Science.gov

Sample records for coolant mixing tests

  1. Treatment of mixed waste coolant

    SciTech Connect

    Kidd, S.; Bowers, J.S.

    1995-09-01

    The primary processes used at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for treatment of radioactively contaminated machine coolants are industrial waste treatment and in situ carbon adsorption. These two processes simplify approaches to meetings the sanitary sewer discharge limits and subsequent Land Disposal REstriction criteria for hazardous and mixed wastes (40 CFR 268). Several relatively simple technologies are used in industrial water treatment. These technologies are considered {open_quotes}Best Demonstrated Available Technologies,{close_quotes} or BDAT, by the Environmental Protection Agency. The machine coolants are primarily aqueous and contain water soluble oil consisting of ethanol amine emulsifiers derived from fatty acids, both synthetic and natural. This emulsion carries away metal turnings from a part being machined on a lathe or other machining tool. When the coolant becomes spent, it contains chlorosolvents carried over from other cutting operations as well as a fair amount of tramp oil from machine bearings. This results in a mutiphasic aqueous waste that requires treatment of metal and organic contaminants. During treatment, any dissolved metals are oxidized with hydrogen peroxide. Once oxidized, these metals are flocculated with ferric sulfate and precipitated with sodium hydroxide, and then the precipitate is filtered through diatomaceous earth. The emulsion is broken up by acidifying the coolant. Solvents and oils are adsorbed using powdered carbon. This carbon is easily separated from the remaining coolant by vacuum filtration.

  2. Treatment of mixed waste coolant

    SciTech Connect

    Kidd, S.; Bowers, J.S.

    1995-02-01

    The primary processes used at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for treatment of radioactively contaminated machine coolants are industrial waste treatment and in situ carbon adsorption. These two processes simplify approaches to meeting the sanitary sewer discharge limits and subsequent Land Disposal Restriction criteria for hazardous and mixed wastes (40 CFR 268). Several relatively simple technologies are used in industrial water treatment. These technologies are considered Best Demonstrated Available Technologies, or BDAT, by the Environmental Protection Agency. The machine coolants are primarily aqueous and contain water soluble oil consisting of ethanol amine emulsifiers derived from fatty acids, both synthetic and natural. This emulsion carries away metal turnings from a part being machined on a lathe or other machining tool. When the coolant becomes spent, it contains chlorosolvents carried over from other cutting operations as well as a fair amount of tramp oil from machine bearings. This results in a multiphasic aqueous waste that requires treatment of metal and organic contaminants. During treatment, any dissolved metals are oxidized with hydrogen peroxide. Once oxidized, these metals are flocculated with ferric sulfate and precipitated with sodium hydroxide, and then the precipitate is filtered through diatomaceous earth. The emulsion is broken up by acidifying the coolant. Solvents and oils are adsorbed using powdered carbon. This carbon is easily separated from the remaining coolant by vacuum filtration.

  3. Coolant mixing and distribution in a transparent reactor model

    SciTech Connect

    Fanning, M.W.; Haury, G.; Pflug, L.; Rothe, P.H.

    1983-11-01

    Following a small break loss-of-coolant accident in a pressurized water reactor, coolant water may be injected at high pressure to help cool the core. This paper reports the results of tests which determined the mixing and distribution of the coolant in a 1/5-scale transparent model of the reactor. The model components included the reactor vessel, cold leg pipe, pump, and loop seal with steam generator and hot leg simulators completing the flow loop. Tests were conducted for a no-refill condition with constant liquid inventory in the facility and zero flow of the primary water. Salt water, dyed red was used for the coolant water to create prototypical density differences in this atmospheric facility. Steady state fluid distribution was determined from flow and density measurements and complete mass balances. Interpretation of the quantitative results was aided by extensive flow visualization studies which include still photographs and motion picture films for all tests. The test parameters included the fluid density ratio, the flow rate of coolant water, and the flow rate of primary water injected in the vessel downcomer to simulate a natural circulation flow through vent valves between the reactor core and the downcomer. Four locations of the small break were tested.

  4. Flow boiling test of GDP replacement coolants

    SciTech Connect

    Park, S.H.

    1995-08-01

    The tests were part of the CFC replacement program to identify and test alternate coolants to replace CFC-114 being used in the uranium enrichment plants at Paducah and Portsmouth. The coolants tested, C{sub 4}F{sub 10} and C{sub 4}F{sub 8}, were selected based on their compatibility with the uranium hexafluoride process gas and how well the boiling temperature and vapor pressure matched that of CFC-114. However, the heat of vaporization of both coolants is lower than that of CFC-114 requiring larger coolant mass flow than CFC-114 to remove the same amount of heat. The vapor pressure of these coolants is higher than CFC-114 within the cascade operational range, and each coolant can be used as a replacement coolant with some limitation at 3,300 hp operation. The results of the CFC-114/C{sub 4}F{sub 10} mixture tests show boiling heat transfer coefficient degraded to a minimum value with about 25% C{sub 4}F{sub 10} weight mixture in CFC-114 and the degree of degradation is about 20% from that of CFC-114 boiling heat transfer coefficient. This report consists of the final reports from Cudo Technologies, Ltd.

  5. Lead Coolant Test Facility Development Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Paul A. Demkowicz

    2005-06-01

    A workshop was held at the Idaho National Laboratory on May 25, 2005, to discuss the development of a next generation lead or lead-alloy coolant test facility. Attendees included representatives from the Generation IV lead-cooled fast reactor (LFR) program, Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative, and several universities. Several participants gave presentations on coolant technology, existing experimental facilities for lead and lead-alloy research, the current LFR design concept, and a design by Argonne National Laboratory for an integral heavy liquid metal test facility. Discussions were focused on the critical research and development requirements for deployment of an LFR demonstration test reactor, the experimental scope of the proposed coolant test facility, a review of the Argonne National Laboratory test facility design, and a brief assessment of the necessary path forward and schedule for the initial stages of this development project. This report provides a summary of the presentations and roundtable discussions.

  6. Testing of organic acids in engine coolants

    SciTech Connect

    Weir, T.W.

    1999-08-01

    The effectiveness of 30 organic acids as inhibitors in engine coolants is reported. Tests include glassware corrosion of coupled and uncoupled metals. FORD galvanostatic and cyclic polarization electrochemistry for aluminum pitting, and reserve alkalinity (RA) measurements. Details of each test are discussed as well as some general conclusions. For example, benzoic acid inhibits coupled metals well but is ineffective on cast iron when uncoupled. In benzoic acid inhibits coupled metals well but is ineffective on cast iron when uncoupled. In general, the organic acids provide little RA when titrated to a pH of 5.5, titration to a pH of 4.5 can result in precipitation of the acid. Trends with respect to acid chain length are reported also.

  7. Reactor coolant seal testing under station blackout conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Marsi, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    Failures of reactor coolant pump (RCP) seals that could result in a significant loss-of-coolant inventory are of current concern to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Particular attention is being focused on seal behavior during station blackout conditions, when failure of on-site emergency diesel generators occurs simultaneously with loss of all off-site alternating current power. Under these conditions, both seal injection flow and component cooling water flow are lost, and the RCP seals are exposed to full reactor coolant temperature. Overheating of elastomeric components and flashing of coolant across the sealing faces can cause unacceptably high leakage rates, with potential catastrophic consequences. A test program has been conducted that subjects full-scale seal cartridges to typical pressurized water reactor (PWR) coolant system steady-state and transient operation conditions including associated dynamic shaft motions. A special test segment was developed to evaluate seal operation under station blackout conditions. The test program successfully mirrored the severity of an actual loss-of-seal cooling water event under station blackout conditions, and the Byron Jackson{reg sign} N-9000 seal cartridge maintained its integrity.

  8. 14 CFR 23.1063 - Coolant tank tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... greater, plus the maximum working pressure of the system; and (b) For a tank with a nonmetallic liner the... specimen liner must be conducted with the coolant at operating temperature. Induction System...

  9. 14 CFR 23.1063 - Coolant tank tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... greater, plus the maximum working pressure of the system; and (b) For a tank with a nonmetallic liner the... specimen liner must be conducted with the coolant at operating temperature. Induction System...

  10. 14 CFR 23.1063 - Coolant tank tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... greater, plus the maximum working pressure of the system; and (b) For a tank with a nonmetallic liner the... specimen liner must be conducted with the coolant at operating temperature. Induction System...

  11. 14 CFR 23.1063 - Coolant tank tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... greater, plus the maximum working pressure of the system; and (b) For a tank with a nonmetallic liner the... specimen liner must be conducted with the coolant at operating temperature. Induction System...

  12. 14 CFR 23.1063 - Coolant tank tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... greater, plus the maximum working pressure of the system; and (b) For a tank with a nonmetallic liner the... specimen liner must be conducted with the coolant at operating temperature. Induction System...

  13. Fleet test evaluation of fully formulated heavy-duty coolant technology maintained with a delayed-release filter compared with coolant inhibited with a nitrited organic acid technology: An interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Aroyan, S.S.; Eaton, E.R.

    1999-08-01

    This paper is a controlled extended service interval (ESI) study of the comparative behaviors of a nitrite/borate/low-silicate, low total dissolved solids (TDS) coolant maintained with delayed-release filters, and an organic acid inhibited coolant technology in heavy-duty engines. It reports both laboratory and fleet test data from 66 trucks, powered with different makes of heavy-duty diesel engines. The engines were cooled with three different types of inhibitors and two different glycol base (ethylene glycol and propylene glycol) coolants for an initial period exceeding two years and 500,000 km (300,000 miles). The data reported include chemical depletion rates, periodic coolant chemical analyses, and engine/cooling system reliability experience. The ongoing test will continue for approximately five years and a 1.6 million km (1 million miles) duration. Thirteen trucks were retained as controls, operating with ASTM D 4985 specification (GM-6038 type) coolant maintained with a standard ASTM D 57542 supplemental coolant additive (SCA). Engines produced by Caterpillar, Detroit Diesel Corp., Cummins Engine Co., and Mack Trucks are included in the test mix.

  14. Reactor coolant pump testing using motor current signatures analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Burstein, N.; Bellamy, J.

    1996-12-01

    This paper describes reactor coolant pump motor testing carried out at Florida Power Corporation`s Crystal River plant using Framatome Technologies` new EMPATH (Electric Motor Performance Analysis and Trending Hardware) system. EMPATH{trademark} uses an improved form of Motor Current Signature Analysis (MCSA), technology, originally developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratories, for detecting deterioration in the rotors of AC induction motors. Motor Current Signature Analysis (MCSA) is a monitoring tool for motor driven equipment that provides a non-intrusive means for detecting the presence of mechanical and electrical abnormalities in the motor and the driven equipment. The base technology was developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory as a means for determining the affects of aging and service wear specifically on motor-operated valves used in nuclear power plant safety systems, but it is applicable to a broad range of electric machinery. MCSA is based on the recognition that an electric motor (ac or dc) driving a mechanical load acts as an efficient and permanently available transducer by sensing mechanical load variations, large and small, long-term and rapid, and converting them into variations in the induced current generated in the motor windings. The motor current variations, resulting from changes in load caused by gears, pulleys, friction, bearings, and other conditions that may change over the life of the motor, are carried by the electrical cables powering the motor and are extracted at any convenient location along the motor lead. These variations modulate the 60 Hz carrier frequency and appear as sidebands in the spectral plot.

  15. Coolant mixing in LMFBR rod bundles and outlet plenum mixing transients. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Todreas, N.E.; Golay, M.W.; Wold, L.

    1981-02-01

    Four tasks are reported on: bundle geometry (wrapped and bare rods), subchannel geometry (bare rods), LMFBR outlet plenum flow mixing, and theoretical determination of local temperature fields in LMFBR fuel rod bundles. (DLC)

  16. Coolant mixing in LMFBR rod bundles and outlet plenum mixing transients. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Todreas, N.E.; Cheng, S.K.; Basehore, K.

    1984-08-01

    This project principally undertook the investigation of the thermal hydraulic performance of wire wrapped fuel bundles of LMFBR configuration. Results obtained included phenomenological models for friction factors, flow split and mixing characteristics; correlations for predicting these characteristics suitable for insertion in design codes; numerical codes for analyzing bundle behavior both of the lumped subchannel and distributed parameter categories and experimental techniques for pressure velocity, flow split, salt conductivity and temperature measurement in water cooled mockups of bundles and subchannels. Flow regimes investigated included laminar, transition and turbulent flow under forced convection and mixed convection conditions. Forced convections conditions were emphasized. Continuing efforts are underway at MIT to complete the investigation of the mixed convection regime initiated here. A number of investigations on outlet plenum behavior were also made. The reports of these investigations are identified.

  17. UO2 and PuO2 utilization in high temperature engineering test reactor with helium coolant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waris, Abdul; Aji, Indarta K.; Novitrian, Pramuditya, Syeilendra; Su'ud, Zaki

    2016-03-01

    High temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR) is one of high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) types which has been developed by Japanese Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). The HTTR is a graphite moderator, helium gas coolant, 30 MW thermal output and 950 °C outlet coolant temperature for high temperature test operation. Original HTTR uses UO2 fuel. In this study, we have evaluated the use of UO2 and PuO2 in form of mixed oxide (MOX) fuel in HTTR. The reactor cell calculation was performed by using SRAC 2002 code, with nuclear data library was derived from JENDL3.2. The result shows that HTTR can obtain its criticality condition if the enrichment of 235U in loaded fuel is 18.0% or above.

  18. Three-dimensional turbulent-mixing-length modeling for discrete-hole coolant injection into a crossflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, C. R.; Papell, S. S.

    1983-01-01

    Three dimensional mixing length models of a flow field immediately downstream of coolant injection through a discrete circular hole at a 30 deg angle into a crossflow were derived from the measurements of turbulence intensity. To verify their effectiveness, the models were used to estimate the anisotropic turbulent effects in a simplified theoretical and numerical analysis to compute the velocity and temperature fields. With small coolant injection mass flow rate and constant surface temperature, numerical results of the local crossflow streamwise velocity component and surface heat transfer rate are consistent with the velocity measurement and the surface film cooling effectiveness distributions reported in previous studies.

  19. Design, manufacture, and test of coolant pump-motor assembly for Brayton power conversion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabacz, L. E.

    1973-01-01

    The design, development, fabrication, and testing of seven coolant circulating pump-motor assemblies are discussed. The pump-motor assembly is driven by the nominal 44.4-volt, 400-Hz, 3-phase output of a nominal 56-volt dc input inverter. The pump-motor assembly will be used to circulate Dow Corning 200 liquid coolant for use in a Brayton cycle space power system. The pump-motor assembly develops a nominal head of 70 psi at 3.7 gpm with an over-all efficiency of 26 percent. The design description, drawings, photographs, reliability results, and developmental and acceptance test results are included.

  20. Rapid electrochemical screening of engine coolants. Correlation of electrochemical potentiometric measurements with ASTM D 1384 glassware corrosion test

    SciTech Connect

    Doucet, G.P.; Jackson, J.M.; Kriegel, O.A.; Passwater, D.K.; Prieto, N.E.

    1999-08-01

    Engine coolants are typically subjected to comprehensive performance evaluations that involve multiple laboratory and field tests. These tests can take several weeks to conduct and can be expensive. The tests can involve everything from preliminary chemical screening to long term fleet tests. An important test conducted at the beginning of coolant formula development to screen the corrosion performance of engine coolants is described in ASTM D 1384. If the coolant formula passes the test, it is then subjected to more rigorous testing. Conducting the test described in ASTM D 1384 takes two weeks, and determining the coolant corrosion performance under several test parameters can takes resources and time that users seldom have. Therefore, it is very desirable to have tests that can be used for rapid screening and quality assurance of coolants. The purpose of this study was to conduct electrochemical tests that can ultimately be used for quick initial screening of engine coolants. The specific intent of the electrochemical tests is to use ASTM D 1384 as a model and to attempt to duplicate its results. Implementation of the electrochemical tests could accelerate the process of selecting promising coolant formulas and reduce coolant evaluation time and cost. Various electrochemical tests were conducted to determine the corrosion performance of several engine coolant formulas. The test results were compared to those obtained from the ASTM D 1384 test. These tests were conducted on the same metal specimens and under similar conditions as those used in the ASTM D 1384 test. The electrochemical tests included the determination of open circuit potential (OCP) for the various metal specimens, anodic and cathodic polarization curves for the various metal specimens, corrosion rate for metal specimens involved in a galvanic triad, and critical pitting potential (CPP) for aluminum (pitting of aluminum engine components and cooling systems is a cause for concern). The details for

  1. Lead Coolant Test Facility Systems Design, Thermal Hydraulic Analysis and Cost Estimate

    SciTech Connect

    Soli Khericha; Edwin Harvego; John Svoboda; Ryan Dalling

    2012-01-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory prepared a preliminary technical and functional requirements (T&FR), thermal hydraulic design and cost estimate for a lead coolant test facility. The purpose of this small scale facility is to simulate lead coolant fast reactor (LFR) coolant flow in an open lattice geometry core using seven electrical rods and liquid lead or lead-bismuth eutectic coolant. Based on review of current world lead or lead-bismuth test facilities and research needs listed in the Generation IV Roadmap, five broad areas of requirements were identified as listed: (1) Develop and Demonstrate Feasibility of Submerged Heat Exchanger; (2) Develop and Demonstrate Open-lattice Flow in Electrically Heated Core; (3) Develop and Demonstrate Chemistry Control; (4) Demonstrate Safe Operation; and (5) Provision for Future Testing. This paper discusses the preliminary design of systems, thermal hydraulic analysis, and simplified cost estimate. The facility thermal hydraulic design is based on the maximum simulated core power using seven electrical heater rods of 420 kW; average linear heat generation rate of 300 W/cm. The core inlet temperature for liquid lead or Pb/Bi eutectic is 4200 C. The design includes approximately seventy-five data measurements such as pressure, temperature, and flow rates. The preliminary estimated cost of construction of the facility is $3.7M (in 2006 $). It is also estimated that the facility will require two years to be constructed and ready for operation.

  2. Preparation, conduct, and experimental results of the AVR loss-of-coolant accident simulation test

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, K.; Bergerfurth, A.; Burger, S.; Pohl, P.; Wimmers, M. ); Cleveland, J.C. )

    1991-02-01

    A loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) is one of the most severe accidents for a nuclear power plant. To demonstrate inherent safety characteristics incorporated into small high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) design, LOCA simulation tests have been conducted at the Arbeitsgemeinschaft Versuchsreaktor (AVR), the German pebble-bed-high-temperature reactor plant. The AVR is the only nuclear power plant ever to have been intentionally subjected to LOCA conditions without emergency cooling. This paper presents the planning and licensing activities including pretest predictions performed for the LOCA test are described, and the conduct of the test and experimental results. The LOCA test was planned to create conditions that would exist if a rapid LOCA occurred with the reactor operating at full power. The test demonstrated this reactor's safe response to an accident in which the coolant escapes from the reactor core and no emergency system is available to provide coolant flow to the core. The test is of special interest because it demonstrates the inherent safety features incorporated into optimized modular HTGR designs. The main LOCA test lasted for 5 days. After the test began, core temperatures increased for {approx}13 h and then gradually and continually decreased as the rate of heat dissipation from the core exceeded the simulated decay power. Throughout the test, temperatures remained below limiting values for the core and other reactor components.

  3. Lead Coolant Test Facility Technical and Functional Requirements, Conceptual Design, Cost and Construction Schedule

    SciTech Connect

    Soli T. Khericha

    2006-09-01

    This report presents preliminary technical and functional requirements (T&FR), thermal hydraulic design and cost estimate for a lead coolant test facility. The purpose of this small scale facility is to simulate lead coolant fast reactor (LFR) coolant flow in an open lattice geometry core using seven electrical rods and liquid lead or lead-bismuth eutectic. Based on review of current world lead or lead-bismuth test facilities and research need listed in the Generation IV Roadmap, five broad areas of requirements of basis are identified: Develop and Demonstrate Prototype Lead/Lead-Bismuth Liquid Metal Flow Loop Develop and Demonstrate Feasibility of Submerged Heat Exchanger Develop and Demonstrate Open-lattice Flow in Electrically Heated Core Develop and Demonstrate Chemistry Control Demonstrate Safe Operation and Provision for Future Testing. These five broad areas are divided into twenty-one (21) specific requirements ranging from coolant temperature to design lifetime. An overview of project engineering requirements, design requirements, QA and environmental requirements are also presented. The purpose of this T&FRs is to focus the lead fast reactor community domestically on the requirements for the next unique state of the art test facility. The facility thermal hydraulic design is based on the maximum simulated core power using seven electrical heater rods of 420 kW; average linear heat generation rate of 300 W/cm. The core inlet temperature for liquid lead or Pb/Bi eutectic is 420oC. The design includes approximately seventy-five data measurements such as pressure, temperature, and flow rates. The preliminary estimated cost of construction of the facility is $3.7M. It is also estimated that the facility will require two years to be constructed and ready for operation.

  4. Coolant mixing in LMFBR rod bundles and outlet plenum mixing transients. Progress report, March 1, 1980-May 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Todreas, N.E.; Golay, M.W.; Wolf, L.

    1980-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical work is reported on four tasks: bundle geometry (wrapped and bare rods), subchannel geometry (bare rods), LMFBR outlet plenum flow mixing, and theoretical local temperature files in LMFBR fuel rod bundles. (DLC)

  5. Waste Heat Recovery from the Advanced Test Reactor Secondary Coolant Loop

    SciTech Connect

    Donna Post Guillen

    2012-11-01

    This study investigated the feasibility of using a waste heat recovery system (WHRS) to recover heat from the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) secondary coolant system (SCS). This heat would be used to preheat air for space heating of the reactor building, thus reducing energy consumption, carbon footprint, and energy costs. Currently, the waste heat from the reactor is rejected to the atmosphere via a four-cell, induced-draft cooling tower. Potential energy and cost savings are 929 kW and $285K/yr. The WHRS would extract a tertiary coolant stream from the SCS loop and pump it to a new plate and frame heat exchanger, from which the heat would be transferred to a glycol loop for preheating outdoor air supplied to the heating and ventilation system. The use of glycol was proposed to avoid the freezing issues that plagued and ultimately caused the failure of a WHRS installed at the ATR in the 1980s. This study assessed the potential installation of a new WHRS for technical, logistical, and economic feasibility.

  6. Safety Analysis of the US Dual Coolant Liquid Lead-Lithium ITER Test Blanket Module

    SciTech Connect

    Merrill, Brad; Reyes, Susana; Sawan, Mohamed; Wong, Clement

    2006-07-01

    The US is proposing a prototype of a dual coolant liquid lead-lithium (DCLL) DEMO blanket concept for testing in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) as an ITER Test Blanket Module (TBM). Because safety considerations are an integral part of the design process to ensure that this TBM does not adversely impact the safety of ITER, a safety assessment has been conducted for this TBM and its ancillary systems as requested by the ITER project. Four events were selected by the ITER International Team (IT) to address specific reactor safety concerns, such as VV pressurization, confinement building pressure build-up, TBM decay heat removal capability, tritium and activation products release from the TBM system, and hydrogen and heat production from chemical reactions. This paper summarizes the results of this safety assessment conducted with the MELCOR computer code.

  7. Flow tests of a single fuel element coolant channel for a compact fast reactor for space power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Springborn, R. H.

    1971-01-01

    Water flow tests were conducted on a single-fuel-element cooling channel for a nuclear concept to be used for space power. The tests established a method for measuring coolant flow rate which is applicable to water flow testing of a complete mockup of the reference reactor. The inlet plenum-to-outlet plenum pressure drop, which approximates the overall core pressure drop, was measured and correlated with flow rate. This information can be used for reactor coolant flow and heat transfer calculations. An analytical study of the flow characteristics was also conducted.

  8. Correlation of analysis with high level vibration test results for primary coolant piping

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Y.J.; Hofmayer, C.H. ); Costello, J.F. )

    1992-01-01

    Dynamic tests on a modified 1/2.5-scale model of pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary coolant piping were performed using a large shaking table at Tadotsu, Japan. The High Level Vibration Test (HLVT) program was part of a cooperative study between the United States (Nuclear Regulatory Commission/Brookhaven National Laboratory, NRC/BNL) and Japan (Ministry of International Trade and Industry/Nuclear Power Engineering Center). During the test program, the excitation level of each test run was gradually increased up to the limit of the shaking table and significant plastic strains, as well as cracking, were induced in the piping. To fully utilize the test results, NRC/BNL sponsored a project to develop corresponding analytical predictions for the nonlinear dynamic response of the piping for selected test runs. The analyses were performed using both simplified and detailed approaches. The simplified approaches utilize a linear solution and an approximate formulation for nonlinear dynamic effects such as the use of a deamplification factor. The detailed analyses were performed using available nonlinear finite element computer codes, including the MARC, ABAQUS, ADINA and WECAN codes. A comparison of various analysis techniques with the test results shows a higher prediction error in the detailed strain values in the overall response values. A summary of the correlation analyses was presented before the BNL. This paper presents a detailed description of the various analysis results and additional comparisons with test results.

  9. Correlation of analysis with high level vibration test results for primary coolant piping

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Y.J.; Hofmayer, C.H.; Costello, J.F.

    1992-05-01

    Dynamic tests on a modified 1/2.5-scale model of pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary coolant piping were performed using a large shaking table at Tadotsu, Japan. The High Level Vibration Test (HLVT) program was part of a cooperative study between the United States (Nuclear Regulatory Commission/Brookhaven National Laboratory, NRC/BNL) and Japan (Ministry of International Trade and Industry/Nuclear Power Engineering Center). During the test program, the excitation level of each test run was gradually increased up to the limit of the shaking table and significant plastic strains, as well as cracking, were induced in the piping. To fully utilize the test results, NRC/BNL sponsored a project to develop corresponding analytical predictions for the nonlinear dynamic response of the piping for selected test runs. The analyses were performed using both simplified and detailed approaches. The simplified approaches utilize a linear solution and an approximate formulation for nonlinear dynamic effects such as the use of a deamplification factor. The detailed analyses were performed using available nonlinear finite element computer codes, including the MARC, ABAQUS, ADINA and WECAN codes. A comparison of various analysis techniques with the test results shows a higher prediction error in the detailed strain values in the overall response values. A summary of the correlation analyses was presented before the BNL. This paper presents a detailed description of the various analysis results and additional comparisons with test results.

  10. Aging, Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA), and high potential testing of damaged cables

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil, R.A.; Jacobus, M.J.

    1994-04-01

    Experiments were conducted to assess the effects of high potential testing of cables and to assess the survivability of aged and damaged cables under Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) conditions. High potential testing at 240 Vdc/mil on undamaged cables suggested that no damage was incurred on the selected virgin cables. During aging and LOCA testing, Okonite ethylene propylene rubber (EPR) cables with a bonded jacket experienced unexpected failures. The failures appear to be primarily related to the level of thermal aging and the presence of a bonded jacket that ages more rapidly than the insulation. For Brand Rex crosslinked polyolefin (XLPO) cables, the results suggest that 7 mils of insulation remaining should give the cables a high probability of surviving accident exposure following aging. The voltage necessary to detect when 7 mils of insulation remain on unaged Brand Rex cables is approximately 35 kVdc. This voltage level would almost certainly be unacceptable to a utility for use as a damage assessment tool. However, additional tests indicated that a 35 kvdc voltage application would not damage virgin Brand Rex cables when tested in water. Although two damaged Rockbestos silicone rubber cables also failed during the accident test, no correlation between failures and level of damage was apparent.

  11. Suppression Pool Mixing and Condensation Tests in PUMA Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Ling Cheng; Kyoung Suk Woo; Mamoru Ishii; Jaehyok Lim; Han, James

    2006-07-01

    Condensation of steam with non-condensable in the form of jet flow or bubbly flow inside the suppression pool is an important phenomenon on determining the containment pressure of a passively safe boiling water reactor. 32 cases of pool mixing and condensation test have been performed in Purdue University Multi-Dimensional Integral Test Assembly (PUMA) facility under the sponsor of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission to investigate thermal stratification and pool mixing inside the suppression pool during the reactor blowdown period. The test boundary conditions, such as the steam flow rate, the noncondensable gas flow rate, the initial water temperature, the pool initial pressure and the vent opening submergence depth, which covers a wide range of prototype (SBWR-600) conditions during Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) were obtained from the RELAP5 calculation. The test results show that steam is quickly condensed at the exit of the vent opening. For pure steam injection or low noncondensable injection cases, only the portion above the vent opening in the suppression pool is heated up by buoyant plumes. The water below the vent opening can be heated up slowly through conduction. The test results also show that the degree of thermal stratification in suppression pool is affected by the vent opening submergence depth, the pool initial pressure and the steam injection rate. And it is slightly affected by the initial water temperature. From these tests it is concluded that the pool mixing is strongly affected by the noncondensable gas flow rate. (authors)

  12. Aging and loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) testing of electrical connections

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, C.F.

    1998-01-01

    This report presents the results of an experimental program to determine the aging and loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) behavior of electrical connections in order to obtain an initial scoping of their performance. Ten types of connections commonly used in nuclear power plants were tested. These included 3 types of conduit seals, 2 types of cable-to-device connectors, 3 types of cable-to-cable connectors, and 2 types of in-line splices. The connections were aged for 6 months under simultaneous thermal (99 C) and radiation (46 Gy/hr) conditions. A simulated LOCA consisting of sequential high dose-rate irradiation (3 kGy/hr) and high-temperature steam exposures followed the aging. Connection functionality was monitored using insulation resistance measurements during the aging and LOCA exposures. Because only 5 of the 10 connection types passed a post-LOCA, submerged dielectric withstand test, further detailed investigation of electrical connections and the effects of cable jacket integrity on the cable-connection system is warranted.

  13. Test plan for high-burnup fuel cladding behavior under loss-of- coolant accident conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Neimark, L.A.; Kassner, T.F.

    1996-10-01

    Excessive oxidation, hydriding, and extensive irradiation damage occur in high-burnup fuel cladding, and as result, mechanical properties of high-burnup fuels are degraded significantly. This may influence the current fuel cladding failure limits for loss-of- coolant-accident (LOCA) situations, which are based on fuel cladding behavior for zero burnup. To avoid cladding fragmentation and fuel dispersal during a LOCA, 10 CFR 50.46 requires that peak cladding temperature shall not exceed 1204 degrees C (2200 degrees F) and that total oxidation of the fuel cladding nowhere exceeds 0.17 times total cladding thickness before oxidation. Because of the concern, a new experimental program to investigate high-burnup fuel cladding behavior under LOCA situations has been initiated under the sponsorship of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. A hot-cell test plan to investigate single-rod behavior under simulated LOCA conditions is described in this paper. In the meantime, industry fuel design and operating conditions are expected to undergo further changes as more advanced cladding materials are developed. Under these circumstances, mechanical properties of high-burnup fuel cladding require further investigation so that results from studies on LOCA, reactivity- initiated-accident (RIA), operational transient, and power-ramping situations, can be extrapolated to modified or advanced cladding materials and altered irradiation conditions without repeating major integral experiments in test reactors. To provide the applicable data base and mechanistic understanding, tests will be conducted to determine dynamic and static fracture toughness and tensile properties. Background and rationale for selecting the specific mechanical properties tests are also described.

  14. Long-term aging and loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) testing of electrical cables

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, C.F.; Gauthier, G.; Carlin, F.

    1996-10-01

    Experiments were performed to assess the aging degradation and loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) behavior of electrical cables subjected to long-term aging exposures. Four different cable types were tested in both the U.S. and France: (1) U.S. 2 conductor with ethylene propylene rubber (EPR) insulation and a Hypalon jacket. (2) U.S. 3 conductor with cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) insulation and a Hypalon jacket. (3) French 3 conductor with EPR insulation and a Hypalon jacket. (4) French coaxial with polyethylene (PE) insulation and a PE jacket. The data represent up to 5 years of simultaneous aging where the cables were exposed to identical aging radiation doses at either 40{degrees}C or 70{degrees}C; however, the dose rate used for the aging irradiation was varied over a wide range (2-100 Gy/hr). Aging was followed by exposure to simulated French LOCA conditions. Several mechanical, electrical, and physical-chemical condition monitoring techniques were used to investigate the degradation behavior of the cables. All the cables, except for the French PE cable, performed acceptably during the aging and LOCA simulations. In general, cable degradation at a given dose was highest for the lowest dose rate, and the amount of degradation decreased as the dose rate was increased.

  15. Computational fluid dynamics analyses of lateral heat conduction, coolant azimuthal mixing and heat transfer predictions in a BR2 fuel assembly geometry.

    SciTech Connect

    Tzanos, C. P.; Dionne, B.

    2011-05-23

    To support the analyses related to the conversion of the BR2 core from highly-enriched (HEU) to low-enriched (LEU) fuel, the thermal-hydraulics codes PLTEMP and RELAP-3D are used to evaluate the safety margins during steady-state operation (PLTEMP), as well as after a loss-of-flow, loss-of-pressure, or a loss of coolant event (RELAP). In the 1-D PLTEMP and RELAP simulations, conduction in the azimuthal and axial directions is not accounted. The very good thermal conductivity of the cladding and the fuel meat and significant temperature gradients in the lateral directions (axial and azimuthal directions) could lead to a heat flux distribution that is significantly different than the power distribution. To evaluate the significance of the lateral heat conduction, 3-D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations, using the CFD code STAR-CD, were performed. Safety margin calculations are typically performed for a hot stripe, i.e., an azimuthal region of the fuel plates/coolant channel containing the power peak. In a RELAP model, for example, a channel between two plates could be divided into a number of RELAP channels (stripes) in the azimuthal direction. In a PLTEMP model, the effect of azimuthal power peaking could be taken into account by using engineering factors. However, if the thermal mixing in the azimuthal direction of a coolant channel is significant, a stripping approach could be overly conservative by not taking into account this mixing. STAR-CD simulations were also performed to study the thermal mixing in the coolant. Section II of this document presents the results of the analyses of the lateral heat conduction and azimuthal thermal mixing in a coolant channel. Finally, PLTEMP and RELAP simulations rely on the use of correlations to determine heat transfer coefficients. Previous analyses showed that the Dittus-Boelter correlation gives significantly more conservative (lower) predictions than the correlations of Sieder-Tate and Petukhov. STAR-CD 3-D

  16. Mixed Stream Test Rig (MISTER) Startup Report

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Park

    2011-02-01

    This report describes the work accomplished to date to design, procure, assemble, authorize, and startup the Mixed Stream Test Rig (MISTER) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). It describes the reasons for establishing this capability, physical configuration of the test equipment, operations methodology, initial success, and plans for completing the initial 1,000 hour test.

  17. Preliminary Study on Utilization of Carbon Dioxide as a Coolant of High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor with MOX and Minor Actinides Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Fauzia, A. F.; Waris, A.; Novitrian

    2010-06-22

    High temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR) is an uranium oxide (UO2) fuel, graphite moderator and helium gas-cooled reactor with 30 MW in thermal output and outlet coolant temperature of 950 deg. C. Instead of using helium gas, we have utilized carbon dioxide as a coolant in the present study. Beside that, uranium and plutonium oxide (mixed oxide, MOX) and minor actinides have been employed as a new fuel type of HTTR. Utilization of plutonium and minor actinide is one of the support system to non-proliferation issue in the nuclear development. The enrichment for uranium oxide has been varied of 6-20% with plutonium and minor actinides concentration of 10%. In this study, burnup period is 1100 days. The reactor cell calculation was performed by using SRAC 2002 code, with nuclear data library was derived from JENDL3.2. Reactor core calculation was done by using CITATION module. The result shows that HTTR can achieve its criticality condition with 14% of {sup 235}U enrichment.

  18. Preliminary Study on Utilization of Carbon Dioxide as a Coolant of High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor with MOX and Minor Actinides Fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauzia, A. F.; Waris, A.; Novitrian

    2010-06-01

    High temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR) is an uranium oxide (UO2) fuel, graphite moderator and helium gas-cooled reactor with 30 MW in thermal output and outlet coolant temperature of 950° C. Instead of using helium gas, we have utilized carbon dioxide as a coolant in the present study. Beside that, uranium and plutonium oxide (mixed oxide, MOX) and minor actinides have been employed as a new fuel type of HTTR. Utilization of plutonium and minor actinide is one of the support system to non-proliferation issue in the nuclear development. The enrichment for uranium oxide has been varied of 6-20% with plutonium and minor actinides concentration of 10%. In this study, burnup period is 1100 days. The reactor cell calculation was performed by using SRAC 2002 code, with nuclear data library was derived from JENDL3.2. Reactor core calculation was done by using CITATION module. The result shows that HTTR can achieve its criticality condition with 14% of 235 U enrichment.

  19. Pulse Jet Mixing Tests With Noncohesive Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Perry A.; Bamberger, Judith A.; Enderlin, Carl W.; Fort, James A.; Wells, Beric E.; Sundaram, S. K.; Scott, Paul A.; Minette, Michael J.; Smith, Gary L.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Greenwood, Margaret S.; Morgen, Gerald P.; Baer, Ellen BK; Snyder, Sandra F.; White, Michael K.; Piepel, Gregory F.; Amidan, Brett G.; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro

    2012-02-17

    This report summarizes results from pulse jet mixing (PJM) tests with noncohesive solids in Newtonian liquid. The tests were conducted during FY 2007 and 2008 to support the design of mixing systems for the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Tests were conducted at three geometric scales using noncohesive simulants, and the test data were used to develop models predicting two measures of mixing performance for full-scale WTP vessels. The models predict the cloud height (the height to which solids will be lifted by the PJM action) and the critical suspension velocity (the minimum velocity needed to ensure all solids are suspended off the floor, though not fully mixed). From the cloud height, the concentration of solids at the pump inlet can be estimated. The predicted critical suspension velocity for lifting all solids is not precisely the same as the mixing requirement for 'disturbing' a sufficient volume of solids, but the values will be similar and closely related. These predictive models were successfully benchmarked against larger scale tests and compared well with results from computational fluid dynamics simulations. The application of the models to assess mixing in WTP vessels is illustrated in examples for 13 distinct designs and selected operational conditions. The values selected for these examples are not final; thus, the estimates of performance should not be interpreted as final conclusions of design adequacy or inadequacy. However, this work does reveal that several vessels may require adjustments to design, operating features, or waste feed properties to ensure confidence in operation. The models described in this report will prove to be valuable engineering tools to evaluate options as designs are finalized for the WTP. Revision 1 refines data sets used for model development and summarizes models developed since the completion of Revision 0.

  20. Large-Break Loss-of-Coolant Accident Testing and Simulation for 200-MWe Simplified Boiling Water Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Revankar, S.T.; Xu, Y.; Yoon, H.J.; Ishii, M.

    2002-07-01

    The performance of the safety systems of a new design of the 200-MWe simplified boiling water reactor during a large-break, loss-of-coolant accident transient was investigated through code modeling and integral system testing. The accident considered was a break in the main steam line which is the major design basis accident. RELAP5/MOD3 best estimate reactor thermalhydraulic code was used and its applicability to the reactor safety system evaluation was examined. The integral tests were performed to assess the safety systems and the response of the emergency core cooling systems to accident conditions in a scaled facility called PUMA. The details of the safety system behavior are presented. The integral test simulations examined code applicability at the scaled facility level as well as prototype key safety system performance. (authors)

  1. Pulse Jet Mixing Tests With Noncohesive Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Perry A.; Bamberger, Judith A.; Enderlin, Carl W.; Fort, James A.; Wells, Beric E.; Sundaram, S. K.; Scott, Paul A.; Minette, Michael J.; Smith, Gary L.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Greenwood, Margaret S.; Morgen, Gerald P.; Baer, Ellen BK; Snyder, Sandra F.; White, Michael; Piepel, Gregory F.; Amidan, Brett G.; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro; Bailey, Sharon A.; Bower, John C.; Denslow, Kayte M.; Eakin, David E.; Elmore, Monte R.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Guzman, Anthony D.; Hatchell, Brian K.; Hopkins, Derek F.; Hurley, David E.; Johnson, Michael D.; Kirihara, Leslie J.; Lawler, Bruce D.; Loveland, Jesse S.; Mullen, O Dennis; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Peters, Timothy J.; Robinson, Peter J.; Russcher, Michael S.; Sande, Susan; Santoso, Christian; Shoemaker, Steven V.; Silva, Steve M.; Smith, Devin E.; Su, Yin-Fong; Toth, James J.; Wiberg, John D.; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Zuljevic, Nino

    2009-05-11

    This report summarizes results from pulse jet mixing (PJM) tests with noncohesive solids in Newtonian liquid conducted during FY 2007 and 2008 to support the design of mixing systems for the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Tests were conducted at three geometric scales using noncohesive simulants. The test data were used to independently develop mixing models that can be used to predict full-scale WTP vessel performance and to rate current WTP mixing system designs against two specific performance requirements. One requirement is to ensure that all solids have been disturbed during the mixing action, which is important to release gas from the solids. The second requirement is to maintain a suspended solids concentration below 20 weight percent at the pump inlet. The models predict the height to which solids will be lifted by the PJM action, and the minimum velocity needed to ensure all solids have been lifted from the floor. From the cloud height estimate we can calculate the concentration of solids at the pump inlet. The velocity needed to lift the solids is slightly more demanding than "disturbing" the solids, and is used as a surrogate for this metric. We applied the models to assess WTP mixing vessel performance with respect to the two perform¬ance requirements. Each mixing vessel was evaluated against these two criteria for two defined waste conditions. One of the wastes was defined by design limits and one was derived from Hanford waste characterization reports. The assessment predicts that three vessel types will satisfy the design criteria for all conditions evaluated. Seven vessel types will not satisfy the performance criteria used for any of the conditions evaluated. The remaining three vessel types provide varying assessments when the different particle characteristics are evaluated. The assessment predicts that three vessel types will satisfy the design criteria for all conditions evaluated. Seven vessel types will not satisfy

  2. Experiment Operations Plan for a Loss-of-Coolant Accident Simulation in the National Research Universal Reactor Materials Tests 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect

    Russcher, G. E.; Wilson, C. L.; Marshall, R, K.; King, L. L.; Parchen, L. J.; Pilger, J. P.; Hesson, G. M.; Mohr, C. L.

    1981-09-01

    A loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) simulation program is evaluating the thermal-hydraulic and mechanical effects of LOCA conditions on pressurized water reactor test fuel bundles. This experiment operation plan for the second and third experiments of the program will provide peak fuel cladding temperatures of up to 1172K (1650{degree}F) and 1061K (1450{degree}) respectively. for a long enough time to cause test fuel cladding deformation and rupture in both. Reflood coolant delay times and the reflooding rates for the experiments were selected from thermal-hydraulic data measured in the National Research Universal (NRU) reactor facilities and test train assembly during the first experiment.

  3. Simulations and field tests of a reactor coolant pump emergency start-up by means of remote gas units

    SciTech Connect

    Omahen, P.; Gubina, F. )

    1992-12-01

    The problem of the reactor coolant pump start-up in case of emergency by means of remote gas power plant units was analyzed. In this paper a simulation model is developed which enabled a detailed simulation of the transient process occurring at the start-up. The start-up of the RCP motor set was simulated in case of available one and two gas units. The field tests were performed and the measured variable values complied well with the simulation results. Two gas units have been determined as a safe start-up scheme of the RCP motor set considering for safety reasons accepted busbars and motor protection settings. A derived model for deep rotor bars was experimentally confirmed as effective means for the RCP motor set start-up transient simulation. Start-up procedures have been designed and adopted to the safety procedures of the Nuclear Power Plant Krsko.

  4. A study of thermal stratification in the cold legs during the subcooled blowdown phase of a loss of coolant accident in the OSU APEX thermal hydraulic testing facility.

    SciTech Connect

    Wachs, D. M.

    1998-11-04

    Thermal stratification, which has been linked to the occurrence of pressurized thermal shock (PTS), is observed to occur during the early stages of simulated loss of coolant accidents (LOCAS) in the Oregon State University Advanced Plant Experiment (OSU APEX) Thermal Hydraulic Test Facility. The OSU APEX Test Facility is a scaled model of the Westinghouse AP600 nuclear power plant. Analysis of the OSU APEX facility data has allowed the determination of an onset criteria for thermal stratification and has provided support for the postulated mechanisms leading to thermal stratification. CFX 4.1, a computational fluid dynamics code, was used to generate a model of the cold legs and the downcomer that described the phenomena occurring within them. Some mixing phenomena were predicted that lead to non-uniformity between the two cold legs attached to the steam generator on the side of the facility containing the Passive Residual Heat Removal (PRHR) injection system. The stratification was found to be two phase and unlikely to be a factor in PTS.

  5. Investigations of ice formation in the Space Shuttle Main Engine 0209 main injector coolant cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, D. R.; Charklwick, D. M.

    1991-01-01

    Severe main combustion chamber wall and main injector baffle element deterioration occurred during tests of Space Shuttle Main Engine 0209. One of the possible causes considered is ice formation and blockage of coolant to these components, resulting from the mixing of leaking hot turbine exhaust gas (hydrogen rich steam) and hydrogen coolant in the injector coolant cavity. The plausibility of ice blockage is investigated through simple mixing calculations for hot gas and hydrogen, investigation of condensation and water droplet formation, calculation of the freezing times for droplets, and the prediction of ice layer thicknesses. It is concluded that condensation and droplet formation can occur, and small water droplets that form can freeze very quickly when in contact with the cold coolant cavity surfaces. Copnservative analysis predicts, however, that the maximum thickness of the ice layers formed is too small to result in significant blockage of the coolant flow.

  6. Effect of surface oxidation on the onset of nucleate boiling in a materials test reactor coolant channel

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Forrest, Eric C.; Don, Sarah M.; Hu, Lin -Wen; Buongiorno, Jacopo; McKrell, Thomas J.

    2016-02-29

    The onset of nucleate boiling (ONB) serves as the thermal-hydraulic operating limit for many research and test reactors. However, boiling incipience under forced convection has not been well-characterized in narrow channel geometries or for oxidized surface conditions. This study presents experimental data for the ONB in vertical upflow of deionized (DI) water in a simulated materials test reactor (MTR) coolant channel. The channel gap thickness and aspect ratio were 1.96 mm and 29:1, respectively. Boiling surface conditions were carefully controlled and characterized, with both heavily oxidized and native oxide surfaces tested. Measurements were performed for mass fluxes ranging from 750more » to 3000 kg/m2s and for subcoolings ranging from 10 to 45°C. ONB was identified using a combination of high-speed visual observation, surface temperature measurements, and channel pressure drop measurements. Surface temperature measurements were found to be most reliable in identifying the ONB. For the nominal (native oxide) surface, results indicate that the correlation of Bergles and Rohsenow, when paired with the appropriate single-phase heat transfer correlation, adequately predicts the ONB heat flux. Furthermore, incipience on the oxidized surface occurred at a higher heat flux and superheat than on the plain surface.« less

  7. Status of the FARO/KROTOS melt-coolant interactions tests

    SciTech Connect

    Magallon, D.; Huhtiniemi, I.; Annunziato, A.; Yerkess, A.; Hohmann, Y.H.

    1996-03-01

    Results of FARO test L-19 are reported. It involved 155 kg of 80 w% UO{sub 2}+20 w% ZrO{sub 2} at 3073 K quenched in 338-kg, 1-m-depth water at saturation at 5.0 MPa (i.e., 537 K). The test is compared with two former tests (L-06 and L-08) performed in similar conditions (1-m-depth water) but with reduced quantities of test (18 and 44 kg, respectively) and with test L-14, performed with a similar quantity of melt (125 kg) but in 2-m-depth water. No fundamental differences with the former tests have been observed. Particularly, the quenching rate per unit melt mass was of the same order (0.5 MW). On the contrary, the portion of melt which remained as a cake on the bottom was larger (50% against a maximum of 30% in the previous tests). The possible reasons for these discrepancies are discussed. Recalculations of test L-19 by using COMETA and TEXAS are also reported and commented. Results from a new set of KROTOS tests conducted with Al{sub 2}O{sub 2} to investigate further the differences already observed with corium melt are presented and discussed. In these tests the effect of men superheat, water subcooling and ambient pressure on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/water system behaviour have been tested. In contrast with corium experiments, the results demonstrated that spontaneous explosions occur in the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/water system over all the range of parameters tested in highly subcooled conditions. Some TEXAS results for the latest KROTOS Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} test, in which a violent steam explosion did occur, are presented and compared with experiment. During some KROTOS experiments there are large deformations of the bottom plate and hold-down bolts. Use is made of the 2-D axisymmetric code SEURBNUK-EURDYN to analyse these deformations of the test section and some results are presented.

  8. Environmentally Friendly Coolant System

    SciTech Connect

    David Jackson Principal Investigator

    2011-11-08

    Energy reduction through the use of the EFCS is most improved by increasing machining productivity. Throughout testing, nearly all machining operations demonstrated less land wear on the tooling when using the EFCS which results in increased tool life. These increases in tool life advance into increased productivity. Increasing productivity reduces cycle times and therefore reduces energy consumption. The average energy savings by using the EFCS in these machining operations with these materials is 9%. The advantage for end milling stays with flood coolant by about 6.6% due to its use of a low pressure pump. Face milling and drilling are both about 17.5% less energy consumption with the EFCS than flood coolant. One additional result of using the EFCS is improved surface finish. Certain machining operations using the EFCS result in a smoother surface finish. Applications where finishing operations are required will be able to take advantage of the improved finish by reducing the time or possibly eliminating completely one or more finishing steps and thereby reduce their energy consumption. Some machining operations on specific materials do not show advantages for the EFCS when compared to flood coolants. More information about these processes will be presented later in the report. A key point to remember though, is that even with equivalent results, the EFCS is replacing petroleum based coolants whose production produces GHG emissions and create unsafe work environments.

  9. Coolant line hydrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, M.D.; Kipp, W.G.

    1987-03-17

    This patent describes a hydrometer unit for connection in an automobile coolant flow line comprising: a tubular fitting adapted to be connected to the coolant flow line; a coolant receiving chamber means connected to the tubular fitting for receiving coolant from the tubular fitting; and indicating float elements contained within the coolant receiving chamber means and adapted to rise therein individually as a function of the specific gravity of the coolant. The coolant receiving chamber means includes a closure cap which when connected to the tubular fitting forms a coolant receiving chamber, retaining means for retaining the indicating float elements within the coolant receiving chamber, a viewing window member of a substantially clear material through which the float elements can be visually observed within the coolant receiving chamber means, and air venturi means located within the coolant receiving chamber means for automatically removing air which may collect within the coolant chamber means.

  10. Safety Design Strategy for the Advanced Test Reactor Primary Coolant Pump and Motor Replacement Project

    SciTech Connect

    Noel Duckwitz

    2011-06-01

    In accordance with the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 413.3B, “Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets,” safety must be integrated into the design process for new or major modifications to DOE Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities. The intended purpose of this requirement involves the handling of hazardous materials, both radiological and chemical, in a way that provides adequate protection to the public, workers, and the environment. Requirements provided in DOE Order 413.3B and DOE Order 420.1B, “Facility Safety,” and the expectations of DOE-STD-1189-2008, “Integration of Safety into the Design Process,” provide for identification of hazards early in the project and use of an integrated team approach to design safety into the facility. This safety design strategy provides the basic safety-in-design principles and concepts that will be used for the Advanced Test Reactor Reliability Sustainment Project. While this project does not introduce new hazards to the ATR, it has the potential for significant impacts to safety-related systems, structures, and components that are credited in the ATR safety basis and are being replaced. Thus the project has been determined to meet the definition of a major modification and is being managed accordingly.

  11. Influence of coolant tube curvature on film cooling effectiveness as detected by infrared imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papell, S. S.; Graham, R. W.; Cageao, R. P.

    1979-01-01

    Thermal film cooling footprints observed by infrared imagery from straight, curved, and looped coolant tube geometries are compared. It was hypothesized that the differences in secondary flow and in the turbulence structure of flow through these three tubes should influence the mixing properties between the coolant and the main stream. A flow visualization tunnel, an infrared camera and detector, and a Hilsch tube were employed to test the hypothesis.

  12. Methods of testing parameterizations: Vertical ocean mixing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tziperman, Eli

    1992-01-01

    The ocean's velocity field is characterized by an exceptional variety of scales. While the small-scale oceanic turbulence responsible for the vertical mixing in the ocean is of scales a few centimeters and smaller, the oceanic general circulation is characterized by horizontal scales of thousands of kilometers. In oceanic general circulation models that are typically run today, the vertical structure of the ocean is represented by a few tens of discrete grid points. Such models cannot explicitly model the small-scale mixing processes, and must, therefore, find ways to parameterize them in terms of the larger-scale fields. Finding a parameterization that is both reliable and plausible to use in ocean models is not a simple task. Vertical mixing in the ocean is the combined result of many complex processes, and, in fact, mixing is one of the less known and less understood aspects of the oceanic circulation. In present models of the oceanic circulation, the many complex processes responsible for vertical mixing are often parameterized in an oversimplified manner. Yet, finding an adequate parameterization of vertical ocean mixing is crucial to the successful application of ocean models to climate studies. The results of general circulation models for quantities that are of particular interest to climate studies, such as the meridional heat flux carried by the ocean, are quite sensitive to the strength of the vertical mixing. We try to examine the difficulties in choosing an appropriate vertical mixing parameterization, and the methods that are available for validating different parameterizations by comparing model results to oceanographic data. First, some of the physical processes responsible for vertically mixing the ocean are briefly mentioned, and some possible approaches to the parameterization of these processes in oceanographic general circulation models are described in the following section. We then discuss the role of the vertical mixing in the physics of the

  13. Multiloop integral system test (MIST): Test Group 31, SBLOCA (small-break loss-of-coolant accident) with varied boundary conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Gloudemans, J.R. . Nuclear Power Div.)

    1989-07-01

    The multiloop integral system test (MIST) is part of a multiphase program started in 1983 to address small-break loss-of-coolant accidents (SBLOCAs) specific to Babcock and Wilcox-designed plants. MIST is sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Babcock and Wilcox Owners Group, the Electric Power Research Institute, and Babcock and Wilcox. The unique features of the Babcock and Wilcox design, specifically the hot leg U-bends and steam generators, prevented the use of existing integral system data or existing integral system facilities to address the thermal-hydraulic SBLOCA questions. MIST and two other supporting facilities were specifically designed and constructed for this program, and an existing facility --- the once-through integral system (OTIS) --- was also used. Data from MIST and the other facilities will be used to benchmark the adequacy of system codes, such as RELAP-5 and TRAC, for predicting abnormal plant transients. The MIST program is reported in 11 volumes. The program is summarized in Volume 1; Volumes 2 through 8 describe groups of tests by test type; Volume 9 presents inter-group comparisons; Volume 10 provides comparisons between the calculations of RELAP5 MOD2 and MIST observations, and Volume 11 presents the later, Phase 4 tests. This is Volume 3 pertaining to Test Group 31, Boundary Conditions Variations. The specifications, conduct, observations, and results of these tests are described. 8 refs., 328 figs., 15 tabs.

  14. Proposed reactor coolant density monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Mackley, A.D.

    1986-01-01

    Until now there has been no feasible method of monitoring coolant density in the environment of an operating reactor core. By analysis of output from self-powered neutron detectors (SPNDs) in the core of the Loss of Fluid Test (LOFT) Reactor, the author has successfully estimated local coolant densities under post-scram conditions during a large break loss of coolant transient. The model used for estimation is not fully explained by published principles on the interaction of gamma rays with SPNDs. However, based on the success of the model, the author proposes employing self powered gamma detectors (SPGDs) to monitor reactor coolant density and discusses areas of experimental work to establish the best conditions for this application. 9 refs., 12 figs.

  15. Mixed Stream Test Rig Winter FY-2011 Report

    SciTech Connect

    Chalres Park; Tedd Lister; Kevin DeWall

    2011-04-01

    This report describes the data and analysis of the initial testing campaign of the Mixed Stream Test Rig (MISTER) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). It describes the test specimen selection, physical configuration of the test equipment, operations methodology, and data and analysis of specimens exposed in two environments designed to represent those expected for high temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE).

  16. Shuttle active thermal control system development testing. Volume 8: Tube anomaly investigation. [failure of coolant fluid tubes containing Freon 21 refrigerant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, M. W.

    1974-01-01

    A modular radiator system projected for use on the space shuttle has been tested. During thermal vacuum testing of the radiator panels leaks developed in the coolant fluid tubes containing the Freon 21 refrigerant. An analysis of thermal vacuum test conditions revealed that the test anomaly consisted of trapped Freon 21 fluid between frozen tube corners colder than the remainder of the panel. The trapped fluid expanded on further warming, causing high pressures to develop in the tubes. The pressure was sufficient to induce tube ruptures. Metallurgical analysis showed that concentric extrusion holes and heat treatment of the aluminum alloy to the -T6 condition would have prevented the ruptures. Thermal analysis indicates that attaching the tube corners to the radiator fin could eliminate the fluid trapping.

  17. Engineering scale mixing system tests for MWTF title II design

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.C.

    1994-10-10

    Mixing tests for the Multifunction Waste Tank Facility (MWTF) were conducted in 1/25 and 1/10 scale test tanks with different slurry levels, solids concentrations, different jet mixers and with simulated in-tank structures. The same test procedure was used as in the Title I program, documented in WHC-SD-W236A-ER-005. The test results support the scaling correlation derived previously in the Title I program. The tests also concluded that a partially filled tank requires less mixing power, and horizontal and angled jets in combination (H/A mixer) are significantly more effective than the two horizontal jet mixers (H/H mixer) when used for mixing slurry with a high solids concentrations.

  18. Long life coolant pump technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Design concepts were investigated to improve space system coolant pump technology to be suitable for mission durations of two years and greater. These design concepts included an improved bearing system for the pump rotating elements, consisting of pressurized conical bearings. This design was satisfactorily endurance tested as was a new prototype pump built using various other improved design concepts. Based upon an overall assessment of the results of the program it is concluded that reliable coolant pumps can be designed for three year space missions.

  19. Measuring flow and pressure of lithium coolant under developmental testing of a high-temperature cooling system of a space nuclear power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolev, V. Ya.; Sinyavsky, V. V.

    2014-12-01

    Sub-megawatt space NPP use lithium as a coolant and niobium alloy as a structural material. In order to refine the lithium-niobium technology of the material and design engineering, lithium-niobium loops were worked out in RSC Energia, and they were tested at a working temperature of lithium equal to 1070-1300 K. In order to measure the lithium flow and pressure, special gauges were developed, which made possible the calibration and checkout of the loops without their dismantling. The paper describes the architecture of the electromagnetic flowmeter and the electromagnetic vibrating-wire pressure transducer (gauge) for lithium coolant in the nuclear power plant cooling systems. The operating principles of these meters are presented. Flowmeters have been developed for channel diameters ranging from 10 to 100 mm, which are capable of measuring lithium flows in the range of 0.1 to 30 L/s with the error of 3% for design calibration and 1% for volume graduation. The temperature error of the pressure transducers does not exceed 0.4% per 100 K; the nonlinearity and hysteresis of the calibration curve do not exceed 0.3 and 0.4%, respectively. The transducer applications are illustrated by the examples of results obtained from tests on the NPP module mockup and heat pipes of a radiation cooler.

  20. Lidar observations of mixed layer dynamics - Tests of parameterized entrainment models of mixed layer growth rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boers, R.; Eloranta, E. W.; Coulter, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    Ground based lidar measurements of the atmospheric mixed layer depth, the entrainment zone depth and the wind speed and wind direction were used to test various parameterized entrainment models of mixed layer growth rate. Six case studies under clear air convective conditions over flat terrain in central Illinois are presented. It is shown that surface heating alone accounts for a major portion of the rise of the mixed layer on all days. A new set of entrainment model constants was determined which optimized height predictions for the dataset. Under convective conditions, the shape of the mixed layer height prediction curves closely resembled the observed shapes. Under conditions when significant wind shear was present, the shape of the height prediction curve departed from the data suggesting deficiencies in the parameterization of shear production. Development of small cumulus clouds on top of the layer is shown to affect mixed layer depths in the afternoon growth phase.

  1. Machine coolant waste reduction by optimizing coolant life. Project summary

    SciTech Connect

    Pallansch, J.

    1995-08-01

    The project was designed to study the following: A specific water-soluble coolant (Blasocut 2000 Universal) in use with a variety of machines, tools, and materials; Coolant maintenance practices associated with three types of machines; Health effects of use and handling of recycled coolant; Handling practices for chips and waste coolant; Chip/coolant separation; and Oil/water separation.

  2. High performance CLSM field mixing and pumping test results

    SciTech Connect

    Rajendran, N.; Langton, C.A.

    1997-05-14

    An improved low bleed water CLSM mix was field tested on May 13, 1997 at the Throop portable auger batching plant. Production and pumping tests were very successful. The four cubic yards of material pumped into a ply wood form where it flowed 48 feet (the entire length of the form). The CLSM slurry was very uniform, self leveling, cohesive, showed no segregation, and had no bleed water. Properties of the High Performance CLSM were the same for material collected at the auger and at the end of the pipeline except for the air content which was 5.5% at the auger and 3.2% at the end of the pipeline. This is exactly what was expected and indicates that this CLSM is easy to mix and pump in the Throop/BSRI equipment. CLSM Mix TW-10 is recommended for Tank Closure based on the field batching and pumping tests.

  3. NUCLEAR REACTOR COOLANT

    DOEpatents

    Colichman, E.L.

    1959-10-20

    The formation of new reactor coolants which suppress polymerization resulting from pyrolytic and radiation decomposition is described. The coolants consist of polyphenyls and condensed ring compounds having from two to about four carbon rings and from 0.1 to about 5% of beryllium or magnesium dispersed in the hydrocarbon.

  4. NUCLEAR REACTOR COOLANT

    DOEpatents

    Colichman, E.L.

    1959-10-20

    The formation of new reactor coolants which suppress polymerization resulting from pyrolitic and radiation decomposition is described. The coolants consist of polyphenyls and condensed ring compounds having from two to about four carbon rings and from 0.1 to about 10% of an alkall metal dispersed in the hydrocarbon.

  5. LIDAR OBSERVATIONS OF MIXED LAYER DYNAMICS: TESTS OF PARAMETERIZED ENTRAINMENT MODELS OF MIXED LAYER GROWTH RATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lidar measurements of the atmospheric boundary layer height, the entrainment zone, wind speed and direction, ancillary temperature profiles and surface flux data were used to test current parameterized entrainment models of mixed layer growth rate. Six case studies under clear ai...

  6. Assessment of Person Fit for Mixed-Format Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinharay, Sandip

    2015-01-01

    Person-fit assessment may help the researcher to obtain additional information regarding the answering behavior of persons. Although several researchers examined person fit, there is a lack of research on person-fit assessment for mixed-format tests. In this article, the lz statistic and the ?2 statistic, both of which have been used for tests…

  7. Rapid estimation of lives of deficient superpave mixes and laboratory-based accelerated mix testing models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manandhar, Chandra Bahadur

    The engineers from the Kansas Department of Transportation (KDOT) often have to decide whether or not to accept non-conforming Superpave mixtures during construction. The first part of this study focused on estimating lives of deficient Superpave pavements incorporating nonconforming Superpave mixtures. These criteria were based on the Hamburg Wheel-Tracking Device (HWTD) test results and analysis. The second part of this study focused on developing accelerated mix testing models to considerably reduce test duration. To accomplish the first objective, nine fine-graded Superpave mixes of 12.5-mm nominal maximum aggregate size (NMAS) with asphalt grade PG 64-22 from six administrative districts of KDOT were selected. Specimens were prepared at three different target air void levels Ndesign gyrations and four target simulated in-place density levels with the Superpave gyratory compactor. Average number of wheel passes to 20-mm rut depth, creep slope, stripping slope, and stripping inflection point in HWTD tests were recorded and then used in the statistical analysis. Results showed that, in general, higher simulated in-place density up to a certain limit of 91% to 93%, results in a higher number of wheel passes until 20-mm rut depth in HWTD tests. A Superpave mixture with very low air voids Ndesign (2%) level performed very poorly in the HWTD test. HWTD tests were also performed on six 12.5-mm NMAS mixtures with air voids Ndesign of 4% for six projects, simulated in-place density of 93%, two temperature levels and five load levels with binder grades of PG 64-22, PG 64-28, and PG 70-22. Field cores of 150-mm in diameter from three projects in three KDOT districts with 12.5-mm NMAS and asphalt grade of PG 64-22 were also obtained and tested in HWTD for model evaluation. HWTD test results indicated as expected. Statistical analysis was performed and accelerated mix testing models were developed to determine the effect of increased temperature and load on the duration of

  8. Thermal and fluid mixing in a 1/2-scale test facility. Volume 2. Data report. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Dolan, F.X.; Valenzuela, J.A.

    1985-07-01

    This report presents data from an experimental study of fluid mixing in a 1/2-scale model of the cold leg, downcomer, lower plenum, pump simulator, and loop seal typical of a Westinghouse Pressurized Water Reactor. The tests were transient cooldown tests in that they simulated an extreme condition of Small Break Loss of Coolant Accident (SBLOCA) during which cold High Pressure Injection (HPI) fluid is injected into stagnant, hot primary fluid with complete loss of natural circulation in the loop. Extensive temperature, velocity, and heat transfer coefficient data are presented at two cold leg Froude numbers: 0.052 and 0.076. The 1/2-scale data are compared with earlier data from a 1/5-scale, geometrically similar facility to assess scaling principles.

  9. Panel Design Variations in the Multistage Test Using the Mixed-Format Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Jiseon; Chung, Hyewon; Dodd, Barbara G.; Park, Ryoungsun

    2012-01-01

    This study compared various panel designs of the multistage test (MST) using mixed-format tests in the context of classification testing. Simulations varied the design of the first-stage module. The first stage was constructed according to three levels of test information functions (TIFs) with three different TIF centers. Additional computerized…

  10. MACHINE COOLANT WASTE REDUCTION BY OPTIMIZING COOLANT LIFE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Machine shops use coolants to improve the life and function of machine tools. hese coolants become contaminated with oils with use, and this contamination can lead to growth of anaerobic bacteria and shortened coolant life. his project investigated methods to extend coolant life ...

  11. Evaluation of engine coolant recycling processes: Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, W.H.

    1999-08-01

    Engine coolant recycling continues to provide solutions to both economic and environmental challenges often faced with the disposal of used engine coolant. General Motors` Service Technology Group (STG), in a continuing effort to validate the general practice of recycling engine coolants, has conducted an in-depth study on the capabilities of recycled coolants. Various recycling processes ranging from complex forms of fractional distillation to simple filtration were evaluated in this study to best represent the current state of coolant recycling technology. This study incorporates both lab and (limited) fleet testing to determine the performance capabilities of the recycled coolants tested. While the results suggest the need for additional studies in this area, they reveal the true capabilities of all types of engine coolant recycling technologies.

  12. PROPERTIES IMPORTANT TO MIXING FOR WTP LARGE SCALE INTEGRATED TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, D.; Martino, C.; Poirier, M.

    2012-04-26

    Large Scale Integrated Testing (LSIT) is being planned by Bechtel National, Inc. to address uncertainties in the full scale mixing performance of the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Testing will use simulated waste rather than actual Hanford waste. Therefore, the use of suitable simulants is critical to achieving the goals of the test program. External review boards have raised questions regarding the overall representativeness of simulants used in previous mixing tests. Accordingly, WTP requested the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to assist with development of simulants for use in LSIT. Among the first tasks assigned to SRNL was to develop a list of waste properties that matter to pulse-jet mixer (PJM) mixing of WTP tanks. This report satisfies Commitment 5.2.3.1 of the Department of Energy Implementation Plan for Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 2010-2: physical properties important to mixing and scaling. In support of waste simulant development, the following two objectives are the focus of this report: (1) Assess physical and chemical properties important to the testing and development of mixing scaling relationships; (2) Identify the governing properties and associated ranges for LSIT to achieve the Newtonian and non-Newtonian test objectives. This includes the properties to support testing of sampling and heel management systems. The test objectives for LSIT relate to transfer and pump out of solid particles, prototypic integrated operations, sparger operation, PJM controllability, vessel level/density measurement accuracy, sampling, heel management, PJM restart, design and safety margin, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Verification and Validation (V and V) and comparison, performance testing and scaling, and high temperature operation. The slurry properties that are most important to Performance Testing and Scaling depend on the test objective and rheological classification of the slurry (i

  13. A Heated Tube Facility for Rocket Coolant Channel Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, James M.; Pease, Gary M.; Meyer, Michael L.

    1995-01-01

    The capabilities of a heated tube facility used for testing rocket engine coolant channels at the NASA Lewis Research Center are presented. The facility uses high current, low voltage power supplies to resistively heat a test section to outer wall temperatures as high as 730 C (1350 F). Liquid or gaseous nitrogen, gaseous helium, or combustible liquids can be used as the test section coolant. The test section is enclosed in a vacuum chamber to minimize heat loss to the surrounding system. Test section geometry, size, and material; coolant properties; and heating levels can be varied to generate heat transfer and coolant performance data bases.

  14. Circulation within the primary system at TMI-2 with lowered coolant level and at atmospheric conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Baston, V.F.; Hofstetter, K.J.; Malinauskas, A.P.

    1985-06-01

    Experiments were performed with the Three Mile Island reactor coolant system open to the atmosphere and the coolant lowered to a level above the fuel (a condition required for defueling) to ascertain the extent of coolant mixing. A principal concern for coolant decontamination during defueling is the radionuclides released and their distribution within the primary system. Analyses of radionuclide, temperature, and dissolved oxygen data taken during these experiments confirm mixing in the primary system under forced coolant flow conditions with only minimal mixing occurring during static periods.

  15. LOFA (loss of flow accident) and LOCA (loss of coolant accident) in the TIBER-II engineering test reactor: Appendix A-4

    SciTech Connect

    Sviatoslavsky, I.N.; Attaya, H.M.; Corradini, M.L.; Lomperski, S.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the preliminary analysis of LOFA (loss of flow accident) and LOCA (loss of coolant accident) in the TIBER-II engineering test reactor breeding shield. TIBER-II is a compact reactor with a major radius of 3 m and thus requires a thin, high efficiency shield on the inboard side. The use of tungsten in the inboard shield implies a rather high rate of afterheat upon plasma shutdown, which must be dissipated in a controlled manner to avoid the possibility of radioactivity release or threatening the investment. Because the shield is cooled with an aqueous solution, LOFA does not pose a problem as long as natural convection can be established. LOCA, however, has more serious consequences, particularly on the inboard side. Circulation of air by natural convection is proposed as a means for dissipating the inboard shield decay heat. The safety and environmental implications of such a scheme are evaluated. It is shown that the inboard shield temperature never exceeds 510/sup 0/C following LOCA posing no hazard to reactor personnel and not threatening the investment. 7 refs., 6 figs.

  16. Preliminary Scaling Estimate for Select Small Scale Mixing Demonstration Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, Beric E.; Fort, James A.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Rector, David R.; Schonewill, Philip P.

    2013-09-12

    The Hanford Site double-shell tank (DST) system provides the staging location for waste that will be transferred to the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Specific WTP acceptance criteria for waste feed delivery describe the physical and chemical characteristics of the waste that must be met before the waste is transferred from the DSTs to the WTP. One of the more challenging requirements relates to the sampling and characterization of the undissolved solids (UDS) in a waste feed DST because the waste contains solid particles that settle and their concentration and relative proportion can change during the transfer of the waste in individual batches. A key uncertainty in the waste feed delivery system is the potential variation in UDS transferred in individual batches in comparison to an initial sample used for evaluating the acceptance criteria. To address this uncertainty, a number of small-scale mixing tests have been conducted as part of Washington River Protection Solutions’ Small Scale Mixing Demonstration (SSMD) project to determine the performance of the DST mixing and sampling systems.

  17. Use of scaled BWR lower plenum boron mixing tests to qualify the boron transport model used in TRACG

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, M. M.; Straka, M.; Chu, Y. C.; Heck, C. L.; Andersen, J. G. M.; Jacobs, R. H.

    2012-07-01

    In 2001 GEH applied best estimate methods combined with a statistical methodology to determine upper bound limits for key licensing parameters for anticipated operation occurrence (AOO) transient and anticipated transients without scram (ATWS) overpressure analyses for operating Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs). The methodology was subsequently extended for ESBWR AOO, ATWS, loss of coolant, and stability analyses. GEH is extending the methodology to long-term ATWS analyses for the operating BWRs. A long-term ATWS scenario uses injection of borated water to achieve reactor shutdown. Predicting the mixing and transport of boron is important for calculating the impact on the key licensing parameters. For the many operating BWRs where the denser boron solution is injected into the lower plenum, stratification may occur, delaying boron transport to the core region. CFD modeling can be used to model the stratification and mixing of the boron solution, but such calculations are extremely computer intensive and not cost effective; therefore, a more-empirical approach supported by a theoretical scaling of the dominant phenomena and backed by test data and benchmark calculations is used. The paper presents the TRACG lower plenum boron transport model qualification effort. The scaling basis used to implement the TRACG boron transport model for BWR applications is discussed. (authors)

  18. Thermal mixing in a model cold leg and downcomer at low flow rates. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Rothe, P.H.; Fanning, M.W.

    1983-03-01

    This report describes an experimental program of fluid-mixing experiments performed at atmospheric pressure in a 1/5-scale, transparent model of a cold leg and downcomer typical of Combustion Engineering and Westinghouse Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). The test program simulated steady-state conditions thought to be extreme for small break Loss of Coolant Accidents (LOCAs). Analysis of transient and steady-state temperature records indicates that the cold High-Pressure Injection (HPI) coolant water and the hot primary coolant water are well mixed prior to flowing over the reactor vessel wall.

  19. Reactor coolant pump flywheel

    SciTech Connect

    Finegan, John Raymond; Kreke, Francis Joseph; Casamassa, John Joseph

    2013-11-26

    A flywheel for a pump, and in particular a flywheel having a number of high density segments for use in a nuclear reactor coolant pump. The flywheel includes an inner member and an outer member. A number of high density segments are provided between the inner and outer members. The high density segments may be formed from a tungsten based alloy. A preselected gap is provided between each of the number of high density segments. The gap accommodates thermal expansion of each of the number of segments and resists the hoop stress effect/keystoning of the segments.

  20. Comparisons between a mixing ability test and masticatory performance tests using a brittle or an elastic test food.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, T; Fueki, K; Igarashi, Y

    2009-03-01

    A variety of chewing tests and test items have been utilized to evaluate masticatory function. The purpose of this study was to compare a mixing ability test with masticatory performance tests using peanuts or gummy jelly as test foods. Thirty-two completely dentate subjects (Dentate group, mean age: 25.1 years) and 40 removable partial denture wearers (RPD group, mean age: 65.5 years) participated in this study. The subjects were asked to chew a two-coloured paraffin wax cube as a test item for 10 strokes. Mixing Ability Index (MAI) was determined from the colour mixture and shape of the chewed cube. Subjects were asked to chew 3 g portions of peanuts and a piece of gummy jelly for 20 strokes, respectively. Median particle size of chewed peanuts was determined using a multiple-sieving method. Concentration of dissolved glucose from the surface of the chewed gummy jelly was measured using a blood glucose meter. Pearson's correlation coefficient was used to test the relationships between the MAI, median particle size and the concentration of dissolved glucose. Mixing Ability Index was significantly related to median particle size (Dentate group: r = -0.56, P < 0.001, RPD group: r = -0.70, P < 0.001), but not significantly related to glucose concentration (Dentate group: r = 0.12, RPD group: r = 0.21, P > 0.05). It seems that ability of mixing the bolus is more strongly related to the ability of comminuting brittle food than elastic food. PMID:18713307

  1. Testing nonunitarity of neutrino mixing matrices at neutrino factories

    SciTech Connect

    Goswami, Srubabati; Ota, Toshihiko

    2008-08-01

    In this paper we explore the effect of nonunitary neutrino mixing on neutrino oscillation probabilities both in vacuum and matter. In particular, we consider the {nu}{sub {mu}}{yields}{nu}{sub {tau}} channel and, using a neutrino factory as the source for {nu}{sub {mu}}'s, discuss the constraints that can be obtained on the moduli and phases of the parameters characterizing the violation of unitarity. We point out how the new CP violation phases present in the case where the nonunitary mixings give rise to spurious ''degenerate'' solutions in the parameter space. We also discuss how the true solutions can be extricated by combining measurements at several baselines.

  2. Powers of Goodness-of-Fit Tests in Detecting Balanced Mixed Normal Distributions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bajgier, Steve M.; Aggarwal, Lalit K.

    1991-01-01

    Ignorance of the characteristics of a mixed population may lead to bias in a summary measure of a phenomenon. A test based on sample kurtosis is demonstrated by a simulation study to be more powerful than six other known tests in detecting a class of mixed normal distributions. (SLD)

  3. Industry-Oriented Laboratory Development for Mixed-Signal IC Test Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, J.; Haffner, M.; Yoder, S.; Scott, M.; Reehal, G.; Ismail, M.

    2010-01-01

    The semiconductor industry is lacking qualified integrated circuit (IC) test engineers to serve in the field of mixed-signal electronics. The absence of mixed-signal IC test education at the collegiate level is cited as one of the main sources for this problem. In response to this situation, the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at…

  4. TRAC-PF1/MOD1 calculations and data comparisons for MIST (Multi-Loop Integral System Test) small-break loss-of-coolant accidents with scaled 10 cm/sup 2/ and 50 cm/sup 2/ breaks

    SciTech Connect

    Steiner, J.L.; Siebe, D.A.; Boyack, B.E.

    1987-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is a participant in the Integral System Test (IST) program initiated in June 1983 for the purpose of providing integral system test data on specific issues/phenomena relevant to post-small-break loss-of-coolant accidents (SBLOCAs), loss of feedwater and other transients in Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) plant designs. The Multi-Loop Integral System Test (MIST) facility is the largest single component in the IST program. MIST is a 2 x 4 (2 hot legs and steam generators, 4 cold legs and reactor-coolant pumps) representation of lowered-loop reactor systems of the B and W design. It is a full-height, full-pressure facility with 1/817 power and volume scaling. Two other experimental facilities are included in the IST program: test loops at the University of Maryland, College Park, and at Stanford Research Institute. The objective of the IST tests is to generate high-quality experimental data to be used for assessing thermal-hydraulic safety computer codes. Efforts are underway at Los Alamos to assess TRAC-PF1/MOD1 against data from each of the IST facilities. Calculations and data comparisons for TRAC-PF1/MOD1 assessment have been completed for two transients run in the MIST facility. These are the MIST nominal test. Test 3109AA, a scaled 10 cm/sup 2/ SBLOCA and Test 320201, a scaled 50 cm/sup 2/ SBLOCA. Only MIST assessment results are presented in this paper.

  5. Mixed oxide fuels testing in the advanced test reactor to support plutonium disposition

    SciTech Connect

    Ryskamp, J.M.; Sterbentz, J.W.; Chang, G.S.

    1995-09-01

    An intense worldwide effort is now under way to find means of reducing the stockpile of weapons-grade plutonium. One of the most attractive solutions would be to use WGPu as fuel in existing light water reactors (LWRs) in the form of mixed oxide (MOX) fuel - i.e., plutonia (PUO{sub 2}) mixed with urania (UO{sub 2}). Before U.S. reactors could be used for this purpose, their operating licenses would have to be amended. Numerous technical issues must be resolved before LWR operating licenses can be amended to allow the use of MOX fuel. These issues include the following: (1) MOX fuel fabrication process verification, (2) Whether and how to use burnable poisons to depress MOX fuel initial reactivity, which is higher than that of urania, (3) The effects of WGPu isotopic composition, (4) The feasibility of loading MOX fuel with plutonia content up to 7% by weight, (5) The effects of americium and gallium in WGPu, (6) Fission gas release from MOX fuel pellets made from WGPu, (7) Fuel/cladding gap closure, (8) The effects of power cycling and off-normal events on fuel integrity, (9) Development of radial distributions of burnup and fission products, (10) Power spiking near the interfaces of MOX and urania fuel assemblies, and (11) Fuel performance code validation. We have performed calculations to show that the use of hafnium shrouds can produce spectrum adjustments that will bring the flux spectrum in ATR test loops into a good approximation to the spectrum anticipated in a commercial LWR containing MOX fuel while allowing operation of the test fuel assemblies near their optimum values of linear heat generation rate. The ATR would be a nearly ideal test bed for developing data needed to support applications to license LWRs for operation with MOX fuel made from weapons-grade plutonium. The requirements for planning and implementing a test program in the ATR have been identified.

  6. Refinements to the Mixed-Mode Bending Test for Delamination Toughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeder, James R.

    2000-01-01

    The mixed-mode bending (MMB) test for delamination toughness was first introduced in 1988. This simple test is a combination of the standard Mode I (opening) test and a Mode II (sliding) test. This MMB test has become widely used in the United States and around the world for mixed-mode toughness measurements. Because of the widespread use of this test method, it is being considered for standardization by ASTM Committee D30. This paper discusses several improvements to the original test method. The improvements to the MMB test procedure include an improved method for calculating toughness from the measured test quantities, a more accurate way of setting the mixed-mode ratio to be tested, and the inclusion of a new alignment criterion for improved consistency in measured values.

  7. 183-H Basin Mixed Waste Analysis and Testing Report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    The purpose of this sampling and analysis report is to provide data necessary to support treatment and disposal options for the low-level mixed waste from the 183-H solar evaporation ponds. In 1973, four of the 16 flocculation and sedimentation basins were designated for use as solar evaporation basins to provide waste reduction by natural evaporation of liquid chemical wastes from the 300 Area fuel fabrication facilities. The primary purpose of this effort is to gather chemical and bulk property data for the waste in the drums/boxes of sediment removed from the basin at Central Waste Complex.

  8. Effluent testing for the Oak Ridge mixed waste incinerator: Emissions test for August 27, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Bostick, W.D.; Bunch, D.H.; Gibson, L.V.; Hoffmann, D.P.; Shoemaker, J.L.

    1990-12-01

    On August 27, 1990, a special emissions test was performed at the K-1435 Toxic Substance Control Act Mixed Waste Incinerator. A sampling and analysis plan was implemented to characterize the incinerator waste streams during a 6 hour burn of actual mixed waste. The results of this characterization are summarized in the present report. Significant among the findings is the observation that less than 3% of the uranium fed to the incinerator kiln was discharged as stack emission. This value is consistent with the estimate of 4% or less derived from long-term mass balance of previous operating experience and with the value assumed in the original Environmental Impact Statement. Approximately 1.4% of the total uranium fed to the incinerator kiln appeared in the aqueous scrubber blowdown; about 85% of the total uranium in the aqueous waste was insoluble (i.e., removable by filtration). The majority of the uranium fed to the incinerator kiln appeared in the ash material, apparently associated with phosphorous as a sparingly-soluble species. Many other metals of potential regulatory concern also appeared to concentrate in the ash as sparingly-soluble species, with minimal partition to the aqueous waste. The aqueous waste was discharged to the Central Neutralization Facility where it was effectively treated by coprecipitation with iron. The treated, filtered aqueous effluent met Environmental Protection Agency interim primary drinking water standards for regulated metals.

  9. Test procedures for polyester immobilized salt-containing surrogate mixed wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Biyani, R.K.; Hendrickson, D.W.

    1997-07-18

    These test procedures are written to meet the procedural needs of the Test Plan for immobilization of salt containing surrogate mixed waste using polymer resins, HNF-SD-RE-TP-026 and to ensure adequacy of conduct and collection of samples and data. This testing will demonstrate the use of four different polyester vinyl ester resins in the solidification of surrogate liquid and dry wastes, similar to some mixed wastes generated by DOE operations.

  10. Ethnic DIF in Reading Tests with Mixed Item Formats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Catherine S.; Lee, Yoonsun

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a study of ethnic Differential Item Functioning (DIF) for 4th-, 7th-, and 10th-grade reading items on a state criterion-referenced achievement test. The tests, administered 1997 to 2001, were composed of multiple-choice and constructed-response items. Item performance by focal groups (i.e., students from Asian/Pacific Island,…

  11. A TEST FOR RADIAL MIXING USING LOCAL STAR SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Jincheng; Chen Li; Hou Jinliang; Sellwood, J. A.; Pryor, Carlton E-mail: chenli@shao.ac.cn E-mail: sellwood@physics.rutgers.edu

    2012-08-01

    We use samples of local main-sequence stars to show that the radial gradient of [Fe/H] in the thin disk of the Milky Way decreases with mean effective stellar temperature. Many of these stars are visiting the solar neighborhood from the inner and outer Galaxy. We use the angular momentum of each star about the Galactic center to determine the guiding center radius and to eliminate the effects of epicyclic motion, which would otherwise blur the estimated gradients. We interpret the effective temperature as a proxy for mean age, and conclude that the decreasing gradient is consistent with the predictions of radial mixing due to transient spiral patterns. We find some evidence that the trend of decreasing gradient with increasing mean age breaks to a constant gradient for samples of stars whose main-sequence lifetimes exceed the likely age of the thin disk.

  12. Theoretical and experimental study of flow through turbine cascades with coolant flow injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabakoff, W.; Hamed, A.

    1975-01-01

    An analytical study is presented which deals with the change in the outlet flow conditions from a turbine blade row due to coolant air injection through slots. The analysis applies to small secondary to primary mass flow ratios, taking into consideration the change in boundary layer development resulting from injection. The effects of injection location, injection flow angle and injected air momentum flux are investigated. The results of the present analysis are compared with the values obtained using the mixing theory method and experimental data from cold flow tests in a turbine cascade tunnel.

  13. The Role of Cohesive Particle Interactions on Solids Uniformity and Mobilization During Jet Mixing: Testing Recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Wells, Beric E.; Bamberger, Judith A.; Fort, James A.; Chun, Jaehun; Jenks, Jeromy WJ

    2010-04-01

    Radioactive waste that is currently stored in large underground tanks at the Hanford Site will be staged in selected double-shell tanks (DSTs) and then transferred to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Before being transferred, the waste will be mixed, sampled, and characterized to determine if the waste composition and meets the waste feed specifications. Washington River Protection Solutions is conducting a Tank Mixing and Sampling Demonstration Program to determine the mixing effectiveness of the current baseline mixing system that uses two jet mixer pumps and the adequacy of the planned sampling method. The overall purpose of the demonstration program is to mitigate the technical risk associated with the mixing and sampling systems meeting the feed certification requirements for transferring waste to the WTP.The purpose of this report is to analyze existing data and evaluate whether scaled mixing tests with cohesive simulants are needed to meet the overall objectives of the small-scale mixing demonstration program. This evaluation will focus on estimating the role of cohesive particle interactions on various physical phenomena that occur in parts of the mixing process. A specific focus of the evaluation will be on the uniformity of suspended solids in the mixed region. Based on the evaluation presented in this report and the absence of definitive studies, the recommendation is to conduct scaled mixing tests with cohesive particles and augment the initial testing with non-cohesive particles. In addition, planning for the quantitative tests would benefit from having test results from some scoping experiments that would provide results on the general behavior when cohesive inter-particle forces are important.

  14. IRT-Estimated Reliability for Tests Containing Mixed Item Formats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shu, Lianghua; Schwarz, Richard D.

    2014-01-01

    As a global measure of precision, item response theory (IRT) estimated reliability is derived for four coefficients (Cronbach's a, Feldt-Raju, stratified a, and marginal reliability). Models with different underlying assumptions concerning test-part similarity are discussed. A detailed computational example is presented for the targeted…

  15. Transient two-phase performance of LOFT reactor coolant pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, T.H.; Modro, S.M.

    1983-01-01

    Performance characteristics of Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) reactor coolant pumps under transient two-phase flow conditions were obtained based on the analysis of two large and small break loss-of-coolant experiments conducted at the LOFT facility. Emphasis is placed on the evaluation of the transient two-phase flow effects on the LOFT reactor coolant pump performance during the first quadrant operation. The measured pump characteristics are presented as functions of pump void fraction which was determined based on the measured density. The calculated pump characteristics such as pump head, torque (or hydraulic torque), and efficiency are also determined as functions of pump void fractions. The importance of accurate modeling of the reactor coolant pump performance under two-phase conditions is addressed. The analytical pump model, currently used in most reactor analysis codes to predict transient two-phase pump behavior, is assessed.

  16. Turbine vane coolant flow variations and calculated effects on metal temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, F. C.; Meitner, P. L.; Russell, L. M.

    1975-01-01

    Seventy-two air-cooled turbine vanes were tested to determine coolant flow variations among the vanes. Calculations were made to estimate the effect of measured coolant flow variations on local vane metal temperatures. The calculations were based on the following assumed operating conditions: turbine inlet temperature, 1700 K (2600 F); turbine inlet pressure, 31 N/sq cm (45 psia); coolant inlet temperature, 811 K (1000 F); and total coolant to gas flow ratio, 0.065. Variations of total coolant flow were not large (about 10 percent from the arithmetic mean) for all 72 vanes, but variations in local coolant flows were large. The local coolant flow variations ranged from 8 to 75 percent, and calculated metal temperature variations ranged from 8 to 60 K (15 to 180 F).

  17. 1996 Coolant Flow Management Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hippensteele, Steven A. (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    The following compilation of documents includes a list of the 66 attendees, a copy of the viewgraphs presented, and a summary of the discussions held after each session at the 1996 Coolant Flow Management Workshop held at the Ohio Aerospace Institute, adjacent to the NASA Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio on December 12-13, 1996. The workshop was organized by H. Joseph Gladden and Steven A. Hippensteele of NASA Lewis Research Center. Participants in this workshop included Coolant Flow Management team members from NASA Lewis, their support service contractors, the turbine engine companies, and the universities. The participants were involved with research projects, contracts and grants relating to: (1) details of turbine internal passages, (2) computational film cooling capabilities, and (3) the effects of heat transfer on both sides. The purpose of the workshop was to assemble the team members, along with others who work in gas turbine cooling research, to discuss needed research and recommend approaches that can be incorporated into the Center's Coolant Flow Management program. The workshop was divided into three sessions: (1) Internal Coolant Passage Presentations, (2) Film Cooling Presentations, and (3) Coolant Flow Integration and Optimization. Following each session there was a group discussion period.

  18. Waste receiving and processing module 2A mixing tests status report

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, J.R.; Hull, K.J.

    1994-11-18

    The purpose of this report is to document the Phase II test conditions, observations, and results of this work. This report provides additional mixing performance test data and rheologic data that provide further indications that there are clear and distinct advantages in the preliminary choice of high-shear mixing alone, and high-shear dispersion in combination with, or followed by, a low-speed type mixer/stirrer for WRAP 2A facility design. Another objective was to determine if significant scale-up problems might exist in the various mix and mixer designs. In the later Phase 2 tests the test material quantities were significantly larger than in the Phase 1 tests.

  19. Analysis and testing of high entrainment single nozzle jet pumps with variable mixing tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickman, K. E.; Hill, P. G.; Gilbert, G. B.

    1972-01-01

    An analytical model was developed to predict the performance characteristics of axisymmetric single-nozzle jet pumps with variable area mixing tubes. The primary flow may be subsonic or supersonic. The computer program uses integral techniques to calculate the velocity profiles and the wall static pressures that result from the mixing of the supersonic primary jet and the subsonic secondary flow. An experimental program was conducted to measure mixing tube wall static pressure variations, velocity profiles, and temperature profiles in a variable area mixing tube with a supersonic primary jet. Static pressure variations were measured at four different secondary flow rates. These test results were used to evaluate the analytical model. The analytical results compared well to the experimental data. Therefore, the analysis is believed to be ready for use to relate jet pump performance characteristics to mixing tube design.

  20. Effects of reclaimed asphalt pavement on indirect tensile strength test of foamed asphalt mix tested in dry condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yati Katman, Herda; Rasdan Ibrahim, Mohd; Yazip Matori, Mohd; Norhisham, Shuhairy; Ismail, Norlela

    2013-06-01

    Indirect tensile strength (ITS) test was conducted to analyse strength of the foamed asphalt mixes incorporating reclaimed asphalt pavement. Samples were tested for ITS after cured in the oven at 40°C for 72 hours. This testing condition known as dry condition or unconditioned. Laboratory results show that reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) contents insignificantly affect the ITS results. ITS results significantly affected by foamed bitumen contents.

  1. The Performance of IRT Model Selection Methods with Mixed-Format Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whittaker, Tiffany A.; Chang, Wanchen; Dodd, Barbara G.

    2012-01-01

    When tests consist of multiple-choice and constructed-response items, researchers are confronted with the question of which item response theory (IRT) model combination will appropriately represent the data collected from these mixed-format tests. This simulation study examined the performance of six model selection criteria, including the…

  2. Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) closure, Savannah River Plant: Clay cap test section construction report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-02-26

    This report contains appendices 3 through 6 for the Clay Cap Test Section Construction Report for the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) closure at the Savannah River Plant. The Clay Cap Test Program was conducted to evaluate the source, lab. permeability, in-situ permeability, and compaction characteristics, representative of kaolin clays from the Aiken, South Carolina vicinity. (KJD)

  3. A testing program to evaluate the effects of simulant mixed wastes on plastic transportation packaging components

    SciTech Connect

    Nigrey, P.J.; Dickens, T.G.; Dickman, P.T.

    1997-08-01

    Based on regulatory requirements for Type A and B radioactive material packaging, a Testing Program was developed to evaluate the effects of mixed wastes on plastic materials which could be used as liners and seals in transportation containers. The plastics evaluated in this program were butadiene-acrylonitrile copolymer (Nitrile rubber), cross-linked polyethylene, epichlorohydrin, ethylene-propylene rubber (EPDM), fluorocarbons, high-density polyethylene (HDPE), butyl rubber, polypropylene, polytetrafluoroethylene, and styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR). These plastics were first screened in four simulant mixed wastes. The liner materials were screened using specific gravity measurements and seal materials by vapor transport rate (VTR) measurements. For the screening of liner materials, Kel-F, HDPE, and XLPE were found to offer the greatest resistance to the combination of radiation and chemicals. The tests also indicated that while all seal materials passed exposure to the aqueous simulant mixed waste, EPDM and SBR had the lowest VTRs. In the chlorinated hydrocarbon simulant mixed waste, only Viton passed the screening tests. In both the simulant scintillation fluid mixed waste and the ketone mixture waste, none of the seal materials met the screening criteria. Those materials which passed the screening tests were subjected to further comprehensive testing in each of the simulant wastes. The materials were exposed to four different radiation doses followed by exposure to a simulant mixed waste at three temperatures and four different exposure times (7, 14, 28, 180 days). Materials were tested by measuring specific gravity, dimensional, hardness, stress cracking, VTR, compression set, and tensile properties. The second phase of this Testing Program involving the comprehensive testing of plastic liner has been completed and for seal materials is currently in progress.

  4. Measurement of LNAPL flux using single-well intermittent mixing tracer dilution tests.

    PubMed

    Smith, Tim; Sale, Tom; Lyverse, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The stability of subsurface Light Nonaqueous Phase Liquids (LNAPLs) is a key factor driving expectations for remedial measures at LNAPL sites. The conventional approach to resolving LNAPL stability has been to apply Darcy's Equation. This paper explores an alternative approach wherein single-well tracer dilution tests with intermittent mixing are used to resolve LNAPL stability. As a first step, an implicit solution for single-well intermittent mixing tracer dilution tests is derived. This includes key assumptions and limits on the allowable time between intermittent mixing events. Second, single-well tracer dilution tests with intermittent mixing are conducted under conditions of known LNAPL flux. This includes a laboratory sand tank study and two field tests at active LNAPL recovery wells. Results from the sand tank studies indicate that LNAPL fluxes in wells can be transformed into formation fluxes using corrections for (1) LNAPL thicknesses in the well and formation and (2) convergence of flow to the well. Using the apparent convergence factor from the sand tank experiment, the average error between the known and measured LNAPL fluxes is 4%. Results from the field studies show nearly identical known and measured LNAPL fluxes at one well. At the second well the measured fluxes appear to exceed the known value by a factor of two. Agreement between the known and measured LNAPL fluxes, within a factor of two, indicates that single-well tracer dilution tests with intermittent mixing can be a viable means of resolving LNAPL stability. PMID:22489832

  5. Vertical reactor coolant pump instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. M.

    1985-01-01

    The investigation conducted at the Tennessee Valley Authority's Sequoyah Nuclear Power Plant to determine and correct increasing vibrations in the vertical reactor coolant pumps is described. Diagnostic procedures to determine the vibration causes and evaluate the corrective measures taken are also described.

  6. Methods for Quantifying the Uncertainties of LSIT Test Parameters, Test Results, and Full-Scale Mixing Performance Using Models Developed from Scaled Test Data

    SciTech Connect

    Piepel, Gregory F.; Cooley, Scott K.; Kuhn, William L.; Rector, David R.; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro

    2015-05-01

    This report discusses the statistical methods for quantifying uncertainties in 1) test responses and other parameters in the Large Scale Integrated Testing (LSIT), and 2) estimates of coefficients and predictions of mixing performance from models that relate test responses to test parameters. Testing at a larger scale has been committed to by Bechtel National, Inc. and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to “address uncertainties and increase confidence in the projected, full-scale mixing performance and operations” in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP).

  7. Unit physics testing of a mix model in an eulerian fluid computation

    SciTech Connect

    Vold, Erik; Douglass, Rod

    2010-01-01

    A K-L turbulence mix model driven with a drag-buoyancy source term is tested in an Eulerian code in a series of basic unit-physics tests, as part of a mix validation milestone. The model and the closure coefficient values are derived in the work of Dimonte-Tipton [D-T] in Phys.Flu.18, 085101 (2006), and many of the test problems were reported there, where the mix model operated in Lagrange computations. The drag-buoyancy K-L mix model was implemented within the Eulerian code framework by A.J. Scannapieco. Mix model performance is evaluated in terms of mix width growth rates compared to experiments in select regimes. Results in our Eulerian code are presented for several unit-physics I-D test problems including the decay of homogeneous isotropic turbulence (HIT), Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) unstable mixing, shock amplification of initial turbulence, Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) mixing in several single shock test cases and in comparison to two RM experiments including re-shock (Vetter-Sturtevant and Poggi, et.al.). Sensitivity to model parameters, to Atwood number, and to initial conditions are examined. Results here are in good agreement in some tests (HIT, RT) with the previous results reported for the mix model in the Lagrange calculations. The HIT turbulent decay agrees closely with analytic expectations, and the RT growth rate matches experimental values for the default values of the model coefficients proposed in [D-T]. Results for RM characterized with a power law growth rate differ from the previous mix model work but are still within the range for reasonable agreement with experiments. Sensitivity to IC values in the RM studies are examined; results are sensitive to initial values of L[t=O], which largely determines the RM mix layer growth rate, and generally differs from the IC values used in the RT studies. Result sensitivity to initial turbulence, K[t=O], is seen to be small but significant above a threshold value. Initial conditions can be adjusted so that single

  8. Mixed-Phase Icing Simulation and Testing at the Cox Icing Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Al-Khalil, Kamel; Irani, Eddie; Miller, Dean

    2003-01-01

    A new capability was developed for indoor simulation of snow and mixed-phase icing conditions. This capability is useful for year-round testing in the Cox closed-loop Icing Wind Tunnel. Certification of aircraft for flight into these types of icing conditions is only required by the JAA in Europe. In an effort to harmonize certification requirements, the FAA in the US sponsored a preliminary program to study the effects of mixed-phase and fully glaciated icing conditions on the performance requirements of thermal ice protection systems. This paper describes the test program and the associated results.

  9. CFD modeling of turbulent duct flows for coolant channel analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ungewitter, Ronald J.; Chan, Daniel C.

    1993-07-01

    The design of modern liquid rocket engines requires the analysis of chamber coolant channels to maximize the heat transfer while minimizing the coolant flow. Coolant channels often do not remain at a constant cross section or at uniform curvature. New designs require higher aspect ratio coolant channels than previously used. To broaden the analysis capability and to complement standard analysis tools an investigation on the accuracy of CFD predictions for coolant channel flow has been initiated. Validation of CFD capabilities for coolant channel analysis will enhance the capabilities for optimizing design parameters without resorting to extensive experimental testing. The eventual goal is to use CFD to determine the flow fields of unique coolant channel designs and therefore determine critical heat transfer coefficients. In this presentation the accuracy of a particular CFD code is evaluated for turbulent flows. The first part of the presentation is a comparison of numerical results to existing cold flow data for square curved ducts (NASA CR-3367, 'Measurements of Laminar and Turbulent Flow in a Curved Duct with Thin Inlet Boundary Layers'). The results of this comparison show good agreement with the relatively coarse experimental data. The second part of the presentation compares two cases of higher aspect ratio channels (AR=2.5,10) to show changes in axial and secondary flow strength. These cases match experimental work presently in progress and will be used for future validation. The comparison shows increased secondary flow strength of the higher aspect ratio case due to the change in radius of curvature. The presentation includes a test case with a heated wall to demonstrate the program's capability. The presentation concludes with an outline of the procedure used to validate the CFD code for future design analysis.

  10. Reactor coolant pump startup under degraded conditions in a scaled OTSG lowered loop PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Tafreshi, A.M.; Marzo, M. di

    1996-12-31

    After a SB-LOCA or improper maintenance activities, the potential exists for a non-uniform distribution of boric acid in a PWR coolant system. This in turn presents the possibility of a reactivity excursion if sufficient volumes of boron-dilute water are transported into the core region without having first undergone substantial mixing. A research program is being conducted at the University of Maryland College Park (UMCP) 2 x 4 thermal-hydraulic test facility to assess the generation, transport and mixing of boron-dilute volumes. Start up of a pump and flow of a boron free slug of water in the cold leg and subsequent transport to the core downcomer in the facility is investigated here.

  11. PIPING FOR COOLANT WATER IS INSTALLED INSIDE REACTOR STRUCTURE PRIOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PIPING FOR COOLANT WATER IS INSTALLED INSIDE REACTOR STRUCTURE PRIOR TO EMBEDMENT IN CONCRETE. HIGHER PIPE IS INLET; THE OTHER, THE OUTLET LOOP. INLET PIPE WILL CONNECT TO TOP SECTION OF REACTOR VESSEL. INL NEGATIVE NO. 1287. Unknown Photographer, 1/18/1951 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  12. Mitigation of tank 241-SY-101 by pump mixing: Results of full-scale testing

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, C.W.; Hudson, J.D.; Friley, J.R.; Panisko, F.E.; Antoniak, Z.I.; Irwin, J.J.; Fadeff, J.G.; Efferding, L.F.; Michener, T.E.; Kirch, N.W.

    1994-06-01

    The Full-Scale Mixer Pump Test Program was performed in Hanford Tank 241-SY-101 from February 4 to April 13, 1994, to confirm the long-term operational strategy for flammable gas mitigation and to demonstrate that mixing can control the gas release and waste level. Since its installation on July 3, 1993, the current pump, operating only a few hours per week, has proved capable of mixing the waste sufficiently to release gas continuously instead of in large episodic events. The results of Full-Scale Testing demonstrated that the pump can control gas release and waste level for long-term mitigation, and the four test sequences formed the basis for the long-term operating schedule. The last test sequence, jet penetration tests, showed that the current pump jet creates flow near the tank wall and that it can excavate portions of the bottom sludge layer if run at maximum power. Pump mixing has altered the {open_quote}normal{close_quote} configuration of the waste; most of the original nonconvective sludge has been mixed with the supernatant liquid into a mobile convective slurry that has since been maintained by gentle pump operation and does not readily return to sludge.

  13. Classification Accuracy of Mixed Format Tests: A Bi-Factor Item Response Theory Approach

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Drasgow, Fritz; Liu, Liwen

    2016-01-01

    Mixed format tests (e.g., a test consisting of multiple-choice [MC] items and constructed response [CR] items) have become increasingly popular. However, the latent structure of item pools consisting of the two formats is still equivocal. Moreover, the implications of this latent structure are unclear: For example, do constructed response items tap reasoning skills that cannot be assessed with multiple choice items? This study explored the dimensionality of mixed format tests by applying bi-factor models to 10 tests of various subjects from the College Board's Advanced Placement (AP) Program and compared the accuracy of scores based on the bi-factor analysis with scores derived from a unidimensional analysis. More importantly, this study focused on a practical and important question—classification accuracy of the overall grade on a mixed format test. Our findings revealed that the degree of multidimensionality resulting from the mixed item format varied from subject to subject, depending on the disattenuated correlation between scores from MC and CR subtests. Moreover, remarkably small decrements in classification accuracy were found for the unidimensional analysis when the disattenuated correlations exceeded 0.90. PMID:26973568

  14. Engine coolant compatibility with the nonmetals found in automotive cooling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Greaney, J.P.; Smith, R.A.

    1999-08-01

    High temperature, short term immersion testing was used to determine the impact of propylene and ethylene glycol base coolants on the physical properties of a variety of elastomeric and thermoplastic materials found in automotive cooling systems. The materials tested are typically used in cooling system hoses, radiator end tanks, and water pump seals. Traditional phosphate or borate-buffered silicated coolants as well as extended-life organic acid formulations were included. A modified ASTM protocol was used to carry out the testing both in the laboratory and at an independent testing facility. Post-test fluid chemistry including an analysis of any solids which may have formed is also reported. Coolant impact on elastomer integrity as well as elastomer-induced changes in fluid chemistry were found to be independent of the coolant`s glycol base.

  15. Aerodynamic effect of coolant ejection in the rear part of transonic rotor blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kost, F. H.; Holmes, A. T.

    1985-09-01

    An investigation of transonic turbine blades designed by Rolls-Royce/Bristol concerning the aerodynamic penalties of coolant flow for two alternative cooling configurations is discussed. Rolls-Royce designed a blade with a thick trailing edge where the coolant is ejected through slots in the trailing edge and a second blade with a thin trailing edge where coolant is ejected through a row of holes on the pressure side and a row of holes on the suction side. Tests were performed in a plane cascade wind tunnel. The results indicate the sensitivity of the blade performance to cooling configuration and coolant flow rate. By combining measured data from blade surface and wake traverses it was possible to separate the various loss mechanisms. Therefore, the separate losses due to the momentum of the coolant, change of base pressure, and change of blade friction could be determined quantitatively as a function of coolant flow rate.

  16. Psychometric Properties of Raw and Scale Scores on Mixed-Format Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolen, Michael J.; Lee, Won-Chan

    2011-01-01

    This paper illustrates that the psychometric properties of scores and scales that are used with mixed-format educational tests can impact the use and interpretation of the scores that are reported to examinees. Psychometric properties that include reliability and conditional standard errors of measurement are considered in this paper. The focus is…

  17. Indices of insulin secretion during a liquid mixed-meal test in obese youth with diabetes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To compare indices of insulin secretion, insulin sensitivity (IS),and oral disposition index (oDI) during the liquid mixed-meal test in obese youth with clinically diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and negative autoantibodies (Ab-) versus those with T2DM and positive autoantibodies (Ab+) to ...

  18. MODELS AND STATISTICAL METHODS FOR GASEOUS EMISSION TESTING OF FINITE SOURCES IN WELL-MIXED CHAMBERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper proposes two families of mathematical models to represent either the concentration of a gaseous emission in (or the accumulated amount exiting from) a well-mixed, environmentally controlled test chamber. A thin film model, which seems applicable to such sources as carpe...

  19. Exploring and Testing the Predictors of New Faculty Success: A Mixed Methods Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stupnisky, R. H.; Weaver-Hightower, M. B.; Kartoshkina, Y.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this mixed methods study was to investigate and test the factors contributing to new faculty members' success. In the first phase, qualitative analysis of focus groups revealed four prominent themes affecting new faculty members: expectations, collegiality, balance, and location. In the second phase, new faculty members…

  20. Robustness to Format Effects of IRT Linking Methods for Mixed-Format Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Seonghoon; Kolen, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    Four item response theory linking methods (2 moment methods and 2 characteristic curve methods) were compared to concurrent (CO) calibration with the focus on the degree of robustness to format effects (FEs) when applying the methods to multidimensional data that reflected the FEs associated with mixed-format tests. Based on the quantification of…

  1. Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) closure, Savannah River Plant: Clay cap test section construction report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-02-26

    This report contains appendix 2 for the Clay Cap Test Section Construction Report for the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) closure at the Savannah River Plant. The Clay Cap Test Program was conducted to evaluate the source, Laboratory permeability, and compaction characteristics representative of Kaolin clays from the aiken, South Carolina vicinity. Included in this report are daily field reports Nos. 1 to 54. (KJD)

  2. Turbulent Dispersion of Film Coolant in a Turbine Vane Cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yapa, Sayuri; Elkins, Christopher; Eaton, John

    2012-11-01

    Gas turbine engines operate at peak temperatures in excess of the material limits because the high pressure turbine nozzles and buckets are film cooled. The nozzle vanes of the first stage turbine use the most cooling air because they are exposed directly to the high temperature combustor exhaust. Existing turbine analysis assumes a uniform temperature at the rotor inlet. However, the coolant does not mix completely with the mainstream flow before impinging on the turbine rotor, and the coolant streaks create variations in temperature along the leading edge of the downstream turbine blades. 3D velocity and concentration measurements are made using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging techniques to study turbulent mixing in a realistic film-cooled nozzle vane cascade. A scalar mixing analogy for thermal diffusion is used in which a chemical contaminant plays the role of temperature. In a typical experiment, the mainstream flow is water and the film coolant is a copper sulfate solution. The concentration of copper sulfate measured anywhere in the flow is a surrogate for normalized temperature. The turbulent scalar diffusivity in the scalar transport equation can be estimated from the MR data and used to improve computational fluid dynamics models. Army Research Office.

  3. Combined Self-Test of Analog Portion and ADCs in Integrated Mixed-Signal Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Geng; Wang, Hong; Yang, Shiyuan

    Testing is a critical stage in integrated circuits production in order to guarantee reliability. The complexity and high integration level of mixed-signal ICs has put forward new challenges to circuit testing. This paper describes an oscillation-based combined self-test strategy for the analog portion and analog-to-digital converters (ADCs) in integrated mixed-signal circuits. In test mode, the analog portion under test is reconfigured into an oscillator, generating periodic signals as the test stimulus of ADC. By analyzing the A/D conversion results, a histogram test of ADC can be performed, and the oscillation frequency as well as amplitude can be checked, and in this way the oscillation test of the analog portion is realized simultaneously. For an analog benchmark circuit combined with an ADC, triangle oscillation and sinusoid oscillation schemes are both given to test their faults. Experimental results show that fault coverage of the analog portion is 92.2% and 94.3% in the two schemes respectively, and faults in the ADC can also be tested.

  4. Stagnation region gas film cooling: Effects of dimensionless coolant temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonnice, M. A.; Lecuyer, M. R.

    1983-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to mode the film cooling performance for a turbine vane leading edge using the stagnation region of a cylinder in cross flow. Experiments were conducted with a single row of spanwise angled (25 deg) coolant holes for a range of the coolant blowing ratio and dimensionless coolant temperature with free stream-to-wall temperature ratio approximately 1.7 and Re sub D = 90000. the cylindrical test surface was instrumented with miniature heat flux gages and wall thermocouples to determine the percentage reduction in the Stanton number as a function of the distance downstream from injection (x/d sub 0) and the location between adjacent holes (z/S). Data from local heat flux measurements are presented for injection from a single row located at 5 deg, 22.9 deg, 40.8 deg, from stagnation using a hole spacing ratio of S/d = 5. The film coolant was injected with T sub c T sub w with a dimensionless coolant temperature in the range 1.18 or equal to theta sub c or equal to 1.56. The data for local Stanton Number Reduction (SNR) showed a significant increase in SNR as theta sub c was increased above 1.0.

  5. A Generalized DIF Effect Variance Estimator for Measuring Unsigned Differential Test Functioning in Mixed Format Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penfield, Randall D.; Algina, James

    2006-01-01

    One approach to measuring unsigned differential test functioning is to estimate the variance of the differential item functioning (DIF) effect across the items of the test. This article proposes two estimators of the DIF effect variance for tests containing dichotomous and polytomous items. The proposed estimators are direct extensions of the…

  6. Test report for run-in acceptance testing of Project W-151 300 HP mixing pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Berglin, B.G.

    1998-01-29

    This report documents the results of a performance demonstration and operational checkout of three 300 HP mixer pumps in accordance with WHC-SD-WI51-TS-001 ``Mixer Pump Test Specification for Project W-151`` and Statement of Work 8K520-EMN-95-004 ``Mixer Pump Performance Demonstration at MASF`` in the 400 Area Maintenance and Storage Facility (MASF) building. Testing of the pumps was performed by Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) Engineering and funded by the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Project W-151. Testing began with the first pump on 04-01-95 and ended with the third pump on 11-01-96. Prior to testing, the MASF was modified and prepared to meet the pump testing requirements set forth by the Test Specification and the Statement of Work.

  7. Using automatic particle counting to monitor aluminum cold mill coolant{copyright}

    SciTech Connect

    Adkins, D.L.

    1995-08-01

    A comprehensive program of testing and evaluation of aluminum cold rolling coolant conditions has been conducted using an automatic particle counting instrument. The project had three objectives. First, there was a need to know at what level of coolant particle contamination is surface cleanliness of an aluminum sheet affected during the rolling process. Secondly, is application of particle counting technology a reliable tool for troubleshooting coolant filtration systems and finally, what are the advantages of analyzing rolling coolants for contamination levels? A testing program was designed and performed over a two-year period. The test results revealed that mineral seal and synthetic-type coolants can begin to affect aluminum sheet surface cleanliness levels when particle sizes greater than five microns are in excess of 10,000 particles power 100 milliliters of rolling coolant. After performing over 3,000 separate tests, it was very clean that particle count levels are direct indicators of how well a filtration facility is performing. Through the application of particle counting, a number of conditions in coolant filtration facilities can be readily detected. Such items as defective filter valving, torn or fractured filter cloth, damaged filter parts, improper equipment operation and many other factors will directly impact the operation of aluminum cold rolling coolant filters. 11 figs.

  8. Analysis of automobile radiator performance with ethylene glycol/water and propylene glycol/water coolants

    SciTech Connect

    Gollin, M.; Bjork, D.

    1996-12-31

    The heat transfer and hydraulic performance of the following coolants was examined in five automobile radiators in a wind tunnel: 100% water; 100% propylene glycol; 70/30 propylene glycol/water (volume); 50/50 propylene glycol/water (volume); 70/30 ethylene glycol/water (volume); 50/50 ethylene glycol water (volume). The results of these studies are presented to demonstrate the relative performance of these coolant mixtures in terms of heat transfer, coolant pressure drop and radiator effectiveness for a range of coolant and air flowrates. It is concluded that the most effective of the coolants in transferring heat in the test radiators was water, followed by 50/50 ethylene glycol/water, 50/50 propylene glycol/water, 70/30 ethylene glycol/water, 70/30 propylene glycol and, finally, 100% propylene glycol. There will be a negligible differences between the performance of a radiator using a 50/50 propylene glycol/water coolant and a 50/50 ethylene glycol/water coolant. It is estimated that, with 50/50 propylene glycol coolant replacing 50/50 ethylene glycol/water, the temperature of the coolant throughout the cooling loop will increase by approximately 5%. The effect that the flow regime (fully turbulent/transition/laminar) has upon the performance of a given radiator/coolant combination was found to be significant. The design of the coolant passages in radiators can affect the onset of fully turbulent flow in the coolant passages in a radiator.

  9. Fuels, Lubricants, and Coolants. FOS: Fundamentals of Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John Deere Co., Moline, IL.

    This manual on fuels, lubricants, and coolants is one of a series of power mechanics tests and visual aids on automotive and off-the-road agricultural and construction equipment. Materials present basic information with illustrations for use by vocational students and teachers as well as shop servicemen and laymen. Focusing on fuels, the first of…

  10. Evaluation of Fluid Conduction and Mixing within a Subassembly of the Actinide Burner Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Cliff B. Davis

    2007-09-01

    The RELAP5-3D code is being considered as a thermal-hydraulic system code to support the development of the sodium-cooled Actinide Burner Test Reactor as part of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership. An evaluation was performed to determine whether the control system could be used to simulate the effects of non-convective mechanisms of heat transport in the fluid, including axial and radial heat conduction and subchannel mixing, that are not currently represented with internal code models. The evaluation also determined the relative importance of axial and radial heat conduction and fluid mixing on peak cladding temperature for a wide range of steady conditions and during a representative loss-of-flow transient. The evaluation was performed using a RELAP5-3D model of a subassembly in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II, which was used as a surrogate for the Actinide Burner Test Reactor.

  11. Corrosion of structural materials by lead-based reactor coolants.

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, D. P.; Leibowitz, L.; Maroni, V. A.; McDeavitt, S. M.; Raraz, A. G.

    2000-11-16

    Advanced nuclear reactor design has, in recent years, focused increasingly on the use of heavy-liquid-metal coolants, such as lead and lead-bismuth eutectic. Similarly, programs on accelerator-based transmutation systems have also considered the use of such coolants. Russian experience with heavy-metal coolants for nuclear reactors has lent credence to the validity of this approach. Of significant concern is the compatibility of structural materials with these coolants. We have used a thermal convection-based test method to allow exposure of candidate materials to molten lead and lead-bismuth flowing under a temperature gradient. The gradient was deemed essential in evaluating the behavior of the test materials in that should preferential dissolution of components of the test material occur we would expect dissolution in the hotter regions and deposition in the colder regions, thus promoting material transport. Results from the interactions of a Si-rich mild steel alloy, AISI S5, and a ferritic-martensitic stainless steel, HT-9, with the molten lead-bismuth are presented.

  12. Scaled Testing to Evaluate Pulse Jet Mixer Performance in Waste Treatment Plant Mixing Vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Fort, James A.; Meyer, Perry A.; Bamberger, Judith A.; Enderlin, Carl W.; Scott, Paul A.; Minette, Michael J.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.

    2010-03-07

    The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) at Hanford is being designed and built to pre-treat and vitrify the waste in Hanford’s 177 underground waste storage tanks. Numerous process vessels will hold waste at various stages in the WTP. These vessels have pulse jet mixer (PJM) systems. A test program was developed to evaluate the adequacy of mixing system designs in the solids-containing vessels in the WTP. The program focused mainly on non-cohesive solids behavior. Specifically, the program addressed the effectiveness of the mixing systems to suspend settled solids off the vessel bottom, and distribute the solids vertically. Experiments were conducted at three scales using various particulate simulants. A range of solids loadings and operational parameters were evaluated, including jet velocity, pulse volume, and duty cycle. In place of actual PJMs, the tests used direct injection from tubes with suction at the top of the tank fluid. This gave better control over the discharge duration and duty cycle and simplified the facility requirements. The mixing system configurations represented in testing varied from 4 to 12 PJMs with various jet nozzle sizes. In this way the results collected could be applied to the broad range of WTP vessels with varying geometrical configurations and planned operating conditions. Data for “just-suspended velocity”, solids cloud height, and solids concentration vertical profile were collected, analyzed, and correlated. The correlations were successfully benchmarked against previous large-scale test results, then applied to the WTP vessels using reasonable assumptions of anticipated waste properties to evaluate adequacy of the existing mixing system designs.

  13. INHIBITING THE POLYMERIZATION OF NUCLEAR COOLANTS

    DOEpatents

    Colichman, E.L.

    1959-10-20

    >The formation of new reactor coolants which contain an additive tbat suppresses polymerization of the primary dissoclation free radical products of the pyrolytic and radiation decomposition of the organic coolants is described. The coolants consist of polyphenyls and condensed ring compounds having from two to about four carbon rings and from 0.1 to 5% of a powdered metal hydride chosen from the group consisting of the group IIA and IVA dispersed in the hydrocarbon.

  14. Organic coolant for ARIES-III

    SciTech Connect

    Sze, D.K. ); Sviatoslavsky, I.; Sawan, M. ); Gierszewski, P. ); Hollies, R. ); Sharafat, S. ); Herring, S. )

    1991-04-01

    ARIES-III is a D-He{sub 3} reactor design study. It is found that the organic coolant is well suited for the D-He{sub 3} reactor. This paper discusses the unique features of the D-He{sub 3} reactor, and the reason that the organic coolant is compatible with those features. The problems associated with the organic coolant are also discussed. 8 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  15. Redesign of the mixed-mode bending delamination test to reduce nonlinear effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeder, James R.; Crews, John H., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The mixed-mode bending (MMB) test uses a lever to apply simultaneously mode I and mode II loading to a split-beam specimen. An iterative analysis that accounts for the geometric nonlinearity of the MMB test was developed. The analysis accurately predicted the measured load-displacement response and the strain energy release rate, G, of an MMB test specimen made of AS4/PEEK. The errors in G when calculated using linear theory were found to be as large as 30 percent in some cases. Because it would be inconvenient to use a nonlinear analysis to analyze MMB data, the MMB apparatus was redesigned to minimize the nonlinearity. With the improved apparatus, loads are applied just above the midplane of the test specimen through a roller attached to the lever. This apparatus was demonstrated by measuring the mixed-mode delamination fracture toughhess of the test specimen. The nonlinearity errors associated with testing this tough composite material were less than +/- 3 percent. The data from the improved MMB apparatus analyzed with a linear analysis were similar to those found with the original apparatus and the nonlinear analysis.

  16. Exenatide Treatment Causes Suppression of Serum Ghrelin Levels following Mixed Meal Test in Obese Diabetic Women

    PubMed Central

    Topyildiz, Figen; Kiyici, Sinem; Gul, Zulfiye; Sigirli, Deniz; Guclu, Metin; Kisakol, Gurcan; Cavun, Sinan

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To investigate the effect of exenatide treatment on serum ghrelin levels in obese female patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods. Fourteen female patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus being treated with metformin and exenatide were enrolled. A mixed meal test was applied to the patients while continuing with their daily medications. Blood samples were taken before and at 60, 120, and 180 minutes following mixed meal test to measure serum total ghrelin, glucose, and insulin levels. The following week, exenatide treatment of the patients was paused for 24 hours and the same experimental procedures were repeated. Results. Serum ghrelin levels were suppressed significantly at 180 minutes with exenatide treatment compared with baseline (294.4 ± 57.5 versus 234.5 ± 59.4 pg/mL) (p < 0.001). Serum ghrelin levels at 180 minutes were statistically different when percentage change in serum ghrelin levels after mixed meal tests with and without exenatide usage were compared (p = 0.001). Estimated total area under the curve values for serum ghrelin concentrations was also significantly lower with exenatide compared with omitted treatment (p = 0.035). Conclusion. These results suggest that the effect of exenatide on weight loss may be related with the suppression of serum ghrelin levels, which is an orexigenic peptide. PMID:26998491

  17. Analysis and testing of two-dimensional slot nozzle ejectors with variable area mixing sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, G. B.; Hill, P. G.

    1973-01-01

    Finite difference computer techniques have been used to calculate the detailed performance of air to air two-dimensional ejectors with symmetric variable area mixing sections and coaxial coverging primary nozzles. The analysis of the primary nozzle assumed correct expansion of the flow and is suitable for subsonic and slightly supersonic velocity levels. The variation of the mixing section channel walls is assumed to be gradual so that the static pressure can be assumed uniform on planes perpendicular to the axis. A test program was run to provide two-dimensional ejector test data for verification of the computer analysis. A primary converging nozzle with a discharge geometry of 0.125 inch x 8.0 inch was supplied with 600 SCFM of air at about 35 psia and 180 F. This nozzle was combined with two mixing section geometries with throat sizes of 1.25 inch x 8.0 inch and 1.875 inch x 8.0 inch and was tested at a total of 11 operating points.

  18. Opportunities for mixed oxide fuel testing in the advanced test reactor to support plutonium disposition

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, W.K.; Ryskamp, J.M.; Sterbentz, J.W.

    1995-08-01

    Numerous technical issues must be resolved before LWR operating licenses can be amended to allow the use of MOX fuel. These issues include the following: (1) MOX fuel fabrication process verification; (2) Whether and how to use burnable poisons to depress MOX fuel initial reactivity, which is higher than that of urania; (3) The effects of WGPu isotopic composition; (4) The feasibility of loading MOX fuel with plutonia content up to 7% by weight; (5) The effects of americium and gallium in WGPu; (6) Fission gas release from MOX fuel pellets made from WGPu; (7) Fuel/cladding gap closure; (8) The effects of power cycling and off-normal events on fuel integrity; (9) Development of radial distributions of burnup and fission products; (10) Power spiking near the interfaces of MOX and urania fuel assemblies; and (11) Fuel performance code validation. The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory possesses many advantages for performing tests to resolve most of the issues identified above. We have performed calculations to show that the use of hafnium shrouds can produce spectrum adjustments that will bring the flux spectrum in ATR test loops into a good approximation to the spectrum anticipated in a commercial LWR containing MOX fuel while allowing operation of the test fuel assemblies near their optimum values of linear heat generation rate. The ATR would be a nearly ideal test bed for developing data needed to support applications to license LWRs for operation with MOX fuel made from weapons-grade plutonium. The requirements for planning and implementing a test program in the ATR have been identified. The facilities at Argonne National Laboratory-West can meet all potential needs for pre- and post-irradiation examination that might arise in a MOX fuel qualification program.

  19. Assessing the Impact of Characteristics of the Test, Common-Items, and Examinees on the Preservation of Equity Properties in Mixed-Format Test Equating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Raffaela

    2013-01-01

    Preservation of equity properties was examined using four equating methods--IRT True Score, IRT Observed Score, Frequency Estimation, and Chained Equipercentile--in a mixed-format test under a common-item nonequivalent groups (CINEG) design. Equating of mixed-format tests under a CINEG design can be influenced by factors such as attributes of the…

  20. Mixing Languages during Learning? Testing the One Subject—One Language Rule

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In bilingual communities, mixing languages is avoided in formal schooling: even if two languages are used on a daily basis for teaching, only one language is used to teach each given academic subject. This tenet known as the one subject-one language rule avoids mixing languages in formal schooling because it may hinder learning. The aim of this study was to test the scientific ground of this assumption by investigating the consequences of acquiring new concepts using a method in which two languages are mixed as compared to a purely monolingual method. Native balanced bilingual speakers of Basque and Spanish—adults (Experiment 1) and children (Experiment 2)—learnt new concepts by associating two different features to novel objects. Half of the participants completed the learning process in a multilingual context (one feature was described in Basque and the other one in Spanish); while the other half completed the learning phase in a purely monolingual context (both features were described in Spanish). Different measures of learning were taken, as well as direct and indirect indicators of concept consolidation. We found no evidence in favor of the non-mixing method when comparing the results of two groups in either experiment, and thus failed to give scientific support for the educational premise of the one subject—one language rule. PMID:26107624

  1. Fluid and thermal mixing in a model cold leg and downcomer with loop flow

    SciTech Connect

    Rothe, P.H.; Ackerson, M.F.

    1982-04-01

    This report describes an experimental program of fluid mixing experiments performed at atmospheric pressure in a 1/5-scale transparent model of the cold leg and downcomer of typical Westinghouse and Combustion Engineering pressurized water reactors. The results include transient data from a grid of thermocouples and exensive flow visualization photographs. Substantial mixing of cold injected water with hot primary coolant occurred during many of the tests.

  2. A Criterion to Control Nonlinear Error in the Mixed-Mode Bending Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeder, James R.

    2002-01-01

    The mixed-mode bending test ha: been widely used to measure delamination toughness and was recently standardized by ASTM as Standard Test Method D6671-01. This simple test is a combination of the standard Mode I (opening) test and a Mode II (sliding) test. This test uses a unidirectional composite test specimen with an artificial delamination subjected to bending loads to characterize when a delamination will extend. When the displacements become large, the linear theory used to analyze the results of the test yields errors in the calcu1ated toughness values. The current standard places no limit on the specimen loading and therefore test data can be created using the standard that are significantly in error. A method of limiting the error that can be incurred in the calculated toughness values is needed. In this paper, nonlinear models of the MMB test are refined. One of the nonlinear models is then used to develop a simple criterion for prescribing conditions where thc nonlinear error will remain below 5%.

  3. Endurance Test for SCK-CEN Catalytic Mixed Packing, Proposed for Water Detritiation System at JET

    SciTech Connect

    Ionita, Gh.; Bornea, A.; Braet, J.; Popescu, I.; Stefanescu, I.; Bidica, N.; Varlam, C; Postolache, Cr.; Mateic, L.

    2005-07-15

    JET machine's operation lead to continuously generation of tritiated water and therefore, it is necessary to consider the development of a Water Detritiation System (WDS) for JET and also for ITER. The key point of WDS is the efficiency and stability of liquid phase catalytic exchange (LPCE) column, that has to achieve a high decontamination of tritiated streams.Two catalytic mixed packing based on hydrophobic Pt-catalyst, and having closed separation performances have been proposed for LPCE column. A complete data base concerning the influence of {beta}-radiation of tritium and the influence of impurities from feed streams on the catalytic mixed packing' s performances and parameters is absolutely necessary.The results of 3 months endurance test for one of these packing (SCK-CEN packing), are presented in this paper. No significant modifications of performances and physico-structural parameters have been observed.

  4. Overview of Nevada Test Site Radioactive and Mixed Waste Disposal Operations

    SciTech Connect

    J.T. Carilli; S.K. Krenzien; R.G. Geisinger; S.J. Gordon; B. Quinn

    2009-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Environmental Management Program is responsible for carrying out the disposal of on-site and off-site generated low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and low-level radioactive mixed waste (MW) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Core elements of this mission are ensuring safe and cost-effective disposal while protecting workers, the public, and the environment. This paper focuses on the impacts of new policies, processes, and opportunities at the NTS related to LLW and MW. Covered topics include: the first year of direct funding for NTS waste disposal operations; zero tolerance policy for non-compliant packages; the suspension of mixed waste disposal; waste acceptance changes; DOE Consolidated Audit Program (DOECAP) auditing; the 92-Acre Area closure plan; new eligibility requirements for generators; and operational successes with unusual waste streams.

  5. Raman distributed temperature measurement at CERN high energy accelerator mixed field radiation test facility (CHARM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toccafondo, Iacopo; Nannipieri, Tiziano; Signorini, Alessandro; Guillermain, Elisa; Kuhnhenn, Jochen; Brugger, Markus; Di Pasquale, Fabrizio

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we present a validation of distributed Raman temperature sensing (RDTS) at the CERN high energy accelerator mixed field radiation test facility (CHARM), newly developed in order to qualify electronics for the challenging radiation environment of accelerators and connected high energy physics experiments. By investigating the effect of wavelength dependent radiation induced absorption (RIA) on the Raman Stokes and anti-Stokes light components in radiation tolerant Ge-doped multi-mode (MM) graded-index optical fibers, we demonstrate that Raman DTS used in loop configuration is robust to harsh environments in which the fiber is exposed to a mixed radiation field. The temperature profiles measured on commercial Ge-doped optical fibers is fully reliable and therefore, can be used to correct the RIA temperature dependence in distributed radiation sensing systems based on P-doped optical fibers.

  6. Nonlinear analysis and redesign of the mixed-mode bending delamination test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeder, J. R.; Crews, J. H., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The Mixed Mode Bending (MMB) test uses a lever to simultaneously apply mode I and mode II loading to a split beam specimen. An iterative analysis that accounts for the geometric nonlinearity of the MMB test was developed. The analysis accurately predicted the measured load displacement response and the strain energy release rate, G, of an MMB test specimen made of APC2 (AS4/PEEK). The errors in G when calculated using linear theory were found to be as large as thirty percent in some cases. Because it would be inconvenient to use a nonlinear analysis to analyze MMB data, the MMB apparatus was redesigned to minimize the nonlinearity. The nonlinear analysis was used as a guide in redesigning the MMB apparatus. With the redesigned apparatus, loads were applied through a roller attached to the level and loaded just above the midplane of the test specimen. The redesigned apparatuus has geometric nonlinearity errors of less than three percent, even for materials substantially tougher than APC2. This apparatus was demonstrated by measuring the mixed mode delamination fracture toughness of APC2.

  7. Design, implementation and testing of extended and mixed precisionBLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X.S.; Demmel, J.W.; Bailey, D.H.; Henry, G.; Hida, Y.; Iskandar, J.; Kahan, W.; Kapur, A.; Martin, M.C.; Tung, T.; Yoo, D.J.

    2000-10-20

    This article describes the design rationale, a C implementation, and conformance testing of a subset of the new Standard for the BLAS (Basic Linear Algebra Subroutines): Extended and Mixed Precision BLAS. Permitting higher internal precision and mixed input/output types and precisions allows us to implement some algorithms that are simpler, more accurate, and sometimes faster than possible without these features. The new BLAS are challenging to implement and test because there are many more subroutines than in the existing Standard, and because we must be able to assess whether a higher precision is used for internal computations than is used for either input or output variables. We have therefore developed an automated process of generating and systematically testing these routines. Our methodology is applicable to languages besides C. In particular, our algorithms used in the testing code will be valuable to all other BLAS implementors. Our extra precision routines achieve excellent performance--close to half of the machine peak Megaflop rate even for the Level 2 BLAS, when the data access is stride one.

  8. Selection of an Alternate Biocide for the ISS Internal Thermal Control System Coolant, Phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Mark E.; Cole, Harold; Weir, Natalee; Oehler, Bill; Steele, John; Varsik, Jerry; Lukens, Clark

    2004-01-01

    The ISS (International Space Station) ITCS (Internal Thermal Control System) includes two internal coolant loops that utilize an aqueous based coolant for heat transfer. A silver salt biocide had previously been utilized as an additive in the coolant formulation to control the growth and proliferation of microorganisms within the coolant loops. Ground-based and in-flight testing demonstrated that the silver salt was rapidly depleted, and did not act as an effective long-term biocide. Efforts to select an optimal alternate biocide for the ITCS coolant application have been underway and are now in the final stages. An extensive evaluation of biocides was conducted to down-select to several candidates for test trials and was reported on previously. Criteria for that down-select included: the need for safe, non-intrusive implementation and operation in a functioning system; the ability to control existing planktonic and biofilm residing microorganisms; a negligible impact on system-wetted materials of construction; and a negligible reactivity with existing coolant additives. Candidate testing to provide data for the selection of an optimal alternate biocide is now in the final stages. That testing has included rapid biocide effectiveness screening using Biolog MT2 plates to determine minimum inhibitory concentration (amount that will inhibit visible growth of microorganisms), time kill studies to determine the exposure time required to completely eliminate organism growth, materials compatibility exposure evaluations, coolant compatibility studies, and bench-top simulated coolant testing. This paper reports the current status of the effort to select an alternate biocide for the ISS ITCS coolant. The results of various test results to select the optimal candidate are presented.

  9. Mixed waste landfill monitoring prototype test design for Los Alamos National Laboratory. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, C.

    1994-09-01

    The purpose of this contract is to design the prototype tests necessary for the verification of the measurement methods proposed for the Mixed Waste Disposal Facility. The design is limited to the hydrological performance of the measurement methods. It does not include the mechanical testing of the methods proposed. The test site is to be selected and when approved, construction drawings provided. The contract also includes testing of vitrified clay pipe as the liner of choice for the passages under the landfill. The tests are to be done of both he hydrologic and the mechanical capability of the pipe. The test bed construction is to be supervised as it is being done by the construction contractor monitored by LANL. This contract does not include the logical subsequent work of performance of the measurements in the test bed. Since this contract was received by September 15, with the work to be completed by September 30, only that work possible in the short time was performed. That included the design of the test bed, the purchase of the vitrified clay pipe and the mechanical tests of the pipe, and the purchase of the SEAMIST systems for testing in the clay pipe. None of those could be delivered in time for flow tests to be done on the clay pipe. The mechanical tests were done as part of the pipe purchase and are reported here. The contract was not extended beyond September 30 for lack of funds. This report is therefore limited to the preliminary design of the test bed and to the specification of the orders for the materials. The hope is that funding will be restored to the program for the completion of the design and measurement effort.

  10. Expert system for online surveillance of nuclear reactor coolant pumps

    DOEpatents

    Gross, Kenny C.; Singer, Ralph M.; Humenik, Keith E.

    1993-01-01

    An expert system for online surveillance of nuclear reactor coolant pumps. This system provides a means for early detection of pump or sensor degradation. Degradation is determined through the use of a statistical analysis technique, sequential probability ratio test, applied to information from several sensors which are responsive to differing physical parameters. The results of sequential testing of the data provide the operator with an early warning of possible sensor or pump failure.

  11. Cobalt-60 simulation of LOCA (loss of coolant accident) radiation effects

    SciTech Connect

    Buckalew, W.H.

    1989-07-01

    The consequences of simulating nuclear reactor loss of coolant accident (LOCA) radiation effects with Cobalt-60 gamma ray irradiators have been investigated. Based on radiation induced damage in polymer base materials, it was demonstrated that electron/photon induced radiation damage could be related on the basis of average absorbed radiation dose. This result was used to estimate the relative effectiveness of the mixed beta/gamma LOCA and Cobalt-60 radiation environments to damage both bare and jacketed polymer base electrical insulation materials. From the results obtained, it is concluded that present simulation techniques are a conservative method for simulating LOCA radiation effects and that the practices have probably substantially overstressed both bare and jacketed materials during qualification testing. 9 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  12. A methodology for use of digital image correlation for hot mix asphalt testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Estefany

    Digital Image Correlation (DIC) is a relatively new technology which aids in the measurement of material properties without the need for installation of sensors. DIC is a noncontact measuring technique that requires the specimen to be marked with a random speckled pattern and to be photographed during the test. The photographs are then post-processed based on the location of the pattern throughout the test. DIC can aid in calculating properties that would otherwise be too difficult even with other measuring instruments. The objective of this thesis is to discuss the methodology and validate the use of DIC in different hot mix asphalt (HMA) tests, such as, the Overlay Tester (OT) Test, Indirect Tensile (IDT) Test, and the Semicircular Bending (SCB) Test. The DIC system provides displacements and strains in any visible surface. The properly calibrated 2-D or 3-D DIC data can be used to understand the complex stress and strain distributions and the modes of the initiation and propagation of cracks. The use of this observational method will lead to further understanding of the complex boundary conditions of the different test, and therefore, allowing it to be implemented in the analysis of other materials. The use of digital image correlation will bring insight and knowledge onto what is happening during a test.

  13. Cleaning of uranium vs machine coolant formulations

    SciTech Connect

    Cristy, S.S.; Byrd, V.R.; Simandl, R.F.

    1984-10-01

    This study compares methods for cleaning uranium chips and the residues left on chips from alternate machine coolants based on propylene glycol-water mixtures with either borax, ammonium tetraborate, or triethanolamine tetraborate added as a nuclear poison. Residues left on uranium surfaces machined with perchloroethylene-mineral oil coolant and on surfaces machined with the borax-containing alternate coolant were also compared. In comparing machined surfaces, greater chlorine contamination was found on the surface of the perchloroethylene-mineral oil machined surfaces, but slightly greater oxidation was found on the surfaces machined with the alternate borax-containing coolant. Overall, the differences were small and a change to the alternate coolant does not appear to constitute a significant threat to the integrity of machined uranium parts.

  14. Characterization of an in-core irradiator for testing of microelectronics in a mixed radiation environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghara, Sukesh K.

    In recent years, the space industry is increasingly in search of easily available commercial and emerging technology devices in order to meet rigorous spacecraft requirements such as weight, power, and cost. Before an electronic device is put in a radiation environment, it is pre-tested and certified for space applications. This process of radiation testing and certification is costly and time intensive. Development of a test methodology and a facility to perform these tests quickly and cost effectively, would facilitate the radiation effects community and NASA to fulfill the "Faster, Better, Cheaper". With the rapid developments in the field of satellite-based telecommunications, the move from analog to digital controls for all electronic devices is imminent; hence, need for radiation-hardened mixed signal processing devices is obvious. Digital-to-Analog Converters (DAC) are of particular interest due to their complex design and performance and their importance in digital signal processing. Limited literature exists for radiation effects on DAC; most of these studies were performed with gamma-ray irradiations (Total Ionization Dose, TID) but the much needed displacement damage data is absent. In the first phase of this work, an in-core mixed radiation (neutron and gamma-ray) test facility at the University of Texas at Austin TRIGA Mark II nuclear research reactor was fully characterized. Further, a test methodology to perform radiation testing on complex "off-the-shelf" semiconductor circuits in a time and cost effective manner was developed. In the second phase, the characterized test facility and the methodology were then employed to successfully assess performance degradation of three commercially available DAC circuits: DAC 0808, MC 1408 (DIP package) and MC 1408 (SOIC package). This research has resulted in the development of a unique in-core fast neutron irradiation facility from a research reactor source. The average fast flux of 1.2E9 n/cm2-s at 1 k

  15. Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) closure, Savannah River Plant: Clay cap test section construction report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-02-26

    This report summarizes the information gathered in constructing the clay cap test section. The purpose of the test section was to determine compaction characteristics of four representative kaolin clays and demonstrate in-situ permeability for these clays of 1 {times} 10 {sup {minus}7} cm/sec or less. The final technical specifications with regard to maximum clod size, acceptable ranges of placement water content, lift thickness, and degree of compaction will be based on experience gained from the test section. The data derived from this study will also be used in the development of Quality Assurance (QA) and Quality Control (QC) methods to be used during actual cap construction of the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) Closure project. 7 tabs.

  16. Lessons learned from start-up testing of a mixed waste incinerator

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes Burns, H.; Burns, D.B.

    1997-05-01

    Start-up testing of a new mixed waste incinerator, the Consolidated Incineration Facility (CIF), has been completed at the Department of Energy`s Savannah River Site (SRS). The incinerator is equipped with an air pollution control system (APCS) that includes a wet quench and scrubber followed by dry air filtration using high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters. The system was designed with optimum materials to maximize reliability, runtime, and ease of maintenance. Changes to the CIF operation and materials have been made to maximize system performance and minimize corrosion. This paper presents a brief overview of the incinerator design philosophy, pilot-scale testing results, and some of the lessons learned during the start-up testing of the CIF.

  17. How Well Do Neodymium Isotopes Trace AMOC Mixing? A Test in the Southwest Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y.; Goldstein, S. L.; Pena, L.; Hartman, A. E.; Rijkenberg, M. J. A.; De Baar, H. J. W.

    2014-12-01

    Neodymium (Nd) isotope ratios are used to trace past AMOC circulation, based on observations that seawater Nd isotope ratios effectively "fingerprint" water masses, and that over long water mass transport distances in deep seawater they reflect values expected from water mass mixing. Over the past several years, studies have increasingly focused on the potential of external addition of Nd along water mass transport paths (for example through "boundary exchange" with particulates or addition from groundwaters), thus challenging the idea that Nd isotopes behave "quasi-conservatively" in the oceans. The SW Atlantic, with the major water masses involved in the AMOC (southward flowing NADW, northward flowing AAIW and AABW), is arguably the best place on Earth to evaluate how well Nd isotopes trace water mass mixing, in order to clarify its value for following the AMOC through time. We will report Nd isotope ratios of seawater collected on the SW Atlantic meridional transect of the NIOZ West Atlantic GEOTRACES Cruise Leg 3 (RRS James Cook 057), which sampled seawater profiles and the sediment surface at 18 stations between 0-50°S. Most stations are sampled in the open ocean, providing a test of whether Nd isotopes show quasi-conservative mixing systematics away from continental margins. The cruise section also provides several opportunities to test the potential effects of external Nd input. For example, it transects the continental shelf in the far south, the Rio Grande Rise, volcanic seamounts, and the major geological age boundaries of South America. It also crosses the major Southern Hemisphere wind zones, allowing us to test the impacts of aeolian input, and inputs from major rivers (Parana-Paraguay, Sao Francisco, Amazon). All of these features have the potential to modify the seawater Nd isotope ratios, allowing us to determine if they add significant external Nd.

  18. Results of the NASP Ames Integrated Mixing Hypersonic Engine (AIMHYE) Scramjet Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavolowsky, John A.; Loomis, Mark P.; Deiwert, George S.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the test techniques and results from the National Aerospace Plane Government Work Package 53, the Ames Integrated Mixing Hypersonic Engine (AIMHYE) Scramjet Test program conducted in the NASA Ames 16-Inch Combustion Driven Shock Tunnel. This was a series of near full-scale scramjet combustor tests with the objective to obtain high speed combustor and nozzle data from an engine with injector configurations similar to the NASP E21 and E22a designs. The experimental test approach was to use a large combustor model (80-100% throat height) designed and fabricated for testing in the semi-free jet mode. The conditions tested were similar to the "blue book" conditions at Mach 12, 14, and 16. GWP 53 validated use of large, long test time impulse facilities, specifically the Ames 16-Inch Shock Tunnel, for high Mach number scramjet propulsion testing an integrated test rig (inlet, combustor, and nozzle). Discussion of key features of the test program will include: effects of the 2-D combustor inlet pressure profile; performance of large injectors' fueling system that included nozzlettes, base injection, and film cooling; and heat transfer measurements to the combustor. Significant instrumentation development and application efforts include the following: combustor force balance application for measurement of combustor drag for comparison with integrated point measurements of skin friction; nozzle metric strip for measuring thrust with comparison to integrated pressure measurements; and nonintrusive optical fiber-based diode laser absorption measurements of combustion products for determination of combustor performance. Direct measurements will be reported for specific test article configurations and compared with CFD solutions.

  19. Level maintenance for Tank 101-SY mitigation-by-mixing test

    SciTech Connect

    Sobocinski, R.G.

    1994-11-16

    This document provides the procedure to be followed to implement the requirements of the Mixer Pump Long-Term Operations Plan for Tank 241-SY-101 Mitigation, WHC-SD-WM-PLN-081. The test is divided into 2 distinct sequences, named Single Position Pump Run and Tank Sweep. Instructions for all sequences are defined within the procedure. All safety requirements as defined in LA-UR-92-3196, A Safety Assessment for Proposed Mixing Operations to Mitigate Episodic Gas Releases in Tank 241-101-SY have been implemented into this procedure.

  20. Sediment fingerprinting experiments to test the sensitivity of multivariate mixing models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaspar, Leticia; Blake, Will; Smith, Hugh; Navas, Ana

    2014-05-01

    Sediment fingerprinting techniques provide insight into the dynamics of sediment transfer processes and support for catchment management decisions. As questions being asked of fingerprinting datasets become increasingly complex, validation of model output and sensitivity tests are increasingly important. This study adopts an experimental approach to explore the validity and sensitivity of mixing model outputs for materials with contrasting geochemical and particle size composition. The experiments reported here focused on (i) the sensitivity of model output to different fingerprint selection procedures and (ii) the influence of source material particle size distributions on model output. Five soils with significantly different geochemistry, soil organic matter and particle size distributions were selected as experimental source materials. A total of twelve sediment mixtures were prepared in the laboratory by combining different quantified proportions of the < 63 µm fraction of the five source soils i.e. assuming no fluvial sorting of the mixture. The geochemistry of all source and mixture samples (5 source soils and 12 mixed soils) were analysed using X-ray fluorescence (XRF). Tracer properties were selected from 18 elements for which mass concentrations were found to be significantly different between sources. Sets of fingerprint properties that discriminate target sources were selected using a range of different independent statistical approaches (e.g. Kruskal-Wallis test, Discriminant Function Analysis (DFA), Principal Component Analysis (PCA), or correlation matrix). Summary results for the use of the mixing model with the different sets of fingerprint properties for the twelve mixed soils were reasonably consistent with the initial mixing percentages initially known. Given the experimental nature of the work and dry mixing of materials, geochemical conservative behavior was assumed for all elements, even for those that might be disregarded in aquatic systems

  1. Testing cleanable/reuseable HEPA prefilters for mixed waste incinerator air pollution control systems

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, D.B.; Wong, A.; Walker, B.W.; Paul, J.D.

    1997-08-01

    The Consolidated Incineration Facility (CIF) at the US DOE Savannah River Site is undergoing preoperational testing. The CIF is designed to treat solid and liquid RCRA hazardous and mixed wastes from site operations and clean-up activities. The technologies selected for use in the air pollution control system (APCS) were based on reviews of existing incinerators, air pollution control experience, and recommendations from consultants. This approach resulted in a facility design using experience from other operating hazardous/radioactive incinerators. In order to study the CIF APCS prior to operation, a 1/10 scale pilot facility, the Offgas Components Test Facility (OCTF), was constructed and has been in operation since late 1994. Its mission is to demonstrate the design integrity of the CIF APCS and optimize equipment/instrument performance of the full scale production facility. Operation of the pilot facility has provided long-term performance data of integrated systems and critical facility components. This has reduced facility startup problems and helped ensure compliance with facility performance requirements. Technical support programs assist in assuring all stakeholders the CIF can properly treat combustible hazardous, mixed, and low-level radioactive wastes. High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters are used to remove hazardous and radioactive particulates from the exhaust gas strewn before being released into the atmosphere. The HEPA filter change-out frequency has been a potential issue and was the first technical issue to be studied at the OCTF. Tests were conducted to evaluate the performance of HEPA filters under different operating conditions. These tests included evaluating the impact on HEPA life of scrubber operating parameters and the type of HEPA prefilter used. This pilot-scale testing demonstrated satisfactory HEPA filter life when using cleanable metal prefilters and high flows of steam and water in the offgas scrubber. 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Scaling Relationships Based on Scaled Tank Mixing and Transfer Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Piepel, Gregory F.; Holmes, Aimee E.; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro; Lee, Kearn P.; Kelly, Steven E.

    2014-01-01

    This report documents the statistical analyses performed (by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for Washington River Protection Solutions) on data from 26 tests conducted using two scaled tanks (43 and 120 inches) in the Small Scale Mixing Demonstration platform. The 26 tests varied several test parameters, including mixer-jet nozzle velocity, base simulant, supernatant viscosity, and capture velocity. For each test, samples were taken pre-transfer and during five batch transfers. The samples were analyzed for the concentrations (lbs/gal slurry) of four primary components in the base simulants (gibbsite, stainless steel, sand, and ZrO2). The statistical analyses including modeling the component concentrations as functions of test parameters using stepwise regression with two different model forms. The resulting models were used in an equivalent performance approach to calculate values of scaling exponents (for a simple geometric scaling relationship) as functions of the parameters in the component concentration models. The resulting models and scaling exponents are displayed in tables and graphically. The sensitivities of component concentrations and scaling exponents to the test parameters are presented graphically. These results will serve as inputs to subsequent work by other researchers to develop scaling relationships that are applicable to full-scale tanks.

  3. Scaling Relationships Based on Scaled Tank Mixing and Transfer Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Piepel, Gregory F.; Holmes, Aimee E.; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro

    2013-09-18

    This report documents the statistical analyses performed (by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for Washington River Protection Solutions) on data from 26 tests conducted using two scaled tanks (43 and 120 inches) in the Small Scale Mixing Demonstration platform. The 26 tests varied several test parameters, including mixer-jet nozzle velocity, base simulant, supernatant viscosity, and capture velocity. For each test, samples were taken pre-transfer and during five batch transfers. The samples were analyzed for the concentrations (lbs/gal slurry) of four primary components in the base simulants (gibbsite, stainless steel, sand, and ZrO2). The statistical analyses including modeling the component concentrations as functions of test parameters using stepwise regression with two different model forms. The resulting models were used in an equivalent performance approach to calculate values of scaling exponents (for a simple geometric scaling relationship) as functions of the parameters in the component concentration models. The resulting models and scaling exponents are displayed in tables and graphically. The sensitivities of component concentrations and scaling exponents to the test parameters are presented graphically. These results will serve as inputs to subsequent work by other researchers to develop scaling relationships that are applicable to full-scale tanks.

  4. Effect of coolant flow ejection on aerodynamic performance of low-aspect-ratio vanes. 2: Performance with coolant flow ejection at temperature ratios up to 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hass, J. E.; Kofskey, M. G.

    1977-01-01

    The aerodynamic performance of a 0.5 aspect ratio turbine vane configuration with coolant flow ejection was experimentally determined in a full annular cascade. The vanes were tested at a nominal mean section ideal critical velocity ratio of 0.890 over a range of primary to coolant total temperature ratio from 1.0 to 2.08 and a range of coolant to primary total pressure ratio from 1.0 to 1.4 which corresponded to coolant flows from 3.0 to 10.7 percent of the primary flow. The variations in primary and thermodynamic efficiency and exit flow conditions with circumferential and radial position were obtained.

  5. Mixed waste chemical compatibility: A testing program for plastic packaging components

    SciTech Connect

    Nigrey, P.J.

    1995-12-01

    The purpose of hazardous and radioactive materials packaging is to enable these materials to be transported without posing a threat to the health or property of the general public. To achieve this aim, regulations in the United States have been written establishing general design requirements for such packagings. While no regulations have been written specifically for mixed waste packaging, regulations for the constituents of mixed wastes, i.e., hazardous and radioactive substances, have been codified by the US Department of Transportation (DOT, 49 CFR 173) and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC, 10 CFR 71). The design requirements for both hazardous [49 CFR 173.24 (e)(1)] and radioactive [49 CFR 173.412 (g)] materials packaging specify packaging compatibility, i.e., that the materials of the packaging @d any contents be chemically compatible with each other. Furthermore, Type A [49 CFR 173.412 (g)] and Type B (10 CFR 71.43) packaging design requirements stipulate that there be no significant chemical, galvanic, or other reaction between the materials and contents of the package. Based on these requirements, a Chemical Compatibility Testing Program was developed in the Transportation Systems Department at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The program attempts to assure any regulatory body that the issue of packaging material compatibility towards hazardous and radioactive materials has been addressed. This program has been described in considerable detail in an internal SNL document, the Chemical Compatibility Test Plan & Procedure Report (Nigrey 1993).

  6. Measurements of Turbulent Flow Field in Separate Flow Nozzles with Enhanced Mixing Devices - Test Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James

    2002-01-01

    As part of the Advanced Subsonic Technology Program, a series of experiments was conducted at NASA Glenn Research Center on the effect of mixing enhancement devices on the aeroacoustic performance of separate flow nozzles. Initial acoustic evaluations of the devices showed that they reduced jet noise significantly, while creating very little thrust loss. The explanation for the improvement required that turbulence measurements, namely single point mean and RMS statistics and two-point spatial correlations, be made to determine the change in the turbulence caused by the mixing enhancement devices that lead to the noise reduction. These measurements were made in the summer of 2000 in a test program called Separate Nozzle Flow Test 2000 (SFNT2K) supported by the Aeropropulsion Research Program at NASA Glenn Research Center. Given the hot high-speed flows representative of a contemporary bypass ratio 5 turbofan engine, unsteady flow field measurements required the use of an optical measurement method. To achieve the spatial correlations, the Particle Image Velocimetry technique was employed, acquiring high-density velocity maps of the flows from which the required statistics could be derived. This was the first successful use of this technique for such flows, and shows the utility of this technique for future experimental programs. The extensive statistics obtained were likewise unique and give great insight into the turbulence which produces noise and how the turbulence can be modified to reduce jet noise.

  7. Testing of the In Situ, Mixed Iron Oxide (IS-MIO) Alpha Removal Process

    SciTech Connect

    PETERS, THOMAS

    2004-06-29

    One of the throughput limitations for the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and Salt Waste Processing Facility is the lengthy sorption time of plutonium on monosodium titanate(MST). Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) personnel proposed use of the In-Situ-Mixed Iron Oxide (IS-MIO) process, which removes strontium and actinides from waste streams with faster reaction kinetics than the MST process. The Savannah River National Laboratory and ANL received funding to develop the IS-MIO process for deployment at the Savannah River Site. Personnel performed simulant filtration tests to evaluate the process. They prepared 100 L of simulated SRS high level waste, added IS-MIO solutions to the simulated waste, mixed the solutions for four hours, and filtered the slurry in a bench-scale crossflow filter. The simulant was designed to maximize strontium solubility; it was not designed to match a particular tank composition. The crossflow filter was 3/8 inch internal diameter, 2 feet long, and possessing a 0.196 ft2 internal surface area. Researchers also performed a series of decontamination tests using actual waste. They prepared a multi-tank composite adjusted it to 5.6 M sodium, and allowed it to equilibrate. They used this material in six tests. Four of the tests used IS-MIO solutions, one of the tests used MST, and one test served as a control. In each test, personnel sampled the supernate at regular intervals and analyzed for strontium and actinides to determine the effective removal capability. The conclusions from this work follow. The IS-MIO solids do not produce an increase in filter flux. The increased flux observed in some comparisons is due to differences in operating conditions rather than to improved filterability of the IS-MIO solids. Filter flux with sludge and IS-MIO solids increases with increasing axial velocity. A similar correlation occurred with sludge and MST solids. The IS-MIO particles are initially larger than MST particles. Because of shear, by the end of

  8. Bi-coolant flat plate solar collector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chon, W. Y.; Green, L. L.

    The feasibility study of a flat plate solar collector which heats air and water concurrently or separately was carried out. Air flows above the collector absorber plate, while water flows in tubes soldered or brazed beneath the plate. The collector efficiencies computed for the flow of both air and water are compared with those for the flow of a single coolant. The results show that the bi-coolant collector efficiency computed for the entire year in Buffalo, New York is higher than the single-coolant collector efficiency, although the efficiency of the water collector is higher during the warmer months.

  9. Coolant mass flow equalizer for nuclear fuel

    DOEpatents

    Betten, Paul R.

    1978-01-01

    The coolant mass flow distribution in a liquid metal cooled reactor is enhanced by restricting flow in sub-channels defined in part by the peripheral fuel elements of a fuel assembly. This flow restriction, which results in more coolant flow in interior sub-channels, is achieved through the use of a corrugated liner positioned between the bundle of fuel elements and the inner wall of the fuel assembly coolant duct. The corrugated liner is expandable to accommodate irradiation induced growth of fuel assembly components.

  10. Computing Flows Of Coolants In Turbomachines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meitner, P. L.

    1994-01-01

    Coolant Passage Flow (CPF) computer code developed to predict accurately coolant flow and heat transfer inside turbomachinery cooling passages (either radial or axial blading). Computes flow in one-inlet/one-outlet passage of any shape. Calculates rate of flow of coolant, temperature, pressure, velocity, and heat-transfer coefficients along passage. Integrates one-dimensional momentum and energy equations along defined flow path, taking into account change in area, addition or subtraction of mass, pumping, friction, and transfer of heat. Written in FORTRAN IV.

  11. Fluid and thermal mixing in a model cold leg and downcomer with vent-valve flow. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Rothe, P.H.; Marscher, W.D.; Block, J.A.

    1982-03-01

    This report describes an experimental program of fluid mixing experiments performed at atmospheric pressure in a 1/5-scale transparent model of the cold leg and downcomer of typical Babcock and Wilcox pressurized water reactors with vent valves. The results include transient data from a grid of thermocouples and extensive flow visualization photographs. Substantial mixing of cold injected water with hot primary coolant occurred during many of the tests.

  12. Numerical analysis of the hot-gas-side and coolant-side heat transfer in liquid rocket engine combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, T. S.; Luong, V.

    1992-01-01

    The objectives of this paper are to develop computational methods to predict the hot-gas-side and coolant-side heat transfer, and to use these methods in parametric studies to recommend optimized design of the coolant channels for regeneratively cooled liquid rocket engine combustors. An integrated numerical model which incorporates computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for the hot-gas thermal environment, and thermal analysis for the coolant channels, was developed. The mode was validated by comparing predicted heat fluxes with those of hot-firing test and industrial design methods. Parametric studies were performed to find a strategy for optimized combustion chamber coolant channel design.

  13. Objective and subjective hardness of a test item used for evaluating food mixing ability.

    PubMed

    Salleh, N M; Fueki, K; Garrett, N R; Ohyama, T

    2007-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare objective and subjective hardness of selected common foods with a wax cube used as a test item in a mixing ability test. Objective hardness was determined for 11 foods (cream cheese, boiled fish paste, boiled beef, apple, raw carrot, peanut, soft/hard rice cracker, jelly, plain chocolate and chewing gum) and the wax cube. Peak force (N) to compress each item was obtained from force-time curves generated with the Tensipresser. Perceived hardness ratings of each item were made by 30 dentate subjects (mean age 26.9 years) using a visual analogue scale (100 mm). These subjective assessments were given twice with a 1 week interval. High intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) for test-retest reliability were seen for all foods (ICC > 0.68; P < 0.001). One-way anova found a significant effect of food type on both the objective hardness score and the subjective hardness rating (P < 0.001). The wax cube showed significant lower objective hardness score (32.6 N) and subjective hardness rating (47.7) than peanut (45.3 N, 63.5) and raw carrot (82.5 N, 78.4) [P < 0.05; Ryan-Einot-Gabriel-Welsch (REGW)-F]. A significant semilogarithmic relationship was found between the logarithm of objective hardness scores and subjective hardness ratings across twelve test items (r = 0.90; P < 0.001). These results suggest the wax cube has a softer texture compared with test foods traditionally used for masticatory performance test, such as peanut and raw carrot. The hardness of the wax cube could be modified to simulate a range of test foods by changing mixture ratio of soft and hard paraffin wax. PMID:17302945

  14. Coolant passage heat transfer with rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajek, T. J.; Higgins, A. W.

    1985-10-01

    The objective is to develop a heat transfer and pressure drop data base, computational fluid dynamic techniques, and correlations for multi-pass rotating coolant passages with and without flow turbulators. The experimental effort is focused on the simulation of configurations and conditions expected in the blades of advanced aircraft high pressure turbines. With the use of this data base, the effects of Coriolis and buoyancy forces on the coolant side flow can be included in the design of turbine blades.

  15. Mixing of process heels, process solutions, and recycle streams: Results of the small-scale radioactive tests

    SciTech Connect

    GJ Lumetta; JP Bramson; OT Farmer III; LR Greenwood; FV Hoopes; MA Mann; MJ Steele; RT Steele; RG Swoboda; MW Urie

    2000-05-17

    Various recycle streams will be combined with the low-activity waste (LAW) or the high-level waste (HLW) feed solutions during the processing of the Hanford tank wastes by BNFL, Inc. In addition, the LAW and HLW feed solutions will also be mixed with heels present in the processing equipment. This report describes the results of a test conducted by Battelle to assess the effects of mixing specific process streams. Observations were made regarding adverse reactions (mainly precipitation) and effects on the Tc oxidation state (as indicated by K{sub d} measurements with SuperLig{reg_sign} 639). The work was conducted according to test plan BNFL-TP-29953-023, Rev. 0, Small Scale Mixing of Process Heels, Solutions, and Recycle Streams. The test went according to plan, with only minor deviations from the test plan. The deviations from the test plan are discussed in the experimental section.

  16. Analysis and testing of two-dimensional vented Coanda ejectors with asymmetric variable area mixing sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maroti, L. A.; Hill, P. G.; Armstrong, R. L.; Haines, D. M.

    1976-01-01

    The analysis of asymmetric, curved (Coanda) ejector flow has been completed using a finite difference technique and a quasi-orthogonal streamline coordinate system. The boundary layer type jet mixing analysis accounts for the effect of streamline curvature in pressure gradients normal to the streamlines and on eddy viscosities. The analysis assured perfect gases, free of pressure discontinuities and flow separation and treated three compound flows of supersonic and subsonic streams. Flow parameters and ejector performance were measured in a vented Coanda flow geometry for the verification of the computer analysis. A primary converging nozzle with a discharge geometry of 0.003175 m x 0.2032 m was supplied with 0.283 cu m/sec of air at about 241.3 KPa absolute stagnation pressure and 82 C stagnation temperature. One mixing section geometry was used with a 0.127 m constant radius Coanda surface. Eight tests were run at spacing between the Coanda surface and primary nozzle 0.01915 m and 0.318 m and at three angles of Coanda turning: 22.5 deg, 45.0 deg, and 75.0 deg. The wall static pressures, the loci of maximum stagnation pressures, and the stagnation pressure profiles agree well between analytical and experimental results.

  17. Simulant Development for Hanford Double-Shell Tank Mixing and Waste Feed Delivery Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Tran, Diana N.; Buchmiller, William C.

    2012-09-24

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of River Projection manages the River Protection Project, which has the mission to retrieve and treat the Hanford tank waste for disposal and close the tank farms (Certa et al. 2011). Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) is responsible for a primary objective of this mission which is to retrieve and transfer tank waste to the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). A mixing and sampling program with four separate demonstrations is currently being conducted to support this objective and also to support activities in a plan for addressing safety concerns identified by the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board related to the ability of the WTP to mix, sample, and transfer fast settling particles. Previous studies have documented the objectives, criteria, and selection of non-radioactive simulants for these four demonstrations. The identified simulants include Newtonian suspending liquids with densities and viscosities that span the range expected in waste feed tanks. The identified simulants also include non-Newtonian slurries with Bingham yield stress values that span a range that is expected to bound the Bingham yield stress in the feed delivery tanks. The previous studies identified candidate materials for the Newtonian and non-Newtonian suspending fluids, but did not provide specific recipes for obtaining the target properties and information was not available to evaluate the compatibility of the fluids and particles or the potential for salt precipitation at lower temperatures. The purpose of this study is to prepare small batches of simulants in advance of the demonstrations to determine specific simulant recipes, to evaluate the compatibility of the liquids and particles, and to determine if the simulants are stable for the potential range of test temperatures. The objective of the testing, which is focused primarily on the Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids, is to determine the composition of

  18. Copper-triazole interaction and coolant inhibitor depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Bartley, L.S.; Fritz, P.O.; Pellet, R.J.; Taylor, S.A.; Van de Ven, P.

    1999-08-01

    To a large extent, the depletion of tolyltriazole (TTZ) observed in several field tests may be attributed to the formation of a protective copper-triazole layer. Laboratory aging studies, shown to correlate with field experience, reveal that copper-TTZ layer formation depletes coolant TTZ levels in a fashion analogous to changes observed in the field. XPS and TPD-MS characterization of the complex formed indicates a strong chemical bond between copper and the adsorbed TTZ which can be desorbed thermally only at elevated temperatures. Electrochemical polarization experiments indicate that the layer provides good copper protection even when TTZ is absent from the coolant phase. Examination of copper cooling system components obtained after extensive field use reveals the presence of a similar protective layer.

  19. Prediction of Frequency for Simulation of Asphalt Mix Fatigue Tests Using MARS and ANN

    PubMed Central

    Fakhri, Mansour

    2014-01-01

    Fatigue life of asphalt mixes in laboratory tests is commonly determined by applying a sinusoidal or haversine waveform with specific frequency. The pavement structure and loading conditions affect the shape and the frequency of tensile response pulses at the bottom of asphalt layer. This paper introduces two methods for predicting the loading frequency in laboratory asphalt fatigue tests for better simulation of field conditions. Five thousand (5000) four-layered pavement sections were analyzed and stress and strain response pulses in both longitudinal and transverse directions was determined. After fitting the haversine function to the response pulses by the concept of equal-energy pulse, the effective length of the response pulses were determined. Two methods including Multivariate Adaptive Regression Splines (MARS) and Artificial Neural Network (ANN) methods were then employed to predict the effective length (i.e., frequency) of tensile stress and strain pulses in longitudinal and transverse directions based on haversine waveform. It is indicated that, under controlled stress and strain modes, both methods (MARS and ANN) are capable of predicting the frequency of loading in HMA fatigue tests with very good accuracy. The accuracy of ANN method is, however, more than MARS method. It is furthermore shown that the results of the present study can be generalized to sinusoidal waveform by a simple equation. PMID:24688400

  20. Measurement of the Coolant Channel Temperatures and Pressures of a Cooled Radial-Inflow Turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicicco, L. Danielle; Nowlin, Brent C.; Tirres, Lizet

    1994-01-01

    Instrumentation has been installed on the surface of a cooled radial-inflow turbine. Thermocouples and miniature integrated sensor pressure transducers were installed to measure steady state coolant temperatures, blade wall temperatures, and coolant pressures. These measurements will eventually be used to determine the heat transfer characteristics of the rotor. This paper will describe the procedures used to install and calibrate the instrumentation and the testing methods followed. A limited amount of data will compare the measured values to the predicted values.

  1. Reactor coolant pump monitoring and diagnostic system

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, R.M.; Gross, K.C.; Walsh, M. ); Humenik, K.E. )

    1990-01-01

    In order to reliably and safely operate a nuclear power plant, it is necessary to continuously monitor the performance of numerous subsystems to confirm that the plant state is within its prescribed limits. An important function of a properly designed monitoring system is the detection of incipient faults in all subsystems (with the avoidance of false alarms) coupled with an information system that provides the operators with fault diagnosis, prognosis of fault progression and recommended (either automatic or prescriptive) corrective action. In this paper, such a system is described that has been applied to reactor coolant pumps. This system includes a sensitive pattern-recognition technique based upon the sequential probability ratio test (SPRT) that detects incipient faults from validated signals, an expert system embodying knowledge bases on pump and sensor performance, extensive hypertext files containing operating and emergency procedures as well as pump and sensor information and a graphical interface providing the operator with easily perceived information on the location and character of the fault as well as recommended corrective action. This system is in the prototype stage and is currently being validated utilizing data from a liquid-metal cooled fast reactor (EBR-II). 3 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Experimental Testing and Modeling Analysis of Solute Mixing at Water Distribution Pipe Junctions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Flow dynamics at a pipe junction controls particle trajectories, solute mixing and concentrations in downstream pipes. Here we have categorized pipe junctions into five hydraulic types, for which flow distribution factors and analytical equations for describing the solute mixing ...

  3. Test Problem: Tilted Rayleigh-Taylor for 2-D Mixing Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, Malcolm J.; Livescu, Daniel; Youngs, David L.

    2012-08-14

    The 'tilted-rig' test problem originates from a series of experiments (Smeeton & Youngs, 1987, Youngs, 1989) performed at AWE in the late 1980's, that followed from the 'rocket-rig' experiments (Burrows et al., 1984; Read & Youngs, 1983), and exploratory experiments performed at Imperial College (Andrews, 1986; Andrews and Spalding, 1990). A schematic of the experiment is shown in Figure 1, and comprises a tank filled with light fluid above heavy, and then 'tilted' on one side of the apparatus, thus causing an 'angled interface' to the acceleration history due to rockets. Details of the configuration given in the next chapter include: fluids, dimensions, and other necessary details to simulate the experiment. Figure 2 shows results from two experiments, Case 110 (which is the source for this test problem) that has an Atwood number of 0.5, and Case 115 (a secondary source described in Appendix B), with Atwood of 0.9 Inspection of the photograph in Figure 2 (the main experimental diagnostic) for Case 110. reveals two main areas for mix development; 1) a large-scale overturning motion that produces a rising plume (spike) on the left, and falling plume (bubble) on the right, that are almost symmetric; and 2) a Rayleigh-Taylor driven mixing central mixing region that has a large-scale rotation associated with the rising and falling plumes, and also experiences lateral strain due to stretching of the interface by the plumes, and shear across the interface due to upper fluid moving downward and to the right, and lower fluid moving upward and to the left. Case 115 is similar but differs by a much larger Atwood of 0.9 that drives a strong asymmetry between a left side heavy spike penetration and a right side light bubble penetration. Case 110 is chosen as the source for the present test problem as the fluids have low surface tension (unlike Case 115) due the addition of a surfactant, the asymmetry small (no need to have fine grids for the spike), and there is extensive

  4. Composition of incipient passivating layers on heat-rejecting aluminum in carboxylate- and silicate-inhibited coolants: Correlation with ASTM D 4340 weight losses

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, F.T.; Moylan, T.E.; Simko, S.J.; Militello, M.C.

    1999-08-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy identified compositional differences between passivating layers initially formed in carboxylated coolants, in silicated coolants, and in a mixture thereof on well-controlled 319 aluminum surfaces under heat-rejecting conditions. The layer formed in silicated coolant was primarily silica, while that in carboxylated coolant was primarily hydrated alumina. Competition between inhibitor packages when carboxylated coolant was contaminated from the start with low levels of silicated coolant produced films which were not simply patchwise mixtures of the pure-coolant film types. The surface analytical results aid the interpretation of subtle differences in weight losses under the ASTM Standard Test Method for Corrosion of Cast Aluminum Alloys in Engine Coolants Under Heat-Rejecting Conditions (D 4340) in carboxylated versus silicated coolants that became more pronounced when testing was carried out at a vehicle-like 50% coolant concentration. Results from time-resolved D4340 measurements and from a two-step cleaning procedure further contribute towards proper evaluation of D4340 weight losses in the different coolant types.

  5. Nuclear reactor loss of coolant protection system

    SciTech Connect

    Loose, R.A.

    1986-03-18

    A pressurized water reactor system is described of a nuclear power plant having a water storage tank for providing emergency coolant water and means provided external to the containment vessel, for use in the event of a primary loss of coolant situation, to circulate emergency water as a coolant by withdrawal through a wall of the containment vessel and return the same back through the wall of the containment vessel and passing the water through a heat exchange means prior to use as a coolant for the reactor core. The improvement described here consists of: an enslosure, the interior of which is sealed to the atmosphere, positioned adjacent to and exterior of a wall of the containment vessel; an inlet conduit, enclosed within a sealed outer casing, communicating between the interior of the containment vessel and the interior of the enclosure; an exhaust conduit, enclosed within a sealed outer casing, communicating between the interior of the enclosure and the interior of the containment vessel; a rupture disc on the inlet conduit within the enclosure, such that failure of the exhaust conduit within the enclosure will produce an increase of the pressure within the enclosure and above a predetermined pressure will fracture the rupture disc, and will circulate the coolant within the enclosure; and means within the interior of the enclosure for pumping coolant from the interior of the containment vessel through the inlet conduit, and back to the interior of the containment vessel through the exhaust conduit; whereby if either of the conduits should fail, coolant will be collected within the enclosure and sealed to the atmosphere.

  6. Conceptual Design Report: Nevada Test Site Mixed Waste Disposal Facility Project

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2009-01-31

    Environmental cleanup of contaminated nuclear weapons manufacturing and test sites generates radioactive waste that must be disposed. Site cleanup activities throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex are projected to continue through 2050. Some of this waste is mixed waste (MW), containing both hazardous and radioactive components. In addition, there is a need for MW disposal from other mission activities. The Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Record of Decision designates the Nevada Test Site (NTS) as a regional MW disposal site. The NTS has a facility that is permitted to dispose of onsite- and offsite-generated MW until November 30, 2010. There is not a DOE waste management facility that is currently permitted to dispose of offsite-generated MW after 2010, jeopardizing the DOE environmental cleanup mission and other MW-generating mission-related activities. A mission needs document (CD-0) has been prepared for a newly permitted MW disposal facility at the NTS that would provide the needed capability to support DOE's environmental cleanup mission and other MW-generating mission-related activities. This report presents a conceptual engineering design for a MW facility that is fully compliant with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and DOE O 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management'. The facility, which will be located within the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the NTS, will provide an approximately 20,000-cubic yard waste disposal capacity. The facility will be licensed by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP).

  7. The Changing Adventures of Mixed Low-Level Waste Disposal at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    DOE /Navarro/NSTec

    2007-02-01

    After a 15-year hiatus, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) began accepting DOE off-site generated mixed low-level radioactive waste (MLLW) for disposal at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in December 2005. This action was predicated on the acceptance by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) of a waste analysis plan (WAP). The NNSA/NSO agreed to limit mixed waste disposal to 20,000 cubic meters (approximately 706,000 cubic feet) and close the facility by December 2010 or sooner, if the volume limit is reached. The WAP and implementing procedures were developed based on Hanford’s system of verification to the extent possible so the two regional disposal sites could have similar processes. Since the NNSA/NSO does not have a breaching facility to allow the opening of boxes at the site, verification of the waste occurs by visual inspection at the generator/treatment facility or by Real-Time-Radiography (RTR) at the NTS. This system allows the NTS to effectively, efficiently, and compliantly accept MLLW for disposal. The WAP, NTS Waste Acceptance Criteria, and procedures have been revised based on learning experiences. These changes include: RTR expectations; visual inspection techniques; tamper-indicating device selection; void space requirements; and chemical screening concerns. The NNSA/NSO, NDEP, and the generators have been working together throughout the debugging of the verification processes. Additionally, the NNSA/NSO will continue to refine the MLLW acceptance processes and strive for continual improvement of the program.

  8. Hot-Gas-Slide and Coolant-Side Heat Transfer in Liquid Rocket Engine Combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See; Luong, Van

    1994-01-01

    The objectives of this article are to develop a multidisciplinary, computational methodology to predict the hot-gas-side and coolant-side heat transfer in film cooling assisted, regeneratively cooled liquid rocket engine combustors, and to use it in parametric studies to recommend optimized design of the coolant channels for a developmental combustor. An integrated numerical model which incorporates computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for the hot-gas thermal environment, and thermal analysis for the liner and coolant channels, was developed. This integrated CFD/thermal model was validated by comparing predicted heat fluxes with those of hot-firing test and industrial design methods for a 40-k calorimeter thrust chamber and the Space Shuttle Main Engine main combustion chamber. Parametric studies were performed for the advanced main combustion chamber to find a strategy for a proposed coolant channel design.

  9. Development of a rapid test method for asphalt concrete content determination in hot-mix paving mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavez, J. J. M.

    1984-01-01

    A rapid test method was developed for the determination of asphalt cement content in hot-mix bituminous paving mixtures. It is based on the extraction of asphalt cement from mixtures with trichloroethylene and subsequent measurement of the transmittance of light through the extracted solution. A good correlation was found between the results obtained using the rapid test and those obtained using the standard test (ASTM D-2172, Method E1) for samples tested in the field at asphalt mix plants. The test uses a portable spectrophotometer and a metal can for extraction. The asphalt content can be determined in less than ten minutes. The possibility of using the rapid test on materials containing emulsified asphalt, slag aggregate, unusually high amounts of fine material and recycled material was also studied.

  10. Coolant Design System for Liquid Propellant Aerospike Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnell, Miranda; Branam, Richard

    2015-11-01

    Liquid propellant rocket engines burn at incredibly high temperatures making it difficult to design an effective coolant system. These particular engines prove to be extremely useful by powering the rocket with a variable thrust that is ideal for space travel. When combined with aerospike engine nozzles, which provide maximum thrust efficiency, this class of rockets offers a promising future for rocketry. In order to troubleshoot the problems that high combustion chamber temperatures pose, this research took a computational approach to heat analysis. Chambers milled into the combustion chamber walls, lined by a copper cover, were tested for their efficiency in cooling the hot copper wall. Various aspect ratios and coolants were explored for the maximum wall temperature by developing our own MATLAB code. The code uses a nodal temperature analysis with conduction and convection equations and assumes no internal heat generation. This heat transfer research will show oxygen is a better coolant than water, and higher aspect ratios are less efficient at cooling. This project funded by NSF REU Grant 1358991.

  11. Patient and provider attitudes toward genomic testing for prostate cancer susceptibility: a mixed method study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The strong association between family history and prostate cancer (PCa) suggests a significant genetic contribution, yet specific highly penetrant PCa susceptibility genes have not been identified. Certain single-nucleotide-polymorphisms have been found to correlate with PCa risk; however uncertainty remains regarding their clinical utility and how to best incorporate this information into clinical decision-making. Genetic testing is available directly to consumers and both patients and healthcare providers are becoming more aware of this technology. Purchasing online allows patients to bypass their healthcare provider yet patients may have difficulty interpreting test results and providers may be called upon to interpret results. Determining optimal ways to educate both patients and providers, and strategies for appropriately incorporating this information into clinical decision-making are needed. Methods A mixed-method study was conducted in Utah between October 2011 and December 2011. Eleven focus group discussions were held and surveys were administered to 23 first-degree relatives of PCa patients living in Utah and 24 primary-care physicians and urologists practicing in Utah to present specific information about these assessments and determine knowledge and attitudes regarding health implications of using these assessments. Results Data was independently coded by two researchers (relative Kappa = .88; provider Kappa = .77) and analyzed using a grounded theory approach. Results indicated differences in attitudes and behavioral intentions between patient and provider. Despite the test’s limitations relatives indicated interest in genetic testing (52%) while most providers indicated they would not recommend the test for their patients (79%). Relatives expected providers to interpret genetic test results and use results to provide personalized healthcare recommendations while the majority of providers did not think the information would be useful in

  12. Experimental studies of local coolant hydrodynamics using a scaled model of cassette-type fuel assembly of a KLT-40S reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, S. M.; Barinov, A. A.; Varentsov, A. V.; Doronkov, D. V.; Solntsev, D. N.; Khrobostov, A. E.

    2016-08-01

    The results of experimental studies of local hydrodynamic and mass exchange characteristics of the coolant flow behind the spacer grid in the fuel assembly of a KLT-40S reactor are presented. The experiments were aimed at the investigation of representative domains of the fuel assembly with three tracer injection regions. The studies were performed at the aerodynamic test facility using the tracer gas diffusion method. According to the theory of hydrodynamic similarity, the obtained experimental results can be transferred to full-scale coolant flow conditions in standard fuel assemblies. The analysis of the tracer concentration propagation made it possible to determine in detail the flow pattern and find the main regularities and specific features of the coolant flow behind the plate spacer grid of KLT-40S fuel assembly. The hydraulic resistance coefficient of the spacer grid was experimentally determined. The coefficients of mass exchange between cells for representative cells of the displacer region in the KLT-40S fuel assembly were calculated for the first time; these results are presented in the form of the "mixing matrix." The results of studies of local coolant flow hydrodynamics in the KLT-40S fuel assembly are used at AO Afrikantov OKBM for estimation of thermotechnical reliability of active cores for reactors of floating nuclear power stations. The experimental data on hydrodynamic and mass exchange characteristics are included in the database for verification of CDF codes and detailed cell-wise calculation of the active core for KLT-40S reactor installation. The results of these studies can be used at FSUE RFNC-VNIIEF for testing and verification of domestic three-dimensional hydrodynamic CFD codes ("Logos") that are applied for substantiation of newly designed reactor installations. Practical recommendations on the application of the obtained results in thermohydraulic calculations of the active core for the KLT-40S reactor will be worked out. Proposals

  13. PILOT SCALE TESTING OF MONOSODIUM TITANATE MIXING FOR THE SRS SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE PROCESS - 11224

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M.; Restivo, M.; Williams, M.; Herman, D.; Steeper, T.

    2011-01-25

    The Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process is being developed to remove cesium, strontium, and select actinides from Savannah River Site (SRS) Liquid Waste using an existing waste tank (i.e., Tank 41H) to house the process. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is conducting pilot-scale mixing tests to determine the pump requirements for suspending monosodium titanate (MST), crystalline silicotitanate (CST), and simulated sludge. The purpose of this pilot scale testing is to determine the requirements for the pumps to suspend the MST particles so that they can contact the strontium and actinides in the liquid and be removed from the tank. The pilot-scale tank is a 1/10.85 linear scaled model of SRS Tank 41H. The tank diameter, tank liquid level, pump nozzle diameter, pump elevation, and cooling coil diameter are all 1/10.85 of their dimensions in Tank 41H. The pump locations correspond to the proposed locations in Tank 41H by the SCIX program (Risers B5 and B2 for two pump configurations and Risers B5, B3, and B1 for three pump configurations). The conclusions from this work follow: (i) Neither two standard slurry pumps nor two quad volute slurry pumps will provide sufficient power to initially suspend MST in an SRS waste tank. (ii) Two Submersible Mixer Pumps (SMPs) will provide sufficient power to initially suspend MST in an SRS waste tank. However, the testing shows the required pump discharge velocity is close to the maximum discharge velocity of the pump (within 12%). (iii) Three SMPs will provide sufficient power to initially suspend MST in an SRS waste tank. The testing shows the required pump discharge velocity is 66% of the maximum discharge velocity of the pump. (iv) Three SMPs are needed to resuspend MST that has settled in a waste tank at nominal 45 C for four weeks. The testing shows the required pump discharge velocity is 77% of the maximum discharge velocity of the pump. Two SMPs are not sufficient to resuspend MST that settled under these

  14. Molecular Design for Cryogenic Magnetic Coolants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun-Liang; Chen, Yan-Cong; Tong, Ming-Liang

    2016-04-01

    The area of molecular magnetic coolants has developed rapidly in recent years. A large number of competitive candidates have been reported, with the cooling performances chasing each other. In this account, four explicit strategies, namely, increasing ground-state spin, reducing magnetic anisotropy, weakening magnetic interactions, and lowering the molecular weight, are proposed from the theoretical viewpoint towards improving the magnetocaloric effect (MCE). According to this guidance, these successful strategies are discussed to pursue excellent magnetic coolants. This is accompanied by a discussion of the representative examples reported by our group. The magnetic entropy change increases from one compound to another, which in the most pronounced cases is suggestive of being the largest MCE in magnetic coolants. PMID:26929130

  15. On the Application of CFD Modeling for the Prediction of the Degree of Mixing in a PWR During a Boron Dilution Transient

    SciTech Connect

    Lycklama, Jan-Aiso; Hoehne, Thomas

    2006-07-01

    In a Pressurized Water Reactor, negative reactivity is present in the core by means of Boric acid as a soluble neutron absorber in the coolant water. During a so-called Boron Dilution Transient (BDT), a de-borated slug of coolant water is transported from the cold leg into the reactor vessel, and the borated coolant water is diluted by mixing with this un-borated water. The resulting decrease in the boron concentration leads to an insertion of positive reactivity in the core, which may lead to a reactivity excursion. The associated power peak may damage the fuel rods. The mixing of borated and un-borated water in downcomer and lower plenum is an important process, because it mitigates the degree of reactivity insertion. In the present study the application of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) for the prediction of this mixing of un-borated with borated water in the RPV has been assessed. The analyses have been compared with the measurement data from the Rossendorf coolant mixing model (ROCOM) experiment. The ROCOM test facility represents the primary cooling system of a KONVOI type of PWR (1300 MW{sub el}). In spite of the complicated spatial, temporal, and geometrical aspects of the flow in the RPV, the agreement between the calculated and the experimental data is good. The CFD model tends to slightly under predict the degree of mixing in the RPV resulting in a slight under-prediction of the boron concentration at the core. (authors)

  16. On-Line Coolant Chemistry Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    LM Bachman

    2006-07-19

    Impurities in the gas coolant of the space nuclear power plant (SNPP) can provide valuable indications of problems in the reactor and an overall view of system health. By monitoring the types and amounts of these impurities, much can be implied regarding the status of the reactor plant. However, a preliminary understanding of the expected impurities is important before evaluating prospective detection and monitoring systems. Currently, a spectroscopy system is judged to hold the greatest promise for monitoring the impurities of interest in the coolant because it minimizes the number of entry and exit points to the plant and provides the ability to detect impurities down to the 1 ppm level.

  17. Coolant monitoring apparatus for nuclear reactors

    DOEpatents

    Tokarz, Richard D.

    1983-01-01

    A system for monitoring coolant conditions within a pressurized vessel. A length of tubing extends outward from the vessel from an open end containing a first line restriction at the location to be monitored. The flowing fluid is cooled and condensed before passing through a second line restriction. Measurement of pressure drop at the second line restriction gives an indication of fluid condition at the first line restriction. Multiple lengths of tubing with open ends at incremental elevations can measure coolant level within the vessel.

  18. Fault Protection Design and Testing for the Cassini Spacecraft in a "Mixed" Thruster Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, David; Lee, Allan; Meakin, Peter; Weitl, Raquel

    2013-01-01

    NASA's Cassini Spacecraft, launched on October 15th, 1997 and arrived at Saturn on June 30th, 2004, is the largest and most ambitious interplanetary spacecraft in history. In order to meet the challenging attitude control and navigation requirements of the orbit profile at Saturn, Cassini is equipped with a monopropellant thruster based Reaction Control System (RCS), a bipropellant Main Engine Assembly (MEA) and a Reaction Wheel Assembly (RWA). In 2008, after 11 years of reliable service, several RCS thrusters began to show signs of end of life degradation, which led the operations team to successfully perform the swap from the A-branch to the B-branch RCS system. If similar degradation begins to occur on any of the B-branch thrusters, Cassini might have to assume a "mixed" thruster configuration, where a subset of both A and B branch thrusters will be designated as prime. The Cassini Fault Protection FSW was recently updated to handle this scenario. The design, implementation, and testing of this update is described in this paper.

  19. Upgrading wet granulation monitoring from hand squeeze test to mixing torque rheometry

    PubMed Central

    Sakr, Walid F.; Ibrahim, Mohamed A.; Alanazi, Fars K.; Sakr, Adel A.

    2011-01-01

    With over 50 years of research in granulation technology, however more research is required to elucidate this widely applicable technology. Wetting phenomena could influence redistribution of individual ingredients within a granule according their solubility and also could affect the drying processes. Binder selection for a particular system is quite often empirical and dependent on the skills and experience of the formulator. Hand squeeze test was and still the main way for determination of wet granulation end point, but it is subjected to individual variation. It depends mainly on operator experience, so it is not possible to be validated. Literature reveals a variety of advanced monitoring techniques following up different wet massing stages. Torque measurement has been proved to be the most reliable control method as its tight relation to mass resistance. Many reports showed successful applications of mixing torque rheometer (MTR) for monitoring the wet massing procedure and scale up in addition to some preformulation applications. MTR as a new approach allows formulators to select a liquid addition range where the granule growth behavior is more predictable. PMID:23960772

  20. Experimental testing of hot mix asphalt mixture made of recycled aggregates.

    PubMed

    Rafi, Muhammad Masood; Qadir, Adnan; Siddiqui, Salman Hameed

    2011-12-01

    The migration of population towards big cities generates rapid construction activities. These activities not only put pressure on natural resources but also produce construction, renovation and demolition waste. There is an urgent need to find out ways to handle this waste owing to growing environmental concerns. This can reduce pressure on natural resources as well. This paper presents the results of experimental studies which were carried out on hot mix asphalt mixture samples. These samples were manufactured by adding recycled aggregates (RA) with natural crushed stone aggregates (CSA). Three levels of addition of RA were considered in the presented studies. RA were obtained from both the concrete waste of construction, renovation and demolition activities and reclaimed asphalt pavement. Separate samples were manufactured with the coarse and fine aggregate fractions of both types of RA. Samples made with CSA were used as control specimens. The samples were prepared and tested using the Marshall method. The performance of the samples was investigated in terms of density-void and stability/flow analysis and was compared with the performance criteria as given by National Highway Authority for wearing course material in Pakistan. Based on this data optimum asphalt contents were determined. All the samples made by adding up to 50% RA conform to the specification requirements of wearing course material as given by National Highway Authority in terms of optimum asphalt contents, voids in mineral aggregates and stability/flow. A statistical analysis of variation of these samples confirmed that addition is also possible statistically. PMID:20483876

  1. Experimental testing and modeling analysis of solute mixing at water distribution pipe junctions.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yu; Jeffrey Yang, Y; Jiang, Lijie; Yu, Tingchao; Shen, Cheng

    2014-06-01

    Flow dynamics at a pipe junction controls particle trajectories, solute mixing and concentrations in downstream pipes. The effect can lead to different outcomes of water quality modeling and, hence, drinking water management in a distribution network. Here we have investigated solute mixing behavior in pipe junctions of five hydraulic types, for which flow distribution factors and analytical equations for network modeling are proposed. First, based on experiments, the degree of mixing at a cross is found to be a function of flow momentum ratio that defines a junction flow distribution pattern and the degree of departure from complete mixing. Corresponding analytical solutions are also validated using computational-fluid-dynamics (CFD) simulations. Second, the analytical mixing model is further extended to double-Tee junctions. Correspondingly the flow distribution factor is modified to account for hydraulic departure from a cross configuration. For a double-Tee(A) junction, CFD simulations show that the solute mixing depends on flow momentum ratio and connection pipe length, whereas the mixing at double-Tee(B) is well represented by two independent single-Tee junctions with a potential water stagnation zone in between. Notably, double-Tee junctions differ significantly from a cross in solute mixing and transport. However, it is noted that these pipe connections are widely, but incorrectly, simplified as cross junctions of assumed complete solute mixing in network skeletonization and water quality modeling. For the studied pipe junction types, analytical solutions are proposed to characterize the incomplete mixing and hence may allow better water quality simulation in a distribution network. PMID:24675269

  2. Impact of the propylene glycol-water-borax coolant on material recovery operations

    SciTech Connect

    Duerksen, W.K.; Taylor, P.A.

    1983-05-01

    The reaction of the propylene glycol-water-borax coolant with nitric acid has now been studied in some detail. This document is intended to provide a summary of the results. Findings are summarized under nine headings. Tests have also been conducted to determine if the new coolant would have any adverse effects on the uranium recycle systems. Experiments were scientifically designed after observation of the production operations so that accurate response to the immediate production concerns could be provided. Conclusions from these studies are: formation of glycol nitrates is very improbable; the reaction of concentrated (70%) nitric acid with pure propylene glycol is very violent and hazardous; dilution of the nitric acid-glycol mixture causes a drastic decrease in the rate and intensity of the reaction; the mechanism of the nitric acid propylene glycol reaction is autocatalytic in nitrous acid; no reaction is observed between coolant and 30% nitric acid unless the solution is heated; the coolant reacts fairly vigorously with 55% nitric acid after a concentration-dependent induction time; experiments showed that the dissolution of uranium chips that had been soaked in coolant proceeded at about the same rate as if the chips had not previously contacted glycol; thermodynamic calculations show that the enthalpy change (heat liberated) by the reaction of nitric acid (30%) with propylene glycol is smaller than if the same amount of nitric acid reacted with uranium. Each of these conclusions is briefly discussed. The effect of new coolant on uranium recycle operations is then briefly discussed.

  3. A Nonparametric Approach for Assessing Goodness-of-Fit of IRT Models in a Mixed Format Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liang, Tie; Wells, Craig S.

    2015-01-01

    Investigating the fit of a parametric model plays a vital role in validating an item response theory (IRT) model. An area that has received little attention is the assessment of multiple IRT models used in a mixed-format test. The present study extends the nonparametric approach, proposed by Douglas and Cohen (2001), to assess model fit of three…

  4. NGNP Reactor Coolant Chemistry Control Study

    SciTech Connect

    Brian Castle

    2010-11-01

    The main focus of this paper is to identify the most desirable ranges of impurity levels in the primary coolant to optimize component life in the primary circuit of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), which will either be a prismatic block or pebble bed reactor.

  5. Updating and testing of a Finnish method for mixed municipal solid waste composition studies.

    PubMed

    Liikanen, M; Sahimaa, O; Hupponen, M; Havukainen, J; Sorvari, J; Horttanainen, M

    2016-06-01

    More efficient recycling of municipal solid waste (MSW) is an essential precondition for turning Europe into a circular economy. Thus, the recycling of MSW must increase significantly in several member states, including Finland. This has increased the interest in the composition of mixed MSW. Due to increased information needs, a method for mixed MSW composition studies was introduced in Finland in order to improve the national comparability of composition study results. The aim of this study was to further develop the method so that it corresponds to the information needed about the composition of mixed MSW and still works in practice. A survey and two mixed MSW composition studies were carried out in the study. According to the responses of the survey, the intensification of recycling, the landfill ban on organic waste and the producer responsibility for packaging waste have particularly influenced the need for information about the composition of mixed MSW. The share of biowaste in mixed MSW interested the respondents most. Additionally, biowaste proved to be the largest waste fraction in mixed MSW in the composition studies. It constituted over 40% of mixed MSW in both composition studies. For these reasons, the classification system of the method was updated by further defining the classifications of biowaste. The classifications of paper as well as paperboard and cardboard were also updated. The updated classification system provides more information on the share of avoidable food waste and waste materials suitable for recycling in mixed MSW. The updated method and the information gained from the composition studies are important in ensuring that the method will be adopted by municipal waste management companies and thus used widely in Finland. PMID:27021698

  6. Testing mixing models of old and young groundwater in a tropical lowland rain forest with environmental tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, D. Kip; Genereux, David P.; Plummer, L. Niel; Busenberg, Eurybiades

    2010-04-01

    We tested three models of mixing between old interbasin groundwater flow (IGF) and young, locally derived groundwater in a lowland rain forest in Costa Rica using a large suite of environmental tracers. We focus on the young fraction of water using the transient tracers CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113, SF6, 3H, and bomb 14C. We measured 3He, but 3H/3He dating is generally problematic due to the presence of mantle 3He. Because of their unique concentration histories in the atmosphere, combinations of transient tracers are sensitive not only to subsurface travel times but also to mixing between waters having different travel times. Samples fall into three distinct categories: (1) young waters that plot along a piston flow line, (2) old samples that have near-zero concentrations of the transient tracers, and (3) mixtures of 1 and 2. We have modeled the concentrations of the transient tracers using (1) a binary mixing model (BMM) of old and young water with the young fraction transported via piston flow, (2) an exponential mixing model (EMM) with a distribution of groundwater travel times characterized by a mean value, and (3) an exponential mixing model for the young fraction followed by binary mixing with an old fraction (EMM/BMM). In spite of the mathematical differences in the mixing models, they all lead to a similar conceptual model of young (0 to 10 year) groundwater that is locally derived mixing with old (>1000 years) groundwater that is recharged beyond the surface water boundary of the system.

  7. Testing mixing models of old and young groundwater in a tropical lowland rain forest with environmental tracers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Solomon, D. Kip; Genereux, David P.; Plummer, L. Niel; Busenberg, Eurybiades

    2010-01-01

    We tested three models of mixing between old interbasin groundwater flow (IGF) and young, locally derived groundwater in a lowland rain forest in Costa Rica using a large suite of environmental tracers. We focus on the young fraction of water using the transient tracers CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113, SF6, 3H, and bomb 14C. We measured 3He, but 3H/3He dating is generally problematic due to the presence of mantle 3He. Because of their unique concentration histories in the atmosphere, combinations of transient tracers are sensitive not only to subsurface travel times but also to mixing between waters having different travel times. Samples fall into three distinct categories: (1) young waters that plot along a piston flow line, (2) old samples that have near-zero concentrations of the transient tracers, and (3) mixtures of 1 and 2. We have modeled the concentrations of the transient tracers using (1) a binary mixing model (BMM) of old and young water with the young fraction transported via piston flow, (2) an exponential mixing model (EMM) with a distribution of groundwater travel times characterized by a mean value, and (3) an exponential mixing model for the young fraction followed by binary mixing with an old fraction (EMM/BMM). In spite of the mathematical differences in the mixing models, they all lead to a similar conceptual model of young (0 to 10 year) groundwater that is locally derived mixing with old (>1000 years) groundwater that is recharged beyond the surface water boundary of the system.

  8. Vegetable oils: liquid coolants for solar heating and cooling applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ingley, H A

    1980-02-01

    It has been proposed that vegetable oils, renewable byproducts of agriculture processes, be investigated for possible use as liquid coolants. The major thrust of the project was to investigate several thermophysical properties of the four vegetable oils selected. Vapor pressures, specific heat, viscosity, density, and thermal conductivity were determined over a range of temperatures for corn, soybean, peanut, and cottonseed oil. ASTM standard methods were used for these determinations. In addition, chemical analyses were performed on samples of each oil. The samples were collected before and after each experiment so that any changes in composition could be noted. The tests included iodine number, fatty acid, and moisture content determination. (MHR)

  9. COMPARISON OF MIXED FLASK CULTURE AND STANDARDIZED LABORATORY MODEL ECOSYSTEMS FOR TOXICITY TESTING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two microecosystem protocols, the Standardized Aquatic Microcosm (SAM) method (1982) and the Mixed Flask Culture (MFC) method (1981), were compared on the basis of their response to copper sulfate. These protocols differed in microcosm structure, age, and the variables monitored....

  10. Application of autochthonous mixed starter for controlled Kedong sufu fermentation in pilot plant tests.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhen; Xu, Miao; Zhai, Shuang; Chen, Hong; Li, Ai-li; Lv, Xin-tong; Deng, Hong-ling

    2015-01-01

    Traditional sufu is fermented by back-slopping and back-slopping has many defects. The objective of this study was to apply autochthonous mixed starter to control Kedong sufu fermentation. Sufu was manufactured using back-slopping (batch A) and autochthonous mixed starter (batch B) with Kocuria kristinae F7, Micrococcus luteus KDF1, and Staphylococcus carnosus KDFR1676. Considering physicochemical properties of sufu, 150-day sufu samples from batch A and 90-day sufu samples from batch B met the standard requirements, respectively. Considering sensory characteristics of sufu, 150-day sufu samples from batch A and 90-day sufu samples from batch B showed no significant differences (P > 0.05). The maturation period of sufu was shortened by 60 d. Profiles of free amino acids and peptides partly revealed the mechanism of typical sensory quality and shorter ripening time of sufu manufactured by autochthonous mixed starter. In final products, content of total biogenic amines was reduced by 48%. Autochthonous mixed starter performed better than back-slopping. Fermentation had a positive influence on the quality, safety, and sensory properties of sufu. The application of autochthonous mixed starter does not change the sensory characteristics of traditional fermented sufu. In addition, it reduces maturation period and improves their homogeneity and safety. It is possible to substitute autochthonous mixed starter for back-slopping in the manufacture of sufu. PMID:25533352

  11. Design criteria for Waste Coolant Processing Facility and preliminary proposal 722 for Waste Coolant Processing Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-27

    This document contains the design criteria to be used by the architect-engineer (A-E) in the performance of Titles 1 and 2 design for the construction of a facility to treat the biodegradable, water soluble, waste machine coolant generated at the Y-12 plant. The purpose of this facility is to reduce the organic loading of coolants prior to final treatment at the proposed West Tank Farm Treatment Facility.

  12. Field-scale tests for determining mixing patterns associated with coarse-bubble air diffuser configurations, Egan Quarry, Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hornewer, N.J.; Johnson, G.P.; Robertson, D.M.; Hondzo, Miki

    1997-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Chicago District did field-scale tests in August-September 1996 to determine mixing patterns associated with different configurations of coarse-bubble air diffusers. The tests were done in an approximately 13-meter deep quarry near Chicago, Ill. Three-dimensional velocity, water-temperature, dissolved oxygen concentration, and specific-conductivity profiles were collected from locations between approximately 2 to 30 meters from the diffusers for two sets of five test configurations; one set for stratified and one set for destratified conditions in the quarry. The data-collection methods and instrumentation used to characterize mixing patterns and interactions of coarse-bubble diffusers were successful. An extensive data set was collected and is available to calibrate and verify aeration and stratification models, and to characterize basic features of bubble-plume interaction.

  13. Investigation of Frequency Mixing Techniques for Eddy Current Testing of Steam Generator Tubes in Nuclear Power Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, H. J.; Kong, Y. B.; Song, S.-J.; Kim, C.-H.; Choi, Y. H.; Kang, S.-C.; Song, M. H.

    2007-03-01

    In eddy current testing (ECT) of steam generator tubes in nuclear power plants, it is very important to extract flaw signals from the signals compound by flaws and supporting structures. To perform such an important task, the multifrequency ECT methods are widely adopted since they have a well-known capability of extracting the flaw signal from the compound signals. Therefore, various frequency mixing algorithms have been proposed up to now. In the present work, two different frequency mixing algorithms, a time-domain optimization method and a discrete cosine transform (DCT) based optimization method, are investigated using experimental signals captured from a ASME standard tube. In this paper, we discuss the basic principles and the performances of these two frequency mixing techniques.

  14. MTR, TRA603. SUBBASEMENT FLOOR PLAN. INLET/OUTLET TUNNELS FOR COOLANT WATER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR, TRA-603. SUB-BASEMENT FLOOR PLAN. INLET/OUTLET TUNNELS FOR COOLANT WATER (NORTH SIDE) AND AIR (SOUTH SIDE). RABBIT CANAL AND BULKHEADS. SUMPS AND DRAINS. BLAW-KNOX 3150-3-7, 3/1950. INL INDEX NO. 531-0603-00-098-100006, REV. 4. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  15. TRITIUM LABORATORY, TRA666, INTERIOR. COOLANT LOOP PIPING DETAIL AND CONTROL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    TRITIUM LABORATORY, TRA-666, INTERIOR. COOLANT LOOP PIPING DETAIL AND CONTROL VALVE EQUIPMENT ALONG EAST WALL. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD30-2-2. Mike Crane, Photographer, 6/2001 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  16. ETR COOLING TOWER PUMP HOUSE, TRA645. FOUR SECONDARY COOLANT PUMPS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ETR COOLING TOWER PUMP HOUSE, TRA-645. FOUR SECONDARY COOLANT PUMPS ARE ARRANGED IN A ROW. IN REAR ARE THREE SHUTDOWN EMERGENCY PUMPS. INL NEGATIVE NO. 56-4176. Jack L. Anderson, Photographer, 12/21/1956 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  17. ETR HEAT EXCHANGER BUILDING, TRA644. A PRIMARY COOLANT PUMP AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ETR HEAT EXCHANGER BUILDING, TRA-644. A PRIMARY COOLANT PUMP AND 24-INCH CHECK VALVE ARE MOUNTED IN A SHIELDED CUBICLE. NOTE CONNECTION AT RIGHT THROUGH SHIELD WALL TO PUMP MOTOR ON OTHER SIDE. INL NEGATIVE NO. 56-4177. Jack L. Anderson, Photographer, 12/21/1956 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  18. Interaction study between MOX fuel and eutectic lead-bismuth coolant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigier, Jean-François; Popa, Karin; Tyrpekl, Vaclav; Gardeur, Sébastien; Freis, Daniel; Somers, Joseph

    2015-12-01

    In the frame of the MYRRHA reactor project, the interaction between fuel pellets and the reactor coolant is essential for safety evaluations, e.g. in case of a pin breach. Therefore, interaction tests between uranium-plutonium mixed oxide (MOX) pellets and molten lead bismuth eutectic (LBE) have been performed and three parameters were studied, namely the interaction temperature (500 °C and 800 °C), the oxygen content in LBE and the stoichiometry of the MOX (U0.7Pu0.3O2-x and U0.7Pu0.3O2.00). After 50 h of interaction in closed containers, the pellet integrity was preserved in all cases. Whatever the conditions, neither interaction compounds (crystalline or amorphous) nor lead and bismuth diffusion into the surface regions of the MOX pellets has been detected. In most of the conditions, actinide releases into LBE were very limited (in the range of 0.01-0.15 mg), with a homogeneous release of the different actinides present in the MOX. Detected values were significantly higher in the 800 °C and low LBE oxygen content tests for both U0.7Pu0.3O2-x and U0.7Pu0.3O2.00, with 1-2 mg of actinide released in these conditions.

  19. A One System Integrated Approach to Simulant Selection for Hanford High Level Waste Mixing and Sampling Tests - 13342

    SciTech Connect

    Thien, Mike G.; Barnes, Steve M.

    2013-07-01

    The Hanford Tank Operations Contractor (TOC) and the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) contractor are both engaged in demonstrating mixing, sampling, and transfer system capabilities using simulated Hanford High-Level Waste (HLW) formulations. This represents one of the largest remaining technical issues with the high-level waste treatment mission at Hanford. Previous testing has focused on very specific TOC or WTP test objectives and consequently the simulants were narrowly focused on those test needs. A key attribute in the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 2010-2 is to ensure testing is performed with a simulant that represents the broad spectrum of Hanford waste. The One System Integrated Project Team is a new joint TOC and WTP organization intended to ensure technical integration of specific TOC and WTP systems and testing. A new approach to simulant definition has been mutually developed that will meet both TOC and WTP test objectives for the delivery and receipt of HLW. The process used to identify critical simulant characteristics, incorporate lessons learned from previous testing, and identify specific simulant targets that ensure TOC and WTP testing addresses the broad spectrum of Hanford waste characteristics that are important to mixing, sampling, and transfer performance are described. (authors)

  20. A One System Integrated Approach to Simulant Selection for Hanford High Level Waste Mixing and Sampling Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Thien, Mike G.; Barnes, Steve M.

    2013-01-17

    The Hanford Tank Operations Contractor (TOC) and the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) contractor are both engaged in demonstrating mixing, sampling, and transfer system capabilities using simulated Hanford High-Level Waste (HLW) formulations. This represents one of the largest remaining technical issues with the high-level waste treatment mission at Hanford. Previous testing has focused on very specific TOC or WTP test objectives and consequently the simulants were narrowly focused on those test needs. A key attribute in the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 2010-2 is to ensure testing is performed with a simulant that represents the broad spectrum of Hanford waste. The One System Integrated Project Team is a new joint TOC and WTP organization intended to ensure technical integration of specific TOC and WTP systems and testing. A new approach to simulant definition has been mutually developed that will meet both TOC and WTP test objectives for the delivery and receipt of HLW. The process used to identify critical simulant characteristics, incorporate lessons learned from previous testing, and identify specific simulant targets that ensure TOC and WTP testing addresses the broad spectrum of Hanford waste characteristics that are important to mixing, sampling, and transfer performance are described.

  1. Loss-of-coolant accident experiment at the AVR (Arbeitsgemeinschaft Versuchsreaktor) gas-cooled reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Krueger, K. ); Cleveland, J. )

    1989-11-01

    Loss of coolant is one of the most severe accidents for a nuclear power plant. To demonstrate inherent safety characteristics incorporated into modular gas-cooled reactor designs, loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) simulation tests were conducted with the 15-MW(electric), 46-MW(thermal), pebble-bed, high-temperature Arbeitsgemeinschaft Versuchsreaktor (AVR) in the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG). This is the only nuclear power plant ever to have been intentionally subjected to LOCa conditions. Oak Ridge National Laboratory participation in the preparation and conduct of the tests was carried out within the U.S./FRG Agreement for Cooperation in Gas-Cooled Reactor Development.

  2. Can leek interfere with bean plant-bean fly interaction? Test of ecological pest management in mixed cropping.

    PubMed

    Bandara, K A N P; Kumar, V; Ninkovic, V; Ahmed, E; Pettersson, J; Glinwood, R

    2009-06-01

    Effects of volatile odors from leek, Allium porum L., on the behavior of bean fly, Ophiomyia phaseoli (Tryon) (Diptera: Agromyzidae), were tested in laboratory olfactometer bioassays. Aqueous and solvent extracts (dichloromethane and methanol) of leek were repellent to adult flies. Whole leek plants were repellent and prevented attraction to the host plant, beans. Beans that had been exposed to volatiles from living leek plants for 7 d became repellent to the fly. Leek and several other crops were tested in field experiments to identify candidate crops for a mixed cropping system to minimize bean fly attack in beans, Phaseolus vulgaris L. In a wet season field experiment, mixed cropping of bean with leek or three other vegetable crops did not significantly reduce bean fly infestation or infection with Fusarium oxysporum Schltdl. compared with a mono crop, but significantly reduced plant death caused by both agents combined. In two dry season field experiments, mixed cropping of beans with leek significantly reduced adult bean fly settling, emergence, and death of bean plants compared with a mono crop. Bean yield per row was approximately 150% higher for the mixed crop, and economic returns were approximately Sri Lankan Rs. 180,000/ha, higher than for the mono crop. For the mono crop, the farmer had a monetary loss, which would become a small profit only if the costs of family labor are excluded. The study is an example of the first steps toward development of sustainable plant protection in a subsistence system. PMID:19610413

  3. Understanding client satisfaction with HIV testing and counseling services: a mixed-methods study in four African countries.

    PubMed

    Osborn, Michelle; Obermeyer, Carla Makhlouf

    2016-06-01

    This paper uses mixed methods to provide comparative evidence across four African countries and identify those aspects of the testing experience that are the most important components of clients' satisfaction with services. We analyze data from three sources: a survey of clients at health facilities that included closed-ended questions about specific services and interactions around testing; responses to open-ended questions about testing experiences that were part of the same survey; and semi-structured interviews with a subsample of respondents who described their experience of testing and being diagnosed with HIV. High levels of reported satisfaction are found in both the survey and interview. The critical factors contributing to client satisfaction included: the three C's of testing-counseling, consent, and confidentiality, client-provider interactions, convenience of location, "good services", and reliable test results. PMID:26872848

  4. Loss-of-coolant accident experiment at the AVR gas-cooled reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Cleveland, J.; Krueger, K.; Kernforschungsanlage Juelich G.m.b.H. . Arbeitsgemeinschaft Versuchsreaktor)

    1989-01-01

    Loss-of-coolant is one of the most severe accidents for a nuclear power plant. To demonstrate inherent safety characteristics incorporated into small High-Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) designs, loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) simulation tests have been conducted with the German pebble-bed High-Temperature Reactor AVR. The AVR is the only nuclear power plant ever to have been intentionally subjected to LOCA conditions. The LOCA test was planned to create conditions that would exist if a rapid LOCA occurred with the reactor operating at full power. The tests demonstrated this reactor's safe response to an accident in which the coolant escapes from the reactor core and no emergency system is available to provide coolant flow to the core. The test is of special interest because it demonstrates the inherent safety features incorporated into modular HTGR designs. The main LOCA test lasted for 5 d. After the test began, core temperatures increased for {approximately}13 h and then gradually and continually decreased as the rate of heat dissipation from the core exceeded accident levels of decay power. Throughout the test, temperatures remained below limiting values for the core and other reactor components. 3 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Coolant passage heat transfer with rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajek, T. J.; Wagner, J.; Johnson, B. V.

    1986-10-01

    In current and advanced gas turbine engines, increased speeds, pressures and temperatures are used to reduce specific fuel consumption and increase thrust/weight ratios. Hence, the turbine airfoils are subjected to increased heat loads escalating the cooling requirements to satisfy life goals. The efficient use of cooling air requires that the details of local geometry and flow conditions be adequately modeled to predict local heat loads and the corresponding heat transfer coefficients. The objective of this program is to develop a heat transfer and pressure drop data base, computational fluid dynamic techniques and correlations for multi-pass rotating coolant passages with and without flow turbulators. The experimental effort is focused on the simulation of configurations and conditions expected in the blades of advanced aircraft high pressure turbines. With the use of this data base, the effects of Coriolis and buoyancy forces on the coolant side flow can be included in the design of turbine blades.

  6. Field testing of component-level model-based fault detection methods for mixing boxes and VAV fan systems

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Peng; Haves, Philip

    2002-05-16

    An automated fault detection and diagnosis tool for HVAC systems is being developed, based on an integrated, life-cycle, approach to commissioning and performance monitoring. The tool uses component-level HVAC equipment models implemented in the SPARK equation-based simulation environment. The models are configured using design information and component manufacturers' data and then fine-tuned to match the actual performance of the equipment by using data measured during functional tests of the sort using in commissioning. This paper presents the results of field tests of mixing box and VAV fan system models in an experimental facility and a commercial office building. The models were found to be capable of representing the performance of correctly operating mixing box and VAV fan systems and detecting several types of incorrect operation.

  7. EVALUATION OF MIXING ENERGY IN FLASKS USED FOR DISPERSANT EFFECTIVENESS TESTING

    EPA Science Inventory

    A U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) laboratory screening protocol for dispersant effectiveness consists of placing water, oil, and a dispersant in a flask and mixing the contents on an orbital shaker. Two flasks are being investigated, a simple Erlenmeyer (used in EPA's...

  8. COMPARISON OF MIXED FLASK CULTURE AND STANDARDIZED LABORATORY MODEL ECOSYSTEMS FOR TOXICITY TESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two microecosystem protocols, the Standardized Aquatic Microcosm (SAM) method developed by Dr. Frieda Taub and associates (1982) and the Mixed Flask Culture (MFC) method of Dr. John Leffler (1981), were compared on the basis of their response to copper sulfate. These protocols di...

  9. Test functions for three-dimensional control-volume mixed finite-element methods on irregular grids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naff, R.L.; Russell, T.F.; Wilson, J.D.

    2000-01-01

    Numerical methods based on unstructured grids, with irregular cells, usually require discrete shape functions to approximate the distribution of quantities across cells. For control-volume mixed finite-element methods, vector shape functions are used to approximate the distribution of velocities across cells and vector test functions are used to minimize the error associated with the numerical approximation scheme. For a logically cubic mesh, the lowest-order shape functions are chosen in a natural way to conserve intercell fluxes that vary linearly in logical space. Vector test functions, while somewhat restricted by the mapping into the logical reference cube, admit a wider class of possibilities. Ideally, an error minimization procedure to select the test function from an acceptable class of candidates would be the best procedure. Lacking such a procedure, we first investigate the effect of possible test functions on the pressure distribution over the control volume; specifically, we look for test functions that allow for the elimination of intermediate pressures on cell faces. From these results, we select three forms for the test function for use in a control-volume mixed method code and subject them to an error analysis for different forms of grid irregularity; errors are reported in terms of the discrete L2 norm of the velocity error. Of these three forms, one appears to produce optimal results for most forms of grid irregularity.

  10. Towards testing the unitarity of the 3 × 3 lepton flavor mixing matrix in a precision reactor antineutrino oscillation experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Zhi-zhong

    2013-01-01

    The 3 × 3 Maki-Nakagawa-Sakata-Pontecorvo (MNSP) lepton flavor mixing matrix may be slightly non-unitary if the three active neutrinos are coupled with sterile neutrinos. We show that it is in principle possible to test whether the relation |Ve1 | 2 +|Ve2 | 2 +|Ve3 | 2 = 1 holds or not in a precision reactor antineutrino oscillation experiment, such as the recently proposed Daya Bay II experiment. We explore three categories of non-unitary effects on the 3 × 3 MNSP matrix: 1) the indirect effect in the (3 + 3) flavor mixing scenario where the three heavy sterile neutrinos do not take part in neutrino oscillations; 2) the direct effect in the (3 + 1) scenario where the light sterile neutrino can oscillate into the active ones; and 3) the interplay of both of them in the (3 + 1 + 2) scenario. We find that both the zero-distance effect and flavor mixing factors of different oscillation modes can be used to determine or constrain the sum of |Ve1 | 2, |Ve2 | 2 and |Ve3 | 2 and its possible deviation from one, and the active neutrino mixing angles θ12 and θ13 can be cleanly extracted even in the presence of light or heavy sterile neutrinos. Some useful analytical results are obtained for each of the three scenarios.

  11. Test plan for immobilization of salt-containing surrogate mixed wastes using polyester resins

    SciTech Connect

    Biyani, R.K.; Douglas, J.C.; Hendrickson, D.W.

    1997-07-07

    Past operations at many Department of Energy (DOE) sites have resulted in the generation of several waste streams with high salt content. These wastes contain listed and characteristic hazardous constituents and are radioactive. The salts contained in the wastes are primarily chloride, sulfate, nitrate, metal oxides, and hydroxides. DOE has placed these types of wastes under the purview of the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA). The MWFA has been tasked with developing and facilitating the implementation of technologies to treat these wastes in support of customer needs and requirements. The MWFA has developed a Technology Development Requirements Document (TDRD), which specifies performance requirements for technology owners and developers to use as a framework in developing effective waste treatment solutions. This project will demonstrate the use of polyester resins in encapsulating and solidifying DOE`s mixed wastes containing salts, as an alternative to conventional and other emerging immobilization technologies.

  12. Loss-of-coolant accident experiment at the AVR gas-cooled reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Krueger, K. ); Cleveland, J. )

    1990-01-01

    A landmark safety test has been conducted at the AVR-reactor, a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) in the Federal Republic of Germany owned by the Arbeitsgemeinschaft Versuchsreaktor, AVR in Juelich. The 46-MW(t), 15-MW(e) AVR reactor was subjected to a simulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA), a very severe occurrence in which the coolant escapes from the reactor core and no emergency system provides coolant flow to the core. The test, which demonstrated the inherently safe response of this reactor to a LOCA, marked the first time ever that a reactor has been intentionally subjected to loss-of-coolant conditions without emergency cooling. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and General Atomics participated in the test by working with AVR staff by jointly performing the analyses needed to obtain the license to conduct the test and by performing post test analyses. This participation was carried out under the cooperative AVR Subprogram which is conducted within the US/FRG Agreement for Cooperation in Gas-Cooled Reactor Development. 7 figs.

  13. Testing an analytic model for Richtmyer-Meshkov turbulent mixing widths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikaelian, K. O.

    2015-01-01

    We discuss a model for the evolution of the turbulent mixing width after a shock or a reshock passes through the interface between two fluids of densities and inducing a velocity jump . In this model, the initial growth rate is independent of the surface finish or initial mixing width , but its duration is directly proportional to it: for , and for . Here is the Atwood number and are dimensionless, -dependent parameters measured in past Rayleigh-Taylor experiments, and is a new dimensionless parameter we introduce via . The mixing width and its derivative remain continuous at since and . We evaluate at from air/SF experiments and propose that the transition at signals isotropication of turbulence. We apply this model to the recent experiments of Jacobs et al. (Shock Waves 23:407-413, 2013) on shock and reshock, and discuss briefly the third wave causing an unstable acceleration of the interface. We also consider the experiments of Weber et al. (Phys Fluids 24:074105, 2012) and argue that their smaller growth rates reflect density gradient stabilization.

  14. Field testing of stiffened deep cement mixing piles under lateral cyclic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raongjant, Werasak; Jing, Meng

    2013-06-01

    Construction of seaside and underground wall bracing often uses stiffened deep cement mixed columns (SDCM). This research investigates methods used to improve the level of bearing capacity of these SDCM when subjected to cyclic lateral loading via various types of stiffer cores. Eight piles, two deep cement mixed piles and six stiffened deep cement mixing piles with three different types of cores, H shape cross section prestressed concrete, steel pipe, and H-beam steel, were embedded though soft clay into medium-hard clay on site in Thailand. Cyclic horizontal loading was gradually applied until pile failure and the hysteresis loops of lateral load vs. lateral deformation were recorded. The lateral carrying capacities of the SDCM piles with an H-beam steel core increased by 3-4 times that of the DCM piles. This field research clearly shows that using H-beam steel as a stiffer core for SDCM piles is the best method to improve its lateral carrying capacity, ductility and energy dissipation capacity.

  15. Thermodynamic considerations and prediction of the primary coolant activity of 99Tc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, B. J.; Thompson, W. T.; Akbari, F.; Morrison, C.; Husain, A.

    2005-04-01

    A physical model has been developed to describe the coolant activity behaviour of 99Tc, during constant and reactor shutdown operations. This analysis accounts for the fission production of technetium and molybdenum, in which their chemical form and volatility is determined by a thermodynamic treatment using Gibbs-energy minimization. The release kinetics are calculated according to the rate-controlling step of diffusional transport in the fuel matrix and vaporization from the fuel-grain surface. Based on several in-reactor tests with defective fuel elements, and as supported by the thermodynamic analysis, the model accounts for the washout of molybdenum from the defective fuel on reactor shutdown. The model also considers the recoil release of both 99Mo and 99Tc from uranium contamination, as well as a corrosion source due to activation of 98Mo. The model has provided an estimate of the activity ratio 99Tc/ 137Cs in the ion-exchange columns of the Darlington Nuclear Generating Station, i.e., 6 × 10 -6 (following ˜200 days of steady reactor operation) and 4 × 10 -6 (with reactor shutdown). These results are consistent with that measured by the Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories with a mixed-bed resin-sampling device installed in a number of Pressurized Water Reactor and Boiling Water Reactor plants.

  16. Viscosity of alumina nanoparticles dispersed in car engine coolant

    SciTech Connect

    Kole, Madhusree; Dey, T.K.

    2010-09-15

    The present paper, describes our experimental results on the viscosity of the nanofluid prepared by dispersing alumina nanoparticles (<50 nm) in commercial car coolant. The nanofluid prepared with calculated amount of oleic acid (surfactant) was tested to be stable for more than 80 days. The viscosity of the nanofluids is measured both as a function of alumina volume fraction and temperature between 10 and 50 C. While the pure base fluid display Newtonian behavior over the measured temperature, it transforms to a non-Newtonian fluid with addition of a small amount of alumina nanoparticles. Our results show that viscosity of the nanofluid increases with increasing nanoparticle concentration and decreases with increase in temperature. Most of the frequently used classical models severely under predict the measured viscosity. Volume fraction dependence of the nanofluid viscosity, however, is predicted fairly well on the basis of a recently reported theoretical model for nanofluids that takes into account the effect of Brownian motion of nanoparticles in the nanofluid. The temperature dependence of the viscosity of engine coolant based alumina nanofluids obeys the empirical correlation of the type: log ({mu}{sub nf}) = A exp(BT), proposed earlier by Namburu et al. (author)

  17. Winchester/Camberley Homes New Construction Test House Design, Construction, and Short-Term Testing in a Mixed-Humid Climate

    SciTech Connect

    Mallay, D.; Wiehagen, J.; Wood, A.

    2012-10-01

    The NAHB Research Center partnered with production builder Winchester/Camberley Homes to build a new construction test house in the mixed-humid climate zone of Silver Spring, MD in June 2011. The goal for this house was to improve energy efficiency by 30% over the Building America B10 benchmark through an optimized energy solutions package design that could be constructed on a production basis. This report outlines the features of this house, discusses the energy efficient design, and reports on short-term testing results.

  18. Bench-scale feasibility testing of pulsed-air technology for in-tank mixing of dry cementitious solids with tank liquids and settled solids

    SciTech Connect

    Whyatt, G.A.; Hymas, C.R.

    1997-09-01

    This report documents the results of testing performed to determine the feasibility of using a pulsed-air mixing technology (equipment developed by Pulsair Systems, Inc., Bellevue, WA) to mix cementitious dry solids with supernatant and settled solids within a horizontal tank. The mixing technology is being considered to provide in situ stabilization of the {open_quotes}V{close_quotes} tanks at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The testing was performed in a vessel roughly 1/6 the scale of the INEEL tanks. The tests used a fine soil to simulate settled solids and water to simulate tank supernatants. The cementitious dry materials consisted of Portland cement and Aquaset-2H (a product of Fluid Tech Inc. consisting of clay and Portland cement). Two scoping tests were conducted to allow suitable mixing parameters to be selected. The scoping tests used only visual observations during grout disassembly to assess mixing performance. After the scoping tests indicated the approach may be feasible, an additional two mixing tests were conducted. In addition to visual observations during disassembly of the solidified grout, these tests included addition of chemical tracers and chemical analysis of samples to determine the degree of mixing uniformity achieved. The final two mixing tests demonstrated that the pulsed-air mixing technique is capable of producing slurries containing substantially more cementitious dry solids than indicated by the formulations suggested by INEEL staff. Including additional cement in the formulation may have benefits in terms of increasing mobilization of solids, reducing water separation during curing, and increasing the strength of the solidified product. During addition to the tank, the cementitious solids had a tendency to form clumps which broke down with continued mixing.

  19. A Comparison of Computer-Based Classification Testing Approaches Using Mixed-Format Tests with the Generalized Partial Credit Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Jiseon

    2010-01-01

    Classification testing has been widely used to make categorical decisions by determining whether an examinee has a certain degree of ability required by established standards. As computer technologies have developed, classification testing has become more computerized. Several approaches have been proposed and investigated in the context of…

  20. Measurement of Coolant in a Flat Heat Pipe Using Neutron Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuta, Kei; Saito, Yasushi; Goshima, Takashi; Tsutsui, Toshio

    A newly developed flat heat pipe FGHPTM (Morex Kiire Co.) was experimentally investigated by using neutron radiography. The test sample of the FGHP heat spreader was 65 × 65 × 2 mm3 composed of several etched copper plates and pure water was used as the coolant. Neutron radiography was performed at the E-2 port of the Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR). The coolant distributions in the wick area of the FGHP and its heat transfer characteristics were measured at heating conditions. Experimental results show that the coolant distributions depend slightly on its installation posture and that the liquid thickness in the wick region remains constant with increasing heat input to the FGHP. In addition, it is found that the wick surface does not dry out even in the vertical posture at present experimental conditions.

  1. Effects of Mesoscale Eddies in the Active Mixed Layer: Test of the Parametrisation in Eddy Resolving Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luneva, M. V.; Clayson, C. A.; Dubovikov, Mikhail

    2015-01-01

    In eddy resolving simulations, we test a mixed layer mesoscale parametrisation, developed recently by Canuto and Dubovikov [Ocean Model., 2011, 39, 200-207]. With no adjustable parameters, the parametrisation yields the horizontal and vertical mesoscale fluxes in terms of coarse-resolution fields and eddy kinetic energy (EKE). We compare terms of the parametrisation diagnosed from coarse-grained fields with the eddy mesoscale fluxes diagnosed directly from the high resolution model. An expression for the EKE in terms of mean fields has also been found to get a closed parametrisation in terms of the mean fields only. In 40 numerical experiments we simulated two types of flows: idealised flows driven by baroclinic instabilities only, and more realistic flows, driven by wind and surface fluxes as well as by inflow-outflow. The diagnosed quasi-instantaneous horizontal and vertical mesoscale buoyancy fluxes (averaged over 1-2 degrees and 10 days) demonstrate a strong scatter typical for turbulent flows, however, the fluxes are positively correlated with the parametrisation with higher (0.5-0.74) correlations at the experiments with larger baroclinic radius Rossby. After being averaged over 3-4 months, diffusivities diagnosed from the eddy resolving simulations are consistent with the parametrisation for a broad range of parameters. Diagnosed vertical mesoscale fluxes restratify mixed layer and are in a good agreement with the parametrisation unless vertical turbulent mixing in the upper layer becomes strong enough in comparison with mesoscale advection. In the latter case, numerical simulations demonstrate that the deviation of the fluxes from the parametrisation is controlled by dimensionless parameter estimating the ratio of vertical turbulent mixing term to mesoscale advection. An analysis using a modified omega-equation reveals that the effects of the vertical mixing of vorticity is responsible for the two-three fold amplification of vertical mesoscale flux

  2. Impact of Accumulated Error on Item Response Theory Pre-Equating with Mixed Format Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Lisa A.; Keller, Robert; Cook, Robert J.; Colvin, Kimberly F.

    2016-01-01

    The equating of tests is an essential process in high-stakes, large-scale testing conducted over multiple forms or administrations. By adjusting for differences in difficulty and placing scores from different administrations of a test on a common scale, equating allows scores from these different forms and administrations to be directly compared…

  3. Non-destructive testing using two-component/two-wave mixing interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Wartelle, A.; Pouet, B.; Breugnot, S.

    2011-06-23

    A new laser-based ultrasonic (LBU) receiver was recently introduced. The novel architecture is based on two-wave mixing in photorefractive materials and allows simultaneous measurement of in-plane and out-of-plane displacements (two- component). By taking advantage of recent developments in electronic processing and our knowledge on multi-channel interferometer, we achieved a compact optical system using only a single collecting aperture and a single laser probe beam. We will characterize the system performances and present experimental results demonstrating the capability for this compact two-component interferometer.

  4. Cryogenic-coolant He-4-superconductor interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caspi, S.; Lee, J. Y.; Kim, Y. I.; Allen, R. J.; Frederking, T. H. K.

    1978-01-01

    The thermodynamic and thermal interaction between a type 2 composite alloy and cryo-coolant He4 was studied with emphasis on post quench phenomena of formvar coated conductors. The latter were investigated using a heater simulation technique. Overall heat transfer coefficients were evaluated for the quench onset point. Heat flux densities were determined for phenomena of thermal switching between a peak and a recovery value. The study covered near saturated liquid, pressurized He4, both above and below the lambda transition, and above and below the thermodynamic critical pressure. In addition, friction coefficients for relative motion between formvar insulated conductors were determined.

  5. Secondary coolant circuit for nuclear-reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Brachet, A.

    1981-10-06

    A secondary coolant circuit for a nuclear-reactor of the liquid metal cooled type is described. The circuit comprises at least one intermediate exchanger mounted in the vessel of said reactor, Also included is a steam-generator for the exchange of calories between the secondary liquid-metal flowing through said secondary circuit and water-steam, at least one pump for circulating said secondary sodium and one tank for storing said secondary liquid-metal andrecovering those products generated by a possible liquid-metal-water reaction in said steam-generator.

  6. Nuclear fuel assembly with coolant conducting tube

    SciTech Connect

    Dunlap, T. G.; Cearley, J. E.; Jameson, W. G. Jr.; Mefford, C. R.; Nelson, H. L.

    1983-12-13

    In a nuclear fuel assembly having a coolant conducting or water tube which also retains the spacers in axial position, the fuel rods experience greater axial growth with exposure than the water tube creating a risk that the water tube might become disengaged from the supporting tie plates. An arrangement for preventing such disengagement is described including lengthened end plug shanks for the water tube, a protective boss surrounding the lower end plug shank to protect it from flow induced vibration, a conical seat for the lower end plug and an arrangement for limiting upward movement of the water tube.

  7. Simulating the mixing of light and heavy gases by mixing saltwater and freshwater in a scaled assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Hsuwen Chiang; Jones, S.C.A. )

    1991-01-01

    During some postulated loss-of-coolant accidents in nuclear power plants, hydrogen may be produced and subsequently released through a break in the primary heat transport system to the containment atmosphere. Containment integrity may then be threatened by overpressurization from uncontrolled hydrogen combustion. Therefore, a knowledge of hydrogen distribution (or the mixing behavior of hydrogen with air or air/steam mixture) within containment is important for containment safety analysis. In the present work, the authors are attempting to simulate the mixing of helium (a simulant of hydrogen) with air in a large-scale assembly by mixing saltwater and freshwater in a small-scale assembly. There are two principal reasons for using this technique: (1) it provides visualization of mixing behavior if a dye is added to saltwater; (2) It is less expensive and more convenient to instrument and analyze than larger scale gas-mixing experiments. Scaling laws necessary to extrapolate the results of the authors' simulation to the mixing of helium and air in a larger scale assembly were established by a dimensional analysis of the governing equations. The scaling laws used in the present test will form the basis for the planned liquid-mixing experiments in scale models of actual reactor containments to simulate the mixing of hydrogen and air in the full-scale geometry.

  8. Materials testing for in situ stabilization treatability study of INEEL mixed wastes soils

    SciTech Connect

    Heiser, J.; Fuhrmann, M.

    1997-09-01

    This report describes the contaminant-specific materials testing phase of the In Situ Stabilization Comprehensive Environment Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Treatability Study (TS). The purpose of materials testing is to measure the effectiveness of grouting agents to stabilize Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Acid Pit soils and select a grout material for use in the Cold Test Demonstration and Acid Pit Stabilization Treatability Study within the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). Test results will assist the selecting a grout material for the follow-on demonstrations described in Test Plan for the Cold Test Demonstration and Acid Pit Stabilization Phases of the In Situ Stabilization Treatability Study at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex.

  9. Numerical analysis of the hot-gas-side and coolant-side heat transfer in liquid rocket engine combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See; Van, Luong

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this paper are to develop a multidisciplinary computational methodology to predict the hot-gas-side and coolant-side heat transfer and to use it in parametric studies to recommend optimized design of the coolant channels for a regeneratively cooled liquid rocket engine combustor. An integrated numerical model which incorporates CFD for the hot-gas thermal environment, and thermal analysis for the liner and coolant channels, was developed. This integrated CFD/thermal model was validated by comparing predicted heat fluxes with those of hot-firing test and industrial design methods for a 40 k calorimeter thrust chamber and the Space Shuttle Main Engine Main Combustion Chamber. Parametric studies were performed for the Advanced Main Combustion Chamber to find a strategy for a proposed combustion chamber coolant channel design.

  10. Effects of reclaimed asphalt pavement on indirect tensile strength test of conditioned foamed asphalt mix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yati Katman, Herda; Rasdan Ibrahim, Mohd; Yazip Matori, Mohd; Norhisham, Shuhairy; Ismail, Norlela

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents the results of Indirect Tensile Strength (ITS) Test for samples prepared with reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP). Samples were conditioned in water at 25°C for 24 hours prior to testing. Results show that recycled aggregate from reclaimed asphalt pavement performs as well as virgin aggregate.

  11. Comparisons among Designs for Equating Mixed-Format Tests in Large-Scale Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Sooyeon; Walker, Michael E.; McHale, Frederick

    2010-01-01

    In this study we examined variations of the nonequivalent groups equating design for tests containing both multiple-choice (MC) and constructed-response (CR) items to determine which design was most effective in producing equivalent scores across the two tests to be equated. Using data from a large-scale exam, this study investigated the use of…

  12. EVALUATION OF MIXING ENERGY IN LABORATORY FLASKS USED FOR DISPERSANT EFFECTIVENESS TESTING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The evaluation of dispersant effectiveness used for oil spills is commonly done using tests conducted in laboratory flasks. The success of a test relies on replication of the conditions at sea. We used a hot wire anemometer to characterize the turbulence characteristics in the s...

  13. The impact of radiolytic yield on the calculated ECP in PWR primary coolant circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urquidi-Macdonald, Mirna; Pitt, Jonathan; Macdonald, Digby D.

    2007-05-01

    A code, PWR-ECP, comprising chemistry, radiolysis, and mixed potential models has been developed to calculate radiolytic species concentrations and the corrosion potential of structural components at closely spaced points around the primary coolant circuits of pressurized water reactors (PWRs). The pH( T) of the coolant is calculated at each point of the primary-loop using a chemistry model for the B(OH) 3 + LiOH system. Although the chemistry/radiolysis/mixed potential code has the ability to calculate the transient reactor response, only the reactor steady state condition (normal operation) is discussed in this paper. The radiolysis model is a modified version of the code previously developed by Macdonald and coworkers to model the radiochemistry and corrosion properties of boiling water reactor primary coolant circuits. In the present work, the PWR-ECP code is used to explore the sensitivity of the calculated electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) to the set of radiolytic yield data adopted; in this case, one set had been developed from ambient temperature experiments and another set reported elevated temperatures data. The calculations show that the calculated ECP is sensitive to the adopted values for the radiolytic yields.

  14. Long-Term Testing of Rhodium-Based Catalysts for Mixed Alcohol Synthesis – 2013 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, Mark A.; Gray, Michel J.; Thompson, Becky L.

    2013-09-23

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has been conducting research since 2005 to develop a catalyst for the conversion of synthesis gas (carbon monoxide and hydrogen) into mixed alcohols for use in liquid transportation fuels. Initially, research involved screening possible catalysts based on a review of the literature, because at that time, there were no commercial catalysts available. The screening effort resulted in a decision to focus on catalysts containing rhodium and manganese. Subsequent research identified iridium as a key promoter for this catalyst system. Since then, research has continued to improve rhodium/manganese/iridium-based catalysts, optimizing the relative and total concentrations of the three metals, examining baseline catalysts on alternative supports, and examining effects of additional promoters. Testing was continued in FY 2013 to evaluate the performance and long-term stability of the best catalysts tested to date. Three tests were conducted. A long-term test of over 2300 hr duration at a single set of operating conditions was conducted with the best carbon-supported catalyst. A second test of about 650 hr duration at a single set of operating conditions was performed for comparison using the same catalyst formulation on an alternative carbon support. A third test of about 680 hr duration at a single set of operating conditions was performed using the best silica-supported catalyst tested to date.

  15. Factors Affecting the Uptake of HIV Testing among Men: A Mixed-Methods Study in Rural Burkina Faso

    PubMed Central

    De Allegri, Manuela; Agier, Isabelle; Tiendrebeogo, Justin; Louis, Valerie Renée; Yé, Maurice; Mueller, Olaf; Sarker, Malabika

    2015-01-01

    Background This study aimed to explore factors shaping the decision to undergo Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) testing among men in rural Burkina Faso. Methods The study took place in 2009 in the Nouna Health District and adopted a triangulation mixed methods design. The quantitative component relied on data collected through a structured survey on a representative sample of 1130 households. The qualitative component relied on 38 in-depth interviews, with men purposely selected to represent variation in testing decision, age, and place of residence. A two-part model was conducted, with two distinct outcome variables, i.e. “being offered an HIV test” and “having done an HIV test”. The qualitative data analysis relied on inductive coding conducted by three independent analysts. Result Of the 937 men, 357 had been offered an HIV test and 97 had taken the test. Younger age, household wealth, living in a village under demographic surveillance, and knowing that HIV testing is available at primary health facilities were all positively associated with the probability of being offered an HIV test. Household wealth and literacy were found to be positively associated, and distance was found to be negatively associated with the probability of having taken an HIV test. Qualitative findings indicated that the limited uptake of HIV testing was linked to poor knowledge on service availability and to low risk perceptions. Conclusion With only 10% of the total sample ever having tested for HIV, our study confirmed that male HIV testing remains unacceptably low in Sub-Saharan Africa. This results from a combination of health system factors, indicating general barriers to access, and motivational factors, such as one’s own knowledge of service availability and risk perceptions. Our findings suggested that using antenatal care and curative services as the exclusive entry points into HIV testing may not be sufficient to reach large portions of the male population. Thus

  16. Engineering design and test plan for demonstrating DETOX treatment of mixed wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Goldblatt, S.; Dhooge, P.

    1995-03-01

    DETOX is a cocatalyzed wet oxidation process in which the catalysts are a relatively great concentration of iron ions (typically as iron(III) chloride) in the presence of small amounts of platinum and ruthenium ions. Organic compounds are oxidized completely to carbon dioxide, water, and (if chlorinated) hydrogen chloride. The process has shown promise as a non-thermal alternative to incineration for treatment and/or volume reduction of hazardous, radioactive, and mixed wastes. Design and fabrication of a demonstration unit capable of destroying 25. Kg/hr of organic material is now in progress. This paper describes the Title 2 design of the demonstration unit, and the planned demonstration effort at Savannah River Site (SRS) and Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP).

  17. Testing of low-temperature stabilization alternatives for salt containing mixed wastes -- Approach and results to date

    SciTech Connect

    Maio, V.; Loomis, G.; Spence, R.D.; Smith, G.; Biyani, R.K.; Wagh, A.

    1998-05-01

    Through its annual process of identifying technology deficiencies associated with waste treatment, the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) determined that the former DOE weapons complex lacks efficient mixed waste stabilization technologies for salt containing wastes. These wastes were generated as sludge and solid effluents from various primary nuclear processes involving acids and metal finishing; and well over 10,000 cubic meters exist at 6 sites. In addition, future volumes of these problematic wastes will be produced as other mixed waste treatment methods such as incineration and melting are deployed. The current method used to stabilize salt waste for compliant disposal is grouting with Portland cement. This method is inefficient since the highly soluble and reactive chloride, nitrate, and sulfate salts interfere with the hydration and setting processes associated with grouting. The inefficiency results from having to use low waste loadings to ensure a durable and leach resistant final waste form. The following five alternatives were selected for MWFA development funding in FY97 and FY98: phosphate bonded ceramics; sol-gel process; polysiloxane; polyester resin; and enhanced concrete. Comparable evaluations were planned for the stabilization development efforts. Under these evaluations each technology stabilized the same type of salt waste surrogates. Final waste form performance data such as compressive strength, waste loading, and leachability could then be equally compared. Selected preliminary test results are provided in this paper.

  18. Fabrication, Inspection, and Test Plan for the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) High-Power Mixed-Oxide (MOX) Fuel Irradiation Project

    SciTech Connect

    Wachs, G. W.

    1998-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Fissile Disposition Program (FMDP) has announced that reactor irradiation of Mixed-Oxide (MOX) fuel is one of the preferred alternatives for disposal of surplus weapons-usable plutonium (Pu). MOX fuel has been utilized domestically in test reactors and on an experimental basis in a number of Commercial Light Water Reactors (CLWRs). Most of this experience has been with Pu derived from spent low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel, known as reactor grade (RG) Pu. The High-Power MOX fuel test will be irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to provide preliminary data to demonstrate that the unique properties of surplus weapons-derived or weapons-grade (WG) plutonium (Pu) do not compromise the applicability of this MOX experience base. The purpose of the high-power experiment, in conjunction with the currently ongoing average-power experiment at the ATR, is to contribute new information concerning the response of WG plutonium under more severe irradiation conditions typical of the peak power locations in commercial reactors. In addition, the high-power test will contribute experience with irradiation of gallium-containing fuel to the database required for resolution of generic CLWR fuel design issues. The distinction between "high-power" and "average-power" relates to the position within the nominal CLWR core. The high-power test project is subject to a number of requirements, as discussed in the Fissile Materials Disposition Program Light Water Reactor Mixed Oxide Fuel Irradiation High-Power Test Project Plan (ORNL/MD/LTR-125).

  19. Robotic inspection of PWR coolant pump casing welds

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, W.R.; Alford, J.W.; Davis, J.B.

    1997-12-01

    As of January 1, 1995, the Swedish Nuclear Inspectorate began requiring more thorough inspections of cast stainless-steel components in nuclear power plants, including pressurized water reactor (PWR) reactor coolant pump (RCP) casings. The examination requirements are established by fracture mechanics analyses of component weldments and demonstrated test system detection capabilities. This may include full volumetric inspection or some portion thereof. Ringhals station is a four-unit nuclear power plant, owned and operated by the Swedish State Power Board, Vattenfall. Unit 1 is a boiling water reactor. Units 2, 3, and 4 are Westinghouse-designed PWRs, ranging in size from 795 to 925 MW. The RCP casings at the PWR units are made of cast stainless steel and contain four circumferential welds that require inspection. Due to the thickness of the casings at the weld locations and configuration and surface conditions on the outside diameter of the casings, remote inspection from the inside diameter of the pump casing was mandated.

  20. Testing of explosives mixed with clay to determine maximum explosive content of non-reactive mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Garza, R; Green, L; Maienschein, J; Pruneda, C

    1998-07-21

    This report contains a detailed description of the experiments conducted to demonstrate that debris from explosives testing in a shot tank that contains 4 weight percent or less of explosive is non-reactive under the specified testing protocol in the Code of Federal Regulations. As such it is a companion report to UCRL-ID-128999, "Program for Certification of Waste from Contained Firing Facility - Establishment of Waste as Non-Reactive and Discussion of Potential Waste Generation Problems."

  1. Why are men less tested for sexually transmitted infections in remote Australian Indigenous communities? A mixed-methods study.

    PubMed

    Su, Jiunn-Yih; Belton, Suzanne; Ryder, Nathan

    2016-10-01

    Gender disparities in testing rates for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) have been identified as one potential factor sustaining high rates of STIs and repeat infections in the Northern Territory of Australia, especially in remote Indigenous communities. The study aimed to investigate the reasons for these disparities utilising a mixed-method study design. We conducted an audit on client information at a remote community health clinic, focus-group discussions with young men in the same community and interviews with experienced remote area clinicians. The clinic audit found a significantly higher proportion of female residents of the community than males visited the clinic (72.8 versus 55.3%, p < 0.005). Women were also more likely to be tested for STIs than men when visiting the clinic (49.7 versus 40.3%, p = 0.015). Major barriers to men's seeking STI testing included a sense of shame from being seen visiting the clinic by women, men's lack of understanding of STIs and the need for testing, and inadequate access to male clinicians. Increasing men's access to healthcare and STI testing requires offering testing at a gender-sensitive and separate locations, and community-based sexual health promotion to increase knowledge of STIs. PMID:27142316

  2. ADMP Mixing of Tank 18F: History, Modeling, Testing, and Results

    SciTech Connect

    LEISHEAR, ROBERTA

    2004-03-29

    Residual radioactive waste was removed from Tank 18F in the F-Area Tank Farm at Savannah River Site (SRS), using the advanced design mixer pump (ADMP). Known as a slurry pump, the ADMP is a 55 foot long pump with an upper motor mounted to a steel super structure, which spans the top of the waste tank. The motor is connected by a long vertical drive shaft to a centrifugal pump, which is submerged in waste near the tank bottom. The pump mixes, or slurries, the waste within the tank so that it may be transferred out of the tank. Tank 18F is a 1.3 million gallon, 85 foot diameter underground waste storage tank, which has no internal components such as cooling coils or structural supports. The tank contained a residual 47,000 gallons of nuclear waste, consisting of a gelatinous radioactive waste known as sludge and particulate zeolite. The prediction of the ADMP success was based on nearly twenty five years of research and the application of that research to slurry pump technology. Many personnel at SRS and Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) have significantly contributed to these efforts. This report summarizes that research which is pertinent to the ADMP performance in Tank 18F. In particular, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was applied to predict the performance of the ADMP in Tank 18F.

  3. Ice Growth Measurements from Image Data to Support Ice Crystal and Mixed-Phase Accretion Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Struk, Peter M.; Lynch, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the imaging techniques as well as the analysis methods used to measure the ice thickness and growth rate in support of ice-crystal icing tests performed at the National Research Council of Canada (NRC) Research Altitude Test Facility (RATFac). A detailed description of the camera setup, which involves both still and video cameras, as well as the analysis methods using the NASA Spotlight software, are presented. Two cases, one from two different test entries, showing significant ice growth are analyzed in detail describing the ice thickness and growth rate which is generally linear. Estimates of the bias uncertainty are presented for all measurements. Finally some of the challenges related to the imaging and analysis methods are discussed as well as methods used to overcome them.

  4. Thermal and fluid mixing in a 1/2-scale test facility. Volume 1. Facility and test design report. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Dolan, F.X.; Valenzuela, J.A.

    1985-07-01

    This report describes the test facility and program designed to measure fluid mixing and heat transfer in a 1/2-scale model of the cold leg downcomer and lower plenum of a pressurized water reactor under conditions of interest to the issue of pressurized thermal shock. Several cold leg assemblies are modeled and the downcomer arrangement can be altered to match vendor-specific configurations. The facility can be operated to model flow rates based on Froude number of the injected flow in the cold leg and with steady or transient inlet boundary conditions. Extensive instrumentation is provided to measure flow rates, temperatures and pressure at the facility boundaries and for detailed measurements of temperature, velocity and heat transfer data in the cold leg and downcomer models. The test data are monitored and recorded by a computer data acquisition system that is also used for post-test data reduction and plotting. The planned test matrix includes 75 tests with variations in cold leg and downcomer geometries, loop and HPI flow rates, cold leg Froude number and loop to HPI density difference. Test results will be reported in a series of quick look and final report.

  5. Predicting the occurrence of mixed mode failure associated with hydraulic fracturing, part 2 water saturated tests

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Stephen J.; Broome, Scott Thomas; Choens, Charles; Barrow, Perry Carl

    2015-09-14

    Seven water-saturated triaxial extension experiments were conducted on four sedimentary rocks. This experimental condition was hypothesized more representative of that existing for downhole hydrofracture and thus it may improve our understanding of the phenomena. In all tests the pore pressure was 10 MPa and confirming pressure was adjusted to achieve tensile and transitional failure mode conditions. Using previous work in this LDRD for comparison, the law of effective stress is demonstrated in extension using this sample geometry. In three of the four lithologies, no apparent chemo-mechanical effect of water is apparent, and in the fourth lithology test results indicate some chemo-mechanical effect of water.

  6. Stabilization of inorganic mixed waste to pass the TCLP and STLC tests using clay and pH-insensitive additives

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, J.S.; Anson, J.R.; Painter, S.M.

    1995-12-31

    Stabilization is a best demonstrated available technology, or BDAT. This technology traps toxic contaminants in a matrix so that they do not leach into the environment. The stabilization process routinely uses pozzolanic materials. Portland cement, fly ash-lime mixes, gypsum cements, and clays are some of the most common materials. In many instances, materials that can pass the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP the federal leach test) or the Soluble Threshold Leachate Concentration (STLC the California leach test) must have high concentrations of lime or other caustic material because of the low pH of the leaching media. Both leaching media, California`s and EPA`s, have a pH of 5.0. California uses citric acid and sodium citrate while EPA uses acetic acid and sodium acetate. The concentration in the leachate is approximately ten times higher for the STLC procedure than the TCLP. These media can form ligands that provide excellent metal leaching. Because of the aggressive nature of the leaching medium, stabilized wastes in many cases will not pass the leaching tests. At the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), additives such as dithiocarbamates and thiocarbonates, which are pH-insensitive and provide resistance to ligand formation, are used in the waste stabilization process. Attapulgite, montmorillonite, and sepiolite clays are used because they are forgiving (recipe can be adjusted before the matrix hardens) when formulating a stabilization matrix, and they have a neutral pH. By using these clays and additives, LLNL`s highly concentrated wastewater treatment sludges have passed the TCLP and STLC tests. The most frequently used stabilization process consists of a customized recipe involving waste sludge, clay and dithiocarbamate salt, mixed with a double planetary mixer into a pasty consistency. TCLP and STLC data on this waste matrix have shown that the process matrix meets land disposal requirements.

  7. Reactions to the Implicit Association Test as an Educational Tool: A Mixed Methods Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillard, Amy L.; Ryan, Carey S.; Gervais, Sarah J.

    2013-01-01

    We examined reactions to the Race Implicit Association Test (IAT), which has been widely used but rarely examined as an educational tool to raise awareness about racial bias. College students (N = 172) were assigned to read that the IAT reflected either personal beliefs or both personal and extrapersonal factors (single vs. multiple explanation…

  8. ADAPTATION OF MIXED FLASK CULTURE MICROCOSMS FOR TESTING THE SURVIVAL AND EFFECTS OF INTRODUCED MICROORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A microcosm test was used to evaluate the survival and effects of Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelinsis (Bti) in aquatic systems. wo commercial formulations (Vectobac tm from Abbot; Mosquito Attack tm form Aeuters Laboratories) and a laboratory preparation of Bti spores were te...

  9. An Empirical Investigation of Methods for Assessing Item Fit for Mixed Format Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chon, Kyong Hee; Lee, Won-Chan; Ansley, Timothy N.

    2013-01-01

    Empirical information regarding performance of model-fit procedures has been a persistent need in measurement practice. Statistical procedures for evaluating item fit were applied to real test examples that consist of both dichotomously and polytomously scored items. The item fit statistics used in this study included the PARSCALE's G[squared],…

  10. Fitting the Mixed Rasch Model to a Reading Comprehension Test: Identifying Reader Types

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baghaei, Purya; Carstensen, Claus H.

    2013-01-01

    Standard unidimensional Rasch models assume that persons with the same ability parameters are comparable. That is, the same interpretation applies to persons with identical ability estimates as regards the underlying mental processes triggered by the test. However, research in cognitive psychology shows that persons at the same trait level may…

  11. A Mixed Model Approach to Meta-Analysis of Diagnostic Studies with Binary Test Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doebler, Philipp; Holling, Heinz; Bohning, Dankmar

    2012-01-01

    We propose 2 related models for the meta-analysis of diagnostic tests. Both models are based on the bivariate normal distribution for transformed sensitivities and false-positive rates. Instead of using the logit as a transformation for these proportions, we employ the "t"[subscript alpha] family of transformations that contains the log, logit,…

  12. Characterization of mixed CH-TRU waste for the WIPP Experimental Test Program conducted at ANL-W

    SciTech Connect

    Dwight, C.C.; McClellan, G.C.; Guay, K.P. ); Courtney, J.C. ); Duff, M.J. )

    1992-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory is participating in the Department of Energy's Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Experimental Test Program by characterizing and repackaging mixed contact-handled transuranic waste. Characterization activities include gas sampling the waste containers, visually examining the waste contents, categorizing the contents according to their gas generation potentials, and weighing the contents. The waste is repackaged from 0.21m{sup 3} (55 gallon) drums into instrumented steel test bins which can hold up to six drum-equivalents in volume. Eventually the loaded test bins will be shipped to WIPP where they will be evaluated during a five-year test program. Three test bins of inorganic solids (primarily glass) were prepared between March and September 1991 and are ready for shipment to WIPP. The characterization activities confirmed process knowledge of the waste and verified the nondestructive examinations; the gas sample analyses showed the target constituents to be within allowable regulatory limits. A new waste characterization chamber is being developed at ANL-W which will improve worker safety, decrease the potential for contamination spread, and increase the waste characterization throughput. The new facility is expected to begin operations by Fall 1992. A comprehensive summary of the project is contained herein.

  13. Characterization of mixed CH-TRU waste for the WIPP Experimental Test Program conducted at ANL-W

    SciTech Connect

    Dwight, C.C.; McClellan, G.C.; Guay, K.P.; Courtney, J.C.; Duff, M.J.

    1992-02-01

    Argonne National Laboratory is participating in the Department of Energy`s Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Experimental Test Program by characterizing and repackaging mixed contact-handled transuranic waste. Characterization activities include gas sampling the waste containers, visually examining the waste contents, categorizing the contents according to their gas generation potentials, and weighing the contents. The waste is repackaged from 0.21m{sup 3} (55 gallon) drums into instrumented steel test bins which can hold up to six drum-equivalents in volume. Eventually the loaded test bins will be shipped to WIPP where they will be evaluated during a five-year test program. Three test bins of inorganic solids (primarily glass) were prepared between March and September 1991 and are ready for shipment to WIPP. The characterization activities confirmed process knowledge of the waste and verified the nondestructive examinations; the gas sample analyses showed the target constituents to be within allowable regulatory limits. A new waste characterization chamber is being developed at ANL-W which will improve worker safety, decrease the potential for contamination spread, and increase the waste characterization throughput. The new facility is expected to begin operations by Fall 1992. A comprehensive summary of the project is contained herein.

  14. Transpiration cooling using air as a coolant

    SciTech Connect

    Kikkawa, Shinzo; Senda, Mamoru; Sakagushi, Katsuji; Shibutani, Hideki )

    1993-02-01

    Transpiration cooling is one of the most effective techniques for protecting a surface exposed to a high-temperature gas stream. In the present paper, the transpiration cooling effectiveness was measured under steady state. Air as a coolant was transpired from the surface of a porous plate exposed to hot gas stream, and the transpiration rate was varied in the range of 0.001 [approximately] 0.006. The transpiration cooling effectiveness was evaluated by measuring the temperature of the upper surface of the plate. Also, a theoretical study was performed and it was clarified that the effectiveness increases with increasing transpiration rate and heat-transfer coefficient of the upper surface. Further, the effectiveness was expressed as a function of the blowing parameter only. The agreement between the experimental results and theoretical ones was satisfactory.

  15. Power module assemblies with staggered coolant channels

    DOEpatents

    Herron, Nicholas Hayden; Mann, Brooks S; Korich, Mark D

    2013-07-16

    A manifold is provided for supporting a power module assembly with a plurality of power modules. The manifold includes a first manifold section. The first face of the first manifold section is configured to receive the first power module, and the second face of the first manifold section defines a first cavity with a first baseplate thermally coupled to the first power module. The first face of the second manifold section is configured to receive the second power module, and the second face of the second manifold section defines a second cavity with a second baseplate thermally coupled to the second power module. The second face of the first manifold section and the second face of the second manifold section are coupled together such that the first cavity and the second cavity form a coolant channel. The first cavity is at least partially staggered with respect to second cavity.

  16. K Basin Sludge Conditioning Process Testing Project Results from Test 4, ''Acid Digestion of Mixed-Bed Ion Exchange Resin''

    SciTech Connect

    Pool, K.H.; Delegard, C.H.; Schmidt, A.J.; Thornton, B.M.; Silvers, K.L.

    1999-04-02

    Approximately 73 m{sup 3} of heterogeneous solid material, ''sludge,'' (upper bound estimate, Packer 1997) have accumulated at the bottom of the K Basins in the 100 K Area of the Hanford Site. This sludge is a mixture of spent fuel element corrosion products, ion exchange materials (organic and inorganic), graphite-based gasket materials, iron and aluminum metal corrosion products, sand, and debris (Makenas et al. 1996, 1997). In addition, small amounts of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) have been found. Ultimately, it is planned to transfer the K Basins sludge to the Hanford double shell tanks (DSTs). The Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel (HSNF) project has conducted a number of evaluations to examine technology and processing alternatives to pretreat K Basin sludge to meet storage and disposal requirements. From these evaluations, chemical pretreatment has been selected to address criticality issues, reactivity, and the destruction or removal of PCBs before the K Basin sludge can be transferred to the DSTs. Chemical pretreatment, referred to as the K Basin sludge conditioning process, includes nitric acid dissolution of the sludge (with removal of acid insoluble solids), neutrons absorber addition, neutralization, and reprecipitation. Laboratory testing is being conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to provide data necessary to develop the sludge conditioning process.

  17. The Effect of the UO{sub 2}/ZrO{sub 2} Composition on Fuel/Coolant Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Jin Ho; Kim, Jong Hwan

    2005-03-15

    A series of experiments on fuel/coolant interaction (FCI) was performed in the TROI facility, where the composition of the mixture was varied. The compositions of the UO{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2} mixture in weight percent were 50:50, 70:30, 80:20, and pure ZrO{sub 2}. The responses of the system including the temperature of the pool of water in the test vessel, pressure and temperature of the containment vessel, and dynamic pressures and force were measured. In addition, high-speed movies were taken through the windows. The tests using corium with a 70:30 composition and pure zirconia resulted in a spontaneous energetic steam explosion, while the tests with other compositions did not lead to an energetic FCI. The debris size distribution and pressure and temperature responses clearly indicated the cases with an energetic explosion and the cases without an explosion. The high-speed movie taken during the FCI through the visible window clearly disclosed the outstanding phases of the FCI, which were the melt entry phase, the triggering phase, and the continued melt jet and expansion of the mixing zone phase.

  18. Measured effects of coolant injection on the performance of a film cooled turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonel, J. D.; Eiswerth, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    Tests have been conducted on a 20-inch diameter single-stage air-cooled turbine designed to evaluate the effects of film cooling air on turbine aerodynamic performance. The present paper reports the results of five test configurations, including two different cooling designs and three combinations of cooled and solid airfoils. A comparison is made of the experimental results with a previously published analytical method of evaluating coolant injection effects on turbine performance.

  19. Multivariate test power approximations for balanced linear mixed models in studies with missing data.

    PubMed

    Ringham, Brandy M; Kreidler, Sarah M; Muller, Keith E; Glueck, Deborah H

    2016-07-30

    Multilevel and longitudinal studies are frequently subject to missing data. For example, biomarker studies for oral cancer may involve multiple assays for each participant. Assays may fail, resulting in missing data values that can be assumed to be missing completely at random. Catellier and Muller proposed a data analytic technique to account for data missing at random in multilevel and longitudinal studies. They suggested modifying the degrees of freedom for both the Hotelling-Lawley trace F statistic and its null case reference distribution. We propose parallel adjustments to approximate power for this multivariate test in studies with missing data. The power approximations use a modified non-central F statistic, which is a function of (i) the expected number of complete cases, (ii) the expected number of non-missing pairs of responses, or (iii) the trimmed sample size, which is the planned sample size reduced by the anticipated proportion of missing data. The accuracy of the method is assessed by comparing the theoretical results to the Monte Carlo simulated power for the Catellier and Muller multivariate test. Over all experimental conditions, the closest approximation to the empirical power of the Catellier and Muller multivariate test is obtained by adjusting power calculations with the expected number of complete cases. The utility of the method is demonstrated with a multivariate power analysis for a hypothetical oral cancer biomarkers study. We describe how to implement the method using standard, commercially available software products and give example code. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26603500

  20. 73. View of line of stainless steel coolant storage tanks ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    73. View of line of stainless steel coolant storage tanks for bi-sodium sulfate/water coolant solution at first floor of transmitter building no. 102. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  1. Automatic coolant flow control device for a nuclear reactor assembly

    DOEpatents

    Hutter, E.

    1984-01-27

    A device which controls coolant flow through a nuclear reactor assembly comprises a baffle means at the exit end of said assembly having a plurality of orifices, and a bimetallic member in operative relation to the baffle means such that at increased temperatures said bimetallic member deforms to unblock some of said orifices and allow increased coolant flow therethrough.

  2. Effects of rotation on coolant passage heat transfer. Volume 1: Coolant passages with smooth walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajek, T. J.; Wagner, J. H.; Johnson, B. V.; Higgins, A. W.; Steuber, G. D.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to investigate heat transfer and pressure loss characteristics of rotating multipass passages, for configurations and dimensions typical of modern turbine blades. The immediate objective was the generation of a data base of heat transfer and pressure loss data required to develop heat transfer correlations and to assess computational fluid dynamic techniques for rotating coolant passages. Experiments were conducted in a smooth wall large scale heat transfer model.

  3. Stabilization of inorganic mixed waste to pass the TCLP and STLC tests using clay and pH-insensitive additives

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, J.S.; Anson, J.R.; Painter, S.M.; Maitino, R.E.

    1995-03-01

    Stabilization traps toxic contaminants (usually both chemically and physically) in a matrix so that they do not leach into the environment. Typical contaminants are metals (mostly transition metals) that exhibit the characteristic of toxicity. The stabilization process routinely uses pozzolanic materials. Portland cement, fly ash-lime mixes, gypsum cements, and clays are some of the most common materials. In many instances, materials that can pass the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP-the federal leach test) or the Soluble Threshold Leachate Concentration (STLC-the California leach test) must have high concentrations of lime or other caustic material because of the low pH of the leaching media. Both leaching media, California`s and EPA`s, have a pH of 5.0. California uses citric acid and sodium citrate while EPA uses acetic acid and sodium acetate. These media can form ligands that provide excellent metal leaching. Because of the aggressive nature of the leaching medium, stabilized wastes in many cases will not pass the leaching tests. At the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, additives such as dithiocarbamates and thiocarbonates, which are pH-insensitive and provide resistance to ligand formation, are used in the waste stabilization process. Attapulgite, montmorillonite, and sepiolite clays are used because they are forgiving (recipe can be adjusted before the matrix hardens). The most frequently used stabilization process consists of a customized recipe involving waste sludge, clay and dithiocarbamate salt, mixed with a double planetary mixer into a pasty consistency. TCLP and STLC data on this waste matrix have shown that the process matrix meets land disposal requirements.

  4. Radiant energy receiver having improved coolant flow control means

    DOEpatents

    Hinterberger, H.

    1980-10-29

    An improved coolant flow control for use in radiant energy receivers of the type having parallel flow paths is disclosed. A coolant performs as a temperature dependent valve means, increasing flow in the warmer flow paths of the receiver, and impeding flow in the cooler paths of the receiver. The coolant has a negative temperature coefficient of viscosity which is high enough such that only an insignificant flow through the receiver is experienced at the minimum operating temperature of the receiver, and such that a maximum flow is experienced at the maximum operating temperature of the receiver. The valving is accomplished by changes in viscosity of the coolant in response to the coolant being heated and cooled. No remotely operated valves, comparators or the like are needed.

  5. Clay Cap Test Program for the Mixed Waste Management Facility closure at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Newell, J.W. , Inc., Charlotte, NC )

    1989-01-01

    A 58 acre low-level radioactive waste disposal facility at the Savannah River Site, a Department of Energy facility near Aiken, South Carolina, requires closure with a RCRA clay cap. A three-foot thick can requiring 300,000 cubic yards of local Tertiary Kaolin clay with an in-situ permeability of less than or equal to 1 {times} 10{sup -7} centimeters per second is to be constructed. The Clay Cap Test Program was conducted to evaluate the source, lab permeability, in-situ permeability, compaction characteristics, representative kaolin clays from the Aiken, SC vicinity. 11 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  6. In-core coolant flow monitoring of pressurized water reactors using temperature and neutron noise

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, F.J.; Upadhyaya, B.R.; Shieh, D.J.

    1984-01-01

    Noise measurements were performed at the Loss-of-Fluid-Test (LOFT) and Sequoyah-1 pressurized water reactors (PWRs) in order to investigate the possibility of inferring in-core coolant velocities from cross-power spectral density (CPSD) phases of core-exit thermocouple and in-core neutron detector signals. These noise measurements were used to investigate the effects of inlet coolant temperature, core flow, reactor power, and random heat transfer fluctuations on the noise-inferred coolant velocities. The effect on the inferred velocities of varying in-core neutron detector and core-exit thermocouple locations was also investigated. Theoretical models of temperature noise were developed, and the results were used to interpret the experimental measurements. Results of these studies indicate that the neutron detector/thermocouple phase is useful for monitoring core flow in PWRs. Results show that the interpretation of the phase between these signals depends on the source of temperature noise, the response times and locations of the sensors, and the neutron dynamics of the reactor. At Sequoyah-1 we found that the in-core neutron detector/core-exit thermocouple phase can be used to infer in-core coolant velocities, provided that the measurements are corrected for the thermocouple response time.

  7. Modelling the activity of 129I in the primary coolant of a CANDU reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Brent J.; Husain, Aamir

    2003-01-01

    A mathematical treatment has been developed to describe the activity levels of 129I as a function of time in the primary heat transport system during constant power operation and for a reactor shutdown situation. The model accounts for a release of fission-product iodine from defective fuel rods and tramp uranium contamination on in-core surfaces. The physical transport constants of the model are derived from a coolant activity analysis of the short-lived radioiodine species. An estimate of 3×10 -9 has been determined for the coolant activity ratio of 129I/ 131I in a CANDU Nuclear Generating Station (NGS), which is in reasonable agreement with that observed in the primary coolant and for plant test resin columns from pressurized and boiling water reactor plants. The model has been further applied to a CANDU NGS, by fitting it to the observed short-lived iodine and long-lived cesium data, to yield a coolant activity ratio of ˜2×10 -8 for 129I/ 137Cs. This ratio can be used to estimate the levels of 129I in reactor waste based on a measurement of the activity of 137Cs.

  8. Preliminary data from an instantaneous profile test conducted near the Mixed Waste Landfill, Technical Area 3, Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Bayliss, S.C.; Goering, T.J.; McVey, M.D.; Strong, W.R.; Peace, J.L.

    1996-04-01

    This paper presents data from an instantaneous profile test conducted near the Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico Mixed Waste Landfill in Technical Area 3. The test was performed from December 1993 through 1995 as part of the environmental Restoration Project`s Phase 2 RCRA Facility Investigation of the Mixed Waste Landfill. The purpose of the test was to measure the unsaturated hydraulic properties of soils near the Mixed Waste Landfill. The instantaneous profile test and instrumentation are described, and the pressure and moisture content data from the test are presented. These data may be useful for understanding the unsaturated hydraulic properties of soils in Technical Area 3 and for model validation, verification, and calibration.

  9. Testing of low temperature stabilization alternatives for salt-containing mixed wastes -- approach and results to date

    SciTech Connect

    Maio, V.; Loomis, G.; Biyani, R.K.; Smith, G.; Spence, R.; Wagh, A.

    1998-07-01

    Through its annual process of identifying technology deficiencies associated with waste treatment, the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) determined that the former DOE weapons complex lacks efficient mixed waste stabilization technologies for salt containing wastes. The current method used to stabilize salt waste for compliant disposal is grouting with Portland cement. This method is inefficient since the highly soluble and reactive chloride, nitrate, and sulfate salts interfere with the hydration and setting processes associated with grouting. The following five alternative salt waste stabilization technologies were selected for MWFA development funding in FY97 and FY98: (1) Phosphate Bonded Ceramics, (2) Sol-gel, (3) Polysiloxane, (4) Polyester Resin, and (5) Enhanced Concrete. Comparable evaluations were planned for the stabilization development efforts. Under these evaluations each technology stabilized the same type of salt waste surrogates as specified by the MWFA. Final waste form performance data such as compressive strength, waste loading, and leachability can then be equally compared to the requirements originally specified. In addition to the selected test results provided in this paper, the performance of each alternative stabilization technology, will be documented in formal MWFA Innovative Technology Summary Reports (ITSRs).

  10. Stabilization of inorganic mixed waste to pass the TCLP and STLC tests using clay and pH-insensitive additives

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, J.S.; Anson, S.M.; Painter, S.M.

    1995-09-01

    Stabilization is a best demonstrated available technology, or BDAT, as defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in Title 40, part 268, of the Code of Federal Regulations (40 CFR 268). This technology traps toxic contaminants (usually both chemically and physically) in a matrix so that they do not. leach into the environment. Typical contaminants that are trapped by stabilization are metals (mostly transition metals) that exhibit the characteristic of toxicity as defined by 40 CFR part 261. The stabilization process routinely uses pozzolanic materials. Portland cement, fly ash-lime mixes, gypsum cements, and clays are some of the most common materials. They are inexpensive, easy to use, and effective for wastes containing low concentrations of toxic materials. At the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), additives such as dithiocarbamates and thiocarbonates, which are pH-insensitive and provide resistance to ligand formation are used in the waste stabilization process. Attapulgite, montmorillonite, and sepiolite clays are used because they are forgiving (recipe can be adjusted before the matrix hardens) when formulating a stabilization matrix, and they have a neutral pH. By using these clays and additives, LLNL`s highly concentrated wastewater treatment sludges have passed the TCLP and STLC tests. The most frequently used stabilization process consists of a customized recipe involving waste sludge, clay and dithiocarbamate salt, mixed with a double planetary mixer into a pasty consistency. TCLP and STLC data on this waste matrix have shown that the process matrix meets land disposal requirements.

  11. Barriers to the Application of High-Temperature Coolants in Hybrid Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, J.S.; Staunton, M.R.; Starke, M.R.

    2006-09-30

    This study was performed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to identify practical approaches, technical barriers, and cost impacts to achieving high-temperature coolant operation for certain traction drive subassemblies and components of hybrid electric vehicles (HEV). HEVs are unique in their need for the cooling of certain dedicated-traction drive subassemblies/components that include the electric motor(s), generators(s), inverter, dc converter (where applicable), and dc-link capacitors. The new coolant system under study would abandon the dedicated 65 C coolant loop, such as used in the Prius, and instead rely on the 105 C engine cooling loop. This assessment is important because automotive manufacturers are interested in utilizing the existing water/glycol engine cooling loop to cool the HEV subassemblies in order to eliminate an additional coolant loop with its associated reliability, space, and cost requirements. In addition, the cooling of power electronic devices, traction motors, and generators is critical in meeting the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technology (FCVT) goals for power rating, volume, weight, efficiency, reliability, and cost. All of these have been addressed in this study. Because there is high interest by the original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) in reducing manufacturing cost to enhance their competitive standing, the approach taken in this analysis was designed to be a positive 'can-do' approach that would be most successful in demonstrating the potential or opportunity of relying entirely on a high-temperature coolant system. Nevertheless, it proved to be clearly evident that a few formidable technical and cost barriers exist and no effective approach for mitigating the barriers was evident in the near term. Based on comprehensive thermal tests of the Prius reported by ORNL in 2005 [1], the continuous ratings at base speed (1200 rpm) with different coolant temperatures were projected from test data at

  12. Barriers to the Application of High-Temperature Coolants in Hybrid Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Staunton, Robert H; Hsu, John S; Starke, Michael R

    2006-09-01

    This study was performed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to identify practical approaches, technical barriers, and cost impacts to achieving high-temperature coolant operation for certain traction drive subassemblies and components of hybrid electric vehicles (HEV). HEVs are unique in their need for the cooling of certain dedicated-traction drive subassemblies/components that include the electric motor(s), generators(s), inverter, dc converter (where applicable), and dc-link capacitors. The new coolant system under study would abandon the dedicated 65 C coolant loop, such as used in the Prius, and instead rely on the 105 C engine cooling loop. This assessment is important because automotive manufacturers are interested in utilizing the existing water/glycol engine cooling loop to cool the HEV subassemblies in order to eliminate an additional coolant loop with its associated reliability, space, and cost requirements. In addition, the cooling of power electronic devices, traction motors, and generators is critical in meeting the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technology (FCVT) goals for power rating, volume, weight, efficiency, reliability, and cost. All of these have been addressed in this study. Because there is high interest by the original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) in reducing manufacturing cost to enhance their competitive standing, the approach taken in this analysis was designed to be a positive 'can-do' approach that would be most successful in demonstrating the potential or opportunity of relying entirely on a high-temperature coolant system. Nevertheless, it proved to be clearly evident that a few formidable technical and cost barriers exist and no effective approach for mitigating the barriers was evident in the near term. Based on comprehensive thermal tests of the Prius reported by ORNL in 2005 [1], the continuous ratings at base speed (1200 rpm) with different coolant temperatures were projected from test data at

  13. Uranium effluent testing for the Oak Ridge Toxic Substances Control Act mixed waste incinerator

    SciTech Connect

    Shor, J.T.; Bostick, W.D.; Hoffmann, D.P.; Gibson, L.V. Jr.; Ho, T.C.

    1993-07-01

    The Oak Ridge K-25 Site Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Incinerator has been undergoing a series of routine tests to determine uranium partitioning to the stack, scrubber waters, and bottom ash. This paper discusses the results of the most recent experiment in which relatively high rates of uranium stack gas emissions were identified: 6.11 g/h or 8 wt % based on the uranium feed. These data are compared with earlier data, and an empirical correlation is suggested between the stack emissions of uranium and the product of the uranium and chlorine concentration of the feed. This is consistent with certain findings with other metals, in which increasing chlorine feed contents led to increasing emissions.

  14. Performance test of the synergetic use of simulated lidar and microwave radiometer observations for mixing-layer height detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeed, Umar; Rocadenbosch, Francesc; Crewell, Susanne

    2015-10-01

    There are several instruments and methods to retrieve the atmospheric Mixing Layer Height (MLH). However, none of these instruments or methods can measure the development of the MLH under all atmospheric conditions. For example, aerosol signatures measured by backscatter lidars can be used to determine the MLH but this approach is reasonable only when the atmosphere is well-mixed. Microwave Radiometer (MWR) derived profiles have low vertical resolution and cannot resolve fine structures in the boundary layer, especially, at higher altitudes. Here we propose a method which combines data from a ground-based lidar and a MWR, in simulated as well as real measurements scenarios, to overcome these limitations. The method works by fitting an erf-like transition model function to the section of range-corrected lidar backscatter signal. The section of the lidar backscatter signal for fitting the model function is obtained by incorporating the MWR estimates of MLH along with their uncertainties. The fitting is achieved by using an extended Kalman filter (EKF). The proposed approach, by exploiting the synergy between the two instruments, enables to detect MLH with original vertical and temporal resolutions. Test cases combining simulated data for a co-located lidar-ceilometer and a MWR are presented. The simulated data is obtained from the Dutch Atmospheric Large Eddy Simulation (DALES) model for boundary layer studies. Doppler wind lidar along with radiosondes (whenever available) data is used to assess the quality of the synergetic MLH estimates. Data from the HD(CP)2 Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE) campaign at Jülich, Germany is used to test the proposed method.

  15. Symbiodinium population genetics: testing for species boundaries and analysing samples with mixed genotypes.

    PubMed

    Wham, Drew C; LaJeunesse, Todd C

    2016-06-01

    Population genetic markers are increasingly being used to study the diversity, ecology and evolution of Symbiodinium, a group of eukaryotic microbes that are often mutualistic with reef-building corals. Population genetic markers can resolve individual clones, or strains, from samples of host tissue; however, samples may comprise different species that may confound interpretations of gene flow and genetic structure. Here, we propose a method for resolving species from population genetic data using tests for genetic recombination. Assigning individuals to genetically recombining populations prior to further analyses avoids critical errors in the interpretation of gene flow and dispersal. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach, we first apply this method to a simulated data set. We then use the method to resolve two species of host generalist Symbiodinium that commonly co-occur in reef-building corals collected from Indo-West Pacific reefs. We demonstrate that the method is robust even when some hosts contain genotypes from two distinct species. Finally, we examine population genetic data sets from two recently published papers in Molecular Ecology. We show that each strongly supports a two species interpretation, which significantly changes the original conclusions presented in these studies. When combined with available phylogenetic and ecological evidence, the use of population genetic data offers a robust method for unambiguously delimiting morphologically cryptic species. PMID:27118512

  16. Neutronic and Physical Characteristics of an Accelerator Driven System with a Lead-208 Coolant

    SciTech Connect

    Khorasanov, Georgy L.; Ivonov, Anatoly P.; Blokhin, Anatoly I.

    2006-07-01

    In the paper a possibility of using a lead isotope, pure Pb-208, as a coolant for a subcritical core of 80 MW thermal capacity of the PDS-XADS type facility is considered. Calculations of neutronic characteristics were performed using Monte Carlo technique. The following initial data were chosen: an annular core with a target, as a neutron source, at its centre; the core coolant -- Pb-208 (100%); a fuel -- a mix of mono nitrides of depleted uranium and power plutonium with a small share of neptunium and americium; the target coolant -- a modified lead and bismuth eutectic, Pb-208(80%)-Bi(20%); proton beam energy -- 600 MeV; effective multiplication factor of the core under operation -- K{sub eff} = 0.97; thermal capacity of the core -- N = 80 MW. From calculations performed it follows that in using Pb-208 as the core coolant the necessary intensity of the external source of neutrons to deliver 80 MW thermal capacity is equal to S = 2.29-10{sup 17} n/s that corresponds to proton beam current I{sub p} = 2.8 mA and beam capacity P{sub p} 1.68 MW. In using natural lead instead of Pb-208 as the core coolant, effective multiplication factor of the core in normal operating regime falls down to the value equal to K{sub eff} = 0.95. In these conditions multiplication of external neutrons in the core and thermal capacity of the subcritical core are below nominal by 1.55 times. For achievement the rated core power N=80 MW it is required on {approx}20-30% to increase the fuel loading and volume of the core, or by 1.55 times to increase intensity of the external source of neutrons. In the last case, the required parameters of the neutron source and of the corresponding proton beam are following: intensity of the neutron source S = 3.55 10{sup 17} n/s., beam current I{sub p} = 4.32 mA, beam capacity P{sub p} 2.59 MW. To exploit the accelerator with the reduced proton beam current it will be required about 56 tons of Pb-208, as a minimum, for the core coolant. Charges for its

  17. MCNP-to-TORT Radiation Transport Calculations in Support of Mixed Oxide Fuels Testing for the Fissile Materials Disposition Program

    SciTech Connect

    Pace, J.V.

    1999-11-01

    The United States (US) Department of Energy Fissile Materials Disposition Program (FMDP) began studies for disposal of surplus weapons-grade plutonium (WG-Pu) as mixed uranium-plutonium oxide (@40X) fuel for commercial light-water reactors(LWRS). As a first step in this program, a test of the utilization of WG-Pu in a LWR environment is being conducted in an I-hole of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Initial radiation transport calculations of the test specimens were made at INEEL using the MCNP Monte Carlo radiation transport code to determine the linear heating rates in the fuel specimens. Unfortunately, the results of the calculations could not show the detailed high and low power-density spots in the specimens. Therefore, INEEL produced an MCNP source at the boundary of a rectangular parallelepiped enclosing the ATR I-hole, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) transformed this boundary source into a discrete -ordinates boundary source for the Three-dimensional Oak Ridge radiation Transport (TORT) code to pinpoint spatial detail. Agreement with average MCNP results were within 5%.

  18. Testing the perfectionism model of binge eating in mother-daughter dyads: a mixed longitudinal and daily diary study.

    PubMed

    Mushquash, Aislin R; Sherry, Simon B

    2013-04-01

    The perfectionism model of binge eating is an integrative model explaining why perfectionism is tied to binge eating. This study extended and tested this emerging model by proposing daughters' socially prescribed perfectionism (i.e., perceiving one's mother is harshly demanding perfection of oneself) and mothers' psychological control (i.e., a negative parenting style involving control and demandingness) contribute indirectly to daughters' binge eating by generating situations or experiences that trigger binge eating. These binge triggers include discrepancies (i.e., viewing oneself as falling short of one's mother's expectations), depressive affect (i.e., feeling miserable and sad), and dietary restraint (i.e., behaviors aimed at reduced caloric intake). This model was tested in 218 mother-daughter dyads studied using a mixed longitudinal and daily diary design. Daughters were undergraduate students. Results largely supported hypotheses, with bootstrapped tests of mediation suggesting daughters' socially prescribed perfectionism and mothers' psychological control contribute to binge eating through binge triggers. For undergraduate women who believe their mothers rigidly require them to be perfect and whose mothers are demanding and controlling, binge eating may provide a means of coping with or escaping from an unhealthy, unsatisfying mother-daughter relationship. PMID:23557815

  19. Sensitivity and specificity of an abbreviated 13C-mixed triglyceride breath test for measurement of pancreatic exocrine function

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Viola; Wolfram, Kristina U; Rosien, Ulrich; Layer, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background A modified 13C-mixed triglyceride breath test (13C -MTGT) detects moderate pancreatic exocrine insufficiency noninvasively and reliably, but it requires prolonged breath sampling (6 hours (hr)). Objective We aimed to investigate whether 13C -MTGT can be abbreviated, to optimize clinical usability. Methods We analyzed the 13C-MTGT of 200 consecutive patients, retrospectively. Cumulative 1–5 hr 13C-exhalation values were compared with the standard parameter (6-hr cumulative 13C-exhalation). We determined the sensitivity and specificity of shortened breath sampling periods, by comparison with the normal values from 10 healthy volunteers, whom also underwent a secretin test to quantitate pancreatic secretion. Moreover, we evaluated the influence of gastric emptying (GE), using a 13C-octanoic acid breath test in a subset (N = 117). Results The 1–5 hr cumulative 13C-exhalation tests correlated highly and significantly with the standard parameter (p < 0.0001). Sensitivity for detection of impaired lipolysis was high (≥77%), but the specificity was low (≥38%) for the early measurements. Both parameters were high after 4 hrs (88% and 94%, respectively) and 5 hrs (98% and 91%, respectively). Multivariate linear correlation analysis confirmed that GE strongly influenced early postprandial 13C-exhalation during the 13C-MTGT. Conclusion Shortening of the 13C -MTGT from 6 to 4 hrs of duration was associated with similar diagnostic accuracy, yet increased clinical usability. The influence of GE on early postprandial results of the 13C-MTGT precluded further abbreviation of the test. PMID:25083286

  20. ISS Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS) Coolant Remediation Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Russell H.; Holt, Mike

    2005-01-01

    The IATCS coolant has experienced a number of anomalies in the time since the US Lab was first activated on Flight 5A in February 2001. These have included: 1) a decrease in coolant pH, 2) increases in inorganic carbon, 3) a reduction in phosphate buffer concentration, 4) an increase in dissolved nickel and precipitation of nickel salts, and 5) increases in microbial concentration. These anomalies represent some risk to the system, have been implicated in some hardware failures and are suspect in others. The ISS program has conducted extensive investigations of the causes and effects of these anomalies and has developed a comprehensive program to remediate the coolant chemistry of the on-orbit system as well as provide a robust and compatible coolant solution for the hardware yet to be delivered. The remediation steps include changes in the coolant chemistry specification, development of a suite of new antimicrobial additives, and development of devices for the removal of nickel and phosphate ions from the coolant. This paper presents an overview of the anomalies, their known and suspected system effects, their causes, and the actions being taken to remediate the coolant.

  1. Reclamation and disposal of water-based machining coolants

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, P.A.

    1982-01-01

    The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, which is operated by the Union Carbide Corporation, Nuclear Division for the Department of Energy under US government contract W-7405-eng-26, currently uses about 10{sup 6} L/yr (260,000 gal/yr) of water-based coolants in its machining operations. These coolants are disposed of in a 110,000-L (29,000-gal) activated sludge reactor. The reactor has oxidized an average of 38.6 kg of total organic carbon (TOC) per day with an overall efficiency of 90%. The predominant bacteria in the reactor have been identified once each year for the past three years. Six primary types of water-based coolants are currently used in the machine shops. In order to reduce the coolant usage rate, efforts are being made to introduce one universal coolant into the shops. By using a biocide to limit bacterial deterioration and using a filter and centrifuge system to remove dirt and tramp oils from the coolant, the coolant discard rate can be greatly reduced. 1 tab.

  2. Effect of mixing time and speed on experimental baking and dough testing with a 200g pin-mixer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Under mixing or over mixing the dough results in varied experimental loaf volumes. Bread preparation requires a trained baker to evaluate dough development and determine stop points of mixer. Instrumentation and electronic control of the dough mixer would allow for automatic mixing. This study us...

  3. Cladding embrittlement during postulated loss-of-coolant accidents.

    SciTech Connect

    Billone, M.; Yan, Y.; Burtseva, T.; Daum, R.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2008-07-31

    The effect of fuel burnup on the embrittlement of various cladding alloys was examined with laboratory tests conducted under conditions relevant to loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs). The cladding materials tested were Zircaloy-4, Zircaloy-2, ZIRLO, M5, and E110. Tests were performed with specimens sectioned from as-fabricated cladding, from prehydrided (surrogate for high-burnup) cladding, and from high-burnup fuel rods which had been irradiated in commercial reactors. The tests were designed to determine for each cladding material the ductile-to-brittle transition as a function of steam oxidation temperature, weight gain due to oxidation, hydrogen content, pre-transient cladding thickness, and pre-transient corrosion-layer thickness. For short, defueled cladding specimens oxidized at 1000-1200 C, ring compression tests were performed to determine post-quench ductility at {le} 135 C. The effect of breakaway oxidation on embrittlement was also examined for short specimens oxidized at 800-1000 C. Among other findings, embrittlement was found to be sensitive to fabrication processes--especially surface finish--but insensitive to alloy constituents for these dilute zirconium alloys used as cladding materials. It was also demonstrated that burnup effects on embrittlement are largely due to hydrogen that is absorbed in the cladding during normal operation. Some tests were also performed with longer, fueled-and-pressurized cladding segments subjected to LOCA-relevant heating and cooling rates. Recommendations are given for types of tests that would identify LOCA conditions under which embrittlement would occur.

  4. Determining When Single Scoring for Constructed-Response Items Is as Effective as Double Scoring in Mixed-Format Licensure Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Sooyeon; Moses, Tim

    2013-01-01

    The major purpose of this study is to assess the conditions under which single scoring for constructed-response (CR) items is as effective as double scoring in the licensure testing context. We used both empirical datasets of five mixed-format licensure tests collected in actual operational settings and simulated datasets that allowed for the…

  5. Does Linking Mixed-Format Tests Using a Multiple-Choice Anchor Produce Comparable Results for Male and Female Subgroups? Research Report. ETS RR-11-44

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Sooyeon; Walker, Michael E.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the use of subpopulation invariance indices to evaluate the appropriateness of using a multiple-choice (MC) item anchor in mixed-format tests, which include both MC and constructed-response (CR) items. Linking functions were derived in the nonequivalent groups with anchor test (NEAT) design using an MC-only anchor set for 4…

  6. Winchester/Camberley Homes New Construction Test House Design, Construction, and Short-Term Testing in a Mixed-Humid Climate

    SciTech Connect

    Mallav, D.; Wiehagen, J.; Wood, A.

    2012-10-01

    The NAHB Research Center partnered with production builder Winchester/Camberley Homes to build a DOE Building America New Construction Test House (NCTH). This single family, detached house, located in the mixed-humid climate zone of Silver Spring, MD, was completed in June 2011. The primary goal for this house was to improve energy efficiency by 30% over the Building America B10 benchmark by developing and implementing an optimized energy solutions package design that could be cost effectively and reliably constructed on a production basis using quality management practices. The intent of this report is to outline the features of this house, discuss the implementation of the energy efficient design, and report on short-term testing results. During the interactive design process of this project, numerous iterations of the framing, air sealing, insulation, and space conditioning systems were evaluated for energy performance, cost, and practical implementation. The final design featured numerous advanced framing techniques, high levels of insulation, and the HVAC system entirely within conditioned space. Short-term testing confirmed a very tight thermal envelope and efficient and effective heating and cooling. In addition, relevant heating, cooling, humidity, energy, and wall cavity moisture data will be collected and presented in a future long-term report.

  7. Corrosion problems with aqueous coolants, final report

    SciTech Connect

    Diegle, R B; Beavers, J A; Clifford, J E

    1980-04-11

    The results of a one year program to characterize corrosion of solar collector alloys in aqueous heat-transfer media are summarized. The program involved a literature review and a laboratory investigation of corrosion in uninhibited solutions. It consisted of three separate tasks, as follows: review of the state-of-the-art of solar collector corrosion processes; study of corrosion in multimetallic systems; and determination of interaction between different waters and chemical antifreeze additives. Task 1 involved a comprehensive review of published literature concerning corrosion under solar collector operating conditions. The reivew also incorporated data from related technologies, specifically, from research performed on automotive cooling systems, cooling towers, and heat exchangers. Task 2 consisted of determining the corrosion behavior of candidate alloys of construction for solar collectors in different types of aqueous coolants containing various concentrations of corrosive ionic species. Task 3 involved measuring the degradation rates of glycol-based heat-transfer media, and also evaluating the effects of degradation on the corrosion behavior of metallic collector materials.

  8. PIV measurements of coolant flow field in a diesel engine cylinder head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hongwei; Zhang, Zhenyang; Xue, Cheng; Huang, Yunlong

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents experimental measurements of coolant flow field in the water jacket of a diesel engine cylinder head. The test was conducted at three different flow rates using a 2-D PIV system. Appropriate tracing particles were selected and delivery device was designed and manufactured before the test. The flow parameters, such as velocity, vorticity and turbulence, were used to analyze the flow field. The effects of vortex which was located between the intake valve and the exhaust valve were discussed. The experimental results showed an asymmetric distribution of velocity in the water jacket. This led to an asymmetric thermal distribution, which would shorten the service life of the cylinder head. The structure optimization to the water jacket of cylinder head was proposed in this paper. The experimental system, especially the 2-D PIV system, is a great help to study the coolant flow structure and analyze cooling mechanism in the diesel engine cylinder head.

  9. Steam as turbine blade coolant: Experimental data generation

    SciTech Connect

    Wilmsen, B.; Engeda, A.; Lloyd, J.R.

    1995-10-01

    Steam as a coolant is a possible option to cool blades in high temperature gas turbines. However, to quantify steam as a coolant, there exists practically no experimental data. This work deals with an attempt to generate such data and with the design of an experimental setup used for the purpose. Initially, in order to guide the direction of experiments, a preliminary theoretical and empirical prediction of the expected experimental data is performed and is presented here. This initial analysis also compares the coolant properties of steam and air.

  10. Longer life for glyco-based stationary engine coolants

    SciTech Connect

    Hohlfeld, R.

    1996-07-01

    Large, stationary diesel engines used to compress natural gas that is to be transported down pipelines generate a great deal of heat. Unless this heat is dissipated efficiently, it will eventually cause an expensive breakdown. Whether the coolant uses ethylene glycol or propylene glycol, the two major causes of glycol degradation are heat and oxidation. The paper discusses inhibitors that enhance coolant service life and presents a comprehensive list of do`s and don`ts for users to gain a 20-year coolant life.

  11. Turbomachine injection nozzle including a coolant delivery system

    DOEpatents

    Zuo, Baifang

    2012-02-14

    An injection nozzle for a turbomachine includes a main body having a first end portion that extends to a second end portion defining an exterior wall having an outer surface. A plurality of fluid delivery tubes extend through the main body. Each of the plurality of fluid delivery tubes includes a first fluid inlet for receiving a first fluid, a second fluid inlet for receiving a second fluid and an outlet. The injection nozzle further includes a coolant delivery system arranged within the main body. The coolant delivery system guides a coolant along at least one of a portion of the exterior wall and around the plurality of fluid delivery tubes.

  12. Method for removing cesium from a nuclear reactor coolant

    DOEpatents

    Colburn, Richard P.

    1986-01-01

    A method of and system for removing cesium from a liquid metal reactor coolant including a carbon packing trap in the primary coolant system for absorbing a major portion of the radioactive cesium from the coolant flowing therethrough at a reduced temperature. A regeneration subloop system having a secondary carbon packing trap is selectively connected to the primary system for isolating the main trap therefrom and connecting it to the regeneration system. Increasing the temperature of the sodium flowing through the primary trap diffuses a portion of the cesium

  13. Modeling Reactor Coolant Systems Thermal-Hydraulic Transients

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1999-10-05

    RELAP5/MOD3.2* is used to model reactor coolant systems during postulated accidents. The code models the coupled behavior of the reactor coolant system and the core for loss-of-coolant accidents and operational transients such as anticipated transients without scram, loss of offsite power, loss of feedwater, and loss of flow. A generic modeling approach is used that permits simulating a variety of thermal-hydraulic systems. Control system and secondary system components are included to allow modeling of themore » plant controls, turbines, condensers, and secondary feedwater systems.« less

  14. MCNP-to-TORT radiation transport calculations in support of mixed oxide fuels testing for the Fissile Materials Disposition Program

    SciTech Connect

    Pace, J.V. III

    1998-04-01

    The US (US) Department of Energy Fissile Materials Disposition Program has begun studies for disposal of surplus weapons-grade plutonium (WG-Pu) as mixed uranium plutonium oxide (MOX) fuel for commercial light water reactors (LWRs). Currently MOX fuel is used commercially in a number of foreign countries, but is not in the US. Most of the experience is with reactor grade plutonium (RG-Pu) in MOX fuel. Therefore, to use WG-Pu in MOX fuel, one must demonstrate that the experience with RG-Pu is relevant. As a first step in this program, the utilization of WG-Pu in a LWR environment must be demonstrated. To accomplish this, a test is to be conducted to investigate some of the unresolved issues. The initial tests will be made in an I-hole of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Initial radiation transport calculations of the test specimens were made at INEEL using the MCNP Monte Carlo radiation transport code. These calculations were made to determine the linear heating rates in the fuel specimens. Unfortunately, the results of the calculations could not show the detailed high and low power density spots in the specimens. However, a discrete ordinates radiation transport code could pinpoint these spatial details. Therefore, INEEL was tasked with producing a MCNP source at the boundary of a rectangular parallelepiped enclosing the ATR I-hole, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory was tasked with transforming this boundary source into a discrete ordinates boundary source for the Three-dimensional Oak Ridge radiation Transport (TORT) code. Thus, the TORT results not only complemented, but also were in agreement with the MCNP results.

  15. TESTING THE CORE OVERSHOOT MIXING DESCRIBED BY A TURBULENT CONVECTION MODEL ON THE ECLIPSING BINARY STAR HY VIR

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Q. S.

    2012-12-20

    Helioseismic investigation has suggested applying turbulent convection models (TCMs) to convective overshoot. Using the turbulent velocity in the overshoot region determined by a TCM, one can deal with overshoot mixing as a diffusion process, which leads to incomplete mixing. It has been found that this treatment can improve solar sound speed and Li depletion in open clusters. In order to investigate whether the TCM can be applied to overshoot mixing outside the stellar convective core, new observations of the eclipsing binary star HY Vir are adopted to calibrate the overshoot mixing parameter. The main conclusions are as follows: (1) the solar TCM parameters and overshoot mixing parameter are also suitable for the eclipsing binary system HY Vir, (2) the incomplete mixing results in a continuous profile of hydrogen abundance, and (3) the e-folding length of the region, in which the hydrogen abundance changes due to overshoot mixing, increases during stellar evolution.

  16. Tellurite glass as a waste form for mixed alkali-chloride waste streams: Candidate materials selection and initial testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, Brian J.; Rieck, Bennett T.; McCloy, John S.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Sundaram, S. K.; Vienna, John D.

    2012-05-01

    Tellurite glasses have historically been shown to host large concentrations of halides. They are here considered for the first time as a waste form for immobilizing chloride wastes, such as may be generated in the proposed molten alkali salt electrochemical separations step in nuclear fuel reprocessing. Key properties of several tellurite glasses are determined to assess acceptability as a chloride waste form. TeO2 glasses with other oxides (PbO, Al2O3 + B2O3, WO3, P2O5, or ZnO) were fabricated with and without 10 mass% of a simulated (non-radioactive) mixed alkali, alkaline-earth, and rare earth chloride waste. Measured chemical durability is compared for the glasses, as determined by the product consistency test (PCT), a common standardized chemical durability test often used to validate borosilicate glass waste forms. The glass with the most promise as a waste form is the TeO2-PbO system, as it offers good halide retention, a low sodium release (by PCT) comparable with high-level waste silicate glass waste forms, and a high storage density.

  17. Main-coolant-pump shaft-seal guidelines. Volume 3. Specification guidelines. Final report. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Fair, C.E.; Greer, A.O.

    1983-03-01

    This report presents a set of guidelines and criteria to aid in the generation of procurement specifications for Main Coolant Pump Shaft Seals. The noted guidelines are developed from EPRI sponsored nuclear power plant seal operating experience studies, a review of pump and shaft seal literature and discussions with pump and seal designers. This report is preliminary in nature and could be expanded and finalized subsequent to completion of further design, test and evaluation efforts.

  18. Three dimensional calculations of the primary coolant flow in a 900 MW PWR vessel. Steady state and transient computations

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, A.; Alvarez, D.; Cases, F.

    1996-06-01

    After the Tchernobyl accident a working group was created to analyze the French PWR Safety with a respect to potential risk of reactivity accident. Potentially risky situations are those which can lead to heterogeneous boron concentration or temperature of the primary coolant fluid. This paper reports a Research and Development action based on numerical simulations and experiments on the primary coolant temperature or boron mixing capabilities in a PWR vessel. New numerical results obtained with the thermal hydraulic Finite Element (FE) Code N3S are presented. In these calculations the FE mesh takes into account the geometry of the lower plenum plates and columns. Two configurations have been investigated The first one is a steady state fluid flow mixing case. The reactor is cooled by free convection and the three loops, balanced in mass flow rate, are in operation. The second is a free boron plug transient case. It is related to the mixing of a clear plug injected in the vessel when a primary coolant pump starts-up. Two clear plug volumes have been investigated (3 and 8 m{sup 3}). Comparisons between these new numerical results and the data previously obtained (see Alvarez et al., 1992, Alvarez, Martin and Schneider, 1994) are presented in this paper.

  19. EVALUATION OF FILTRATION AND DISTILLATION METHODS FOR RECYCLING AUTOMOTIVE COOLANT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This evaluation addresses the product quality, waste reduction, and economic issues involved in recycling automotive engine coolants at a New Jersey Department of Transportation garage. he specific recycling units evaluated are based on the technologies of filtration and distilla...

  20. INVESTIGATION OF CLEANER TECHNOLOGIES TO MINIMIZE AUTOMOTIVE COOLANT WASTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US Environmental Protection Agency in cooperation with the State of New Jersey evaluated chemical filtration and distillation technologies designed to recycle automotive and heavy-duty engine coolants. These evaluations addressed the product quality, waste reduction and econo...

  1. Optimized Coolant-Flow Diverter For Increased Bearing Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subbaraman, Maria R.; Butner, Myles F.

    1995-01-01

    Coolant-flow diverter for rolling-element bearings in cryogenic turbopump designed to enhance cooling power of flow in contact with bearings and thereby reduce bearing wear. Delivers jets of coolant as close as possible to hot spots at points of contact between balls and race. Also imparts swirl that enhances beneficial pumping effect. Used with success in end ball bearing of high-pressure-oxidizer turbopump.

  2. Hydrodynamics of large-scale fuel-coolant interactions. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Baines, M.; Board, S.J.; Buttery, N.E.

    1980-06-01

    The analogy between thermal reactive and chemical reactive flows suggests that all propagating thermal explosions have a detonation-like (i.e., shock) structure. A vapor detonation model, which allows for thermal disequilibrium in the coolant, is developed. It is suggested that similar nonequilibrium effects may limit the efficiency of UO/sub 2/-sodium system, however, because of high conductivity of the coolant. 34 refs.

  3. Investigation of cleaner technologies to minimize automotive coolant wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Randall, P.M.

    1993-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in cooperation with the State of New Jersey evaluated chemical filtration and distillation technologies designed to recycle automotive and heavy-duty engine coolants. These evaluations addressed the product quality, waste reduction, and economic issues. In addition, the authors examined the potential for substituting propylene glycol for ethylene glycol based engine coolant formulations. (Copyright (c) 1993 Butterworth-Heinemann Ltd.)

  4. Analysis of instantaneous profile test data from soils near the Mixed Waste Landfill, Technical Area 3, Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Goering, T.J.; McVey, M.D.; Strong, W.R.; Peace, J.L.

    1996-02-01

    This paper presents the results of an instantaneous profile test conducted near the Mixed Waste Landfill at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico. The purpose of the test was to measure the unsaturated hydraulic properties of soils near the Mixed Waste Landfill, including the relations between hydraulic conductivity, moisture content, and soil water tension. A 4.7 meter by 4.7 meter plot was saturated with water to a depth of 2 meters, and the wetting and drying responses of the vertical profile were observed. These data were analyzed to obtain in situ measurements of the unsaturated hydraulic properties.

  5. Using the {delta}{sub 3} statistic to test for missed levels in mixed sequence neutron resonance data

    SciTech Connect

    Mulhall, Declan

    2009-09-15

    The {delta}{sub 3}(L) statistic is studied as a tool to detect missing levels in the neutron resonance data where two sequences are present. These systems are problematic because there is no level repulsion, and the resonances can be too close to resolve. {delta}{sub 3}(L) is a measure of the fluctuations in the number of levels in an interval of length L on the energy axis. The method used is tested on ensembles of mixed Gaussian orthogonal ensemble spectra, with a known fraction of levels (x%) randomly depleted, and can accurately return x. The accuracy of the method as a function of spectrum size is established. The method is used on neutron resonance data for 11 isotopes with either s-wave neutrons on odd-A isotopes, or p-wave neutrons on even-A isotopes. The method compares favorably with a maximum likelihood method applied to the level spacing distribution. Nuclear data ensembles were made from 20 isotopes in total, and their {delta}{sub 3}(L) statistics are discussed in the context of random matrix theory.

  6. Large break loss-of-coolant accident analyses for the high flux isotope reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Taleyarkhan, R.P. )

    1989-01-01

    The US Department of Energy's High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) was analyzed to evaluate it's response to a spectrum of loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs) with potential for leading to core damage. The MELCOR severe accident analysis code (version 1.7.1) was used to evaluate the overall dynamic response of HFIR. Before conducting LOCA analyses, the steady-state thermal-hydraulic parameters evaluated by MELCOR for various loop sections were verified against steady-state operating data. Thereafter, HFIR depressurization tests were simulated to evaluate the system pressure change for a given depletion in coolant inventory. Interesting and important safety-related phenomena were observed. The current analyses (which should be considered preliminary) that occur over a period from 1 to 3 seconds do not lead to core wide fuel melting. Core fluid flashing during the initial rapid depressurization does cause fuel temperature excursions due to adiabatic-like heatup. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Fluid-Structure Interaction for Coolant Flow in Research-type Nuclear Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, Franklin G; Ekici, Kivanc; Freels, James D

    2011-01-01

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), is scheduled to undergo a conversion of the fuel used and this proposed change requires an extensive analysis of the flow through the reactor core. The core consists of 540 very thin and long fuel plates through which the coolant (water) flows at a very high rate. Therefore, the design and the flow conditions make the plates prone to dynamic and static deflections, which may result in flow blockage and structural failure which in turn may cause core damage. To investigate the coolant flow between fuel plates and associated structural deflections, the Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI) module in COMSOL will be used. Flow induced flutter and static deflections will be examined. To verify the FSI module, a test case of a cylinder in crossflow, with vortex induced vibrations was performed and validated.

  8. Modeling the activity of 129I and 137Cs in the primary coolant and CVCS resin of an operating PWR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, K. H.; Lee, K. J.

    2006-04-01

    Mathematical models have been developed to describe the activities of 129I and 137Cs in the primary coolant and resin of the chemical and volume control system (CVCS) during constant power operation in a pressurized water reactor (PWR). The models, which account for the source releases from defective fuel rod(s) and tramp uranium, rely on the contribution of CVCS resin and boron recovery system as a removal process, and differences in behavior for each nuclide. The current models were validated through measured coolant activities of 137Cs. The resultant scaling factors agree reasonably well with the results of the test resin of the coolant and the actual resins from the PWRs of other countries.

  9. FARO base case post-test analysis by COMETA code

    SciTech Connect

    Annunziato, A.; Addabbo, C.

    1995-09-01

    The paper analyzes the COMETA (Core Melt Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis) post test calculations of FARO Test L-11, the so-called Base Case Test. The FARO Facility, located at JRC Ispra, is used to simulate the consequences of Severe Accidents in Nuclear Power Plants under a variety of conditions. The COMETA Code has a 6 equations two phase flow field and a 3 phases corium field: the jet, the droplets and the fused-debris bed. The analysis shown that the code is able to pick-up all the major phenomena occurring during the fuel-coolant interaction pre-mixing phase.

  10. Influence of coolant pH on corrosion of 6061 aluminum under reactor heat transfer conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel, S.J.; Felde, D.K.; Pawel, R.E.

    1995-10-01

    To support the design of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS), an experimental program was conducted wherein aluminum alloy specimens were exposed at high heat fluxes to high-velocity aqueous coolants in a corrosion test loop. The aluminum alloys selected for exposure were candidate fuel cladding materials, and the loop system was constructed to emulate the primary coolant system for the proposed ANS reactor. One major result of this program has been the generation of an experimental database defining oxide film growth on 6061 aluminum alloy cladding. Additionally, a data correlation was developed from the database to permit the prediction of film growth for any reasonable thermal-hydraulic excursion. This capability was utilized effectively during the conceptual design stages of the reactor. During the course of this research, it became clear that the kinetics of film growth on the aluminum alloy specimens were sensitively dependent on the chemistry of the aqueous coolant and that relatively small deviations from the intended pH 5 operational level resulted in unexpectedly large changes in the corrosion behavior. Examination of the kinetic influences and the details of the film morphology suggested that a mechanism involving mass transport from other parts of the test loop was involved. Such a mechanism would also be expected to be active in the operating reactor. This report emphasizes the results of experiments that best illustrate the influence of the nonthermal-hydraulic parameters on film growth and presents data to show that comparatively small variations in pH near 5.0 invoke a sensitive response. Simply, for operation in the temperature and heat flux range appropriate for the ANS studies, coolant pH levels from 4.5 to 4.9 produced significantly less film growth than those from pH 5.1 to 6. A mechanism for this behavior based on the concept of treating the entire loop as an active corrosion system is presented.

  11. Sealing of a shrouded rotor-stator system with pre-swirl coolant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Oun, Z. B.; Neller, P. H.; Turner, A. B.

    1987-05-01

    Experimental results for a modeled gas turbine rotor-stator system using both preswirled blade coolant and radially outward flowing disc coolant are presented. Although the preswirled coolant flow is found to have little effect on the pressure distribution below the preswirl nozzles, it is shown that considerable contamination of the preswirled coolant by the frictionally heated disc coolant can occur. A clear pressure inversion effect was found when coolant was provided by the preswirl nozzles alone, while the pressure under the rim seal increased with increasing rotational speed. Blade coolant flow increases the sealing flow requirement, except at the lowest flow rates.

  12. Apparatus for controlling coolant level in a liquid-metal-cooled nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Robert D.

    1978-01-01

    A liquid-metal-cooled fast-breeder reactor which has a thermal liner spaced inwardly of the pressure vessel and includes means for passing bypass coolant through the annulus between the thermal liner and the pressure vessel to insulate the pressure vessel from hot outlet coolant includes control ports in the thermal liner a short distance below the normal operating coolant level in the reactor and an overflow nozzle in the pressure vessel below the control ports connected to an overflow line including a portion at an elevation such that overflow coolant flow is established when the coolant level in the reactor is above the top of the coolant ports. When no makeup coolant is added, bypass flow is inwardly through the control ports and there is no overflow; when makeup coolant is being added, coolant flow through the overflow line will maintain the coolant level.

  13. Evaluation of sulfate reduction at experimentally induced mixing interfaces using small-scale push-pull tests in an aquifer-wetland system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kneeshaw, T.A.; McGuire, J.T.; Smith, E.W.; Cozzarelli, I.M.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents small-scale push-pull tests designed to evaluate the kinetic controls on SO42 - reduction in situ at mixing interfaces between a wetland and aquifer impacted by landfill leachate at the Norman Landfill research site, Norman, OK. Quantifying the rates of redox reactions initiated at interfaces is of great interest because interfaces have been shown to be zones of increased biogeochemical transformations and thus may play an important role in natural attenuation. To mimic the aquifer-wetland interface and evaluate reaction rates, SO42 --rich anaerobic aquifer water (??? 100 mg / L SO42 -) was introduced into SO42 --depleted wetland porewater via push-pull tests. Results showed SO42 - reduction was stimulated by the mixing of these waters and first-order rate coefficients were comparable to those measured in other push-pull studies. However, rate data were complex involving either multiple first-order rate coefficients or a more complex rate order. In addition, a lag phase was observed prior to SO42 - reduction that persisted until the mixing interface between test solution and native water was recovered, irrespective of temporal and spatial constraints. The lag phase was not eliminated by the addition of electron donor (acetate) to the injected test solution. Subsequent push-pull tests designed to elucidate the nature of the lag phase support the importance of the mixing interface in controlling terminal electron accepting processes. These data suggest redox reactions may occur rapidly at the mixing interface between injected and native waters but not in the injected bulk water mass. Under these circumstances, push-pull test data should be evaluated to ensure the apparent rate is actually a function of time and that complexities in rate data be considered. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. 40 CFR 1065.745 - Coolants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... your engine in use. (b) For laboratory testing of liquid-cooled engines, you may use water with or... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Engine Fluids, Test Fuels, Analytical Gases and Other Calibration Standards § 1065.745...

  15. 40 CFR 1065.745 - Coolants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... your engine in use. (b) For laboratory testing of liquid-cooled engines, you may use water with or... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Engine Fluids, Test Fuels, Analytical Gases and Other Calibration Standards § 1065.745...

  16. The aerodynamic effects of wheelspace coolant injection into the mainstream flow of a high pressure gas turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLean, Christopher Elliot

    Modern gas turbine engines operate with mainstream gas temperatures exceeding 1450°C in the high-pressure turbine stage. Unlike turbine blades, rotor disks and other internal components are not designed to withstand the extreme temperatures found in mainstream flow. In modern gas turbines, cooling air is pumped into the wheelspace cavities to prevent mainstream gas ingestion and then exits through a seal between the rotor and the nozzle guide vane (NGV) thereby mixing with the mainstream flow. The primary purpose for the wheelspace cooling air is the cooling of the turbine wheelspace. However, secondary effects arise from the mixing of the spent cooling air with the mainstream flow. The exiting cooling air is mixed with the hot mainstream flow effecting the aerodynamic and performance characteristics of the turbine stage. The physics underlying this mixing process and its effects on stage performance are not yet fully understood. The relative aerodynamic and performance effects associated with rotor - NGV gap coolant injections were investigated in the Axial Flow Turbine Research Facility (AFTRF) of the Center for Gas Turbines and Power of The Pennsylvania State University. This study quantifies the secondary effects of the coolant injection on the aerodynamic and performance character of the turbines main stream flow for root injection, radial cooling, and impingement cooling. Measurement and analysis of the cooling effects were performed in both stationary and rotational frames of reference. The AFTRF is unique in its ability to perform long duration cooling measurements in the stationary and rotating frames. The effects of wheelspace coolant mixing with the mainstream flow on total-to-total efficiency, energy transport, three dimensional velocity field, and loading coefficient were investigated. Overall, it was found that a small quantity (1%) of cooling air can have significant effects on the performance character and exit conditions of the high pressure stage

  17. Students' perceptions of the Script Concordance Test and its impact on their learning behavior: a mixed methods study.

    PubMed

    Cobb, Kate A; Brown, George; Hammond, Richard; Mossop, Liz H

    2015-01-01

    The Script Concordance Test (SCT) is increasingly used in postgraduate and undergraduate education as a method of summative clinical assessment. It has been shown to have high validity and reliability but there is little evidence of its use in veterinary education as assessment for learning. This study investigates some students' perceptions of the SCT and its effects on their approaches to learning. Final-year undergraduates of the School of Veterinary Medicine and Science (SVMS) at the University of Nottingham participated in a mixed-methods study after completing three formative SCT assessments. A qualitative, thematic analysis was produced from transcripts of three focus group discussions. The quantitative study was a survey based on the analyses of the qualitative study. Out of 50 students who registered for the study, 18 participated in the focus groups and 28 completed the survey. Clinical experience was regarded as the most useful source of information for answering the SCT. The students also indicated that recall of facts was perceived as useful for multiple-choice questions but least useful for the SCT. Themes identified in the qualitative study related to reliability, acceptability, educational impact, and validity of the SCT. The evidence from this study shows that the SCT has high face validity among veterinary students. They reported that it encouraged them to reflect upon their clinical experience, to participate in discussions of case material, and to adopt a deeper approach to clinical learning. These findings strongly suggest that the SCT is potentially a valuable method for assessing clinical reasoning and enhancing student learning. PMID:25526762

  18. An analytical study of the effect of coolant flow variables on the kinetic energy output of a cooled turbine blade flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prust, H. W., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    The results of an analytical study to determine the effect of changes in the amount, velocity, injection location, injection angle, and temperature of coolant flow on blade row performance are presented. The results show that the change in output of a cooled turbine blade row relative to the specific output of the uncooled blade row can be positive, negative, or zero. Comparisons between the analytical results and experimental results for four different cases of coolant discharge, all at a coolant temperature ratio of unity, show good agreement for three cases and rather poor agreement for the other. To further test the validity of the method, more experimental data is needed, particularly at different coolant temperature ratios.

  19. Nuclear criticality safety assessment of the proposed CFC replacement coolants

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, W.C.; Dyer, H.R.

    1993-12-01

    The neutron multiplication characteristics of refrigerant-114 (R-114) and proposed replacement coolants perfluorobutane (C{sub 4}F{sub 10}) and cycloperfluorobutane C{sub 4}F{sub 8}) have been compared by evaluating the infinite media multiplication factors of UF{sub 6}/H/coolant systems and by replacement calculations considering a 10-MW freezer/sublimer. The results of these comparisons demonstrate that R-114 is a neutron absorber, due to its chlorine content, and that the alternative fluorocarbon coolants are neutron moderators. Estimates of critical spherical geometries considering mixtures of UF{sub 6}/HF/C{sub 4}F{sub 10} indicate that the flourocarbon-moderated systems are large compared with water-moderated systems. The freezer/sublimer calculations indicate that the alternative coolants are more reactive than R-114, but that the reactivity remains significantly below the condition of water in the tubes, which was a limiting condition. Based on these results, the alternative coolants appear to be acceptable; however, several follow-up tasks have been recommended, and additional evaluation will be required on an individual equipment basis.

  20. Diesel engine coolant analysis, new application for established instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.P.; Lukas, M.; Lynch, B.K.

    1998-09-01

    Rotating disk electrode (RDE) arc emission spectrometers are used in many commercial, industrial and military laboratories throughout the world to analyze millions of oil and fuel samples each year. In fact, RDE spectrometers have been used exclusively for oil and fuel analysis for so long, that most practitioners have probably forgotten that when RDE spectrometers were first introduced more than 40 years ago, they were also routinely used for aqueous samples. This paper describes recent work to calibrate and modify RDE arc emission spectrometers for the analysis of engine coolant samples; a mixture of approximately 50% water and 50% glycol. The technique has been shown to be effective for the analysis of wear metals, contamination and supplemental coolant additives in ethylene and propylene glycol. A comparison of results for coolant samples measured by both inductively coupled plasma (ICP) and RDE spectrometers will be presented. The data correlates extremely well on new and relatively clean coolants. However, not surprisingly, RDE results are sometimes higher for samples containing particles larger than a few micrometers. This paper suggests that RDE spectrometers are appropriate, and sometimes preferred, for most types of coolants and certain types of aqueous samples. Actual field data is be presented to support the arguments.

  1. Flow boiling with enhancement devices for cold plate coolant channel design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Ronald D., Sr.; Smith, Alvin

    1990-01-01

    The use of flow boiling for thermal energy transport is intended to provide an alternative for accommodating higher heat fluxes in commercial space systems. The objectives are to: (1) examine the variations in both the mean and local (axial and circumferential) heat transfer coefficients for a circular coolant channel with either smooth walls, spiral fins, or both spiral fins and a twisted tape; (2) examine the effects of channel diameter and subcooling; and (3) develop an improved reduction analysis and/or suggest possible heat transfer correlation of the present data. Freon-11 is the working fluid. Two-dimensional (circumferential and axial) wall temperature distributions were measured for coolant channels with the above noted internal geometries. The flow regimes which are being studied are: (1) single phase; (2) subcooled flow boiling; and (3) stratified flow boiling. The inside diameter of all test sections is near 1.0 cm. Cicumferentially averaged heat transfer coefficients at several axial locations were obtained for selected coolant channels for a mass velocity of 210 kg/sq m s, an exit pressure of 0.19 MPa (absolute), and an inlet subcooling of 20.8 C. Overall (averaged over the entire channel) heat transfer coefficients were compared for the above channel geometries. This comparison showed that the channel with large pitch spiral fins had higher heat transfer coefficients at all power levels.

  2. Effects of LWR coolant environments on fatigue design curves of carbon and low-alloy steels

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; Shack, W.J.

    1998-03-01

    The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code provides rules for the construction of nuclear power plant components. Figures I-9.1 through I-9.6 of Appendix I to Section III of the code specify fatigue design curves for structural materials. While effects of reactor coolant environments are not explicitly addressed by the design curves, test data indicate that the Code fatigue curves may not always be adequate in coolant environments. This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue of carbon and low-alloy steels in light water reactor (LWR) environments. The existing fatigue S-N data have been evaluated to establish the effects of various material and loading variables such as steel type, dissolved oxygen level, strain range, strain rate, temperature, orientation, and sulfur content on the fatigue life of these steels. Statistical models have been developed for estimating the fatigue S-N curves as a function of material, loading, and environmental variables. The results have been used to estimate the probability of fatigue cracking of reactor components. The different methods for incorporating the effects of LWR coolant environments on the ASME Code fatigue design curves are presented.

  3. Guidelines to achieve seals with minimal leak rates for HWR-NPR coolant system components

    SciTech Connect

    Finn, P.A.

    1991-03-01

    Seal design practices that are acceptable in pressurized-water and boiling-water reactors in the United States are not usable for the Heavy Water Reactor-New Production Reactor (HWR-NPR) because of the stringent requirement on tritium control for the atmosphere within its containment building. To maintain an atmosphere in which workers do not need protective equipment, the components of the coolant system must have a cumulative leak rate less than 0.00026 L/s. Existing technology for seal systems was reviewed with regard to flange, elastomer, valve, and pump design. A technology data base for the designers of the HWR-NPR coolant system was derived from operating experience and seal development work on reactors in the United States, Canada, and Europe. This data base was then used to generate guidelines for the design of seals and/or joints for the HWR-NPR coolant system. Also discussed are needed additional research and development, as well as the necessary component qualification tests for an effective quality control program. 141 refs., 21 figs., 14 tabs.

  4. Radiolysis of the coolant in the VK-50 boiling water reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Zabelin, A.I.; Shmelev, V.E.

    1986-10-01

    Radiolysis of the coolant proceeds at a higher rate in a boiling water reactor as compared to a water-moderated, water-cooled reactor. The radiolytic gases (hydrogen and oxygen) exiting the reactor together with steam can form a potentially explosive mixture. Special interest attaches to the results obtained under the codnitions of prolonged operation of the VK-50 reactor. Tests of various water-chemistry conditions which were performed in the experimental reactor showed their critical influence on the rate of progress of radiolytic processes. The entire period of operation of the reactor may be arbitrarily divided into three stages, each of which is characterized by its own peculiar conditions of water chemistry and range of thermal power. From stage to stage, there is a noticeable improvement in the coolant quality which to a limited extent is reflected in the exit of radiolytic gases with the steam. The concentration of radiolytic gases increases with decreased power and with an increased content of corrosion products and other contaminants in the coolant.

  5. Large Engine Technology (LET) Task XXXVII Low-Bypass Ratio Mixed Turbofan Engine Subsonic Jet Noise Reduction Program Test Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauser, Joseph R.; Zysman, Steven H.; Barber, Thomas J.

    2001-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center supported a three year effort to develop the technology for reducing jet noise from low-bypass ratio engines. This effort concentrated on both analytical and experimental approaches using various mixer designs. CFD and MGB predictions are compared with LDV and noise data, respectively. While former predictions matched well with data, experiment shows a need for improving the latter predictions. Data also show that mixing noise can be sensitive to engine hardware upstream of the mixing exit plane.

  6. Redesigning the ‘choice architecture’ of hospital prescription charts: a mixed methods study incorporating in situ simulation testing

    PubMed Central

    King, Dominic; Jabbar, Ali; Charani, Esmita; Bicknell, Colin; Wu, Zhe; Miller, Gavin; Gilchrist, Mark; Vlaev, Ivo; Franklin, Bryony Dean; Darzi, Ara

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To incorporate behavioural insights into the user-centred design of an inpatient prescription chart (Imperial Drug Chart Evaluation and Adoption Study, IDEAS chart) and to determine whether changes in the content and design of prescription charts could influence prescribing behaviour and reduce prescribing errors. Design A mixed-methods approach was taken in the development phase of the project; in situ simulation was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the newly developed IDEAS prescription chart. Setting A London teaching hospital. Interventions/methods A multimodal approach comprising (1) an exploratory phase consisting of chart reviews, focus groups and user insight gathering (2) the iterative design of the IDEAS prescription chart and finally (3) testing of final chart with prescribers using in situ simulation. Results Substantial variation was seen between existing inpatient prescription charts used across 15 different UK hospitals. Review of 40 completed prescription charts from one hospital demonstrated a number of frequent prescribing errors including illegibility, and difficulty in identifying prescribers. Insights from focus groups and direct observations were translated into the design of IDEAS chart. In situ simulation testing revealed significant improvements in prescribing on the IDEAS chart compared with the prescription chart currently in use in the study hospital. Medication orders on the IDEAS chart were significantly more likely to include correct dose entries (164/164 vs 166/174; p=0.0046) as well as prescriber's printed name (163/164 vs 0/174; p<0.0001) and contact number (137/164 vs 55/174; p<0.0001). Antiinfective indication (28/28 vs 17/29; p<0.0001) and duration (26/28 vs 15/29; p<0.0001) were more likely to be completed using the IDEAS chart. Conclusions In a simulated context, the IDEAS prescription chart significantly reduced a number of common prescribing errors including dosing errors and illegibility. Positive

  7. The Functional Fitness MOT Test Battery for Older Adults: Protocol for a Mixed-Method Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Increasing physical activity (PA) brings many health benefits, but engaging people in higher levels of PA after their 60s is not straightforward. The Functional Fitness MOT (FFMOT) is a new approach which aims to raise awareness about the importance of components of fitness (strength, balance, flexibility), highlight benefits of PA, engages older people in health behavior change discussions, and directs them to local activity resources. This battery of tests combined with a brief motivational interview has not been tested in terms of feasibility or effectiveness. Objective To assess whether the FFMOT, provided in a health care setting, is appealing to older patients of a community physiotherapy service and to understand the views and perceptions of the older people undergoing the FFMOT regarding the intervention, as well as the views of the physiotherapy staff delivering the intervention. Secondary aims are to assess the feasibility of carrying out a phase 2 pilot randomized controlled trial of the FFMOT, in the context of a community physiotherapy service, by establishing whether enough patients can be recruited and retained in the study, and enough outcome data can be generated. Methods A mixed-methods feasibility study will be conducted in two physiotherapy outpatient clinics in the United Kingdom. A total of 30 physically inactive, medically stable older adults over the age of 60 will be provided with an individual FFMOT, comprising a set of six standardized, validated, age-appropriate tests aimed at raising awareness of the different components of fitness. The results of these tests will be used to provide the participants with feedback on performance in comparison to sex and age-referenced norms. This will be followed by tailored advice on how to become more active and improve fitness, including advice on local opportunities to be more active. Subsequently, participants will be invited to attend a focus group to discuss barriers and motivators to

  8. Fracture mechanics evaluation for at typical PWR primary coolant pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, T.; Shimizu, S.; Ogata, Y.

    1997-04-01

    For the primary coolant piping of PWRs in Japan, cast duplex stainless steel which is excellent in terms of strength, corrosion resistance, and weldability has conventionally been used. The cast duplex stainless steel contains the ferrite phase in the austenite matrix and thermal aging after long term service is known to change its material characteristics. It is considered appropriate to apply the methodology of elastic plastic fracture mechanics for an evaluation of the integrity of the primary coolant piping after thermal aging. Therefore we evaluated the integrity of the primary coolant piping for an initial PWR plant in Japan by means of elastic plastic fracture mechanics. The evaluation results show that the crack will not grow into an unstable fracture and the integrity of the piping will be secured, even when such through wall crack length is assumed to equal the fatigue crack growth length for a service period of up to 60 years.

  9. Actively controlling coolant-cooled cold plate configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Parida, Pritish R.

    2015-07-28

    A method is provided to facilitate active control of thermal and fluid dynamic performance of a coolant-cooled cold plate. The method includes: monitoring a variable associated with at least one of the coolant-cooled cold plate or one or more electronic components being cooled by the cold plate; and dynamically varying, based on the monitored variable, a physical configuration of the cold plate. By dynamically varying the physical configuration, the thermal and fluid dynamic performance of the cold plate are adjusted to, for example, optimally cool the one or more electronic components, and at the same time, reduce cooling power consumption used in cooling the electronic component(s). The physical configuration can be adjusted by providing one or more adjustable plates within the coolant-cooled cold plate, the positioning of which may be adjusted based on the monitored variable.

  10. Method for removing cesium from a nuclear reactor coolant

    DOEpatents

    Colburn, R.P.

    1983-08-10

    A method of and system for removing cesium from a liquid metal reactor coolant including a carbon packing trap in the primary coolant system for absorbing a major portion of the radioactive cesium from the coolant flowing therethrough at a reduced temperature. A regeneration subloop system having a secondary carbon packing trap is selectively connected to the primary system for isolating the main trap therefrom and connecting it to the regeneration system. Increasing the temperature of the sodium flowing through the primary trap diffuses a portion of the cesium inventory thereof further into the carbon matrix while simultaneously redispersing a portion into the regeneration system for absorption at a reduced temperature by the secondary trap.

  11. Spectrophotometric Procedure for Fast Reactor Advanced Coolant Manufacture Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrienko, O. S.; Egorov, N. B.; Zherin, I. I.; Indyk, D. V.

    2016-01-01

    The paper describes a spectrophotometric procedure for fast reactor advanced coolant manufacture control. The molar absorption coefficient of dimethyllead dibromide with dithizone was defined as equal to 68864 ± 795 l·mole-1·cm-1, limit of detection as equal to 0.583 · 10-6 g/ml. The spectrophotometric procedure application range was found to be equal to 37.88 - 196.3 g. of dimethyllead dibromide in the sample. The procedure was used within the framework of the development of the method of synthesis of the advanced coolant for fast reactors.

  12. Code System to Calculate Reactor Coolant System Leak Rate.

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Pat

    1999-10-19

    Version 00 RCSLK9 was developed to analyze the leak tightness of the primary coolant system for any pressurized water reactor (PWR). From given system conditions, water levels in tanks, and certain system design parameters, RCSLK9 calculates the loss of water from the reactor coolant system (RCS) and the increase of water in the leakage collection system during an arbitrary time interval. The program determines the system leak rates and displays or prints a report of the results. During the initial application to a specific reactor, RCSLK9 creates a file of system parameters and saves it for future use.

  13. Code System to Calculate Reactor Coolant System Leak Rate.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1999-10-19

    Version 00 RCSLK9 was developed to analyze the leak tightness of the primary coolant system for any pressurized water reactor (PWR). From given system conditions, water levels in tanks, and certain system design parameters, RCSLK9 calculates the loss of water from the reactor coolant system (RCS) and the increase of water in the leakage collection system during an arbitrary time interval. The program determines the system leak rates and displays or prints a report ofmore » the results. During the initial application to a specific reactor, RCSLK9 creates a file of system parameters and saves it for future use.« less

  14. Evaluation of engine coolants under flow boiling conditions

    SciTech Connect

    McAssey, E.V. Jr.; Stinson, C.; Gollin, M.

    1995-12-31

    An experimental program has been conducted to evaluate the heat transfer performance of two engine coolant mixtures, propylene-glycol/water and ethylene-glycol/water. In each mixture, the concentration was 50-50 by volume. Performance in this situation is defined as the ability to maintain a lower surface temperature for a given flux. The heat transfer regimes considered covered the range from single phase forced convection through saturated flow boiling. Results show that both coolants perform satisfactorily. However, in single phase convection, ethylene-glycol/water is slightly more effective. Conversely, for sub-cooled nucleate boiling and saturated boiling, propylene-glycol/water results in slightly lower metal temperatures.

  15. Development of Figure of Merits (FOMs) for Intermediate Coolant Characterization and Selection

    SciTech Connect

    Eung Soo Kim; Piyush Sabharwall; Nolan Anderson

    2011-06-01

    This paper focuses on characterization of several coolant performances in the IHTL. There are lots of choices available for the IHTL coolants; gases, liquid metals, molten salts, and etc. Traditionally, the selection of coolants is highly dependent on engineer's experience and decisions. In this decision, the following parameters are generally considered: melting point, vapor pressure, density, thermal conductivity, heat capacity, viscosity, and coolant chemistry. The followings are general thermal-hydraulic requirements for the coolant in the IHTL: (1) High heat transfer performance - The IHTL coolant should exhibit high heat transfer performance to achieve high efficiency and economics; (2) Low pumping power - The IHTL coolant requires low pumping power to improve economics through less stringent pump requirements; (3) Low amount of coolant volume - The IHTL coolant requires less coolant volume for better economics; (4) Low amount of structural materials - The IHTL coolant requires less structural material volume for better economics; (5) Low heat loss - The IHTL requires less heat loss for high efficiency; and (6) Low temperature drop - The IHTL should allow less temperature drop for high efficiency. Typically, heat transfer coolants are selected based on various fluid properties such as melting point, vapor pressure, density, thermal conductivity, heat capacity, viscosity, and coolant chemistry. However, the selection process & results are highly dependent on the engineer's personal experience and skills. In the coolant selection, if a certain coolant shows superior properties with respect to the others, the decision will be very straightforward. However, generally, each coolant material exhibits good characteristics for some properties but poor for the others. Therefore, it will be very useful to have some figures of merits (FOMs), which can represent and quantify various coolant thermal performances in the system of interest. The study summarized in this

  16. Investigation of aerodynamic effects of coolant ejection at the trailing edge of a turbine blade model by PIV and pressure measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raffel, M.; Kost, F.

    In order to simulate the thick trailing edges of turbine blades a slotted plate profile together with a newly designed nozzle was installed into the high-speed wind tunnel of the DLR Göttingen. At different supersonic Mach numbers and at four coolant flow rates in the range of 0-2.5% pressure distribution measurements and probe measurements were performed. The flow field was visualized by schlieren photos and the instantaneous velocity field was quantitatively investigated by Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The measurements of the velocity field gave an insight into stationary effects, for example the change of shock strength with coolant flow rate, and instationary effects such as the existence of a vortex street in the wake. The PIV technique offers special advantages for the investigation of transonic flow fields, but also yields to special experimental difficulties, which are also described in this article. Measured losses display a maximum at the downstream Mach number 1. This is strongly related to the behaviour of the base pressure. A loss minimum is achieved at moderate coolant flow rates, showing that an optimum coolant flow rate exists. The loss was analysed and separated into the loss contributions from the profile upstream of the trailing edge and the mixing loss due to the coolant flow.

  17. Corrosion of Ferritic Steels in High Temperature Molten Salt Coolants for Nuclear Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J; El-Dasher, B; de Caro, M S; Ferreira, J

    2008-11-25

    Corrosion of ferritic steels in high temperature molten fluoride salts may limit the life of advanced reactors, including some hybrid systems that are now under consideration. In some cases, the steel may be protected through galvanic coupling with other less noble materials with special neutronic properties such a beryllium. This paper reports the development of a model for predicting corrosion rates for various ferritic steels, with and without oxide dispersion strengthening, in FLiBe (Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4}) and FLiNaK (Li-Na-K-F) coolants at temperatures up to 800 C. Mixed potential theory is used to account for the protection of steel by beryllium, Tafel kinetics are used to predict rates of dissolution as a function of temperature and potential, and the thinning of the mass-transfer boundary layer with increasing Reynolds number is accounted for with dimensionless correlations. The model also accounts for the deceleration of corrosion as the coolants become saturated with dissolved chromium and iron. This paper also reports electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of steels at their corrosion potentials in high-temperature molten salt environments, with the complex impedance spectra interpreted in terms of the interfacial charge transfer resistance and capacitance, as well as the electrolyte conductivity. Such in situ measurement techniques provide valuable insight into the degradation of materials under realistic conditions.

  18. AUTOMOTIVE AND HEAVY-DUTY ENGINE COOLANT RECYCLING BY FILTRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This evaluation addresses the product quality, waste reduction and economic issues involved in recycling automotive and heavy-duty engine coolants. he specific recycling units evaluated are a fleet-size unit and a portable unit, both based on the technology of chemical filtration...

  19. Coolant Characteristics and Control in Direct Chill Casting

    SciTech Connect

    2001-10-01

    This project focuses on understanding the fundamentals of coolant behavior and developing strategies to control the cooling rate of DC casting of aluminum ingots. Project partners will conduct a fundamental study to identify various parameters affecting critical heat flux and boiling transition and evaluate the effects of various additives (impurity particulates, sodium and calcium salts, carbonates, bicarbonates, surfactants, etc.).

  20. Coolants with selective optical filtering characteristics for ruby laser applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mc Devitt, F. R.; Rasquin, J. R.

    1968-01-01

    Coolant-filtering medium developed consists of a solution of copper sulfate in a 4-1 volumetric mixture of ethanol and methanol. This solution should be a useful addition to ruby laser systems, particularily in large pulse or Q switching applications.

  1. Integral coolant channels supply made by melt-out method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Escher, W. J. D.

    1964-01-01

    Melt-out method of constructing strong, pressure-tight fluid coolant channels for chambers is accomplished by cementing pins to the surface and by depositing a melt-out material on the surface followed by two layers of epoxy-resin impregnated glass fibers. The structure is heated to melt out the low-melting alloy.

  2. AUTOMOTIVE AND HEAVY-DUTY ENGINE COOLANT RECYCLING BY DISTILLATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This evaluation addresses the product quality, waste reduction, and economic issues involved in recycling automotive and heavy-duty engine coolants for a facility such as the New Jersey Department of Transportation garage in Ewing, New Jersey. he specific recycling evaluated is b...

  3. EVALUATION OF FILTRATION AND DISTILLATION METHODS FOR RECYCLING AUTOMOTIVE COOLANT.

    EPA Science Inventory

    This evaluation addresses the product quality, waste reduction, and economic issues involved in recycling automotive and heavy-duty engine coolants at a New Jersey Department of Transportation garage. The specific recycling units evaluated are based on the technologies of filtrat...

  4. 37. Upper level, chromate tanks (formerly provided coolant to missile ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. Upper level, chromate tanks (formerly provided coolant to missile guidance section, retractor cables for lock pin in front of ladder at left - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Delta Flight, Launch Facility, On County Road T512, south of Exit 116 off I-90, Interior, Jackson County, SD

  5. Antimony tartrate corrosion inhibitive composition for coolant systems

    SciTech Connect

    Payerle, N.E.

    1987-08-11

    An automobile coolant concentrate is described comprising (a) a liquid polyhydric alcohol chosen from the group consisting of ethylene glycol, propylene glycol, diethylene glycol and mixtures thereof, and (b) corrosion inhibitors in a corrosion inhibitory amount with respect to corrosion of lead-containing solders, the corrosion inhibitors comprising (i) an alkali metal antimony tartrate, and (ii) an azole compound.

  6. Thermal explosions resulting from fuel-coolant interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Bartusiak, R.D.; Caram, H.S.

    1988-08-01

    High-speed photographic data and pressure traces of thermal explosions from the contact of single drops of ion oxide with water were analyzed according to models describing underwater chemical explosion and cavitation bubbles. The objective was to develop a simple method for analyzing the microscale hydrodynamics of fuel-coolant interactions (FCI). For a given external pressure and liquid density essentially all the features of the radial motion of the explosion bubble, including the total energy release, are uniquely determined by a single parameter - the bubble period. Nearly all of the heat transfer from fuel to coolant occurs during the 10/sup -5/ to 10/sup -4/ sec timespan of coolant vapor film collapse during which the fuel fragments. The features of the resulting explosion bubble are not significantly affected by the degree of heat transfer from vapor to coolant liquid and the bubble can be modeled as an empty cavity. The method developed during this study should facilitate investigations on FCI by simplifying the analyses of thermal explosion data. Further attention can be given to experiments on the effects of fuel parameters, e.g., surface tension and viscosity, on fragmentation, heat transfer, and explosive yield.

  7. INVESTIGATION OF CLEANER TECHNOLOGIES TO MINIMIZE AUTOMOTIVE COOLANT WASTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in cooperation with the State of New Jersey evaluated chemical filtration and distillation technologies designed to recycle automotive and heavy-duty engine coolants. hese evaluations addressed the product quality, waste reduction, and eco...

  8. Directly connected heat exchanger tube section and coolant-cooled structure

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J; Coico, Patrick A; Graybill, David P; Iyengar, Madhusudan K; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J; Schmidt, Roger R; Steinke, Mark E

    2014-04-01

    A cooling apparatus for an electronics rack is provided which includes an air-to-liquid heat exchanger, one or more coolant-cooled structures and a tube. The heat exchanger, which is associated with the electronics rack and disposed to cool air passing through the rack, includes a plurality of distinct, coolant-carrying tube sections, each tube section having a coolant inlet and a coolant outlet, one of which is coupled in fluid communication with a coolant loop to facilitate flow of coolant through the tube section. The coolant-cooled structure(s) is in thermal contact with an electronic component(s) of the rack, and facilitates transfer of heat from the component(s) to the coolant. The tube connects in fluid communication one coolant-cooled structure and the other of the coolant inlet or outlet of the one tube section, and facilitates flow of coolant directly between that coolant-carrying tube section of the heat exchanger and the coolant-cooled structure.

  9. Scaling Laws for Reduced-Scale Tests of Pulse Jet Mixing Systems in Non-Newtonian Slurries: Gas Retention and Release Behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Charles W.; Meyer, Perry A.; Kurath, Dean E.; Barnes, Steven M.

    2006-03-02

    The Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) under construction at the Hanford Site will use pulse jet mixer (PJM) technology for mixing and gas retention control applications in tanks expected to contain waste slurries exhibiting a non-Newtonian rheology. This paper presents the results of theoretical and experimental studies performed to establish the methodology to perform reduced-scale gas retention and release tests with PJM systems in non-Newtonian fluids with gas generation. The technical basis for scaled testing with unsteady jet mixing systems in gas-generating non-Newtonian fluids is presented in the form of a bubble migration model that accounts for the gas generation rate, the average bubble rise velocity, and the geometry of the vessel. Scaling laws developed from the model were validated with gas holdup and release tests conducted at three scales: large scale, 1/4 scale, and 1/9 scale. Experiments were conducted with two non-Newtonian simulants with in-situ gas generation by decomposition of hydrogen peroxide. The data were compared non-dimensionally, and the important scale laws were examined. From these results, scaling laws are developed which allow the design of mixing systems at a reduced scale.

  10. Experimental interaction of magma and “dirty” coolants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schipper, C. Ian; White, James D. L.; Zimanowski, Bernd; Büttner, Ralf; Sonder, Ingo; Schmid, Andrea

    2011-03-01

    The presence of water at volcanic vents can have dramatic effects on fragmentation and eruption dynamics, but little is known about how the presence of particulate matter in external water will further alter eruptions. Volcanic edifices are inherently “dirty” places, where particulate matter of multiple origins and grainsizes typically abounds. We present the results of experiments designed to simulate non-explosive interactions between molten basalt and various “coolants,” ranging from homogeneous suspensions of 0 to 30 mass% bentonite clay in pure water, to heterogeneous and/or stratified suspensions including bentonite, sand, synthetic glass beads and/or naturally-sorted pumice. Four types of data are used to characterise the interactions: (1) visual/video observations; (2) grainsize and morphology of resulting particles; (3) heat-transfer data from a network of eight thermocouples; and (4) acoustic data from three force sensors. In homogeneous coolants with <~10% bentonite, heat transfer is by convection, and the melt is efficiently fragmented into blocky particles through multiple thermal granulation events which produce associated acoustic signals. For all coolants with >~20% sediment, heat transfer is by forced convection and conduction, and thermal granulation is less efficient, resulting in fewer blocky particles, larger grainsizes, and weaker acoustic signals. Many particles are droplet-shaped or/and “vesicular,” containing bubbles filled with coolant. Both of these particle types indicate significant hydrodynamic magma-coolant mingling, and many of them are rewelded into compound particles. The addition of coarse material to heterogeneous suspensions further slows heat transfer thus reducing thermal granulation, and variable interlocking of large particles prevents efficient hydrodynamic mingling. This results primarily in rewelded melt piles and inefficient distribution of melt and heat throughout the coolant volume. Our results indicate

  11. Two-phase performance of scale models of a primary coolant pump. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kamath, P.S.; Swift, W.L.

    1982-09-01

    Scale models of PWR primary coolant pumps were tested in steady and transient two-phase flows in order to generate a data base to aid in the development and assessment of pump performance models for use in computer codes for the analysis of postulated Loss-of-Coolant Accidents (LOCA). This report summarizes and unifies the single and two-phase air/water and steam/water performance data on the relatively high specific speed pumps (4200 rpm (US gpm) /sup 1/2//ft /sup 3/4/) tested in these programs. These data are compared with those acquired from tests on the lower specific speed Semiscale pump (926 rpm (US gpm)/sup 1/2//ft/sup 3/4/) to better understand the mechanism of performance degradation with increasing void fraction. The study revealed that scaling down the size of the pump while maintaining the same design specific speed produces very similar performance characteristics both in single and two-phase flows. Effects due to size and operating speed were not discernible within the range of test conditions and within experimental uncertainties. System pressure appears to affect the rate of degradation as a function of void fraction. The report includes a survey of the existing two-phase pump performance correlations. A correlation synthesized from the B and W, C-E and Creare two-phase data is also presented.

  12. A hydrogen-oxygen rocket engine coolant passage design program (RECOP) for fluid-cooled thrust chambers and nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomsik, Thomas M.

    1994-01-01

    The design of coolant passages in regeneratively cooled thrust chambers is critical to the operation and safety of a rocket engine system. Designing a coolant passage is a complex thermal and hydraulic problem requiring an accurate understanding of the heat transfer between the combustion gas and the coolant. Every major rocket engine company has invested in the development of thrust chamber computer design and analysis tools; two examples are Rocketdyne's REGEN code and Aerojet's ELES program. In an effort to augment current design capabilities for government and industry, the NASA Lewis Research Center is developing a computer model to design coolant passages for advanced regeneratively cooled thrust chambers. The RECOP code incorporates state-of-the-art correlations, numerical techniques and design methods, certainly minimum requirements for generating optimum designs of future space chemical engines. A preliminary version of the RECOP model was recently completed and code validation work is in progress. This paper introduces major features of RECOP and compares the analysis to design points for the first test case engine; the Pratt & Whitney RL10A-3-3A thrust chamber.

  13. Measurement of core coolant flow velocities in PWRs using temperature: neutron noise cross correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, F.J.; Upadhyaya, B.R.

    1982-01-01

    To study the relationship between the time delay inferred from this phase angle and core coolant flow velocities, noise measurements were performed at the Loss of Fluid Test Facility (LOFT) reactor and at a commercial PWR. In-core, self-powered neutron detector (SPND) noise at LOFT and ex-core ionization chamber noise at the commercial PWR were cross correlated with core exit temperature noise. Time delays were inferred from the slope of the phase angle versus frequency plots over the frequency range from 0.05 to 2.0 Hz.

  14. Cooled-turbine aerodynamic performance prediction from reduced primary to coolant total-temperature-ratio results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, L. J.

    1976-01-01

    The prediction of the cooled aerodynamic performance, for both stators and turbines, at actual primary to coolant inlet total temperature ratios from the results obtained at a reduced total temperature ratio is described. Theoretical and available experimental results were compared for convection film and transpiration cooled stator vanes and for a film cooled, single stage core turbine. For these tests the total temperature ratio varied from near 1.0 to about 2.7. The agreement between the theoretical and the experimental results was, in general, reasonable.

  15. Failures of the thermal barriers of 900 MWe reactor coolant pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Peyrouty, P.

    1996-12-01

    This report describes the anomalies encountered in the thermal barriers of the reactor coolant pumps in French 900 MWe PWR power stations. In addition to this specific problem, it demonstrates how the fortuitous discovery of a fault during a sampling test enabled faults of a generic nature to be revealed in components which were not subject to periodic inspection, the failure of which could seriously affect safety. This example demonstrates the risk which can be associated with the deterioration in areas which are not examined periodically and for which there are no preceding signs which would make early detection of deterioration possible.

  16. Analysis of a small break loss-of-coolant accident of pressurized water reactor by APROS

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Falahi, A.; Haennine, M.; Porkholm, K.

    1995-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to study the capability of APROS (Advanced PROcess Simulator) code to simulate the real plant thermal-hydraulic transient of a Small Break Loss-Of-Coolant Accident (SBLOCA) of Loss-Of-Fluid Test (LOFT) facility. The LOFT is a scaled model of a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). This work is a part of a larger validation of the APROS thermal-hydraulic models. The results of SBLOCA transient calculated by APROS showed a reasonable agreement with the measured data.

  17. Prototypic Thermal-Hydraulic Experiment in NRU to Simulate Loss-of-Coolant Accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Mohr, C. L.; Hesson, G. M.; Russcher, G. E.; Marsh, R. K.; King, L. L.; Wildung, N. J.; Rausch, W. N.; Bennett, W. D.

    1981-04-01

    Quick-look test results are reported for the initial test series of the Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) Simulation in the National Research Universal {NRU) test program, conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This test was devoted to evaluating the thermal-hydraulic characteristics of a full-length light water reactor (LWR) fuel bundle during the heatup, reflood, and quench phases of a LOCA. Experimental results from 28 tests cover reflood rates of 0.74 in./sec to 11 in./sec and delay times to initiate reflood of 3 sec to 66 sec. The results indicate that current analysis methods can predict peak temperatures within 10% and measured quench times for the bundle were significantly less than predicted. For reflood rates of 1 in./sec where long quench times were predicted (>2000 sec}, measured quench times of 200 sec were found.

  18. Fuel rod mechanical deformation during the PBF/LOFT lead rod loss-of-coolant experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Varacalle, Jr., D. J.; MacDonald, P. E.; Shiozawa, S.; Driskell, W. E.

    1980-01-01

    Results of four PBF/LOFT Lead Rod (LLR) sequential blowdown tests conducted in the Power Burst Facility (PBF) are presented. Each test employed four separately shrouded fuel rods. The primary objective of the test series was to evaluate the extent of mechanical deformation that would be expected to occur to low pressure (0.1 MPa), light water reactor design fuel rods when subjected to a series of double ended cold leg break loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) tests, and to determine whether subjecting these deformed fuel rods to subsequent testing would result in rod failure. The extent of mechanical deformation (buckling, collapse, or waisting of the cladding) was evaluated by comparison of cladding temperature and system pressure measurements with out-of-pile experimental data, and by posttest visual examinations and cladding diametral measurements.

  19. SLURRY MIX EVAPORATOR BATCH ACCEPTABILITY AND TEST CASES OF THE PRODUCT COMPOSITION CONTROL SYSTEM WITH THORIUM AS A REPORTABLE ELEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, T.

    2010-10-07

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), which is operated by Savannah River Remediation, LLC (SRR), has recently begun processing Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) by combining it with Frit 418 at a nominal waste loading (WL) of 36%. A unique feature of the SB6/Frit 418 glass system, as compared to the previous glass systems processed in DWPF, is that thorium will be a reportable element (i.e., concentrations of elemental thorium in the final glass product greater than 0.5 weight percent (wt%)) for the resulting wasteform. Several activities were initiated based upon this unique aspect of SB6. One of these was an investigation into the impact of thorium on the models utilized in DWPF's Product Composition and Control System (PCCS). While the PCCS is described in more detail below, for now note that it is utilized by Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) to evaluate the acceptability of each batch of material in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) before this material is passed on to the melter. The evaluation employs models that predict properties associated with processability and product quality from the composition of vitrified samples of the SME material. The investigation of the impact of thorium on these models was conducted by Peeler and Edwards [1] and led to a recommendation that DWPF can process the SB6/Frit 418 glass system with ThO{sub 2} concentrations up to 1.8 wt% in glass. Questions also arose regarding the handling of thorium in the SME batch acceptability process as documented by Brown, Postles, and Edwards [2]. Specifically, that document is the technical bases of PCCS, and while Peeler and Edwards confirmed the reliability of the models, there is a need to confirm that the current implementation of DWPF's PCCS appropriately handles thorium as a reportable element. Realization of this need led to a Technical Task Request (TTR) prepared by Bricker [3] that identified some specific SME-related activities that the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was

  20. Mixed results with mixed disulfides.

    PubMed

    Brigelius-Flohé, Regina

    2016-04-01

    A period of research with Helmut Sies in the 1980s is recalled. Our experiments aimed at an in-depth understanding of metabolic changes due to oxidative challenges under near-physiological conditions, i.e. perfused organs. A major focus were alterations of the glutathione and the NADPH/NADP(+) system by different kinds of oxidants, in particular formation of glutathione mixed disulfides with proteins. To analyze mixed disulfides, a test was adapted which is widely used until today. The observations in perfused rat livers let us believe that glutathione-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH), i.a. might be activated by glutathionylation. Although we did not succeed to verify this hypothesis for the special case of G6PDH, the regulation of enzyme/protein activities by glutathionylation today is an accepted posttranslational mechanism in redox biology in general. Our early experimental approaches are discussed in the context of present knowledge. PMID:27095221

  1. Modular Porous Plate Sublimator /MPPS/ requires only water supply for coolant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rathbun, R. J.

    1966-01-01

    Modular porous plate sublimators, provided for each location where heat must be dissipated, conserve the battery power of a space vehicle by eliminating the coolant pump. The sublimator requires only a water supply for coolant.

  2. Numerical simulation of PWR response to a small break LOCA (loss-of-coolant accident) with reactor coolant pumps operating

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, J.P.; Dobbe, C.A.; Bayless, P.D.

    1986-01-01

    Calculations have been made of the response of pressurized water reactors (PWRs) during a small-break, loss-of-coolant accident with the reactor coolant pumps (RCPs) operating. This study was conducted, as part of a comprehensive project, to assess the relationship between measurable RCP parameters, such as motor power or current, and fluid density, both local (at the RCP inlet) and global (average reactor coolant system). Additionally, the efficacy of using these RCP parameters, together with fluid temperature, to identify an off-nominal transient as either a LOCA, a heatup transient, or a cooldown transient and to follow recovery from the transient was assessed. The RELAP4 and RELAP5 computer codes were used with three independent sets of RCP, two-phase degradation multipliers. These multipliers were based on data obtained in two-phase flow conditions for the Semiscale, LOFT, and Creare/Combustion Engineering (CE)/Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) pumps, respectively. Two reference PWRs were used in this study: Zion, a four-loop, 1100-MWe, Westinghouse plant operated by Commonwealth Edison Co. in Zion, Illinois and Bellefonte, a two-by-four loop, 1213 MWe, Babcock and Wilcox designed plant being built by the Tennessee Valley Authority in Scottsboro, Alabama. The results from this study showed that RCP operation resulted in an approximately homogeneous reactor coolant system and that this result was independent of reference plant, computer code, or two-phase RCP head degradation multiplier used in the calculation.

  3. Development and Evaluation of a Rapid Diagnostic Test for Plasmodium falciparum, P. vivax, and Mixed-Species Malaria Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gyu-Cheol; Jeon, Eun-Sung; Le, Dung Tien; Kim, Tong-Soo; Yoo, Jong-Ha; Kim, Hak Yong; Chong, Chom-Kyu

    2011-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax malaria are endemic to many parts of the world and humans can be co-infected with both species. Because each Plasmodium species has different biological and clinical characteristics, accurate differentiation of the infecting species is essential for effective treatment. Therefore, we produced three monoclonal antibodies that recognize the lactate dehydrogenase of P. falciparum, P. vivax, or both to develop the first P. falciparum, P. vivax, and mixed-species infections malaria antigen detection kit. The detection limits of this kit were 150 and 250 parasites/μL for P. falciparum and P. vivax, respectively, and the kit was able to detect mixed-species infections. The sensitivity and specificity of this kit was assessed with 722 clinical specimens. Our results showed that its sensitivities for P. falciparum, P. vivax, and mixed-species infection were 96.5%, 95.3%, and 85.7%, respectively. In addition, its specificity was high (99.4%). PMID:22144432

  4. Mixed waste solidification testing on thermosetting polymer and cement based waste forms in support of Hanford`s WRAP Module 2A Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Burbank, D.A.; Weingardt, K.M.

    1993-03-01

    A testing program has been conducted by the Westinghouse Hanford Company to confirm the baseline waste form selection for use in Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Module 2A. WRAP Module 2A will provide treatment required to properly dispose of containerized contact-handled, mixed low-level waste at the US Department of Energy Hanford Site in south-central Washington State. Solidification/stabilization has been chosen as the appropriate treatment for this waste. This work is intended to test cement-based and thermosetting polymer solidification media to confirm the baseline technologies selected for WRAP Module 2A. Screening tests were performed using the major chemical constituent of each waste type to measure the gross compatibility with the immobilization media and to determine formulations for more detailed testing. Surrogate wastes representing each of the eight waste types were prepared for testing. Surrogates for polymer testing were sent to a vendor commissioned for that portion of the test work. Surrogates for the grout testing were used in the Westinghouse Hanford Company laboratory responsible for the grout performance testing. Detailed discussion of the laboratory work and results are contained in this report.

  5. An analysis method for multistage transonic turbines with coolant mass flow addition

    SciTech Connect

    Mildner, F.; Gallus, H.E.

    1998-10-01

    The subject of this paper is a numerical method for the calculation of the transonic flow field of multistage turbines, taking high coolant flow into account. To reduce the processing time, a throughflow method based on the principles of Wu is used for the hub-to-tip calculation. The flow field is obtained by an iterative solution between a three-dimensional inviscid hyperbolic time-dependent algorithm with an implicit finite volume method for the blade-to-blade calculations using C-meshes and a single representative meridional S{sub 2m}-stream surface. Along the 2{sub 2m}-plane with respect to nonorthogonal curvilinear coordinates, the stream function equation governing fluid flow is established. The cooling air inflow inside the blade passage forbids the assumption of a constant mass flow along the main stream direction. To consider the change of the aerodynamic and thermodynamic behavior, a cooling air model was developed and implemented in the algorithm, which allows the mixing of radially arbitrarily distributed cooling air in the trailing edge section of each blade row. The viscous effects and the influence of cooling air mixing are considered by the use of selected loss correlations for profile, tip leakage, secondary flow and mixing losses in the S{sub 2m}-plane in terms of entropy. The method is applied to the four-stage high-temperature gas turbine Siemens KWU V84.3. The numerical results obtained are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  6. 10 CFR 50.46a - Acceptance criteria for reactor coolant system venting systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Acceptance criteria for reactor coolant system venting... criteria for reactor coolant system venting systems. Each nuclear power reactor must be provided with high point vents for the reactor coolant system, for the reactor vessel head, and for other systems...

  7. 10 CFR 50.46a - Acceptance criteria for reactor coolant system venting systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Acceptance criteria for reactor coolant system venting... criteria for reactor coolant system venting systems. Each nuclear power reactor must be provided with high point vents for the reactor coolant system, for the reactor vessel head, and for other systems...

  8. 10 CFR 50.46a - Acceptance criteria for reactor coolant system venting systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Acceptance criteria for reactor coolant system venting... criteria for reactor coolant system venting systems. Each nuclear power reactor must be provided with high point vents for the reactor coolant system, for the reactor vessel head, and for other systems...

  9. Directly connected heat exchanger tube section and coolant-cooled structure

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Coico, Patrick A.; Graybill, David P.; Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J.; Schmidt, Roger R.; Steinke, Mark E.

    2015-09-15

    A method is provided for fabricating a cooling apparatus for cooling an electronics rack, which includes an air-to-liquid heat exchanger, one or more coolant-cooled structures, and a tube. The heat exchanger is associated with the electronics rack and disposed to cool air passing through the rack, includes a plurality of coolant-carrying tube sections, each tube section having a coolant inlet and outlet, one of which is coupled in fluid communication with a coolant loop to facilitate flow of coolant through the tube section. The coolant-cooled structure(s) is in thermal contact with an electronic component(s) of the rack, and facilitates transfer of heat from the component(s) to the coolant. The tube connects in fluid communication one coolant-cooled structure and the other of the coolant inlet or outlet of the one tube section, and facilitates flow of coolant directly between that coolant-carrying tube section of the heat exchanger and the coolant-cooled structure.

  10. Effects of nateglinide and acarbose on glycemic excursions in standardized carbohydrate and mixed-meal tests in drug-naïve type 2 diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    LI, HAI; XU, WENMING; LIU, JUAN; CHEN, AILING; LIAO, ZHIHONG; LI, YANBING

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of nateglinide and acarbose on glycemic excursions and postprandial glucose profiles with different types of meals (standardized carbohydrate and mixed meals) in drug-naïve type 2 diabetic patients. A randomized, parallel-group prospective design clinical trial was conducted and a total of 39 drug-naïve patients (16 males and 23 females, aged 56.7±10.2 years) were enrolled. The patients were randomly divided into group A [nateglinide 120 mg three times daily (t.i.d.), n=19] and group B (acarbose 50 mg t.i.d., n=20). The standardized carbohydrate and mixed-meal tests were performed at baseline and at the end of study. Continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS) data were recorded. Various parameters that measure glucose variability were derived from the CGMS data. In the standardized carbohydrate meal tests, the postprandial glucose excursions (PPGEs) were significantly decreased in the two groups after 12 weeks of treatment (P<0.05), whereas the decrease was more prominent in the acarbose compared to the nateglinide group (P=0.138). In the mixed-meal tests, the mean sensor glucose values [24-h mean blood glucose (MBG)] were significantly decreased in the two groups after 12 weeks of treatment (P<0.05) and the parameters of glucose excursions, including standardized deviation (SD), largest amplitude of glycemic excursion (LAGE), mean of daily differences (MODD) and mean amplitude of glycemic excursion (MAGE), were reduced in the two groups. However, the decreases in SD and LAGE in the nateglinide group were statistically significant, whereas in the acarbose group only the decreases in LAGE were statistically significant. The efficiency of nateglinide or acarbose in lowering postprandial 120-min hyperglycemia were similar in the standardized carbohydrate meal test. However, acarbose was more efficient in lowering postprandial 30- and 60-min hyperglycemia (P<0.05) compared to nateglinide. The fasting and postprandial

  11. Blend uniformity evaluation during continuous mixing in a twin screw granulator by in-line NIR using a moving F-test.

    PubMed

    Fonteyne, Margot; Vercruysse, Jurgen; De Leersnyder, Fien; Besseling, Rut; Gerich, Ad; Oostra, Wim; Remon, Jean Paul; Vervaet, Chris; De Beer, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    This study focuses on the twin screw granulator of a continuous from-powder-to-tablet production line. Whereas powder dosing into the granulation unit is possible from a container of preblended material, a truly continuous process uses several feeders (each one dosing an individual ingredient) and relies on a continuous blending step prior to granulation. The aim of the current study was to investigate the in-line blending capacity of this twin screw granulator, equipped with conveying elements only. The feasibility of in-line NIR (SentroPAT, Sentronic GmbH, Dresden, Germany) spectroscopy for evaluating the blend uniformity of powders after the granulator was tested. Anhydrous theophylline was used as a tracer molecule and was blended with lactose monohydrate. Theophylline and lactose were both fed from a different feeder into the twin screw granulator barrel. Both homogeneous mixtures and mixing experiments with induced errors were investigated. The in-line spectroscopic analyses showed that the twin screw granulator is a useful tool for in-line blending in different conditions. The blend homogeneity was evaluated by means of a novel statistical method being the moving F-test method in which the variance between two blocks of collected NIR spectra is evaluated. The α- and β-error of the moving F-test are controlled by using the appropriate block size of spectra. The moving F-test method showed to be an appropriate calibration and maintenance free method for blend homogeneity evaluation during continuous mixing. PMID:27543030

  12. The determination of V sub ud and a test of the unitarity of the quark mixing matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Rasche, G. ); Woolcock, W.S. . Research School of Physical Sciences)

    1990-07-10

    The significant violation of unitarity implied by recently published results for the elements V{sub ud}, V{sub us} and V{sub ub} of the first row of the quark mixing matrix is considered. A possible way out of the difficulty is described, which gives a different value of {vert bar}V{sub ud}{vert bar}. It involves close scrutiny of the calculated values of the nuclear isospin breaking correction {delta}{sub c} to the ft values for superallowed {beta} decays.

  13. EXPERIMENT OPERATIONS PLAN FOR A LOSS-OF-COOLANT ACCIDENT SIMULATION IN THE NATIONAL RESEARCH UNIVERSAL REACTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Russcher, G. E.; Cannon, L. W.; Goodman, R. L.; Hesson, G. M.; King, L. L.; McDuffie, P. N.; Marshall, R. K.; Nealley, C.; Pilger, J. P.; Mohr, C. L.

    1981-04-01

    Pressurized water reactor loss-of-coolant accident phenomena are being simulated with a series of experiments in the U-2 loop of the National Research Universal Reactor at Chalk River, Ontario, Canada. The first of these experiments includes up to 45 parametric thermal-hydraulic tests to establish the relationship between the reflood delay time of emergency coolant, the reflooding rate, and the resultant fuel rod cladding peak temperature. This document contains both experiment proposal and assembly proposal information. The intent of this document is to supply information required by the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL), and to identify the planned procedures and data that will be used both to establish readiness to proceed from one test phase to the next and to operate the experiment. Operating control settings and limits are provided for both experimenter systems and CRNL systems. A hazards review summarizes safety issues that have been addressed during the development of the experiment plan.

  14. Tellurite glass as a waste form for a simulated mixed chloride waste stream: Candidate materials selection and initial testing

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Brian J.; Rieck, Bennett T.; McCloy, John S.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Sundaram, S. K.; Vienna, John D.

    2012-02-02

    Tellurite glasses have been researched widely for the last 60 years since they were first introduced by Stanworth. These glasses have been primarily used in research applications as glass host materials for lasers and as non-linear optical materials, though many other uses exist in the literature. Tellurite glasses have long since been used as hosts for various, and even sometimes mixed, halogens (i.e., multiple chlorides or even chlorides and iodides). Thus, it was reasonable to expect that these types of glasses could be used as a waste form to immobilize a combination of mixed chlorides present in the electrochemical separations process involved with fuel separations and processing from nuclear reactors. Many of the properties related to waste forms (e.g., chemical durability, maximum chloride loading) for these materials are unknown and thus, in this study, several different types of tellurite glasses were made and their properties studied to determine if such a candidate waste form could be fabricated with these glasses. One of the formulations studied was a lead tellurite glass, which had a low sodium release and is on-par with high-level waste silicate glass waste forms.

  15. Health physics aspects of processing EBR-I coolant

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, L.L.; Thalgott, J.O.; Poston, J.W. Jr.

    1998-12-31

    The sodium-potassium reactor coolant removed from the Experimental Breeder Reactor Number One after a partial reactor core meltdown had been stored at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory for 40 years. The State of Idaho considered this waste the most hazardous waste stored in the state and required its processing. The reactor coolant was processed in three phases. The first phase converted the alkali metal into a liquid sodium-potassium hydroxide. The second phase converted this caustic to a liquid sodium-potassium carbonate. The third phase solidified the sodium-potassium carbonate into a form acceptable for land disposal. Health physics aspects and dose received during each phase of the processing are discussed.

  16. Glycol coolants improve heat transfer and corrosion control

    SciTech Connect

    Holfield, R.

    1995-03-01

    Various liquids from plain water to exotic fluids have been used as coolants in large stationary diesel engines that drive compressors on natural gas pipeline distribution systems. Although water is an efficient heat transfer medium, its drawbacks of freezing at {minus}32 F and boiling at 212 F seriously limit its usefulness. Special glycol-based heat transfer fluids are available and refined specifically for long-term needs of gas compressor engines. Appropriate corrosion inhibitors have been formulated for metallurgy and operating conditions encountered with these engines. Propylene glycol was developed as an alternative for use in environmentally sensitive areas. Glycol-based fluids must be specifically inhibited for industrial applications because uninhibited or improperly inhibited coolants can seriously damage reciprocating engines.

  17. Distributed Raman temperature measurement system for monitoring of nuclear power plant coolant loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Fredrik B. H.; Takada, Eiji; Nakazawa, Masaharu; Kakuta, Tsunemi; Yamamoto, Satoshi

    1996-09-01

    A distributed temperature sensor based on Raman scattering in optical fibers has been tested for use as coolant loop monitor in nuclear power plants. Different types of pure- silica-core, polyimide-coated fibers have been subjected to 60Co-gamma-ray and fission-reactor irradiation at varying temperatures. 60Co-gamma-ray irradiations at dose rates from 4.8 kR/h up to 1 MR/h were done. Simultaneous gamma-ray and high temperature experiments up to 300 degrees Celsius have also been performed. The induced loss of the tested fibers was found to saturate with increasing dose at the anti-Stokes and Stokes wavelengths. This feature was then made use of to develop a model for radiation induced loss which was used to make system lifetime predictions. It has also been demonstrated that the induced loss of the optical fibers is favorably affected by high-temperature use. A 10-fold decrease in the radiation- induced loss levels when the system was operated at 300 degrees Celsius was observed, as compared with room- temperature operation. The experiments have shown that with a pure-silica-core, polyimide-coated fiber the temperature sensing capabilities of the RDTS will not be degraded excessively if used at primary coolant loops with an expected upper radiation level of 200 R/hr.

  18. LOSS-OF-COOLANT ACIDENT SIMULATIONS IN THE NATIONAL RESEARCH UNIVERSAL REACTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, W D; Goodman, R L; Heaberlin, S W; Hesson, G M; Nealley, C; Kirg, L L; Marshall, R K; McNair, G W; Meitzler, W D; Neally, G W; Parchen, L J; Pilger, J P; Rausch, W N; Russcher, G E; Schreiber, R E; Wildung, N J; Wilson, C L

    1981-02-01

    Pressurized water reactor loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) phenomena are being simulated with a series of experiments in the U-2 loop of the National Research Universal Reactor at Chalk River, Ontario, Canada. The first of these experiments includes up to 45 parametric thermal-hydraulic tests to establish the relationship among the reflood delay time of emergency coolant, the reflooding rate, and the resultant fuel rod cladding peak temperature. Subsequent experiments establish the fuel rod failure characteristics at selected peak cladding temperatures. Fuel rod cladding pressurization simulates high burnup fission gas pressure levels of modern PWRs. This document contains both an experiment overview of the LOCA simulation program and a review of the safety analyses performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to define the expected operating conditions as well as to evaluate the worst case operating conditions. The primary intent of this document is to supply safety information required by the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL), to establish readiness to proceed from one test phase to the next and to establish the overall safety of the experiment. A hazards review summarizes safety issues, normal operation and three worst case accidents that have been addressed during the development of the experiment plan.

  19. Experimental investigations of thermal interaction between corium and coolants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagorul'ko, Yu. I.; Zhmurin, V. G.; Volov, A. N.; Kovalev, Yu. P.

    2008-03-01

    We present a generalized analysis of the experimental results from investigations of thermal interaction in corium simulators (melts of thermite mixtures U + Mo3 and Zr + Fe2O3)-coolant (Na and H2O) systems. We also present the results from experimental assessments of the kinematic characteristics pertinent to the displacement of materials during the thermal interaction process and the coefficients for conversion of the corium thermal energy into mechanical work.

  20. 92. View of transmitter building no. 102 first floor coolant ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    92. View of transmitter building no. 102 first floor coolant process water tanks (sodium bisulfate solution), stainless steel, for electronic systems cooling in transmitter and MIP rooms. RCA Services Company 29 September, 1960, official photograph BMEWS Project by unknown photograph, Photographic Services, Riverton, NJ, BMEWS, clear as negative no. A-1226 - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  1. Coolant pressure and airflow distribution in a strut-supported transpiration-cooled vane for a gas turbine engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, A.; Poferl, D. J.; Richards, H. T.

    1972-01-01

    An analysis to predict pressure and flow distribution in a strut-supported wire-cloth vane was developed. Results were compared with experimental data obtained from room-temperature airflow tests conducted over a range of vane inlet airflow rates from 10.7 to 40.4 g/sec (0.0235 to 0.0890 lb/sec). The analytical method yielded reasonably accurate predictions of vane coolant flow rate and pressure distribution.

  2. Crack stability analysis of low alloy steel primary coolant pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, T.; Kameyama, M.; Urabe, Y.

    1997-04-01

    At present, cast duplex stainless steel has been used for the primary coolant piping of PWRs in Japan and joints of dissimilar material have been applied for welding to reactor vessels and steam generators. For the primary coolant piping of the next APWR plants, application of low alloy steel that results in designing main loops with the same material is being studied. It means that there is no need to weld low alloy steel with stainless steel and that makes it possible to reduce the welding length. Attenuation of Ultra Sonic Wave Intensity is lower for low alloy steel than for stainless steel and they have advantageous inspection characteristics. In addition to that, the thermal expansion rate is smaller for low alloy steel than for stainless steel. In consideration of the above features of low alloy steel, the overall reliability of primary coolant piping is expected to be improved. Therefore, for the evaluation of crack stability of low alloy steel piping to be applied for primary loops, elastic-plastic future mechanics analysis was performed by means of a three-dimensioned FEM. The evaluation results for the low alloy steel pipings show that cracks will not grow into unstable fractures under maximum design load conditions, even when such a circumferential crack is assumed to be 6 times the size of the wall thickness.

  3. Acceptance criteria for reactor coolant pumps and valves

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, N.K.; Miller, R.F.; Sindelar, R.L.

    1993-05-01

    Each of the six primary coolant loop systems of the Savannah River Site (SRS) production reactors contains one reactor coolant pump, one PUMP suction side motor operated valve, and other smaller valves. The pumps me double suction, double volute, and radially split type pumps. The valves are different size shutoff and control valves rated from ANSI B16.5 construction class 150 to class 300. The reactor coolant system components, also known as the process water system (PWS), are classified as nuclear Safety Class I components. These components were constructed in the 1950`s in accordance with the then prevailing industry practices. No uniform construction codes were used for design and analysis of these components. However, no pressure boundary failures or bolting failures have ever been recorded throughout their operating history. Over the years, the in-service inspection (ISI) was limited to visual inspection of the pressure boundaries, and surface and volumetric examination of the pressure retaining bolts. Efforts are now underway to implement ISI requirements similar to the ASME Section XI requirements for pumps and valves. This report discusses the new ISI requirements which also call for volumetric examination of the pump casing and valve body welds.

  4. Tests of Branch Splitting and Branch-Splitting Independence in Allais Paradoxes with Positive and Mixed Consequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birnbaum, Michael H.

    2007-01-01

    Four experiments with 1391 participants compared descriptive models of risky decision making. The first replicated and extended evidence refuting cumulative prospect theory (CPT) as an explanation of Allais paradoxes. The second and third experiments used a new design to unconfound tests of upper and lower coalescing, which allows tests of…

  5. Testing and Treating Women after Unsuccessful Conservative Treatments for Overactive Bladder or Mixed Urinary Incontinence: A Model-Based Economic Evaluation Based on the BUS Study

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Pelham; Middleton, Lee J.; Deeks, Jonathan J.; Daniels, Jane P.; Latthe, Pallavi; Coomarasamy, Arri; Rachaneni, Suneetha; McCooty, Shanteela; Verghese, Tina S.; Roberts, Tracy E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the cost-effectiveness of bladder ultrasonography, clinical history, and urodynamic testing in guiding treatment decisions in a secondary care setting for women failing first line conservative treatment for overactive bladder or urgency-predominant mixed urinary incontinence. Design Model-based economic evaluation from a UK National Health Service (NHS) perspective using data from the Bladder Ultrasound Study (BUS) and secondary sources. Methods Cost-effectiveness analysis using a decision tree and a 5-year time horizon based on the outcomes of cost per woman successfully treated and cost per Quality-Adjusted Life-Year (QALY). Deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses, and a value of information analysis are also undertaken. Results Bladder ultrasonography is more costly and less effective test-treat strategy than clinical history and urodynamics. Treatment on the basis of clinical history alone has an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of £491,100 per woman successfully treated and an ICER of £60,200 per QALY compared with the treatment of all women on the basis of urodynamics. Restricting the use of urodynamics to women with a clinical history of mixed urinary incontinence only is the optimal test-treat strategy on cost-effectiveness grounds with ICERs of £19,500 per woman successfully treated and £12,700 per QALY compared with the treatment of all women based upon urodynamics. Conclusions remained robust to sensitivity analyses, but subject to large uncertainties. Conclusions Treatment based upon urodynamics can be seen as a cost-effective strategy, and particularly when targeted at women with clinical history of mixed urinary incontinence only. Further research is needed to resolve current decision uncertainty. PMID:27513926

  6. 1/12-Scale mixing interface visualization and buoyant particle release tests in support of Tank 241-SY-101 hydrogen mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Eschbach, E.J.; Enderlin, C.W.

    1993-10-01

    In support of tank waste safety programs, visualization tests were performed in the 1/12-scale tank facility, using a low-viscosity simulant. The primary objective of the tests was to obtain video records of the transient jet-sludge interaction. The intent is that these videos will provide useful qualitative data for comparison with model predictions. Two tests were initially planned: mixing interface visualization (MIV) and buoyant particle release (BPR). Completion of the buoyant particle release test was set aside in order to complete additional MIV tests. Rheological measurements were made on simulant samples before testing, and the simulant was found to exhibit thixotropic behavior. Shear vane measurements were also made on an in-situ analog of the 1/12-scale tank simulant. Simulant shear strength has been observed to be time dependent. The primary objective of obtaining video records of jet-sludge interaction was satisfied, and the records yielded jet location information which may be of use in completing model comparisons. The modeling effort is not part of this task, but this report also discusses test specific instrumentation, visualization techniques, and shear vane instrumentation which would enable improved characterization of jet-sludge interaction and simulant characteristics.

  7. Line Mixing in Parallel and Perpendicular Bands of CO2: A Further Test of the Refined Robert-Bonamy Formalism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boulet, C.; Ma, Qiancheng; Tipping, R. H.

    2015-01-01

    Starting from the refined Robert-Bonamy formalism [Q. Ma, C. Boulet, and R. H. Tipping, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 034305 (2013)], we propose here an extension of line mixing studies to infrared absorptions of linear polyatomic molecules having stretching and bending modes. The present formalism does not neglect the internal degrees of freedom of the perturbing molecules, contrary to the energy corrected sudden (ECS) modeling, and enables one to calculate the whole relaxation matrix starting from the potential energy surface. Meanwhile, similar to the ECS modeling, the present formalism properly accounts for roles played by all the internal angular momenta in the coupling process, including the vibrational angular momentum. The formalism has been applied to the important case of CO2 broadened by N2. Applications to two kinds of vibrational bands (sigma yields sigma and sigma yields pi) have shown that the present results are in good agreement with both experimental data and results derived from the ECS model.

  8. Line mixing in parallel and perpendicular bands of CO2: A further test of the refined Robert-Bonamy formalism.

    PubMed

    Boulet, C; Ma, Q; Tipping, R H

    2015-09-28

    Starting from the refined Robert-Bonamy formalism [Q. Ma, C. Boulet, and R. H. Tipping, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 034305 (2013)], we propose here an extension of line mixing studies to infrared absorptions of linear polyatomic molecules having stretching and bending modes. The present formalism does not neglect the internal degrees of freedom of the perturbing molecules, contrary to the energy corrected sudden (ECS) modelling, and enables one to calculate the whole relaxation matrix starting from the potential energy surface. Meanwhile, similar to the ECS modelling, the present formalism properly accounts for roles played by all the internal angular momenta in the coupling process, including the vibrational angular momentum. The formalism has been applied to the important case of CO2 broadened by N2. Applications to two kinds of vibrational bands (Σ → Σ and Σ → Π) have shown that the present results are in good agreement with both experimental data and results derived from the ECS model. PMID:26429017

  9. The design and testing of a cooling system using mixed solid cryogen for a portable superconducting magnetic energy storage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K. L.; Song, J. B.; Choi, J. H.; Kim, S. H.; Y Koh, D.; Seong, K. C.; Chang, H. M.; Lee, H. G.

    2010-12-01

    A cooling system that uses solid nitrogen (SN2) as an effective heat capacity enhancer was recently introduced to enhance the thermal stability of the HTS SMES. Since SN2 has a large enthalpy with minimal weight, it enables a portable system by increasing the recooling to recooling time period (RRTP). However, contact between the SN2 and HTS SMES magnet can be broken by repeated thermal disturbances (thermal 'dry-out' phenomena). Therefore, it is essential to improve thermal contact to allow full use of the heat capacity of SN2. This study evaluated the effect of using a mixture containing SN2 and a small amount of a liquid cryogen as a cooling system in the HTS SMES system. The performance of the cooling system was evaluated using the mixed cryogen and compared with that of SN2 alone. In addition, the role of liquid neon (Ne) as a heat exchanger between SN2 and the HTS SMES magnet is discussed.

  10. RCRA Part A and Part B Permit Application for Waste Management Activities at the Nevada Test Site: Proposed Mixed Waste Disposal Unit (MWSU)

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2010-07-19

    The proposed Mixed Waste Storage Unit (MWSU) will be located within the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). Existing facilities at the RWMC will be used to store low-level mixed waste (LLMW). Storage is required to accommodate offsite-generated LLMW shipped to the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for disposal in the new Mixed Waste Disposal Unit (MWDU) currently in the design/build stage. LLMW generated at the NTS (onsite) is currently stored on the Transuranic (TRU) Pad (TP) in Area 5 under a Mutual Consent Agreement (MCA) with the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection, Bureau of Federal Facilities (NDEP/BFF). When the proposed MWSU is permitted, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) will ask that NDEP revoke the MCA and onsite-generated LLMW will fall under the MWSU permit terms and conditions. The unit will also store polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) waste and friable and non-friable asbestos waste that meets the acceptance criteria in the Waste Analysis Plan (Exhibit 2) for disposal in the MWDU. In addition to Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements, the proposed MWSU will also be subject to Department of Energy (DOE) orders and other applicable state and federal regulations. Table 1 provides the metric conversion factors used in this application. Table 2 provides a list of existing permits. Table 3 lists operational RCRA units at the NTS and their respective regulatory status.

  11. Vapor pressures of mixtures of CFC-114 with the potential replacement coolants C{sub 4}F{sub 10} and c-C{sub 4}F{sub 8}

    SciTech Connect

    Trowbridge, L.D.; Otey, M.G.

    1994-09-01

    The U.S. Enrichment Corporation`s production of isotopically enriched uranium depends solely on two plants which utilize the gaseous diffusion process. This process uses large quantities of CFC-114 as an evaporative coolant. CFC-114, however, will be phased out of production at the end of 1995 due to its potential to deplete stratospheric ozone. A search has been underway for substitutes for a number of years. The initial search (1988-89) for an ozone-friendly, commercially available, chemically compatible substitute yielded two candidates, FC-c318 (c-C{sub 4}F{sub 8}) and FC-3110 (C{sub 4}F{sub 10}). The intended mode of replacing coolant was to stage the new coolant into independent subsystems of the plants, so that some systems would continue to operate on CFC-114, and an increasing number would operate on the new coolant. During that changeover process, the possibility of coolant mixing arises in variety of scenarios. This work was intended to generate sufficient experimental information to be able to predict the vapor pressure of coolant mixtures over the range of operating conditions likely to be found in the diffusion plants. Specifically, vapor pressures were measured over the temperature range 322 to 355 K (120{degrees}F to 180{degrees}F) and over the full range of mole fractions for binary mixtures of CFC-114 with FC-3110, and of CFC-114 with FC-c318.

  12. Barriers to Provider-Initiated Testing and Counselling for Children in a High HIV Prevalence Setting: A Mixed Methods Study

    PubMed Central

    Kranzer, Katharina; Meghji, Jamilah; Bandason, Tsitsi; Dauya, Ethel; Mungofa, Stanley; Busza, Joanna; Hatzold, Karin; Kidia, Khameer; Mujuru, Hilda; Ferrand, Rashida A.

    2014-01-01

    Background There is a substantial burden of HIV infection among older children in sub-Saharan Africa, the majority of whom are diagnosed after presentation with advanced disease. We investigated the provision and uptake of provider-initiated HIV testing and counselling (PITC) among children in primary health care facilities, and explored health care worker (HCW) perspectives on providing HIV testing to children. Methods and Findings Children aged 6 to 15 y attending six primary care clinics in Harare, Zimbabwe, were offered PITC, with guardian consent and child assent. The reasons why testing did not occur in eligible children were recorded, and factors associated with HCWs offering and children/guardians refusing HIV testing were investigated using multivariable logistic regression. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with clinic nurses and counsellors to explore these factors. Among 2,831 eligible children, 2,151 (76%) were offered PITC, of whom 1,534 (54.2%) consented to HIV testing. The main reasons HCWs gave for not offering PITC were the perceived unsuitability of the accompanying guardian to provide consent for HIV testing on behalf of the child and lack of availability of staff or HIV testing kits. Children who were asymptomatic, older, or attending with a male or a younger guardian had significantly lower odds of being offered HIV testing. Male guardians were less likely to consent to their child being tested. 82 (5.3%) children tested HIV-positive, with 95% linking to care. Of the 940 guardians who tested with the child, 186 (19.8%) were HIV-positive. Conclusions The HIV prevalence among children tested was high, highlighting the need for PITC. For PITC to be successfully implemented, clear legislation about consent and guardianship needs to be developed, and structural issues addressed. HCWs require training on counselling children and guardians, particularly male guardians, who are less likely to engage with health care services. Increased

  13. Evaluating Constraints on Heavy-Ion SEE Susceptibility Imposed by Proton SEE Testing and Other Mixed Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladbury, R. L.; Lauenstein, J.-M.

    2016-01-01

    We develop metrics for assessing the effectiveness of proton SEE data for bounding heavy-ion SEE susceptibility. The metrics range from simple geometric criteria requiring no knowledge of the test articles to bounds of SEE rates.

  14. Experiment Safety Assurance Package for Mixed Oxide Fuel Irradiation in an Average Power Position (I-24) in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    J. M . Ryskamp; R. C. Howard; R. C. Pedersen; S. T. Khericha

    1998-10-01

    The Fissile Material Disposition Program Light Water Reactor Mixed Oxide Fuel Irradiation Test Project Plan details a series of test irradiations designed to investigate the use of weapons-grade plutonium in MOX fuel for light water reactors (LWR) (Cowell 1996a, Cowell 1997a, Thoms 1997a). Commercial MOX fuel has been successfully used in overseas reactors for many years; however, weapons-derived test fuel contains small amounts of gallium (about 2 parts per million). A concern exists that the gallium may migrate out of the fuel and into the clad, inducing embrittlement. For preliminary out-of-pile experiments, Wilson (1997) states that intermetallic compound formation is the principal interaction mechanism between zircaloy cladding and gallium. This interaction is very limited by the low mass of gallium, so problems are not expected with the zircaloy cladding, but an in-pile experiment is needed to confirm the out-of-pile experiments. Ryskamp (1998) provides an overview of this experiment and its documentation. The purpose of this Experiment Safety Assurance Package (ESAP) is to demonstrate the safe irradiation and handling of the mixed uranium and plutonium oxide (MOX) Fuel Average Power Test (APT) experiment as required by Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Technical Safety Requirement (TSR) 3.9.1 (LMITCO 1998). This ESAP addresses the specific operation of the MOX Fuel APT experiment with respect to the operating envelope for irradiation established by the Upgraded Final Safety Analysis Report (UFSAR) Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company (LMITCO 1997a). Experiment handling activities are discussed herein.

  15. Uranium oxide and sodium oxide aerosol experiments: NSPP mixed-oxide tests 303-307, data record report. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, R.E.; Kress, T.S.; Tobias, M.L.

    1982-10-01

    This data record report summarizes five tests, involving mixtures of uranium oxide and sodium oxide aerosols, conducted in the Nuclear Safety Pilot Plant project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The goal of this project is to establish the validity (or level of conservatism) of the aerosol behavioral code, HAARM-3, and follow-on codes under development at Battelle Columbus Laboratories for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Descriptions of the five tests with tables and graphs summarizing the results are included.

  16. Acceptability and Feasibility of HIV Self-Testing Among Transgender Women in San Francisco: A Mixed Methods Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Lippman, Sheri A; Moran, Lissa; Sevelius, Jae; Castillo, Leslie S; Ventura, Angel; Treves-Kagan, Sarah; Buchbinder, Susan

    2016-04-01

    An estimated one in four transgender women (trans women) in the U.S. are infected with HIV. Rates of HIV testing are not commensurate with their risk, necessitating alternative strategies for early detection and care. We explored the feasibility and acceptability of HIV self-testing (HIVST) with 50 HIV-negative adult trans women in San Francisco. Participants received three self-test kits to perform once a month. Acceptability and behavioral surveys were collected as were 11 in-depth interviews (IDIs). Among 50 participants, 44 reported utilizing HIVST at least once; 94 % reported the test easy to use; 93 % said results were easy to read; and 91 % would recommend it to others. Most participants (68 %) preferred HIVST to clinic-based testing, although price was a key barrier to uptake. IDIs revealed a tension between desires for privacy versus support found at testing sites. HIVST for trans women was acceptable and feasible and requires careful consideration of linkage to support services. PMID:26511864

  17. Evaluation of Solvita compost stability and maturity tests for assessment of quality of end-products from mixed latrine style compost toilets.

    PubMed

    Hill, Geoffrey B; Baldwin, Susan A; Vinnerås, Bjorn

    2013-07-01

    It is challenging and expensive to monitor and test decentralized composting toilet systems, yet critical to prevent the mismanagement of potentially harmful and pathogenic end-product. Recent studies indicate that mixed latrine composting toilets can be inhibited by high ammonia content, a product of urea hydrolysis. Urine-diverting vermicomposting toilets are better able to accomplish the goals of remote site human waste management by facilitating the consumption of fecal matter by earthworms, which are highly sensitive to ammonia. The reliability of Solvita compost stability and maturity tests were evaluated as a means of determining feedstock suitability for vermicomposting (ammonia) and end-product stability/completeness (carbon dioxide). A significant linear regression between Solvita ammonia and free ammonia gas was found. Solvita ranking of maturity did not correspond to ranking assigned by ammonium:nitrate standards. Solvita ammonia values 4 and 5 contained ammonia levels below earthworm toxicity limits in 80% and 100% of samples respectively indicative of their use in evaluating feedstock suitability for vermicomposting. Solvita stability tests did not correlate with carbon dioxide evolution tests nor ranking of stability by the same test, presumably due to in situ inhibition of decomposition and microbial respiration by ammonia which were reported by the Solvita CO2 test as having high stability values. PMID:23647950

  18. Effluent testing for the Oak Ridge Toxic Substances Control Act mixed waste incinerator emissions tests of January 16 and 18, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Shor, J.T. ); Bostick, W.D.; Coroneos, A.C.; Bunch, D.H.; Gibson, L.V.; Hoffmann, D.P.; Shoemaker, J.L. )

    1992-02-01

    On January 16 and 18, 1991, special emissions tests were conducted at the Oak Ridge, K-25 Site Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Incinerator. Both tests were approximately 6 h long and were performed at TSCA temperatures (1200{degrees}C, secondary combustion chamber (SSC)). Liquid feed and effluent samples were collected every 30 min. A filter was used to collect particles from stack gases to study morphology and composition during the first test. Isokinetic air samples were also taken during the second test. Metals emissions from the second test were evaluated using the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Method 5 sampling train. The aqueous waste was collected and fed in batches to the Central Neutralization Facility (CNF), where it was treated by iron coprecipitation and polymer flocculation and data were collected. In the first test (1-16-91), the aqueous and organic wastes were fed directly to the kiln or primary combustion chamber (PCC). In the second test (1-18-91), the remaining organic waste from the first test was fed into the SSC, and other organic waste was fed into the PCC. One objective of the two tests was to determine if feeding the same organic waste into the two combustion chambers made a difference in a partitioning of uranium and other metals. No evaluation of radionuclides other than uranium was made. The partition coefficient of uranium to the quench water was 0.3 on January 16 and 0.35 on January 18; so directing Tank 306A to the feed to the primary vs the secondary combustion chamber appears to have made little difference. The partition coefficient of uranium to the stack on January 18 was 0.0039. 5 refs., 15 figs., 26 tabs.

  19. Effluent testing for the Oak Ridge Toxic Substances Control Act mixed waste incinerator emissions tests of January 16 and 18, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Shor, J.T.; Bostick, W.D.; Coroneos, A.C.; Bunch, D.H.; Gibson, L.V.; Hoffmann, D.P.; Shoemaker, J.L.

    1992-02-01

    On January 16 and 18, 1991, special emissions tests were conducted at the Oak Ridge, K-25 Site Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Incinerator. Both tests were approximately 6 h long and were performed at TSCA temperatures [1200{degrees}C, secondary combustion chamber (SSC)]. Liquid feed and effluent samples were collected every 30 min. A filter was used to collect particles from stack gases to study morphology and composition during the first test. Isokinetic air samples were also taken during the second test. Metals emissions from the second test were evaluated using the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Method 5 sampling train. The aqueous waste was collected and fed in batches to the Central Neutralization Facility (CNF), where it was treated by iron coprecipitation and polymer flocculation and data were collected. In the first test (1-16-91), the aqueous and organic wastes were fed directly to the kiln or primary combustion chamber (PCC). In the second test (1-18-91), the remaining organic waste from the first test was fed into the SSC, and other organic waste was fed into the PCC. One objective of the two tests was to determine if feeding the same organic waste into the two combustion chambers made a difference in a partitioning of uranium and other metals. No evaluation of radionuclides other than uranium was made. The partition coefficient of uranium to the quench water was 0.3 on January 16 and 0.35 on January 18; so directing Tank 306A to the feed to the primary vs the secondary combustion chamber appears to have made little difference. The partition coefficient of uranium to the stack on January 18 was 0.0039. 5 refs., 15 figs., 26 tabs.

  20. Cooling Characteristics of the V-1650-7 Engine. 1; Coolant-Flow Distribution, Cylinder Temperatures, and Heat Rejections at Typical Operating Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Povolny, John H.; Bogdan, Louis J.

    1947-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the coolant-flow distribu tion, the cylinder temperatures, and the heat rejections of the V-165 0-7 engine . The tests were run a t several power levels varying from minimum fuel consumption to war emergency power and at each power l evel the coolant flows corresponded to the extremes of those likely t o be encountered in typical airplane installations, A mixture of 30-p ercent ethylene glycol and 70-percent water was used as the coolant. The temperature of each cylinder was measured between the exhaust val ves, between the intake valves, in the center of the head, on the exh aust-valve guide, at the top of the barrel on the exhaust side, and o n each exhaust spark-plug gasket. For an increase in engine power fro m 628 to approximately 1700 brake horsepower the average temperature for the cylinder heads between the exhaust valves increased from 437 deg to 517 deg F, the engine coolant heat rejection increased from 12 ,600 to 22,700 Btu. per minute, the oil heat rejection increased from 1030 to 4600 Btu per minute, and the aftercooler-coolant heat reject ion increased from 450 to 3500 Btu -per minute.

  1. Testing of commonly used mixing and sampling procedures to evaluate fertilizer blends prepared with matched and mismatched particle sizes.

    PubMed

    Hall, William L; Ramsey, Charles; Falls, J Harold

    2014-01-01

    Bulk blending of dry fertilizers is a common practice in the United States and around the world. This practice involves the mixing (either physically or volumetrically) of concentrated, high analysis raw materials. Blending is followed by bagging (for small volume application such as lawn and garden products), loading into truck transports, and spreading. The great majority of bulk blended products are not bagged but handled in bulk and transferred from the blender to a holding hopper. The product is then transferred to a transport vehicle, which may, or may not, also be a spreader. If the primary transport vehicle is not a spreader, then there is another transfer at the user site to a spreader for application. Segregation of materials that are mismatched due to size, density, or shape is an issue when attempting to effectively sample or evenly spread bulk blended products. This study, prepared in coordination with and supported by the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services and the Florida Fertilizer and Agrochemical Association, looks at the impact of varying particle size as it relates to blending, sampling, and application of bulk blends. The study addresses blends containing high ratios of N-P-K materials and varying (often small) quantities of the micronutrient Zn. PMID:25051620

  2. Solidification Tests Conducted on Transuranic Mixed Oil Waste (TRUM) at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS)

    SciTech Connect

    Brunkow, W. G.; Campbell, D.; Geimer, R.; Gilbreath, C.; Rivera, M.

    2002-02-25

    Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) near Golden, Colorado is the first major nuclear weapons site within the DOE complex that has been declared a full closure site. RFETS has been given the challenge of closing the site by 2006. Key to meeting this challenge is the removal of all waste from the site followed by site restoration. Crucial to meeting this challenge is Kaiser-Hill's (RFETS Operating Contractor) ability to dispose of significant quantities of ''orphan'' wastes. Orphan wastes are those with no current disposition for treatment or disposal. Once such waste stream, generically referred to as Transuranic oils, poses a significant threat to meeting the closure schedule. Historically, this waste stream, which consist of a variety of oil contaminated with a range of organic solvents were treated by simply mixing with Environstone. This treatment method rendered a solidified waste form, but unfortunately not a TRUPACT-II transportable waste. So for the last ten years, RFETS has been accumulating these TRU oils while searching for a non-controversial treatment option.

  3. Pre-Test CFD for the Design and Execution of the Enhanced Injection and Mixing Project at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drozda, Tomasz G.; Axdahl, Erik L.; Cabell, Karen F.

    2014-01-01

    With the increasing costs of physics experiments and simultaneous increase in availability and maturity of computational tools it is not surprising that computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is playing an increasingly important role, not only in post-test investigations, but also in the early stages of experimental planning. This paper describes a CFD-based effort executed in close collaboration between computational fluid dynamicists and experimentalists to develop a virtual experiment during the early planning stages of the Enhanced Injection and Mixing project at NASA Langley Research Center. This projects aims to investigate supersonic combustion ramjet (scramjet) fuel injection and mixing physics, improve the understanding of underlying physical processes, and develop enhancement strategies and functional relationships relevant to flight Mach numbers greater than 8. The purpose of the virtual experiment was to provide flow field data to aid in the design of the experimental apparatus and the in-stream rake probes, to verify the nonintrusive measurements based on NO-PLIF, and to perform pre-test analysis of quantities obtainable from the experiment and CFD. The approach also allowed for the joint team to develop common data processing and analysis tools, and to test research ideas. The virtual experiment consisted of a series of Reynolds-averaged simulations (RAS). These simulations included the facility nozzle, the experimental apparatus with a baseline strut injector, and the test cabin. Pure helium and helium-air mixtures were used to determine the efficacy of different inert gases to model hydrogen injection. The results of the simulations were analyzed by computing mixing efficiency, total pressure recovery, and stream thrust potential. As the experimental effort progresses, the simulation results will be compared with the experimental data to calibrate the modeling constants present in the CFD and validate simulation fidelity. CFD will also be used to

  4. Methods for incorporating effects of LWR coolant environment into ASME code fatigue evaluations.

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O. K.

    1999-04-15

    The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code provides rules for the construction of nuclear power plant components. Appendix I to Section HI of the Code specifies design fatigue curves for structural materials. However, the effects of light water reactor (LWR) coolant environments are not explicitly addressed by the Code design curves. Recent test data illustrate potentially significant effects of LWR environments on the fatigue resistance of carbon and low-alloy steels and austenitic stainless steels (SSs). Under certain loading and environmental conditions, fatigue lives of carbon and low-alloy steels can be a factor of {approx}70 lower in an LWR environment than in air. These results raise the issue of whether the design fatigue curves in Section III are appropriate for the intended purpose. This paper presents the two methods that have been proposed for incorporating the effects of LWR coolant environments into the ASME Code fatigue evaluations. The mechanisms of fatigue crack initiation in carbon and low-alloy steels and austenitic SSs in LWR environments are discussed.

  5. An investigation of core liquid level depression in small break loss-of-coolant accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, R.R.; Watkins, J.C. ); Motley, F.E.; Stumpf, H. ); Chen, Y.S. . Div. of Systems Research)

    1991-08-01

    Core liquid level depression can result in partial core dryout and heatup early in a small break loss-of-coolant accident (SBLOCA) transient. Such behavior occurs when steam, trapped in the upper regions of the reactor primary system (between the loop seal and the core inventory), moves coolant out of the core region and uncovers the rod upper elevations. The net result is core liquid level depression. Core liquid level depression and subsequent core heatups are investigated using subscale data from the ROSA-IV Program's 1/48-scale Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF) and the 1/1705-scale Semiscale facility. Both facilities are Westinghouse-type, four-loop, pressurized water reactor simulators. The depression phenomena and factors which influence the minimum core level are described and illustrated using examples from the data. Analyses of the subject experiments, conducted using the TRAC-PF1/MOD1 (Version 12.7) thermal-hydraulic code, are also described and summarized. Finally, the response of a typical Westinghouse four-loop plant (RESAR-3S) was calculated to qualitatively study coal liquid level depression in a full-scale system. 31 refs., 37 figs., 6 tabs.

  6. In-vessel ITER tubing failure rates for selected materials and coolants

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, T.D.; Cadwallader, L.C.

    1994-03-01

    Several materials have been suggested for fabrication of ITER in-vessel coolant tubing: beryllium, copper, Inconel, niobium, stainless steel, titanium, and vanadium. This report generates failure rates for the materials to identify the best performer from an operational safety and availability perspective. Coolant types considered in this report are helium gas, liquid lithium, liquid sodium, and water. Failure rates for the materials are generated by including the influence of ITER`s operating environment and anticipated tubing failure mechanisms with industrial operating experience failure rates. The analyses define tubing failure mechanisms for ITER as: intergranular attack, flow erosion, helium induced swelling, hydrogen damage, neutron irradiation embrittlement, cyclic fatigue, and thermal cycling. K-factors, multipliers, are developed to model each failure mechanism and are applied to industrial operating experience failure rates to generate tubing failure rates for ITER. The generated failure rates identify the best performer by its expected reliability. With an average leakage failure rate of 3.1e-10(m-hr){sup {minus}1}and an average rupture failure rate of 3.1e-11(m-hr){sup {minus}1}, titanium proved to be the best performer of the tubing materials. The failure rates generated in this report are intended to serve as comparison references for design safety and optimization studies. Actual material testing and analyses are required to validate the failure rates.

  7. Program to design, fabricate, test, and deliver a thermal control-mixing control device for the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thurston, T. S.; Larson, R. H.

    1976-01-01

    The development and testing of a temperature sensor and pulse duration modulation (PDM) diverter valve for a thermal control-mixing control device are described. The temperature sensor selected for use uses a fluidic pin amplifier in conjunction with an expansion device. This device can sense changes of less than 0.25 F with greater than 15:1 signal to noise ratio when operating with a typical Freon pump supplied pressure. The pressure sensitivity of the sensor is approximately 0.0019 F/kPa. The valve which was selected was tested and performed with 100% flow diversion. In addition, the valve operates with a flow efficiency of at least 95%, with the possibility of attaining 100% if the vent flow of the PDM can be channeled through the last stage of the diverter valve. A temperature sensor which utilized an orifice bridge circuit and proportional-vortex combination mixing valve were also evaluated, but the concepts were rejected due to various problems.

  8. Ice Growth Measurements from Image Data to Support Ice-Crystal and Mixed-Phase Accretion Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Struk, Peter, M; Lynch, Christopher, J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the imaging techniques as well as the analysis methods used to measure the ice thickness and growth rate in support of ice-crystal icing tests performed at the National Research Council of Canada (NRC) Research Altitude Test Facility (RATFac). A detailed description of the camera setup, which involves both still and video cameras, as well as the analysis methods using the NASA Spotlight software, are presented. Two cases, one from two different test entries, showing significant ice growth are analyzed in detail describing the ice thickness and growth rate which is generally linear. Estimates of the bias uncertainty are presented for all measurements. Finally some of the challenges related to the imaging and analysis methods are discussed as well as methods used to overcome them.

  9. Vortex-generating coolant-flow-passage design for increased film-cooling effectiveness and surface coverage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papell, S. S.

    1984-01-01

    The thermal film-cooling footprints observed by infrared imagery for three coolant-passage configurations embedded in adiabatic-test plates are discussed. The configurations included a standard round-hole cross section and two orientations of a vortex-generating flow passage. Both orientations showed up to factors of four increases in both film-cooling effectiveness and surface coverage over that obtained with the round coolant passage. The crossflow data covered a range of tunnel velocities from 15.5 to 45 m/sec with blowing rates from 0.20 to 2.05. A photographic streakline flow visualization technique supported the concept of the counterrotating apability of the flow passage design and gave visual credence to its role in inhibiting flow separation.

  10. A new sensor for detection of coolant leakage in nuclear power plants using off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Lim; Park, Hyunmin; Kim, Taek-Soo; Ko, Kwang-Hoon; Jeong, Do-Young

    2012-06-01

    A new sensor based on laser absorption spectroscopy was developed for the detection of coolant leakage which may happen in pressurized heavy water reactor (PHWR). Off-axis integrated output spectroscopy (OA-ICOS) technique was adopted for developing a simple and robust sensor with sufficient sensitivity. Leak events could be monitored by detecting a small change in semi-heavy water (HDO) concentration induced by the exchange reaction of leaked heavy water (D2O) with light water (H2O). From the results of feasibility tests, we have shown that the measured area of absorption features was linearly correlated with HDO concentration, and the minimum detectable change of HDO concentration with the developed sensor was evaluated as 3.2 ppm. This new sensor is expected to be a reliable and promising device for the detection of coolant leakage since it has some advantages on real-time monitoring and early detection for nuclear safety.

  11. Cold-air study of the effect on turbine stator blade aerodynamic performance of coolant ejection from various trailing-edge slot geometries. 1: Experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prust, H. W., Jr.; Bartlett, W. M.

    1974-01-01

    Trailing-edge slot configurations were investigated in a two-dimensional cascade of turbine stator blades. The trailing-edge slots were incorporated into blades with round trailing edges. The five blade configurations investigated included blades with two different trailing-edge thicknesses and four different slot widths. The results of the investigation showed that there was, in general, a significant increase in primary-air efficiency due to the coolant flow, the increase varying with slot configuration. For the five configurations tested, the average percent change in primary-air efficiency per percent coolant flow varied almost linearly from zero to about 1.4 percent over a range of coolant- to primary-air exit-velocity ratios between 0 and 1.2. However, for different configurations there was considerable deviation from the average values in the lower range of exit velocity ratios.

  12. Underground tank vitrification: A pilot-scale in situ vitrification test of a tank containing a simulated mixed waste sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.E.; Powell, T.D.; Tixier, J.S.; Miller, M.C.; Owczarski, P.C.

    1993-09-01

    This report documents research on sludge vitrification. The first pilot scale in-situ vitrification test of a simulated underground tank was successfully completed by researchers at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The vitrification process effectively immobilized the vast majority of radionuclides simulants and toxic metals were retained in the melt and uniformly distributed throughout the monolith.

  13. Oxidation of SiC cladding under Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) conditions in LWRs

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.; Yue, C.; Arnold, R. P.; McKrell, T. J.; Kazimi, M. S.

    2012-07-01

    An experimental assessment of Silicon Carbide (SiC) cladding oxidation rate in steam under conditions representative of Loss of Coolant Accidents (LOCA) in light water reactors (LWRs) was conducted. SiC oxidation tests were performed with monolithic alpha phase tubular samples in a vertical quartz tube at a steam temperature of 1140 deg. C and steam velocity range of 1 to 10 m/sec, at atmospheric pressure. Linear weight loss of SiC samples due to boundary layer controlled reaction of silica scale (SiO{sub 2} volatilization) was experimentally observed. The weight loss rate increased with increasing steam flow rate. Over the range of test conditions, SiC oxidation rates were shown to be about 3 orders of magnitude lower than the oxidation rates of zircaloy 4. A SiC volatilization correlation for developing laminar flow in a vertical channel is formulated. (authors)

  14. A comparison of groundwater fluxes computed with MODFLOW and a mixing model using deuterium: Application to the eastern Nevada Test Site and vicinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Rosemary W. H.; Pohll, Greg M.; Earman, Sam; Hershey, Ronald L.

    2008-11-01

    SummaryThe primary objective of this study was to verify groundwater flows in the vicinity of the eastern Nevada Test Site (NTS) computed with a hydraulically defined flow model against groundwater δD values computed by a steady-state mixing model. The United States Geological Survey's Death Valley regional flow model (DVRFM) is a transient, three-dimensional, groundwater model that uses the public domain, finite-difference code MODFLOW. The mixing model (Discrete-State Compartment Model-Shuffled Complex Evolution, or DSCM-SCE) is a recently developed code that is able to autocalibrate groundwater fluxes (both magnitude and direction) to best match observed tracer concentrations in groundwater. To compare modeling approaches, DVRFM boundary conditions and cell-to-cell interactions were implemented into a previously developed 15-cell DSCM-SCE δD model of the eastern NTS. Analysis of δD and δ18Ο data conducted throughout the model domain suggests recharge and mixing are the dominant mechanisms for groundwater isotopic enrichment in the downgradient direction. Therefore, evaporation, at least at the regional scale, was ignored. Model results showed that DVRFM boundary fluxes and cell outflow volumes reproduced observed groundwater δD values in nine of the 11 hydrographic basins that contained deuterium data. The remaining four modeled basins did not have any deuterium data, however, modeling results closely matched estimated δD for two of these basins. The isotope mixing model independently verified that most of the hydraulically defined groundwater flows simulated by MODFLOW are reasonable. Optimization of the DSCM-SCE was then done by adjusting groundwater fluxes between cells to improve predicted groundwater δD values. This significantly lowered the weighted root-mean-squared error and helped to identify several basins where DVRFM-simulated boundary conditions and groundwater fluxes should be reexamined. Overall, the two modeling approaches complemented

  15. Mixed waste solidification testing on polymer and cement-based waste forms in support of Hanford`s WRAP 2A facility

    SciTech Connect

    Burbank, D.A. Jr.; Weingardt, K.M.

    1993-10-01

    A testing program has been conducted by the Westinghouse Hanford Company to confirm the baseline waste form selection for use in Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Module 2A. WRAP Module 2A will provide treatment required to properly dispose of containerized contact-handled, mixed low-level waste at the US Department of Energy Hanford Site in south-central Washington State. Solidification/stabilization has been chosen as the appropriate treatment for this waste. This work is intended to test cement-based, thermosetting polymer, and thermoplastic polymer solidification media to substantiate the technology approach for WRAP Module 2A. Screening tests were performed using the major chemical constituent of each waste type to measure the gross compatibility with the immobilization media and to determine formulations for more detailed testing. Surrogate materials representing each of the eight waste types were prepared in the laboratory. These surrogates were then solidified with the selected immobilization media and subjected to a battery of standard performance tests. Detailed discussion of the laboratory work and results are contained in this report.

  16. 40 CFR 1065.935 - Emission test sequence for field testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Field Testing and Portable Emission Measurement... engine in-use until the engine coolant, block, or head absolute temperature is within ±10% of its mean value for the previous 2 min or until an engine thermostat controls engine temperature with coolant...

  17. 40 CFR 1065.935 - Emission test sequence for field testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Field Testing and Portable Emission Measurement... engine in-use until the engine coolant, block, or head absolute temperature is within ±10% of its mean value for the previous 2 min or until an engine thermostat controls engine temperature with coolant...

  18. 40 CFR 1065.935 - Emission test sequence for field testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Field Testing and Portable Emission Measurement... engine in-use until the engine coolant, block, or head absolute temperature is within ±10% of its mean value for the previous 2 min or until an engine thermostat controls engine temperature with coolant...

  19. 40 CFR 1065.935 - Emission test sequence for field testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Field Testing and Portable Emission Measurement... engine in-use until the engine coolant, block, or head absolute temperature is within ±10% of its mean value for the previous 2 min or until an engine thermostat controls engine temperature with coolant...

  20. Evaluation of Solvita compost stability and maturity tests for assessment of quality of end-products from mixed latrine style compost toilets

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Geoffrey B.; Baldwin, Susan A.; Vinnerås, Bjorn

    2013-07-15

    Highlights: • Solvita® stability and maturity tests used on composting toilet end-product. • Solvita® ammonia better suited in evaluation of feedstock suitability for vermicomposting. • No clear value of Solvita® stability test due to prevalent inhibition of decomposition by ammonia. - Abstract: It is challenging and expensive to monitor and test decentralized composting toilet systems, yet critical to prevent the mismanagement of potentially harmful and pathogenic end-product. Recent studies indicate that mixed latrine composting toilets can be inhibited by high ammonia content, a product of urea hydrolysis. Urine-diverting vermicomposting toilets are better able to accomplish the goals of remote site human waste management by facilitating the consumption of fecal matter by earthworms, which are highly sensitive to ammonia. The reliability of Solvita® compost stability and maturity tests were evaluated as a means of determining feedstock suitability for vermicomposting (ammonia) and end-product stability/completeness (carbon dioxide). A significant linear regression between Solvita® ammonia and free ammonia gas was found. Solvita® ranking of maturity did not correspond to ranking assigned by ammonium:nitrate standards. Solvita® ammonia values 4 and 5 contained ammonia levels below earthworm toxicity limits in 80% and 100% of samples respectively indicative of their use in evaluating feedstock suitability for vermicomposting. Solvita® stability tests did not correlate with carbon dioxide evolution tests nor ranking of stability by the same test, presumably due to in situ inhibition of decomposition and microbial respiration by ammonia which were reported by the Solvita® CO{sub 2} test as having high stability values.

  1. Heat transfer characteristics for some coolant additives used for water cooled engines

    SciTech Connect

    Abou-Ziyan, H.Z.; Helali, A.H.B.

    1996-12-31

    Engine coolants contain certain additives to prevent engine overheating or coolant freezing in cold environments. Coolants, also, contain corrosion and rust inhibitors, among other additives. As most engines are using engine cooling solutions, it is of interest to evaluate the effect of engine coolants on the boiling heat transfer coefficient. This has its direct impact on radiator size and environment. This paper describes the apparatus and the measurement techniques. Also, it presents the obtained boiling heat transfer results at different parameters. Three types of engine coolants and their mixtures in distilled water are evaluated, under sub-cooled and saturated boiling conditions. A profound effect of the presence of additives in the coolant, on heat transfer, was clear since changes of heat transfer for different coolants were likely to occur. The results showed that up to 180% improvement of boiling heat transfer coefficient is experienced with some types of coolants. However, at certain concentrations other coolants provide deterioration or not enhancement in the boiling heat transfer characteristics. This investigation proved that there are limitations, which are to be taken into consideration, for the composition of engine coolants in different environments. In warm climates, ethylene glycol should be kept at the minimum concentration required for dissolving other components, whereas borax is beneficial to the enhancement of the heat transfer characteristics.

  2. Effect of Coolant Temperature and Mass Flow on Film Cooling of Turbine Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Vijay K.; Gaugler, Raymond E.

    1997-01-01

    A three-dimensional Navier Stokes code has been used to study the effect of coolant temperature, and coolant to mainstream mass flow ratio on the adiabatic effectiveness of a film-cooled turbine blade. The blade chosen is the VKI rotor with six rows of cooling holes including three rows on the shower head. The mainstream is akin to that under real engine conditions with stagnation temperature = 1900 K and stagnation pressure = 3 MPa. Generally, the adiabatic effectiveness is lower for a higher coolant temperature due to nonlinear effects via the compressibility of air. However, over the suction side of shower-head holes, the effectiveness is higher for a higher coolant temperature than that for a lower coolant temperature when the coolant to mainstream mass flow ratio is 5% or more. For a fixed coolant temperature, the effectiveness passes through a minima on the suction side of shower-head holes as the coolant to mainstream mass flow, ratio increases, while on the pressure side of shower-head holes, the effectiveness decreases with increase in coolant mass flow due to coolant jet lift-off. In all cases, the adiabatic effectiveness is highly three-dimensional.

  3. Atomization and Mixing Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrenberg, A.; Hunt, K.; Duesberg, J.

    1985-01-01

    The primary objective was the obtainment of atomization and mixing performance data for a variety of typical liquid oxygen/hydrocarbon injector element designs. Such data are required to establish injector design criteria and to provide critical inputs to liquid rocket engine combustor performance and stability analysis, and computational codes and methods. Deficiencies and problems with the atomization test equipment were identified, and action initiated to resolve them. Test results of the gas/liquid mixing tests indicated that an assessment of test methods was required. A series of 71 liquid/liquid tests were performed.

  4. Cryogenic-coolant He4-superconductor dynamic and static interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caspi, S.; Chuang, C.; Kim, Y. I.; Allen, R. J.; Frederking, T. H. E.

    1980-01-01

    A composite superconducting material (NbTi-Cu) was evaluated with emphasis on post quench solid cooling interaction regimes. The quasi-steady runs confirm the existence of a thermodynamic limiting thickness for insulating coatings. Two distinctly different post quench regimes of coated composites are shown to relate to the limiting thickness. Only one regime,, from quench onset to the peak value, revealed favorable coolant states, in particular in He2. Transient recovery shows favorable recovery times from this post quench regime (not drastically different from bare conductors) for both single coated specimens and a coated conductor bundle.

  5. System Study: High-Pressure Coolant Injection 1998–2013

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, John Alton

    2015-01-31

    This report presents an unreliability evaluation of the high-pressure coolant injection system (HPCI) at 25 U.S. commercial boiling water reactors. Demand, run hours, and failure data from fiscal year 1998 through 2013 for selected components were obtained from the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) Consolidated Events Database (ICES). The unreliability results are trended for the most recent 10-year period, while yearly estimates for system unreliability are provided for the entire active period. No statistically significant increasing or decreasing trends were identified in the HPCI results.

  6. System Study: High-Pressure Coolant Injection 1998-2014

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, John Alton

    2015-12-01

    This report presents an unreliability evaluation of the high-pressure coolant injection system (HPCI) at 25 U.S. commercial boiling water reactors. Demand, run hours, and failure data from fiscal year 1998 through 2014 for selected components were obtained from the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) Consolidated Events Database (ICES). The unreliability results are trended for the most recent 10 year period, while yearly estimates for system unreliability are provided for the entire active period. No statistically significant increasing or decreasing trends were identified in the HPCI results.

  7. System Study: High-Pressure Coolant Injection 1998-2012

    SciTech Connect

    T. E. Wierman

    2013-10-01

    This report presents an unreliability evaluation of the high-pressure coolant injection system (HPCI) at 69 U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. Demand, run hours, and failure data from fiscal year 1998 through 2012 for selected components were obtained from the Equipment Performance and Information Exchange (EPIX). The unreliability results are trended for the most recent 10 year period while yearly estimates for system unreliability are provided for the entire active period. No statistically significant increasing or decreasing trends were identified in the HPCI results.

  8. Women's Experiences and Preferences for Service Delivery of Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing for Aneuploidy in a Public Health Setting: A Mixed Methods Study.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Celine; Hill, Melissa; Chitty, Lyn S

    2016-01-01

    Non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) for aneuploidy is currently only available in the UK through the private sector outside of the research arena. As part of an implementation study in the UK National Health Service we conducted a mixed methods study to assess women's experience of being offered NIPT using validated measures of decisional conflict, decisional regret and anxiety. Clinical service preferences were also explored. Women with a Down syndrome screening risk >1:1000 were invited to take part in the study and offered NIPT, NIPT and invasive testing (for women with a risk above 1:150) or no further testing. A cross-sectional survey and semi-structured interviews were conducted at two time points; at the time of testing and one month following receipt of results (or equivalent for NIPT decliners). In total, 845 questionnaires and 81 interviews were analysed. The main motivation to accept NIPT was for reassurance (30.8%). Decisional conflict occurred in a minimal number of cases (3.8%), however, none of the participants experienced decisional regret. Around a third (29.9%) of women had elevated anxiety at the time of testing, including intermediate risk women who traditionally would not be offered further testing (54.4% high risk; 20.1% medium risk), a finding supported through the qualitative interviews where prolonged or additional anxiety was found to occur in some medium risk cases. Women were overwhelmingly positive about the opportunity to have a test that was procedurally safe, accurate, reduced the need for invasive testing and identified cases of Down syndrome that might otherwise have been missed. Reassurance was identified as the main motivator for accepting NIPT, particularly amongst medium risk women, with high risk women inclined to accept NIPT to inform decisions around invasive testing. The current turnaround time for test result was identified as a key limitation. All the women interviewed thought NIPT should be adopted as part of NHS

  9. Women’s Experiences and Preferences for Service Delivery of Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing for Aneuploidy in a Public Health Setting: A Mixed Methods Study

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Celine; Hill, Melissa; Chitty, Lyn S.

    2016-01-01

    Non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) for aneuploidy is currently only available in the UK through the private sector outside of the research arena. As part of an implementation study in the UK National Health Service we conducted a mixed methods study to assess women’s experience of being offered NIPT using validated measures of decisional conflict, decisional regret and anxiety. Clinical service preferences were also explored. Women with a Down syndrome screening risk >1:1000 were invited to take part in the study and offered NIPT, NIPT and invasive testing (for women with a risk above 1:150) or no further testing. A cross-sectional survey and semi-structured interviews were conducted at two time points; at the time of testing and one month following receipt of results (or equivalent for NIPT decliners). In total, 845 questionnaires and 81 interviews were analysed. The main motivation to accept NIPT was for reassurance (30.8%). Decisional conflict occurred in a minimal number of cases (3.8%), however, none of the participants experienced decisional regret. Around a third (29.9%) of women had elevated anxiety at the time of testing, including intermediate risk women who traditionally would not be offered further testing (54.4% high risk; 20.1% medium risk), a finding supported through the qualitative interviews where prolonged or additional anxiety was found to occur in some medium risk cases. Women were overwhelmingly positive about the opportunity to have a test that was procedurally safe, accurate, reduced the need for invasive testing and identified cases of Down syndrome that might otherwise have been missed. Reassurance was identified as the main motivator for accepting NIPT, particularly amongst medium risk women, with high risk women inclined to accept NIPT to inform decisions around invasive testing. The current turnaround time for test result was identified as a key limitation. All the women interviewed thought NIPT should be adopted as part of NHS

  10. A Comparison of Groundwater Fluxes Computed with MODFLOW and a Stable Isotope Mixing Model: Application to the Eastern Nevada Test Site and Vicinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, R. W.; Pohll, G. M.; Earman, S.; Hershey, R. L.

    2007-12-01

    The primary objective of this study was to compare groundwater flows in the vicinity of the eastern Nevada Test Site (NTS) computed with a hydraulically defined groundwater flow model against those predicted with an isotopically based mixing model. The US Geological Survey (USGS) Death Valley Regional Flow Model (DVRFM) is a transient, three-dimensional, groundwater model that uses the public domain, finite difference code MODFLOW. The second model (Discrete-State Compartment Model-Shuffled Complex Evolution; DSCM-SCE) is a recently developed code that auto-calibrates groundwater flows (both magnitude and direction) using a steady- state mixing algorithm to best match observed conservative tracer concentrations in groundwater. The model can be calibrated based on data for multiple tracers with tracer concentrations considered either independent or fully covariant. To compare modeling approaches, DVRFM boundary conditions and cell-to-cell interactions were used in the DSCM-SCE's 15-cell eastern NTS model. Analysis of δD and δ18O data conducted throughout the model domain suggests recharge and mixing may be the dominant mechanisms for groundwater isotopic enrichment in the down gradient direction. Model results show that DVRFM boundary fluxes and cell outflows match representative groundwater isotopic values relatively well. However, optimization on data for an individual isotope lowered the objective function, while combining δD and δ18O independently produced the least error. Large uncertainty in the estimated covariant relationships between δD and δ18O prohibited development of a unique DSCM-SCE solution. Results suggest error exists in estimated DVRFM boundary conditions associated with three of the fifteen modeled basins, while the lack of isotopic data in several basins defining the eastern edge of the model prevents certitude of results pertaining to fluxes in this portion of the model. Future work will look at the uncertainty associated with boundary

  11. Vitrification and Product Testing of C-104 and AZ-102 Pretreated Sludge Mixed with Flowsheet Quantities of Secondary Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Gary L.; Bates, Derrick J.; Goles, Ronald W.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Lettau, Ralph C.; Piepel, Gregory F.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Smith, Harry D.; Urie, Michael W.; Wagner, Jerome J.

    2001-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of River Protection (ORP) has acquired Hanford tank waste treatment services at a demonstration scale. The River Protection Project Waste Treatment Plant (RPP-WTP) team is responsible for producing an immobilized (vitrified) high-level waste (IHLW) waste form. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, hereafter referred to as PNNL, has been contracted to produce and test a vitrified IHLW waste form from two Envelope D high-level waste (HLW) samples previously supplied to the RPP-WTP project by DOE.

  12. Description of nuclear systems with a self-consistent configuration-mixing approach: Theory, algorithm, and application to the 12C test nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robin, C.; Pillet, N.; Peña Arteaga, D.; Berger, J.-F.

    2016-02-01

    Background: Although self-consistent multiconfiguration methods have been used for decades to address the description of atomic and molecular many-body systems, only a few trials have been made in the context of nuclear structure. Purpose: This work aims at the development of such an approach to describe in a unified way various types of correlations in nuclei in a self-consistent manner where the mean-field is improved as correlations are introduced. The goal is to reconcile the usually set-apart shell-model and self-consistent mean-field methods. Method: This approach is referred to as "variational multiparticle-multihole configuration mixing method." It is based on a double variational principle which yields a set of two coupled equations that determine at the same time the expansion coefficients of the many-body wave function and the single-particle states. The solution of this problem is obtained by building a doubly iterative numerical algorithm. Results: The formalism is derived and discussed in a general context, starting from a three-body Hamiltonian. Links to existing many-body techniques such as the formalism of Green's functions are established. First applications are done using the two-body D1S Gogny effective force. The numerical procedure is tested on the 12C nucleus to study the convergence features of the algorithm in different contexts. Ground-state properties as well as single-particle quantities are analyzed, and the description of the first 2+ state is examined. Conclusions: The self-consistent multiparticle-multihole configuration mixing method is fully applied for the first time to the description of a test nucleus. This study makes it possible to validate our numerical algorithm and leads to encouraging results. To test the method further, we will realize in the second article of this series a systematic description of more nuclei and observables obtained by applying the newly developed numerical procedure with the same Gogny force. As

  13. Surrogate formulations for thermal treatment of low-level mixed waste. Part 3: Plasma hearth process testing

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, J.M.; Bostick, W.D.; Hoffman, D.P.; Hermes, W.H.; Gibson, L.V. Jr.; Richmond, A.A.

    1994-01-01

    The plasma hearth process (PHP) presented in this report has been tested at a facility at Ukiah, California, in a cooperative effort between the Department of Energy (DOE), Science Applications International Corporation, Inc., and ReTech, Inc. The electrically heated plasma gas is used to destroy organic materials and bind radionuclides and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metals in the glassy slag. Proof-of-principle tests were conducted successfully using nonhazardous and non-radioactive materials placed in 30-gal steel drums. On-line analyses of the gaseous effluents indicated complete combustion; emissions of CO, NO{sub x}, and particulates were low. The process also produced highly stable solid waste forms. The experiments for the next phase have been planned employing surrogates for the hazardous and radioactive components of the simulated waste streams. Natural cerium oxide is selected to simulate the behavior of radioactive actinide and transuranium elements, while natural cesium chloride is simulated for the study of relatively volatile radioactive fission products. For RCRA organics, naphthalene and 1,2-dichlorobenzene are semivolatile compounds selected to represent significant challenges to thermal destruction, whereas chlorobenzene is selected for the study of relatively volatile organics. Salts of chromium, nickel, lead, and cadmium are chosen to represent the twelve regulated toxic metals for emission and partitioning studies. The simulated waste packages presented in the text do not necessarily represent an individual waste stream within the DOE complex; rather, they were formulated to represent the most probable components in generic waste stream categories.

  14. Building biomass into the utility fuel mix at NYSEG: System conversion and testing results for Greenidge Station

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin, W.

    1996-12-31

    NYSEG is in the second phase of developing resources and systems for cofiring biomass with coal. In the first phase, stoker boilers were fired with biomass (typically wood waste products). Encouraged by positive results at the older stokers, NYSEG decided to develop the process for its pulverized coal boilers beginning with Greenidge Station, a 108-MW pulverized coal (PC) unit with a General Electric turbine generator and a 665,000-lb Combustion Engineering, tangentially fired boiler. Greenidge Station is in the center of New York, surrounded by farms, forests, vineyards, and orchards. The test bums at Greenidge Station demonstrated that a parallel fuel feed system can effectively provide wood products to a PC unit. Emission results were promising but inconclusive. Additional testing, for longer durations, at varied loads and with different woods needs to be conducted to clarify and establish relationships between the percent wood fired at varying moisture contents. Loads need to be varied to develop continuous emission monitor emission data that can be compared to coal-only data. Economic analysis indicates that it will be beneficial to further refine the equipment and systems. Refinements may include chipping and drying equipment, plus installation of fuel storage and feed systems with permanent boiler penetration. NYSEG will attempt to identify the problems associated with cofiring by direct injection, compared to cofiring a biomass/coal mixture through the existing fuel handling system. Specifically, an examination will be made of fuel size criteria and the system modifications necessary for minimal impacts on coal-fired operation.

  15. Load following capability of CANDLE reactor by adjusting coolant operation condition

    SciTech Connect

    Sekimoto, Hiroshi; Nakayama, Sinsuke

    2012-06-06

    The load following capability of CANDLE reactor is investigated in the condition that the control rods are unavailable. Both sodium cooled metallic fuel fast reactor (SFR) and {sup 208}Pb cooled metallic fuel fast reactor (LFR) are investigated for their performance in power rate changing by changing its coolant operation condition; either coolant flow rate or coolant inlet temperature. The change by coolant flow rate is difficult especially for SFR because the maximum temperature criteria on cladding material may be violated. The power rate can be changed for its full range easily by changing the coolant temperature at the core inlet. LFR can reduce the same amount of power rate by smaller change of temperature than SFR. However, the coolant output temperature is generally decreased for this method and the thermal efficiency becomes worse.

  16. Load following capability of CANDLE reactor by adjusting coolant operation condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekimoto, Hiroshi; Nakayama, Sinsuke

    2012-06-01

    The load following capability of CANDLE reactor is investigated in the condition that the control rods are unavailable. Both sodium cooled metallic fuel fast reactor (SFR) and 208Pb cooled metallic fuel fast reactor (LFR) are investigated for their performance in power rate changing by changing its coolant operation condition; either coolant flow rate or coolant inlet temperature. The change by coolant flow rate is difficult especially for SFR because the maximum temperature criteria on cladding material may be violated. The power rate can be changed for its full range easily by changing the coolant temperature at the core inlet. LFR can reduce the same amount of power rate by smaller change of temperature than SFR. However, the coolant output temperature is generally decreased for this method and the thermal efficiency becomes worse.

  17. Development and Application of the Reactor Coolant On-Line Leakage Evaluation Model for Pressurized Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Thomas K.S.; Hung, H.-J.; Chang, C.-J.

    2001-12-15

    With the consideration of mass unbalance, coolant shrinking, and compressibility, a model for reactor coolant leakage evaluation has been developed to quantify on-line the system leakage rate with conventional system measurements, regardless of where the leak occurs. This model has been derived from the system of total continuity, and it divides the reactor coolant system (RCS) into two regions, namely, the saturated and subcooled regions. The pressurizer is considered as a saturated region, and the remaining part of the RCS is regarded as a subcooled region. Taking the on-line measurements of the RCS including the RCS pressure, temperature, pressurizer water level, and charging and letdown flow rates, this model can directly evaluate on-line the RCS leakage rate. It is noted that this model is applicable only if the RCS remains subcooled. To verify the applicability of this model, data generated by RELAP5/MOD3 simulation and experimental measurements from the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taiwan, Integral System Test Facility were adopted to assess this model. With further on-line verification against the Maanshan training simulator, this model was finally delivered to the Maanshan nuclear power plant (a three-looped Westinghouse pressurized water reactor) to assist the operator training and on-line evaluation of the RCS leakage rate. The smallest amount of leak flow that can be detected by the ROCK model is 3 gal/min.

  18. [Amylase in the mixed saliva of diabetics and nondiabetics on an empty stomach and during the glucose tolerance test].

    PubMed

    Fekete, Z; Gol'denberg, A; Lukach, I; Korets, R; Shval'b, O; Platilova, G; Bandura, A

    1989-01-01

    The catalytic activity of alpha-amylase is significantly elevated in salivary pool from 146 diabetics (2176 +/- 149.3 mu catal.l-1) vs. the salivary pool from 78 nondiabetics (1159 +/- 97.3 mu catal X l-1), the difference in the concentrations of the saliva condensation index (the chloride concentration) in the diabetics and nondiabetics being negligible. Glucose tolerance test has been carried out in 54 subjects. Glucose intake has increased the alpha-amylase catalytic activity and augmented glycosialia in 14 diabetics, in 13 subjects with abnormal glucose tolerance, and in 16 nondiabetics; a negligible rise of glycosialia and a reduction of alpha-amylase catalytic activity have been observed in 11 subjects with a flat glycemia curve. Basing on these data, the authors claim that oral glucose activates amylase and glucose secretion by the salivary glands. PMID:2481117

  19. Assessment of Candidate Molten Salt Coolants for the Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR)

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, D.F.

    2006-03-24

    transfer and nuclear performance metrics. Lighter salts also tend to have more favorable (larger) moderating ratios, and thus should have a more favorable coolant-voiding behavior in-core. Heavy (high-Z) salts tend to have lower heat capacities and thermal conductivities and more significant activation and transmutation products. However, all of the salts are relatively good heat-transfer agents. A detailed discussion of each property and the combination of properties that served as a heat-transfer metric is presented in the body of this report. In addition to neutronic metrics, such as moderating ratio and neutron absorption, the activation properties of the salts were investigated (Table C). Again, lighter salts tend to have more favorable activation properties compared to salts with high atomic-number constituents. A simple model for estimating the reactivity coefficients associated with a reduction of salt content in the core (voiding or thermal expansion) was also developed, and the primary parameters were investigated. It appears that reasonable design flexibility exists to select a safe combination of fuel-element design and salt coolant for most of the candidate salts. Materials compatibility is an overriding consideration for high-temperature reactors; therefore the question was posed whether any one of the candidate salts was inherently, or significantly, more corrosive than another. This is a very complex subject, and it was not possible to exclude any fluoride salts based on the corrosion database. The corrosion database clearly indicates superior container alloys, but the effect of salt identity is masked by many factors which are likely more important (impurities, redox condition) in the testing evidence than salt identity. Despite this uncertainty, some reasonable preferences can be recommended, and these are indicated in the conclusions. The reasoning to support these conclusions is established in the body of this report.

  20. Optimization of the water chemistry of the primary coolant at nuclear power plants with VVER

    SciTech Connect

    Barmin, L. F.; Kruglova, T. K.; Sinitsyn, V. P.

    2005-01-15

    Results of the use of automatic hydrogen-content meter for controlling the parameter of 'hydrogen' in the primary coolant circuit of the Kola nuclear power plant are presented. It is shown that the correlation between the 'hydrogen' parameter in the coolant and the 'hydrazine' parameter in the makeup water can be used for controlling the water chemistry of the primary coolant system, which should make it possible to optimize the water chemistry at different power levels.

  1. Emergency cooling analysis for the loss of coolant malfunction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peoples, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    This report examines the dynamic response of a conceptual space power fast-spectrum lithium cooled reactor to the loss of coolant malfunction and several emergency cooling concepts. The results show that, following the loss of primary coolant, the peak temperatures of the center most 73 fuel elements can range from 2556 K to the region of the fuel melting point of 3122 K within 3600 seconds after the start of the accident. Two types of emergency aftercooling concepts were examined: (1) full core open loop cooling and (2) partial core closed loop cooling. The full core open loop concept is a one pass method of supplying lithium to the 247 fuel pins. This method can maintain fuel temperature below the 1611 K transient damage limit but requires a sizable 22,680-kilogram auxiliary lithium supply. The second concept utilizes a redundant internal closed loop to supply lithium to only the central area of each hexagonal fuel array. By using this method and supplying lithium to only the triflute region, fuel temperatures can be held well below the transient damage limit.

  2. Thermal-hydraulic posttest analysis for the ANL/MCTF 360/sup 0/ model heat-exchanger water test under mixed convection. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, C.I.; Sha, W.T.; Kasza, K.E.

    1982-01-01

    As a result of the uncertainties in the understanding of the influence of thermal-buoyancy effects on the flow and heat transfer in Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor heat exchangers and steam generators under off-normal operating conditions, an extensive experimental program is being conducted at Argonne National Laboratory to eliminate these uncertainties. Concurrently, a parallel analytical effort is also being pursued to develop a three-dimensional transient computer code (COMMIX-IHX) to study and predict heat exchanger performance under mixed, forced, and free convection conditions. This paper presents computational results from a heat exchanger simulation and compares them with the results from a test case exhibiting strong thermal buoyancy effects. Favorable agreement between experiment and code prediction is obtained.

  3. Terminal-shock and restart control of a Mach 2.5, axisymmetric, mixed compression inlet with 40 percent internal contraction. [wind tunnel tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumbick, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    Results of experimental tests conducted on a supersonic, mixed-compression, axisymmetric inlet are presented. The inlet is designed for operation at Mach 2.5 with a turbofan engine (TF-30). The inlet was coupled to either a choked orifice plate or a long duct which had a variable-area choked exit plug. Closed-loop frequency responses of selected diffuser static pressures used in the terminal-shock control system are presented. Results are shown for Mach 2.5 conditions with the inlet coupled to either the choked orifice plate or the long duct. Inlet unstart-restart traces are also presented. High-response inlet bypass doors were used to generate an internal disturbance and also to achieve terminal-shock control.

  4. A MODEL FOR PREDICTING FISSION PRODUCT ACTIVITIES IN REACTOR COOLANT: APPLICATION OF MODEL FOR ESTIMATING I-129 LEVELS IN RADIOACTIVE WASTE

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, B.J.; Husain, A.

    2003-02-27

    A general model was developed to estimate the activities of fission products in reactor coolant and hence to predict a value for the I-129/Cs-137 scaling factor; the latter can be applied along with measured Cs-137 activities to estimate I-129 levels in reactor waste. The model accounts for fission product release from both defective fuel rods and uranium contamination present on in-core reactor surfaces. For simplicity, only the key release mechanisms were modeled. A mass balance, considering the two fuel source terms and a loss term due to coolant cleanup was solved to estimate fission product activity in the primary heat transport system coolant. Steady state assumptions were made to solve for the activity of shortlived fission products. Solutions for long-lived fission products are time-dependent. Data for short-lived radioiodines I-131, I-132, I-133, I-134 and I-135 were analyzed to estimate model parameters for I-129. The estimated parameter values were then used to determine I-1 29 coolant activities. Because of the chemical affinity between iodine and cesium, estimates of Cs-137 coolant concentrations were also based on parameter values similar to those for the radioiodines; this assumption was tested by comparing measured and predicted Cs-137 coolant concentrations. Application of the derived model to Douglas Point and Darlington Nuclear Generating Station plant data yielded estimates for I-129/I-131 and I-129/Cs-137 which are consistent with values reported for pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and boiling water reactors (BWRs). The estimated magnitude for the I-129/Cs-137 ratio was 10-8 - 10-7.

  5. Development of mobile, on-site engine coolant recycling utilizing reverse-osmosis technology

    SciTech Connect

    Kughn, W.; Eaton, E.R.

    1999-08-01

    This paper presents the history of the development of self-contained, mobile, high-volume, engine coolant recycling by reverse osmosis (R/O). It explains the motivations, created by government regulatory agencies, to minimize the liability of waste generators who produce waste engine coolant by providing an engine coolant recycling service at the customer`s location. Recycling the used engine coolant at the point of origin minimizes the generators` exposure to documentation requirements, liability, and financial burdens by greatly reducing the volume of used coolant that must be hauled from the generator`s property. It describes the inherent difficulties of recycling such a highly contaminated, inconsistent input stream, such as used engine coolant, by reverse osmosis. The paper reports how the difficulties were addressed, and documents the state of the art in mobile R/O technology. Reverse osmosis provides a purified intermediate fluid that is reinhibited for use in automotive cooling systems. The paper offers a review of experiences in various automotive applications, including light-duty, medium-duty and heavy-duty vehicles operating on many types of fuel. The authors conclude that mobile embodiments of R/O coolant recycling technology provide finished coolants that perform equivalently to new coolants as demonstrated by their ability to protect vehicles from freezing, corrosion damage, and other cooling system related problems.

  6. A Mixed-Methods Approach to the Development, Refinement, and Pilot Testing of Social Networks for Improving Healthy Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle; Fahim, Arjang; Freix, Andrew; Wilcox, Sara; Davis, Rachel E; Huhns, Michael; Valafar, Homayoun

    2016-01-01

    Background Mobile health (mHealth) has shown promise as a way to deliver weight loss interventions, including connecting users for social support. Objective To develop, refine, and pilot test the Social Pounds Off Digitally (POD) Android app for personalized health monitoring and interaction. Methods Adults who were overweight and obese with Android smartphones (BMI 25-49.9 kg/m2; N=9) were recruited for a 2-month weight loss pilot intervention and iterative usability testing of the Social POD app. The app prompted participants via notification to track daily weight, diet, and physical activity behaviors. Participants received the content of the behavioral weight loss intervention via podcast. In order to re-engage infrequent users (did not use the app within the previous 48 hours), the app prompted frequent users to select 1 of 3 messages to send to infrequent users targeting the behavioral theory constructs social support, self-efficacy, or negative outcome expectations. Body weight, dietary intake (2 24-hr recalls), and reported calories expended during physical activity were assessed at baseline and 2 months. All participants attended 1 of 2 focus groups to provide feedback on use of the app. Results Participants lost a mean of 0.94 kg (SD 2.22, P=.24) and consumed significantly fewer kcals postintervention (1570 kcal/day, SD 508) as compared to baseline (2384 kcal/day, SD 993, P=.01). Participants reported expending a mean of 171 kcal/day (SD 153) during intentional physical activity following the intervention as compared to 138 kcal/day (SD 139) at baseline, yet this was not a statistically significant difference (P=.57). There was not a statistically significant correlation found between total app entries and percent weight loss over the course of the intervention (r=.49, P=.19). Mean number of app entries was 77.2 (SD 73.8) per person with a range of 0 to 219. Messages targeting social support were selected most often (32/68, 47%), followed by self

  7. Failure probability of PWR reactor coolant loop piping. [Double-ended guillotine break

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, T.; Woo, H.H.; Holman, G.S.; Chou, C.K.

    1984-02-01

    This paper describes the results of assessments performed on the PWR coolant loop piping of Westinghouse and Combustion Engineering plants. For direct double-ended guillotine break (DEGB), consideration was given to crack existence probability, initial crack size distribution, hydrostatic proof test, preservice inspection, leak detection probability, crack growth characteristics, and failure criteria based on the net section stress failure and tearing modulus stability concept. For indirect DEGB, fragilities of major component supports were estimated. The system level fragility was then calculated based on the Boolean expression involving these fragilities. Indirect DEGB due to seismic effects was calculated by convolving the system level fragility and the seismic hazard curve. The results indicate that the probability of occurrence of both direct and indirect DEGB is extremely small, thus, postulation of DEGB in design should be eliminated and replaced by more realistic criteria.

  8. Comparison of central axis and jet ring coolant supply for turbine disk cooling on a SSME-HPOTP model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Y. W.; Metzger, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    The test facility, test methods and results are presented for an experimental study modeling the cooling of turbine disks in the blade attachment regions with multiple impinging jets, in a configuration simulating the disk cooling method employed on the Space Shuttle Main Engine oxygen turbopump. The study's objective was to provide a comparison of detailed local convection heat transfer rates obtained for a single center-supply of disk coolant with those obtained with the present flight configuration where disk coolant is supplied through an array of 19 jets located near the disk outer radius. Specially constructed disk models were used in a program designed to evaluate possible benefits and identify any possible detrimental effects involved in employing an alternate disk cooling scheme. The study involved the design, construction and testing of two full scale rotating model disks, one plane and smooth for baseline testing and the second contoured to the present flight configuration, together with the corresponding plane and contoured stator disks. Local heat transfer rates are determined from the color display of encapsulated liquid crystals coated on the disk in conjunction with use of a computer vision system. The test program was composed of a wide variety of disk speeds, flowrates, and geometrical configurations, including testing for the effects of disk boltheads and gas ingestion from the gas path region radially outboard of the disk-cavity.

  9. Sodium boiling and mixed oxide fuel thermal behavior in FBR undercooling transients; W-1 SLSF experiment results

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, J M; Wood, S A; Knight, D D

    1981-01-01

    The W-1 Sodium Loop Safety Facility (SLSF) Experiment was conducted to study fuel pin heat release characteristics during a series of LMFBR Loss-of-Piping Integrity (LOPI) transients and to investigate a regime of coolant boiling during a second series of transients at low, medium and high bundle power levels. The LOPI transients produced no coolant boiling and showed only small changes in coolant temperatures as the test fuel microstructure changed from a fresh, unrestructured to a low burnup, restructured condition. During the last of seven boiling transients, intense coolant boiling produced inlet flow reversal, cladding dryout and moderate cladding melting.

  10. [COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF THE EFFECTIVENESS OF THE USE OF 13C-LABELED MIXED TRIGLYCERIDE AND 13C-STARCH BREATH TESTS IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC PANCREATITIS AFTER CHOLECYSTECTOMY].

    PubMed

    Sirchak, Ye S

    2015-01-01

    The results of a comprehensive study of 96 patients after cholecystectomy are provided. The higher sensitivity and informativeness of the 13C-labeled mixed triglyceride breath .test compared with 13C-starch breath test for determining functional pancreatic insufficiency in patients after cholecystectomy in early stages of its formation was set. PMID:27491156

  11. Zero waste machine coolant management strategy at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, B.; Algarra, F.; Wilburn, D.

    1998-12-01

    Machine coolants are used in machining equipment including lathes, grinders, saws and drills. The purpose of coolants is to wash away machinery debris in the form of metal fines, lubricate, and disperse heat between the part and the machine tool. An effective coolant prolongs tool life and protects against part rejection, commonly due to scoring or scorching. Traditionally, coolants have a very short effective life in the machine, often times being disposed of as frequently as once per week. The cause of coolant degradation is primarily due to the effects of bacteria, which thrive in the organic rich coolant environment. Bacteria in this environment reproduce at a logarithmic rate, destroying the coolant desirable aspects and causing potential worker health risks associated with the use of biocides to control the bacteria. The strategy described in this paper has effectively controlled bacterial activity without the use of biocides, avoided disposal of a hazardous waste, and has extend ed coolant life indefinitely. The Machine Coolant Management Strategy employed a combination of filtration, heavy lubricating oil removal, and aeration, which maintained the coolant peak performance without the use of biocides. In FY96, the Laboratory generated and disposed of 19,880 kg of coolants from 9 separate sites at a cost of $145K. The single largest generator was the main machine shop producing an average 14,000 kg annually. However, in FY97, the waste generation for the main machine shop dropped to 4,000 kg after the implementation of the zero waste strategy. It is expected that this value will be further reduced in FY98.

  12. Zero Waste Machine Coolant Management Strategy at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, B.; Algarra, F.; Wilburn, D.

    1998-06-01

    Machine coolants are used in machining equipment including lathes, grinders, saws and drills. The purpose of coolants is to wash away machinery debris in the form of metal fines, lubricate, and disperse heat between the part and the machine tool. An effective coolant prolongs tool life and protects against part rejection, commonly due to scoring or scorching. Traditionally, coolants have a very short effective life in the machine, often times being disposed of as frequently as once per week. The cause of coolant degradation is primarily due to the effects of bacteria, which thrive in the organic rich coolant environment. Bacteria in this environment reproduce at a logarithmic rate, destroying the coolant desirable aspects and causing potential worker health risks associated with the use of biocides to control the bacteria. The strategy described in this paper has effectively controlled bacterial activity without the use of biocides, avoided disposal of a hazardous waste, and has extend ed coolant life indefinitely. The Machine Coolant Management Strategy employed a combination of filtration, heavy lubricating oil removal, and aeration, which maintained the coolant peak performance without the use of biocides. In FY96, the Laboratory generated and disposed of 19,880 kg of coolants from 9 separate sites at a cost of $145K. The single largest generator was the main machine shop producing an average 14,000 kg annually. However, in FY97, the waste generation for the main machine shop dropped to 4,000 kg after the implementation of the zero waste strategy. It is expected that this value will be further reduced in FY98.

  13. Actively controlling coolant-cooled cold plate configuration

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Parida, Pritish R.

    2016-04-26

    Cooling apparatuses are provided to facilitate active control of thermal and fluid dynamic performance of a coolant-cooled cold plate. The cooling apparatus includes the cold plate and a controller. The cold plate couples to one or more electronic components to be cooled, and includes an adjustable physical configuration. The controller dynamically varies the adjustable physical configuration of the cold plate based on a monitored variable associated with the cold plate or the electronic component(s) being cooled by the cold plate. By dynamically varying the physical configuration, the thermal and fluid dynamic performance of the cold plate are adjusted to, for example, optimally cool the electronic component(s), and at the same time, reduce cooling power consumption used in cooling the electronic component(s). The physical configuration can be adjusted by providing one or more adjustable plates within the cold plate, the positioning of which may be adjusted based on the monitored variable.

  14. Leak rate analysis of the Westinghouse Reactor Coolant Pump

    SciTech Connect

    Boardman, T.; Jeanmougin, N.; Lofaro, R.; Prevost, J.

    1985-07-01

    An independent analysis was performed by ETEC to determine what the seal leakage rates would be for the Westinghouse Reactor Coolant Pump (RCP) during a postulated station blackout resulting from loss of ac electric power. The object of the study was to determine leakage rates for the following conditions: Case 1: All three seals function. Case 2: No. 1 seal fails open while Nos. 2 and 3 seals function. Case 3: All three seals fail open. The ETEC analysis confirmed Westinghouse calculations on RCP seal performance for the conditions investigated. The leak rates predicted by ETEC were slightly lower than those predicted by Westinghouse for each of the three cases as summarized below. Case 1: ETEC predicted 19.6 gpm, Westinghouse predicted 21.1 gpm. Case 2: ETEC predicted 64.7 gpm, Westinghouse predicted 75.6 gpm. Case 3: ETEC predicted 422 gpm, Westinghouse predicted 480 gpm. 3 refs., 22 figs., 6 tabs.

  15. Loss of coolant analysis for the tower shielding reactor 2

    SciTech Connect

    Radcliff, T.D.; Williams, P.T.

    1990-06-01

    The operational limits of the Tower Shielding Reactor-2 (TSR-2) have been revised to account for placing the reactor in a beam shield, which reduces convection cooling during a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). A detailed heat transfer analysis was performed to set operating time limits which preclude fuel damage during a LOCA. Since a LOCA is survivable, the pressure boundary need not be safety related, minimizing seismic and inspection requirements. Measurements of reactor component emittance for this analysis revealed that aluminum oxidized in water may have emittance much higher than accepted values, allowing higher operating limits than were originally expected. These limits could be increased further with analytical or hardware improvements. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  16. Fusion Blanket Coolant Section Criteria, Methodology, and Results

    SciTech Connect

    DeMuth, J. A.; Meier, W. R.; Jolodosky, A.; Frantoni, M.; Reyes, S.

    2015-10-02

    The focus of this LDRD was to explore potential Li alloys that would meet the tritium breeding and blanket cooling requirements but with reduced chemical reactivity, while maintaining the other attractive features of pure Li breeder/coolant. In other fusion approaches (magnetic fusion energy or MFE), 17Li- 83Pb alloy is used leveraging Pb’s ability to maintain high TBR while lowering the levels of lithium in the system. Unfortunately this alloy has a number of potential draw-backs. Due to the high Pb content, this alloy suffers from very high average density, low tritium solubility, low system energy, and produces undesirable activation products in particular polonium. The criteria considered in the selection of a tritium breeding alloy are described in the following section.

  17. Electrochemical pitting evaluation of aluminium alloy 7075 in machining coolant

    SciTech Connect

    Stanaland, V.A.; Dillon, J.J.

    1984-08-24

    The corrosion rate of aluminum alloy 7075 in Trim Sol with a Tris-Nitro biocide addition is satisfactory. Both deaeration and increasing the nitrite addition decreased the stability of the passive film. Chloride contamination below 500 ppM does not cause pitting corrosion of aluminum alloy 7075 in the Trim Sol environment. The limit for chloride contamination is between 500 and 1000 ppM. The potentiodynamic, fast-scan-rate technique is satisfactory for evaluating the pitting tendency of the aluminum alloy 7075 in a Trim Sol environment. Consequently, the potentiodynamic, fast-scan-rate technique is recommended for use in conjunction with reverse scans to evaluate the quality of in-use machining coolants, that are suspected of causing contamination.

  18. Computational investigation of fluid and thermal mixing of the EPRI/Creare onefifth-scale facility

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, Y.A.; Kim, J.H.

    1985-03-01

    During an overcooling transient in a pressurized water reactor, the cold water from the high-pressure safety system is injected into the hot primary coolant in the cold leg. This can cause the water temperature in the cold leg and downcomer annulus to decrease; hence, the problem of pressurized thermal shock arises. A multidimensional numerical study for the analysis of the Electric Power Research Institute/ Creare one-fifth-scale mixing test is performed. A new, accurate, stable mass-flow-weighted skew-upwind scheme is employed in the finite difference solution of the energy equation. The temperature predictions using the new scheme are in good agreement with the experimental data. A significant reduction in the numerical diffusion errors was achieved. These errors have plagued the conventional upwind scheme results. A good agreement between the computed velocity patterns and flow visualization is obtained.

  19. Coincident steam generator tube rupture and stuck-open safety relief valve carryover tests: MB-2 steam generator transient response test program

    SciTech Connect

    Garbett, K; Mendler, O J; Gardner, G C; Garnsey, R; Young, M Y

    1987-03-01

    In PWR steam generator tube rupture (SGTR) faults, a direct pathway for the release of radioactive fission products can exist if there is a coincident stuck-open safety relief valve (SORV) or if the safety relief valve is cycled. In addition to the release of fission products from the bulk steam generator water by moisture carryover, there exists the possibility that some primary coolant may be released without having first mixed with the bulk water - a process called primary coolant bypassing. The MB-2 Phase II test program was designed specifically to identify the processes for droplet carryover during SGTR faults and to provide data of sufficient accuracy for use in developing physical models and computer codes to describe activity release. The test program consisted of sixteen separate tests designed to cover a range of steady-state and transient fault conditions. These included a full SGTR/SORV transient simulation, two SGTR overfill tests, ten steady-state SGTR tests at water levels ranging from very low levels in the bundle up to those when the dryer was flooded, and three moisture carryover tests without SGTR. In these tests the influence of break location and the effect of bypassing the dryer were also studied. In a final test the behavior with respect to aerosol particles in a dry steam generator, appropriate to a severe accident fault, was investigated.

  20. Investigation of an anion exchange resin for cleanup of a coolant used to machine nuclear materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hinton, E.R. Jr.; Tucker, H.L.; Asbury, W.L.

    1986-01-01

    This article describes the interaction of Dowex SBR-P, which is a strongly basic anion exchange resin, with ions found in a used machining coolant. The coolant is used in machining enriched uranium and contains uranium, chloride, nitrite, borate ions, water, and propylene glycol.

  1. 10 CFR 50.46a - Acceptance criteria for reactor coolant system venting systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Acceptance criteria for reactor coolant system venting systems. 50.46a Section 50.46a Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING OF PRODUCTION AND UTILIZATION FACILITIES Standards for Licenses, Certifications, and Regulatory Approvals § 50.46a Acceptance criteria for reactor coolant...

  2. Some peculiarities of checking the Topaz-2 system coolant filling quality

    SciTech Connect

    Ogloblin, B.G.; Svishchev, A.M.; Shalaev, A.I.

    1996-03-01

    This paper contains the analysis of validity of methods used for checking the Topaz-2 system coolant filling quality by a metering tank according to the mathematical model developed. A number of criteria is proposed for detecting occluded gas in the coolant loop. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. A method for measuring cooling air flow in base coolant passages of rotating turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, C. H.; Pollack, F. G.

    1975-01-01

    Method accurately determines actual coolant mass flow rate in cooling passages of rotating turbine blades. Total and static pressures are measured in blade base coolant passages. Mass flow rates are calculated from these measurements of pressure, measured temperature and known area.

  4. Coolant flows in prismatic fuel and particle bed nuclear reactors for rocket applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohachevsky, Ihor O.

    1993-01-01

    Semiempirical expressions for pressure losses in prismatic and particle bed reactors for nuclear propulsion are combined with the geometric characteristics of core configurations and coolant flow patterns. The results are used to illustrate a limitation on the coolant velocity and to develop a unified approach to a quantitative comparison of merits and demerits of different reactor core concepts intended for space applications.

  5. Surface Treatment to Improve Corrosion Resistance in Lead-Alloy Coolants

    SciTech Connect

    Todd R. Allen; Kumar Sridharan; McLean T. Machut; Lizhen Tan

    2007-08-29

    One of the six proposed advanced reactor designs of the Generation IV Initiative, the Leadcooled Fast Reactor (LFR) possesses many characteristics that make it a desirable candidate for future nuclear energy production and responsible actinide management. These characteristics include favorable heat transfer, fluid dynamics, and neutronic performance compared to other candidate coolants. However, the use of a heavy liquid metal coolant presents a challenge for reactor designers in regards to reliable structural and fuel cladding materials in both a highly corrosive high temperature liquid metal and an intense radiation fieldi. Flow corrosion studies at the University of Wisconsin have examined the corrosion performance of candidate materials for application in the LFR concept as well as the viability of various surface treatments to improve the materials’ compatibility. To date this research has included several focus areas, which include the formulation of an understanding of corrosion mechanisms and the examination of the effects of chemical and mechanical surface modifications on the materials’ performance in liquid lead-bismuth by experimental testing in Los Alamos National Laboratory’s DELTA Loop, as well as comparison of experimental findings to numerical and physical models for long term corrosion prediction. This report will first review the literature and introduce the experiments and data that will be used to benchmark theoretical calculations. The experimental results will be followed by a brief review of the underlying theory and methodology for the physical and theoretical models. Finally, the results of theoretical calculations as well as experimentally obtained benchmarks and comparisons to the literature are presented.

  6. Good practice statements on safe laboratory testing: A mixed methods study by the LINNEAUS collaboration on patient safety in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Bowie, Paul; Forrest, Eleanor; Price, Julie; Verstappen, Wim; Cunningham, David; Halley, Lyn; Grant, Suzanne; Kelly, Moya; Mckay, John

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: The systems-based management of laboratory test ordering and results handling is a known source of error in primary care settings worldwide. The consequences are wide-ranging for patients (e.g. avoidable harm or poor care experience), general practitioners (e.g. delayed clinical decision making and potential medico-legal implications) and the primary care organization (e.g. increased allocation of resources to problem-solve and dealing with complaints). Guidance is required to assist care teams to minimize associated risks and improve patient safety. Objective: To identify, develop and build expert consensus on ‘good practice’ guidance statements to inform the implementation of safe systems for ordering laboratory tests and managing results in European primary care settings. Methods: Mixed methods studies were undertaken in the UK and Ireland, and the findings were triangulated to develop ‘good practice’ statements. Expert consensus was then sought on the findings at the wider European level via a Delphi group meeting during 2013. Results: We based consensus on 10 safety domains and developed 77 related ‘good practice’ statements (≥ 80% agreement levels) judged to be essential to creating safety and minimizing risks in laboratory test ordering and subsequent results handling systems in international primary care. Conclusion: Guidance was developed for improving patient safety in this important area of primary care practice. We need to consider how this guidance can be made accessible to frontline care teams, utilized by clinical educators and improvement advisers, implemented by decision makers and evaluated to determine acceptability, feasibility and impacts on patient safety. PMID:26339831

  7. Assessment and Accommodation of Thermal Expansion of the Internal Active Thermal Control System Coolant During Launch to On-Orbit Activation of International Space Station Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, J. Darryl; Ungar, Eugene K.; Holt, James M.; Turner, Larry D. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) employs an Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS) comprised of several single-phase water coolant loops. These coolant loops are distributed throughout the ISS pressurized elements. The primary element coolant loops (i.e., US Laboratory module) contain a fluid accumulator to accommodate thermal expansion of the system. Other element coolant loops are parasitic (i.e., Airlock), have no accumulator, and require an alternative approach to insure that the system Maximum Design Pressure (MDP) is not exceeded during the Launch to Activation phase. During this time the element loop is a stand alone closed individual system. The solution approach for accommodating thermal expansion was affected by interactions of system components and their particular limitations. The mathematical solution approach was challenged by the presence of certain unknown or not readily obtainable physical and thermodynamic characteristics of some system components and processes. The purpose of this paper is to provide a brief description of a few of the solutions that evolved over time, a novel mathematical solution to eliminate some of the unknowns or derive the unknowns experimentally, and the testing and methods undertaken.

  8. Assessment and Accommodation of Thermal Expansion of the Internal Active Thermal Control System Coolant During Launch to On-Orbit Activation of International Space Station Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Darryl; Ungar, Eugene K.; Holt, James M.

    2002-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) employs an Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS) comprised of several single-phase water coolant loops. These coolant loops are distributed throughout the ISS pressurized elements. The primary element coolant loops (i.e. U.S. Laboratory module) contain a fluid accumulator to accomodate thermal expansion of the system. Other element coolant loops are parasitic (i.e. Airlock), have no accumulator, and require an alternative approach to insure that the system maximum design pressure (MDP) is not exceeded during the Launch to Activation (LTA) phase. During this time the element loops is a stand alone closed system. The solution approach for accomodating thermal expansion was affected by interactions of system components and their particular limitations. The mathematical solution approach was challenged by the presence of certain unknown or not readily obtainable physical and thermodynamic characteristics of some system components and processes. The purpose of this paper is to provide a brief description of a few of the solutions that evolved over time, a novel mathematical solution to eliminate some of the unknowns or derive the unknowns experimentally, and the testing and methods undertaken.

  9. Uniform corrosion of FeCrAl alloys in LWR coolant environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrani, K. A.; Pint, B. A.; Kim, Y.-J.; Unocic, K. A.; Yang, Y.; Silva, C. M.; Meyer, H. M.; Rebak, R. B.

    2016-10-01

    The corrosion behavior of commercial and model FeCrAl alloys and type 310 stainless steel was examined by autoclave tests and compared to Zircaloy-4, the reference cladding materials in light water reactors. The corrosion studies were carried out in three distinct water chemistry environments found in pressurized and boiling water reactor primary coolant loop conditions for up to one year. The structure and morphology of the oxides formed on the surface of these alloys was consistent with thermodynamic predictions. Spinel-type oxides were found to be present after hydrogen water chemistry exposures, while the oxygenated water tests resulted in the formation of very thin and protective hematite-type oxides. Unlike the alloys exposed to oxygenated water tests, the alloys tested in hydrogen water chemistry conditions experienced mass loss as a function of time. This mass loss was the result of net sum of mass gain due to parabolic oxidation and mass loss due to dissolution that also exhibits parabolic kinetics. The maximum thickness loss after one year of LWR water corrosion in the absence of irradiation was ∼2 μm, which is inconsequential for a ∼300-500 μm thick cladding.

  10. Uniform corrosion of FeCrAl alloys in LWR coolant environments

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Terrani, K. A.; Pint, B. A.; Kim, Y. -J.; Unocic, K. A.; Yang, Y.; Silva, C. M.; Meyer, III, H. M.; Rebak, R. B.

    2016-06-29

    In this study, the corrosion behavior of commercial and model FeCrAl alloys and type 310 stainless steel was examined by autoclave tests and compared to Zircaloy-4, the reference cladding materials in light water reactors. The corrosion studies were carried out in three distinct water chemistry environments found in pressurized and boiling water reactor primary coolant loop conditions for up to one year. The structure and morphology of the oxides formed on the surface of these alloys was consistent with thermodynamic predictions. Spinel-type oxides were found to be present after hydrogen water chemistry exposures, while the oxygenated water tests resulted inmore » the formation of very thin and protective hematite-type oxides. Unlike the alloys exposed to oxygenated water tests, the alloys tested in hydrogen water chemistry conditions experienced mass loss as a function of time. This mass loss was the result of net sum of mass gain due to parabolic oxidation and mass loss due to dissolution that also exhibits parabolic kinetics. Finally, the maximum thickness loss after one year of LWR water corrosion in the absence of irradiation was ~2 μm, which is inconsequential for a ~300–500 μm thick cladding.« less

  11. Analysis of two small break loss-of-coolant experiments in the BETHSY facility using RELAP5/MOD3

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, P.A.; Schultz, R.R. ); Choi, C.J. )

    1992-07-01

    Small break loss-of-coolant accident (SBLOCA) data were recorded during tests 9.lb and 6.2 TC in the Boucle d'Etudes Thermohydrouliques Systeme (BETHSY) facility at the Centre d'Etudes Nucleares de Grenoble (CENG) complex in Grenoble, France. The data from test 9.lb form the basis for the International Standard Problem number 27 (ISP-27). For each test the primary system depressurization, break flow rate, core heat-up, and effect of operator actions were analyzed. Based on the test 9.lb/ISP-27 and 6.2 TC data, an assessment study of the RELAP5/MOD3 version 7 code was performed which included a study of the above phenomena along with countercurrent flow limitation and vapor pull-through. The code provided a reasonable simulation of the various phenomena which occurred during the tests.

  12. Analysis of two small break loss-of-coolant experiments in the BETHSY facility using RELAP5/MOD3

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, P.A.; Schultz, R.R.; Choi, C.J.

    1992-07-01

    Small break loss-of-coolant accident (SBLOCA) data were recorded during tests 9.lb and 6.2 TC in the Boucle d`Etudes Thermohydrouliques Systeme (BETHSY) facility at the Centre d`Etudes Nucleares de Grenoble (CENG) complex in Grenoble, France. The data from test 9.lb form the basis for the International Standard Problem number 27 (ISP-27). For each test the primary system depressurization, break flow rate, core heat-up, and effect of operator actions were analyzed. Based on the test 9.lb/ISP-27 and 6.2 TC data, an assessment study of the RELAP5/MOD3 version 7 code was performed which included a study of the above phenomena along with countercurrent flow limitation and vapor pull-through. The code provided a reasonable simulation of the various phenomena which occurred during the tests.

  13. Solar receiver protection means and method for loss of coolant flow

    DOEpatents

    Glasgow, L.E.

    1980-11-24

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for preventing a solar receiver utilizing a flowing coolant liquid for removing heat energy therefrom from overheating after a loss of coolant flow. Solar energy is directed to the solar receiver by a plurality of reflectors which rotate so that they direct solar energy to the receiver as the earth rotates. The apparatus disclosed includes a first storage tank for containing a first predetermined volume of the coolant and a first predetermined volume of gas at a first predetermined pressure. The first storage tank includes an inlet and outlet through which the coolant can enter and exit. The apparatus also includes a second storage tank for containing a second predetermined volume of the coolant and a second predetermined volume of the gas at a second predetermined pressure, the second storage tank having an inlet through which the coolant can enter. The first and second storage tanks are in fluid communication with each other through the solar receiver. The first and second predetermined coolant volumes, the first and second gas volumes, and the first and second predetermined pressures are chosen so that a predetermined volume of the coolant liquid at a predetermined rate profile will flow from the first storage tank through the solar receiver and into the second storage tank. Thus, in the event of a power failure so that coolant flow ceases and the solar reflectors stop rotating, a flow rate maintained by the pressure differential between the first and second storage tanks will be sufficient to maintain the coolant in the receiver below a predetermined upper temperature until the solar reflectors become defocused with respect to the solar receiver due to the earth's rotation.

  14. Solar receiver protection means and method for loss of coolant flow

    DOEpatents

    Glasgow, Lyle E.

    1983-01-01

    An apparatus and method for preventing a solar receiver (12) utilizing a flowing coolant liquid for removing heat energy therefrom from overheating after a loss of coolant flow. Solar energy is directed to the solar receiver (12) by a plurality of reflectors (16) which rotate so that they direct solar energy to the receiver (12) as the earth rotates. The apparatus disclosed includes a first storage tank (30) for containing a first predetermined volume of the coolant and a first predetermined volume of gas at a first predetermined pressure. The first storage tank (30) includes an inlet and outlet through which the coolant can enter and exit. The apparatus also includes a second storage tank (34) for containing a second predetermined volume of the coolant and a second predetermined volume of the gas at a second predetermined pressure, the second storage tank (34) having an inlet through which the coolant can enter. The first and second storage tanks (30) and (34) are in fluid communication with each other through the solar receiver (12). The first and second predetermined coolant volumes, the first and second gas volumes, and the first and second predetermined pressures are chosen so that a predetermined volume of the coolant liquid at a predetermined rate profile will flow from the first storage tank (30) through the solar receiver (12) and into the second storage tank (34). Thus, in the event of a power failure so that coolant flow ceases and the solar reflectors (16) stop rotating, a flow rate maintained by the pressure differential between the first and second storage tanks (30) and (34) will be sufficient to maintain the coolant in the receiver (12) below a predetermined upper temperature until the solar reflectors (16) become defocused with respect to the solar receiver (12) due to the earth's rotation.

  15. Characterization of uranium surfaces machined with aqueous propylene glycol-borax or perchloroethylene-mineral oil coolants

    SciTech Connect

    Cristy, S.S.; Bennett, R.K. Jr.; Dillon, J.J.; Richards, H.L.; Seals, R.D.; Byrd, V.R.

    1986-12-31

    The use of perchloroethylene (perc) as an ingredient in coolants for machining enriched uranium at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant has been discontinued because of environmental concerns. A new coolant was substituted in December 1985, which consists of an aqueous solution of propylene glycol with borax (sodium tetraborate) added as a nuclear poison and with a nitrite added as a corrosion inhibitor. Uranium surfaces machined using the two coolants were compared with respects to residual contamination, corrosion or corrosion potential, and with the aqueous propylene glycol-borax coolant was found to be better than that of enriched uranium machined with the perc-mineral oil coolant. The boron residues on the final-finished parts machined with the borax-containing coolant were not sufficient to cause problems in further processing. All evidence indicated that the enriched uranium surfaces machined with the borax-containing coolant will be as satisfactory as those machined with the perc coolant.

  16. Mixed Dementia

    MedlinePlus

    ... bodies , What Is Alzheimer's? NIA-Funded Memory & Aging Project Reveals Mixed Dementia Common Data from the first ... disease. For example, in the Memory and Aging Project study involving long-term cognitive assessments followed by ...

  17. Exploratory Investigation of Transpiration Cooling of a 40 deg Double Wedge using Nitrogen and Helium as Coolants at Stagnation Temperatures from 1,295 deg F to 2,910 deg F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashis, Bernard

    1961-01-01

    An investigation of transpiration cooling has been conducted in the preflight jet of the Langley Pilotless Aircraft Research Station at Wallops Island, Va. The model consisted of a double wedge of 40 deg included angle having a porous stainless-steel specimen inserted flush with the top surface of the wedge. The tests were conducted at a free-stream Mach number of 2.0 for stagnation temperatures ranging from 1,295 F to 2,910 F. Nitrogen and helium were used as coolants and tests were conducted for values ranging from approximately 0.03 to 0.30 percent of the local weight flow rate. The data for both the nitrogen and helium coolants indicated greater cooling effectiveness than that predicted by theory and were in good agreement with the results for an 8 deg cone tested at a stagnation temperature of 600 F. The results indicate that the helium coolant, for the same amount of heat-transfer reduction, requires only about one-fourth to one-fifth the coolant flow weight as the nitrogen coolant.

  18. Comparative limb bone loading in the humerus and femur of the tiger salamander: testing the 'mixed-chain' hypothesis for skeletal safety factors.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Sandy M; Economy, D Ross; Kennedy, Marian S; Dean, Delphine; Blob, Richard W

    2016-02-01

    Locomotion imposes some of the highest loads upon the skeleton, and diverse bone designs have evolved to withstand these demands. Excessive loads can fatally injure organisms; however, bones have a margin of extra protection, called a 'safety factor' (SF), to accommodate loads that are higher than normal. The extent to which SFs might vary amongst an animal's limb bones is unclear. If the limbs are likened to a chain composed of bones as 'links', then similar SFs might be expected for all limb bones because failure of the system would be determined by the weakest link, and extra protection in other links could waste energetic resources. However, Alexander proposed that a 'mixed-chain' of SFs might be found amongst bones if: (1) their energetic costs differ, (2) some elements face variable demands, or (3) SFs are generally high. To test whether such conditions contribute to diversity in limb bone SFs, we compared the biomechanical properties and locomotor loading of the humerus and femur in the tiger salamander (Ambystoma tigrinum). Despite high SFs in salamanders and similar sizes of the humerus and femur that would suggest similar energetic costs, the humerus had lower bone stresses, higher mechanical hardness and larger SFs. SFs were greatest in the anatomical regions where yield stresses were highest in the humerus and lowest in the femur. Such intraspecific variation between and within bones may relate to their different biomechanical functions, providing insight into the emergence of novel locomotor capabilities during the invasion of land by tetrapods. PMID:26596535

  19. Single-locus species delimitation: a test of the mixed Yule-coalescent model, with an empirical application to Philippine round-leaf bats.

    PubMed

    Esselstyn, Jacob A; Evans, Ben J; Sedlock, Jodi L; Anwarali Khan, Faisal Ali; Heaney, Lawrence R

    2012-09-22

    Prospects for a comprehensive inventory of global biodiversity would be greatly improved by automating methods of species delimitation. The general mixed Yule-coalescent (GMYC) was recently proposed as a potential means of increasing the rate of biodiversity exploration. We tested this method with simulated data and applied it to a group of poorly known bats (Hipposideros) from the Philippines. We then used echolocation call characteristics to evaluate the plausibility of species boundaries suggested by GMYC. In our simulations, GMYC performed relatively well (errors in estimated species diversity less than 25%) when the product of the haploid effective population size (N(e)) and speciation rate (SR; per lineage per million years) was less than or equal to 10(5), while interspecific variation in N(e) was twofold or less. However, at higher but also biologically relevant values of N(e) × SR and when N(e) varied tenfold among species, performance was very poor. GMYC analyses of mitochondrial DNA sequences from Philippine Hipposideros suggest actual diversity may be approximately twice the current estimate, and available echolocation call data are mostly consistent with GMYC delimitations. In conclusion, we consider the GMYC model useful under some conditions, but additional information on N(e), SR and/or corroboration from independent character data are needed to allow meaningful interpretation of results. PMID:22764163

  20. Design and Test of Mixed-flow Impellers III : Design and Experimental Results for Impeller Model MFI-2A and Comparison with Impeller Model MFI-1A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrick, Joseph T; Osborn, Walter M; Beede, William L

    1953-01-01

    A mixed-flow impeller was designed to give a prescribed blade-surface velocity distribution at mean blade height for a given hub-shroud profile. The blade shape at mean blade height, which was produced by the prescribed velocity distribution, was extended by means of radial lines to form the composite blade shape from hub to shroud. The resulting blade was relatively thick; therefore, it was necessary to retain the inverse blade taper which resulted from extension of the radial lines in order to prevent merging or near merging of the separate blades near the hub. For the first test version of the impeller, designated the MFI-2A, the blade height was arbitrarily made greater than that for the basic impeller (the MFI-2) to allow for viscous effects. At design equivalent speed of 1400 feet per second the peak pressure ratio and maximum adiabatic efficiency were 3.95 and 79 percent, respectively. The adiabatic efficiency of the MFI-2A is four points lower than that for impeller model MFI-1A, but because of the higher slip factor for the MFI-2A, the pressure ratios are approximately equal. The procedures followed in the design of the MFI-1A and MFI-2A were, in general, the same; and, although the prescribed initial condition resulted in geometrical configurations that were quite dissimilar, the resulting performance characteristics compare favorably with designs for which considerable development work has been necessary.