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Sample records for cooled superconducting power

  1. Superconducting magnet cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Vander Arend, Peter C.; Fowler, William B.

    1977-01-01

    A device is provided for cooling a conductor to the superconducting state. The conductor is positioned within an inner conduit through which is flowing a supercooled liquid coolant in physical contact with the conductor. The inner conduit is positioned within an outer conduit so that an annular open space is formed therebetween. Through the annular space is flowing coolant in the boiling liquid state. Heat generated by the conductor is transferred by convection within the supercooled liquid coolant to the inner wall of the inner conduit and then is removed by the boiling liquid coolant, making the heat removal from the conductor relatively independent of conductor length.

  2. Power superconducting power transmission cable

    DOEpatents

    Ashworth, Stephen P.

    2003-01-01

    The present invention is for a compact superconducting power transmission cable operating at distribution level voltages. The superconducting cable is a conductor with a number of tapes assembled into a subconductor. These conductors are then mounted co-planarly in an elongated dielectric to produce a 3-phase cable. The arrangement increases the magnetic field parallel to the tapes thereby reducing ac losses.

  3. Power superconducting power transmission cable

    DOEpatents

    Ashworth, Stephen P.

    2003-06-10

    The present invention is for a compact superconducting power transmission cable operating at distribution level voltages. The superconducting cable is a conductor with a number of tapes assembled into a subconductor. These conductors are then mounted co-planarly in an elongated dielectric to produce a 3-phase cable. The arrangement increases the magnetic field parallel to the tapes thereby reducing ac losses.

  4. Superconducting magnet system for muon beam cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, N.; Johnson, R.P.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Novitski, I.; Yonehara, K.; Zlobin, A.; /Fermilab

    2006-08-01

    A helical cooling channel has been proposed to quickly reduce the six-dimensional phase space of muon beams for muon colliders, neutrino factories, and intense muon sources. A novel superconducting magnet system for a muon beam cooling experiment is being designed at Fermilab. The inner volume of the cooling channel is filled with liquid helium where passing muon beam can be decelerated and cooled in a process of ionization energy loss. The magnet parameters are optimized to match the momentum of the beam as it slows down. The results of 3D magnetic analysis for two designs of magnet system, mechanical and quench protection considerations are discussed.

  5. The integration of cryogenic cooling systems with superconducting electronic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael A.

    2003-07-01

    The need for cryogenic cooling has been critical issue that has kept superconducting electronic devices from reaching the market place. Even though the performance of the superconducting circuit is superior to silicon electronics, the requirement for cryogenic cooling has put the superconducting devices at a disadvantage. This report will talk about the various methods for refrigerating superconducting devices. Cryocooler types will be compared for vibration, efficiency, and cost. Some solutions to specific problems of integrating cryocoolers to superconducting devices are presented.

  6. Cooling system for superconducting magnet

    DOEpatents

    Gamble, B.B.; Sidi-Yekhlef, A.

    1998-12-15

    A cooling system is configured to control the flow of a refrigerant by controlling the rate at which the refrigerant is heated, thereby providing an efficient and reliable approach to cooling a load (e.g., magnets, rotors). The cooling system includes a conduit circuit connected to the load and within which a refrigerant circulates; a heat exchanger, connected within the conduit circuit and disposed remotely from the load; a first and a second reservoir, each connected within the conduit, each holding at least a portion of the refrigerant; a heater configured to independently heat the first and second reservoirs. In a first mode, the heater heats the first reservoir, thereby causing the refrigerant to flow from the first reservoir through the load and heat exchanger, via the conduit circuit and into the second reservoir. In a second mode, the heater heats the second reservoir to cause the refrigerant to flow from the second reservoir through the load and heat exchanger via the conduit circuit and into the first reservoir. 3 figs.

  7. Cooling system for superconducting magnet

    DOEpatents

    Gamble, Bruce B.; Sidi-Yekhlef, Ahmed

    1998-01-01

    A cooling system is configured to control the flow of a refrigerant by controlling the rate at which the refrigerant is heated, thereby providing an efficient and reliable approach to cooling a load (e.g., magnets, rotors). The cooling system includes a conduit circuit connected to the load and within which a refrigerant circulates; a heat exchanger, connected within the conduit circuit and disposed remotely from the load; a first and a second reservoir, each connected within the conduit, each holding at least a portion of the refrigerant; a heater configured to independently heat the first and second reservoirs. In a first mode, the heater heats the first reservoir, thereby causing the refrigerant to flow from the first reservoir through the load and heat exchanger, via the conduit circuit and into the second reservoir. In a second mode, the heater heats the second reservoir to cause the refrigerant to flow from the second reservoir through the load and heat exchanger via the conduit circuit and into the first reservoir.

  8. Power electronics cooling apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Sanger, Philip Albert; Lindberg, Frank A.; Garcen, Walter

    2000-01-01

    A semiconductor cooling arrangement wherein a semiconductor is affixed to a thermally and electrically conducting carrier such as by brazing. The coefficient of thermal expansion of the semiconductor and carrier are closely matched to one another so that during operation they will not be overstressed mechanically due to thermal cycling. Electrical connection is made to the semiconductor and carrier, and a porous metal heat exchanger is thermally connected to the carrier. The heat exchanger is positioned within an electrically insulating cooling assembly having cooling oil flowing therethrough. The arrangement is particularly well adapted for the cooling of high power switching elements in a power bridge.

  9. Discoveries in Superconductivity, Persistent-Switch Magnets, and Magnetic Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, E. Dwight

    2016-07-01

    A historical review of developments in superconducting magnets begins with Kamerlingh Onnes' construction of the first one in 1914 and extends to the invention of the superconducting persistent switch reported in 1963. A section on magnetic cooling includes refrigeration by paramagnetic salts and by nuclei in metals, as well as direct nuclear demagnetization in which only the nuclei are cooled.

  10. Cooling of superconducting devices by liquid storage and refrigeration unit

    SciTech Connect

    Laskaris, Evangelos Trifon; Urbahn, John Arthur; Steinbach, Albert Eugene

    2013-08-20

    A system is disclosed for cooling superconducting devices. The system includes a cryogen cooling system configured to be coupled to the superconducting device and to supply cryogen to the device. The system also includes a cryogen storage system configured to supply cryogen to the device. The system further includes flow control valving configured to selectively isolate the cryogen cooling system from the device, thereby directing a flow of cryogen to the device from the cryogen storage system.

  11. Design of oil-free simple turbo type 65 K/6 KW helium and neon mixture gas refrigerator for high temperature superconducting power cable cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saji, N.; Asakura, H.; Yoshinaga, S.; Ishizawa, T.; Miyake, A.; Obata, M.; Nagaya, S.

    2002-05-01

    For the requirement of HTS facility cooling, we propose oil-free simple turbo-type refrigerator. The working gas is a helium and neon mixture. Two single-stage turbo compressors and two expansion turbines are applied to the cycle. The rotor consists of the compressor impeller, turbine impeller and driving motor, and is supported by foil type gas bearing. The refrigerator requires two rotating machines with excellent reliability and compactness, and the motor power required is 72.5 kW for a refrigeration load of 6 kW. For the cooling of power cable, sub-cooled pressurized liquid nitrogen and a circulation pump must be provided. If the estimated distance between inter-cooling stations is quite long, for example 5 km, plural refrigerators may be set up on one cooling station.

  12. Conceptual study of superconducting urban area power systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noe, Mathias; Bach, Robert; Prusseit, Werner; Willén, Dag; Gold-acker, Wilfried; Poelchau, Juri; Linke, Christian

    2010-06-01

    Efficient transmission, distribution and usage of electricity are fundamental requirements for providing citizens, societies and economies with essential energy resources. It will be a major future challenge to integrate more sustainable generation resources, to meet growing electricity demand and to renew electricity networks. Research and development on superconducting equipment and components have an important role to play in addressing these challenges. Up to now, most studies on superconducting applications in power systems have been concentrated on the application of specific devices like for example cables and current limiters. In contrast to this, the main focus of our study is to show the consequence of a large scale integration of superconducting power equipment in distribution level urban power systems. Specific objectives are to summarize the state-of-the-art of superconducting power equipment including cooling systems and to compare the superconducting power system with respect to energy and economic efficiency with conventional solutions. Several scenarios were considered starting from the replacement of an existing distribution level sub-grid up to a full superconducting urban area distribution level power system. One major result is that a full superconducting urban area distribution level power system could be cost competitive with existing solutions in the future. In addition to that, superconducting power systems offer higher energy efficiency as well as a number of technical advantages like lower voltage drops and improved stability.

  13. Sub-50-mK Electronic Cooling with Large-Area Superconducting Tunnel Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, H. Q.; Meschke, M.; Courtois, H.; Pekola, J. P.

    2014-11-01

    In electronic cooling with superconducting tunnel junctions, the cooling power is counterbalanced by the interaction with phonons and by the heat flow from the overheated leads. We study aluminum-based coolers that are equipped with a suspended normal metal and an efficient quasiparticle drain. At intermediate temperatures, the phonon bath of the suspended normal metal is cooled. By adjusting the junction transparency, we control the injection current and, thus, the temperature of the superconducting lead at the optimum cooling point. The best device shows remarkable cooling from 150 mK down to about 30 mK, a factor of 5 in temperature at a power of 40 pW. We discuss heat transport in our device and the reasons for cooling saturation at the low-temperature end.

  14. Helium cooling systems for large superconducting physics detector magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, M. A.

    The large superconducting detector magnets used for high energy physics experiments are virtually all indirectly cooled. In general, these detector magnets are not cryogenically stabilized. Therefore, there are a number of choices for cooling large indirectly cooled detector magnets. These choices include; 1) forced two-phase helium cooling driven by the helium refrigerator J-T circuit, 2) forced two-phase helium cooling driven by a helium pump, and 3) a peculation gravity feed cooling system which uses liquid helium from a large storage dewar. The choices for the cooling of a large detector magnet are illustrated by applying these concepts to a 4.2 meter diameter 0.5 tesla thin superconducting solenoid for an experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC).

  15. Efficient cooling of superconducting fiber core via holey cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homa, Daniel; Kaur, Gurbinder; Pickrell, Gary; Liang, Yongxuan

    2014-05-01

    Superconductivity has the potential to alter the entire landscape of technological advancement and innovation. Unfortunately, its true potential has been limited, in part, by the lack of conventional geometries, adequate stability, cooling efficiencies and in turn, cost. In this study, we demonstrate an optical fiber design with a superconducting core that is cooled via the flow of liquid helium in holes disposed in the fused silica cladding. The efficiently micro cooled superconducting fiber lends itself to low current electronic applications such as ultrasensitive sensing and imaging, quantum measurement instrumentation and supercomputing. Although not presently applicable for large scale applications such as high current transmission lines or motors, the basic approach may be combined with other traditional technologies to improve cooling efficiency and reliability.

  16. System and method for cooling a superconducting rotary machine

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, Robert Adolf; Laskaris, Evangelos Trifon; Huang, Xianrui; Bray, James William

    2011-08-09

    A system for cooling a superconducting rotary machine includes a plurality of sealed siphon tubes disposed in balanced locations around a rotor adjacent to a superconducting coil. Each of the sealed siphon tubes includes a tubular body and a heat transfer medium disposed in the tubular body that undergoes a phase change during operation of the machine to extract heat from the superconducting coil. A siphon heat exchanger is thermally coupled to the siphon tubes for extracting heat from the siphon tubes during operation of the machine.

  17. System and method for cooling a super-conducting device

    SciTech Connect

    Bray, James William; Steinbach, Albert Eugene; Dawson, Richard Nils; Laskaris, Evangelos Trifon; Huang, Xianrul

    2008-01-08

    A system and method for cooling a superconductive rotor coil. The system comprises a rotatable shaft coupled to the superconductive rotor coil. The rotatable shaft may comprise an axial passageway extending through the rotatable shaft and a first passageway extending through a wall of the rotatable shaft to the axial passageway. The axial passageway and the first passageway are operable to convey a cryogenic fluid to the superconductive rotor coil through the wall of the rotatable shaft. A cryogenic transfer coupling may be provided to supply cryogenic fluid to the first passageway.

  18. Stability improvement of AC superconducting magnet by forced-convection cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Ishigohka, T.; Kasuya, A.; Ninomiya, A.

    1996-07-01

    The authors propose a new improved cooling system of an AC(50/60Hz) superconducting magnet introducing a forced-convection flow of liquid helium. In this system, the flow through the cooling channel between the winding layers is generated by a screw rotating in a cylinder surrounding the magnet. A small experimental device composed of an AC superconducting magnet and a rotating screw was manufactured. The screw was rotated by an extended driving shaft. The experimental result shows that the stability of the magnet is improved by the rotation of the screw. That is, the thermal disturbance (heater input power) which generates the quench of the magnet increases as the rotational speed of the screw does. It is expected that this technique can be successfully applied to superconducting AC power apparatuses as transformers or reactors.

  19. Direct cooled power electronics substrate

    DOEpatents

    Wiles, Randy H [Powell, TN; Wereszczak, Andrew A [Oak Ridge, TN; Ayers, Curtis W [Kingston, TN; Lowe, Kirk T [Knoxville, TN

    2010-09-14

    The disclosure describes directly cooling a three-dimensional, direct metallization (DM) layer in a power electronics device. To enable sufficient cooling, coolant flow channels are formed within the ceramic substrate. The direct metallization layer (typically copper) may be bonded to the ceramic substrate, and semiconductor chips (such as IGBT and diodes) may be soldered or sintered onto the direct metallization layer to form a power electronics module. Multiple modules may be attached to cooling headers that provide in-flow and out-flow of coolant through the channels in the ceramic substrate. The modules and cooling header assembly are preferably sized to fit inside the core of a toroidal shaped capacitor.

  20. Progress on Superconducting Magnets for the MICE Cooling Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael A; Virostek, Steve P.; Li, Derun; Zisman, Michael S.; Wang, Li; Pan, Heng; Wu, Hong; Guo, XingLong; Xu, FengYu; Liu, X. K.; Zheng, S. X.; Bradshaw, Thomas; Baynham, Elwyn; Cobb, John; Lau, Wing; Lau, Peter; Yang, Stephanie Q.

    2009-09-09

    The muon ionization cooling experiment (MICE) consists of a target, a beam line, a pion decay channel, the MICE cooling channel. Superconducting magnets are used in the pion decay channel and the MICE cooling channel. This report describes the MICE cooling channel magnets and the progress in the design and fabrication of these magnets. The MICE cooling channel consists of three types of superconducting solenoids; the spectrometer solenoids, the coupling solenoids and the focusing solenoids. The three types of magnets are being fabricated in he United States, China, and the United Kingdom respectively. The spectrometer magnets are used to analyze the muon beam before and after muon cooling. The coupling magnets couple the focusing sections and keep the muon beam contained within the iris of the RF cavities that re used to recover the muon momentum lost during ionization cooling. The focusing magnets focus the muon beam in the center of a liquid hydrogen absorber. The first of the cooling channel magnets will be operational in MICE in the spring of 2010.

  1. Superconductivity Program for Electric Power Systems: 1994 Annual PEER Review. Volume 1, Meeting Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-07-01

    This is Volume 1 of information presented at the Annual Peer Review of the Superconductivity Program For Electric Power Systems. Topics include: Wire development; powder synthesis; characterization of superconducting materials; electric power applications; and motor cooling issues. Individual reports were processed separately for the database.

  2. Cryogenic performance of a cryocooler-cooled superconducting undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Fuerst, J. D.; Doose, C.; Hasse, Q.; Ivanyushenkov, Y.; Kasa, M.; Shiroyanagi, Y.

    2014-01-29

    A cryocooler-cooled superconducting undulator has been installed and operated with beam at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The device consists of a dual-core 42-pole magnet structure that is cooled to 4.2 K with a system of four cryocoolers operating in a zero-boil-off configuration. This effort represents the culmination of a development program to establish concept feasibility and evaluate cryostat design and cryocooler-based refrigeration. Cryostat performance is described including cool-down/warm-up, steady-state operation, cooling margin, and the impact of beam during operation in the APS storage ring. Plans for future devices with longer magnets, which will incorporate lessons learned from the development program, are also discussed.

  3. Influence of neutron irradiation on conduction cooling superconducting magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y.; Yoshida, M.; Ogitsu, T.; Makida, Y.; Nakamoto, T.; Okamura, T.; Sasaki, K.; Sugano, M.

    2015-12-01

    The conduction-cooled superconducting magnets are now widely used in various applications due to their minimum usage of helium. In the accelerator science, they also play an increasingly important role in particle detector solenoids because they can minimize the materials needed for the magnet such that they can be more transparent against irradiated particles. For the same reason they are currently used in high radiation environments because they can reduce the heat load from the irradiation. However, the hadronic reactions, such as neutron or proton irradiation, can create degradation on the thermal conductivity of pure aluminum which is used as a cooling path. It leads to a poor cooling condition of the magnets. In Japan, there are two conduction-cooled superconducting magnets for muon production; one is already constructed and under operation, the other is now under construction. This paper briefly reports the influence of the irradiation on those magnets and discusses the possibilities of HTS based conduction-cooled magnets under high irradiation environments.

  4. Superconductivity for electric power systems: Program overview

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1995-02-01

    Largely due to government and private industry partnerships, electric power applications based upon high-temperature superconductivity are now being designed and tested only seven years after the discovery of the high-temperature superconductors. These applications offer many benefits to the national electric system including: increased energy efficiency, reduced equipment size, reduced emissions, increased stability/reliability, deferred expansion, and flexible electricity dispatch/load management. All of these benefits have a common outcome: lower electricity costs and improved environmental quality. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sponsors research and development through its Superconductivity Program for Electric Power Systems. This program will help develop the technology needed for U.S. industries to commercialize high-temperature superconductive electric power applications. DOE envisions that by 2010 the U.S. electric power systems equipment industry will regain a major share of the global market by offering superconducting products that outperform the competition.

  5. Solar-powered cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Farmer, Joseph C

    2013-12-24

    A solar-powered adsorption-desorption refrigeration and air conditioning system uses nanostructural materials made of high specific surface area adsorption aerogel as the adsorptive media. Refrigerant molecules are adsorbed on the high surface area of the nanostructural material. A circulation system circulates refrigerant from the nanostructural material to a cooling unit.

  6. Magnetic flux studies in horizontally cooled elliptical superconducting cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Martinello, M. Checchin, M.; Grassellino, A. Crawford, A. C.; Melnychuk, O.; Romanenko, A.; Sergatskov, D. A.

    2015-07-28

    Previous studies on magnetic flux expulsion as a function of cooldown procedures for elliptical superconducting radio frequency (SRF) niobium cavities showed that when the cavity beam axis is placed parallel to the helium cooling flow and sufficiently large thermal gradients are achieved, all magnetic flux could be expelled and very low residual resistance could be achieved. In this paper, we investigate flux trapping for the case of resonators positioned perpendicularly to the helium cooling flow, which is more representative of how SRF cavities are cooled in accelerators and for different directions of the applied magnetic field surrounding the resonator. We show that different field components have a different impact on the surface resistance, and several parameters have to be considered to fully understand the flux dynamics. A newly discovered phenomenon of concentration of flux lines at the cavity top leading to temperature rise at the cavity equator is presented.

  7. Trapping hot quasi-particles in a high-power superconducting electronic cooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, H. Q.; Aref, T.; Kauppila, V. J.; Meschke, M.; Winkelmann, C. B.; Courtois, H.; Pekola, J. P.

    2013-08-01

    The performance of hybrid superconducting electronic coolers is usually limited by the accumulation of hot quasi-particles in their superconducting leads. This issue is all the more stringent in large-scale and high-power devices, as required by the applications. Introducing a metallic drain connected to the superconducting electrodes via a fine-tuned tunnel barrier, we efficiently remove quasi-particles and obtain electronic cooling from 300 mK down to 130 mK with a 400 pW cooling power. A simple thermal model accounts for the experimental observations.

  8. Heat pipe cooled power magnetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chester, M. S.

    1979-01-01

    A high frequency, high power, low specific weight (0.57 kg/kW) transformer developed for space use was redesigned with heat pipe cooling allowing both a reduction in weight and a lower internal temperature rise. The specific weight of the heat pipe cooled transformer was reduced to 0.4 kg/kW and the highest winding temperature rise was reduced from 40 C to 20 C in spite of 10 watts additional loss. The design loss/weight tradeoff was 18 W/kg. Additionally, allowing the same 40 C winding temperature rise as in the original design, the KVA rating is increased to 4.2 KVA, demonstrating a specific weight of 0.28 kg/kW with the internal loss increased by 50W. This space environment tested heat pipe cooled design performed as well electrically as the original conventional design, thus demonstrating the advantages of heat pipes integrated into a high power, high voltage magnetic. Another heat pipe cooled magnetic, a 3.7 kW, 20A input filter inductor was designed, developed, built, tested, and described. The heat pipe cooled magnetics are designed to be Earth operated in any orientation.

  9. Performance test of the cryogenic cooling system for the superconducting fault current limiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Yong-Ju; In, Sehwan; Yeom, Han-Kil; Kim, Heesun; Kim, Hye-Rim

    2015-12-01

    A Superconducting Fault Current Limiter is an electric power device which limits the fault current immediately in a power grid. The SFCL must be cooled to below the critical temperature of high temperature superconductor modules. In general, they are submerged in sub-cooled liquid nitrogen for their stable thermal characteristics. To cool and maintain the target temperature and pressure of the sub-cooled liquid nitrogen, the cryogenic cooling system should be designed well with a cryocooler and coolant circulation devices. The pressure of the cryostat for the SFCL should be pressurized to suppress the generation of nitrogen bubbles in quench mode of the SFCL. In this study, we tested the performance of the cooling system for the prototype 154 kV SFCL, which consist of a Stirling cryocooler, a subcooling cryostat, a pressure builder and a main cryostat for the SFCL module, to verify the design of the cooling system and the electric performance of the SFCL. The normal operation condition of the main cryostat is 71 K and 500 kPa. This paper presents tests results of the overall cooling system.

  10. Thermoelectric cooling and power generation

    PubMed

    DiSalvo

    1999-07-30

    In a typical thermoelectric device, a junction is formed from two different conducting materials, one containing positive charge carriers (holes) and the other negative charge carriers (electrons). When an electric current is passed in the appropriate direction through the junction, both types of charge carriers move away from the junction and convey heat away, thus cooling the junction. Similarly, a heat source at the junction causes carriers to flow away from the junction, making an electrical generator. Such devices have the advantage of containing no moving parts, but low efficiencies have limited their use to specialty applications, such as cooling laser diodes. The principles of thermoelectric devices are reviewed and strategies for increasing the efficiency of novel materials are explored. Improved materials would not only help to cool advanced electronics but could also provide energy benefits in refrigeration and when using waste heat to generate electrical power. PMID:10426986

  11. Heat Pipes Cool Power Magnetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, I.; Chester, M.; Luedke, E.

    1983-01-01

    Configurations originally developed for space use are effective in any orientation. Heat pipes integrated into high-power, high-frequency, highvoltage spaceflight magnetics reduce weight and improve reliability by lowering internal tempertures. Two heat pipes integrated in design of power transformer cool unit in any orientation. Electrostatic shield conducts heat from windings to heat pipe evaporator. Technology allows dramatic reductions in size and weight, while significantly improving reliability. In addition, all attitude design of heat pipes allows operation of heat pipes independent of local gravity forces.

  12. Thermoelectric Devices Cool, Power Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Nextreme Thermal Solutions Inc., based in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, licensed thermoelectric technology from NASA s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. This has allowed the company to develop cutting edge, thin-film thermoelectric coolers that effective remove heat generated by increasingly powerful and tightly packed microchip components. These solid-state coolers are ideal solutions for applications like microprocessors, laser diodes, LEDs, and even potentially for cooling the human body. Nextreme s NASA technology has also enabled the invention of thermoelectric generators capable of powering technologies like medical implants and wireless sensor networks.

  13. Surface Power Radiative Cooling Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughn, Jason; Schneider, Todd

    2006-01-20

    Terrestrial nuclear power plants typically maintain their temperature through convective cooling, such as water and forced air. However, the space environment is a vacuum environment, typically 10-8 Torr pressure, therefore in proposed missions to the lunar surface, power plants would have to rely on radiative cooling to remove waste heat. Also, the Martian surface has a very tenuous atmosphere (e.g. {approx}5 Torr CO2), therefore, the main heat transfer method on the Martian surface is also radiative. Because of the lack of atmosphere on the Moon and the tenuous atmosphere on Mars, surface power systems on both the Lunar and Martian surface must rely heavily on radiative heat transfer. Because of the large temperature swings on both the lunar and the Martian surfaces, trying to radiate heat is inefficient. In order to increase power system efficiency, an effort is underway to test various combinations of materials with high emissivities to demonstrate their ability to survive these degrading atmospheres to maintain a constant radiator temperature improving surface power plant efficiency. An important part of this effort is the development of a unique capability that would allow the determination of a materials emissivity at high temperatures. A description of the test capability as well as initial data is presented.

  14. Surface Power Radiative Cooling Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughn, Jason; Schneider, Todd

    2006-01-01

    Terrestrial nuclear power plants typically maintain their temperature through convective cooling, such as water and forced air. However, the space environment is a vacuum environment, typically 10-8 Torr pressure, therefore in proposed missions to the lunar surface, power plants would have to rely on radiative cooling to remove waste heat. Also, the Martian surface has a very tenuous atmosphere (e.g. ~5 Torr CO2), therefore, the main heat transfer method on the Martian surface is also radiative. Because of the lack of atmosphere on the Moon and the tenuous atmosphere on Mars, surface power systems on both the Lunar and Martian surface must rely heavily on radiative heat transfer. Because of the large temperature swings on both the lunar and the Martian surfaces, trying to radiate heat is inefficient. In order to increase power system efficiency, an effort is underway to test various combinations of materials with high emissivities to demonstrate their ability to survive these degrading atmospheres to maintain a constant radiator temperature improving surface power plant efficiency. An important part of this effort is the development of a unique capability that would allow the determination of a materials emissivity at high temperatures. A description of the test capability as well as initial data is presented.

  15. A robust platform cooled by superconducting electronic refrigerators

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, H. Q.; Meschke, M.; Pekola, J. P.

    2015-01-05

    A biased tunnel junction between a superconductor and a normal metal can cool the latter electrode. Based on a recently developed cooler with high power and superior performance, we have integrated it with a dielectric silicon nitride membrane, and cooled phonons from 305 mK down to 200 mK. Without perforation and covered under a thin alumina layer, the membrane is rigorously transformed into a cooling platform that is robust and versatile for multiple practical purposes. We discussed our results and possibilities to further improve the device.

  16. Termination for superconducting power transmission systems

    DOEpatents

    Forsyth, E.B.; Jensen, J.E.

    1975-08-26

    This patent relates to a cold, electrical gradient, terminal section for a superconducting cable for alternating current power transmission. A cold electrical gradient section filled with a gaseous coolant acting as an insulator is provided in series with a separate thermal gradient section. (auth)

  17. Optimal cool-down time of a 4 K superconducting magnet cooled by a two-stage cryocooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yeon Suk; Kim, Dong Lak; Shin, Dong Won

    2012-01-01

    A cool-down time is one of the major factors in many cryocooler applications, especially for the design of conduction-cooled superconducting devices. Cool-down time means a time cooling a thermal mass from a room-temperature to cryogenic-temperature within a stipulated amount of time. The estimation of cool-down time seeks the elapsed time to cool the thermal object by a cryocooler during initial cool-down process. This procedure includes the dimension and properties of thermal object, heat transfer analysis for cryogenic load, thermal interface between cold mass and cryocooler, and available refrigeration capacity of cryocooler. The proposed method is applied to the specific cooling system for 3 T superconducting magnet cooled by a two-stage GM cryocooler. The result is compared with that of experiment, showing that proposed method has a good agreement with experiment. In addition, the initial cool-down time can be shortened by employing thermal link between the cold mass and first-stage of cryocooler. Through a rigorous modeling and analysis taking into account the effect of thermal link size, it is concluded that there exists an optimal cool-down time during initial cooling in conduction-cooled superconducting magnet system.

  18. Bent Superconducting Solenoids for the Muon Cooling Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.; Eyssa, Y.; Kenney, S.; Miller, J. R.; Prestemon, S.; Wang, S.T.

    1999-03-18

    This report describes some solenoid design work done for the cooling experiment for the muon collider collaboration. This report describes an analysis section of superconducting solenoids that have a center line induction of 3.0 T. The section is bent in the shape of an S. Each bend in the S bends the muon beam one radian (57.3 degrees). The warm bore diameter of the solenoid bent solenoid is 300 to 320 mm. The radius of the bend at the solenoid center line is 1000 mm. This report shows the results of three dimensional field calculations and presents a solenoid design that will include four TPC detectors that are 240 mm in diameter and 550 mm long as well as a 1300 mm long section of 1300 MHz RF cavities. The TPC sections need a solenoid wann bore diameter of about 300 320 mm while RF cavities require a warm bore diameter of 440 mm. The superconducting solenoid design must take into account the varying warm bore diameter requirements for the magnet string yet meet the stringent solenoidal field uniformity requirements within the active volume of the four TPCs.

  19. High power density spray cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilton, Donald E.; Pais, Martin R.; Chow, Louis C.

    1989-07-01

    The research reported describes experimental and theoretical investigations of high power density evaporative spray cooling. Preliminary experiments demonstrating heat fluxes greater than 1,000 W/sq cm were conducted. Extensive laser phase Doppler measurements of spray characteristics were also taken. These measurements provided valuable insight into the heat transfer process. An in-depth analysis was conducted to determine the mechanisms responsible for critical heat flux. Theoretical modeling was also conducted to determine the most desirable heat transfer conditions. After analysis of these results, an improved experimental apparatus was designed and fabricated. The new apparatus provided greater experimental control and improve accuracy. New tests were conducted in which the critical heat flux was increased, and the heat transfer efficiency was greatly improved. These results are compared to those of previous researchers, and indicated substantial improvement.

  20. Solar-powered cooling system

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, Joseph C.

    2015-07-28

    A solar-powered adsorption-desorption refrigeration and air conditioning system that uses nanostructural materials such as aerogels, zeolites, and sol gels as the adsorptive media. Refrigerant molecules are adsorbed on the high surface area of the nanostructural material while the material is at a relatively low temperature, perhaps at night. During daylight hours, when the nanostructural materials is heated by the sun, the refrigerant are thermally desorbed from the surface of the aerogel, thereby creating a pressurized gas phase in the vessel that contains the aerogel. This solar-driven pressurization forces the heated gaseous refrigerant through a condenser, followed by an expansion valve. In the condenser, heat is removed from the refrigerant, first by circulating air or water. Eventually, the cooled gaseous refrigerant expands isenthalpically through a throttle valve into an evaporator, in a fashion similar to that in more conventional vapor recompression systems.

  1. Superconducting cable cooling system by helium gas at two pressures

    DOEpatents

    Dean, John W.

    1977-01-01

    Thermally contacting, oppositely streaming, cryogenic fluid streams in the same enclosure in a closed cycle that changes the fluid from a cool high pressure helium gas to a cooler reduced pressure helium gas in an expander so as to be at different temperature ranges and pressures respectively in go and return legs that are in thermal contact with each other and in thermal contact with a longitudinally extending superconducting transmission line enclosed in the same cable enclosure that insulates the line from the ambient at a temperature T.sub.1. By first circulating the fluid from a refrigerator at one end of the line as a cool gas at a temperature range T.sub.2 to T.sub.3 in the go leg, then circulating the gas through an expander at the other end of the line where the gas becomes a cooler gas at a reduced pressure and at a reduced temperature T.sub.4 and finally by circulating the cooler gas back again to the refrigerator in a return leg at a temperature range T.sub.4 to T.sub.5, while in thermal contact with the gas in the go leg, and in the same enclosure therewith for compression into a higher pressure gas at T.sub.2 in a closed cycle, where T.sub.2 >T.sub.3 and T.sub.5 >T.sub.4, the fluid leaves the enclosure in the go leg as a gas at its coldest point in the go leg, and the temperature distribution is such that the line temperature decreases along its length from the refrigerator due to the cooling from the gas in the return leg.

  2. Development of superconducting power devices in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tixador, Pascal

    2010-11-01

    Europe celebrated last year (2008) the 100-year anniversary of the first liquefaction of helium by H. Kammerling Onnes in Leiden. It led to the discovery of superconductivity in 1911. Europe is still active in the development of superconducting (SC) devices. The discovery of high critical temperature materials in 1986, again in Europe, has opened a lot of opportunities for SC devices by broking the 4 K cryogenic bottleneck. Electric networks experience deep changes due to the emergence of dispersed generation (renewable among other) and to the advances in ICT (Information Communication Technologies). The networks of the future will be “smart grids”. Superconductivity will offer “smart” devices for these grids like FCL (Fault Current Limiter) or VLI (Very Low Inductance) cable and would certainly play an important part. Superconductivity also will participate to the required sustainable development by lowering the losses and enhancing the mass specific powers. Different SC projects in Europe will be presented (Cable, FCL, SMES, Flywheel and Electrical Machine) but the description is not exhaustive. Nexans has commercialized the first two FCLs without public funds in the European grid (UK and Germany). The Amsterdam HTS cable is an exciting challenge in term of losses for long SC cables. European companies (Nexans, Air Liquide, Siemens, Converteam, …) are also very active for projects outside Europe (LIPA, DOE FCL, …).

  3. Performance of Conduction Cooled Splittable Superconducting Magnet Package for Linear Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikhin, Vladimire S.; Andreev, N.; Cheban, S.; DiMarco, J.; Kimura, N.; Makarov, A.; Orlov, Y.; Poloubotko. V., Poloubotko. V.; Tartaglia, M.; Yamamoto, A.

    2015-01-01

    New Linear Superconducting Accelerators need a superconducting magnet package installed inside SCRF Cryomodules to focus and steer electron or proton beams. A superconducting magnet package was designed and built as a collaborative effort of FNAL and KEK. The magnet package includes one quadrupole, and two dipole windings. It has a splittable in the vertical plane configuration, and features for conduction cooling. The magnet was successfully tested at room temperature, in a liquid He bath, and in a conduction cooling experiment. The paper describes the design and test results including: magnet cooling, training, and magnetic measurements by rotational coils. The effects of superconductor and iron yoke magnetization, hysteresis, and fringe fields are discussed.

  4. Experimental validation of advanced regulations for superconducting magnet cooling undergoing periodic heat loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagier, B.; Rousset, B.; Hoa, C.; Bonnay, P.

    2014-01-01

    Superconducting magnets used in tokamaks undergo periodic heat load caused by cycling plasma operations inducing AC losses, neutrons fluxes and eddy currents in magnet structures. In the cryogenic system of JT60-SA tokamak, the Auxiliary Cold Box (ACB) distributes helium from the refrigerator to the cryogenic users and in particular to the superconducting magnets. ACB comprises a saturated helium bath with immersed heat exchangers, extracting heat from independent cooling loops. The supercritical helium flow in each cooling loop is driven by a cold circulator. In order to safely operate the refrigerator during plasma pulses, the interface between the ACB and the refrigerator shall be as stable as possible, with well-balanced bath inlet and outlet mass flows during cycling operation. The solution presented in this paper relies on a combination of regulations to smooth pulsed heat loads and to keep a constant refrigeration power during all the cycle. Two smoothing strategies are presented, both regulating the outlet mass flow of the bath: the first one using the bath as a thermal buffer and the second one storing energy in the loop by varying the cold circulator speed. The bath outlet mass flow is also controlled by an immersed resistive heater which enables a constant evaporation rate in the bath when power coming from the loops is decreasing. The refrigeration power is controlled so that the compensating power remains within an acceptable margin. Experimental validation is achieved using the HELIOS facility. This facility running at CEA Grenoble since 2010 is a scaled down model of the ACB bath and Central Solenoid magnet cooling loop of the JT60-SA tokamak. Test results show performances and robustness of the regulations.

  5. Experimental validation of advanced regulations for superconducting magnet cooling undergoing periodic heat loads

    SciTech Connect

    Lagier, B.; Rousset, B.; Hoa, C.; Bonnay, P.

    2014-01-29

    Superconducting magnets used in tokamaks undergo periodic heat load caused by cycling plasma operations inducing AC losses, neutrons fluxes and eddy currents in magnet structures. In the cryogenic system of JT60-SA tokamak, the Auxiliary Cold Box (ACB) distributes helium from the refrigerator to the cryogenic users and in particular to the superconducting magnets. ACB comprises a saturated helium bath with immersed heat exchangers, extracting heat from independent cooling loops. The supercritical helium flow in each cooling loop is driven by a cold circulator. In order to safely operate the refrigerator during plasma pulses, the interface between the ACB and the refrigerator shall be as stable as possible, with well-balanced bath inlet and outlet mass flows during cycling operation. The solution presented in this paper relies on a combination of regulations to smooth pulsed heat loads and to keep a constant refrigeration power during all the cycle. Two smoothing strategies are presented, both regulating the outlet mass flow of the bath: the first one using the bath as a thermal buffer and the second one storing energy in the loop by varying the cold circulator speed. The bath outlet mass flow is also controlled by an immersed resistive heater which enables a constant evaporation rate in the bath when power coming from the loops is decreasing. The refrigeration power is controlled so that the compensating power remains within an acceptable margin. Experimental validation is achieved using the HELIOS facility. This facility running at CEA Grenoble since 2010 is a scaled down model of the ACB bath and Central Solenoid magnet cooling loop of the JT60-SA tokamak. Test results show performances and robustness of the regulations.

  6. Design of a conduction-cooled 4 T superconducting racetrack for a multi-field coupling measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Quan; Ma, Li-Zhen; Wu, Wei; Guan, Ming-Zhi; Wu, Bei-Min; Mei, En-Ming; Xin, Can-Jie

    2015-12-01

    A conduction-cooled superconducting magnet producing a transverse field of 4 T has been designed for a new generation multi-field coupling measurement system, which will be used to study the mechanical behavior of superconducting samples at cryogenic temperatures and intense magnetic fields. A compact cryostat with a two-stage GM cryocooler is designed and manufactured for the superconducting magnet. The magnet is composed of a pair of flat racetrack coils wound by NbTi/Cu superconducting composite wires, a copper and stainless steel combinational former and two Bi2Sr2CaCu2Oy superconducting current leads. The two coils are connected in series and can be powered with a single power supply. In order to support the high stress and attain uniform thermal distribution in the superconducting magnet, a detailed finite element (FE) analysis has been performed. The results indicate that in the operating status the designed magnet system can sufficiently bear the electromagnetic forces and has a uniform temperature distribution. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11327802, 11302225), China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (2014M560820) and National Scholarship Foundation of China (201404910172)

  7. Trial manufacture of liquid nitrogen cooling High Temperature Superconductivity Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, H.; Nishikawa, T.; Tsuda, T.; Hondou, Y.; Akita, Y.; Takeda, T.; Okazaki, T.; Ohashi, S.; Yoshida, Y.

    2006-06-01

    We present a new high temperature superconductivity (HTS) synchronous motor using the liquid nitrogen as the refrigerant in this paper. This motor is designed to be used as the propulsion motor in ship. Because we use the liquid nitrogen as the refrigerant, it is possible to simplify the cooling equipments in the motor. And in our design, we apply the axial flux type of motor to simplify the cryostat of the HTS wires used to make the field coils. Here, the fields using the bismuth HTS wire for the HTS coils are fixed. Moreover, the cores used in the fields are separated from cryostat, and the armature applies the core-less structure. According to various the electromagnetic field analysis results, the new motor was designed and produced. The diameter of the motor is 650mm, and the width of the motor is 360mm. The motor's rated output is 8.8kW at 100rpm, while the overload output is 44kW, and the maximum efficiency is 97.7%. Also, in order to further miniaturize the motor, other magnetic field analysis have been done when the high-current-density type HTS wire was used and the permendur was used instead of magnetic steel plates. In this case, the motor's rated output is 12kW, and the overload output is 60kW.

  8. Fundamental Power Couplers for Superconducting Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Isidoro E. Campisi

    2001-09-01

    Fundamental power couplers (FPC's) for superconducting cavities must meet very strict requirements to perform at high power levels (hundreds of kilowatts) and in a variety of conditions (CS, pulsed, travelling wave, standing wave) without adversely affecting the performance of the cavities they are powering. Producing good coupler designs and achieving operational performances in accelerator environments are challenging tasks that have traditionally involved large resources from many laboratories. The designs involve state-of-the-art activities in RF, cryogenic and mechanical engineering, materials science, vacuum technology, and electromagnetic field modeling. Handling, assembly and conditioning procedures have been developed to achieve ever-increasing power levels and more reliable operation. In this paper, the technical issues associated with the design, construction, assembly, processing, and operation of FPC's will be reviewed, together with the progress in FPC activities in several laboratories during the past few years.

  9. Superconductivity Program for Electric Power Systems: 1994 Annual PEER Review. Volume 2, Meeting Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-07-01

    This is volume 2 of information that was presented at the 1994 Annual Peer Review, Superconductivity Program For Electric Power. Topics include component development; characterization of high-(Tc) Superconductors; wire development; coils; magnetic refrigerators; motor cooling issues; and magnetic separation. Individual projects were processed separately for the database.

  10. Superconducting power link for power transmission and fault current limitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paasi, J.; Herrmann, P. F.; Verhaege, T.; Lehtonen, J.; Bock, J.; Cowey, L.; Freyhardt, H. C.; Usoskin, A.; Moulaert, G.; Collet, M.

    2001-05-01

    Superconducting power links (SUPERPOLI) will offer the opportunity for low-loss power transmission of high nominal currents and fault current limitation simultaneously in a single device. This paper presents the status of European SUPERPOLI project where the long term goal is to build a GVA class, 20 kV, three-phased, 200 m long superconducting power link. As a step towards the GVA-class application, a one-phase demonstrator of 2 m length for 20 kV, 2-5 kA rms operation has been designed and is now under construction. The project includes the development of two alternative low-ac-loss conductor designs suitable for current limitation: a tubular Bi-2212 bulk conductor with moderate Jc and a tubular YBCO coated conductor with high Jc.

  11. Small high cooling power space cooler

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, T. V.; Raab, J.; Durand, D.; Tward, E.

    2014-01-29

    The small High Efficiency pulse tube Cooler (HEC) cooler, that has been produced and flown on a number of space infrared instruments, was originally designed to provide cooling of 10 W @ 95 K. It achieved its goal with >50% margin when limited by the 180 W output ac power of its flight electronics. It has also been produced in 2 stage configurations, typically for simultaneously cooling of focal planes to temperatures as low as 35 K and optics at higher temperatures. The need for even higher cooling power in such a low mass cryocooler is motivated by the advent of large focal plane arrays. With the current availability at NGAS of much larger power cryocooler flight electronics, reliable long term operation in space with much larger cooling powers is now possible with the flight proven 4 kg HEC mechanical cooler. Even though the single stage cooler design can be re-qualified for those larger input powers without design change, we redesigned both the linear and coaxial version passive pulse tube cold heads to re-optimize them for high power cooling at temperatures above 130 K while rejecting heat to 300 K. Small changes to the regenerator packing, the re-optimization of the tuned inertance and no change to the compressor resulted in the increased performance at 150 K. The cooler operating at 290 W input power achieves 35 W@ 150 K corresponding to a specific cooling power at 150 K of 8.25 W/W and a very high specific power of 72.5 W/Kg. At these powers the cooler still maintains large stroke, thermal and current margins. In this paper we will present the measured data and the changes to this flight proven cooler that were made to achieve this increased performance.

  12. Estimation of the superconducting joint for the forced-cooled superconducting poloidal coil for the Large Helical Device

    SciTech Connect

    Hanawa, S.; Wachi, Y.; Shibayama, K.

    1996-07-01

    The authors applied a new solid state bonding technique to the joints of the forced-cooled superconducting poloidal coils for LHD. The NbTi/Cu wires of the cable-in-conduit (CIC) conductors were joined superconductively by this technique to realize the low electrical resistance and compactness. They make several joint samples and study the joint condition among the NbTi filaments. By the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) they make sure that the filaments are joined with very narrow gaps. They measure the magnetization of the joint using Superconducting Quantum Interference Device and estimate the effective diameter of the filaments to be about 90 {micro}m. This value shows that the joint is magnetically stable by the adiabatic theory.

  13. Power electronics substrate for direct substrate cooling

    DOEpatents

    Le, Khiet; Ward, Terence G.; Mann, Brooks S.; Yankoski, Edward P.; Smith, Gregory S.

    2012-05-01

    Systems and apparatus are provided for power electronics substrates adapted for direct substrate cooling. A power electronics substrate comprises a first surface configured to have electrical circuitry disposed thereon, a second surface, and a plurality of physical features on the second surface. The physical features are configured to promote a turbulent boundary layer in a coolant impinged upon the second surface.

  14. Performance of conduction cooled splittable superconducting magnet package for linear accelerators

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kashikhin, Vladimire S.; Andreev, N.; Cheban, S.; DiMarco, J.; Kimura, N.; Makarov, A.; Orlov, Y.; V. Poloubotko; Tartaglia, M.; Yamamoto, A.

    2016-02-19

    New Linear Superconducting Accelerators need a superconducting magnet package installed inside SCRF Cryomodules to focus and steer electron or proton beams. A superconducting magnet package was designed and built as a collaborative effort of FNAL and KEK. The magnet package includes one quadrupole, and two dipole windings. It has a splittable in the vertical plane configuration, and features for conduction cooling. The magnet was successfully tested at room temperature, in a liquid He bath, and in a conduction cooling experiment. The paper describes the design and test results including: magnet cooling, training, and magnetic measurements by rotational coils. Furthermore, themore » effects of superconductor and iron yoke magnetization, hysteresis, and fringe fields are discussed.« less

  15. Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, Yung K.

    Many potential high-temperature superconductivity (HTS) military applications have been demonstrated by low-temperature superconductivity systems; they encompass high efficiency electric drives for naval vessels, airborne electric generators, energy storage systems for directed-energy weapons, electromechanical launchers, magnetic and electromagnetic shields, and cavity resonators for microwave and mm-wave generation. Further HST applications in militarily relevant fields include EM sensors, IR focal plane arrays, SQUIDs, magnetic gradiometers, high-power sonar sources, and superconducting antennas and inertial navigation systems. The development of SQUID sensors will furnish novel magnetic anomaly detection methods for ASW.

  16. Pressure rise during the quench of a superconducting magnet using internally cooled conductors

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.R.; Dresner, L.; Lue, J.W.; Shen, S.S.; Yeh, H.T.

    1980-01-01

    Superconducting magnets cooled by supercritical helium flowing through internal conductor passages are an alternative to magnets cooled in a boiling pool. This alternative involves a possible large pressure increase in the captured volume of helium during a quench. In the US Large Coil Program (LCP), three of six coils to be tested will use internally cooled conductors. This paper describes experiments performed to understand the quench behavior of the Westinghouse coil. Agreement between experiment and theory is good. Also discussed is the extension of this work to the EURATOM coil and the Swiss coil, as well as to any coils wound with internally cooled conductors.

  17. Application of Superconducting Power Cables to DC Electric Railway Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohsaki, Hiroyuki; Lv, Zhen; Sekino, Masaki; Tomita, Masaru

    For novel design and efficient operation of next-generation DC electric railway systems, especially for their substantial energy saving, we have studied the feasibility of applying superconducting power cables to them. In this paper it is assumed that a superconducting power cable is applied to connect substations supplying electric power to trains. An analysis model line was described by an electric circuit, which was analyzed with MATLAB-Simulink. From the calculated voltages and currents of the circuit, the regenerative brake and the energy losses were estimated. In addition, assuming the heat loads of superconducting power cables and the cryogenic efficiency, the energy saving of the total system was evaluated. The results show that the introduction of superconducting power cables could achieve the improved use of regenerative brake, the loss reduction, the decreased number of substations, the reduced maintenance, etc.

  18. Hydrogen cooling options for MgB{sub 2}-based superconducting systems

    SciTech Connect

    Stautner, W.; Xu, M.; Mine, S.; Amm, K.

    2014-01-29

    With the arrival of MgB{sub 2} for low-cost superconducting magnets, hydrogen cooling has become an interesting alternative to costly liquid helium. Hydrogen is generally regarded as the most efficient coolant in cryogenics and, in particular, is well suited for cooling superconducting magnets. Cooling methods need to take into account the specific quench propagation in the MgB{sub 2} magnet winding and facilitate a cryogenically reliable and safe cooling environment. The authors propose three different multi-coolant options for MRI scanners using helium or hydrogen within the same design framework. Furthermore, a design option for whole-body scanners which employs technology, components, fueling techniques and safety devices from the hydrogen automotive industry is presented, continuing the trend towards replacing helium with hydrogen as a safe and cost efficient coolant.

  19. Potential Refrigerants for Power Electronics Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Starke, M.R.

    2005-10-24

    In the past, automotive refrigerants have conventionally been used solely for the purpose of air conditioning. However, with the development of hybrid-electric vehicles and the incorporation of power electronics (PEs) into the automobile, automotive refrigerants are taking on a new role. Unfortunately, PEs have lifetimes and functionalities that are highly dependent on temperature and as a result thermal control plays an important role in the performance of PEs. Typically, PEs are placed in the engine compartment where the internal combustion engine (ICE) already produces substantial heat. Along with the ICE heat, the additional thermal energy produced by PEs themselves forces designers to use different cooling methods to prevent overheating. Generally, heat sinks and separate cooling loops are used to maintain the temperature. Disturbingly, the thermal control system can consume one third of the total volume and may weigh more than the PEs [1]. Hence, other avenues have been sought to cool PEs, including submerging PEs in automobile refrigerants to take advantage of two-phase cooling. The objective of this report is to explore the different automotive refrigerants presently available that could be used for PE cooling. Evaluation of the refrigerants will be done by comparing environmental effects and some thermo-physical properties important to two-phase cooling, specifically measuring the dielectric strengths of potential candidates. Results of this report will be used to assess the different candidates with good potential for future use in PE cooling.

  20. Direct-Cooled Power Electronics Substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Wiles, R.; Ayers, C.; Wereszczak, A.

    2008-12-23

    The goal of the Direct-Cooled Power Electronics Substrate project is to reduce the size and weight of the heat sink for power electronics used in hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). The concept proposed in this project was to develop an innovative power electronics mounting structure, model it, and perform both thermal and mechanical finite-element analysis (FEA). This concept involved integrating cooling channels within the direct-bonded copper (DBC) substrate and strategically locating these channels underneath the power electronic devices. This arrangement would then be directly cooled by water-ethylene glycol (WEG), essentially eliminating the conventional heat sink and associated heat flow path. The concept was evaluated to determine its manufacturability, its compatibility with WEG, and the potential to reduce size and weight while directly cooling the DBC and associated electronics with a coolant temperature of 105 C. This concept does not provide direct cooling to the electronics, only direct cooling inside the DBC substrate itself. These designs will take into account issues such as containment of the fluid (separation from the electronics) and synergy with the whole power inverter design architecture. In FY 2008, mechanical modeling of substrate and inverter core designs as well as thermal and mechanical stress FEA modeling of the substrate designs was performed, along with research into manufacturing capabilities and methods that will support the substrate designs. In FY 2009, a preferred design(s) will be fabricated and laboratory validation testing will be completed. In FY 2010, based on the previous years laboratory testing, the mechanical design will be modified and the next generation will be built and tested in an operating inverter prototype.

  1. Cooling power of transverse thermoelectrics for cryogenic cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yang; Ma, Ming; Grayson, M.

    2016-05-01

    Transverse Peltier coolers have been experimentally and theoretically studied since 1960s due to their capability of achieving cooling in a single-leg geometry. Recently proposed pxn-type transverse thermoelectrics reveal the possibility of intrinsic or undoped transverse coolers that can, in principle, function at cryogenic temperatures, which has drawn more attention to the performance of such transverse coolers. However, unlike longitudinal thermoelectrics, the equations for transverse thermoelectrics cannot be solved analytically. In this study, we therefore calculate the thermoelectric transport in transverse coolers numerically, and introduce a normalized notation, which reduces the independent parameters in the governing equations to a normalized electric field E* and a hot-side transverse figure of merit zTh, only. A numerical study of the maximum cooling temperature difference and cooling power reveals the superior performance of transverse thermoelectric coolers compared to longitudinal coolers with the same figure of merit, providing another motivation in the search for new transverse thermoelectric materials with large figure of merit.

  2. Paramagnetic moment in field-cooled superconducting plates: Paramagnetic Meissner effect

    SciTech Connect

    Koshelev, A.E.; Larkin, A.I.

    1995-11-01

    We calculate the magnetic moment for thin superconducting plates after field cooling. We consider the situation when the whole magnetic flux is trapped within the strip and compressed due to inhomogeneous cooling. We demonstrate that the magnetic moment in such a state is paramagnetic. For a thin superconducting strip we found exact solutions for the field and current distributions at any degree of flux compression. The cases of complete and partial Bean states were considered. For a thin superconducting disk we found an approximate solution for the case of weak compression and a complete Bean state. The mechanism considered can explain the paramagnetic Meissner effect observed recently in some high-{ital T}{sub {ital c}} superconductors and in Nb.

  3. Hybrid Wet/Dry Cooling for Power Plants (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Kutscher, C.; Buys, A.; Gladden, C.

    2006-02-01

    This presentation includes an overview of cooling options, an analysis of evaporative enhancement of air-cooled geothermal power plants, field measurements at a geothermal plant, a preliminary analysis of trough plant, and improvements to air-cooled condensers.

  4. Steam-Electric Power-Plant-Cooling Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnichsen, J.C.; Carlson, H.A.; Charles, P.D.; Jacobson, L.D.; Tadlock, L.A.

    1982-02-01

    The Steam-Electric Power Plant Cooling Handbook provides summary data on steam-electric power plant capacity, generation and number of plants for each cooling means, by Electric Regions, Water Resource Regions and National Electric Reliability Council Areas. Water consumption by once-through cooling, cooling ponds and wet evaporative towers is discussed and a methodology for computation of water consumption is provided for a typical steam-electric plant which uses a wet evaporative tower or cooling pond for cooling.

  5. a Rotating Heat Pipe for Cooling of Superconducting Machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jankowski, T. A.; Prenger, F. C.; Schmierer, E. N.; Razani, A.

    2008-03-01

    A curved rotating heat pipe for use in superconducting motor and generator applications is introduced here. The heat pipe shown here is built so that both the condenser and evaporator sections are parallel to the axis of rotation. The condenser section is concentric with the axis of rotation while the evaporator section can be placed in contact with off-axis heat sources in the rotating machine. The geometry is achieved by incorporating an S-shaped curve between the on-axis rotating condenser section and the off-axis revolving evaporator section. We show that because the heat pipe is a sealed, passive heat transfer device with nearly isothermal operation, the heat pipe concept may be advantageous when considering the overall refrigeration system used with the superconducting machine. High-speed, room temperature test data with this heat pipe geometry indicate that the working fluid in the heat pipe continued to circulate, resulting in heat transfer with a high effective thermal conductivity, with the heat pipe operating under the influence of centrifugal accelerations approaching 400 g.

  6. Thermal analysis of the APT power coupler and similarities to superconducting magnet current leads

    SciTech Connect

    Waynert, J.A.; Daney, D.E.; Prenger, F.C.

    1998-12-31

    A detailed thermal analysis has been performed of the 210 kW, 700 MHz RF power coupler (PC) which transfers microwave energy from high power klystrons to the superconducting (SC) resonant cavities for the acceleration of protons. The work is part of the design for Accelerator Production of Tritium funded by the US Department of Energy. The PC is a co-axial design with the RF power transmitted in the annular region between two concentric cylinders. The PC provides a thermal connection from room temperature to superconducting niobium operating at 2.15 K. Heat transfer mechanisms considered are conduction, infra-red radiation, RF joule heating in normal and superconducting materials, and, forced and natural convection cooling. The objective of the thermal analysis is to minimize the required refrigeration power subject to manufacturability and reliability concerns. The problem is reminiscent of the optimization of superconducting magnet leads. The similarities and differences in the results between SC leads and PCs are discussed as well as the critical parameters in the PC optimization.

  7. Study of high field superconducting solenoids for muon beam cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikhin, V.V.; Barzi, E.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Lamm, Michael J.; Sadovskiy, Y.; Zlobin, Alexander V; /Fermilab

    2007-08-01

    The final beam cooling stages of a possible Muon Collider may require DC solenoid magnets with magnetic fields of 40-50 T in an aperture of 40-50 mm. In this paper we study possible solutions towards creating DC fields of that order using available superconductors. Several magnetic and mechanical designs, optimized for the maximum performance are presented and compared in terms of cost and size.

  8. Polk power station syngas cooling system

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, S.D.

    1995-01-01

    Tampa Electric Company (TEC) is in the site development and construction phase of the new Polk Power Station Unit No. 1. This will be the first unit at a new site and will use Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Technology. The unit will utilize Texaco`s oxygen-blown, entrained-flow coal gasification, along with combined cycle power generation, to produce nominal 260MW. Integral to the gasification process is the syngas cooling system. The design, integration, fabrication, transportation, and erection of this equipment have provided and continue to provide major challenges for this project.

  9. Heat pipe cooling of power processing magnetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, I. G.; Chester, M. S.

    1979-01-01

    A heat pipe cooled transformer and input filter were developed for the 2.4 kW beam supply of a 30 cm ion thruster system. This development yielded a mass reduction of 40% (1.76 kg) and lower mean winding temperature (20 C lower). While these improvements are significant, preliminary designs predict even greater benefits to be realized at higher power. The design details are presented along with the results of thermal vacuum operation and the component performance in a 3 kW breadboard power processor.

  10. Solid-Cryogen Cooling Technique for Superconducting Magnets of NMR and MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasa, Yukikazu; Bascuñán, Juan; Hahn, Seungyong; Park, Dong Keun

    This paper describes a solid-cryogen cooling technique currently being developed at the M.I.T. Francis Bitter Magnet Laboratory for application to superconducting magnets of NMR and MRI. The technique is particularly appropriate for "dry" magnets that do not rely on liquid cryogen, e.g., liquid helium (LHe), as their primary cooling sources. In addition, the advantages of a cryocirculator (a combination of a cryocooler and a working fluid circulator) over a cryocooler as the primary cooling source for dry magnets are described. The four magnets described here, all incorporating this cooling technique described and currently being developed at the FBML, are: 1) a solid-nitrogen (SN2)-cooled Nb3Sn 500-MHz/200-mm MRI magnet with an operating temperature range between 4.2 K (nominal) and 6.0 K (maximum with its primary cooling source off); 2) an SN2-cooled MgB2 0.5-T/800-mm MRI magnet, 1015 K; 3) an SN2-cooled compact YBCO "annulus" 100-MHz/9-mm NMR magnet, 10-15 K; 4) an SN2-cooled 1.5T/75-mm NbTi magnet for slow magic-angle-spinning NMR/MRI, 4.5-5.5 K.

  11. Cryogenic Thermal Studies on Terminations for Helium Gas Cooled Superconducting Cables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chul Han; Kim, Sung-Kyu; Graber, Lukas; Pamidi, Sastry V.

    Details of the design of terminations for testing a superconducting DC monopole cable cooled with gaseous helium are presented. The termination design includes a liquid nitrogen chamber to reduce heat influx into the helium section through current leads. Thermal studies on the assembly of the two terminations and a 1 m or 30 m cable cryostat were performed at variable mass flow rates of helium gas. Measurements of temperature profile for the test system without the superconducting cable showed temperature rise between 5 K and 20 K depending on the mass flow rate. The temperature profile across the test system was used to estimate the heat load from different components of the system. Results with and without the liquid nitrogen in current lead section were compared to estimate the savings provided by the liquid nitrogen on the head of the helium circulation system. Suggestions for improving the design to enable fully gas cooled terminations are presented.

  12. Numerical Simulations for the Cool-Down of the XFEL and TTF Superconducting Linear Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Jensch, K.; Lange, R.; Petersen, B.

    2004-06-23

    The alignment of the superconducting RF-cavities and the magnet packages of the cryomodules of the future XFEL linear accelerator and the existing TTF linear accelerator at DESY can be affected by the mechanical stress caused by thermal gradients during the cool-down and warm-up. Also the design of the XFEL cryogenic system has to include the cool-down and warm-up procedures. An object-oriented software concept is applied to analyze the cool-down procedures for the TTF and the XFEL linear accelerators by numerical simulations. The numerical results are compared to measurements taken during the first cool-down of the TTF linear accelerator. Some results for the XFEL cryogenic system are presented.

  13. Design analysis of a solid nitrogen cooled ''permanent'' high-temperature superconducting magnet system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haid, Benjamin J.; Lee, Haigun; Iwasa, Yukikazu; Oh, Sang-Soo; Kwon, Young-Kil; Ryu, Kang-Sik

    2002-10-01

    Potential performance advantages of a solid nitrogen cooled "permanent" high-temperature superconducting (SN2/HTS) magnet system over a liquid helium cooled low-temperature superconducting (LHe/LTS) system are explored. The SN2/HTS system design includes a second solid heat capacitor that cools a radiation shield. Recooling of the heat capacitors is performed with a demountable cryocooler. The SN2/HTS system offers both enhanced stability and improved portability over a LHe/LTS system. Design codes are constructed to compare the SN2/HTS system design with a LHe/LTS design for a general permanent superconducting magnet system employing a room temperature bore. The codes predict the system volume and mass that should be expected for a given set of design requirements, i.e. field strength and bore size, and a given set of conductor properties. The results indicate that present HTS conductor critical current and index are not yet sufficient for producing SN2/HTS systems of a size that is comparable with that expected for a LHe/LTS system; however, the conductor properties of Bi2223/Ag have been consistently improving, and new HTS conductors are expected to be developed in the near future. The codes are used to determine the minimum Bi2223/Ag conductor performance required for a SN2/HTS system to be competitive with a LHe/LTS system.

  14. Power converter having improved fluid cooling

    DOEpatents

    Meyer, Andreas A.; Radosevich, Lawrence D.; Beihoff, Bruce C.; Kehl, Dennis L.; Kannenberg, Daniel G.

    2007-03-06

    A thermal support may receive one or more power electronic circuits. The support may aid in removing heat from the circuits through fluid circulating through the support, which may be controlled in a closed-loop manner. Interfacing between circuits, circuit mounting structure, and the support provide for greatly enhanced cooling. The support may form a shield from both external EMI/RFI and from interference generated by operation of the power electronic circuits. Features may be provided to permit and enhance connection of the circuitry to external circuitry, such as improved terminal configurations. Modular units may be assembled that may be coupled to electronic circuitry via plug-in arrangements or through interface with a backplane or similar mounting and interconnecting structures.

  15. COOLING OF COMPACT STARS WITH COLOR SUPERCONDUCTING PHASE IN QUARK-HADRON MIXED PHASE

    SciTech Connect

    Noda, Tsuneo; Hashimoto, Masa-aki; Yasutake, Nobutoshi; Maruyama, Toshiki; Tatsumi, Toshitaka; Fujimoto, Masayuki E-mail: hashimoto@phys.kyushu-u.ac.jp

    2013-03-01

    We present a new scenario for the cooling of compact stars considering the central source of Cassiopeia A (Cas A). The Cas A observation shows that the central source is a compact star that has high effective temperature, and it is consistent with the cooling without exotic phases. The observation also gives the mass range of M {>=} 1.5 M {sub Sun }, which may conflict with the current plausible cooling scenario of compact stars. There are some cooled compact stars such as Vela or 3C58, which can barely be explained by the minimal cooling scenario, which includes the neutrino emission by nucleon superfluidity (PBF). Therefore, we invoke the exotic cooling processes, where a heavier star cools faster than lighter one. However, the scenario seems to be inconsistent with the observation of Cas A. Therefore, we present a new cooling scenario to explain the observation of Cas A by constructing models that include a quark color superconducting (CSC) phase with a large energy gap; this phase appears at ultrahigh density regions and reduces neutrino emissivity. In our model, a compact star has a CSC quark core with a low neutrino emissivity surrounded by high emissivity region made by normal quarks. We present cooling curves obtained from the evolutionary calculations of compact stars: while heavier stars cool slowly, and lighter ones indicate the opposite tendency without considering nucleon superfluidity. Furthermore, we show that our scenario is consistent with the recent observations of the effective temperature of Cas A during the last 10 years, including nucleon superfluidity.

  16. Venus Surface Power and Cooling System Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Mellott, Kenneth D.

    2004-01-01

    A radioisotope power and cooling system is designed to provide electrical power for the a probe operating on the surface of Venus. Most foreseeable electronics devices and sensors simply cannot operate at the 450 C ambient surface temperature of Venus. Because the mission duration is substantially long and the use of thermal mass to maintain an operable temperature range is likely impractical, some type of active refrigeration may be required to keep certain components at a temperature below ambient. The fundamental cooling requirements are comprised of the cold sink temperature, the hot sink temperature, and the amount of heat to be removed. In this instance, it is anticipated that electronics would have a nominal operating temperature of 300 C. Due to the highly thermal convective nature of the high-density atmosphere, the hot sink temperature was assumed to be 50 C, which provided a 500 C temperature of the cooler's heat rejecter to the ambient atmosphere. The majority of the heat load on the cooler is from the high temperature ambient surface environment on Venus. Assuming 5 cm radial thickness of ceramic blanket insulation, the ambient heat load was estimated at approximately 77 watts. With an estimated quantity of 10 watts of heat generation from electronics and sensors, and to accommodate some level of uncertainty, the total heat load requirement was rounded up to an even 100 watts. For the radioisotope Stirling power converter configuration designed, the Sage model predicts a thermodynamic power output capacity of 478.1 watts, which slightly exceeds the required 469.1 watts. The hot sink temperature is 1200 C, and the cold sink temperature is 500 C. The required heat input is 1740 watts. This gives a thermodynamic efficiency of 27.48 %. The maximum theoretically obtainable efficiency is 47.52 %. It is estimated that the mechanical efficiency of the power converter design is on the order of 85 %, based on experimental measurements taken from 500 watt power

  17. Designs for a high power superconducting delay line

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.J.; Caporaso, G.

    1997-06-26

    Potential designs for a high power superconducting delay line of approximately 10 microsecs duration are described. The transmitted signal should have low dispersion and little attenuation to recapture the original signal. Such demands cannot be met using conventional metal conductors. This paper outlines a proposal for a new transmission line design using low temperature superconducting material which meets system specifications. The 25 omega line is designed to carry pulsed signals with an approximate rise time of 8 nsec and a maximum voltage magnitude of 25 kV. Predicted electrical design and performance of the line will be presented.

  18. Liquid Metal Cooled Reactor for Space Power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weitzberg, Abraham

    2003-01-01

    The conceptual design is for a liquid metal (LM) cooled nuclear reactor that would provide heat to a closed Brayton cycle (CBC) power conversion subsystem to provide electricity for electric propulsion thrusters and spacecraft power. The baseline power level is 100 kWe to the user. For long term power generation, UN pin fuel with Nb1Zr alloy cladding was selected. As part of the SP-100 Program this fuel demonstrated lifetime with greater than six atom percent burnup, at temperatures in the range of 1400-1500 K. The CBC subsystem was selected because of the performance and lifetime database from commercial and aircraft applications and from prior NASA and DOE space programs. The high efficiency of the CBC also allows the reactor to operate at relatively low power levels over its 15-year life, minimizing the long-term power density and temperature of the fuel. The scope of this paper is limited to only the nuclear components that provide heated helium-xenon gas to the CBC subsystem. The principal challenge for the LM reactor concept was to design the reactor core, shield and primary heat transport subsystems to meet mission requirements in a low mass configuration. The LM concept design approach was to assemble components from prior programs and, with minimum change, determine if the system met the objective of the study. All of the components are based on technologies having substantial data bases. Nuclear, thermalhydraulic, stress, and shielding analyses were performed using available computer codes. Neutronics issues included maintaining adequate operating and shutdown reactivities, even under accident conditions. Thermalhydraulic and stress analyses calculated fuel and material temperatures, coolant flows and temperatures, and thermal stresses in the fuel pins, components and structures. Using conservative design assumptions and practices, consistent with the detailed design work performed during the SP-100 Program, the mass of the reactor, shield, primary heat

  19. Improved cooling design for high power waveguide system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, W. C. J.; Hartop, R.

    1981-01-01

    Testing of X band high power components in a traveling wave resonator indicates that this improved cooling design reduces temperature in the waveguide and flange. The waveguide power handling capability and power transmission reliability is increased substantially.

  20. Critical current density and current distribution in field cooled superconducting disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernstein, Pierre; Noudem, Jacques; Dupont, Louis

    2016-07-01

    Applications of bulk superconductors concern superconducting motors and generators, the levitation of vehicles, the generation of high magnetic fields with small size cryo-magnets, the shielding of magnetic fields and other applications. For all of them, it is essential to determine the critical current density, and to understand the effect of the shape and size of the bulks on the properties of interest. In this contribution, we show how the combination of levitation force and trapped field measurements allow one to determine the characteristics and the potential performances of superconducting disks using analytical modeling. As examples of applications we detail the effects of the magnetizing field and of the bulk sheet critical current density on the levitation force. An important result of the reported measurements is that in field-cooled samples, the shielding currents possibly do not flow along the whole thickness of the disks.

  1. Performance Analysis of XCPC Powered Solar Cooling Demonstration Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widyolar, Bennett K.

    A solar thermal cooling system using novel non-tracking External Compound Parabolic Concentrators (XCPC) has been built at the University of California, Merced and operated for two cooling seasons. Its performance in providing power for space cooling has been analyzed. This solar cooling system is comprised of 53.3 m2 of XCPC trough collectors which are used to power a 23 kW double effect (LiBr) absorption chiller. This is the first system that combines both XCPC and absorption chilling technologies. Performance of the system was measured in both sunny and cloudy conditions, with both clean and dirty collectors. It was found that these collectors are well suited at providing thermal power to drive absorption cooling systems and that both the coinciding of available thermal power with cooling demand and the simplicity of the XCPC collectors compared to other solar thermal collectors makes them a highly attractive candidate for cooling projects.

  2. New power-conditioning systems for superconducting magnetic energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Byung Moon

    1992-06-01

    This dissertation presents the development of new power-conditioning systems for superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES), which can regulate fast and independently the active and reactive powers demanded in the ac network. Three new power-conditioning systems were developed through a systematic approach to match the requirements of the superconducting coil and the ac power network. Each of these new systems is composed of ten 100-MW modules connected in parallel to handle the large current through the superconducting coil. The first system, which was published in the IEEE Transactions on Energy Conversion, consists of line-commutated 24-pulse converter, a thyristor-switched tap-changing transformer, and a thyristor-switched capacitor bank. The second system, which was accepted for publication in the IEEE Transactions on Energy Conversion, consists of a 12-pulse GTO (gate turn-off thyristor) converter and a thyristor-switched tap-changing transformer. The third system, which was submitted to the International Journal of Energy System, consists of a dc chopper and a voltage-source PWM (pulse width modulation) converter. The operational concept of each new system is verified through mathematical analyses and computer simulations. The dynamic interaction of each new system with the ac network and the superconducting coil is analyzed using a simulation model with EMTP (electro-magnetic transients program). The analysis results prove that each new system is feasible and realizable. Each system can regulate the active and reactive powers of the utility network rapidly and independently, and each offer a significant reduction of the system rating by reducing the reactive power demand in the converter. Feasible design for each new system was introduced using a modular design approach based on the 1000 MW/5000 MWH plant, incorporating commercially available components and proven technologies.

  3. Cryogenic-temperature profiling of high-power superconducting lines using local and distributed optical-fiber sensors.

    PubMed

    Chiuchiolo, Antonella; Palmieri, Luca; Consales, Marco; Giordano, Michele; Borriello, Anna; Bajas, Hugues; Galtarossa, Andrea; Bajko, Marta; Cusano, Andrea

    2015-10-01

    This contribution presents distributed and multipoint fiber-optic monitoring of cryogenic temperatures along a superconducting power transmission line down to 30 K and over 20 m distance. Multipoint measurements were conducted using fiber Bragg gratings sensors coated with two different functional overlays (epoxy and poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA)) demonstrating cryogenic operation in the range 300-4.2 K. Distributed measurements exploited optical frequency-domain reflectometry to analyze the Rayleigh scattering along two concatenated fibers with different coatings (acrylate and polyimide). The integrated system has been placed along the 20 m long cryostat of a superconducting power transmission line, which is currently being tested at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN). Cool-down events from 300-30 K have been successfully measured in space and time, confirming the viability of these approaches to the monitoring of cryogenic temperatures along a superconducting transmission line. PMID:26421547

  4. Case study on the US superconducting power transmission program

    SciTech Connect

    Hammel, E.F.

    1996-02-01

    After the 1911 discovery of superconductivity (the abrupt loss of electrical resistance in certain materials at very low temperatures), attempts were made to make practical use of this phenomenon. Initially these attempts failed, but in the early 1960s (after 50 years of research) they succeeded. By then, the projected growth in the production and consumption of electrical energy required much higher capacity power transmission capabilities than were available or likely to become available from incremental improvements in existing transmission technology. Since superconductors were capable in principle of transmitting huge amounts of power, research programs to develop and demonstrate superconducting transmission lines were initiated in the US and abroad. The history of the US program, including the participants, their objectives, funding and progress made, is outlined. Since the R&D program was terminated before the technology was completely demonstrated, the reasons for and consequences of this action are discussed in a final section.

  5. 10-kA pulsed power supply for superconducting coils

    SciTech Connect

    Ehsani, M.; Fuja, R.E.; Kustom, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    A new 4-MW inductor-converter bridge (ICB) for supplying power to pulsed superconducting magnets is under construction at Argonne National Laoratory. This is a second-generation ICB built at Argonne Lab. The analytical, design, and control techniques developed for the first prototype have been used in the design of the new system. The paper presents the important considerations in the design of the new ICB. A brief description of the operation of the circuit is also given.

  6. High-Tc superconducting materials for electric power applications.

    PubMed

    Larbalestier, D; Gurevich, A; Feldmann, D M; Polyanskii, A

    2001-11-15

    Large-scale superconducting electric devices for power industry depend critically on wires with high critical current densities at temperatures where cryogenic losses are tolerable. This restricts choice to two high-temperature cuprate superconductors, (Bi,Pb)2Sr2Ca2Cu3Ox and YBa2Cu3Ox, and possibly to MgB2, recently discovered to superconduct at 39 K. Crystal structure and material anisotropy place fundamental restrictions on their properties, especially in polycrystalline form. So far, power applications have followed a largely empirical, twin-track approach of conductor development and construction of prototype devices. The feasibility of superconducting power cables, magnetic energy-storage devices, transformers, fault current limiters and motors, largely using (Bi,Pb)2Sr2Ca2Cu3Ox conductor, is proven. Widespread applications now depend significantly on cost-effective resolution of fundamental materials and fabrication issues, which control the production of low-cost, high-performance conductors of these remarkable compounds. PMID:11713544

  7. Superconducting electromechanical rotating device having a liquid-cooled, potted, one layer stator winding

    DOEpatents

    Dombrovski, Viatcheslav V.; Driscoll, David I.; Shovkhet, Boris A.

    2001-01-01

    A superconducting electromechanical rotating (SER) device, such as a synchronous AC motor, includes a superconducting field winding and a one-layer stator winding that may be water-cooled. The stator winding is potted to a support such as the inner radial surface of a support structure and, accordingly, lacks hangers or other mechanical fasteners that otherwise would complicate stator assembly and require the provision of an unnecessarily large gap between adjacent stator coil sections. The one-layer winding topology, resulting in the number of coils being equal to half the number of slots or other mounting locations on the support structure, allows one to minimize or eliminate the gap between the inner radial ends of adjacent straight sections of the stator coilswhile maintaining the gap between the coil knuckles equal to at least the coil width, providing sufficient room for electrical and cooling element configurations and connections. The stator winding may be potted to the support structure or other support, for example, by a one-step VPI process relying on saturation of an absorbent material to fill large gaps in the stator winding or by a two-step process in which small gaps are first filled via a VPI or similar operation and larger gaps are then filled via an operation that utilizes the stator as a portion of an on-site mold.

  8. Hybrid Cooling Systems for Low-Temperature Geothermal Power Production

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, A.; Bharathan, D.

    2011-03-01

    This paper describes the identification and evaluation of methods by which the net power output of an air-cooled geothermal power plant can be enhanced during hot ambient conditions with a minimal amount of water use.

  9. Inverter power module with distributed support for direct substrate cooling

    DOEpatents

    Miller, David Harold; Korich, Mark D.; Ward, Terence G.; Mann, Brooks S.

    2012-08-21

    Systems and/or methods are provided for an inverter power module with distributed support for direct substrate cooling. An inverter module comprises a power electronic substrate. A first support frame is adapted to house the power electronic substrate and has a first region adapted to allow direct cooling of the power electronic substrate. A gasket is interposed between the power electronic substrate and the first support frame. The gasket is configured to provide a seal between the first region and the power electronic substrate. A second support frame is adapted to house the power electronic substrate and joined to the first support frame to form the seal.

  10. Superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Langone, J.

    1989-01-01

    This book explains the theoretical background of superconductivity. Includes discussion of electricity, material fabrication, maglev trains, the superconducting supercollider, and Japanese-US competition. The authors reports the latest discoveries.

  11. Purification of condenser water in thermal power station by superconducting magnetic separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, D. W.; Kwon, J. M.; Baik, S. K.; Lee, Y. J.; Han, K. S.; Ko, R. K.; Sohn, M. H.; Seong, K. C.

    2011-11-01

    Thermal power station is made up of a steam turbine and a steam condenser which need a lot of water. The water of steam condenser should be replaced, since scales consisting of iron oxide mainly are accumulated on the surface of condenser pipes as it goes. Superconducting high gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) system has merits to remove paramagnetic substance like iron oxides because it can generate higher magnetic field strength than electromagnet or permanent magnet. In this paper, cryo-cooled Nb-Ti superconducting magnet that can generate up to 6 T was used for HGMS systems. Magnetic filters were designed by the analysis of magnetic field distribution at superconducting magnets. The result of X-ray analysis showed contaminants were mostly α-Fe 2O 3 (hematite) and γ-Fe 2O 3 (maghemite). The higher magnetic field was applied up to 6 T, the more iron oxides were removed. As the wire diameter of magnetic filter decreased, the turbidity removal of the sample was enhanced.

  12. Minimization of power consumption during charging of superconducting accelerating cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Anirban Krishna; Ziemann, Volker; Ruber, Roger; Goryashko, Vitaliy

    2015-11-01

    The radio frequency cavities, used to accelerate charged particle beams, need to be charged to their nominal voltage after which the beam can be injected into them. The standard procedure for such cavity filling is to use a step charging profile. However, during initial stages of such a filling process a substantial amount of the total energy is wasted in reflection for superconducting cavities because of their extremely narrow bandwidth. The paper presents a novel strategy to charge cavities, which reduces total energy reflection. We use variational calculus to obtain analytical expression for the optimal charging profile. Energies, reflected and required, and generator peak power are also compared between the charging schemes and practical aspects (saturation, efficiency and gain characteristics) of power sources (tetrodes, IOTs and solid state power amplifiers) are also considered and analysed. The paper presents a methodology to successfully identify the optimal charging scheme for different power sources to minimize total energy requirement.

  13. The economics of solar powered absorption cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, J. C.

    1978-01-01

    Analytic procedure evaluates cost of combining absorption-cycle chiller with solar-energy system in residential or commercial application. Procedure assumes that solar-energy system already exists to heat building and that cooling system must be added. Decision is whether to cool building with conventional vapor-compression-cycle chiller or to use solar-energy system to provide heat input to absorption chiller.

  14. Conductor requirements for high-temperature superconducting utility power transformers

    SciTech Connect

    Pleva, E. F.; Mehrotra, V.; Schwenterly, S W

    2010-01-01

    High-temperature superconducting (HTS) coated conductors in utility power transformers must satisfy a set of operating requirements that are driven by two major considerations-HTS transformers must be economically competitive with conventional units, and the conductor must be robust enough to be used in a commercial manufacturing environment. The transformer design and manufacturing process will be described in order to highlight the various requirements that it imposes on the HTS conductor. Spreadsheet estimates of HTS transformer costs allow estimates of the conductor cost required for an HTS transformer to be competitive with a similarly performing conventional unit.

  15. Flux trapping in superconducting accelerating cavities during cooling down with a spatial temperature gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, Takayuki

    2016-05-01

    During the cool-down of a superconducting accelerating cavity, a magnetic flux is trapped as quantized vortices, which yield additional dissipation and contribute to the residual resistance. Recently, cooling down with a large spatial temperature gradient has attracted much attention for successfully reducing the number of trapped vortices. The purpose of the present paper is to propose a model to explain the observed efficient flux expulsions and the role of spatial temperature gradient during the cool-down of the cavity. In the vicinity of a region with a temperature close to the critical temperature T_c, the critical fields are strongly suppressed and can be smaller than the ambient magnetic field. A region with a lower critical field smaller than the ambient field is in the vortex state. As the material is cooled down, a region with a temperature close to T_c associated with the vortex state domain sweeps and passes through the material. In this process, vortices contained in the vortex state domain are trapped by pinning centers that randomly distribute in the material. The number of trapped vortices can be naively estimated by analogy with a beam-target collision event. Based on this result, the residual resistance is evaluated. We find that the number of trapped vortices and the residual resistance are proportional to the strength of the ambient magnetic field and the inverse of the temperature gradient. The residual resistance obtained agrees well with experimental results. A material property dependence of the number of trapped vortices is also discussed.

  16. Emerging Two-Phase Cooling Technologies for Power Electronic Inverters

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, J.S.

    2005-08-17

    In order to meet the Department of Energy's (DOE's) FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (FVCT) goals for volume, weight, efficiency, reliability, and cost, the cooling of the power electronic devices, traction motors, and generators is critical. Currently the power electronic devices, traction motors, and generators in a hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) are primarily cooled by water-ethylene glycol (WEG) mixture. The cooling fluid operates as a single-phase coolant as the liquid phase of the WEG does not change to its vapor phase during the cooling process. In these single-phase systems, two cooling loops of WEG produce a low temperature (around 70 C) cooling loop for the power electronics and motor/generator, and higher temperature loop (around 105 C) for the internal combustion engine. There is another coolant option currently available in automobiles. It is possible to use the transmission oil as a coolant. The oil temperature exists at approximately 85 C which can be utilized to cool the power electronic and electrical devices. Because heat flux is proportional to the temperature difference between the device's hot surface and the coolant, a device that can tolerate higher temperatures enables the device to be smaller while dissipating the same amount of heat. Presently, new silicon carbide (SiC) devices and high temperature direct current (dc)-link capacitors, such as Teflon capacitors, are available but at significantly higher costs. Higher junction temperature (175 C) silicon (Si) dies are gradually emerging in the market, which will eventually help to lower hardware costs for cooling. The development of high-temperature devices is not the only way to reduce device size. Two-phase cooling that utilizes the vaporization of the liquid to dissipate heat is expected to be a very effective cooling method. Among two-phase cooling methods, different technologies such as spray, jet impingement, pool boiling and submersion, etc. are being developed. The Oak Ridge

  17. Dependence of the residual surface resistance of superconducting radio frequency cavities on the cooling dynamics around T{sub c}

    SciTech Connect

    Romanenko, A. Grassellino, A. Melnychuk, O.; Sergatskov, D. A.

    2014-05-14

    We report a strong effect of the cooling dynamics through T{sub c} on the amount of trapped external magnetic flux in superconducting niobium cavities. The effect is similar for fine grain and single crystal niobium and all surface treatments including electropolishing with and without 120 °C baking and nitrogen doping. Direct magnetic field measurements on the cavity walls show that the effect stems from changes in the flux trapping efficiency: slow cooling leads to almost complete flux trapping and higher residual resistance, while fast cooling leads to the much more efficient flux expulsion and lower residual resistance.

  18. Thermoacoustic Duplex Technology for Cooling and Powering a Venus Lander

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, A. R.; Haberbusch, M. S.; Sasson, J.

    2015-04-01

    A Thermoacoustic Stirling Heat Engine (TASHE) is directly coupled to a Pulse Tube Refrigerator (PTR) in a duplex configuration, providing simultaneous cooling and electrical power, thereby suiting the needs of a long-lived Venus lander.

  19. Convective Array Cooling for a Solar Powered Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colozza, Anthony J.; Dolce, James (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    A general characteristic of photovoltaics is that they increase in efficiency as their operating temperature decreases. Based on this principal, the ability to increase a solar aircraft's performance by cooling the solar cells was examined. The solar cells were cooled by channeling some air underneath the cells and providing a convective cooling path to the back side of the array. A full energy balance and flow analysis of the air within the cooling passage was performed. The analysis was first performed on a preliminary level to estimate the benefits of the cooling passage. This analysis established a clear benefit to the cooling passage. Based on these results a more detailed analysis was performed. From this cell temperatures were calculated and array output power throughout a day period were determined with and without the cooling passage. The results showed that if the flow through the cooling passage remained laminar then the benefit in increased output power more than offset the drag induced by the cooling passage.

  20. Cryogenic cooling for high power laser amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perin, J. P.; Millet, F.; Divoky, M.; Rus, B.

    2013-11-01

    Using DPSSL (Diode Pumped Solid State Lasers) as pumping technology, PW-class lasers with enhanced repetition rates are developed. Each of the Yb YAG amplifiers will be diode-pumped at a wavelength of 940 nm. This is a prerequisite for achieving high repetition rates (light amplification duration 1 millisecond and repetition rate 10 Hz). The efficiency of DPSSL is inversely proportional to the temperature, for this reason the slab amplifier have to be cooled at a temperature in the range of 100 K-170 K with a heat flux of 1 MW*m-2. This paper describes the thermo-mechanical analysis for the design of the amplification laser head, presents a preliminary proposal for the required cryogenic cooling system and finally outlines the gain of cryogenic operation for the efficiency of high pulsed laser.

  1. Evacuation time of cryogenic pipes for superconducting power transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Hirofumi; Sun, Jian; Yamamoto, Norimasa; Hamabe, Makoto; Kawahara, Toshio; Yamaguchi, Satarou

    2013-11-01

    The vacuum insulation has been used for the thermal insulation of cryogenic pipes for the superconducting power transmission to reduce the heat leak from the environment at the room temperature to the low temperature parts. Since the cryogenic pipes, in particular, those for long distance power transmission, are considered to be thin long pipes, it might take a long time for evacuation. To estimate the evacuation time of the long cryogenic pipes, model calculations have been performed. According to the calculations, it is found that there is an optimum condition between the pumping speed, the diameter of the outer pipe and the length of the cryogenic pipe for efficient evacuation. It is also found that, if the outgassing is suppressed enough, the evacuation can be possible within 1 week even for the long cryogenic pipe with the length of 10 km. The reduction of outgassing is particularly important for the efficient evacuation.

  2. Dry Dilution Refrigerator with High Cooling Power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlig, K.

    2008-03-01

    We present the construction concept and cooling capacity measurements of a 3,4He dilution refrigerator (DR), which was pre-cooled by a commercial pulse tube refrigerator (PTR). No cryogens are needed for the operation of this type of cryostat. The condensation of the helium mash was done in an integrated Joule-Thomson circuit, which was part of the dilution unit. The composition of the dilution unit was standard, but its components (still, heat exchangers, mixing chamber) were designed for high 3He flow. For thermometry, calibrated RuO chip resistance thermometers were available. In order to condense the mixture before an experiment, the fridge was operated like a Joule-Thomson liquefier with a relatively high inlet pressure (4 bar), where the liquid fraction of the circulating 3,4He mixture was accumulated in the dilution unit. The condensation took about 2 hours, and after 2 more hours of running, the temperature of the mixing chamber approached its minimum temperature of 10 mK. The maximum flow rate of the fridge was 1 mmol/s, and the refrigeration capacity of the mixing chamber was 700 μW at 100 mK. High cooling capacity, ease of operation and reliability distinguish this type of milli-Kelvin cooler.

  3. A Cool-down and Fault Study of a Long Length HTS Power Transmission Cable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, J.; Maguire, J.; Allais, A.; Schmidt, F.

    2006-04-01

    High temperature superconductor (HTS) power transmission cables offer significant advantages in power density over conventional copper-based cables. Currently the US Department of Energy is funding the design, development, and demonstration of the first long length, transmission level voltage, cold dielectric, underground high temperature superconductor power cable. The cable is 620 meters long and is designed for permanent installation in the Long Island Power Authority (LIPA) grid. The cable is specified to carry 574 MVA at a voltage of 138 kV and is designed to withstand a 69 kA fault current for a duration of 200ms. The superconducting state of the cable conductors is maintained by circulating sub-cooled liquid nitrogen, which flows through one phase conductor of the cable and returns through the other two. As HTS cables develop and lengths increase to what may be considered commercial, it is critical to study the cable thermal behavior during cool-down process and fault condition to avoid any possible damage to the cable core due to the thermal stress, over heating or bubble formation. This paper reviews the efforts that have been made to study the cool-down process and fault condition. Descriptions of the transient thermal and fluid model are provided. A discussion of the simulation results is also included.

  4. Passive Two-Phase Cooling of Automotive Power Electronics: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, G.; Jeffers, J. R.; Narumanchi, S.; Bennion, K.

    2014-08-01

    Experiments were conducted to evaluate the use of a passive two-phase cooling strategy as a means of cooling automotive power electronics. The proposed cooling approach utilizes an indirect cooling configuration to alleviate some reliability concerns and to allow the use of conventional power modules. An inverter-scale proof-of-concept cooling system was fabricated, and tests were conducted using the refrigerants hydrofluoroolefin HFO-1234yf and hydrofluorocarbon HFC-245fa. Results demonstrated that the system can dissipate at least 3.5 kW of heat with 250 cm3 of HFC-245fa. An advanced evaporator design that incorporates features to improve performance and reduce size was conceived. Simulation results indicate its thermal resistance can be 37% to 48% lower than automotive dual side cooled power modules. Tests were also conducted to measure the thermal performance of two air-cooled condensers--plain and rifled finned tube designs. The results combined with some analysis were then used to estimate the required condenser size per operating conditions and maximum allowable system (i.e., vapor and liquid) temperatures.

  5. High temperature superconductivity technology for advanced space power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faymon, Karl A.; Myers, Ira T.; Connolly, Denis J.

    1990-01-01

    In 1987, the Lewis Research center of the NASA and the Argonne National Laboratory of the Department of Energy joined in a cooperative program to identify and assess high payoff space and aeronautical applications of high temperature superconductivity (HTSC). The initial emphasis of this effort was limited, and those space power related applications which were considered included microwave power transmission and magnetic energy storage. The results of these initial studies were encouraging and indicated the need of further studies. A continuing collaborative program with Argonne National Laboratory has been formulated and the Lewis Research Center is presently structuring a program to further evaluate HTSC, identify applications and define the requisite technology development programs for space power systems. This paper discusses some preliminary results of the previous evaluations in the area of space power applications of HTSC which were carried out under the joint NASA-DOE program, the future NASA-Lewis proposed program, its thrusts, and its intended outputs and give general insights on the anticipated impact of HTSC for space power applications of the future.

  6. High power cooled mini-DIL pump lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Bo; Zayer, Nadhum; Chen, Bob; He, Dylan; Pliska, Tomas

    2009-11-01

    The miniature dual-inline (mini-DIL) pump laser becomes more attactive for compact optical amplifiers designs due to the advantage of smaller footprint, lower power consumption and lower cost. In this paper we report the development of a new generation of small form factor, high power "cooled" mini-DIL 980-nm pump lasers module for compact EDFA application.

  7. Space-deployed, thin-walled enclosure for a cryogenically-cooled high temperature superconducting coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Allison K.

    The interaction of magnetic fields generated by large superconducting coils has multiple applications in space, including actuation of spacecraft or spacecraft components, wireless power transfer, and shielding of spacecraft from radiation and high energy particles. These applications require coils with major diameters as large as 20 meters and a thermal management system to maintain the superconducting material of the coil below its critical temperature. Since a rigid thermal management system, such as a heat pipe, is unsuitable for compact stowage inside a 5 meter payload fairing, a thin-walled thermal enclosure is proposed. A 1.85 meter diameter test article consisting of a bladder layer for containing chilled nitrogen vapor, a restraint layer, and multilayer insulation was tested in a custom toroidal vacuum chamber. The material properties found during laboratory testing are used to predict the performance of the test article in low Earth orbit. Deployment motion of the same test article was measured using a motion capture system and the results are used to predict the deployment in space. A 20 meter major diameter and coil current of 6.7 MA is selected as a point design case. This design point represents a single coil in a high energy particle shielding system. Sizing of the thermal and structural components of the enclosure is completed. The thermal and deployment performance is predicted.

  8. Novel concept for a space power distribution busbar using HTS materials and passive cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimko, Martin A.; Crowley, Christopher J.; Wallis, Peter N.

    1992-04-01

    This paper presents the performance, defines the range of applications, and shows the feasibility of using high temperature superconducting (HTS) materials with passive heat rejection for space power transmission. A conceptual design for the busbar is presented, and mass and resistive energy losses are estimated for various missions, power levels, and current types (AC and DC). All applications display a large increase in power transmission efficiency, while mass comparisons show the passively cooled HTS busbar mass ranges from 12% of the mass of a copper busbar at geosynchronous orbit (GEO) and beyond, to 38% at a 1000 km earth orbit (LEO). The design of the HTS conductor is novel, consisting of interleaved HTS strip conductors (HTS plus substrate) separated by dielectric insulating material. Appropriate HTS materials are presently available in long length (≳100 m) with current densities (≳1000 amp/cm2) and critical temperatures (95 K) which make the passively cooled busbar feasible. An original numerical model for the conductor/radiator assembly is described which includes the effects of solar insolation, reflected and IR thermal loads from the earth, and internally generated losses in the HTS. Completely passive operation at low earth orbits (LEO) of 1000 km is enabled by a novel asymmetric design for a directional radiator that includes a unique back-to-back busbar configuration that does not require active pointing. The design includes copper conductor downleads employing the same passive cooling scheme.

  9. Superconducting cable cooling system by helium gas and a mixture of gas and liquid helium

    DOEpatents

    Dean, John W.

    1977-01-01

    Thermally contacting, oppositely streaming cryogenic fluid streams in the same enclosure in a closed cycle that changes from a cool high pressure helium gas to a cooler reduced pressure helium fluid comprised of a mixture of gas and boiling liquid so as to be near the same temperature but at different pressures respectively in go and return legs that are in thermal contact with each other and in thermal contact with a longitudinally extending superconducting transmission line enclosed in the same cable enclosure that insulates the line from the ambient at a temperature T.sub.1. By first circulating the fluid in a go leg from a refrigerator at one end of the line as a high pressure helium gas near the normal boiling temperature of helium; then circulating the gas through an expander at the other end of the line where the gas becomes a mixture of reduced pressure gas and boiling liquid at its boiling temperature; then by circulating the mixture in a return leg that is separated from but in thermal contact with the gas in the go leg and in the same enclosure therewith; and finally returning the resulting low pressure gas to the refrigerator for compression into a high pressure gas at T.sub.2 is a closed cycle, where T.sub.1 >T.sub.2, the temperature distribution is such that the line temperature is nearly constant along its length from the refrigerator to the expander due to the boiling of the liquid in the mixture. A heat exchanger between the go and return lines removes the gas from the liquid in the return leg while cooling the go leg.

  10. Thermally matched fluid cooled power converter

    DOEpatents

    Radosevich, Lawrence D.; Kannenberg, Daniel G.; Kaishian, Steven C.; Beihoff, Bruce C.

    2005-06-21

    A thermal support may receive one or more power electronic circuits. The support may aid in removing heat from the circuits through fluid circulating through the support. Power electronic circuits are thermally matched, such as between component layers and between the circuits and the support. The support may form a shield from both external EMI/RFI and from interference generated by operation of the power electronic circuits. Features may be provided to permit and enhance connection of the circuitry to external circuitry, such as improved terminal configurations. Modular units may be assembled that may be coupled to electronic circuitry via plug-in arrangements or through interface with a backplane or similar mounting and interconnecting structures.

  11. Modular power converter having fluid cooled support

    DOEpatents

    Beihoff, Bruce C.; Radosevich, Lawrence D.; Meyer, Andreas A.; Gollhardt, Neil; Kannenberg, Daniel G.

    2005-09-06

    A support may receive one or more power electronic circuits. The support may aid in removing heat from the circuits through fluid circulating through the support. The support, in conjunction with other packaging features may form a shield from both external EMI/RFI and from interference generated by operation of the power electronic circuits. Features may be provided to permit and enhance connection of the circuitry to external circuitry, such as improved terminal configurations. Modular units may be assembled that may be coupled to electronic circuitry via plug-in arrangements or through interface with a backplane or similar mounting and interconnecting structures.

  12. Modular power converter having fluid cooled support

    DOEpatents

    Beihoff, Bruce C.; Radosevich, Lawrence D.; Meyer, Andreas A.; Gollhardt, Neil; Kannenberg, Daniel G.

    2005-12-06

    A support may receive one or more power electronic circuits. The support may aid in removing heat from the circuits through fluid circulating through the support. The support, in conjunction with other packaging features may form a shield from both external EMI/RFI and from interference generated by operation of the power electronic circuits. Features may be provided to permit and enhance connection of the circuitry to external circuitry, such as improved terminal configurations. Modular units may be assembled that may be coupled to electronic circuitry via plug-in arrangements or through interface with a backplane or similar mounting and interconnecting structures.

  13. Concurrent Wind Cooling in Power Transmission Lines

    SciTech Connect

    Jake P Gentle

    2012-08-01

    Idaho National Laboratory and the Idaho Power Company, with collaboration from Idaho State University, have been working on a project to monitor wind and other environmental data parameters along certain electrical transmission corridors. The combination of both real-time historical weather and environmental data is being used to model, validate, and recommend possibilities for dynamic operations of the transmission lines for power and energy carrying capacity. The planned results can also be used to influence decisions about proposed design criteria for or upgrades to certain sections of the transmission lines.

  14. Air Cooling for High Temperature Power Electronics (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Waye, S.; Musselman, M.; King, C.

    2014-09-01

    Current emphasis on developing high-temperature power electronics, including wide-bandgap materials such as silicon carbide and gallium nitride, increases the opportunity for a completely air-cooled inverter at higher powers. This removes the liquid cooling system for the inverter, saving weight and volume on the liquid-to-air heat exchanger, coolant lines, pumps, and coolant, replacing them with just a fan and air supply ducting. We investigate the potential for an air-cooled heat exchanger from a component and systems-level approach to meet specific power and power density targets. A proposed baseline air-cooled heat exchanger design that does not meet those targets was optimized using a parametric computational fluid dynamics analysis, examining the effects of heat exchanger geometry and device location, fixing the device heat dissipation and maximum junction temperature. The CFD results were extrapolated to a full inverter, including casing, capacitor, bus bar, gate driver, and control board component weights and volumes. Surrogate ducting was tested to understand the pressure drop and subsequent system parasitic load. Geometries that met targets with acceptable loads on the system were down-selected for experimentation. Nine baseline configuration modules dissipated the target heat dissipation, but fell below specific power and power density targets. Six optimized configuration modules dissipated the target heat load, exceeding the specific power and power density targets. By maintaining the same 175 degrees C maximum junction temperature, an optimized heat exchanger design and higher device heat fluxes allowed a reduction in the number of modules required, increasing specific power and power density while still maintaining the inverter power.

  15. SUPERCONDUCTING PHOTOINJECTOR

    SciTech Connect

    BEN-ZVI,I.; BURRILL, A.; CALAGA, R.; CHANG, X.; GROVER, R.; GUPTA, R.; HAHN, H.; HAMMONS, L.; KAYRAN, D.; KEWISCH, J.; LAMBIASE, R.; LITVINENKO, V.; MCINTYRE, G.; NAIK, D.; PATE, D.; PHILLIPS, D.; POZDEYEV, E.; RAO, T.; SMEDLEY, J.; THAN, R.; TODD, R.; WEISS, D.; WU, Q.; ZALTSMAN, A.; ET AL.

    2007-08-26

    One of the frontiers in FEL science is that of high power. In order to reach power in the megawatt range, one requires a current of the order of one ampere with a reasonably good emittance. The superconducting laser-photocathode RF gun with a high quantum efficiency photocathode is the most natural candidate to provide this performance. The development of a 1/2 cell superconducting photoinjector designed to operate at up to a current of 0.5 amperes and beam energy of 2 MeV and its photocathode system are the subjects covered in this paper. The main issues are the photocathode and its insertion mechanism, the power coupling and High Order Mode damping. This technology is being developed at BNL for DOE nuclear physics applications such as electron cooling at high energy and electron ion colliders..

  16. Design of dechlorination units for power plant cooling streams

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, C.S.; Berker, A.; Whitaker, S.

    1980-02-01

    The design of dechlorination units using sulfur dioxide as a reducing agent for once-through power plant cooling streams is considered. The average concentration of hypochlorite ions is determined downstream from the point of injection of sulfurous acid as a function of the number of injection points and the initial sulfurous acid concentration. The results can be used for the design of sulfurous acid injection units required to reduce the hypochlorite ion concentration to a specified level. A sample design calculation is presented for a typical power plant cooling stream.

  17. Temporal response of laser power standards with natural convective cooling.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tao; Gan, Haiyong; Yu, Jing; Zang, Erjun

    2016-01-25

    Laser power detectors with natural convective cooling are convenient to use and hence widely applicable in a power range below 150 W. However, the temporal response characteristics of the laser power detectors need to be studied in detail for accurate measurement. The temporal response based on the absolute laser power standards with natural convective cooling is studied through theoretical analysis, numerical simulations, and experimental verifications. Our results show that the response deviates from a single exponential function and that an ultimate response balance is difficult to achieve because the temperature rise of the heat sink leads to continuous increase of the response. To determine the measurement values, an equal time reading method is proposed and validated by the laser power calibrations. PMID:26832477

  18. Design and optimization of geothermal power generation, heating, and cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanoglu, Mehmet

    Most of the world's geothermal power plants have been built in 1970s and 1980s following 1973 oil crisis. Urgency to generate electricity from alternative energy sources and the fact that geothermal energy was essentially free adversely affected careful designs of plants which would maximize their performance for a given geothermal resource. There are, however, tremendous potentials to improve performance of many existing geothermal power plants by retrofitting, optimizing the operating conditions, re-selecting the most appropriate binary fluid in binary plants, and considering cogeneration such as a district heating and/or cooling system or a system to preheat water entering boilers in industrial facilities. In this dissertation, some representative geothermal resources and existing geothermal power plants in Nevada are investigated to show these potentials. Economic analysis of a typical geothermal resource shows that geothermal heating and cooling may generate up to 3 times as much revenue as power generation alone. A district heating/cooling system is designed for its incorporation into an existing 27 MW air-cooled binary geothermal power plant. The system as designed has the capability to meet the entire heating needs of an industrial park as well as 40% of its cooling needs, generating potential revenues of $14,040,000 per year. A study of the power plant shows that evaporative cooling can increase the power output by up to 29% in summer by decreasing the condenser temperature. The power output of the plant can be increased by 2.8 percent by optimizing the maximum pressure in the cycle. Also, replacing the existing working fluid isobutane by butane, R-114, isopentane, and pentane can increase the power output by up to 2.5 percent. Investigation of some well-known geothermal power generation technologies as alternatives to an existing 12.8 MW single-flash geothermal power plant shows that double-flash, binary, and combined flash/binary designs can increase the

  19. Characteristic Analysis of DC Electric Railway Systems with Superconducting Power Cables Connecting Power Substations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohsaki, H.; Matsushita, N.; Koseki, T.; Tomita, M.

    2014-05-01

    The application of superconducting power cables to DC electric railway systems has been studied. It could leads to an effective use of regenerative brake, improved energy efficiency, effective load sharing among the substations, etc. In this study, an electric circuit model of a DC feeding system is built and numerical simulation is carried out using MATLAB-Simulink software. A modified electric circuit model with an AC power grid connection taken into account is also created to simulate the influence of the grid connection. The analyses have proved that a certain amount of energy can be conserved by introducing superconducting cables, and that electric load distribution and concentration among the substations depend on the substation output voltage distribution.

  20. Novel Thermoelectric Modules for Cooling Powerful LEDs: Experimental Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenyuk, V.; Dekhtiaruk, R.

    2013-07-01

    We present the results of an experimental study of a cooling system based on a novel thermoelectric module specifically designed for thermal management of high-power light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The Seoul Semiconductor LED W724C0 device was chosen for experimental validation of the efficiency of the proposed cooling unit. Two cooling systems with identical heat sinks were tested for comparison: a state-of-the-art one based on an insulated metal substrate-printed circuit board (IMS-PCB), and a system with thermoelectric cooling. The obtained results show that use of thermoelectrics results in a considerable reduction of the LED operating temperature, providing increased light output and greatly increased LED lifetime.

  1. Keeping Cool With Solar-Powered Refrigeration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    In the midst of developing battery-free, solar-powered refrigeration and air conditioning systems for habitats in space, David Bergeron, the team leader for NASA's Advanced Refrigerator Technology Team at Johnson Space Center, acknowledged the need for a comparable solar refrigerator that could operate in conjunction with the simple lighting systems already in place on Earth. Bergeron, a 20-year veteran in the aerospace industry, founded the company Solus Refrigeration, Inc., in 1999 to take the patented advanced refrigeration technology he co-developed with his teammate, Johnson engineer Michael Ewert, to commercial markets. Now known as SunDanzer Refrigeration, Inc., Bergeron's company is producing battery-free, photovoltaic (PV) refrigeration systems under license to NASA, and selling them globally.

  2. Development of a higher power cooling system for lithium targets.

    PubMed

    Phoenix, B; Green, S; Scott, M C; Bennett, J R J; Edgecock, T R

    2015-12-01

    The accelerator based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy beam at the University of Birmingham is based around a solid thick lithium target cooled by heavy water. Significant upgrades to Birmingham's Dynamitron accelerator are planned prior to commencing a clinical trial. These upgrades will result in an increase in maximum achievable beam current to at least 3 mA. Various upgrades to the target cooling system to cope with this increased power have been investigated. Tests of a phase change coolant known as "binary ice" have been carried out using an induction heater to provide a comparable power input to the Dynamitron beam. The experimental data shows no improvement over chilled water in the submerged jet system, with both systems exhibiting the same heat input to target temperature relation for a given flow rate. The relationship between the cooling circuit pumping rate and the target temperature in the submerged jet system has also been tested. PMID:26254970

  3. A thermosyphon heat pipe cooler for high power LEDs cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ji; Tian, Wenkai; Lv, Lucang

    2016-08-01

    Light emitting diode (LED) cooling is facing the challenge of high heat flux more seriously with the increase of input power and diode density. The proposed unique thermosyphon heat pipe heat sink is particularly suitable for cooling of high power density LED chips and other electronics, which has a heat dissipation potential of up to 280 W within an area of 20 mm × 22 mm (>60 W/cm2) under natural air convection. Meanwhile, a thorough visualization investigation was carried out to explore the two phase flow characteristics in the proposed thermosyphon heat pipe. Implementing this novel thermosyphon heat pipe heat sink in the cooling of a commercial 100 W LED integrated chip, a very low apparent thermal resistance of 0.34 K/W was obtained under natural air convection with the aid of the enhanced boiling heat transfer at the evaporation side and the enhanced natural air convection at the condensation side.

  4. Reduction of helium loss from a superconducting accelerating cavity during initial cool-down and cryostat exchange by pre-cooling the re-condensing cryostat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Rourke, B. E.; Minehara, E. J.; Hayashizaki, N.; Oshima, N.; Suzuki, R.

    2015-03-01

    A Zero-Boil-Off (ZBO) cryostat is designed to realize a compact, stand-alone cryogenic system for the AIST superconducting accelerator (SCA). Under normal operation there is no evaporative helium loss from the cryomodule and therefore operating costs associated with the supply of liquid helium can be eliminated. The only significant loss of helium from the module occurs during the initial cavity cool-down procedure or when the re-condensing cryostat is replaced. It takes about 3 h to cool down the cryostat head from room temperature (300 K) to 4 K. During this time around 100 L of liquid helium is lost due to evaporation. By pre-cooling the cryostat inside a low heat load vacuum tube before transfer to the cryomodule, this evaporative loss could be essentially eliminated, significantly reducing the volume of liquid helium required for the initial cryomodule cool-down. The pre-cooling system also provides an efficient method to test the cryostat prior to use.

  5. Gas-cooled reactor power systems for space

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, C.E.

    1987-01-01

    Efficiency and mass characteristics for four gas-cooled reactor power system configurations in the 2- to 20-MWe power range are modeled. The configurations use direct and indirect Brayton cycles with and without regeneration in the power conversion loop. The prismatic ceramic core of the reactor consists of several thousand pencil-shaped tubes made from a homogeneous mixture of moderator and fuel. The heat rejection system is found to be the major contributor to system mass, particularly at high power levels. A direct, regenerated Brayton cycle with helium working fluid permits high efficiency and low specific mass for a 10-MWe system.

  6. Superconductivity:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacchetti, N.

    In this paper a short historical account of the discovery of superconductivity and of its gradual development is given. The physical interpretation of its various aspects took about forty years (from 1911 to 1957) to reach a successful description of this phenomenon in terms of a microscopic theory At the very end it seemed that more or less everything could be reasonably interpreted even if modifications and refinements of the original theory were necessary. In 1986 the situation changed abruptly when a cautious but revolutionary paper appeared showing that superconductivity was found in certain ceramic oxides at temperatures above those up to then known. A rush of frantic experimental activity started world-wide and in less than one year it was shown that superconductivity is a much more widespread phenomenon than deemed before and can be found at temperatures well above the liquid air boiling point. The complexity and the number of the substances (mainly ceramic oxides) involved call for a sort of modern alchemy if compounds with the best superconducting properties are to be manufactured. We don't use the word alchemy in a deprecatory sense but just to emphasise that till now nobody can say why these compounds are what they are: superconductors.

  7. Developmental condition and technical problems on electric insulation for super-conducting electric power machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motoyama, H.

    1989-05-01

    The present situations of superconducting electric power machines in the world and studied problems were investigated from viewpoint of the electric insulation. 50MVA generator (CRIE/Hitachi) or 120MVA generator (KWU/Siemens) where the dc superconducting technique was applied on field windings, are developed. As to Superconducting transformer, 220KVA transformer is trially manufactured and the conceptual design of 1,000MVA transformer is made by W.H. or Alstom. Future problems are the study of protecting method for the overvoltage to superconducting electric power machines and the study to prevent the quench for superconducting windings. The respective insulating characteristics of solid and liquid insulators become clear gradually under the cryogenic condition but a large part of insulating characteristics of composite insulator prepared by combination of both insulators are not clear, so that these problems must be clarified.

  8. Personal cooling in nuclear power stations. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kamon, E.

    1983-03-01

    Two approaches to personal, non-restrictive cooling of workers exposed to high-temperature work environments in nuclear power plants were evaluated. Both approaches involved a cooling garment designed to be worn under the protective clothing donned in penetration into radiation areas. One garmet was developed to cool by direct body contact with small packets of frozen water enclosed in the pockets of a shirt. The other garmets cooled by circulating a cooled liquid through capillaries in a vest and head cap (System A) or a vest (System B). Testing was conducted in a laboratory simulation of high ambient temperature (55/sup 0/C) and moderate metabolic heat production (200 to 300 kcal/h). Exposure time without cooling (control) was 52 minutes (Group 1) for the workloads demanding 200 kcal/h (48 minutes for Group 2). A long garmet with 7.2 kg of frozen water (LFWG) increased mean exposure time over the control by 242% (163% for the same garmet with 6.2 kg of frozen water). A short-version garmet with 3.8 kg of frozen water (SFWG) increased the stay time by 115%. The circulating-liquid garmets increased mean exposure time 35% (System A) and 27% (System B) over the control. In field observation, the LFWG with 6.2 kg of frozen water improved stay time by 125%.

  9. Two-Phase Cooling Method Using R134a Refrigerant to Cool Power Electronic Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, Kirk T; Tolbert, Leon M; Ayers, Curtis William; Ozpineci, Burak; Campbell, Jeremy B

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a two-phase cooling method using R134a refrigerant to dissipate the heat energy (loss) generated by power electronics (PE) such as those associated with rectifiers, converters, and inverters for a specific application in hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs). The cooling method involves submerging PE devices in an R134a bath, which limits the junction temperature of PE devices while conserving weight and volume of the heat sink without sacrificing equipment reliability. First, experimental tests that included an extended soak for more than 300 days were performed on a submerged IGBT and gate-controller card to study dielectric characteristics, deterioration effects, and heat flux capability of R134a. Results from these tests illustrate that R134a has high dielectric characteristics, no deterioration on electrical components, and a heat flux of 114 W/cm 2 for the experimental configuration. Second, experimental tests that included simultaneous operation with a mock automotive air-conditioner (A/C) system were performed on the same IGBT and gate controller card. Data extrapolation from these tests determined that a typical automotive A/C system has more than sufficient cooling capacity to cool a typical 30 kW traction inverter. Last, a discussion and simulation of active cooling of the IGBT junction layer with R134a refrigerant is given. This technique will drastically increase the forward current ratings and reliability of the PE device

  10. Design and comparative analysis of 10 MW class superconducting wind power generators according to different types of superconducting wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Hae-Jin; Kim, Gyeong-Hun; Kim, Kwangmin; Park, Minwon; Yu, In-Keun; Kim, Jong-Yul

    2013-11-01

    Wind turbine concepts can be classified into the geared type and the gearless type. The gearless type wind turbine is more attractive due to advantages of simplified drive train and increased energy yield, and higher reliability because the gearbox is omitted. In addition, this type resolves the weight issue of the wind turbine with the light weight of gearbox. However, because of the low speed operation, this type has disadvantage such as the large diameter and heavy weight of generator. Super-Conducting (SC) wind power generator can reduce the weight and volume of a wind power system. Properties of superconducting wire are very different from each company. This paper considers the design and comparative analysis of 10 MW class SC wind power generators according to different types of SC wires. Super-Conducting Synchronous Generators (SCSGs) using YBCO and Bi-2223 wires are optimized by an optimal method. The magnetic characteristics of the SCSGs are investigated using the finite elements method program. The optimized specifications of the SCSGs are discussed in detail, and the optimization processes can be used effectively to develop large scale wind power generation systems.

  11. Cooling of high power generators and motors for electric propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szatkowski, J. L.

    1984-03-01

    This study reviews the history and development of marine electric propulsion drives, the types of electric propulsion, and the inherent losses which occur within the synchronous ac machines typically used for high-power propulsion systems. A thorough review of the literature pertaining to heat transfer in electrical machinery is made. In particular, the use of liquid cooling in various flow configurations, including buoyancy-driven thermosyphons and two-phase thermosyphons is analyzed. Forced-liquid cooling is feasible, but the required rotating seals are a problem in reliability. Closed-loop thermosyphon cooling appears feasible at high rotational speeds, although a secondary heat exchange through the shaft is required. Closed, two-phase thermosyphons and heat pipes are also feasible, but require forced-air circulation for heat rejection to the ambient. Since all of these concepts deserve additional attention, areas for further research and development are recommended.

  12. Hybrid Cooling for Geothermal Power Plants: Final ARRA Project Report

    SciTech Connect

    Bharathan, D.

    2013-06-01

    Many binary-cycle geothermal plants use air as the heat rejection medium. Usually this is accomplished by using an air-cooled condenser (ACC) system to condense the vapor of the working fluid in the cycle. Many air-cooled plants suffer a loss of production capacity of up to 50% during times of high ambient temperatures. Use of limited amounts of water to supplement the performance of ACCs is investigated. Deluge cooling is found to be one of the least-cost options. Limiting the use of water in such an application to less than one thousand operating hours per year can boost plant output during critical high-demand periods while minimizing water use in binary-cycle geothermal power plants.

  13. Operating experience with the southwire 30-meter high-temperature superconducting power cable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stovall, J. P.; Lue, J. W.; Demko, J. A.; Fisher, P. W.; Gouge, M. J.; Hawsey, R. A.; Armstrong, J. W.; Hughey, R. L.; Lindsay, D. T.; Roden, M. L.; Sinha, U. K.; Tolbert, J. C.

    2002-05-01

    Southwire Company is operating a high-temperature superconducting (HTS) cable system at its corporate headquarters. The 30-m long, 3-phase cable system is powering three Southwire manufacturing plants and is rated at 12.4-kV, 1250-A, 60-Hz. Cooling is provided by a pressurized liquid nitrogen system operating at 70-80 K. The cables were energized on January 5, 2000 for on-line testing and operation and in April 2000 were placed into extended service. As of June 1, 2001, the HTS cables have provided 100% of the customer load for 8000 hours. The cryogenic system has been in continuous operation since November 1999. The HTS cable system has not been the cause of any power outages to the average 20 MW industrial load served by the cable. The cable has been exposed to short-circuit currents caused by load-side faults without damage. Based upon field measurements described herein, the cable critical current-a key performance parameter-remains the same and has not been affected by the hours of real-world operation, further proving the viability of this promising technology.

  14. Improved thermal isolation for superconducting magnet systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiebe, E. R.

    1974-01-01

    Closed-cycle refrigerating system for superconductive magnet and maser is operated in vacuum environment. Each wire leading from external power source passes through cooling station which blocks heat conduction. In connection with these stations, switch with small incandescent light bulb, which generates heat, is used to stop superconduction.

  15. Passively cooled diode laser for high-power applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonati, Guido F.; Hennig, Petra; Schmidt, Karsten

    2004-06-01

    For the usage of diode lasers in industrial applications, customers ask today for expected lifetimes of more then 30.000 hours. To match the request for low costs per Watt as well, the output power has to be as high as possible. To achieve a maximum power out of a diode laser bar, heat removal must be extremely efficient. Today, micro channel heatsinks (MCHS) are the only way to achieve the high power level of 50W. But due to erosion/corrosion effects the lifetime of MCHS is limited at 15000...20.000 hours today. Finally we have to determine that for selected semiconductor materials not the semiconductor but the heatsink is limiting the expected lifetime of high power diode lasers today. Passive heat sinks based on solid copper are not limiting lifetime expectations in any way. But as cooling efficiency is lower, the power has to be reduced to a level of 30...40W. The first time ever, the JENOPTIK Laserdiode can present today a cooling technique that combines the passive cooling of a diode laser bar with the optical output a power of a bar, mounted on a MCHS. Using a special heat exchanger called DCB (patent pending) we were able to increase the power to 50W per bar while looking forward to extend the expected lifetime to more than 30.000 hours for selected materials. Restrictions on the quality of the water by means of deionization grade or PH- level are no longer necessary. The device is operating with regular water. The flow rate is as low as on MCHS, the pressure drop over the DCB is comparable. Additionally, the measurements will show an even lower thermal resistance compared to MCHS. The second generationof engineering samples is built up for pumping rows. A vertical stack design will be available for evaluating purposes soon. All these efforts are part of the JENOPTIK Laserdiode's LongLifeTechnology.

  16. Design of the fundamental power coupler and photocathode inserts for the 112MHz superconducting electron gun

    SciTech Connect

    Xin, T.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Belomestnykh, S.; Chang, X.; Rao, T.; Skaritka, J.; Wu, Q.; Wang, E.; Liang, X.

    2011-07-25

    A 112 MHz superconducting quarter-wave resonator electron gun will be used as the injector of the Coherent Electron Cooling (CEC) proof-of-principle experiment at BNL. Furthermore, this electron gun can be the testing cavity for various photocathodes. In this paper, we present the design of the cathode stalks and a Fundamental Power Coupler (FPC) designated to the future experiments. Two types of cathode stalks are discussed. Special shape of the stalk is applied in order to minimize the RF power loss. The location of cathode plane is also optimized to enable the extraction of low emittance beam. The coaxial waveguide structure FPC has the properties of tunable coupling factor and small interference to the electron beam output. The optimization of the coupling factor and the location of the FPC are discussed in detail. Based on the transmission line theory, we designed a half wavelength cathode stalk which significantly brings down the voltage drop between the cavity and the stalk from more than 5.6 kV to 0.1 kV. The transverse field distribution on cathode has been optimized by carefully choosing the position of cathode stalk inside the cavity. Moreover, in order to decrease the RF power loss, a variable diameter design of cathode stalk has been applied. Compared to the uniform shape of stalk, this design gives us much smaller power losses in important locations. Besides that, we also proposed a fundamental power coupler based on the designed beam parameters for the future proof-of-principle CEC experiment. This FPC should give a strong enough coupling which has the Q external range from 1.5e7 to 2.6e8.

  17. Magnetocaloric Materials and the Optimization of Cooling Power Density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wikus, Patrick; Canavan, Edgar; Heine, Sarah Trowbridge; Matsumoto, Koichi; Numazawa, Takenori

    2014-01-01

    The magnetocaloric effect is the thermal response of a material to an external magnetic field. This manuscript focuses on the physics and the properties of materials which are commonly used for magnetic refrigeration at cryogenic temperatures. After a brief overview of the magnetocaloric effect and associated thermodynamics, typical requirements on refrigerants are discussed from a standpoint of cooling power density optimization. Finally, a compilation of the most important properties of several common magnetocaloric materials is presented.

  18. Operational characteristic analysis of conduction cooling HTS SMES for Real Time Digital Simulator based power quality enhancement simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, A. R.; Kim, G. H.; Kim, K. M.; Kim, D. W.; Park, M.; Yu, I. K.; Kim, S. H.; Sim, K.; Sohn, M. H.; Seong, K. C.

    2010-11-01

    This paper analyzes the operational characteristics of conduction cooling Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) through a real hardware based simulation. To analyze the operational characteristics, the authors manufactured a small-scale toroidal-type SMES and implemented a Real Time Digital Simulator (RTDS) based power quality enhancement simulation. The method can consider not only electrical characteristics such as inductance and current but also temperature characteristic by using the real SMES system. In order to prove the effectiveness of the proposed method, a voltage sag compensation simulation has been implemented using the RTDS connected with the High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) model coil and DC/DC converter system, and the simulation results are discussed in detail.

  19. Analytical design of a superconducting magnetic energy storage for pulsed power peak

    SciTech Connect

    Netter, D.; Leveque, J.; Rezzoug, A.; Caron, J.P.; Sargos, F.M.

    1996-09-01

    A Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage can be used to produce very high pulsed power peak. A superconducting coil is magnetically coupled with another coil linked to the load. During the storage phase, the current is constant. In order to transfer the energy to the load, the authors cause the quench of the superconducting coil. It is very important to know the efficiency of the transfer and how much energy is discharged in the Helium vessel. In this paper, they propose an analytical method which enables to calculate very quickly the electrical parameters of such a device.

  20. High power density reactors based on direct cooled particle beds

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, J.R.; Horn, F.L.

    1985-01-01

    Reactors based on direct cooled HTGR type particle fuel are described. The small diameter particle fuel is packed between concentric porous cylinders to make annular fuel elements, with the inlet coolant gas flowing inwards. Hot exit gas flows out long the central channel of each element. Because of the very large heat transfer area in the packed beds, power densities in particle bed reactors (PBR's) are extremely high resulting in compact, lightweight systems. Coolant exit temperatures are high, because of the ceramic fuel temperature capabilities, and the reactors can be ramped to full power and temperature very rapidly. PBR systems can generate very high burst power levels using open cycle hydrogen coolant, or high continuous powers using closed cycle helium coolant. PBR technology is described and development requirements assessed. 12 figs.

  1. Use of reclaimed water for power plant cooling.

    SciTech Connect

    Veil, J. A.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-10-16

    Freshwater demands are steadily increasing throughout the United States. As its population increases, more water is needed for domestic use (drinking, cooking, cleaning, etc.) and to supply power and food. In arid parts of the country, existing freshwater supplies are not able to meet the increasing demands for water. New water users are often forced to look to alternative sources of water to meet their needs. Over the past few years, utilities in many locations, including parts of the country not traditionally water-poor (e.g., Georgia, Maryland, Massachusetts, New York, and North Carolina) have needed to reevaluate the availability of water to meet their cooling needs. This trend will only become more extreme with time. Other trends are likely to increase pressure on freshwater supplies, too. For example, as populations increase, they will require more food. This in turn will likely increase demands for water by the agricultural sector. Another example is the recent increased interest in producing biofuels. Additional water will be required to grow more crops to serve as the raw materials for biofuels and to process the raw materials into biofuels. This report provides information about an opportunity to reuse an abundant water source -- treated municipal wastewater, also known as 'reclaimed water' -- for cooling and process water in electric generating facilities. The report was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Innovations for Existing Plants research program (Feeley 2005). This program initiated an energy-water research effort in 2003 that includes the availability and use of 'nontraditional sources' of water for use at power plants. This report represents a unique reference for information on the use of reclaimed water for power plant cooling. In particular, the database of reclaimed water user facilities described in Chapter 2 is the first comprehensive national effort to identify and catalog those

  2. A Gas-Cooled Reactor Surface Power System

    SciTech Connect

    Harms, G.A.; Lenard, R.X.; Lipinski, R.J.; Wright, S.A.

    1998-11-09

    A human outpost on Mars requires plentiful power to assure survival of the astronauts. Anywhere from 50 to 500 kW of electric power (kWe) will be needed, depending on the number of astronauts, level of scientific activity, and life- cycle closure desired. This paper describes a 250-kWe power system based on a gas-cooled nuclear reactor with a recuperated closed Brayton cycle conversion system. The design draws upon the extensive data and engineering experience developed under the various high-temperature gas cooled reactor programs and under the SP-100 program. The reactor core is similar in power and size to the research reactors found on numerous university campuses. The fuel is uranium nitide clad in Nb 1 %Zr, which has been extensively tested under the SP-I 00 program The fiel rods are arranged in a hexagonal array within a BeO block. The BeO softens the spectrum, allowing better use of the fbel and stabilizing the geometty against deformation during impact or other loadings. The system has a negative temperature feedback coefficient so that the power level will automatically follow a variable load without the need for continuous adjustment of control elements. Waste heat is removed by an air-cooled heat exchanger using cold Martian air. The amount of radioactivity in the reactor at launch is very small (less than a Curie, and about equal to a truckload of uranium ore). The system will need to be engineered so that criticality cannot occur for any launch accident. This system is also adaptable for electric propulsion or life-support during transit to and from Mars.

  3. A gas-cooled reactor surface power system

    SciTech Connect

    Lipinski, R.J.; Wright, S.A.; Lenard, R.X.; Harms, G.A.

    1999-01-01

    A human outpost on Mars requires plentiful power to assure survival of the astronauts. Anywhere from 50 to 500 kW of electric power (kWe) will be needed, depending on the number of astronauts, level of scientific activity, and life-cycle closure desired. This paper describes a 250-kWe power system based on a gas-cooled nuclear reactor with a recuperated closed Brayton cycle conversion system. The design draws upon the extensive data and engineering experience developed under the various high-temperature gas cooled reactor programs and under the SP-100 program. The reactor core is similar in power and size to the research reactors found on numerous university campuses. The fuel is uranium nitride clad in Nb1{percent}Zr, which has been extensively tested under the SP-100 program. The fuel rods are arranged in a hexagonal array within a BeO block. The BeO softens the spectrum, allowing better use of the fuel and stabilizing the geometry against deformation during impact or other loadings. The system has a negative temperature feedback coefficient so that the power level will automatically follow a variable load without the need for continuous adjustment of control elements. Waste heat is removed by an air-cooled heat exchanger using cold Martian air. The amount of radioactivity in the reactor at launch is very small (less than a Curie, and about equal to a truckload of uranium ore). The system will need to be engineered so that criticality can not occur for any launch accident. This system is also adaptable for electric propulsion or life-support during transit to and from Mars. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. A gas-cooled reactor surface power system

    SciTech Connect

    Lipinski, Ronald J.; Wright, Steven A.; Lenard, Roger X.; Harms, Gary A.

    1999-01-22

    A human outpost on Mars requires plentiful power to assure survival of the astronauts. Anywhere from 50 to 500 kW of electric power (kWe) will be needed, depending on the number of astronauts, level of scientific activity, and life-cycle closure desired. This paper describes a 250-kWe power system based on a gas-cooled nuclear reactor with a recuperated closed Brayton cycle conversion system. The design draws upon the extensive data and engineering experience developed under the various high-temperature gas cooled reactor programs and under the SP-100 program. The reactor core is similar in power and size to the research reactors found on numerous university campuses. The fuel is uranium nitride clad in Nb1%Zr, which has been extensively tested under the SP-100 program. The fuel rods are arranged in a hexagonal array within a BeO block. The BeO softens the spectrum, allowing better use of the fuel and stabilizing the geometry against deformation during impact or other loadings. The system has a negative temperature feedback coefficient so that the power level will automatically follow a variable load without the need for continuous adjustment of control elements. Waste heat is removed by an air-cooled heat exchanger using cold Martian air. The amount of radioactivity in the reactor at launch is very small (less than a Curie, and about equal to a truckload of uranium ore). The system will need to be engineered so that criticality can not occur for any launch accident. This system is also adaptable for electric propulsion or life-support during transit to and from Mars.

  5. A gas-cooled reactor surface power system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipinski, Ronald J.; Wright, Steven A.; Lenard, Roger X.; Harms, Gary A.

    1999-01-01

    A human outpost on Mars requires plentiful power to assure survival of the astronauts. Anywhere from 50 to 500 kW of electric power (kWe) will be needed, depending on the number of astronauts, level of scientific activity, and life-cycle closure desired. This paper describes a 250-kWe power system based on a gas-cooled nuclear reactor with a recuperated closed Brayton cycle conversion system. The design draws upon the extensive data and engineering experience developed under the various high-temperature gas cooled reactor programs and under the SP-100 program. The reactor core is similar in power and size to the research reactors found on numerous university campuses. The fuel is uranium nitride clad in Nb1%Zr, which has been extensively tested under the SP-100 program. The fuel rods are arranged in a hexagonal array within a BeO block. The BeO softens the spectrum, allowing better use of the fuel and stabilizing the geometry against deformation during impact or other loadings. The system has a negative temperature feedback coefficient so that the power level will automatically follow a variable load without the need for continuous adjustment of control elements. Waste heat is removed by an air-cooled heat exchanger using cold Martian air. The amount of radioactivity in the reactor at launch is very small (less than a Curie, and about equal to a truckload of uranium ore). The system will need to be engineered so that criticality can not occur for any launch accident. This system is also adaptable for electric propulsion or life-support during transit to and from Mars.

  6. Ice Thermal Storage Systems for Nuclear Power Plant Supplemental Cooling and Peak Power Shifting

    SciTech Connect

    Haihua Zhao; Hongbin Zhang; Phil Sharpe; Blaise Hamanaka; Wei Yan; WoonSeong Jeong

    2013-03-01

    Availability of cooling water has been one of the major issues for the nuclear power plant site selection. Cooling water issues have frequently disrupted the normal operation at some nuclear power plants during heat waves and long draught. One potential solution is to use ice thermal storage (ITS) systems that reduce cooling water requirements and boost the plant’s thermal efficiency in hot hours. ITS uses cheap off-peak electricity to make ice and uses the ice for supplemental cooling during peak demand time. ITS also provides a way to shift a large amount of electricity from off peak time to peak time. For once-through cooling plants near a limited water body, adding ITS can bring significant economic benefits and avoid forced derating and shutdown during extremely hot weather. For the new plants using dry cooling towers, adding the ITS systems can effectively reduce the efficiency loss during hot weather so that new plants could be considered in regions lack of cooling water. This paper will review light water reactor cooling issues and present the feasibility study results.

  7. 78 FR 35330 - Initial Test Programs for Water-Cooled Nuclear Power Plants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-12

    ... COMMISSION Initial Test Programs for Water-Cooled Nuclear Power Plants AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission... revision to Regulatory Guide (RG), 1.68, ``Initial Test Programs for Water-Cooled Nuclear Power Plants... Initial Test Programs (ITPs) for light water cooled nuclear power plants. ADDRESSES: Please refer...

  8. Solar-powered Rankine heat pump for heating and cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rousseau, J.

    1978-01-01

    The design, operation and performance of a familyy of solar heating and cooling systems are discussed. The systems feature a reversible heat pump operating with R-11 as the working fluid and using a motor-driven centrifugal compressor. In the cooling mode, solar energy provides the heat source for a Rankine power loop. The system is operational with heat source temperatures ranging from 155 to 220 F; the estimated coefficient of performance is 0.7. In the heating mode, the vapor-cycle heat pump processes solar energy collected at low temperatures (40 to 80 F). The speed of the compressor can be adjusted so that the heat pump capacity matches the load, allowing a seasonal coefficient of performance of about 8 to be attained.

  9. First high power pulsed tests of a dressed 325 MHz superconducting single spoke resonator at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Madrak, R.; Branlard, J.; Chase, B.; Darve, C.; Joireman, P.; Khabiboulline, T.; Mukherjee, A.; Nicol, T.; Peoples-Evans, E.; Peterson, D.; Pischalnikov, Y.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    In the recently commissioned superconducting RF cavity test facility at Fermilab (SCTF), a 325 MHz, {beta} = 0.22 superconducting single-spoke resonator (SSR1) has been tested for the first time with its input power coupler. Previously, this cavity had been tested CW with a low power, high Q{sub ext} test coupler; first as a bare cavity in the Fermilab Vertical Test Stand and then fully dressed in the SCTF. For the tests described here, the design input coupler with Q{sub ext} {approx} 10{sup 6} was used. Pulsed power was provided by a Toshiba E3740A 2.5 MW klystron.

  10. Power- and Cooling-Aware Parallel Performance Diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, Rashawn; Karavanic, Karen; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Marquez, Andres

    2011-12-14

    Increasing concern about the power consumption of data centers and computer laboratories, which in some cases matches or exceeds the resources required to power a small city, drive a need for a new, integrated approach to parallel performance diagnosis that integrates traditional application oriented performance data with measurements of the physical runtime environment. We have developed infrastructure for combined evaluation of system, application, and machine room performance in the high end environment. We motivate our approach, with a case study of the performance, power and cooling impact of the choice of physical location for a scientific application within the machine room. We present a new intensity metric for use in automated performance diagnosis tools, and discuss the challenges encountered.

  11. Legionnaires' disease bacteria in power plant cooling systems: Phase 2

    SciTech Connect

    Tyndall, R.L.; Christensen, S.W.; Solomon, J.A.

    1985-04-01

    Legionnaires' Disease Bacteria (Legionella) are a normal component of the aquatic community. The study investigated various environmental factors that affect Legionella profiles in power plant cooling waters. The results indicate that each of the four factors investigated (incubation temperature, water quality, the presence and type of associated biota, and the nature of the indigenous Legionella population) is important in determining the Legionella profile of these waters. Simple predictive relationships were not found. At incubation temperatures of 32/sup 0/ and 37/sup 0/C, waters from a power plant where infectious Legionella were not observed stimulated the growth of stock Legionella cultures more than did waters from plants where infectious Legionella were prevalent. This observation is consistent with Phase I results, which showed that densities of Legionella were frequently reduced in closed-cycle cooling systems despite the often higher infectivity of Legionella in closed-cycle waters. In contrast, water from power plants where infectious Legionella were prevalent supported the growth of indigenous Legionella pneumophila at 42/sup 0/C, while water from a power plant where infectious Legionella were absent did not support growth of indigenous Legionella. Some Legionella are able to withstand a water temperature of 85/sup 0/C for several hours, thus proving more tolerant than was previously realized. Finally, the observation that water from two power plants where infectious Legionella were prevalent usually supported the growth of Group A Legionella at 45/sup 0/C indicates the presence, of soluble Legionella growth promoters in these waters. This test system could allow for future identification and control of these growth promoters and, hence, of Legionella. 25 refs., 23 figs., 10 tabs.

  12. Microgravity Spray Cooling Research for High Powered Laser Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zivich, Chad P.

    2004-01-01

    An extremely powerful laser is being developed at Goddard Space Flight Center for use on a satellite. This laser has several potential applications. One application is to use it for upper atmosphere weather research. In this case, the laser would reflect off aerosols in the upper atmosphere and bounce back to the satellite, where the aerosol velocities could be calculated and thus the upper atmosphere weather patterns could be monitored. A second application would be for the US. Air Force, which wants to use the laser strategically as a weapon for satellite defense. The Air Force fears that in the coming years as more and more nations gain limited space capabilities that American satellites may become targets, and the laser could protect the satellites. Regardless of the ultimate application, however, a critical step along the way to putting the laser in space is finding a way to efficiently cool it. While operating the laser becomes very hot and must be cooled to prevent overheating. On earth, this is accomplished by simply running cool tap water over the laser to keep it cool. But on a satellite, this is too inefficient. This would require too much water mass to be practical. Instead, we are investigating spray cooling as a means to cool the laser in microgravity. Spray cooling requires much less volume of fluid, and thus could be suitable for use on a satellite. We have inherited a 2.2 second Drop Tower rig to conduct our research with. In our experiments, water is pressurized with a compressed air tank and sprayed through a nozzle onto our test plate. We can vary the pressure applied to the water and the temperature of the plate before an experiment trial. The whole process takes place in simulated microgravity in the 2.2 second Drop Tower, and a high speed video camera records the spray as it hits the plate. We have made much progress in the past few weeks on these experiments. The rig originally did not have the capability to heat the test plate, but I did

  13. Low-Cost Superconducting Wire for Wind Generators: High Performance, Low Cost Superconducting Wires and Coils for High Power Wind Generators

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    REACT Project: The University of Houston will develop a low-cost, high-current superconducting wire that could be used in high-power wind generators. Superconducting wire currently transports 600 times more electric current than a similarly sized copper wire, but is significantly more expensive. The University of Houston’s innovation is based on engineering nanoscale defects in the superconducting film. This could quadruple the current relative to today’s superconducting wires, supporting the same amount of current using 25% of the material. This would make wind generators lighter, more powerful and more efficient. The design could result in a several-fold reduction in wire costs and enable their commercial viability of high-power wind generators for use in offshore applications.

  14. Power Conversion Study for High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Oh; Richard Moore; Robert Barner

    2005-05-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is investigating a Brayton cycle efficiency improvement on a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) as part of Generation-IV nuclear engineering research initiative. There are some technical issues to be resolved before the selection of the final design of the high temperature gascooled reactor, called as a Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), which is supposed to be built at the INEEL by year 2017. The technical issues are the selection of the working fluid, direct vs. indirect cycle, power cycle type, the optimized design in terms of a number of intercoolers, and others. In this paper, we investigated a number of working fluids for the power conversion loop, direct versus indirect cycle, the effect of intercoolers, and other thermal hydraulics issues. However, in this paper, we present part of the results we have obtained. HYSYS computer code was used along with a computer model developed using Visual Basic computer language.

  15. Thermal analysis of the forced cooled conductor for the TF (toroidal field) superconducting coils in the TIBER II ETR design

    SciTech Connect

    Kerns, J.A.; Slack, D.S.; Miller, J.R.

    1987-06-11

    The Tokamak Ignition/Burn Experimental Reactor (TIBER) is being designed to provide nuclear testing capabilities for first wall and blanket design concepts. The baseline design for TIBER II is to provide steady-state nuclear burn capabilities. These objectives must be met using reactor relevant components, such as state-of-the-art current drive schemes coupled with superconducting toroidal field (TF) and poloidal field (PF) coils. The design is also constrained to be cost effective, which forces the machine to be as small as possible. This last constraint limits the nuclear shielding in TIBER. Therefore, the TF coils will have a high nuclear heat load of up to 4.5 kW per coil. The cooling scheme and the thermal analysis for this design are presented.

  16. The Cost of Helium Refrigerators and Coolers for SuperconductingDevices as a Function of Cooling at 4 K

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael A.

    2007-08-27

    This paper is an update of papers written in 1991 and in1997 by Rod Byrns and this author concerning estimating the cost ofrefrigeration for superconducting magnets and cavities. The actual costsof helium refrigerators and coolers (escalated to 2007 dollars) areplotted and compared to a correlation function. A correlation functionbetween cost and refrigeration at 4.5 K is given. The capital cost oflarger refrigerators (greater than 10 W at 4.5 K) is plotted as afunction of 4.5-K cooling. The cost of small coolers is plotted as afunction of refrigeration available at 4.2 K. A correlation function forestimating efficiency (percent of Carnot) of both types of refrigeratorsis also given.

  17. High Temperature Superconducting Degaussing-Cooling Two Hts Coils with One Cryocooler for the Littoral Combat Ship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, B. K.; Golda, E. M.; Kephart, J. T.

    2008-03-01

    The concept of creating a high temperature superconducting degaussing system has previously been studied by the Navy and shown to provide significant weight savings over conventional copper based degaussing systems. Modeling efforts have shown that in a HTS Degaussing System (HTSDG) for the Littoral Combat Ship, the dominant costs are cryocoolers. In an effort to minimize the number of cryocoolers, a two coil demonstrator cooled by one cryocooler has been constructed at NSWCCD Philadelphia. The demonstration consists of two 22 m long sections of flexible cryostat that are electrically isolated but connected in series through two junction boxes for serial gas flow. Within each cryostat section, 12 turns of HTS represent a vertical and horizontal degaussing coil. Use of Helium as the working fluid reduces safety impacts and allows higher current density in the HTS conductor due to lower temperature operation. Design, testing results, and lessons learned from the installation and operation of this cable are presented in this paper.

  18. High power input coupler development for BEPCII 500 MHz superconducting cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Tongming; Pan, Weimin; Ma, Qiang; Wang, Guangwei; Dai, Xuwen; Zhang, Zhanjun; Furuya, T.; Mitsunobu, S.

    2010-11-01

    A high power input coupler for a 500 MHz superconducting cavity (SCC) of the upgrade project of Beijing Electron Positron Collider (BEPCII) has been developed in China. Several prototypes have been fabricated and tested successfully. A maximum of 420 kW continuous wave (CW) RF power in traveling wave (TW) mode was achieved in the high power test. The detailed design, fabrication and test of the coupler are described in this paper.

  19. Effect of input power on cooling property of a thermoacoustic cooling system with diameter-expanded prime movers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, So; Sakamoto, Shin-ichi; Orino, Yuichiro; Wada, Takahiro; Inui, Yoshitaka; Watanabe, Yoshiaki

    2016-07-01

    We studied a thermoacoustic cooling system driven at low temperatures to make practical use of the system. Aiming to reduce the driving temperature of the thermoacoustic system, we developed a loop-tube-type thermoacoustic system with diameter-expanded two-stage prime movers, i.e., a heat-to-sound transducer. The system drove at 67 °C. Additionally, we developed a prototype for a thermoacoustic cooling system with a diameter-expanded two-stage prime mover. In the experiment, the cooling point temperature was decreased by 4.4 °C from room temperature, i.e., 20 °C. To improve the cooling performance of the prototype thermoacoustic cooling system, we experimentally investigated the effect of increasing the input power on the cooling performance.

  20. Conceptual design of MgB2 coil for the 100 MJ SMES of advanced superconducting power conditioning system (ASPCS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atomura, Naoki; Takahashi, Toshinori; Amata, Hiroto; Iwasaki, Tatsuya; Son, Kyoungwoo; Miyagi, Daisuke; Tsuda, Makoto; Hamajima, Takataro; Shintomi, Takakazu; Makida, Yasuhiro; Takao, Tomoaki; Munakata, Kohe; Kajiwara, Masataka

    In order to reduce global carbon-dioxide in the world, we propose an Advanced Superconducting Power Conditioning System (ASPCS) which is composed of 5 MW renewable energy resources and 1 MW hybrid storage system. The hybrid storage system is composed of FC-H2-EL and SMES which is installed adjacent to a LH2 station for vehicles. Since the SMES can be operated at 20 K which is a saturated temperature of LH2, we can use MgB2 superconductors. In the ASPCS, 100 MJ storage capacities of the SMES should be required. This paper focuses on studies into a conceptual design of SMES toroidal coil composed of the MgB2 and indirectly cooled by LH2.

  1. A role for high frequency superconducting devices in free space power transmission systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christian, Jose L., Jr.; Cull, Ronald C.

    1988-01-01

    Major advances in space power technology are being made in photovoltaic, solar thermal, and nuclear systems. Despite these advances, the power systems required by the energy and power intensive mission of the future will be massive due to the large collecting surfaces, large thermal management systems, and heavy shielding. Reducing this mass on board the space vehicle can result in significant benefits because of the high cost of transporting and moving mass about in space. An approach to this problem is beaming the power from a point where the massiveness of the power plant is not such a major concern. The viability of such an approach was already investigated. Efficient microwave power beam transmission at 2.45 GHz was demonstrated over short range. Higher frequencies are desired for efficient transmission over several hundred or thousand kilometers in space. Superconducting DC-RF conversion as well as RF-DC conversion offers exciting possibilities. Multivoltage power conditioning for multicavity high power RF tubes could be eliminated since only low voltages are required for Josephson junctions. Small, high efficiency receivers may be possible using the reverse Josephson effects. A conceptual receiving antenna design using superconducting devices to determine possible system operating efficiency is assessed. If realized, these preliminary assessments indicate a role for superconducting devices in millimeter and submillimeter free space power transmission systems.

  2. Non-Cooled Power System for Venus Lander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salazar, Denise; Landis, Geoffrey A.; Colozza, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    The Planetary Science Decadal Survey of 2013-2022 stated that the exploration of Venus is of significant interest. Studying the seismic activity of the planet is of particular importance because the findings can be compared to the seismic activity of Earth. Further, the geological and atmospheric properties of Venus will shed light into the past and future of Earth. This paper presents a radioisotope power system (RPS) design for a small low-power Venus lander. The feasibility of the new power system is then compared to that of primary batteries. A requirement for the power source system is to avoid moving parts in order to not interfere with the primary objective of the mission - to collect data about the seismic activity of Venus using a seismometer. The target mission duration of the lander is 117 days, a significant leap from Venera 13, the longest-lived lander on the surface of Venus, which survived for 2 hours. One major assumption for this mission design is that the power source system will not provide cooling to the other components of the lander. This assumption is based on high-temperature electronics technology that will enable the electronics and components of the lander to operate at Venus surface temperature. For the proposed RPS, a customized General Purpose Heat Source Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (GPHSRTG) is designed and analyzed. The GPHS-RTG is chosen primarily because it has no moving parts and it is capable of operating for long duration missions on the order of years. This power system is modeled as a spherical structure for a fundamental thermal analysis. The total mass and electrical output of the system are calculated to be 24 kilograms and 26 Watts, respectively. An alternative design for a battery-based power system uses Sodium Sulfur batteries. To deliver a similar electrical output for 117 days, the battery mass is calculated to be 234 kilograms. Reducing mission duration or power required will reduce the required battery mass

  3. One-phase dual converter for two quadrant power control of superconducting magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Ehsani, M.; Kustom, R.I.; Boom, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents the results of theoretical and experimental development of a new dc-ac-dc converter for superconducting magnet power supplies. The basic operating principles of the circuit are described followed by a theoretical treatment of the dynamics and control of the system. The successful results of the first experimental operation and control of such a circuit are presented and discussed.

  4. One Hundred Years of Superconductivity: Superconducting Materials and Electric Power Applications (465th Brookhaven Lecture)

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Qiang

    2011-01-19

    It was one hundred years ago this year that Dutch physicist Heike Kamerlingh Onnes discovered that by lowering the temperature of mercury to a blistering cold four degrees Kelvin, the metal became a “superconductor” and allowed electricity to flow through it with very little, if any, resistance. Fast forward one hundred years: now we are looking for new ways to store and transport energy — energy we can use to get from one place to another, stay comfortable when the weather outside is not, grow enough healthy food to feed the population, and sustain our ways of life — all while trying to protect the planet. Superconductors, with their potential to be über-energy efficient, are likely to play a crucial role in solving these challenges, and researchers at Brookhaven Lab are figuring out just how it can be done. Li will begin his talk with an overview of the first one hundred years of exploring superconductivity. He will also discuss the challenges of developing new superconductors and improving their performance for real-world energy applications, and then explain how basic science researchers at BNL are addressing those challenges.

  5. At the Frontiers of Science Superconductivity and Its Electric Power Applications

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-01

    Electricity - it is one of our modern scientific miracles, and today we could not imagine living without it. But what if we could make it better? Superconductivity has the potential to do just that, by improving the capacity, quality, and reliability of products that use electricity. There has been a great deal of discussion about superconductivity in the last 10 years, but what exactly is it? In this document you will learn the definition of superconductivity, how it works, and its present and potential uses. You will also get an inside look at the challenges that scientists around the world are working to overcome in order to fully incorporate superconductivity in our everyday lives. When you turn on a lamp at home, the electric current flows - is conducted - through a wire made of copper or aluminum. Along the way, this wire resists the flow of electricity, and this resistance is something very much like friction. The resistance causes some of the electricity to be lost in the form of heat. Which means that every time you use an appliance, from a radio to a generator, you are not getting 100% of the energy that flows through it; some of it is wasted by the conductor. Superconductivity - the ability of a material to conduct electricity without losses to resistance - is a physical property inherent to a variety of metals and ceramics, much the same way magnetism is present in a variety of materials. It is dependent on temperature; that is, a material will not exhibit superconductivity until it is sufficiently cold. The necessary temperatures to induce superconductivity are well below what we might commonly consider 'cold.' They are so low, in fact, that they are measured using the Kelvin temperature scale (K). Absolute zero, or 0 K, is equal to -459 Fahrenheit (F). It is defined as the lowest temperature theoretically possible, or the complete absence of heat. In 1911, working in a laboratory in Holland, the Dutch scientist Heike Kamerlingh Onnes cooled mercury to

  6. Design of an improved high cooling power 4 K GM cryocooler and helium compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, X. H.

    2015-12-01

    High cooling power 4 K cryocoolers are in high demand given their broad applications in such fields as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and low temperature superconductors. ARS has recently designed and developed a high cooling power 4 K pneumatic-drive GM cryocooler which achieves a typical cooling power of 1.75 W/4.2 K. Steady input power of our newly developed helium compressor supplied to the cold head is 11.8 kW at 60 Hz. The operational speed of the cold head is 30 RPM. The effects of geometries and operational conditions on the cooling performance of this 4 K GM cryocooler are also experimentally tested.

  7. RF Conditioning and Testing of Fundamental Power Couplers for SNS Superconducting Cavity Production

    SciTech Connect

    M. Stirbet; G.K. Davis; M. A. Drury; C. Grenoble; J. Henry; G. Myneni; T. Powers; K. Wilson; M. Wiseman; I.E. Campisi; Y.W. Kang; D. Stout

    2005-05-16

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) makes use of 33 medium beta (0.61) and 48 high beta (0.81) superconducting cavities. Each cavity is equipped with a fundamental power coupler, which should withstand the full klystron power of 550 kW in full reflection for the duration of an RF pulse of 1.3 msec at 60 Hz repetition rate. Before assembly to a superconducting cavity, the vacuum components of the coupler are submitted to acceptance procedures consisting of preliminary quality assessments, cleaning and clean room assembly, vacuum leak checks and baking under vacuum, followed by conditioning and RF high power testing. Similar acceptance procedures (except clean room assembly and baking) were applied for the airside components of the coupler. All 81 fundamental power couplers for SNS superconducting cavity production have been RF power tested at JLAB Newport News and, beginning in April 2004 at SNS Oak Ridge. This paper gives details of coupler processing and RF high power-assessed performances.

  8. Development of a naturally aspired thermosyphon for power amplifier cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siedel, S.; Robinson, A. J.; Kempers, R.; Kerslake, S.

    2014-07-01

    This paper details the early development steps of a two-phase thermosyphon thermal management solution for power amplifiers (PA) in the telecommunication industry. These components, attached to a vertical PCB within an enclosure between the RF filter and a natural or forced convection heat sink, dissipate a large amount of heat with a high heat flux density. Currently cooled by direct contact to a shared heat sink, they tend to spread heat towards other components of their board, affecting their reliability. A thermosyphon thus appear as an ideal thermal management solution to transport the heat from the power amplifiers in order to dissipate it to a remote and dedicated natural convection heat sink. In the present study, the performance and the heat spreading of a forced convection unit is measured. A thermosyphon solution is then designed with a flat vertical evaporator and a radial natural convection heat sink and condenser. The performance of the thermosyphon thermal management solution is measured and compared to the initial solution. The limits and improvement needs of the thermosyphon solution are then discussed.

  9. Gas-cooled reactor for space power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, C.E.; Pearson, J.S.

    1987-05-01

    Reactor characteristics based on extensive development work on the 500-MWt reactor for the Pluto nuclear ramjet are described for space power systems useful in the range of 2 to 20 MWe for operating times of 1 y. The modest pressure drop through the prismatic ceramic core is supported at the outlet end by a ceramic dome which also serves as a neutron reflector. Three core materials are considered which are useful at temperatures up to about 2000 K. Most of the calculations are based on a beryllium oxide with uranium dioxide core. Reactor control is accomplished by use of a burnable poison, a variable-leakage reflector, and internal control rods. Reactivity swings of 20% are obtained with a dozen internal boron-10 rods for the size cores studied. Criticality calculations were performed using the ALICE Monte Carlo code. The inherent high-temperature capability of the reactor design removes the reactor as a limiting condition on system performance. The low fuel inventories required, particularly for beryllium oxide reactors, make space power systems based on gas-cooled near-thermal reactors a lesser safeguard risk than those based on fast reactors.

  10. USE of mine pool water for power plant cooling.

    SciTech Connect

    Veil, J. A.; Kupar, J. M .; Puder, M. G.

    2006-11-27

    Water and energy production issues intersect in numerous ways. Water is produced along with oil and gas, water runs off of or accumulates in coal mines, and water is needed to operate steam electric power plants and hydropower generating facilities. However, water and energy are often not in the proper balance. For example, even if water is available in sufficient quantities, it may not have the physical and chemical characteristics suitable for energy or other uses. This report provides preliminary information about an opportunity to reuse an overabundant water source--ground water accumulated in underground coal mines--for cooling and process water in electric generating facilities. The report was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), which has implemented a water/energy research program (Feeley and Ramezan 2003). Among the topics studied under that program is the availability and use of ''non-traditional sources'' of water for use at power plants. This report supports NETL's water/energy research program.

  11. 14 CFR 23.1045 - Cooling test procedures for turbine engine powered airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Cooling test procedures for turbine engine powered airplanes. 23.1045 Section 23.1045 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Cooling § 23.1045 Cooling test procedures for turbine engine...

  12. 14 CFR 23.1045 - Cooling test procedures for turbine engine powered airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Cooling test procedures for turbine engine powered airplanes. 23.1045 Section 23.1045 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Cooling § 23.1045 Cooling test procedures for turbine engine...

  13. 14 CFR 23.1045 - Cooling test procedures for turbine engine powered airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Cooling test procedures for turbine engine powered airplanes. 23.1045 Section 23.1045 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Cooling § 23.1045 Cooling test procedures for turbine engine...

  14. 14 CFR 23.1045 - Cooling test procedures for turbine engine powered airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Cooling test procedures for turbine engine powered airplanes. 23.1045 Section 23.1045 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Cooling § 23.1045 Cooling test procedures for turbine engine...

  15. 14 CFR 23.1045 - Cooling test procedures for turbine engine powered airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cooling test procedures for turbine engine powered airplanes. 23.1045 Section 23.1045 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Cooling § 23.1045 Cooling test procedures for turbine engine...

  16. Microwave-Induced Cooling of a Superconducting Persistent-Current Qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenzuela, Sergio; Oliver, William; Berns, David; Berggren, Karl; Levitov, Leonid; Orlando, Terry

    2007-03-01

    We present the experimental demonstration of microwave-induced cooling of a persistent-current qubit. Our qubit is a multi-level artificial atom. Thermal population of the first-excited qubit state is driven to a higher-excited state, from which it preferentially relaxes to the qubit ground state. Cooling is realized, because the driving-induced population transfer to the ground state is faster than the thermal repopulation of the excited state. We achieve effective qubit temperatures < 3 mK, a factor 10x-100x lower than the dilution refrigerator ambient temperature. This talk will present and discuss these experimental results. [1] S.O. Valenzuela, W.D. Oliver, D.M. Berns, et al., Science (2006).

  17. The Use of a Solid State Analog Television Transmitter as a Superconducting Electron Gun Power Amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    J.G. Kulpin, K.J. Kleman, R.A. Legg

    2012-07-01

    A solid state analog television transmitter designed for 200 MHz operation is being commissioned as a radio frequency power amplifier on the Wisconsin superconducting electron gun cavity. The amplifier consists of three separate radio frequency power combiner cabinets and one monitor and control cabinet. The transmitter employs rugged field effect transistors built into one kilowatt drawers that are individually hot swappable at maximum continuous power output. The total combined power of the transmitter system is 33 kW at 200 MHz, output through a standard coaxial transmission line. A low level radio frequency system is employed to digitally synthesize the 200 MHz signal and precisely control amplitude and phase.

  18. Design report for an indirectly cooled 3-m diameter superconducting solenoid for the Fermilab Collider Detector Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Fast, R.; Grimson, J.; Kephart, R.

    1982-10-01

    The Fermilab Collider Detector Facility (CDF) is a large detector system designed to study anti pp collisions at very high center of mass energies. The central detector for the CDF shown employs a large axial magnetic field volume instrumented with a central tracking chamber composed of multiple layers of cylindrical drift chambers and a pair of intermediate tracking chambers. The purpose of this system is to determine the trajectories, sign of electric charge, and momenta of charged particles produced with polar angles between 10 and 170 degrees. The magnetic field volume required for tracking is approximately 3.5 m long an 3 m in diameter. To provide the desired ..delta..p/sub T/p/sub T/ less than or equal to 1.5% at 50 GeV/c using drift chambers with approx. 200..mu.. resolution the field inside this volume should be 1.5 T. The field should be as uniform as is practical to simplify both track finding and the reconstruction of particle trajectories with the drift chambers. Such a field can be produced by a cylindrical current sheet solenoid with a uniform current density of 1.2 x 10/sup 6/ A/m (1200 A/mm) surrounded by an iron return yoke. For practical coils and return yokes, both central electromagnetic and central hadronic calorimetry must be located outside the coil of the magnet. This geometry requires that the coil and the cryostat be thin both in physical thickness and in radiation and absorption lengths. This dual requirement of high linear current density and minimal coil thickness can only be satisfied using superconducting technology. In this report we describe the design for an indirectly cooled superconducting solenoid to meet the requirements of the Fermilab CDF. The components of the magnet system are discussed in the following chapters, with a summary of parameters listed in Appendix A.

  19. Pathogenic amoebae in power-plant cooling lakes. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Tyndall, R.L.; Willaert, E.; Stevens, A.R.

    1981-06-01

    Cooling waters and associated algae and sediments from four northern and four southern/western electric power plants were tested for the presence of pathogenic amoebae. Unheated control waters and algae/sediments from four northern and five southern/western sites were also tested. When comparing results from the test versus control sites, a significantly higher proportion (P less than or equal to 0.05) of the samples from the test sites were positive for thermophilic amoeba, thermophilic Naegleria and pathogenic Naegleria. The difference in number of samples positive for thermophilic Naegleria between heated and unheated waters, however, was attributable predominantly to the northern waters and algae/sediments. While two of four northern test sites yielded pathogenic Naegleria, seven of the eight isolates were obtained from one site. Seasonality effects relative to the isolation of the pathogen were also noted at this site. One pathogen was isolated from a southwestern test site. Pathogens were not isolated from any control sites. Some of the pathogenic isolates were analyzed serologically and classified as pathogenic Naegleria fowleri. Salinity, pH, conductivity, and bacteriological profiles did not obviously correlate with the presence or absence of pathogenic Naegleria. While thermal addition was significantly associated with the presence of thermophilic Naegleria (P less than or equal to 0.05), the data implicate other as yet undefined parameters associated with the presence of the pathogenic thermophile. Until further delineation of these parameters is effected, generalizations cannot be made concerning the effect of thermal impact on the growth of pathogenic amoeba in a particular cooling system.

  20. Modeling Single-Phase and Boiling Liquid Jet Impingement Cooling in Power Electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Narumanchi, S. V. J.; Hassani, V.; Bharathan, D.

    2005-12-01

    Jet impingement has been an attractive cooling option in a number of industries over the past few decades. Over the past 15 years, jet impingement has been explored as a cooling option in microelectronics. Recently, interest has been expressed by the automotive industry in exploring jet impingement for cooling power electronics components. This technical report explores, from a modeling perspective, both single-phase and boiling jet impingement cooling in power electronics, primarily from a heat transfer viewpoint. The discussion is from the viewpoint of the cooling of IGBTs (insulated-gate bipolar transistors), which are found in hybrid automobile inverters.

  1. Noise and Bandwidth Measurements of Diffusion-Cooled Nb Hot-Electron Bolometer Mixers at Frequencies Above the Superconductive Energy Gap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyss, R. A.; Karasik, B. S.; McGrath, W. R.; Bumble, B.; LeDuc, H.

    1999-01-01

    Diffusion-cooled Nb hot-electron bolometer (HEB) mixers have the potential to simultaneously achieve high intermediate frequency (IF) bandwidths and low mixer noise temperatures for operation at THz frequencies (above the superconductive gap energy). We have measured the IF signal bandwidth at 630 GHz of Nb devices with lengths L = 0.3, 0.2, and 0.1 micrometer in a quasioptical mixer configuration employing twin-slot antennas. The 3-dB EF bandwidth increased from 1.2 GHz for the 0.3 gm long device to 9.2 GHz for the 0.1 gm long device. These results demonstrate the expected 1/L squared dependence of the IF bandwidth at submillimeter wave frequencies for the first time, as well as the largest EF bandwidth obtained to date. For the 0.1 gm device, which had the largest bandwidth, the double sideband (DSB) noise temperature of the receiver was 320-470 K at 630 GHz with an absorbed LO power of 35 nW, estimated using the isothermal method. A version of this mixer with the antenna length scaled for operation at 2.5 THz has also been tested. A DSB receiver noise temperature of 1800 plus or minus 100 K was achieved, which is about 1,000 K lower than our previously reported results. These results demonstrate that large EF bandwidth and low-noise operation of a diffusion-cooled HEB mixer is possible at THz frequencies with the same device geometry.

  2. Design and cost estimate of an 800 MVA superconducting power transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Alex, P.; Ernst, A. ); Forsyth, E.; Gibbs, R.; Thomas, R.; Muller, T. )

    1990-10-18

    Numerous studies involving cost estimates have been performed for superconducting power transmission systems. As these systems were usually aimed at providing transmission from large clusters of generation the base power rating of the corridor was very high; in the case of the most comprehensive study it was 10,000 MVA. The purpose of this study is to examine a system which is very closely based on the prototype 1000 MVA system which was operated at Brookhaven National Laboratory over a four year period. The purpose of the study is to provide cost estimates for the superconducting system and to compare these estimates with a design based on the use of advanced but conventional cable designs. The work is supported by funding from the Office of Energy Research's Industry/Laboratory Technology Exchange Program. This program is designed to commercialize energy technologies. The technical design of the superconducting system was prepared by the BNL staff, the design of the 800 MVA conventional cable system was done by engineers from Underground Systems Incorporated. Both institutions worked on the cost estimate of the superconducting system. The description and cost estimate of the conventional cable system is given in the Appendix. 5 refs.

  3. Self-driven cooling loop for a large superconducting magnet in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mord, A. J.; Snyder, H. A.

    1992-01-01

    Pressurized cooling loops in which superfluid helium circulation is driven by the heat being removed have been previously demonstrated in laboratory tests. A simpler and lighter version which eliminates a heat exchanger by mixing the returning fluid directly with the superfluid helium bath was analyzed. A carefully designed flow restriction must be used to prevent boiling in this low-pressure system. A candidate design for Astromag is shown that can keep the magnet below 2.0 K during magnet charging. This gives a greater margin against accidental quench than approaches that allow the coolant to warm above the lambda point. A detailed analysis of one candidate design is presented.

  4. Site-dependent factors affecting the economic feasibility of solar powered absorption cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, J. C.

    1977-01-01

    A procedure has been developed which can be used to determine the economic feasibility of solar powered absorption cooling systems. This procedure has been used in a study to investigate the influence of the site-dependent parameters on the economic feasibility of solar absorption cooling. The purpose of this study was to make preliminary site selections for solar powered absorption cooling systems. This paper summarizes the results of that study.

  5. Simulation of cooling-water discharges from power plants.

    PubMed

    Wu, J; Buchak, E M; Edinger, J E; Kolluru, V S

    2001-01-01

    Accurate simulation of the temperature distribution in a cooling lake or reservoir is often required for feasibility studies of engineering options that increase the cooling capacity of the waterbody. A three-dimensional hydrodynamic and temperature model has been developed and applied to several cooling lakes in the south-eastern United States. In this paper, the details of the modeling system are presented, along with the application to the Flint Creek Lake. PMID:11381460

  6. Remote Measurement of Heat Flux from Power Plant Cooling Lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, Alfred J.; Kurzeja, Robert J.; Villa-Aleman, Eliel; Bollinger, James S.; Pendergast, Malcolm M.

    2013-06-01

    Laboratory experiments have demonstrated a correlation between the rate of heat loss q" from an experimental fluid to the air above and the standard deviation σ of the thermal variability in images of the fluid surface. These experimental results imply that q" can be derived directly from thermal imagery by computing σ. This paper analyses thermal imagery collected over two power plant cooling lakes to determine if the same relationship exists. Turbulent boundary layer theory predicts a linear relationship between q" and σ when both forced (wind driven) and free (buoyancy driven) convection are present. Datasets derived from ground- and helicopter-based imagery collections had correlation coefficients between σ and q" of 0.45 and 0.76, respectively. Values of q" computed from a function of σ and friction velocity u* derived from turbulent boundary layer theory had higher correlations with measured values of q" (0.84 and 0.89). Finally, this research may be applicable to the problem of calculating losses of heat from the ocean to the atmosphere during high-latitude cold-air outbreaks because it does not require the information typically needed to compute sensible, evaporative, and thermal radiation energy losses to the atmosphere.

  7. Spray cooling characteristics of nanofluids for electronic power devices.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Shou-Shing; Leu, Hsin-Yuan; Liu, Hao-Hsiang

    2015-01-01

    The performance of a single spray for electronic power devices using deionized (DI) water and pure silver (Ag) particles as well as multi-walled carbon nanotube (MCNT) particles, respectively, is studied herein. The tests are performed with a flat horizontal heated surface using a nozzle diameter of 0.5 mm with a definite nozzle-to-target surface distance of 25 mm. The effects of nanoparticle volume fraction and mass flow rate of the liquid on the surface heat flux, including critical heat flux (CHF), are explored. Both steady state and transient data are collected for the two-phase heat transfer coefficient, boiling curve/ cooling history, and the corresponding CHF. The heat transfer removal rate can reach up to 274 W/cm(2) with the corresponding CHF enhancement ratio of 2.4 for the Ag/water nanofluids present at a volume fraction of 0.0075% with a low mass flux of 11.9 × 10(-4) kg/cm(2)s. PMID:25852429

  8. Spray cooling characteristics of nanofluids for electronic power devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Shou-Shing; Leu, Hsin-Yuan; Liu, Hao-Hsiang

    2015-03-01

    The performance of a single spray for electronic power devices using deionized (DI) water and pure silver (Ag) particles as well as multi-walled carbon nanotube (MCNT) particles, respectively, is studied herein. The tests are performed with a flat horizontal heated surface using a nozzle diameter of 0.5 mm with a definite nozzle-to-target surface distance of 25 mm. The effects of nanoparticle volume fraction and mass flow rate of the liquid on the surface heat flux, including critical heat flux (CHF), are explored. Both steady state and transient data are collected for the two-phase heat transfer coefficient, boiling curve/ cooling history, and the corresponding CHF. The heat transfer removal rate can reach up to 274 W/cm2 with the corresponding CHF enhancement ratio of 2.4 for the Ag/water nanofluids present at a volume fraction of 0.0075% with a low mass flux of 11.9 × 10-4 kg/cm2s.

  9. Mechanical Analysis of High Power Internally Cooled Annular Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Jiyun; No, Hee Cheon; Kazimi, Mujid S.

    2004-05-15

    Annular fuel with internal flow is proposed to allow higher power density in pressurized water reactors. The structural behavior issues arising from the higher flow rate required to cool the fuel are assessed here, including buckling, vibrations, and potential wear problems. Five flow-induced vibration mechanisms are addressed: buckling instability, vortex-induced vibration, acoustic resonance, fluid-elastic instability, and turbulence-induced vibration. The structural behavior of the 17 x 17 traditional solid fuel array is compared with that of two types of annular fuels, a 15 x 15 array, and a 13 x 13 array.It is seen that the annular fuels are superior to the reference fuel in avoiding vibration-induced damage, even at a 50% increase in flow velocity above today's reactors. The higher resistance to vibration is mainly due to their relatively larger cross section area making them more rigid. The 13 x 13 annular fuel shows better structural performance than the 15 x 15 one due to its higher rigidity. Analysis of acoustic resonance of the inner channel cladding with pump blade passing frequencies showed that the acoustic frequencies are within 120% of the pulsation frequency. The annular fuel exhibits reduced impact, sliding, and fretting wear than the solid fuel, even at 150% flow rate of today's reactors.

  10. 14 CFR 23.1047 - Cooling test procedures for reciprocating engine powered airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... engine powered airplanes. 23.1047 Section 23.1047 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Cooling § 23.1047 Cooling test procedures for reciprocating engine powered airplanes. Compliance with § 23.1041 must be shown for the climb (or, for multiengine airplanes...

  11. 14 CFR 23.1047 - Cooling test procedures for reciprocating engine powered airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... engine powered airplanes. 23.1047 Section 23.1047 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Cooling § 23.1047 Cooling test procedures for reciprocating engine powered airplanes. Compliance with § 23.1041 must be shown for the climb (or, for multiengine airplanes...

  12. 14 CFR 23.1047 - Cooling test procedures for reciprocating engine powered airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... engine powered airplanes. 23.1047 Section 23.1047 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Cooling § 23.1047 Cooling test procedures for reciprocating engine powered airplanes. Compliance with § 23.1041 must be shown for the climb (or, for multiengine airplanes...

  13. 14 CFR 23.1047 - Cooling test procedures for reciprocating engine powered airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... engine powered airplanes. 23.1047 Section 23.1047 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Cooling § 23.1047 Cooling test procedures for reciprocating engine powered airplanes. Compliance with § 23.1041 must be shown for the climb (or, for multiengine airplanes...

  14. 77 FR 73056 - Initial Test Programs for Water-Cooled Nuclear Power Plants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-07

    ...The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is issuing for public comment draft regulatory guide (DG), DG-1259, ``Initial Test Programs for Water-Cooled Nuclear Power Plants.'' This guide describes the general scope and depth that the staff of the NRC considers acceptable for Initial Test Programs (ITPs) for light water cooled nuclear power...

  15. Engineering development of superconducting RF linac for high-power applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dominic Chan, K.C.; Rusnak, B.; Gentzlinger, R.C.; Campbell, B.M.; Kelley, J.P.; Safa, H.

    1998-12-31

    High-power proton linacs are a promising source of neutrons for material processing and research applications. Superconducting radiofrequency (SCRF) Rf linac technology is preferred for such applications because of power efficiency. A multi-year engineering development program is underway at Los Alamos National Laboratory to demonstrate the required SCRF technology. The program consists of development of SC cavities, power couplers, and cryomodule integration. Prototypes will be built and operated to obtain performance and integration information, and for design improvement. This paper describes the scope and present status of the development program.

  16. A hybrid superconducting fault current limiter for enhancing transient stability in Korean power systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Sangsoo; Kim, Seog-Joo; Moon, Young-Hwan; Lee, Byongjun

    2013-11-01

    Additional power generation sites have been limited in Korea, despite the fact load demands are gradually increasing. In order to meet these increasing demands, Korea’s power system company has begun constructing new generators at existing sites. Thus, multi-unit plants can create problems in terms of transient stability when a large disturbance occurs. This paper proposes a hybrid superconducting fault current limiter (SFCL) application to enhance the transient stability of multi-unit power plants. SFCLs reduce fault currents, and limitation currents decrease the imbalance of the mechanical and electrical torque of the generators, resulting in an improvement in transient stability.

  17. State of the Art Power Couplers for Superconducting RF Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Isidoro Campisi

    2002-08-01

    Simulations are now routinely performed that allow the prediction of electromagnetic, multipacting, thermal, and mechanical properties of couplers. From these studies, better designs have been conceived which can minimize potential problems ahead of construction. Judicious use of materials and the implementation of clean practices and of careful conditioning have gradually increased the power levels at which couplers can safely operate. Machine operation at hundreds of kilowatts has been achieved in CW at KEK and Cornell, and in a pulsed mode at the TESLA Test Facility (TTF). Test stand operations in CW at the megawatt level (Accelerator for the Production of Tritium) and in pulse mode at a peak power of 2 MW (Spallation Neutron Source, TTF version II) have been achieved. The recent progress indicates that the understanding of the behavior of fundamental power couplers is rapidly increasing and that optimal designs are being developed which will allow in the future to attain routine attainment of the megawatt power levels necessary for high-beam-power machines under construction and under study.

  18. Magnetic Energy Storage System: Superconducting Magnet Energy Storage System with Direct Power Electronics Interface

    SciTech Connect

    2010-10-01

    GRIDS Project: ABB is developing an advanced energy storage system using superconducting magnets that could store significantly more energy than today’s best magnetic storage technologies at a fraction of the cost. This system could provide enough storage capacity to encourage more widespread use of renewable power like wind and solar. Superconducting magnetic energy storage systems have been in development for almost 3 decades; however, past devices were designed to supply power only for short durations—generally less than a few minutes. ABB’s system would deliver the stored energy at very low cost, making it ideal for eventual use in the electricity grid as a costeffective competitor to batteries and other energy storage technologies. The device could potentially cost even less, on a per kilowatt basis, than traditional lead-acid batteries.

  19. A study on insulation characteristics according to cooling methods of the HTS SMES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, J. H.; Cheon, H. G.; Choi, J. W.; Kim, H. J.; Seong, K. C.; Kim, S. H.

    2010-11-01

    The high temperature superconducting magnetic energy storage (HTS SMES) stores electric power in the form of magnetic energy, and then converts it to electric energy. For the operation, the HTS SMES must have a cryogenic temperature. The cooling methods for a cryogenic temperature are divided into an immersed method and a conduction cooled method. The immersed method is a direct cooling method that immerses the superconducting magnet into a cryogen. On the other hand, the conduction cooled method is an indirect cooling method that cools a superconductor through thermal conduction with a cryocooler. This paper classified the structures of insulation according to cooling methods, and studied the insulation characteristics of each insulation factor.

  20. Consideration of sub-cooled LN2 circulation system for HTS power machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Shigeru; Hirai, Hirokazu; Nara, N.; Nagasaka, T.; Hirokawa, M.; Okamoto, H.; Hayashi, H.; Shiohara, Y.

    2012-06-01

    We consider a sub-cooled liquid nitrogen (LN) circulation system for HTS power equipment. The planned circulation system consists of a sub-cool heat exchanger (subcooler) and a circulation pump. The sub-cooler will be connected to a neon turbo- Brayton cycle refrigerator with a cooling power of 2 kW at 65 K. Sub-cooled LN will be delivered into the sub-cooler by the pump and cooled within it. Sub-cooled LN is adequate fluid for cooling HTS power equipment, because its dielectric strength is high and it supports a large critical current. However, a possibility of LN solidification in the sub-cooler is a considerable issue. The refrigerator will produce cold neon gas of about 60 K, which is lower than the nitrogen freezing temperature of 63 K. Therefore, we designed two-stage heat exchangers which are based on a plate-fin type and a tube-intube type. Process simulations of those heat exchangers indicate that sub-cooled LN is not frozen in either sub-cooler. The plate-fin type sub-cooler is consequently adopted for its reliability and compactness. Furthermore, we found that a cooling system with a Brayton refrigerator has the same total cooling efficiency as a cooling system with a Stirling refrigerator.

  1. Horizontal cryogenic bushing for the termination of a superconducting power-transmission line

    DOEpatents

    Minati, K.F.; Morgan, G.H.; McNerney, A.J.; Schauer, F.

    1982-07-29

    A termination for a superconducting power transmission line is disclosed which is comprised of a standard air entrance insulated vertical bushing with an elbow, a horizontal cryogenic bushing linking the pressurized cryogenic cable environment to the ambient temperature bushing and a stress cone which terminated the cable outer shield and transforms the large radial voltage gradient in the cable dielectric into a much lower radial voltage gradient in the high density helium coolant at the cold end of the cryogenic bushing.

  2. Termination for a superconducting power transmission line including a horizontal cryogenic bushing

    DOEpatents

    Minati, Kurt F.; Morgan, Gerry H.; McNerney, Andrew J.; Schauer, Felix

    1984-01-01

    A termination for a superconducting power transmission line is disclosed which is comprised of a standard air entrance insulated vertical bushing with an elbow, a horizontal cryogenic bushing linking the pressurized cryogenic cable environment to the ambient temperature bushing and a stress cone which terminates the cable outer shield and transforms the large radial voltage gradient in the cable dielectric into a much lower radial voltage gradient in the high density helium coolant at the cold end of the cryogenic bushing.

  3. Calorimeters for Precision Power Dissipation Measurements on Controlled-Temperature Superconducting Radiofrequency Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Binping P.; Kelley, Michael J.; Reece, Charles E.; Phillips, H. L.

    2012-12-01

    Two calorimeters, with stainless steel and Cu as the thermal path material for high precision and high power versions, respectively, have been designed and commissioned for the surface impedance characterization (SIC) system at Jefferson Lab to provide low temperature control and measurement for CW power up to 22 W on a 5 cm dia. disk sample which is thermally isolated from the RF portion of the system. A power compensation method has been developed to measure the RF induced power on the sample. Simulation and experimental results show that with these two calorimeters, the whole thermal range of interest for superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) materials has been covered. The power measurement error in the interested power range is within 1.2% and 2.7% for the high precision and high power versions, respectively. Temperature distributions on the sample surface for both versions have been simulated and the accuracy of sample temperature measurements have been analysed. Both versions have the ability to accept bulk superconductors and thin film superconducting samples with a variety of substrate materials such as Al, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Cu, MgO, Nb and Si.

  4. Calorimeters for precision power dissipation measurements on controlled-temperature superconducting radiofrequency samples.

    PubMed

    Xiao, B P; Reece, C E; Phillips, H L; Kelley, M J

    2012-12-01

    Two calorimeters, with stainless steel and Cu as the thermal path material for high precision and high power versions, respectively, have been designed and commissioned for the 7.5 GHz surface impedance characterization system at Jefferson Lab to provide low temperature control and measurement for CW power up to 22 W on a 5 cm diameter disk sample which is thermally isolated from the radiofrequency (RF) portion of the system. A power compensation method has been developed to measure the RF induced power on the sample. Simulation and experimental results show that with these two calorimeters, the whole thermal range of interest for superconducting radiofrequency materials has been covered. The power measurement error in the interested power range is within 1.2% and 2.7% for the high precision and high power versions, respectively. Temperature distributions on the sample surface for both versions have been simulated and the accuracy of sample temperature measurements have been analyzed. Both versions have the ability to accept bulk superconductors and thin film superconducting samples with a variety of substrate materials such as Al, Al(2)O(3), Cu, MgO, Nb, and Si. PMID:23278016

  5. Use of Cooling Thermal Storage as a Heat Sink for Steam Power Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegazy, Ahmed Sabry

    In the present paper, a system is proposed for improving the performance of steam power plant with air-cooled condenser during peak loads. In this system, the power plant comprises two steam turbines, and the air-cooled condenser is replaced by two condensers. The first one is air-cooled (dry) and used for condensing the exhaust steam of the first turbine, while the second is water-cooled and serves to condense the steam outlet of the second turbine. The warm cooling water exiting the wet condenser is pumped to a cooling storage container, where it is cooled and re-circulated to the wet condenser. Cooling is produced by a refrigeration machine driven by the extra electric power generated by the two turbines during the time of the off-peak-loads (low electricity rates). Simple energy analyses have been developed to predict the energy characteristics of this system. The results of this paper showed that the proposed system leads to improving the plant power output at peak-loads. About 6, 16, 24 and 33% increase in generated plant power can be achieved at peak-loads (high electricity rates) when the ambient temperature is 20, 30, 40 and 50°C respectively, and the whole steam exiting both turbines is cooled in a wet condenser to a design temperature of 20°C. The results showed also that choice of the capacity of each turbine is essentially affected by the quality of the refrigeration machine and ambient temperature.

  6. Sub-cooled liquid nitrogen cryogenic system with neon turbo-refrigerator for HTS power equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, S.; Hirai, H.; Nara, N.; Ozaki, S.; Hirokawa, M.; Eguchi, T.; Hayashi, H.; Iwakuma, M.; Shiohara, Y.

    2014-01-01

    We developed a prototype sub-cooled liquid nitrogen (LN) circulation system for HTS power equipment. The system consists of a neon turbo-Brayton refrigerator with a LN sub-cooler and LN circulation pump unit. The neon refrigerator has more than 2 kW cooling power at 65 K. The LN sub-cooler is a plate-fin type heat exchanger and is installed in a refrigerator cold box. In order to carry out the system performance tests, a dummy cryostat having an electric heater was set instead of a HTS power equipment. Sub-cooled LN is delivered into the sub-cooler by the LN circulation pump and cooled within it. After the sub-cooler, sub-cooled LN goes out from the cold box to the dummy cryostat, and comes back to the pump unit. The system can control an outlet sub-cooled LN temperature by adjusting refrigerator cooling power. The refrigerator cooling power is automatically controlled by the turbo-compressor rotational speed. In the performance tests, we increased an electric heater power from 200 W to 1300 W abruptly. We confirmed the temperature fluctuation was about ±1 K. We show the cryogenic system details and performance test results in this paper.

  7. Cryogenics Vision Workshop for High-Temperature Superconducting Electric Power Systems Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Energetics, Inc.

    2000-01-01

    The US Department of Energy's Superconductivity Program for Electric Systems sponsored the Cryogenics Vision Workshop, which was held on July 27, 1999 in Washington, D.C. This workshop was held in conjunction with the Program's Annual Peer Review meeting. Of the 175 people attending the peer review meeting, 31 were selected in advance to participate in the Cryogenics Vision Workshops discussions. The participants represented cryogenic equipment manufactures, industrial gas manufacturers and distributors, component suppliers, electric power equipment manufacturers (Superconductivity Partnership Initiative participants), electric utilities, federal agencies, national laboratories, and consulting firms. Critical factors were discussed that need to be considered in describing the successful future commercialization of cryogenic systems. Such systems will enable the widespread deployment of high-temperature superconducting (HTS) electric power equipment. Potential research, development, and demonstration (RD and D) activities and partnership opportunities for advancing suitable cryogenic systems were also discussed. The workshop agenda can be found in the following section of this report. Facilitated sessions were held to discuss the following specific focus topics: identifying Critical Factors that need to be included in a Cryogenics Vision for HTS Electric Power Systems (From the HTS equipment end-user perspective) identifying R and D Needs and Partnership Roles (From the cryogenic industry perspective) The findings of the facilitated Cryogenics Vision Workshop were then presented in a plenary session of the Annual Peer Review Meeting. Approximately 120 attendees participated in the afternoon plenary session. This large group heard summary reports from the workshop session leaders and then held a wrap-up session to discuss the findings, cross-cutting themes, and next steps. These summary reports are presented in this document. The ideas and suggestions raised during

  8. Evaluation of cooling concepts for high power avionics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, E. M.

    1992-10-01

    Evaluations were made of emerging cooling technologies having potential to remove 100 W/sq cm steady state heat dissipation while holding chip junction temperature to 90 C. Several constraints were imposed on the cooler due to the intended application of cooling fighter aircraft electronics. Constraints included a practical lower limit on coolant supply temperature, the preference for a nontoxic, nonflammable, and nonfreezing coolant, the need to minimize weight and volume, and operation in an accelerating environment. Evaluation factors included aircraft system impact, cooler development status, reliability and maintainability, safety, etc. This paper describes the cooling concepts and assessments made as to their relative performance in a fighter aircraft environment.

  9. Experimental study on active cooling systems used for thermal management of high-power multichip light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop suitable cooling systems for high-power multichip LEDs. To this end, three different active cooling systems were investigated to control the heat generated by the powering of high-power multichip LEDs in two different configurations (30 and 2 × 15 W). The following cooling systems were used in the study: an integrated multi-fin heat sink design with a fan, a cooling system with a thermoelectric cooler (TEC), and a heat pipe cooling device. According to the results, all three systems were observed to be sufficient for cooling high-power LEDs. Furthermore, it was observed that the integrated multifin heat sink design with a fan was the most efficient cooling system for a 30 W high-power multichip LED. The cooling system with a TEC and 46 W input power was the most efficient cooling system for 2 × 15 W high-power multichip LEDs. PMID:25162058

  10. Fast, low-power manipulation of spin ensembles in superconducting microresonators

    SciTech Connect

    Sigillito, A. J. Malissa, H.; Tyryshkin, A. M.; Houck, A. A.; Lyon, S. A.; Riemann, H.; Abrosimov, N. V.; Becker, P.; Pohl, H.-J.; Thewalt, M. L. W.; Itoh, K. M.; Morton, J. J. L.; Schuster, D. I.

    2014-06-02

    We demonstrate the use of high-Q superconducting coplanar waveguide (CPW) microresonators to perform rapid manipulations on a randomly distributed spin ensemble using very low microwave power (400 nW). This power is compatible with dilution refrigerators, making microwave manipulation of spin ensembles feasible for quantum computing applications. We also describe the use of adiabatic microwave pulses to overcome microwave magnetic field (B{sub 1}) inhomogeneities inherent to CPW resonators. This allows for uniform control over a randomly distributed spin ensemble. Sensitivity data are reported showing a single shot (no signal averaging) sensitivity to 10{sup 7} spins or 3×10{sup 4}spins/√(Hz) with averaging.

  11. Optimized use of superconducting magnetic energy storage for electromagnetic rail launcher powering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badel, Arnaud; Tixador, Pascal; Arniet, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Electromagnetic rail launchers (EMRLs) require very high currents, from hundreds of kA to several MA. They are usually powered by capacitors. The use of superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) in the supply chain of an EMRL is investigated, as an energy buffer and as direct powering source. Simulations of direct powering are conducted to quantify the benefits of this method in terms of required primary energy. In order to enhance further the benefits of SMES powering, a novel integration concept is proposed, the superconducting self-supplied electromagnetic launcher (S3EL). In the S3EL, the SMES is used as a power supply for the EMRL but its coil serves also as an additional source of magnetic flux density, in order to increase the thrust (or reduce the required current for a given thrust). Optimization principles for this new concept are presented. Simulations based on the characteristics of an existing launcher demonstrate that the required current could be reduced by a factor of seven. Realizing such devices with HTS cables should be possible in the near future, especially if the S3EL concept is used in combination with the XRAM principle, allowing current multiplication.

  12. Solar-powered/fuel-assisted Rankine cycle power and cooling system - Sensitivity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lior, N.; Koai, K.

    1984-11-01

    The subject of this analysis is a solar power/cooling system based on a novel hybrid steam Rankine cycle. Steam is generated by the use of solar energy collected at about 100 C, and it is then superheated to about 600 C in a fossil-fuel-fired superheater. The addition of about 20-26 percent of energy as fuel doubles the power cycle's efficiency as compared to organic fluid Rankine cycles operating at similar collector temperatures. A sensitivity analysis of the system's performance to the size and type of its components was performed by a transient (hourly) computer simulation over the month of August in two representative climatic regions (Washington, D.C. and Phoenix, Ariz.), and led to the description of a system configuration which provides optimal energy performance. The newly designed turbine's predicted efficiency is seen to be essentially invariant with system configuration, and has a monthly average value of about 73 percent.

  13. WET/DRY COOLING SYSTEMS FOR FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS: WATER CONSERVATION AND PLUME ABATEMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study of technical and economic feasibilities of wet/dry cooling towers for water conservation and vapor plume abatement. Results of cost optimizations of wet/dry cooling for 1000-MWe fossil-fueled power plants are presented. Five sites in the wester...

  14. Ice Thermal Storage Systems for LWR Supplemental Cooling and Peak Power Shifting

    SciTech Connect

    Haihua Zhao; Hongbin Zhang; Phil Sharpe; Blaise Hamanaka; Wei Yan; WoonSeong Jeong

    2010-06-01

    Availability of enough cooling water has been one of the major issues for the nuclear power plant site selection. Cooling water issues have frequently disrupted the normal operation at some nuclear power plants during heat waves and long draught. The issues become more severe due to the new round of nuclear power expansion and global warming. During hot summer days, cooling water leaving a power plant may become too hot to threaten aquatic life so that environmental regulations may force the plant to reduce power output or even temporarily to be shutdown. For new nuclear power plants to be built at areas without enough cooling water, dry cooling can be used to remove waste heat directly into the atmosphere. However, dry cooling will result in much lower thermal efficiency when the weather is hot. One potential solution for the above mentioned issues is to use ice thermal storage systems (ITS) that reduce cooling water requirements and boost the plant’s thermal efficiency in hot hours. ITS uses cheap off-peak electricity to make ice and uses those ice for supplemental cooling during peak demand time. ITS is suitable for supplemental cooling storage due to its very high energy storage density. ITS also provides a way to shift large amount of electricity from off peak time to peak time. Some gas turbine plants already use ITS to increase thermal efficiency during peak hours in summer. ITSs have also been widely used for building cooling to save energy cost. Among three cooling methods for LWR applications: once-through, wet cooling tower, and dry cooling tower, once-through cooling plants near a large water body like an ocean or a large lake and wet cooling plants can maintain the designed turbine backpressure (or condensation temperature) during 99% of the time; therefore, adding ITS to those plants will not generate large benefits. For once-through cooling plants near a limited water body like a river or a small lake, adding ITS can bring significant economic

  15. Coupling interaction between the power coupler and the third harmonic superconducting cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jianjian; Solyak, Nikolay; Wong, Thomas; /IIT, Chicago

    2007-06-01

    Fermilab has developed a third harmonic superconducting cavity operating at the frequency of 3.9 GHz to improve the beam performance for the FLASH user facility at DESY. It is interesting to investigate the coupling interaction between the SRF cavity and the power coupler with or without beam loading. The coupling of the power coupler to the cavity needs to be determined to minimize the power consumption and guarantee the best performance for a given beam current. In this paper, we build and analyze an equivalent circuit model containing a series of lumped elements to represent the resonant system. An analytic solution of the required power from the generator as a function of the system parameters has also been given based on a vector diagram.

  16. Implementation of superconducting fault current limiter for flexible operation in the power substation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Chong Suk; Lee, Hansang; Cho, Yoon-sung; Suh, Jaewan; Jang, Gilsoo

    2014-09-01

    The concentration of large-scale power loads located in the metropolitan areas have resulted in high fault current levels during a fault thereby requiring the substation to operate in the double busbar configuration mode. However, the double busbar configuration mode results in deterioration of power system reliability and unbalanced power flow in the adjacent transmission lines which may result in issues such as overloading of lines. This paper proposes the implementation of the superconducting fault current limiter (SFCL) to be installed between the two substation busbars for a more efficient and flexible operation of the substation enabling both single and double busbar configurations depending on the system conditions for guaranteeing power system reliability as well as fault current limitations. Case studies are being performed for the effectiveness of the SFCL installation and results are compared for the cases where the substation is operating in single and double busbar mode and with and without the installation of the SFCL for fault current mitigation.

  17. Solving LFC problem in an interconnected power system using superconducting magnetic energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farahani, Mohsen; Ganjefar, Soheil

    2013-04-01

    This paper proposes the combination of a load frequency control (LFC) with superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) to solve the LFC problem in interconnected power systems. By using this combination, the speed damping of frequency and tie-line power flow deviations is considerably increased. A new control strategy of SMES is proposed in this paper. The problem of determining optimal parameters of PID and SMES control loop is considered as an optimization problem and a pattern search algorithm (PS) optimization is employed to solve it. The simulation results show that if an SMES unit is installed in an interconnected power system, in addition to eliminating oscillations and deviations, the settling time in the frequency and tie-line power flow responses is considerably reduced.

  18. ORNL Superconducting Technology Program for Electric Power Systems, Annual Report for FY 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Hawsey, R.A.; Murphy, A.W.

    1999-04-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Superconducting Technology Program is conducted as part of a national effort by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy to develop the science and technology base needed by U.S. industry for commercial development of electric power applications of high temperature superconductivity. The two major elements of this program are wire development and applications development. This document describes the major research and development activities for this program together with related accomplishments. The technical progress reported was summarized from recent open literature publications, presentations, and information prepared for the FY 1998 Annual Program Review held July 20-22, 1998. Aspects of ORNL's work that were presented at the Applied Superconductivity Conference (September 1998) are included in this report, as well. This ORNL program is highly leveraged by the staff and other resources of U.S. industry and universities. In fact, nearly three-fourths of the ORNL effort is devoted to cooperative projects. Patent disclosures, working group meetings, staff exchanges, and joint publications and presentations ensure that there is technology transfer with U.S. industry. Working together, the collaborative teams are making rapid progress in solving the scientific and technical issues necessary for the commercialization of long lengths of practical high temperature superconductor wire and wire-using systems.

  19. EVALUATION OF EUROPEAN RIVERS FOR POWER PLANT COOLING - A POLISH RESEARCH PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes analytical, laboratory, and field research conducted to optimize the use of rivers, specifically in Poland, for once-through cooling of steam electric power plants. Maximum discharge and receiving water temperatures, based on biological criteria, are coupled ...

  20. Analysis of distributed cooled high power millimeter wave windows

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, S.D.; Caplan, M.; Reitter, T.A.

    1995-09-09

    The sectional high-frequency (100--170 GHz) distributed cooled window has been investigated both electromagnetically and thermally previously using computational electromagnetics (EM) and thermal codes. Recent data describes the relationship to some experimental data for the window. Results are presented for time domain CW EM analyses and CW thermal and stress calculations.

  1. Sport fishery potential of power plant cooling ponds: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Heidinger, R.C.; Lewis, W.M.

    1986-10-01

    This research was undertaken to determine if cooling ponds could serve as habitat for several coolwater fish species and also to evaluate the potential use of cooling ponds as nursery areas for receiving waters. The work was conducted on two cooling ponds in northern Illinois. Walleye (Stizostedion vitreum), muskellunge (Esox masquinongy), striped bass (Morone saxatilis) fingerlings, and adult threadfin shad (Dorosoma petenense) were stocked into both cooling ponds. The hybrids between the striped bass and white bass (M. chrysops) had been previously stocked into Collins Pond. Smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieui) fingerlings and larval striped bass and walleye were stocked in Dresden Pond. Several sampling techniques including seining, electrofishing, and rotenoning were used to monitor growth and survival of stocked species. In addition, escapement of stocked and indigenous species was monitored at the Dresden Pond spillway. Walleye, muskellunge, striped bass and hybrid striped bass exhibited excellent growth in Collins Pond as did smallmouth bass in Dresden Pond. One of the primary differences between an open system (such as Dresden Pond) and a closed system (such as Collins Pond) is the potential that the open system has to serve as a fish nursery area for receiving waters. The stocking of ''coolwater'' species in a closed type system such as Collins Pond is an effective way to control and maintain selected sport species. Dresden Pond was not open to public fishing during this study, but Collins Pond developed an excellent sport fishery as a result of these stockings.

  2. Joint operation of the superconducting fault current limiter and magnetic energy storage system in an electric power network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopylov, S. I.; Balashov, N. N.; Ivanov, S. S.; Veselovsky, A. S.; Zhemerikin, V. D.

    2010-06-01

    An opportunity of using superconductors as active elements of electric power systems designed to control the electric power distribution, to enhance the systems operating modes and to limit fault currents, was very attractive for investigators for a long time. In this paper, is considered an opportunity to enhance the electric power systems with the aid of superconducting magnetic energy storage systems (SMES) and superconducting fault current limiters (SFCL) operating together. It has been shown that the joint operation of both these superconducting devices allows additional varying of their parameters, what in turn gives a further opportunity to reduce their mass and dimensions and consequently the costs. There had been also shown an additional advantage of the SMES and SFCL joint operation consisting in that they ensure a more effective protection for a power system, preventing its uncontrolled load-off and subsequent acceleration up to the inaccessible rotation speed.

  3. A Unique Approach to Power Electronics and Motor Cooling in a Hybrid Electric Vehicle Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Ayers, Curtis William; Hsu, John S; Lowe, Kirk T; Conklin, Jim

    2007-01-01

    An innovative system for cooling the power electronics of hybrid electric vehicles is presented. This system uses a typical automotive refrigerant R-134a (1,1,1,2 tetrafluoroethane) as the cooling fluid in a system that can be used as either part of the existing vehicle passenger air conditioning system or separately and independently of the existing air conditioner. Because of the design characteristics, the cooling coefficient of performance is on the order of 40. Because liquid refrigerant is used to cool the electronics directly, high heat fluxes can result while maintaining an electronics junction temperature at an acceptable value. In addition, an inverter housing that occupies only half the volume of a conventional inverter has been designed to take advantage of this cooling system. Planned improvements should result in further volume reductions while maintaining a high power level.

  4. Thermal-hydraulic tests of a recirculation cooling installation for the Rostov nuclear power station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balunov, B. F.; Balashov, V. A.; Il'in, V. A.; Krayushnikov, V. V.; Lychakov, V. D.; Meshalkin, V. V.; Ustinov, A. N.; Shcheglov, A. A.

    2013-09-01

    Results obtained from thermal-hydraulic tests of the recirculation cooling installation used as part of the air cooling system under the containments of the Rostov nuclear power station Units 3 and 4 are presented. The operating modes of the installation during normal operation (air cooling on the surface of finned tubes), under the conditions of anticipated operational occurrences (air cooling and steam condensation from a steam-air mixture), and during an accident (condensation of pure steam) are considered. Agreement is obtained between the results of tests and calculations carried out according to the recommendations given in the relevant regulatory documents. A procedure of carrying out thermal calculation for the case of steam condensation from a steam-air mixture on the surface of fins is proposed. The possibility of efficient use of the recirculation cooling installation in the system for reducing emergency pressure under the containment of a nuclear power station is demonstrated.

  5. RF power upgrade at the superconducting 1.3 GHz CW LINAC "ELBE" with solid state amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Büttig, Hartmut; Arnold, A.; Büchner, A.; Justus, M.; Kuntsch, M.; Lehnert, U.; Michel, P.; Schurig, R.; Staats, G.; Teichert, J.

    2013-03-01

    The RF power for the superconducting 1.3 GHz CW LINAC "ELBE" has been doubled from less than 10 kW to 20 kW per cavity. In January 2012 the four 10 kW klystrons used to drive the four superconducting cavities of the LINAC have been replaced by pairs of 10 kW solid state power amplifiers (SSPA). ELBE is now worldwide the first 1.3 GHz CW LINAC equipped with solid state RF power amplifiers. This technical note details on this project.

  6. TLS-like temperature and power dependence for loss in superconducting coplanar resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladchenko, S.; Stoutimore, M. J. A.; Khalil, M.; Osborn, K.

    2013-03-01

    Loss in 2D superconducting coplanar resonators and qubits is often limited by two-level systems thought to be on the metal and substrate surfaces. While these TLSs are thought to be similar to those found in amorphous dielectrics, their nature is generally different. In most experiments, loss in coplanar resonators shows power and temperature dependence which disagrees with TLS theory. Here we will show new data from high-quality Al on sapphire coplanar resonators which is in qualitative agreement with TLS theory, and discuss the quantitative differences to TLS theory. The data on surface TLS behavior will be compared to resonator measurements of ALD-grown thin films.

  7. Conceptual design study of the moderate size superconducting spherical tokamak power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gi, Keii; Ono, Yasushi; Nakamura, Makoto; Someya, Youji; Utoh, Hiroyasu; Tobita, Kenji; Ono, Masayuki

    2015-06-01

    A new conceptual design of the superconducting spherical tokamak (ST) power plant was proposed as an attractive choice for tokamak fusion reactors. We reassessed a possibility of the ST as a power plant using the conservative reactor engineering constraints often used for the conventional tokamak reactor design. An extensive parameters scan which covers all ranges of feasible superconducting ST reactors was completed, and five constraints which include already achieved plasma magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) and confinement parameters in ST experiments were established for the purpose of choosing the optimum operation point. Based on comparison with the estimated future energy costs of electricity (COEs) in Japan, cost-effective ST reactors can be designed if their COEs are smaller than 120 mills kW-1 h-1 (2013). We selected the optimized design point: A = 2.0 and Rp = 5.4 m after considering the maintenance scheme and TF ripple. A self-consistent free-boundary MHD equilibrium and poloidal field coil configuration of the ST reactor were designed by modifying the neutral beam injection system and plasma profiles. The MHD stability of the equilibrium was analysed and a ramp-up scenario was considered for ensuring the new ST design. The optimized moderate-size ST power plant conceptual design realizes realistic plasma and fusion engineering parameters keeping its economic competitiveness against existing energy sources in Japan.

  8. Power system analysis of Hanlim superconducting HVDC system using real time digital simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Won, Y. J.; Kim, J. G.; Kim, A. R.; Kim, G. H.; Park, M.; Yu, I. K.; Sim, K. D.; Cho, J.; Lee, S.; Jeong, K. W.; Watanabe, K.

    2011-11-01

    Jeju island is located approximately 100 km south from the mainland of Korea, and had a peak load of about 553 MW in 2008. The demand increases 7.2% a year over the last 5 years. Since the wind profiles of Jeju island are more favorable than mainland of Korea, many companies have shown interest in the wind power business at the Jeju island. Moreover KEPCO has a plan for renewable energy test too whose power will be delivered by HVDC system. One kilometer length of total 8 km was designed as superconducting DC cable. Rest 7 km will be the conventional overhead line. In this paper, the authors have developed a simulation model of the power network around 8 km HVDC system using real time digital simulator (RTDS).

  9. Energy and peak power saved by passively cooled residences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, G.; Loxsom, F.; Doderer, E.; Vieira, R.; Fleischhacker, P.

    1983-11-01

    The energy displacement potential of roof pond cooling in humid climates is sensitive to the type of dehumidification equipment employed and the humidity levels allowed. The simulated energy requirements of roof pond residences assisted by two high efficiency dehumidifier options are described. One dehumidifier was a vapor compression air conditioner with sensible cooling recovery by an air-to-air heat exchanger (improved mechanical dehumidification or IMD). The second option was a solar regenerated desiccant dehumidifier (SRDD). An IMD assisted roof pond house had energy savings of 30 to 65% in humid climates compared to the conventional house; an SRDD assisted roof pond house had energy savings of 70 to 75% in humid climates.

  10. Comparison of Hybrid Electric Vehicle Power Electronics Cooling Options

    SciTech Connect

    O'Keefe, M.; Bennion, K.

    2008-01-01

    This study quantifies the heat dissipation potential of three inverter package configurations over a range of control factors. These factors include coolant temperature, number of sides available for cooling, effective heat transfer coefficient, maximum semiconductor junction temperature, and interface material thermal resistance. Heat dissipation potentials are examined in contrast to a research goal to use 105..deg..C coolant and dissipate 200 W/cm2 heat across the insulated gate bipolar transistor and diode silicon area. Advanced double-sided cooling configurations with aggressive heat transfer coefficients show the possibility of meeting these targets for a 125..deg..C maximum junction temperature, but further investigation is needed. Even with maximum tolerable junction temperatures of 200..deg..C, effective heat transfer coefficients of 5,000 to 10,000 W/m2-K will be needed for coolant temperatures of 105..deg..C or higher.

  11. Use of LHP for cooling power electronic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smitka, M.; Malcho, M.; Nemec, P.; Kolková, Z.

    2013-04-01

    The paper deals with use of cooling equipment build on basis two phase thermosyphon loop. This device belongs to a group of loop heat pipe (LHP). This LHP is a two-phase device with extremely high effective thermal conductivity that utilizes the thermodynamic pressure difference to circulate fluid. It was invented in Russia in the early 1980´s. Thermosyphon loop is similar as LHP but it doesn't contain wick and circulation of the fluid using gravitation force instead of capillary pressure as it is in LHP. The work deals with the cooling insulated gate bipolar transistor with 370 W. The paper describes the course of the heat dissipation using ribbed cooler for natural convection and using fin for forced convection. The results are compared with heat dissipation through thermosyphon loop.

  12. Utilization of municipal wastewater for cooling in thermoelectric power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Safari, Iman; Walker, Michael E.; Hsieh, Ming-Kai; Dzombak, David A.; Liu, Wenshi; Vidic, Radisav D.; Miller, David C.; Abbasian, Javad

    2013-09-01

    A process simulation model has been developed using Aspen Plus® with the OLI (OLI System, Inc.) water chemistry model to predict water quality in the recirculating cooling loop utilizing secondary- and tertiary-treated municipal wastewater as the source of makeup water. Simulation results were compared with pilot-scale experimental data on makeup water alkalinity, loop pH, and ammonia evaporation. The effects of various parameters including makeup water quality, salt formation, NH3 and CO2 evaporation mass transfer coefficients, heat load, and operating temperatures were investigated. The results indicate that, although the simulation model can capture the general trends in the loop pH, experimental data on the rates of salt precipitation in the system are needed for more accurate prediction of the loop pH. It was also found that stripping of ammonia and carbon dioxide in the cooling tower can influence the cooling loop pH significantly. The effects of the NH3 mass transfer coefficient on cooling loop pH appear to be more significant at lower values (e.g., kNH3 < 4×10-3 m/s) when the makeup water alkalinity is low (e.g., <90 mg/L as CaCO3). The effect of the CO2 mass transfer coefficient was found to be significant only at lower alkalinity values (e.g., kCO2<4×10-6 m/s).

  13. Method and system for powering and cooling semiconductor lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Telford, Steven J; Ladran, Anthony S

    2014-02-25

    A semiconductor laser system includes a diode laser tile. The diode laser tile includes a mounting fixture having a first side and a second side opposing the first side and an array of semiconductor laser pumps coupled to the first side of the mounting fixture. The semiconductor laser system also includes an electrical pulse generator thermally coupled to the diode bar and a cooling member thermally coupled to the diode bar and the electrical pulse generator.

  14. Monolayer graphene dispersion and radiative cooling for high power LED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Tun-Jen; Eyassu, Tsehaye; Henderson, Kimberly; Kim, Taesam; Lin, Chhiu-Tsu

    2013-10-01

    Molecular fan, a radiative cooling by thin film, has been developed and its application for compact electronic devices has been evaluated. The enhanced surface emissivity and heat dissipation efficiency of the molecular fan coating are shown to correlate with the quantization of lattice modes in active nanomaterials. The highly quantized G and 2D bands in graphene are achieved by our dispersion technique, and then incorporated in an organic-inorganic acrylate emulsion to form a coating assembly on heat sinks (for LED and CPU). This water-based dielectric layer coating has been formulated and applied on metal core printed circuit boards. The heat dissipation efficiency and breakdown voltage are evaluated by a temperature-monitoring system and a high-voltage breakdown tester. The molecular fan coating on heat dissipation units is able to decrease the equilibrium junction temperature by 29.1 ° C, while functioning as a dielectric layer with a high breakdown voltage (>5 kV). The heat dissipation performance of the molecular fan coating applied on LED devices shows that the coated 50 W LED gives an enhanced cooling of 20% at constant light brightness. The schematics of monolayer graphene dispersion, undispersed graphene platelet, and continuous graphene sheet are illustrated and discussed to explain the mechanisms of radiative cooling, radiative/non-radiative, and non-radiative heat re-accumulation.

  15. Thermal Management of Power Semiconductor Packages - Matching Cooling Technologies with Packaging Technologies (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Bennion, K.; Moreno, G.

    2010-04-27

    Heat removal for power semiconductor devices is critical for robust operation. Because there are different packaging options, different thermal management technologies, and a range of applications, there is a need for a methodology to match cooling technologies and package configurations to target applications. To meet this need, a methodology was developed to compare the sensitivity of cooling technologies on the overall package thermal performance over a range of power semiconductor packaging configurations. The results provide insight into the trade-offs associated with cooling technologies and package configurations. The approach provides a method for comparing new developments in power semiconductor packages and identifying potential thermal control technologies for the package. The results can help users select the appropriate combination of packaging configuration and cooling technology for the desired application.

  16. Overview of the development of the advanced power system by the applied superconductivity technologies programme in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Kang-Sik; Jo, Young-Sik; Park, Minwon

    2006-03-01

    At the end of July 2004, DAPAS (development of the advanced power system by applied superconductivity technologies), which is a 10 year long programme, finished the first of three phases. As a result of the first phase, a process for a metre long coated conductor and the core technologies of the distribution line voltage class high temperature superconductor (HTS) power systems including cables, transformers, fault current limiters (FCLs), and motors have been developed. The ultimate goal of the HTS cable project is to develop 1 GVA class HTS transmission cables. During the first phase, a three-phase 50 MVA/22.9 kV class HTS cable of 30 m length has been developed and tested successfully; it has been installed by LS Cable Ltd. In the second phase, grid-connected HTS cables will be developed and established in the real utility line. In case of FCLs, there were two types of FCL developed during the first phase: a reactive type and a resistive type. Both types had the same project targets with the specification of 6.6 kV/200 A for three-phase, and entered the second phase with the target of a 22.9 kV class. In the case of the HTS transformer project, a 1 MVA/22.9 kV class was developed, and after the second phase this project will be considered for practical application. Technically, the optimal design and the manufacturing technologies of HTS transformers as well as the analysis tools of electromagnetic field in the transformer were developed. Furthermore, a 100 hp class motor has been developed so that the key technologies for the utilization of superconducting motors could be obtained. The developed motor consists of Bi-2223 field coils of 100 A operating current at 30 K and a closed-loop cooling system, the results of which will lead us to develop 1 and 5 MVA motors in the second and third phase, respectively. In the case of the coated conductors (CCs) programme, a batch-type co-evaporation process and a reel-to-reel pulsed laser deposition process gave us 10 m

  17. Energy penalty analysis of possible cooling water intake structurerequirements on existing coal-fired power plants.

    SciTech Connect

    Veil, J. A.; Littleton, D. J.; Gross, R. W.; Smith, D. N.; Parsons, E.L., Jr.; Shelton, W. W.; Feeley, T. J.; McGurl, G. V.

    2006-11-27

    Section 316(b) of the Clean Water Act requires that cooling water intake structures must reflect the best technology available for minimizing adverse environmental impact. Many existing power plants in the United States utilize once-through cooling systems to condense steam. Once-through systems withdraw large volumes (often hundreds of millions of gallons per day) of water from surface water bodies. As the water is withdrawn, fish and other aquatic organisms can be trapped against the screens or other parts of the intake structure (impingement) or if small enough, can pass through the intake structure and be transported through the cooling system to the condenser (entrainment). Both of these processes can injure or kill the organisms. EPA adopted 316(b) regulations for new facilities (Phase I) on December 18, 2001. Under the final rule, most new facilities could be expected to install recirculating cooling systems, primarily wet cooling towers. The EPA Administrator signed proposed 316(b) regulations for existing facilities (Phase II) on February 28, 2002. The lead option in this proposal would allow most existing facilities to achieve compliance without requiring them to convert once-through cooling systems to recirculating systems. However, one of the alternate options being proposed would require recirculating cooling in selected plants. EPA is considering various options to determine best technology available. Among the options under consideration are wet-cooling towers and dry-cooling towers. Both types of towers are considered to be part of recirculating cooling systems, in which the cooling water is continuously recycled from the condenser, where it absorbs heat by cooling and condensing steam, to the tower, where it rejects heat to the atmosphere before returning to the condenser. Some water is lost to evaporation (wet tower only) and other water is removed from the recirculating system as a blow down stream to control the building up of suspended and

  18. Advanced superconducting power conditioning system with SMES for effective use of renewable energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamajima, T.; Tsuda, M.; Miyagi, D.; Amata, H.; Iwasaki, T.; Son, K.; Atomura, N.; Shintomi, T.; Makida, Y.; Takao, T.; Munakata, K.; Kajiwara, M.

    Since it is an urgent issue to reduce the global Carbon-dioxide in the world, renewable energy should be supplied as a large amount of the electric power. However, if a large amount of fluctuating renewable energy becomes more than adjustable amount of a utility grid capacity, instabilities such as frequency deviation might occur. We propose a system that is composed of SMES and FC-H2-Electrolyzer and also installed adjacent to Liquid Hydrogen station to cool down the SMES. Since the SMES has potentials of quick response and large I/O power, and Fuel Cell has potentials of slow response and steady power supplied from a large amount of hydrogen, we combine both storage devices and apply them to suppress the fluctuating power. We convert the fluctuating power to the constant power by using a developed prediction technology of Kalman filter to predict a trend of the fluctuating power. While the trend power should be supplied by FC or absorbed by the electrolyzer to produce hydrogen, the power difference between the renewable power and the trend power should be stored by the SMES. We simulate the power balance and analyze the required SMES capacity, design the concept of the SMES, and propose an operation algorithm for the SMES to estimate the electric efficiency of the system. It is found that the electric efficiency of the ASPCS can become greater than that of a pumped hydro-machine.

  19. Design Issues for the Superconducting Magnet that Goes Around theLiquid Hydrogen Absorber for the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment(MICE)

    SciTech Connect

    Barr, G.; Cobb, J.H.; Green, M.A.; Lau, W.; Senanayake R.S.; Yang, S.Q.; Baynham, D.E.; Bradshaw, T.W.; Drum, P.V.; Rochford, J.H.; Chilton, Didcot

    2004-06-15

    This report describes the design issues that are associated with a superconducting focusing solenoid that goes around a liquid hydrogen absorber for the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) proposed for the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory. The solenoid consists of two superconducting coils that may operated at the same polarity or at opposite polarities. As a result, the coils and their support structure must be designed to carry a 360-ton inter-coil force that is forcing the coils apart along their axis. The basic design parameters for the focusing magnet are discussed. The magnet and its cryostat are designed so that the absorber can be assembled and tested before installation into the pre-tested focusing solenoid. Safety requirements for MICE dictate that the insulating vacuum for the superconducting magnet be separated from the insulating vacuum for the absorber and that both vacuum be separated from the experiment vacuum and the vacuum within adjacent RF cavities. The safety issues associated with the arrangement of the various vacuums in the MICE focusing modules are presented. The effect of magnet operation and magnet quench on the liquid hydrogen absorber is also discussed.

  20. Rugged passively cooled high power laser fiber optic connectors and methods of use

    DOEpatents

    Rinzler, Charles C.; Gray, William C.; Fraze, Jason D.; Faircloth, Brian O.; Zediker, Mark S.; McKay, Ryan P.

    2016-06-07

    There are provided high power laser connectors and couplers and methods that are capable of providing high laser power without the need for active cooling to remote, harsh and difficult to access locations and under difficult and harsh conditions and to manage and mitigate the adverse effects of back reflections.

  1. Integrated three-dimensional module heat exchanger for power electronics cooling

    DOEpatents

    Bennion, Kevin; Lustbader, Jason

    2013-09-24

    Embodiments discussed herein are directed to a power semiconductor packaging that removes heat from a semiconductor package through one or more cooling zones that are located in a laterally oriented position with respect to the semiconductor package. Additional embodiments are directed to circuit elements that are constructed from one or more modular power semiconductor packages.

  2. High power rapidly tunable system for laser cooling.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, V M; Hernández, L; Gomez, E

    2012-01-01

    We present a laser configuration capable of fast frequency changes with a high power output and a large tuning range. The system integrates frequency tuning with an acousto-optic modulator with a double pass tapered amplifier. A compensation circuit keeps the seed power constant and prevents damage to the amplifier. A single mode fiber decouples the modulation and amplification sections and keeps the alignment fixed. The small power required to saturate the amplifier makes the system very reliable. We use the system to obtain a dipole trap that we image using a beam derived from the same configuration. PMID:22299990

  3. Engineering evaluation of magma cooling-tower demonstration at Nevada Power Company's Sunrise Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-11-01

    The Magma Cooling Tower (MCT) process utilizes a falling film heat exchanger integrated into an induced draft cooling tower to evaporate waste water. A hot water source such as return cooling water provides the energy for evaporation. Water quality control is maintained by removing potential scaling constituents to make concentrations of the waste water possible without scaling heat transfer surfaces. A pilot-scale demonstration test of the MCT process was performed from March 1979 through June 1979 at Nevada Power Company's Sunrise Station in Las Vegas, Nevada. The pilot unit extracted heat from the powerplant cooling system to evaporate cooling tower blowdown. Two water quality control methods were employed: makeup/sidestream softening and fluidized bed crystallization. The 11 week softening mode test was successful.

  4. From BCS to Vortices: A 40 Year Personal Journey through Superconductivity from Basic Research to Power Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Paul M.

    2011-03-01

    A century has passed since the discovery of superconductivity in Leiden followed 75 years later by the Great Leap Forward in Zuerich. This talk will chronicle the author's trajectory through the science and technology of superconductivity first taking off with his IBM career in fundamental research on organic and layered copper oxide perovskite superconductors to a final landing at EPRI to explore applications of the latter to the electric power industry. Although many fundamental mysteries remain with respect to the copper and iron compounds, especially regarding the BCS pairing mechanism, nonetheless a significant number of successful demonstrations of cables, rotating machinery, storage and power conditioning equipment employing both low-and high- T superconducting materials have been undertaken worldwide since the decade of the 1960s to the present. However, massive application to the power industry has yet to take place or be inserted into utility long-range planning. Although there will certainly be a relatively small number of opportunistic deployments in those situations where superconductivity has a compelling advantage over conventional technology, its time will more likely await a future revolution in energy and electricity infrastructure such as a symbiosis of nuclear and hydrogen with superconductivity. Perhaps the distant future will even deliver the dream of a room temperature superconductor. ``20th Anniversary of the Woodstock of Physics,'' APS March Meeting 2007, Denver, CO.

  5. Design and construction of a high temperature superconducting power cable cryostat for use in railway system applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomita, M.; Muralidhar, M.; Suzuki, K.; Fukumoto, Y.; Ishihara, A.; Akasaka, T.; Kobayashi, Y.

    2013-10-01

    The primary objective of the current effort was to design and test a cryostat using a prototype five-meter long high temperature Bi2Sr2Ca2Cu3Oy (Bi-2223) superconducting dc power cable for railway systems. To satisfy the safety regulations of the Govt of Japan a mill sheet covered by super-insulation was used inside the walls of the cryostat. The thicknesses of various walls in the cryostat were obtained from a numerical analysis. A non-destructive inspection was utilized to find leaks under vacuum or pressure. The cryostat target temperature range was around 50 K, which is well below liquid nitrogen temperature, the operating temperature of the superconducting cable. The qualification testing was carried out from 77 down to 66 K. When using only the inner sheet wire, the maximum current at 77.3 K was 10 kA. The critical current (Ic) value increased with decreasing temperature and reached 11.79 kA at 73.7 K. This is the largest dc current reported in a Bi2Sr2Ca2Cu3Oy or YBa2Cu3Oy (Y-123) superconducting prototype cable so far. These results verify that the developed DC superconducting cable is reliable and fulfils all the requirements necessary for successful use in various power applications including railway systems. The key issues for the design of a reliable cryogenic system for superconducting power cables for railway systems are discussed.

  6. COOLING WATER ISSUES AND OPPORTUNITIES AT U.S. NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Gary Vine

    2010-12-01

    This report has been prepared for the Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), for the purpose of providing a status report on the challenges and opportunities facing the U.S. commercial nuclear energy industry in the area of plant cooling water supply. The report was prompted in part by recent Second Circuit and Supreme Court decisions regarding cooling water system designs at existing thermo-electric power generating facilities in the U.S. (primarily fossil and nuclear plants). At issue in the courts have been Environmental Protection Agency regulations that define what constitutes “Best Technology Available” for intake structures that withdraw cooling water that is used to transfer and reject heat from the plant’s steam turbine via cooling water systems, while minimizing environmental impacts on aquatic life in nearby water bodies used to supply that cooling water. The report was also prompted by a growing recognition that cooling water availability and societal use conflicts are emerging as strategic energy and environmental issues, and that research and development (R&D) solutions to emerging water shortage issues are needed. In particular, cooling water availability is an important consideration in siting decisions for new nuclear power plants, and is an under-acknowledged issue in evaluating the pros and cons of retrofitting cooling towers at existing nuclear plants. Because of the significant ongoing research on water issues already being performed by industry, the national laboratories and other entities, this report relies heavily on ongoing work. In particular, this report has relied on collaboration with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), including its recent work in the area of EPA regulations governing intake structures in thermoelectric cooling water systems.

  7. Subtask 5.10 - Testing of an Advanced Dry Cooling Technology for Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Christopher; Pavlish, John

    2013-09-30

    The University of North Dakota’s Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) is developing a market-focused dry cooling technology that is intended to address the key shortcomings of conventional dry cooling technologies: high capital cost and degraded cooling performance during daytime temperature peaks. The unique aspect of desiccant dry cooling (DDC) is the use of a hygroscopic working fluid—a liquid desiccant—as a heat-transfer medium between a power plant’s steam condenser and the atmosphere. This configuration enables a number of beneficial features for large-scale heat dissipation to the atmosphere, without the consumptive use of cooling water. The overall goal of this project was to accurately define the performance and cost characteristics of DDC to determine if further development of the concept is warranted. A balanced approach of modeling grounded in applied experimentation was pursued to substantiate DDC-modeling efforts and outline the potential for this technology to cool full-scale power plants. The resulting analysis shows that DDC can be a lower-cost dry cooling alternative to an air-cooled condenser (ACC) and can even be competitive with conventional wet recirculating cooling under certain circumstances. This project has also highlighted the key technological steps that must be taken in order to transfer DDC into the marketplace. To address these issues and to offer an extended demonstration of DDC technology, a next-stage project should include the opportunity for outdoor ambient testing of a small DDC cooling cell. This subtask was funded through the EERC–U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Joint Program on Research and Development for Fossil Energy-Related Resources Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-08NT43291. Nonfederal funding was provided by the Wyoming State Legislature under an award made through the Wyoming Clean Coal Technologies Research Program.

  8. Cooling System for the Merit High-Power Target Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haug, F.; Pereira, H.; Silva, P.; Pezzetti, M.; Pavlov, O.; Pirotte, O.; Metselaar, J.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fabich, A.; Lettry, J.; Kirk, H. G.; McDonald, K. T.; Titus, P.; Bennett, J. R. J.

    2010-04-01

    MERIT is a proof-of-principle experiment of a target station suitable as source for future muon colliders or neutrino factories. When installed at the CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research) PS (Proton Synchrotron) complex fast-extracted high-intensity proton beams intercepted a free mercury jet inside a normal-conducting, pulsed 15-T capture solenoid magnet cooled with liquid nitrogen. Up to 25 MJ of Joule heat was dissipated in the magnet during a pulse. The fully automated, remotely controlled cryogenic system of novel design permitted the transfer of nitrogen by the sole means of differential pressures inside the vessels. This fast cycling system permitted several hundred tests in less than three weeks during the 2007 data taking campaign.

  9. The development of a solar-powered residential heating and cooling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Efforts to demonstrate the engineering feasibility of utilizing solar power for residential heating and cooling are described. These efforts were concentrated on the analysis, design, and test of a full-scale demonstration system which is currently under construction at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Alabama. The basic solar heating and cooling system under development utilizes a flat plate solar energy collector, a large water tank for thermal energy storage, heat exchangers for space heating and water heating, and an absorption cycle air conditioner for space cooling.

  10. Geographic, technologic, and economic analysis of using reclaimed water for thermoelectric power plant cooling.

    PubMed

    Stillwell, Ashlynn S; Webber, Michael E

    2014-04-15

    Use of reclaimed water-municipal wastewater treatment plant effluent-in nonpotable applications can be a sustainable and efficient water management strategy. One such nonpotable application is at thermoelectric power plants since these facilities require cooling, often using large volumes of freshwater. To evaluate the geographic, technologic, and economic feasibility of using reclaimed water to cool thermoelectric power plants, we developed a spatially resolved model of existing power plants. Our model integrates data on power plant and municipal wastewater treatment plant operations into a combined geographic information systems and optimization approach to evaluate the feasibility of cooling system retrofits. We applied this broadly applicable methodology to 125 power plants in Texas as a test case. Results show that sufficient reclaimed water resources exist within 25 miles of 92 power plants (representing 61% of capacity and 50% of generation in our sample), with most of these facilities meeting both short-term and long-term water conservation cost goals. This retrofit analysis indicates that reclaimed water could be a suitable cooling water source for thermoelectric power plants, thereby mitigating some of the freshwater impacts of electricity generation. PMID:24625241