically (in trans) and therefore does not depend on the cis arrangement of convergent genes; we conclude that the mechanism of transcriptional interference cannot be explained by the transcriptional collision

  11. The importance of accurate convergence in addressing stereoscopic visual fatigue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayhew, Christopher A.

    2015-03-01

    Visual fatigue (asthenopia) continues to be a problem in extended viewing of stereoscopic imagery. Poorly converged imagery may contribute to this problem. In 2013, the Author reported that in a study sample a surprisingly high number of 3D feature films released as stereoscopic Blu-rays contained obvious convergence errors.1 The placement of stereoscopic image convergence can be an "artistic" call, but upon close examination, the sampled films seemed to have simply missed their intended convergence location. This failure maybe because some stereoscopic editing tools do not have the necessary fidelity to enable a 3D editor to obtain a high degree of image alignment or set an exact point of convergence. Compounding this matter further is the fact that a large number of stereoscopic editors may not believe that pixel accurate alignment and convergence is necessary. The Author asserts that setting a pixel accurate point of convergence on an object at the start of any given stereoscopic scene will improve the viewer's ability to fuse the left and right images quickly. The premise is that stereoscopic performance (acuity) increases when an accurately converged object is available in the image for the viewer to fuse immediately. Furthermore, this increased viewer stereoscopic performance should reduce the amount of visual fatigue associated with longer-term viewing because less mental effort will be required to perceive the imagery. To test this concept, we developed special stereoscopic imagery to measure viewer visual performance with and without specific objects for convergence. The Company Team conducted a series of visual tests with 24 participants between 25 and 60 years of age. This paper reports the results of these tests.

  12. Media Multitasking Behavior: Concurrent Television and Computer Usage

    PubMed Central

    Gips, James

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Changes in the media landscape have made simultaneous usage of the computer and television increasingly commonplace, but little research has explored how individuals navigate this media multitasking environment. Prior work suggests that self-insight may be limited in media consumption and multitasking environments, reinforcing a rising need for direct observational research. A laboratory experiment recorded both younger and older individuals as they used a computer and television concurrently, multitasking across television and Internet content. Results show that individuals are attending primarily to the computer during media multitasking. Although gazes last longer on the computer when compared to the television, the overall distribution of gazes is strongly skewed toward very short gazes only a few seconds in duration. People switched between media at an extreme rate, averaging more than 4 switches per min and 120 switches over the 27.5-minute study exposure. Participants had little insight into their switching activity and recalled their switching behavior at an average of only 12 percent of their actual switching rate revealed in the objective data. Younger individuals switched more often than older individuals, but other individual differences such as stated multitasking preference and polychronicity had little effect on switching patterns or gaze duration. This overall pattern of results highlights the importance of exploring new media environments, such as the current drive toward media multitasking, and reinforces that self-monitoring, post hoc surveying, and lay theory may offer only limited insight into how individuals interact with media. PMID:21381969

  13. Japanese Media in English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanaka, Sachiko Oda

    1995-01-01

    Describes the use of English in the media in Japan, focusing on the role and history of English-language newspapers, radio, and television programs, as well as the proliferation of English-language films shown in Japanese cinemas. Discusses the implications of English in the Japanese media. (20 references) (MDM)

  14. Social Media. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    The growing use of social media by students and adults is impacting schools. A recent Pew study found that 73% of teens use social-networking sites to connect with others. Social media includes blogs, wikis, and podcasts as well as sites such as MySpace, Facebook, and Linkedin. While such sites promote connection with others, their use has created…

  15. Introduction to Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riler, Robert

    Designed for senior high school students, this one semester course focuses on four aspects of modern media: television, film, radio, and advertising. Each topic is worked into a weekly lesson plan format that stresses the active involvement of students in the learning process. The course outline contains lists of objectives and media materials…

  16. Advertising Pressures on Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammitt, Harry

    The majority of the media in the United States is funded through revenues derived from the sale of advertising space. The problem that arises from this situation is fundamentally an economic one: if advertisers are paying the bills for the media, how much control over content should they have? This report offers a review of instances in which…

  17. EMMSE Media Index.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hewitt, Clifford A., Comp.; McKinstry, Herbert A., Comp.

    This index provides a topical taxonomy of media which have been selected for their relevance in the teaching of materials science and engineering. The index is keyed to a matrix which matches topical and/or class material with six classifications of media: print, 16mm film, super 8 film, slide/tape, videotape, and other (including interactive…

  18. Speaking through the Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabrick, Andrea; Dessoff, Alan

    2002-01-01

    Offers advice for college communications officers in dealing with the media. Tips include: "bring in the big guns", "play show and tell", expand the media circle, understand reporters' jobs and respect deadlines, "keep it real", "stay in touch", and "hedge your bets". (EV)

  19. Media Literacy and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lacina, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Technology affects education at all levels. Children are naturals at using technology. They use technology in all aspects of their lives; for that reason, it is imperative that teachers not only keep up with the latest technology, but also find ways to integrate technology, including the media, into classroom instruction. Media literacy is a…

  20. Teens and Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Communication: Journalism Education Today, 1988

    1988-01-01

    Teenage consumers question the priorities of the media. They: (1) regard the media as another institution against young people; (2) avoid it because they find it depressing, (3) challenge time allocated for sports and weather, (4) question emphasis on violence, and lack of concern for details and fairness; and (5) advocate a reversal in the role…

  1. Media: Eyeing the News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gage, Susan

    1990-01-01

    This issue of "Teachergram" addresses media-related issues such as the kind of world picture Canadians receive from mainstream media, the ability of television to describe the complexity of world events, and the claim of distorted and simplistic portrayal of developing nations. Students are encouraged critical perspective--to help them look at the…

  2. Wisconsin Ideas in Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Rose, Ed.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    These two documents contain a variety of articles on media use in education. The first provides 16 articles that focus on justifying media programs in the 1980's. Topics include selling your program to administrators; reorganization of the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction; video literacy; student-made videotape recordings; interactive…

  3. Building Social Media Connections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferriter, William N.; Ramsden, Jason T.; Sheninger, Eric C.

    2012-01-01

    Incorporating social media tools into your professional practices does not have to be intimidating as long as you are willing to tackle five action steps. It is far easier to articulate the strengths--and to imagine the possibilities--of social media spaces as tools for communication and professional development when you are actively using those…

  4. Writing and Digital Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Waes, Luuk, Ed.; Leijten, Marielle, Ed.; Neuwirth, Chris, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    Digital media has become an increasingly powerful force in modern society. This volume brings together outstanding European, American and Australian research in "writing and digital media" and explores its cognitive, social and cultural implications. In addition to presenting programs of original research by internationally known scholars from a…

  5. Accessing the Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Judy

    This guide for school districts offers a quick outline for developing good communications skills and public relations with news media personnel. Guidelines for good press relations are provided that emphasize the importance of keeping two-way, open communications with the media, with attention to: accuracy; being prepared; sharing the bad news as…

  6. Trends in Media Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Donald F.; Foehr, Ulla G.

    2008-01-01

    American youth are awash in media. They have television sets in their bedrooms, personal computers in their family rooms, and digital music players and cell phones in their backpacks. They spend more time with media than any single activity other than sleeping, with the average American eight- to eighteen-year-old reporting more than six hours of…

  7. Literacy, Learning, and Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Dennis; Hamm, Mary

    2000-01-01

    Considers the expanding definition of literacy from traditional reading and writing skills to include technological, visual, information, and networking literacy. Discusses the impact of media on social interactions and intellectual development; linking technology to educational goals; influences of new media symbol systems on communication;…

  8. Minorities in the Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherard, Regina G., Comp.; And Others

    The four reports in this compilation focus on the role of blacks in the various media. The first report provides a general discussion of the status of blacks in the media, and notes that it has been largely analogous to their political and economic development. The second report traces the changing image of blacks as it has been portrayed on…

  9. Photonic layered media

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, James G.; Lin, Shawn-Yu

    2002-01-01

    A new class of structured dielectric media which exhibit significant photonic bandstructure has been invented. The new structures, called photonic layered media, are easy to fabricate using existing layer-by-layer growth techniques, and offer the ability to significantly extend our practical ability to tailor the properties of such optical materials.

  10. Media Richness and Social Information Processing: Rationale for Multifocal Continuing Medical Education Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilman, Stuart C.; Turner, Jeanine Warisse

    2001-01-01

    Media richness theory suggests that media choice results from matching characteristics with content requirements. Social information processing theory adds the influence of social norms and familiarity with media types. In applying both to continuing medical information, consideration of content and participant environment guides selection of…

  11. Fatal Amusements: Contemplating the Tempest of Contemporary Media and American Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strate, Lance

    2016-01-01

    Our use of the electronic media to conduct serious discourse raises the question of whether "we are amusing ourselves to death," as Neil Postman argued. The approach known as "media ecology," the study of media as environments, which emphasizes the need to understand context and find balance, provides a basis for the analysis…

  12. Agricultural Media Coverage of Farm Safety: Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Evans, Jim; Heiberger, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Agricultural media merit increased attention in addressing dynamic changes in safety aspects of one of the nation's most hazardous industries. Changes in farming, such as larger-scale, new "niche" enterprises and new technologies, bring new forms of risk to the safety of those who live and work on farms and ranches. At the same time, traditional agricultural media--commercial firms that publish farm periodicals and commercial radio/television stations and networks that provide farm programming--are changing dramatically. In the face of media convergence, these enterprises provide an increasing menu of agricultural information services delivered by print, radio, and television, plus a host of new electronic media. This review of literature addressed the role and importance of commercial agricultural media in the United States, the scope and pattern of their safety coverage, and the opportunities they represent. The review involved searches of 14 bibliographic databases, as well as reference lists of relevant studies and contacts with farm safety experts. Analysis of 122 documents suggested that limited focus has been directed to the role of commercial agricultural media in safety decisions on US farms. Findings revealed that they continue to serve an efficient, early-stage role in creating awareness and interest, providing information, forming attitudes, and stirring consideration of farm safety. Potentials are seen as expanding through the interactive features of social media and other new services offered by these media firms. Findings also identified research needs, 100 farm safety topics for reporting, and opportunities for strengthening safety coverage by commercial agricultural media. PMID:26506853

  13. The convergence of spectral methods for nonlinear conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tadmor, Eitan

    1987-01-01

    The convergence of the Fourier method for scalar nonlinear conservation laws which exhibit spontaneous shock discontinuities is discussed. Numerical tests indicate that the convergence may (and in fact in some cases must) fail, with or without post-processing of the numerical solution. Instead, a new kind of spectrally accurate vanishing viscosity is introduced to augment the Fourier approximation of such nonlinear conservation laws. Using compensated compactness arguments, it is shown that this spectral viscosity prevents oscillations, and convergence to the unique entropy solution follows.

  14. On the Convergence of an Implicitly Restarted Arnoldi Method

    SciTech Connect

    Lehoucq, Richard B.

    1999-07-12

    We show that Sorensen's [35] implicitly restarted Arnoldi method (including its block extension) is simultaneous iteration with an implicit projection step to accelerate convergence to the invariant subspace of interest. By using the geometric convergence theory for simultaneous iteration due to Watkins and Elsner [43], we prove that an implicitly restarted Arnoldi method can achieve a super-linear rate of convergence to the dominant invariant subspace of a matrix. Moreover, we show how an IRAM computes a nested sequence of approximations for the partial Schur decomposition associated with the dominant invariant subspace of a matrix.

  15. IS THERE CONVERGENCE ACROSS COUNTRIES? A SPATIAL APPROACH

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Heather; Guillen, Mauro F.; Hendi, Arun S.

    2014-01-01

    We analyze convergence across countries over the last half century as a result of globalizing forces. Drawing on theories of modernization, dependency, the world-system, political trade blocs, and the world-society, we consider economic, demographic, knowledge, financial, and political dimensions of convergence. Using a new methodology, we calculate the minimum volume ellipsoid encompassing different groupings of countries, finding that during the 1960–2009 period, countries have not evolved significantly closer or similar to one another, although groups of countries based on their core-periphery status or membership in trade blocs exhibit increasing internal convergence and divergence between one another. PMID:25580035

  16. Comparative Convergence Analysis of Nonlinear AMLI-Cycle Multigrid

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Xiaozhe; Vassilevski, Panayot S.; Xu, Jinchao

    2013-04-30

    The purpose of our paper is to provide a comprehensive convergence analysis of the nonlinear algebraic multilevel iteration (AMLI)-cycle multigrid (MG) method for symmetric positive definite problems. We show that the nonlinear AMLI-cycle MG method is uniformly convergent, based on classical assumptions for approximation and smoothing properties. Furthermore, under only the assumption that the smoother is convergent, we show that the nonlinear AMLI-cycle method is always better (or not worse) than the respective V-cycle MG method. Finally, numerical experiments are presented to illustrate the theoretical results.

  17. Flat plate puncture test convergence study.

    SciTech Connect

    Snow, Spencer; Ammerman, Douglas James; Molitoris, David; Tso, Chi-Fung; Yaksh, Mike

    2010-10-01

    The ASME Task Group on Computational Mechanics for Explicit Dynamics is investigating the types of finite element models needed to accurately solve various problems that occur frequently in cask design. One type of problem is the 1-meter impact onto a puncture spike. The work described in this paper considers this impact for a relatively thin-walled shell, represented as a flat plate. The effects of mesh refinement, friction coefficient, material models, and finite element code will be discussed. The actual punch, as defined in the transport regulations, is 15 cm in diameter with a corner radius of no more than 6 mm. The punch used in the initial part of this study has the same diameter, but has a corner radius of 25 mm. This more rounded punch was used to allow convergence of the solution with a coarser mesh. A future task will be to investigate the effect of having a punch with a smaller corner radius. The 25-cm thick type 304 stainless steel plate that represents the cask wall is 1 meter in diameter and has added mass on the edge to represent the remainder of the cask. The amount of added mass to use was calculated using Nelm's equation, an empirically derived relationship between weight, wall thickness, and ultimate strength that prevents punch through. The outer edge of the plate is restrained so that it can only move in the direction parallel to the axis of the punch. Results that are compared include the deflection at the edge of the plate, the deflection at the center of the plate, the plastic strains at radius r=50 cm and r=100 cm , and qualitatively, the distribution of plastic strains. The strains of interest are those on the surface of the plate, not the integration point strains. Because cask designers are using analyses of this type to determine if shell will puncture, a failure theory, including the effect of the tri-axial nature of the stress state, is also discussed. The results of this study will help to determine what constitutes an adequate

  18. Social media in nursing education: responsible integration for meaningful use.

    PubMed

    Peck, Jessica L

    2014-03-01

    The astonishing popularity of social media and its emergence into the academic arena has shown tremendous potential for innovations in teaching. The appeal of using social media in the learning environment is enhanced by accessibility and affordability. However, it has also broadened the scope of consideration for protecting student privacy. This article explores the legal impact of privacy concerns when social media is used as a teaching tool. Institutions of higher learning must formulate guidelines that will govern appropriate social media use so that novel teaching modalities can be safely explored. Students must be educated by faculty regarding the standards of conduct and privacy considerations related to social media. The National Council of State Boards of Nursing has issued the White Paper: A Nurse's Guide to the Use of Social Media, a must-read for nursing faculty in the current academic arena. PMID:24530130

  19. Social Justice and Media. Media Corner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, Joseph A., III, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    Contends that the end of slavery, women's suffrage, and the civil rights movement were watershed events of social justice in U.S. history. Provides reviews of two media-based sets of instructional materials that can help students understand the struggle by disenfranchised groups to become full participants in society. (CFR)

  20. Media Roles and Legislators' New Media Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riffe, Daniel

    1990-01-01

    Surveys 82 Alabama legislators and finds officials' views of the press as adversary or agent of consensus relates to perceived value of media for job-relevant information. Suggests a dysfunction of the "watch-dog" role because those believing the consensus model found the press more useful than those seeing the press as an adversary. (MG)

  1. Patient loyalty and the social media effect.

    PubMed

    Verkamp, Jamie

    2013-01-01

    In a changing healthcare environment, patient loyalty has never been more important. However, creating patient loyalty can mean more than providing quality health services within the four walls of the medical office. With patients turning to online sources and social media in search of advice and a better patient experience, we must now ensure that patients have meaningful engagements with us across the continuum of care, from the phone, to the office, to social media tools like Facebook and YouTube as we look to build loyalty and grow our referral volumes. PMID:24228370

  2. MediaTracker system

    SciTech Connect

    Sandoval, D. M.; Strittmatter, R. B.; Abeyta, J. D.; Brown, J.; Marks, T. , Jr.; Martinez, B. J.; Jones, D. B.; Hsue, W.

    2004-01-01

    The initial objectives of this effort were to provide a hardware and software platform that can address the requirements for the accountability of classified removable electronic media and vault access logging. The Media Tracker system software assists classified media custodian in managing vault access logging and Media Tracking to prevent the inadvertent violation of rules or policies for the access to a restricted area and the movement and use of tracked items. The MediaTracker system includes the software tools to track and account for high consequence security assets and high value items. The overall benefits include: (1) real-time access to the disposition of all Classified Removable Electronic Media (CREM), (2) streamlined security procedures and requirements, (3) removal of ambiguity and managerial inconsistencies, (4) prevention of incidents that can and should be prevented, (5) alignment with the DOE's initiative to achieve improvements in security and facility operations through technology deployment, and (6) enhanced individual responsibility by providing a consistent method of dealing with daily responsibilities. In response to initiatives to enhance the control of classified removable electronic media (CREM), the Media Tracker software suite was developed, piloted and implemented at the Los Alamos National Laboratory beginning in July 2000. The Media Tracker software suite assists in the accountability and tracking of CREM and other high-value assets. One component of the MediaTracker software suite provides a Laboratory-approved media tracking system. Using commercial touch screen and bar code technology, the MediaTracker (MT) component of the MediaTracker software suite provides an efficient and effective means to meet current Laboratory requirements and provides new-engineered controls to help assure compliance with those requirements. It also establishes a computer infrastructure at vault entrances for vault access logging, and can accommodate

  3. Convergence of semigroups with an application to the Carleman equation

    SciTech Connect

    Kaper, H.G.; Leaf, G.K.; Reich, S.

    1980-01-01

    A simple proof of a convergence result for nonlinear semigroups is presented which can be applied to obtain the fluid dynamical limit of Carleman's equation. In addition, a closed exponential generator of the limit semigroup is explicitly identified.

  4. Heterotic quantum and classical computing on convergence spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patten, D. R.; Jakel, D. W.; Irwin, R. J.; Blair, H. A.

    2015-05-01

    Category-theoretic characterizations of heterotic models of computation, introduced by Stepney et al., combine computational models such as classical/quantum, digital/analog, synchronous/asynchronous, etc. to obtain increased computational power. A highly informative classical/quantum heterotic model of computation is represented by Abramsky's simple sequential imperative quantum programming language which extends the classical simple imperative programming language to encompass quantum computation. The mathematical (denotational) semantics of this classical language serves as a basic foundation upon which formal verification methods can be developed. We present a more comprehensive heterotic classical/quantum model of computation based on heterotic dynamical systems on convergence spaces. Convergence spaces subsume topological spaces but admit finer structure from which, in prior work, we obtained differential calculi in the cartesian closed category of convergence spaces allowing us to define heterotic dynamical systems, given by coupled systems of first order differential equations whose variables are functions from the reals to convergence spaces.

  5. A Fixed-Point Iteration Method with Quadratic Convergence

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Kevin P.; Sham, Sam

    2012-01-01

    The fixed-point iteration algorithm is turned into a quadratically convergent scheme for a system of nonlinear equations. Most of the usual methods for obtaining the roots of a system of nonlinear equations rely on expanding the equation system about the roots in a Taylor series, and neglecting the higher order terms. Rearrangement of the resulting truncated system then results in the usual Newton-Raphson and Halley type approximations. In this paper the introduction of unit root functions avoids the direct expansion of the nonlinear system about the root, and relies, instead, on approximations which enable the unit root functions to considerably widen the radius of convergence of the iteration method. Methods for obtaining higher order rates of convergence and larger radii of convergence are discussed.

  6. Convergence of oscillator spectral estimators for counted-frequency measurements.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tausworthe, R. C.

    1972-01-01

    A common intermediary connecting frequency-noise calibration or testing of an oscillator to useful applications is the spectral density of the frequency-deviating process. In attempting to turn test data into predicts of performance characteristics, one is naturally led to estimation of statistical values by sample-mean and sample-variance techniques. However, sample means and sample variances themselves are statistical quantities that do not necessarily converge (in the mean-square sense) to actual ensemble-average means and variances, except perhaps for excessively large sample sizes. This is especially true for the flicker noise component of oscillators. This article shows, for the various types of noises found in oscillators, how sample averages converge (or do not converge) to their statistical counterparts. The convergence rate is shown to be the same for all oscillators of a given spectral type.

  7. Numerical Stability and Convergence of Approximate Methods for Conservation Laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galkin, V. A.

    We present the new approach to background of approximate methods convergence based on functional solutions theory for conservation laws. The applications to physical kinetics, gas and fluid dynamics are considered.

  8. Simulating convergent extension by way of anisotropic differential adhesion.

    PubMed

    Zajac, Mark; Jones, Gerald L; Glazier, James A

    2003-05-21

    Simulations using the Extended Potts Model suggest that anisotropic differential adhesion can account for convergent extension, as observed during embryonic development of the frog Xenopus laevis for example. During gastrulation in these frogs, convergent extension produces longitudinal tissue growth from latitudinal elongation and migration of aligned constituent cells. The Extended Potts Model employs clustered points on a grid to represent subdivided cells with probabilistic displacement of cell boundaries such that small changes in energy drive gradual tissue development. For modeling convergent extension, simulations include anisotropic differential adhesion: the degree of attachment between adjacent elongated cells depends on their relative orientation. Without considering additional mechanisms, simulations based on anisotropic differential adhesion reproduce the hallmark stages of convergent extension in the correct sequence, with random fluctuations as sufficient impetus for cell reorganization. PMID:12727459

  9. Beyond division: convergences between postmodern qualitative research and family therapy.

    PubMed

    De Haene, Lucia

    2010-01-01

    Starting from examples of postmodern research and therapeutic practice, we raise the question on the role of the research-therapy dichotomy within these approaches. The article aims to show the profound convergence between postmodern ethnographic research and constructionist, collaborative therapeutic approaches on a double, epistemological and practice level. First, we point out their converging development toward narrative and constructionist epistemologies. Second, an inquiry into the core features of these disciplinary activities' goal, process, and expert role reveals their profound convergence into a dialogical practice in which the boundaries between research and therapy are radically transgressed. We conclude by questioning the implications and acceptability of this convergence for researchers' and therapists' understanding of their practices. PMID:20074120

  10. Convergence Results on Iteration Algorithms to Linear Systems

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhuande; Yang, Chuansheng; Yuan, Yubo

    2014-01-01

    In order to solve the large scale linear systems, backward and Jacobi iteration algorithms are employed. The convergence is the most important issue. In this paper, a unified backward iterative matrix is proposed. It shows that some well-known iterative algorithms can be deduced with it. The most important result is that the convergence results have been proved. Firstly, the spectral radius of the Jacobi iterative matrix is positive and the one of backward iterative matrix is strongly positive (lager than a positive constant). Secondly, the mentioned two iterations have the same convergence results (convergence or divergence simultaneously). Finally, some numerical experiments show that the proposed algorithms are correct and have the merit of backward methods. PMID:24991640

  11. Otolith-Canal Convergence in Vestibular Nuclei Neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickman, J. David

    1996-01-01

    During manned spaceflight, acute vestibular disturbances often occur, leading to physical duress and a loss of performance. Vestibular adaptation to the weightless environment follows within two to three days yet the mechanisms responsible for the disturbance and subsequent adaptation are still unknown In order to understand vestibular system function in space and normal earth conditions the basic physiological mechanisms of vestibular information co coding must be determined. Information processing regarding head movement and head position with respect to gravity takes place in the vestibular nuclei neurons that receive signals From the semicircular canals and otolith organs in the vestibular labyrinth. These neurons must synthesize the information into a coded output signal that provides for the head and eye movement reflexes as well as the conscious perception of the body in three-dimensional space The current investigation will for the first time. determine how the vestibular nuclei neurons quantitatively synthesize afferent information from the different linear and angular acceleration receptors in the vestibular labyrinths into an integrated output signal. During the second year of funding, progress on the current project has been focused on the anatomical orientation of semicircular canals and the spatial orientation of the innervating afferent responses. This information is necessary in order to understand how vestibular nuclei neurons process the incoming afferent spatial signals particularly with the convergent otolith afferent signals that are also spatially distributed Since information from the vestibular nuclei is presented to different brain regions associated with differing reflexive and sensory functions it is important to understand the computational mechanisms used by vestibular neurons to produce the appropriate output signal.

  12. Multisensory convergence of visual and haptic object preference across development.

    PubMed

    Joanne Jao, R; James, Thomas W; Harman James, Karin

    2014-04-01

    Visuohaptic inputs offer redundant and complementary information regarding an object׳s geometrical structure. The integration of these inputs facilitates object recognition in adults. While the ability to recognize objects in the environment both visually and haptically develops early on, the development of the neural mechanisms for integrating visual and haptic object shape information remains unknown. In the present study, we used functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) in three groups of participants, 4 to 5.5 year olds, 7 to 8.5 year olds, and adults. Participants were tested in a block design involving visual exploration of two-dimensional images of common objects and real textures, and haptic exploration of their three-dimensional counterparts. As in previous studies, object preference was defined as a greater BOLD response for objects than textures. The analyses specifically target two sites of known visuohaptic convergence in adults: the lateral occipital tactile-visual region (LOtv) and intraparietal sulcus (IPS). Results indicated that the LOtv is involved in visuohaptic object recognition early on. More importantly, object preference in the LOtv became increasingly visually dominant with development. Despite previous reports that the lateral occipital complex (LOC) is adult-like by 8 years, these findings indicate that at least part of the LOC is not. Whole-brain maps showed overlap between adults and both groups of children in the LOC. However, the overlap did not build incrementally from the younger to the older group, suggesting that visuohaptic object preference does not develop in an additive manner. Taken together, the results show that the development of neural substrates for visuohaptic recognition is protracted compared to substrates that are primarily visual or haptic. PMID:24560914

  13. Multisensory convergence of visual and haptic object preference across development

    PubMed Central

    Jao, R. Joanne; James, Thomas W.; James, Karin Harman

    2014-01-01

    Visuohaptic inputs offer redundant and complementary information regarding an object's geometrical structure. The integration of these inputs facilitates object recognition in adults. While the ability to recognize objects in the environment both visually and haptically develops early on, the development of the neural mechanisms for integrating visual and haptic object shape information remains unknown. In the present study, we used functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) in three groups of participants, 4 to 5.5 year olds, 7 to 8.5 year olds, and adults. Participants were tested in a block design involving visual exploration of two-dimensional images of common objects and real textures, and haptic exploration of their three-dimensional counterparts. As in previous studies, object preference was defined as a greater BOLD response for objects than textures. The analyses specifically target two sites of known visuohaptic convergence in adults: the lateral occipital tactile-visual region (LOtv) and intraparietal sulcus (IPS). Results indicated that the LOtv is involved in visuohaptic object recognition early on. More importantly, object preference in the LOtv became increasingly visually dominant with development. Despite previous reports that the lateral occipital complex (LOC) is adult-like by 8 years, these findings indicate that at least part of the LOC is not. Whole-brain maps showed overlap between adults and both groups of children in the LOC. However, the overlap did not build incrementally from the younger to the older group, suggesting that visuohaptic object preference does not develop in an additive manner. Taken together, the results show that the development of neural substrates for visuohaptic recognition is protracted compared to substrates that are primarily visual or haptic. PMID:24560914

  14. Can systems biology help to separate evolutionary analogies (convergent homoplasies) from homologies?

    PubMed

    Gordon, Malcolm S; Notar, Julia C

    2015-01-01

    Convergent evolutionary analogies (homoplasies) of many kinds occur in diverse phylogenetic clades/lineages on both the animal and plant branches of the Tree of Life. Living organisms whose last common ancestors lived millions to hundreds of millions of years ago have later converged morphologically, behaviorally or at other levels of functionality (from molecular genetics through biochemistry, physiology and other organismic processes) as a result of long term strong natural selection that has constrained and channeled evolutionary processes. This happens most often when organisms belonging to different clades occupy ecological niches, habitats or environments sharing major characteristics that select for a relatively narrow range of organismic properties. Systems biology, broadly defined, provides theoretical and methodological approaches that are beginning to make it possible to answer a perennial evolutionary biological question relating to convergent homoplasies: Are at least some of the apparent analogies actually unrecognized homologies? This review provides an overview of the current state of knowledge of important aspects of this topic area. It also provides a resource describing many homoplasies that may be fruitful subjects for systems biological research. PMID:25620424

  15. Convergent Evolution Associated with Habitat Decouples Phenotype from Phylogeny in a Clade of Lizards

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Shelley; Vanhooydonck, Bieke; Herrel, Anthony; Measey, G. John; Tolley, Krystal A.

    2012-01-01

    Convergent evolution can explain similarity in morphology between species, due to selection on a fitness-enhancing phenotype in response to local environmental conditions. As selective pressures on body morphology may be strong, these have confounded our understanding of the evolutionary relationships between species. Within the speciose African radiation of lacertid lizards (Eremiadini), some species occupy a narrow habitat range (e.g. open habitat, cluttered habitat, strictly rupicolous, or strictly psammophilic), which may exert strong selective pressures on lizard body morphology. Here we show that the overall body plan is unrelated to shared ancestry in the African radiation of Eremiadini, but is instead coupled to habitat use. Comprehensive Bayesian and likelihood phylogenies using multiple representatives from all genera (2 nuclear, 2 mitochondrial markers) show that morphologically convergent species thought to represent sister taxa within the same genus are distantly related evolutionary lineages (Ichnotropis squamulosa and Ichnotropis spp.; Australolacerta rupicola and A. australis). Hierarchical clustering and multivariate analysis of morphological characters suggest that body, and head, width and height (stockiness), all of which are ecologically relevant with respect to movement through habitat, are similar between the genetically distant species. Our data show that convergence in morphology, due to adaptation to similar environments, has confounded the assignment of species leading to misidentification of the taxonomic position of I. squamulosa and the Australolacerta species. PMID:23251601

  16. Many Paths to a Common Destination: Morphological Differentiation of a Functionally Convergent Visual Signal.

    PubMed

    Hagman, Mattias; Ord, Terry J

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the interacting outcomes of selection and historical contingency in shaping adaptive evolution remains a challenge in evolutionary biology. While selection can produce convergent outcomes when species occupy similar environments, the unique history of each species can also influence evolutionary trajectories and result in different phenotypic end points. The question is to what extent historical contingency places species on different adaptive pathways and, in turn, the extent to which we can predict evolutionary outcomes. Among lizards there are several distantly related genera that have independently evolved an elaborate extendible dewlap for territorial communication. We conducted a detailed morphological study and employed new phylogenetic comparative methods to investigate the evolution of the underlying hyoid that powers the extension of the dewlap. This analysis showed that there appear to have been multiple phenotypic pathways for evolving a functionally convergent dewlap. The biomechanical complexity that underlies this morphological structure implies that adaptation should have been constrained to a narrow phenotypic pathway. However, multiple adaptive solutions have been possible in apparent response to a common selection pressure. Thus, the phenotypic outcome that subsequently evolved in different genera seems to have been contingent on the history of the group in question. This blurs the distinction between convergent and historically contingent adaptation and suggests that adaptive phenotypic diversity can evolve without the need for divergent natural selection. PMID:27501088

  17. Integrative Convergence in Neuroscience: Trajectories, Problems, and the Need for a Progressive Neurobioethics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, J.

    The advanced integrative scientific convergence (AISC) model represents a viable approach to neuroscience. Beyond simple multi-disciplinarity, the AISC model unifies constituent scientific and technological fields to foster innovation, invention and new ways of addressing seemingly intractable questions. In this way, AISC can yield novel methods and foster new trajectories of knowledge and discovery, and yield new epistemologies. As stand-alone disciplines, each and all of the constituent fields generate practical and ethical issues, and their convergence may establish a unique set of both potential benefits and problems. To effectively attend to these contingencies requires pragmatic assessment of the actual capabilities and limits of neurofocal AISC, and an openness to what new knowledge and scientific/technological achievements may be produced, and how such outcomes can affect humanity, the human condition, society and the global environment. It is proposed that a progressive neurobioethics may be needed to establish both a meta-ethical framework upon which to structure ethical decisions, and a system and method of ethics that is inclusive, convergent and innovative, and in thus aligned with and meaningful to use of an AISC model in neuroscience.

  18. Numerical Optimization of converging diverging miniature cavitating nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavan, Kanchan; Bhingole, B.; Raut, J.; Pandit, A. B.

    2015-12-01

    The work focuses on the numerical optimization of converging diverging cavitating nozzles through nozzle dimensions and wall shape. The objective is to develop design rules for the geometry of cavitating nozzles for desired end-use. Two main aspects of nozzle design which affects the cavitation have been studied i.e. end dimensions of the geometry (i.e. angle and/or curvature of the inlet, outlet and the throat and the lengths of the converging and diverging sections) and wall curvatures(concave or convex). Angle of convergence at the inlet was found to control the cavity growth whereas angle of divergence of the exit controls the collapse of cavity. CFD simulations were carried out for the straight line converging and diverging sections by varying converging and diverging angles to study its effect on the collapse pressure generated by the cavity. Optimized geometry configurations were obtained on the basis of maximum Cavitational Efficacy Ratio (CER)i.e. cavity collapse pressure generated for a given permanent pressure drop across the system. With increasing capabilities in machining and fabrication, it is possible to exploit the effect of wall curvature to create nozzles with further increase in the CER. Effect of wall curvature has been studied for the straight, concave and convex shapes. Curvature has been varied and effect of concave and convex wall curvatures vis-à-vis straight walls studied for fixed converging and diverging angles.It is concluded that concave converging-diverging nozzles with converging angle of 20° and diverging angle of 5° with the radius of curvature 0.03 m and 0.1530 m respectively gives maximum CER. Preliminary experiments using optimized geometry are indicating similar trends and are currently being carried out. Refinements of the CFD technique using two phase flow simulations are planned.

  19. Convergence of reinforcement learning algorithms and acceleration of learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potapov, A.; Ali, M. K.

    2003-02-01

    The techniques of reinforcement learning have been gaining increasing popularity recently. However, the question of their convergence rate is still open. We consider the problem of choosing the learning steps αn, and their relation with discount γ and exploration degree ɛ. Appropriate choices of these parameters may drastically influence the convergence rate of the techniques. From analytical examples, we conjecture optimal values of αn and then use numerical examples to verify our conjectures.

  20. Bayesian Optimization Algorithm, Population Sizing, and Time to Convergence

    SciTech Connect

    Pelikan, M.; Goldberg, D.E.; Cantu-Paz, E.

    2000-01-19

    This paper analyzes convergence properties of the Bayesian optimization algorithm (BOA). It settles the BOA into the framework of problem decomposition used frequently in order to model and understand the behavior of simple genetic algorithms. The growth of the population size and the number of generations until convergence with respect to the size of a problem is theoretically analyzed. The theoretical results are supported by a number of experiments.