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Sample records for convex surface facing

  1. Effects of Specular Highlights on Perceived Surface Convexity

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Wendy J.; Elder, James H.

    2014-01-01

    Shading is known to produce vivid perceptions of depth. However, the influence of specular highlights on perceived shape is unclear: some studies have shown that highlights improve quantitative shape perception while others have shown no effect. Here we ask how specular highlights combine with Lambertian shading cues to determine perceived surface curvature, and to what degree this is based upon a coherent model of the scene geometry. Observers viewed ambiguous convex/concave shaded surfaces, with or without highlights. We show that the presence/absence of specular highlights has an effect on qualitative shape, their presence biasing perception toward convex interpretations of ambiguous shaded objects. We also find that the alignment of a highlight with the Lambertian shading modulates its effect on perceived shape; misaligned highlights are less likely to be perceived as specularities, and thus have less effect on shape perception. Increasing the depth of the surface or the slant of the illuminant also modulated the effect of the highlight, increasing the bias toward convexity. The effect of highlights on perceived shape can be understood probabilistically in terms of scene geometry: for deeper objects and/or highly slanted illuminants, highlights will occur on convex but not concave surfaces, due to occlusion of the illuminant. Given uncertainty about the exact object depth and illuminant direction, the presence of a highlight increases the probability that the surface is convex. PMID:24811069

  2. Turbulent boundary layer on a convex, curved surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillis, J. C.; Johnston, J. P.; Kays, W. M.; Moffat, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of strong convex curvature on boundary layer turbulence were investigated. The data gathered on the behavior of Reynolds stress suggested the formulation of a simple turbulence model. Three sets of data were taken on two separate facilities. Both rigs had flow from a flat surface, over a convex surface with 90 deg of turning, and then onto a flat recovery surface. The geometry was adjusted so that, for both rigs, the pressure gradient along the test surface was zero - thus avoiding any effects of streamwise acceleration on the wall layers. Results show that after a sudden introduction of curvature, the shear stress in the outer part of the boundary layer is sharply diminished and is even slightly negative near the edge. The wall shear also drops off quickly downstream. In contrast, when the surface suddenly becomes flat again, the wall shear and shear stress profiles recover very slowly towards flat wall conditions.

  3. Independent effects of local and global binocular disparity on the perceived convexity of stereoscopically presented faces in scenes.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Harold; Hill, Harold; Palmisano, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Evidence suggests that experiencing the hollow-face illusion involves perceptual reversal of the binocular disparities associated with the face even though the rest of the scene appears unchanged. This suggests stereoscopic processing of object shape may be independent of scene-based processing of the layout of objects in depth. We investigated the effects of global scene-based and local object-based disparity on the compellingness of the perceived convexity of the face. We took stereoscopic photographs of people in scenes, and independently reversed the binocular disparities associated with the head and scene. Participants rated perceived convexity of a natural disparity ("convex") or reversed disparity ("concave") face shown either in its original context with reversed or natural disparities or against a black background. Faces with natural disparity were rated as more convincingly convex independent of the background, showing that the local disparities can affect perceived convexity independent of disparities across the rest of the image. However, the apparent convexity of the faces was also greater in natural disparity scenes compared to either a reversed disparity scene or a zero disparity black background. This independent effect of natural scene disparity suggests that the 'solidity' associated with natural scene disparities spread to enhance the perceived convexity of the face itself. Together, these findings suggest that global and local disparity exert independent and additive effects upon the perceived convexity of the face. PMID:22670345

  4. Monodispersed Spray Generation from Convex Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shroff, Shilpa; Liepmann, Dorian

    1999-11-01

    Flow of a fluid sheet over a concave surface has been found to amplify streamwise vorticity leading to a new mechanism for droplet formation. An instability leading to waves that travel in the streamwise direction is also observed. The resultant grid-like structure produces monodispersed droplets at the intersections of the two instabilities as the flow develops. The presentation will focus on the dominant physics associated with the interaction between the solid surface and the fluid sheet and discuss how these control the formation of the droplets. The cross-stream ridges result from a wave instability that depends on the curvature of the bed and the Froude Number. There has been some analytical work done on determining the stability characteristic of flow in curved beds by Eagles, which indicates a weak instability even at Reynolds numbers approaching zero. The possibility of streamwise vortices was also investigated as the source of the streamwise ridges. This vorticity may be introduced into the flow by the angle between the jet and the sheet during the initial contact. An analytic model as well as experimental work has been developed to determine the physical phenomena that influence the dynamics of this flow. In addition, work has been done to identify important scaling parameters, especially those that control the development of the surface deformation and droplet formation.

  5. Approximating convex Pareto surfaces in multiobjective radiotherapy planning

    SciTech Connect

    Craft, David L.; Halabi, Tarek F.; Shih, Helen A.; Bortfeld, Thomas R.

    2006-09-15

    Radiotherapy planning involves inherent tradeoffs: the primary mission, to treat the tumor with a high, uniform dose, is in conflict with normal tissue sparing. We seek to understand these tradeoffs on a case-to-case basis, by computing for each patient a database of Pareto optimal plans. A treatment plan is Pareto optimal if there does not exist another plan which is better in every measurable dimension. The set of all such plans is called the Pareto optimal surface. This article presents an algorithm for computing well distributed points on the (convex) Pareto optimal surface of a multiobjective programming problem. The algorithm is applied to intensity-modulated radiation therapy inverse planning problems, and results of a prostate case and a skull base case are presented, in three and four dimensions, investigating tradeoffs between tumor coverage and critical organ sparing.

  6. Discrete-hole film cooling characteristics over concave and convex surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Shao-Yen; Yao, Yong-Qing; Xia, Bin; Tsou, Fu-Kang

    The local film-cooling effectiveness and local pressure distribution for single-row discrete holes were measured over the whole areas of concave and convex surfaces, using a plexiglass test section with curvature radii of 140 mm and 70 mm for the concave and the convex surfaces and film-cooling holes (34 on the convex surface and 22 on the concave surface) 8 mm in diameter. The results indicate that the concave surface has the widest film-cooling coverage area in the z-direction (perpendicular to the x-flow direction), while the highest film-cooling effectiveness of the convex surface is near the ejection hole. High blowing ratios at holes have an adverse effect on film cooling. The weakest cooling region is near the center line between holes; such a poorly cooled region is larger on convex surfaces than on the concave ones. Optimal design characteristics for turbine blades surfaces are discussed.

  7. Effects of compaction variables on porosity and material tensile strength of convex-faced aspirin tablets.

    PubMed

    Pitt, K G; Newton, J M; Stanley, P

    1991-04-01

    The porosity and tensile strength of convex-faced aspirin tablets formed under a compaction pressure in the range 40-320 MPa and at punch velocities in the range 0.008 to 500 mm s-1 have been determined. The material tensile strength, sigma f, was calculated from the observed fracture load, Ps, using the equation of Pitt et al (1988): sigma f = 10 Ps/pi D2(2.84 t/D - 0.126 t/W + 3.15 W/D + 0.01)-1 where D is the tablet diameter, t is the overall tablet thickness and W is the central cylinder thickness. Tablets formed at lower compaction pressures had a higher porosity and lower tensile strength than those formed at higher compaction pressures. Tablets of face curvature ratio (D/R) in the range 0.25-0.67 and a normalized cylinder length (W/D) of 0.2 had the optimum tensile strength. (R is the radius of curvature of the tablet face.) Tablets formed at high compaction rates were significantly weaker than those formed at lower compaction rates. PMID:1676731

  8. Rationally convex domains and singular Lagrangian surfaces in $mathbb {C}(2) $ C 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemirovski, Stefan; Siegel, Kyler

    2016-01-01

    We give a complete characterization of those disk bundles over surfaces which embed as rationally convex strictly pseudoconvex domains in $\\mathbb{C}^2$. We recall some classical obstructions and prove some deeper ones related to symplectic and contact topology. We explain the close connection to Lagrangian surfaces with isolated singularities and develop techniques for constructing such surfaces. Our proof also gives a complete characterization of Lagrangian surfaces with open Whitney umbrellas, answering a question first posed by Givental in 1986.

  9. Heat transfer and fluid mechanics measurements in transitional boundary layers on convex-curved surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, T.; Simon, T. W.

    1987-01-01

    The test section of the present experiment to ascertain the effects of convex curvature and freestream turbulence on boundary layer momentum and heat transfer during natural transition provided a two-dimensional boundary layer flow on a uniformly heated curved surface, with bending to various curvature radii, R. Attention is given to results for the cases of R = infinity, 180 cm, and 90 cm, each with two freestream turbulence intensity levels. While the mild convex curvature of R = 180 cm delays transition, further bending to R = 90 cm leads to no signifucant further delay of transition. Cases with both curvature and higher freestream disturbance effects exhibit the latter's pronounced dominance. These data are pertinent to the development of transition prediction models for gas turbine blade design.

  10. A simple device for sub-aperture stitching of fast convex surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre-Aguirre, D.; Izazaga-Pérez, R.; Villalobos-Mendoza, B.; Carrasco-Licea, E.; Granados-Agustin, F. S.; Percino-Zacarías, M. E.; Salazar-Morales, M. F.; Cruz-Zavala, E.

    2015-10-01

    In this work, we show a simple device that helps in the use of the sub-aperture stitching method for testing convex surfaces with large diameter and a small f/#. This device was designed at INAOE's Optical work shop to solve the problem that exists when a Newton Interferometer and the sub-aperture stitching method are used. It is well known that if the f/# of a surface is small, the slopes over the surface increases rapidly and this is critical for points far from the vertex. Therefore, if we use a reference master in the Newton interferometer to test a convex surface with a large diameter and an area far from the vertex, the master tends to slide causing scratches over the surface under test. To solve this problem, a device for mounting the surface under test with two freedom degrees, a rotating axis and a lever to tilt the surface, was designed. As result, the optical axis of the master can be placed in vertical position avoiding undesired movements of the master and making the sub-aperture stitching easier. We describe the proposed design and the results obtained with this device.

  11. Experimental data and model for the turbulent boundary layer on a convex, curved surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillis, J. C.; Johnson, J. P.; Moffat, R. J.; Kays, W. M.

    1981-01-01

    Experiments were performed to determine how boundary layer turbulence is affected by strong convex curvature. The data gathered on the behavior of the Reynolds stress suggested the formulation of a simple turbulence model. Data were taken on two separate facilities. Both rigs had flow from a flat surface, over a convex surface with 90 deg of turning and then onto a flat recovery surface. The geometry was adjusted so that, for both rigs, the pressure gradient along the test surface was zero. Two experiments were performed at delta/R approximately 0.10, and one at weaker curvature with delta/R approximately 0.05. Results show that after a sudden introduction of curvature the shear stress in the outer part of the boundary layer is sharply diminished and is even slightly negative near the edge. The wall shear also drops off quickly downstream. When the surface suddenly becomes flat again, the wall shear and shear stress profiles recover very slowly towards flat wall conditions. A simple turbulence model, which was based on the theory that the Prandtl mixing length in the outer layer should scale on the velocity gradient layer, was shown to account for the slow recovery.

  12. Geodesic constant method: A novel approach to analytical surface-ray tracing on convex conducting bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, R. M.; Wiesbeck, W.

    1995-04-01

    A generalized approach to analytical surface-ray tracing in three dimensions, and a review of its application to convex conducting bodies, is presented, using the Eisenhart Coordinate System. The ray-parameters so obtained, for quadric cylinders (QUACYLs) and surfaces of revolution (QUASORs), are in a one-parameter form for UTD mutual-coupling applications. The ray analysis is also extended to the hybrid QUACYLs (e.g., aircraft wings) and hybrid QUASORs (e.g., satellite-launch vehicles), by introducing Hertz's principle of particle dynamics to EM theory. This mathematical formulation is applicable even to other important non-Eisenhart surfaces, such as the ogive. A summary of the mathematical formulations is included.

  13. A DNS Study on the Effects of Streamwise Convex Surface Curvature on Coherent Structures in Turbulent Boundary Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dave, Nikunj

    Direct numerical simulation results are used to establish the effect of streamwise convex surface curvature on the development of turbulent boundary layers, and the effect of such curvature on the forced-convection heat transfer variations observed at certain supercritical thermodynamic states. The results illustrate the stabilizing effects of this flow geometry through modification of the structure and distribution of hairpin-like vortical flow structures in the boundary layer. Specifically, the radial equilibrium mechanism existing on the streamwise convex surface acts to decrease the streamwise spacing of hairpin-like structures within a wave packet and increase the spanwise spacing of the hairpin-like structures in comparison to the behaviour of such structures within the boundary layer on a flat surface. Furthermore, enhancement of convective heat transfer realized at a particular heat flux-to-mass flux ratio with the working fluid at a supercritical thermodynamic state is observed to be reduced by the stabilizing effect of convex surface curvature.

  14. Advanced Face Gear Surface Durability Evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.; Heath, Gregory F.

    2016-01-01

    The surface durability life of helical face gears and isotropic super-finished (ISF) face gears was investigated. Experimental fatigue tests were performed at the NASA Glenn Research Center. Endurance tests were performed on 10 sets of helical face gears in mesh with tapered involute helical pinions, and 10 sets of ISF-enhanced straight face gears in mesh with tapered involute spur pinions. The results were compared to previous tests on straight face gears. The life of the ISF configuration was slightly less than that of previous tests on straight face gears. The life of the ISF configuration was slightly greater than that of the helical configuration.

  15. Streamwise Vortices on the Convex Surfaces of Circular Cylinders and Turbomachinery Blading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gostelow, Paul

    2010-01-01

    In assessing the results please recall that the Mach number regimes and model geometries differ considerably. Selection of the radius of curvature at the 10% chord location is consistent but arbitrary, although it does seem representative for most blades and gives a good fit for the results. Measured spanwise wavelengths of the periodic vortex arrays on blading are predicted well by the Kestin and Wood theory. If this behavior is at all common it could have implications for turbine aerodynamic and blade cooling design. The outcome is to establish that organized streamwise vorticity may occur more frequently on convex surfaces, such as turbine blade suction surfaces, than hitherto appreciated. Investigations and predictions of flow behavior should be extended to encompass that possibility.

  16. Smart, passive sun facing surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Hively, Lee M.

    1996-01-01

    An article adapted for selectively utilizing solar radiation comprises an absorptive surface and a reflective surface, the absorptive surface and the reflective surface oriented to absorb solar radiation when the sun is in a relatively low position, and to reflect solar radiation when the sun is in a relatively high position.

  17. Smart, passive sun facing surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Hively, L.M.

    1996-04-30

    An article adapted for selectively utilizing solar radiation comprises an absorptive surface and a reflective surface, the absorptive surface and the reflective surface oriented to absorb solar radiation when the sun is in a relatively low position, and to reflect solar radiation when the sun is in a relatively high position. 17 figs.

  18. Fiber coupler end face wavefront surface metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compertore, David C.; Ignatovich, Filipp V.; Marcus, Michael A.

    2015-09-01

    Despite significant technological advances in the field of fiber optic communications, one area remains surprisingly `low-tech': fiber termination. In many instances it involves manual labor and subjective visual inspection. At the same time, high quality fiber connections are one of the most critical parameters in constructing an efficient communication link. The shape and finish of the fiber end faces determines the efficiency of a connection comprised of coupled fiber end faces. The importance of fiber end face quality becomes even more critical for fiber connection arrays and for in the field applications. In this article we propose and demonstrate a quantitative inspection method for the fiber connectors using reflected wavefront technology. The manufactured and polished fiber tip is illuminated by a collimated light from a microscope objective. The reflected light is collected by the objective and is directed to a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. A set of lenses is used to create the image of the fiber tip on the surface of the sensor. The wavefront is analyzed by the sensor, and the measured parameters are used to obtain surface properties of the fiber tip, and estimate connection loss. For example, defocus components in the reflected light indicate the presence of bow in the fiber end face. This inspection method provides a contact-free approach for quantitative inspection of fiber end faces and for estimating the connection loss, and can potentially be integrated into a feedback system for automated inspection and polishing of fiber tips and fiber tip arrays.

  19. Two-dimensional convex-molecule fluid model for surface adsorption of proteins: Effect of soft interaction on adsorption equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahata, Paritosh; Das, Sovan Lal

    2014-12-01

    Adsorption of proteins on membrane surfaces plays an important role in cell biological processes. In this work, we develop a two-dimensional fluid model for proteins. The protein molecules have been modeled as two-dimensional convex and soft particles. The Lennard-Jones potential for circular particles and Kihara (12,6) potential for elliptical particles with hard core have been used to model pairwise intermolecular interactions. The equation of state of the fluid model has been derived using Weeks-Chandler-Andersen decomposition and it involves three parameters, an attraction, a repulsion, and a size parameter, which depend on the shape and core size of the molecules. For validation of the model, a two-dimensional molecular dynamics simulation has been performed. Finally, the model has been applied to study the adsorption of proteins on a flat membrane. In comparison with the existing model of hard and convex particles for protein adsorption, our model predicts a higher packing fraction for the adsorption equilibria. Although the present work is based on Lennard-Jones-type interaction, it can be extended for other specific soft interactions between convex molecules. Thus the model has general applicability for any other two-dimensional adsorption systems of molecules with soft interaction.

  20. A Cutting Surface Algorithm for Semi-Infinite Convex Programming with an Application to Moment Robust Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Mehrotra, Sanjay; Papp, Dávid

    2014-01-01

    We present and analyze a central cutting surface algorithm for general semi-infinite convex optimization problems and use it to develop a novel algorithm for distributionally robust optimization problems in which the uncertainty set consists of probability distributions with given bounds on their moments. Moments of arbitrary order, as well as nonpolynomial moments, can be included in the formulation. We show that this gives rise to a hierarchy of optimization problems with decreasing levels of risk-aversion, with classic robust optimization at one end of the spectrum and stochastic programming at the other. Although our primary motivation is to solve distributionally robust optimization problems with moment uncertainty, the cutting surface method for general semi-infinite convex programs is also of independent interest. The proposed method is applicable to problems with nondifferentiable semi-infinite constraints indexed by an infinite dimensional index set. Examples comparing the cutting surface algorithm to the central cutting plane algorithm of Kortanek and No demonstrate the potential of our algorithm even in the solution of traditional semi-infinite convex programming problems, whose constraints are differentiable, and are indexed by an index set of low dimension. After the rate of convergence analysis of the cutting surface algorithm, we extend the authors' moment matching scenario generation algorithm to a probabilistic algorithm that finds optimal probability distributions subject to moment constraints. The combination of this distribution optimization method and the central cutting surface algorithm yields a solution to a family of distributionally robust optimization problems that are considerably more general than the ones proposed to date.

  1. A Cutting Surface Algorithm for Semi-Infinite Convex Programming with an Application to Moment Robust Optimization

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mehrotra, Sanjay; Papp, Dávid

    2014-01-01

    We present and analyze a central cutting surface algorithm for general semi-infinite convex optimization problems and use it to develop a novel algorithm for distributionally robust optimization problems in which the uncertainty set consists of probability distributions with given bounds on their moments. Moments of arbitrary order, as well as nonpolynomial moments, can be included in the formulation. We show that this gives rise to a hierarchy of optimization problems with decreasing levels of risk-aversion, with classic robust optimization at one end of the spectrum and stochastic programming at the other. Although our primary motivation is to solve distributionally robustmore » optimization problems with moment uncertainty, the cutting surface method for general semi-infinite convex programs is also of independent interest. The proposed method is applicable to problems with nondifferentiable semi-infinite constraints indexed by an infinite dimensional index set. Examples comparing the cutting surface algorithm to the central cutting plane algorithm of Kortanek and No demonstrate the potential of our algorithm even in the solution of traditional semi-infinite convex programming problems, whose constraints are differentiable, and are indexed by an index set of low dimension. After the rate of convergence analysis of the cutting surface algorithm, we extend the authors' moment matching scenario generation algorithm to a probabilistic algorithm that finds optimal probability distributions subject to moment constraints. The combination of this distribution optimization method and the central cutting surface algorithm yields a solution to a family of distributionally robust optimization problems that are considerably more general than the ones proposed to date.« less

  2. The influence of tool path strategies on cutting force and surface texture during ball end milling of low curvature convex surfaces.

    PubMed

    Shajari, Shaghayegh; Sadeghi, Mohammad Hossein; Hassanpour, Hamed

    2014-01-01

    Advancement in machining technology of curved surfaces for various engineering applications is increasing. Various methodologies and computer tools have been developed by the manufacturers to improve efficiency of freeform surface machining. Selection of the right sets of cutter path strategies and appropriate cutting conditions is extremely important in ensuring high productivity rate, meeting the better quality level, and lower cutting forces. In this paper, cutting force as a new decision criterion for the best selection of tool paths on convex surfaces is presented. Therefore, this work aims at studying and analyzing different finishing strategies to assess their influence on surface texture, cutting forces, and machining time. Design and analysis of experiments are performed by means of Taguchi technique and analysis of variance. In addition, the significant parameters affecting the cutting force in each strategy are introduced. Machining strategies employed include raster, 3D-offset, radial, and spiral. The cutting parameters were feed rate, cutting speed, and step over. The experiments were carried out on low curvature convex surfaces of stainless steel 1.4903. The conclusion is that radial strategy provokes the best surface texture and the lowest cutting forces and spiral strategy signifies the worst surface texture and the highest cutting forces. PMID:24701163

  3. The Influence of Tool Path Strategies on Cutting Force and Surface Texture during Ball End Milling of Low Curvature Convex Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Mohammad Hossein; Hassanpour, Hamed

    2014-01-01

    Advancement in machining technology of curved surfaces for various engineering applications is increasing. Various methodologies and computer tools have been developed by the manufacturers to improve efficiency of freeform surface machining. Selection of the right sets of cutter path strategies and appropriate cutting conditions is extremely important in ensuring high productivity rate, meeting the better quality level, and lower cutting forces. In this paper, cutting force as a new decision criterion for the best selection of tool paths on convex surfaces is presented. Therefore, this work aims at studying and analyzing different finishing strategies to assess their influence on surface texture, cutting forces, and machining time. Design and analysis of experiments are performed by means of Taguchi technique and analysis of variance. In addition, the significant parameters affecting the cutting force in each strategy are introduced. Machining strategies employed include raster, 3D-offset, radial, and spiral. The cutting parameters were feed rate, cutting speed, and step over. The experiments were carried out on low curvature convex surfaces of stainless steel 1.4903. The conclusion is that radial strategy provokes the best surface texture and the lowest cutting forces and spiral strategy signifies the worst surface texture and the highest cutting forces. PMID:24701163

  4. Flexible Polyhedral Surfaces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexandrov, V. A.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses some questions connected with Cauchy's theorem which states that two convex closed polyhedral surfaces whose corresponding faces are congruent and whose faces adjoin each other in the same way are congruent. Describes how to construct a flexible polyhedron. (ASK)

  5. Tensile property of H13 die steel with convex-shaped biomimetic surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z. H.; Zhou, H.; Ren, L. Q.; Tong, X.; Shan, H. Y.; Cao, Y.

    2007-09-01

    The H13 steel specimens with non-smooth surface were fabricated by biomimetic method and laser technique, and the effect of these biomimetic surfaces on the tensile properties was investigated. The results indicated that the biomimetic surface has an advantageous effect on improving the tensile properties of H13 steel. As the area ratio occupied by non-smooth units on the biomimetic surface grows to 26.7%, the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and 0.2% yield strength (YS) of materials linearly increase by about 8.4% and 17.2%, respectively. The elongation to fracture of materials reaches to the peak value of about 41.3% at the point of 17.1% area ratio, and further heightening the area ratio can result in a reduced ductility relative to this peak value. This improvement of tensile properties can be attributed to the combined effects of the microstructure characteristics within the unit zone and the unit-distribution features on the surface. Meanwhile, the regressed relation equations of UTS, YS and elongation regarding the area ratio were obtained via statistical theory. The tests of regression significance showed that the confidence of these equations achieved 99% above.

  6. Convex Lattice Polygons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Paul

    2006-01-01

    A "convex" polygon is one with no re-entrant angles. Alternatively one can use the standard convexity definition, asserting that for any two points of the convex polygon, the line segment joining them is contained completely within the polygon. In this article, the author provides a solution to a problem involving convex lattice polygons.

  7. Electromagnetic scattering by coated convex surfaces and wedges simulated by approximate boundary conditions. Ph.D. Thesis Technical Report, Feb. - Sep. 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Syed, H. H.; Volakis, John L.

    1992-01-01

    Asymptotic/high-frequency solutions are developed for analyzing the non-specular scattering mechanisms associated with coated convex surfaces and edges simulated by approximate boundary conditions. In particular, the standard impedance boundary conditions (SIBC's) and the second order generalized impedance boundary conditions (GIBC's) are employed for a characterization of the edge diffraction, creeping wave, and surface diffracted wave contributions. To study the creeping wave and surface diffracted wave mechanisms, rigorous UTD (uniform geometrical theory of diffraction) diffraction coefficients are developed for a convex coated cylinder simulated with SIBC's and GIBC's. The ray solutions obtained remain valid in the transition region and reduce uniformly to those in the deep lit and shadow regions. A uniform asymptotic solution is also presented for observations in the close vicinity of the cylinder. The diffraction coefficient for a convex cylinder are obtained via a generalization of the corresponding ones of the circular cylinder. To validate the asymptotic/high-frequency solution, integral equations are derived for both E and H-polarization and solved numerically using the method of moments. Results are presented for a single and three layered coated convex cylinder. Some insights are also provided on the accuracy of the employed GIBC's versus SIBC's for application to curved surfaces. To characterize the scattering by impedance wedges illuminated at skew incidence, diffraction coefficients are derived from an approximate solution of the governing functional difference equations. This solution exactly recovers the known ones for an impedance half plane or an arbitrary wedge at normal incidence, and to validate it for other wedge angles, a moment method code was used. Finally, to test the usefulness of the approximate skew incidence impedance wedge diffraction coefficient for three dimensional structures, equivalent currents are derived in the context of the

  8. 3D face recognition based on matching of facial surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echeagaray-Patrón, Beatriz A.; Kober, Vitaly

    2015-09-01

    Face recognition is an important task in pattern recognition and computer vision. In this work a method for 3D face recognition in the presence of facial expression and poses variations is proposed. The method uses 3D shape data without color or texture information. A new matching algorithm based on conformal mapping of original facial surfaces onto a Riemannian manifold followed by comparison of conformal and isometric invariants computed in the manifold is suggested. Experimental results are presented using common 3D face databases that contain significant amount of expression and pose variations.

  9. RDS-21 Face-Gear Surface Durability Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.; Heath, Gregory F.; Filler, Robert R.; Slaughter, Stephen C.; Fetty, Jason

    2007-01-01

    Experimental fatigue tests were performed to determine the surface durability life of a face gear in mesh with a tapered spur involute pinion. Twenty-four sets of gears were tested at three load levels: 7200, 8185, and 9075 lb-in face gear torque, and 2190 to 3280 rpm face gear speed. The gears were carburized and ground, shot-peened and vibro-honed, and made from VIM-VAR Pyrowear 53 steel per AMS 6308. The tests produced 17 gear tooth spalling failures and 7 suspensions. For all the failed sets, spalling occurred on at least one tooth of all the pinions. In some cases, the spalling initiated a crack in the pinion teeth which progressed to tooth fracture. Also, spalling occurred on some face gear teeth. The AGMA endurance allowable stress for a tapered spur involute pinion in mesh with a face gear was determined to be 275 ksi for the material tested. For the application of a tapered spur involute pinion in mesh with a face gear, proper face gear shim controlled the desired gear tooth contact pattern while proper pinion shim was an effective way of adjusting backlash without severely affecting the contact pattern.

  10. CONVEX mini manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tennille, Geoffrey M.; Howser, Lona M.

    1993-01-01

    The use of the CONVEX computers that are an integral part of the Supercomputing Network Subsystems (SNS) of the Central Scientific Computing Complex of LaRC is briefly described. Features of the CONVEX computers that are significantly different than the CRAY supercomputers are covered, including: FORTRAN, C, architecture of the CONVEX computers, the CONVEX environment, batch job submittal, debugging, performance analysis, utilities unique to CONVEX, and documentation. This revision reflects the addition of the Applications Compiler and X-based debugger, CXdb. The document id intended for all CONVEX users as a ready reference to frequently asked questions and to more detailed information contained with the vendor manuals. It is appropriate for both the novice and the experienced user.

  11. Observations of quenching of downward-facing surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T.Y.; Bainbridge, B.L.; Bentz, J.H.; Simpson, R.B.

    1994-01-01

    This report documents results of a series of scoping experiments on boiling from downward-facing surfaces in support of the Sandia New Production Reactor, Vessel-Pool Boiling Heat Transfer task. Quenching experiments have been performed to examine the boiling processes from downward-facing surfaces using two 61-centimeter diameter test masses, one with a flat test surface and one with a curved test surface having a radius of curvature of 335 cm, matching that of the Cylindrical Boiling facility test vessel. Boiling curves were obtained for both test surfaces facing horizontally downward. The critical beat flux was found to be essentially the same, having an average value of approximately 0.5 MW/m{sup 2}. This value is substantially higher than current estimates of the heat dissipation rates required for in-vessel retention of core debris in the Heavy Water New Production Reactor as well as some of the advanced light water reactors under design. The nucleate boiling process was found to be cyclic with four relatively distinct phases: direct liquid/solid contact, nucleation and growth of bubbles, coalescence, and ejection.

  12. Plasma Facing Surface Composition During NSTX Li Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, C. H.; Sullenberger, R.; Koel, B. E.; Jaworski, M. A.; Kugel, H. W.

    2012-07-20

    Lithium conditioned plasma facing surfaces have lowered recycling and enhanced plasma performance on many fusion devices. However, the nature of the plasma-lithium surface interaction has been obscured by the difficulty of in-tokamak surface analysis. We report laboratory studies of the chemical composition of lithium surfaces exposed to typical residual gases found in tokamaks. Solid lithium and a molybdenum alloy (TZM) coated with lithium has been examined using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, temperature programmed desorption, and Auger electron spectroscopy both in ultrahigh vacuum conditions and after exposure to trace gases. Lithium surfaces near room temperature were oxidized after exposure to 1-2 Langmuirs of oxygen or water vapor. The oxidation rate by carbon monoxide was four times less. Lithiated PFC surfaces in tokamaks will be oxidized in about 100 s depending on the tokamak vacuum conditions.

  13. Gerrymandering and Convexity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodge, Jonathan K.; Marshall, Emily; Patterson, Geoff

    2010-01-01

    Convexity-based measures of shape compactness provide an effective way to identify irregularities in congressional district boundaries. A low convexity coefficient may suggest that a district has been gerrymandered, or it may simply reflect irregularities in the corresponding state boundary. Furthermore, the distribution of population within a…

  14. Generalized convexity and inequalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, G. D.; Vamanamurthy, M. K.; Vuorinen, M.

    2007-11-01

    Let and let be the family of all mean values of two numbers in (some examples are the arithmetic, geometric, and harmonic means). Given , we say that a function is (m1,m2)-convex if f(m1(x,y))[less-than-or-equals, slant]m2(f(x),f(y)) for all . The usual convexity is the special case when both mean values are arithmetic means. We study the dependence of (m1,m2)-convexity on m1 and m2 and give sufficient conditions for (m1,m2)-convexity of functions defined by Maclaurin series. The criteria involve the Maclaurin coefficients. Our results yield a class of new inequalities for several special functions such as the Gaussian hypergeometric function and a generalized Bessel function.

  15. Stereotype locally convex spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbarov, S. S.

    2000-08-01

    We give complete proofs of some previously announced results in the theory of stereotype (that is, reflexive in the sense of Pontryagin duality) locally convex spaces. These spaces have important applications in topological algebra and functional analysis.

  16. Surface Acoustic Wave Duplexer Composed of SiO2/Cu Electrode/LiNbO3 Structure Having Convex and Concave Portions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakai, Yasuharu; Nakao, Takeshi; Nishiyama, Kenji; Kadota, Michio

    2009-07-01

    The transition bandwidth of 20 MHz between the transmission (Tx: 1850-1910 MHz) and the receiving (Rx: 1930-1990 MHz) bands of personal communication service (PCS) handy phones in the United States (US) is very narrow compared with those of other systems. We have already realized surface acoustic wave (SAW) duplexers with sizes of 5.0×5.0×1.7 and 3.0×2.5×1.2 mm3 for PCS handy phones in the US with an excellent temperature coefficient of frequency (TCF) by using a shear horizontal (SH) wave on a flattened SiO2/Cu electrode/36-48° YX-LiTaO3 structure and a Rayleigh wave on a SiO2/Cu electrode/120-128° YX-LiNbO3 structure. Although the surface of the above-mentioned structures is flattened SiO2, we have also studied the shape of the SiO2 surface. As a result, in addition to increasing the stop-band width, which corresponds to the reflection coefficient, the TCF and power durability have been improved by forming convex portions on the surface of the SiO2 over the interdigital transducer (IDT) gaps.

  17. Optical metrology for very large convex aspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burge, J. H.; Su, P.; Zhao, C.

    2008-07-01

    Telescopes with very large diameter or with wide fields require convex secondary mirrors that may be many meters in diameter. The optical surfaces for these mirrors can be manufactured to the accuracy limited by the surface metrology. We have developed metrology systems that are specifically optimized for measuring very large convex aspheric surfaces. Large aperture vibration insensitive sub-aperture Fizeau interferometer combined with stitching software give high resolution surface measurements. The global shape is corroborated with a coordinate measuring machine based on the swing arm profilometer.

  18. Computing convex quadrangulations☆

    PubMed Central

    Schiffer, T.; Aurenhammer, F.; Demuth, M.

    2012-01-01

    We use projected Delaunay tetrahedra and a maximum independent set approach to compute large subsets of convex quadrangulations on a given set of points in the plane. The new method improves over the popular pairing method based on triangulating the point set. PMID:22389540

  19. Statistical properties of convex clustering

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Kean Ming; Witten, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    In this manuscript, we study the statistical properties of convex clustering. We establish that convex clustering is closely related to single linkage hierarchical clustering and k-means clustering. In addition, we derive the range of the tuning parameter for convex clustering that yields a non-trivial solution. We also provide an unbiased estimator of the degrees of freedom, and provide a finite sample bound for the prediction error for convex clustering. We compare convex clustering to some traditional clustering methods in simulation studies.

  20. Convex geometry analysis method of hyperspectral data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Yanjun; Wang, XiChang; Qi, Hongxing; Yu, BingXi

    2003-06-01

    We present matrix expression of convex geometry analysis method of hyperspectral data by linear mixing model and establish a mathematic model of endmembers. A 30-band remote sensing image is applied to testify the model. The results of analysis reveal that the method can analyze mixed pixel questions. The targets that are smaller than earth surface pixel can be identified by applying the method.

  1. Localized surface plasmons in face to face dimer silver triangular prism nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azarian, Abas; Babaei, Ferydon

    2016-05-01

    Using the discrete dipole approximation method, all plasmonic bands in 80 nm silver face to face dimer triangular prism nanoparticles were reported. The characteristics of plasmonics peaks were investigated with variations of dimer gap and refractive index of the surrounding medium of dimer. We found that there are three and four plasmonic bands, respectively, for dimer separation 2 and 4 nm. The extinction spectra and electric field distribution showed that the dipole-dipole interaction creates strong plasmonic band, but the quadrupole-quadrupole interaction relates to weak plasmonic band. The results revealed that the strong plasmonic bands have high sensitivity factors with respect to weak plasmonic bands. This study may be used in the synthesis of asymmetric dimers made of metal nanoparticles with new plasmonics properties.

  2. Effects of surface materials on polarimetric-thermal measurements: applications to face recognition.

    PubMed

    Short, Nathaniel J; Yuffa, Alex J; Videen, Gorden; Hu, Shuowen

    2016-07-01

    Materials, such as cosmetics, applied to the face can severely inhibit biometric face-recognition systems operating in the visible spectrum. These products are typically made up of materials having different spectral properties and color pigmentation that distorts the perceived shape of the face. The surface of the face emits thermal radiation, due to the living tissue beneath the surface of the skin. The emissivity of skin is approximately 0.99; in comparison, oil- and plastic-based materials, commonly found in cosmetics and face paints, have an emissivity range of 0.9-0.95 in the long-wavelength infrared part of the spectrum. Due to these properties, all three are good thermal emitters and have little impact on the heat transferred from the face. Polarimetric-thermal imaging provides additional details of the face and is also dependent upon the thermal radiation from the face. In this paper, we provide a theoretical analysis on the thermal conductivity of various materials commonly applied to the face using a metallic sphere. Additionally, we observe the impact of environmental conditions on the strength of the polarimetric signature and the ability to recover geometric details. Finally, we show how these materials degrade the performance of traditional face-recognition methods and provide an approach to mitigating this effect using polarimetric-thermal imaging. PMID:27409214

  3. Plasma temperature rise toward the plasma-facing surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishijima, D.; Doerner, R. P.; Seraydarian, R. P.; De Temmerman, G.; van der Meiden, H. J.

    2015-08-01

    Detailed measurements of axial electron temperature, Te, profiles in the presheath region were carried out using a Langmuir probe and the line intensity ratio technique for both He I (728.1 nm/706.5 nm) and Be II (467.3 nm/313.1 nm). The results show that Te increases toward the material surface, which contradicts the standard picture that Te is constant along the magnetic field in the sheath-limited regime. While no target bias voltage, Vb, dependence is seen, the Te rise becomes more prominent with decreasing neutral pressure. Similarly, the ion temperature, Ti, evaluated from Doppler broadening of a He II line emission at 468.6 nm is found to increase toward the surface, but also does not depend on Vb. Possible mechanisms of the Te and Ti rise as well as validity of the line intensity ratio technique near the material surface are discussed.

  4. Thermal expansion compensator having an elastic conductive element bonded to two facing surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Determan, William (Inventor); Matejczyk, Daniel Edward (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A thermal expansion compensator is provided and includes a first electrode structure having a first surface, a second electrode structure having a second surface facing the first surface and an elastic element bonded to the first and second surfaces and including a conductive element by which the first and second electrode structures electrically and/or thermally communicate, the conductive element having a length that is not substantially longer than a distance between the first and second surfaces.

  5. More Realistic Face Model Surface Improves Relevance of Pediatric In-Vitro Aerosol Studies

    PubMed Central

    Amirav, Israel; Halamish, Asaf; Gorenberg, Miguel; Omar, Hamza; Newhouse, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Various hard face models are commonly used to evaluate the efficiency of aerosol face masks. Softer more realistic “face” surface materials, like skin, deform upon mask application and should provide more relevant in-vitro tests. Studies that simultaneously take into consideration many of the factors characteristic of the in vivo face are lacking. These include airways, various application forces, comparison of various devices, comparison with a hard-surface model and use of a more representative model face based on large numbers of actual faces. Aim To compare mask to “face” seal and aerosol delivery of two pediatric masks using a soft vs. a hard, appropriately representative, pediatric face model under various applied forces. Methods Two identical face models and upper airways replicas were constructed, the only difference being the suppleness and compressibility of the surface layer of the “face.” Integrity of the seal and aerosol delivery of two different masks [AeroChamber (AC) and SootherMask (SM)] were compared using a breath simulator, filter collection and realistic applied forces. Results The soft “face” significantly increased the delivery efficiency and the sealing characteristics of both masks. Aerosol delivery with the soft “face” was significantly greater for the SM compared to the AC (p< 0.01). No statistically significant difference between the two masks was observed with the hard “face.” Conclusions The material and pliability of the model “face” surface has a significant influence on both the seal and delivery efficiency of face masks. This finding should be taken into account during in-vitro aerosol studies. PMID:26090661

  6. Surface reconstruction and graphene formation on face-to-face 6H-SiC at 2000 ^oC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmquist, Randolph E.; Real, Mariano; Bush, Brian G.; Shen, Tian; Stiles, Mark D.; Lass, Eric A.

    2012-02-01

    Improved epitaxial graphene films have been widely reported when the sublimation rate of Si is reduced by ambient Ar gas, vapor phase silane, or confined Si vapor. We describe graphene growth on (0001) 6H-SiC samples annealed ``face-to-face'' [1]; in our modified method the separation is limited only by the flatness of the surfaces. After annealing in 100 kPa Ar gas at 2000 ^oC for 300 s, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) show graphene coverage is typically between one and a few layers. Samples without prior hydrogen etching undergo surface reconstruction in the graphitization process, resulting in atomically flat terraces with step bunching. Estimates of the sequestered carbon in the form of graphene are compared to calculated levels due to sublimation and diffusion rates where the sublimated gas is dominated by Si atoms below 2100 ^oC. The 2000 ^oC samples are contrasted against samples processed between 1700 ^oC and 1900 ^oC and transport results on large-scale graphene devices are presented.[4pt] [1] X.Z Yu, C.G. Hwang, C.M. Jozwiak, A. Kohl, A.K. Schmid and A. Lanzara, New synthesis method for the growth of epitaxial graphene, Journal of Electron Spectroscopy and Related Phenomena 184 (2011) 100-106.

  7. Surface Stereo Imager on Mars, Face-On

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image is a view of NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Surface Stereo Imager (SSI) as seen by the lander's Robotic Arm Camera. This image was taken on the afternoon of the 116th Martian day, or sol, of the mission (September 22, 2008). The mast-mounted SSI, which provided the images used in the 360 degree panoramic view of Phoenix's landing site, is about 4 inches tall and 8 inches long. The two 'eyes' of the SSI seen in this image can take photos to create three-dimensional views of the landing site.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  8. Convex polytopes and quantum separability

    SciTech Connect

    Holik, F.; Plastino, A.

    2011-12-15

    We advance a perspective of the entanglement issue that appeals to the Schlienz-Mahler measure [Phys. Rev. A 52, 4396 (1995)]. Related to it, we propose a criterium based on the consideration of convex subsets of quantum states. This criterium generalizes a property of product states to convex subsets (of the set of quantum states) that is able to uncover an interesting geometrical property of the separability property.

  9. Convex polytopes and quantum separability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holik, F.; Plastino, A.

    2011-12-01

    We advance a perspective of the entanglement issue that appeals to the Schlienz-Mahler measure [Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.52.4396 52, 4396 (1995)]. Related to it, we propose a criterium based on the consideration of convex subsets of quantum states. This criterium generalizes a property of product states to convex subsets (of the set of quantum states) that is able to uncover an interesting geometrical property of the separability property.

  10. Computing Surface Coordinates Of Face-Milled Spiral-Bevel Gear Teeth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, Robert F.; Litvin, Faydor L.

    1995-01-01

    Surface coordinates of face-milled spiral-bevel gear teeth computed by method involving numerical solution of governing equations. Needed to generate mathematical models of tooth surfaces for use in finite-element analyses of stresses, strains, and vibrations in meshing spiral-bevel gears.

  11. Three-dimensional clustering of Janus cylinders by convex curvature and hydrophobic interactions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jongmin; Oh, Myung Seok; Choi, Chang-Hyung; Kang, Sung-Min; Kwak, Moo Jin; You, Jae Bem; Im, Sung Gap; Lee, Chang-Soo

    2015-06-28

    The three-dimensional (3D) clustering of Janus cylinders is controlled by simply tuning the cylinder geometry and hydrophobic interactions. Janus cylinders were prepared by combining two approaches: micromolding and initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD). Hydrophilic cylinders with a flat- or convex-top curvature were prepared by micromolding based on surface tension-induced flow. The iCVD process then provides a hydrophobic domain through the simple and precise deposition of a polymer film on the top surface, forming monodisperse Janus microcylinders. We use these Janus cylinders as building blocks to form 2D or 3D clusters via hydrophobic interactions in methanol. We investigate how cylinder geometry or degree of hydrophobic interaction affects the resulting cluster geometries. The convex-top Janus cylinders lead to 3D clustering through tip-to-tip interactions, and the flat-top Janus cylinders lead to 2D clustering through face-to-face attraction. The number of Janus cylinders in 3D clusters is tuned by controlling the degree of hydrophobic (or hydrophilic) interaction. PMID:26008176

  12. Thermodynamic study of reconstructed crystal surfaces.. The octopolar (111) face of LiF crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubbo, Marco; Bruno, Marco; Prencipe, Mauro

    2015-02-01

    Dipolar crystal faces, although reconstructed, have a high surface energy and are forbidden in a Wulff plot at 0 K, in a vacuum. However, they do grow far from equilibrium and due to the relatively open surface structure, are eligible for adsorption, epitaxy and incorporation of foreign substances. In this paper, we study the surface structure of the (111) dipolar face of LiF and calculate the thermal contribution to the surface energy, in the harmonic limit at the Hartree-Fock level. The surface energy calculated at 0 K, of the Li and F terminated (111) faces are 0.767 and 0.698 J/m2, respectively. When the vibrational energy and entropy are considered the surface energies at 298.15 K decrease to 0.720 (Li terminated) and 0.670 (F terminated) J/m2. Finally, when the configurational entropy is also taken into account, the surface energies are 0.663 (Li terminated) and 0.612 (F terminated) J/m2.

  13. Convex dynamics: Unavoidable difficulties in bounding some greedy algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowicki, Tomasz; Tresser, Charles

    2004-03-01

    A greedy algorithm for scheduling and digital printing with inputs in a convex polytope, and vertices of this polytope as successive outputs, has recently been proven to be bounded for any convex polytope in any dimension. This boundedness property follows readily from the existence of some invariant region for a dynamical system equivalent to the algorithm, which is what one proves. While the proof, and some constructions of invariant regions that can be made to depend on a single parameter, are reasonably simple for convex polygons in the plane, the proof of boundedness gets quite complicated in dimension three and above. We show here that such complexity is somehow justified by proving that the most natural generalization of the construction that works for polygons does not work in any dimension above two, even if we allow for as many parameters as there are faces. We first prove that some polytopes in dimension greater than two admit no invariant region to which they are combinatorially equivalent. We then modify these examples to get polytopes such that no invariant region can be obtained by pushing out the borders of the half spaces that intersect to form the polytope. We also show that another mechanism prevents some simplices (the simplest polytopes in any dimension) from admitting invariant regions to which they would be similar. By contrast in dimension two, one can always get an invariant region by pushing these borders far enough in some correlated way; for instance, pushing all borders by the same distance builds an invariant region for any polygon if the push is at a distance big enough for that polygon. To motivate the examples that we provide, we discuss briefly the bifurcations of polyhedra associated with pushing half spaces in parallel to themselves. In dimension three, the elementary codimension one bifurcation resembles the unfolding of the elementary degenerate singularity for codimension one foliations on surfaces. As the subject of this

  14. Convex dynamics: unavoidable difficulties in bounding some greedy algorithms.

    PubMed

    Nowicki, Tomasz; Tresser, Charles

    2004-03-01

    A greedy algorithm for scheduling and digital printing with inputs in a convex polytope, and vertices of this polytope as successive outputs, has recently been proven to be bounded for any convex polytope in any dimension. This boundedness property follows readily from the existence of some invariant region for a dynamical system equivalent to the algorithm, which is what one proves. While the proof, and some constructions of invariant regions that can be made to depend on a single parameter, are reasonably simple for convex polygons in the plane, the proof of boundedness gets quite complicated in dimension three and above. We show here that such complexity is somehow justified by proving that the most natural generalization of the construction that works for polygons does not work in any dimension above two, even if we allow for as many parameters as there are faces. We first prove that some polytopes in dimension greater than two admit no invariant region to which they are combinatorially equivalent. We then modify these examples to get polytopes such that no invariant region can be obtained by pushing out the borders of the half spaces that intersect to form the polytope. We also show that another mechanism prevents some simplices (the simplest polytopes in any dimension) from admitting invariant regions to which they would be similar. By contrast in dimension two, one can always get an invariant region by pushing these borders far enough in some correlated way; for instance, pushing all borders by the same distance builds an invariant region for any polygon if the push is at a distance big enough for that polygon. To motivate the examples that we provide, we discuss briefly the bifurcations of polyhedra associated with pushing half spaces in parallel to themselves. In dimension three, the elementary codimension one bifurcation resembles the unfolding of the elementary degenerate singularity for codimension one foliations on surfaces. As the subject of this

  15. 3D face recognition using simulated annealing and the surface interpenetration measure.

    PubMed

    Queirolo, Chauã C; Silva, Luciano; Bellon, Olga R P; Segundo, Maurício Pamplona

    2010-02-01

    This paper presents a novel automatic framework to perform 3D face recognition. The proposed method uses a Simulated Annealing-based approach (SA) for range image registration with the Surface Interpenetration Measure (SIM), as similarity measure, in order to match two face images. The authentication score is obtained by combining the SIM values corresponding to the matching of four different face regions: circular and elliptical areas around the nose, forehead, and the entire face region. Then, a modified SA approach is proposed taking advantage of invariant face regions to better handle facial expressions. Comprehensive experiments were performed on the FRGC v2 database, the largest available database of 3D face images composed of 4,007 images with different facial expressions. The experiments simulated both verification and identification systems and the results compared to those reported by state-of-the-art works. By using all of the images in the database, a verification rate of 96.5 percent was achieved at a False Acceptance Rate (FAR) of 0.1 percent. In the identification scenario, a rank-one accuracy of 98.4 percent was achieved. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest rank-one score ever achieved for the FRGC v2 database when compared to results published in the literature. PMID:20075453

  16. Convex analysis and ideal tensegrities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maceri, Franco; Marino, Michele; Vairo, Giuseppe

    2011-11-01

    A theoretical framework based on convex analysis is formulated and developed to study tensegrity structures under steady-state loads. Many classical results for ideal tensegrities are rationally deduced from subdifferentiable models in a novel mechanical perspective. Novel energy-based criteria for rigidity and pre-stressability are provided, allowing to formulate numerical algorithms for computations.

  17. Computational redesign of the lipid-facing surface of the outer membrane protein OmpA

    PubMed Central

    Stapleton, James A.; Whitehead, Timothy A.; Nanda, Vikas

    2015-01-01

    Advances in computational design methods have made possible extensive engineering of soluble proteins, but designed β-barrel membrane proteins await improvements in our understanding of the sequence determinants of folding and stability. A subset of the amino acid residues of membrane proteins interact with the cell membrane, and the design rules that govern this lipid-facing surface are poorly understood. We applied a residue-level depth potential for β-barrel membrane proteins to the complete redesign of the lipid-facing surface of Escherichia coli OmpA. Initial designs failed to fold correctly, but reversion of a small number of mutations indicated by backcross experiments yielded designs with substitutions to up to 60% of the surface that did support folding and membrane insertion. PMID:26199411

  18. Semiconductor Surface Structure Determination via Low Energy Positron Diffraction: Cleavage Faces of Cadmium-Selenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horsky, Thomas Neil

    Low energy positron diffraction (LEPD) is used to determine the surface structure of the wurtzite CdSe(1010) and CdSe(1120) cleavage faces. Low energy electron diffraction (LEED) is also performed, utilizing a beam optical system which produces both a e^+ and e ^- beam with the same phase-space characteristics, i.e. 1 mm-deg. Both e^+ and e^- measurements were collected from the same sample surface of each cleavage face, removing systematic errors from the comparison. Dynamical calculations were performed for both the LEPD and LEED using the R-factor methodology of Duke et al. For the (1010) surface, the calculations and analyses were performed at Brandeis via link to the John Von Neumann Supercomputer Center at Princeton, NJ. For the (1120) surface, the LEPD calculations and analysis was performed by Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories, while the LEED calculations were performed by Princeton University. Resulting surface structures for CdSe(1010) are in accord with the proposed reconstruction model of Wang and Duke, indicating a bond-length-conserving rotation of the surface dimer. The best-fit values of the bond-rotation angle omega are 15^circ +/- 5^circ as determined by LEPD and omega = 21.5^ circ +/- 4^ circ as determined by LEED. These values are in agreement with the predicted value of omega = 17^circ. For CdSe(1120), the best-fit LEPD results indicate an omega of 27^circ +/- 7^circ while preliminary LEED results indicate an omega of 35^circ +/- 5^circ. Both values for this previously undetermined surface are also in agreement with the theoretically predicted value of omega = 32^circ . These results serve to confirm a universal model of reconstruction which describes the surface structures of both the zincblende and wurtzite compound semiconductor cleavage faces.

  19. Revisiting separation properties of convex fuzzy sets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Separation of convex sets by hyperplanes has been extensively studied on crisp sets. In a seminal paper separability and convexity are investigated, however there is a flaw on the definition of degree of separation. We revisited separation on convex fuzzy sets that have level-wise (crisp) disjointne...

  20. Convex Lens-Induced Nanoscale Templating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berard, Daniel; Michaud, Francois; McFaul, Christopher; Mahsid, Sara; Reisner, Walter; Leslie, Sabrina

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate a new platform, ``Convex Lens-Induced Nanoscale Templating'' (CLINT), for dynamic manipulation and trapping of single DNA molecules. In the CLINT technique, the curved surface of a convex lens is used to deform a flexible coverslip above a substrate containing embedded nanotopography, creating a nanoscale gap that can be adjusted during an experiment to confine molecules within the embedded nanostructures. Critically, CLINT has the capability of actively transforming a macroscale flow-cell into a nanofluidic device without need for high-temperature direct bonding, leading to ease of sample loading and greater accessibility of the surface. Moreover, as DNA molecules present in the gap will be driven into the embedded topography from above, CLINT eliminates the need for the high pressures or electric fields necessitated by direct bonded nanofluidic devices for loading DNA in the confined structures. To demonstrate the versatility of CLINT, we confine DNA to nanogroove structures, demonstrating DNA nanochannel-based stretching. Using ionic strengths that are in line with typical biological buffers, we have successfully extended DNA in sub 30nm nanochannels, achieving high stretching (90%) that is in good agreement with Odijk deflection theory.

  1. Convex lens-induced nanoscale templating

    PubMed Central

    Berard, Daniel J.; Michaud, François; Mahshid, Sara; Ahamed, Mohammed Jalal; McFaul, Christopher M. J.; Leith, Jason S.; Bérubé, Pierre; Sladek, Rob; Reisner, Walter; Leslie, Sabrina R.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a new platform, convex lens-induced nanoscale templating (CLINT), for dynamic manipulation and trapping of single DNA molecules. In the CLINT technique, the curved surface of a convex lens is used to deform a flexible coverslip above a substrate containing embedded nanotopography, creating a nanoscale gap that can be adjusted during an experiment to confine molecules within the embedded nanostructures. Critically, CLINT has the capability of transforming a macroscale flow cell into a nanofluidic device without the need for permanent direct bonding, thus simplifying sample loading, providing greater accessibility of the surface for functionalization, and enabling dynamic manipulation of confinement during device operation. Moreover, as DNA molecules present in the gap are driven into the embedded topography from above, CLINT eliminates the need for the high pressures or electric fields required to load DNA into direct-bonded nanofluidic devices. To demonstrate the versatility of CLINT, we confine DNA to nanogroove and nanopit structures, demonstrating DNA nanochannel-based stretching, denaturation mapping, and partitioning/trapping of single molecules in multiple embedded cavities. In particular, using ionic strengths that are in line with typical biological buffers, we have successfully extended DNA in sub–30-nm nanochannels, achieving high stretching (90%) that is in good agreement with Odijk deflection theory, and we have mapped genomic features using denaturation analysis. PMID:25092333

  2. Evaluating convex roof entanglement measures.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Géza; Moroder, Tobias; Gühne, Otfried

    2015-04-24

    We show a powerful method to compute entanglement measures based on convex roof constructions. In particular, our method is applicable to measures that, for pure states, can be written as low order polynomials of operator expectation values. We show how to compute the linear entropy of entanglement, the linear entanglement of assistance, and a bound on the dimension of the entanglement for bipartite systems. We discuss how to obtain the convex roof of the three-tangle for three-qubit states. We also show how to calculate the linear entropy of entanglement and the quantum Fisher information based on partial information or device independent information. We demonstrate the usefulness of our method by concrete examples. PMID:25955038

  3. Convex accelerated maximum entropy reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worley, Bradley

    2016-04-01

    Maximum entropy (MaxEnt) spectral reconstruction methods provide a powerful framework for spectral estimation of nonuniformly sampled datasets. Many methods exist within this framework, usually defined based on the magnitude of a Lagrange multiplier in the MaxEnt objective function. An algorithm is presented here that utilizes accelerated first-order convex optimization techniques to rapidly and reliably reconstruct nonuniformly sampled NMR datasets using the principle of maximum entropy. This algorithm - called CAMERA for Convex Accelerated Maximum Entropy Reconstruction Algorithm - is a new approach to spectral reconstruction that exhibits fast, tunable convergence in both constant-aim and constant-lambda modes. A high-performance, open source NMR data processing tool is described that implements CAMERA, and brief comparisons to existing reconstruction methods are made on several example spectra.

  4. Simulated plasma facing component measurements for an in situ surface diagnostic on Alcator C-Moda)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartwig, Z. S.; Whyte, D. G.

    2010-10-01

    The ideal in situ plasma facing component (PFC) diagnostic for magnetic fusion devices would perform surface element and isotope composition measurements on a shot-to-shot (˜10 min) time scale with ˜1 μm depth and ˜1 cm spatial resolution over large areas of PFCs. To this end, the experimental adaptation of the customary laboratory surface diagnostic—nuclear scattering of MeV ions—to the Alcator C-Mod tokamak is being guided by ACRONYM, a Geant4 synthetic diagnostic. The diagnostic technique and ACRONYM are described, and synthetic measurements of film thickness for boron-coated PFCs are presented.

  5. Simulated plasma facing component measurements for an in situ surface diagnostic on Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Hartwig, Z. S.; Whyte, D. G.

    2010-10-15

    The ideal in situ plasma facing component (PFC) diagnostic for magnetic fusion devices would perform surface element and isotope composition measurements on a shot-to-shot ({approx}10 min) time scale with {approx}1 {mu}m depth and {approx}1 cm spatial resolution over large areas of PFCs. To this end, the experimental adaptation of the customary laboratory surface diagnostic - nuclear scattering of MeV ions - to the Alcator C-Mod tokamak is being guided by ACRONYM, a Geant4 synthetic diagnostic. The diagnostic technique and ACRONYM are described, and synthetic measurements of film thickness for boron-coated PFCs are presented.

  6. Convex Diffraction Grating Imaging Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chrisp, Michael P. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A 1:1 Offner mirror system for imaging off-axis objects is modified by replacing a concave spherical primary mirror that is concentric with a convex secondary mirror with two concave spherical mirrors M1 and M2 of the same or different radii positioned with their respective distances d1 and d2 from a concentric convex spherical diffraction grating having its grooves parallel to the entrance slit of the spectrometer which replaces the convex secondary mirror. By adjusting their distances d1 and d2 and their respective angles of reflection alpha and beta, defined as the respective angles between their incident and reflected rays, all aberrations are corrected without the need to increase the spectrometer size for a given entrance slit size to reduce astigmatism, thus allowing the imaging spectrometer volume to be less for a given application than would be possible with conventional imaging spectrometers and still give excellent spatial and spectral imaging of the slit image spectra over the focal plane.

  7. High-speed surface temperature measurements on plasma facing materials for fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Araki, M.; Kobayashi, M.

    1996-01-01

    For the lifetime evaluation of plasma facing materials in fusion experimental machines, it is essential to investigate their surface behavior and their temperature responses during an off-normal event such as the plasma disruptions. An infrared thermometer with a sampling speed as fast as 1{times}10{sup {minus}6} s/data, namely, the high-speed infrared thermometer (HSIR), has been developed by the National Research Laboratory of Metrology in Japan. To evaluate an applicability of the newly developed HSIR on the surface temperature measurement of plasma facing materials, high heat flux beam irradiation experiments have been performed with three different materials under the surface heat fluxes up to 170 MW/m{sup 2} for 0.04 s in a hydrogen ion beam test facility at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. As for the results, HSIR can be applicable for measuring the surface temperature responses of the armor tile materials with a little modification. It is also confirmed that surface temperatures measured with the HSIR thermometer show good agreement with the analytical results for stainless steel and carbon based materials at a temperature range of up to 2500{degree}C. However, for aluminum the HSIR could measure the temperature of the high dense vapor cloud which was produced during the heating due to lower melting temperature. Based on the result, a multichannel arrayed HSIR thermometer has been designed and fabricated. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Convex-profile inversion of asteroid lightcurves - Theory and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostro, Steven J.; Connelly, Robert; Dorogi, Mark

    1988-01-01

    A theory for asteroid light curve interpretation is derived from the reformulation, extension, and calibration of Ostro and Connely's (1984) convex-profile inversion, and then used to constrain the shapes of selected asteroids. The ideal conditions for the estimation of an asteroid's main cross-section from a light curve are (1) that the viewing-illumination geometry be equatorial, (2) that the scattering be uniform and geometric, (3) that the asteroid surface contours parallel to the equatorial plane be convex, (4) and that the solar angle not equal zero. Results are presented from simulations calibrating the kind, severity, and predictability of systematic errors.

  9. Molecular Graphics of Convex Body Fluids.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Adrian T; Meyer, Timm; Germano, Guido

    2008-03-01

    Coarse-grained modeling of molecular fluids is often based on nonspherical convex rigid bodies like ellipsoids or spherocylinders representing rodlike or platelike molecules or groups of atoms, with site-site interaction potentials depending both on the distance among the particles and the relative orientation. In this category of potentials, the Gay-Berne family has been studied most extensively. However, conventional molecular graphics programs are not designed to visualize such objects. Usually the basic units are atoms displayed as spheres or as vertices in a graph. Atomic aggregates can be highlighted through an increasing amount of stylized representations, e.g., Richardson ribbon diagrams for the secondary structure of proteins, Connolly molecular surfaces, density maps, etc., but ellipsoids and spherocylinders are generally missing, especially as elementary simulation units. We fill this gap providing and discussing a customized OpenGL-based program for the interactive, rendered representation of large ensembles of convex bodies, useful especially in liquid crystal research. We pay particular attention to the performance issues for typical system sizes in this field. The code is distributed as open source. PMID:26620787

  10. Goethite surface reactivity: III. Unifying arsenate adsorption behavior through a variable crystal face - Site density model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar-Camacho, Carlos; Villalobos, Mario

    2010-04-01

    We developed a model that describes quantitatively the arsenate adsorption behavior for any goethite preparation as a function of pH and ionic strength, by using one basic surface arsenate stoichiometry, with two affinity constants. The model combines a face distribution-crystallographic site density model for goethite with tenets of the Triple Layer and CD-MUSIC surface complexation models, and is self-consistent with its adsorption behavior towards protons, electrolytes, and other ions investigated previously. Five different systems of published arsenate adsorption data were used to calibrate the model spanning a wide range of chemical conditions, which included adsorption isotherms at different pH values, and adsorption pH-edges at different As(V) loadings, both at different ionic strengths and background electrolytes. Four additional goethite-arsenate systems reported with limited characterization and adsorption data were accurately described by the model developed. The adsorption reaction proposed is: lbond2 FeOH +lbond2 SOH +AsO43-+H→lbond2 FeOAsO3[2-]…SOH+HO where lbond2 SOH is an adjacent surface site to lbond2 FeOH; with log K = 21.6 ± 0.7 when lbond2 SOH is another lbond2 FeOH, and log K = 18.75 ± 0.9, when lbond2 SOH is lbond2 Fe 2OH. An additional small contribution of a protonated complex was required to describe data at low pH and very high arsenate loadings. The model considered goethites above 80 m 2/g as ideally composed of 70% face (1 0 1) and 30% face (0 0 1), resulting in a site density for lbond2 FeOH and for lbond2 Fe 3OH of 3.125/nm 2 each. Below 80 m 2/g surface capacity increases progressively with decreasing area, which was modeled by considering a progressively increasing proportion of faces (0 1 0)/(1 0 1), because face (0 1 0) shows a much higher site density of lbond2 FeOH groups. Computation of the specific proportion of faces, and thus of the site densities for the three types of crystallographic surface groups present in

  11. Crack-face displacements for embedded elliptic and semi-elliptical surface cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, I. S.

    1989-01-01

    Analytical expressions for the crack-face displacements of an embedded elliptic crack in infinite solid subjected to arbitrary tractions are obtained. The tractions on the crack faces are assumed to be expressed in a polynomial form. These displacements expressions complete the exact solution of Vijayakumar and Atluri, and Nishioki and Atluri. For the special case of an embedded crack in an infinite solid subjected to uniform pressure loading, the present displacements agree with those by Green and Sneddon. The displacement equations derived were used with the finite-element alternating method (FEAM) for the analysis of a semi-elliptic surface crack in a finite solid subjected to remote tensile loading. The maximum opening displacements obtained with FEAM are compared to those with the finite-element method with singularity elements. The maximum crack opening displacements by the two methods showed good agreement.

  12. Effects of hydrogen surface processes on hydrogen retention in plasma facing components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guterl, Jerome; Smirnov, Roman; Krasheninnikov, Sergei

    2014-10-01

    Hydrogen retention and recycling on metallic plasma-facing components (PFCs) are among the key-issues for future fusion devices due to both safety and operational reasons. For tungsten, which has been chosen as divertor material in ITER, parameters of hydrogen desorption from Wsurfaces, experimentally measured for fusion-related conditions, show a large discrepancy. Indeed, various complex phenomena may affect hydrogen desorption (e.g atomic islands, roughness, surface reconstruction, impurities, ect). In this work, we investigate effects of hydrogen desorption from W surfaces on hydrogen retention in W material. Two regimes of hydrogen surface desorption (readsorption-limited and recombination-limited) can be identified and may affect the kinetic order of desorption. Within these desorption regimes, it is shown that release of hydrogen from W material in fusion-related conditions may be surface-limited at low temperature and diffusion-limited at high temperature. Analyses of hydrogen release regimes for thermodesorption experiments and plasma operations in fusion reactors show that surface processes may strongly affect retention and release of hydrogen from W material. In this context, effects of W surface coverage with oxygen on hydrogen desorption are discussed since high concentrations of oxygen on PFCs surfaces are expected in future fusion devices. This work is performed under the auspices of USDOE Grant No. DE-FG02-04ER54739 and the PSI Science Center Grant DE-SC0001999 at UCSD.

  13. Natural and orbital debris particles on LDEF's trailing and forward-facing surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoerz, Friedrich; See, Thomas H.; Bernhard, Ronald P.; Brownlee, Donald E.

    1995-01-01

    Approximately 1000 impact craters on the Chemistry of Meteoroid Experiment (CME) have been analyzed by means of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis (EDXA) to determine the compositional make-up of projectile residues. This report completes our systematic survey of gold and aluminum surfaces exposed at the trailing-edge (A03) and forward-facing (A11) LDEF sites, respectively. The major categories for the projectile residues were (1) natural, with diverse subgroups such as chondritic, monomineralic silicates, and sulfides, and (2) man made, that were classified into aluminum (metallic or oxide) and miscellaneous materials (such as stainless steel, paint flakes, etc). On CME gold collectors on LDEF's trailing edge approximately 11 percent of all craters greater than 100 micron in diameter were due to man-made debris, the majority (8.6 percent) caused by pure aluminum, approximately 31.4 percent were due to cosmic dust, while the remaining 58 percent were indeterminate via the analytical techniques utilized in this study. The aluminum surfaces located at the A11 forward-facing site did not permit analysis of aluminum impactors, but approximately 9.4 percent of all craters were demonstratably caused by miscellaneous debris materials and approximately 39.2 percent were the result of natural particles, leaving approximately 50 percent which were indeterminate. Model considerations and calculations are presented that focus on the crater-production rates for features greater than 100 micron in diameter, and on assigning the intermediate crater population to man-made or natural particles. An enhancement factor of 6 in the crater-production rate of natural impactors for the 'forward-facing' versus the 'trailing-edge' CME collectors was found to best explain all observations (i.e., total crater number(s), as well as their computational characteristics). Enhancement factors of 10 and 4 are either too high or too low. It is also suggested that

  14. Hybrid analysis of EM radiation and scattering by composite slot-blade cavity-backed antennas on the surface of electrically large smooth convex cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Huan-Wan

    1998-07-01

    In the first part of this work, a hybrid approach is developed, which combines the asymptotic high-frequency based uniform geometrical theory of diffraction (UTD) ray technique with a numerical method of moments (MM), to analyze the EM scattering of blade, slot, and composite slot-blade cavity backed antenna structures, respectively residing on the surface of electrically large circular cylinders. The MM is used to solve an integral equation formulation for the unknown equivalent current distributions over the blade and the slot. In that MM solution of the integral equation formulation, a UTD approximation for the dyadic Green's function for a perfectly conducting circular cylinder is employed to calculate the excitation vector by an incoming local plane wave. After these equivalent current distributions become known via the MM solutions, the UTD dyadic Green's functions are next also used to calculate the radiation from these equivalent current distributions in the presence of the circular cylinder. The UTD can describe the effects of the large cylinder in a rather simple closed form fashion while the MM is used essentially to deal with the much smaller blade and slot antennas which cannot directly be analyzed by the UTD. In the second part of this work, this hybrid MM/UTD technique is employed to analyze the radiation from a composite slot-blade cavity backed antenna located on realistic aircraft configurations. The excitation of the antenna is due to a delta gap generator in a thin-wire probe feed that is placed inside a rectangular cavity. The MM procedure is used first to solve coupled integral equations that are formulated for the unknown equivalent electric current distribution on the blade and the unknown equivalent magnetic current distribution on the slot, when this composite slot-blade antenna configuration resides on an infinite ground plane. Finally the UTD is used to efficiently and accurately calculate the radiation from these equivalent current

  15. Moving-Surface Plasma-Facing Components for Particle Control in Steady State Magnetic Fusion Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Hirooka, Yoshi; Fukushima, Hoju; Ohno, Noriyasu; Takamura, Shuichi; Nishikawa, Masahiro

    2004-01-15

    This paper will report on the proof-of-principle (POP) experiments conducted to demonstrate reduced wall recycling, using a laboratory-scale test unit, constructed based on the concept of moving-surface plasma-facing component (MS-PFC). In this concept, the moving-surface exposed to edge plasmas in steady state magnetic fusion devices is continuously deposited ex-situ with a getter material, so that particle trapping capabilities can be regenerated prior to the subsequent exposure. In our previous paper, the construction details of the MS-PFC test unit and the first results in the case of titanium gettering was reported, but in the present paper preliminary results in the case of lithium gettering will be presented for comparison. Results indicate that the H{sub {alpha}} light intensity used as the measure of hydrogen recycling is reduced by {approx}6% due to titanium gettering and by {approx}12% due to lithium gettering, both at steady state.

  16. Surface roughness of rock faces through the curvature of triangulated meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, P.; Samson, C.; Bose, P.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we examine three different measures of roughness based on a geometric property of surfaces known as curvature. These methods were demonstrated using an image of a large rock face made up of a smooth blocky limestone in contact with a rough friable dolostone. The point cloud analysed contained 10,334,288 points and was acquired at a distance of 3 m from the rock face. The point cloud was first decimated using an epsilon-net and then meshed using the Poisson surface reconstruction method before the proposed measures of roughness were applied. The first measure of roughness is defined as the difference in curvature between a mesh and a smoothed version of the same mesh. The second measure of roughness is a voting system applied to each vertex which identifies the subset of vertices which represent rough regions within the mesh. The third measure of roughness uses a combination of spatial partitioning data structures and data clustering in order to define roughness for a region in the mesh. The spatial partitioning data structure allows for a hierarchy of roughness values which is related to the size of the region being considered. All of the proposed measures of roughness are visualised using colour-coded displays which allows for an intuitive interpretation.

  17. 2D surface temperature measurement of plasma facing components with modulated active pyrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Amiel, S.; Loarer, T.; Pocheau, C.; Roche, H.; Gauthier, E.; Aumeunier, M.-H.; Courtois, X.; Jouve, M.; Balorin, C.; Moncada, V.; Le Niliot, C.; Rigollet, F.

    2014-10-01

    In nuclear fusion devices, such as Tore Supra, the plasma facing components (PFC) are in carbon. Such components are exposed to very high heat flux and the surface temperature measurement is mandatory for the safety of the device and also for efficient plasma scenario development. Besides this measurement is essential to evaluate these heat fluxes for a better knowledge of the physics of plasma-wall interaction, it is also required to monitor the fatigue of PFCs. Infrared system (IR) is used to manage to measure surface temperature in real time. For carbon PFCs, the emissivity is high and known (ε ~ 0.8), therefore the contribution of the reflected flux from environment and collected by the IR cameras can be neglected. However, the future tokamaks such as WEST and ITER will be equipped with PFCs in metal (W and Be/W, respectively) with low and variable emissivities (ε ~ 0.1–0.4). Consequently, the reflected flux will contribute significantly in the collected flux by IR camera. The modulated active pyrometry, using a bicolor camera, proposed in this paper allows a 2D surface temperature measurement independently of the reflected fluxes and the emissivity. Experimental results with Tungsten sample are reported and compared with simultaneous measurement performed with classical pyrometry (monochromatic and bichromatic) with and without reflective flux demonstrating the efficiency of this method for surface temperature measurement independently of the reflected flux and the emissivity.

  18. Nitrogen retention mechanisms in tokamaks with beryllium and tungsten plasma-facing surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberkofler, M.; Meisl, G.; Hakola, A.; Drenik, A.; Alegre, D.; Brezinsek, S.; Craven, R.; Dittmar, T.; Keenan, T.; Romanelli, S. G.; Smith, R.; Douai, D.; Herrmann, A.; Krieger, K.; Kruezi, U.; Liang, G.; Linsmeier, Ch; Mozetic, M.; Rohde, V.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team; the EUROfusion MST1 Team; Contributors, JET

    2016-02-01

    Global gas balance experiments at ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) and JET have shown that a considerable fraction of nitrogen injected for radiative cooling is not recovered as N2 upon regeneration of the liquid helium cryo pump. The most probable loss channels are ion implantation into plasma-facing materials, co-deposition and ammonia formation. These three mechanisms are investigated in laboratory and tokamak experiments and by numerical simulations. Laboratory experiments have shown that implantation of nitrogen ions into beryllium and tungsten leads to the formation of surface nitrides, which may decompose under thermal loads. On beryllium the presence of nitrogen at the surface has been seen to reduce the sputtering yield. On tungsten surfaces it has been observed that the presence of nitrogen can increase hydrogen retention. The global nitrogen retention in AUG by implantation into the tungsten surfaces saturates. At JET the steady state nitrogen retention is increased by co-deposition with beryllium. The tokamak experiments are interpreted in detail by simulations of the global migration with WallDYN. Mass spectrometry of the exhaust gas of AUG and JET has revealed the conversion of nitrogen to ammonia at percent-levels. Conclusions are drawn on the potential implications of nitrogen seeding on the operation of a reactor in a deuterium-tritium mix.

  19. 2D surface temperature measurement of plasma facing components with modulated active pyrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiel, S.; Loarer, T.; Pocheau, C.; Roche, H.; Gauthier, E.; Aumeunier, M.-H.; Le Niliot, C.; Rigollet, F.; Courtois, X.; Jouve, M.; Balorin, C.; Moncada, V.

    2014-10-01

    In nuclear fusion devices, such as Tore Supra, the plasma facing components (PFC) are in carbon. Such components are exposed to very high heat flux and the surface temperature measurement is mandatory for the safety of the device and also for efficient plasma scenario development. Besides this measurement is essential to evaluate these heat fluxes for a better knowledge of the physics of plasma-wall interaction, it is also required to monitor the fatigue of PFCs. Infrared system (IR) is used to manage to measure surface temperature in real time. For carbon PFCs, the emissivity is high and known (ɛ ˜ 0.8), therefore the contribution of the reflected flux from environment and collected by the IR cameras can be neglected. However, the future tokamaks such as WEST and ITER will be equipped with PFCs in metal (W and Be/W, respectively) with low and variable emissivities (ɛ ˜ 0.1-0.4). Consequently, the reflected flux will contribute significantly in the collected flux by IR camera. The modulated active pyrometry, using a bicolor camera, proposed in this paper allows a 2D surface temperature measurement independently of the reflected fluxes and the emissivity. Experimental results with Tungsten sample are reported and compared with simultaneous measurement performed with classical pyrometry (monochromatic and bichromatic) with and without reflective flux demonstrating the efficiency of this method for surface temperature measurement independently of the reflected flux and the emissivity.

  20. Flat tori in three-dimensional space and convex integration

    PubMed Central

    Borrelli, Vincent; Jabrane, Saïd; Lazarus, Francis; Thibert, Boris

    2012-01-01

    It is well-known that the curvature tensor is an isometric invariant of C2 Riemannian manifolds. This invariant is at the origin of the rigidity observed in Riemannian geometry. In the mid 1950s, Nash amazed the world mathematical community by showing that this rigidity breaks down in regularity C1. This unexpected flexibility has many paradoxical consequences, one of them is the existence of C1 isometric embeddings of flat tori into Euclidean three-dimensional space. In the 1970s and 1980s, M. Gromov, revisiting Nash’s results introduced convex integration theory offering a general framework to solve this type of geometric problems. In this research, we convert convex integration theory into an algorithm that produces isometric maps of flat tori. We provide an implementation of a convex integration process leading to images of an embedding of a flat torus. The resulting surface reveals a C1 fractal structure: Although the tangent plane is defined everywhere, the normal vector exhibits a fractal behavior. Isometric embeddings of flat tori may thus appear as a geometric occurrence of a structure that is simultaneously C1 and fractal. Beyond these results, our implementation demonstrates that convex integration, a theory still confined to specialists, can produce computationally tractable solutions of partial differential relations. PMID:22523238

  1. The Band around a Convex Body

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, David

    2011-01-01

    We give elementary proofs of formulas for the area and perimeter of a planar convex body surrounded by a band of uniform thickness. The primary tool is a integral formula for the perimeter of a convex body which describes the perimeter in terms of the projections of the body onto lines in the plane.

  2. How to name and order convex polyhedra.

    PubMed

    Voytekhovsky, Yury L

    2016-09-01

    In this paper a method is suggested for naming any convex polyhedron by a numerical code arising from the adjacency matrix of its edge graph. A polyhedron is uniquely fixed by its name and can be built using it. Classes of convex n-acra (i.e. n-vertex polyhedra) are strictly ordered by their names. PMID:27580206

  3. From face to interface recognition: a differential geometric approach to distinguish DNA from RNA binding surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Shazman, Shula; Elber, Gershon; Mandel-Gutfreund, Yael

    2011-01-01

    Protein nucleic acid interactions play a critical role in all steps of the gene expression pathway. Nucleic acid (NA) binding proteins interact with their partners, DNA or RNA, via distinct regions on their surface that are characterized by an ensemble of chemical, physical and geometrical properties. In this study, we introduce a novel methodology based on differential geometry, commonly used in face recognition, to characterize and predict NA binding surfaces on proteins. Applying the method on experimentally solved three-dimensional structures of proteins we successfully classify double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) from single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) binding proteins, with 83% accuracy. We show that the method is insensitive to conformational changes that occur upon binding and can be applicable for de novo protein-function prediction. Remarkably, when concentrating on the zinc finger motif, we distinguish successfully between RNA and DNA binding interfaces possessing the same binding motif even within the same protein, as demonstrated for the RNA polymerase transcription-factor, TFIIIA. In conclusion, we present a novel methodology to characterize protein surfaces, which can accurately tell apart dsDNA from an ssRNA binding interfaces. The strength of our method in recognizing fine-tuned differences on NA binding interfaces make it applicable for many other molecular recognition problems, with potential implications for drug design. PMID:21693557

  4. Artificial Neural Networks for Surface Roughness Prediction when Face Milling Al 7075-T7351

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz-Escalona, Patricia; Maropoulos, Paul G.

    2010-03-01

    In this work, different artificial neural networks (ANN) are developed for the prediction of surface roughness ( R a ) values in Al alloy 7075-T7351 after face milling machining process. The radial base (RBNN), feed forward (FFNN), and generalized regression (GRNN) networks were selected, and the data used for training these networks were derived from experiments conducted using a high-speed milling machine. The Taguchi design of experiment was applied to reduce the time and cost of the experiments. From this study, the performance of each ANN used in this research was measured with the mean square error percentage and it was observed that FFNN achieved the best results. Also the Pearson correlation coefficient was calculated to analyze the correlation between the five inputs (cutting speed, feed per tooth, axial depth of cut, chip’s width, and chip’s thickness) selected for the network with the selected output (surface roughness). Results showed a strong correlation between the chip thickness and the surface roughness followed by the cutting speed.

  5. From face to interface recognition: a differential geometric approach to distinguish DNA from RNA binding surfaces.

    PubMed

    Shazman, Shula; Elber, Gershon; Mandel-Gutfreund, Yael

    2011-09-01

    Protein nucleic acid interactions play a critical role in all steps of the gene expression pathway. Nucleic acid (NA) binding proteins interact with their partners, DNA or RNA, via distinct regions on their surface that are characterized by an ensemble of chemical, physical and geometrical properties. In this study, we introduce a novel methodology based on differential geometry, commonly used in face recognition, to characterize and predict NA binding surfaces on proteins. Applying the method on experimentally solved three-dimensional structures of proteins we successfully classify double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) from single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) binding proteins, with 83% accuracy. We show that the method is insensitive to conformational changes that occur upon binding and can be applicable for de novo protein-function prediction. Remarkably, when concentrating on the zinc finger motif, we distinguish successfully between RNA and DNA binding interfaces possessing the same binding motif even within the same protein, as demonstrated for the RNA polymerase transcription-factor, TFIIIA. In conclusion, we present a novel methodology to characterize protein surfaces, which can accurately tell apart dsDNA from an ssRNA binding interfaces. The strength of our method in recognizing fine-tuned differences on NA binding interfaces make it applicable for many other molecular recognition problems, with potential implications for drug design. PMID:21693557

  6. Critical heat flux (CHF) phenomenon on a downward facing curved surface

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, F.B.; Haddad, K.H.; Liu, Y.C.

    1997-06-01

    This report describes a theoretical and experimental study of the boundary layer boiling and critical heat flux phenomena on a downward facing curved heating surface, including both hemispherical and toroidal surfaces. A subscale boundary layer boiling (SBLB) test facility was developed to measure the spatial variation of the critical heat flux and observe the underlying mechanisms. Transient quenching and steady-state boiling experiments were performed in the SBLB facility under both saturated and subcooled conditions to obtain a complete database on the critical heat flux. To complement the experimental effort, an advanced hydrodynamic CHF model was developed from the conservation laws along with sound physical arguments. The model provides a clear physical explanation for the spatial variation of the CHF observed in the SBLB experiments and for the weak dependence of the CHF data on the physical size of the vessel. Based upon the CHF model, a scaling law was established for estimating the local critical heat flux on the outer surface of a heated hemispherical vessel that is fully submerged in water. The scaling law, which compares favorably with all the available local CHF data obtained for various vessel sizes, can be used to predict the local CHF limits on large commercial-size vessels. This technical information represents one of the essential elements that is needed in assessing the efficacy of external cooling of core melt by cavity flooding as a severe accident management strategy. 83 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. The impact of surface morphology on C- and Si-face 4H-SiC Schottky barrier diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kung-Yen; Huang, Chih-Fang; Chen, Wenzhou; Capano, Michael A.

    2007-12-01

    The goal of this research is to investigate the correlation of reverse characteristics of Schottky barrier diodes (SBDs) and surface morphological defects on 4° (off-axis) carbon (C) face, 4° and 8° silicon (Si) face 4H-SiC. Different dimensions of SBDs with boron-implanted edge terminations are fabricated on 4° C-face, 4° and 8° Si-face 4H-SiC samples. The ideality factor for these three samples is about 1.1. Average breakdown voltages of 4° Si-face 4H-SiC SBDs are higher than the other two samples, particularly for large size SBDs. Breakdown voltages of 1500 and 2000 μm 4° Si-face SBDs can reach over 1000 V. This value is about two times higher than the other two samples, though the root-mean-square (RMS) roughness of 4° Si-face samples obtained from atomic force microscopy (AFM) is 3.5 nm. The yield of 1500 and 2000 μm 4° Si-face 4H-SiC SBDs with a breakdown voltage over 1000 V is more than 50%, much higher than the other two samples.

  8. Neck and face surface electromyography for prosthetic voice control after total laryngectomy.

    PubMed

    Stepp, Cara E; Heaton, James T; Rolland, Rebecca G; Hillman, Robert E

    2009-04-01

    The electrolarynx (EL) is a common rehabilitative speech aid for individuals who have undergone total laryngectomy, but they typically lack pitch control and require the exclusive use of one hand. The viability of using neck and face surface electromyography (sEMG) to control the onset, offset, and pitch of an EMG-controlled EL (EMG-EL) was studied. Eight individuals who had undergone total laryngectomy produced serial and running speech using a typical handheld EL and the EMG-EL while attending to real-time visual sEMG biofeedback. Running speech tokens produced with the EMG-EL were examined for naturalness by 10 listeners relative to those produced with a typical EL using a visual analog scale. Serial speech performance was assessed as the percentage of words that were fully voiced and pauses that were successfully produced. Results of the visual analog scale assessment indicated that individuals were able to use the EMG-EL without training to produce running speech perceived as natural as that produced with a typical handheld EL. All participants were able to produce running and serial speech with the EMG-EL controlled by sEMG from multiple recording locations, with the superior ventral neck or submental surface locations providing at least one of the two best control locations. PMID:19304494

  9. Use of neck and face surface electromyography for controlling a prosthetic voice after total laryngectomy

    PubMed Central

    Stepp, Cara E; Heaton, James T; Givens, Rebecca N; Hillman, Robert E

    2012-01-01

    The electrolarynx (EL) is a common rehabilitative speech aid for individuals who have undergone total laryngectomy, but typically lack pitch control and require the exclusive use of one hand. The viability of using neck and face surface electromyography (sEMG) to control the onset, offset, and pitch of an EMG-controlled EL (EMG-EL) was studied. Eight individuals who had undergone total laryngectomy produced serial and running speech using a typical handheld EL and the EMG-EL while attending to real-time visual sEMG biofeedback. Running speech tokens produced with the EMG-EL were examined for naturalness by 10 listeners relative to those produced with a typical EL using a visual analog scale. Serial speech performance was assessed as the percentage of words that were fully voiced and pauses that were successfully produced. Results of the visual analog scale assessment indicated that individuals were able to use the EMG-EL without training to produce running speech perceived as natural as that produced with a typical handheld EL. All participants were able to produce running and serial speech with the EMG-EL controlled by sEMG from multiple recording locations, with the superior ventral neck or submental surface locations providing at least one of the two best control locations. PMID:19304494

  10. Surface Potentials of (001), (012), (113) Hematite (α-Fe2O3) Crystal Faces in Aqueous Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Chatman, Shawn ME; Zarzycki, Piotr P.; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2013-09-05

    Hematite (α-Fe2O3) is an important candidate electrode for energy system technologies such as photoelectrochemical water splitting. Conversion efficiency issues with this material are presently being addressed through nanostructuring, doping, and surface modification. However, key electrochemical properties of hematite/electrolyte interfaces remain poorly understood at a fundamental level, in particular those of crystallographically well-defined hematite faces likely present as interfacial components at the grain scale. We report a combined measurement and theory study that isolates and evaluates the equilibrium surface potentials of three nearly defect-free single crystal faces of hematite, titrated from pH 3 to 11.25. We link measured surface potentials with atomic-scale surface topology, namely the ratio and distributions of surface protonation/deprotonation site types expected from the bulk structure. The data reveal face-specific points of zero potential (PZP) relatable to points of zero net charge (PZC) that lie within a small pH window (8.35-8.85). Over the entire pH range the surface potentials show strong non-Nernstian charging at pH extremes separated by a wide central plateau in agreement with surface complexation modeling predictions, but with important face-specific distinctions. We introduce a new surface complexation model based on fitting the entire data set that depends primarily only on the proton affinities of two site types and the two associated electrical double layer capacitances. The data and model show that magnitudes of surface potential biases at the pH extremes are on the order of 100 mV, similar to the activation energy for electron hopping mobility. An energy band diagram for hematite crystallites with specific face expression and pH effects is proposed that could provide a baseline for understanding water splitting performance enhancement effects from nanostructuring, and guide morphology targets and pH for systematic improvements in

  11. Effect of Surface Site Interactions on Potentiometric Titration of Hematite (α-Fe2O3) Crystal Faces

    SciTech Connect

    Chatman, Shawn ME; Zarzycki, Piotr P.; Preocanin, Tajana; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2013-02-01

    Time dependent potentiometric pH titrations were used to study the effect of atomic scale surface structure on the protonation behavior of the structurally well defined hematite/aqueous electrolyte interfaces. Our recently proposed thermodynamic model [1,23] was applied to measured acidimetric and alkalimetric titration hysteresis loops, collected from highly organized (001), (012), and (113) crystal face terminations using pH equilibration times ranging from 15 to 30 mins. Hysteresis loop areas indicate that (001) faces equilibrate faster than the (012) and (113) faces, consistent with the different expected ensembles of singly, doubly, and triply coordinated surface sites on each face. Strongly non-linear hysteretic pH-potential relationships were found, with slopes exceeding Nernstian, collectively indicating that protonation and deprotonation is much more complex than embodied in present day surface complexation models. The asymmetrical shape of the acidimetric and alkalimetric titration branches were used to illustrate a proposed steric "leaky screen" repulsion/trapping interaction mechanism that stems from high affinity singly-coordinated sites electrostatically and sterically screening lower affinity doubly and triply coordinated sites. Our data indicate that site interaction is the dominant phenomenon defining surface potential accumulation behavior on single crystal faces of metal oxide minerals.

  12. Lower Bound for Energies of Harmonic Tangent Unit-Vector Fields on Convex Polyhedra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumdar, A.; Robbins, J. M.; Zyskin, M.

    2004-11-01

    We derive a lower bound for energies of harmonic maps of convex polyhedra in $ \\R^3 $ to the unit sphere $S^2,$ with tangent boundary conditions on the faces. We also establish that $C^\\infty$ maps, satisfying tangent boundary conditions, are dense with respect to the Sobolev norm, in the space of continuous tangent maps of finite energy.

  13. Geometric-Harmonic convexity and integral inequalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akdemir, Ahmet Ocak; Yalçin, Abdüllatif; Polat, Fatma; Kavurmaci-Önalan, Havva

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, some new integral inequalities have been proved for functions whose absolute value of derivatives are GH-convex functions by using integral equalities that have been obtained previously.

  14. Study on transient characteristics of mist-cooling heat transfer from a horizontal upward-facing surface

    SciTech Connect

    Ohkubo, Hidetoshi; Nishio, Shigefumi )

    1993-04-01

    The effects of cooling rate and thermal conductivity of a heat-transfer plate on mist-cooling heat transfer were investigated experimentally for the high-temperature region. Experiments were conducted for horizontal upward-facing surfaces made of silver, stainless steel, and fused quartz. The experimental conditions of mist flow were as follows: The air velocity V[sub a] = 20 m/s, the temperature of water droplet T[sub l] = 21 C, and the volumetric droplet-flow-rate D = 0.00043-0.00472[sup 3]/(m[sup 2]s). It was found that, in the case where the horizontal surfaces face upward, the thermal properties of surface material does not significantly affect the heat-transfer coefficient, but the cooling rate of the surface affects it if the heat capacity of the surface is less than a critical value.

  15. Univalent harmonic mappings convex in one direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponnusamy, S.; Kaliraj, A. Sairam

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we present a criterion for a harmonic function to be convex in one direction. Also, we discuss the class of harmonic functions starlike in one direction in the unit disk and obtain a method to construct univalent harmonic functions convex in one direction. Although the converse of classical Alexander's theorem for harmonic functions was proved to be false, we obtain a version of converse of it under a suitable additional condition.

  16. Three-dimensional surface texture visualization of bone tissue through epifluorescence-based serial block face imaging.

    PubMed

    Slyfield, C R; Niemeyer, K E; Tkachenko, E V; Tomlinson, R E; Steyer, G G; Patthanacharoenphon, C G; Kazakia, G J; Wilson, D L; Hernandez, C J

    2009-10-01

    Serial block face imaging is a microscopy technique in which the top of a specimen is cut or ground away and a mosaic of images is collected of the newly revealed cross-section. Images collected from each slice are then digitally stacked to achieve 3D images. The development of fully automated image acquisition devices has made serial block face imaging more attractive by greatly reducing labour requirements. The technique is particularly attractive for studies of biological activity within cancellous bone as it has the capability of achieving direct, automated measures of biological and morphological traits and their associations with one another. When used with fluorescence microscopy, serial block face imaging has the potential to achieve 3D images of tissue as well as fluorescent markers of biological activity. Epifluorescence-based serial block face imaging presents a number of unique challenges for visualizing bone specimens due to noise generated by sub-surface signal and local variations in tissue autofluorescence. Here we present techniques for processing serial block face images of trabecular bone using a combination of non-uniform illumination correction, precise tiling of the mosaic in each cross-section, cross-section alignment for vertical stacking, removal of sub-surface signal and segmentation. The resulting techniques allow examination of bone surface texture that will enable 3D quantitative measures of biological processes in cancellous bone biopsies. PMID:19772536

  17. Surface acoustic load sensing using a face-shear PIN-PMN-PT single-crystal resonator.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyungrim; Zhang, Shujun; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2012-11-01

    Pb(In(0.5)Nb(0.5))O(3)-Pb(Mg(1/3)Nb(2/3))O(3)-PbTiO(3) (PIN-PMN-PT) resonators for surface acoustic load sensing are presented in this paper. Different acoustic loads are applied to thickness mode, thickness-shear mode, and face-shear mode resonators, and the electrical impedances at resonance and anti-resonance frequencies are recorded. More than one order of magnitude higher sensitivity (ratio of electrical impedance change to surface acoustic impedance change) at the resonance is achieved for the face-shear-mode resonator compared with other resonators with the same dimensions. The Krimholtz, Leedom, and Matthaei (KLM) model is used to verify the surface acoustic loading effect on the electrical impedance spectrum of face-shear PIN-PMN-PT single-crystal resonators. The demonstrated high sensitivity of face-shear mode resonators to surface loads is promising for a broad range of applications, including artificial skin, biological and chemical sensors, touch screens, and other touch-based sensors. PMID:23192819

  18. What causes the facing-the-viewer bias in biological motion?

    PubMed

    Weech, Séamas; McAdam, Matthew; Kenny, Sophie; Troje, Nikolaus F

    2014-01-01

    Orthographically projected biological motion point-light displays are generally ambiguous with respect to their orientation in depth, yet observers consistently prefer the facing-the-viewer interpretation. There has been discussion as to whether this bias can be attributed to the social relevance of biological motion stimuli or relates to local, low-level stimulus properties. In the present study we address this question. In Experiment 1, we compared the facing-the-viewer bias produced by a series of four stick figures and three human silhouettes that differed in posture, gender, and the presence versus absence of walking motion. Using a paradigm in which we asked observers to indicate the spinning direction of these figures, we found no bias when participants observed silhouettes, whereas a pronounced degree of bias was elicited by most stick figures. We hypothesized that the ambiguous surface normals on the lines and dots that comprise stick figures are prone to a visual bias that assumes surfaces to be convex. The local surface orientations of the occluding contours of silhouettes are unambiguous, and as such the convexity bias does not apply. In Experiment 2, we tested the role of local features in ambiguous surface perception by adding dots to the elbows and knees of silhouettes. We found biases consistent with the facing directions implied by a convex body surface. The results unify a number of findings regarding the facing-the-viewer bias. We conclude that the facing-the-viewer bias is established at the level of surface reconstruction from local image features rather than on a semantic level. PMID:25761278

  19. Convex-relaxed kernel mapping for image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Ben Salah, Mohamed; Ben Ayed, Ismail; Jing Yuan; Hong Zhang

    2014-03-01

    This paper investigates a convex-relaxed kernel mapping formulation of image segmentation. We optimize, under some partition constraints, a functional containing two characteristic terms: 1) a data term, which maps the observation space to a higher (possibly infinite) dimensional feature space via a kernel function, thereby evaluating nonlinear distances between the observations and segments parameters and 2) a total-variation term, which favors smooth segment surfaces (or boundaries). The algorithm iterates two steps: 1) a convex-relaxation optimization with respect to the segments by solving an equivalent constrained problem via the augmented Lagrange multiplier method and 2) a convergent fixed-point optimization with respect to the segments parameters. The proposed algorithm can bear with a variety of image types without the need for complex and application-specific statistical modeling, while having the computational benefits of convex relaxation. Our solution is amenable to parallelized implementations on graphics processing units (GPUs) and extends easily to high dimensions. We evaluated the proposed algorithm with several sets of comprehensive experiments and comparisons, including: 1) computational evaluations over 3D medical-imaging examples and high-resolution large-size color photographs, which demonstrate that a parallelized implementation of the proposed method run on a GPU can bring a significant speed-up and 2) accuracy evaluations against five state-of-the-art methods over the Berkeley color-image database and a multimodel synthetic data set, which demonstrates competitive performances of the algorithm. PMID:24723519

  20. Convexity of the Photosynthetic Light-Response Curve in Relation to Intensity and Direction of Light during Growth.

    PubMed Central

    Ogren, E.

    1993-01-01

    Photosynthesis in the intermediate light range is most efficient when the convexity of the photosynthetic light-response curve is high. Factors determining the convexity were examined for intact leaves using Salix sp. and for a plant cell culture using the green microalga Coccomyxa sp. It was found that the leaf had lower convexity than diluted plant cells because the light gradient through the leaf was not fully matched by a corresponding gradient in photosynthetic capacity. The degree to which the leaf gradients were matched was quantified by measuring photosynthesis at both leaf surfaces using modulated fluorescence. Two principal growth conditions were identified as those causing mismatch of leaf gradients and lowering of the convexity relative to cells. The first was growth under low light, where leaves did not develop any noteworthy gradient in photosynthetic capacity. This led to decreased convexity, particularly in old leaves with high chlorophyll content and, hence, steep light gradients. Second and less conspicuous was growth under high light conditions when light was given bilaterally rather than unilaterally, which yielded leaves of high photosynthetic capacity at both surfaces. Two situations were also identified that caused the convexity to decrease at the chloroplast level: (a) increased light during growth, for both leaves and cells, and (b) increased CO2 concentration during measurement of high-light-grown leaves. These changes of the intrinsic convexity were interpreted to indicate that the convexity declines with increased capacity of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase relative to the capacity of electron transport. PMID:12231754

  1. Effects of an aft facing step on the surface of a laminar flow glider wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandlin, Doral R.; Saiki, Neal

    1993-01-01

    A motor glider was used to perform a flight test study on the effects of aft facing steps in a laminar boundary layer. This study focuses on two dimensional aft facing steps oriented spanwise to the flow. The size and location of the aft facing steps were varied in order to determine the critical size that will force premature transition. Transition over a step was found to be primarily a function of Reynolds number based on step height. Both of the step height Reynolds numbers for premature and full transition were determined. A hot film anemometry system was used to detect transition.

  2. Contactless electroreflectance studies of surface potential barrier for N- and Ga-face epilayers grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Kudrawiec, R.; Janicki, L.; Gladysiewicz, M.; Misiewicz, J.; Cywinski, G.; Boćkowski, M.; Muzioł, G.

    2013-07-29

    Two series of N- and Ga-face GaN Van Hoof structures were grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy to study the surface potential barrier by contactless electroreflectance (CER). A clear CER resonance followed by strong Franz-Keldysh oscillation of period varying with the thickness of undoped GaN layer was observed for these structures. This period was much shorter for N-polar structures that means smaller surface potential barrier in these structures than in Ga-polar structures. From the analysis of built-in electric field it was determined that the Fermi-level is located 0.27 ± 0.05 and 0.60 ± 0.05 eV below the conduction band for N- and Ga-face GaN surface, respectively.

  3. Automatic Treatment Planning with Convex Imputing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayre, G. A.; Ruan, D.

    2014-03-01

    Current inverse optimization-based treatment planning for radiotherapy requires a set of complex DVH objectives to be simultaneously minimized. This process, known as multi-objective optimization, is challenging due to non-convexity in individual objectives and insufficient knowledge in the tradeoffs among the objective set. As such, clinical practice involves numerous iterations of human intervention that is costly and often inconsistent. In this work, we propose to address treatment planning with convex imputing, a new-data mining technique that explores the existence of a latent convex objective whose optimizer reflects the DVH and dose-shaping properties of previously optimized cases. Using ten clinical prostate cases as the basis for comparison, we imputed a simple least-squares problem from the optimized solutions of the prostate cases, and show that the imputed plans are more consistent than their clinical counterparts in achieving planning goals.

  4. Fission Surface Power Systems (FSPS) Project Final Report for the Exploration Technology Development Program (ETDP): Fission Surface Power, Transition Face to Face

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palac, Donald T.

    2011-01-01

    The Fission Surface Power Systems Project became part of the ETDP on October 1, 2008. Its goal was to demonstrate fission power system technology readiness in an operationally relevant environment, while providing data on fission system characteristics pertinent to the use of a fission power system on planetary surfaces. During fiscal years 08 to 10, the FSPS project activities were dominated by hardware demonstrations of component technologies, to verify their readiness for inclusion in the fission surface power system. These Pathfinders demonstrated multi-kWe Stirling power conversion operating with heat delivered via liquid metal NaK, composite Ti/H2O heat pipe radiator panel operations at 400 K input water temperature, no-moving-part electromagnetic liquid metal pump operation with NaK at flight-like temperatures, and subscale performance of an electric resistance reactor simulator capable of reproducing characteristics of a nuclear reactor for the purpose of system-level testing, and a longer list of component technologies included in the attached report. Based on the successful conclusion of Pathfinder testing, work began in 2010 on design and development of the Technology Demonstration Unit (TDU), a full-scale 1/4 power system-level non-nuclear assembly of a reactor simulator, power conversion, heat rejection, instrumentation and controls, and power management and distribution. The TDU will be developed and fabricated during fiscal years 11 and 12, culminating in initial testing with water cooling replacing the heat rejection system in 2012, and complete testing of the full TDU by the end of 2014. Due to its importance for Mars exploration, potential applicability to missions preceding Mars missions, and readiness for an early system-level demonstration, the Enabling Technology Development and Demonstration program is currently planning to continue the project as the Fission Power Systems project, including emphasis on the TDU completion and testing.

  5. Convex Regression with Interpretable Sharp Partitions

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Ashley; Simon, Noah; Witten, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    We consider the problem of predicting an outcome variable on the basis of a small number of covariates, using an interpretable yet non-additive model. We propose convex regression with interpretable sharp partitions (CRISP) for this task. CRISP partitions the covariate space into blocks in a data-adaptive way, and fits a mean model within each block. Unlike other partitioning methods, CRISP is fit using a non-greedy approach by solving a convex optimization problem, resulting in low-variance fits. We explore the properties of CRISP, and evaluate its performance in a simulation study and on a housing price data set.

  6. SEM study on the dorsal lingual surface of the lesser dog-faced fruit bat, Cynopterus brachyotis.

    PubMed

    Emura, S; Hayakawa, D; Chen, H; Shoumura, S; Atoji, Y; Agungpriyono, S

    2001-10-01

    The dorsal lingual surface of the lesser dog-faced fruit bat was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Filiform (Fi), fungiform (Fu) and vallate papillae (V) were observed. The Fi papillae were distributed over the entire dorsal surface of the tongue. The Fi papillae notably differed in morphology by their location on the tongue and could be classified into 5 types: 1) crown-like papillae, 2) giant trifid papillae, 3) scale-like papillae, 4) small conical papillae, and 5) large conical papillae. The Fu papillae were present rounded bodies on the anterior 2/3 of the tongue. The lesser dog-faced fruit bat showed the triangular arrangement of the three V, with the apex of the triangle directed posteriorly. PMID:11774747

  7. Predicting the Surface Quality of Face Milled Aluminium Alloy Using a Multiple Regression Model and Numerical Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simunovic, K.; Simunovic, G.; Saric, T.

    2013-10-01

    The surface roughness is a very significant indicator of surface quality. It represents an essential exploitation requirement and influences technological time and costs, i.e. productivity. For that reason, the main objective of this paper is to analyse the influence of face milling cutting parameters (number of revolution, feed rate and depth of cut) on the surface roughness of aluminium alloy. Hence, a statistical (regression) model has been developed to predict the surface roughness by using the methodology of experimental design. Central composite design is chosen for fitting response surface. Also, numerical optimization considering two goals simultaneously (minimum propagation of error and minimum roughness) was performed throughout the experimental region. In this way, the settings of cutting parameters causing the minimum variability in response were determined for the estimated variations of the significant regression factors.

  8. Dependence of LTX plasma performance on surface conditions as determined by in situ analysis of plasma facing components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucia, M.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.; Bedoya, F.; Allain, J. P.; Abrams, T.; Bell, R. E.; Boyle, D. P.; Jaworski, M. A.; Schmitt, J. C.

    2015-08-01

    The Materials Analysis and Particle Probe (MAPP) diagnostic has been implemented on the Lithium Tokamak Experiment (LTX) at PPPL, providing the first in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) surface characterization of tokamak plasma facing components (PFCs). MAPP samples were exposed to argon glow discharge conditioning (GDC), lithium evaporations, and hydrogen tokamak discharges inside LTX. Samples were analyzed with XPS, and alterations to surface conditions were correlated against observed LTX plasma performance changes. Argon GDC caused the accumulation of nm-scale metal oxide layers on the PFC surface, which appeared to bury surface carbon and oxygen contamination and thus improve plasma performance. Lithium evaporation led to the rapid formation of a lithium oxide (Li2O) surface; plasma performance was strongly improved for sufficiently thick evaporative coatings. Results indicate that a 5 h argon GDC or a 50 nm evaporative lithium coating will both significantly improve LTX plasma performance.

  9. Convex Formulations of Learning from Crowds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajino, Hiroshi; Kashima, Hisashi

    It has attracted considerable attention to use crowdsourcing services to collect a large amount of labeled data for machine learning, since crowdsourcing services allow one to ask the general public to label data at very low cost through the Internet. The use of crowdsourcing has introduced a new challenge in machine learning, that is, coping with low quality of crowd-generated data. There have been many recent attempts to address the quality problem of multiple labelers, however, there are two serious drawbacks in the existing approaches, that are, (i) non-convexity and (ii) task homogeneity. Most of the existing methods consider true labels as latent variables, which results in non-convex optimization problems. Also, the existing models assume only single homogeneous tasks, while in realistic situations, clients can offer multiple tasks to crowds and crowd workers can work on different tasks in parallel. In this paper, we propose a convex optimization formulation of learning from crowds by introducing personal models of individual crowds without estimating true labels. We further extend the proposed model to multi-task learning based on the resemblance between the proposed formulation and that for an existing multi-task learning model. We also devise efficient iterative methods for solving the convex optimization problems by exploiting conditional independence structures in multiple classifiers.

  10. Robust Utility Maximization Under Convex Portfolio Constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Matoussi, Anis; Mezghani, Hanen Mnif, Mohamed

    2015-04-15

    We study a robust maximization problem from terminal wealth and consumption under a convex constraints on the portfolio. We state the existence and the uniqueness of the consumption–investment strategy by studying the associated quadratic backward stochastic differential equation. We characterize the optimal control by using the duality method and deriving a dynamic maximum principle.

  11. Local Convexity-Preserving C2 Rational Cubic Spline for Convex Data

    PubMed Central

    Abd Majid, Ahmad; Ali, Jamaludin Md.

    2014-01-01

    We present the smooth and visually pleasant display of 2D data when it is convex, which is contribution towards the improvements over existing methods. This improvement can be used to get the more accurate results. An attempt has been made in order to develop the local convexity-preserving interpolant for convex data using C2 rational cubic spline. It involves three families of shape parameters in its representation. Data dependent sufficient constraints are imposed on single shape parameter to conserve the inherited shape feature of data. Remaining two of these shape parameters are used for the modification of convex curve to get a visually pleasing curve according to industrial demand. The scheme is tested through several numerical examples, showing that the scheme is local, computationally economical, and visually pleasing. PMID:24757421

  12. On strongly GA-convex functions and stochastic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekar, Nurgül Okur; Akdemir, Hande Günay; Işcan, Imdat

    2014-08-01

    In this study, we introduce strongly GA-convex functions and stochastic processes. We provide related well-known Kuhn type results and Hermite-Hadamard type inequality for strongly GA-convex functions and stochastic processes.

  13. On strongly GA-convex functions and stochastic processes

    SciTech Connect

    Bekar, Nurgül Okur; Akdemir, Hande Günay; İşcan, İmdat

    2014-08-20

    In this study, we introduce strongly GA-convex functions and stochastic processes. We provide related well-known Kuhn type results and Hermite-Hadamard type inequality for strongly GA-convex functions and stochastic processes.

  14. In-situ surface debris inspection and removal system for upward-facing transport mirrors of the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Gourdin, W H; Dzenitis, E; Martin, D; Listiyo, K; Sherman, G; Kent, W; Butlin, R; Stolz, C J; Pryatel, J

    2004-11-10

    We describe a system to inspect and remove surface debris in-situ from the surfaces of upward-facing mirrors that transport 1053 nm laser light to the target chamber of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Grazing angle (2-5{sup o}) illumination with a bar light highlights debris {approx}10 {micro}m in size and larger, which is then viewed through windows in the enclosures of selected mirrors. Debris is removed with 1-second bursts of high velocity (76 m/s) clean air delivered across the optic surfaces by a commercially available linear nozzle (''gas knife''). Experiments with aluminum, stainless steel, glass and polystyrene particles of various sizes >30 {micro}m show that particle removal efficiency is near 100% over most of the mirror surfaces for all sizes tested.

  15. Face-dependent Auger neutralization and ground-state energy shift for He in front of Al surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Wethekam, S.; Winter, H.; Valdes, Diego; Monreal, R. C.

    2008-08-15

    He atoms and ions with keV energies are scattered under grazing angles of incidence from Al(111), Al(100), and Al(110) surfaces. Fractions of surviving ions and normal energy gains of He{sup +} ions prior to neutralization, derived from shifts of angular distributions for incident atoms and ions, are compared to results from three-dimensional Monte Carlo simulations based on theoretically calculated Auger neutralization rates and He ground-state energy shifts. From the good agreement of experimental data with simulations, we conclude a detailed microscopic understanding for a model system of ion-surface interactions. Our work provides further evidence for the recently reported surface Miller index dependence for the neutralization of He{sup +} ions at metal surfaces. The study is extended to the face dependence of the He ground-state energy shift.

  16. Endotoxin deposits on the inner surfaces of closed-face cassettes during bioaerosol sampling: a field investigation at composting facilities.

    PubMed

    Duquenne, Philippe; Simon, Xavier; Demange, Valérie; Harper, Martin; Wild, Pascal

    2015-05-01

    A set of 270 bioaerosol samples was taken from 15 composting facilities using polystyrene closed-face filter cassettes (CFCs). The objective was to measure the quantity of endotoxin deposits on the inner surfaces of the cassettes (sometimes referred to as 'wall deposits'). The results show that endotoxins are deposited on the inner surfaces of the CFCs through sampling and/or handling of samples. The quantity of endotoxins measured on inner surfaces range between 0.05 (the limit of detection of the method) and 3100 endotoxin units per cassette. The deposits can represent a large and variable percentage of the endotoxins sampled. More than a third of the samples presented a percentage of inner surface deposits >40% of the total quantity of endotoxins collected (filter + inner surfaces). Omitting these inner surface deposits in the analytical process lead to measurement errors relative to sampling all particles entering the CFC sampler, corresponding to a developing consensus on matching the inhalable particulate sampling convention. The result would be underestimated exposures and could affect the decision as to whether or not a result is acceptable in comparison to airborne concentration limits defined in terms of the inhalability convention. The results of this study suggest including the endotoxins deposited on the inner surfaces of CFCs during analysis. Further researches are necessary to investigate endotoxin deposits on the inner cassette surfaces in other working sectors. PMID:25535181

  17. Face shape of unaffected parents with cleft affected offspring: combining three-dimensional surface imaging and geometric morphometrics

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, SM; Naidoo, SD; Bardi, KM; Brandon, CA; Neiswanger, K; Resick, JM; Martin, RA; Marazita, ML

    2009-01-01

    Objective Various lines of evidence suggest that face shape may be a predisposing factor for nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P). In the present study, 3D surface imaging and statistical shape analysis were used to evaluate face shape differences between the unaffected (non-cleft) parents of individuals with CL/P and unrelated controls. Methods Sixteen facial landmarks were collected from 3D captures of 80 unaffected parents and 80 matched controls. Prior to analysis, each unaffected parent was assigned to a subgroup on the basis of prior family history (positive or negative). A geometric morphometric approach was utilized to scale and superimpose the landmark coordinate data (Procrustes analysis), test for omnibus group differences in face shape, and uncover specific modes of shape variation capable of discriminating unaffected parents from controls. Results Significant disparity in face shape was observed between unaffected parents and controls (p < 0.01). Notably, these changes were specific to parents with a positive family history of CL/P. Shape changes associated with CL/P predisposition included marked flattening of the facial profile (midface retrusion), reduced upper facial height, increased lower facial height and excess interorbital width. Additionally, a sex-specific pattern of parent-control difference was evident in the transverse dimensions of the nasolabial complex. Conclusions The faces of unaffected parents from multiplex cleft families display meaningful shape differences compared with the general population. Quantitative assessment of the facial phenotype in cleft families may enhance efforts to discover the root causes of CL/P. PMID:19840279

  18. The many faces of Mars. [Mariner 9 photography of Mars surface, satellites, and atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The Mariner Mars 1971 spacecraft was the first to orbit another planet. For 349 days, it transmitted a vast amount of data, including 7300 television pictures, gathered by its five scientific instruments. This memorandum presents some of the findings on the characteristics of the surface, atmosphere, and satellites of Mars. Included are photographs of the surface, atmosphere, satellites, surface maps, and spectrometric data for the atmosphere.

  19. Impurity concentrations and surface charge densities on the heavily doped face of a silicon solar cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, I.; Hsu, L. C.

    1977-01-01

    Increased solar cell efficiencies are attained by reduction of surface recombination and variation of impurity concentration profiles at the n(+) surface of silicon solar cells. Diagnostic techniques are employed to evaluate the effects of specific materials preparation methodologies on surface and near surface concentrations. It is demonstrated that the MOS C-V method, when combined with a bulk measurement technique, yields more complete concentration data than are obtainable by either method alone. Specifically, new solar cell MOS C-V measurements are combined with bulk concentrations obtained by a successive layer removal technique utilizing measurements of sheet resistivity and Hall coefficient.

  20. Face-related segregation reversal at Pt 50Ni 50 surfaces studied with the embedded atom method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deurinck, P.; Creemers, C.

    1999-11-01

    The segregation to the three low-index surfaces of a Pt50Ni50 single crystal is modelled by Monte Carlo simulations combined with the embedded atom method (EAM). Using the best fit EAM parameters from the literature for the six transition metals of the Ni and Cu groups does not yield satisfactory results. In this work the EAM parameters are recalculated and optimised exclusively for the Pt-Ni alloy system under study. Only then does EAM reliably reproduce the driving forces for segregation. The experimental results [Y. Gauthier et al., Phys. Rev. B 31 (1985) 6216; Y. Gauthier et al., Phys. Rev. B 35 (1987) 7867; S.M. Foiles, in: P.A. Dobson, A. Miller (Eds.), Surface Segregation Phenomena, CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL, 1990, p. 79] reveal a face-related segregation reversal for the Pt50Ni50 single crystal. It appears from the simulations that this is caused by a relatively small difference in surface energy in close competition with the elastic strain release. At the open (110) surface the difference in surface energy dominates causing Ni segregation. At the (100) and (111) surfaces the difference in surface energy is overpowered by the elastic strain leading to Pt segregation. The simulations are in good agreement with the experimental results and reproduce quantitatively the Ni segregation to the (110) surface and the Pt segregation to the (100) and (111) surfaces. Only at the (110) surface significant relaxations are predicted in good agreement with experimental evidence. Atomic vibrations can be included by allowing a large number of very small displacements or with a more classical treatment of vibrational entropy. Both approaches yield the same results and show that the inclusion of atomic vibrations is important only for the (110) surface and tend to attenuate the Ni segregation profile.

  1. Use of convexity in pouching: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Hoeflok, Jo; Kittscha, Julia; Purnell, Paris

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive literature review was conducted to examine research, current best evidence, and best practice recommendations associated with the use of convex skin barriers for patients living with an ostomy. The review revealed a fragmented array of citations related to convexity and a paucity of evidence regarding convexity product descriptions and application. Most convexity choices appear to be based on the clinician experience over time using trial and error to determine clinical application. Current descriptors used for convexity products are creating confusion, and a standardized approach to product nomenclature does not exist. The development of assistive clinical practice guidelines, in conjunction with further research, is recommended. PMID:24448619

  2. Convex nonnegative matrix factorization with manifold regularization.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wenjun; Choi, Kup-Sze; Wang, Peiliang; Jiang, Yunliang; Wang, Shitong

    2015-03-01

    Nonnegative Matrix Factorization (NMF) has been extensively applied in many areas, including computer vision, pattern recognition, text mining, and signal processing. However, nonnegative entries are usually required for the data matrix in NMF, which limits its application. Besides, while the basis and encoding vectors obtained by NMF can represent the original data in low dimension, the representations do not always reflect the intrinsic geometric structure embedded in the data. Motivated by manifold learning and Convex NMF (CNMF), we propose a novel matrix factorization method called Graph Regularized and Convex Nonnegative Matrix Factorization (GCNMF) by introducing a graph regularized term into CNMF. The proposed matrix factorization technique not only inherits the intrinsic low-dimensional manifold structure, but also allows the processing of mixed-sign data matrix. Clustering experiments on nonnegative and mixed-sign real-world data sets are conducted to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:25523040

  3. Solving ptychography with a convex relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Richard Y; Ou, Xiaoze; Ames, Brendan; Tropp, Joel A; Yang, Changhuei

    2015-01-01

    Ptychography is a powerful computational imaging technique that transforms a collection of low-resolution images into a high-resolution sample reconstruction. Unfortunately, algorithms that currently solve this reconstruction problem lack stability, robustness, and theoretical guarantees. Recently, convex optimization algorithms have improved the accuracy and reliability of several related reconstruction efforts. This paper proposes a convex formulation of the ptychography problem. This formulation has no local minima, it can be solved using a wide range of algorithms, it can incorporate appropriate noise models, and it can include multiple a priori constraints. The paper considers a specific algorithm, based on low-rank factorization, whose runtime and memory usage are near-linear in the size of the output image. Experiments demonstrate that this approach offers a 25% lower background variance on average than alternating projections, the ptychographic reconstruction algorithm that is currently in widespread use. PMID:26146480

  4. On the convexity of relativistic hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibáñez, José M.; Cordero-Carrión, Isabel; Martí, José M.; Miralles, Juan A.

    2013-03-01

    The relativistic hydrodynamic system of equations for a perfect fluid obeying a causal equation of state is hyperbolic (Anile 1989 Relativistic Fluids and Magneto-Fluids (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press)). In this report, we derive the conditions for this system to be convex in terms of the fundamental derivative of the equation of state (Menikoff and Plohr1989 Rev. Mod. Phys. 61 75). The classical limit is recovered. Communicated by L Rezzolla

  5. Convex relaxations for gas expansion planning

    SciTech Connect

    Borraz-Sanchez, Conrado; Bent, Russell Whitford; Backhaus, Scott N.; Hijazi, Hassan; Van Hentenryck, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Expansion of natural gas networks is a critical process involving substantial capital expenditures with complex decision-support requirements. Here, given the non-convex nature of gas transmission constraints, global optimality and infeasibility guarantees can only be offered by global optimisation approaches. Unfortunately, state-of-the-art global optimisation solvers are unable to scale up to real-world size instances. In this study, we present a convex mixed-integer second-order cone relaxation for the gas expansion planning problem under steady-state conditions. The underlying model offers tight lower bounds with high computational efficiency. In addition, the optimal solution of the relaxation can often be used to derive high-quality solutions to the original problem, leading to provably tight optimality gaps and, in some cases, global optimal solutions. The convex relaxation is based on a few key ideas, including the introduction of flux direction variables, exact McCormick relaxations, on/off constraints, and integer cuts. Numerical experiments are conducted on the traditional Belgian gas network, as well as other real larger networks. The results demonstrate both the accuracy and computational speed of the relaxation and its ability to produce high-quality solution

  6. Convex relaxations for gas expansion planning

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Borraz-Sanchez, Conrado; Bent, Russell Whitford; Backhaus, Scott N.; Hijazi, Hassan; Van Hentenryck, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Expansion of natural gas networks is a critical process involving substantial capital expenditures with complex decision-support requirements. Here, given the non-convex nature of gas transmission constraints, global optimality and infeasibility guarantees can only be offered by global optimisation approaches. Unfortunately, state-of-the-art global optimisation solvers are unable to scale up to real-world size instances. In this study, we present a convex mixed-integer second-order cone relaxation for the gas expansion planning problem under steady-state conditions. The underlying model offers tight lower bounds with high computational efficiency. In addition, the optimal solution of the relaxation can often be used to derive high-quality solutionsmore » to the original problem, leading to provably tight optimality gaps and, in some cases, global optimal solutions. The convex relaxation is based on a few key ideas, including the introduction of flux direction variables, exact McCormick relaxations, on/off constraints, and integer cuts. Numerical experiments are conducted on the traditional Belgian gas network, as well as other real larger networks. The results demonstrate both the accuracy and computational speed of the relaxation and its ability to produce high-quality solution« less

  7. Generalized vector calculus on convex domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Om P.; Xu, Yufeng

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we apply recently proposed generalized integral and differential operators to develop generalized vector calculus and generalized variational calculus for problems defined over a convex domain. In particular, we present some generalization of Green's and Gauss divergence theorems involving some new operators, and apply these theorems to generalized variational calculus. For fractional power kernels, the formulation leads to fractional vector calculus and fractional variational calculus for problems defined over a convex domain. In special cases, when certain parameters take integer values, we obtain formulations for integer order problems. Two examples are presented to demonstrate applications of the generalized variational calculus which utilize the generalized vector calculus developed in the paper. The first example leads to a generalized partial differential equation and the second example leads to a generalized eigenvalue problem, both in two dimensional convex domains. We solve the generalized partial differential equation by using polynomial approximation. A special case of the second example is a generalized isoperimetric problem. We find an approximate solution to this problem. Many physical problems containing integer order integrals and derivatives are defined over arbitrary domains. We speculate that future problems containing fractional and generalized integrals and derivatives in fractional mechanics will be defined over arbitrary domains, and therefore, a general variational calculus incorporating a general vector calculus will be needed for these problems. This research is our first attempt in that direction.

  8. Manufacturing and testing of a convex aspherical mirror for ASSIST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ter Horst, Rik; Stuik, Remko

    2012-09-01

    ASSIST is the testbed for the ESO Adaptive Optics Facility. The main objective of ASSIST is the characterization of the 1.2 meter deformable mirror which will replace the existing secondary of one of the 8 meter VLT telescopes. A large concave 1.65 meter diameter aspherical primary mirror combined with a 140 mm diameter convex aspherical secondary forms the main optical system of ASSIST. Two additional optical units provide the light sources and the wave front analyzing optics. Without having the possibility for checking the entire optical system as a whole, each individual mirror had to be manufactured and tested using reliable techniques. The secondary mirror for ASSIST (AM2) is made of an optically transparent material (BK7) with a specific and accurate backside radius in order to achieve a null test in transmission. Furthermore, not only the overall RMS surface error of AM2 is important, but due to the fact that it will be used in a setup that measures specific spatial frequencies, also the spatial frequencies of the surface error of AM2 is important. The aspherical surface is tested in double pass using an optical flat and an interferometer with a transmission sphere. Manufacturing of this asphere is mainly done by hand at the optical lab of NOVA-ASTRON. The final accuracy of the reflecting surface is within the required 50 nm RMS with a surface roughness of less than 2 nm RMS. This paper reports in more detail on manufacturing and testing of the a-spherical convex mirror.

  9. Rapid Generation of Optimal Asteroid Powered Descent Trajectories Via Convex Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinson, Robin; Lu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates a convex optimization based method that can rapidly generate the fuel optimal asteroid powered descent trajectory. The ultimate goal is to autonomously design the optimal powered descent trajectory on-board the spacecraft immediately prior to the descent burn. Compared to a planetary powered landing problem, the major difficulty is the complex gravity field near the surface of an asteroid that cannot be approximated by a constant gravity field. This paper uses relaxation techniques and a successive solution process that seeks the solution to the original nonlinear, nonconvex problem through the solutions to a sequence of convex optimal control problems.

  10. Effect of surface segregation and mobility on erosion of plasma-facing materials in magnetic fusion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sizyuk, Tatyana; Hassanein, Ahmed

    2015-03-01

    The present work studies the combined effects of collisional sputtering and mixing processes of carbon impurities in tungsten plasma-facing material integrated with thermal processes including surface segregation and diffusion. We used our ITMC-DYN package, which includes description of all collisional and thermal processes, for the analysis of recent experimental results of tungsten erosion and carbon implantation at various target temperatures. Self-consistent integrated modeling predicted thermal processes effects on erosion/deposition dynamics and defined decisive parameters range and their importance. Critical parameters were estimated based on available experimental data. The integrated simulation reproduced the experimental results and predicted the transition from enhanced tungsten erosion to significant carbon coverage on the tungsten surface. These effects for wider range of system conditions with C/H ions irradiation and for reactor conditions can be predicted by including detailed modeling of chemical erosion processes in a self-consistent manner.

  11. Focused Weathering Control of Convex Waterfalls Along the Niobrara River in Cherry and Brown Counties, Nebraska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, L. J.; Pederson, D. T.; Goble, R. J.

    2004-12-01

    More than 200 waterfalls exist along the southern spring branch tributaries that feed an approximately twenty-five mile section of the Niobrara River, east of Valentine, Nebraska. Many of these waterfalls posses a convex shape in the horizontal plane and are buttressed. This morphology is controlled by focused, season-specific weathering along the escarpments adjacent to the waterfall face and a lack of stream erosion on the actual waterfall face. The waterfalls are composed of the Rosebud Formation, a poorly indurated siltstone that should be easily eroded by stream flow. The spring creeks are ineffective at significantly eroding the waterfall face mainly due to their relatively low discharge, three to five cubic feet per second, and low sediment load. The erosive power of the streams is further reduced at the site of the waterfall by the buttressed shape spreading the flow into a thin sheet. The buttressed shape of the waterfall develops in response to stress relief. The only areas of the waterfall face showing stream erosion and lack of diatom cover is where free falling water is impacting the waterfall face. Large, loose talus slopes at the base of the waterfall escarpments further support that the weathering processes operate at a faster rate than stream erosion. Observable groundwater seepage from the escarpments on either side of the waterfalls exposes the faces to season-specific weathering processes. The moisture content of the escarpments varies with exposure to sunlight and changes in air temperature. Cyclic differential expansion and contraction of clays and minerals as well as precipitation and hydration of salts operate on a daily and seasonal basis. These repeated stresses give the escarpments a flaky, shingle like appearance and can cause rapid deterioration of the escarpment. During the winter, the seeping groundwater and waterfall spray form large ice flows on either side of the waterfall face. Freeze-thaw processes operate on a seasonal and

  12. Deuterium retention enhancement in lithiated graphite plasma-facing surfaces in fusion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allain, Jean Paul

    2011-10-01

    Lithium conditioning has been adopted in a number of magnetic confinement devices resulting in significant effects on plasma performance. In NSTX for example effects include: reduction of ELMs, reduced edge neutral density, increased pedestal electron and ion temperature, and improved energy confinement. The main assumption conjectured for the effects observed in NSTX plasmas is the retention of hydrogen by coatings of lithium on ATJ graphite tile surfaces. The main binding channel understood to be the ionic lithium hydride bond. However, the likelihood that the dominant retention mechanism is governed by lithium-hydride bonding seems less probable based on well-known intercalation effects of lithium in graphite. The observed effects on plasma behavior in NSTX, despite the strong chemical interaction of D, Li, O and carbon, indicate an enhanced mechanism for retaining hydrogen in addition to Li-D binding. This paper summarizes the key mechanisms understood today of enhanced hydrogen retention in lithium-treated ATJ graphite surfaces. The mechanisms are elucidated by four major efforts: 1) controlled in-situ off-line experiments at Purdue,, 2) post-mortem NSTX tile analysis, 3) in-vacuo PMI probe data in NSTX, and 4) computational quantum-based atomistic simulations. Results show that a saturation limit of D pumping by lithium conditioning of ATJ graphite surfaces is reached in a few number of shots. Computational modeling using semi-empirical quantum mechanics of electrons and classical mechanics of nuclei elucidate on the polar-covalent interactions that emerge between lithium and the C-D-O system.

  13. Morphological convexity measures for terrestrial basins derived from digital elevation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Sin Liang; Daya Sagar, B. S.; Chet Koo, Voon; Tien Tay, Lea

    2011-09-01

    Geophysical basins of terrestrial surfaces have been quantitatively characterized through a host of indices such as topological quantities (e.g. channel bifurcation and length ratios), allometric scaling exponents (e.g. fractal dimensions), and other geomorphometric parameters (channel density, Hack's and Hurst exponents). Channel density, estimated by taking the ratio between the length of channel network ( L) and the area of basin ( A) in planar form, provides a quantitative index that has hitherto been related to various geomorphologically significant processes. This index, computed by taking the planar forms of channel network and its corresponding basin, is a kind of convexity measure in the two-dimensional case. Such a measure - estimated in general as a function of basin area and channel network length, where the important elevation values of the topological region within a basin and channel network are ignored - fails to capture the spatial variability between homotopic basins possessing different altitude-ranges. Two types of convexity measures that have potential to capture the terrain elevation variability are defined as the ratio of (i) length of channel network function and area of basin function and (ii) areas of basin and its convex hull functions. These two convexity measures are estimated in three data sets that include (a) synthetic basin functions, (b) fractal basin functions, and (c) realistic digital elevation models (DEMs) of two regions of peninsular Malaysia. It is proven that the proposed convexity measures are altitude-dependent and that they could capture the spatial variability across the homotopic basins of different altitudes. It is also demonstrated on terrestrial DEMs that these convexity measures possess relationships with other quantitative indexes such as fractal dimensions and complexity measures (roughness indexes).

  14. Influences of the third and fourth nearest neighbouring interactions on the surface anisotropy of face-centred-cubic metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yongkun; Qin, Rongshan

    2014-06-01

    The structure and the anisotropic properties of the surfaces of face-centred-cubic (FCC) metals have been studied using the broken-bond model while considering the third and fourth nearest neighbouring (3rd and 4th NN) interactions. The pair potential expressions are obtained using the Rose-Vinet universal potential equation. The model is suitable for calculation of the property of a surface with arbitrary crystallographic orientations and can provide absolute unrelaxed surface energy values using three input parameters, namely the lattice constant, bulk modulus and cohesive energy. These parameters are available for the majority of FCC metals. The numerical results for 7 FCC metals have been obtained and compared with these obtained from ab initio calculations and experimental measurements. Good agreement is observed between the two. Taking into account up to the 4th NN interactions, the overall surface energy anisotropy for FCC metals was found to be between 12% to 16%, and the ratio between the surface energies at (100) and (111) planes was found to be 1.05. These values are less than those reported by conventional calculations but more similar to experimental measurements. It is found that the strength of 3rd and 4th NN interactions differs from one element to another, the Ni and Cu interactions being the most significant while the Au, Pt and Pb interactions are the least significant. This suggests that the polar diagrams of the surface energy of Ni and Cu are different from those of Au, Pt and Pb by showing cusps of the unconventional {110} and high-index {210}, {311} and possibly {135} poles. This provides explanations to the recent experimental observations of the {110}, {210}, {311} and {135} facets in equilibrated Ni and Cu crystallines.

  15. CVXPY: A Python-Embedded Modeling Language for Convex Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Diamond, Steven; Boyd, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    CVXPY is a domain-specific language for convex optimization embedded in Python. It allows the user to express convex optimization problems in a natural syntax that follows the math, rather than in the restrictive standard form required by solvers. CVXPY makes it easy to combine convex optimization with high-level features of Python such as parallelism and object-oriented design. CVXPY is available at http://www.cvxpy.org/ under the GPL license, along with documentation and examples. PMID:27375369

  16. Lithium-Gettered Moving Surface Plasma-Facing Components for Particle Control in Steady State Magnetic Fusion Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Hirooka, Yoshi; Ohgaki, Hirotsugu; Hosaka, Souichirou; Ohtsuka, Yusuke; Nishikawa, Masahiro

    2005-04-15

    In our previous work, the first proof-of-principle experiments were successfully conducted on the particle control capability based on the concept of moving-surface plasma-facing component (MS-PFC). Over a continuously titanium-gettered rotating drum, hydrogen recycling was found to be reduced down to levels around 94% even at steady state. These experiments on the MS-PFC concept have now been extended to the second stage where lithium is employed as the getter material, while using the same rotating drum. These experiments are intended to pilot the potential use of lithium as a flowing liquid facing the edge plasmas in steady state reactors beyond ITER. Reported in this paper are rather dramatic findings that hydrogen recycling is reduced down to levels around 76% and 86% at steady state over the rotating drum at the lithium deposition rates of 9.5 A/s and 7.3 A/s, respectively. These steady state recycling data have been nicely reproduced by a simple zero-dimensional particle balance model.

  17. Regression models for convex ROC curves.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, C J

    2000-09-01

    The performance of a diagnostic test is summarized by its receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. Under quite natural assumptions about the latent variable underlying the test, the ROC curve is convex. Empirical data on a test's performance often comes in the form of observed true positive and false positive relative frequencies under varying conditions. This paper describes a family of regression models for analyzing such data. The underlying ROC curves are specified by a quality parameter delta and a shape parameter mu and are guaranteed to be convex provided delta > 1. Both the position along the ROC curve and the quality parameter delta are modeled linearly with covariates at the level of the individual. The shape parameter mu enters the model through the link functions log(p mu) - log(1 - p mu) of a binomial regression and is estimated either by search or from an appropriate constructed variate. One simple application is to the meta-analysis of independent studies of the same diagnostic test, illustrated on some data of Moses, Shapiro, and Littenberg (1993). A second application, to so-called vigilance data, is given, where ROC curves differ across subjects and modeling of the position along the ROC curve is of primary interest. PMID:10985227

  18. Thermodynamic characteristics of the adsorption of isomeric molecules of fluoroadamantanes on the surface of the basal face of graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yashkin, S. N.; Svetlov, D. A.; Klimochkin, Yu. N.

    2011-10-01

    The thermodynamic characteristics of adsorption (TCA) for isomeric molecules of mono-, di-, tri-, and tetrafluoroadamantanes were determined for the first time experimentally and by molecular statistics on the surface of graphitized thermal black (GTB). The parameters of atom-atom potential function of pair intermolecular interaction (φ( r)) for F atoms included in fluoroadamantanes with C atoms on the basal face of graphite were calculated for the first time within an atom-atom approximation of the semi-empirical molecular statistical theory of adsorption. The adsorption non-equivalence of F atoms in various positions of an adamantane framework, a consequence of the mutual effect of atoms in a framework molecule, was determined. On the basis of the definite TCA values, the conclusion was drawn as to the possibility of isolation of isomeric fluoroadamantanes under the conditions of gas-adsorption chromatography on GTB.

  19. Steady-state observations and theoretical modeling of critical heat flux phenomena on a downward facing hemispherical surface

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, F.B.; Haddad, K.H.

    1996-03-01

    Steady-state boiling experiments were performed in the SBLB test facility to observe the two-phase boundary layer flow behavior on the outer surface of a heated hemispherical vessel near the critical heat flux (CHF) limit and to measure the spatial variation of the local CHF along the vessel outer surface. Based upon the flow observations, an advanced hydrodynamic CHF model was developed. The model considers the existence of a micro-layer underneath an elongated vapor slug on the downward facing curved heating surface. The micro-layer is treated as a thin liquid film with numerous micro-vapor jets penetrating through it. The micro-jets have the characteristic size dictated by Helmholtz instability. Local dryout is considered to occur when the supply of fresh liquid from the two phase boundary layer to the micro-layer is not sufficient to prevent depletion of the liquid film by boiling. A boundary layer analysis, treating the two-phase motion as a separated flow, is performed to determine the liquid supply rate and thus the local critical heat flux. The model provides a clear physical explanation for the spatial variation of the CHF observed in the SBLB experiments and for the weak dependence of the CHF data on the physical size of the vessel.

  20. Effect of subcooling and wall thickness on pool boiling from downward-facing curved surfaces in water

    SciTech Connect

    El-Genk, M.S.; Glebov, A.G.

    1995-09-01

    Quenching experiments were performed to investigate the effects of water subcooling and wall thickness on pool boiling from a downward-facing curved surface. Experiments used three copper sections of the same diameter (50.8 mm) and surface radius (148 mm), but different thickness (12.8, 20 and 30 mm). Local and average pool boiling curves were obtained at saturation and 5 K, 10 K, and 14 K subcooling. Water subcooling increased the maximum heat flux, but decreased the corresponding wall superheat. The minimum film boiling heat flux and the corresponding wall superheat, however, increased with increased subcooling. The maximum and minimum film boiling heat fluxes were independent of wall thickness above 20 mm and Biot Number > 0.8, indicating that boiling curves for the 20 and 30 thick sections were representative of quasi steady-state, but not those for the 12.8 mm thick section. When compared with that for a flat surface section of the same thickness, the data for the 12.8 mm thick section showed significant increases in both the maximum heat flux (from 0.21 to 0.41 MW/m{sup 2}) and the minimum film boiling heat flux (from 2 to 13 kW/m{sup 2}) and about 11.5 K and 60 K increase in the corresponding wall superheats, respectively.

  1. Material probe analysis for plasma facing surface in the Large Helical Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hino, T.; Sagara, A.; Nobuta, Y.; Inoue, N.; Hirohata, Y.; Yamauchi, Y.; Masuzaki, S.; Noda, N.; Suzuki, H.; Komori, A.; Ohyabu, N.; Motojima, O.; LHD Experimental Group

    2004-04-01

    Material probes have been installed at the inner walls along the poloidal direction in large helical device (LHD) from the first experimental campaign. After each campaign, the impurity deposition and the gas retention have been examined to study the plasma surface interaction and the degree of wall cleaning. In the 2nd campaign, the entire wall was thoroughly cleaned by glow discharge conditioning and the number of main discharge shots increased. For the 3rd and 4th campaigns, graphite tiles were installed over the entire divertor strike region, and then the wall condition was significantly changed compared with the case of a stainless steel (SS) wall. It was seen that graphite tiles in the divertor were eroded mainly during main discharges, and the SS first wall mainly during glow discharges. During main discharges the eroded carbon was deposited on the entire wall. A reduction of metal impurities in the plasma was observed, which corresponds to the carbonized wall. The deposition thickness was great at the wall far from the plasma. Since the entire wall was carbonized, the amount of discharge gases retained such as H and He became large. In particular, helium retention was large at a position close to the anodes used for helium glow discharge cleanings. One characteristic of the LHD wall is a large retention of helium since the wall temperature is limited to below 368 K. In order to reduce the recycling of the discharge gas, wall heating is necessary.

  2. Dry deposition washoff and dew on the surfaces of pine foliage on the urban- and mountain-facing sides of Mt. Gokurakuji, western Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiwa, M.; Oshiro, N.; Miyake, T.; Nakatani, N.; Kimura, N.; Yuhara, T.; Hashimoto, N.; Sakugawa, H.

    Dry deposition and dew components on pine foliage were measured from 1998 to 2000 on the urban- and mountain-facing sides of Mt. Gokurakuji in order to estimate the effect of anthropogenic activities to dry deposition and dew concentration on the surfaces of pine foliage. A leaf wash experiment was employed to determine the dry deposition rates on the pine foliage. The NO 3- and SO 42- dry deposition rates per unit surface area of pine foliage were 1.47 and 0.28 μmol m -2 h -1 respectively on the urban-facing side and 0.32 and 0.09 μmol m -2 h -1 on the mountain-facing side. Dry deposition fluxes of N (NO 3-+NH 4+) and S (SO 42-) to the forest floors were 8.4 kg N ha -1 yr -1 and 2.8 kg S ha -1 yr -1 on the urban-facing, and 3.3 kg N ha -1 yr -1 and 1.8 kg S ha -1 yr -1 on the mountain-facing side, respectively. The higher dry deposition fluxes of N and S on the urban-facing side could be attributed to its proximity to traffic roads and the urban area. The concentrations of most ions in the dew were higher on the urban-facing side (U130) than on the mountain-facing side (M430). NO 3- and SO 42- concentrations in dew at U130 were 802 and 428 μeq l -1, respectively, while at M430 they were 199 and 222 μeq l -1, respectively, suggesting that higher dry deposition rates on the urban-facing side enhanced their concentrations in the dew on this side. The role of dry deposits and subsequently dissolved ones in dew on the needle surfaces is discussed in terms of pine tree damage by atmospheric depositions.

  3. Material ejection and surface morphology changes during transient heat loading of tungsten as plasma-facing component in fusion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suslova, A.; El-Atwani, O.; Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A.

    2015-03-01

    We investigated the effect of edge-localized mode like transient heat events on pristine samples for two different grades of deformed tungsten with ultrafine and nanocrystalline grains as potential candidates for plasma-facing components. Pulses from a laser beam with durations ∼1 ms and operating in the near infrared wavelength were used for simulating transient heat loading in fusion devices. We specifically focused on investigating and analysis of different mechanisms for material removal from the sample surface under repetitive transient heat loads. Several techniques were applied for analysing different mechanisms leading to material removal from the W surface under repetitive transient heat loads which include witness plates for collected ejected material, and subsequent analysis using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy, visible imaging using fast-gated camera, and evaluating thermal emission from the particles using optical emission spectroscopy. Our results show a significantly improved performance of polycrystalline cold-rolled tungsten compared to tungsten produced using an orthogonal machining process under repetitive transient loads for a wide range of the power densities.

  4. Study of thermal flows from two-dimensional, upward-facing isothermal surfaces using a laser speckle photography technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kihm, K. D.; Cheeti, S. K. R.

    1994-08-01

    A laser specklegram or speckle photography technique allows a direct measurement of surface temperature gradients and provides a full field interrogation with an extremely high resolution from a single data taking. The specklegram technique has been successfully applied to investigate the natural convection heat transfer from an upward-facing isothermal plate. For a plate with a large aspect ratio of 15, both local and global Nusselt numbers have been determined from the direct measurement of local temperature gradients. The Rayleigh number, based on the length scale equivalent to the ratio of the surface area to the perimeter, has been varied from 9.0 × 103 to 4.0 × 104. The present result for the global heat transfer has shown that a 1/5-power law, i.e., Nu = C1 Ra 1/5, correlates the data more properly whilst previously published results showed a large scatter in the exponent, ranging from 1/8-power to 1/4-power. The proportional constant, C1 has been determined to be 0.56 which shows a fairly good agreement with previously published theoretical results. The laser specklegram technique has shown a strong potential as a powerful and convenient method for an experimental assessment of natural convection heat transfer problems. The specklegram technique at the same time has eliminated the deficiencies of both the mass transfer analogy technique and the classical heat transfer measurement technique.

  5. Imaging spectrometer/camera having convex grating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reininger, Francis M. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    An imaging spectrometer has fore-optics coupled to a spectral resolving system with an entrance slit extending in a first direction at an imaging location of the fore-optics for receiving the image, a convex diffraction grating for separating the image into a plurality of spectra of predetermined wavelength ranges; a spectrometer array for detecting the spectra; and at least one concave sperical mirror concentric with the diffraction grating for relaying the image from the entrance slit to the diffraction grating and from the diffraction grating to the spectrometer array. In one embodiment, the spectrometer is configured in a lateral mode in which the entrance slit and the spectrometer array are displaced laterally on opposite sides of the diffraction grating in a second direction substantially perpendicular to the first direction. In another embodiment, the spectrometer is combined with a polychromatic imaging camera array disposed adjacent said entrance slit for recording said image.

  6. Convex Lower Bounds for Free Energy Minimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussa, Jonathan

    We construct lower bounds on free energy with convex relaxations from the nonlinear minimization over probabilities to linear programs over expectation values. Finite-temperature expectation values are further resolved into distributions over energy. A superset of valid expectation values is delineated by an incomplete set of linear constraints. Free energy bounds can be improved systematically by adding constraints, which also increases their computational cost. We compute several free energy bounds of increasing accuracy for the triangular-lattice Ising model to assess the utility of this method. This work was supported by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program at Sandia National Laboratories. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  7. Infants' Perception of Information along Object Boundaries: Concavities versus Convexities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhatt, Ramesh S.; Hayden, Angela; Reed, Andrea; Bertin, Evelin; Joseph, Jane

    2006-01-01

    Object parts are signaled by concave discontinuities in shape contours. In seven experiments, we examined whether 5- and 6 1/2-month-olds are sensitive to concavities as special aspects of contours. Infants of both ages detected discrepant concave elements amid convex distractors but failed to discriminate convex elements among concave…

  8. On some interpolation properties in locally convex spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Pater, Flavius

    2015-03-10

    The aim of this paper is to introduce the notion of interpolation between locally convex spaces, the real method, and to present some elementary results in this setting. This represents a generalization from the Banach spaces framework to the locally convex spaces sequentially complete one, where the operators acting on them are locally bounded.

  9. Study on the method to test large-aperture hyperboloid convex mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xiaohui; Dong, Huiwen; Guo, Wen; Wang, Huijun

    2014-08-01

    There are numerous reflecting optical system designs that call for large-aperture convex surfaces, such as secondary mirror in on-axis three mirror anastigmatic (TMA). Several methods to test high accuracy hyperboloid convex surfaces are introduced separately in this paper. A kind of arrangement is chosen to test a surface with diameter of 420mm, radius of 1371mm, and conic K -2.1229. The CGH compensator for testing is designed, which is made up of illumination lens and hologram test plate with designed residual wavefront aberration less than 0.001λ (RMS). The second transmitted method that is equipped with a technical flat surface coating by Ag film in the bottom of surface mirror under test, which form an auto-collimation optical system to eliminate the aberration. The Hindle-Simpson test that requires a larger meniscus lens to compensate the optical aberration, and the designed result of optical test system is less than 0.0016λ. Contrasting the CGH compensator and the second transmitted method, the Hindle-Simpson testing method has the advantage of it is easily to manufacture and adjust; meanwhile the test result is stable and has been less affected by the environment. It has been found that the method is rational and reliable, and it can fulfill the requirement of manufacturing and testing process for hyperboloid convex mirrors.

  10. CPU timing routines for a CONVEX C220 computer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bynum, Mary Ann

    1989-01-01

    The timing routines available on the CONVEX C220 computer system in the Structural Mechanics Division (SMD) at NASA Langley Research Center are examined. The function of the timing routines, the use of the timing routines in sequential, parallel, and vector code, and the interpretation of the results from the timing routines with respect to the CONVEX model of computing are described. The timing routines available on the SMD CONVEX fall into two groups. The first group includes standard timing routines generally available with UNIX 4.3 BSD operating systems, while the second group includes routines unique to the SMD CONVEX. The standard timing routines described in this report are /bin/csh time,/bin/time, etime, and ctime. The routines unique to the SMD CONVEX are getinfo, second, cputime, toc, and a parallel profiling package made up of palprof, palinit, and palsum.

  11. Fabrication of ф 160 mm convex hyperbolic mirror for remote sensing instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Ching-Hsiang; Yu, Zong-Ru; Ho, Cheng-Fang; Hsu, Wei-Yao; Chen, Fong-Zhi

    2012-10-01

    In this study, efficient polishing processes with inspection procedures for a large convex hyperbolic mirror of Cassegrain optical system are presented. The polishing process combines the techniques of conventional lapping and CNC polishing. We apply the conventional spherical lapping process to quickly remove the sub-surface damage (SSD) layer caused by grinding process and to get the accurate radius of best-fit sphere (BFS) of aspheric surface with fine surface texture simultaneously. Thus the removed material for aspherization process can be minimized and the polishing time for SSD removal can also be reduced substantially. The inspection procedure was carried out by using phase shift interferometer with CGH and stitching technique. To acquire the real surface form error of each sub aperture, the wavefront errors of the reference flat and CGH flat due to gravity effect of the vertical setup are calibrated in advance. Subsequently, we stitch 10 calibrated sub-aperture surface form errors to establish the whole irregularity of the mirror in 160 mm diameter for correction polishing. The final result of the In this study, efficient polishing processes with inspection procedures for a large convex hyperbolic mirror of Cassegrain optical system are presented. The polishing process combines the techniques of conventional lapping and CNC polishing. We apply the conventional spherical lapping process to quickly remove the sub-surface damage (SSD) layer caused by grinding process and to get the accurate radius of best-fit sphere (BFS) of aspheric surface with fine surface texture simultaneously. Thus the removed material for aspherization process can be minimized and the polishing time for SSD removal can also be reduced substantially. The inspection procedure was carried out by using phase shift interferometer with CGH and stitching technique. To acquire the real surface form error of each sub aperture, the wavefront errors of the reference flat and CGH flat due to

  12. A scalable projective scaling algorithm for l(p) loss with convex penalizations.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hongbo; Cheng, Qiang

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents an accurate, efficient, and scalable algorithm for minimizing a special family of convex functions, which have a lp loss function as an additive component. For this problem, well-known learning algorithms often have well-established results on accuracy and efficiency, but there exists rarely any report on explicit linear scalability with respect to the problem size. The proposed approach starts with developing a second-order learning procedure with iterative descent for general convex penalization functions, and then builds efficient algorithms for a restricted family of functions, which satisfy the Karmarkar's projective scaling condition. Under this condition, a light weight, scalable message passing algorithm (MPA) is further developed by constructing a series of simpler equivalent problems. The proposed MPA is intrinsically scalable because it only involves matrix-vector multiplication and avoids matrix inversion operations. The MPA is proven to be globally convergent for convex formulations; for nonconvex situations, it converges to a stationary point. The accuracy, efficiency, scalability, and applicability of the proposed method are verified through extensive experiments on sparse signal recovery, face image classification, and over-complete dictionary learning problems. PMID:25608289

  13. Fourth class of convex equilateral polyhedron with polyhedral symmetry related to fullerenes and viruses

    PubMed Central

    Schein, Stan; Gayed, James Maurice

    2014-01-01

    The three known classes of convex polyhedron with equal edge lengths and polyhedral symmetry––tetrahedral, octahedral, and icosahedral––are the 5 Platonic polyhedra, the 13 Archimedean polyhedra––including the truncated icosahedron or soccer ball––and the 2 rhombic polyhedra reported by Johannes Kepler in 1611. (Some carbon fullerenes, inorganic cages, icosahedral viruses, geodesic structures, and protein complexes resemble these fundamental shapes.) Here we add a fourth class, “Goldberg polyhedra,” which are also convex and equilateral. We begin by decorating each of the triangular facets of a tetrahedron, an octahedron, or an icosahedron with the T vertices and connecting edges of a “Goldberg triangle.” We obtain the unique set of internal angles in each planar face of each polyhedron by solving a system of n equations and n variables, where the equations set the dihedral angle discrepancy about different types of edge to zero, and the variables are a subset of the internal angles in 6gons. Like the faces in Kepler’s rhombic polyhedra, the 6gon faces in Goldberg polyhedra are equilateral and planar but not equiangular. We show that there is just a single tetrahedral Goldberg polyhedron, a single octahedral one, and a systematic, countable infinity of icosahedral ones, one for each Goldberg triangle. Unlike carbon fullerenes and faceted viruses, the icosahedral Goldberg polyhedra are nearly spherical. The reasoning and techniques presented here will enable discovery of still more classes of convex equilateral polyhedra with polyhedral symmetry. PMID:24516137

  14. General and mechanistic optimal relationships for tensile strength of doubly convex tablets under diametrical compression.

    PubMed

    Razavi, Sonia M; Gonzalez, Marcial; Cuitiño, Alberto M

    2015-04-30

    We propose a general framework for determining optimal relationships for tensile strength of doubly convex tablets under diametrical compression. This approach is based on the observation that tensile strength is directly proportional to the breaking force and inversely proportional to a non-linear function of geometric parameters and materials properties. This generalization reduces to the analytical expression commonly used for flat faced tablets, i.e., Hertz solution, and to the empirical relationship currently used in the pharmaceutical industry for convex-faced tablets, i.e., Pitt's equation. Under proper parametrization, optimal tensile strength relationship can be determined from experimental results by minimizing a figure of merit of choice. This optimization is performed under the first-order approximation that a flat faced tablet and a doubly curved tablet have the same tensile strength if they have the same relative density and are made of the same powder, under equivalent manufacturing conditions. Furthermore, we provide a set of recommendations and best practices for assessing the performance of optimal tensile strength relationships in general. Based on these guidelines, we identify two new models, namely the general and mechanistic models, which are effective and predictive alternatives to the tensile strength relationship currently used in the pharmaceutical industry. PMID:25683146

  15. Insulated face brick

    SciTech Connect

    Cromrich, J.; Cromrich, L.B.

    1990-10-16

    This patent describes a method for forming insulated brick intended solely for use in building walls and having superior insulation qualities and lighter weight consonant with the load bearing capabilities of building bricks and the appearance of facing brick. It comprises dry mixing two parts of vermiculite and one part of brick clay, thereby forming a dry mixture having a vermiculite to clay ratio of approximately two-to-one by volume; adding water to the dry mixture and mixing, so that a substantially dry admixture having expanded vermiculite and brick clay is formed; forming a facing layer solely from brick clay; molding and compressing the substantially dry admixture, so as to form a generally rectangular main body layer having parallel top and bottom faces, a pair of parallel side faces and a pair of parallel end faces, respectively, the top and bottom faces being substantially larger in area than the respective side faces, and the side faces being substantially larger in area than the respective end faces, the body layer further having at least one bore formed therein, the bore running from the top face to the bottom face perpendicularly thereto and substantially parallel to the side surfaces thereof, the bore being substantially centrally disposed and wherein the facing layer is disposed on one of the side surfaces of the body portion; curing the molded admixture having the facing layer disposed thereon; whereby a cured brick is formed; and firing the cured brick and the facing layer disposed thereon, whereby an integral brick is formed having top and bottom faces of the brick which are entirely devoid of facing layers, wherein the brick has the desired load bearing capability substantially between its top and bottom faces, whereby the outer facing layer only provides the desired appearance and weather resistance, and further whereby the weight of the brick is substantially reduced.

  16. Faceted Gold Nanorods: Nanocuboids, Convex Nanocuboids, and Concave Nanocuboids.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingfeng; Zhou, Yadong; Villarreal, Esteban; Lin, Ye; Zou, Shengli; Wang, Hui

    2015-06-10

    Au nanorods are optically tunable anisotropic nanoparticles with built-in catalytic activities. The state-of-the-art seed-mediated nanorod synthesis offers excellent control over the aspect ratios of cylindrical Au nanorods, which enables fine-tuning of plasmon resonances over a broad spectral range. However, facet control of Au nanorods with atomic-level precision remains significantly more challenging. The coexistence of various types of low-index and high-index facets on the highly curved nanorod surfaces makes it extremely challenging to quantitatively elucidate the atomic-level structure-property relationships that underpin the catalytic competence of Au nanorods. Here we demonstrate that cylindrical Au nanorods undergo controlled facet evolution during their overgrowth in the presence of Cu(2+) and cationic surfactants, resulting in the formation of anisotropic nanostructures enclosed by well-defined facets, such as low-index faceting nanocuboids and high-index faceting convex nanocuboids and concave nanocuboids. These faceted Au nanorods exhibit enriched optical extinction spectral features, broader plasmonic tuning range, and enhanced catalytic tunability in comparison to the conventional cylindrical Au nanorods. The capabilities to both fine-tailor the facets and fine-tune the plasmon resonances of anisotropic Au nanoparticles open up unique opportunities for us to study, in great detail, the facet-dependent interfacial molecular transformations on Au nanocatalysts using surface-enhanced Raman scattering as a time-resolved spectroscopic tool. PMID:25927399

  17. Nonparametric illumination correction for scanned document images via convex hulls.

    PubMed

    Meng, Gaofeng; Xiang, Shiming; Zheng, Nanning; Pan, Chunhong

    2013-07-01

    A scanned image of an opened book page often suffers from various scanning artifacts known as scanning shading and dark borders noises. These artifacts will degrade the qualities of the scanned images and cause many problems to the subsequent process of document image analysis. In this paper, we propose an effective method to rectify these scanning artifacts. Our method comes from two observations: that the shading surface of most scanned book pages is quasi-concave and that the document contents are usually printed on a sheet of plain and bright paper. Based on these observations, a shading image can be accurately extracted via convex hulls-based image reconstruction. The proposed method proves to be surprisingly effective for image shading correction and dark borders removal. It can restore a desired shading-free image and meanwhile yield an illumination surface of high quality. More importantly, the proposed method is nonparametric and thus does not involve any user interactions or parameter fine-tuning. This would make it very appealing to nonexpert users in applications. Extensive experiments based on synthetic and real-scanned document images demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed method. PMID:23681999

  18. Convex Image Orientation from Relative Orientations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reich, M.; Heipke, C.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we propose a novel workflow for the estimation of global image orientations given relative orientations between pairs of overlapping images. Our approach is convex and independent on initial values. First, global rotations are estimated in a relaxed semidefinite program (SDP) and refined in an iterative least squares adjustment in the tangent space of SO(3). A critical aspect is the handling of outliers in the relative orientations. We present a novel heuristic graph based approach for filtering the relative rotations that outperforms state-of-the-art robust rotation averaging algorithms. In a second part we make use of point-observations, tracked over a set of overlapping images and formulate a linear homogeneous system of equations to transfer the scale information between triplets of images, using estimated global rotations and relative translation directions. The final step consists of refining the orientation parameters in a robust bundle adjustment. The proposed approach handles outliers in the homologous points and relative orientations in every step of the processing chain. We demonstrate the robustness of the procedure on synthetic data. Moreover, the performance of our approach is illustrated on real world benchmark data.

  19. Entropy and convexity for nonlinear partial differential equations

    PubMed Central

    Ball, John M.; Chen, Gui-Qiang G.

    2013-01-01

    Partial differential equations are ubiquitous in almost all applications of mathematics, where they provide a natural mathematical description of many phenomena involving change in physical, chemical, biological and social processes. The concept of entropy originated in thermodynamics and statistical physics during the nineteenth century to describe the heat exchanges that occur in the thermal processes in a thermodynamic system, while the original notion of convexity is for sets and functions in mathematics. Since then, entropy and convexity have become two of the most important concepts in mathematics. In particular, nonlinear methods via entropy and convexity have been playing an increasingly important role in the analysis of nonlinear partial differential equations in recent decades. This opening article of the Theme Issue is intended to provide an introduction to entropy, convexity and related nonlinear methods for the analysis of nonlinear partial differential equations. We also provide a brief discussion about the content and contributions of the papers that make up this Theme Issue. PMID:24249768

  20. Non-parametric Single View Reconstruction of Curved Objects Using Convex Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oswald, Martin R.; Töppe, Eno; Kolev, Kalin; Cremers, Daniel

    We propose a convex optimization framework delivering intuitive and reasonable 3D meshes from a single photograph. For a given input image, the user can quickly obtain a segmentation of the object in question. Our algorithm then automatically generates an admissible closed surface of arbitrary topology without the requirement of tedious user input. Moreover we provide a tool by which the user is able to interactively modify the result afterwards through parameters and simple operations in a 2D image space. The algorithm targets a limited but relevant class of real world objects. The object silhouette and the additional user input enter a functional which can be optimized globally in a few seconds using recently developed convex relaxation techniques parallelized on state-of-the-art graphics hardware.

  1. Convex Lens-induced Confinement to Visualize Biopolymers and Interaction Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stabile, Frank; Berard, Daniel; Henkin, Gil; Shayegan, Marjan; Michaud, François; Leslie, Sabrina

    In this poster, we present a versatile CLiC (Convex Lens-induced Confinement) microscopy system to access a broad range of biopolymer visualization and interaction parameters. In the CLiC technique, the curved surface of a convex lens is used to deform a flexible coverslip above a glass substrate, creating a nanoscale gap that can be tuned during an experiment to load and confine molecules into nanoscale features, both linear and circular, embedded in the bottom substrate. We demonstrate and characterize massively parallel DNA nanochannel-based stretching, building on prior work. Further, we demonstrate controlled insertion of reagent molecules within the CLiC imaging chamber. We visualize real-time reaction dynamics of nanoconfined species, including dye/DNA intercalation and DNA/DNA ligation reactions, demonstrating the versatility of this nanoscale microscopy platform.

  2. Application of Analytical Model of the Electric Potential Distribution for Calculation of Charged Particle Dynamics in a Near-Wall Layer and Sputtering of the Plasma Facing Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borodkina, I. E.; Komm, M.; Tsvetkov, I. V.

    2015-08-01

    Simple analytical formulas are derived for calculation of the electric field potential distribution in the magnetic pre-layer and the Debye layer near the plasma facing surfaces. It is shown that the calculated potential profiles are in good agreement with the dependences of the potential distribution on the magnetic field inclination obtained by solving the magnetic hydrodynamic (MHD) equations and modeling using the PIC code SPICE2. Dependences of the angular distribution of ions incident on the surface of plasma facing elements on the magnetic field inclination are obtained. Results of calculations demonstrate that the surface areas, on which the magnetic field is incident at sliding angles, are critical from the viewpoint of the increase of sputtering.

  3. Shape recognition: convexities, concavities and things in between.

    PubMed

    Schmidtmann, Gunnar; Jennings, Ben J; Kingdom, Frederick A A

    2015-01-01

    Visual objects are effortlessly recognized from their outlines, largely irrespective of viewpoint. Previous studies have drawn different conclusions regarding the importance to shape recognition of specific shape features such as convexities and concavities. However, most studies employed familiar objects, or shapes without curves, and did not measure shape recognition across changes in scale and position. We present a novel set of random shapes with well-defined convexities, concavities and inflections (intermediate points), segmented to isolate each feature type. Observers matched the segmented reference shapes to one of two subsequently presented whole-contour shapes (target or distractor) that were re-scaled and re-positioned. For very short segment lengths, performance was significantly higher for convexities than for concavities or intermediate points and for convexities remained constant with increasing segment length. For concavities and intermediate points, performance improved with increasing segment length, reaching convexity performance only for long segments. No significant differences between concavities and intermediates were found. These results show for the first time that closed curvilinear shapes are encoded using the positions of convexities, rather than concavities or intermediate regions. A shape-template model with no free parameters gave an excellent account of the data. PMID:26598139

  4. Object perception and masking: contributions of sides and convexities.

    PubMed

    Poirier, Frédéric J A M; Wilson, Hugh R

    2007-10-01

    Object perception uses a variety of visual cues, including shape cues derived from sides and convexities. Two recent masking studies using radial frequency patterns have argued, respectively, for a predominant role of convexity [Habak, C., Wilkinson, F., Zakher, B., & Wilson, H. R. (2004). Curvature population coding for complex shapes in human vision. Vision Research, 44 (24), 2815-2823] or side information [Hess, R. F., Wang, Y. -Z., & Dakin, S. C. (1999). Are judgements of circularity local or global? Vision Research, 39, 4354-4360]. Here we resolve the controversy by separating the masks into their parts (e.g., convexities and sides), and measuring the relative masking influences of the different mask components. We found that both side and convexity information contribute to masking. However, masking due to side information was much less dependent on alignment compared to masking due to convexities. This supports a theory where convexities constitute a prime source of information for shape processing, and sides do also contribute but to a smaller extent. PMID:17889924

  5. Shape recognition: convexities, concavities and things in between

    PubMed Central

    Schmidtmann, Gunnar; Jennings, Ben J.; Kingdom, Frederick A. A.

    2015-01-01

    Visual objects are effortlessly recognized from their outlines, largely irrespective of viewpoint. Previous studies have drawn different conclusions regarding the importance to shape recognition of specific shape features such as convexities and concavities. However, most studies employed familiar objects, or shapes without curves, and did not measure shape recognition across changes in scale and position. We present a novel set of random shapes with well-defined convexities, concavities and inflections (intermediate points), segmented to isolate each feature type. Observers matched the segmented reference shapes to one of two subsequently presented whole-contour shapes (target or distractor) that were re-scaled and re-positioned. For very short segment lengths, performance was significantly higher for convexities than for concavities or intermediate points and for convexities remained constant with increasing segment length. For concavities and intermediate points, performance improved with increasing segment length, reaching convexity performance only for long segments. No significant differences between concavities and intermediates were found. These results show for the first time that closed curvilinear shapes are encoded using the positions of convexities, rather than concavities or intermediate regions. A shape-template model with no free parameters gave an excellent account of the data. PMID:26598139

  6. Face pain

    MedlinePlus

    Face pain may be dull and throbbing or an intense, stabbing discomfort in the face or forehead. It can occur in one or ... Pain that starts in the face may be caused by a nerve problem, injury, or infection. Face pain may also begin in other places in the body. ...

  7. Surface aggregation of urinary proteins and aspartic acid-rich peptides on the faces of calcium oxalate monohydrate investigated by in situ force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, M L; Qiu, S R; Hoyer, J R; Casey, W H; Nancollas, G H; De Yoreo, J J

    2008-05-28

    The growth of calcium oxalate monohydrate in the presence of Tamm-Horsfall protein (THP), osteopontin (OPN), and the 27-residue synthetic peptides (DDDS){sub 6}DDD and (DDDG){sub 6}DDD [where D = aspartic acid and X = S (serine) or G (glycine)] was investigated via in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results show that these three growth modulators create extensive deposits on the crystal faces. Depending on the modulator and crystal face, these deposits can occur as discrete aggregates, filamentary structures, or uniform coatings. These proteinaceous films can lead to either the inhibition or increase of the step speeds (with respect to the impurity-free system) depending on a range of factors that include peptide or protein concentration, supersaturation and ionic strength. While THP and the linear peptides act, respectively, to exclusively increase and inhibit growth on the (-101) face, both exhibit dual functionality on the (010) face, inhibiting growth at low supersaturation or high modulator concentration and accelerating growth at high supersaturation or low modulator concentration. Based on analyses of growth morphologies and dependencies of step speeds on supersaturation and protein or peptide concentration, we argue for a picture of growth modulation that accounts for the observations in terms of the strength of binding to the surfaces and steps and the interplay of electrostatic and solvent-induced forces at crystal surface.

  8. Vergence and facing patterns in large-scale sheath folds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsop, G. I.; Holdsworth, R. E.

    1999-10-01

    The careful geometric analysis of minor structural detail elucidates the relationships and evolution of associated large-scale curvilinear hinge geometries, developed during WNW-directed Caledonian thrusting exposed in Neoproterozoic Moine psammites of the Moine Nappe. Reversals in the polarity of structural facing associated with minor folding, mark the position of major sheath folds which parallel transport. Upwardly convex sheaths (closing in the direction of thrust transport) cored by older gneissose basement inliers are termed culminations, whilst those opening in the transport direction (and cored by Moine psammites) are termed depressions. Sheath folds are bisected by transport parallel and foliation normal (culmination/depression) surfaces which separate not only the reversals in facing, but also delineate zones of minor fold hinge obliquity into clockwise and anticlockwise domains relative to the transport direction. The sense of obliquity of minor Z and S folds is thus dependent on position with respect to the surfaces of culmination and depression and not the fold axial surfaces. Surfaces of culmination and depression may be superimposed on original overturned antiformal and synformal folds to produce a variety of dome (culmination on antiform), saddle (depression on antiform), inverted saddle (culmination on synform) and basin (depression on synform) configurations. The curvilinear hinges of minor folds may also be asymmetrical about the transport direction and within the plane of the regional foliation to define patterns of fold hinge-line vergence. Classical concepts of fold limb vergence may thus relate to larger antiformal and synformal hinges, whilst the fold hinge-line vergence defines major curvilinear hinges associated with culminations and depressions. Major sheath folds may therefore be interpreted in terms of both minor fold hinge-line and limb vergence, coupled with fold axis obliquity and reversals in the polarity of structural facing. The

  9. The Knaster-Kuratowski-Mazurkiewicz theorem and abstract convexities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cain, George L., Jr.; González, Luis

    2008-02-01

    The Knaster-Kuratowski-Mazurkiewicz covering theorem (KKM), is the basic ingredient in the proofs of many so-called "intersection" theorems and related fixed point theorems (including the famous Brouwer fixed point theorem). The KKM theorem was extended from Rn to Hausdorff linear spaces by Ky Fan. There has subsequently been a plethora of attempts at extending the KKM type results to arbitrary topological spaces. Virtually all these involve the introduction of some sort of abstract convexity structure for a topological space, among others we could mention H-spaces and G-spaces. We have introduced a new abstract convexity structure that generalizes the concept of a metric space with a convex structure, introduced by E. Michael in [E. Michael, Convex structures and continuous selections, Canad. J. MathE 11 (1959) 556-575] and called a topological space endowed with this structure an M-space. In an article by Shie Park and Hoonjoo Kim [S. Park, H. Kim, Coincidence theorems for admissible multifunctions on generalized convex spaces, J. Math. Anal. Appl. 197 (1996) 173-187], the concepts of G-spaces and metric spaces with Michael's convex structure, were mentioned together but no kind of relationship was shown. In this article, we prove that G-spaces and M-spaces are close related. We also introduce here the concept of an L-space, which is inspired in the MC-spaces of J.V. Llinares [J.V. Llinares, Unified treatment of the problem of existence of maximal elements in binary relations: A characterization, J. Math. Econom. 29 (1998) 285-302], and establish relationships between the convexities of these spaces with the spaces previously mentioned.

  10. Dissolution of quartz in aqueous basic solution, 106-236 C - Surface kinetics of 'perfect' crystallographic faces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gratz, Andrew J.; Bird, Peter; Quiro, Glenn B.

    1990-01-01

    A highly accurate method, called the negative crystal method, for determining the rate of dissolution on specific crystallographic faces of crystals was developed, in which the dissolution rates of nominally perfect crystal faces are obtained by measuring the size of individual negative crystals during a sequence of dissolution steps. The method was applied to determine the apparent activation energy and rate constants for the dissolution of quartz in 0.01 M KOH solutions at temperatures from 106 to 236 C. Also investigated were the effects of hydroxyl activity and ionic strength. The apparent activation energies for the dissolution of the prism and of the rhomb were determined.

  11. Accurate interface normal and curvature estimates on three-dimensional unstructured non-convex polyhedral meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivey, Christopher B.; Moin, Parviz

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a framework for extending the height-function technique for the calculation of interface normals and curvatures to unstructured non-convex polyhedral meshes with application to the piecewise-linear interface calculation volume-of-fluid method. The methodology is developed with reference to a collocated node-based finite-volume two-phase flow solver that utilizes the median-dual mesh, requiring a set of data structures and algorithms for non-convex polyhedral operations: truncation of a polyhedron by a plane, intersection of two polyhedra, joining of two convex polyhedra, volume enforcement of a polyhedron by a plane, and volume fraction initialization by a signed-distance function. By leveraging these geometric tools, a geometric interpolation strategy for embedding structured height-function stencils in unstructured meshes is developed. The embedded height-function technique is tested on surfaces with known interface normals and curvatures, namely cylinder, sphere, and ellipsoid. Tests are performed on the median duals of a uniform cartesian mesh, a wedge mesh, and a tetrahedral mesh, and comparisons are made with conventional methods. Across the tests, the embedded height-function technique outperforms contemporary methods and its accuracy approaches the accuracy that the traditional height-function technique exemplifies on uniform cartesian meshes.

  12. Convexity Bias and Perspective Cues in the Reverse-Perspective Illusion

    PubMed Central

    Papathomas, Thomas V.; Vlajnic, Vanja M.

    2016-01-01

    The present experiment was designed to examine the roles of painted linear perspective cues, and the convexity bias that are known to influence human observers’ perception of three-dimensional (3D) objects and scenes. Reverse-perspective stimuli were used to elicit a depth-inversion illusion, in which far points on the stimulus appear to be closer than near points and vice versa, with a 2 (Type of stimulus) × 2 (Fixation mark position) design. To study perspective, two types of stimuli were used: a version with painted linear perspective cues and a version with blank (unpainted) surfaces. To examine the role of convexity, two locations were used for the fixation mark: either in a locally convex or a locally concave part of each stimulus (painted and unpainted versions). Results indicated that the reverse-perspective illusion was stronger when the stimulus contained strong perspective cues and when observers fixated a locally concave region within the scene. PMID:27482372

  13. Direct single-layered fabrication of 3D concavo convex patterns in nano-stereolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, T. W.; Park, S. H.; Yang, D. Y.; Kong, H. J.; Lee, K. S.

    2006-09-01

    A nano-surfacing process (NSP) is proposed to directly fabricate three-dimensional (3D) concavo convex-shaped microstructures such as micro-lens arrays using two-photon polymerization (TPP), a promising technique for fabricating arbitrary 3D highly functional micro-devices. In TPP, commonly utilized methods for fabricating complex 3D microstructures to date are based on a layer-by-layer accumulating technique employing two-dimensional sliced data derived from 3D computer-aided design data. As such, this approach requires much time and effort for precise fabrication. In this work, a novel single-layer exposure method is proposed in order to improve the fabricating efficiency for 3D concavo convex-shaped microstructures. In the NSP, 3D microstructures are divided into 13 sub-regions horizontally with consideration of the heights. Those sub-regions are then expressed as 13 characteristic colors, after which a multi-voxel matrix (MVM) is composed with the characteristic colors. Voxels with various heights and diameters are generated to construct 3D structures using a MVM scanning method. Some 3D concavo convex-shaped microstructures were fabricated to estimate the usefulness of the NSP, and the results show that it readily enables the fabrication of single-layered 3D microstructures.

  14. Convexity Bias and Perspective Cues in the Reverse-Perspective Illusion.

    PubMed

    Dobias, Joshua J; Papathomas, Thomas V; Vlajnic, Vanja M

    2016-01-01

    The present experiment was designed to examine the roles of painted linear perspective cues, and the convexity bias that are known to influence human observers' perception of three-dimensional (3D) objects and scenes. Reverse-perspective stimuli were used to elicit a depth-inversion illusion, in which far points on the stimulus appear to be closer than near points and vice versa, with a 2 (Type of stimulus) × 2 (Fixation mark position) design. To study perspective, two types of stimuli were used: a version with painted linear perspective cues and a version with blank (unpainted) surfaces. To examine the role of convexity, two locations were used for the fixation mark: either in a locally convex or a locally concave part of each stimulus (painted and unpainted versions). Results indicated that the reverse-perspective illusion was stronger when the stimulus contained strong perspective cues and when observers fixated a locally concave region within the scene. PMID:27482372

  15. How do changes to plate thickness, length, and face-connectivity affect femoral cancellous bone's density and surface area? An investigation using regular cellular models.

    PubMed

    Anderson, I A; Carman, J B

    2000-03-01

    Models of regular cellular-solids representing femoral head 'medial group' bone were used to (1) compare thickness data for plate-like and beam-like structures at realistic surface areas and densities; (2) test the validity of a standard formula for trabecular thickness (Tb.Th); and (3) study how systematic changes in cancellous bone thicknesses, spacing, and face-connectivity affect relative density and surface area. Models of different face-connectivities, produced by plate removal from the unit cell, were fitted to bone density and surface area data. The medial group bone was anisotropic: the supero-inferior (SI) direction was the principal direction for bone plate alignment and the plane normal to this had the largest number of bone/void intersections per unit line length (P(I)). A comparison of boundary perimeter per unit area data, in planes normal to SI, with surface area data placed the medial group bone between prismatic structures in which walls are parallel to one principal direction and isotropic structures. Selective removal of plates from a closed-cell model produced a similar result. For the same relative density and surface-area, plate-like models had significantly thinner cross-sections than beam-like models. The formula for Tb.Th produced overestimates of model plate thickness by up to 20% at realistic femoral cancellous densities. Trends in data on surface area to volume ratio and density observed on sampled medial group bone could be simulated by plate thickness changes on models of intermediate face-connectivity (approximately 1.5) or by plate removal from models with relatively thick and short (low aspect-ratio) plates. The latter mechanism is unrealistic for it resulted in beam-like structures at low 'medial group' densities, an architecture unlike the predominantly plate-like bone in the sample. PMID:10673116

  16. Verification of surface polarity of O-face ZnO(0 0 0 1\\OverBar) by quantitative modeling analysis of Auger electron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, C. W.; Huang, M. S.; Tsai, T. H.; Chang, S. C.

    2012-12-01

    Is crystalline ZnO(0 0 0 1¯) O-face surface believed to be enriched by Zn atoms? This study may get the answer. We proposed a simplified model to simulate surface concentration ratio on (0 0 0 1¯)-O or (0 0 0 1)-Zn surface based on the hard-sphere model. The simulation ratio was performed by integrating electron signals from the assumed Auger emission, in which the electron mean free path and relative atomic layer arrangements inside the different polarity ZnO crystal surface were considered as relevant parameters. After counting more than 100 experimental observations of Zn/O ratios, the high frequency peak ratio was found at around 0.428, which was near the value predicted by the proposed model using the IMFP database. The ratio larger than the peak value corresponds to that observed in the annealed samples. A downward trend of the ratio evaluated on the post-sputtering sample indicates the possibility of a Zn-enriched phase appearing on the annealed O-face surface. This phenomenon can further elucidate the O-deficiency debate on most ZnO materials.

  17. Diffractive analysis of circular computer-generated hologram for convex aspheric test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hua

    2015-11-01

    Convex aspheric surface is tested by a circular amplitude computer-generated hologram (CGH) fabricated with our equipment and techniques, and much research work has been done simultaneously. However, the analysis of the detailed characters of the CGH used in the test system has not been systematically given in detail, including the correct phase, amplitude, and filter condition of the CGH. The calculation equation of the proper duty circle and the phase of the CGH are deduced, the frequency filter condition of the different diffracted orders of the CGH is demonstrated, and the deduction results are validated by the related experiment. The conclusion can help us to determine the radius ratio of the uncontrolled area over the full aperture of the aspheric surface during the process of optical system design, and it also points out that the radius ratio can be reduced by adjusting the radius of curvature of the reference surface and the distance between the reference surface and the convex aspheric surface. The work can assist us in designing the test system efficiently and correctly with CGH.

  18. Game Face

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiner, Jill

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses "Game Face: Life Lessons Across the Curriculum", a teaching kit that challenges assumptions and builds confidence. Game Face, which is derived from a book and art exhibition, "Game Face: What Does a Female Athlete Look Like?", uses layered and powerful images of women and girls participating in sports to teach…

  19. Non-deterministic fatigue life analysis using convex set models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, WenCai; Yang, ZiChun; Li, KunFeng

    2013-04-01

    The non-probabilistic approach to fatigue life analysis was studied using the convex models—interval, ellipsoidal and multi-convex models. The lower and upper bounds of the fatigue life were obtained by using the second-order Taylor series and Lagrange multiplier method. The solving process for derivatives of the implicit life function was presented. Moreover, a median ellipsoidal model was proposed which can take into account the sample blind zone and almost impossibility of concurrence of some small probability events. The Monte Carlo method for multi-convex model was presented, an important alternative when the analytical method does not work. A project example was given. The feasibility and rationality of the presented approach were verified. It is also revealed that the proposed method is conservative compared to the traditional probabilistic method, but it is a useful complement when it is difficult to obtain the accurate probability densities of parameters.

  20. Design of quasi-phasematching gratings via convex optimization.

    PubMed

    Phillips, C R; Gallmann, L; Fejer, M M

    2013-04-22

    We propose a new approach to quasi-phasematching (QPM) design based on convex optimization. We show that with this approach, globally optimum solutions to several important QPM design problems can be determined. The optimization framework is highly versatile, enabling the user to trade-off different objectives and constraints according to the particular application. The convex problems presented consist of simple objective and constraint functions involving a few thousand variables, and can therefore be solved quite straightforwardly. We consider three examples: (1) synthesis of a target pulse profile via difference frequency generation (DFG) from two ultrashort input pulses, (2) the design of a custom DFG transfer function, and (3) a new approach enabling the suppression of spectral gain narrowing in chirped-QPM-based optical parametric chirped pulse amplification (OPCPA). These examples illustrate the power and versatility of convex optimization in the context of QPM devices. PMID:23609719

  1. Worst case estimation of homology design by convex analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshikawa, N.; Elishakoff, Isaac; Nakagiri, S.

    1998-01-01

    The methodology of homology design is investigated for optimum design of advanced structures. for which the achievement of delicate tasks by the aid of active control system is demanded. The proposed formulation of homology design, based on the finite element sensitivity analysis, necessarily requires the specification of external loadings. The formulation to evaluate the worst case for homology design caused by uncertain fluctuation of loadings is presented by means of the convex model of uncertainty, in which uncertainty variables are assigned to discretized nodal forces and are confined within a conceivable convex hull given as a hyperellipse. The worst case of the distortion from objective homologous deformation is estimated by the Lagrange multiplier method searching the point to maximize the error index on the boundary of the convex hull. The validity of the proposed method is demonstrated in a numerical example using the eleven-bar truss structure.

  2. Entanglement Quantification Made Easy: Polynomial Measures Invariant under Convex Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regula, Bartosz; Adesso, Gerardo

    2016-02-01

    Quantifying entanglement in composite systems is a fundamental challenge, yet exact results are available in only a few special cases. This is because hard optimization problems are routinely involved, such as finding the convex decomposition of a mixed state with the minimal average pure-state entanglement, the so-called convex roof. We show that under certain conditions such a problem becomes trivial. Precisely, we prove by a geometric argument that polynomial entanglement measures of degree 2 are independent of the choice of pure-state decomposition of a mixed state, when the latter has only one pure unentangled state in its range. This allows for the analytical evaluation of convex roof extended entanglement measures in classes of rank-2 states obeying such a condition. We give explicit examples for the square root of the three-tangle in three-qubit states, and we show that several representative classes of four-qubit pure states have marginals that enjoy this property.

  3. Point-in-convex polygon and point-in-convex polyhedron algorithms with O(1) complexity using space subdivision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skala, Vaclav

    2016-06-01

    There are many space subdivision and space partitioning techniques used in many algorithms to speed up computations. They mostly rely on orthogonal space subdivision, resp. using hierarchical data structures, e.g. BSP trees, quadtrees, octrees, kd-trees, bounding volume hierarchies etc. However in some applications a non-orthogonal space subdivision can offer new ways for actual speed up. In the case of convex polygon in E2 a simple Point-in-Polygon test is of the O(N) complexity and the optimal algorithm is of O(log N) computational complexity. In the E3 case, the complexity is O(N) even for the convex polyhedron as no ordering is defined. New Point-in-Convex Polygon and Point-in-Convex Polyhedron algorithms are presented based on space subdivision in the preprocessing stage resulting to O(1) run-time complexity. The presented approach is simple to implement. Due to the principle of duality, dual problems, e.g. line-convex polygon, line clipping, can be solved in a similarly.

  4. Interpolation Error Estimates for Mean Value Coordinates over Convex Polygons.

    PubMed

    Rand, Alexander; Gillette, Andrew; Bajaj, Chandrajit

    2013-08-01

    In a similar fashion to estimates shown for Harmonic, Wachspress, and Sibson coordinates in [Gillette et al., AiCM, to appear], we prove interpolation error estimates for the mean value coordinates on convex polygons suitable for standard finite element analysis. Our analysis is based on providing a uniform bound on the gradient of the mean value functions for all convex polygons of diameter one satisfying certain simple geometric restrictions. This work makes rigorous an observed practical advantage of the mean value coordinates: unlike Wachspress coordinates, the gradient of the mean value coordinates does not become large as interior angles of the polygon approach π. PMID:24027379

  5. Interpolation Error Estimates for Mean Value Coordinates over Convex Polygons

    PubMed Central

    Rand, Alexander; Gillette, Andrew; Bajaj, Chandrajit

    2012-01-01

    In a similar fashion to estimates shown for Harmonic, Wachspress, and Sibson coordinates in [Gillette et al., AiCM, to appear], we prove interpolation error estimates for the mean value coordinates on convex polygons suitable for standard finite element analysis. Our analysis is based on providing a uniform bound on the gradient of the mean value functions for all convex polygons of diameter one satisfying certain simple geometric restrictions. This work makes rigorous an observed practical advantage of the mean value coordinates: unlike Wachspress coordinates, the gradient of the mean value coordinates does not become large as interior angles of the polygon approach π. PMID:24027379

  6. Laser micromilling of convex microfluidic channels onto glassy carbon for glass molding dies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Shih-Feng; Chen, Ming-Fei; Hsiao, Wen-Tse; Huang, Chien-Yao; Yang, Chung-Heng; Chen, Yu-Sheng

    2014-06-01

    This study reports the fabrication of convex microfluidic channels on glassy carbon using an ultraviolet laser processing system to produce glass molding dies. The laser processing parameters, including various laser fluences and scanning speeds of galvanometers, were adjusted to mill a convex microchannel on a glassy carbon substrate to identify the effects of material removal. The machined glassy carbon substrate was then applied as a glass molding die to fabricate a glass-based microfluidic biochip. The surface morphology, milled width and depth, and surface roughness of the microchannel die after laser micromilling were examined using a three-dimensional confocal laser scanning microscope. This study also investigates the transcription rate of microchannels after the glass molding process. To produce a 180 μm high microchannel on the GC substrate, the optimal number of milled cycles, laser fluence, and scanning speed were 25, 4.9 J/cm2, and 200 mm/s, respectively. The width, height, and surface roughness of milled convex microchannels were 119.6±0.217 μm, 180.26±0.01 μm, and 0.672±0.08 μm, respectively. These measured values were close to the predicted values and suitable for a glass molding die. After the glass molding process, a typical glass-based microchannel chip was formed at a molding temperature of 660 °C and the molding force of 0.45 kN. The transcription rates of the microchannel width and depth were 100% and 99.6%, respectively. Thus, the proposed approach is suitable for performing in chemical, biochemical, or medical reactions.

  7. Research into preparation and properties of graded cemented carbides with face center cubic-rich surface layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian; Deng, Xin; Gong, Manfeng; Liu, Wei; Wu, Shanghua

    2016-09-01

    This paper systematically investigated a set of functionally graded WC-TiC-Mo-Co cemented carbides with modified surface layer (called fcc-rich surface layer in this study), which is mainly composed of fcc phases (Ti(CN) and TiN) and WC. Nitridation at liquid phase sintering temperature is the key process making this fcc-rich surface layer. The functionally graded WC-TiC-Mo-Co cemented carbides synthesized in this study show 3 layer structure: the outer layer, i.e. the fcc-rich surface layer; the intermediate layer, which is characterized by abnormally large WC and high Co content; and the inner layer. It was found that TiC is the most critical component for the formation of fcc-rich surface layer. The higher content of TiC results in the thicker fcc-rich outer layer, higher (Ti(CN) and TiN) content in the outer layer, and higher hardness of the fcc-rich outer layer. The formation of this fcc-rich surface layer is mainly due to the nitridation process between Ti and N, which leads to the diffusion of Ti outwards (from the inside of the sample to the surface) and the subsequent migration of liquid cobalt inwards (from surface to the inside of the sample). The three-layer structure developed in this study provides the excellent combination of high wear resistance and high toughness, which is favorable for some applications.

  8. Use of a variable exposure photographic pyrometer to measure surface temperatures on a hemispherical-face model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantsios, A. G.; Henley, W. C., Jr.; Snow, W. L.

    1982-01-01

    The use of a photographic pyrometer for nonintrusive measurement of high temperature surfaces in a wind tunnel test is described. The advantages of the pyrometer for measuring surfaces whose unique shape makes use of thermocouples difficult are pointed out. The use of computer operated densitometers or optical processors for the data reduction is recommended.

  9. Parametric R-norm directed-divergence convex function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, Dhanesh; Kumar, Satish

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we define parametric R-norm directed-divergence convex function and discuss their special cases and prove some properties similar to Kullback-Leibler information measure. From R-norm divergence measure new information measures have also been derived and their relations with different measures of entropy have been obtained and give its application in industrial engineering.

  10. Systematization of problems on ball estimates of a convex compactum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudov, S. I.

    2015-09-01

    We consider a class of finite-dimensional problems on the estimation of a convex compactum by a ball of an arbitrary norm in the form of extremal problems whose goal function is expressed via the function of the distance to the farthest point of the compactum and the function of the distance to the nearest point of the compactum or its complement. Special attention is devoted to the problem of estimating (approximating) a convex compactum by a ball of fixed radius in the Hausdorff metric. It is proved that this problem plays the role of the canonical problem: solutions of any problem in the class under consideration can be expressed via solutions of this problem for certain values of the radius. Based on studying and using the properties of solutions of this canonical problem, we obtain ranges of values of the radius in which the canonical problem expresses solutions of the problems on inscribed and circumscribed balls, the problem of uniform estimate by a ball in the Hausdorff metric, the problem of asphericity of a convex body, the problems of spherical shells of the least thickness and of the least volume for the boundary of a convex body. This makes it possible to arrange the problems in increasing order of the corresponding values of the radius. Bibliography: 34 titles.

  11. NONPARAMETRIC ESTIMATION OF MULTIVARIATE CONVEX-TRANSFORMED DENSITIES

    PubMed Central

    Seregin, Arseni; Wellner, Jon A.

    2011-01-01

    We study estimation of multivariate densities p of the form p(x) = h(g(x)) for x ∈ ℝd and for a fixed monotone function h and an unknown convex function g. The canonical example is h(y) = e−y for y ∈ ℝ; in this case, the resulting class of densities P(e−y)={p=exp(−g):gis convex}is well known as the class of log-concave densities. Other functions h allow for classes of densities with heavier tails than the log-concave class. We first investigate when the maximum likelihood estimator p̂ exists for the class P(h) for various choices of monotone transformations h, including decreasing and increasing functions h. The resulting models for increasing transformations h extend the classes of log-convex densities studied previously in the econometrics literature, corresponding to h(y) = exp(y). We then establish consistency of the maximum likelihood estimator for fairly general functions h, including the log-concave class P(e−y) and many others. In a final section, we provide asymptotic minimax lower bounds for the estimation of p and its vector of derivatives at a fixed point x0 under natural smoothness hypotheses on h and g. The proofs rely heavily on results from convex analysis. PMID:21423877

  12. Preconditioning 2D Integer Data for Fast Convex Hull Computations.

    PubMed

    Cadenas, José Oswaldo; Megson, Graham M; Luengo Hendriks, Cris L

    2016-01-01

    In order to accelerate computing the convex hull on a set of n points, a heuristic procedure is often applied to reduce the number of points to a set of s points, s ≤ n, which also contains the same hull. We present an algorithm to precondition 2D data with integer coordinates bounded by a box of size p × q before building a 2D convex hull, with three distinct advantages. First, we prove that under the condition min(p, q) ≤ n the algorithm executes in time within O(n); second, no explicit sorting of data is required; and third, the reduced set of s points forms a simple polygonal chain and thus can be directly pipelined into an O(n) time convex hull algorithm. This paper empirically evaluates and quantifies the speed up gained by preconditioning a set of points by a method based on the proposed algorithm before using common convex hull algorithms to build the final hull. A speedup factor of at least four is consistently found from experiments on various datasets when the condition min(p, q) ≤ n holds; the smaller the ratio min(p, q)/n is in the dataset, the greater the speedup factor achieved. PMID:26938221

  13. Preconditioning 2D Integer Data for Fast Convex Hull Computations

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In order to accelerate computing the convex hull on a set of n points, a heuristic procedure is often applied to reduce the number of points to a set of s points, s ≤ n, which also contains the same hull. We present an algorithm to precondition 2D data with integer coordinates bounded by a box of size p × q before building a 2D convex hull, with three distinct advantages. First, we prove that under the condition min(p, q) ≤ n the algorithm executes in time within O(n); second, no explicit sorting of data is required; and third, the reduced set of s points forms a simple polygonal chain and thus can be directly pipelined into an O(n) time convex hull algorithm. This paper empirically evaluates and quantifies the speed up gained by preconditioning a set of points by a method based on the proposed algorithm before using common convex hull algorithms to build the final hull. A speedup factor of at least four is consistently found from experiments on various datasets when the condition min(p, q) ≤ n holds; the smaller the ratio min(p, q)/n is in the dataset, the greater the speedup factor achieved. PMID:26938221

  14. Electron work function and surface energy of body-centered and face-centered cubic modifications of 4 d- and 5 d-metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aref'eva, L. P.; Shebzukhova, I. G.

    2016-07-01

    A technique for the evaluation of the electron work function of metallic single crystals and the electron work function anisotropy has been developed in the framework of the electron-statistical method. The surface energy and the electron work function have been calculated for crystal faces of allotropic modifications of 4 d- and 5 d-metals. A change in the electron work function due to the allotropic transformations has been estimated, and the periodic dependence of the electron work function has been determined. It has been shown that the results obtained using the proposed technique correlate with the available experimental data for polycrystals.

  15. Face Painting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Diana

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the use of face painting as a technique for making the endangered species issue tangible for children while addressing the complexity of the issue. Children are "given" an animal of their own and are educated about the animal while having their faces painted to resemble the animal. (LZ)

  16. Double face sealing device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, Bruce C. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A double face sealing device for mounting between two surfaces to provide an airtight and fluid-tight seal between a closure member bearing one of the surfaces and a structure or housing bearing the other surface which extends around the opening or hatchway to be closed. The double face sealing device includes a plurality of sections or segments mounted to one of the surfaces, each having a main body portion, a pair of outwardly extending and diverging, cantilever, spring arms, and a pair of inwardly extending and diverging, cantilever, spring arms, an elastomeric cover on the distal, free, ends of the outwardly extending and diverging spring arms, and an elastomeric cover on the distal, free, ends of the inwardly extending and diverging spring arms. The double face sealing device has application or use in all environments requiring a seal, but is particularly useful to seal openings or hatchways between compartments of spacecraft or aircraft.

  17. Three-Dimensional Structure of a Simple Liquid at a Face-Centered-Cubic (001) Solid Surface Interface

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Luyao; Hu, Haibao; Wen, Jun; Sepri, Paavo; Luo, Kai

    2016-01-01

    A liquid in the vicinity of a solid-liquid interface (SLI) may exhibit complex structures. In this study, we used molecular dynamics simulations demonstrating for the first time that the liquid adjacent to the SLI can have a two-level structure in some cases: a major structure and a minor structure. Through a time-averaging process of molecular motions, we identified the type of the liquid structure by calculating positions of the maximum liquid density in three spatial dimensions, and these positions were found to distribute in many dispersed zones (called high-density zones (HDZs)). The major structure appears throughout the SLI, while the minor structure only occurs significantly within the third layer. Instead of the previously reported body-centered cubic (BCC) or face-centered-cubic (FCC) types, the major structure was found to show a body-centered tetragonal (BCT) type. The adjacent HDZs are connected by specific junctions, demonstrating that atoms diffuse along some particular high probability paths from one HDZ to another. By considering the three-dimensional liquid density distribution from the continuum point of view, more complete details of the structure and diffusive behavior of liquids in the SLI are also possible to be revealed. PMID:27430188

  18. Three-Dimensional Structure of a Simple Liquid at a Face-Centered-Cubic (001) Solid Surface Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Luyao; Hu, Haibao; Wen, Jun; Sepri, Paavo; Luo, Kai

    2016-07-01

    A liquid in the vicinity of a solid-liquid interface (SLI) may exhibit complex structures. In this study, we used molecular dynamics simulations demonstrating for the first time that the liquid adjacent to the SLI can have a two-level structure in some cases: a major structure and a minor structure. Through a time-averaging process of molecular motions, we identified the type of the liquid structure by calculating positions of the maximum liquid density in three spatial dimensions, and these positions were found to distribute in many dispersed zones (called high-density zones (HDZs)). The major structure appears throughout the SLI, while the minor structure only occurs significantly within the third layer. Instead of the previously reported body-centered cubic (BCC) or face-centered-cubic (FCC) types, the major structure was found to show a body-centered tetragonal (BCT) type. The adjacent HDZs are connected by specific junctions, demonstrating that atoms diffuse along some particular high probability paths from one HDZ to another. By considering the three-dimensional liquid density distribution from the continuum point of view, more complete details of the structure and diffusive behavior of liquids in the SLI are also possible to be revealed.

  19. Convex hull matching and hierarchical decomposition for multimodality medical image registration.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jian; Fan, Jingfan; Fu, Tianyu; Ai, Danni; Zhu, Jianjun; Li, Qin; Wang, Yongtian

    2015-01-01

    This study proposes a novel hierarchical pyramid strategy for 3D registration of multimodality medical images. The surfaces of the source and target volume data are first extracted, and the surface point clouds are then aligned roughly using convex hull matching. The convex hull matching registration procedure could align images with large-scale transformations. The original images are divided into blocks and the corresponding blocks in the two images are registered by affine and non-rigid registration procedures. The sub-blocks are iteratively smoothed by the Gaussian kernel with different sizes during the registration procedure. The registration result of the large kernel is taken as the input of the small kernel registration. The fine registration of the two volume data sets is achieved by iteratively increasing the number of blocks, in which increase in similarity measure is taken as a criterion for acceptation of each iteration level. Results demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed method in registering the multiple modalities of medical images. PMID:25882735

  20. Face pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... gets worse when you bend forward) Tic douloureux Temporomandibular joint dysfunction syndrome Sometimes the reason for the face pain ... is persistent, unexplained, or accompanied by other unexplained symptoms. Call your primary provider. What to Expect at ...

  1. On Rank One Convex Functions that are Homogeneous of Degree One

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchheim, Bernd; Kristensen, Jan

    2016-07-01

    We show that positively 1-homogeneous rank one convex functions are convex at 0 and at matrices of rank one. The result is a special case of an abstract convexity result that we establish for positively 1-homogeneous directionally convex functions defined on an open convex cone in a finite dimensional vector space. From these results we derive a number of consequences including various generalizations of the Ornstein L1 non inequalities. Most of the results were announced in ( C R Acad Sci Paris Ser I 349:407-409, 2011).

  2. Recognition of Graphs with Convex Quadratic Stability Number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco, Maria F.; Cardoso, Domingos M.

    2009-09-01

    A stable set of a graph is a set of mutually non-adjacent vertices. The determination of a maximum size stable set, which is called maximum stable set, and the determination of its size, which is called stability number, are central combinatorial optimization problems. However, given a nonnegative integer k, to determine if a graph G has a stable set of size k is NP-complete. In this paper we deal with graphs for which the stability number can be determined by solving a convex quadratic programming problem. Such graphs were introduced in [13] and are called graphs with convex-QP stability number. A few algorithmic techniques for the recognition of this type of graphs in particular families are presented.

  3. Delivering Sound Energy along an Arbitrary Convex Trajectory

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Sipei; Hu, Yuxiang; Lu, Jing; Qiu, Xiaojun; Cheng, Jianchun; Burnett, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Accelerating beams have attracted considerable research interest due to their peculiar properties and various applications. Although there have been numerous research on the generation and application of accelerating light beams, few results have been published on the generation of accelerating acoustic beams. Here we report on the experimental observation of accelerating acoustic beams along arbitrary convex trajectories. The desired trajectory is projected to the spatial phase profile on the boundary which is discretized and sampled spatially. The sound field distribution is formulated with the Green function and the integral equation method. Both the paraxial and the non-paraxial regimes are examined and observed in the experiments. The effect of obstacle scattering in the sound field is also investigated and the results demonstrate that the approach is robust against obstacle scattering. The realization of accelerating acoustic beams will have an impact on various applications where acoustic information and energy are required to be delivered along an arbitrary convex trajectory. PMID:25316353

  4. Shock wave reflection over convex and concave wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitade, M.; Kosugi, T.; Yada, K.; Takayama, Kazuyoshi

    2001-04-01

    It is well known that the transition criterion nearly agrees with the detachment criterion in the case of strong shocks, two-dimensional, and pseudosteady flow. However, when the shock wave diffracts over a wedge whose angle is below the detachment criterion, that is, in the domain of Mach reflection, precursory regular reflection (PRR) appears near the leading edge and as the shock wave propagates, the PRR is swept away by the overtaking corner signal (cs) that forces the transition to Mach reflection. It is clear that viscosity and thermal conductivity influences transition and the triple point trajectory. On the other hand, the reflection over concave and convex wedges is truly unsteady flow, and the effect of viscosity and thermal conductivity on transition and triple point trajectory has not been reported. This paper describes that influence of viscosity over convex and concave corners investigated both experiments and numerical simulations.

  5. A convex penalty for switching control of partial differential equations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Clason, Christian; Rund, Armin; Kunisch, Karl; Barnard, Richard C.

    2016-01-19

    A convex penalty for promoting switching controls for partial differential equations is introduced; such controls consist of an arbitrary number of components of which at most one should be simultaneously active. Using a Moreau–Yosida approximation, a family of approximating problems is obtained that is amenable to solution by a semismooth Newton method. In conclusion, the efficiency of this approach and the structure of the obtained controls are demonstrated by numerical examples.

  6. Convexity properties of images under nonlinear integral operators

    SciTech Connect

    Kokurin, M Yu

    2014-12-31

    Conditions are obtained for the image of a given set under a general completely continuous nonlinear integral operator to have convex closure. These results are used to establish the uniqueness of quasi-solutions of nonlinear integral equations of the first kind and to prove the solvability of equations of the first kind on a dense subset of the right-hand sides. Bibliography: 11 titles.

  7. Convex Clustering: An Attractive Alternative to Hierarchical Clustering

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gary K.; Chi, Eric C.; Ranola, John Michael O.; Lange, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    The primary goal in cluster analysis is to discover natural groupings of objects. The field of cluster analysis is crowded with diverse methods that make special assumptions about data and address different scientific aims. Despite its shortcomings in accuracy, hierarchical clustering is the dominant clustering method in bioinformatics. Biologists find the trees constructed by hierarchical clustering visually appealing and in tune with their evolutionary perspective. Hierarchical clustering operates on multiple scales simultaneously. This is essential, for instance, in transcriptome data, where one may be interested in making qualitative inferences about how lower-order relationships like gene modules lead to higher-order relationships like pathways or biological processes. The recently developed method of convex clustering preserves the visual appeal of hierarchical clustering while ameliorating its propensity to make false inferences in the presence of outliers and noise. The solution paths generated by convex clustering reveal relationships between clusters that are hidden by static methods such as k-means clustering. The current paper derives and tests a novel proximal distance algorithm for minimizing the objective function of convex clustering. The algorithm separates parameters, accommodates missing data, and supports prior information on relationships. Our program CONVEXCLUSTER incorporating the algorithm is implemented on ATI and nVidia graphics processing units (GPUs) for maximal speed. Several biological examples illustrate the strengths of convex clustering and the ability of the proximal distance algorithm to handle high-dimensional problems. CONVEXCLUSTER can be freely downloaded from the UCLA Human Genetics web site at http://www.genetics.ucla.edu/software/ PMID:25965340

  8. Constrained spacecraft reorientation using mixed integer convex programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, Margaret; Glenn Lightsey, E.

    2016-10-01

    A constrained attitude guidance (CAG) system is developed using convex optimization to autonomously achieve spacecraft pointing objectives while meeting the constraints imposed by on-board hardware. These constraints include bounds on the control input and slew rate, as well as pointing constraints imposed by the sensors. The pointing constraints consist of inclusion and exclusion cones that dictate permissible orientations of the spacecraft in order to keep objects in or out of the field of view of the sensors. The optimization scheme drives a body vector towards a target inertial vector along a trajectory that consists solely of permissible orientations in order to achieve the desired attitude for a given mission mode. The non-convex rotational kinematics are handled by discretization, which also ensures that the quaternion stays unity norm. In order to guarantee an admissible path, the pointing constraints are relaxed. Depending on how strict the pointing constraints are, the degree of relaxation is tuneable. The use of binary variables permits the inclusion of logical expressions in the pointing constraints in the case that a set of sensors has redundancies. The resulting mixed integer convex programming (MICP) formulation generates a steering law that can be easily integrated into an attitude determination and control (ADC) system. A sample simulation of the system is performed for the Bevo-2 satellite, including disturbance torques and actuator dynamics which are not modeled by the controller. Simulation results demonstrate the robustness of the system to disturbances while meeting the mission requirements with desirable performance characteristics.

  9. Stochastic Homogenization of Nonconvex Unbounded Integral Functionals with Convex Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duerinckx, Mitia; Gloria, Antoine

    2016-03-01

    We consider the well-trodden ground of the problem of the homogenization of random integral functionals. When the integrand has standard growth conditions, the qualitative theory is well-understood. When it comes to unbounded functionals, that is, when the domain of the integrand is not the whole space and may depend on the space-variable, there is no satisfactory theory. In this contribution we develop a complete qualitative stochastic homogenization theory for nonconvex unbounded functionals with convex growth. We first prove that if the integrand is convex and has p-growth from below (with p > d, the dimension), then it admits homogenization regardless of growth conditions from above. This result, that crucially relies on the existence and sublinearity at infinity of correctors, is also new in the periodic case. In the case of nonconvex integrands, we prove that a similar homogenization result holds provided that the nonconvex integrand admits a two-sided estimate by a convex integrand (the domain of which may depend on the space variable) that itself admits homogenization. This result is of interest to the rigorous derivation of rubber elasticity from polymer physics, which involves the stochastic homogenization of such unbounded functionals.

  10. Stochastic Homogenization of Nonconvex Unbounded Integral Functionals with Convex Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duerinckx, Mitia; Gloria, Antoine

    2016-09-01

    We consider the well-trodden ground of the problem of the homogenization of random integral functionals. When the integrand has standard growth conditions, the qualitative theory is well-understood. When it comes to unbounded functionals, that is, when the domain of the integrand is not the whole space and may depend on the space-variable, there is no satisfactory theory. In this contribution we develop a complete qualitative stochastic homogenization theory for nonconvex unbounded functionals with convex growth. We first prove that if the integrand is convex and has p-growth from below (with p > d, the dimension), then it admits homogenization regardless of growth conditions from above. This result, that crucially relies on the existence and sublinearity at infinity of correctors, is also new in the periodic case. In the case of nonconvex integrands, we prove that a similar homogenization result holds provided that the nonconvex integrand admits a two-sided estimate by a convex integrand (the domain of which may depend on the space variable) that itself admits homogenization. This result is of interest to the rigorous derivation of rubber elasticity from polymer physics, which involves the stochastic homogenization of such unbounded functionals.

  11. Designing null phase screens to test a fast plano-convex aspheric lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DelOlmo-Márquez, Jesús; Castán-Ricaño, Diana; Avendaño-Alejo, Maximino; Díaz-Uribe, Rufino

    2015-08-01

    We have obtained a formula to represent the wavefront produced by a plano-convex aspheric lens with symmetry of revolution considering a plane wavefront propagating parallel to the optical axis and impinging on the refracting surface, it is called a zero-distance phase front, being it the first wavefront to be out of the optical system. Using a concept of differential geometry called parallel curves it is possible to obtain an analytic formula to represent the wavefront propagated at arbitrary distances through the optical axis. In order to evaluate qualitatively a plano-convex aspheric lens, we have modified slightly an interferometer Tywman-Green as follow: In the reference beam we use a plane mirror and the beam of test we have used a spatial light modulator (SLM) to compensate the phase produced by the lens under test. It will be called a null phase interferometer. The main idea is to recombine both wavefronts in order to get a null interferogram, otherwise we will associate the patterns of the interferogram to deformations of the lens under test. The null phase screens are formed with concentric circumferences assuming different gray levels printed on SLM.

  12. Creeping waves and resonances in transient scattering by smooth convex objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyman, E.; Felsen, L. B.

    1983-05-01

    The surface currents induced by an impulsive line source of magnetic currents located on the surface of a perfectly conducting circular cylinder are determined. The transient field is Fourier transformed to reduce it to the time-harmonic domain. Alternative field representations, based on the method of characteristic Green's functions, are constructed directly and without intervention of the Watson transformation to yield expansions in terms of angular eigenfunctions, radial eigenfunctions, and resonant eigenfunctions. The various ways of dealing with the creeping waves in the time-harmonic and the transient regimes, and the connection between the creeping waves and the singularity expansion method (SEM) resonances are emphasized. The results are employed to develop alternative hybrid formulations by collective treatment of a group of creeping waves or of a group of SEM resonant solutions. The generalization to scattering by cylinderical objects with arbitrary convex curvature is given.

  13. The influence of non-vacuum electron-beam facing on the structure of Ti-Ta layers formed on the surface of VT1-0 alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samoylenko, V. V.; Lenivtseva, O. G.; Polyakov, I. A.; Laptev, I. S.; Martyushev, N. V.

    2016-04-01

    The influence of electron-beam facing modes on the structure of Ti-Ta layers formed on the surface of commercially pure titanium VT1-0 has been studied in the paper. The mode of the electron-beam treatment of alloying powder mixture, by which there were no defects in the pad, has been identified. The methods of optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy have shown that in pads there is dendritic segregation typical for the process of initial crystallisation. At greater magnifications it is possible to observe a structure of the laminar type. The X-ray phase analysis of titanium-tantalum layers justifies the presence of two phases: a hexagonal α'-phase and a cubic (β-phase of titanium.

  14. Climate Influences on Groundwater Recharge: Implications for Western Groundwater and Surface Water Resources in the Face of Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Earman, S.; Dettinger, M.

    2007-12-01

    Groundwater is a vital resource in the western USA, accounting for over a quarter of total supplies and irrigation uses. In addition, groundwater is a major contributor to surface-water resources, sustaining baseflows throughout the year, and contributes important fractions of streamflows even during high-flow periods following rainfall and snowmelt. Because mountains are generally cooler and wetter than adjacent basins, groundwater in the West is derived mostly from mountain precipitation. Large infiltrations of water are required to break through the region's thick unsaturated zones. Because snowpacks store and then release precipitation from several storms at once, snowmelt contributes disproportionately more recharge than does rain. Warming temperatures have already caused declines in Western snowpacks and earlier flows in melt-fed streams. Current projections of future climate suggest that these trends will continue. Snowline elevations are expected to rise, reducing snow-covered areas in western mountains, and decreasing the amount of snow in areas where snowpacks remain. If so, mountain-block recharge also may also decline, as recharge areas shrink and snow available for melt generation dwindles. Declines in mountain recharge triggered by loss of snowpack would have immediate impacts on mountain water resources, including low flows and stream temperatures, and may also have serious impacts on long-term ground-water supplies in surrounding basins. Although recharge that supplies mountain groundwater may decline, much of this unrecharged water may run off onto fans and basins, increasing recharge beyond the mountains. However, if the water that is not recharged in the mountains is mostly evapotranspired from the mountain soils, the overall recharge (mountain plus basin) may decline. Changes in temperature will bring concomitant changes in water temperatures, and thus in streambed conductance and leakance; changes in dominant vegetation may also occur. All

  15. Funny Faces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Yvonne

    2000-01-01

    Presents a torn-paper and gadget-print activity for younger students, specifically pre-kindergarten to first grade, that can be done any time over the school year or at Halloween. Discusses how the students create their funny faces and lists the materials needed. (CMK)

  16. Synthesis of Janus-like gold nanoparticles with hydrophilic/hydrophobic faces by surface ligand exchange and their self-assemblies in water.

    PubMed

    Iida, Ryo; Kawamura, Hitoshi; Niikura, Kenichi; Kimura, Takashi; Sekiguchi, Shota; Joti, Yasumasa; Bessho, Yoshitaka; Mitomo, Hideyuki; Nishino, Yoshinori; Ijiro, Kuniharu

    2015-04-14

    This study aims at the synthesis of Janus gold nanoparticles (Janus GNPs) with hydrophilic/hydrophobic faces by a simple ligand exchange reaction in an homogeneous system and at the elucidation of the self-assembled structures of the Janus GNPs in water. As hydrophilic surface ligands, we synthesized hexaethylene glycol (E6)-terminated thiolate ligands with C3, C7, or C11 alkyl chains, referred to as E6C3, E6C7, and E6C11, respectively. As a hydrophobic ligand, a butyl-headed thiolate ligand C4-E6C11, in which a C4 alkyl was introduced on the E6C11 terminus, was synthesized. The degree of segregation between the two ligands on the GNPs (5 nm in diameter) was examined by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of fright mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) analysis. We found that the choice of immobilization methods, one-step or two-step addition of the two ligands to the GNP solution, crucially affects the degree of segregation. The two-step addition of a hydrophilic ligand (E6C3) followed by a hydrophobic ligand (C4-E6C11) produced a large degree of segregation on the GNPs, providing Janus-like GNPs. When dispersed in water, these Janus-like GNPs formed assemblies of ∼160 nm in diameter, whereas Domain GNPs, in which the two ligands formed partial domains on the surface, were precipitated even when the molar ratio of the hydrophilic ligand and the hydrophobic ligand on the surface of the NPs was almost 1:1. The assembled structure of the Janus-like GNPs in water was directly observed by pulsed coherent X-ray solution scattering using an X-ray free-electron laser, revealing irregular spherical structures with uneven surfaces. PMID:25796963

  17. Multifrequency swept common-path en-face OCT for wide-field measurement of interior surface vibrations in thick biological tissues.

    PubMed

    Choi, Samuel; Watanabe, Tomoya; Suzuki, Takamasa; Nin, Fumiaki; Hibino, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Osami

    2015-08-10

    Microvibrations that occur in bio-tissues are considered to play pivotal roles in organ function; however techniques for their measurement have remained underdeveloped. To address this issue, in the present study we have developed a novel optical coherence tomography (OCT) method that utilizes multifrequency swept interferometry. The OCT volume data can be acquired by sweeping the multifrequency modes produced by combining a tunable Fabry-Perot filter and an 840 nm super-luminescent diode with a bandwidth of 160 nm. The system employing the wide-field heterodyne method does not require mechanical scanning probes, which are usually incorporated in conventional Doppler OCTs and heterodyne-type interferometers. These arrangements allow obtaining not only 3D tomographic images but also various vibration parameters such as spatial amplitude, phase, and frequency, with high temporal and transverse resolutions over a wide field. Indeed, our OCT achieved the axial resolution of ~2.5 μm when scanning the surface of a glass plate. Moreover, when examining a mechanically resonant multilayered bio-tissue in full-field configuration, we captured 22 nm vibrations of its internal surfaces at 1 kHz by reconstructing temporal phase variations. This so-called "multifrequency swept common-path en-face OCT" can be applied for measuring microdynamics of a variety of biological samples, thus contributing to the progress in life sciences research. PMID:26367958

  18. Millihertz quasi-periodic oscillations in 4U 1636-53 associated with bursts with positive convexity only

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, Ming; Méndez, Mariano; Altamirano, Diego; Zhang, Guobao

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the convexity of all type I X-ray bursts with millihertz quasi-periodic oscillations (mHz QPOs) in 4U 1636-53 using archival observations with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. We found that, at a 3.5σ confidence level, in all 39 cases in which the mHz QPOs disappeared at the time of an X-ray burst, the convexity of the burst is positive. The convexity measures the shape of the rising part of the burst light curve and, according to recent models, it is related to the ignition site of bursts on the neutron-star surface. This finding suggests that in 4U 1636-53 these 39 bursts and the marginally-stable nuclear burning process responsible for the mHz QPOs take place at the neutron-star equator. This scenario could explain the inconsistency between the high accretion rate required for triggering mHz QPOs in theoretical models and the relatively low accretion rate derived from observations.

  19. Confined buckling of inextensible rods by convex difference algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alart, Pierre; Pagano, Stéphane

    2002-12-01

    In this Note we present an approach to determine the local minima of a specific class of minimization problems. Attention is focused on the inextensibility condition of flexible rods expressed as a nonconvex constraint. Two algorithms are derived from a special splitting of the Lagrangian into the difference of two convex functions (DC). They are compared to the augmented Lagrangian methods used in this context. These DC formulations are easily extended to contact problems and applied to the determination of confined buckling shapes. To cite this article: P. Alart, S. Pagano, C. R. Mecanique 330 (2002) 819-824.

  20. Computation of nonparametric convex hazard estimators via profile methods

    PubMed Central

    Jankowski, Hanna K.; Wellner, Jon A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes a profile likelihood algorithm to compute the nonparametric maximum likelihood estimator of a convex hazard function. The maximisation is performed in two steps: First the support reduction algorithm is used to maximise the likelihood over all hazard functions with a given point of minimum (or antimode). Then it is shown that the profile (or partially maximised) likelihood is quasi-concave as a function of the antimode, so that a bisection algorithm can be applied to find the maximum of the profile likelihood, and hence also the global maximum. The new algorithm is illustrated using both artificial and real data, including lifetime data for Canadian males and females. PMID:20300560

  1. On the structure of self-affine convex bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Voynov, A S

    2013-08-31

    We study the structure of convex bodies in R{sup d} that can be represented as a union of their affine images with no common interior points. Such bodies are called self-affine. Vallet's conjecture on the structure of self-affine bodies was proved for d = 2 by Richter in 2011. In the present paper we disprove the conjecture for all d≥3 and derive a detailed description of self-affine bodies in R{sup 3}. Also we consider the relation between properties of self-affine bodies and functional equations with a contraction of an argument. Bibliography: 10 titles.

  2. Use of Convex supercomputers for flight simulation at NASA Langley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleveland, Jeff I., II

    1992-01-01

    The use of the Convex Computer Corporation supercomputers for flight simulation is discussed focusing on a real-time input/output system for supporting the flight simulation. The flight simulation computing system is based on two single processor control data corporation CYBER 175 computers, coupled through extended memory. The Advanced Real-Time Simulation System for digital data distribution and signal conversion is a state-of-the-art, high-speed fiber-optic-based, ring network system which is based on the computer automated measurement and control technology.

  3. Off-Grid DOA Estimation Based on Analysis of the Convexity of Maximum Likelihood Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LIU, Liang; WEI, Ping; LIAO, Hong Shu

    Spatial compressive sensing (SCS) has recently been applied to direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimation owing to advantages over conventional ones. However the performance of compressive sensing (CS)-based estimation methods decreases when true DOAs are not exactly on the discretized sampling grid. We solve the off-grid DOA estimation problem using the deterministic maximum likelihood (DML) estimation method. In this work, we analyze the convexity of the DML function in the vicinity of the global solution. Especially under the condition of large array, we search for an approximately convex range around the ture DOAs to guarantee the DML function convex. Based on the convexity of the DML function, we propose a computationally efficient algorithm framework for off-grid DOA estimation. Numerical experiments show that the rough convex range accords well with the exact convex range of the DML function with large array and demonstrate the superior performance of the proposed methods in terms of accuracy, robustness and speed.

  4. Supersonic cavity flows over concave and convex walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, A. Ran; Das, Rajarshi; Setoguchi, Toshiaki; Kim, Heuy Dong

    2016-04-01

    Supersonic cavity flows are characterized by compression and expansion waves, shear layer, and oscillations inside the cavity. For decades, investigations into cavity flows have been conducted, mostly with flows at zero pressure gradient entering the cavity in straight walls. Since cavity flows on curved walls exert centrifugal force, the features of these flows are likely to differ from those of straight wall flows. The aim of the present work is to study the flow physics of a cavity that is cut out on a curved wall. Steady and unsteady numerical simulations were carried out for supersonic flow through curved channels over the cavity with L/H = 1. A straight channel flow was also analyzed which serves as the base model. The velocity gradient along the width of the channel was observed to increase with increasing the channel curvature for both concave and convex channels. The pressure on the cavity floor increases with the increase in channel curvature for concave channels and decreases for convex channels. Moreover, unsteady flow characteristics are more dependent on channel curvature under supersonic free stream conditions.

  5. A Deep-Cutting-Plane Technique for Reverse Convex Optimization.

    PubMed

    Moshirvaziri, K; Amouzegar, M A

    2011-08-01

    A large number of problems in engineering design and in many areas of social and physical sciences and technology lend themselves to particular instances of problems studied in this paper. Cutting-plane methods have traditionally been used as an effective tool in devising exact algorithms for solving convex and large-scale combinatorial optimization problems. Its utilization in nonconvex optimization has been also promising. A cutting plane, essentially a hyperplane defined by a linear inequality, can be used to effectively reduce the computational efforts in search of a global solution. Each cut is generated in order to eliminate a large portion of the search domain. Thus, a deep cut is intuitively superior in which it will exclude a larger set of extraneous points from consideration. This paper is concerned with the development of deep-cutting-plane techniques applied to reverse-convex programs. An upper bound and a lower bound for the optimal value are found, updated, and improved at each iteration. The algorithm terminates when the two bounds collapse or all the generated subdivisions have been fathomed. Finally, computational considerations and numerical results on a set of test problems are discussed. An illustrative example, walking through the steps of the algorithm and explaining the computational process, is presented. PMID:21296710

  6. A convex minimization approach to data association with prior constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huimin; Kirubarajan, Thiagalingam

    2004-08-01

    In this paper we propose a new formulation for reliably solving the measurement-to-track association problem with a priori constraints. Those constraints are incorporated into the scalar objective function in a general formula. This is a key step in most target tracking problems when one has to handle the measurement origin uncertainty. Our methodology is able to formulate the measurement-to-track correspondence problem with most of the commonly used assumptions and considers target feature measurements and possibly unresolved measurements as well. The resulting constrained optimization problem deals with the whole combinatorial space of possible feature selections and measurement-to-track correspondences. To find the global optimal solution, we build a convex objective function and relax the integer constraint. The special structure of this extended problem assures its equivalence to the original one, but it can be solved optimally by efficient algorithms to avoid the cominatorial search. This approach works for any cost function with continuous second derivatives. We use a track formation example and a multisensor tracking scenario to illustrate the effectiveness of the convex programming approach.

  7. Multiband RF pulses with improved performance via convex optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Hong; Larson, Peder E. Z.; Kerr, Adam; Reed, Galen; Sukumar, Subramaniam; Elkhaled, Adam; Gordon, Jeremy W.; Ohliger, Michael A.; Pauly, John M.; Lustig, Michael; Vigneron, Daniel B.

    2016-01-01

    Selective RF pulses are commonly designed with the desired profile as a low pass filter frequency response. However, for many MRI and NMR applications, the spectrum is sparse with signals existing at a few discrete resonant frequencies. By specifying a multiband profile and releasing the constraint on "don't-care" regions, the RF pulse performance can be improved to enable a shorter duration, sharper transition, or lower peak B1 amplitude. In this project, a framework for designing multiband RF pulses with improved performance was developed based on the Shinnar-Le Roux (SLR) algorithm and convex optimization. It can create several types of RF pulses with multiband magnitude profiles, arbitrary phase profiles and generalized flip angles. The advantage of this framework with a convex optimization approach is the flexible trade-off of different pulse characteristics. Designs for specialized selective RF pulses for balanced SSFP hyperpolarized (HP) 13C MRI, a dualband saturation RF pulse for 1H MR spectroscopy, and a pre-saturation pulse for HP 13C study were developed and tested.

  8. Extra-axial isolated cerebral varix misdiagnosed as convexity meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Zhi-Gang; Zhou, Qian; Cui, Yan; Yi, Lei; Ouyang, Yian; Jiang, Yugang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Isolated cerebral varix is a rare cerebrovascular anomaly, which is easily misdiagnosed as other brain tumors. A 59-year-old female patient with noncontributory medical history presented with headache and insomnia for the last 2 months. Upon admission, her neurological examination was unremarkable. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a well-demarcated extra medullary mass, 11 × 11 mm in size, within the subdural space at the right frontal lobe. The lesion was initially interpreted as a convexity meningioma. After conducting a craniotomy on the patient, an extra-axial varix was exposed and resected subsequently. The patient's headache was resolved soon after surgery and charged without neurologic sequelae. Extra-axial isolated cerebral varix is mimicking convexity meningioma on MR images and should be considered as a differential diagnosis. The focal erosion in the inner table of the skull could be an important character of extra-axial isolated cerebral varix. An extremely round shape and smooth contour of the lesion was another important character. Isolated cerebral varix is rare vascular lesion that is treated surgically in the case of rupture or compression of adjacent structures. The information obtained with noninvasive imaging techniques should include CTA to make a clinical decision. PMID:27368037

  9. Mixed convection heat transfer in concave and convex channels

    SciTech Connect

    Moukalled, F.; Doughan, A.; Acharya, S.

    1997-07-01

    Mixed convection heat transfer studies in the literature have been primarily confined to pipe and rectangular channel geometry's. In some applications, however, heat transfer in curved channels may be of interest (e.g., nozzle and diffuser shaped passages in HVAC systems, fume hoods, chimneys, bell-shaped or dome-shaped chemical reactors, etc.). A numerical investigation of laminar mixed convection heat transfer of air in concave and convex channels is presented. Six different channel aspects ratios (R/L = 1.04, 1.25, 2.5, 5, 10, and {infinity}) and five different values of Gr/Re{sup 2} (Gr/Re{sup 2} = 0, 0.1, 1, 3, 5) are considered. Results are displayed in terms of streamline and isotherm plots, velocity and temperature profiles, and local and average Nusselt number estimates. Numerical predictions reveal that compared to straight channels of equal height, concave channels of low aspect ratio have lower heat transfer at relatively low values of Gr/Re{sup 2} and higher heat transfer at high values of Gr/Re{sup 2}. When compared to straight channels of equal heated length, concave channels are always found to have lower heat transfer and for all values of Gr/Re{sup 2}. On the other hand, predictions for convex channels revealed enhancement in heat transfer compared to straight channels of equal height and/or equal heated length for all values of Gr/Re{sup 2}.

  10. Multiband RF pulses with improved performance via convex optimization.

    PubMed

    Shang, Hong; Larson, Peder E Z; Kerr, Adam; Reed, Galen; Sukumar, Subramaniam; Elkhaled, Adam; Gordon, Jeremy W; Ohliger, Michael A; Pauly, John M; Lustig, Michael; Vigneron, Daniel B

    2016-01-01

    Selective RF pulses are commonly designed with the desired profile as a low pass filter frequency response. However, for many MRI and NMR applications, the spectrum is sparse with signals existing at a few discrete resonant frequencies. By specifying a multiband profile and releasing the constraint on "don't-care" regions, the RF pulse performance can be improved to enable a shorter duration, sharper transition, or lower peak B1 amplitude. In this project, a framework for designing multiband RF pulses with improved performance was developed based on the Shinnar-Le Roux (SLR) algorithm and convex optimization. It can create several types of RF pulses with multiband magnitude profiles, arbitrary phase profiles and generalized flip angles. The advantage of this framework with a convex optimization approach is the flexible trade-off of different pulse characteristics. Designs for specialized selective RF pulses for balanced SSFP hyperpolarized (HP) (13)C MRI, a dualband saturation RF pulse for (1)H MR spectroscopy, and a pre-saturation pulse for HP (13)C study were developed and tested. PMID:26754063

  11. Convex foundations for generalized MaxEnt models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frongillo, Rafael; Reid, Mark D.

    2014-12-01

    We present an approach to maximum entropy models that highlights the convex geometry and duality of generalized exponential families (GEFs) and their connection to Bregman divergences. Using our framework, we are able to resolve a puzzling aspect of the bijection of Banerjee and coauthors between classical exponential families and what they call regular Bregman divergences. Their regularity condition rules out all but Bregman divergences generated from log-convex generators. We recover their bijection and show that a much broader class of divergences correspond to GEFs via two key observations: 1) Like classical exponential families, GEFs have a "cumulant" C whose subdifferential contains the mean: Eo˜pθ[φ(o)]∈∂C(θ) ; 2) Generalized relative entropy is a C-Bregman divergence between parameters: DF(pθ,pθ')= D C(θ,θ') , where DF becomes the KL divergence for F = -H. We also show that every incomplete market with cost function C can be expressed as a complete market, where the prices are constrained to be a GEF with cumulant C. This provides an entirely new interpretation of prediction markets, relating their design back to the principle of maximum entropy.

  12. Producing desired ice faces

    PubMed Central

    Shultz, Mary Jane; Brumberg, Alexandra; Bisson, Patrick J.; Shultz, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    The ability to prepare single-crystal faces has become central to developing and testing models for chemistry at interfaces, spectacularly demonstrated by heterogeneous catalysis and nanoscience. This ability has been hampered for hexagonal ice, Ih––a fundamental hydrogen-bonded surface––due to two characteristics of ice: ice does not readily cleave along a crystal lattice plane and properties of ice grown on a substrate can differ significantly from those of neat ice. This work describes laboratory-based methods both to determine the Ih crystal lattice orientation relative to a surface and to use that orientation to prepare any desired face. The work builds on previous results attaining nearly 100% yield of high-quality, single-crystal boules. With these methods, researchers can prepare authentic, single-crystal ice surfaces for numerous studies including uptake measurements, surface reactivity, and catalytic activity of this ubiquitous, fundamental solid. PMID:26512102

  13. Convex Structures: Ray and Modal Techniques for Propagation and Scattering.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyman, Ehud

    A self-contained theory of two-dimensional time -harmonic and transient fields scattered by and/or guided along a smooth convex object is presented. Emphasis is on the high frequency region where ray methods are applicable. Guidance along a smooth convex boundary is formulated in terms of a self-consistent system of rays which are complex due to energy leakage. These complex ray congruences are generated by a complex caustic whose location relative to the boundary determines the type of the guided mode: trapped wave with slight leakage, creeping wave or leaky wave. While closure can be invoked globally when the object has circular symmetry, a local closure condition can be found in the case of variable curvature when the caustic is close to the boundary. By imposing circumferential periodicity on the guided modes traveling around the object, one may synthesize the complex resonances which form the basis for analysis of transient scattering by the Singularity Expansion Method (SEM). A hybrid method is developed therefrom which expresses transient scattering by a perfectly conducting smooth convex cylinder in terms of a well-defined combination of traveling (creeping) wave fields and of SEM resonances. The former describe efficiently the high-frequency effects that dominate the early time response while the latter are more appropriate for the lower frequency behavior at later times. Intimately related to the phenomena described above is the mechanism of excitation of ray fields, and the associated energy transfer, when a source is located near a curved interface. This problem is explored for a canonical prototype that involves a high-frequency line source on the concave (interior) side of a curved dielectric interface, which side also contains the denser medium. A detailed study of the transmitted field resolves the intricate behavior in the vicinity of the critically refracted ray in terms of GTD parameters appropriate to regular and to transition regions. The

  14. Chance-Constrained Guidance With Non-Convex Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ono, Masahiro

    2011-01-01

    Missions to small bodies, such as comets or asteroids, require autonomous guidance for descent to these small bodies. Such guidance is made challenging by uncertainty in the position and velocity of the spacecraft, as well as the uncertainty in the gravitational field around the small body. In addition, the requirement to avoid collision with the asteroid represents a non-convex constraint that means finding the optimal guidance trajectory, in general, is intractable. In this innovation, a new approach is proposed for chance-constrained optimal guidance with non-convex constraints. Chance-constrained guidance takes into account uncertainty so that the probability of collision is below a specified threshold. In this approach, a new bounding method has been developed to obtain a set of decomposed chance constraints that is a sufficient condition of the original chance constraint. The decomposition of the chance constraint enables its efficient evaluation, as well as the application of the branch and bound method. Branch and bound enables non-convex problems to be solved efficiently to global optimality. Considering the problem of finite-horizon robust optimal control of dynamic systems under Gaussian-distributed stochastic uncertainty, with state and control constraints, a discrete-time, continuous-state linear dynamics model is assumed. Gaussian-distributed stochastic uncertainty is a more natural model for exogenous disturbances such as wind gusts and turbulence than the previously studied set-bounded models. However, with stochastic uncertainty, it is often impossible to guarantee that state constraints are satisfied, because there is typically a non-zero probability of having a disturbance that is large enough to push the state out of the feasible region. An effective framework to address robustness with stochastic uncertainty is optimization with chance constraints. These require that the probability of violating the state constraints (i.e., the probability of

  15. Double face sealing device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, Bruce (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A double face sealing device is disclosed for mounting between two surfaces to provide an air-tight and fluid-tight seal between a closure member bearing one of the surfaces and a structure or housing bearing the other surface which extends around the opening or hatchway to be closed. The double face sealing device includes a plurality of sections or segments mounted to one of the surfaces, each having a main body portion, a pair of outwardly extending and diverging, cantilever, spring arms, and a pair of inwardly extending and diverging, cantilever, spring arms, an elastomeric cover on the distal, free ends of the outwardly extending and diverging spring arms, and an elastomeric cover on the distal, free, ends of the outwardly extending and diverging spring arms, and an elastomeric cover on the distal, free ends of the inwardly extending and diverging spring arms. The double face sealing device has application or use in all environments requiring a seal, but is particularly useful to seal openings or hatchways between compartments of spacecraft or aircraft.

  16. A fast and accurate sparse continuous signal reconstruction by homotopy DCD with non-convex regularization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tianyun; Lu, Xinfei; Yu, Xiaofei; Xi, Zhendong; Chen, Weidong

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, various applications regarding sparse continuous signal recovery such as source localization, radar imaging, communication channel estimation, etc., have been addressed from the perspective of compressive sensing (CS) theory. However, there are two major defects that need to be tackled when considering any practical utilization. The first issue is off-grid problem caused by the basis mismatch between arbitrary located unknowns and the pre-specified dictionary, which would make conventional CS reconstruction methods degrade considerably. The second important issue is the urgent demand for low-complexity algorithms, especially when faced with the requirement of real-time implementation. In this paper, to deal with these two problems, we have presented three fast and accurate sparse reconstruction algorithms, termed as HR-DCD, Hlog-DCD and Hlp-DCD, which are based on homotopy, dichotomous coordinate descent (DCD) iterations and non-convex regularizations, by combining with the grid refinement technique. Experimental results are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithms and related analysis. PMID:24675758

  17. A Fast and Accurate Sparse Continuous Signal Reconstruction by Homotopy DCD with Non-Convex Regularization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tianyun; Lu, Xinfei; Yu, Xiaofei; Xi, Zhendong; Chen, Weidong

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, various applications regarding sparse continuous signal recovery such as source localization, radar imaging, communication channel estimation, etc., have been addressed from the perspective of compressive sensing (CS) theory. However, there are two major defects that need to be tackled when considering any practical utilization. The first issue is off-grid problem caused by the basis mismatch between arbitrary located unknowns and the pre-specified dictionary, which would make conventional CS reconstruction methods degrade considerably. The second important issue is the urgent demand for low-complexity algorithms, especially when faced with the requirement of real-time implementation. In this paper, to deal with these two problems, we have presented three fast and accurate sparse reconstruction algorithms, termed as HR-DCD, Hlog-DCD and Hlp-DCD, which are based on homotopy, dichotomous coordinate descent (DCD) iterations and non-convex regularizations, by combining with the grid refinement technique. Experimental results are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithms and related analysis. PMID:24675758

  18. Fast inference of ill-posed problems within a convex space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-de-Cossio-Diaz, J.; Mulet, R.

    2016-07-01

    In multiple scientific and technological applications we face the problem of having low dimensional data to be justified by a linear model defined in a high dimensional parameter space. The difference in dimensionality makes the problem ill-defined: the model is consistent with the data for many values of its parameters. The objective is to find the probability distribution of parameter values consistent with the data, a problem that can be cast as the exploration of a high dimensional convex polytope. In this work we introduce a novel algorithm to solve this problem efficiently. It provides results that are statistically indistinguishable from currently used numerical techniques while its running time scales linearly with the system size. We show that the algorithm performs robustly in many abstract and practical applications. As working examples we simulate the effects of restricting reaction fluxes on the space of feasible phenotypes of a genome scale Escherichia coli metabolic network and infer the traffic flow between origin and destination nodes in a real communication network.

  19. Laplace's equation on convex polyhedra via the unified method

    PubMed Central

    Ashton, A. C. L.

    2015-01-01

    We provide a new method to study the classical Dirichlet problem for Laplace's equation on a convex polyhedron. This new approach was motivated by Fokas’ unified method for boundary value problems. The central object in this approach is the global relation: an integral equation which couples the known boundary data and the unknown boundary values. This integral equation depends holomorphically on two complex parameters, and the resulting analysis takes place on a Banach space of complex analytic functions closely related to the classical Paley–Wiener space. We write the global relation in the form of an operator equation and prove that the relevant operator is bounded below using some novel integral identities. We give a new integral representation to the solution to the underlying boundary value problem which serves as a concrete realization of the fundamental principle of Ehrenpreis.

  20. Convex probe endobronchial ultrasound: applications beyond conventional indications

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peng; Zheng, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) is maturing and gaining acceptance by more and more clinicians for lymph node staging of lung cancer and diagnosis of mediastinal and hilar masses or lymph node enlargement by convex probe endobronchial ultrasound (CP-EBUS). The application of CP-EBUS, however, is not limited to conventional indications. Diagnostically, elastography is a new technology for the differentiation of benign and malignant lymph nodes before aspiration. CP-EBUS can also be used for pulmonary vascular diseases, such as pulmonary embolism (PE) and non-thrombotic endovascular lesions (NELs). Therapeutically, CP-EBUS can be used for cyst drainage and drug injections. CP-EBUS is not limited to observation and aspiration of mediastinal masses and lymph nodes, but is also suitable for exploration of other tissues external to the central airway, which necessitates unprecedented skills for the bronchoscopist. PMID:26543618

  1. Convex crystal x-ray spectrometer for laser plasma experiments

    SciTech Connect

    May, M.; Heeter, R.; Emig, J.

    2004-10-01

    Measuring time and space-resolved spectra is important for understanding Hohlraum and Halfraum plasmas. Experiments at the OMEGA laser have used the Nova TSPEC which was not optimized for the OMEGA diagnostic space envelope or for the needed spectroscopic coverage and resolution. An improved multipurpose spectrometer snout, the MSPEC, has been constructed and fielded on OMEGA. The MSPEC provides the maximal internal volume for mounting crystals without any beam interferences at either 2x or 3x magnification. The RAP crystal is in a convex mounting geometry bent to a 20 cm radius of curvature. The spectral resolution, E/dE, is about 200 at 2.5 keV. The spectral coverage is 2 to 4.5 keV. The MSPEC can record four separate spectra on the framing camera at time intervals of up to several ns. The spectrometer design and initial field-test performance will be presented and compared to that of the TSPEC.

  2. Convexity at finite temperature and non-extensive thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandre, J.

    2016-09-01

    Assuming that tunnel effect between two degenerate bare minima occurs, in a scalar field theory at finite volume, this article studies the consequences for the effective potential, to all loop orders. Convexity is achieved only if the two bare minima are taken into account in the path integral, and a new derivation of the effective potential is given, in the large volume limit. The effective potential then has a universal form, it is suppressed by the space time volume, and does not feature spontaneous symmetry breaking as long as the volume is finite. The finite temperature analysis leads to surprising thermal properties, following from the non-extensive expression for the free energy. Although the physical relevance of these results is not clear, the potential application to ultra-light scalar particles is discussed.

  3. A convex complementarity approach for simulating large granular flows.

    SciTech Connect

    Tasora, A.; Anitescu, M.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Univ. degli Studi di Parma

    2010-07-01

    Aiming at the simulation of dense granular flows, we propose and test a numerical method based on successive convex complementarity problems. This approach originates from a multibody description of the granular flow: all the particles are simulated as rigid bodies with arbitrary shapes and frictional contacts. Unlike the discrete element method (DEM), the proposed approach does not require small integration time steps typical of stiff particle interaction; this fact, together with the development of optimized algorithms that can run also on parallel computing architectures, allows an efficient application of the proposed methodology to granular flows with a large number of particles. We present an application to the analysis of the refueling flow in pebble-bed nuclear reactors. Extensive validation of our method against both DEM and physical experiments results indicates that essential collective characteristics of dense granular flow are accurately predicted.

  4. Nonparametric instrumental regression with non-convex constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasmair, M.; Scherzer, O.; Vanhems, A.

    2013-03-01

    This paper considers the nonparametric regression model with an additive error that is dependent on the explanatory variables. As is common in empirical studies in epidemiology and economics, it also supposes that valid instrumental variables are observed. A classical example in microeconomics considers the consumer demand function as a function of the price of goods and the income, both variables often considered as endogenous. In this framework, the economic theory also imposes shape restrictions on the demand function, such as integrability conditions. Motivated by this illustration in microeconomics, we study an estimator of a nonparametric constrained regression function using instrumental variables by means of Tikhonov regularization. We derive rates of convergence for the regularized model both in a deterministic and stochastic setting under the assumption that the true regression function satisfies a projected source condition including, because of the non-convexity of the imposed constraints, an additional smallness condition.

  5. Computational stoning method for surface defect detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ninshu; Zhu, Xinhai

    2013-12-01

    Surface defects on outer panels of automotive bodies must be controlled in order to improve the surface quality. The detection and quantitative evaluation of surface defects are quite difficult because the deflection of surface defects is very small. One of detecting methods for surface defects used in factories is a stoning method in which a stone block is moved on the surface of a stamped panel. The computational stoning method was developed to detect surface low defect by authors based on a geometry contact algorithm between a stone block and a stamped panel. If the surface is convex, the stone block always contacts with the convex surface of a stamped panel and the contact gap between them is zero. If there is a surface low, the stone block does not contact to the surface and the contact gap can be computed based on contact algorithm. The convex surface defect can also be detected by applying computational stoning method to the back surface of a stamped panel. By performing two way stoning computations from both the normal surface and the back surface, not only the depth of surface low defect but also the height of convex surface defect can be detected. The surface low defect and convex surface defect can also be detected through multi-directions. Surface defects on the handle emboss of outer panels were accurately detected using the computational stoning method and compared with the real shape. A very good accuracy was obtained.

  6. Path Following in the Exact Penalty Method of Convex Programming

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hua; Lange, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Classical penalty methods solve a sequence of unconstrained problems that put greater and greater stress on meeting the constraints. In the limit as the penalty constant tends to ∞, one recovers the constrained solution. In the exact penalty method, squared penalties are replaced by absolute value penalties, and the solution is recovered for a finite value of the penalty constant. In practice, the kinks in the penalty and the unknown magnitude of the penalty constant prevent wide application of the exact penalty method in nonlinear programming. In this article, we examine a strategy of path following consistent with the exact penalty method. Instead of performing optimization at a single penalty constant, we trace the solution as a continuous function of the penalty constant. Thus, path following starts at the unconstrained solution and follows the solution path as the penalty constant increases. In the process, the solution path hits, slides along, and exits from the various constraints. For quadratic programming, the solution path is piecewise linear and takes large jumps from constraint to constraint. For a general convex program, the solution path is piecewise smooth, and path following operates by numerically solving an ordinary differential equation segment by segment. Our diverse applications to a) projection onto a convex set, b) nonnegative least squares, c) quadratically constrained quadratic programming, d) geometric programming, and e) semidefinite programming illustrate the mechanics and potential of path following. The final detour to image denoising demonstrates the relevance of path following to regularized estimation in inverse problems. In regularized estimation, one follows the solution path as the penalty constant decreases from a large value. PMID:26366044

  7. Laboratory radiometric calibration for the convex grating imaging spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jiankang; Chen, Xinhua; Chen, Yuheng; Ji, Yiqun; Shen, Weimin

    2014-09-01

    The radiometric calibration of imaging spectrometer plays an import role for scientific application of spectral data. The radiometric calibration accuracy is influenced by many factors, such as the stability and uniformity of light source, the transfer precision of radiation standard and so on. But the deviation from the linear response mode and the polarization effect of the imaging spectrometer are always neglected. In this paper, the linear radiometric calibration model is constructed and the radiometric linear response capacity is test by adjusting electric gain, exposure time and radiance level. The linear polarizer and the sine function fitting algorithm are utilized to measure polarization effect. The integrating sphere calibration system is constructed in our Lab and its spectral radiance is calibrated by a well-characterized and extremely stable NIST traceable transfer spectroradiometer. Our manufactured convex grating imaging spectrometer is relative and absolute calibrated based on the integrating sphere calibration system. The relative radiometric calibration data is used to remove or reduce the radiometric response non-uniformity every pixel of imaging spectrometer while the absolute radiometric calibration is used to construct the relationship between the physical radiant of the scene and the digital number of the image. The calibration coefficients are acquired at ten radiance levels. The diffraction noise in the images can be corrected by the calibration coefficients and the uniform radiance image can be got. The calibration result shows that our manufactured imaging spectrometer with convex grating has 3.0% degree of polarization and the uncertainties of the relative and absolute radiometric calibrations are 2.4% and 5.6% respectively.

  8. Convexity of momentum map, Morse index, and quantum entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawicki, Adam; Oszmaniec, Michał; Kuś, Marek

    2014-03-01

    We analyze from the topological perspective the space of all SLOCC (Stochastic Local Operations with Classical Communication) classes of pure states for composite quantum systems. We do it for both distinguishable and indistinguishable particles. In general, the topology of this space is rather complicated as it is a non-Hausdorff space. Using geometric invariant theory (GIT) and momentum map geometry, we propose a way to divide the space of all SLOCC classes into mathematically and physically meaningful families. Each family consists of possibly many "asymptotically" equivalent SLOCC classes. Moreover, each contains exactly one distinguished SLOCC class on which the total variance (a well-defined measure of entanglement) of the state Var[v] attains maximum. We provide an algorithm for finding critical sets of Var[v], which makes use of the convexity of the momentum map and allows classification of such defined families of SLOCC classes. The number of families is in general infinite. We introduce an additional refinement into finitely many groups of families using some developments in the momentum map geometry known as the Kirwan-Ness stratification. We also discuss how to define it equivalently using the convexity of the momentum map applied to SLOCC classes. Moreover, we note that the Morse index at the critical set of the total variance of state has an interpretation of number of non-SLOCC directions in which entanglement increases and calculate it for several exemplary systems. Finally, we introduce the SLOCC-invariant measure of entanglement as a square root of the total variance of state at the critical point and explain its geometric meaning.

  9. Stereo and shading contribute independently to shape convexity-concavity discrimination.

    PubMed

    Aubin, Mercédès; Arguin, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The present study examined the joint contribution of shading and stereopsis to the perception of shape convexity-concavity. The stimuli were the images of a synthetic convex 3-D shape seen from viewpoints leading to ambiguity as to its convexity. Illumination came from either above or below, and from either the right or the left, and stimuli were presented dichoptically with normal binocular disparity, reversed disparity, or no disparity. Participants responded "convex" more often when the lighting came from above than from below. Also, participants responded that the shape was convex more often with normal than with zero disparity, and more often with zero disparity than with reversed stereopsis. The effects of lighting direction and display mode were additive--that is, they did not interact. This indicates that shading and stereopsis contribute independently to shape perception. PMID:25109021

  10. Synthesis of convex hexoctahedral Pt micro/nanocrystals with high-index facets and electrochemistry-mediated shape evolution.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jing; Liu, Shuo; Tian, Na; Zhou, Zhi-You; Liu, Hai-Xia; Xu, Bin-Bin; Sun, Shi-Gang

    2013-12-18

    Systematic manipulation of nanocrystal shapes is prerequisite for revealing their shape-dependent physical and chemical properties. Here we successfully prepared a complex shape of Pt micro/nanocrystals: convex hexoctahedron (HOH) enclosed with 48 {15 5 3} high-index facets by electrochemical square-wave-potential (SWP) method. This shape is the last crystal single form that had not been achieved previously for face-centered-cubic (fcc) metals. We further realized the shape evolution of Pt nanocrystals with high-index facets from tetrahexahedron (THH) to the HOH, and finally to trapezohedron (TPH) by increasing either the upper (EU) or lower potential (EL). The shape evolution, accompanied by the decrease of low-coordinated kink atoms, can be correlated with the competitive interactions between preferentially oxidative dissolution of kink atoms at high EU and the redeposition of Pt atoms at the EL. PMID:24299234