Science.gov

Sample records for cooled superconducting power

  1. Power superconducting power transmission cable

    DOEpatents

    Ashworth, Stephen P.

    2003-06-10

    The present invention is for a compact superconducting power transmission cable operating at distribution level voltages. The superconducting cable is a conductor with a number of tapes assembled into a subconductor. These conductors are then mounted co-planarly in an elongated dielectric to produce a 3-phase cable. The arrangement increases the magnetic field parallel to the tapes thereby reducing ac losses.

  2. Power superconducting power transmission cable

    DOEpatents

    Ashworth, Stephen P. (Cambridge, GB)

    2003-01-01

    The present invention is for a compact superconducting power transmission cable operating at distribution level voltages. The superconducting cable is a conductor with a number of tapes assembled into a subconductor. These conductors are then mounted co-planarly in an elongated dielectric to produce a 3-phase cable. The arrangement increases the magnetic field parallel to the tapes thereby reducing ac losses.

  3. Cooling of Color Superconducting Compact Stars

    E-print Network

    David Blaschke

    2006-03-26

    We review the status of research on the cooling of compact stars, with emphasis on the influence of color superconducting quark matter phases. Although a consistent microscopic approach is not yet available, severe constraints on the phase structure of matter at high densities come from recent mass and cooling observations of compact stars.

  4. Superconducting Materials, Magnets and Electric Power Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crabtree, George

    2011-03-01

    The surprising discovery of superconductivity a century ago launched a chain of convention-shattering innovations and discoveries in superconducting materials and applications that continues to this day. The range of large-scale applications grows with new materials discoveries - low temperature NbTi and Nb3 Sn for liquid helium cooled superconducting magnets, intermediate temperature MgB2 for inexpensive cryocooled applications including MRI magnets, and high temperature YBCO and BSSCO for high current applications cooled with inexpensive liquid nitrogen. Applications based on YBCO address critical emerging challenges for the electricity grid, including high capacity superconducting cables to distribute power in urban areas; transmission of renewable electricity over long distances from source to load; high capacity DC interconnections among the three US grids; fast, self-healing fault current limiters to increase reliability; low-weight, high capacity generators enabling off-shore wind turbines; and superconducting magnetic energy storage for smoothing the variability of renewable sources. In addition to these grid applications, coated conductors based on YBCO deposited on strong Hastelloy substrates enable a new generation of all superconducting high field magnets capable of producing fields above 30 T, approximately 50% higher than the existing all superconducting limit based on Nb3 Sn . The high fields, low power cost and the quiet electromagnetic and mechanical operation of such magnets could change the character of high field basic research on materials, enable a new generation of high-energy colliding beam experiments and extend the reach of high density superconducting magnetic energy storage.

  5. Superconducting magnet system for muon beam cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, N.; Johnson, R.P.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Novitski, I.; Yonehara, K.; Zlobin, A.; /Fermilab

    2006-08-01

    A helical cooling channel has been proposed to quickly reduce the six-dimensional phase space of muon beams for muon colliders, neutrino factories, and intense muon sources. A novel superconducting magnet system for a muon beam cooling experiment is being designed at Fermilab. The inner volume of the cooling channel is filled with liquid helium where passing muon beam can be decelerated and cooled in a process of ionization energy loss. The magnet parameters are optimized to match the momentum of the beam as it slows down. The results of 3D magnetic analysis for two designs of magnet system, mechanical and quench protection considerations are discussed.

  6. Cooling system for superconducting magnet

    DOEpatents

    Gamble, Bruce B. (Wellesley, MA); Sidi-Yekhlef, Ahmed (Framingham, MA)

    1998-01-01

    A cooling system is configured to control the flow of a refrigerant by controlling the rate at which the refrigerant is heated, thereby providing an efficient and reliable approach to cooling a load (e.g., magnets, rotors). The cooling system includes a conduit circuit connected to the load and within which a refrigerant circulates; a heat exchanger, connected within the conduit circuit and disposed remotely from the load; a first and a second reservoir, each connected within the conduit, each holding at least a portion of the refrigerant; a heater configured to independently heat the first and second reservoirs. In a first mode, the heater heats the first reservoir, thereby causing the refrigerant to flow from the first reservoir through the load and heat exchanger, via the conduit circuit and into the second reservoir. In a second mode, the heater heats the second reservoir to cause the refrigerant to flow from the second reservoir through the load and heat exchanger via the conduit circuit and into the first reservoir.

  7. Cooling system for superconducting magnet

    DOEpatents

    Gamble, B.B.; Sidi-Yekhlef, A.

    1998-12-15

    A cooling system is configured to control the flow of a refrigerant by controlling the rate at which the refrigerant is heated, thereby providing an efficient and reliable approach to cooling a load (e.g., magnets, rotors). The cooling system includes a conduit circuit connected to the load and within which a refrigerant circulates; a heat exchanger, connected within the conduit circuit and disposed remotely from the load; a first and a second reservoir, each connected within the conduit, each holding at least a portion of the refrigerant; a heater configured to independently heat the first and second reservoirs. In a first mode, the heater heats the first reservoir, thereby causing the refrigerant to flow from the first reservoir through the load and heat exchanger, via the conduit circuit and into the second reservoir. In a second mode, the heater heats the second reservoir to cause the refrigerant to flow from the second reservoir through the load and heat exchanger via the conduit circuit and into the first reservoir. 3 figs.

  8. Power electronics cooling apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Sanger, Philip Albert (Monroeville, PA); Lindberg, Frank A. (Baltimore, MD); Garcen, Walter (Glen Burnie, MD)

    2000-01-01

    A semiconductor cooling arrangement wherein a semiconductor is affixed to a thermally and electrically conducting carrier such as by brazing. The coefficient of thermal expansion of the semiconductor and carrier are closely matched to one another so that during operation they will not be overstressed mechanically due to thermal cycling. Electrical connection is made to the semiconductor and carrier, and a porous metal heat exchanger is thermally connected to the carrier. The heat exchanger is positioned within an electrically insulating cooling assembly having cooling oil flowing therethrough. The arrangement is particularly well adapted for the cooling of high power switching elements in a power bridge.

  9. Power cooling primer

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, P.L. )

    1993-01-01

    Power cooling technology has come a long way since the Clean Water Act was passed in the 1970s. Now, the choice between a wet, dry or hybrid cooling system depends on a host of variables. Since the initial passage of the Clean Water Act and other environmental laws in the early 1970's, both the regulations governing discharge of the resulting waste heat and the technology for complying with them have become increasingly complex. As a result, the decision as to the type of cooling system to use depends on a variety of project parameters, such as size of unit, site, and environmental constraints.

  10. Cooling of superconducting devices by liquid storage and refrigeration unit

    DOEpatents

    Laskaris, Evangelos Trifon; Urbahn, John Arthur; Steinbach, Albert Eugene

    2013-08-20

    A system is disclosed for cooling superconducting devices. The system includes a cryogen cooling system configured to be coupled to the superconducting device and to supply cryogen to the device. The system also includes a cryogen storage system configured to supply cryogen to the device. The system further includes flow control valving configured to selectively isolate the cryogen cooling system from the device, thereby directing a flow of cryogen to the device from the cryogen storage system.

  11. Compact he II Cooling System for Superconducting Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, M.; Yazawa, T.; Tosaka, T.; Kuriyama, T.; Kakutani, N.; Ota, T.; Nakayama, K.; Saito, K.

    2008-03-01

    This paper describes a compact He II cooling system for superconducting cavities. The cooling system mainly comprises a vacuum vessel, an 80 K liquid nitrogen bath, a 4 K He I bath, a He II bath, an evacuation pump, a single-stage GM cryocooler for the 80 K bath, and a 4 K GM cryocooler for the 4 K He I bath. Superfluid helium is generated and refilled into the He II bath via a heat exchanger and a JT valve by operating the evacuation pump. The refrigeration capacity attained was more than 10 W at 1.8 K. The cooling system was connected with a single-cell cavity cryostat. A superconducting cavity was immersed in superfluid helium. He II was supplied to the cavity vessel from the cooling system and evaporated helium gas was returned to it. High electric fields were obtained during superconducting cavity operations.

  12. Magnetic Flux Dynamics in Horizontally Cooled Superconducting Cavities

    E-print Network

    Martinello, M; Grassellino, A; Crawford, A C; Melnychuk, O; Romanenko, A; Sergatkov, D A

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies on magnetic flux expulsion as a function of cooling details have been performed for superconducting niobium cavities with the cavity beam axis placed parallel respect to the helium cooling flow, and findings showed that for sufficient cooling thermogradients all magnetic flux could be expelled and very low residual resistance could be achieved. In this paper we investigate the flux trapping and its impact on radio frequency surface resistance when the resonators are positioned perpendicularly to the helium cooling flow, which is representative of how superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities are cooled in an accelerator. We also extend the studies to different directions of applied magnetic field surrounding the resonator. Results show that in the cavity horizontal configuration there is a different impact of the various field components on the final surface resistance, and that several parameters have to be considered to understand flux dynamics. A newly discovered phenomenon of concent...

  13. Cooling arrangement for a superconducting coil

    DOEpatents

    Herd, K.G.; Laskaris, E.T.

    1998-06-30

    A superconducting device is disclosed, such as a superconducting rotor for a generator or motor. A vacuum enclosure has an interior wall surrounding a cavity containing a vacuum. A superconductive coil is placed in the cavity. A generally-annularly-arranged, thermally-conductive sheet has an inward-facing surface contacting generally the entire outward-facing surface of the superconductive coil. A generally-annularly-arranged coolant tube contains a cryogenic fluid and contacts a generally-circumferential portion of the outward-facing surface of the sheet. A generally-annularly-arranged, thermally-insulative coil overwrap generally circumferentially surrounds the sheet. The coolant tube and the inward-facing surface of the coil overwrap together contact generally the entire outward-facing surface of the sheet. 3 figs.

  14. Cooling arrangement for a superconducting coil

    DOEpatents

    Herd, Kenneth Gordon (Niskayuna, NY); Laskaris, Evangelos Trifon (Schenectady, NY)

    1998-06-30

    A superconducting device, such as a superconducting rotor for a generator or motor. A vacuum enclosure has an interior wall surrounding a cavity containing a vacuum. A superconductive coil is placed in the cavity. A generally-annularly-arranged, thermally-conductive sheet has an inward-facing surface contacting generally the entire outward-facing surface of the superconductive coil. A generally-annularly-arranged coolant tube contains a cryogenic fluid and contacts a generally-circumferential portion of the outward-facing surface of the sheet. A generally-annularly-arranged, thermally-insulative coil overwrap generally circumferentially surrounds the sheet. The coolant tube and the inward-facing surface of the coil overwrap together contact generally the entire outward-facing surface of the sheet.

  15. System and method for cooling a superconducting rotary machine

    DOEpatents

    Ackermann, Robert Adolf (Schenectady, NY); Laskaris, Evangelos Trifon (Schenectady, NY); Huang, Xianrui (Clifton Park, NY); Bray, James William (Niskayuna, NY)

    2011-08-09

    A system for cooling a superconducting rotary machine includes a plurality of sealed siphon tubes disposed in balanced locations around a rotor adjacent to a superconducting coil. Each of the sealed siphon tubes includes a tubular body and a heat transfer medium disposed in the tubular body that undergoes a phase change during operation of the machine to extract heat from the superconducting coil. A siphon heat exchanger is thermally coupled to the siphon tubes for extracting heat from the siphon tubes during operation of the machine.

  16. System and method for cooling a super-conducting device

    DOEpatents

    Bray, James William (Niskayuna, NY); Steinbach, Albert Eugene (Schenectady, NY); Dawson, Richard Nils (Voorheesville, NY); Laskaris, Evangelos Trifon (Schenectady, NY); Huang, Xianrul (Clifton Park, NY)

    2008-01-08

    A system and method for cooling a superconductive rotor coil. The system comprises a rotatable shaft coupled to the superconductive rotor coil. The rotatable shaft may comprise an axial passageway extending through the rotatable shaft and a first passageway extending through a wall of the rotatable shaft to the axial passageway. The axial passageway and the first passageway are operable to convey a cryogenic fluid to the superconductive rotor coil through the wall of the rotatable shaft. A cryogenic transfer coupling may be provided to supply cryogenic fluid to the first passageway.

  17. Direct cooled power electronics substrate

    DOEpatents

    Wiles, Randy H [Powell, TN; Wereszczak, Andrew A [Oak Ridge, TN; Ayers, Curtis W. (Kingston, TN) [Kingston, TN; Lowe, Kirk T. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN

    2010-09-14

    The disclosure describes directly cooling a three-dimensional, direct metallization (DM) layer in a power electronics device. To enable sufficient cooling, coolant flow channels are formed within the ceramic substrate. The direct metallization layer (typically copper) may be bonded to the ceramic substrate, and semiconductor chips (such as IGBT and diodes) may be soldered or sintered onto the direct metallization layer to form a power electronics module. Multiple modules may be attached to cooling headers that provide in-flow and out-flow of coolant through the channels in the ceramic substrate. The modules and cooling header assembly are preferably sized to fit inside the core of a toroidal shaped capacitor.

  18. Superconductivity Program for Electric Power Systems: 1994 Annual PEER Review. Volume 1, Meeting Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-07-01

    This is Volume 1 of information presented at the Annual Peer Review of the Superconductivity Program For Electric Power Systems. Topics include: Wire development; powder synthesis; characterization of superconducting materials; electric power applications; and motor cooling issues. Individual reports were processed separately for the database.

  19. Progress on Superconducting Magnets for the MICE Cooling Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael A; Virostek, Steve P.; Li, Derun; Zisman, Michael S.; Wang, Li; Pan, Heng; Wu, Hong; Guo, XingLong; Xu, FengYu; Liu, X. K.; Zheng, S. X.; Bradshaw, Thomas; Baynham, Elwyn; Cobb, John; Lau, Wing; Lau, Peter; Yang, Stephanie Q.

    2009-09-09

    The muon ionization cooling experiment (MICE) consists of a target, a beam line, a pion decay channel, the MICE cooling channel. Superconducting magnets are used in the pion decay channel and the MICE cooling channel. This report describes the MICE cooling channel magnets and the progress in the design and fabrication of these magnets. The MICE cooling channel consists of three types of superconducting solenoids; the spectrometer solenoids, the coupling solenoids and the focusing solenoids. The three types of magnets are being fabricated in he United States, China, and the United Kingdom respectively. The spectrometer magnets are used to analyze the muon beam before and after muon cooling. The coupling magnets couple the focusing sections and keep the muon beam contained within the iris of the RF cavities that re used to recover the muon momentum lost during ionization cooling. The focusing magnets focus the muon beam in the center of a liquid hydrogen absorber. The first of the cooling channel magnets will be operational in MICE in the spring of 2010.

  20. Magnetar superconductivity versus magnetism: Neutrino cooling processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Monika; Sedrakian, Armen

    2015-03-01

    We describe the microphysics, phenomenology, and astrophysical implication of a B -field induced unpairing effect that may occur in magnetars, if the local B field in the core of a magnetar exceeds a critical value Hc 2. Using the Ginzburg-Landau theory of superconductivity, we derive the Hc 2 field for proton condensate taking into the correction (?30 % ) which arises from its coupling to the background neutron condensate. The density dependence of pairing of proton condensate implies that Hc 2 is maximal at the crust-core interface and decreases towards the center of the star. As a consequence, magnetar cores with homogenous constant fields will be partially superconducting for "medium-field" magnetars (1015?B ?5 ×1016G) whereas "strong-field" magnetars (B >5 ×1016G) will be void of superconductivity. The neutrino emissivity of a magnetar's core changes in a twofold manner: (i) the B -field assisted direct Urca process is enhanced by orders of magnitude, because of the unpairing effect in regions where B ?Hc 2 ; (ii) the Cooper-pair breaking processes on protons vanish in these regions and the overall emissivity by the pair-breaking processes is reduced by a factor of only a few.

  1. Cryogenic performance of a cryocooler-cooled superconducting undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Fuerst, J. D.; Doose, C.; Hasse, Q.; Ivanyushenkov, Y.; Kasa, M.; Shiroyanagi, Y.

    2014-01-29

    A cryocooler-cooled superconducting undulator has been installed and operated with beam at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The device consists of a dual-core 42-pole magnet structure that is cooled to 4.2 K with a system of four cryocoolers operating in a zero-boil-off configuration. This effort represents the culmination of a development program to establish concept feasibility and evaluate cryostat design and cryocooler-based refrigeration. Cryostat performance is described including cool-down/warm-up, steady-state operation, cooling margin, and the impact of beam during operation in the APS storage ring. Plans for future devices with longer magnets, which will incorporate lessons learned from the development program, are also discussed.

  2. Solar-powered cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Farmer, Joseph C

    2013-12-24

    A solar-powered adsorption-desorption refrigeration and air conditioning system uses nanostructural materials made of high specific surface area adsorption aerogel as the adsorptive media. Refrigerant molecules are adsorbed on the high surface area of the nanostructural material. A circulation system circulates refrigerant from the nanostructural material to a cooling unit.

  3. Heat pipe cooled power magnetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chester, M. S.

    1979-01-01

    A high frequency, high power, low specific weight (0.57 kg/kW) transformer developed for space use was redesigned with heat pipe cooling allowing both a reduction in weight and a lower internal temperature rise. The specific weight of the heat pipe cooled transformer was reduced to 0.4 kg/kW and the highest winding temperature rise was reduced from 40 C to 20 C in spite of 10 watts additional loss. The design loss/weight tradeoff was 18 W/kg. Additionally, allowing the same 40 C winding temperature rise as in the original design, the KVA rating is increased to 4.2 KVA, demonstrating a specific weight of 0.28 kg/kW with the internal loss increased by 50W. This space environment tested heat pipe cooled design performed as well electrically as the original conventional design, thus demonstrating the advantages of heat pipes integrated into a high power, high voltage magnetic. Another heat pipe cooled magnetic, a 3.7 kW, 20A input filter inductor was designed, developed, built, tested, and described. The heat pipe cooled magnetics are designed to be Earth operated in any orientation.

  4. Thermoelectric Devices Cool, Power Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Nextreme Thermal Solutions Inc., based in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, licensed thermoelectric technology from NASA s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. This has allowed the company to develop cutting edge, thin-film thermoelectric coolers that effective remove heat generated by increasingly powerful and tightly packed microchip components. These solid-state coolers are ideal solutions for applications like microprocessors, laser diodes, LEDs, and even potentially for cooling the human body. Nextreme s NASA technology has also enabled the invention of thermoelectric generators capable of powering technologies like medical implants and wireless sensor networks.

  5. Surface Power Radiative Cooling Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughn, Jason; Schneider, Todd

    2006-01-01

    Terrestrial nuclear power plants typically maintain their temperature through convective cooling, such as water and forced air. However, the space environment is a vacuum environment, typically 10-8 Torr pressure, therefore in proposed missions to the lunar surface, power plants would have to rely on radiative cooling to remove waste heat. Also, the Martian surface has a very tenuous atmosphere (e.g. ~5 Torr CO2), therefore, the main heat transfer method on the Martian surface is also radiative. Because of the lack of atmosphere on the Moon and the tenuous atmosphere on Mars, surface power systems on both the Lunar and Martian surface must rely heavily on radiative heat transfer. Because of the large temperature swings on both the lunar and the Martian surfaces, trying to radiate heat is inefficient. In order to increase power system efficiency, an effort is underway to test various combinations of materials with high emissivities to demonstrate their ability to survive these degrading atmospheres to maintain a constant radiator temperature improving surface power plant efficiency. An important part of this effort is the development of a unique capability that would allow the determination of a materials emissivity at high temperatures. A description of the test capability as well as initial data is presented.

  6. Surface Power Radiative Cooling Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughn, Jason; Schneider, Todd

    2006-01-20

    Terrestrial nuclear power plants typically maintain their temperature through convective cooling, such as water and forced air. However, the space environment is a vacuum environment, typically 10-8 Torr pressure, therefore in proposed missions to the lunar surface, power plants would have to rely on radiative cooling to remove waste heat. Also, the Martian surface has a very tenuous atmosphere (e.g. {approx}5 Torr CO2), therefore, the main heat transfer method on the Martian surface is also radiative. Because of the lack of atmosphere on the Moon and the tenuous atmosphere on Mars, surface power systems on both the Lunar and Martian surface must rely heavily on radiative heat transfer. Because of the large temperature swings on both the lunar and the Martian surfaces, trying to radiate heat is inefficient. In order to increase power system efficiency, an effort is underway to test various combinations of materials with high emissivities to demonstrate their ability to survive these degrading atmospheres to maintain a constant radiator temperature improving surface power plant efficiency. An important part of this effort is the development of a unique capability that would allow the determination of a materials emissivity at high temperatures. A description of the test capability as well as initial data is presented.

  7. A robust platform cooled by superconducting electronic refrigerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, H. Q.; Meschke, M.; Pekola, J. P.

    2015-01-01

    A biased tunnel junction between a superconductor and a normal metal can cool the latter electrode. Based on a recently developed cooler with high power and superior performance, we have integrated it with a dielectric silicon nitride membrane, and cooled phonons from 305 mK down to 200 mK. Without perforation and covered under a thin alumina layer, the membrane is rigorously transformed into a cooling platform that is robust and versatile for multiple practical purposes. We discussed our results and possibilities to further improve the device.

  8. Superconducting helical solenoid systems for muon cooling experiment at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikhin, Vladimir S.; Andreev, Nikolai; Johnson, Rolland P.; Kashikhin, Vadim V.; Lamm, Michael J.; Romanov, Gennady; Yonehara, Katsuya; Zlobin, Alexander V.; /Fermilab

    2007-08-01

    Novel configurations of superconducting magnet system for Muon Beam Cooling Experiment is under design at Fermilab. The magnet system has to generate longitudinal and transverse dipole and quadrupole helical magnetic fields providing a muon beam motion along helical orbit. It was found that such complicated field configuration can be formed by a set of circular coils shifted in transverse directions in such a way that their centers lay on the center of the helical beam orbit. Closed beam orbit configurations were also proposed and investigated. This paper describes the magnetic and mechanical designs and parameters of such magnetic system based on a NbTi Rutherford type cable. The helical solenoid fabrication, assembly and quench protection issues are presented.

  9. The design and fabrication of a reverse Brayton cycle cryocooler system for the high temperature superconductivity cable cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jae Hong; Kwon, Yong Ha; Kim, Young Soo

    2005-01-01

    A high temperature superconductivity cable must be cooled below the nitrogen liquefaction temperature to apply the cable to power generation and transmission systems under superconducting state. To maintain the superconducting state, a reliable cryocooler system is also required. The design and fabrication of a cryocooler system have been performed with a reverse Brayton cycle using neon gas as a refrigerant. The system consists of a compressor, a recuperator, a cold-box, and control valves. The design of the system is made to have 1 kW cooling capacity. The heat loss through multilayer insulators is calculated. Conduction heat loss is about 7 W through valves and access ports and radiation heat loss is about 18 W on the surface of a cryocooler. The design factors are discussed in detail.

  10. Solar-powered cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Farmer, Joseph C.

    2015-07-28

    A solar-powered adsorption-desorption refrigeration and air conditioning system that uses nanostructural materials such as aerogels, zeolites, and sol gels as the adsorptive media. Refrigerant molecules are adsorbed on the high surface area of the nanostructural material while the material is at a relatively low temperature, perhaps at night. During daylight hours, when the nanostructural materials is heated by the sun, the refrigerant are thermally desorbed from the surface of the aerogel, thereby creating a pressurized gas phase in the vessel that contains the aerogel. This solar-driven pressurization forces the heated gaseous refrigerant through a condenser, followed by an expansion valve. In the condenser, heat is removed from the refrigerant, first by circulating air or water. Eventually, the cooled gaseous refrigerant expands isenthalpically through a throttle valve into an evaporator, in a fashion similar to that in more conventional vapor recompression systems.

  11. Experimental validation of advanced regulations for superconducting magnet cooling undergoing periodic heat loads

    SciTech Connect

    Lagier, B.; Rousset, B.; Hoa, C.; Bonnay, P.

    2014-01-29

    Superconducting magnets used in tokamaks undergo periodic heat load caused by cycling plasma operations inducing AC losses, neutrons fluxes and eddy currents in magnet structures. In the cryogenic system of JT60-SA tokamak, the Auxiliary Cold Box (ACB) distributes helium from the refrigerator to the cryogenic users and in particular to the superconducting magnets. ACB comprises a saturated helium bath with immersed heat exchangers, extracting heat from independent cooling loops. The supercritical helium flow in each cooling loop is driven by a cold circulator. In order to safely operate the refrigerator during plasma pulses, the interface between the ACB and the refrigerator shall be as stable as possible, with well-balanced bath inlet and outlet mass flows during cycling operation. The solution presented in this paper relies on a combination of regulations to smooth pulsed heat loads and to keep a constant refrigeration power during all the cycle. Two smoothing strategies are presented, both regulating the outlet mass flow of the bath: the first one using the bath as a thermal buffer and the second one storing energy in the loop by varying the cold circulator speed. The bath outlet mass flow is also controlled by an immersed resistive heater which enables a constant evaporation rate in the bath when power coming from the loops is decreasing. The refrigeration power is controlled so that the compensating power remains within an acceptable margin. Experimental validation is achieved using the HELIOS facility. This facility running at CEA Grenoble since 2010 is a scaled down model of the ACB bath and Central Solenoid magnet cooling loop of the JT60-SA tokamak. Test results show performances and robustness of the regulations.

  12. Solid-Cryogen Cooling Technique for Superconducting Magnets of NMR and MRI

    E-print Network

    Iwasa, Yukikazu

    This paper describes a solid-cryogen cooling technique currently being developed at the M.I.T. Francis Bitter Magnet Laboratory for application to superconducting magnets of NMR and MRI. The technique is particularly ...

  13. Superconductivity Program for Electric Power Systems: 1994 Annual PEER Review. Volume 2, Meeting Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-07-01

    This is volume 2 of information that was presented at the 1994 Annual Peer Review, Superconductivity Program For Electric Power. Topics include component development; characterization of high-(Tc) Superconductors; wire development; coils; magnetic refrigerators; motor cooling issues; and magnetic separation. Individual projects were processed separately for the database.

  14. Design of A Conduction-cooled 4T Superconducting Racetrack for Multi-field Coupling Measurement System

    E-print Network

    Chen, Yuquan; Wu, Wei; Guan, Mingzhi; Wu, Beimin; Mei, Enming; Xin, Canjie

    2015-01-01

    A conduction-cooled superconducting magnet producing a transverse field of 4 Tesla has been designed for the new generation multi-field coupling measurement system, which was used to study the mechanical behavior of superconducting samples at cryogenic temperature and intense magnetic fields. Considering experimental costs and coordinating with system of strain measurements by contactless signals (nonlinear CCD optics system), the racetrack type for the coil winding was chosen in our design, and a compact cryostat with a two-stage GM cryocooler was designed and manufactured for the superconducting magnet. The magnet was composed of a pair of flat racetrack coils wound by NbTi/Cu superconducting composite wires, a copper and stainless steel combinational form and two Bi2Sr2CaCu2Oy superconducting current leads. All the coils were connected in series and can be powered with a single power supply. The maximum central magnetic field is 4 T. In order to support the high stress and uniform thermal distribution in t...

  15. Cryogenic System for a High Temperature Superconducting Power Transmission Cable

    SciTech Connect

    Demko, J.A.; Gouge, M.J.; Hughey, R.L.; Lue, J.W.; Martin, R.; Sinha, U.; Stovall, J.P.

    1999-07-12

    High-temperature superconducting (HTS) cable systems for power transmission are under development that will use pressurized liquid nitrogen to provide cooling of the cable and termination hardware. Southwire Company and Oak Ridge National Laboratory have been operating a prototype HTS cable system that contains many of the typical components needed for a commercial power transmission application. It is being used to conduct research in the development of components and systems for eventual commercial deployment. The cryogenic system was built by Air Products and Chemicals, Allentown, Pennsylvania, and can circulate up to 0.35 kg/s of liquid nitrogen at temperatures as low as 67 K at pressures of 1 to 10 bars. Sufficient cooling is provided for testing a 5-m-long HTS transmission cable system that includes the terminations required for room temperature electrical connections. Testing of the 5-m HTS transmission cable has been conducted at the design ac conditions of 1250 A and 7.5 kV line to ground. This paper contains a description of the essential features of the HTS cable cryogenic system and performance results obtained during operation of the system. The salient features of the operation that are important in large commercial HTS cable applications will be discussed.

  16. Small high cooling power space cooler

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, T. V.; Raab, J.; Durand, D.; Tward, E.

    2014-01-29

    The small High Efficiency pulse tube Cooler (HEC) cooler, that has been produced and flown on a number of space infrared instruments, was originally designed to provide cooling of 10 W @ 95 K. It achieved its goal with >50% margin when limited by the 180 W output ac power of its flight electronics. It has also been produced in 2 stage configurations, typically for simultaneously cooling of focal planes to temperatures as low as 35 K and optics at higher temperatures. The need for even higher cooling power in such a low mass cryocooler is motivated by the advent of large focal plane arrays. With the current availability at NGAS of much larger power cryocooler flight electronics, reliable long term operation in space with much larger cooling powers is now possible with the flight proven 4 kg HEC mechanical cooler. Even though the single stage cooler design can be re-qualified for those larger input powers without design change, we redesigned both the linear and coaxial version passive pulse tube cold heads to re-optimize them for high power cooling at temperatures above 130 K while rejecting heat to 300 K. Small changes to the regenerator packing, the re-optimization of the tuned inertance and no change to the compressor resulted in the increased performance at 150 K. The cooler operating at 290 W input power achieves 35 W@ 150 K corresponding to a specific cooling power at 150 K of 8.25 W/W and a very high specific power of 72.5 W/Kg. At these powers the cooler still maintains large stroke, thermal and current margins. In this paper we will present the measured data and the changes to this flight proven cooler that were made to achieve this increased performance.

  17. Small high cooling power space cooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, T. V.; Raab, J.; Durand, D.; Tward, E.

    2014-01-01

    The small High Efficiency pulse tube Cooler (HEC) cooler, that has been produced and flown on a number of space infrared instruments, was originally designed to provide cooling of 10 W @ 95 K. It achieved its goal with >50% margin when limited by the 180 W output ac power of its flight electronics. It has also been produced in 2 stage configurations, typically for simultaneously cooling of focal planes to temperatures as low as 35 K and optics at higher temperatures. The need for even higher cooling power in such a low mass cryocooler is motivated by the advent of large focal plane arrays. With the current availability at NGAS of much larger power cryocooler flight electronics, reliable long term operation in space with much larger cooling powers is now possible with the flight proven 4 kg HEC mechanical cooler. Even though the single stage cooler design can be re-qualified for those larger input powers without design change, we redesigned both the linear and coaxial version passive pulse tube cold heads to re-optimize them for high power cooling at temperatures above 130 K while rejecting heat to 300 K. Small changes to the regenerator packing, the re-optimization of the tuned inertance and no change to the compressor resulted in the increased performance at 150 K. The cooler operating at 290 W input power achieves 35 W@ 150 K corresponding to a specific cooling power at 150 K of 8.25 W/W and a very high specific power of 72.5 W/Kg. At these powers the cooler still maintains large stroke, thermal and current margins. In this paper we will present the measured data and the changes to this flight proven cooler that were made to achieve this increased performance.

  18. Power electronics substrate for direct substrate cooling

    DOEpatents

    Le, Khiet (Mission Viejo, CA); Ward, Terence G. (Redondo Beach, CA); Mann, Brooks S. (Redondo Beach, CA); Yankoski, Edward P. (Corona, CA); Smith, Gregory S. (Woodland Hills, CA)

    2012-05-01

    Systems and apparatus are provided for power electronics substrates adapted for direct substrate cooling. A power electronics substrate comprises a first surface configured to have electrical circuitry disposed thereon, a second surface, and a plurality of physical features on the second surface. The physical features are configured to promote a turbulent boundary layer in a coolant impinged upon the second surface.

  19. ON THE LOW-FIELD Q-SLOPE OF RF SUPERCONDUCTING NIOBIUM CAVITIES COOLED BY HELIUM-I

    E-print Network

    Geng, Rong-Li

    ON THE LOW-FIELD Q-SLOPE OF RF SUPERCONDUCTING NIOBIUM CAVITIES COOLED BY HELIUM-I R. L. Gengy , H Experimental measurements have consistently shown that RF superconducting Niobium cavities cooled by He- I of Niobium cavities and liquid Helium. Thermal modeling of Niobium cavi- ties is performed in this paper

  20. Pressure rise during the quench of a superconducting magnet using internally cooled conductors

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.R.; Dresner, L.; Lue, J.W.; Shen, S.S.; Yeh, H.T.

    1980-01-01

    Superconducting magnets cooled by supercritical helium flowing through internal conductor passages are an alternative to magnets cooled in a boiling pool. This alternative involves a possible large pressure increase in the captured volume of helium during a quench. In the US Large Coil Program (LCP), three of six coils to be tested will use internally cooled conductors. This paper describes experiments performed to understand the quench behavior of the Westinghouse coil. Agreement between experiment and theory is good. Also discussed is the extension of this work to the EURATOM coil and the Swiss coil, as well as to any coils wound with internally cooled conductors.

  1. Application of Superconducting Power Cables to DC Electric Railway Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohsaki, Hiroyuki; Lv, Zhen; Sekino, Masaki; Tomita, Masaru

    For novel design and efficient operation of next-generation DC electric railway systems, especially for their substantial energy saving, we have studied the feasibility of applying superconducting power cables to them. In this paper it is assumed that a superconducting power cable is applied to connect substations supplying electric power to trains. An analysis model line was described by an electric circuit, which was analyzed with MATLAB-Simulink. From the calculated voltages and currents of the circuit, the regenerative brake and the energy losses were estimated. In addition, assuming the heat loads of superconducting power cables and the cryogenic efficiency, the energy saving of the total system was evaluated. The results show that the introduction of superconducting power cables could achieve the improved use of regenerative brake, the loss reduction, the decreased number of substations, the reduced maintenance, etc.

  2. Hydrogen cooling options for MgB2-based superconducting systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stautner, W.; Xu, M.; Mine, S.; Amm, K.

    2014-01-01

    With the arrival of MgB2 for low-cost superconducting magnets, hydrogen cooling has become an interesting alternative to costly liquid helium. Hydrogen is generally regarded as the most efficient coolant in cryogenics and, in particular, is well suited for cooling superconducting magnets. Cooling methods need to take into account the specific quench propagation in the MgB2 magnet winding and facilitate a cryogenically reliable and safe cooling environment. The authors propose three different multi-coolant options for MRI scanners using helium or hydrogen within the same design framework. Furthermore, a design option for whole-body scanners which employs technology, components, fueling techniques and safety devices from the hydrogen automotive industry is presented, continuing the trend towards replacing helium with hydrogen as a safe and cost efficient coolant.

  3. Hydrogen cooling options for MgB{sub 2}-based superconducting systems

    SciTech Connect

    Stautner, W.; Xu, M.; Mine, S.; Amm, K.

    2014-01-29

    With the arrival of MgB{sub 2} for low-cost superconducting magnets, hydrogen cooling has become an interesting alternative to costly liquid helium. Hydrogen is generally regarded as the most efficient coolant in cryogenics and, in particular, is well suited for cooling superconducting magnets. Cooling methods need to take into account the specific quench propagation in the MgB{sub 2} magnet winding and facilitate a cryogenically reliable and safe cooling environment. The authors propose three different multi-coolant options for MRI scanners using helium or hydrogen within the same design framework. Furthermore, a design option for whole-body scanners which employs technology, components, fueling techniques and safety devices from the hydrogen automotive industry is presented, continuing the trend towards replacing helium with hydrogen as a safe and cost efficient coolant.

  4. Potential Refrigerants for Power Electronics Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Starke, M.R.

    2005-10-24

    In the past, automotive refrigerants have conventionally been used solely for the purpose of air conditioning. However, with the development of hybrid-electric vehicles and the incorporation of power electronics (PEs) into the automobile, automotive refrigerants are taking on a new role. Unfortunately, PEs have lifetimes and functionalities that are highly dependent on temperature and as a result thermal control plays an important role in the performance of PEs. Typically, PEs are placed in the engine compartment where the internal combustion engine (ICE) already produces substantial heat. Along with the ICE heat, the additional thermal energy produced by PEs themselves forces designers to use different cooling methods to prevent overheating. Generally, heat sinks and separate cooling loops are used to maintain the temperature. Disturbingly, the thermal control system can consume one third of the total volume and may weigh more than the PEs [1]. Hence, other avenues have been sought to cool PEs, including submerging PEs in automobile refrigerants to take advantage of two-phase cooling. The objective of this report is to explore the different automotive refrigerants presently available that could be used for PE cooling. Evaluation of the refrigerants will be done by comparing environmental effects and some thermo-physical properties important to two-phase cooling, specifically measuring the dielectric strengths of potential candidates. Results of this report will be used to assess the different candidates with good potential for future use in PE cooling.

  5. Direct-Cooled Power Electronics Substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Wiles, R.; Ayers, C.; Wereszczak, A.

    2008-12-23

    The goal of the Direct-Cooled Power Electronics Substrate project is to reduce the size and weight of the heat sink for power electronics used in hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). The concept proposed in this project was to develop an innovative power electronics mounting structure, model it, and perform both thermal and mechanical finite-element analysis (FEA). This concept involved integrating cooling channels within the direct-bonded copper (DBC) substrate and strategically locating these channels underneath the power electronic devices. This arrangement would then be directly cooled by water-ethylene glycol (WEG), essentially eliminating the conventional heat sink and associated heat flow path. The concept was evaluated to determine its manufacturability, its compatibility with WEG, and the potential to reduce size and weight while directly cooling the DBC and associated electronics with a coolant temperature of 105 C. This concept does not provide direct cooling to the electronics, only direct cooling inside the DBC substrate itself. These designs will take into account issues such as containment of the fluid (separation from the electronics) and synergy with the whole power inverter design architecture. In FY 2008, mechanical modeling of substrate and inverter core designs as well as thermal and mechanical stress FEA modeling of the substrate designs was performed, along with research into manufacturing capabilities and methods that will support the substrate designs. In FY 2009, a preferred design(s) will be fabricated and laboratory validation testing will be completed. In FY 2010, based on the previous years laboratory testing, the mechanical design will be modified and the next generation will be built and tested in an operating inverter prototype.

  6. Theoretical analysis for the transient behaviour of radiative cooling of cavities in superconducting LINAC cryomodule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, T. S.; Kar, Soumen; Chacko, Jacob; Choudhury, Anup; Antony, Joby; Babu, Suresh; Kumar, Manoj

    2014-06-01

    For the superconducting linear accelerator program, three cryomodules each houses eight superconducting cavities were successfully developed at IUAC, New Delhi. In each cryomodule, the cold mass at 4.2 K is surrounded by the liquid nitrogen cooled thermal shield maintained at 100 K. Three stages of cooling namely, radiation cooling followed by liquid nitrogen pre-cooling and finally liquid helium (LHe) cooling, are followed to reduce the temperature of cold mass from 300 to 4.2 K. The cold mass at 4.2 K consists of cavities, LHe vessel and the support structure. The temperature of cavity and helium vessel reaches to 210-220 K in 40 h of time by the natural radiation from the thermal shield. The radiative cooling rates for the cavities, helium vessel and support structure are found to be 3.0, 4.0 and 2.0 K/h respectively. A detailed analytical calculation has been done to understand the transient cool-down phenomenon for each component and compared with the experimental measured values. The experimental values are in agreement with the analytical data within 5 % variation considering the correction factor of radiation funneling. This paper presents the role of different thermal parameters like shield temperature, conduction load and radiation funneling area in the transient radiative cool-down behaviour of different components.

  7. Hybrid Wet/Dry Cooling for Power Plants (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Kutscher, C.; Buys, A.; Gladden, C.

    2006-02-01

    This presentation includes an overview of cooling options, an analysis of evaporative enhancement of air-cooled geothermal power plants, field measurements at a geothermal plant, a preliminary analysis of trough plant, and improvements to air-cooled condensers.

  8. The Application of High Temperature Superconducting Materials to Power Switches

    E-print Network

    March, S A; Ballarino, A

    2009-01-01

    Superconducting switches may find application in superconducting magnet systems that require energy extraction. Such superconducting switches could be bypass-switches that are operated in conjunction with a parallel resistor or dump-switches where all of the energy is dissipated in the switch itself. Bypass-switches are more suited to higher energy circuits as a portion of the energy can be dissipated in the external dump resistor. Dump- switches require less material and triggering energy as a lower switch resistance is needed to achieve the required total dump resistance. Both superconducting bypass-switches and superconducting dump-switches can be ther- mally activated. Switching times that are comparable to those obtained with mechanical bypass-switch systems can be achieved using a co-wound heater that is powered by a ca- pacitor discharge. Switches that have fast thermal diffusion times through the insulation can be modelled as a lumped system whereas those with slow thermal diffusion times were modelle...

  9. Steam-Electric Power-Plant-Cooling Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnichsen, J.C.; Carlson, H.A.; Charles, P.D.; Jacobson, L.D.; Tadlock, L.A.

    1982-02-01

    The Steam-Electric Power Plant Cooling Handbook provides summary data on steam-electric power plant capacity, generation and number of plants for each cooling means, by Electric Regions, Water Resource Regions and National Electric Reliability Council Areas. Water consumption by once-through cooling, cooling ponds and wet evaporative towers is discussed and a methodology for computation of water consumption is provided for a typical steam-electric plant which uses a wet evaporative tower or cooling pond for cooling.

  10. Ground state cooling of nanomechanical resonator via linear coupling in a superconducting circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Lin

    2009-03-01

    In recent experiments, it has been demonstrated that radiation pressure-like coupling between a nanomechanical resonator and a superconducting resonator can be explored for the cooling of the nanomechanical mode. In this work, We present a ground state cooling scheme for a nanomechanical resonator linearly coupled with a superconducting LC oscillator. The linear coupling, when periodically modulated at red detuning, up-converts the low-frequency nanomechanical mode to the high- frequency LC oscillator mode and generates backaction force that can cool the nanomechanical mode to its ground state in the resolved-sideband regime. Compared with schemes using radiation pressure-like coupling, the LC oscillator mode doesn't need to be driven to high photon occupation number in our scheme. We calculate the cooling rate and the stationary occupation number of the nanomechanical mode and show that ground state can be reached with practical device parameters. A detailed study of our model shows that the quantum backaction noise that limits the cooling process is due to the counter rotating terms in the linear coupling. The scheme can be compared with laser cooling for the atomic systems as well.

  11. Numerical analysis of thermal stability of an immersion-cooled, pancake type superconducting coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, S.; Kim, J.-K.; Aihara, T.; Kuroda, K.

    A numerical analysis of the thermal stability of an immersion-cooled, single pancake type superconducting coil has been carried out, taking into account transient boiling heat transfer and the temperature dependence of the physical properties of the superconducting composite. The unsteady heat conduction equation, with source terms allowing for heat conduction through an electric insulation film, thermal disturbance, heat transfer and Joule heat generation, has been solved by a control volume finite method. The stability limit of the variable property solution (VPS) is compared with that of the constant property solution (CPS). The result shows that the VPS is 1.5 times as large as the CPS. Also, the effects of the transport current density and the magnetic flux density on the stability of the superconducting coil are clarified.

  12. Study of high field superconducting solenoids for muon beam cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikhin, V.V.; Barzi, E.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Lamm, Michael J.; Sadovskiy, Y.; Zlobin, Alexander V; /Fermilab

    2007-08-01

    The final beam cooling stages of a possible Muon Collider may require DC solenoid magnets with magnetic fields of 40-50 T in an aperture of 40-50 mm. In this paper we study possible solutions towards creating DC fields of that order using available superconductors. Several magnetic and mechanical designs, optimized for the maximum performance are presented and compared in terms of cost and size.

  13. Numerical Simulations for the Cool-Down of the XFEL and TTF Superconducting Linear Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensch, K.; Lange, R.; Petersen, B.

    2004-06-01

    The alignment of the superconducting RF-cavities and the magnet packages of the cryomodules of the future XFEL linear accelerator and the existing TTF linear accelerator at DESY can be affected by the mechanical stress caused by thermal gradients during the cool-down and warm-up. Also the design of the XFEL cryogenic system has to include the cool-down and warm-up procedures. An object-oriented software concept is applied to analyze the cool-down procedures for the TTF and the XFEL linear accelerators by numerical simulations. The numerical results are compared to measurements taken during the first cool-down of the TTF linear accelerator. Some results for the XFEL cryogenic system are presented.

  14. Cooling Strings of Superconducting Devices below 2 K the Helium II Bayonet Heat Exchanger

    E-print Network

    Lebrun, P; Tavian, L; Van Weelderen, R

    1998-01-01

    High-energy particle accelerators and colliders contain long strings of superconducting devices - acceleration RF cavities and magnets - operating at high field, which may require cooling in helium II below 2 K. In order to maintain adequate operating conditions, the applied or generated heat loads must be extracted and transported with minimum temperature difference. Conventional cooling schemes based on conductive or convective heat transport in pressurized helium II very soon reach their intrinsic limits of thermal impedance over extended lengths. We present the concept of helium II bayonet heat exchanger, which has been developed at CERN for the magnet cooling scheme of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), and describe its specific advantages as a slim, quasi-isothermal heat sink. Experimental results obtained on several test set-ups, and a prototype magnet string have permitted to validate its performance and sizing rules, for transporting linear heat loads in the W.m-1 range over distances of several tens o...

  15. Hydraulic behavior of forced-flow cooled superconducting coils for the large helical device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Soo-Hwan; Takahata, Kazuya

    2011-06-01

    The large helical device (LHD) has been operated since 1998 and the 13th experimental campaign was conducted in 2009. Before final assembling, cool-down and excitation tests for the Inner Vertical (IV) field coil, which is one of the LHD poloidal field coils, were carried out in 1995. This coil, which consists of a cable-in-conduit conductor, (CICC) is cooled by the forced-flow of supercritical helium. During the tests of the IV coil, hydraulic characteristics, such as flow distribution among cooling channels and friction factors, were measured. In this paper, the consistency of the behavior of the IV coil will be presented and comparison with other fusion devices using superconducting coils will also be made at not only cryogenic temperatures but also at room temperature.

  16. Power converter having improved fluid cooling

    DOEpatents

    Meyer, Andreas A.; Radosevich, Lawrence D.; Beihoff, Bruce C.; Kehl, Dennis L.; Kannenberg, Daniel G.

    2007-03-06

    A thermal support may receive one or more power electronic circuits. The support may aid in removing heat from the circuits through fluid circulating through the support, which may be controlled in a closed-loop manner. Interfacing between circuits, circuit mounting structure, and the support provide for greatly enhanced cooling. The support may form a shield from both external EMI/RFI and from interference generated by operation of the power electronic circuits. Features may be provided to permit and enhance connection of the circuitry to external circuitry, such as improved terminal configurations. Modular units may be assembled that may be coupled to electronic circuitry via plug-in arrangements or through interface with a backplane or similar mounting and interconnecting structures.

  17. Cooling profiles of laser induced temperature fields for superconducting vanadium nitrate products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emetere, Moses Eterigho

    2015-05-01

    The flexibility of vanadium nitrate makes it a good constituent for emerging superconductors. Its thermal instability engenders a disordered structure when doped by insulating constituents. The physics of the heat source i.e. the probe laser was theoretical derived to avoid deficiency of the superconducting material at low laser energy density. The mathematical experimentation was accomplished by queering the energy balance and heat conductivity of the individual constituents of the reagent. In-depth analysis of the layered distribution of laser induced temperature fields was carried out by cooling the compound via the forced convective cooling technique to about 150 °C. The material was gradual heated via the laser probe to its superconducting state. The structural defect which explained different state of the thermal outcomes were explained and proven to correspond with experimental outcomes. The temperature distribution under the irradiating laser intensity (0.45 W) shows an effective decay rate probability density function which is peculiar to the concept of photoluminescence. The dynamics of the electronic structure of thermally-excited superconducting materials is hinged on the complementary stoichiometry signatures, thermal properties amongst others. The maximum possible critical temperatures of the inter-layer were calculated to be about 206 K.

  18. Venus Surface Power and Cooling System Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Mellott, Kenneth D.

    2004-01-01

    A radioisotope power and cooling system is designed to provide electrical power for the a probe operating on the surface of Venus. Most foreseeable electronics devices and sensors simply cannot operate at the 450 C ambient surface temperature of Venus. Because the mission duration is substantially long and the use of thermal mass to maintain an operable temperature range is likely impractical, some type of active refrigeration may be required to keep certain components at a temperature below ambient. The fundamental cooling requirements are comprised of the cold sink temperature, the hot sink temperature, and the amount of heat to be removed. In this instance, it is anticipated that electronics would have a nominal operating temperature of 300 C. Due to the highly thermal convective nature of the high-density atmosphere, the hot sink temperature was assumed to be 50 C, which provided a 500 C temperature of the cooler's heat rejecter to the ambient atmosphere. The majority of the heat load on the cooler is from the high temperature ambient surface environment on Venus. Assuming 5 cm radial thickness of ceramic blanket insulation, the ambient heat load was estimated at approximately 77 watts. With an estimated quantity of 10 watts of heat generation from electronics and sensors, and to accommodate some level of uncertainty, the total heat load requirement was rounded up to an even 100 watts. For the radioisotope Stirling power converter configuration designed, the Sage model predicts a thermodynamic power output capacity of 478.1 watts, which slightly exceeds the required 469.1 watts. The hot sink temperature is 1200 C, and the cold sink temperature is 500 C. The required heat input is 1740 watts. This gives a thermodynamic efficiency of 27.48 %. The maximum theoretically obtainable efficiency is 47.52 %. It is estimated that the mechanical efficiency of the power converter design is on the order of 85 %, based on experimental measurements taken from 500 watt power class, laboratory-tested Stirling engines at GRC. The overall efficiency is calculated to be 23.36 %. The mass of the power converter is estimated at approximately 21.6 kg.

  19. Large cooling power hybrid Gifford mac Mahon / Joule Thomson refrigerator andliquefier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poncet, Jean-Marc; Claudet, Gérard; Lagnier, Robert; Ravex, Alain

    In this paper, we present two refrigerators using Joule Thomson cycle providing cooling powers of 4.5 W at 4.4 K and using Gifford Mac Mahon cryocoolers for the precooling. Several smaller machines have been developped in our laboratory with refrigeration capacity ranging from 100 mW up to 1.5 W in the temperature range 3 K to 4.4 K. In the present case, to increase the cooling power, we introduced a three stage precooling scheme using a liquid nitrogen vessel plus the two stages of a Gifford Mac Mahon cryocooler. Cooldown and operation of the system are fully automatic. The first refrigerator is used to cool two Nb 3Sn superconducting coils having a maximum field of 11.8 T. The second system is an helium liquefier, designed to produce more than 1 liter per hour.

  20. Experimental simulation of helium pressure rise during a quench of a superconducting coil cooled by a superfluid helium bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meuris, C.

    2013-01-01

    Experimental and numerical studies have been conducted with the aim of modeling pressure rises which occur in the helium, during quenches of the 11.7-T superconducting magnet named Iseult. Iseult is based on a double-pancake winding internally cooled by superfluid helium channels opening into a pressurized He II bath at 1.8 K. A scale mock-up has been built of 10 copper equivalent pancake slices and 7 helium channels per pancake. The heat produced by a quench of the Iseult magnet is simulated by electrical heaters put inside each copper plate. Cryogenic pressure and temperature sensors have been fitted in the helium channels and in the bath. Bath pressure measurements are given for various heating powers, various numbers of heated plates and various bath volumes. Comparisons with a simple numerical model permit to identify the main physical mechanisms which drive the pressure rise during a quench.

  1. Two-Phase Cooling Method Using R134a Refrigerant to Cool Power Electronic Devices

    E-print Network

    Tolbert, Leon M.

    Two-Phase Cooling Method Using R134a Refrigerant to Cool Power Electronic Devices Jeremy B, TN 37932 Abstract This paper presents a two-phase cooling method using R134a refrigerant configuration. Second, experimental tests that included simultaneous operation with a mock automotive air

  2. Cryogenic-temperature profiling of high-power superconducting lines using local and distributed optical-fiber sensors.

    PubMed

    Chiuchiolo, Antonella; Palmieri, Luca; Consales, Marco; Giordano, Michele; Borriello, Anna; Bajas, Hugues; Galtarossa, Andrea; Bajko, Marta; Cusano, Andrea

    2015-10-01

    This contribution presents distributed and multipoint fiber-optic monitoring of cryogenic temperatures along a superconducting power transmission line down to 30 K and over 20 m distance. Multipoint measurements were conducted using fiber Bragg gratings sensors coated with two different functional overlays (epoxy and poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA)) demonstrating cryogenic operation in the range 300-4.2 K. Distributed measurements exploited optical frequency-domain reflectometry to analyze the Rayleigh scattering along two concatenated fibers with different coatings (acrylate and polyimide). The integrated system has been placed along the 20 m long cryostat of a superconducting power transmission line, which is currently being tested at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN). Cool-down events from 300-30 K have been successfully measured in space and time, confirming the viability of these approaches to the monitoring of cryogenic temperatures along a superconducting transmission line. PMID:26421547

  3. Case study on the US superconducting power transmission program

    SciTech Connect

    Hammel, E.F.

    1996-02-01

    After the 1911 discovery of superconductivity (the abrupt loss of electrical resistance in certain materials at very low temperatures), attempts were made to make practical use of this phenomenon. Initially these attempts failed, but in the early 1960s (after 50 years of research) they succeeded. By then, the projected growth in the production and consumption of electrical energy required much higher capacity power transmission capabilities than were available or likely to become available from incremental improvements in existing transmission technology. Since superconductors were capable in principle of transmitting huge amounts of power, research programs to develop and demonstrate superconducting transmission lines were initiated in the US and abroad. The history of the US program, including the participants, their objectives, funding and progress made, is outlined. Since the R&D program was terminated before the technology was completely demonstrated, the reasons for and consequences of this action are discussed in a final section.

  4. Superconducting electromechanical rotating device having a liquid-cooled, potted, one layer stator winding

    DOEpatents

    Dombrovski, Viatcheslav V. (Willoughby Hills, OH); Driscoll, David I. (South Euclid, OH); Shovkhet, Boris A. (Beachwood, OH)

    2001-01-01

    A superconducting electromechanical rotating (SER) device, such as a synchronous AC motor, includes a superconducting field winding and a one-layer stator winding that may be water-cooled. The stator winding is potted to a support such as the inner radial surface of a support structure and, accordingly, lacks hangers or other mechanical fasteners that otherwise would complicate stator assembly and require the provision of an unnecessarily large gap between adjacent stator coil sections. The one-layer winding topology, resulting in the number of coils being equal to half the number of slots or other mounting locations on the support structure, allows one to minimize or eliminate the gap between the inner radial ends of adjacent straight sections of the stator coilswhile maintaining the gap between the coil knuckles equal to at least the coil width, providing sufficient room for electrical and cooling element configurations and connections. The stator winding may be potted to the support structure or other support, for example, by a one-step VPI process relying on saturation of an absorbent material to fill large gaps in the stator winding or by a two-step process in which small gaps are first filled via a VPI or similar operation and larger gaps are then filled via an operation that utilizes the stator as a portion of an on-site mold.

  5. Hybrid Cooling Systems for Low-Temperature Geothermal Power Production

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, A.; Bharathan, D.

    2011-03-01

    This paper describes the identification and evaluation of methods by which the net power output of an air-cooled geothermal power plant can be enhanced during hot ambient conditions with a minimal amount of water use.

  6. High-Tc superconducting materials for electric power applications.

    PubMed

    Larbalestier, D; Gurevich, A; Feldmann, D M; Polyanskii, A

    2001-11-15

    Large-scale superconducting electric devices for power industry depend critically on wires with high critical current densities at temperatures where cryogenic losses are tolerable. This restricts choice to two high-temperature cuprate superconductors, (Bi,Pb)2Sr2Ca2Cu3Ox and YBa2Cu3Ox, and possibly to MgB2, recently discovered to superconduct at 39 K. Crystal structure and material anisotropy place fundamental restrictions on their properties, especially in polycrystalline form. So far, power applications have followed a largely empirical, twin-track approach of conductor development and construction of prototype devices. The feasibility of superconducting power cables, magnetic energy-storage devices, transformers, fault current limiters and motors, largely using (Bi,Pb)2Sr2Ca2Cu3Ox conductor, is proven. Widespread applications now depend significantly on cost-effective resolution of fundamental materials and fabrication issues, which control the production of low-cost, high-performance conductors of these remarkable compounds. PMID:11713544

  7. Inverter power module with distributed support for direct substrate cooling

    DOEpatents

    Miller, David Harold (San Pedro, CA); Korich, Mark D. (Chino Hills, CA); Ward, Terence G. (Redondo Beach, CA); Mann, Brooks S. (Redondo Beach, CA)

    2012-08-21

    Systems and/or methods are provided for an inverter power module with distributed support for direct substrate cooling. An inverter module comprises a power electronic substrate. A first support frame is adapted to house the power electronic substrate and has a first region adapted to allow direct cooling of the power electronic substrate. A gasket is interposed between the power electronic substrate and the first support frame. The gasket is configured to provide a seal between the first region and the power electronic substrate. A second support frame is adapted to house the power electronic substrate and joined to the first support frame to form the seal.

  8. Purification of condenser water in thermal power station by superconducting magnetic separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, D. W.; Kwon, J. M.; Baik, S. K.; Lee, Y. J.; Han, K. S.; Ko, R. K.; Sohn, M. H.; Seong, K. C.

    2011-11-01

    Thermal power station is made up of a steam turbine and a steam condenser which need a lot of water. The water of steam condenser should be replaced, since scales consisting of iron oxide mainly are accumulated on the surface of condenser pipes as it goes. Superconducting high gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) system has merits to remove paramagnetic substance like iron oxides because it can generate higher magnetic field strength than electromagnet or permanent magnet. In this paper, cryo-cooled Nb-Ti superconducting magnet that can generate up to 6 T was used for HGMS systems. Magnetic filters were designed by the analysis of magnetic field distribution at superconducting magnets. The result of X-ray analysis showed contaminants were mostly ?-Fe 2O 3 (hematite) and ?-Fe 2O 3 (maghemite). The higher magnetic field was applied up to 6 T, the more iron oxides were removed. As the wire diameter of magnetic filter decreased, the turbidity removal of the sample was enhanced.

  9. Minimization of power consumption during charging of superconducting accelerating cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Anirban Krishna; Ziemann, Volker; Ruber, Roger; Goryashko, Vitaliy

    2015-11-01

    The radio frequency cavities, used to accelerate charged particle beams, need to be charged to their nominal voltage after which the beam can be injected into them. The standard procedure for such cavity filling is to use a step charging profile. However, during initial stages of such a filling process a substantial amount of the total energy is wasted in reflection for superconducting cavities because of their extremely narrow bandwidth. The paper presents a novel strategy to charge cavities, which reduces total energy reflection. We use variational calculus to obtain analytical expression for the optimal charging profile. Energies, reflected and required, and generator peak power are also compared between the charging schemes and practical aspects (saturation, efficiency and gain characteristics) of power sources (tetrodes, IOTs and solid state power amplifiers) are also considered and analysed. The paper presents a methodology to successfully identify the optimal charging scheme for different power sources to minimize total energy requirement.

  10. The economics of solar powered absorption cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, J. C.

    1978-01-01

    Analytic procedure evaluates cost of combining absorption-cycle chiller with solar-energy system in residential or commercial application. Procedure assumes that solar-energy system already exists to heat building and that cooling system must be added. Decision is whether to cool building with conventional vapor-compression-cycle chiller or to use solar-energy system to provide heat input to absorption chiller.

  11. Finite element code for quench and stability analysis of superconducting magnets cooled by He II

    SciTech Connect

    Gorbounov, M.B.; Miller, J.R.; Van Sciver, S.W.

    1996-12-31

    The design of the protection system for the superconducting portion of the 45-T Hybrid Magnet System being constructed at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory and the establishment of safe and reliable operating procedures are critical tasks. To support these efforts, the finite element code SARUMAN has been extended to include capability for analysis of the stability and quench in Cable-in-Conduit Conductors (CICC) cooled by pressurized superfluid He II. This modification consists of introducing a temperature gradient term in the energy equation for the counterflow mechanism and extension of the properties of helium and other materials of the magnet to the He II temperature region. Using this new version of the code, the stability of the conductors for the 45-T Hybrid have been analyzed against different thermal disturbances and under a variety of possible operating conditions, as well as the evolution of the quench in the conductor.

  12. Cryogenic analysis of forced-cooled, superconducting TF magnets for compact tokamak reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Kerns, J.A.; Slack, D.S.; Miller, J.R.

    1988-10-25

    Current designs for compact tokamak reactors require the toroidal- field (TF) superconducting magnets to produce fields from 10 to 15 T at the winding pack, using high-current densities to high nuclear heat loads (greater than 1 kW/coil in some instances), which are significantly greater than the conduction and radiation heat loads for which cryogenic systems are usually designed. A cryogenic system for the TF winding pack for two such tokamak designs has been verified by performing a detailed, steady-state heat-removal analysis. Helium properties along the forced-cooled conductor flow path for a range of nuclear heat loads have been calculated. The results and implications of this analysis are presented. 12 refs., 6 figs.

  13. 78 FR 35330 - Initial Test Programs for Water-Cooled Nuclear Power Plants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-12

    ...Programs for Water-Cooled Nuclear Power Plants AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory...Programs for Water-Cooled Nuclear Power Plants.'' This guide describes...ITPs) for light water cooled nuclear power plants. ADDRESSES: Please...

  14. 77 FR 73056 - Initial Test Programs for Water-Cooled Nuclear Power Plants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-07

    ...Programs for Water-Cooled Nuclear Power Plants AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory...Programs for Water-Cooled Nuclear Power Plants.'' This guide describes...ITPs) for light water cooled nuclear power plants. DATES: Submit comments...

  15. Dependence of the residual surface resistance of superconducting radio frequency cavities on the cooling dynamics around T{sub c}

    SciTech Connect

    Romanenko, A. Grassellino, A. Melnychuk, O.; Sergatskov, D. A.

    2014-05-14

    We report a strong effect of the cooling dynamics through T{sub c} on the amount of trapped external magnetic flux in superconducting niobium cavities. The effect is similar for fine grain and single crystal niobium and all surface treatments including electropolishing with and without 120?°C baking and nitrogen doping. Direct magnetic field measurements on the cavity walls show that the effect stems from changes in the flux trapping efficiency: slow cooling leads to almost complete flux trapping and higher residual resistance, while fast cooling leads to the much more efficient flux expulsion and lower residual resistance.

  16. Emerging Two-Phase Cooling Technologies for Power Electronic Inverters

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, J.S.

    2005-08-17

    In order to meet the Department of Energy's (DOE's) FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (FVCT) goals for volume, weight, efficiency, reliability, and cost, the cooling of the power electronic devices, traction motors, and generators is critical. Currently the power electronic devices, traction motors, and generators in a hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) are primarily cooled by water-ethylene glycol (WEG) mixture. The cooling fluid operates as a single-phase coolant as the liquid phase of the WEG does not change to its vapor phase during the cooling process. In these single-phase systems, two cooling loops of WEG produce a low temperature (around 70 C) cooling loop for the power electronics and motor/generator, and higher temperature loop (around 105 C) for the internal combustion engine. There is another coolant option currently available in automobiles. It is possible to use the transmission oil as a coolant. The oil temperature exists at approximately 85 C which can be utilized to cool the power electronic and electrical devices. Because heat flux is proportional to the temperature difference between the device's hot surface and the coolant, a device that can tolerate higher temperatures enables the device to be smaller while dissipating the same amount of heat. Presently, new silicon carbide (SiC) devices and high temperature direct current (dc)-link capacitors, such as Teflon capacitors, are available but at significantly higher costs. Higher junction temperature (175 C) silicon (Si) dies are gradually emerging in the market, which will eventually help to lower hardware costs for cooling. The development of high-temperature devices is not the only way to reduce device size. Two-phase cooling that utilizes the vaporization of the liquid to dissipate heat is expected to be a very effective cooling method. Among two-phase cooling methods, different technologies such as spray, jet impingement, pool boiling and submersion, etc. are being developed. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is leading the research on a novel floating refrigerant loop that cools high-power electronic devices and the motor/generator with very low cooling energy. The loop can be operated independently or attached to the air conditioning system of the vehicle to share the condenser and other mutually needed components. The ability to achieve low cooling energy in the floating loop is attributable to the liquid refrigerant operating at its hot saturated temperature (around 50 C+). In an air conditioning system, the liquid refrigerant is sub-cooled for producing cool air to the passenger compartment. The ORNL floating loop avoids the sub-cooling of the liquid refrigerant and saves significant cooling energy. It can raise the coefficient of performance (COP) more than 10 fold from that of the existing air-conditioning system, where the COP is the ratio of the cooled power and the input power for dissipating the cooled power. In order to thoroughly investigate emerging two-phase cooling technologies, ORNL subcontracted three university/companies to look into three leading two-phase cooling technologies. ORNL's assessments on these technologies are summarized in Section I. Detailed descriptions of the reports by the three university/companies (subcontractors) are in Section II.

  17. Thermoacoustic Duplex Technology for Cooling and Powering a Venus Lander

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, A. R.; Haberbusch, M. S.; Sasson, J.

    2015-04-01

    A Thermoacoustic Stirling Heat Engine (TASHE) is directly coupled to a Pulse Tube Refrigerator (PTR) in a duplex configuration, providing simultaneous cooling and electrical power, thereby suiting the needs of a long-lived Venus lander.

  18. Convective Array Cooling for a Solar Powered Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colozza, Anthony J.; Dolce, James (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    A general characteristic of photovoltaics is that they increase in efficiency as their operating temperature decreases. Based on this principal, the ability to increase a solar aircraft's performance by cooling the solar cells was examined. The solar cells were cooled by channeling some air underneath the cells and providing a convective cooling path to the back side of the array. A full energy balance and flow analysis of the air within the cooling passage was performed. The analysis was first performed on a preliminary level to estimate the benefits of the cooling passage. This analysis established a clear benefit to the cooling passage. Based on these results a more detailed analysis was performed. From this cell temperatures were calculated and array output power throughout a day period were determined with and without the cooling passage. The results showed that if the flow through the cooling passage remained laminar then the benefit in increased output power more than offset the drag induced by the cooling passage.

  19. Naegleria fowleri in cooling waters of power plants.

    PubMed

    Cerva, L; Kasprzak, W; Mazur, T

    1982-01-01

    Six strains of nonvirulent and three strains of virulent variants of Naegleria fowleri amoebae were isolated from the examined cooling water samples from 9 power plants. The virulent variants were obtained solely from effluents discharged from power plants with a closed-circuit cooling N. fowleri was not detected outside the reach of the thermal pollution. A disinfection of out-flowing cooling water seems to be an unnecessary investment in our climate. Warm discharge water should under no conditions be used directly for sports and recreational purposes. PMID:7119430

  20. Evacuation time of cryogenic pipes for superconducting power transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Hirofumi; Sun, Jian; Yamamoto, Norimasa; Hamabe, Makoto; Kawahara, Toshio; Yamaguchi, Satarou

    2013-11-01

    The vacuum insulation has been used for the thermal insulation of cryogenic pipes for the superconducting power transmission to reduce the heat leak from the environment at the room temperature to the low temperature parts. Since the cryogenic pipes, in particular, those for long distance power transmission, are considered to be thin long pipes, it might take a long time for evacuation. To estimate the evacuation time of the long cryogenic pipes, model calculations have been performed. According to the calculations, it is found that there is an optimum condition between the pumping speed, the diameter of the outer pipe and the length of the cryogenic pipe for efficient evacuation. It is also found that, if the outgassing is suppressed enough, the evacuation can be possible within 1 week even for the long cryogenic pipe with the length of 10 km. The reduction of outgassing is particularly important for the efficient evacuation.

  1. Superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Caruana, C.M.

    1988-05-01

    Despite reports of new, high-temperature superconductive materials almost every day, participants at the First Congress on Superconductivity do not anticipate commercial applications with these materials soon. What many do envision is the discovery of superconducting materials that can function at much warmer, perhaps even room temperatures. Others hope superconductivity will usher in a new age of technology as semiconductors and transistors did. This article reviews what the speakers had to say at the four-day congress held in Houston last February. Several speakers voiced concern that the Reagan administration's apparent lack of interest in funding superconductivity research while other countries, notably Japan, continue to pour money into research and development could hamper America's international competitiveness.

  2. Passive Two-Phase Cooling of Automotive Power Electronics: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, G.; Jeffers, J. R.; Narumanchi, S.; Bennion, K.

    2014-08-01

    Experiments were conducted to evaluate the use of a passive two-phase cooling strategy as a means of cooling automotive power electronics. The proposed cooling approach utilizes an indirect cooling configuration to alleviate some reliability concerns and to allow the use of conventional power modules. An inverter-scale proof-of-concept cooling system was fabricated, and tests were conducted using the refrigerants hydrofluoroolefin HFO-1234yf and hydrofluorocarbon HFC-245fa. Results demonstrated that the system can dissipate at least 3.5 kW of heat with 250 cm3 of HFC-245fa. An advanced evaporator design that incorporates features to improve performance and reduce size was conceived. Simulation results indicate its thermal resistance can be 37% to 48% lower than automotive dual side cooled power modules. Tests were also conducted to measure the thermal performance of two air-cooled condensers--plain and rifled finned tube designs. The results combined with some analysis were then used to estimate the required condenser size per operating conditions and maximum allowable system (i.e., vapor and liquid) temperatures.

  3. 14 CFR 23.1045 - Cooling test procedures for turbine engine powered airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cooling test procedures for turbine engine powered airplanes. 23.1045 Section 23.1045...Powerplant Cooling § 23.1045 Cooling test procedures for turbine engine powered airplanes. (a) Compliance...

  4. 14 CFR 23.1045 - Cooling test procedures for turbine engine powered airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Cooling test procedures for turbine engine powered airplanes. 23.1045 Section 23.1045...Powerplant Cooling § 23.1045 Cooling test procedures for turbine engine powered airplanes. (a) Compliance...

  5. 14 CFR 23.1045 - Cooling test procedures for turbine engine powered airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Cooling test procedures for turbine engine powered airplanes. 23.1045 Section 23.1045...Powerplant Cooling § 23.1045 Cooling test procedures for turbine engine powered airplanes. (a) Compliance...

  6. 14 CFR 23.1045 - Cooling test procedures for turbine engine powered airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Cooling test procedures for turbine engine powered airplanes. 23.1045 Section 23.1045...Powerplant Cooling § 23.1045 Cooling test procedures for turbine engine powered airplanes. (a) Compliance...

  7. 14 CFR 23.1045 - Cooling test procedures for turbine engine powered airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Cooling test procedures for turbine engine powered airplanes. 23.1045 Section 23.1045...Powerplant Cooling § 23.1045 Cooling test procedures for turbine engine powered airplanes. (a) Compliance...

  8. High temperature superconductivity technology for advanced space power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faymon, Karl A.; Myers, Ira T.; Connolly, Denis J.

    1990-01-01

    In 1987, the Lewis Research center of the NASA and the Argonne National Laboratory of the Department of Energy joined in a cooperative program to identify and assess high payoff space and aeronautical applications of high temperature superconductivity (HTSC). The initial emphasis of this effort was limited, and those space power related applications which were considered included microwave power transmission and magnetic energy storage. The results of these initial studies were encouraging and indicated the need of further studies. A continuing collaborative program with Argonne National Laboratory has been formulated and the Lewis Research Center is presently structuring a program to further evaluate HTSC, identify applications and define the requisite technology development programs for space power systems. This paper discusses some preliminary results of the previous evaluations in the area of space power applications of HTSC which were carried out under the joint NASA-DOE program, the future NASA-Lewis proposed program, its thrusts, and its intended outputs and give general insights on the anticipated impact of HTSC for space power applications of the future.

  9. Liquid metal cooled reactors for space power applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, S.; Vaidyanathan, S.; Van Hoomissen, J.

    1985-01-01

    The technology basis for evaluation of liquid metal cooled space reactors is summarized. Requirements for space nuclear power which are relevant to selection of the reactor subsystem are then reviewed. The attributes of liquid metal cooled reactors are considered in relation to these requirements in the areas of liquid metal properties, neutron spectrum characteristics, and fuel form. Key features of typical reactor designs are illustrated. It is concluded that liquid metal cooled fast spectrum reactors provide a high confidence, flexible option for meeting requirements for SP-100 and beyond.

  10. SUPERCONDUCTING PHOTOINJECTOR

    SciTech Connect

    BEN-ZVI,I.; BURRILL, A.; CALAGA, R.; CHANG, X.; GROVER, R.; GUPTA, R.; HAHN, H.; HAMMONS, L.; KAYRAN, D.; KEWISCH, J.; LAMBIASE, R.; LITVINENKO, V.; MCINTYRE, G.; NAIK, D.; PATE, D.; PHILLIPS, D.; POZDEYEV, E.; RAO, T.; SMEDLEY, J.; THAN, R.; TODD, R.; WEISS, D.; WU, Q.; ZALTSMAN, A.; ET AL.

    2007-08-26

    One of the frontiers in FEL science is that of high power. In order to reach power in the megawatt range, one requires a current of the order of one ampere with a reasonably good emittance. The superconducting laser-photocathode RF gun with a high quantum efficiency photocathode is the most natural candidate to provide this performance. The development of a 1/2 cell superconducting photoinjector designed to operate at up to a current of 0.5 amperes and beam energy of 2 MeV and its photocathode system are the subjects covered in this paper. The main issues are the photocathode and its insertion mechanism, the power coupling and High Order Mode damping. This technology is being developed at BNL for DOE nuclear physics applications such as electron cooling at high energy and electron ion colliders..

  11. Non-linear Model Predictive Control for cooling strings of superconducting magnets using superfluid helium

    E-print Network

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)673023; Blanco Viñuela, Enrique

    In each of eight arcs of the 27 km circumference Large Hadron Collider (LHC), 2.5 km long strings of super-conducting magnets are cooled with superfluid Helium II at 1.9 K. The temperature stabilisation is a challenging control problem due to complex non-linear dynamics of the magnets temperature and presence of multiple operational constraints. Strong nonlinearities and variable dead-times of the dynamics originate at strongly heat-flux dependent effective heat conductivity of superfluid that varies three orders of magnitude over the range of possible operational conditions. In order to improve the temperature stabilisation, a proof of concept on-line economic output-feedback Non-linear Model Predictive Controller (NMPC) is presented in this thesis. The controller is based on a novel complex first-principles distributed parameters numerical model of the temperature dynamics over a 214 m long sub-sector of the LHC that is characterized by very low computational cost of simulation needed in real-time optimizat...

  12. Air Cooling for High Temperature Power Electronics (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Waye, S.; Musselman, M.; King, C.

    2014-09-01

    Current emphasis on developing high-temperature power electronics, including wide-bandgap materials such as silicon carbide and gallium nitride, increases the opportunity for a completely air-cooled inverter at higher powers. This removes the liquid cooling system for the inverter, saving weight and volume on the liquid-to-air heat exchanger, coolant lines, pumps, and coolant, replacing them with just a fan and air supply ducting. We investigate the potential for an air-cooled heat exchanger from a component and systems-level approach to meet specific power and power density targets. A proposed baseline air-cooled heat exchanger design that does not meet those targets was optimized using a parametric computational fluid dynamics analysis, examining the effects of heat exchanger geometry and device location, fixing the device heat dissipation and maximum junction temperature. The CFD results were extrapolated to a full inverter, including casing, capacitor, bus bar, gate driver, and control board component weights and volumes. Surrogate ducting was tested to understand the pressure drop and subsequent system parasitic load. Geometries that met targets with acceptable loads on the system were down-selected for experimentation. Nine baseline configuration modules dissipated the target heat dissipation, but fell below specific power and power density targets. Six optimized configuration modules dissipated the target heat load, exceeding the specific power and power density targets. By maintaining the same 175 degrees C maximum junction temperature, an optimized heat exchanger design and higher device heat fluxes allowed a reduction in the number of modules required, increasing specific power and power density while still maintaining the inverter power.

  13. Thermally matched fluid cooled power converter

    DOEpatents

    Radosevich, Lawrence D.; Kannenberg, Daniel G.; Kaishian, Steven C.; Beihoff, Bruce C.

    2005-06-21

    A thermal support may receive one or more power electronic circuits. The support may aid in removing heat from the circuits through fluid circulating through the support. Power electronic circuits are thermally matched, such as between component layers and between the circuits and the support. The support may form a shield from both external EMI/RFI and from interference generated by operation of the power electronic circuits. Features may be provided to permit and enhance connection of the circuitry to external circuitry, such as improved terminal configurations. Modular units may be assembled that may be coupled to electronic circuitry via plug-in arrangements or through interface with a backplane or similar mounting and interconnecting structures.

  14. Design of dechlorination units for power plant cooling streams

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, C.S.; Berker, A.; Whitaker, S.

    1980-02-01

    The design of dechlorination units using sulfur dioxide as a reducing agent for once-through power plant cooling streams is considered. The average concentration of hypochlorite ions is determined downstream from the point of injection of sulfurous acid as a function of the number of injection points and the initial sulfurous acid concentration. The results can be used for the design of sulfurous acid injection units required to reduce the hypochlorite ion concentration to a specified level. A sample design calculation is presented for a typical power plant cooling stream.

  15. Modular power converter having fluid cooled support

    DOEpatents

    Beihoff, Bruce C.; Radosevich, Lawrence D.; Meyer, Andreas A.; Gollhardt, Neil; Kannenberg, Daniel G.

    2005-12-06

    A support may receive one or more power electronic circuits. The support may aid in removing heat from the circuits through fluid circulating through the support. The support, in conjunction with other packaging features may form a shield from both external EMI/RFI and from interference generated by operation of the power electronic circuits. Features may be provided to permit and enhance connection of the circuitry to external circuitry, such as improved terminal configurations. Modular units may be assembled that may be coupled to electronic circuitry via plug-in arrangements or through interface with a backplane or similar mounting and interconnecting structures.

  16. Modular power converter having fluid cooled support

    DOEpatents

    Beihoff, Bruce C.; Radosevich, Lawrence D.; Meyer, Andreas A.; Gollhardt, Neil; Kannenberg, Daniel G.

    2005-09-06

    A support may receive one or more power electronic circuits. The support may aid in removing heat from the circuits through fluid circulating through the support. The support, in conjunction with other packaging features may form a shield from both external EMI/RFI and from interference generated by operation of the power electronic circuits. Features may be provided to permit and enhance connection of the circuitry to external circuitry, such as improved terminal configurations. Modular units may be assembled that may be coupled to electronic circuitry via plug-in arrangements or through interface with a backplane or similar mounting and interconnecting structures.

  17. Concurrent Wind Cooling in Power Transmission Lines

    SciTech Connect

    Jake P Gentle

    2012-08-01

    Idaho National Laboratory and the Idaho Power Company, with collaboration from Idaho State University, have been working on a project to monitor wind and other environmental data parameters along certain electrical transmission corridors. The combination of both real-time historical weather and environmental data is being used to model, validate, and recommend possibilities for dynamic operations of the transmission lines for power and energy carrying capacity. The planned results can also be used to influence decisions about proposed design criteria for or upgrades to certain sections of the transmission lines.

  18. PREFACE: Focus section on superconducting power systems Focus section on superconducting power systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardwell, D. A.; Amemiya, N.; Fair, R.

    2012-01-01

    This focus section of Superconductor Science and Technology looks at the properties, technology and applications of (RE)BCO and MgB2 based superconductors for power engineering systems. Both bulk and conductor forms of material are addressed, including elements of materials fabrication and processing, and the measurement of their applied properties for various levels of system application. The areas of research include ac losses in type II materials in power devices, cables and coated conductors, the development of high current dc cables and the application of superconductors in levitation devices, motors and fault current limiters. This focus section presents a broad cross-section of contemporary issues, that represent state-of-the-art for power applications of superconductors, and highlights the areas that require further development if commercial applications of these rapidly emerging materials are to be realised. It contains papers from some of the major groups in the field, including contributions from Europe, the USA and Japan, and describes devices that are relatively close to market.

  19. Characteristic Analysis of DC Electric Railway Systems with Superconducting Power Cables Connecting Power Substations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohsaki, H.; Matsushita, N.; Koseki, T.; Tomita, M.

    2014-05-01

    The application of superconducting power cables to DC electric railway systems has been studied. It could leads to an effective use of regenerative brake, improved energy efficiency, effective load sharing among the substations, etc. In this study, an electric circuit model of a DC feeding system is built and numerical simulation is carried out using MATLAB-Simulink software. A modified electric circuit model with an AC power grid connection taken into account is also created to simulate the influence of the grid connection. The analyses have proved that a certain amount of energy can be conserved by introducing superconducting cables, and that electric load distribution and concentration among the substations depend on the substation output voltage distribution.

  20. Reduction of helium loss from a superconducting accelerating cavity during initial cool-down and cryostat exchange by pre-cooling the re-condensing cryostat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Rourke, B. E.; Minehara, E. J.; Hayashizaki, N.; Oshima, N.; Suzuki, R.

    2015-03-01

    A Zero-Boil-Off (ZBO) cryostat is designed to realize a compact, stand-alone cryogenic system for the AIST superconducting accelerator (SCA). Under normal operation there is no evaporative helium loss from the cryomodule and therefore operating costs associated with the supply of liquid helium can be eliminated. The only significant loss of helium from the module occurs during the initial cavity cool-down procedure or when the re-condensing cryostat is replaced. It takes about 3 h to cool down the cryostat head from room temperature (300 K) to 4 K. During this time around 100 L of liquid helium is lost due to evaporation. By pre-cooling the cryostat inside a low heat load vacuum tube before transfer to the cryomodule, this evaporative loss could be essentially eliminated, significantly reducing the volume of liquid helium required for the initial cryomodule cool-down. The pre-cooling system also provides an efficient method to test the cryostat prior to use.

  1. A thermosyphon heat pipe cooler for high power LEDs cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ji; Tian, Wenkai; Lv, Lucang

    2015-09-01

    Light emitting diode (LED) cooling is facing the challenge of high heat flux more seriously with the increase of input power and diode density. The proposed unique thermosyphon heat pipe heat sink is particularly suitable for cooling of high power density LED chips and other electronics, which has a heat dissipation potential of up to 280 W within an area of 20 mm × 22 mm (>60 W/cm2) under natural air convection. Meanwhile, a thorough visualization investigation was carried out to explore the two phase flow characteristics in the proposed thermosyphon heat pipe. Implementing this novel thermosyphon heat pipe heat sink in the cooling of a commercial 100 W LED integrated chip, a very low apparent thermal resistance of 0.34 K/W was obtained under natural air convection with the aid of the enhanced boiling heat transfer at the evaporation side and the enhanced natural air convection at the condensation side.

  2. Development of a higher power cooling system for lithium targets.

    PubMed

    Phoenix, B; Green, S; Scott, M C; Bennett, J R J; Edgecock, T R

    2015-12-01

    The accelerator based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy beam at the University of Birmingham is based around a solid thick lithium target cooled by heavy water. Significant upgrades to Birmingham's Dynamitron accelerator are planned prior to commencing a clinical trial. These upgrades will result in an increase in maximum achievable beam current to at least 3mA. Various upgrades to the target cooling system to cope with this increased power have been investigated. Tests of a phase change coolant known as "binary ice" have been carried out using an induction heater to provide a comparable power input to the Dynamitron beam. The experimental data shows no improvement over chilled water in the submerged jet system, with both systems exhibiting the same heat input to target temperature relation for a given flow rate. The relationship between the cooling circuit pumping rate and the target temperature in the submerged jet system has also been tested. PMID:26254970

  3. Keeping Cool With Solar-Powered Refrigeration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    In the midst of developing battery-free, solar-powered refrigeration and air conditioning systems for habitats in space, David Bergeron, the team leader for NASA's Advanced Refrigerator Technology Team at Johnson Space Center, acknowledged the need for a comparable solar refrigerator that could operate in conjunction with the simple lighting systems already in place on Earth. Bergeron, a 20-year veteran in the aerospace industry, founded the company Solus Refrigeration, Inc., in 1999 to take the patented advanced refrigeration technology he co-developed with his teammate, Johnson engineer Michael Ewert, to commercial markets. Now known as SunDanzer Refrigeration, Inc., Bergeron's company is producing battery-free, photovoltaic (PV) refrigeration systems under license to NASA, and selling them globally.

  4. Superconductivity:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacchetti, N.

    In this paper a short historical account of the discovery of superconductivity and of its gradual development is given. The physical interpretation of its various aspects took about forty years (from 1911 to 1957) to reach a successful description of this phenomenon in terms of a microscopic theory At the very end it seemed that more or less everything could be reasonably interpreted even if modifications and refinements of the original theory were necessary. In 1986 the situation changed abruptly when a cautious but revolutionary paper appeared showing that superconductivity was found in certain ceramic oxides at temperatures above those up to then known. A rush of frantic experimental activity started world-wide and in less than one year it was shown that superconductivity is a much more widespread phenomenon than deemed before and can be found at temperatures well above the liquid air boiling point. The complexity and the number of the substances (mainly ceramic oxides) involved call for a sort of modern alchemy if compounds with the best superconducting properties are to be manufactured. We don't use the word alchemy in a deprecatory sense but just to emphasise that till now nobody can say why these compounds are what they are: superconductors.

  5. Two-Phase Cooling Method Using R134a Refrigerant to Cool Power Electronic Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, Kirk T; Tolbert, Leon M; Ayers, Curtis William; Ozpineci, Burak; Campbell, Jeremy B

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a two-phase cooling method using R134a refrigerant to dissipate the heat energy (loss) generated by power electronics (PE) such as those associated with rectifiers, converters, and inverters for a specific application in hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs). The cooling method involves submerging PE devices in an R134a bath, which limits the junction temperature of PE devices while conserving weight and volume of the heat sink without sacrificing equipment reliability. First, experimental tests that included an extended soak for more than 300 days were performed on a submerged IGBT and gate-controller card to study dielectric characteristics, deterioration effects, and heat flux capability of R134a. Results from these tests illustrate that R134a has high dielectric characteristics, no deterioration on electrical components, and a heat flux of 114 W/cm 2 for the experimental configuration. Second, experimental tests that included simultaneous operation with a mock automotive air-conditioner (A/C) system were performed on the same IGBT and gate controller card. Data extrapolation from these tests determined that a typical automotive A/C system has more than sufficient cooling capacity to cool a typical 30 kW traction inverter. Last, a discussion and simulation of active cooling of the IGBT junction layer with R134a refrigerant is given. This technique will drastically increase the forward current ratings and reliability of the PE device

  6. Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketterson, J. B.; Song, S. N.

    1999-02-01

    Part I. Phenomenological Theories of Suoerconductivity: 1. Introduction; 2. The London-London equation; 3. Pippard's equation; 4. Thermodynamics of type I superconductor; 5. The intermediate state; 6. Surface energy between a normal and a superconducting metal; 7. Quantized vorticity; 8. Type II superconductivity; 9. The Ginzburg-Landau theory; 10. The upper critical field of a type II superconductor; 11. The anisotropic superconductor; 12. Superconductivity in thin slabs; 13. Surface superconductivity; 14. The type II superconductor for H just below Hc2; 15. The Josephson effect; 16. The Josephson lattice in 1D; 17. Vortex structures in layered superconductors; 18. Granular superconductors; the Josephson lattice in 2D and 3D; 19. Wave propagation in Josephson junctions, superlattices and arrays; 20. Flux pinning and flux motion; 21. Time dependent Ginzburg-Landau theory; 22. Fluctuation effects; 23. Ginzburg-Landau theory of an unconventional superfluid; 24. Landau Fermi liquid theory; Part II. The Microscopic Theory of a Uniform Superconductor: 25. The Cooper problem: pairing of two electrons above a filled Fermi sea; 26. The Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory of the superconducting ground state; 27. Elementary excitations; the Bogoliubov-Valatin transformation; 28. Calculation of the thermodynamic properties using the Bogoliubov-Valatin method; 29. Quasiparticle tunneling; 30. Pair tunneling: the microscopic theory of the Josephson effects; 31. Simplified discussion of pairing mechanisms; 32. The effect of Coulomb repulsion on Tc; 33. The two band superconductor; 34. Time dependent perturbations; 35. Non equilibrium superconductivity; Part III. Non Uniform Superconductors: 36. Bogoliubov's self-consistent potential equations; 37. Self consistency conditions and the free energy; 38. Linearized self consistency and the correlation function; 39. Behaviour of the correlation function in the clean and dirty limits; 40. Self consistency condition; 41. Effects involving electron spin; 42. Boundary conditions; 43. The proximity effect at zero field; 44. Proximity effect in a magnetic field; 45. Derivation of the Ginzburg-Landau theory; 46. Gauge invariance; Diamagnetism in the low field limit; 47. The quasi-classical case; 48. The isolated vortex line; 49. Time dependent Bogoliubov equations; 50. The response of a superconductor to an electromagnetic field; 51. The Bogoliubov equations for an unconventional superfluid; 53. Superfluid 3He; 54. Collective modes in normal and superfluid Fermi systems; 55. Green's functions; Appendix A. The occupation number representation; Appendix B. Some calculations involving the BCS wavefunction; Appendix C. The gap as a perturbation through third order; References; Additional reading; List of mathematical and physical symbols; Index.

  7. Specific power of liquid-metal-cooled reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Dobranich, D.

    1987-10-01

    Calculations of the core specific power for conceptual space-based liquid-metal-cooled reactors, based on heat transfer considerations, are presented for three different fuel types: (1) pin-type fuel; (2) cermet fuel; and (3) thermionic fuel. The calculations are based on simple models and are intended to provide preliminary comparative results. The specific power is of interest because it is a measure of the core mass required to produce a given amount of power. Potential problems concerning zero-g critical heat flux and loss-of-coolant accidents are also discussed because these concerns may limit the core specific power. Insufficient experimental data exists to accurately determine the critical heat flux of liquid-metal-cooled reactors in space; however, preliminary calculations indicate that it may be a concern. Results also indicate that the specific power of the pin-type fuels can be increased significantly if the gap between the fuel and the clad is eliminated. Cermet reactors offer the highest specific power because of the excellent thermal conductivity of the core matrix material. However, it may not be possible to take fuel advantage of this characteristic when loss-of-coolant accidents are considered in the final core design. The specific power of the thermionic fuels is dependent mainly on the emitter temperature. The small diameter thermionic fuels have specific powers comparable to those of pin-type fuels. 11 refs., 12 figs, 2 tabs.

  8. Hybrid Cooling for Geothermal Power Plants: Final ARRA Project Report

    SciTech Connect

    Bharathan, D.

    2013-06-01

    Many binary-cycle geothermal plants use air as the heat rejection medium. Usually this is accomplished by using an air-cooled condenser (ACC) system to condense the vapor of the working fluid in the cycle. Many air-cooled plants suffer a loss of production capacity of up to 50% during times of high ambient temperatures. Use of limited amounts of water to supplement the performance of ACCs is investigated. Deluge cooling is found to be one of the least-cost options. Limiting the use of water in such an application to less than one thousand operating hours per year can boost plant output during critical high-demand periods while minimizing water use in binary-cycle geothermal power plants.

  9. Design of the fundamental power coupler and photocathode inserts for the 112MHz superconducting electron gun

    SciTech Connect

    Xin, T.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Belomestnykh, S.; Chang, X.; Rao, T.; Skaritka, J.; Wu, Q.; Wang, E.; Liang, X.

    2011-07-25

    A 112 MHz superconducting quarter-wave resonator electron gun will be used as the injector of the Coherent Electron Cooling (CEC) proof-of-principle experiment at BNL. Furthermore, this electron gun can be the testing cavity for various photocathodes. In this paper, we present the design of the cathode stalks and a Fundamental Power Coupler (FPC) designated to the future experiments. Two types of cathode stalks are discussed. Special shape of the stalk is applied in order to minimize the RF power loss. The location of cathode plane is also optimized to enable the extraction of low emittance beam. The coaxial waveguide structure FPC has the properties of tunable coupling factor and small interference to the electron beam output. The optimization of the coupling factor and the location of the FPC are discussed in detail. Based on the transmission line theory, we designed a half wavelength cathode stalk which significantly brings down the voltage drop between the cavity and the stalk from more than 5.6 kV to 0.1 kV. The transverse field distribution on cathode has been optimized by carefully choosing the position of cathode stalk inside the cavity. Moreover, in order to decrease the RF power loss, a variable diameter design of cathode stalk has been applied. Compared to the uniform shape of stalk, this design gives us much smaller power losses in important locations. Besides that, we also proposed a fundamental power coupler based on the designed beam parameters for the future proof-of-principle CEC experiment. This FPC should give a strong enough coupling which has the Q external range from 1.5e7 to 2.6e8.

  10. SAFE AND FAST QUENCH RECOVERY OF LARGE SUPERCONDUCTING SOLENOIDS COOLED BY FORCED TWO-PHASE HELIUM FLOW.

    SciTech Connect

    JIA,L.X.

    1999-07-12

    The cryogenic characteristics in energy extraction of the four fifteen-meter-diameter superconducting solenoids of the g-2 magnet are reported in this paper. The energy extraction tests at full-current and half-current of its operating value were deliberately carried out for the quench analyses and evaluation of the cryogenic system. The temperature profiles of each coil mandrel and pressure profiles in its helium cooling tube during the energy extraction are discussed. The low peak temperature and pressure as well as the short recovery time indicated the desirable characteristics of the cryogenic system.

  11. Cooling tower fill fouling control in a geothermal power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, F.P.; Ginn, L.D.; McCoy, W.F.; Castanieto, H.

    1998-12-31

    Since its first introduction to the market in the 1970s, cooling tower film fill technology has significantly increased thermal performance and reduced the size of cooling towers. However, the narrow spaces between film fill sheets make them susceptible to fouling. Without proper chemical treatment, deposits can accumulate within the film fill resulting in reduced tower efficiency, increased fouling and plugging of the fill. These phenomena could eventually lead to collapse of the tower structure, This paper describes a new approach to remedy the high efficiency film fill fouling problem in a geothermal power plant. The plant has a long history of fill fouling problems due to a very complex make-up water chemistry and desert-related environmental conditions. In recent years, various biocide and biodispersant treatments have significantly improved fouling control by slowing down tower fill deposition rates. However, no program has been successful in reducing fill weights, especially during the summer months. Within six weeks after starting a new control program, the average weight of the tower fill deposits dropped 22% and thermal performance of the cooling tower increased 20%. The treatment resulted in significant improvements in cooling tower operation and power production efficiency.

  12. Magnetocaloric Materials and the Optimization of Cooling Power Density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wikus, Patrick; Canavan, Edgar; Heine, Sarah Trowbridge; Matsumoto, Koichi; Numazawa, Takenori

    2014-01-01

    The magnetocaloric effect is the thermal response of a material to an external magnetic field. This manuscript focuses on the physics and the properties of materials which are commonly used for magnetic refrigeration at cryogenic temperatures. After a brief overview of the magnetocaloric effect and associated thermodynamics, typical requirements on refrigerants are discussed from a standpoint of cooling power density optimization. Finally, a compilation of the most important properties of several common magnetocaloric materials is presented.

  13. Cooling options for high-average-power laser mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vojna, D.; Slezak, O.; Lucianetti, A.; Mocek, T.

    2015-01-01

    Thermally-induced deformations of steering mirrors reflecting 100 J/10 Hz laser pulses in vacuum have been analyzed. This deformation is caused by the thermal stress arisen due to parasitic absorption of 1 kW square-shaped flat-top laser beam in the dielectric multi-layer structure. Deformation depends on amount of absorbed power and geometry of the mirror as well as on the heat removal scheme. In our calculations, the following percentages of absorption of the incident power have been used: 1%, 0.5% and 0.1%. The absorbed power has been considered to be much higher than that expected in reality to assess the worst case scenario. Rectangular and circular mirrors made of zerodur (low thermal expansion glass) were considered for these simulations. The effect of coating layers on induced deformations has been neglected. Induced deformation of the mirror surface can significantly degrade the quality of the laser beam in the beam delivery system. Therefore, the proper design of the cooling scheme for the mirror in order to minimize the deformations is needed. Three possible cooling schemes of the mirror have been investigated. The first one takes advantage of a radiation cooling of the mirror and a copper heatsink fixed to the rear face of the mirror, the second scheme is based on additional heat conduction provided by flexible copper wires connected to the mirror holder, and the last scheme combines two above mentioned methods.

  14. Analytical design of a superconducting magnetic energy storage for pulsed power peak

    SciTech Connect

    Netter, D.; Leveque, J.; Rezzoug, A.; Caron, J.P.; Sargos, F.M.

    1996-09-01

    A Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage can be used to produce very high pulsed power peak. A superconducting coil is magnetically coupled with another coil linked to the load. During the storage phase, the current is constant. In order to transfer the energy to the load, the authors cause the quench of the superconducting coil. It is very important to know the efficiency of the transfer and how much energy is discharged in the Helium vessel. In this paper, they propose an analytical method which enables to calculate very quickly the electrical parameters of such a device.

  15. Development of a high-Q superconducting microwave resonator for coupling to trapped laser-cooled atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertzberg, Jared; Voigt, Kristen; Kim, Zaeill; Hoffman, Jonathan; Grover, Jeff; Lee, Jongmin; Solano, Pablo; Budoyo, Rangga; Ballard, Cody; Anderson, James; Lobb, Chris; Orozco, Luis; Rolston, Steven; Wellstood, Frederick

    2014-03-01

    We present progress towards a hybrid quantum system in which microwave quanta may be exchanged between a superconducting qubit and laser-trapped atoms via a magnetic dipole interaction. In initial experiments, we seek to couple a thin-film superconducting LC resonator cooled to 20 mK to the 6.835 GHz hyperfine splitting in an ensemble of optically trapped 87Rb atoms. The atoms will be trapped in the evanescent optical field on the waist of a tapered 500-nm-diameter optical fiber which is moved to within a few microns of the inductor in the LC resonator. Rayleigh scattered light from defects in the optical fiber will impinge on the superconducting device. We describe the resulting effects of absorbed photons and how to minimize optical effects as well as results on positioning the resonator relative to the optical fiber within a dilution refrigerator. Work supported by NSF through the Physics Frontier Center at the Joint Quantum Institute, Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Maryland.

  16. 78 FR 35330 - Initial Test Programs for Water-Cooled Nuclear Power Plants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-12

    ... COMMISSION Initial Test Programs for Water-Cooled Nuclear Power Plants AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission... revision to Regulatory Guide (RG), 1.68, ``Initial Test Programs for Water-Cooled Nuclear Power Plants... Initial Test Programs (ITPs) for light water cooled nuclear power plants. ADDRESSES: Please refer...

  17. Ice Thermal Storage Systems for Nuclear Power Plant Supplemental Cooling and Peak Power Shifting

    SciTech Connect

    Haihua Zhao; Hongbin Zhang; Phil Sharpe; Blaise Hamanaka; Wei Yan; WoonSeong Jeong

    2013-03-01

    Availability of cooling water has been one of the major issues for the nuclear power plant site selection. Cooling water issues have frequently disrupted the normal operation at some nuclear power plants during heat waves and long draught. One potential solution is to use ice thermal storage (ITS) systems that reduce cooling water requirements and boost the plant’s thermal efficiency in hot hours. ITS uses cheap off-peak electricity to make ice and uses the ice for supplemental cooling during peak demand time. ITS also provides a way to shift a large amount of electricity from off peak time to peak time. For once-through cooling plants near a limited water body, adding ITS can bring significant economic benefits and avoid forced derating and shutdown during extremely hot weather. For the new plants using dry cooling towers, adding the ITS systems can effectively reduce the efficiency loss during hot weather so that new plants could be considered in regions lack of cooling water. This paper will review light water reactor cooling issues and present the feasibility study results.

  18. High power density reactors based on direct cooled particle beds

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, J.R.; Horn, F.L.

    1985-01-01

    Reactors based on direct cooled HTGR type particle fuel are described. The small diameter particle fuel is packed between concentric porous cylinders to make annular fuel elements, with the inlet coolant gas flowing inwards. Hot exit gas flows out long the central channel of each element. Because of the very large heat transfer area in the packed beds, power densities in particle bed reactors (PBR's) are extremely high resulting in compact, lightweight systems. Coolant exit temperatures are high, because of the ceramic fuel temperature capabilities, and the reactors can be ramped to full power and temperature very rapidly. PBR systems can generate very high burst power levels using open cycle hydrogen coolant, or high continuous powers using closed cycle helium coolant. PBR technology is described and development requirements assessed. 12 figs.

  19. A gas-cooled reactor surface power system

    SciTech Connect

    Lipinski, R.J.; Wright, S.A.; Lenard, R.X.; Harms, G.A.

    1999-01-01

    A human outpost on Mars requires plentiful power to assure survival of the astronauts. Anywhere from 50 to 500 kW of electric power (kWe) will be needed, depending on the number of astronauts, level of scientific activity, and life-cycle closure desired. This paper describes a 250-kWe power system based on a gas-cooled nuclear reactor with a recuperated closed Brayton cycle conversion system. The design draws upon the extensive data and engineering experience developed under the various high-temperature gas cooled reactor programs and under the SP-100 program. The reactor core is similar in power and size to the research reactors found on numerous university campuses. The fuel is uranium nitride clad in Nb1{percent}Zr, which has been extensively tested under the SP-100 program. The fuel rods are arranged in a hexagonal array within a BeO block. The BeO softens the spectrum, allowing better use of the fuel and stabilizing the geometry against deformation during impact or other loadings. The system has a negative temperature feedback coefficient so that the power level will automatically follow a variable load without the need for continuous adjustment of control elements. Waste heat is removed by an air-cooled heat exchanger using cold Martian air. The amount of radioactivity in the reactor at launch is very small (less than a Curie, and about equal to a truckload of uranium ore). The system will need to be engineered so that criticality can not occur for any launch accident. This system is also adaptable for electric propulsion or life-support during transit to and from Mars. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. A gas-cooled reactor surface power system

    SciTech Connect

    Lipinski, Ronald J.; Wright, Steven A.; Lenard, Roger X.; Harms, Gary A.

    1999-01-22

    A human outpost on Mars requires plentiful power to assure survival of the astronauts. Anywhere from 50 to 500 kW of electric power (kWe) will be needed, depending on the number of astronauts, level of scientific activity, and life-cycle closure desired. This paper describes a 250-kWe power system based on a gas-cooled nuclear reactor with a recuperated closed Brayton cycle conversion system. The design draws upon the extensive data and engineering experience developed under the various high-temperature gas cooled reactor programs and under the SP-100 program. The reactor core is similar in power and size to the research reactors found on numerous university campuses. The fuel is uranium nitride clad in Nb1%Zr, which has been extensively tested under the SP-100 program. The fuel rods are arranged in a hexagonal array within a BeO block. The BeO softens the spectrum, allowing better use of the fuel and stabilizing the geometry against deformation during impact or other loadings. The system has a negative temperature feedback coefficient so that the power level will automatically follow a variable load without the need for continuous adjustment of control elements. Waste heat is removed by an air-cooled heat exchanger using cold Martian air. The amount of radioactivity in the reactor at launch is very small (less than a Curie, and about equal to a truckload of uranium ore). The system will need to be engineered so that criticality can not occur for any launch accident. This system is also adaptable for electric propulsion or life-support during transit to and from Mars.

  1. A Gas-Cooled Reactor Surface Power System

    SciTech Connect

    Harms, G.A.; Lenard, R.X.; Lipinski, R.J.; Wright, S.A.

    1998-11-09

    A human outpost on Mars requires plentiful power to assure survival of the astronauts. Anywhere from 50 to 500 kW of electric power (kWe) will be needed, depending on the number of astronauts, level of scientific activity, and life- cycle closure desired. This paper describes a 250-kWe power system based on a gas-cooled nuclear reactor with a recuperated closed Brayton cycle conversion system. The design draws upon the extensive data and engineering experience developed under the various high-temperature gas cooled reactor programs and under the SP-100 program. The reactor core is similar in power and size to the research reactors found on numerous university campuses. The fuel is uranium nitide clad in Nb 1 %Zr, which has been extensively tested under the SP-I 00 program The fiel rods are arranged in a hexagonal array within a BeO block. The BeO softens the spectrum, allowing better use of the fbel and stabilizing the geometty against deformation during impact or other loadings. The system has a negative temperature feedback coefficient so that the power level will automatically follow a variable load without the need for continuous adjustment of control elements. Waste heat is removed by an air-cooled heat exchanger using cold Martian air. The amount of radioactivity in the reactor at launch is very small (less than a Curie, and about equal to a truckload of uranium ore). The system will need to be engineered so that criticality cannot occur for any launch accident. This system is also adaptable for electric propulsion or life-support during transit to and from Mars.

  2. Solar-powered Rankine heat pump for heating and cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rousseau, J.

    1978-01-01

    The design, operation and performance of a familyy of solar heating and cooling systems are discussed. The systems feature a reversible heat pump operating with R-11 as the working fluid and using a motor-driven centrifugal compressor. In the cooling mode, solar energy provides the heat source for a Rankine power loop. The system is operational with heat source temperatures ranging from 155 to 220 F; the estimated coefficient of performance is 0.7. In the heating mode, the vapor-cycle heat pump processes solar energy collected at low temperatures (40 to 80 F). The speed of the compressor can be adjusted so that the heat pump capacity matches the load, allowing a seasonal coefficient of performance of about 8 to be attained.

  3. The power sources of cooling-flow filaments and LINERs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabra, Bassem Mohamad

    The main aim of this dissertation is to determine the nature of the power sources in low-ionization emission-line nebulae. This analysis makes use of optical spectra of the cooling-flow filaments around NGC 1275 and NGC 4486, the central elliptical galaxies in the Perseus and Virgo clusters, respectively, and optical and ultraviolet spectra of the low-ionization nuclear emission-line regions (LINERs) in the active galaxies NGC 3507 and NGC 4486. Spectra of the filaments of NGC 1275 show strong low-ionization forbidden lines and hydrogen Balmer lines. Strong forbidden lines indicate high heating per ionization. These low-ionization forbidden lines arise in a zone of partially ionized hydrogen. Utilizing various emission line diagnostics, I find that shocks and stellar photoionization have difficulty in predicting the line ratios observed in the filaments around NGC 1275. An energy source that is highly viable is the cooling intracluster medium (ICM). However, the ionizing continuum provided by the ICM is harder than needed; it leads to He IIlambda4686 higher than what is actually observed. Undertaking photoionization simulations, I discover that attenuating the continuum from the cooling ICM through an ionized absorber satisfactorily reproduces the observed line ratios. Heating and ionization by reconnection of the intracluster magnetic field remains a potentially viable alternative. The NGC 4486 cooling-flow nebulae are in a higher ionization state than those of the NGC 1275 clouds, and are best described by the "mixing-layers" model where the filaments are irradiated by a turbulent mixing layer that forms at the interface of the cold gas and the hotter ICM. Analysis based on line-ratio diagrams was also used for the LINERs. Ultraviolet spectroscopy with HST was very important in establishing that the nucleus of NGC 3507 is powered by a fading starburst, while that of NGC 4486 is photoionized by the AGN.

  4. A coaxial HOM coupler for a superconducting RF cavity and its low-power measurement results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, An; Tang, Ya-Zhe; Zhang, Li-Ping; Li, Ying-Min; Han-Sung, Kim

    2011-03-01

    A resonant buildup of beam-induced fields in a superconducting radio frequency (RF) cavity may make a beam unstable or a superconducting RF cavity quench. Higher-order mode (HOM) couplers are used for damping higher-order modes to avoid such a resonant buildup. A coaxial HOM coupler based on the TTF (TESLA Test Facility) HOM coupler has been designed for the superconducting RF cavities at the Proton Engineering Frontier Project (PEFP) in order to overcome notch frequency shift and feed-through tip melting issues. In order to confirm the HOM coupler design and finalize its structural dimensions, two prototype HOM couplers have been fabricated and tested. Low-power testing and measurement of the HOM couplers has shown that the HOM coupler has good filter properties and can fully meet the damping requirements of the PEFP low-beta superconducting RF linac.

  5. Superconducting Tunnel Junction Refrigerators for Sub-Kelvin Cooling of Electrons, Phonons, and Arbitrary, User-Supplied Payloads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowell, Peter Joseph

    Modern science often requires measurements at sub-Kelvin temperatures. Temperatures of 300 mK can be reached by using liquid 3He, but reaching lower temperatures requires the use of adiabatic demagnetization and dilution refrigerators which are complex, large, and costly. Normal-metalInsulatorSuperconductor (NIS) tunnel junctions provide an alternative refrigeration method that is simple to use, compact, and provides continuous cooling power that has the potential to expand the accessibility of these sub-Kelvin temperatures. When properly biased, the electron system in the normal metal of an NIS junction is cooled since the hottest electrons preferentially tunnel from the normal metal to the superconductor, transferring heat in the process. When the normal metal is extended onto a thermally isolated membrane, the cold electrons cool the phonons in the membrane through electron-phonon coupling. In previous work, NIS junctions have been used to cool detectors and bulk objects that were integrated with the membrane, but could not be considered a general-purpose refrigerator since they could not cool arbitrary objects. The goal of this work has been to demonstrate a general-purpose NIS refrigerator to which a user can attach arbitrary bulk objects. First, we discuss NIS refrigeration and then develop a model to predict phonon cooling. We fabricated and tested NIS refrigerators capable of cooling bulk objects and used the model to explain the results. The devices were able to cool phonons from 300 mK to 154 mK with 100 pW of cooling power at 200 mK. With these devices, we were able to cool a 2 cm3 piece of copper from 290 mK to 256 mK with 700 pW of cooling power at 290 mK. This demonstration marks the emergence of NIS refrigerators as a true, general-purpose refrigerator since users can attach arbitrary objects. Measurements of Andreev reflections in the devices and next-generation refrigerators that cool electrons from 100 mK to below 50 mK are also presented.

  6. Low-Cost Superconducting Wire for Wind Generators: High Performance, Low Cost Superconducting Wires and Coils for High Power Wind Generators

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    REACT Project: The University of Houston will develop a low-cost, high-current superconducting wire that could be used in high-power wind generators. Superconducting wire currently transports 600 times more electric current than a similarly sized copper wire, but is significantly more expensive. The University of Houston’s innovation is based on engineering nanoscale defects in the superconducting film. This could quadruple the current relative to today’s superconducting wires, supporting the same amount of current using 25% of the material. This would make wind generators lighter, more powerful and more efficient. The design could result in a several-fold reduction in wire costs and enable their commercial viability of high-power wind generators for use in offshore applications.

  7. RF design and processing of a power coupler for third harmonic superconducting cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jianjian; Harms, Elvin; Kubicki, Tom; Nicklaus, Dennis; Olis, Daniel; Prieto, Peter; Reid, John; Solyak, Nikolay; Wong, Thomas; /IIT, Chicago

    2007-06-01

    The FLASH user facility providing free electron laser radiation is built based on the TTF project at DESY. Fermilab has the responsibility for the design and processing of a third harmonic, 3.9 GHz, superconducting cavity which is powered via a coaxial power coupler. Six power couplers have been manufactured at CPI after successful design of the power coupler including RF simulation, multipacting calculation, and thermal analysis. The power couplers are being tested and processed with high pulsed power in an elaborate test stand at Fermilab now. This paper presents the RF design and processing work of the power coupler.

  8. Microgravity Spray Cooling Research for High Powered Laser Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zivich, Chad P.

    2004-01-01

    An extremely powerful laser is being developed at Goddard Space Flight Center for use on a satellite. This laser has several potential applications. One application is to use it for upper atmosphere weather research. In this case, the laser would reflect off aerosols in the upper atmosphere and bounce back to the satellite, where the aerosol velocities could be calculated and thus the upper atmosphere weather patterns could be monitored. A second application would be for the US. Air Force, which wants to use the laser strategically as a weapon for satellite defense. The Air Force fears that in the coming years as more and more nations gain limited space capabilities that American satellites may become targets, and the laser could protect the satellites. Regardless of the ultimate application, however, a critical step along the way to putting the laser in space is finding a way to efficiently cool it. While operating the laser becomes very hot and must be cooled to prevent overheating. On earth, this is accomplished by simply running cool tap water over the laser to keep it cool. But on a satellite, this is too inefficient. This would require too much water mass to be practical. Instead, we are investigating spray cooling as a means to cool the laser in microgravity. Spray cooling requires much less volume of fluid, and thus could be suitable for use on a satellite. We have inherited a 2.2 second Drop Tower rig to conduct our research with. In our experiments, water is pressurized with a compressed air tank and sprayed through a nozzle onto our test plate. We can vary the pressure applied to the water and the temperature of the plate before an experiment trial. The whole process takes place in simulated microgravity in the 2.2 second Drop Tower, and a high speed video camera records the spray as it hits the plate. We have made much progress in the past few weeks on these experiments. The rig originally did not have the capability to heat the test plate, but I did some heat transfer calculations and picked out a heater to order for the rig. I learned QBasic programming language to change the operating code for our drops, allowing us to rapidly cycle the spray nozzle open and closed to study the effects. We have derived an equation for flow rate vs. pressure for our experiment. We have recorded several videos of drops at different pressures, some with heated test plate and some without, and have noticed substantial differences in the liquid behavior. I have also changed the computer program to write a file with temperature vs. time profiles for the test plate, and once the necessary thermocouple comes in (it was ordered last week), we will have temperature profiles to accompany the videos. Once we have these temperature profiles to go with the videos, we will be able to see how the temperature is affected by the spray at different pressures, and how the spray changes its behavior once as the plate changes from hot to cool. With quantitative temperature data, we can then mathematically model the heat transfer from the plate to the cooling spray. Finally, we can look at the differences between trials in microgravity and those in normal earth gravity.

  9. Cold side thermal energy storage system for improved operation of air cooled power plants

    E-print Network

    Williams, Daniel David

    2012-01-01

    Air cooled power plants experience significant performance fluctuations as plant cooling capacity reduces due to higher daytime temperature than nighttime temperature. The purpose of this thesis is to simulate the detailed ...

  10. Power Conversion Study for High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Oh; Richard Moore; Robert Barner

    2005-05-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is investigating a Brayton cycle efficiency improvement on a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) as part of Generation-IV nuclear engineering research initiative. There are some technical issues to be resolved before the selection of the final design of the high temperature gascooled reactor, called as a Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), which is supposed to be built at the INEEL by year 2017. The technical issues are the selection of the working fluid, direct vs. indirect cycle, power cycle type, the optimized design in terms of a number of intercoolers, and others. In this paper, we investigated a number of working fluids for the power conversion loop, direct versus indirect cycle, the effect of intercoolers, and other thermal hydraulics issues. However, in this paper, we present part of the results we have obtained. HYSYS computer code was used along with a computer model developed using Visual Basic computer language.

  11. The Cost of Helium Refrigerators and Coolers for SuperconductingDevices as a Function of Cooling at 4 K

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael A.

    2007-08-27

    This paper is an update of papers written in 1991 and in1997 by Rod Byrns and this author concerning estimating the cost ofrefrigeration for superconducting magnets and cavities. The actual costsof helium refrigerators and coolers (escalated to 2007 dollars) areplotted and compared to a correlation function. A correlation functionbetween cost and refrigeration at 4.5 K is given. The capital cost oflarger refrigerators (greater than 10 W at 4.5 K) is plotted as afunction of 4.5-K cooling. The cost of small coolers is plotted as afunction of refrigeration available at 4.2 K. A correlation function forestimating efficiency (percent of Carnot) of both types of refrigeratorsis also given.

  12. Thermal analysis of the forced cooled conductor for the TF (toroidal field) superconducting coils in the TIBER II ETR design

    SciTech Connect

    Kerns, J.A.; Slack, D.S.; Miller, J.R.

    1987-06-11

    The Tokamak Ignition/Burn Experimental Reactor (TIBER) is being designed to provide nuclear testing capabilities for first wall and blanket design concepts. The baseline design for TIBER II is to provide steady-state nuclear burn capabilities. These objectives must be met using reactor relevant components, such as state-of-the-art current drive schemes coupled with superconducting toroidal field (TF) and poloidal field (PF) coils. The design is also constrained to be cost effective, which forces the machine to be as small as possible. This last constraint limits the nuclear shielding in TIBER. Therefore, the TF coils will have a high nuclear heat load of up to 4.5 kW per coil. The cooling scheme and the thermal analysis for this design are presented.

  13. A role for high frequency superconducting devices in free space power transmission systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christian, Jose L., Jr.; Cull, Ronald C.

    1988-01-01

    Major advances in space power technology are being made in photovoltaic, solar thermal, and nuclear systems. Despite these advances, the power systems required by the energy and power intensive mission of the future will be massive due to the large collecting surfaces, large thermal management systems, and heavy shielding. Reducing this mass on board the space vehicle can result in significant benefits because of the high cost of transporting and moving mass about in space. An approach to this problem is beaming the power from a point where the massiveness of the power plant is not such a major concern. The viability of such an approach was already investigated. Efficient microwave power beam transmission at 2.45 GHz was demonstrated over short range. Higher frequencies are desired for efficient transmission over several hundred or thousand kilometers in space. Superconducting DC-RF conversion as well as RF-DC conversion offers exciting possibilities. Multivoltage power conditioning for multicavity high power RF tubes could be eliminated since only low voltages are required for Josephson junctions. Small, high efficiency receivers may be possible using the reverse Josephson effects. A conceptual receiving antenna design using superconducting devices to determine possible system operating efficiency is assessed. If realized, these preliminary assessments indicate a role for superconducting devices in millimeter and submillimeter free space power transmission systems.

  14. THERMAL STRESS CALCULATIONS FOR HEATPIPE-COOLED REACTOR POWER SYSTEMS.

    SciTech Connect

    Kapernick, R. J.; Guffee, R. M.

    2001-01-01

    A heatpipe-cooled fast reactor concept has been under development at Los Alamos National Laboratory for the past several years, to be used as a power source for nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) or as a planetary surface power system. The reactor core consists of an array of modules that are held together by a core lateral restraint system. Each module comprises a single heatpipe surrounded by 3-6 clad fuel pins. As part of the design development and performance assessment activities for these reactors, specialized methods and models have been developed to perform thermal and stress analyses of the core modules. The methods have been automated so that trade studies can be readily performed, looking at design options such as module size, heatpipe and clad thickness, use of sleeves to contain the fuel, material type, etc. This paper describes the methods and models that have been developed, and presents thermal and stress analysis results for a Mars surface power system and a NEP power source.

  15. Non-Cooled Power System for Venus Lander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salazar, Denise; Landis, Geoffrey A.; Colozza, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    The Planetary Science Decadal Survey of 2013-2022 stated that the exploration of Venus is of significant interest. Studying the seismic activity of the planet is of particular importance because the findings can be compared to the seismic activity of Earth. Further, the geological and atmospheric properties of Venus will shed light into the past and future of Earth. This paper presents a radioisotope power system (RPS) design for a small low-power Venus lander. The feasibility of the new power system is then compared to that of primary batteries. A requirement for the power source system is to avoid moving parts in order to not interfere with the primary objective of the mission - to collect data about the seismic activity of Venus using a seismometer. The target mission duration of the lander is 117 days, a significant leap from Venera 13, the longest-lived lander on the surface of Venus, which survived for 2 hours. One major assumption for this mission design is that the power source system will not provide cooling to the other components of the lander. This assumption is based on high-temperature electronics technology that will enable the electronics and components of the lander to operate at Venus surface temperature. For the proposed RPS, a customized General Purpose Heat Source Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (GPHSRTG) is designed and analyzed. The GPHS-RTG is chosen primarily because it has no moving parts and it is capable of operating for long duration missions on the order of years. This power system is modeled as a spherical structure for a fundamental thermal analysis. The total mass and electrical output of the system are calculated to be 24 kilograms and 26 Watts, respectively. An alternative design for a battery-based power system uses Sodium Sulfur batteries. To deliver a similar electrical output for 117 days, the battery mass is calculated to be 234 kilograms. Reducing mission duration or power required will reduce the required battery mass. Finally, the advantages and disadvantages of both power systems with regard to science return, risk, and cost are briefly compared. The design of the radioisotope power system is considerably riskier because it is novel and would require additional years of further refinement, manufacturing, safety analysis, and testing that the primary batteries do not need. However, the lifetime of the radioisotope power system makes its science return more promising.

  16. One-phase dual converter for two quadrant power control of superconducting magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Ehsani, M.; Kustom, R.I.; Boom, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents the results of theoretical and experimental development of a new dc-ac-dc converter for superconducting magnet power supplies. The basic operating principles of the circuit are described followed by a theoretical treatment of the dynamics and control of the system. The successful results of the first experimental operation and control of such a circuit are presented and discussed.

  17. Study on Stability of Superconducting Coil Cooled by Subcooled He I and He II at Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohya, M.; Shirai, Y.; Shiotsu, M.; Imagawa, S.

    2004-06-01

    Stability tests were performed of small test coils using two kinds of superconducting wire wound respectively on a FRP or a SUS bobbin. One wire is 0.50 mm-diameter NbTi composite wire with the copper ratio of 1.3, and with no insulation film. The other wire is a 0.80 mm-diameter NbTi composite wire with the copper ratio of 6.5, and with the PVF insulation. The stability limit was determined as the maximum direct current that could be applied to the test coil without spreading of a normal zone after giving a pulse current to a small heater located at a center part of the test coil winding. The stability limits were obtained for magnetic fields from 1.1 T to 7.6 T and bulk liquid temperatures from 1.6 K to 4.2 K at atmospheric pressure. The critical current at the stability limit under a constant magnetic field increased slightly with the decrease of liquid He temperature from 4.2 K down to near the ?-temperature. The stability limit increased dramatically by shifting to He II cooling from He I cooling. The degradation of heat transfer in the Kapitza conductance regime was observed on the wire with insulation film, and was not seen on the wire with no insulation film.

  18. Superconducting RF Cavity Measurement Formulae for an Exponential Decayed Pulse Incident Power

    SciTech Connect

    Sun An; Haipeng Wang

    2005-07-10

    Experimental method for evaluating a Superconducting RF (SRF) cavity performance is through low power and high power measurements without a beam load. The equations for square incident power pulse are the most popular formulae for the pulsed mode measurements. In practice, incident power may not be exactly square pulse. To understand cavity behavior and performance more accurately, in this paper, the SRF cavity's measurement equations for an exponential-decayed pulsed incident power are developed from a series equivalent circuit. The analytical result can be directly compared with the experimental data of SNS cavities obtained from the Cryomodule Test Facility (CMTF) at Jefferson Lab.

  19. At the Frontiers of Science Superconductivity and Its Electric Power Applications

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-01

    Electricity - it is one of our modern scientific miracles, and today we could not imagine living without it. But what if we could make it better? Superconductivity has the potential to do just that, by improving the capacity, quality, and reliability of products that use electricity. There has been a great deal of discussion about superconductivity in the last 10 years, but what exactly is it? In this document you will learn the definition of superconductivity, how it works, and its present and potential uses. You will also get an inside look at the challenges that scientists around the world are working to overcome in order to fully incorporate superconductivity in our everyday lives. When you turn on a lamp at home, the electric current flows - is conducted - through a wire made of copper or aluminum. Along the way, this wire resists the flow of electricity, and this resistance is something very much like friction. The resistance causes some of the electricity to be lost in the form of heat. Which means that every time you use an appliance, from a radio to a generator, you are not getting 100% of the energy that flows through it; some of it is wasted by the conductor. Superconductivity - the ability of a material to conduct electricity without losses to resistance - is a physical property inherent to a variety of metals and ceramics, much the same way magnetism is present in a variety of materials. It is dependent on temperature; that is, a material will not exhibit superconductivity until it is sufficiently cold. The necessary temperatures to induce superconductivity are well below what we might commonly consider 'cold.' They are so low, in fact, that they are measured using the Kelvin temperature scale (K). Absolute zero, or 0 K, is equal to -459 Fahrenheit (F). It is defined as the lowest temperature theoretically possible, or the complete absence of heat. In 1911, working in a laboratory in Holland, the Dutch scientist Heike Kamerlingh Onnes cooled mercury to 4 K (-452 F), almost absolute zero; at this temperature, the motion of individual atoms nearly ceased. Scientists were unsure what effect this extremely low temperature would have on resistance; most suspected resistance would increase as atomic motion slowed. However, during routine measurements of the mercury, it appeared that there was no electrical resistance. Onnes assumed his equipment was broken, but days later he confirmed that, near absolute zero, mercury did completely lose electrical resistance. Onnes had discovered superconductivity.

  20. Commissioning tests of the Bonneville Power Administration 30 MJ superconducting magnetic energy storage unit

    SciTech Connect

    Boenig, H.J.; Hauer, J.F.

    1984-01-01

    A 30 MJ (8.4 kWh) Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) unit with a 10 MW converter has been installed and commissioned at the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) substation in Tacoma, Washington. This is the first large-scale application in the US of superconductivity in an electric utility system.The unit, which is capable of absorbing and releasing up to 10 MJ of energy at a frequency of 0.35 Hz, was designed to damp the dominant power swing mode of the Pacific AC Intertie. This paper describes the electrical characteristics of the magnetic energy storage unit, its modes of operation, results of device tests, means for controlling real and reactive power, and some initial power system response tests. A short summary of the operating history of the unit over the first eleven months is also presented.

  1. Commissioning tests of the bonneville power administration 30 MJ Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage unit

    SciTech Connect

    Boenig, M.J.; Hauer, J.F.

    1985-02-01

    A 30 MJ (8.4 kWh) Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) unit with a 10 MW converter has been installed and commissioned at the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) substation in Tacoma, Washington. This is the first large-scale application in the US of superconductivity in an electric utility system. The unit, which is capable of absorbing and releasing up to 10 MJ of energy at a frequency of 0.35 Hz, was designed to damp the dominant power swing mode of the Pacific AC Intertie. This paper describes the electrical characteristics of the magnetic energy storage unit, its modes of operation, results of device tests, means for controlling real and reactive power, and some initial power system response tests. A short summary of the operating history of the unit over the first eleven months is also presented.

  2. One Hundred Years of Superconductivity: Superconducting Materials and Electric Power Applications (465th Brookhaven Lecture)

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Qiang

    2011-01-19

    It was one hundred years ago this year that Dutch physicist Heike Kamerlingh Onnes discovered that by lowering the temperature of mercury to a blistering cold four degrees Kelvin, the metal became a “superconductor” and allowed electricity to flow through it with very little, if any, resistance. Fast forward one hundred years: now we are looking for new ways to store and transport energy — energy we can use to get from one place to another, stay comfortable when the weather outside is not, grow enough healthy food to feed the population, and sustain our ways of life — all while trying to protect the planet. Superconductors, with their potential to be über-energy efficient, are likely to play a crucial role in solving these challenges, and researchers at Brookhaven Lab are figuring out just how it can be done. Li will begin his talk with an overview of the first one hundred years of exploring superconductivity. He will also discuss the challenges of developing new superconductors and improving their performance for real-world energy applications, and then explain how basic science researchers at BNL are addressing those challenges.

  3. RF Conditioning and Testing of Fundamental Power Couplers for SNS Superconducting Cavity Production

    SciTech Connect

    M. Stirbet; G.K. Davis; M. A. Drury; C. Grenoble; J. Henry; G. Myneni; T. Powers; K. Wilson; M. Wiseman; I.E. Campisi; Y.W. Kang; D. Stout

    2005-05-16

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) makes use of 33 medium beta (0.61) and 48 high beta (0.81) superconducting cavities. Each cavity is equipped with a fundamental power coupler, which should withstand the full klystron power of 550 kW in full reflection for the duration of an RF pulse of 1.3 msec at 60 Hz repetition rate. Before assembly to a superconducting cavity, the vacuum components of the coupler are submitted to acceptance procedures consisting of preliminary quality assessments, cleaning and clean room assembly, vacuum leak checks and baking under vacuum, followed by conditioning and RF high power testing. Similar acceptance procedures (except clean room assembly and baking) were applied for the airside components of the coupler. All 81 fundamental power couplers for SNS superconducting cavity production have been RF power tested at JLAB Newport News and, beginning in April 2004 at SNS Oak Ridge. This paper gives details of coupler processing and RF high power-assessed performances.

  4. Forced cooling of underground electric power transmission lines : design manual

    E-print Network

    Brown, Jay A.

    1978-01-01

    The methodology utilized for the design of a forced-cooled pipe-type underground transmission system is presented. The material is divided into three major parts: (1) The Forced-cooled Pipe-Type Underground Transmission ...

  5. Modeling Single-Phase and Boiling Liquid Jet Impingement Cooling in Power Electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Narumanchi, S. V. J.; Hassani, V.; Bharathan, D.

    2005-12-01

    Jet impingement has been an attractive cooling option in a number of industries over the past few decades. Over the past 15 years, jet impingement has been explored as a cooling option in microelectronics. Recently, interest has been expressed by the automotive industry in exploring jet impingement for cooling power electronics components. This technical report explores, from a modeling perspective, both single-phase and boiling jet impingement cooling in power electronics, primarily from a heat transfer viewpoint. The discussion is from the viewpoint of the cooling of IGBTs (insulated-gate bipolar transistors), which are found in hybrid automobile inverters.

  6. Above: Power deposition in the superconducting magnets and the tungsten-carbide + water shield inside them, according to a

    E-print Network

    McDonald, Kirk

    Above: Power deposition in the superconducting magnets and the tungsten-carbide + water shield Magnet shield WC beads + water Shield must dissipate 2.4 MW Superconducting magnets tungsten-carbide (WC) beads + water tungsten-carbide beads + water proton beam and mercury jet mercury pool proton dump beam

  7. The Use of a Solid State Analog Television Transmitter as a Superconducting Electron Gun Power Amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    J.G. Kulpin, K.J. Kleman, R.A. Legg

    2012-07-01

    A solid state analog television transmitter designed for 200 MHz operation is being commissioned as a radio frequency power amplifier on the Wisconsin superconducting electron gun cavity. The amplifier consists of three separate radio frequency power combiner cabinets and one monitor and control cabinet. The transmitter employs rugged field effect transistors built into one kilowatt drawers that are individually hot swappable at maximum continuous power output. The total combined power of the transmitter system is 33 kW at 200 MHz, output through a standard coaxial transmission line. A low level radio frequency system is employed to digitally synthesize the 200 MHz signal and precisely control amplitude and phase.

  8. Design report for an indirectly cooled 3-m diameter superconducting solenoid for the Fermilab Collider Detector Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Fast, R.; Grimson, J.; Kephart, R.

    1982-10-01

    The Fermilab Collider Detector Facility (CDF) is a large detector system designed to study anti pp collisions at very high center of mass energies. The central detector for the CDF shown employs a large axial magnetic field volume instrumented with a central tracking chamber composed of multiple layers of cylindrical drift chambers and a pair of intermediate tracking chambers. The purpose of this system is to determine the trajectories, sign of electric charge, and momenta of charged particles produced with polar angles between 10 and 170 degrees. The magnetic field volume required for tracking is approximately 3.5 m long an 3 m in diameter. To provide the desired ..delta..p/sub T/p/sub T/ less than or equal to 1.5% at 50 GeV/c using drift chambers with approx. 200..mu.. resolution the field inside this volume should be 1.5 T. The field should be as uniform as is practical to simplify both track finding and the reconstruction of particle trajectories with the drift chambers. Such a field can be produced by a cylindrical current sheet solenoid with a uniform current density of 1.2 x 10/sup 6/ A/m (1200 A/mm) surrounded by an iron return yoke. For practical coils and return yokes, both central electromagnetic and central hadronic calorimetry must be located outside the coil of the magnet. This geometry requires that the coil and the cryostat be thin both in physical thickness and in radiation and absorption lengths. This dual requirement of high linear current density and minimal coil thickness can only be satisfied using superconducting technology. In this report we describe the design for an indirectly cooled superconducting solenoid to meet the requirements of the Fermilab CDF. The components of the magnet system are discussed in the following chapters, with a summary of parameters listed in Appendix A.

  9. Noise and Bandwidth Measurements of Diffusion-Cooled Nb Hot-Electron Bolometer Mixers at Frequencies Above the Superconductive Energy Gap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyss, R. A.; Karasik, B. S.; McGrath, W. R.; Bumble, B.; LeDuc, H.

    1999-01-01

    Diffusion-cooled Nb hot-electron bolometer (HEB) mixers have the potential to simultaneously achieve high intermediate frequency (IF) bandwidths and low mixer noise temperatures for operation at THz frequencies (above the superconductive gap energy). We have measured the IF signal bandwidth at 630 GHz of Nb devices with lengths L = 0.3, 0.2, and 0.1 micrometer in a quasioptical mixer configuration employing twin-slot antennas. The 3-dB EF bandwidth increased from 1.2 GHz for the 0.3 gm long device to 9.2 GHz for the 0.1 gm long device. These results demonstrate the expected 1/L squared dependence of the IF bandwidth at submillimeter wave frequencies for the first time, as well as the largest EF bandwidth obtained to date. For the 0.1 gm device, which had the largest bandwidth, the double sideband (DSB) noise temperature of the receiver was 320-470 K at 630 GHz with an absorbed LO power of 35 nW, estimated using the isothermal method. A version of this mixer with the antenna length scaled for operation at 2.5 THz has also been tested. A DSB receiver noise temperature of 1800 plus or minus 100 K was achieved, which is about 1,000 K lower than our previously reported results. These results demonstrate that large EF bandwidth and low-noise operation of a diffusion-cooled HEB mixer is possible at THz frequencies with the same device geometry.

  10. USE of mine pool water for power plant cooling.

    SciTech Connect

    Veil, J. A.; Kupar, J. M .; Puder, M. G.

    2006-11-27

    Water and energy production issues intersect in numerous ways. Water is produced along with oil and gas, water runs off of or accumulates in coal mines, and water is needed to operate steam electric power plants and hydropower generating facilities. However, water and energy are often not in the proper balance. For example, even if water is available in sufficient quantities, it may not have the physical and chemical characteristics suitable for energy or other uses. This report provides preliminary information about an opportunity to reuse an overabundant water source--ground water accumulated in underground coal mines--for cooling and process water in electric generating facilities. The report was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), which has implemented a water/energy research program (Feeley and Ramezan 2003). Among the topics studied under that program is the availability and use of ''non-traditional sources'' of water for use at power plants. This report supports NETL's water/energy research program.

  11. Pathogenic amoebae in power-plant cooling lakes. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Tyndall, R.L.; Willaert, E.; Stevens, A.R.

    1981-06-01

    Cooling waters and associated algae and sediments from four northern and four southern/western electric power plants were tested for the presence of pathogenic amoebae. Unheated control waters and algae/sediments from four northern and five southern/western sites were also tested. When comparing results from the test versus control sites, a significantly higher proportion (P less than or equal to 0.05) of the samples from the test sites were positive for thermophilic amoeba, thermophilic Naegleria and pathogenic Naegleria. The difference in number of samples positive for thermophilic Naegleria between heated and unheated waters, however, was attributable predominantly to the northern waters and algae/sediments. While two of four northern test sites yielded pathogenic Naegleria, seven of the eight isolates were obtained from one site. Seasonality effects relative to the isolation of the pathogen were also noted at this site. One pathogen was isolated from a southwestern test site. Pathogens were not isolated from any control sites. Some of the pathogenic isolates were analyzed serologically and classified as pathogenic Naegleria fowleri. Salinity, pH, conductivity, and bacteriological profiles did not obviously correlate with the presence or absence of pathogenic Naegleria. While thermal addition was significantly associated with the presence of thermophilic Naegleria (P less than or equal to 0.05), the data implicate other as yet undefined parameters associated with the presence of the pathogenic thermophile. Until further delineation of these parameters is effected, generalizations cannot be made concerning the effect of thermal impact on the growth of pathogenic amoeba in a particular cooling system.

  12. 14 CFR 23.1047 - Cooling test procedures for reciprocating engine powered airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... engine powered airplanes. 23.1047 Section 23.1047 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Cooling § 23.1047 Cooling test procedures for reciprocating engine powered airplanes. Compliance with § 23.1041 must be shown for the climb (or, for multiengine airplanes...

  13. 14 CFR 23.1045 - Cooling test procedures for turbine engine powered airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... powered airplanes. 23.1045 Section 23.1045 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Cooling § 23.1045 Cooling test procedures for turbine engine powered airplanes. (a) Compliance with § 23.1041 must be shown for all phases of operation. The airplane must...

  14. 14 CFR 23.1047 - Cooling test procedures for reciprocating engine powered airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... engine powered airplanes. 23.1047 Section 23.1047 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Cooling § 23.1047 Cooling test procedures for reciprocating engine powered airplanes. Compliance with § 23.1041 must be shown for the climb (or, for multiengine airplanes...

  15. 14 CFR 23.1045 - Cooling test procedures for turbine engine powered airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... powered airplanes. 23.1045 Section 23.1045 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Cooling § 23.1045 Cooling test procedures for turbine engine powered airplanes. (a) Compliance with § 23.1041 must be shown for all phases of operation. The airplane must...

  16. 14 CFR 23.1045 - Cooling test procedures for turbine engine powered airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... powered airplanes. 23.1045 Section 23.1045 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Cooling § 23.1045 Cooling test procedures for turbine engine powered airplanes. (a) Compliance with § 23.1041 must be shown for all phases of operation. The airplane must...

  17. 14 CFR 23.1045 - Cooling test procedures for turbine engine powered airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... powered airplanes. 23.1045 Section 23.1045 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Cooling § 23.1045 Cooling test procedures for turbine engine powered airplanes. (a) Compliance with § 23.1041 must be shown for all phases of operation. The airplane must...

  18. 14 CFR 23.1047 - Cooling test procedures for reciprocating engine powered airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... engine powered airplanes. 23.1047 Section 23.1047 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Cooling § 23.1047 Cooling test procedures for reciprocating engine powered airplanes. Compliance with § 23.1041 must be shown for the climb (or, for multiengine airplanes...

  19. 14 CFR 23.1047 - Cooling test procedures for reciprocating engine powered airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... engine powered airplanes. 23.1047 Section 23.1047 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Cooling § 23.1047 Cooling test procedures for reciprocating engine powered airplanes. Compliance with § 23.1041 must be shown for the climb (or, for multiengine airplanes...

  20. 14 CFR 23.1045 - Cooling test procedures for turbine engine powered airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... powered airplanes. 23.1045 Section 23.1045 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Cooling § 23.1045 Cooling test procedures for turbine engine powered airplanes. (a) Compliance with § 23.1041 must be shown for all phases of operation. The airplane must...

  1. 14 CFR 23.1047 - Cooling test procedures for reciprocating engine powered airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... engine powered airplanes. 23.1047 Section 23.1047 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Cooling § 23.1047 Cooling test procedures for reciprocating engine powered airplanes. Compliance with § 23.1041 must be shown for the climb (or, for multiengine airplanes...

  2. Self-driven cooling loop for a large superconducting magnet in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mord, A. J.; Snyder, H. A.

    1992-01-01

    Pressurized cooling loops in which superfluid helium circulation is driven by the heat being removed have been previously demonstrated in laboratory tests. A simpler and lighter version which eliminates a heat exchanger by mixing the returning fluid directly with the superfluid helium bath was analyzed. A carefully designed flow restriction must be used to prevent boiling in this low-pressure system. A candidate design for Astromag is shown that can keep the magnet below 2.0 K during magnet charging. This gives a greater margin against accidental quench than approaches that allow the coolant to warm above the lambda point. A detailed analysis of one candidate design is presented.

  3. Engineering development of superconducting RF linac for high-power applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dominic Chan, K.C.; Rusnak, B.; Gentzlinger, R.C.; Campbell, B.M.; Kelley, J.P.; Safa, H.

    1998-12-31

    High-power proton linacs are a promising source of neutrons for material processing and research applications. Superconducting radiofrequency (SCRF) Rf linac technology is preferred for such applications because of power efficiency. A multi-year engineering development program is underway at Los Alamos National Laboratory to demonstrate the required SCRF technology. The program consists of development of SC cavities, power couplers, and cryomodule integration. Prototypes will be built and operated to obtain performance and integration information, and for design improvement. This paper describes the scope and present status of the development program.

  4. Natural cooling of spent fuel pools in nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Malzahn, M.V.; Valandani, P.; Hojati, M.

    1995-12-31

    This paper discusses the analytical and test methods used to determine the temperature response of the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station (SONGS) Unit 1 Spent Fuel Pool (SFP) following a hypothetical loss of forced cooling. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the point in time at which natural cooling processes alone can maintain the SFP temperature within acceptable limits. This was accomplished by modeling the various natural cooling phenomena involved and verifying the results with test data.

  5. Radiation Heat Measurement on Thermally-Isolated Double-Pipe for DC Superconducting Power Transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamabe, M.; Nasu, Y.; Ninomiya, A.; Ishiguro, Y.; Kusaka, S.; Yamaguchi, S.

    2008-03-01

    Multilayer insulator (MLI) is a strong tool for use as a radiation heat shield, though the use of MLI has disadvantages in construction and evacuation for a long superconducting power cable. We have proposed the "MLI-free" radiation heat shielding for DC superconducting power cable and have measured the radiation heat transfer for thermally-isolated double-pipes with different surfaces. Here, Zn coating, MLI, and Al-foil sheet were tested. Consequently, from the radiation heat of 9.7 W/m for bare stainless-steel pipe, Zn-coated stainless-steel surface reduced to 2.6 W/m, whereas the use of MLI reduced to 0.2 W/m. It is expected that the simultaneous use of Zn coating and MLI can reduce the number of total MLI sheets to reduce the evacuation time.

  6. Magnetic Energy Storage System: Superconducting Magnet Energy Storage System with Direct Power Electronics Interface

    SciTech Connect

    2010-10-01

    GRIDS Project: ABB is developing an advanced energy storage system using superconducting magnets that could store significantly more energy than today’s best magnetic storage technologies at a fraction of the cost. This system could provide enough storage capacity to encourage more widespread use of renewable power like wind and solar. Superconducting magnetic energy storage systems have been in development for almost 3 decades; however, past devices were designed to supply power only for short durations—generally less than a few minutes. ABB’s system would deliver the stored energy at very low cost, making it ideal for eventual use in the electricity grid as a costeffective competitor to batteries and other energy storage technologies. The device could potentially cost even less, on a per kilowatt basis, than traditional lead-acid batteries.

  7. Remote Measurement of Heat Flux from Power Plant Cooling Lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, A.; Kurzeja, R.; Villa-Aleman, E.; Bollinger, J.

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory experiments have demonstrated a correlation between the rate of heat loss q? from an experimental fluid to the air above and the standard deviation ? of the thermal variability in images of the fluid surface. These experimental results imply that q? can be derived directly from thermal imagery by computing ?. This paper analyses thermal imagery collected over two power plant cooling lakes to determine if the same relationship exists. Turbulent boundary layer theory predicts a linear relationship between q? and ? when both forced (wind driven) and free (buoyancy driven) convection are present. Datasets derived from ground- and helicopter-based imagery collections had correlation coefficients between ? and q? of 0.45 and 0.76, respectively. Values of q? computed from a function of ? and friction velocity u* derived from turbulent boundary layer theory had higher correlations with measured values of q? (0.84 and 0.89). This research may be applicable to the problem of calculating losses of heat from the ocean to the atmosphere during high-latitude cold-air outbreaks because it does not require the information typically needed to compute sensible, evaporative, and thermal radiation energy losses to the atmosphere.

  8. Mechanical Analysis of High Power Internally Cooled Annular Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Jiyun; No, Hee Cheon; Kazimi, Mujid S.

    2004-05-15

    Annular fuel with internal flow is proposed to allow higher power density in pressurized water reactors. The structural behavior issues arising from the higher flow rate required to cool the fuel are assessed here, including buckling, vibrations, and potential wear problems. Five flow-induced vibration mechanisms are addressed: buckling instability, vortex-induced vibration, acoustic resonance, fluid-elastic instability, and turbulence-induced vibration. The structural behavior of the 17 x 17 traditional solid fuel array is compared with that of two types of annular fuels, a 15 x 15 array, and a 13 x 13 array.It is seen that the annular fuels are superior to the reference fuel in avoiding vibration-induced damage, even at a 50% increase in flow velocity above today's reactors. The higher resistance to vibration is mainly due to their relatively larger cross section area making them more rigid. The 13 x 13 annular fuel shows better structural performance than the 15 x 15 one due to its higher rigidity. Analysis of acoustic resonance of the inner channel cladding with pump blade passing frequencies showed that the acoustic frequencies are within 120% of the pulsation frequency. The annular fuel exhibits reduced impact, sliding, and fretting wear than the solid fuel, even at 150% flow rate of today's reactors.

  9. Horizontal cryogenic bushing for the termination of a superconducting power-transmission line

    DOEpatents

    Minati, K.F.; Morgan, G.H.; McNerney, A.J.; Schauer, F.

    1982-07-29

    A termination for a superconducting power transmission line is disclosed which is comprised of a standard air entrance insulated vertical bushing with an elbow, a horizontal cryogenic bushing linking the pressurized cryogenic cable environment to the ambient temperature bushing and a stress cone which terminated the cable outer shield and transforms the large radial voltage gradient in the cable dielectric into a much lower radial voltage gradient in the high density helium coolant at the cold end of the cryogenic bushing.

  10. Termination for a superconducting power transmission line including a horizontal cryogenic bushing

    DOEpatents

    Minati, Kurt F. (Northport, NY); Morgan, Gerry H. (Patchogue, NY); McNerney, Andrew J. (Shoreham, NY); Schauer, Felix (Upton, NY)

    1984-01-01

    A termination for a superconducting power transmission line is disclosed which is comprised of a standard air entrance insulated vertical bushing with an elbow, a horizontal cryogenic bushing linking the pressurized cryogenic cable environment to the ambient temperature bushing and a stress cone which terminates the cable outer shield and transforms the large radial voltage gradient in the cable dielectric into a much lower radial voltage gradient in the high density helium coolant at the cold end of the cryogenic bushing.

  11. Use of Cooling Thermal Storage as a Heat Sink for Steam Power Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegazy, Ahmed Sabry

    In the present paper, a system is proposed for improving the performance of steam power plant with air-cooled condenser during peak loads. In this system, the power plant comprises two steam turbines, and the air-cooled condenser is replaced by two condensers. The first one is air-cooled (dry) and used for condensing the exhaust steam of the first turbine, while the second is water-cooled and serves to condense the steam outlet of the second turbine. The warm cooling water exiting the wet condenser is pumped to a cooling storage container, where it is cooled and re-circulated to the wet condenser. Cooling is produced by a refrigeration machine driven by the extra electric power generated by the two turbines during the time of the off-peak-loads (low electricity rates). Simple energy analyses have been developed to predict the energy characteristics of this system. The results of this paper showed that the proposed system leads to improving the plant power output at peak-loads. About 6, 16, 24 and 33% increase in generated plant power can be achieved at peak-loads (high electricity rates) when the ambient temperature is 20, 30, 40 and 50°C respectively, and the whole steam exiting both turbines is cooled in a wet condenser to a design temperature of 20°C. The results showed also that choice of the capacity of each turbine is essentially affected by the quality of the refrigeration machine and ambient temperature.

  12. MODEL AND BEAM BASED SETUP PROCEDURES FOR A HIGH POWER HADRON SUPERCONDUCTING LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Shishlo, Andrei P

    2014-01-01

    This presentation will review methods for experimental determination of optimal operational set points in a multi-cavity superconducting high power hadron linac. A typical tuning process is based on comparison between measured data and the results of simulations from envelope and single-particle models. Presence of significant space charge effects requires simulation and measurement of bunch dynamics in 3 dimensions to ensure low loss beam transport. This is especially difficult in a superconducting linac where use of interceptive diagnostics is usually restricted because of the risk of SRF cavity surface contamination. The procedures discussed here are based on non-interceptive diagnostics such as beam position monitors and laser wires, and conventional diagnostics devices such as wire scanners and bunch shape monitors installed outside the superconducting linac. The longitudinal Twiss analysis based on the BPM signals will be described. The superconducting SNS linac tuning experience will be used to demonstrate problems and their solution for real world linac tune-up procedures

  13. Experimental study on active cooling systems used for thermal management of high-power multichip light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop suitable cooling systems for high-power multichip LEDs. To this end, three different active cooling systems were investigated to control the heat generated by the powering of high-power multichip LEDs in two different configurations (30 and 2 × 15 W). The following cooling systems were used in the study: an integrated multi-fin heat sink design with a fan, a cooling system with a thermoelectric cooler (TEC), and a heat pipe cooling device. According to the results, all three systems were observed to be sufficient for cooling high-power LEDs. Furthermore, it was observed that the integrated multifin heat sink design with a fan was the most efficient cooling system for a 30 W high-power multichip LED. The cooling system with a TEC and 46 W input power was the most efficient cooling system for 2 × 15 W high-power multichip LEDs. PMID:25162058

  14. Experimental Study on Active Cooling Systems Used for Thermal Management of High-Power Multichip Light-Emitting Diodes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop suitable cooling systems for high-power multichip LEDs. To this end, three different active cooling systems were investigated to control the heat generated by the powering of high-power multichip LEDs in two different configurations (30 and 2 × 15?W). The following cooling systems were used in the study: an integrated multi-fin heat sink design with a fan, a cooling system with a thermoelectric cooler (TEC), and a heat pipe cooling device. According to the results, all three systems were observed to be sufficient for cooling high-power LEDs. Furthermore, it was observed that the integrated multifin heat sink design with a fan was the most efficient cooling system for a 30?W high-power multichip LED. The cooling system with a TEC and 46?W input power was the most efficient cooling system for 2 × 15?W high-power multichip LEDs. PMID:25162058

  15. Sub-cooled liquid nitrogen cryogenic system with neon turbo-refrigerator for HTS power equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, S.; Hirai, H.; Nara, N.; Ozaki, S.; Hirokawa, M.; Eguchi, T.; Hayashi, H.; Iwakuma, M.; Shiohara, Y.

    2014-01-01

    We developed a prototype sub-cooled liquid nitrogen (LN) circulation system for HTS power equipment. The system consists of a neon turbo-Brayton refrigerator with a LN sub-cooler and LN circulation pump unit. The neon refrigerator has more than 2 kW cooling power at 65 K. The LN sub-cooler is a plate-fin type heat exchanger and is installed in a refrigerator cold box. In order to carry out the system performance tests, a dummy cryostat having an electric heater was set instead of a HTS power equipment. Sub-cooled LN is delivered into the sub-cooler by the LN circulation pump and cooled within it. After the sub-cooler, sub-cooled LN goes out from the cold box to the dummy cryostat, and comes back to the pump unit. The system can control an outlet sub-cooled LN temperature by adjusting refrigerator cooling power. The refrigerator cooling power is automatically controlled by the turbo-compressor rotational speed. In the performance tests, we increased an electric heater power from 200 W to 1300 W abruptly. We confirmed the temperature fluctuation was about ±1 K. We show the cryogenic system details and performance test results in this paper.

  16. Refrigeration system for superfluid-cooled 21 T magnet and 40 T hybrid magnets at TML

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, F.; Nagai, H.; Kiyoshi, T.; Sato, A.; Kawamura, I.; Matsumoto, K.

    1996-02-01

    A Helium refrigeration system has been constructed for a superfluid-cooled 21 T superconducting magnet and a 15 T superconducting outer magnet of 40 T class hybrid magnet. The refrigeration system was designed for the application of two refrigeration modes, that is, superfluid cooling mode, and pool boiling cooling mode. The refrigeration power of 450 W at 4.4 K was obtained successfully.

  17. Study on a Highly Stabilized Power Supply for Hybrid-Magnet Superconducting Outsert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jinglin; Long, Jiaojiao; Liu, Xiaoning

    2014-09-01

    The superconducting outsert of the 40 T hybrid-magnet in High Magnetic Field Laboratory (HMFL) of Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) requires a highly stabilized power supply. In this paper, two kinds of power supply design are briefly presented and both advantages and disadvantages are analyzed. In order to overcome the drawbacks of switching power supply, a series regulated active filter is adopted and a new design is proposed which ensures cooperative relationship between the feedback control loops of the switching converter and the series regulated active filter. Besides, unlike the traditional switching power supply, which can generate positive voltage only, this new design can also generate negative voltage which is needed in the quench protection for the superconducting magnet. In order to demonstrate the effectiveness of the methodology, a low-power prototype has been accomplished. The simulation and experiment results show that the power supply achieves high precision under the combined action of two feedback control loops. The peak-to-peak amplitude of the output ripple voltage of the prototype is 0.063%, while the peak-to-peak amplitude of the output ripple current is 120 ppm.

  18. 10 CFR 50.46 - Acceptance criteria for emergency core cooling systems for light-water nuclear power reactors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...core cooling systems for light-water nuclear power reactors. 50.46 Section 50.46 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING...core cooling systems for light-water nuclear power reactors....

  19. Hybrid liquid metal-water cooling system for heat dissipation of high power density microdevices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yueguang; Liu, Jing

    2010-12-01

    The recent decades have witnessed a remarkable advancement of very large scale integrated circuits (VLSI) and electronic equipments in micro-electronic industry. Meanwhile, the ever increasing power density of microdevices leads to the tough issue that thermal management becomes rather hard to solve. Conventional water cooling is widely used, but the convective coefficient is not high enough. Liquid metal owns much higher convective coefficient and has been identified as an effective coolant recently, but the high cost greatly precludes its large scale utilization. In this paper, a hybrid liquid metal-water cooling system which combines the advantages of both water and liquid metal cooling was proposed and demonstrated. By utilizing a liquid metal "heat spreader" in front of the water cooling module, this system not only owns more excellent cooling capability than that based on water alone, but also has much lower initial cost compared with absolute liquid metal cooling system. A series of experiments under different operation conditions have been performed to evaluate the cooling performance of this hybrid system. The compared results with absolute water cooling and liquid metal cooling system showed that the cooling capability of the new system is competitive with absolute liquid metal cooling, but the initial cost could be much lower. The theoretical thermal resistance model and economic feasibility also have been analyzed and discussed, which shows that the hybrid liquid metal-water cooling system is quite feasible and useful.

  20. Superconducting fault-current limiter and inductor design

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.D.; Boenig, H.J.; Chowdhuri, P.; Schermer, R.I.; Wollan, J.J.; Weldon, D.M.

    1982-01-01

    A superconducting fault current limiter (SFCL) that uses a biased superconducting inductor in a diode or thyristor bridge circuit was analyzed for transmission systems in 69, 138, and 230 rms kV utility transmission systems. The limiter was evaluated for costs with all components - superconducting coil, diode and/or SCR power electronics, high voltage insulation, high voltage bushings and vapor cooled leads, dewar, and refrigerator - included. A design was undertaken for the superconducting cable and coils for both diode and SCR 69 kV limiter circuits.

  1. Fast, low-power manipulation of spin ensembles in superconducting microresonators

    SciTech Connect

    Sigillito, A. J. Malissa, H.; Tyryshkin, A. M.; Houck, A. A.; Lyon, S. A.; Riemann, H.; Abrosimov, N. V.; Becker, P.; Pohl, H.-J.; Thewalt, M. L. W.; Itoh, K. M.; Morton, J. J. L.; Schuster, D. I.

    2014-06-02

    We demonstrate the use of high-Q superconducting coplanar waveguide (CPW) microresonators to perform rapid manipulations on a randomly distributed spin ensemble using very low microwave power (400 nW). This power is compatible with dilution refrigerators, making microwave manipulation of spin ensembles feasible for quantum computing applications. We also describe the use of adiabatic microwave pulses to overcome microwave magnetic field (B{sub 1}) inhomogeneities inherent to CPW resonators. This allows for uniform control over a randomly distributed spin ensemble. Sensitivity data are reported showing a single shot (no signal averaging) sensitivity to 10{sup 7} spins or 3×10{sup 4}spins/?(Hz) with averaging.

  2. 30 MJ superconducting magnetic energy storage performance on the Bonneville Power Administration utility transmission system

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.D.; Boenig, H.J.

    1984-01-01

    The 30 MJ, 10 MW superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) system was devised to interact in the Western U.S. Power System as an alternate means to damp unstable oscillations at 0.35 Hz on the Pacific HVAC Intertie. The SMES unit was installed at the Tacoma Substation of the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The operating limits of the 30 MJ SMES unit were established, and different means of controlling real and reactive power were tested. Experiments showed that the Pacific AC Intertie has current and reactive power variations of the same frequency as the modulating frequency of the SMES device. Endurance tests were run to assess the reliability of the SMES subsystems with a narrow band noise input, which is characteristic of the modulation signal for stabilizer operation. During the endurance tests, parameters of the ac power system were determined.

  3. First High power test results for 2.1 GHz superconducting photonic band gap accelerator cavities.

    PubMed

    Simakov, Evgenya I; Haynes, W Brian; Madrid, Michael A; Romero, Frank P; Tajima, Tsuyoshi; Tuzel, Walter M; Boulware, Chase H; Grimm, Terry L

    2012-10-19

    We report the results of the recent high power testing of superconducting radio frequency photonic band gap (PBG) accelerator cells. Tests of the two single-cell 2.1 GHz cavities were performed at both 4 and 2 K. An accelerating gradient of 15 MV/m and an unloaded quality factor Q(0) of 4×10(9) were achieved. It has been long realized that PBG structures have great potential in reducing long-range wakefields in accelerators. A PBG structure confines the fundamental TM(01)-like accelerating mode, but does not support higher order modes. Employing PBG cavities to filter out higher order modes in superconducting particle accelerators will allow suppression of dangerous beam instabilities caused by wakefields and thus operation at higher frequencies and significantly higher beam luminosities. This may lead towards a completely new generation of colliders for high energy physics and energy recovery linacs for the free-electron lasers. PMID:23215084

  4. Self-cooling on power MOSFET using n-type Si wafer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakatsugawa, H.; Sato, T.; Okamoto, Y.; Kawahara, T.; Yamaguchi, S.

    2012-06-01

    The self-cooling device was developed by combining the commercial n-channel power MOSFET and the copper plating single-crystalline Sb doped n-type silicon wafer in order to improve heat removal or cooling for power devices. The time dependence of the temperature distribution of the self-cooling device was measured to estimate the heat flux both by the thermal conduction and by the Peltier effect. We found that the average temperature of the upper side of the power MOSFET was cooled down about 0.7°C by the addition of the copper plating n-type Si wafer after 40 minutes despite enlargement of the temperature distribution range. This fact strongly indicates that the copper plating ntype Si wafer is one of the candidate materials for use in self-cooling devices.

  5. A SELF-COOLED LIQUID BREEDER BLANKET FOR A LASER IFE POWER PLANT WITH MAGNETIC INTERVENTION

    E-print Network

    Raffray, A. René

    if an electrically resistive structural material is used. An advanced blanket based on a self- cooled liquid breederA SELF-COOLED LIQUID BREEDER BLANKET FOR A LASER IFE POWER PLANT WITH MAGNETIC INTERVENTION A in the compressed plasma can be dissipated by using resistive chamber blanket walls, and recovered through

  6. WET/DRY COOLING SYSTEMS FOR FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS: WATER CONSERVATION AND PLUME ABATEMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study of technical and economic feasibilities of wet/dry cooling towers for water conservation and vapor plume abatement. Results of cost optimizations of wet/dry cooling for 1000-MWe fossil-fueled power plants are presented. Five sites in the wester...

  7. Ice Thermal Storage Systems for LWR Supplemental Cooling and Peak Power Shifting

    SciTech Connect

    Haihua Zhao; Hongbin Zhang; Phil Sharpe; Blaise Hamanaka; Wei Yan; WoonSeong Jeong

    2010-06-01

    Availability of enough cooling water has been one of the major issues for the nuclear power plant site selection. Cooling water issues have frequently disrupted the normal operation at some nuclear power plants during heat waves and long draught. The issues become more severe due to the new round of nuclear power expansion and global warming. During hot summer days, cooling water leaving a power plant may become too hot to threaten aquatic life so that environmental regulations may force the plant to reduce power output or even temporarily to be shutdown. For new nuclear power plants to be built at areas without enough cooling water, dry cooling can be used to remove waste heat directly into the atmosphere. However, dry cooling will result in much lower thermal efficiency when the weather is hot. One potential solution for the above mentioned issues is to use ice thermal storage systems (ITS) that reduce cooling water requirements and boost the plant’s thermal efficiency in hot hours. ITS uses cheap off-peak electricity to make ice and uses those ice for supplemental cooling during peak demand time. ITS is suitable for supplemental cooling storage due to its very high energy storage density. ITS also provides a way to shift large amount of electricity from off peak time to peak time. Some gas turbine plants already use ITS to increase thermal efficiency during peak hours in summer. ITSs have also been widely used for building cooling to save energy cost. Among three cooling methods for LWR applications: once-through, wet cooling tower, and dry cooling tower, once-through cooling plants near a large water body like an ocean or a large lake and wet cooling plants can maintain the designed turbine backpressure (or condensation temperature) during 99% of the time; therefore, adding ITS to those plants will not generate large benefits. For once-through cooling plants near a limited water body like a river or a small lake, adding ITS can bring significant economic benefits and avoid forced derating and shutdown during extremely hot weather. For the new plants using dry cooling towers, adding the ice thermal storage systems can effectively reduce the efficiency loss and water consumption during hot weather so that new LWRs could be considered in regions without enough cooling water. \\ This paper presents the feasibility study of using ice thermal storage systems for LWR supplemental cooling and peak power shifting. LWR cooling issues and ITS application status will be reviewed. Two ITS application case studies will be presented and compared with alternative options: one for once-through cooling without enough cooling for short time, and the other with dry cooling. Because capital cost, especially the ice storage structure/building cost, is the major cost for ITS, two different cost estimation models are developed: one based on scaling method, and the other based on a preliminary design using Building Information Modeling (BIM), an emerging technology in Architecture/Engineering/Construction, which enables design options, performance analysis and cost estimating in the early design stage.

  8. Implementation of superconducting fault current limiter for flexible operation in the power substation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Chong Suk; Lee, Hansang; Cho, Yoon-sung; Suh, Jaewan; Jang, Gilsoo

    2014-09-01

    The concentration of large-scale power loads located in the metropolitan areas have resulted in high fault current levels during a fault thereby requiring the substation to operate in the double busbar configuration mode. However, the double busbar configuration mode results in deterioration of power system reliability and unbalanced power flow in the adjacent transmission lines which may result in issues such as overloading of lines. This paper proposes the implementation of the superconducting fault current limiter (SFCL) to be installed between the two substation busbars for a more efficient and flexible operation of the substation enabling both single and double busbar configurations depending on the system conditions for guaranteeing power system reliability as well as fault current limitations. Case studies are being performed for the effectiveness of the SFCL installation and results are compared for the cases where the substation is operating in single and double busbar mode and with and without the installation of the SFCL for fault current mitigation.

  9. Operational experiences of the spallation neutron source superconducting linac and power ramp-up

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sang-Ho

    2009-01-01

    The spallation neutron source (SNS) is a second generation pulsed neutron source and designed to provide a 1-GeV, 1.44-MW proton beam to a mercury target for neutron production. Since the commissioning of the accelerator complex in 2006, the SNS has started its operation for neutron production and beam power ramp-up has been in progress toward the design goal. All subsystems of the SNS were designed and developed for substantial improvements compared to existing accelerators because the design beam power is almost an order of magnitude higher compared to existing neutron facilities and the achievable neutron scattering performance will exceed present sources by more than a factor of 20 to 100. In this paper, the operational experiences with the SNS Superconducting Linac (SCL), Power Ramp-up Plan to reach the design goal and the Power Upgrade Plan (PUP) will be presented including machine, subsystem and beam related issues.

  10. EVALUATION OF EUROPEAN RIVERS FOR POWER PLANT COOLING - A POLISH RESEARCH PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes analytical, laboratory, and field research conducted to optimize the use of rivers, specifically in Poland, for once-through cooling of steam electric power plants. Maximum discharge and receiving water temperatures, based on biological criteria, are coupled ...

  11. ORNL Superconducting Technology Program for Electric Power Systems, Annual Report for FY 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Hawsey, R.A.; Murphy, A.W.

    1999-04-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Superconducting Technology Program is conducted as part of a national effort by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy to develop the science and technology base needed by U.S. industry for commercial development of electric power applications of high temperature superconductivity. The two major elements of this program are wire development and applications development. This document describes the major research and development activities for this program together with related accomplishments. The technical progress reported was summarized from recent open literature publications, presentations, and information prepared for the FY 1998 Annual Program Review held July 20-22, 1998. Aspects of ORNL's work that were presented at the Applied Superconductivity Conference (September 1998) are included in this report, as well. This ORNL program is highly leveraged by the staff and other resources of U.S. industry and universities. In fact, nearly three-fourths of the ORNL effort is devoted to cooperative projects. Patent disclosures, working group meetings, staff exchanges, and joint publications and presentations ensure that there is technology transfer with U.S. industry. Working together, the collaborative teams are making rapid progress in solving the scientific and technical issues necessary for the commercialization of long lengths of practical high temperature superconductor wire and wire-using systems.

  12. July 13, 2002 Page 1/4 ACT E951 High-Power Pulsed Cooling

    E-print Network

    McDonald, Kirk

    and 7.5 kW average cooling system power load. The sum of the steady state background loads is ca. 700 W system circulator flow work, pump inefficiency and conductive heat loads6 add ca. 1 kW to the backgroundJuly 13, 2002 Page 1/4 ACT E951 High-Power Pulsed Cooling G.T. Mulholland, ACT (July 13, 2002

  13. Space power reactor ground test in the experimental gas cooled reactor (EGCR) at Oak Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontana, Mario H.; Holcomb, Robert S.; Cooper, Roy H.

    1993-01-01

    The Experimental Gas Cooled Reactor (EGCR) facility and the supporting technical infrastructure at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory have the capabilities of performing ground tests of space nuclear power reactor systems. A candidate test would be a 10 MWt lithium cooled reactor, generating potassium vapor that would drive a power turbine. The facility is a large containment vessel originally intended to test the EGCR. Large, contained, and shielded spaces are available for testing, assembly, disassembly, and post-test examination.

  14. 30 MJ superconducting magnetic energy storage performance on the Bonneville Power Administration utility transmission system*

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.D.; Boenig, H.J.

    1984-08-01

    The 30 MJ, 10 MW superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) system was devised to interact in the Western U.S. Power System as an alternate means to damp unstable oscillations at 0.35 Hz on the Pacific HVAC Intertie. The SMES unit was installed at the Tacoma Substation of the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The operating limits of the 30 MJ SMES unit were established, and different means of controlling real and reactive power were tested. The unit can follow a sinusoidal power demand signal with an amplitude of up to 8.6 MW with the converter working in a 12 pulse mode. When the converter operates in the constant VAR mode, a time varying real power demand signal of up to 5 MW can be met. Experiments showed that the Pacific AC Intertie has current and reactive power variations of the same frequency as the modulating frequency of the SMES device. Endurance tests were run to assess the reliability of the SMES subsystems with a narrow band noise input, which is characteristic of the modulation signal for stabilizer operation. In this mode, the energy of the power spectrum is not concentrated at one frequency to avoid exciting a resonance frequency of the ac transmission system. During the endurance tests, parameters of the ac power system were determined. Accurate power system data are necessary for tuning the control algorithm so that the SMES unit can operate in the closed loop stabilizer mode.

  15. Conceptual design study of the moderate size superconducting spherical tokamak power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gi, Keii; Ono, Yasushi; Nakamura, Makoto; Someya, Youji; Utoh, Hiroyasu; Tobita, Kenji; Ono, Masayuki

    2015-06-01

    A new conceptual design of the superconducting spherical tokamak (ST) power plant was proposed as an attractive choice for tokamak fusion reactors. We reassessed a possibility of the ST as a power plant using the conservative reactor engineering constraints often used for the conventional tokamak reactor design. An extensive parameters scan which covers all ranges of feasible superconducting ST reactors was completed, and five constraints which include already achieved plasma magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) and confinement parameters in ST experiments were established for the purpose of choosing the optimum operation point. Based on comparison with the estimated future energy costs of electricity (COEs) in Japan, cost-effective ST reactors can be designed if their COEs are smaller than 120 mills kW-1 h-1 (2013). We selected the optimized design point: A = 2.0 and Rp = 5.4 m after considering the maintenance scheme and TF ripple. A self-consistent free-boundary MHD equilibrium and poloidal field coil configuration of the ST reactor were designed by modifying the neutral beam injection system and plasma profiles. The MHD stability of the equilibrium was analysed and a ramp-up scenario was considered for ensuring the new ST design. The optimized moderate-size ST power plant conceptual design realizes realistic plasma and fusion engineering parameters keeping its economic competitiveness against existing energy sources in Japan.

  16. Thermal Management of Power Semiconductor Packages - Matching Cooling Technologies with Packaging Technologies (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Bennion, K.; Moreno, G.

    2010-04-27

    Heat removal for power semiconductor devices is critical for robust operation. Because there are different packaging options, different thermal management technologies, and a range of applications, there is a need for a methodology to match cooling technologies and package configurations to target applications. To meet this need, a methodology was developed to compare the sensitivity of cooling technologies on the overall package thermal performance over a range of power semiconductor packaging configurations. The results provide insight into the trade-offs associated with cooling technologies and package configurations. The approach provides a method for comparing new developments in power semiconductor packages and identifying potential thermal control technologies for the package. The results can help users select the appropriate combination of packaging configuration and cooling technology for the desired application.

  17. Calculation and visual displaying of the water chemistry conditions in return cooling systems at thermal power stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochkov, V. F.; Orlov, K. A.; Ivanov, E. N.; Makushin, A. A.

    2013-07-01

    Matters concerned with treatment of cooling water at thermal power stations are addressed. Problems arising during operation of return cooling systems equipped with cooling towers are analyzed. The software used for monitoring, control, and indication of the hydraulic and water chemistry operating conditions of the circulation system at the Yaivinsk district power station is considered.

  18. Microscale Thermoelectric Cooling Elements (TECs) are being proposed to cool down an integrated circuit to maintain its performance. The maximum cooling power of microscale TECs is significantly reduced by the interfacial resistance. For our

    E-print Network

    ICT 2008 1 Abstract Microscale Thermoelectric Cooling Elements (TECs) are being proposed to cool act as a good guideline for two-dimensional analysis and assembly of TECs. Key Words - Thermoelectric by the thermal power at the hotspot regions. Microscale Thermoelectric Cooling Elements (TECs) or Thermoelectric

  19. Powering Anomalous X-ray Pulsars by Neutron Star Cooling

    E-print Network

    Heyl, J S; Heyl, Jeremy S.; Hernquist, Lars

    1997-01-01

    Using recently calculated analytic models for the thermal structure of ultramagnetized neutron stars, we estimate the thermal fluxes from young ($t\\sim 1000$ yr) ultramagnetized ($B \\sim 10^{15}$ G) cooling neutron stars. We find that the pulsed X-ray emission from objects such as 1E 1841-045 and 1E 2259+586 as well as many soft-gamma repeaters can be explained by photon cooling if the neutron star possesses a thin insulating envelope of matter of low atomic weight at densities $\\rho < 10^{7}-10^{8}$ g/cm$^3$. The total mass of this insulating layer is $M \\sim 10^{-11}-10^{-8} M_\\odot$.

  20. Powering Anomalous X-ray Pulsars by Neutron Star Cooling

    E-print Network

    Jeremy S. Heyl; Lars Hernquist

    1997-08-30

    Using recently calculated analytic models for the thermal structure of ultramagnetized neutron stars, we estimate the thermal fluxes from young ($t\\sim 1000$ yr) ultramagnetized ($B \\sim 10^{15}$ G) cooling neutron stars. We find that the pulsed X-ray emission from objects such as 1E 1841-045 and 1E 2259+586 as well as many soft-gamma repeaters can be explained by photon cooling if the neutron star possesses a thin insulating envelope of matter of low atomic weight at densities $\\rho < 10^{7}-10^{8}$ g/cm$^3$. The total mass of this insulating layer is $M \\sim 10^{-11}-10^{-8} M_\\odot$.

  1. Overview of the development of the advanced power system by the applied superconductivity technologies programme in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Kang-Sik; Jo, Young-Sik; Park, Minwon

    2006-03-01

    At the end of July 2004, DAPAS (development of the advanced power system by applied superconductivity technologies), which is a 10 year long programme, finished the first of three phases. As a result of the first phase, a process for a metre long coated conductor and the core technologies of the distribution line voltage class high temperature superconductor (HTS) power systems including cables, transformers, fault current limiters (FCLs), and motors have been developed. The ultimate goal of the HTS cable project is to develop 1 GVA class HTS transmission cables. During the first phase, a three-phase 50 MVA/22.9 kV class HTS cable of 30 m length has been developed and tested successfully; it has been installed by LS Cable Ltd. In the second phase, grid-connected HTS cables will be developed and established in the real utility line. In case of FCLs, there were two types of FCL developed during the first phase: a reactive type and a resistive type. Both types had the same project targets with the specification of 6.6 kV/200 A for three-phase, and entered the second phase with the target of a 22.9 kV class. In the case of the HTS transformer project, a 1 MVA/22.9 kV class was developed, and after the second phase this project will be considered for practical application. Technically, the optimal design and the manufacturing technologies of HTS transformers as well as the analysis tools of electromagnetic field in the transformer were developed. Furthermore, a 100 hp class motor has been developed so that the key technologies for the utilization of superconducting motors could be obtained. The developed motor consists of Bi-2223 field coils of 100 A operating current at 30 K and a closed-loop cooling system, the results of which will lead us to develop 1 and 5 MVA motors in the second and third phase, respectively. In the case of the coated conductors (CCs) programme, a batch-type co-evaporation process and a reel-to-reel pulsed laser deposition process gave us 10 m long CC tapes in February 2005. We expect that 100 m long or longer CC will be developed during the second phase.

  2. Method and system for powering and cooling semiconductor lasers

    DOEpatents

    Telford, Steven J; Ladran, Anthony S

    2014-02-25

    A semiconductor laser system includes a diode laser tile. The diode laser tile includes a mounting fixture having a first side and a second side opposing the first side and an array of semiconductor laser pumps coupled to the first side of the mounting fixture. The semiconductor laser system also includes an electrical pulse generator thermally coupled to the diode bar and a cooling member thermally coupled to the diode bar and the electrical pulse generator.

  3. Utilization of municipal wastewater for cooling in thermoelectric power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Safari, Iman; Walker, Michael E.; Hsieh, Ming-Kai; Dzombak, David A.; Liu, Wenshi; Vidic, Radisav D.; Miller, David C.; Abbasian, Javad

    2013-09-01

    A process simulation model has been developed using Aspen Plus® with the OLI (OLI System, Inc.) water chemistry model to predict water quality in the recirculating cooling loop utilizing secondary- and tertiary-treated municipal wastewater as the source of makeup water. Simulation results were compared with pilot-scale experimental data on makeup water alkalinity, loop pH, and ammonia evaporation. The effects of various parameters including makeup water quality, salt formation, NH3 and CO2 evaporation mass transfer coefficients, heat load, and operating temperatures were investigated. The results indicate that, although the simulation model can capture the general trends in the loop pH, experimental data on the rates of salt precipitation in the system are needed for more accurate prediction of the loop pH. It was also found that stripping of ammonia and carbon dioxide in the cooling tower can influence the cooling loop pH significantly. The effects of the NH3 mass transfer coefficient on cooling loop pH appear to be more significant at lower values (e.g., kNH3 < 4×10-3 m/s) when the makeup water alkalinity is low (e.g., <90 mg/L as CaCO3). The effect of the CO2 mass transfer coefficient was found to be significant only at lower alkalinity values (e.g., kCO2<4×10-6 m/s).

  4. Energy penalty analysis of possible cooling water intake structurerequirements on existing coal-fired power plants.

    SciTech Connect

    Veil, J. A.; Littleton, D. J.; Gross, R. W.; Smith, D. N.; Parsons, E.L., Jr.; Shelton, W. W.; Feeley, T. J.; McGurl, G. V.

    2006-11-27

    Section 316(b) of the Clean Water Act requires that cooling water intake structures must reflect the best technology available for minimizing adverse environmental impact. Many existing power plants in the United States utilize once-through cooling systems to condense steam. Once-through systems withdraw large volumes (often hundreds of millions of gallons per day) of water from surface water bodies. As the water is withdrawn, fish and other aquatic organisms can be trapped against the screens or other parts of the intake structure (impingement) or if small enough, can pass through the intake structure and be transported through the cooling system to the condenser (entrainment). Both of these processes can injure or kill the organisms. EPA adopted 316(b) regulations for new facilities (Phase I) on December 18, 2001. Under the final rule, most new facilities could be expected to install recirculating cooling systems, primarily wet cooling towers. The EPA Administrator signed proposed 316(b) regulations for existing facilities (Phase II) on February 28, 2002. The lead option in this proposal would allow most existing facilities to achieve compliance without requiring them to convert once-through cooling systems to recirculating systems. However, one of the alternate options being proposed would require recirculating cooling in selected plants. EPA is considering various options to determine best technology available. Among the options under consideration are wet-cooling towers and dry-cooling towers. Both types of towers are considered to be part of recirculating cooling systems, in which the cooling water is continuously recycled from the condenser, where it absorbs heat by cooling and condensing steam, to the tower, where it rejects heat to the atmosphere before returning to the condenser. Some water is lost to evaporation (wet tower only) and other water is removed from the recirculating system as a blow down stream to control the building up of suspended and dissolved solids. Makeup water is withdrawn, usually from surface water bodies, to replace the lost water. The volume of makeup water is many times smaller than the volume needed to operate a once-through system. Although neither the final new facility rule nor the proposed existing facility rule require dry cooling towers as the national best technology available, the environmental community and several States have supported the use of dry-cooling technology as the appropriate technology for addressing adverse environmental impacts. It is possible that the requirements included in the new facility rule and the ongoing push for dry cooling systems by some stakeholders may have a role in shaping the rule for existing facilities. The temperature of the cooling water entering the condenser affects the performance of the turbine--the cooler the temperature, the better the performance. This is because the cooling water temperature affects the level of vacuum at the discharge of the steam turbine. As cooling water temperatures decrease, a higher vacuum can be produced and additional energy can be extracted. On an annual average, once-through cooling water has a lower temperature than recirculated water from a cooling tower. By switching a once-through cooling system to a cooling tower, less energy can be generated by the power plant from the same amount of fuel. This reduction in energy output is known as the energy penalty. If a switch away from once-through cooling is broadly implemented through a final 316(b) rule or other regulatory initiatives, the energy penalty could result in adverse effects on energy supplies. Therefore, in accordance with the recommendations of the Report of the National Energy Policy Development Group (better known as the May 2001 National Energy Policy), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), through its Office of Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), has studied the energy penalty resulting from converting plants with once-through cooling to wet towers or indirect-dry towers. Five l

  5. Manufacturing Superconducting Cables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    England, Christopher

    1996-01-01

    Process proposed for manufacture of cables containing ceramic high-temperature-superconductor YBa(2)Cu(3)O(7-a). For protection, superconducting ceramic encapsulated before activation. Cables carry electrical current with little or no loss of power when cooled to or below temperatures of about minus 200 degrees C. Process accommodates brittle nature of YBa(2)Cu(3)O(7-a) and economical and readily controllable. Also flexible in sense modified to accommodate variety of precursor materials to be processed into YBa(2)Cu(3)O(7-a).

  6. Integrated three-dimensional module heat exchanger for power electronics cooling

    DOEpatents

    Bennion, Kevin; Lustbader, Jason

    2013-09-24

    Embodiments discussed herein are directed to a power semiconductor packaging that removes heat from a semiconductor package through one or more cooling zones that are located in a laterally oriented position with respect to the semiconductor package. Additional embodiments are directed to circuit elements that are constructed from one or more modular power semiconductor packages.

  7. Subtask 5.10 - Testing of an Advanced Dry Cooling Technology for Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Christopher; Pavlish, John

    2013-09-30

    The University of North Dakota’s Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) is developing a market-focused dry cooling technology that is intended to address the key shortcomings of conventional dry cooling technologies: high capital cost and degraded cooling performance during daytime temperature peaks. The unique aspect of desiccant dry cooling (DDC) is the use of a hygroscopic working fluid—a liquid desiccant—as a heat-transfer medium between a power plant’s steam condenser and the atmosphere. This configuration enables a number of beneficial features for large-scale heat dissipation to the atmosphere, without the consumptive use of cooling water. The overall goal of this project was to accurately define the performance and cost characteristics of DDC to determine if further development of the concept is warranted. A balanced approach of modeling grounded in applied experimentation was pursued to substantiate DDC-modeling efforts and outline the potential for this technology to cool full-scale power plants. The resulting analysis shows that DDC can be a lower-cost dry cooling alternative to an air-cooled condenser (ACC) and can even be competitive with conventional wet recirculating cooling under certain circumstances. This project has also highlighted the key technological steps that must be taken in order to transfer DDC into the marketplace. To address these issues and to offer an extended demonstration of DDC technology, a next-stage project should include the opportunity for outdoor ambient testing of a small DDC cooling cell. This subtask was funded through the EERC–U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Joint Program on Research and Development for Fossil Energy-Related Resources Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-08NT43291. Nonfederal funding was provided by the Wyoming State Legislature under an award made through the Wyoming Clean Coal Technologies Research Program.

  8. COOLING WATER ISSUES AND OPPORTUNITIES AT U.S. NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Gary Vine

    2010-12-01

    This report has been prepared for the Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), for the purpose of providing a status report on the challenges and opportunities facing the U.S. commercial nuclear energy industry in the area of plant cooling water supply. The report was prompted in part by recent Second Circuit and Supreme Court decisions regarding cooling water system designs at existing thermo-electric power generating facilities in the U.S. (primarily fossil and nuclear plants). At issue in the courts have been Environmental Protection Agency regulations that define what constitutes “Best Technology Available” for intake structures that withdraw cooling water that is used to transfer and reject heat from the plant’s steam turbine via cooling water systems, while minimizing environmental impacts on aquatic life in nearby water bodies used to supply that cooling water. The report was also prompted by a growing recognition that cooling water availability and societal use conflicts are emerging as strategic energy and environmental issues, and that research and development (R&D) solutions to emerging water shortage issues are needed. In particular, cooling water availability is an important consideration in siting decisions for new nuclear power plants, and is an under-acknowledged issue in evaluating the pros and cons of retrofitting cooling towers at existing nuclear plants. Because of the significant ongoing research on water issues already being performed by industry, the national laboratories and other entities, this report relies heavily on ongoing work. In particular, this report has relied on collaboration with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), including its recent work in the area of EPA regulations governing intake structures in thermoelectric cooling water systems.

  9. Advantage of superconducting bearing in a commercial flywheel system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viznichenko, R.; Velichko, A. V.; Hong, Z.; Coombs, T. A.

    2008-02-01

    The use of a superconducting magnetic bearing in an Urenco Power Technologies (UPT) 100kW flywheel is being studied. The dynamics of a conventional flywheel energy storage system have been studied at low frequencies. We show that the main design consideration is overcoming drag friction losses and parasitic resonances. We propose an original superconducting magnetic bearing design and improved cryogenic motor cooling to increase stability and decrease energy losses in the system.

  10. The development of a solar-powered residential heating and cooling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Efforts to demonstrate the engineering feasibility of utilizing solar power for residential heating and cooling are described. These efforts were concentrated on the analysis, design, and test of a full-scale demonstration system which is currently under construction at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Alabama. The basic solar heating and cooling system under development utilizes a flat plate solar energy collector, a large water tank for thermal energy storage, heat exchangers for space heating and water heating, and an absorption cycle air conditioner for space cooling.

  11. Geographic, technologic, and economic analysis of using reclaimed water for thermoelectric power plant cooling.

    PubMed

    Stillwell, Ashlynn S; Webber, Michael E

    2014-04-15

    Use of reclaimed water-municipal wastewater treatment plant effluent-in nonpotable applications can be a sustainable and efficient water management strategy. One such nonpotable application is at thermoelectric power plants since these facilities require cooling, often using large volumes of freshwater. To evaluate the geographic, technologic, and economic feasibility of using reclaimed water to cool thermoelectric power plants, we developed a spatially resolved model of existing power plants. Our model integrates data on power plant and municipal wastewater treatment plant operations into a combined geographic information systems and optimization approach to evaluate the feasibility of cooling system retrofits. We applied this broadly applicable methodology to 125 power plants in Texas as a test case. Results show that sufficient reclaimed water resources exist within 25 miles of 92 power plants (representing 61% of capacity and 50% of generation in our sample), with most of these facilities meeting both short-term and long-term water conservation cost goals. This retrofit analysis indicates that reclaimed water could be a suitable cooling water source for thermoelectric power plants, thereby mitigating some of the freshwater impacts of electricity generation. PMID:24625241

  12. High power rapidly tunable system for laser cooling.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, V M; Hernández, L; Gomez, E

    2012-01-01

    We present a laser configuration capable of fast frequency changes with a high power output and a large tuning range. The system integrates frequency tuning with an acousto-optic modulator with a double pass tapered amplifier. A compensation circuit keeps the seed power constant and prevents damage to the amplifier. A single mode fiber decouples the modulation and amplification sections and keeps the alignment fixed. The small power required to saturate the amplifier makes the system very reliable. We use the system to obtain a dipole trap that we image using a beam derived from the same configuration. PMID:22299990

  13. Cooling System for the Merit High-Power Target Experiment

    E-print Network

    Haug, F; Silva, P; Pezzeti, M; Pavlov, O; Pirotte, O; Metselaar, J; Efthymiopoulos, I; Fabich, A; Lettry, J; Kirk, H G; McDonald, K T; Titus, P; Bennett, J R J; 10.1063/1.3422261

    2010-01-01

    MERIT is a proof-of-principle experiment of a target station suitable as source for future muon colliders or neutrino factories. When installed at the CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research) PS (Proton Synchrotron)complex fast-extracted high-intensity proton beams intercepted a free mercury jet inside a normal-conducting, pulsed 15-T capture solenoid magnet cooled with liquid nitrogen. Up to 25 MJ of Joule heat was dissipated in the magnet during a pulse. The fully automated, remotely controlled cryogenic system of novel design permitted the transfer of nitrogen by the sole means of differential pressures inside the vessels. This fast cycling system permitted several hundred tests in less than three weeks during the 2007 data taking campaign.

  14. COOLING SYSTEM FOR THE MERIT HIGH-POWER TARGET EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Haug, F.; Pereira, H.; Silva, P.; Pezzetti, M.; Pavlov, O.; Pirotte, O.; Metselaar, J.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fabich, A.; Lettry, J.; Kirk, H. G.; McDonald, K. T.; Titus, P.; Bennett, J. R. J.

    2010-04-09

    MERIT is a proof-of-principle experiment of a target station suitable as source for future muon colliders or neutrino factories. When installed at the CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research) PS (Proton Synchrotron) complex fast-extracted high-intensity proton beams intercepted a free mercury jet inside a normal-conducting, pulsed 15-T capture solenoid magnet cooled with liquid nitrogen. Up to 25 MJ of Joule heat was dissipated in the magnet during a pulse. The fully automated, remotely controlled cryogenic system of novel design permitted the transfer of nitrogen by the sole means of differential pressures inside the vessels. This fast cycling system permitted several hundred tests in less than three weeks during the 2007 data taking campaign.

  15. Cooling System for the Merit High-Power Target Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haug, F.; Pereira, H.; Silva, P.; Pezzetti, M.; Pavlov, O.; Pirotte, O.; Metselaar, J.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fabich, A.; Lettry, J.; Kirk, H. G.; McDonald, K. T.; Titus, P.; Bennett, J. R. J.

    2010-04-01

    MERIT is a proof-of-principle experiment of a target station suitable as source for future muon colliders or neutrino factories. When installed at the CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research) PS (Proton Synchrotron) complex fast-extracted high-intensity proton beams intercepted a free mercury jet inside a normal-conducting, pulsed 15-T capture solenoid magnet cooled with liquid nitrogen. Up to 25 MJ of Joule heat was dissipated in the magnet during a pulse. The fully automated, remotely controlled cryogenic system of novel design permitted the transfer of nitrogen by the sole means of differential pressures inside the vessels. This fast cycling system permitted several hundred tests in less than three weeks during the 2007 data taking campaign.

  16. ORNL Superconducting Technology Program for electric power systems. Annual report for FY 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Koncinski, W.S.; Hawsey, R.A.

    1997-05-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Superconducting Technology Program is conducted as part of a national effort by the US Department of Energy`s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy to develop the science and technology base needed by US industry for commercial development of electric power applications of high temperature superconductivity. The two major elements of this program are wire development and applications development. This document describes the major research and development activities for this program together with related accomplishments. The technical progress reported was summarized from recent open literature publications, presentations, and information prepared for the FY 1996 Annual Program Review held July 31 and August 1, 1996. This ORNL program is highly leveraged by the staff and other resources of US industry and universities. In fact, nearly three-fourths of the ORNL effort is devoted to cooperative projects with private companies. Interlaboratory teams are also in place on a number of industry-driven projects. Patent disclosures, working group meetings, staff exchanges, and joint publications and presentations ensure that there is technology transfer with US industry. Working together, the collaborative teams are making rapid progress in solving the scientific and technical issues necessary for the commercialization of long lengths of practical high temperature superconductor wire and wire-using systems.

  17. ORNL Superconducting Technology Program for electric power systems: Annual report for FY 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Koncinski, W.S.; O`Hara, L.M.; Hawsey, R.A.; Murphy, A.W.

    1998-03-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Superconducting Technology Program is conducted as part of a national effort by the US Department of Energy`s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy to develop the science and technology base needed by US industry for commercial development of electric power applications of high temperature superconductivity. The two major elements of this program are wire development and applications development. This document describes the major research and developments activities for this program together with related accomplishments. The technical progress reported was summarized from recent open literature publications, presentations, and information prepared for the FY 1997 Annual Program Review held July 21--23, 1997. This ORNL program is highly leveraged by the staff and other resources of US industry and universities. In fact, nearly three-fourths of the ORNL effort is devoted to cooperative projects with private companies. Interlaboratory teams are also in place on a number of industry-driven projects. Patent disclosures, working group meetings, staff exchanges, and joint publications and presentations ensure that there is technology transfer with US industry. Working together, the collaborative teams are making rapid progress in solving the scientific and technical issues necessary for the commercialization of long lengths of practical high temperature superconductor wire and wire-using systems.

  18. ORNL Superconducting Technology Program for electric power systems. Annual report for FY 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Hawsey, R.A.; Turner, J.W.

    1996-05-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Superconducting Technology Program is conducted as part of a national effort by the U.S. Department of Energy`s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy to develop the science and technology base needed by U.S. industry for commercial development of electric power applications of high-temperature superconductivity. The two major elements of this program are wire development and systems development. This document describes the major research and development activities for this program together with related accomplishments. The technical progress reported was summarized from information prepared for the FY 1995 Annual Program Review held August 1-2, 1995. This ORNL program is highly leveraged by the staff and other resources of U.S. industry and universities. In fact, nearly three-fourths of the ORNL effort is devoted to cooperative projects with private companies. Interlaboratory teams are also in place on a number of industry-driven projects. Patent disclosures, working group meetings, staff exchanges, and joint publications and presentations ensure that there is technology transfer with U.S. industry. Working together, the collaborative teams are making rapid progress in solving the scientific and technical issues necessary for the commercialization of long lengths of practical high-temperature superconductor wire and wire-using systems.

  19. ORNL Superconducting Technology Program for Electric Power Systems--Annual Report for FY 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Hawsey, RA

    2002-02-18

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Superconducting Technology Program is conducted as part of a national effort by the US Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy to develop the science and technology base needed by US industry for development of electric power applications of high-temperature superconductivity. The two major elements of this program are wire development and applications development. A new part of the wire research effort was the Accelerated Coated Conductor Initiative. This document describes the major research and development activities for this program together with related accomplishments. The technical progress reported was summarized from recent open literature publications, presentations, and information prepared for the FY 2001 Annual Program Review held August 1-3, 2001. Aspects of ORNL's work that were presented at the International Cryogenic Materials Conference/Cryogenic Engineering Conference (July 2001) are included in this report as well. This ORNL program is highly leveraged by the staff and other resources of US industry and universities. Interlaboratory teams are also in place on a number of industry-driven projects. Working group meetings, staff exchanges, and joint publications and presentations ensure that there is technology transfer with US industry. Working together, the collaborative teams are making rapid progress in solving the scientific and technical issues necessary for the commercialization of long lengths of practical high-temperature superconductor wire and wire-using systems.

  20. ORNL Superconducting Technology Program for Electric Power Systems: Annual Report for FY 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Hawsey, R.A.

    2000-06-13

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Superconducting Technology Program is conducted as part of a national effort by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy to develop the science and technology base needed by U.S. industry for development of electric power applications of high-temperature superconductivity. The two major elements of this program are wire development and applications development. This document describes the major research and development activities for this program together with related accomplishments. The technical progress reported was summarized from recent open literature publications, presentations, and information prepared for the FY 1999 Annual Program Review held July 26-28, 1999. Aspects of ORNL's work that were presented at the International Cryogenic Materials Conference and the Cryogenic Engineering Conference (July 1999) are included in this report, as well. This ORNL program is highly leveraged by the staff and other resources of U.S. industry and universities. In fact, nearly three-fourths of the ORNL effort is devoted to cooperative projects with private companies. Interlaboratory teams are also in place on a number of industry-driven projects. Working group meetings, staff exchanges, and joint publications and presentations ensure that there is technology transfer with U.S. industry. Working together, the collaborative teams are making rapid progress in solving the scientific and technical issues necessary for the commercialization of long lengths of practical high-temperature superconductor wire and wire-using systems.

  1. ORNL Superconducting Technology Program for Electric Power Systems, Annual Report for FY 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Hawsey, R.A.; Murphy, A.W

    2000-04-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Superconducting Technology Program is conducted as part of a national effort by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy to develop the science and technology base needed by U.S. industry for development of electric power applications of high-temperature superconductivity. The two major elements of this program are wire development and applications development. This document describes the major research and development activities for this program together with related accomplishments. The technical progress reported was summarized from recent open literature publications, presentations, and information prepared for the FY 1999 Annual Program Review held July 26--28, 1999. Aspects of ORNL's work that were presented at the International Cryogenic Materials Conference and the Cryogenic Engineering Conference (July 1999) are included in this report, as well. This ORNL program is highly leveraged by the staff and other resources of U.S. industry and universities. In fact, nearly three-fourths of the ORNL effort is devoted to cooperative projects with private companies. Interlaboratory teams are also in place on a number of industry-driven projects. Working group meetings, staff exchanges, and joint publications and presentations ensure that there is technology transfer with U.S. industry. Working together, the collaborative teams are making rapid progress in solving the scientific and technical issues necessary for the commercialization of long lengths of practical high-temperature superconductor wire and wire-using systems.

  2. Biocide usage in cooling towers in the electric power and petroleum refining industries

    SciTech Connect

    Veil, J.; Rice, J.K.; Raivel, M.E.S.

    1997-11-01

    Cooling towers users frequently apply biocides to the circulating cooling water to control growth of microorganisms, algae, and macroorganisms. Because of the toxic properties of biocides, there is a potential for the regulatory controls on their use and discharge to become increasingly more stringent. This report examines the types of biocides used in cooling towers by companies in the electric power and petroleum refining industries, and the experiences those companies have had in dealing with agencies that regulate cooling tower blowdown discharges. Results from a sample of 67 electric power plants indicate that the use of oxidizing biocides (particularly chlorine) is favored. Quaternary ammonia salts (quats), a type of nonoxidizing biocide, are also used in many power plant cooling towers. The experience of dealing with regulators to obtain approval to discharge biocides differs significantly between the two industries. In the electric power industry, discharges of any new biocide typically must be approved in writing by the regulatory agency. The approval process for refineries is less formal. In most cases, the refinery must notify the regulatory agency that it is planning to use a new biocide, but the refinery does not need to get written approval before using it. The conclusion of the report is that few of the surveyed facilities are having any difficulty in using and discharging the biocides they want to use.

  3. 78 FR 64029 - Cost-Benefit Analysis for Radwaste Systems for Light-Water-Cooled Nuclear Power Reactors

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ... COMMISSION Cost-Benefit Analysis for Radwaste Systems for Light-Water-Cooled Nuclear Power Reactors AGENCY... Systems for Light-Water-Cooled Nuclear Power Reactors,'' in which the NRC made editorial corrections and... analysis for liquid and gaseous radwaste system components for light water nuclear power...

  4. A passive cooling system proposal for multifunction and high-power displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tari, Ilker

    2013-03-01

    Flat panel displays are conventionally cooled by internal natural convection, which constrains the possible rate of heat transfer from the panel. On one hand, during the last few years, the power consumption and the related cooling requirement for 1080p displays have decreased mostly due to energy savings by the switch to LED backlighting and more efficient electronics. However, on the other hand, the required cooling rate recently started to increase with new directions in the industry such as 3D displays, and ultra-high-resolution displays (recent 4K announcements and planned introduction of 8K). In addition to these trends in display technology itself, there is also a trend to integrate consumer entertainment products into displays with the ultimate goal of designing a multifunction device replacing the TV, the media player, the PC, the game console and the sound system. Considering the increasing power requirement for higher fidelity in video processing, these multifunction devices tend to generate very high heat fluxes, which are impossible to dissipate with internal natural convection. In order to overcome this obstacle, instead of active cooling with forced convection that comes with drawbacks of noise, additional power consumption, and reduced reliability, a passive cooling system relying on external natural convection and radiation is proposed here. The proposed cooling system consists of a heat spreader flat heat pipe and aluminum plate-finned heat sink with anodized surfaces. For this system, the possible maximum heat dissipation rates from the standard size panels (in 26-70 inch range) are estimated by using our recently obtained heat transfer correlations for the natural convection from aluminum plate-finned heat sinks together with the surface-to-surface radiation. With the use of the proposed passive cooling system, the possibility of dissipating very high heat rates is demonstrated, hinting a promising green alternative to active cooling.

  5. Compact fluid cooled power converter supporting multiple circuit boards

    DOEpatents

    Radosevich, Lawrence D.; Meyer, Andreas A.; Beihoff, Bruce C.; Kannenberg, Daniel G.

    2005-03-08

    A support may receive one or more power electronic circuits. The support may aid in removing heat from the circuits through fluid circulating through the support. The support, in conjunction with other packaging features may form a shield from both external EMI/RFI and from interference generated by operation of the power electronic circuits. Features may be provided to permit and enhance connection of the circuitry to external circuitry, such as improved terminal configurations. Modular units may be assembled that may be coupled to electronic circuitry via plug-in arrangements or through interface with a backplane or similar mounting and interconnecting structures.

  6. Evaluation of Hybrid Air-Cooled Flash/Binary Power Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Greg Mines

    2005-10-01

    Geothermal binary power plants reject a significant portion of the heat removed from the geothermal fluid. Because of the relatively low temperature of the heat source (geothermal fluid), the performance of these plants is quite sensitive to the sink temperature to which heat is rejected. This is particularly true of air-cooled binary plants. Recent efforts by the geothermal industry have examined the potential to evaporatively cool the air entering the air-cooled condensers during the hotter portions of a summer day. While the work has shown the benefit of this concept, air-cooled binary plants are typically located in regions that lack an adequate supply of clean water for use in this evaporative cooling. In the work presented, this water issue is addressed by pre-flashing the geothermal fluid to produce a clean condensate that can be utilized during the hotter portions of the year to evaporatively cool the air. This study examines both the impact of this pre-flash on the performance of the binary plant, and the increase in power output due to the ability to incorporate an evaporative component to the heat rejection process.

  7. Efficient transfer of positrons from a buffer-gas-cooled accumulator into an orthogonally oriented superconducting solenoid for antihydrogen studies

    E-print Network

    Gabrielse, Gerald

    Gesellschaft #12;2 100% efficiency. A 7 m long 5 cm diameter stainless-steel tube and a 20 mm long, 1.5 mm. The positrons are guided along a 9 m long magnetic guide that connects the central field lines of the 0.15 T field in the positron accumulator to the central magnetic field lines of the superconducting solenoid

  8. 2298 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON APPLIED SUPERCONDUCTIVITY, VOL. 13, NO. 2, JUNE 2003 Cryogenic Cooling Temperature of HTS Transformers

    E-print Network

    Chang, Ho-Myung

    , if the amount of ac loss is substantially reduced or the saving in capital investment earned by the compactness grant from the Center for Applied Superconductivity Technology (CAST) under the 21st Century Frontier R to exploit the capital investment and the operational cost for different sizes and op- erating temperatures

  9. High power density self-cooled lithium-vanadium blanket.

    SciTech Connect

    Gohar, Y.; Majumdar, S.; Smith, D.

    1999-07-01

    A self-cooled lithium-vanadium blanket concept capable of operating with 2 MW/m{sup 2} surface heat flux and 10 MW/m{sup 2} neutron wall loading has been developed. The blanket has liquid lithium as the tritium breeder and the coolant to alleviate issues of coolant breeder compatibility and reactivity. Vanadium alloy (V-4Cr-4Ti) is used as the structural material because it can accommodate high heat loads. Also, it has good mechanical properties at high temperatures, high neutron fluence capability, low degradation under neutron irradiation, good compatibility with the blanket materials, low decay heat, low waste disposal rating, and adequate strength to accommodate the electromagnetic loads during plasma disruption events. Self-healing electrical insulator (CaO) is utilized to reduce the MHD pressure drop. A poloidal coolant flow with high velocity at the first wall is used to reduce the peak temperature of the vanadium structure and to accommodate high surface heat flux. The blanket has a simple blanket configuration and low coolant pressure to reduce the fabrication cost, to improve the blanket reliability, and to increase confidence in the blanket performance. Spectral shifter, moderator, and reflector are utilized to improve the blanket shielding capability and energy multiplication, and to reduce the radial blanket thickness. Natural lithium is used to avoid extra cost related to the lithium enrichment process.

  10. Aalborg Universitet Water cooling of high power light emitting diode

    E-print Network

    Berning, Torsten

    specific power (W/m3 ) inside the LED based lamps cold plates were designed and manufactured. 6 different; traditional straight mini channel, S-shaped mini channel, straight mini channel with swirl, threaded mini the pressure difference across the cold plate in addition to heat transfer properties, it turned out that two

  11. POWER PLANT COOLING WATER CHLORINATION IN NORTHERN CALIFORNIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    A survey was conducted of chlorination practices at five power plants owned and operated by the Pacific Gas and Electric Company. Frequency and duration of chlorination varied significantly from plant to plant and was controlled analytically by the orthotolidine and/or amperometr...

  12. Adaptive Environmentally Contained Power and Cooling IT Infrastructure for the Data Center

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, Ron; Chavez, Miguel, E.

    2012-06-27

    The objectives of this program were to research and develop a fully enclosed Information Technology (IT) rack system for 100 kilowatts (KW) of IT load that provides its own internal power and cooling with High Voltage Alternating Current (HVAC defined as 480 volt) and chilled water as the primary inputs into the system and accepts alternative energy power sources such as wind and solar. For maximum efficiency, internal power to the IT equipment uses distributed High Voltage Direct Current power (HVDC defined as 360-380 volt) from the power source to the IT loads. The management scheme aggressively controls energy use to insure the best utilization of available power and cooling resources. The solution incorporates internal active management controls that not only optimizes the system environment for the given dynamic IT loads and changing system conditions, but also interfaces with data center Building Management Systems (BMS) to provide a complete end-to-end view of power and cooling chain. This technology achieves the goal of a Power Usage Effectiveness (PUE) of 1.25, resulting in a 38% reduction in the total amount of energy needed to support a 100KW IT load compared to current data center designs.

  13. Cryogenic temperature monitoring in superconducting power transmission line at CERN with hybrid multi-point and distributed fiber optic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiuchiolo, A.; Palmieri, L.; Consales, M.; Giordano, M.; Bajas, H.; Galtarossa, A.; Bajko, M.; Cusano, A.

    2015-09-01

    Distributed and multi-point fiber-optic based measurements of cryogenic temperature down to 30 K are presented. Measurements have been performed along the cryostat of a superconducting power transmission line, which is currently being tested at CERN over a length of about 20 m. Multi-point measurements were based on two kinds of FBG with different coatings (epoxy and PMMA). In addition, distributed measurements exploited optical frequency-domain reflectometry to analyze the Rayleigh scattering along two concatenated fibers with different coatings (acrylate and polyimmide). Results confirm the viability of these approaches to monitor cryogenic temperatures along a superconducting transmission line.

  14. Operation of the 30 MJ superconducting magnetic energy storage system in the Bonneville Power Administration electrical grid

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.D.; Boenig, H.J.; Schermer, R.I.

    1985-03-01

    The 30 MJ superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) system was installed in the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Tacoma Substation in 1982-83. Operation of the unit since that time has been for over 1200 hours. Specific tests to explore the SMES system's thermal and electrical characteristics and the control functions were conducted. The coil heat load with current modulation was determined. A converter with two 6-pulse bridges interfaces the superconducting coil to the power bus. Equal bridge voltage amplitude and constant reactive power modes of operation of the system were run with computer control of the SCR bridge firing angles. Coil energy dump tests were performed. Electrical grid system response to SMES modulation was observed, and full power SMES modulation was undertaken.

  15. Operation of the 30 MJ superconducting magnetic energy storage system in the Bonneville Power Administration Electrical Grid

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.D.; Boenig, H.J.; Schermer, R.I.; Hauer, J.F.

    1984-01-01

    The 30 MJ superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) system was installed in the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Tacoma Substation in 1982 to 1983. Operation of the unit since that time has been for over 1200 hours. Specific tests to explore the SMES system's thermal and electrical characteristics and the control functions were conducted. The coil heat load with current modulation was determined. A converter with two 6-pulse bridges interfaces the superconducting coil to the power bus. Equal bridge voltage amplitude and constant reactive power modes of operation of the system were run with computer control of the SCR bridge firing angles. Coil energy dump tests were performed. Electrical grid system response to SMES modulation was observed, and full power SMES modulation was undertaken.

  16. Peak power reduction and energy efficiency improvement with the superconducting flywheel energy storage in electric railway system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hansang; Jung, Seungmin; Cho, Yoonsung; Yoon, Donghee; Jang, Gilsoo

    2013-11-01

    This paper proposes an application of the 100 kWh superconducting flywheel energy storage systems to reduce the peak power of the electric railway system. The electric railway systems have high-power characteristics and large amount of regenerative energy during vehicles’ braking. The high-power characteristic makes operating cost high as the system should guarantee the secure capacity of electrical equipment and the low utilization rate of regenerative energy limits the significant energy efficiency improvement. In this paper, it had been proved that the peak power reduction and energy efficiency improvement can be achieved by using 100 kWh superconducting flywheel energy storage systems with the optimally controlled charging or discharging operations. Also, economic benefits had been assessed.

  17. Impact of Hybrid Wet/Dry Cooling on Concentrating Solar Power Plant Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, M. J.; Kutscher, C.

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the sensitivity of Rankine cycle plant performance to dry cooling and hybrid (parallel) wet/dry cooling combinations with the traditional wet-cooled model as a baseline. Plants with a lower temperature thermal resource are more sensitive to fluctuations in cooling conditions, and so the lower temperature parabolic trough plant is analyzed to assess the maximum impact of alternative cooling configurations. While low water-use heat rejection designs are applicable to any technology that utilizes a Rankine steam cycle for power generation, they are of special interest to concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies that are located in arid regions with limited water availability. System performance is evaluated using hourly simulations over the course of a year at Daggett, CA. The scope of the analysis in this paper is limited to the power block and the heat rejection system, excluding the solar field and thermal storage. As such, water used in mirror washing, maintenance, etc., is not included. Thermal energy produced by the solar field is modeled using NREL's Solar Advisor Model (SAM).

  18. Effect of Power Plant Cooling Water Discharge upon Water Quality in the Tokyo Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitahara, Kouichi; Wada, Akira; Uehara, Yoshikazu; Fukuoka, Ippei; Kawanaga, Mitsuhito; Takano, Tairyu

    Water quality in the Tokyo Bay is controlled by the load input from rivers, seawater currents, temperature variation, photosynthetic processes and others. On the other hand, 23.5 GJ/s of heat, as of 1995, is discharged into the Bay as cooling water effluent from thermal power plants along the coast. Low temperature water of bottom layers is pumped up and utilized as cooling water in thermal power plants. Although the intake and discharge of cooling water may influence water quality of coastal and inner bay areas where power plants are sited, few quantitative evaluations of the effects of cooling water on the water quality have been made yet. In the present study, we report a result of computations to predict the effects of cooling water discharge on the water quality of the Tokyo Bay in the summer, based on a "primary ecological model" for two thermal conditions: the current heat discharge of 23.5 GJ/s, and a heat discharge of 28.9 GJ/s which is expected in the future. Flow and water temperature distribution data, computed by Kitahara et al.(2003), were used to run the model. It was concluded that except in the vicinities of outlet points, water quality of the Tokyo Bay in the summer might be little changed by the future increase of 5.4 GJ/s of heat discharge.

  19. Long-term research in Japan: amorphous metals, metal oxide varistors, high-power semiconductors and superconducting generators

    SciTech Connect

    Hane, G.J.; Yorozu, M.; Sogabe, T.; Suzuki, S.

    1985-04-01

    The review revealed that significant activity is under way in the research of amorphous metals, but that little fundamental work is being pursued on metal oxide varistors and high-power semiconductors. Also, the investigation of long-term research program plans for superconducting generators reveals that activity is at a low level, pending the recommendations of a study currently being conducted through Japan's Central Electric Power Council.

  20. Design and operation of the 30-MJ superconducting magnetic-storage system on the Bonneville Power Administration bus

    SciTech Connect

    Schermer, R.I.; Barron, M.H.; Boenig, H.J.; Brown, R.R.; Criscuolo, A.L.; Cumming, C.J.; Dean, J.W.; Hassenzahl, W.V.; Rogers, J.D.; Seamons, M.J.

    1983-01-01

    A superconducting magnetic-energy-storage (SMES) unit is suitable for power-system stabilization because it can provide positive damping by absorbing or releasing energy with a relatively fast response time, 10 ms. In the fall of 1982, an SMES unit was installed at the Tacoma Substation of the Bonneville Power Administration as an experiment in monitoring, predicting and improving system stability. This paper reports principally on the system testing.

  1. Development of fundamental power coupler for high-current superconducting RF cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Jain P.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Xu, W.

    2012-05-20

    Brookhaven National Laboratory took a project of developing a 704 MHz five-cell superconducting RF cavity for high-current linacs, including Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) for planned electron-hadron collider eRHIC. The cavity will be fed by a high-power RF amplifier using a coaxial Fundamental Power Coupler (FPC), which delivers 20 kW of CW RF power to the cavity. The design of FPC is one of the important aspects as one has to take into account the heat losses dissipated on the surface of the conductor by RF fields along with that of the static heat load. Using a simple simulation model we show the temperature profile and the heat load dissipated along the coupler length. To minimize the heat load on FPC near the cavity end, a thermal intercept is required at an appropriate location on FPC. A 10 K intercept was chosen and its location optimized with our simulation code. The requirement on the helium gas flow rate for the effective heat removal from the thermal intercept is also discussed.

  2. Injection locking of a high power ultraviolet laser diode for laser cooling of ytterbium atoms.

    PubMed

    Hosoya, Toshiyuki; Miranda, Martin; Inoue, Ryotaro; Kozuma, Mikio

    2015-07-01

    We developed a high-power laser system at a wavelength of 399?nm for laser cooling of ytterbium atoms with ultraviolet laser diodes. The system is composed of an external cavity laser diode providing frequency stabilized output at a power of 40?mW and another laser diode for amplifying the laser power up to 220?mW by injection locking. The systematic method for optimization of our injection locking can also be applied to high power light sources at any other wavelengths. Our system does not depend on complex nonlinear frequency-doubling and can be made compact, which will be useful for providing light sources for laser cooling experiments including transportable optical lattice clocks. PMID:26233359

  3. Injection locking of a high power ultraviolet laser diode for laser cooling of ytterbium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosoya, Toshiyuki; Miranda, Martin; Inoue, Ryotaro; Kozuma, Mikio

    2015-07-01

    We developed a high-power laser system at a wavelength of 399 nm for laser cooling of ytterbium atoms with ultraviolet laser diodes. The system is composed of an external cavity laser diode providing frequency stabilized output at a power of 40 mW and another laser diode for amplifying the laser power up to 220 mW by injection locking. The systematic method for optimization of our injection locking can also be applied to high power light sources at any other wavelengths. Our system does not depend on complex nonlinear frequency-doubling and can be made compact, which will be useful for providing light sources for laser cooling experiments including transportable optical lattice clocks.

  4. $500,000 annually for heating and cooling prior to the installation of the PureComfortTM cooling, heating, and power system. Electrical power and space conditioning are now

    E-print Network

    Pennycook, Steve

    $500,000 annually for heating and cooling prior to the installation of the PureComfortTM cooling, heating, and power system. Electrical power and space conditioning are now provided more efficiently and with less environmental impact. Technology Butler installed the United Technologies PureComfortTM Model 240M

  5. Nuclear thermoelectric power unit with two-phase thermosiphons in the cooling circuit

    SciTech Connect

    Yakimov, V.; Kaplar, E.; Sveshnikov, V.; Sukhov, A.

    1993-12-31

    Nuclear thermoelectric units with electric power as high as 200 KWT, in case of of lifted thermogenerator blocks by their technical, ecological, and economic chracteristics, meet the requirements of autonomous electric energy sources for land-based and sea units of the stationary and transportable type. This report describes the developement of a thermoelectric unit with two phase thermosiphons in the cooling circuits.

  6. Tier-Partitioning for Power Delivery vs Cooling Tradeoff in 3D VLSI for Mobile Applications

    E-print Network

    Lim, Sung Kyu

    Tier-Partitioning for Power Delivery vs Cooling Tradeoff in 3D VLSI for Mobile Applications delivery to the tier farthest away from the package in 3D VLSI is challenging. This is because the current provided by the package on the bottom is (1) first used by other tiers before it reaches the top, and (2

  7. FORAGE FISH POPULATIONS AND GROWTH OF MUSKELLUNGE IN A SOUTH DAKOTA POWER PLANT COOLING RESERVOIR

    E-print Network

    ) in Big Stone Power Plant cooling reservoir, South Dakota, and other waters in the northern United states. . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 11. Table 11. Condition factor for 3 length intervals of tadpole madtoms (Noturus gyrinus), Big. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. Back-calculated total lengths (mm) of tadpole madtoms (Noturus gyrinus), Big

  8. WATER CONSUMPTION AND COSTS FOR VARIOUS STEAM ELECTRIC POWER PLANT COOLING SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a state-of-the-art study, addressing consumptive water use and related costs of various steam electric power plant cooling systems, the availability of water for all uses by area, and the impact of legal constraints on water use in the U.S.

  9. Prospects for the medium- and long-term development of China`s electric power industry and analysis of the potential market for superconductivity technology

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Z.

    1998-05-01

    First of all, overall economic growth objectives in China are concisely and succinctly specified in this report. Secondly, this report presents a forecast of energy supply and demand for China`s economic growth for 2000--2050. In comparison with the capability of energy construction in China in the future, a gap between supply and demand is one of the important factors hindering the sustainable development of Chain`s economy. The electric power industry is one of China`s most important industries. To adopt energy efficiency through high technology and utilizing energy adequately is an important technological policy for the development of China`s electric power industry in the future. After briefly describing the achievements of China`s electric power industry, this report defines the target areas and policies for the development of hydroelectricity and nuclear electricity in the 2000s in China, presents the strategic position of China`s electric power industry as well as objectives and relevant plans of development for 2000--2050. This report finds that with the discovery of superconducting electricity, the discovery of new high-temperature superconducting (HTS) materials, and progress in materials techniques, the 21st century will be an era of superconductivity. Applications of superconductivity in the energy field, such as superconducting storage, superconducting transmission, superconducting transformers, superconducting motors, its application in Magneto-Hydro-Dynamics (MHD), as well as in nuclear fusion, has unique advantages. Its market prospects are quite promising. 12 figs.

  10. A modular gas-cooled cermet reactor system for planetary base power

    SciTech Connect

    Jahshan, S.N.; Borkowski, J.A. )

    1993-01-15

    Fission nuclear power is foreseen as the source for electricity in planetary colonization and exploration. A six module gas-cooled, cermet-fueled reactor is proposed that can meet the design objectives. The highly enriched core is compact and can operate at high temperature for a long life. The helium coolant powers six modular Brayton cycles that compare favorably with the SP-100-based Brayton cycle.

  11. NREL Helps Cool the Power Electronics in Electric Vehicles (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-07-01

    Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are developing and demonstrating innovative heat-transfer technologies for cooling power electronics devices in hybrid and electric vehicles. In collaboration with 3M and Wolverine Tube, Inc., NREL is using surface enhancements to dissipate heat more effectively, permitting a reduction in the size of power electronic systems and potentially reducing the overall costs of electric vehicles.

  12. Development of air-cooled ceramic nozzles for a power-generating gas turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuchiya, T.; Furuse, Y.; Yoshino, S.; Chikami, R.; Tsukuda, Y.; Mori, M.

    1996-10-01

    The development of air-cooled ceramic nozzle vanes for a power-generating gas turbine has been reported. To make up the limited temperature resistance of present ceramic materials, the utilization of a small amount of cooling air has been studied for the first-stage nozzle vanes of a 1,500 C class gas turbine. A series of cascade tests were carried out for the designed air-cooled Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} nozzle vanes under 6 atm and 1,500 C conditions. It was confirmed that the maximum ceramic temperature can be maintained below 1,300 C by a small amount of cooling air. In spite of the increased thermal stresses from local cooling, all Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} nozzle vanes survived the cascade tests, including both steady-state and transients of emergency shutdown. The potential for an air-cooled ceramic nozzle was demonstrated for a 1,500 C class gas turbine application.

  13. Application of evaporative cooling technology in super-high power density magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, B.; Ruan, L.; Gu, G. B.; Guo, S. Q.; Cao, R.; Li, Z. G.; Lu, W.; Zhang, X. Z.; Sun, L. T.; Zhao, H. W.

    2014-02-01

    Evaporative cooling technology utilizes phase-change heat transfer mode to achieve the cooling for heating equipment. The heat transfer capacity of evaporative cooling technology is far more than air or water cooling technology. The Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source magnet is a typical super-high power density magnet, and the evaporative cooling technology is an ideal cooling method for the coils of magnet. In this paper we show the structure and process of coils and the special design of flow channels of coolant for an experiment magnet model. Additionally, the heat transfer circulation is presented and analyzed. By the finite element method, the flow channels are optimized to rationally allocate coolant and to reduce the temperature of coils. For the experiment model, the current density of copper wire of coils is 19 A/mm2, and the coil-windows current density is larger than 12 A/mm2. The max temperature of coils is below 80 °C, and the total heat is about 200 kW.

  14. 78 FR 64029 - Cost-Benefit Analysis for Radwaste Systems for Light-Water-Cooled Nuclear Power Reactors

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ...components for light water nuclear power reactors. ADDRESSES...Burton@nrc.gov, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington...Technical Direction to Revise Radiation Protection Regulations and...Material in Light-Water-Cooled Nuclear Power Reactor...

  15. Microwave power coupler for a superconducting multiple-cell cavity for accelerator application and its testing procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jianjian

    2008-12-01

    Superconducting cavity resonators offer the advantage of high field intensity for a given input power, making them an attractive contender for particle accelerator applications. Power coupling into a superconducting cavity employed in a particle accelerator requires unique provisions to maintain high vacuum and cryogenic temperature on the cavity side, while operating with ambient conditions on the source side. Components introduced to fulfill mechanical requirements must show negligible obstruction of the propagation of the microwave with absence of critical locations that may give rise to electron multipaction, leading to a multiple section design, instead of an aperture, a probe, or a loop structure as found in conventional cavities. A coaxial power coupler for a superconducting multiple-cell cavity at 3.9 GHz has been developed. The cavity is intended to be employed as an accelerator to provide enhanced electron beam quality in a free-electron laser in Hamburg (FLASH) user facility. The design of the coupler called for two windows to sustain high vacuum in the cavity and two bellows to accommodate mechanical dimensional changes resulting from cryogenics. Suppression of multipacting was accomplished by the choice of conductor dimensions and materials with low second yield coefficients. Prior to integration with the cavity, the coupler was tested for intrinsic properties in a back-to-back configuration and conditioned for high-power operation with increasing power input. Maximum incident power was measured to be 61 kW. When integrated with the superconducting cavity, a loaded quality factor of 9 x 10{sup 5} was measured by transient method. Coupler return loss and insertion loss were estimated to be around -21 dB and -0.2 dB, respectively.

  16. Simulation of chip-size electrocaloric refrigerator with high cooling-power density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Haiming; Craven, Brent; Qian, Xiaoshi; Li, Xinyu; Cheng, Ailan; Zhang, Q. M.

    2013-03-01

    The large electrocaloric effect that found in ferroelectric polymers creates unique opportunity for developing high performance chip scale solid state refrigerator. This letter presents a finite volume simulation study and shows that by employing solid state regenerators and the micro-heat pumping mechanism used in the thermoacoustic cooling, a compact Electrocaloric Oscillatory Refrigeration (ECOR) device can be realized. The simulation results demonstrate that a 1 cm-long ECOR device can provide 9 W/cm3 volumetric cooling power density at 20 K temperature span. By tuning the device parameters in the model, the ECOR can reach more than 50% of the Carnot efficiency.

  17. Organohalogen products from chlorination of cooling water at nuclear power stations

    SciTech Connect

    Bean, R.M.

    1983-10-01

    Eight nuclear power units at seven locations in the US were studied to determine the effects of chlorine, added as a biocide, on the composition of cooling water discharge. Water, sediment and biota samples from the sites were analyzed for total organic halogen and for a variety of organohalogen compounds. Haloforms were discharged from all plants studied, at concentrations of a few ..mu..g/L (parts-per-billion). Evidence was obtained that power plants with cooling towers discharge a significant portion of the haloforms formed during chlorination to the atmosphere. A complex mixture of halogenated phenols was found in the cooling water discharges of the power units. Cooling towers can act to concentrate halogenated phenols to levels approaching those of the haloforms. Examination of samples by capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry did not result in identification of any significant concentrations of lipophilic base-neutral compounds that could be shown to be formed by the chlorination process. Total concentrations of lipophilic (Bioabsorbable) and volatile organohalogen material discharged ranged from about 2 to 4 ..mu..g/L. Analysis of sediment samples for organohalogen material suggests that certain chlorination products may accumulate in sediments, although no tissue bioaccumulation could be demonstrated from analysis of a limited number of samples. 58 references, 25 figures, 31 tables.

  18. Development of practical high temperature superconducting wire for electric power application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawsey, Robert A.; Sokolowski, Robert S.; Haldar, Pradeep; Motowidlo, Leszek R.

    1995-01-01

    The technology of high temperature superconductivity has gone from beyond mere scientific curiousity into the manufacturing environment. Single lengths of multifilamentary wire are now produced that are over 200 meters long and that carry over 13 amperes at 77 K. Short-sample critical current densities approach 5 x 104 A/sq cm at 77 K. Conductor requirements such as high critical current density in a magnetic field, strain-tolerant sheathing materials, and other engineering properties are addressed. A new process for fabricating round BSCCO-2212 wire has produced wires with critical current densities as high as 165,000 A/sq cm at 4.2 K and 53,000 A/sq cm at 40 K. This process eliminates the costly, multiple pressing and rolling steps that are commonly used to develop texture in the wires. New multifilamentary wires with strengthened sheathing materials have shown improved yield strengths up to a factor of five better than those made with pure silver. Many electric power devices require the wire to be formed into coils for production of strong magnetic fields. Requirements for coils and magnets for electric power applications are described.

  19. Heterogeneous Superconducting Low-Noise Sensing Coils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, Inseob; Penanen, Konstantin I.; Ho Eom, Byeong

    2008-01-01

    A heterogeneous material construction has been devised for sensing coils of superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometers that are subject to a combination of requirements peculiar to some advanced applications, notably including low-field magnetic resonance imaging for medical diagnosis. The requirements in question are the following: The sensing coils must be large enough (in some cases having dimensions of as much as tens of centimeters) to afford adequate sensitivity; The sensing coils must be made electrically superconductive to eliminate Johnson noise (thermally induced noise proportional to electrical resistance); and Although the sensing coils must be cooled to below their superconducting- transition temperatures with sufficient cooling power to overcome moderate ambient radiative heat leakage, they must not be immersed in cryogenic liquid baths. For a given superconducting sensing coil, this combination of requirements can be satisfied by providing a sufficiently thermally conductive link between the coil and a cold source. However, the superconducting coil material is not suitable as such a link because electrically superconductive materials are typically poor thermal conductors. The heterogeneous material construction makes it possible to solve both the electrical- and thermal-conductivity problems. The basic idea is to construct the coil as a skeleton made of a highly thermally conductive material (typically, annealed copper), then coat the skeleton with an electrically superconductive alloy (typically, a lead-tin solder) [see figure]. In operation, the copper skeleton provides the required thermally conductive connection to the cold source, while the electrically superconductive coating material shields against Johnson noise that originates in the copper skeleton.

  20. Use of Produced Water in Recirculated Cooling Systems at Power Generating Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    C. McGowin; M. DiFilippo; L. Weintraub

    2006-06-30

    Tree ring studies indicate that, for the greater part of the last three decades, New Mexico has been relatively 'wet' compared to the long-term historical norm. However, during the last several years, New Mexico has experienced a severe drought. Some researchers are predicting a return of very dry weather over the next 30 to 40 years. Concern over the drought has spurred interest in evaluating the use of otherwise unusable saline waters to supplement current fresh water supplies for power plant operation and cooling and other uses. The U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory sponsored three related assessments of water supplies in the San Juan Basin area of the four-corner intersection of Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico. These were (1) an assessment of using water produced with oil and gas as a supplemental supply for the San Juan Generating Station (SJGS); (2) a field evaluation of the wet-surface air cooling (WSAC) system at SJGS; and (3) the development of a ZeroNet systems analysis module and an application of the Watershed Risk Management Framework (WARMF) to evaluate a range of water shortage management plans. The study of the possible use of produced water at SJGS showed that produce water must be treated to justify its use in any reasonable quantity at SJGS. The study identified produced water volume and quality, the infrastructure needed to deliver it to SJGS, treatment requirements, and delivery and treatment economics. A number of produced water treatment alternatives that use off-the-shelf technology were evaluated along with the equipment needed for water treatment at SJGS. Wet surface air-cooling (WSAC) technology was tested at the San Juan Generating Station (SJGS) to determine its capacity to cool power plant circulating water using degraded water. WSAC is a commercial cooling technology and has been used for many years to cool and/or condense process fluids. The purpose of the pilot test was to determine if WSAC technology could cool process water at cycles of concentration considered highly scale forming for mechanical draft cooling towers. At the completion of testing, there was no visible scale on the heat transfer surfaces and cooling was sustained throughout the test period. The application of the WARMF decision framework to the San Juan Basis showed that drought and increased temperature impact water availability for all sectors (agriculture, energy, municipal, industry) and lead to critical shortages. WARMF-ZeroNet, as part of the integrated ZeroNet decision support system, offers stakeholders an integrated approach to long-term water management that balances competing needs of existing water users and economic growth under the constraints of limited supply and potential climate change.

  1. Environmental problems associated with decommissioning the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Cooling Pond.

    PubMed

    Oskolkov, B Ya; Bondarkov, M D; Gaschak, S P; Maksymenko, A M; Maksymenko, V M; Martynenko, V I; Farfán, E B; Jannik, G T; Marra, J C

    2010-11-01

    Decommissioning of nuclear power plants and other nuclear fuel cycle facilities associated with residual radioactive contamination of their territories is an imperative issue. Significant problems may result from decommissioning of cooling ponds with residual radioactive contamination. The Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) Cooling Pond is one of the largest self-contained water reservoirs in the Chernobyl region and Ukrainian and Belorussian Polesye region. The 1986 ChNPP Reactor Unit Number Four significantly contaminated the ChNPP Cooling Pond. The total radionuclide inventory in the ChNPP Cooling Pond bottom deposits are as follows: ¹³?Cs: 16.28 ± 2.59 TBq; ??Sr: 2.4 ± 0.48 TBq; and ²³?+²??Pu: 0.00518 ± 0.00148 TBq. The ChNPP Cooling Pond is inhabited by over 500 algae species and subspecies, over 200 invertebrate species, and 36 fish species. The total mass of the living organisms in the ChNPP Cooling Pond is estimated to range from about 60,000 to 100,000 tons. The territory adjacent to the ChNPP Cooling Pond attracts many birds and mammals (178 bird species and 47 mammal species were recorded in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone). This article describes several options for the ChNPP Cooling Pond decommissioning and environmental problems associated with its decommissioning. The article also provides assessments of the existing and potential exposure doses for the shoreline biota. For the 2008 conditions, the estimated total dose rate values were 11.4 40 ?Gy h?¹ for amphibians, 6.3 ?Gy h?¹ for birds, 15.1 ?Gy h?¹ for mammals, and 10.3 ?Gy h?¹ for reptiles, with the recommended maximum dose rate being equal to 40 ?Gy h?¹. However, drying the ChNPP Cooling Pond may increase the exposure doses to 94.5 ?Gy h?¹ for amphibians, 95.2 ?Gy h?¹ for birds, 284.0 ?Gy h?¹ for mammals, and 847.0 ?Gy h?¹ for reptiles. All of these anticipated dose rates exceed the recommended values. PMID:20938234

  2. Microwave properties of YBa2Cu3O(7-delta) high-transition-temperature superconducting thin films measured by the power transmission method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, F. A.; Gordon, W. L.; Bhasin, K. B.; Heinen, V. O.; Warner, J. D.

    1991-01-01

    The microwave response of YBa2Cu3O(7-delta) superconducting thin films deposited on LaAlO3, MgO, YSZ, and LaGaO3 substrates are studied. It is found that the microwave transmission properties are very weakly dependent on temperature in the normal state but change drastically upon transition to the superconducting state. In particular, the transmission decreases and there is a negative phase shift with respect to the phase at room temperature when the sample is cooled through its transition temperature. The magnetic penetration depth for all the films was determined from the surface reactance of the films. The microwave complex conductivity is determined in both the normal and the superconducting state. It is observed that both sigma1 and sigma2 increase in transition to the superconducting state. The surface resistivity is calculated for all the films.

  3. Thermal Insulation Test of new Designed Cryogenic Pipes for the Superconducting DC Power Transmission System in Ishikari, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Hirofumi; Ivanov, Yury V.; Hamabe, Makoto; Chikumoto, Noriko; Takano, Hirohisa; Yamaguchi, Satarou

    New cryogenic pipes were designed for the superconducting DC power transmission systems constructed in the Ishikari area in Japan. In the designs two inner pipes, for the cable and for the return of liquid nitrogen, are installed in a single outer pipe for the circulation of liquid nitrogen. In contrast to the cryogenic pipes commonly used for the superconducting power transmission, in which corrugated pipes are used, straight pipes are adopted to reduce pressure loss of the circulation of the liquid nitrogen. A radiation shield to reduce heat leak to the inner pipe for the cable is adopted in one of the designs. Two types of test pipes with and without the radiation shield were constructed and heat leak of these pipes was measured to evaluate the effciency of the test pipes. The lowest heat leak of 0.73 W/m was measured for the test pipe with the radiation shield.

  4. Topographic power spectral density study of the effect of surface treatment processes on niobium for superconducting radio frequency accelerator cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Reece, Hui Tian, Michael Kelley, Chen Xu

    2012-04-01

    Microroughness is viewed as a critical issue for attaining optimum performance of superconducting radio frequency accelerator cavities. The principal surface smoothing methods are buffered chemical polish (BCP) and electropolish (EP). The resulting topography is characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The power spectral density (PSD) of AFM data provides a more thorough description of the topography than a single-value roughness measurement. In this work, one dimensional average PSD functions derived from topography of BCP and EP with different controlled starting conditions and durations have been fitted with a combination of power law, K correlation, and shifted Gaussian models to extract characteristic parameters at different spatial harmonic scales. While the simplest characterizations of these data are not new, the systematic tracking of scale-specific roughness as a function of processing is new and offers feedback for tighter process prescriptions more knowledgably targeted at beneficial niobium topography for superconducting radio frequency applications.

  5. Superconducting mirror for laser gyroscope

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.

    1991-05-14

    This paper describes an apparatus for reflecting a light beam. It comprises: a mirror assembly comprising a substrate and a superconductive mirror formed on such substrate, wherein: the substrate is optically transparent to the light beam and has a thickness of from about 0.5 to about 1.0 millimeter, and the superconductive mirror has a thickness of from about 0.5 to about 1.0 microns; means for cooling the superconductive mirror; means for measuring the temperature of the superconductive mirror; means for determining the reflectivity of the superconductive mirror; and means for varying the reflectivity of the superconductive mirror.

  6. Application of a combined superconducting fault current limiter and STATCOM to enhancement of power system transient stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdad, Belkacem; Srairi, K.

    2013-12-01

    Stable and reliable operation of the power system network is dependent on the dynamic equilibrium between energy production and power demand under large disturbance such as short circuit or important line tripping. This paper investigates the use of combined model based superconducting fault current limiter (SFCL) and shunt FACTS Controller (STATCOM) for assessing the transient stability of a power system considering the automatic voltage regulator. The combined model located at a specified branch based on voltage stability index using continuation power flow. The main role of the proposed combined model is to achieve simultaneously a flexible control of reactive power using STATCOM Controller and to reduce fault current using superconducting technology based SFCL. The proposed combined model has been successfully adapted within the transient stability program and applied to enhance the transient power system stability of the WSCC9-Bus system. Critical clearing time (CCT) has been used as an index to evaluate and validate the contribution of the proposed coordinated Controller. Simulation results confirm the effectiveness and perspective of this combined Controller to enhance the dynamic power system performances.

  7. Accumulation of /sup 137/Cs in commercial fish of the Belyarsk nuclear power station cooling supply

    SciTech Connect

    Trapeznikova, V.N.; Kulikov, N.V.; Trapeznikov, A.V.

    1984-07-01

    Results are presented of a comparative study of the accumulation of /sup 137/Cs in basic species of commercial fish of the Beloyarsk reservoir which is used as the cooling supply for the Beloyarsk nuclear power station. Possible reasons for interspecies differences in accumulation of the radionuclide are indicated, and the increased accumulation of /sup 137/Cs by free-living fish in the zone of heated water effluent from the station and the reduced accumulation of the emitter in carp, which are cultivated on artificial food in cages, are noted. Levels of the content of the radionuclide are compared in roach and farm carp from the cooling supplies of the Beloyarsk station and the Reftinsk power plant in the Urals.

  8. All-solid-state high-power conduction-cooled Nd:YLF rod laser.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Y; Yanagisawa, T; Ueno, S; Tajime, T; Uchino, O; Nagai, T; Nagasawa, C

    2000-08-15

    A high-average-power conduction-cooled diode-pumped Nd:YLF rod laser has been developed. A new conduction-cooled side-pumping scheme with a solid prismatic pump-light confinement cavity was employed. A transparent, high-thermal-conductivity MgF>(2) prism was used as a highly efficient pump cavity as well as a low-thermal-resistance heat spreader. The pumping efficiency and thermal resistance of the cavity were 85% and 0.20 degrees C degrees W, respectively. When this scheme was combined with heat pipes for heat removal, a maximum average output power of 72 W was demonstrated, with an optical slope efficiency as high as 49%. PMID:18066156

  9. Air-Cooled Heat Exchanger for High-Temperature Power Electronics: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Waye, S. K.; Lustbader, J.; Musselman, M.; King, C.

    2015-05-06

    This work demonstrates a direct air-cooled heat exchanger strategy for high-temperature power electronic devices with an application specific to automotive traction drive inverters. We present experimental heat dissipation and system pressure curves versus flow rate for baseline and optimized sub-module assemblies containing two ceramic resistance heaters that provide device heat fluxes. The maximum allowable junction temperature was set to 175 deg.C. Results were extrapolated to the inverter scale and combined with balance-of-inverter components to estimate inverter power density and specific power. The results exceeded the goal of 12 kW/L and 12 kW/kg for power density and specific power, respectively.

  10. Noise power spectra of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry using a cooled spray chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollmann, D.; Pilger, C.; Hergenröder, R.; Leis, F.; Tschöpel, P.; Broekaert, J. A. C.

    1994-07-01

    The influence of the spray chamber temperature and the related aerosol water loading on ArO + as typical spectral interference in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is studied. Therefore, the noise power spectra for the ArO + have been measured by use of fast Fourier transform (FFT) analysis. A Meinhard nebulizer and a GMK nebulizer were used in connection with a cooled spray chamber at a temperature of 5-25°C. It could be found that the relative standard deviation of the analyte signal in ICP-MS was improved by cooling the spray chamber. The noise power spectra showed that especially the white noise goes down when the spray chamber is cooled. The overall white noise with the GMK nebulizer is shown to be higher in the case of an Al 2O 3 slurry than in the case of an AlCl 3 solution, containing both 400 ?g/ml Al. The pumping pulse rates are clearly visible in the noise amplitude spectra, but their amplitudes decrease at the presence of an impactor bead m the GMK nebulizer. Shifts of the noise band around 355 Hz were shown to occur as a result of the power level and the outer gas flow as well.

  11. A HIGH POWER RF COUPLER DESIGN FOR MUON COOLING RF CAVITIES.

    SciTech Connect

    CORLETT,J.; LI,DERUN; RIMMER,R.; HOLTKAMP,N.; MORETTI,A.; KIRK,H.G.

    1999-03-29

    We present a high power RF coupler design for an interleaved {pi}/2 805 MHz standing wave accelerating structure proposed for an muon cooling experiment at FNAL. The coupler, in its simplest form, is a rectangular waveguide directly connected to an accelerating Cell through an open slot on the cavity side-wall or end-plates. Two of such couplers are needed to feed the interleaved cavities. Current high power RF test requires the coupler to be at critical coupling. Numerical simulations on the coupler designs using MAFIA will be presented.

  12. Achieving more reliable operation of turbine generators at nuclear power plants by improving the water chemistry of the generator stator cooling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyapkov, V. F.; Chudakova, I. Yu.; Alekseenko, O. A.

    2011-08-01

    Ways of improving the water chemistry used in the turbine generator stator's cooling systems at Russian nuclear power plants are considered. Data obtained from operational chemical monitoring of indicators characterizing the quality of cooling water in the turbine generator stator cooling systems of operating power units at nuclear power plants are presented.

  13. RESIDUAL OXIDANTS REMOVAL FROM COASTAL POWER PLANT COOLING SYSTEM DISCHARGES: FIELD EVALUATION OF SO2 ADDITION SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an evaluation of the performance of a dechlorination system that uses SO2 to remove residual oxidants from chlorinated sea water in a power plant cooling system. Samples of unchlorinated, chlorinated, and dechlorinated cooling water were obtained at Pa...

  14. Multi-criteria decision analysis of concentrated solar power with thermal energy storage and dry cooling.

    PubMed

    Klein, Sharon J W

    2013-12-17

    Decisions about energy backup and cooling options for parabolic trough (PT) concentrated solar power have technical, economic, and environmental implications. Although PT development has increased rapidly in recent years, energy policies do not address backup or cooling option requirements, and very few studies directly compare the diverse implications of these options. This is the first study to compare the annual capacity factor, levelized cost of energy (LCOE), water consumption, land use, and life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of PT with different backup options (minimal backup (MB), thermal energy storage (TES), and fossil fuel backup (FF)) and different cooling options (wet (WC) and dry (DC). Multicriteria decision analysis was used with five preference scenarios to identify the highest-scoring energy backup-cooling combination for each preference scenario. MB-WC had the highest score in the Economic and Climate Change-Economy scenarios, while FF-DC and FF-WC had the highest scores in the Equal and Availability scenarios, respectively. TES-DC had the highest score for the Environmental scenario. DC was ranked 1-3 in all preference scenarios. Direct comparisons between GHG emissions and LCOE and between GHG emissions and land use suggest a preference for TES if backup is require for PT plants to compete with baseload generators. PMID:24245524

  15. Contingency power for a small turboshaft engine by using water injection into turbine cooling air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biesiadny, Thomas J.; Klann, Gary A.

    1992-01-01

    Because of one-engine-inoperative (OEI) requirements, together with hot-gas reingestion and hot-day, high-altitude take-off situations, power augmentation for multiengine rotorcraft has always been of critical interest. However, power augmentation by using overtemperature at the turbine inlet will shorten turbine life unless a method of limiting thermal and mechanical stress is found. A possible solution involves allowing the turbine inlet temperature to rise to augment power while injecting water into the turbine cooling air to limit hot-section metal temperatures. An experimental water injection device was installed in an engine and successfully tested. Although concern for unprotected subcomponents in the engine hot section prevented demonstration of the technique's maximum potential, it was still possible to demonstrate increases in power while maintaining nearly constant turbine rotor blade temperature.

  16. Contingency power for small turboshaft engines using water injection into turbine cooling air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biesiadny, Thomas J.; Klann, Gary A.; Clark, David A.; Berger, Brett

    1987-01-01

    Because of one engine inoperative requirements, together with hot-gas reingestion and hot day, high altitude takeoff situations, power augmentation for multiengine rotorcraft has always been of critical interest. However, power augmentation using overtemperature at the turbine inlet will shorten turbine life unless a method of limiting thermal and mechanical stresses is found. A possible solution involves allowing the turbine inlet temperature to rise to augment power while injecting water into the turbine cooling air to limit hot-section metal temperatures. An experimental water injection device was installed in an engine and successfully tested. Although concern for unprotected subcomponents in the engine hot section prevented demonstration of the technique's maximum potential, it was still possible to demonstrate increases in power while maintaining nearly constant turbine rotor blade temperature.

  17. Power flattening on modified CANDLE small long life gas-cooled fast reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Monado, Fiber; Su'ud, Zaki; Waris, Abdul; Basar, Khairul; Ariani, Menik; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2014-09-30

    Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) is one of the candidates of next generation Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) that expected to be operated commercially after 2030. In this research conceptual design study of long life 350 MWt GFR with natural uranium metallic fuel as fuel cycle input has been performed. Modified CANDLE burn-up strategy with first and second regions located near the last region (type B) has been applied. This reactor can be operated for 10 years without refuelling and fuel shuffling. Power peaking reduction is conducted by arranging the core radial direction into three regions with respectively uses fuel volume fraction 62.5%, 64% and 67.5%. The average power density in the modified core is about 82 Watt/cc and the power peaking factor decreased from 4.03 to 3.43.

  18. Fibre-coupled air-cooled high-power diode laser systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartoschewski, Daniel; Meinschien, Jens; Fornahl, Udo

    2008-02-01

    Current laser systems based on high-power laser diode bars need active cooling either water cooling or the use of thermo-electric coolers to ensure an adequate operating temperature for a reasonable lifetime. Here is a solution with a bonded fin heat sink and forced ventilation introduced, a diode laser bar with an improved efficiency and a low thermal resistance as well as an optical system for a highly efficient fibre coupling. With this system it is possible to couple 25 Watt continuous wave power from a single laser diode bar on a passive heat sink into a fibre with 200 ?m core diameter. The basis for this performance is a heat sink with an exceptionally low thermal resistance. Several new features are introduced to reach a low overall gradient between the laser diode temperature and the ambient temperature. In addition, it does geometrically fit to the layout of the optical design. Shape and aspect ratio of both heat sink and housing of the laser system are matched to each other. Another feature is the use of hard-soldered or pressed bars to achieve a thermo-mechanically stable performance. The long-term thermal characteristic was tested. The operation temperature comes to saturation after about 30 minutes. Therefore it can be used for continuous wave operation at 25 Watt output power. At a quasi continuous operation at 70 percent duty cycle a peak power of 30 Watt out of the fibre is possible. From this technology results a compact fibre coupled laser system what is simple to drive compared with current high power laser systems, because there is no need to control the operating temperature. This gives way for more compact driver solutions. Fields of application are laser marking systems and material processing, where a simple driver system is requested. Also medical applications need this requirement and a compact cooling too so that mobile integrated solutions become possible. Further developments allow multiple laser diode systems for specific industrial applications demanding more power. Our measurements show the potential for direct air-cooled laser systems with 100 Watt power out of the fibre.

  19. Design and testing of a phototype water-cooled vacuum interrupter for use in superconducting magnet protection circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, W.M.

    1988-01-01

    A water-cooled vacuum interrupter was designed and tested for use at 25 kA and 10 kV. This device is expected to have a lifetime approximately one order of magnitude greater than commercial dc circuit breakers. Testing showed that, although the device could successfully carry and interrupt 25 kA, interruption reliabililty was only about 95% with a 10 kV recovery voltage. In addition, a structural crack developed in one electrode from either thermal or mechanical stresses or a combination thereof. 11 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Effect of makeup water properties on the condenser fouling in power planr cooling system

    SciTech Connect

    Safari, I.; Walker, M.; Abbasian, J.; Arastoopour, H.; Hsieh, M-K.; Dzombak, D.; Miller, D.

    2011-01-01

    The thermoelectric power industry in the U.S. uses a large amount of fresh water. As available freshwater for use in thermoelectric power production becomes increasingly limited, use of nontraditional water sources is of growing interest. Utilization of nontraditional water, in cooling systems increases the potential for mineral precipitation on heat exchanger surfaces. In that regard, predicting the accelerated rate of scaling and fouling in condenser is crucial to evaluate the condenser performance. To achieve this goal, water chemistry should be incorporated in cooling system modeling and simulation. This paper addresses the effects of various makeup water properties on the cooling system, namely pH and aqueous speciation, both of which are important factors affecting the fouling rate in the main condenser. Detailed modeling of the volatile species desorption (i.e. CO{sub 2} and NH{sub 3}), the formation of scale in the recirculating system, and the relationship between water quality and the corresponding fouling rates is presented.

  1. ENVIRONMENTAL PROBLEMS ASSOCIATED WITH DECOMMISSIONING THE CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR POWER PLANT COOLING POND

    SciTech Connect

    Farfan, E.

    2009-09-30

    Decommissioning of nuclear power plants and other nuclear fuel cycle facilities has been an imperative issue lately. There exist significant experience and generally accepted recommendations on remediation of lands with residual radioactive contamination; however, there are hardly any such recommendations on remediation of cooling ponds that, in most cases, are fairly large water reservoirs. The literature only describes remediation of minor reservoirs containing radioactive silt (a complete closure followed by preservation) or small water reservoirs resulting in reestablishing natural water flows. Problems associated with remediation of river reservoirs resulting in flooding of vast agricultural areas also have been described. In addition, the severity of environmental and economic problems related to the remedial activities is shown to exceed any potential benefits of these activities. One of the large, highly contaminated water reservoirs that require either remediation or closure is Karachay Lake near the MAYAK Production Association in the Chelyabinsk Region of Russia where liquid radioactive waste had been deep well injected for a long period of time. Backfilling of Karachay Lake is currently in progress. It should be noted that secondary environmental problems associated with its closure are considered to be of less importance since sustaining Karachay Lake would have presented a much higher radiological risk. Another well-known highly contaminated water reservoir is the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) Cooling Pond, decommissioning of which is planned for the near future. This study summarizes the environmental problems associated with the ChNPP Cooling Pond decommissioning.

  2. Environmental Problems Associated With Decommissioning The Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Cooling Pond

    SciTech Connect

    Farfan, E. B.; Jannik, G. T.; Marra, J. C.; Oskolkov, B. Ya.; Bondarkov, M. D.; Gaschak, S. P.; Maksymenko, A. M.; Maksymenko, V. M.; Martynenko, V. I.

    2009-11-09

    Decommissioning of nuclear power plants and other nuclear fuel cycle facilities has been an imperative issue lately. There exist significant experience and generally accepted recommendations on remediation of lands with residual radioactive contamination; however, there are hardly any such recommendations on remediation of cooling ponds that, in most cases, are fairly large water reservoirs. The literature only describes remediation of minor reservoirs containing radioactive silt (a complete closure followed by preservation) or small water reservoirs resulting in reestablishing natural water flows. Problems associated with remediation of river reservoirs resulting in flooding of vast agricultural areas also have been described. In addition, the severity of environmental and economic problems related to the remedial activities is shown to exceed any potential benefits of these activities. One of the large, highly contaminated water reservoirs that require either remediation or closure is Karachay Lake near the MAYAK Production Association in the Chelyabinsk Region of Russia where liquid radioactive waste had been deep well injected for a long period of time. Backfilling of Karachay Lake is currently in progress. It should be noted that secondary environmental problems associated with its closure are considered to be of less importance since sustaining Karachay Lake would have presented a much higher radiological risk. Another well-known highly contaminated water reservoir is the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) Cooling Pond, decommissioning of which is planned for the near future. This study summarizes the environmental problems associated with the ChNPP Cooling Pond decommissioning.

  3. AP1000{sup R} nuclear power plant safety overview for spent fuel cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Gorgemans, J.; Mulhollem, L.; Glavin, J.; Pfister, A.; Conway, L.; Schulz, T.; Oriani, L.; Cummins, E.; Winters, J.

    2012-07-01

    The AP1000{sup R} plant is an 1100-MWe class pressurized water reactor with passive safety features and extensive plant simplifications that enhance construction, operation, maintenance, safety and costs. The AP1000 design uses passive features to mitigate design basis accidents. The passive safety systems are designed to function without safety-grade support systems such as AC power, component cooling water, service water or HVAC. Furthermore, these passive features 'fail safe' during a non-LOCA event such that DC power and instrumentation are not required. The AP1000 also has simple, active, defense-in-depth systems to support normal plant operations. These active systems provide the first level of defense against more probable events and they provide investment protection, reduce the demands on the passive features and support the probabilistic risk assessment. The AP1000 passive safety approach allows the plant to achieve and maintain safe shutdown in case of an accident for 72 hours without operator action, meeting the expectations provided in the U.S. Utility Requirement Document and the European Utility Requirements for passive plants. Limited operator actions are required to maintain safe conditions in the spent fuel pool via passive means. In line with the AP1000 approach to safety described above, the AP1000 plant design features multiple, diverse lines of defense to ensure spent fuel cooling can be maintained for design-basis events and beyond design-basis accidents. During normal and abnormal conditions, defense-in-depth and other systems provide highly reliable spent fuel pool cooling. They rely on off-site AC power or the on-site standby diesel generators. For unlikely design basis events with an extended loss of AC power (i.e., station blackout) or loss of heat sink or both, spent fuel cooling can still be provided indefinitely: - Passive systems, requiring minimal or no operator actions, are sufficient for at least 72 hours under all possible pool heat load conditions. - After 3 days, several different means are provided to continue spent fuel cooling using installed plant equipment as well as off-site equipment with built-in connections. Even for beyond design basis accidents with postulated pool damage and multiple failures in the passive safety-related systems and in the defense-in-depth active systems, the AP1000 multiple spent fuel pool spray and fill systems provide additional lines of defense to prevent spent fuel damage. (authors)

  4. Environmental Problems Associated with Decommissioning of Chernobyl Power Plant Cooling Pond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, T. Q.; Oskolkov, B. Y.; Bondarkov, M. D.; Gashchak, S. P.; Maksymenko, A. M.; Maksymenko, V. M.; Martynenko, V. I.; Jannik, G. T.; Farfan, E. B.; Marra, J. C.

    2009-12-01

    Decommissioning of nuclear power plants and other nuclear fuel cycle facilities associated with residual radioactive contamination is a fairly pressing issue. Significant problems may result from decommissioning of cooling ponds. The Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) Cooling Pond is one of the largest self-contained bodies of water in the Chernobyl Region and Ukrainian Polesye with a water surface area of 22.9 km2. The major hydrological feature of the ChNPP Cooling Pond is that its water level is 6-7 m higher than the water level in the Pripyat River and water losses due to seepage and evaporation are replenished by pumping water from the Pripyat River. In 1986, the accident at the ChNPP #4 Reactor Unit significantly contaminated the ChNPP Cooling Pond. According to the 2001 data, the total radionuclide inventory in the ChNPP Cooling Pond bottom deposits was as follows: 16.28 ± 2.59 TBq for 137Cs; 2.4 ± 0.48 TBq for 90Sr, and 0.00518 ± 0.00148 TBq for 239+240Pu. Since ChNPP is being decommissioned, the ChNPP Cooling Pond of such a large size will no longer be needed and cost effective to maintain. However, shutdown of the water feed to the Pond would expose the contaminated bottom deposits and change the hydrological features of the area, destabilizing the radiological and environmental situation in the entire region in 2007 - 2008, in order to assess potential consequences of draining the ChNPP Cooling Pond, the authors conducted preliminary radio-ecological studies of its shoreline ecosystems. The radioactive contamination of the ChNPP Cooling Pond shoreline is fairly variable and ranges from 75 to 7,500 kBq/m2. Three areas with different contamination levels were selected to sample soils, vegetation, small mammals, birds, amphibians, and reptilians in order to measure their 137Cs and 90Sr content. Using the ERICA software, their dose exposures were estimated. For the 2008 conditions, the estimated dose rates were found to be as follows: amphibians - 11.4 µGy/hr; birds - 6.3 µGy/hr; mammals - 15.1 µGy/hr; reptilians - 10.3 µGy/hr, with the recommended maximum allowable limit of 40 µGy/hr. The conservative risk coefficient ranged from 0.51 for birds to 1.82 for amphibians. In spite of a high contamination level of the shoreline areas, the current total doses received by the animals do not reach the recommended maximum allowable doses. However, drainage of the ChNPP Cooling Pond is likely to increase the dose rates as follows: amphibians - 94.5, birds - 95.2, mammals - 284.0, reptilians - 847.0 µGy/hr, which will significantly exceed the maximum allowable values. These predictions are conservative and prior to making the final decision on the fate of the ChNPP Cooling Pond, a detailed radio-ecological assessment of its drainage will have to be performed.

  5. European development of He-cooled divertors for fusion power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norajitra, P.; Giniyatulin, R.; Ihli, T.; Janeschitz, G.; Karditsas, P.; Krauss, W.; Kruessmann, R.; Kuznetsov, V.; Maisonnier, D.; Mazul, I.; Nardi, C.; Ovchinnikov, I.; Papastergiou, S.; Pizzuto, A.; Sardain, P.

    2005-11-01

    Helium-cooled divertor concepts are considered suitable for use in fusion power plants for safety reasons, as they enable the use of a coolant compatible with any blanket concept, since water would not be acceptable, e.g. in connection with ceramic breeder blankets using large amounts of beryllium. Moreover, they allow for a high coolant exit temperature for increasing the efficiency of the power conversion system. Within the framework of the European power plant conceptual study, different helium-cooled divertor concepts based on different heat transfer mechanisms are being investigated at ENEA Frascati, Italy, and Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Germany. They are based on a modular design which helps reduce thermal stresses. The design goal is to withstand a high heat flux of about 10-15 MW m-2, a value which is considered relevant to future fusion power plants to be built after ITER. The development and optimization of the divertor concepts require an iterative design approach with analyses, studies of materials and fabrication technologies and the execution of experiments. These issues and the state of the art of divertor development shall be the subject of this report.

  6. Efficiency and its bounds for thermal engines at maximum power using Newton's law of cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, H.; Guo, Hao

    2012-01-01

    We study a thermal engine model for which Newton's cooling law is obeyed during heat transfer processes. The thermal efficiency and its bounds at maximum output power are derived and discussed. This model, though quite simple, can be applied not only to Carnot engines but also to four other types of engines. For the long thermal contact time limit, new bounds, tighter than what were known before, are obtained. In this case, this model can simulate Otto, Joule-Brayton, Diesel, and Atkinson engines. While in the short contact time limit, which corresponds to the Carnot cycle, the same efficiency bounds as that from Esposito [Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.105.150603 105, 150603 (2010)] are derived. In both cases, the thermal efficiency decreases as the ratio between the heat capacities of the working medium during heating and cooling stages increases. This might provide instructions for designing real engines.

  7. Efficiency and its bounds for thermal engines at maximum power using Newton's law of cooling.

    PubMed

    Yan, H; Guo, Hao

    2012-01-01

    We study a thermal engine model for which Newton's cooling law is obeyed during heat transfer processes. The thermal efficiency and its bounds at maximum output power are derived and discussed. This model, though quite simple, can be applied not only to Carnot engines but also to four other types of engines. For the long thermal contact time limit, new bounds, tighter than what were known before, are obtained. In this case, this model can simulate Otto, Joule-Brayton, Diesel, and Atkinson engines. While in the short contact time limit, which corresponds to the Carnot cycle, the same efficiency bounds as that from Esposito et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 150603 (2010)] are derived. In both cases, the thermal efficiency decreases as the ratio between the heat capacities of the working medium during heating and cooling stages increases. This might provide instructions for designing real engines. PMID:22400551

  8. Keeping cool while planning a major cooling system modification for a large base-loaded power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Mallory, J.; Randels, R.; Penrose, J.; Ludovisi, D.

    2012-07-01

    This paper addresses vital considerations which need to be addressed to help ensure that the wisest approach is used for evaluating or modifying existing open or closed cycle cooling systems. (authors)

  9. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Superconducting Technology Program for electric power systems. Annual report for FY 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Koncinski, W.S.; Hawsey, R.A.

    1994-12-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Superconducting Technology Program is conducted as part of a national effort by the US Department of Energy`s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy to develop the technology base needed by US industry for commercial development of electric power applications of high-temperature superconductivity. The three major elements of this program are conductor development, applications development, and the Superconductivity Partnership Initiative. This document describes the major research and development activities for this program together with related accomplishments. The technical progress reported was summarized from information prepared for the FY 1994 Annual Program Review held July 19--20, 2994. This ORNL program is highly leveraged by the staff and other resources of US industry and universities. In fact, nearly three-fourths of the ORNL effort is devoted to industrial competitiveness projects with private companies. Interlaboratory teams are also in place on a number of industry-driven projects. Patent disclosures, working group meetings, staff exchanges, and joint publications and presentations ensure that there is technology transfer with US industry. Working together, the collaborative teams are making rapid progress in solving the scientific and technical issues necessary for the commercialization of long lengths of practical high-temperature superconductor wire and wire products.

  10. High-power laser phosphor light source with liquid cooling for digital cinema applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kenneth

    2014-02-01

    Laser excited phosphor has been used to excite phosphor material, producing high intensity light output with smaller etendue than that of LEDs with the same long lifetime. But due to the high intensity of the laser light, phosphor with organic binder burns at low power, which requires the phosphor to be deposited on a rotating wheel in practical applications. Phosphor with inorganic binders, commonly known as ceramic phosphor, on the other hand, does not burn, but efficiency goes down as temperature goes up under high power excitation. This paper describes cooling schemes in sealed chambers such that the phosphor materials using organic or inorganic binders can be liquid cooled for high efficiency operations. Confined air bubbles are introduced into the sealed chamber accommodating the differential thermal expansion of the liquid and the chamber. For even higher power operation suitable for digital cinema, a suspension of phosphor in liquid is described suitable for screen brightness of over 30,000 lumens. The aging issues of phosphor can also be solved by using replaceable phosphor cartridges.

  11. Presence of pathogenic amoebae in power plant cooling waters. Final report, October 15, 1977-September 30, 1979. [Naegleria fowleri

    SciTech Connect

    Tyndall, R.L.; Willaert, E.; Stevens, A.R.

    1981-03-01

    Cooling-water-associated algae and sediments from five northern and five southern or western electric power plants were tested for the presence of pathogenic amoebae. In addition, water algae and sediments from five northern and five southern/western sites not associated with power plants were tested. There was a significant correlation at northern power plants between the presence of thermophilic, pathogenic amoebae in cooling waters and thermal additions. Presence of the pathogenic did not correlate with salinity, pH, conductivity, or a variety of various chemical components of the cooling waters. Selected pathogenic isolates were tested serologically and were classified as Naegleria fowleri. Although thermal additions were shown to be contributing factor in predisposing cooling waters to the growth of pathogenic amoebae, the data suggest the involvement of other currently undefined parameters associated with the presence of the pathogenic amoebae. 35 refs., 21 tabs.

  12. Compatibility tests of materials for a lithium-cooled space power reactor concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinclair, J. H.

    1973-01-01

    Materials for a lithium-cooled space power reactor concept must be chemically compatible for up to 50,000 hr at high temperature. Capsule tests at 1040 C (1900 F) were made of material combinations of prime interest: T-111 in direct contact with uranium mononitride (UN), Un in vacuum separated from T-111 by tungsten wire, UN with various oxygen impurity levels enclosed in tungsten wire lithium-filled T-111 capsules, and TZM and lithium together in T-111 capsules. All combinations were compatible for over 2800 hr except for T-111 in direct contact with UN.

  13. Macrofouling communities in the cooling system of the Vladivostok heat and power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moshchenko, Alexander V.; Zvyagintsev, Alexander Yu.

    2010-03-01

    The composition, structure, and distribution of flora and fauna on hydraulic facilities in the cooling system of the Vladivostok combined heat and power plant-2 were studied in summer and autumn of 2001. Cluster analysis was applied to differentiate Balanus rostratus, Mytilus trossulus, Jassa marmorata, Crassostrea gigas + Balanus rostratus, Modiolus modiolus + Pachycheles stevensii, Hydroides ezoensis, and Amphibalanus improvisus communities. The groups of fouling organisms found on the studied objects were shown to be assigned both to “physically controlled” and “biologically balanced” benthic communities. This study stresses the high similarity between the fouling communities of anthropogenic substrata and natural intertidal and subtidal benthic communities from adjacent areas of Peter the Great Bay.

  14. Determining Optimal Equipment Capacities in Cooling, Heating and Power (CHP) Systems

    SciTech Connect

    DeVault, Robert C; Hudson II, Carl Randy

    2006-01-01

    Evaluation of potential cooling, heating and power (CHP) applications requires an assessment of the operations and economics of a particular system in meeting the electric and thermal demands of a specific end-use facility. A key determinate in whether a candidate system will be economic is the proper selection of equipment capacities. A methodology to determine the optimal capacities for CHP prime movers and absorption chillers using nonlinear optimization algorithms has been coded into a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet tool that performs the capacity optimization and operations simulation. This paper presents details on the use and results of this publicly available tool.

  15. Magnetocaloric effect and refrigeration cooling power in amorphous Gd7Ru3 alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Pramod; Kumar, Rachana

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we report the magnetic, heat capacity and magneto-caloric effect (MCE) of amorphous Gd7Ru3 compound. Both, temperature dependent magnetization and heat capacity data reveals that two transitions at 58 K and 34 K. MCE has been calculated in terms of isothermal entropy change (?SM) and adiabatic temperature change (?Tad) using the heat capacity data in different fields. The maximum values of ?SM and ?Tad are 21 Jmol-1K-1 and 5 K respectively, for field change of 50 kOe whereas relative cooling power (RCP) is ˜735 J/kg for the same field change.

  16. A feasibility study of full-bridge type superconducting fault current controller on electric machine power stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, J. Y.; Hwang, Y. J.; Lee, J.; Ko, T. K.

    2016-02-01

    Recently, because of the advent of Smart Grid and integration of distributed generations, electrical power grids are facing uncountable challenges. Increase of fault current is one of such serious challenges and there are some fault current limiters (FCLs) that can limit the fault current. Existing grid protection FCLs, however, simply limit the fault current passively and can allow the existing protection coordination schemes to fail. This phenomenon leads to catastrophic failure in the complex system and may cause unpredictable power grid operation. Unlike a FCL, a superconducting fault current controller (SFCC) employs a full-bridge thyristor rectifier, a high temperature superconducting (HTS) DC reactor, and an embedded control unit to maintain the fault current level at a proper value by adjusting the phase angle of thyristors. This paper contains experimental and numerical analysis to design and fabricate a SFCC system for protection and stability improvement in power grids. At first, fundamental characteristics of a SFCC system were introduced. System circuit diagram and operational principles were proposed. Secondly, the developed small-scale SFCC system was introduced and verified. A 40 Vrms/30 Arms class prototype SFCC employing HTS DC reactor was fabricated and short circuit tests that simulate various fault conditions were implemented to verify the control performance of the fault current. Finally, the practical feasibility of application of the SFCC system to the power system was studied. The problems caused by three-phase faults from the power grid were surveyed and transient stability analysis of the power system was conducted by simulations. From the experimental and simulation results, we can verify the feasibility of the SFCC in power system.

  17. Wetland Water Cooling Partnership: The Use of Constructed Wetlands to Enhance Thermoelectric Power Plant Cooling and Mitigate the Demand of Surface Water Use

    SciTech Connect

    Apfelbaum, Steven; Duvall, Kenneth; Nelson, Theresa; Mensing, Douglas; Bengtson, Harlan; Eppich, John; Penhallegon, Clayton; Thompson, Ry

    2013-09-30

    Through the Phase I study segment of contract #DE-NT0006644 with the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory, Applied Ecological Services, Inc. and Sterling Energy Services, LLC (the AES/SES Team) explored the use of constructed wetlands to help address stresses on surface water and groundwater resources from thermoelectric power plant cooling and makeup water requirements. The project objectives were crafted to explore and develop implementable water conservation and cooling strategies using constructed wetlands (not existing, naturally occurring wetlands), with the goal of determining if this strategy has the potential to reduce surface water and groundwater withdrawals of thermoelectric power plants throughout the country. Our team’s exploratory work has documented what appears to be a significant and practical potential for augmenting power plant cooling water resources for makeup supply at many, but not all, thermoelectric power plant sites. The intent is to help alleviate stress on existing surface water and groundwater resources through harvesting, storing, polishing and beneficially re-using critical water resources. Through literature review, development of conceptual created wetland plans, and STELLA-based modeling, the AES/SES team has developed heat and water balances for conventional thermoelectric power plants to evaluate wetland size requirements, water use, and comparative cooling technology costs. The ecological literature on organism tolerances to heated waters was used to understand the range of ecological outcomes achievable in created wetlands. This study suggests that wetlands and water harvesting can provide a practical and cost-effective strategy to augment cooling waters for thermoelectric power plants in many geographic settings of the United States, particularly east of the 100th meridian, and in coastal and riverine locations. The study concluded that constructed wetlands can have significant positive ancillary socio-economic, ecosystem, and water treatment/polishing benefits when used to complement water resources at thermoelectric power plants. Through the Phase II pilot study segment of the contract, the project team partnered with Progress Energy Florida (now Duke Energy Florida) to quantify the wetland water cooling benefits at their Hines Energy Complex in Bartow, Florida. The project was designed to test the wetland’s ability to cool and cleanse power plant cooling pond water while providing wildlife habitat and water harvesting benefits. Data collected during the monitoring period was used to calibrate a STELLA model developed for the site. It was also used to inform management recommendations for the demonstration site, and to provide guidance on the use of cooling wetlands for other power plants around the country. As a part of the pilot study, Duke Energy is scaling up the demonstration project to a larger, commercial scale wetland instrumented with monitoring equipment. Construction is expected to be finalized in early 2014.

  18. Optimal Self-Tuning PID Controller Based on Low Power Consumption for a Server Fan Cooling System

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chengming; Chen, Rongshun

    2015-01-01

    Recently, saving the cooling power in servers by controlling the fan speed has attracted considerable attention because of the increasing demand for high-density servers. This paper presents an optimal self-tuning proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller, combining a PID neural network (PIDNN) with fan-power-based optimization in the transient-state temperature response in the time domain, for a server fan cooling system. Because the thermal model of the cooling system is nonlinear and complex, a server mockup system simulating a 1U rack server was constructed and a fan power model was created using a third-order nonlinear curve fit to determine the cooling power consumption by the fan speed control. PIDNN with a time domain criterion is used to tune all online and optimized PID gains. The proposed controller was validated through experiments of step response when the server operated from the low to high power state. The results show that up to 14% of a server’s fan cooling power can be saved if the fan control permits a slight temperature response overshoot in the electronic components, which may provide a time-saving strategy for tuning the PID controller to control the server fan speed during low fan power consumption. PMID:26007725

  19. Optimal Self-Tuning PID Controller Based on Low Power Consumption for a Server Fan Cooling System.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chengming; Chen, Rongshun

    2015-01-01

    Recently, saving the cooling power in servers by controlling the fan speed has attracted considerable attention because of the increasing demand for high-density servers. This paper presents an optimal self-tuning proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller, combining a PID neural network (PIDNN) with fan-power-based optimization in the transient-state temperature response in the time domain, for a server fan cooling system. Because the thermal model of the cooling system is nonlinear and complex, a server mockup system simulating a 1U rack server was constructed and a fan power model was created using a third-order nonlinear curve fit to determine the cooling power consumption by the fan speed control. PIDNN with a time domain criterion is used to tune all online and optimized PID gains. The proposed controller was validated through experiments of step response when the server operated from the low to high power state. The results show that up to 14% of a server's fan cooling power can be saved if the fan control permits a slight temperature response overshoot in the electronic components, which may provide a time-saving strategy for tuning the PID controller to control the server fan speed during low fan power consumption. PMID:26007725

  20. The effects of age on nuclear power plant containment cooling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lofaro, R.; Subudhi, M.; Travis, R.; DiBiasio, A.; Azarm, A.; Davis, J.

    1994-04-01

    A study was performed to assess the effects of aging on the performance and availability of containment cooling systems in US commercial nuclear power plants. This study is part of the Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) program sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The objectives of this program are to provide an understanding of the aging process and how it affects plant safety so that it can be properly managed. This is one of a number of studies performed under the NPAR program which provide a technical basis for the identification and evaluation of degradation caused by age. The effects of age were characterized for the containment cooling system by reviewing and analyzing failure data from national databases, as well as plant-specific data. The predominant failure causes and aging mechanisms were identified, along with the components that failed most frequently. Current inspection, surveillance, and monitoring practices were also examined. A containment cooling system unavailability analysis was performed to examine the potential effects of aging by increasing failure rates for selected components. A commonly found containment spray system design and a commonly found fan cooler system design were modeled. Parametric failure rates for those components in each system that could be subject to aging were accounted for in the model to simulate the time-dependent effects of aging degradation, assuming no provisions are made to properly manage it. System unavailability as a function of increasing component failure rates was then calculated.

  1. Hybrid superconducting magnetic suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Tixador, P.; Hiebel, P.; Brunet, Y.

    1996-07-01

    Superconductors, especially high T{sub c} ones, are the most attractive materials to design stable and fully passive magnetic suspensions which have to control five degrees of freedom. The hybrid superconducting magnetic suspensions present high performances and a simple cooling mode. They consist of a permanent magnet bearing, stabilized by a suitable magnet-superconductor structure. Several designs are given and compared in terms of forces and stiffnesses. The design of the magnet bearing plays an important part. The superconducting magnetic bearing participates less in levitation but must provide a high stabilizing stiffness. This is achieved by the magnet configuration, a good material in term of critical current density and field cooling. A hybrid superconducting suspension for a flywheel is presented. This system consists of a magnet thrust bearing stabilized by superconductors interacting with an alternating polarity magnet structure. First tests and results are reported. Superconducting materials are magnetically melt-textured YBaCuO.

  2. DEPOSITION OF NIOBIUM AND OTHER SUPERCONDUCTING MATERIALS WITH HIGH POWER IMPULSE MAGNETRON SPUTTERING: CONCEPT AND FIRST RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    High Current Electronics Institute, Tomsk, Russia; Anders, Andre; Mendelsberg, Rueben J.; Lim, Sunnie; Mentink, Matthijs; Slack, Jonathan L.; Wallig, Joseph G.; Nollau, Alexander V.; Yushkov, Georgy Yu.

    2011-07-24

    Niobium coatings on copper cavities have been considered as a cost-efficient replacement of bulk niobium RF cavities, however, coatings made by magnetron sputtering have not quite lived up to high expectations due to Q-slope and other issues. High power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) is a promising emerging coatings technology which combines magnetron sputtering with a pulsed power approach. The magnetron is turned into a metal plasma source by using very high peak power density of ~ 1 kW/cm{sup 2}. In this contribution, the cavity coatings concept with HIPIMS is explained. A system with two cylindrical, movable magnetrons was set up with custom magnetrons small enough to be inserted into 1.3 GHz cavities. Preliminary data on niobium HIPIMS plasma and the resulting coatings are presented. The HIPIMS approach has the potential to be extended to film systems beyond niobium, including other superconducting materials and/or multilayer systems.

  3. PREFACE: Superconducting materials Superconducting materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charfi Kaddour, Samia; Singleton, John; Haddad, Sonia

    2011-11-01

    The discovery of superconductivity in 1911 was a great milestone in condensed matter physics. This discovery has resulted in an enormous amount of research activity. Collaboration among chemists and physicists, as well as experimentalists and theoreticians has given rise to very rich physics with significant potential applications ranging from electric power transmission to quantum information. Several superconducting materials have been synthesized. Crucial progress was made in 1987 with the discovery of high temperature superconductivity in copper-based compounds (cuprates) which have revealed new fascinating properties. Innovative theoretical tools have been developed to understand the striking features of cuprates which have remained for three decades the 'blue-eyed boy' for researchers in superconductor physics. The history of superconducting materials has been notably marked by the discovery of other compounds, particularly organic superconductors which despite their low critical temperature continue to attract great interest regarding their exotic properties. Last but not least, the recent observation of superconductivity in iron-based materials (pnictides) has renewed hope in reaching room temperature superconductivity. However, despite intense worldwide studies, several features related to this phenomenon remain unveiled. One of the fundamental key questions is the mechanism by which superconductivity takes place. Superconductors continue to hide their 'secret garden'. The new trends in the physics of superconductivity have been one of the two basic topics of the International Conference on Conducting Materials (ICoCoM2010) held in Sousse,Tunisia on 3-7 November 2010 and organized by the Tunisian Physical Society. The conference was a nice opportunity to bring together participants from multidisciplinary domains in the physics of superconductivity. This special section contains papers submitted by participants who gave an oral contribution at ICoCoM2010 and by invited authors selected by the editor. We are grateful to IUPAP, ICTP and the European Office of Aerospace Research and Development, Air Force Office of Scientific Research, United States Air Force Laboratory. We would like to acknowledge the authors for their careful work, and finally we thank Dr L Smith the publisher of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter for her patience and help. Superconducting materials contents Raman spectrum in the pseudogap phase of the underdoped cuprates: effect of phase coherence and the signature of the KT-type superconducting transitionTao Li and Haijun Liao Pressure effects on Dirac fermions in ?-(BEDT-TTF)2I3Takahiro Himura, Takao Morinari and Takami Tohyama Effect of Zn doping in hole-type 1111 phase (Pr, Sr)FeAsOXiao Lin, Chenyi Shen, Chen Lv, Jianjian Miao, Hao Tan, Guanghan Cao and Zhu-An Xu Superconductivity and ferromagnetism in EuFe2(As1 - xPx)2*Guanghan Cao, Shenggao Xu, Zhi Ren, Shuai Jiang, Chunmu Feng and Zhu'an Xu OInhomogeneous superconductivity in organic conductors: the role of disorder and magnetic fieldS Haddad, S Charfi-Kaddour and J-P Pouget

  4. User's guide for the BNW-III optimization code for modular dry/wet-cooled power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, D.J.; Faletti, D.W.

    1984-09-01

    This user's guide describes BNW-III, a computer code developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of the Dry Cooling Enhancement Program sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE). The BNW-III code models a modular dry/wet cooling system for a nuclear or fossil fuel power plant. The purpose of this guide is to give the code user a brief description of what the BNW-III code is and how to use it. It describes the cooling system being modeled and the various models used. A detailed description of code input and code output is also included. The BNW-III code was developed to analyze a specific cooling system layout. However, there is a large degree of freedom in the type of cooling modules that can be selected and in the performance of those modules. The costs of the modules are input to the code, giving the user a great deal of flexibility.

  5. 10 CFR 50.46 - Acceptance criteria for emergency core cooling systems for light-water nuclear power reactors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...criteria for emergency core cooling systems for light-water nuclear power reactors. (a)(1)(i) Each boiling or pressurized light-water nuclear power reactor...temperature shall be maintained at an acceptably low value and decay heat shall be removed...

  6. Cold weather operating guidelines and experience for natural draft cooling towers on the American Electric Power system

    SciTech Connect

    Michell, F.L.; Drew, D.H.

    1996-10-01

    American Electric Power`s more than 30 years of experience in operating natural draft cooling towers during freezing winter weather conditions is discussed in the paper. Design features incorporated into the specifications for major rebuild/repack projects for crossflow and counterflow towers to facilitate cold weather operation are also reviewed.

  7. Passive radiative cooling of a HTS coil for attitude orbit control in micro-spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inamori, Takaya; Ozaki, Naoya; Saisutjarit, Phongsatorn; Ohsaki, Hiroyuki

    2015-02-01

    This paper proposes a novel radiative cooling system for a high temperature superconducting (HTS) coil for an attitude orbit control system in nano- and micro-spacecraft missions. These days, nano-spacecraft (1-10 kg) and micro-spacecraft (10-100 kg) provide space access to a broader range of spacecraft developers and attract interest as space development applications. In planetary and high earth orbits, most previous standard-size spacecraft used thrusters for their attitude and orbit control, which are not available for nano- and micro-spacecraft missions because of the strict power consumption, space, and weight constraints. This paper considers orbit and attitude control methods that use a superconducting coil, which interacts with on-orbit space plasmas and creates a propulsion force. Because these spacecraft cannot use an active cooling system for the superconducting coil because of their mass and power consumption constraints, this paper proposes the utilization of a passive radiative cooling system, in which the superconducting coil is thermally connected to the 3 K cosmic background radiation of deep space, insulated from the heat generation using magnetic holders, and shielded from the sun. With this proposed cooling system, the HTS coil is cooled to 60 K in interplanetary orbits. Because the system does not use refrigerators for its cooling system, the spacecraft can achieve an HTS coil with low power consumption, small mass, and low cost.

  8. HOM damping properties of fundamental power couplers in the superconducting electron gun of the energy recovery LINAC at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Hammons, L.; Hahn, H.

    2011-03-28

    Among the accelerator projects under construction at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is an R and D energy recovery LINAC (ERL) test facility. The ERL includes both a five-cell superconducting cavity as well as a superconducting, photoinjector electron gun. Because of the high-charge and high-current demands, effective higher-order mode (HOM) damping is essential, and several strategies are being pursued. Among these is the use of the fundamental power couplers as a means for damping some HOMs. Simulation studies have shown that the power couplers can play a substantial role in damping certain HOMs, and this presentation discusses these studies along with measurements.

  9. Next generation cooled long range thermal sights with minimum size, weight, and power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breiter, R.; Ihle, T.; Wendler, J.; Rühlich, I.; Ziegler, J.

    2013-06-01

    Situational awareness and precise targeting at day, night and severe weather conditions are key elements for mission success in asymmetric warfare. To support these capabilities for the dismounted soldier, AIM has developed a family of stand-alone thermal weapon sights based on high performance cooled IR-modules which are used e.g. in the infantryman of the future program of the German army (IdZ). The design driver for these sights is a long ID range <1500m for the NATO standard target to cover the operational range of a platoon with the engagement range of .50 cal rifles, 40mm AGLs or for reconnaissance tasks. The most recent sight WBZG has just entered into serial production for the IdZ enhanced system of the German army with additional capabilities like a wireless data link to the soldier backbone computer. Minimum size, weight and power (SWaP) are most critical requirements for the dismounted soldiers' equipment and sometimes push a decision towards uncooled equipment with marginal performance referring to the outstanding challenges in current asymmetric warfare, e.g. the capability to distinguish between combatants and non-combatants in adequate ranges. To provide the uncompromised e/o performance with SWaP parameters close to uncooled, AIM has developed a new thermal weapon sight based on high operating temperature (HOT) MCT MWIR FPAs together with a new low power single piston stirling cooler. In basic operation the sight is used as a clip-on in front of the rifle scope. An additional eyepiece for stand-alone targeting with e.g. AGLs or a biocular version for relaxed surveillance will be available. The paper will present details of the technologies applied for such long range cooled sights with size, weight and power close to uncooled.

  10. Power Tests of a String of Magnets Comprising a Full Cell of the Superconducting Super Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Burgett, W.; Cromer, L.; Haenni, D.; Hentges, M.; Jaffrey, T.; Kraushaar, P.; Levin, M.; Mulholland, G.; Richter, D.; Robinson, W.; Weisend II, J.; Zapotek, J.

    1995-06-28

    In this paper we describe the operation and testing of a string of magnets comprising a full cell of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC). The full cell configuration composed of ten dipoles, two quadrupoles, and three spool pieces is the longest SSC magnet string ever tested. Although the tests of the full cell were undertaken after the SSC project was marked for termination, their completion was deemed necessary and useful to future efforts at other accelerator laboratories utilizing Superconducting magnets. The focus of this work is on the electrical and cryogenic performance of the string components and the quench protection system with an emphasis on solving some of the questions concerning electrical performance raised during the previous two experimental runs involving a half cell configuration.

  11. Superconducting wire with improved strain characteristics

    DOEpatents

    Luhman, Thomas (Westhampton Beach, NY); Klamut, Carl J. (E. Patchogue, NY); Suenaga, Masaki (Bellport, NY); Welch, David (Stony Brook, NY)

    1982-01-01

    A superconducting wire comprising a superconducting filament and a beryllium strengthened bronze matrix in which the addition of beryllium to the matrix permits a low volume matrix to exhibit reduced elastic deformation after heat treating which increases the compression of the superconducting filament on cooling and thereby improves the strain characteristics of the wire.

  12. Superconducting wire with improved strain characteristics

    DOEpatents

    Luhman, Thomas (Westhampton Beach, NY); Klamut, Carl J. (East Patchogue, NY); Suenaga, Masaki (Bellport, NY); Welch, David (Stony Brook, NY)

    1982-01-01

    A superconducting wire comprising a superconducting filament and a beryllium strengthened bronze matrix in which the addition of beryllium to the matrix permits a low volume matrix to exhibit reduced elastic deformation after heat treating which increases the compression of the superconducting filament on cooling and thereby improve the strain characteristics of the wire.

  13. Interim Report: Air-Cooled Condensers for Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants Improved Binary Cycle Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel S. Wendt; Greg L. Mines

    2010-09-01

    As geothermal resources that are more expensive to develop are utilized for power generation, there will be increased incentive to use more efficient power plants. This is expected to be the case with Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) resources. These resources will likely require wells drilled to depths greater than encountered with hydrothermal resources, and will have the added costs for stimulation to create the subsurface reservoir. It is postulated that plants generating power from these resources will likely utilize the binary cycle technology where heat is rejected sensibly to the ambient. The consumptive use of a portion of the produced geothermal fluid for evaporative heat rejection in the conventional flash-steam conversion cycle is likely to preclude its use with EGS resources. This will be especially true in those areas where there is a high demand for finite supplies of water. Though they have no consumptive use of water, using air-cooling systems for heat rejection has disadvantages. These systems have higher capital costs, reduced power output (heat is rejected at the higher dry-bulb temperature), increased parasitics (fan power), and greater variability in power generation on both a diurnal and annual basis (larger variation in the dry-bulb temperature). This is an interim report for the task ‘Air-Cooled Condensers in Next- Generation Conversion Systems’. The work performed was specifically aimed at a plant that uses commercially available binary cycle technologies with an EGS resource. Concepts were evaluated that have the potential to increase performance, lower cost, or mitigate the adverse effects of off-design operation. The impact on both cost and performance were determined for the concepts considered, and the scenarios identified where a particular concept is best suited. Most, but not all, of the concepts evaluated are associated with the rejection of heat. This report specifically addresses three of the concepts evaluated: the use of recuperation, the use of turbine reheat, and the non-consumptive use of EGS make-up water to supplement heat rejection

  14. Experimental investigation of an ammonia-based combined power and cooling cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamm, Gunnar Olavi

    A novel ammonia-water thermodynamic cycle, capable of producing both power and refrigeration, was proposed by D. Yogi Goswami. The binary mixture exhibits variable boiling temperatures during the boiling process, which leads to a good thermal match between the heating fluid and working fluid for efficient heat source utilization. The cycle can be driven by low temperature sources such as solar, geothermal, and waste heat from a conventional power cycle, reducing the reliance on high temperature sources such as fossil fuels. A theoretical simulation of the cycle at heat source temperatures obtainable from low and mid temperature solar collectors showed that the ideal cycle could produce power and refrigeration at a maximum exergy efficiency, defined as the ratio of the net work and refrigeration output to the change in availability of the heat source, of over 60%. The exergy efficiency is a useful measure of the cycle's performance as it compares the effectiveness of different cycles in harnessing the same source. An experimental system was constructed to demonstrate the feasibility of the cycle and to compare the experimental results with the theoretical simulations. In this first phase of experimentation, the turbine expansion was simulated with a throttling valve and a heat exchanger. Results showed that the vapor generation and absorption condensation processes work experimentally. The potential for combined turbine work and refrigeration output was evidenced in operating the system. Analysis of losses led to modifications in the system design, which were implemented to yield improvements in heat exchange, vapor generation, pump performance and overall stability. The research that has been conducted verifies the potential of the power and cooling cycle as an alternative to using conventional fossil fuel technologies. The research that continues is to further demonstrate the concept and direct it towards industry. On the large scale, the cycle can be used for industrial power production or as a central power plant for a community, with refrigeration produced as required by the application. On the small scale, an affordable residential or commercial unit could allow independent electricity generation for the home or business while also cooling it.

  15. Fiber Bragg Grating Cryo-Sensors for Superconducting Accelerator Magnets

    E-print Network

    Chiuchiolo, A; Perez, J; Bajas, H; Consales, M; Giordano, M; Breglio, G; Cusano, A

    2014-01-01

    The design, fabrication and tests of the new generation of superconducting magnets for the High Luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (HL - LHC) require the support of an adequate sensing technology able to assure the integrity of the strain sensitive and brittle superconducting cables through the whole service life of the magnet: assembly up to 150 MPa, cool down to 1.9 K and powering up to about 16 kA. A precise temperature monitoring is also needed in order to guarantee the safe working condition of the superconducting cables in the power transmission lines (SC - Link) designed to feed the magnet over long distance. Temperature and strain FBGs based monitoring systems have been implemented in the first SC-Link prototype and in two subscale dipole magnets and tested in the cryogenic test facility at CERN at 30 K, 77 K and 1.9 K.

  16. ELECTRON COOLING OF RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    BEN-ZVI, I.; LITVINENKO, V.; BARTON, D.; ET AL.

    2005-05-16

    We report progress on the R&D program for electron-cooling of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). This electron cooler is designed to cool 100 GeV/nucleon at storage energy using 54 MeV electrons. The electron source will be a superconducting RF photocathode gun. The accelerator will be a superconducting energy recovery linac. The frequency of the accelerator is set at 703.75 MHz. The maximum electron bunch frequency is 9.38 MHz, with bunch charge of 20 nC. The R&D program has the following components: The photoinjector and its photocathode, the superconducting linac cavity, start-to-end beam dynamics with magnetized electrons, electron cooling calculations including benchmarking experiments and development of a large superconducting solenoid. The photoinjector and linac cavity are being incorporated into an energy recovery linac aimed at demonstrating ampere class current at about 20 MeV.

  17. Cool Down Analysis of a Cryocooler Based Quadrupole Magnet Cryostat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, A.; Kar, S.; Chacko, J.; Kumar, M.; Babu, S.; Sahu, S.; Kumar, R.; Antony, J.; Datta, T. S.

    A superconducting quadrupole doublet magnet with cold superferric iron cover for the Hybrid Recoil Mass Analyzer (HYRA) beam line has been commissioned. The total cold mass of the helium vessel with iron yoke and pole is 2 ton. A set of two Sumitomo cryocoolers take care of various heat loads to the cryostat. The first successful cool down of the cryostat has been completed recently, magnets have been powered and magnetic field profiling has been done inside theroom temperature beam tube. This paper will highlight the cryostat details along with the cool down and operational test results obtained from the first cool down.

  18. System for thermal energy storage, space heating and cooling and power conversion

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M. (Downers Grove, IL); Fields, Paul R. (Chicago, IL)

    1981-04-21

    An integrated system for storing thermal energy, for space heating and cong and for power conversion is described which utilizes the reversible thermal decomposition characteristics of two hydrides having different decomposition pressures at the same temperature for energy storage and space conditioning and the expansion of high-pressure hydrogen for power conversion. The system consists of a plurality of reaction vessels, at least one containing each of the different hydrides, three loops of circulating heat transfer fluid which can be selectively coupled to the vessels for supplying the heat of decomposition from any appropriate source of thermal energy from the outside ambient environment or from the spaces to be cooled and for removing the heat of reaction to the outside ambient environment or to the spaces to be heated, and a hydrogen loop for directing the flow of hydrogen gas between the vessels. When used for power conversion, at least two vessels contain the same hydride and the hydrogen loop contains an expansion engine. The system is particularly suitable for the utilization of thermal energy supplied by solar collectors and concentrators, but may be used with any source of heat, including a source of low-grade heat.

  19. Superconducting levitating bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moon, Francis C. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A superconducting bearing assembly includes a coil field source that may be superconducting and a superconducting structure. The coil field source assembly and superconducting structure are positioned so as to enable relative rotary movement therebetween. The structure and coil field source are brought to a supercooled temperature before a power supply induces a current in the coil field source. A Meissner-like effect is thereby obtained and little or no penetration of the field lines is seen in the superconducting structure. Also, the field that can be obtained from the superconducting coil is 2-8 times higher than that of permanent magnets. Since the magnetic pressure is proportioned to the square of the field, magnetic pressures from 4 to 64 times higher are achieved.

  20. Solid-Core, Gas-Cooled Reactor for Space and Surface Power

    SciTech Connect

    King, Jeffrey C.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.

    2006-01-20

    The solid-core, gas-cooled, Submersion-Subcritical Safe Space (S and 4) reactor is developed for future space power applications and avoidance of single point failures. The Mo-14%Re reactor core is loaded with uranium nitride fuel in enclosed cavities, cooled by He-30%Xe, and sized to provide 550 kWth for seven years of equivalent full power operation. The beryllium oxide reflector disassembles upon impact on water or soil. In addition to decreasing the reactor and shadow shield mass, Spectral Shift Absorber (SSA) materials added to the reactor core ensure that it remains subcritical in the worst-case submersion accident. With a 0.1 mm thick boron carbide coating on the outside surface of the core block and 0.25 mm thick iridium sleeves around the fuel stacks, the reflector outer diameter is 43.5 cm and the combined reactor and shadow shield mass is 935.1 kg. With 12.5 atom% gadolinium-155 added to the fuel, 2.0 mm diameter gadolinium-155 sesquioxide intersititial pins, and a 0.1 mm thick gadolinium-155 sesquioxide coating, the S and 4 reactor has a slightly smaller reflector outer diameter of 43.0 cm, and a total reactor and shield mass of 901.7 kg. With 8.0 atom% europium-151 added to the fuel, 2.0 mm diameter europium-151 sesquioxide interstitial pins, and a 0.1 mm thick europium-151 sesquioxide coating, the reflector's outer diameter and the total reactor and shield mass are further reduced to 41.5 cm and 869.2 kg, respect0011ive.

  1. Solid-Core, Gas-Cooled Reactor for Space and Surface Power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Jeffrey C.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.

    2006-01-01

    The solid-core, gas-cooled, Submersion-Subcritical Safe Space (S?4) reactor is developed for future space power applications and avoidance of single point failures. The Mo-14%Re reactor core is loaded with uranium nitride fuel in enclosed cavities, cooled by He-30%Xe, and sized to provide 550 kWth for seven years of equivalent full power operation. The beryllium oxide reflector disassembles upon impact on water or soil. In addition to decreasing the reactor and shadow shield mass, Spectral Shift Absorber (SSA) materials added to the reactor core ensure that it remains subcritical in the worst-case submersion accident. With a 0.1 mm thick boron carbide coating on the outside surface of the core block and 0.25 mm thick iridium sleeves around the fuel stacks, the reflector outer diameter is 43.5 cm and the combined reactor and shadow shield mass is 935.1 kg. With 12.5 atom% gadolinium-155 added to the fuel, 2.0 mm diameter gadolinium-155 sesquioxide intersititial pins, and a 0.1 mm thick gadolinium-155 sesquioxide coating, the S?4 reactor has a slightly smaller reflector outer diameter of 43.0 cm, and a total reactor and shield mass of 901.7 kg. With 8.0 atom% europium-151 added to the fuel, 2.0 mm diameter europium-151 sesquioxide interstitial pins, and a 0.1 mm thick europium-151 sesquioxide coating, the reflector's outer diameter and the total reactor and shield mass are further reduced to 41.5 cm and 869.2 kg, respectively.

  2. Optimization of power-cycle arrangements for Supercritical Water cooled Reactors (SCWRs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizon-A-Lugrin, Laure

    The world energy demand is continuously rising due to the increase of both the world population and the standard of life quality. Further, to assure both a healthy world economy as well as adequate social standards, in a relatively short term, new energy-conversion technologies are mandatory. Within this framework, a Generation IV International Forum (GIF) was established by the participation of 10 countries to collaborate for developing nuclear power reactors that will replace the present technology by 2030. The main goals of these nuclear-power reactors are: economic competitiveness, sustainability, safety, reliability and resistance to proliferation. As a member of the GIF, Canada has decided to orient its efforts towards the design of a CANDU-type Super Critical Water-cooled Reactor (SCWR). Such a system must run at a coolant outlet temperature of about 625°C and at a pressure of 25 MPa. It is obvious that at such conditions the overall efficiency of this kind of Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) will compete with actual supercritical water-power boilers. In addition, from a heat-transfer viewpoint, the use of a supercritical fluid allows the limitation imposed by Critical Heat Flux (CHF) conditions, which characterize actual technologies, to be removed. Furthermore, it will be also possible to use direct thermodynamic cycles where the supercritical fluid expands right away in a turbine without the necessity of using intermediate steam generators and/or separators. This work presents several thermodynamic cycles that could be appropriate to run SCWR power plants. Improving both thermal efficiency and mechanical power constitutes a multi-objective optimization problem and requires specific tools. To this aim, an efficient and robust evolutionary algorithm, based on genetic algorithm, is used and coupled to an appropriate power plant thermodynamic simulation model. The results provide numerous combinations to achieve a thermal efficiency higher than 50% with a mechanical power of 1200 MW. It is observed that in most cases the landscape of Pareto's front is mostly controlled only by few key parameters. These results may be very useful for future plant design engineers. Furthermore, some calculations for pipe sizing and temperature variation between coolant and fuel have been carried out to provide an idea on their order of magnitude.

  3. Ensure Continuous Power to Critical Industrial Processes with the New Superconducting Storage Device (SSD™) 

    E-print Network

    Dewinkel, C. C.; Koeppe, P. F.

    1992-01-01

    . as well as reliability and maintenance problems with the thousands of connections of large ballery banks. Banks of capacitors are sometimes employed to store the energy for "ride-tllrough." These have drawbacks similar to those of the balleries...-superconduct. ing part of the circuit. When voltage on the capacitor bank on the dc side of the inverter drops during a sag or outage. the switch (S) in the voltage regulator opens. and current from the magnet immediately tlows across the capacitor bank. When...

  4. DEVELOP A CONCENTRATED SOLAR POWER-BASED THERMAL COOLING SYSTEM VIA SIMULATION AND EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A small scale CSP-based cooling system prototype (300W cooling capacity) and the system performance simulation tool will be developed as a proof of concept. Practical issues will be identified to improve our design.

  5. Design study of the cooling scheme for SMES system in ASPCS by using liquid hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makida, Yasuhiro; Shintomi, Takakazu; Asami, Takuya; Suzuki, Goro; Takao, Tomoaki; Hamajima, Takataro; Tsuda, Makoto; Miyagi, Daisuke; Munakata, Kouhei; Kajiwara, Masataka

    2013-11-01

    From the point of view of environment and energy problems, the renewable energies have been attracting attention. However, fluctuating power generation by the renewable energies affects the stability of the power network. Thus, we propose a new electric power storage and stabilization system, Advanced Superconducting Power Conditioning System (ASPCS), in which a Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) and a hydrogen-energy-storage converge on a liquid hydrogen station for fuel cell vehicles. The ASPCS proposes that the SMES coils wound with MgB2 conductor are indirectly cooled by thermo-siphon circulation of liquid hydrogen to use its cooling capability. The conceptual design of cooling scheme of the ASPCS is presented.

  6. Overturning the Case for Gravitational Powering in the Prototypical Cooling Lyman-alpha Nebula

    E-print Network

    Prescott, Moire K M; Brammer, Gabriel B; Fynbo, Johan P U; Møller, Palle

    2015-01-01

    The Nilsson et al. (2006) Lyman-alpha nebula has often been cited as the most plausible example of a Lyman-alpha nebula powered by gravitational cooling. In this paper, we bring together new data from the Hubble Space Telescope and the Herschel Space Observatory as well as comparisons to recent theoretical simulations in order to revisit the questions of the local environment and most likely power source for the Lyman-alpha nebula. In contrast to previous results, we find that this Lyman-alpha nebula is associated with 6 nearby galaxies and an obscured AGN that is offset by $\\sim$4"$\\approx$30 kpc from the Lyman-alpha peak. The local region is overdense relative to the field, by a factor of $\\sim$10, and at low surface brightness levels the Lyman-alpha emission appears to encircle the position of the obscured AGN, highly suggestive of a physical association. At the same time, we confirm that there is no compact continuum source located within $\\sim$2-3"$\\approx$15-23 kpc of the Lyman-alpha peak. Since the lat...

  7. Organic Fluids and Passive Cooling in a Supercritical Rankine Cycle for Power Generation from Low Grade Heat Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidhi, Rachana

    Low grade heat sources have a large amount of thermal energy content. Due to low temperature, the conventional power generation technologies result in lower efficiency and hence cannot be used. In order to efficiently generate power, alternate methods need to be used. In this study, a supercritical organic Rankine cycle was used for heat source temperatures varying from 125°C to 200°C. Organic refrigerants with zero ozone depletion potential and their mixtures were selected as working fluid for this study while the cooling water temperature was changed from 10-25°C. Operating pressure of the cycle has been optimized for each fluid at every heat source temperature to obtain the highest thermal efficiency. Energy and exergy efficiencies of the thermodynamic cycle have been obtained as a function of heat source temperature. Efficiency of a thermodynamic cycle depends significantly on the sink temperature. At areas where water cooling is not available and ambient air temperature is high, efficient power generation from low grade heat sources may be a challenge. Use of passive cooling systems coupled with the condenser was studied, so that lower sink temperatures could be obtained. Underground tunnels, buried at a depth of few meters, were used as earth-air-heat-exchanger (EAHE) through which hot ambient air was passed. It was observed that the air temperature could be lowered by 5-10°C in the EAHE. Vertical pipes were used to lower the temperature of water by 5°C by passing it underground. Nocturnal cooling of stored water has been studied that can be used to cool the working fluid in the thermodynamic cycle. It was observed that the water temperature can be lowered by 10-20°C during the night when it is allowed to cool. The amount of water lost was calculated and was found to be approximately 0.1% over 10 days. The different passive cooling systems were studied separately and their effects on the efficiency of the thermodynamic cycle were investigated. They were then combined into a novel condenser design that uses passive cooling technology to cool the working fluid that was selected in the first part of the study. It was observed that the efficiency of the cycle improved by 2-2.5% when passive cooling system was used.

  8. Thermal effluent from the power sector: an analysis of once-through cooling system impacts on surface water temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madden, N.; Lewis, A.; Davis, M.

    2013-09-01

    In this study, we review federal datasets to assess the impacts of once-through power plant cooling systems on summer freshwater temperatures in the United States from 1996 to 2005. We find that maximum reported temperature discharges averaged 37?° C (1996-2005) and were 9.5?° C (1996-2000) to 10?° C (2001-2005) higher than maximum reported intake temperatures during the summer. More than half of all power plant cooling systems report maximum temperature discharges that exceed 32?° C and increase water temperatures enough to potentially impact aquatic life. However, current federal data on thermal discharges from power plants are insufficient to adequately assess their impact on in stream temperatures, or their subsequent effects on aquatic ecosystems and biodiversity. A preliminary analysis indicates that certain watersheds, primarily in the Southeastern and Midwestern United States, are good candidates for more focused study of power plant temperature impacts.

  9. CLOSED-CYCLE COOLING SYSTEMS FOR STEAM-ELECTRIC POWER PLANTS: A STATE-OF-THE-ART MANUAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report, in a practical manual format, gives results of a technical review of the state-of-the-art of thermal pollution control and treatment of cooling water in the steam-electric power generation industry. It assesses current, near horizon, and future technologies utilized o...

  10. REMOVING COOL CORES AND CENTRAL METALLICITY PEAKS IN GALAXY CLUSTERS WITH POWERFUL ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS OUTBURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Fulai; Mathews, William G.

    2010-07-10

    Recent X-ray observations of galaxy clusters suggest that cluster populations are bimodally distributed according to central gas entropy and are separated into two distinct classes: cool core (CC) and non-cool core (NCC) clusters. While it is widely accepted that active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback plays a key role in offsetting radiative losses and maintaining many clusters in the CC state, the origin of NCC clusters is much less clear. At the same time, a handful of extremely powerful AGN outbursts have recently been detected in clusters, with a total energy {approx}10{sup 61}-10{sup 62} erg. Using two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations, we show that if a large fraction of this energy is deposited near the centers of CC clusters, which is likely common due to dense cores, these AGN outbursts can completely remove CCs, transforming them to NCC clusters. Our model also has interesting implications for cluster abundance profiles, which usually show a central peak in CC systems. Our calculations indicate that during the CC to NCC transformation, AGN outbursts efficiently mix metals in cluster central regions and may even remove central abundance peaks if they are not broad enough. For CC clusters with broad central abundance peaks, AGN outbursts decrease peak abundances, but cannot effectively destroy the peaks. Our model may simultaneously explain the contradictory (possibly bimodal) results of abundance profiles in NCC clusters, some of which are nearly flat, while others have strong central peaks similar to those in CC clusters. A statistical analysis of the sizes of central abundance peaks and their redshift evolution may shed interesting insights on the origin of both types of NCC clusters and the evolution history of thermodynamics and AGN activity in clusters.

  11. Removing Cool Cores and Central Metallicity Peaks in Galaxy Clusters with Powerful Active Galactic Nucleus Outbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Fulai; Mathews, William G.

    2010-07-01

    Recent X-ray observations of galaxy clusters suggest that cluster populations are bimodally distributed according to central gas entropy and are separated into two distinct classes: cool core (CC) and non-cool core (NCC) clusters. While it is widely accepted that active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback plays a key role in offsetting radiative losses and maintaining many clusters in the CC state, the origin of NCC clusters is much less clear. At the same time, a handful of extremely powerful AGN outbursts have recently been detected in clusters, with a total energy ~1061-1062 erg. Using two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations, we show that if a large fraction of this energy is deposited near the centers of CC clusters, which is likely common due to dense cores, these AGN outbursts can completely remove CCs, transforming them to NCC clusters. Our model also has interesting implications for cluster abundance profiles, which usually show a central peak in CC systems. Our calculations indicate that during the CC to NCC transformation, AGN outbursts efficiently mix metals in cluster central regions and may even remove central abundance peaks if they are not broad enough. For CC clusters with broad central abundance peaks, AGN outbursts decrease peak abundances, but cannot effectively destroy the peaks. Our model may simultaneously explain the contradictory (possibly bimodal) results of abundance profiles in NCC clusters, some of which are nearly flat, while others have strong central peaks similar to those in CC clusters. A statistical analysis of the sizes of central abundance peaks and their redshift evolution may shed interesting insights on the origin of both types of NCC clusters and the evolution history of thermodynamics and AGN activity in clusters.

  12. Minnesota Project: district heating and cooling through power plant retrofit and distribution network. Final report. Phase 1. [Minnesota Project

    SciTech Connect

    1980-01-01

    Appendices are presented for the Minnesota Project: District Heating and Cooling Through Power Plant Retrofit and Distribution Network. These are: SYNTHA results (SYNTHA II is a proprietary program of the SYNTHA Corporation); Market Survey Questionnaire: Environmental Review Procedures; Public Service Commission Regulation of District Heating; Energy Use Normalization Procedures; Power Plant Description; Letters of Commitment; Bond Opinion and Issuance; and Marvin Koeplin Letter, Chairman of Public Service Commission, Moorehead, Minnesota.

  13. Evaluation of Gas-Cooled Pressurized Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cells for Electric Utility Power Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faroque, M.

    1983-01-01

    Gas cooling is a more reliable, less expensive and a more simple alternative to conventional liquid cooling for heat removal from the phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC). The feasibility of gas-cooling was already demonstrated in atmospheric pressure stacks. Theoretical and experimental investigations of gas-cooling for pressurized PAFC are presented. Two approaches to gas cooling, Distributed Gas-Cooling (DIGAS) and Separated Gas-Cooling (SGC) were considered, and a theoretical comparison on the basis of cell performance indicated SGC to be superior to DIGAS. The feasibility of SGC was experimentally demonstrated by operating a 45-cell stack for 700 hours at pressure, and determining thermal response and the effect of other related parameters.

  14. MULTI-TUBE POWER LEADS TOWER FOR BEPCII IR MAGNETS.

    SciTech Connect

    JIA,L.X.; ZHANG,X.B.; WANG,L.; WANG,T.H.; YAO,Z.L.

    2004-05-11

    A power lead tower containing the multi-tube power leads is designed and under fabrication for the superconducting IR quadrupole magnets in the Beijing Electron Position Collider Upgrade (BEPCII). The lead tower consists of six pairs of gas-cooled leads for seven superconducting coils at various operating currents. The power lead is designed in a modular fashion, which can be easily applied to suit different operating current. The end copper block of the tube lead has a large cold mass that provide a large time constant in case of cooling flow interruption. A novel cryogenic electrical isolator is used for the leads.

  15. Test results of 50 MVA superconducting generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maki, N.; Yamaguchi, K.; Takahashi, M.; Sanematsu, T.

    1987-09-01

    A 50-MVA superconducting synchronous generator with a superconducting field winding was developed. This paper describes its features and test results. The saddle-shaped field winding, impregnated with epoxy resin, was mounted on a torque tube and fastened with prestressed nonmagnetic stainless steel wires. A free-convection cooling system, which uses the thermosiphon effect, was adopted for the field winding. Cooldown of the rotor was carried out with a constant liquid helium feed rate of 50 l/h and it was completed smoothly within about 40 hours. After that, the rotor could rotate stably at 3600 rpm. Electrical tests of no-load, short-circuit and sudden short-circuit characteristics were also carried out. Finally, the 50 MVA generator was connected to a power network and confirmed to operate successfully for 80 minutes as a syncronous condenser with a small capacity.

  16. Technical analysis of a river basin-based model of advanced power plant cooling technologies for mitigating water management challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stillwell, Ashlynn S.; Clayton, Mary E.; Webber, Michael E.

    2011-07-01

    Thermoelectric power plants require large volumes of water for cooling, which can introduce drought vulnerability and compete with other water needs. Alternative cooling technologies, such as cooling towers and hybrid wet-dry or dry cooling, present opportunities to reduce water diversions. This case study uses a custom, geographically resolved river basin-based model for eleven river basins in the state of Texas (the Brazos and San Jacinto-Brazos, Colorado and Colorado-Brazos, Cypress, Neches, Nueces, Red, Sabine, San Jacinto, and Trinity River basins), focusing on the Brazos River basin, to analyze water availability during drought. We utilized two existing water availability models for our analysis: (1) the full execution of water rights—a scenario where each water rights holder diverts the full permitted volume with zero return flow, and (2) current conditions—a scenario reflecting actual diversions with associated return flows. Our model results show that switching the cooling technologies at power plants in the eleven analyzed river basins to less water-intensive alternative designs can potentially reduce annual water diversions by 247-703 million m3—enough water for 1.3-3.6 million people annually. We consider these results in a geographic context using geographic information system tools and then analyze volume reliability, which is a policymaker's metric that indicates the percentage of total demand actually supplied over a given period. This geographic and volume reliability analysis serves as a measure of drought susceptibility in response to changes in thermoelectric cooling technologies. While these water diversion savings do not alleviate all reliability concerns, the additional streamflow from the use of dry cooling alleviates drought concerns for some municipal water rights holders and might also be sufficient to uphold instream flow requirements for important bays and estuaries on the Texas Gulf coast.

  17. WET/DRY COOLING AND COOLING TOWER BLOWDOWN DISPOSAL IN SYNTHETIC FUEL AND STEAM-ELECTRIC POWER PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report extends the results of a previous study dealing with the detailed determination of consumptive water use and wet-solids residuals for coal and oil shale conversion plants and coal-fired steam-electric power generation plants located in the western United States. The p...

  18. Aerospace applications of high temperature superconductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinen, V. O.; Connolly, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    Space application of high temperature superconducting (HTS) materials may occur before most terrestrial applications because of the passive cooling possibilities in space and because of the economic feasibility of introducing an expensive new technology which has a significant system benefit in space. NASA Lewis Research Center has an ongoing program to develop space technology capitalizing on the potential benefit of HTS materials. The applications being pursued include space communications, power and propulsion systems, and magnetic bearings. In addition, NASA Lewis is pursuing materials research to improve the performance of HTS materials for space applications.

  19. Optimum Reflector Configurations for Minimizing Fission Power Peaking in a Lithium-Cooled, Liquid-Metal Reactor with Sliding Reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Fensin, Michael L.; Poston, David I.

    2005-02-06

    Many design constraints limit the development of a space fission power system optimized for fuel performance, system reliability, and mission cost. These design constraints include fuel mass provisions to meet cycle-length requirements, fuel centerline and clad temperatures, and clad creep from fission gas generation. Decreasing the fission power peaking of the reactor system enhances all of the mentioned parameters. This design study identifies the cause, determines the reflector configurations for reactor criticality, and generates worth curves for minimized fission-power-peaking configuration in a lithium-cooled liquid-metal reactor that uses sliding reflectors. Because of the characteristics of the core axial power distribution and axial power distortions inherent to the sliding reflector design, minimizing the power peaking of the reactor involves placing the reflectors in a position that least distorts the axial power distribution. The views expressed in this document are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect agreement by the Government.

  20. Feasibility study of a superconducting motor for electrical helicopter propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simons, C. A. B. A. E.; Sanabria-Walter, C.; Polinder, H.

    2014-05-01

    During the past decades, superconducting electrical machines have become more suitable to replace conventional iron based designs, because of their lower weight and higher torque density. These properties make them good candidates for use in More Electric Aircraft (MEA). Especially helicopter propulsion systems could benefit from the increased performance. This paper describes the feasibility study of a superconducting motor to be used for helicopter propulsion as part of a More Electric Aircraft (MEA). For this, the armature, field windings and cryostat are designed, aiming at meeting the difficult specifications. Since superconductors have virtually no electrical resistance when cooled down below a certain critical temperature, they can be used to build high field and low weight coils for electrical machines. Especially the possibility to not use iron can make the superconducting motor lighter with a higher power density compared with conventional Permanent Magnet (PM) motors.

  1. High intensity neutrino source superconducting solenoid cyrostat design

    SciTech Connect

    Page, T.M.; Nicol, T.H.; Feher, S.; Terechkine, I.; Tompkins, J.; /Fermilab

    2006-06-01

    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) is involved in the development of a 100 MeV superconducting linac. This linac is part of the High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) R&D Program. The initial beam acceleration in the front end section of the linac is achieved using room temperature spoke cavities, each of which is combined with a superconducting focusing solenoid. These solenoid magnets are cooled with liquid helium at 4.5K, operate at 250 A and have a maximum magnetic field strength of 7.5 T. The solenoid cryostat will house the helium vessel, suspension system, thermal shield, multilayer insulation, power leads, instrumentation, a vacuum vessel and cryogenic distribution lines. This paper discusses the requirements and detailed design of these superconducting solenoid cryostats.

  2. Superconducting light generator for large offshore wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz, S.; Arlaban, T.; Manzanas, R.; Tropeano, M.; Funke, R.; Ková?, P.; Yang, Y.; Neumann, H.; Mondesert, B.

    2014-05-01

    Offshore wind market demands higher power rate and reliable turbines in order to optimize capital and operational cost. These requests are difficult to overcome with conventional generator technologies due to a significant weight and cost increase with the scaling up. Thus superconducting materials appears as a prominent solution for wind generators, based on their capacity to held high current densities with very small losses, which permits to efficiently replace copper conductors mainly in the rotor field coils. However the state-of-the-art superconducting generator concepts still seem to be expensive and technically challenging for the marine environment. This paper describes a 10 MW class novel direct drive superconducting generator, based on MgB2 wires and a modular cryogen free cooling system, which has been specifically designed for the offshore wind industry needs.

  3. The impact of monochloramine on the diversity and dynamics of Legionella pneumophila subpopulations in a nuclear power plant cooling circuit.

    PubMed

    Jakubek, Delphine; Le Brun, Matthieu; Leblon, Gerard; DuBow, Michael; Binet, Marie

    2013-08-01

    Members of the pathogenic Legionella genus encounter suitable growth conditions in nuclear power plant cooling circuits. To limit its proliferation and ensure that levels remain below regulatory thresholds, chemical treatment with monochloramine can be used in continuous or sequential conditions. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of monochloramine on L. pneumophila subpopulations in the cooling circuits of a nuclear power plant. The chosen procedure involved monitoring the diversity and dynamics of L. pneumophila subpopulations every month over the course of a year in a nuclear power plant cooling circuit, which was treated for 2 months during the period under study. This study confirmed the effectiveness of monochloramine to limit L. pneumophila concentrations in cooling circuits. The culturable L. pneumophila community was strongly affected by the injection of monochloramine. Several subpopulations persisted during treatment at low concentrations (below the detection limit of standard methods), suggesting that the susceptibility of L. pneumophila is strain dependent. Although the composition of the subpopulations was not similar, the resilience of the community structure was observed. Indeed, the community eventually returned to its initial structure and presented a similar pattern of richness, diversity and uniformity to that seen before treatment. PMID:23530621

  4. Electric Current Dependence of a Self-Cooling Device Consisting of Silicon Wafers Connected to a Power MOSFET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakatsugawa, H.; Okamoto, Y.; Kawahara, T.; Yamaguchi, S.

    2014-06-01

    A self-cooling device has been developed by combining a commercial n-channel power metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) and single-crystalline Sb-doped n-type or B-doped p-type silicon wafers in order to improve the heat removal or cooling quantitatively. The electric current dependence of the temperature distribution in the self-cooling device and the voltage between the source and drain electrodes have been measured to estimate the Peltier heat flux. We found that the average temperature is decreased for a power MOSFET in which an electric current of 50 A flows. In particular, the average temperature of the power MOSFET was decreased by 2.7°C with the n-type Si wafer and by 3.5°C with the p-type Si wafer, although an electric current of 40 A makes little difference. This certainly warrants further work with improved measurement conditions. Nonetheless, the results strongly indicate that such n-type or p-type silicon wafers are candidate materials for use in self-cooling devices.

  5. Cooling through heat pumps powered by a combustion engine for natural gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janovcová, Martina; Janda?ka, Jozef; Kiš, Roman

    2014-08-01

    The heat pump can be used both for heating and hot water in winter, but in the case of reversible heat pumps also air-conditioning in summer. Currently, air conditioners are becoming standard equipment for residential and industrial buildings. Heating and cooling occurs separately in many cases, ie that for the purpose of heating is used a separate heat source and for the cooling production other source of cold with own equipment and distribution systems. The heat pump is one device that can heat and cool often at a much lower price. This article deals with the research parameters of the gas heat pump in cooling mode.

  6. Magnetocaloric properties and critical behavior of high relative cooling power FeNiB nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhary, V.; Maheswar Repaka, D. V.; Chaturvedi, A.; Sridhar, I.; Ramanujan, R. V.

    2014-10-01

    Low cost magnetocaloric nanomaterials have attracted considerable attention for energy efficient applications. We report a very high relative cooling power (RCP) in a study of the magnetocaloric effect in quenched FeNiB nanoparticles. RCP increases from 89.8 to 640 J kg-1 for a field change of 1 and 5 T, respectively, these values are the largest for rare earth free iron based magnetocaloric nanomaterials. To investigate the magnetocaloric behavior around the Curie temperature (TC), the critical behavior of these quenched nanoparticles was studied. Detailed analysis of the magnetic phase transition using the modified Arrott plot, Kouvel-Fisher method, and critical isotherm plots yields critical exponents of ? = 0.364, ? = 1.319, ? = 4.623, and ? = -0.055, which are close to the theoretical exponents obtained from the 3D-Heisenberg model. Our results indicate that these FeNiB nanoparticles are potential candidates for magnetocaloric fluid based heat pumps and low grade waste heat recovery.

  7. Magnetocaloric properties and critical behavior of high relative cooling power FeNiB nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhary, V.; Maheswar Repaka, D. V.; Chaturvedi, A.; Ramanujan, R. V.; Sridhar, I.

    2014-10-28

    Low cost magnetocaloric nanomaterials have attracted considerable attention for energy efficient applications. We report a very high relative cooling power (RCP) in a study of the magnetocaloric effect in quenched FeNiB nanoparticles. RCP increases from 89.8 to 640?J kg{sup ?1} for a field change of 1 and 5?T, respectively, these values are the largest for rare earth free iron based magnetocaloric nanomaterials. To investigate the magnetocaloric behavior around the Curie temperature (T{sub C}), the critical behavior of these quenched nanoparticles was studied. Detailed analysis of the magnetic phase transition using the modified Arrott plot, Kouvel-Fisher method, and critical isotherm plots yields critical exponents of ??=?0.364, ??=?1.319, ??=?4.623, and ??=??0.055, which are close to the theoretical exponents obtained from the 3D-Heisenberg model. Our results indicate that these FeNiB nanoparticles are potential candidates for magnetocaloric fluid based heat pumps and low grade waste heat recovery.

  8. Thermal ecology of Naegleria fowleri from a power plant cooling reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Huizinga, H.W. ); McLaughlin, G.L. )

    1990-07-01

    The pathogenic, free-living amoeba Naegleria fowleri is the causative agent of human primary amebic meningoencephalitis. N. fowleri has been isolated from thermally elevated aquatic environments worldwide, but temperature factors associated with occurrence of the amoeba remain undefined. In this study, a newly created cooling reservoir (Clinton Lake, Illinois) was surveyed for Naegleria spp. before and after thermal additions from a nuclear power plant. Water and sediment samples were collected from heated and unheated arms of the reservoir and analyzed for the presence of thermophilic Naegleria spp. and pathogenic N. fowleri. Amoebae were identified by morphology, in vitro cultivation, temperature tolerance, mouse pathogenicity assay, and DNA restriction fragment length analysis. N. fowleri was isolated from the thermally elevated arm but not from the ambient-temperature arm of the reservoir. The probability of isolating thermophilic Naegleria and pathogenic N. fowleri increased significantly with temperature. Repetitive DNA restriction fragment profiles of the N. fowleri Clinton Lake isolates and a known N. fowleri strain of human origin were homogeneous.

  9. Thermal ecology of Naegleria fowleri from a power plant cooling reservoir.

    PubMed Central

    Huizinga, H W; McLaughlin, G L

    1990-01-01

    The pathogenic, free-living amoeba Naegleria fowleri is the causative agent of human primary amebic meningoencephalitis. N. fowleri has been isolated from thermally elevated aquatic environments worldwide, but temperature factors associated with occurrence of the amoeba remain undefined. In this study, a newly created cooling reservoir (Clinton Lake, Illinois) was surveyed for Naegleria spp. before and after thermal additions from a nuclear power plant. Water and sediment samples were collected from heated and unheated arms of the reservoir and analyzed for the presence of thermophilic Naegleria spp. and pathogenic N. fowleri. Amoebae were identified by morphology, in vitro cultivation, temperature tolerance, mouse pathogenicity assay, and DNA restriction fragment length analysis. N. fowleri was isolated from the thermally elevated arm but not from the ambient-temperature arm of the reservoir. The probability of isolating thermophilic Naegleria and pathogenic N. fowleri increased significantly with temperature. Repetitive DNA restriction fragment profiles of the N. fowleri Clinton Lake isolates and a known N. fowleri strain of human origin were homogeneous. Images PMID:1975164

  10. Nonequilibrium Thermoelectrics: Low-Cost, High-Performance Materials for Cooling and Power Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Q.

    2011-05-18

    Thermoelectric materials can be made into coolers (TECs) that use electricity to develop a temperature difference, cooling something, or generators (TEGs) that convert heat directly to electricity. One application of TEGs is to place them in a waste heat stream to recuperate some of the power being lost and putting it to use more profitably. To be effective thermoelectrics, however, materials must have both high electrical conductivity and low thermal conductivity, a combination rarely found in nature. Materials selection and processing has led to the development of several systems with a figure of merit, ZT, of nearly unity. By using non-equilibrium techniques, we have fabricated higher efficiency thermoelectric materials. The process involves creating an amorphous material through melt spinning and then sintering it with either spark plasma or a hot press for as little as two minutes. This results in a 100% dense material with an extremely fine grain structure. The grain boundaries appear to retard phonons resulting in a reduced thermal conductivity while the electrons move through the material relatively unchecked. The techniques used are low-cost and scaleable to support industrial manufacturing.

  11. Micro Cooling, Heating, and Power (Micro-CHP) and Bio-Fuel Center, Mississippi State University

    SciTech Connect

    Louay Chamra

    2008-09-26

    Initially, most micro-CHP systems will likely be designed as constant-power output or base-load systems. This implies that at some point the power requirement will not be met, or that the requirement will be exceeded. Realistically, both cases will occur within a 24-hour period. For example, in the United States, the base electrical load for the average home is approximately 2 kW while the peak electrical demand is slightly over 4 kW. If a 3 kWe micro- CHP system were installed in this situation, part of the time more energy will be provided than could be used and for a portion of the time more energy will be required than could be provided. Jalalzadeh-Azar [6] investigated this situation and presented a comparison of electrical- and thermal-load-following CHP systems. In his investigation he included in a parametric analysis addressing the influence of the subsystem efficiencies on the total primary energy consumption as well as an economic analysis of these systems. He found that an increase in the efficiencies of the on-site power generation and electrical equipment reduced the total monthly import of electricity. A methodology for calculating performance characteristics of different micro-CHP system components will be introduced in this article. Thermodynamic cycles are used to model each individual prime mover. The prime movers modeled in this article are a spark-ignition internal combustion engine (Otto cycle) and a diesel engine (Diesel cycle). Calculations for heat exchanger, absorption chiller, and boiler modeling are also presented. The individual component models are then linked together to calculate total system performance values. Performance characteristics that will be observed for each system include maximum fuel flow rate, total monthly fuel consumption, and system energy (electrical, thermal, and total) efficiencies. Also, whether or not both the required electrical and thermal loads can sufficiently be accounted for within the system specifications is observed. Case study data for various micro-CHP system configurations have been discussed and compared. Comparisons are made of the different prime mover/fuel combinations. Also, micro- CHP monthly energy cost results are compared for each system configuration to conventional monthly utility costs for equivalent monthly building power, heating, and cooling requirements.

  12. Superconducting magnet

    DOEpatents

    Satti, John A. (Naperville, IL)

    1980-01-01

    A superconducting magnet designed to produce magnetic flux densities of the order of 4 to 5 Webers per square meter is constructed by first forming a cable of a plurality of matrixed superconductor wires with each wire of the plurality insulated from each other one. The cable is shaped into a rectangular cross-section and is wound with tape in an open spiral to create cooling channels. Coils are wound in a calculated pattern in saddle shapes to produce desired fields, such as dipoles, quadrupoles, and the like. Wedges are inserted between adjacent cables as needed to maintain substantially radial placement of the long dimensions of cross sections of the cables. After winding, individual strands in each of the cables are brought out to terminals and are interconnected to place all of the strands in series and to maximize the propagation of a quench by alternating conduction from an inner layer to an outer layer and from top half to bottom half as often as possible. Individual layers are separated from others by spiraled aluminum spacers to facilitate cooling. The wound coil is wrapped with an epoxy tape that is cured by heat and then machined to an interference fit with an outer aluminum pipe which is then affixed securely to the assembled coil by heating it to make a shrink fit. In an alternate embodiment, one wire of the cable is made of copper or the like to be heated externally to propagate a quench.

  13. Electromagnetic, stress and thermal analysis of the Superconducting Magnet

    E-print Network

    Ren, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Within the framework of the National Special Project for Magnetic Confined Nuclear Fusion Energy of China, the design of a superconducting magnet project as a test facility of the Nb3Sn coil or NbTi coil for the Chinese Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR) has been carried out not only to estimate the relevant conductor performance but also to implement a background magnetic field for CFETR CS insert and toroidal field (TF) insert coils. The superconducting magnet is composed of two parts: the inner part with Nb3Sn cable-in-conduit conductor (CICC) and the outer part with NbTi CICC. Both parts are connected in series and powered by a single DC power supply. The superconducting magnet can be cooled with supercritical helium at inlet temperature of 4.5 K. The total inductance and stored energy of the superconducting magnet are about 0.278 H and 436.6 MJ at an operating current of 56 kA respectively. An active quench protection circuit was adopted to transfer the stored magnetic energy of the superconducting ...

  14. Reuse of Treated Internal or External Wastewaters in the Cooling Systems of Coal-Based Thermoelectric Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Radisav Vidic; David Dzombak; Ming-Kai Hsieh; Heng Li; Shih-Hsiang Chien; Yinghua Feng; Indranil Chowdhury; Jason Monnell

    2009-06-30

    This study evaluated the feasibility of using three impaired waters - secondary treated municipal wastewater, passively treated abandoned mine drainage (AMD), and effluent from ash sedimentation ponds at power plants - for use as makeup water in recirculating cooling water systems at thermoelectric power plants. The evaluation included assessment of water availability based on proximity and relevant regulations as well as feasibility of managing cooling water quality with traditional chemical management schemes. Options for chemical treatment to prevent corrosion, scaling, and biofouling were identified through review of current practices, and were tested at bench and pilot-scale. Secondary treated wastewater is the most widely available impaired water that can serve as a reliable source of cooling water makeup. There are no federal regulations specifically related to impaired water reuse but a number of states have introduced regulations with primary focus on water aerosol 'drift' emitted from cooling towers, which has the potential to contain elevated concentrations of chemicals and microorganisms and may pose health risk to the public. It was determined that corrosion, scaling, and biofouling can be controlled adequately in cooling systems using secondary treated municipal wastewater at 4-6 cycles of concentration. The high concentration of dissolved solids in treated AMD rendered difficulties in scaling inhibition and requires more comprehensive pretreatment and scaling controls. Addition of appropriate chemicals can adequately control corrosion, scaling and biological growth in ash transport water, which typically has the best water quality among the three waters evaluated in this study. The high TDS in the blowdown from pilot-scale testing units with both passively treated mine drainage and secondary treated municipal wastewater and the high sulfate concentration in the mine drainage blowdown water were identified as the main challenges for blowdown disposal. Membrane treatment (nanofiltration or reverse osmosis) can be employed to reduce TDS and sulfate concentrations to acceptable levels for reuse of the blowdown in the cooling systems as makeup water.

  15. Evaluation of distributed gas cooling of pressurized PAFC for utility power generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farooque, M.; Hooper, M.; Maru, H.

    1981-01-01

    A proof-of-concept test for a gas-cooled pressurized phosphoric acid fuel cell is described. After initial feasibility studies in short stacks, two 10 kW stacks are tested. Progress includes: (1) completion of design of the test stations with a recirculating gas cooling loop; (2) atmospheric testing of the baseline stack.

  16. POWER CYCLE AND STRESS ANALYSES FOR HIGH TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED REACTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Chang H; Davis, Cliff; Hawkes, Brian D; Sherman, Steven R

    2007-05-01

    The Department of Energy and the Idaho National Laboratory are developing a Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) to serve as a demonstration of state-of-the-art nuclear technology. The purpose of the demonstration is two fold 1) efficient low cost energy generation and 2) hydrogen production. Although a next generation plant could be developed as a single-purpose facility, early designs are expected to be dual-purpose. While hydrogen production and advanced energy cycles are still in its early stages of development, research towards coupling a high temperature reactor, electrical generation and hydrogen production is under way. Many aspects of the NGNP must be researched and developed in order to make recommendations on the final design of the plant. Parameters such as working conditions, cycle components, working fluids, and power conversion unit configurations must be understood. Three configurations of the power conversion unit were demonstrated in this study. A three-shaft design with three turbines and four compressors, a combined cycle with a Brayton top cycle and a Rankine bottoming cycle, and a reheated cycle with three stages of reheat were investigated. An intermediate heat transport loop for transporting process heat to a High Temperature Steam Electrolysis (HTSE) hydrogen production plant was used. Helium, CO2, and a 80% nitrogen, 20% helium mixture (by weight) were studied to determine the best working fluid in terms cycle efficiency and development cost. In each of these configurations the relative component size were estimated for the different working fluids. The relative size of the turbomachinery was measured by comparing the power input/output of the component. For heat exchangers the volume was computed and compared. Parametric studies away from the baseline values of the three-shaft and combined cycles were performed to determine the effect of varying conditions in the cycle. This gives some insight into the sensitivity of these cycles to various operating conditions as well as trade offs between efficiency and capital cost. Parametric studies were carried out on reactor outlet temperature, mass flow, pressure, and turbine cooling. Recommendations on the optimal working fluid for each configuration were made. Engineering analyses were performed for several configurations of the intermediate heat transport loop that transfers heat from the nuclear reactor to the hydrogen production plant. The analyses evaluated parallel and concentric piping arrangements and two different working fluids, including helium and a liquid salt. The thermal-hydraulic analyses determined the size and insulation requirements for the hot and cold leg pipes in the different configurations. Mechanical analyses were performed to determine hoop stresses and thermal expansion characteristics for the different configurations. Economic analyses were performed to estimate the cost of the various configurations.

  17. Improved Performance of an Air Cooled Condenser (ACC) Using SPX Wind Guide Technology at Coal-Based Thermoelectric Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Ken Mortensen

    2010-12-31

    This project added a new airflow enhancement technology to an existing ACC cooling process at a selected coal power plant. Airflow parameters and efficiency improvement for the main plant cooling process using the applied technology were determined and compared with the capabilities of existing systems. The project required significant planning and pre-test execution in order to reach the required Air Cooled Condenser system configuration for evaluation. A host Power Plant ACC system had to be identified, agreement finalized, and addition of the SPX ACC Wind Guide Technology completed on that site. Design of the modification, along with procurement, fabrication, instrumentation, and installation of the new airflow enhancement technology were executed. Baseline and post-modification cooling system data was collected and evaluated. The improvement of ACC thermal performance after SPX wind guide installation was clear. Testing of the improvement indicates there is a 5% improvement in heat transfer coefficient in high wind conditions and 1% improvement at low wind speed. The benefit increased with increasing wind speed. This project was completed on schedule and within budget.

  18. Impact of drought on U.S. steam electric power plant cooling water intakes and related water resource management issues.

    SciTech Connect

    Kimmell, T. A.; Veil, J. A.; Environmental Science Division

    2009-04-03

    This report was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Existing Plants Research Program, which has an energy-water research effort that focuses on water use at power plants. This study complements their overall research effort by evaluating water availability at power plants under drought conditions. While there are a number of competing demands on water uses, particularly during drought conditions, this report focuses solely on impacts to the U.S. steam electric power plant fleet. Included are both fossil-fuel and nuclear power plants. One plant examined also uses biomass as a fuel. The purpose of this project is to estimate the impact on generation capacity of a drop in water level at U.S. steam electric power plants due to climatic or other conditions. While, as indicated above, the temperature of the water can impact decisions to halt or curtail power plant operations, this report specifically examines impacts as a result of a drop in water levels below power plant submerged cooling water intakes. Impacts due to the combined effects of excessive temperatures of the returned cooling water and elevated temperatures of receiving waters (due to high ambient temperatures associated with drought) may be examined in a subsequent study. For this study, the sources of cooling water used by the U.S. steam electric power plant fleet were examined. This effort entailed development of a database of power plants and cooling water intake locations and depths for those plants that use surface water as a source of cooling water. Development of the database and its general characteristics are described in Chapter 2 of this report. Examination of the database gives an indication of how low water levels can drop before cooling water intakes cease to function. Water level drops are evaluated against a number of different power plant characteristics, such as the nature of the water source (river vs. lake or reservoir) and type of plant (nuclear vs. fossil fuel). This is accomplished in Chapter 3. In Chapter 4, the nature of any compacts or agreements that give priority to users (i.e., which users must stop withdrawing water first) is examined. This is examined on a regional or watershed basis, specifically for western water rights, and also as a function of federal and state water management programs. Chapter 5 presents the findings and conclusions of this study. In addition to the above, a related intent of this study is to conduct preliminary modeling of how lowered surface water levels could affect generating capacity and other factors at different regional power plants. If utility managers are forced to take some units out of service or reduce plant outputs, the fuel mix at the remaining plants and the resulting carbon dioxide emissions may change. Electricity costs and other factors may also be impacted. Argonne has conducted some modeling based on the information presented in the database described in Chapter 2 of this report. A separate report of the modeling effort has been prepared (Poch et al. 2009). In addition to the U.S. steam electric power plant fleet, this modeling also includes an evaluation of power production of hydroelectric facilities. The focus of this modeling is on those power plants located in the western United States.

  19. Flux free growth of large FeSe1/2Te1/2 superconducting single crystals by an easy high temperature melt and slow cooling method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maheshwari, P. K.; Jha, Rajveer; Gahtori, Bhasker; Awana, V. P. S.

    2015-09-01

    We report successful growth of flux free large single crystals of superconducting FeSe1/2Te1/2 with typical dimensions of up to few cm. The AC and DC magnetic measurements revealed the superconducting transition temperature (Tc) value of around 11.5K and the isothermal MH showed typical type-II superconducting behavior. The lower critical field (Hc1) being estimated by measuring the low field isothermal magnetization in superconducting regime is found to be above 200Oe at 0K. The temperature dependent electrical resistivity ?(T ) showed the Tc (onset) to be 14K and the Tc(? = 0) at 11.5K. The electrical resistivity under various magnetic fields i.e., ?(T)H for H//ab and H//c demonstrated the difference in the width of Tc with applied field of 14Tesla to be nearly 2K, confirming the anisotropic nature of superconductivity. The upper critical and irreversibility fields at absolute zero temperature i.e., Hc2(0) and Hirr(0) being determined by the conventional one-band Werthamer-Helfand-Hohenberg (WHH) equation for the criteria of normal state resistivity (?n) falling to 90% (onset), and 10% (offset) is 76.9Tesla, and 37.45Tesla respectively, for H//c and 135.4Tesla, and 71.41Tesla respectively, for H//ab. The coherence length at the zero temperature is estimated to be above 20Å ´ by using the Ginsburg-Landau theory. The activation energy for the FeSe1/2Te1/2 in both directions H//c and H//ab is determined by using Thermally Activation Flux Flow (TAFF) model.

  20. Helical Muon Beam Cooling Channel Engineering Design

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikhin, V.S.; Lopes, M.L.; Romanov, G.V.; Tartaglia, M.A.; Yonehara, K.; Yu, M.; Zlobin, A.V.; Flanagan, G.; Johnson, R.P.; Kazakevich, G.M.; Marhauser, F.; /MUONS Inc., Batavia

    2012-05-01

    The Helical Cooling Channel (HCC), a novel technique for six-dimensional (6D) ionization cooling of muon beams, has shown considerable promise based on analytic and simulation studies. However, the implementation of this revolutionary method of muon cooling requires new techniques for the integration of hydrogen-pressurized, high-power RF cavities into the low-temperature superconducting magnets of the HCC. We present the progress toward a conceptual design for the integration of 805 MHz RF cavities into a 10 T Nb{sub 3}Sn based HCC test section. We include discussions on the pressure and thermal barriers needed within the cryostat to maintain operation of the magnet at 4.2 K while operating the RF and energy absorber at a higher temperature. Additionally, we include progress on the Nb{sub 3}Sn helical solenoid design.

  1. PH adjustment of power plant cooling water with flue gas/fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Brady, Patrick V.; Krumhansl, James L.

    2015-09-22

    A system including a vessel including a heat source and a flue; a turbine; a condenser; a fluid conduit circuit disposed between the vessel, the turbine and the condenser; and a diverter coupled to the flue to direct a portion of an exhaust from the flue to contact with a cooling medium for the condenser water. A method including diverting a portion of exhaust from a flue of a vessel; modifying the pH of a cooling medium for a condenser with the portion of exhaust; and condensing heated fluid from the vessel with the pH modified cooling medium.

  2. USE OF PRODUCED WATER IN RECIRCULATING COOLING SYSTEMS AT POWER GENERATING FACILITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Kent Zammit; Michael N. DiFilippo

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate produced water as a supplemental source of water for the San Juan Generating Station (SJGS). This study incorporates elements that identify produced water volume and quality, infrastructure to deliver it to SJGS, treatment requirements to use it at the plant, delivery and treatment economics, etc. SJGS, which is operated by Public Service of New Mexico (PNM) is located about 15 miles northwest of Farmington, New Mexico. It has four units with a total generating capacity of about 1,800 MW. The plant uses 22,400 acre-feet of water per year from the San Juan River with most of its demand resulting from cooling tower make-up. The plant is a zero liquid discharge facility and, as such, is well practiced in efficient water use and reuse. For the past few years, New Mexico has been suffering from a severe drought. Climate researchers are predicting the return of very dry weather over the next 30 to 40 years. Concern over the drought has spurred interest in evaluating the use of otherwise unusable saline waters. Produced water is generated nationally as a byproduct of oil and gas production. Seven states generate 90 percent of the produced water in the continental US. About 37 percent of the sources documented in the US Geological Survey's (USGS) Produced Waters Database have a TDS of less than 30,000 mg/l. This is significant because produced water treatment for reuse in power plants was found to be very costly above 30,000 mg/l TDS. For the purposes of this report, produced water treatment was assessed using the technologies evaluated for the San Juan Generating Station (SJGS) in Deliverable 3, Treatment and Disposal Analysis. Also, a methodology was developed to readily estimate capital and operating costs for produced water treatment. Two examples are presented to show how the cost estimating methodology can be used to evaluate the cost of treatment of produced water at power plants close to oil and gas production.

  3. Development of a high-power water cooled beryllium target for use in accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, B W; Yanch, J C; Klinkowstein, R E

    1998-10-01

    In order for ABNCT (accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy) to be successful, 10-16 kW or more must be dissipated from a target. Beryllium is well suited as a high-power target material. Beryllium has a thermal conductivity of 200 W/mK at 300 K which is comparable to aluminum, and it has one of the highest strength to weight ratios of any metal even at high temperatures (100 MPa at 600 degrees C). Submerged jet impingement cooling has been investigated as an effective means to remove averaged power densities on the order of 2 x 10(7) W/m2 with local power densities as high as 6 x 10(7) W/m2. Water velocities required to remove these power levels are in excess of 24 m/s with volumetric flow rates of nearly 100 GPM. Tests on a prototype target revealed that the heat transfer coefficient scaled as Re0.6. With jet-Reynolds numbers as high as 5.5 x 10(5) heat transfer coefficients of 2.6 x 10(5) W/m2K were achieved. With this type of cooling configuration 30 kW of power could be effectively removed from a beryllium target placed on the end of an accelerator. A beryllium target utilizing a proton beam of 3.7 MeV and cooled by submerged jet impingement could be used to deliver a dose of 13 RBE cGy/min mA to a tumor at a depth of 4 cm. With a beam power of 30 kW, 1500 cGy could be delivered in 14.2 min. PMID:9800705

  4. FEASIBILITY OF RECOVERING USEFUL SALTS FROM IRRIGATION WASTEWATER CONCENTRATES PRODUCED BY POWER PLANT COOLING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report evaluates the feasibility of a novel energy-conserving way to recover useful salts (sodium sulfate and calcium sulfate) from concentrated brines by evaporation/crystallization. The concentrated brines examined were cooling tower blowdown from agricultural wastewater an...

  5. Power and magnetic field-induced microwave absorption in Tl-based high Tc superconducting films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portis, A. M.; Cooke, D. W.; Gray, E. R.; Arendt, P. N.; Bohn, C. L.; Delayen, J. R.; Roche, C. T.; Hein, M.; Klein, N.; Müller, G.; Orbach, S.; Piel, H.

    1991-01-01

    The increase in the microwave surface resistance Rs of high Tc superconductors at elevated microwave power levels is reported for both oriented and unoriented Tl-based films as a function of rf magnetic field at 820 MHz and 18 GHz. The application of dc magnetic fields produces qualitatively similar increases in Rs and in the surface reactance Xs. The increase in Rs with dc field is shown to arise from simple decoupling of grains by intergranular magnetic flux. The increase in Rs with microwave power, on the other hand, is a consequence of hysteretic intergranular processes.

  6. Macroscopic Subkelvin Refrigerator Employing Superconducting Tunnel Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaohang; Lowell, Peter J.; Wilson, Brandon L.; O'Neil, Galen C.; Ullom, Joel N.

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate a general-purpose macroscopic refrigerator based on the transport of electrons through superconducting tunnel junctions. Our refrigerator is intended to provide access to temperatures below those achievable using pumped 3He. The refrigerator is cooled by 96 normal-metal-insulator-superconductor (N -I -S ) junctions divided among three separate silicon substrates. The use of thin-film devices on different substrates shows the potential to achieve higher cooling powers by connecting N -I -S devices in parallel. Improving on previous work by Lowell et al. [Appl. Phys. Lett. 102, 082601 (2013)], we demonstrate a larger temperature reduction, a more robust mechanical suspension, and a new electromechanical heat switch that will make it easier to integrate our refrigerator into other cryostats. The electromechanical heat switch has a measured thermal conductance in the on state of 1.2 ±0.3 ? W /K at 300 mK and no measurable thermal conductance in the off state. We observe a temperature reduction from 291 to 233 mK and infer cooling to 228 mK on longer time scales. The cooled payload is a metal stage whose mass exceeds 150 g and with 28 cm2 of area for attaching user-supplied devices. Using the product of the cooled mass and the temperature reduction as a performance metric, this work is a more than tenfold advance over previous efforts.

  7. Site dependent factors affecting the economic feasibility of solar powered absorption cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, J. C.

    1978-01-01

    A procedure was developed to evaluate the cost effectiveness of combining an absorption cycle chiller with a solar energy system. A basic assumption of the procedure is that a solar energy system exists for meeting the heating load of the building, and that the building must be cooled. The decision to be made is to either cool the building with a conventional vapor compression cycle chiller or to use the existing solar energy system to provide a heat input to the absorption chiller. Two methods of meeting the cooling load not supplied by solar energy were considered. In the first method, heat is supplied to the absorption chiller by a boiler using fossil fuel. In the second method, the load not met by solar energy is net by a conventional vapor compression chiller. In addition, the procedure can consider waste heat as another form of auxiliary energy. Commercial applications of solar cooling with an absorption chiller were found to be more cost effective than the residential applications. In general, it was found that the larger the chiller, the more economically feasible it would be. Also, it was found that a conventional vapor compression chiller is a viable alternative for the auxiliary cooling source, especially for the larger chillers. The results of the analysis gives a relative rating of the sites considered as to their economic feasibility of solar cooling.

  8. Superconducting Cable Termination

    DOEpatents

    Sinha, Uday K. (Carrollton, GA); Tolbert, Jerry (Newnan, GA)

    2005-08-30

    Disclosed is a termination that connects high temperature superconducting (HTS) cable immersed in pressurized liquid nitrogen to high voltage and neutral (shield) external bushings at ambient temperature and pressure. The termination consists of a splice between the HTS power (inner) and shield (outer) conductors and concentric copper pipes which are the conductors in the termination. There is also a transition from the dielectric tape insulator used in the HTS cable to the insulators used between and around the copper pipe conductors in the termination. At the warm end of the termination the copper pipes are connected via copper braided straps to the conventional warm external bushings which have low thermal stresses. This termination allows for a natural temperature gradient in the copper pipe conductors inside the termination which enables the controlled flashing of the pressurized liquid coolant (nitrogen) to the gaseous state. Thus the entire termination is near the coolant supply pressure and the high voltage and shield cold bushings, a highly stressed component used in most HTS cables, are eliminated. A sliding seal allows for cable contraction as it is cooled from room temperature to ˜72-82 K. Seals, static vacuum, and multi-layer superinsulation minimize radial heat leak to the environment.

  9. On the flow and water quality in the Tokyo Bay including effect of cooling water for the Power Generating Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitahara, Kouichi; Wada, Akira; Uehara, Yoshikazu; Fukuoka, Ippei; Kawanaga, Mitsuhito; Takano, Tairyu

    Driving forces of seawater current in the Tokyo Bay have several factors including the tide, the density structure, the river inflow and others. On the other hand, many power plants of total output of 185.4 MW (as of 1995) are located along the coast of the bay, together with a large number of factors which load the sea area with cooling water and heat. Although these facilities might be considered to affect water current in the bay, few studies have been made on the effects which these artificial inputs may exert on water current. The present study reports computation results, using a 3-dimentional current model on effects of water intake and effluent by a possibly increasing number of power plants on the current in the bay. It was concluded that an additional power plant output of 103.1 MW (corresponding to increase of cooling water by 30% and of heat load by 20% from the present levels) might bring about only slight changes except for altered water current and temperature in the vicinities of power plants of which power output were increased. Average temperature rise of 0.1 °C was also predicted in the surface water throughout the bay.

  10. Superconductive wire

    DOEpatents

    Korzekwa, David A. (Los Alamos, NM); Bingert, John F. (Jemez Springs, NM); Peterson, Dean E. (Los Alamos, NM); Sheinberg, Haskell (Santa Fe, NM)

    1995-01-01

    A superconductive article is made by inserting a rigid mandrel into an internal cavity of a first metallic tube, said tube having an interior surface and an exterior surface, said interior surface defining the interior cavity, forming a layer of a superconductive material or superconductive precursor upon the exterior surface of said first metallic tube, machining the layer of superconductive material or superconductive precursor to a predetermined diameter to form an intermediate article configured for insertion into a second metallic tube having an interior diameter corresponding to the predetermined diameter, inserting the machined intermediate article into a second metallic tube having an internal diameter corresponding to the predetermined diameter of the intermediate article to form a composite intermediate article, reducing or ironing the composite intermediate article to a predetermined cross-sectional diameter, and sintering the reduced or ironed composite intermediate article at temperatures and for time sufficient for the superconductive material or superconductive precursor to exhibit superconductivity.

  11. Superconductive wire

    DOEpatents

    Korzekwa, D.A.; Bingert, J.F.; Peterson, D.E.; Sheinberg, H.

    1995-07-18

    A superconductive article is made by inserting a rigid mandrel into an internal cavity of a first metallic tube, said tube having an interior surface and an exterior surface, said interior surface defining the interior cavity, forming a layer of a superconductive material or superconductive precursor upon the exterior surface of said first metallic tube, machining the layer of superconductive material or superconductive precursor to a predetermined diameter to form an intermediate article configured for insertion into a second metallic tube having an interior diameter corresponding to the predetermined diameter, inserting the machined intermediate article into a second metallic tube having an internal diameter corresponding to the predetermined diameter of the intermediate article to form a composite intermediate article, reducing or ironing the composite intermediate article to a predetermined cross-sectional diameter, and sintering the reduced or ironed composite intermediate article at temperatures and for time sufficient for the superconductive material or superconductive precursor to exhibit superconductivity. 2 figs.

  12. High-Temperature Superconductive Cabling Investigated for Space Solar Power Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tew, Roy C.; Juhasz, Albert J.

    2000-01-01

    NASA has been directed by Congress to take a fresh look at the Space Solar Power (SSP) concept that was studied by the Department of Energy and NASA about 20 years ago. To summarize, the concept involves (1) collecting solar energy and converting it to electrical energy via photovoltaic arrays on satellites in Earth orbit, (2) conducting the electricity to the microwave transmitting portion of the satellite, and (3) transmitting the power via microwave transmitters (or possibly via lasers) to ground power station antennas located on the surface of the Earth. One Sun Tower SSP satellite concept is illustrated here. This figure shows many photovoltaic arrays attached to a "backbone" that conducts electricity down to a wireless transmitter, which is pointed toward the Earth. Other variations on this concept use multiple backbones to reduce the overall length of the satellite structure. In addition, non-Sun-Tower concepts are being considered. The objective of the work reported here was to determine the benefits to the SSP concept of using high-temperature superconductors (HTS) to conduct the electricity from the photovoltaic arrays to the wireless power transmitters. Possible benefits are, for example, reduced mass, improved efficiency, and improved reliability. Dr. James Powell of Plus Ultra Technologies, Inc., of Stony Brook, New York, is conducting the study, and it is being managed by the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field via a task-order contract through Scientific Applications International Corp. (SAIC).

  13. Offshore Floating Wind Turbine-driven Deep Sea Water Pumping for Combined Electrical Power and District Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sant, T.; Buhagiar, D.; Farrugia, R. N.

    2014-06-01

    A new concept utilising floating wind turbines to exploit the low temperatures of deep sea water for space cooling in buildings is presented. The approach is based on offshore hydraulic wind turbines pumping pressurised deep sea water to a centralised plant consisting of a hydro-electric power system coupled to a large-scale sea water-cooled air conditioning (AC) unit of an urban district cooling network. In order to investigate the potential advantages of this new concept over conventional technologies, a simplified model for performance simulation of a vapour compression AC unit was applied independently to three different systems, with the AC unit operating with (1) a constant flow of sea surface water, (2) a constant flow of sea water consisting of a mixture of surface sea water and deep sea water delivered by a single offshore hydraulic wind turbine and (3) an intermittent flow of deep sea water pumped by a single offshore hydraulic wind turbine. The analysis was based on one year of wind and ambient temperature data for the Central Mediterranean that is known for its deep waters, warm climate and relatively low wind speeds. The study confirmed that while the present concept is less efficient than conventional turbines utilising grid-connected electrical generators, a significant portion of the losses associated with the hydraulic transmission through the pipeline are offset by the extraction of cool deep sea water which reduces the electricity consumption of urban air-conditioning units.

  14. Numerical simulation of heat transfer performance of an air-cooled steam condenser in a thermal power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiufeng; Zhang, Chengwei; Wei, Jinjia; Yu, Bo

    2009-09-01

    Numerical simulation of the thermal-flow characteristics and heat transfer performance is made of an air-cooled steam condenser (ACSC) in a thermal power plant by considering the effects of ambient wind speed and direction, air-cooled platform height, location of the main factory building and terrain condition. A simplified physical model of the ACSC combined with the measured data as input parameters is used in the simulation. The wind speed effects on the heat transfer performance and the corresponding steam turbine back pressure for different heights of the air-cooled platform are obtained. It is found that the turbine back pressure (absolute pressure) increases with the increase of wind speed and the decrease of platform height. This is because wind can not only reduce the flowrate in the axial fans, especially at the periphery of the air-cooled platform, due to cross-flow effects, but also cause an air temperature increase at the fan inlet due to hot air recirculation, resulting in the deterioration of the heat transfer performance. The hot air recirculation is found to be the dominant factor because the main factory building is situated on the windward side of the ACSC.

  15. High Power Intermodulation Measurements up to 30 W of High Temperature Superconducting Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilker, Charles; Carter, Charles F., III; Shen, Zhi-Yuan

    1999-01-01

    We have demonstrated a high power intermodulation measurement set-up capable of delivering 30 W in each of two fundamental tones. For closely spaced frequencies (less than 35 MHz), the dynamic range of the measurement is limited by the nonlinear performance of the mixer in the front end of the HP71210C spectrum analyzer. A tunable TE(sub 011) mode copper cavity was fabricated in which one of the endwalls could be adjusted shifting its resonant frequency between 5.7 and 6.6 GHz. Since the Q-value of this cavity is high, greater than 10(exp 4), and its bandwidth is small, less than 1 MHz, it can be used to attenuate the two fundamental tones relative to one of the harmonic tones, which greatly enhances the dynamic range of the measurement. This set-up can be used to measure the two-tone intermodulation distortion of any passive microwave device, e.g. a HTS filter, a connector, a cable, etc., over a frequency range of 5.9 to 6.4 GHz and a power range of 0.1 to 30 W. The third order intercept (TOI) of a prototype HTS filter measured at powers up to 30 W was +81.3 dBm.

  16. Use of remote sensing data to enhance the performance of a hydrodynamic simulation of a partially frozen power plant cooling lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsenovic, May V.; Salvaggio, Carl; Garrett, Alfred J.; Bartlett, Brent D.; Faulring, Jason W.; Kremens, Robert L.; Salvaggio, Philip S.

    2009-05-01

    The effectiveness of a power generation site's cooling pond has a significant impact on the overall efficiency of a power plant. The ability to monitor a cooling pond using thermal remote sensing, coupled with hydrodynamic models, is a valuable tool for determining the driving characteristics of a cooling system. However, the thermodynamic analysis of a cooling lake can become significantly more complex when a power generation site is located in a northern climate. The heated effluent from a power plant entering a cooling lake is often not enough to keep a lake from freezing during winter months. Once the lake is partially or fully frozen, the predictive capabilities of the hydrodynamic model are weakened due to an insulating surface layer of ice and snow. Thermal imagery of a cooling pond was collected over a period of approximately 16 weeks in tandem with high-density thermal measurements both in open water and embedded in ice, meteorological data, and snow layer characterization data. The proposed research presents a method to employ thermal imagery to improve the performance of a 3-D hydrodynamic model of a power plant cooling pond in the presence of ice and snow.

  17. Use of Air2Air Technology to Recover Fresh-Water from the Normal Evaporative Cooling Loss at Coal-Based Thermoelectric Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Ken Mortensen

    2009-06-30

    This program was undertaken to build and operate the first Air2Air{trademark} Water Conservation Cooling Tower at a power plant, giving a validated basis and capability for water conservation by this method. Air2Air{trademark} water conservation technology recovers a portion of the traditional cooling tower evaporate. The Condensing Module provides an air-to-air heat exchanger above the wet fill media, extracting the heat from the hot saturated moist air leaving in the cooling tower and condensing water. The rate of evaporate water recovery is typically 10%-25% annually, depending on the cooling tower location (climate).

  18. Optimizing Cooling Tower Performance- Refrigeration Systems, Chemical Plants, and Power Plants all Have A Resource Quietly Awaiting Exploitation-Cold Water!! 

    E-print Network

    Burger, R.

    1990-01-01

    of their seeming simplicity, are usually orphans of the facilities operation. We are all aware that cooling towers are the step-children of the chemical process plant, electric power generating station, and refrigeration system. While engineers are pretty...

  19. Evaluation of distributed gas cooling of pressurized PAFC for utility power generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farooque, M.; Maru, H.; Skok, A.

    1981-01-01

    Two short stacks were pressure tested at 446 kPa (4.4 atm.) and the pressure gains were more than the theoretically predicted gains. Temperature profiles were observed to be independent of operating pressure. The pressure drop was found to be inversely proportional to operating pressure as expected. Continuous pressurized operation of a stack for 1000 hours verified the compatability of the fuel cell component design. A simple pressurization procedure was also developed. Six separate designs, covering two gas cooling schemes (DIGAS and separated) and two cooling channel geometries (straight through and treed), were analysed on the net voltage output basis. Separated cooling with 5 cells per cooler was recognized to be the best among the designs considered.

  20. Superconducting cascade electron refrigerator

    SciTech Connect

    Camarasa-Gómez, M.; Giazotto, F.; Di Marco, A.; Hekking, F. W. J.; Winkelmann, C. B.; Courtois, H.

    2014-05-12

    The design and operation of an electronic cooler based on a combination of superconducting tunnel junctions is described. The cascade extraction of hot-quasiparticles, which stems from the energy gaps of two different superconductors, allows for a normal metal to be cooled down to about 100 mK starting from a bath temperature of 0.5?K. We discuss the practical implementation, potential performance, and limitations of such a device.

  1. Single-phase ac losses in prototype HTS conductors for superconducting power transmission lines

    SciTech Connect

    Daney, D.E.; Maley, M.P.; Boenig, H.J.; Willis, J.O.; Coulter, J.Y.; Gherardi, L.; Coletta, G.

    1998-12-01

    The authors report single-phase ac loss measurements on 8, 4, and 3-layer, multi-strand, HTS prototype conductors for power transmission lines. They use both calorimetric and electrical techniques. The agreement between the two techniques suggests that the interlayer current distribution in one-meter long conductors are representative of those in long conductors. The losses for the 8 and 4-layer conductors are in rough agreement, with the 8-layer losses being somewhat lower. The 3-layer conductor losses are substantially higher--probably due to unbalanced azimuthal currents for this configuration.

  2. Self-cooling mono-container fuel cell generators and power plants using an array of such generators

    DOEpatents

    Gillett, James E. (Greensburg, PA); Dederer, Jeffrey T. (Valencia, PA); Zafred, Paolo R. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1998-01-01

    A mono-container fuel cell generator (10) contains a layer of interior insulation (14), a layer of exterior insulation (16) and a single housing (20) between the insulation layers, where fuel cells, containing electrodes and electrolyte, are surrounded by the interior insulation (14) in the interior (12) of the generator, and the generator is capable of operating at temperatures over about 650.degree. C., where the combination of interior and exterior insulation layers have the ability to control the temperature in the housing (20) below the degradation temperature of the housing material. The housing can also contain integral cooling ducts, and a plurality of these generators can be positioned next to each other to provide a power block array with interior cooling.

  3. Economic analysis of wind-powered refrigeration cooling/water-heating systems in food processing. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Garling, W.S.; Harper, M.R.; Merchant-Geuder, L.; Welch, M.

    1980-03-01

    Potential applications of wind energy include not only large central turbines that can be utilized by utilities, but also dispersed systems for farms and other applications. The US Departments of Energy (DOE) and Agriculture (USDA) currently are establishing the feasibility of wind energy use in applications where the energy can be used as available, or stored in a simple form. These applications include production of hot water for rural sanitation, heating and cooling of rural structures and products, drying agricultural products, and irrigation. This study, funded by USDA, analyzed the economic feasibility of wind power in refrigeration cooling and water heating systems in food processing plants. Types of plants included were meat and poultry, dairy, fruit and vegetable, and aquaculture.

  4. Self-cooling mono-container fuel cell generators and power plants using an array of such generators

    DOEpatents

    Gillett, J.E.; Dederer, J.T.; Zafred, P.R.

    1998-05-12

    A mono-container fuel cell generator contains a layer of interior insulation, a layer of exterior insulation and a single housing between the insulation layers, where fuel cells, containing electrodes and electrolyte, are surrounded by the interior insulation in the interior of the generator, and the generator is capable of operating at temperatures over about 650 C, where the combination of interior and exterior insulation layers have the ability to control the temperature in the housing below the degradation temperature of the housing material. The housing can also contain integral cooling ducts, and a plurality of these generators can be positioned next to each other to provide a power block array with interior cooling. 7 figs.

  5. Cooling and heat transport in low dimensional phonon systems, superconductors and silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhonen, Juha

    Temperatures below 0.1 kelvin can be nowadays routinely attained. The methods for achieving these temperatures rely on either mixing the rare and expensive isotope of helium with the more common isotope (dilution refrigerator) or on adiabatic demagnetisation of paramagnetic salt (ADR). Although both of these methods are mature, they still remain complicated enough to limit the usage only to specialized laboratories. The research done in this thesis revolves around a promising alternative to these techniques; using normal metal - insulator - superconductor (NIS) junctions. One of the defining properties of a superconductor is a gap in its electronic density of states. This gap enables it to act as an energy filter for electrons. Because of this property, when a proper bias voltage is applied over a NIS junction the normal metal part will cool down as current passes the junction. The cooling properties of NIS junctions were demonstrated almost two decades ago with cooling powers of the order of one picowatt. At present cooling powers of few hundreds of picowatts have been achieved. This thesis describes research on three areas related to NIS junctions. Firstly we use NIS junctions to cool low dimensional lattice systems, both 1D and 2D. The cooling of a 1D lattice (beam) is interesting for fundamental research. The 2D lattice cooling (membrane) is aimed at bringing NIS devices closer to more widespread use. An electronically cooled membrane would offer a platform on which applications, such as radiation detectors or superconducting electronics, could be integrated. Secondly we focus on the limitations of NIS cooling. In all cooling, one of the main problems is the dissipation of the extracted heat. As the other side of the junction (normal metal) is cooled, the other side (superconductor) is heated with many times larger power. This heat can then weaken the superconducting properties and heat up the phonon system around the junction. These effects act to counter the cooling effect and have been one of the main obstacles in scaling up the cooling power of NIS devices. We study these effects both numerically and experimentally. Thirdly, we study the cooling of silicon with superconducting tunnel junctions. In these superconductor - semiconductor structures the normal metal in a NIS structure is replaced with highly doped silicon. Specifically we study the effects of induced lattice strain to the electron-phonon coupling in silicon and hence to the cooling properties of these structures.

  6. Superconducting nanostructured materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Metlushko, V.

    1998-07-13

    Within the last year it has been realized that the remarkable properties of superconducting thin films containing a periodic array of defects (such as sub-micron sized holes) offer a new route for developing a novel superconducting materials based on precise control of microstructure by modern photolithography. A superconductor is a material which, when cooled below a certain temperature, loses all resistance to electricity. This means that superconducting materials can carry large electrical currents without any energy loss--but there are limits to how much current can flow before superconductivity is destroyed. The current at which superconductivity breaks down is called the critical current. The value of the critical current is determined by the balance of Lorentz forces and pinning forces acting on the flux lines in the superconductor. Lorentz forces proportional to the current flow tend to drive the flux lines into motion, which dissipates energy and destroys zero resistance. Pinning forces created by isolated defects in the microstructure oppose flux line motion and increase the critical current. Many kinds of artificial pinning centers have been proposed and developed to increase critical current performance, ranging from dispersal of small non-superconducting second phases to creation of defects by proton, neutron or heavy ion irradiation. In all of these methods, the pinning centers are randomly distributed over the superconducting material, causing them to operate well below their maximum efficiency. We are overcome this drawback by creating pinning centers in aperiodic lattice (see Fig 1) so that each pin site interacts strongly with only one or a few flux lines.

  7. Serial and parallel power equipment with high-temperature superconducting elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bencze, Laszlo; Goebl, Nandor; Palotas, Bela; Vajda, Istvan

    1995-01-01

    One of the prospective, practical applications of high-temperature superconductors is the fault-current limitation in electrical energy networks. The development and testing of experimental HTSC serial current limiters have been reported in the literature. A Hungarian electric power company has proposed the development of a parallel equipment for arc suppressing both in the industrial and customers' networks. On the basis of the company's proposal the authors have outlined the scheme of a compound circuit that can be applied both for current limitation and arc suppressing. In this paper the design principles and methods of the shunt equipment are presented. These principles involve the electrical, mechanical and cryogenic aspects with the special view on the electrical and mechanical connection between the HTSC material and the current lead. Preliminary experiments and tests have been carried out to demonstrate the validity of the design principles developed. The results of the experiments and of the technological investigations are presented.

  8. Thermal and dynamic analysis of the RING (Radiatively-cooled, Inertially-driven Nuclear Generator) power system radiator

    SciTech Connect

    Apley, W.J.; Babb, A.L.

    1989-01-01

    The nuclear option for a space-based power system appears most suitable for missions that require long-term, sustained operation at power levels above 100 kWe. Systems currently available operate at relatively low thermal efficiencies (6--10%). Thus, a 100 kWe system must discharge nearly 2 MWth of waste heat through the comparatively inefficient process of radiative cooling. The impact of the resultant radiator assembly size on overall power system weight is significant, and has led to proposals for radiators with potentially higher efficiencies. Examples include the: liquid droplet radiator; fabric radiator; bubble membrane radiator; rotating film radiator; and dust radiator. 14 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Development and performance testing of a 200 kVA damperless superconducting generator

    SciTech Connect

    Suryanarayana, T.; Bhattacharya, J.L.; Raju, K.S.N.; Durga Prasad, K.A.

    1997-12-01

    A 200 kVA, 3,000 RPM superconducting generator has been developed and tested. The rotor has been wound with superconducting wire of Nb-Ti alloy. A closed-circuit liquid helium system has been designed and installed for cooling the superconducting windings. The stator carries the air-gap type armature windings and a laminated-iron flux-shield. A new concept in the design of superconducting generators with high short-circuit ratio (more than 5) has been introduced. This eliminates the requirement of Electro-magnetic Damper (EMD) and Quick Response Excitation System (QRES). The generator has been comprehensively tested in superconducting state. Open-circuit and sustained short-circuit tests, 3-phase sudden short-circuit test, synchronization with grid and parallel operation with power system have been conducted. The synchronous machine was operated up to its rated kVA in the four quadrants--as generator and as condenser with leading and lagging power factors. A few special tests on superconducting generator, which were not reported earlier, such as direct-on-line starting of a 20 HP squirrel-cage induction motor and negative phase sequence tests have also been performed successfully. Test results and conclusions are given in the paper.

  10. REPRODUCTION AND DISTRIBUTION OF FISHES IN A COOLING LAKE: WISCONSIN POWER PLANT IMPACT STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Spatial and temporal patterns during reproduction and early life history of fishes were studied in a manmade cooling lake. Lake Columbia, impounded in 1974, near Portage, Wisconsin, has an area of 190 ha, a mean depth of 2.1 m, and a 15C temperature gradient derived from the ther...

  11. Current leads cooling for the series-connected hybrid magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Hongyu; Marshall, William S.; Bird, Mark D.; Gavrilin, Andrew V.; Weijers, Hubertus W.

    2014-01-01

    Two Series-Connected Hybrid (SCH) magnets are being developed at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory. Both SCH magnets combine a set of resistive Florida-Bitter coils with a superconducting outsert coil constructed of the cable-in-conduit conductor (CICC). The outsert coils of the two magnets employ 20 kA BSCCO HTS current leads for the power supply although they have different designs and cooling methods. The copper heat exchangers of the HTS current leads for the HZB SCH are cooled with forced flow helium at a supply temperature of 44 K, while the copper heat exchangers of HTS current leads for NHMFL SCH are cooled with liquid nitrogen at a temperature of 78 K in a self-demand boil-off mode. This paper presents the two cooling methods and their impacts on cryogenic systems. Their efficiencies and costs are compared and presented.

  12. Electron Cooling of RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    I. Ben-Zvi; D.S. Barton; D.B. Beavis; M. Blaskiewicz; J.M. Brennan; A. Burrill; R. Calaga; P. Cameron; X.Y. Chang; R. Connolly; Yu.I. Eidelman; A.V. Fedotov; W. Fischer; D.M. Gassner; H. Hahn; M. Harrison; A. Hershcovitch; H.-C. Hseuh; A.K. Jain; P.D.J. Johnson; D. Kayran; J. Kewisch; R.F. Lambiase; V. Litvinenko; W.W. MacKay; G.J. Mahler; N. Malitsky; G.T. McIntyre; W. Meng; K.A.M. Mirabella; C. Montag; T.C.N. Nehring; T. Nicoletti; B. Oerter; G. Parzen; D. Pate; J. Rank; T. Rao; T. Roser; T. Russo; J. Scaduto; K. Smith; D. Trbojevic; G. Wang; J. Wei; N.W.W. Williams; K.-C. Wu; V. Yakimenko; A. Zaltsman; Y. Zhao; D.T. Abell; D.L. Bruhwiler; H. Bluem; A. Burger; M.D. Cole; A.J. Favale; D. Holmes; J. Rathke; T. Schultheiss; A.M.M. Todd; A.V. Burov; S. Nagaitsev; J.R. Delayen; Y.S. Derbenev; L. W. Funk; P. Kneisel; L. Merminga; H.L. Phillips; J.P. Preble; I. Koop; V.V. Parkhomchuk; Y.M. Shatunov; A.N. Skrinsky; I. Koop; V.V. Parkhomchuk; Y.M. Shatunov; A.N. Skrinsky; J.S. Sekutowicz

    2005-05-16

    We report progress on the R&D program for electron-cooling of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). This electron cooler is designed to cool 100 GeV/nucleon at storage energy using 54 MeV electrons. The electron source will be a superconducting RF photocathode gun. The accelerator will be a superconducting energy recovery linac. The frequency of the accelerator is set at 703.75 MHz. The maximum electron bunch frequency is 9.38 MHz, with bunch charge of 20 nC. The R&D program has the following components: The photoinjector and its photocathode, the superconducting linac cavity, start-to-end beam dynamics with magnetized electrons, electron cooling calculations including benchmarking experiments and development of a large superconducting solenoid. The photoinjector and linac cavity are being incorporated into an energy recovery linac aimed at demonstrating ampere class current at about 20 MeV. A Zeroth Order Design Report is in an advanced draft state, and can be found on the web at http://www.agsrhichome.bnl.gov/eCool/.

  13. Expanding the potential for saline formations : modeling carbon dioxide storage, water extraction and treatment for power plant cooling.

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-04-01

    The National Water, Energy and Carbon Sequestration simulation model (WECSsim) is being developed to address the question, 'Where in the current and future U.S. fossil fuel based electricity generation fleet are there opportunities to couple CO{sub 2} storage and extracted water use, and what are the economic and water demand-related impacts of these systems compared to traditional power systems?' The WECSsim collaborative team initially applied this framework to a test case region in the San Juan Basin, New Mexico. Recently, the model has been expanded to incorporate the lower 48 states of the U.S. Significant effort has been spent characterizing locations throughout the U.S. where CO{sub 2} might be stored in saline formations including substantial data collection and analysis efforts to supplement the incomplete brine data offered in the NatCarb database. WECSsim calculates costs associated with CO{sub 2} capture and storage (CCS) for the power plant to saline formation combinations including parasitic energy costs of CO{sub 2} capture, CO{sub 2} pipelines, water treatment options, and the net benefit of water treatment for power plant cooling. Currently, the model can identify the least-cost deep saline formation CO{sub 2} storage option for any current or proposed coal or natural gas-fired power plant in the lower 48 states. Initial results suggest that additional, cumulative water withdrawals resulting from national scale CCS may range from 676 million gallons per day (MGD) to 30,155 MGD depending on the makeup power and cooling technologies being utilized. These demands represent 0.20% to 8.7% of the U.S. total fresh water withdrawals in the year 2000, respectively. These regional and ultimately nation-wide, bottom-up scenarios coupling power plants and saline formations throughout the U.S. can be used to support state or national energy development plans and strategies.

  14. Investigation of Absorption Cooling Application Powered by Solar Energy in the South Coast Region of Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babayigit, O.; Aksoy, M. H.; Ozgoren, M.; Solmaz, O.

    2013-04-01

    In this study, an absorption system using ammonia-water (NH3-H2O) solution has been theoretically examined in order to meet the cooling need of a detached building having 150 m2 floor area for Antalya, Mersin and Mugla provinces in Turkey. Hourly dynamic cooling load capacities of the building were determined by using Radiant Time Series (RTS) method in the chosen cities. For the analysis, hourly average meteorological data such as atmospheric air temperature and solar radiation belonging to the years 1998-2008 are used for performance prediction of the proposed system. Thermodynamic relations for each component of absorption cooling system is explained and coefficients of performance of the system are calculated. The maximum daily total radiation data were calculated as 7173 W/m2day on July 15, 7277 W/m2 day on July 19 and 7231 W/m2day on July 19 for Mersin, Antalya and Mugla, respectively on the 23° toward to south oriented panels from horizontal surface. The generator operating temperatures are considered between 90-130°C and the best result for 110°C is found the optimum degree for maximum coefficient of performance (COP) values at the highest solar radiation occurred time during the considered days for each province. The COP values varies between 0.521 and 0.530 for the provinces. In addition, absorber and condenser capacities and thermal efficiency for the absorption cooling system were calculated. The necessary evacuated tube collector area for the different provinces were found in the range of 45 m2 to 47 m2. It is shown that although the initial investment cost is higher for the proposed absorption cooling system, it is economically feasible because of its lower annual operation costs and can successfully be operated for the considered provinces.

  15. High-temperature superconducting quantum interference device with cooled LC resonant circuit for measuring alternating magnetic fields with improved signal-to-noise ratio.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Longqing; Zhang, Yi; Krause, Hans-Joachim; Braginski, Alex I; Usoskin, Alexander

    2007-05-01

    Certain applications of superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) require a magnetic field measurement only in a very narrow frequency range. In order to selectively improve the alternating-current (ac) magnetic field sensitivity of a high-temperature superconductor SQUID for a distinct frequency, a single-coil LC resonant circuit has been used. Within the liquid nitrogen bath, the coil surrounds the SQUID and couples to it inductively. Copper coils with different numbers of windings were used to cover the frequency range from <1 to nearly 100 kHz. A superconducting coil made of YBa(2)Cu(3)O(7-delta) tape conductor was also tested. With the LC circuit, the signal-to-noise ratio of measurements could be improved typically by one order of magnitude or more in a narrow frequency band around the resonance frequency exceeding a few kilohertz. The best attained equivalent magnetic field resolution was 2.5 fT/radicalHz at 88 kHz. The experimental findings are in good agreement with mathematical analysis of the circuit with copper coil. PMID:17552846

  16. An assessment of the use of direct contact condensers with wet cooling systems for utility steam power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Bharathan, D.; Hoo, E. ); D'Errico, P. )

    1992-02-01

    Potential use of a direct contact condenser for steam recovery at the turbine exhaust of a utility power plant using a wet cooling system is investigated. To maintain condensate separate from the cooling water, a bank of plate heat exchangers is used. In a case study for a nominal 130-MW steam power plant, two heat rejection systems, one using a conventional surface condenser and another using a direct contact condenser together with a set of plate heat exchangers are compared on the basis of their performance, operation and maintenance, and system economics. Despite a higher initial cost for the direct contact system, the advantages it offers suggests that this system is viable both technically and economically. Key to the improvements the direct contact system offers is a higher equivalent availability for the power system. Reduction of dissolved oxygen and other metallic ions in the condensate, reduced use of chemical scavengers and polishers, and potential elimination of a plant floor are also major benefits of this system. Drawbacks include added plant components and higher initial cost. The potential for long-term cost reduction for the direct contact system is also identified.

  17. Single and three-phase AC losses in HTS superconducting power transmission line prototype cables

    SciTech Connect

    Daney, D.E.; Boenig, H.J.; Maley, M.P.; Coulter, J.Y.; Fleshler, S.

    1997-11-01

    AC losses in two, one-meter-long lengths of HTS prototype multi-strand conductors (PMC`s) are measured with a temperature-difference calorimeter. Both single-phase and three-phase losses are examined with ac currents up to 1,000 A rms. The calorimeter, designed specifically for these measurements, has a precision of 1 mW. PMC {number_sign}1 has two helically-wound, non-insulated layers of HTS tape (19 tapes per layer), each layer wrapped with opposite pitch. PMC {number_sign}2 is identical except for insulation between the layers. The measured ac losses show no significant effect of interlayer insulation and depend on about the third power of the current--a result in agreement with the Bean-Norris model adapted to the double-helix configuration. The three-phase losses are a factor of two higher than those exhibited by a single isolated conductor, indicating a significant interaction between phases.

  18. Study on neutronic of very small Pb - Bi cooled no-onsite refueling nuclear power reactor (VSPINNOR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arianto, Fajar; Su'ud, Zaki; Zuhair

    2014-09-01

    A conceptual design study on Very Small Pb-Bi No-Onsite Refueling Cooled Nuclear Reactor (VSPINNOR) with Uranium nitride fuel using MCNPX program has been performed. In this design the reactor core is divided into three regions with different enrichment. At the center of the core is laid fuel without enrichment (internal blanket). While for the outer region using fuel enrichment variations. VSPINNOR fast reactor was operated for 10 years without refueling. Neutronic analysis shows optimized result of VSPINNOR has a core of 50 cm radius and 100 cm height with 300 MWth thermal power output at 60% fuel fraction that can be operated 18 years without refueling or fuel shuffling.

  19. Study on neutronic of very small Pb - Bi cooled no-onsite refueling nuclear power reactor (VSPINNOR)

    SciTech Connect

    Arianto, Fajar; Su'ud, Zaki; Zuhair

    2014-09-30

    A conceptual design study on Very Small Pb-Bi No-Onsite Refueling Cooled Nuclear Reactor (VSPINNOR) with Uranium nitride fuel using MCNPX program has been performed. In this design the reactor core is divided into three regions with different enrichment. At the center of the core is laid fuel without enrichment (internal blanket). While for the outer region using fuel enrichment variations. VSPINNOR fast reactor was operated for 10 years without refueling. Neutronic analysis shows optimized result of VSPINNOR has a core of 50 cm radius and 100 cm height with 300 MWth thermal power output at 60% fuel fraction that can be operated 18 years without refueling or fuel shuffling.

  20. Muon acceleration in a superconducting proton Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Popovic, Milorad; Johnson, Rolland P.; /MUONS Inc., Batavia

    2005-11-01

    This note describes how a future Fermilab proton driver [1] based on TESLA superconducting linac modules can perform as both the source of protons to produce the muons and as the accelerator of the muons to be used for a neutrino factory or muon collider. Recent advances in muon cooling [2] have the promise of muon emittances that are compatible with the 1300 MHz accelerating structures that are the basis for the ILC design. In the design described here, H{sup -} ions are accelerated to 8 GeV in the superconducting Linac, then stripped, stored and bunched in a ring while the Linac cavities are rephased for muon acceleration. Then the protons are extracted from the ring to produce pions and muons which are cooled in a few hundred meters, accelerated to a few GeV and injected into the Linac at the {beta} = 1 point for acceleration to add 7 GeV. By recirculating the muons in the constant frequency section of such a proton driver Linac, even higher energies can be achieved quickly so that losses from muon decay are minimized. By adding additional refrigeration and RF power, the repetition rate of the Linac can be increased to make large increases in the average flux of a neutrino factory and the average luminosity of a muon collider. driver linac to be able to accelerate muons, including the costs to produce and cool the muons, will be considerably less than the costs estimated in previous neutrino factory design studies. We also believe that such an approach can produce a much higher neutrino flux and, because of the necessity for effective muon cooling, also be on the path to an energy frontier muon collider.

  1. Presence of pathogenic microorganisms in power-plant cooling waters. Final report, October 1, 1981-June 30, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Tyndall, R.L.

    1983-07-01

    Air was sampled at the point of discharge and at short distances downwind and upwind from industrial and power-plant cooling towers. Both high-volume electrostatic and impinger type samplers were used. Concentrates of the air samples were analyzed for Legionnaires' Disease Bacteria (LDB). In some cases, the samples were also tested for the presence of free-living amoebae. The concentrations of LDB in the air samples were well below the minimal infectious dose for guinea pigs and precluded testing of the samples for infectious LDB. Results of LDB analysis were related to the meteorological conditions at the time of sampling. Generally, the concentrations of LDB in the air at the discharge of the cooling towers were 1 x 10/sup -6/ to 1 x 10/sup -7/ of that found in comparable volumes of tower basin water. During periods of high humidity and wind speed, LDB was detected in a few downwind samples and one upwind sample. One site with extensive construction and excavation activity had higher LDB concentrations in air samples relative to other sites. Nonpathogenic Naegleria were present in one of two air samples taken in the mist at the base of a natural-draft cooling tower.

  2. Determination of surface resistance and magnetic penetration depth of superconducting YBa2Cu3O(7-delta) thin films by microwave power transmission measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhasin, K. B.; Warner, J. D.; Miranda, F. A.; Gordon, W. L.; Newman, H. S.

    1990-01-01

    A novel waveguide power transmission measurement technique was developed to extract the complex conductivity of superconducting thin films at microwave frequencies. The microwave conductivity was taken of two laser ablated YBa2Cu3O(7-delta) thin films on LaAlO3 with transition temperatures of approx. 86.3 and 82 K, respectively, in the temperature range 25 to 300 K. From the conductivity values, the penetration depth was found to be approx. 0.54 and 0.43 micron, and the surface resistance (R sub s) to be approx. 24 and 36 micro-Ohms at 36 GHz and 76 K for the two films under consideration. The R sub s values were compared with those obtained from the change in the Q-factor of a 36 GHz Te sub 011-mode (OFHC) copper cavity by replacing one of its end walls with the superconducting sample. This technique allows noninvasive characterization of high transition temperature superconducting thin films at microwave frequencies.

  3. Power conversion system design for supercritical carbon dioxide cooled indirect cycle nuclear reactors

    E-print Network

    Gibbs, Jonathan Paul

    2008-01-01

    The supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO?) cycle is a promising advanced power conversion cycle which couples nicely to many Generation IV nuclear reactors. This work investigates the power conversion system design and ...

  4. Cool Vest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    ILC, Dover Division's lightweight cooling garment, called Cool Vest was designed to eliminate the harmful effects of heat stress; increases tolerance time in hot environments by almost 300 percent. Made of urethane-coated nylon used in Apollo, it works to keep the body cool, circulating chilled water throughout the lining by means of a small battery-powered pump. A pocket houses the pump, battery and the coolant which can be ice or a frozen gel, a valve control allows temperature regulation. One version is self-contained and portable for unrestrained movement, another has an umbilical line attached to an external source of coolant, such as standard tap water, when extended mobility is not required. It is reported from customers that the Cool Vest pays for itself in increased productivity in very high temperatures.

  5. Water-Cooled Data Center Packs More Power Per Rack | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Frank Blanchard and Ken Michaels, Staff Writers Behind each tall, black computer rack in the data center at the Advanced Technology Research Facility (ATRF) is something both strangely familiar and oddly out of place: It looks like a radiator. The back door of each cabinet is gridded with the coils of the Liebert cooling system, which circulates chilled water to remove heat generated by the high-speed, high-capacity, fault-tolerant equipment.

  6. Superconducting Cable

    DOEpatents

    Hughey, Raburn L. (Franklin, GA); Sinha, Uday K. (Carrollton, GA); Reece, David S. (Carrollton, GA); Muller, Albert C. (Eidson, TN)

    2005-07-22

    In order to provide a flexible oxide superconducting cable which is reduced in AC loss, tape-shaped superconducting wires covered with a stabilizing metal are wound on a flexible former. The superconducting wires are preferably laid on the former at a bending strain of not more than 0.2%. In laying on the former, a number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on a core member in a side-by-side manner, to form a first layer. A prescribed number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on top of the first layer in a side-by-side manner, to form a second layer. The former may be made of a metal, plastic, reinforced plastic, polymer, or a composite and provides flexibility to the superconducting wires and the cable formed therewith.

  7. Superconducting Cable

    DOEpatents

    Hughey, Raburn L. (Franklin, GA); Sinha, Uday K. (Carrollton, GA); Reece, David S. (Carrollton, GA); Muller, Albert C. (Eidson, TN)

    2005-03-08

    In order to provide a flexible oxide superconducting cable which is reduced in AC loss, tape-shaped superconducting wires covered with a stabilizing metal are wound on a flexible former. The superconducting wires are preferably laid on the former at a bending strain of not more than 0.2%. In laying on the former, a number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on a core member in a side-by-side manner, to form a first layer. A prescribed number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on top of the first layer in a side-by-side manner, to form a second layer. The former may be made of a metal, plastic, reinforced plastic, polymer, or a composite and provides flexibility to the superconducting wires and the cable formed therewith.

  8. Superconducting electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstock, H.; Nisenoff, M.

    1989-01-01

    The book provides an in-depth understanding of the fundamentals of superconducting electronics and the practical considerations for the fabrication of superconducting electronic structures. Additionally, it covers in detail the opportunities afforded by superconductivity for uniquely sensitive electronic devices and illustrates how these devices (in some cases employing high-temperature, ceramic superconductors) can be applied in analog and digital signal processing, laboratory instruments, biomagnetism, geophysics, nondestructive evaluation and radioastronomy. Improvements in cryocooler technology for application to cryoelectronics are also covered.

  9. A high-efficiency coaxial pulse tube cryocooler with 500 W cooling capacity at 80 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, J. Y.; Zhang, L. M.; Zhu, J.; Chen, S.; Luo, E. C.; Dai, W.; Li, H. B.

    2014-07-01

    High-temperature superconductivity power-grid technologies require a highly reliable and efficient cryocooler with cooling power of 100 W to kilowatt level at liquid-nitrogen temperatures to produce cryogenic environments. This paper describes the design of a coaxial Stirling-type pulse tube cryocooler to meet this need. In the designed cryocooler, the regenerator and pulse tube are lengthened to avoid possible temperature inhomogeneity. In an experiment, the azimuthal temperature difference at the middle of the regenerator was less than 30 K. With 7.6 kW electric power input, the cryocooler offers more than 520 W cooling power at 80 K corresponding to a relative Carnot efficiency of 18.2%. When the cooling power was less than 370 W, the efficiency is higher than 20%.

  10. Power-law decay of the velocity autocorrelation function of a granular fluid in the homogeneous cooling state.

    PubMed

    Brey, J Javier; Ruiz-Montero, M J

    2015-01-01

    The hydrodynamic part of the velocity autocorrelation function of a granular fluid in the homogeneous cooling state has been calculated by using mode-coupling theory for a finite system with periodic boundary conditions. The existence of the shearing instability, leading to a divergent behavior of the velocity flow fluctuations, is taken into account. A time region in which the velocity autocorrelation function exhibits a power-law decay, when time is measured by the number of collisions per particle, has been been identified. Also the explicit form of the exponential asymptotic long time decay has been obtained. The theoretical prediction for the power-law decay is compared with molecular dynamics simulation results, and a good agreement is found, after taking into account finite size corrections. The effects of approaching the shearing instability are also explored. PMID:25679614

  11. Maryland power plant cooling-water intake regulations and their application in evaluation of adverse environmental impact.

    PubMed

    McLean, Richard; Richkus, William A; Schreiner, Stephen P; Fluke, David

    2002-03-01

    Maryland's cooling-water intake and discharge regulations, the Code of Maryland Regulations (COMAR) 26.08.03, stem from Sections 316(a) and (b) of the Clean Water Act (CWA). COMAR 26.08.03.05 and litigative and administrative rulings stipulate that the location, design, construction, and capability of cooling-water intake structures must reflect the best technology available (BTA) for minimizing adverse environmental impacts (AEIs), providing that the costs of implementing the BTA are not wholly disproportionate to the expected environmental benefits. Maryland law exempts facilities that withdraw less than 10 million gallons/day (MGD) and less than 20% of stream or net flow by the intake. If not exempt, BTA must be installed if the cost of doing so is less than five times the value of fish impinged annually. Through site-specific studies and the use of a Spawning and Nursery Area of Consequence (SNAC) model applied to Representative Important Species, several power plants were evaluated to determine if they have had an adverse effect on spawning and nursery areas of consequence. Examples of application of the Maryland law to a number of power plants in the state are presented, together with the outcome of their evaluation. PMID:12806012

  12. Direct-Drive Gas-Cooled Reactor Power System: Concept and Preliminary Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, S. A.; Lipinski, R. J.; Godfroy, T. J.; Bragg-Sitton, S. M.; VanDyke, M. K.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the concept and preliminary component testing of a gas-cooled, UN-fueled, pin-type reactor which uses He/Xe gas that goes directly into a recuperated Brayton system to produce electricity for nuclear electric propulsion. This Direct-Drive Gas-Cooled Reactor (DDG) is designed to be subcritical under water or wet- sand immersion in case of a launch accident. Because the gas-cooled reactor can directly drive the Brayton turbomachinery, it is possible to configure the system such that there are no external surfaces or pressure boundaries that are refractory metal, even though the gas delivered to the turbine is 1144 K. The He/Xe gas mixture is a good heat transport medium when flowing, and a good insulator when stagnant. Judicious use of stagnant cavities as insulating regions allows transport of the 1144-K gas while keeping all external surfaces below 900 K. At this temperature super-alloys (Hastelloy or Inconel) can be used instead of refractory metals. Super-alloys reduce the technology risk because they are easier to fabricate than refractory metals, we have a much more extensive knowledge base on their characteristics, and, because they have a greater resistance to oxidation, system testing is eased. The system is also relatively simple in its design: no additional coolant pumps, heat exchanger, or freeze-thaw systems are required. Key to success of this concept is a good knowledge of the heat transfer between the fuel pins and the gas, as well as the pressure drop through the system. This paper describes preliminary testing to obtain this key information, as well as experience in demonstrating electrically heated testing of simulated reactor components.

  13. Use of Produced Water in Recirculating Cooling Systems at Power Generating Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Kent Zammit; Michael N. DiFilippo

    2005-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate produced water as a supplemental source of water for the San Juan Generating Station (SJGS). This study incorporates elements that identify produced water volume and quality, infrastructure to deliver it to SJGS, treatment requirements to use it at the plant, delivery and treatment economics, etc. SJGS, which is operated by Public Service of New Mexico (PNM) is located about 15 miles northwest of Farmington, New Mexico. It has four units with a total generating capacity of about 1,800 MW. The plant uses 22,400 acre-feet of water per year from the San Juan River with most of its demand resulting from cooling tower make-up. The plant is a zero liquid discharge facility and, as such, is well practiced in efficient water use and reuse. For the past few years, New Mexico has been suffering from a severe drought. Climate researchers are predicting the return of very dry weather over the next 30 to 40 years. Concern over the drought has spurred interest in evaluating the use of otherwise unusable saline waters. This deliverable describes possible test configurations for produced water demonstration projects at SJGS. The ability to host demonstration projects would enable the testing and advancement of promising produced water treatment technologies. Testing is described for two scenarios: Scenario 1--PNM builds a produced water treatment system at SJGS and incorporates planned and future demonstration projects into the design of the system. Scenario 2--PNM forestalls or decides not to install a produced water treatment system and would either conduct limited testing at SJGS (produced water would have to be delivered by tanker trucked) or at a salt water disposal facility (SWD). Each scenario would accommodate demonstration projects differently and these differences are discussed in this deliverable. PNM will host a demonstration test of water-conserving cooling technology--Wet Surface Air Cooling (WSAC) using cooling tower blowdown from the existing SJGS Unit 3 tower--during the summer months of 2005. If successful, there may be follow-on testing using produced water. WSAC is discussed in this deliverable. Recall that Deliverable 4, Emerging Technology Testing, describes the pilot testing conducted at a salt water disposal facility (SWD) by the CeraMem Corporation. This filtration technology could be a candidate for future demonstration testing and is also discussed in this deliverable.

  14. Korea's developmental program for superconductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, Gye-Won; Won, Dong-Yeon; Kuk, Il-Hyun; Park, Jong-Chul

    1995-01-01

    Superconductivity research in Korea was firstly carried out in the late 70's by a research group in Seoul National University (SNU), who fabricated a small scale superconducting magnetic energy storage system under the financial support from Korea Electric Power Company (KEPCO). But a few researchers were involved in superconductivity research until the oxide high Tc superconductor was discovered by Bednorz and Mueller. After the discovery of YBaCuO superconductor operating above the boiling point of liquid nitrogen (77 K)(exp 2), Korean Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST) sponsored a special fund for the high Tc superconductivity research to universities and national research institutes by recognizing its importance. Scientists engaged in this project organized 'High Temperature Superconductivity Research Association (HITSRA)' for effective conducting of research. Its major functions are to coordinate research activities on high Tc superconductivity and organize the workshop for active exchange of information. During last seven years the major superconductivity research has been carried out through the coordination of HITSRA. The major parts of the Korea's superconductivity research program were related to high temperature superconductor and only a few groups were carrying out research on conventional superconductor technology, and Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) and Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute (KERI) have led this research. In this talk, the current status and future plans of superconductivity research in Korea will be reviewed based on the results presented in interim meeting of HITSRA, April 1-2, 1994. Taejeon, as well as the research activity of KAERI.

  15. An air-cooled pulse tube cryocooler with 50 W cooling capacity at 77 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jianying; Wang, Xiaotao; Zhu, Jian; Chen, Shuai; Luo, Ercang; Li, Haibin

    2014-01-01

    A pulse tube cryocooler with 50 W cooling capacity at 77 K is developed to cool superconducting devices mounted on automobiles. The envisioned cryocooler weight is less than 40 kg, and the input electric power is less than 1 kW. To achieve these requirements, the working frequency is increased to 75 Hz, and the dual-opposed pistons use gas bearings to reduce compressor weight and volume. The heat from the main heat exchanger is rejected by forced convective air instead of water. The compressor and the cold finger are carefully matched to improve the efficiency. The details of these will be presented in this paper. After some adjustment, a no load temperature for the pulse tube cryocooler of 40 K was achieved with 1 kW input electric power in surroundings at 298 K. At 77 K, the cooling capacity is 50 W. If the main heat exchanger is cooled by water at 293 K, the cooling capacity increases to 64 W, corresponding to a relative Carnot efficiency of 18%.

  16. Certification of Superconducting Solenoid-Based Focusing Lenses

    SciTech Connect

    DiMarco, E.Joseph; Hemmati, Ali M.; Orris, Darryl F.; Page, Thomas M.; Rabehl, Roger H.; Tartaglia, Michael A.; Terechkine, Iouri; Tompkins, John C.

    2010-07-29

    The first production focusing lens for the HINS beam line at Fermilab has been assembled into a cryostat and tested. A total of 5 devices will be tested before they are installed in the low energy section of the HINS beam line, which uses copper Crossbar-H (CH) style RF cavities. One of the tested CH-section lens assemblies includes a pair of weak orthogonal steering dipoles nested within a strong focusing solenoid, and has six vapor cooled power leads. The other device has only the strong focusing solenoid, and utilizes a single pair of HTS power leads. The production test program is designed to measure the thermal performance of the cryostat, minimum cooling requirements for the HTS leads, quench performance of all superconducting components, and precise determination of the magnetic axis and field angles. Results and future plans for the first production device tests are presented.

  17. Magnetically leviated superconducting bearing

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberger, Bernard R.; Lynds, Jr., Lahmer

    1993-01-01

    A magnetically levitated superconducting bearing includes a magnet (2) mounted on a shaft (12) that is rotatable around an axis of rotation and a Type II superconductor (6) supported on a stator (14) in proximity to the magnet (2). The superconductor (6) is positioned so that when it is cooled to its superconducting state in the presence of a magnetic field, it interacts with the magnet (2) to produce an attractive force that levitates the magnet (2) and supports a load on the shaft (12). The interaction between the superconductor (6) and magnet(2) also produces surface screening currents (8) that generate a repulsive force perpendicular to the load. The bearing also has means for maintaining the superconductor at a temperature below its critical temperature (16, 18). The bearing could also be constructed so the magnet (2) is supported on the stator (14) and the superconductor (6) is mounted on the shaft (12). The bearing can be operated by cooling the superconductor (6) to its superconducting state in the presence of a magnetic field.

  18. Utilization of municipal wastewater for cooling in thermoelectric power plants: Evaluation of the combined cost of makeup water treatment and increased condenser fouling

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Michael E.; Theregowda, Ranjani B.; Safari, Iman; Abbasian, Javad; Arastoopour, Hamid; Dzombak, David A.; Hsieh, Ming-Kai; Miller, David C.

    2013-10-01

    A methodology is presented to calculate the total combined cost (TCC) of water sourcing, water treatment and condenser fouling in the recirculating cooling systems of thermoelectric power plants. The methodology is employed to evaluate the economic viability of using treated municipal wastewater (MWW) to replace the use of freshwater as makeup water to power plant cooling systems. Cost analyses are presented for a reference power plant and five different tertiary treatment scenarios to reduce the scaling tendencies of MWW. Results indicate that a 550 MW sub-critical coal fired power plant with a makeup water requirement of 29.3 ML/day has a TCC of $3.0 - 3.2 million/yr associated with the use of treated MWW for cooling. (All costs USD 2009). This translates to a freshwater conservation cost of $0.29/kL, which is considerably lower than that of dry air cooling technology, $1.5/kL, as well as the 2020 conservation cost target set by the U.S. Department of Energy, $0.74/kL. Results also show that if the available price of freshwater exceeds that of secondary-treated MWW by more than $0.13-0.14/kL, it can be economically advantageous to purchase secondary MWW and treat it for utilization in the recirculating cooling system of a thermoelectric power plant.

  19. Magnetic Levitators With Superconductive Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolgin, Benjamin P.

    1995-01-01

    Magnetic noncontact levitators that include superconductive components provide vibration-damping suspension for cryogenic instruments, according to proposal. Because superconductive components attached to levitated cryogenic instruments, no additional coolant liquid or refrigeration power needed. Also because vibration-damping components of levitators located outside cold chambers, in ambient environment, not necessary to waste coolant liquid or refrigeration power on dissipation of vibrational energy. At least three levitating magnets and three superconductors necessary for stable levitation.

  20. New research in Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khorrami, Mona

    2013-03-01

    Superconductors are materials that have no resistance to electricity's flow; they are one of the last great frontiers of scientific discovery. The theories that explain superconductor behavior seem to be constantly under review. In 1911 superconductivity was first observed in mercury by Dutch physicist Heike Kamerlingh Onnes When he cooled it to the temperature of liquid helium, 4 degrees Kelvin (-452F, -269C), its resistance suddenly disappeared. It was necessary for Onnes to come within 4 degrees of the coldest temperature that is theoretically attainable to witness the phenomenon of superconductivity. In 1933 German researchers Walther Meissner and Robert Ochsenfeld discovered that a superconducting material will repel a magnetic field. A magnet moving by a conductor induces currents in the conductor, but, in a superconductor the induced currents exactly mirror the field that would have otherwise penetrated the superconducting material - causing the magnet to be repulsed. This phenomenon is known as strong diamagnetism and is today often referred to as the ``Meissner effect'' (an eponym). Later on the theory developed by American physicists John Bardeen, Leon Cooper, and John Schrieffer together with extensions and refinements of the theory, which followed in the years after 1957, succeeded in explaining in considerable detail the properties of superconductors.

  1. Superconducting Microelectronics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, Richard W.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses superconducting microelectronics based on the Josephson effect and its advantages over conventional integrated circuits in speed and sensitivity. Considers present uses in standards laboratories (voltage) and in measuring weak magnetic fields. Also considers future applications in superfast computer circuitry using Superconducting

  2. Superconducting structure

    DOEpatents

    Kwon, Chuhee (Los Alamos, NM); Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM); Foltyn, Stephen R. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2003-04-01

    A superconductive structure including a dielectric oxide substrate, a thin buffer layer of a superconducting material thereon; and, a layer of a rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film thereon the thin layer of yttrium-barium-copper oxide, the rare earth selected from the group consisting of samarium, gadolinium, ytterbium, erbium, neodymium, dysprosium, holmium, lutetium, a combination of more than one element from the rare earth group and a combination of one or more elements from the rare earth group with yttrium, the buffer layer of superconducting material characterized as having chemical and structural compatibility with the dielectric oxide substrate and the rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film is provided.

  3. Superconducting Structure

    DOEpatents

    Kwon, Chuhee (Los Alamos, NM); Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM); Foltyn, Stephen R. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2005-09-13

    A superconductive structure including a dielectric oxide substrate, a thin buffer layer of a superconducting material thereon; and, a layer of a rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film thereon the thin layer of yttrium-barium-copper oxide, the rare earth selected from the group consisting of samarium, gadolinium, ytterbium, erbium, neodymium, dysprosium, holmium, lutetium, a combination of more than one element from the rare earth group and a combination of one or more elements from the rare earth group with yttrium, the buffer layer of superconducting material characterized as having chemical and structural compatibility with the dielectric oxide substrate and the rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film is provided.

  4. Fluoride-Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactor (FHR) for Power and Process Heat

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, Charles; Hu, Lin-wen; Peterson, Per; Sridharan, Kumar

    2015-01-21

    In 2011 the U.S. Department of Energy through its Nuclear Energy University Program (NEUP) awarded a 3- year integrated research project (IRP) to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and its partners at the University of California at Berkeley (UCB) and the University of Wisconsin at Madison (UW). The IRP included Westinghouse Electric Company and an advisory panel chaired by Regis Matzie that provided advice as the project progressed. The first sentence of the proposal stated the goals: The objective of this Integrated Research Project (IRP) is to develop a path forward to a commercially viable salt-cooled solid-fuel high-temperature reactor with superior economic, safety, waste, nonproliferation, and physical security characteristics compared to light-water reactors. This report summarizes major results of this research.

  5. Novel Controls for Time-Dependent Economic Dispatch of Combined Cooling Heating and Power (CCHP)

    SciTech Connect

    Samuelsen, Scott; Brouwer, Jack

    2013-08-31

    The research and development effort detailed in this report directly addresses the challenge of reducing U.S. industrial energy and carbon intensity by contributing to an increased understanding of potential CCHP technology, the CCHP market and the challenges of widespread adoption. This study developed a number of new tools, models, and approaches for the design, control, and optimal dispatch of various CCHP technologies. The UC Irvine campus served as a ‘living laboratory’ of new CCHP technologies and enabled the design and demonstration of several novel control methods. In particular, the integration of large scale thermal energy storage capable of shifting an entire day of cooling demand required a novel approach to the CCHP dispatch optimization. The thermal energy storage proved an economically viable resource which reduced both costs and emissions by enabling generators and chillers to operate under steady high efficiency conditions at all times of the day.

  6. Climate Change Effect on Thermal Power Cooling in the U.S.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Maintaining reasonable surface-water temperatures is paramount for aquatic ecosystem health. Thermal pollution from power plant effluent can result in unnatural river temperature spikes locally, as well as cause damaging breaches to river temperature. The threat of a nonstationar...

  7. Actively controlled superconducting bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eyssa, Yehia M.; Huang, X.

    1991-01-01

    Actively controlled conventional radial beating using copper winding and soft magnetic material can provide only up to 200 N/sq cm of pressure. Large cryogenic pumps for space applications operating at 30,000 rpm and high rpm machines may require larger magnetic pressure. We show that using superconducting winding in the rotor and the stator of a magnetic bearing system increases the pressure by an order of magnitude. The paper addresses winding configuration, stability, ac losses, and power requirement for the superconducting winding.

  8. Cryogenic Cooling for Myriad Applications-A STAR Is Born

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Cryogenics, the science of generating extremely low temperatures, has wide applicability throughout NASA. The Agency employs cryogenics for rocket propulsion, high-pressure gas supply, breathable air in space, life support equipment, electricity, water, food preservation and packaging, medicine, imaging devices, and electronics. Cryogenic liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen systems are also replacing solid rocket motor propulsion systems in most of the proposed launch systems, a reversion to old-style liquid propellants. In the late 1980s, NASA wanted a compact linear alternator/motor with reduced size and mass, as well as high efficiency, that had unlimited service life for use in a thermally driven power generator for space power applications. Prior development work with free-piston Stirling converters (a Stirling engine integrated with a linear actuator that produces electrical power output) had shown the promise of that technology for high-power space applications. A dual use for terrestrial applications exists for compact Stirling converters for onsite combined heat and power units. The Stirling cycle is also usable in reverse as a refrigeration cycle suitable for cryogenic cooling, so this Stirling converter work promised double benefits as well as dual uses. The uses for cryogenic coolers within NASA abound; commercial applications are similarly wide-ranging, from cooling liquid oxygen and nitrogen, to cryobiology and bio-storage, cryosurgery, instrument and detector cooling, semiconductor manufacturing, and support service for cooled superconducting power systems.

  9. Reanalysis of the gas-cooled fast reactor experiments at the zero power facility proteus - Spectral indices

    SciTech Connect

    Perret, G.; Pattupara, R. M.; Girardin, G.; Chawla, R.

    2012-07-01

    The gas-cooled fast reactor (GCFR) concept was investigated experimentally in the PROTEUS zero power facility at the Paul Scherrer Inst. during the 1970's. The experimental program was aimed at neutronics studies specific to the GCFR and at the validation of nuclear data in fast spectra. A significant part of the program used thorium oxide and thorium metal fuel either distributed quasi-homogeneously in the reference PuO{sub 2}/UO{sub 2} lattice or introduced in the form of radial and axial blanket zones. Experimental results obtained at the time are still of high relevance in view of the current consideration of the Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) as a Generation-IV nuclear system, as also of the renewed interest in the thorium cycle. In this context, some of the experiments have been modeled with modern Monte Carlo codes to better account for the complex PROTEUS whole-reactor geometry and to allow validating recent continuous neutron cross-section libraries. As a first step, the MCNPX model was used to test the JEFF-3.1, JEFF-3.1.1, ENDF/B-VII.0 and JENDL-3.3 libraries against spectral indices, notably involving fission and capture of {sup 232}Th and {sup 237}Np, measured in GFR-like lattices. (authors)

  10. Superconducting wind turbine generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrahamsen, A. B.; Mijatovic, N.; Seiler, E.; Zirngibl, T.; Træholt, C.; Nørgård, P. B.; Pedersen, N. F.; Andersen, N. H.; Østergård, J.

    2010-03-01

    We have examined the potential of 10 MW superconducting direct drive generators to enter the European offshore wind power market and estimated that the production of about 1200 superconducting turbines until 2030 would correspond to 10% of the EU offshore market. The expected properties of future offshore turbines of 8 and 10 MW have been determined from an up-scaling of an existing 5 MW turbine and the necessary properties of the superconducting drive train are discussed. We have found that the absence of the gear box is the main benefit and the reduced weight and size is secondary. However, the main challenge of the superconducting direct drive technology is to prove that the reliability is superior to the alternative drive trains based on gearboxes or permanent magnets. A strategy of successive testing of superconducting direct drive trains in real wind turbines of 10 kW, 100 kW, 1 MW and 10 MW is suggested to secure the accumulation of reliability experience. Finally, the quantities of high temperature superconducting tape needed for a 10 kW and an extreme high field 10 MW generator are found to be 7.5 km and 1500 km, respectively. A more realistic estimate is 200-300 km of tape per 10 MW generator and it is concluded that the present production capacity of coated conductors must be increased by a factor of 36 by 2020, resulting in a ten times lower price of the tape in order to reach a realistic price level for the superconducting drive train.

  11. Blazar synchrotron emission of instantaneously power-law injected electrons under linear synchrotron, non-linear SSC, and combined synchrotron-SSC cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacharias, M.; Schlickeiser, R.

    2010-12-01

    Context. The broadband spectral energy distributions (SED) of blazars show two distinct components which in leptonic models are associated with synchrotron and synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) emission of highly relativistic electrons. In some sources the SSC component dominates the synchrotron peak by one or more orders of magnitude implying that the electrons mainly cool by inverse Compton collisions with their self-made synchrotron photons. Therefore, the linear synchrotron loss of electrons, which is normally invoked in emission models, has to be replaced by a nonlinear loss rate depending on an energy integral of the electron distribution. This modified electron cooling changes significantly the emerging radiation spectra. Aims: It is the purpose of this work to apply this new cooling scenario to relativistic power-law distributed electrons, which are injected instantaneously into the jet. Methods: We assume a spherical, uniform, nonthermal source, where the distribution of the electrons is spatially and temporally isotropic throughout the source. We will first solve the differential equation of the volume-averaged differential number density of the electrons, and then discuss their temporal evolution. Since any non-linear cooling will turn into linear cooling after some time, we also calculated the electron number density for a combined cooling scenario consisting of both the linear and non-linear cooling. For all cases, we will also calculate analytically the emerging optically thin time-integrated synchrotron intensity spectrum, also named the fluence, and compare it to a numerical solution. Results: The first result is that the combined cooling scenario depends critically on the value of the injection parameter ?0. For values ?0 ? 1 the electrons cool mainly linear, while in the opposite case the cooling begins non-linear and becomes linear for later times. Secondly, in all cased we find that for small normalized frequencies f < 1 the fluence spectra F(f) exhibit power-laws with constant spectral indices F(f) f-\\vartheta. We find for purely linear cooling \\vartheta_SYN = 1/2, and for purely non-linear cooling \\vartheta_SSC = 3/2. In the combined cooling scenario we obtain for the small injection parameter \\vartheta_1 = 1/2, and for the large injection parameter \\vartheta_2 = 3/2, which becomes \\vartheta_1 = 1/2 for very small frequencies. These identical behaviors, as compared to the existing calculations for monoenergetically injected electrons, prove that the spectral behavior of the total synchrotron fluence is independent from the functional form of the energy injection spectrum. Appendices are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  12. Impact of E × B flow shear on turbulence and resulting power fall-off width in H-mode plasmas in experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Q. Q.; Xu, G. S.; Zhong, F. C.; Wang, L.; Wang, H. Q.; Chen, R.; Yan, N.; Liu, S. C.; Chen, L.; Jia, M. N.; Li, Y. L.; Liu, J. B.

    2015-06-01

    The power fall-off width in the H-mode scrape-off layer (SOL) in tokamaks shows a strong inverse dependence on the plasma current, which was noticed by both previous multi-machine scaling work [T. Eich et al., Nucl. Fusion 53, 093031 (2013)] and more recent work [L. Wang et al., Nucl. Fusion 54, 114002 (2014)] on the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak. To understand the underlying physics, probe measurements of three H-mode discharges with different plasma currents have been studied in this work. The results suggest that a higher plasma current is accompanied by a stronger E × B shear and a shorter radial correlation length of turbulence in the SOL, thus resulting in a narrower power fall-off width. A simple model has also been applied to demonstrate the suppression effect of E × B shear on turbulence in the SOL and shows relatively good agreement with the experimental observations.

  13. Design and operating experience of an ac-dc power converter for a superconducting magnetic energy storage unit

    SciTech Connect

    Boenig, H.J.; Nielsen, R.G.; Sueker, K.H.

    1984-01-01

    The design philosophy and the operating behavior of a 5.5 kA, +-2.5 kV converter, being the electrical interface between a high voltage transmission system and a 30 MJ superconducting coil, are documented in this paper. Converter short circuit tests, load tests under various control conditions, dc breaker tests for magnet current interruption, and converter failure modes are described.

  14. Foulant characteristics comparison in recycling cooling water system makeup by municipal reclaimed water and surface water in power plant.

    PubMed

    Ping, Xu; Jing, Wang; Yajun, Zhang; Jie, Wang; Shuai, Si

    2015-01-01

    Due to water shortage, municipal reclaimed water rather than surface water was replenished into recycling cooling water system in power plants in some cities in China. In order to understand the effects of the measure on carbon steel corrosion, characteristics of two kinds of foulant produced in different systems were studied in the paper. Differences between municipal reclaimed water and surface water were analyzed firstly. Then, the weight and the morphology of two kinds of foulant were compared. Moreover, other characteristics including the total number of bacteria, sulfate reducing bacteria, iron bacteria, extracellular polymeric substance (EPS), protein (PN), and polysaccharide (PS) in foulant were analyzed. Based on results, it could be concluded that microbial and corrosive risk would be increased when the system replenished by municipal reclaimed water instead of surface water. PMID:25893132

  15. Foulant Characteristics Comparison in Recycling Cooling Water System Makeup by Municipal Reclaimed Water and Surface Water in Power Plant

    PubMed Central

    Ping, Xu; Jing, Wang; Yajun, Zhang; Jie, Wang; Shuai, Si

    2015-01-01

    Due to water shortage, municipal reclaimed water rather than surface water was replenished into recycling cooling water system in power plants in some cities in China. In order to understand the effects of the measure on carbon steel corrosion, characteristics of two kinds of foulant produced in different systems were studied in the paper. Differences between municipal reclaimed water and surface water were analyzed firstly. Then, the weight and the morphology of two kinds of foulant were compared. Moreover, other characteristics including the total number of bacteria, sulfate reducing bacteria, iron bacteria, extracellular polymeric substance (EPS), protein (PN), and polysaccharide (PS) in foulant were analyzed. Based on results, it could be concluded that microbial and corrosive risk would be increased when the system replenished by municipal reclaimed water instead of surface water. PMID:25893132

  16. Presence of pathogenic microorganisms in power-plant cooling waters. Report for October 1, 1979-September 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Tyndall, R.L.

    1982-10-01

    Cooling waters from eleven geographically disparate power plants were tested for the presence of Naegleria fowleri and Legionella pneumophila (LDB). Control source waters for each plant were also tested for these pathogens. Water from two of the eleven plants contained pathogenic Naegleria, and infectious Legionella were found in seven of the test sites. Pathogenic Naegleria were not found in control waters, but infectious Legionella were found in five of the eleven control source water sites. Concentrations of nitrite, sulfate, and total organic carbon correlated with the concentrations of LDB. A new species of Legionella was isolated from one of the test sites. In laboratory tests, both Acanthamoeba and Naegleria were capable of supporting the growth of Legionella pneumophila.

  17. The impact of water use fees on dispatching and water requirements for water-cooled power plants in Texas.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Kelly T; Blackhurst, Michael F; King, Carey W; Webber, Michael E

    2014-06-17

    We utilize a unit commitment and dispatch model to estimate how water use fees on power generators would affect dispatching and water requirements by the power sector in the Electric Reliability Council of Texas' (ERCOT) electric grid. Fees ranging from 10 to 1000 USD per acre-foot were separately applied to water withdrawals and consumption. Fees were chosen to be comparable in cost to a range of water supply projects proposed in the Texas Water Development Board's State Water Plan to meet demand through 2050. We found that these fees can reduce water withdrawals and consumption for cooling thermoelectric power plants in ERCOT by as much as 75% and 23%, respectively. To achieve these water savings, wholesale electricity generation costs might increase as much as 120% based on 2011 fuel costs and generation characteristics. We estimate that water saved through these fees is not as cost-effective as conventional long-term water supply projects. However, the electric grid offers short-term flexibility that conventional water supply projects do not. Furthermore, this manuscript discusses conditions under which the grid could be effective at "supplying" water, particularly during emergency drought conditions, by changing its operational conditions. PMID:24832169

  18. Natural Circulation in Water Cooled Nuclear Power Plants Phenomena, models, and methodology for system reliability assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Jose Reyes

    2005-02-14

    In recent years it has been recognized that the application of passive safety systems (i.e., those whose operation takes advantage of natural forces such as convection and gravity), can contribute to simplification and potentially to improved economics of new nuclear power plant designs. In 1991 the IAEA Conference on ''The Safety of Nuclear Power: Strategy for the Future'' noted that for new plants the use of passive safety features is a desirable method of achieving simplification and increasing the reliability of the performance of essential safety functions, and should be used wherever appropriate''.

  19. Superconducting PM undiffused machines with stationary superconducting coils

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, John S.; Schwenterly, S. William

    2004-03-02

    A superconducting PM machine has a stator, a rotor and a stationary excitation source without the need of a ferromagnetic frame which is cryogenically cooled for operation in the superconducting state. PM material is placed between poles on the rotor to prevent leakage or diffusion of secondary flux before reaching the main air gap, or to divert PM flux where it is desired to weaken flux in the main air gap. The PM material provides hop-along capability for the machine in the event of a fault condition.

  20. USE OF PRODUCED WATER IN RECIRCULATING COOLING SYSTEMS AT POWER GENERATING FACILITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Michael N. DiFilippo

    2004-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate produced water as a supplemental source of water for the San Juan Generating Station (SJGS). This study incorporates elements that identify produced water volume and quality, infrastructure to deliver it to SJGS, treatment requirements to use it at the plant, delivery and treatment economics, etc. SJGS, which is operated by Public Service of New Mexico (PNM) is located about 15 miles northwest of Farmington, New Mexico. It has four units with a total generating capacity of about 1,800 MW. The plant uses 22,400 acre-feet of water per year from the San Juan River with most of its demand resulting from cooling tower make-up. The plant is a zero liquid discharge facility and, as such, is well practiced in efficient water use and reuse. For the past few years, New Mexico has been suffering from a severe drought. Climate researchers are predicting the return of very dry weather over the next 30 to 40 years. Concern over the drought has spurred interest in evaluating the use of otherwise unusable saline waters. Deliverable 1 presents a general assessment of produced water generation in the San Juan Basin in Four Corners Area of New Mexico. Oil and gas production, produced water handling and disposal, and produced water quantities and chemistry are discussed. Legislative efforts to enable the use of this water at SJGS are also described.

  1. Reproduction and distribution of fishes in a cooling lake: Wisconsin power plant impact study

    SciTech Connect

    Rondorf, D.W.; Kitchell, J.F.

    1985-06-01

    Spatial and temporal patterns during reproduction and early-life history of fishes were studied in a manmade cooling lake. Lake Columbia, impounded in 1974, near Portage, Wisconsin, has an area of 190 ha, a mean depth of 2.1 m, and a 15C temperature gradient derived from the thermal effluent of a 527-MW fossil-fueled generating station that began operating in 1975. The lake was initially colonized by fishes when filled with Wisconsin River water. Observations suggest a decline of species diversity of the fish community due to direct action of upper lethal temperatures, absence of colonization by warm-water, lake-dwelling species, and lack of recruitment for certain species. Spatial and temporal patterns of spawning of black crappie were altered by a rapid rise in water temperatures following plant startup after a three-week shutdown. Elevated temperatures subsequently shortened the spawning season, induced resorption of ova, and caused loss of secondary sexual characteristics. After initially drifting with water current, juvenile stages of sunfish and gizzard shad responded to changes in the thermal gradient by horizontal and vertical shifts in abundance.

  2. Minimizing Data Center Cooling and Server Power Costs Ehsan Pakbaznia and Massoud Pedram

    E-print Network

    Pedram, Massoud

    dollars in the US alone, while the power density is expected to reach 60KW/m2 for data centers by 2010 minimization in a data center accounting for both the information technology equipment and the air conditioning the center of the WWW and more broadly the cyber-universe. They sit at the heart of the information

  3. Solar Central Receiver Hybrid Power Systems sodium-cooled receiver concept. Final report. Volume III. Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    1980-01-01

    The overall, long term objective of the Solar Central Receiver Hybrid Power System is to identify, characterize, and ultimately demonstrate the viability and cost effectiveness of solar/fossil, steam Rankine cycle, hybrid power systems that: (1) consist of a combined solar central receiver energy source and a nonsolar energy source at a single, common site, (2) may operate in the base, intermediate, and peaking capacity modes, (3) produce the rated output independent of variations in solar insolation, (4) provide a significant savings (50% or more) in fuel consumpton, and (5) produce power at the minimum possible cost in mills/kWh. It is essential that these hybrid concepts be technically feasible and economically competitive with other systems in the near to mid-term time period (1985-1990) on a commercial scale. The program objective for Phase I is to identify and conceptually characterize solar/fossil steam Rankine cycle, commercial-scale, power plant systems that are economically viable and technically feasible. This volume contains appendices to the conceptual design and systems analysis studies gien in Volume II, Books 1 and 2. (WHK)

  4. Thermal Stability Analysis for Superconducting Coupling Coil in MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hong; Wang, Li; Pan, Heng; Guo, XingLong; Green, M.A.

    2010-06-28

    The superconducting coupling coil to be used in the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) with inner radius of 750 mm, length of 285 mm and thickness of 110.4 mm will be cooled by a pair of 1.5 W at 4.2 K cryo-coolers. When the coupling coil is powered to 210 A, it will produce about 7.3 T peak magnetic field at the conductor and it will have a stored energy of 13 MJ. A key issue for safe operation of the coupling coil is the thermal stability of the coil during a charge and discharge. The magnet and its cooling system are designed for a rapid discharge where the magnet is to be discharged in 5400 seconds. The numerical simulation for the thermal stability of the MICE coupling coil has been done using ANSYS. The analysis results show that the superconducting coupling coil has a good stability and can be charged and discharged safely.

  5. USE OF PRODUCED WATER IN RECIRCULATING COOLING SYSTEMS AT POWER GENERATING FACILITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Michael N. DiFilippo

    2004-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate produced water as a supplemental source of water for the San Juan Generating Station (SJGS). This study incorporates elements that identify produced water volume and quality, infrastructure to deliver it to SJGS, treatment requirements to use it at the plant, delivery and treatment economics, etc. SJGS, which is operated by Public Service of New Mexico (PNM) is located about 15 miles northwest of Farmington, New Mexico. It has four units with a total generating capacity of about 1,800 MW. The plant uses 22,400 acre-feet of water per year from the San Juan River with most of its demand resulting from cooling tower make-up. The plant is a zero liquid discharge facility and, as such, is well practiced in efficient water use and reuse. For the past few years, New Mexico has been suffering from a severe drought. Climate researchers are predicting the return of very dry weather over the next 30 to 40 years. Concern over the drought has spurred interest in evaluating the use of otherwise unusable saline waters. Deliverable 2 focuses on transportation--the largest obstacle to produced water reuse in the San Juan Basin (the Basin). Most of the produced water in the Basin is stored in tanks at the well head and must be transported by truck to salt water disposal (SWD) facilities prior to injection. Produced water transportation requirements from the well head to SJGS and the availability of existing infrastructure to transport the water are discussed in this deliverable.

  6. Start-up fuel and power flattening of sodium-cooled candle core

    SciTech Connect

    Takaki, Naoyuki; Sagawa, Yu; Umino, Akitake; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2013-07-01

    The hard neutron spectrum and unique power shape of CANDLE enable its distinctive performances such as achieving high burnup more than 30% and exempting necessity of both enrichment and reprocessing. On the other hand, they also cause several challenging problems. One is how the initial fuel can be prepared to start up the first CANDLE reactor because the equilibrium fuel composition that enables stable CANDLE burning is complex both in axial and radial directions. Another prominent problem is high radial power peaking factor that worsens averaged burnup, namely resource utilization factor in once-through mode and shorten the life time of structure materials. The purposes of this study are to solve these two problems. Several ideas for core configurations and startup fuel using single enrichment uranium and iron as a substitute of fission products are studied. As a result, it is found that low enriched uranium is applicable to ignite the core but all concepts examined here exceeded heat limits. Adjustment in enrichment and height of active and burnt zone is opened for future work. Sodium duct assemblies and thorium fuel assemblies loaded in the center region are studied as measures to reduce radial power peaking factor. Replacing 37 fuels by thorium fuel assemblies in the zeroth to third row provides well-balanced performance with flattened radial power distribution. The CANDLE core loaded with natural uranium in the outer and thorium in the center region achieved 35.6% of averaged burnup and 7.0 years of cladding life time owing to mitigated local fast neutron irradiation at the center. Using thorium with natural or depleted uranium in CANDLE reactor is also beneficial to diversifying fission resource and extending available term of fission energy without expansion of needs for enrichment and reprocessing.

  7. Superconducting multipole corrector magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikhin, Vladimir; /Fermilab

    2004-10-01

    A novel concept of superconducting multipole corrector magnet is discussed. This magnet assembled from 12 identical racetrack type coils and can generate any combination of dipole, quadrupole and sextupole magnetic fields. The coil groups are powered from separate power supplies. In the case of normal dipole, quadrupole and sextupole fields the total field is symmetrical relatively the magnet median plane and there are only five powered separately coil groups. This type multipole corrector magnet was proposed for BTeV, Fermilab project and has following advantages: universal configuration, simple manufacturing and high mechanical stability. The results of magnetic design including the field quality and magnetic forces in comparison with known shell type superconducting correctors are presented.

  8. Magnetic and structural properties of high relative cooling power (Fe70Ni30)92Mn8 magnetocaloric nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhary, V.; Ramanujan, R. V.

    2015-08-01

    Earth-abundant, low-cost, and rare earth free magnetocaloric nanomaterials have attracted considerable attention for affordable, ‘green’, energy-efficient thermal management applications. Hence, we investigated the magnetocaloric properties and critical behavior of (Fe70Ni30)92Mn8 alloy nanoparticles. A near room temperature magnetocaloric effect, with a high relative cooling power (RCP), was obtained by alloying FeNi with Mn and fcc (?) phase stabilization. The Curie temperature (T C) of the ?- phase was 40?K less than that of the T C of the bcc (?) phase. For a field change of 5?T, the RCP for the ?- and ?- phase was found to be 507?J?kg-1 and 466?J?kg-1, respectively; these values are higher than those for Gd nanoparticles. The RCP exhibited a power law relationship with magnetic field H. Critical exponents values of ? = 4.71, ? = 0.319 and ? = 1.195 were obtained, close to those obtained from the short range order 3D-Heisenberg model. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of developing high RCP, low-cost, rare earth free magnetocaloric nanoparticles for near room temperature applications.

  9. Helium heater design for the helium direct cycle component test facility. [for gas-cooled nuclear reactor power plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, V. R.; Gunn, S. V.; Lee, J. C.

    1975-01-01

    The paper describes a helium heater to be used to conduct non-nuclear demonstration tests of the complete power conversion loop for a direct-cycle gas-cooled nuclear reactor power plant. Requirements for the heater include: heating the helium to a 1500 F temperature, operating at a 1000 psia helium pressure, providing a thermal response capability and helium volume similar to that of the nuclear reactor, and a total heater system helium pressure drop of not more than 15 psi. The unique compact heater system design proposed consists of 18 heater modules; air preheaters, compressors, and compressor drive systems; an integral control system; piping; and auxiliary equipment. The heater modules incorporate the dual-concentric-tube 'Variflux' heat exchanger design which provides a controlled heat flux along the entire length of the tube element. The heater design as proposed will meet all system requirements. The heater uses pressurized combustion (50 psia) to provide intensive heat transfer, and to minimize furnace volume and heat storage mass.

  10. Subtask 1.24 - Optimization of Cooling Water Resources for Power Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel Stepan; Richard Shockey; Bethany Kurz; Wesley Peck

    2009-03-31

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has developed an interactive, Web-based decision support system (DSS{copyright} 2007 EERC Foundation) to provide power generation utilities with an assessment tool to address water supply issues when planning new or modifying existing generation facilities. The Web-based DSS integrates water and wastewater treatment technology and water law information with a geographic information system-based interactive map that links to state and federal water quality and quantity databases for North Dakota, South Dakota, Minnesota, Wyoming, Montana, Nebraska, Wisconsin, and Iowa.

  11. Mississippi State University Cooling, Heating, and Power (Micro-CHP) and Bio-Fuel Center

    SciTech Connect

    Mago, Pedro; Newell, LeLe

    2014-01-31

    Between 2008 and 2014, the U.S. Department of Energy funded the MSU Micro-CHP and Bio-Fuel Center located at Mississippi State University. The overall objective of this project was to enable micro-CHP (micro-combined heat and power) utilization, to facilitate and promote the use of CHP systems and to educate architects, engineers, and agricultural producers and scientists on the benefits of CHP systems. Therefore, the work of the Center focused on the three areas: CHP system modeling and optimization, outreach, and research. In general, the results obtained from this project demonstrated that CHP systems are attractive because they can provide energy, environmental, and economic benefits. Some of these benefits include the potential to reduce operational cost, carbon dioxide emissions, primary energy consumption, and power reliability during electric grid disruptions. The knowledge disseminated in numerous journal and conference papers from the outcomes of this project is beneficial to engineers, architects, agricultural producers, scientists and the public in general who are interested in CHP technology and applications. In addition, more than 48 graduate students and 23 undergraduate students, benefited from the training and research performed in the MSU Micro-CHP and Bio-Fuel Center.

  12. District heating and cooling systems for communities through power plant retrofit distribution network. Phase 2. Final report, 1 March 1980-31 January 1984. Volume III

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-31

    The technical information in the report, includes staged development of district heating systems, central power station retrofit, intermediate and peaking/backup thermal plants, transmission and distribution, user connections, and alternatives to district heating. Discussion of heat pumps, cooling, waste heat recovery, small cogeneration and/or solid fuel-burning plants, solar alternatives to district heating and nuclear district heating are included.

  13. A 10-kW SiC Inverter with A Novel Printed Metal Power Module With Integrated Cooling Using Additive Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Chinthavali, Madhu Sudhan; Ayers, Curtis William; Campbell, Steven L; Wiles, Randy H; Ozpineci, Burak

    2014-01-01

    With efforts to reduce the cost, size, and thermal management systems for the power electronics drivetrain in hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), wide band gap semiconductors including silicon carbide (SiC) have been identified as possibly being a partial solution. This paper focuses on the development of a 10-kW all SiC inverter using a high power density, integrated printed metal power module with integrated cooling using additive manufacturing techniques. This is the first ever heat sink printed for a power electronics application. About 50% of the inverter was built using additive manufacturing techniques.

  14. Steam Generator Component Model in a Combined Cycle of Power Conversion Unit for Very High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Chang H; Han, James; Barner, Robert; Sherman, Steven R

    2007-06-01

    The Department of Energy and the Idaho National Laboratory are developing a Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), Very High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (VHTR) to serve as a demonstration of state-of-the-art nuclear technology. The purpose of the demonstration is two fold 1) efficient low cost energy generation and 2) hydrogen production. Although a next generation plant could be developed as a single-purpose facility, early designs are expected to be dual-purpose. While hydrogen production and advanced energy cycles are still in its early stages of development, research towards coupling a high temperature reactor, electrical generation and hydrogen production is under way. A combined cycle is considered as one of the power conversion units to be coupled to the very high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR). The combined cycle configuration consists of a Brayton top cycle coupled to a Rankine bottoming cycle by means of a steam generator. A detailed sizing and pressure drop model of a steam generator is not available in the HYSYS processes code. Therefore a four region model was developed for implementation into HYSYS. The focus of this study was the validation of a HYSYS steam generator model of two phase flow correlations. The correlations calculated the size and heat exchange of the steam generator. To assess the model, those calculations were input into a RELAP5 model and its results were compared with HYSYS results. The comparison showed many differences in parameters such as the heat transfer coefficients and revealed the different methods used by the codes. Despite differences in approach, the overall results of heat transfer were in good agreement.

  15. Effects of heating power on divertor in-out asymmetry and scrape-off layer flow in reversed field on Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, S. C. Wang, H. Q.; Gan, K. F.; Xia, T. Y.; Xu, G. S.; Liu, Z. X.; Chen, L.; Zhang, W.; Chen, R.; Shao, L. M.; Ding, S.; Hu, G. H.; Liu, Y. L.; Zhao, N.; Li, Y. L.; Gong, X. Z.; Gao, X.; Guo, H. Y.; Wang, L.; Xu, X. Q.; and others

    2014-12-15

    The dependence of divertor asymmetry and scrape-off layer (SOL) flow on heating power has been investigated in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). Divertor plasma exhibits an outboard-enhanced in-out asymmetry in heat flux in lower single null configuration for in reversed (ion ?B drift direction toward the upper X-point) field directions. Upper single null exhibits an inboard-favored asymmetry in low heating power condition, while exhibits an outboard-favored asymmetry when increasing the heating power. Double null has the strongest in-out asymmetry in heat flux, favoring the outer divertor. The in-out asymmetry ratios of q{sub t,out}/q{sub t,in} and P{sub out}/P{sub total} increase with the power across the separatrix P{sub loss}, which is probably induced by the enhanced radial particle transport due to a large pressure gradient. The characteristics of the measured SOL parallel flow under various discharge conditions are consistent with the Pfirsch-Schlüter (PS) flow with the parallel Mach number M{sub ?} decreasing with the line averaged density but increasing with P{sub loss}, in the same direction as the PS flow. The contributions of both poloidal E×B drift and parallel flow on poloidal particle transport in SOL on EAST are also assessed.

  16. Numerical Model for Conduction-Cooled Current Lead Heat Loads

    SciTech Connect

    White, M.J.; Wang, X.L.; Brueck, H.D.; /DESY

    2011-06-10

    Current leads are utilized to deliver electrical power from a room temperature junction mounted on the vacuum vessel to a superconducting magnet located within the vacuum space of a cryostat. There are many types of current leads used at laboratories throughout the world; however, conduction-cooled current leads are often chosen for their simplicity and reliability. Conduction-cooled leads have the advantage of using common materials, have no superconducting/normal state transition, and have no boil-off vapor to collect. This paper presents a numerical model for conduction-cooled current lead heat loads. This model takes into account varying material and fluid thermal properties, varying thicknesses along the length of the lead, heat transfer in the circumferential and longitudinal directions, electrical power dissipation, and the effect of thermal intercepts. The model is validated by comparing the numerical model results to ideal cases where analytical equations are valid. In addition, the XFEL (X-Ray Free Electron Laser) prototype current leads are modeled and compared to the experimental results from testing at DESY's XFEL Magnet Test Stand (XMTS) and Cryomodule Test Bench (CMTB).

  17. Non-Destructive Testing of Bus-Bar Joints Powering LHC Superconducting Magnets, by Using Gamma Sources

    E-print Network

    Skoczen, B

    2004-01-01

    The main LHC superconducting magnets (dipoles and quadrupoles) use Rutherford type cables, stabilized electrically and thermally with copper profiles. The portions of cables are connected to each other by a soft soldering technique (Sn96Ag4) with an overlapping length corresponding to one pitch of the superconducting strands. The splice constitutes a "composite" structure with the interchanging layers of Sn96Ag4 and NbTi superconductor, located inside a Cu cage. In order to ensure a high level of reliability (failure probability not exceeding 10-8) for some 10000 connections in the LHC, a non-destructive technique to check the quantity of solder in the joint is foreseen. The technique is based on a gamma ray source (241Am) and the detection is position-sensitive in the transmission mode. Scintillating detectors of gamma rays are used and their accumulated length corresponds to the length of the radioactive source (120 mm). The method can be used in-situ, the equipment being optimized and portable, with implem...

  18. From Electrons Paired to Electric Power Delivered- A Personal Journey in Research and Applications of Superconductivity at IBM, EPRI, and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Paul

    2014-03-01

    This talk will reprise a personal journey by the speaker in industrial and applied physics, commencing with his employment by IBM at age 17 in the early 1950s, and continuing through his corporate sponsored undergraduate and graduate years at Clarkson and Harvard Universities, resulting in 1965 in a doctorate in applied physics from the latter. He was subsequently assigned by IBM to its research division in San Jose (now Almaden), where he initially carried out both pure and applied theoretical and experimental investigations encompassing a broad range of company-related product technologies...storage, display, printer and data acquisition hardware and software. In 1973, he undertook performing DFT and quantum Monte Carlo calculations in support of group research in the then emerging field of organic and polymer superconductors, a very esoteric pursuit at the time. Following upon several corporate staff assignments involving various product development and sales strategies, in 1982 he was appointed manager of the cooperative phenomena group in the Almaden Research Center, which beginning in early 1987, made significant contributions to both the basic science and applications of high temperature superconductivity (HTSC). In 1993, after a 40-year career, he retired from IBM to accept a Science Fellow position at the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) where he funded power application development of superconductivity. In 2004, he retired from his EPRI career to undertake ``due diligence'' consulting services in support of the venture capital community in Silicon Valley. As a ``hobby,'' he currently pursues and publishes DFT studies in hope of discovering the pairing mechanism of HTSC. In summary, the speaker's career in industrial and applied physics demonstrates one can combine publishing a record three PRLs in one month with crawling around underground in substations with utility lineman helping install superconducting cables, along the way publishing 10 patents, conducting numerous interviews with the national media, serving a sabbatical as visiting professor at the National University of Mexico, writing review articles, commentaries and book reviews for Scientific American, Physics World and Nature and, most importantly, having lots of fun at the end of the day!

  19. A "permanent" high-temperature superconducting magnet operated in thermal communication with a mass of solid nitrogen

    E-print Network

    Haid, Benjamin J. (Benjamin John Jerome), 1974-

    2001-01-01

    This thesis explores a new design for a portable "permanent" superconducting magnet system. The design is an alternative to permanent low-temperature superconducting (LTS) magnet systems where the magnet is cooled by a ...

  20. Application of Pulsed Electrical Fields for Advanced Cooling and Water Recovery in Coal-Fired Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Young Cho; Alexander Fridman

    2009-04-02

    The overall objective of the present work was to develop technologies to reduce freshwater consumption in a cooling tower of coal-based power plant so that one could significantly reduce the need of make-up water. The specific goal was to develop a scale prevention technology based an integrated system of physical water treatment (PWT) and a novel filtration method so that one could reduce the need for the water blowdown, which accounts approximately 30% of water loss in a cooling tower. The present study investigated if a pulsed spark discharge in water could be used to remove deposits from the filter membrane. The test setup included a circulating water loop and a pulsed power system. The present experiments used artificially hardened water with hardness of 1,000 mg/L of CaCO{sub 3} made from a mixture of calcium chloride (CaCl{sub 2}) and sodium carbonate (Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) in order to produce calcium carbonate deposits on the filter membrane. Spark discharge in water was found to produce strong shockwaves in water, and the efficiency of the spark discharge in cleaning filter surface was evaluated by measuring the pressure drop across the filter over time. Results showed that the pressure drop could be reduced to the value corresponding to the initial clean state and after that the filter could be maintained at the initial state almost indefinitely, confirming the validity of the present concept of pulsed spark discharge in water to clean dirty filter. The present study also investigated the effect of a plasma-assisted self-cleaning filter on the performance of physical water treatment (PWT) solenoid coil for the mitigation of mineral fouling in a concentric counterflow heat exchanger. The self-cleaning filter utilized shockwaves produced by pulse-spark discharges in water to continuously remove scale deposits from the surface of the filter, thus keeping the pressure drop across the filter at a relatively low value. Artificial hard water was used in the present fouling experiments for three different cases: no treatment, PWT coil only, and PWT coil plus self-cleaning filter. Fouling resistances decreased by 59-72% for the combined case of PWT coil plus filter compared with the values for no-treatment cases. SEM photographs showed much smaller particle sizes for the combined case of PWT coil plus filter as larger particles were continuously removed from circulating water by the filter. The x-ray diffraction data showed calcite crystal structures for all three cases.

  1. Space applications of superconductivity - High field magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fickett, F. R.

    1979-01-01

    The paper discusses developments in superconducting magnets and their applications in space technology. Superconducting magnets are characterized by high fields (to 15T and higher) and high current densities combined with low mass and small size. The superconducting materials and coil design are being improved and new high-strength composites are being used for magnet structural components. Such problems as maintaining low cooling temperatures (near 4 K) for long periods of time and degradation of existing high-field superconductors at low strain levels can be remedied by research and engineering. Some of the proposed space applications of superconducting magnets include: cosmic ray analysis with magnetic spectrometers, energy storage and conversion, energy generation by magnetohydrodynamic and thermonuclear fusion techniques, and propulsion. Several operational superconducting magnet systems are detailed.

  2. Analysis of N-16 concentration in primary cooling system of AP1000 power reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohanda, Anis; Waris, Abdul

    2015-04-01

    Nitrogen-16 (N-16) is one of the radiation safety parameter on the primary reactor system. The activation product, N-16, is the predominant contributor to the activity in the reactor coolant system during reactor operation. N-16 is activation product derived from activation of O-16 with fast neutron based on 16O(n,p)16N reaction. Thus study is needed and it performs to determine N-16 concentration in reactor coolant (primary coolant) in supporting radiation safety. One of the way is using analytical methode based on activation and redecay princip to obtain N-16 concentration. The analysis was performed on the configuration basis and operational of Westinghouse AP1000 power reactor in several monitoring points at coolant reactor system. The results of the calculation of N-16 concentration at the core outlet, reactor vessel outlet, pressurizer line, inlet and outlet of steam generators, primary pumps, reactor vessels inlet and core inlet are: 281, 257, 255, 250, 145, 142, 129 and 112 µCi/gram respectively. The results of analysis compared with AP1000 design control document as standard values. The verification showed very high accuracy comparation between analytical results and standard values.

  3. Analysis of N-16 concentration in primary cooling system of AP1000 power reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Rohanda, Anis; Waris, Abdul

    2015-04-16

    Nitrogen-16 (N-16) is one of the radiation safety parameter on the primary reactor system. The activation product, N-16, is the predominant contributor to the activity in the reactor coolant system during reactor operation. N-16 is activation product derived from activation of O-16 with fast neutron based on {sup 16}O(n,p){sup 16}N reaction. Thus study is needed and it performs to determine N-16 concentration in reactor coolant (primary coolant) in supporting radiation safety. One of the way is using analytical methode based on activation and redecay princip to obtain N-16 concentration. The analysis was performed on the configuration basis and operational of Westinghouse AP1000 power reactor in several monitoring points at coolant reactor system. The results of the calculation of N-16 concentration at the core outlet, reactor vessel outlet, pressurizer line, inlet and outlet of steam generators, primary pumps, reactor vessels inlet and core inlet are: 281, 257, 255, 250, 145, 142, 129 and 112 µCi/gram respectively. The results of analysis compared with AP1000 design control document as standard values. The verification showed very high accuracy comparation between analytical results and standard values.

  4. Internet Based, GIS Catalog of Non-Traditional Sources of Cooling Water for Use at America's Coal-Fired Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    J. Daniel Arthur

    2011-09-30

    In recent years, rising populations and regional droughts have caused coal-fired power plants to temporarily curtail or cease production due to a lack of available water for cooling. In addition, concerns about the availability of adequate supplies of cooling water have resulted in cancellation of plans to build much-needed new power plants. These issues, coupled with concern over the possible impacts of global climate change, have caused industry and community planners to seek alternate sources of water to supplement or replace existing supplies. The Department of Energy, through the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is researching ways to reduce the water demands of coal-fired power plants. As part of the NETL Program, ALL Consulting developed an internet-based Catalog of potential alternative sources of cooling water. The Catalog identifies alternative sources of water, such as mine discharge water, oil and gas produced water, saline aquifers, and publicly owned treatment works (POTWs), which could be used to supplement or replace existing surface water sources. This report provides an overview of the Catalog, and examines the benefits and challenges of using these alternative water sources for cooling water.

  5. Implications of Climate Change on the Heat Budget of Lentic Systems Used for Power Station Cooling: Case Study Clinton Lake, Illinois.

    PubMed

    Quijano, Juan C; Jackson, P Ryan; Santacruz, Santiago; Morales, Viviana M; García, Marcelo H

    2016-01-01

    We use a numerical model to analyze the impact of climate change-in particular higher air temperatures-on a nuclear power station that recirculates the water from a reservoir for cooling. The model solves the hydrodynamics, the transfer of heat in the reservoir, and the energy balance at the surface. We use the numerical model to (i) quantify the heat budget in the reservoir and determine how this budget is affected by the combined effect of the power station and climate change and (ii) quantify the impact of climate change on both the downstream thermal pollution and the power station capacity. We consider four different scenarios of climate change. Results of simulations show that climate change will reduce the ability to dissipate heat to the atmosphere and therefore the cooling capacity of the reservoir. We observed an increase of 25% in the thermal load downstream of the reservoir, and a reduction in the capacity of the power station of 18% during the summer months for the worst-case climate change scenario tested. These results suggest that climate change is an important threat for both the downstream thermal pollution and the generation of electricity by power stations that use lentic systems for cooling. PMID:26556581

  6. Superconducting magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Willen, E.; Dahl, P.; Herrera, J.

    1985-01-01

    This report provides a self-consistent description of a magnetic field in the aperture of a superconducting magnet and details how this field can be calculated in a magnet with cos theta current distribution in the coils. A description of an apparatus that can be used to measure the field uniformity in the aperture has been given. Finally, a detailed description of the magnet being developed for use in the Superconducting Super Collider is given. When this machine is built, it will be by far the largest application of superconductivity to date and promises to make possible the experimental discoveries needed to understand the basic laws of nature governing the world in which we live.

  7. Superconductive articles

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, X.D.; Muenchausen, R.E.

    1991-12-31

    An article of manufacture including a substrate, a patterned interlayer of magnesium oxide, barium-titanium oxide or barium-zirconium oxide, the patterned interlayer material overcoated with a secondary interlayer material of yttria-stabilized zirconia or magnesium-aluminum oxide, upon the surface of the substrate whereby an intermediate article with an exposed surface of both the overcoated patterned interlayer and the substrate is formed, a coating of a buffer layer selected from the group consisting of oxides of Ce, Y, Cm, Dy, Er, Eu, Fe, Gd, Ho, In, La, Mn, Lu, Nd, Pr, Pu, Sm, Tb, Tl, Tm, Y, and Yb over the entire exposed surface of the intermediate article, and, a ceramic superconductive material layer as an overcoat upon the buffer layer whereby the ceramic superconductive material situated directly above the substrate has a crystal structure substantially different than the ceramic superconductive material situated above the overcoated patterned interlayer.

  8. Ultrasensitive graphene far-infrared power detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKitterick, C. B.; Prober, D. E.; Vora, H.; Du, X.

    2015-04-01

    We describe the properties of ultrasensitive graphene photon detectors for use in the far-infrared/terahertz spectral region and present theoretical predictions for their power detection sensitivity. These predictions are based on two graphene contacting schemes with superconducting contacts: contacts with a thin insulating barrier, and direct superconducting contacts. To quantitatively assess these predictions, we perform thermal measurements of graphene at low temperatures and analyse them to extract information on electron-phonon cooling in graphene. These new results for the electron-phonon cooling channel allow reliable prediction of the noise equivalent power (NEP) that can be expected from an optimized graphene detector, using measurement of the Johnson noise emission as the thermometry method. We find that an NEP of 2 × 10-19 W Hz-1/2 should be achievable under certain biasing conditions with an ideal device.

  9. Improved temperature retrieval methods for the validation of a hydrodynamic simulation of a partially frozen power plant cooling lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casterline, May V.; Salvaggio, Carl; Garrett, Alfred J.; Bartlett, Brent D.; Faulring, Jason W.; Salvaggio, Philip S.

    2010-05-01

    The ALGE code is a hydrodynamic model developed by Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to derive the power output levels of an electric generation facility from observing the associated cooling pond with an aerial imaging platform. Over the past two years work has been completed to extend the capabilities of the model to incorporate snow and ice as possible phenomena in the modeled environment. In order to validate the extension of the model, intensive ground truth data as well as high-resolution aerial infrared imagery were collected during the winters of 2008-2009 and 2009-2010, for a combined eight months of data collection. Due to the harsh and extreme environmental conditions automatic data collection instruments were designed and deployed. Based on experience gained during the first collection season and equipment design failures, overhauls in the design and operation of the automated data collection buoys were performed. In addition, a more thorough and robust twofold calibration technique was implemented within the aerial imaging chain to assess the accuracy of the retrieved surface temperatures. By design, the calibration method employed in this application uses ground collected, geolocated water surface temperatures and in-flight blackbody imagery to produce accurate temperature maps of the pond in interest. A sensitivity analysis was implemented within the data reduction technique to produce accurate sensor reaching temperature values using designed equipment and methods for temperature retrieval at the water's surface.

  10. Cooling Capacity Optimization: Calculation of Hardening Power of Aqueous Solution Based on Poly(N-Vinyl-2-Pyrrolidone)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koudil, Z.; Ikkene, R.; Mouzali, M.

    2013-11-01

    Polymer quenchants are becoming increasingly popular as substitutes for traditional quenching media in hardening metallic alloys. Water-soluble organic polymer offers a number of environmental, economic, and technical advantages, as well as eliminating the quench-oil fire hazard. The close control of polymer quenchant solutions is essential for their successful applications, in order to avoid the defects of structure of steels, such as shrinkage cracks and deformations. The aim of the present paper is to evaluate and optimize the experimental parameters of polymer quenching bath which gives the best behavior quenching process and homogeneous microstructure of the final work-piece. This study has been carried out on water-soluble polymer based on poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone) PVP K30, which does not exhibit inverse solubility phenomena in water. The studied parameters include polymer concentration, bath temperature, and agitation speed. Evaluation of cooling power and hardening performance has been measured with IVF SmartQuench apparatus, using standard ISO Inconel-600 alloy. The original numerical evaluation method has been introduced in the computation software called SQ Integra. The heat transfer coefficients were used as input data for calculation of microstructural constituents and the hardness profile of cylindrical sample.

  11. Status of the plasma generator of the superconducting proton linaca)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronberger, M.; Faircloth, D.; Lettry, J.; Paoluzzi, M.; Pereira, H.; Arias, J. Sanchez; Schmitzer, C.; Scrivens, R.

    2012-02-01

    In the framework of the superconducting proton linac (SPL) study at CERN, a new non-cesiated H- plasma generator driven by an external 2 MHz RF antenna has been developed and successfully operated at repetition rates of 50 Hz, pulse lengths of up to 3 ms, and average RF powers of up to 3 kW. The coupling efficiency of RF power into the plasma was determined by the cooling water temperatures and the analysis of the RF forward and reflected power and the antenna current and amounts to 50%-60%. The plasma resistance increases between 10 kW and 40 kW RF power from about 0.45 ? to 0.65 ?. Measurements of RF power dissipated in the ferrites and the magnets on a test bench show a 5-fold decrease of the power losses for the magnets when they are contained in a Cu box, thus validating the strategy of shielding the magnets with a high electrical conductivity material. An air cooling system was installed in the SPL plasma generator to control the temperatures of the ferrites despite hysteresis losses of several Watts.

  12. Status of the plasma generator of the superconducting proton linac.

    PubMed

    Kronberger, M; Faircloth, D; Lettry, J; Paoluzzi, M; Pereira, H; Sanchez Arias, J; Schmitzer, C; Scrivens, R

    2012-02-01

    In the framework of the superconducting proton linac (SPL) study at CERN, a new non-cesiated H(-) plasma generator driven by an external 2 MHz RF antenna has been developed and successfully operated at repetition rates of 50 Hz, pulse lengths of up to 3 ms, and average RF powers of up to 3 kW. The coupling efficiency of RF power into the plasma was determined by the cooling water temperatures and the analysis of the RF forward and reflected power and the antenna current and amounts to 50%-60%. The plasma resistance increases between 10 kW and 40 kW RF power from about 0.45 ? to 0.65 ?. Measurements of RF power dissipated in the ferrites and the magnets on a test bench show a 5-fold decrease of the power losses for the magnets when they are contained in a Cu box, thus validating the strategy of shielding the magnets with a high electrical conductivity material. An air cooling system was installed in the SPL plasma generator to control the temperatures of the ferrites despite hysteresis losses of several Watts. PMID:22380212

  13. Status of the plasma generator of the superconducting proton linac

    SciTech Connect

    Kronberger, M.; Lettry, J.; Paoluzzi, M.; Pereira, H.; Arias, J. Sanchez; Schmitzer, C.; Scrivens, R.; Faircloth, D.

    2012-02-15

    In the framework of the superconducting proton linac (SPL) study at CERN, a new non-cesiated H{sup -} plasma generator driven by an external 2 MHz RF antenna has been developed and successfully operated at repetition rates of 50 Hz, pulse lengths of up to 3 ms, and average RF powers of up to 3 kW. The coupling efficiency of RF power into the plasma was determined by the cooling water temperatures and the analysis of the RF forward and reflected power and the antenna current and amounts to 50%-60%. The plasma resistance increases between 10 kW and 40 kW RF power from about 0.45 {Omega} to 0.65 {Omega}. Measurements of RF power dissipated in the ferrites and the magnets on a test bench show a 5-fold decrease of the power losses for the magnets when they are contained in a Cu box, thus validating the strategy of shielding the magnets with a high electrical conductivity material. An air cooling system was installed in the SPL plasma generator to control the temperatures of the ferrites despite hysteresis losses of several Watts.

  14. COOL-IT: A HEAT EXCHANGER SYSTEM TO PROVIDE GASEOUS HELIUM AT INTERMEDIATE TEMPERATURES FOR SRF LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Pattalwar, S. M.; Bate, R.

    2010-04-09

    ALICE, a prototype accelerator developed at the Daresbury laboratory UK, has successfully demonstrated the energy-recovery technique by circulating the electron beam to more than 20 MeV. At the heart of ALICE is a superconducting linac operating at 2 K. At high average-current operation the performance of Superconducting RF (SRF) cavities suffer from instabilities due to the generation of higher-order modes (HOM) as well as microphonics. HOMs are extracted out of the cavities using HOM absorbers operating at 80 K. This, however, increases the demand for cooling power at intermediate temperatures, i.e. at 80 K and 5 K, by more than an order of magnitude.In order to provide this extra cooling capacity with gaseous helium a new cryogenic system, 'COOL-IT,'(System for cooling to intermediate temperatures) is being developed. It will provide two streams of helium gases at 80 K and 5 K. COOL-IT uses a set of heat exchangers cooled by liquid helium and liquid nitrogen to generate two cold streams. It will be integrated into the existing cryo-system for ALICE for automatic operation. This paper describes the COOL-IT system in detail.

  15. Fast superconducting magnetic field switch

    DOEpatents

    Goren, Yehuda (Mountain View, CA); Mahale, Narayan K. (The Woodlands, TX)

    1996-01-01

    The superconducting magnetic switch or fast kicker magnet is employed with electron stream or a bunch of electrons to rapidly change the direction of flow of the electron stream or bunch of electrons. The apparatus employs a beam tube which is coated with a film of superconducting material. The tube is cooled to a temperature below the superconducting transition temperature and is subjected to a constant magnetic field which is produced by an external dc magnet. The magnetic field produced by the dc magnet is less than the critical field for the superconducting material, thus, creating a Meissner Effect condition. A controllable fast electromagnet is used to provide a magnetic field which supplements that of the dc magnet so that when the fast magnet is energized the combined magnetic field is now greater that the critical field and the superconducting material returns to its normal state allowing the magnetic field to penetrate the tube. This produces an internal field which effects the direction of motion and of the electron stream or electron bunch. The switch can also operate as a switching mechanism for charged particles.

  16. Fast superconducting magnetic field switch

    DOEpatents

    Goren, Y.; Mahale, N.K.

    1996-08-06

    The superconducting magnetic switch or fast kicker magnet is employed with electron stream or a bunch of electrons to rapidly change the direction of flow of the electron stream or bunch of electrons. The apparatus employs a beam tube which is coated with a film of superconducting material. The tube is cooled to a temperature below the superconducting transition temperature and is subjected to a constant magnetic field which is produced by an external dc magnet. The magnetic field produced by the dc magnet is less than the critical field for the superconducting material, thus, creating a Meissner Effect condition. A controllable fast electromagnet is used to provide a magnetic field which supplements that of the dc magnet so that when the fast magnet is energized the combined magnetic field is now greater that the critical field and the superconducting material returns to its normal state allowing the magnetic field to penetrate the tube. This produces an internal field which effects the direction of motion and of the electron stream or electron bunch. The switch can also operate as a switching mechanism for charged particles. 6 figs.

  17. Fluid dynamics and heat transfer in superconducting equipment (2nd revised and enlarged edition)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miropol'Skii, Z. L.; Soziev, R. I.

    Research in the USSR on fluid dynamics and heat transfer in superconducting equipment is reviewed. The general topics addressed include: cryosytems for supplying superconducting equipment, low-temperature thermophysical properties of helium and materials of construction and methods of investigating heat transfer and hydrodynamics, hydrodynamics of the cooling system of superconducting devices. Also discussed are: heat transfer in submerged systems, forced-convection heat transfer in cryogens, transient heat transfer processes in superconducting equipment, heat transfer in a vacuum-shield insulation, a simplified method for calculating heat transfer in vacuum-shield thermal insulation, specifics of cooling and thermal insulation of devices using high-temperature superconducting materials.

  18. Design considerations of a pair of power leads for fast-cycling superconducting accelerator magnets operating at 2 Tesla and 100 kA

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Yuenian; Hays, Steven; Piekarz, Henryk; de Rijk, Gijsbert; Rossi, L.; /Fermilab /CERN

    2007-08-01

    Recently proposed injector accelerator, Low Energy Ring (LER) for the LHC and fast cycling accelerators for the proton drivers (SF-SPS at CERN and DSF-MR at Fermilab) require that a new magnet technology be developed. In support of this accelerator program, a pair of power leads needs to be developed to close the loop between the power supply and accelerator system. The magnet proposed to be used will be a modified transmission line magnet technology that would allow for accelerator quality magnetic field sweep of 2 T/s. The transmission line conductor will be using HTS technology and cooled with supercritical helium at 5 K. The power leads consist of two sections; upper one is a copper and lower section will be using HTS tapes. The accelerator magnet will be ramped to 100 kA in a second and almost immediately ramped down to zero in one second. This paper outlines the design considerations for the power leads to meet the operational requirements for the accelerator system. The power leads thermal analysis during the magnet powering cycle will be included.

  19. 10 CFR 50.46 - Acceptance criteria for emergency core cooling systems for light-water nuclear power reactors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., excluding the cladding surrounding the plenum volume, were to react. (4) Coolable geometry. Calculated changes in core geometry shall be such that the core remains amenable to cooling. (5) Long-term cooling... required by the long-lived radioactivity remaining in the core. (c) As used in this section: (1)...

  20. Superconducting magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This report discusses the following topics on superconducting magnets: D19B and -C: The next steps for a record-setting magnet; D20: The push beyond 10 T: Beyond D20: Speculations on the 16-T regime; other advanced magnets for accelerators; spinoff applications; APC materials development; cable and cabling-machine development; and high-{Tc} superconductor at low temperature.

  1. Concentrations of copper-binding proteins in livers of bluegills from the cooling lake at the H. B. Robinson Nuclear Power Station

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, F.L.; Lam, J.R.

    1982-05-01

    Bluegills collected from the cooling lake of the H.B. Robinson Nuclear Power Station near the effluent discharge, near the water intake to the cooling system, and from a control population in a local pond were examined for total copper in muscle and liver tissues and metalloproteins in different compartments of liver tissues. Much lower concentrations of copper were found in muscle than in liver tissue. Also, copper changes in the environment were reflected in liver but not in muscle tissue. Liver metalloproteins were separated into low molecular weight (LMW), intermediate molecular weight (IMW), and high molecular weight (HMW) protein fractions using high performance liquid chromatography. Large differences in kinds and quantities of metals associated with metalloproteins were found. Copper concentrations in the LMW proteins (metallothionein-like proteins) were highest in bluegills from the discharge site and lowest in those from the control pond. Evidence of overloading of the metallothionein-like protein detoxification system was found in bluegills at the discharge site. These data and that from related studies indicate that the labile copper released from the cooling system of the H.B. Robinson Nuclear Power Station may be implicated in the increased deformities and reduced reproductive capacity found in the bluegill population in the adjacent cooling lake.

  2. Superconducting magnets. Citations from NTIS data base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimherr, G. W.

    1980-10-01

    The cited reports discuss research on materials studies, theory, design and applications of superconducting magnets. Examples of applications include particle accelerators, MHD power generation, superconducting generators, nuclear fusion research devices, energy storage systems, and magnetic levitation. This updated bibliography contains 218 citations, 88 of which are new entries to the previous edition.

  3. Materials science challenges for high-temperature superconducting wire.

    PubMed

    Foltyn, S R; Civale, L; Macmanus-Driscoll, J L; Jia, Q X; Maiorov, B; Wang, H; Maley, M

    2007-09-01

    Twenty years ago in a series of amazing discoveries it was found that a large family of ceramic cuprate materials exhibited superconductivity at temperatures above, and in some cases well above, that of liquid nitrogen. Imaginations were energized by the thought of applications for zero-resistance conductors cooled with an inexpensive and readily available cryogen. Early optimism, however, was soon tempered by the hard realities of these new materials: brittle ceramics are not easily formed into long flexible conductors; high current levels require near-perfect crystallinity; and--the downside of high transition temperature--performance drops rapidly in a magnetic field. Despite these formidable obstacles, thousands of kilometres of high-temperature superconducting wire have now been manufactured for demonstrations of transmission cables, motors and other electrical power components. The question is whether the advantages of superconducting wire, such as efficiency and compactness, can outweigh the disadvantage: cost. The remaining task for materials scientists is to return to the fundamentals and squeeze as much performance as possible from these wonderful and difficult materials. PMID:17767181

  4. Scaling of divertor power footprint width in RF-heated type-III ELMy H-mode on the EAST superconducting tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Guo, H. Y.; Xu, G. S.; Liu, S. C.; Gan, K. F.; Wang, H. Q.; Gong, X. Z.; Liang, Y.; Zou, X. L.; Hu, J. S.; Chen, L.; Xu, J. C.; Liu, J. B.; Yan, N.; Zhang, W.; Chen, R.; Shao, L. M.; Ding, S.; Hu, G. H.; Feng, W.; Zhao, N.; Xiang, L. Y.; Liu, Y. L.; Li, Y. L.; Sang, C. F.; Sun, J. Z.; Wang, D. Z.; Ding, H. B.; Luo, G. N.; Chen, J. L.; Gao, X.; Hu, L. Q.; Wan, B. N.; Li, J.; the EAST Team

    2014-11-01

    Dedicated experiments for the scaling of divertor power footprint width have been performed in the ITER-relevant radio-frequency (RF)-heated H-mode scheme under the lower single null, double null and upper single null divertor configurations in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) under lithium wall coating conditioning. A strong inverse scaling of the edge localized mode (ELM)-averaged power fall-off width with the plasma current (equivalently the poloidal field) has been demonstrated for the attached type-III ELMy H-mode as ?q \\propto Ip-1.05 by various heat flux diagnostics including the divertor Langmuir probes (LPs), infra-red (IR) thermograph and reciprocating LPs on the low-field side. The IR camera and divertor LP measurements show that ?q,IR ? {?q,div{-LPs}}/{1.3}=1.15Bp,omp-1.25 , in good agreement with the multi-machine scaling trend during the inter-ELM phase between type-I ELMs or ELM-free enhanced D? (EDA). H-mode. However, the magnitude is nearly doubled, which may be attributed to the different operation scenarios or heating schemes in EAST, i.e., dominated by electron heating. It is also shown that the type-III ELMs only broaden the power fall-off width slightly, and the ELM-averaged width is representative for the inter-ELM period. Furthermore, the inverse Ip (Bp) scaling appears to be independent of the divertor configurations in EAST. The divertor power footprint integral width, fall-off width and dissipation width derived from EAST IR camera measurements follow the relation, ?int ? ?q + 1.64S, yielding ?_intEAST =(1.39+/- 0.03)?qEAST +(0.97+/- 0.35) mm . Detailed analysis of these three characteristic widths was carried out to shed more light on their extrapolation to ITER.

  5. ASTROMAG coil cooling study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maytal, Ben-Zion; Vansciver, Steven W.

    1990-01-01

    ASTROMAG is a planned particle astrophysics magnetic facility. Basically it is a large magnetic spectrometer outside the Earth's atmosphere for an extended period of time in orbit on a space station. A definition team summarized its scientific objectives assumably related to fundamental questions of astrophysics, cosmology, and elementary particle physics. Since magnetic induction of about 7 Tesla is desired, it is planned to be a superconducting magnet cooled to liquid helium 2 temperatures. The general structure of ASTROMAG is based on: (1) two superconducting magnetic coils, (2) dewar of liquid helium 2 to provide cooling capability for the magnets; (3) instrumentation, matter-anti matter spectrometer (MAS) and cosmic ray isotope spectrometer (CRIS); and (4) interfaces to the shuttle and space station. Many configurations of the superconducting magnets and the dewar were proposed and evaluated, since those are the heart of the ASTROMAG. Baseline of the magnet configuration and cryostat as presented in the phase A study and the one kept in mind while doing the present study are presented. ASTROMAG's development schedule reflects the plan of launching to the space station in 1995.

  6. Renovation of steam electric power plant cooling tower blowdown for non-potable reuse. Technical report 2 Sep 81-15 Jan 84

    SciTech Connect

    Osantowski, R.; Kane, J.; Geinopolos, A.

    1984-01-01

    Findings are presented of a nine month pilot plant study investigating non-potable reuse potential of electric power plant cooling tower blowdown. The two demineralizing technologies studies included reverse osmosis and electrodialysis. Pretreatment throughout the testing was performed using chemical softening/clarification and dual media filtration. During the investigation, about 4,000 operating hours were put on each of the two desalting technology membranes to obtain information on membrane life expectancy. The most promising treatment technologies which meet the make-up water quality requirements for reuse of the cooling tower blowdown in the tower recirculating water system, as determined by pilot treatment train performance, are discussed. Potential power plant water reuse applications have been identified along with the water quality and quantity requirements. Comparisons were then made to the treated blowdown quality achieved from each of the pilot process elements.

  7. Improving Vortex Generators to Enhance the Performance of Air-Cooled Condensers in a Geothermal Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Manohar S. Sohal

    2005-09-01

    This report summarizes work at the Idaho National Laboratory to develop strategies to enhance air-side heat transfer in geothermal air-cooled condensers such that it should not significantly increase pressure drop and parasitic fan pumping power. The work was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, NEDO (New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization) of Japan, Yokohama National University, and the Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur, India. A combined experimental and numerical investigation was performed to investigate heat transfer enhancement techniques that may be applicable to largescale air-cooled condensers such as those used in geothermal power applications. A transient heat transfer visualization and measurement technique was employed in order to obtain detailed distributions of local heat transfer coefficients on model fin surfaces. Pressure drop measurements were obtained for a variety of tube and winglet configurations using a single-channel flow apparatus that included four tube rows in a staggered array. Heat transfer and pressure drop measurements were also acquired in a separate multiple-tube row apparatus in the Single Blow Test Facility. In addition, a numerical modeling technique was developed to predict local and average heat transfer for these low-Reynolds number flows, with and without winglets. Representative experimental and numerical results were obtained that reveal quantitative details of local finsurface heat transfer in the vicinity of a circular tube with a single delta winglet pair downstream of the cylinder. Heat transfer and pressure-drop results were obtained for flow Reynolds numbers based on channel height and mean flow velocity ranging from 700 to 6500. The winglets were of triangular (delta) shape with a 1:2 or 1:3 height/length aspect ratio and a height equal to 90% of the channel height. Overall mean fin-surface heat transfer results indicate a significant level of heat transfer enhancement (in terms of Colburn j-factor) associated with deployment of the winglets with circular as well as oval tubes. In general, toe-in (common flow up) type winglets appear to have better performance than the toe-out (common flow down) type winglets. Comparisons of heat transfer and pressure drop results for the elliptical tube versus a circular tube with and without winglets are provided. During the course of their independent research, all of the researchers have established that about 10 to 30% enhancement in Colburn j-factor is expected. However, actual increase in heat transfer rate from a heat exchanger employing finned tubes with winglets may be smaller, perhaps on the order of 2 to 5%. It is also concluded that for any specific application, more full-size experimentation is needed to optimize the winglet design for a specific heat exchanger application. If in place of a circular tube, an oval tube can be economically used in a bundle, it is expected that the pressure drop across the tube bundle with the application of vortex generators (winglets) will be similar to that in a conventional circular tube bundle. It is hoped that the results of this research will demonstrate the benefits of applying vortex generators (winglets) on the fins to improve the heat transfer from the air-side of the tube bundle.

  8. Future development of large superconducting generators

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, S.K.; Mole, C.J.

    1989-03-01

    Large superconducting generators are being developed worldwide. The use of superconductors to reduce the electrical power dissipation in power equipment has been a technological possibility ever since the discovery of superconductivity, even though their use in power equipment remained an impractical dream for a long time. However, scientific and technological progress in superconductivity and cryogenics has brought this dream much closer to reality. Results obtained so far establish the technical feasibility of these machines. Analytical developments have been providing a sound basis for the design of superconducting machines and results of these design studies have shown improvements in power density of up to a factor of 10 higher than the power density for conventional machines. This paper describes the recently completed USA programs, the current foreign and USA programs, and then proposes a USA development program to maintain leadership in the field.

  9. Progress on Design and Construction of a MuCool Coupling Solenoid Magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.; Liu, Xiao Kun; Xu, FengYu; Li, S.; Pan, Heng; Wu, Hong; Guo, Xinglong; Zheng, ShiXian; Li, Derun; Virostek, Steve; Zisman, Mike; Green, M.A.

    2010-06-28

    The MuCool program undertaken by the US Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration is to study the behavior of muon ionization cooling channel components. A single superconducting coupling solenoid magnet is necessary to pursue the research and development work on the performance of high gradient, large size RF cavities immersed in magnetic field, which is one of the main challenges in the practical realization of ionization cooling of muons. The MuCool coupling magnet is to be built using commercial copper based niobium titanium conductors and cooled by two cryo-coolers with each cooling capacity of 1.5 W at 4.2 K. The solenoid magnet will be powered by using a single 300A power supply through a single pair of binary leads that are designed to carry a maximum current of 210A. The magnet is to be passively protected by cold diodes and resistors across sections of the coil and by quench back from the 6061 Al mandrel in order to lower the quench voltage and the hot spot temperature. The magnet is currently under construction. This paper presents the updated design and fabrication progress on the MuCool coupling magnet.

  10. Power-Law Fading of the Frustration Effect in a Periodic Rectangular Superconducting Network with Increasing Aspect Ratio 

    E-print Network

    Hu, Chia-Ren; CHEN, RL.

    1988-01-01

    VOLUME 37, NUMBER 13 1 MAY 1988 Power-law fading of the frnstration eS'ect in a periodic rectanlnlar snpercondncting neiwork with increasing aspect ratio Chia-Ren Hu and Raymond Lei Chen Department of Physics, Center for Theoretical Physics, Texas ASM... is in- creased. Various types of power-law behavior are found in the hmit of a/b~ ~, the most in- teresting one being that the slope discontinuities of T,q/T, 0 at rational (p/q) ilux quanta per unit cell approach zero according to the power law (a...

  11. Monitoring peak power and cooling energy savings of shade trees and white surfaces in the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) service area: Project design and preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    Akbari, H.; Bretz, S.; Hanford, J.; Rosenfeld, A.; Sailor, D.; Taha, H.; Bos, W.

    1992-12-01

    Urban areas in warm climates create summer heat islands of daily average intensity of 3--5{degrees}C, adding to discomfort and increasing air-conditioning loads. Two important factors contributing to urban heat islands are reductions in albedo (lower overall city reflectance) and loss of vegetation (less evapotranspiration). Reducing summer heat islands by planting vegetation (shade trees) and increasing surface albedos, saves cooling energy, allows down-sizing of air conditioners, lowers air-conditioning peak demand, and reduces the emission of CO{sub 2} and other pollutants from electric power plants. The focus of this multi-year project, jointly sponsored by SMUD and the California Institute for Energy Efficiency (CIEE), was to measure the direct cooling effects of trees and white surfaces (mainly roofs) in a few buildings in Sacramento. The first-year project was to design the experiment and obtain base case data. We also obtained limited post retrofit data for some sites. This report provides an overview of the project activities during the first year at six sites. The measurement period for some of the sites was limited to September and October, which are transitional cooling months in Sacramento and hence the interpretation of results only apply to this period. In one house, recoating the dark roof with a high-albedo coating rendered air conditioning unnecessary for the month of September (possible savings of up to 10 kWh per day and 2 kW of non-coincidental peak power). Savings of 50% relative to an identical base case bungalow were achieved when a school bungalow`s roof and southeast wall were coated with a high-albedo coating during the same period. Our measured data for the vegetation sites do not indicate conclusive results because shade trees were small and the cooling period was almost over. We need to collect more data over a longer cooling season in order to demonstrate savings conclusively.

  12. Development of a 4.5 K Pulse Tube Cryocooler for Superconducting Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nast, Ted; Olson, Jeff; Champagne, Patrick; Mix, Jack; Evtimov, Bobby; Roth, Eric; Collaco, Andre

    2008-03-01

    Lockheed Martin's (LM) Advanced Technology Center (ATC) has developed a four stage pulse tube cryocooler (stirling-type pulse tube system) to provide cooling at 4.5 K for superconducting digital electronics communications programs. These programs utilize superconducting niobium integrated circuits [1, 2]. A prior ATC 4 stage unit has provided cooling to 3.8 K. [3] The relatively high cooling loads for the present program led us to a new design which improves the 4.5 K power efficiency over prior systems. This design includes a unique pulse tube approach using both He-3 and He-4 working gas in two compression spaces. The compressor utilizes our standard moving magnet linear motor, clearance seal and flexure bearing system. The system is compact, lightweight and reliable and utilizes our aerospace cooler technology to provide unlimited lifetime. The unit is a proof of concept, but the construction is at an engineering model level. Follow on activities for improvements of performance and more compact packaging and future production for ground based communication systems is anticipated. This paper presents the experimental results at various cooling conditions. Primary results are shown for HYPRES cooling requirements and data is also included at lower cooling loads that may be required for future space missions. The system provides a maximum of 42 mW @ 4.5 K and a no load temperature of 3 K. The majority of this work was subcontracted by HYPRES and funded by the Army and Navy. A small part of this effort to obtain data at lower cooling loads (1-10 mW @ 4.5 K) was funded by LM internal funds.

  13. Quench Cooling Slow Cooling

    E-print Network

    Hasegawa, Shuji

    0.76 ML -!3 !3 !3 !3 !3 !3 !3 DW Domain Wall 18 19 DW -!3 DW Au 19 1.0 ML DW -!3 Fig. 1 c -!3 STM !3 !3 !3 !3 Fig. 1 d STM d !3 !3 LEED 19 20 -!3 650 DW 19 30 Slow Cooling DW 6 6 18 19 Fig. 1 a 6 6 STM 6 6 6 6 -!3 Fig. 1 b a 6 6 6 6 650 Quench Cooling -!3 DW 2 -!3 2 6 6 Fig. 1. (a) A filled

  14. Superconducting Spintronics

    E-print Network

    Linder, Jacob; Robinson, Jason W. A.

    2015-04-02

    that the inverse proximity effect (the induction of ferromagnetic order inside the superconduc- tor) is responsible for this phenomenon. A variation of Tc on dF requires the measurement of multiple samples but controlling Tc through the relative orientation... seriously the role of the magnetic vector potential in the prox- imity effect. We also note that the electromagnetic effect of stray fields in SF structures have been experimentally shown to offer an interesting way to control superconductivity [110...

  15. The cryogenic system for ITER CC superconducting conductor test facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Jinqing; Wu, Yu; Liu, Huajun; Shi, Yi; Chen, Jinglin; Ren, Zhibin

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the cryogenic system of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Correction Coils (CC) test facility, which consists of a 500 W/4.5 K helium refrigerator, a 50 kA superconducting transformer cryostat (STC) and a background field magnet cryostat (BFMC). The 500 W/4.5 K helium refrigerator synchronously produces both the liquid helium (LHe) and supercritical helium (SHe). The background field magnet and the primary coil of the superconducting transformer (PCST) are cooled down by immersing into 4.2 K LHe. The secondary Cable-In-Conduit Conductor (CICC) coil of the superconducting transformer (SCST), superconducting joints and the testing sample of ITER CC are cooled down by forced-flow supercritical helium. During the commissioning experiment, all the superconducting coils were successfully translated into superconducting state. The background field magnet was fully cooled by immersing it into 4.2 K LHe and generated a maximal background magnetic field of 6.96 T; the temperature of transformer coils and current leads was reduced to 4.3 K; the inlet temperature of SHe loop was 5.6 K, which can meet the cooling requirements of CIC-Conductor and joint boxes. It is noted that a novel heat cut-off device for High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) binary current leads was introduced to reduce the heat losses of transformer cryostat.

  16. High temperature superconducting fault current limiter

    DOEpatents

    Hull, J.R.

    1997-02-04

    A fault current limiter for an electrical circuit is disclosed. The fault current limiter includes a high temperature superconductor in the electrical circuit. The high temperature superconductor is cooled below its critical temperature to maintain the superconducting electrical properties during operation as the fault current limiter. 15 figs.

  17. High temperature superconducting fault current limiter

    DOEpatents

    Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL)

    1997-01-01

    A fault current limiter (10) for an electrical circuit (14). The fault current limiter (10) includes a high temperature superconductor (12) in the electrical circuit (14). The high temperature superconductor (12) is cooled below its critical temperature to maintain the superconducting electrical properties during operation as the fault current limiter (10).

  18. US Navy superconductivity program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubser, Donald U.

    1991-01-01

    Both the new high temperature superconductors (HTS) and the low temperature superconductors (LTS) are important components of the Navy's total plan to integrate superconductivity into field operational systems. Fundamental research is an important component of the total Navy program and focuses on the HTS materials. Power applications (ship propulsion) use LTS materials while space applications (millimeter wave electronics) use HTS materials. The Space Experiment to be conducted at NRL will involve space flight testing of HTS devices built by industry and will demonstrate the ability to engineer and space qualify these devices for systems use. Another important component of the Navy's effort is the development of Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometers. This program will use LTS materials initially, but plans to implement HTS materials as soon as possible. Hybrid HTS/LTS systems are probable in many applications. A review of the status of the Navy's HTS materials research is given as well as an update on the Navy's development efforts in superconductivity.

  19. Navy superconductivity efforts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubser, D. U.

    1990-01-01

    Both the new high temperature superconductors (HTS) and the low temperature superconductors (LTS) are important components of Navy's total plan to integrate superconductivity into field operational systems. Fundamental research is an important component of the total Navy program and focuses on the HTS materials. Power applications (ship propulsion, etc.) use LTS materials while space applications (MMW electronics, etc.) use HTS materials. The Space Experiment being conducted at NRL will involve space flight testing of HTS devices built by industry and will demonstrate the ability to engineer and space qualify these devices for systems use. Another important component of the Navy's effort is the development of Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometers. This program will use LTS materials initially, but plans to implement HTS materials as soon as possible. Hybrid HTS/LTS systems are probable in many applications. A review of the status of the Navy's HTS materials research is given as well as an update on the Navy's development efforts in superconductivity, with particular emphasis on the related SDIO sponsored program on HTS applications.

  20. Superconducting flux flow digital circuits

    DOEpatents

    Hietala, V.M.; Martens, J.S.; Zipperian, T.E.

    1995-02-14

    A NOR/inverter logic gate circuit and a flip flop circuit implemented with superconducting flux flow transistors (SFFTs) are disclosed. Both circuits comprise two SFFTs with feedback lines. They have extremely low power dissipation, very high switching speeds, and the ability to interface between Josephson junction superconductor circuits and conventional microelectronics. 8 figs.