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Sample records for copolymer thermoplastic vulcanizates

  1. Thermoplastic vulcanizates: new materials of choice.

    PubMed

    Severyns, K

    2000-03-01

    Increasingly, thermoplastic vulcanizates of ethylene propylene diene monomer rubber-polypropylene are being specified for medical applications. This article describes their properties and advantages over thermoset rubbers and other conventional medical elastomeric materials. PMID:10915490

  2. Thermoplastic nanoclay-modified vulcanizates based on polypropylene and nitrile-butadiene rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volfson, Svetoslav I.; Okhotina, Natalya A.; Nigmatullina, Alina I.; Panfilova, Olga A.

    2014-05-01

    Thermoplastic vulcanizates based on polypropylene and nitrile-butadiene rubber, containing modified organoclay were developed. It was shown that composites containing 1 to 5 pbw of Cloisite 15A montmorillonite added to rubber show improved physical-mechanical characteristics. Their swelling degree in AI-92 and motor oil was determined. The swelling degree of composites in petrol and motor oil decreases substantially, by 20-63%, due to the introduction of Cloisite 15A montmorillonite. Modification of thermoplastic vulcanizates using layered silicates raised the degradation onset temperature and decreases weight loss upon high temperature heating.

  3. Fly ash reinforced thermoplastic vulcanizates obtained from waste tire powder.

    PubMed

    Sridhar, V; Xiu, Zhang Zhen; Xu, Deng; Lee, Sung Hyo; Kim, Jin Kuk; Kang, Dong Jin; Bang, Dae-Suk

    2009-03-01

    Novel thermoplastic composites made from two major industrial and consumer wastes, fly ash and waste tire powder, have been developed. The effect of increasing fly ash loadings on performance characteristics such as tensile strength, thermal, dynamic mechanical and magnetic properties has been investigated. The morphology of the blends shows that fly ash particles have more affinity and adhesion towards the rubbery phase when compared to the plastic phase. The fracture surface of the composites shows extensive debonding of fly ash particles. Thermal analysis of the composites shows a progressive increase in activation energy with increase in fly ash loadings. Additionally, morphological studies of the ash residue after 90% thermal degradation shows extensive changes occurring in both the polymer and filler phases. The processing ability of the thermoplastics has been carried out in a Monsanto processability testing machine as a function of shear rate and temperature. Shear thinning behavior, typical of particulate polymer systems, has been observed irrespective of the testing temperatures. Magnetic properties and percolation behavior of the composites have also been evaluated. PMID:18838261

  4. Finite element analysis as a design tool for thermoplastic vulcanizate glazing seals

    SciTech Connect

    Gase, K.M.; Hudacek, L.L.; Pesevski, G.T.

    1998-12-31

    There are three materials that are commonly used in commercial glazing seals: EPDM, silicone and thermoplastic vulcanizates (TPVs). TPVs are a high performance class of thermoplastic elastomers (TPEs), where TPEs have elastomeric properties with thermoplastic processability. TPVs have emerged as materials well suited for use in glazing seals due to ease of processing, economics and part design flexibility. The part design and development process is critical to ensure that the chosen TPV provides economics, quality and function in demanding environments. In the design and development process, there is great value in utilizing dual durometer systems to capitalize on the benefits of soft and rigid materials. Computer-aided design tools, such as Finite Element Analysis (FEA), are effective in minimizing development time and predicting system performance. Examples of TPV glazing seals will illustrate the benefits of utilizing FEA to take full advantage of the material characteristics, which results in functional performance and quality while reducing development iterations. FEA will be performed on two glazing seal profiles to confirm optimum geometry.

  5. Influence of different crosslinking systems on the mechanical and morphological properties of thermoplastic vulcanizates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patermann, Simone; Altstädt, Volker

    2015-05-01

    Thermoplastic vulcanizates (TPVs) combine the elastic properties of thermoset cross-linked rubbers with the melt processability of thermoplastics. The most representative examples of this class are the TPVs based on polypropylene (PP) and ethylene-propylene-diene terpolymer rubber (EPDM). The PP/EPDM blends were produced by dynamic vulcanization in a continuous extrusion process. The influence of different crosslinking systems was studied with regard to cross-link density, compression set, tensile strength/elongation at break and morphology. With increasing peroxide concentration, the cross-link density increases, leading to a reduction of the compression set by 50 %. The same improvement is only reachable with twice the concentration of phenolic resin. Only the peroxide cross-linked blends show smaller dispersed EPDM particles with increasing peroxide concentration. With a peroxide concentration between 0.2 and 0.5 wt. %, a maximum in tensile strength and elongation at break was found. For the phenolic resin cross-linked blends, the tensile strength stays almost constant with increasing phenolic resin concentration and the elongation at break shows best results at 0.5 wt. % phenolic resin. Compared to batch processes, the results show different values, but comparable trends.

  6. New understanding of microstructure formation of the rubber phase in thermoplastic vulcanizates (TPV).

    PubMed

    Wu, Hanguang; Tian, Ming; Zhang, Liqun; Tian, Hongchi; Wu, Youping; Ning, Nanying

    2014-03-21

    The breakup of the rubber phase in an ethylene-propylene-diene monomer (EPDM)/polypropylene (PP) blend at the early stage of dynamic vulcanization is similar to that in an unvulcanized EPDM/PP blend because of the low crosslink density of the EPDM phase. In this work, the minimum size of the rubber phase in the unvulcanized EPDM/PP blend was first calculated by using the critical breakup law of viscoelastic droplets in a matrix. The calculated results showed that the minimum size of the rubber phase in the unvulcanized blend was in the nanometer scale (25-46 nm), not the micrometer scale as reported in many works. Meanwhile, the actual size of the rubber phase in the thermoplastic vulcanizate (TPV) at both the early stage and the final stage of dynamic vulcanization was observed by using peak force tapping atomic force microscopy (PF-AFM). The results indicated that the EPDM phase indeed broke up into nanoparticles at the early stage of dynamic vulcanization, in good agreement with the calculated results. More interestingly, we first revealed that the micrometer-sized rubber particles commonly observed in TPV were actually the agglomerates of rubber nanoparticles with diameters between 40 and 60 nm. The mechanism for the formation of rubber nanoparticles and their agglomerates during dynamic vulcanization was then discussed. Our work provides guidance to control the microstructure of the rubber phase in TPV to prepare high performance TPV products for a wide range of applications in the automobile and electronic industries. PMID:24652229

  7. Fully biobased and supertough polylactide-based thermoplastic vulcanizates fabricated by peroxide-induced dynamic vulcanization and interfacial compatibilization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guang-Chen; He, Yi-Song; Zeng, Jian-Bing; Li, Qiu-Tong; Wang, Yu-Zhong

    2014-11-10

    A fully biobased and supertough thermoplastic vulcanizate (TPV) consisting of polylactide (PLA) and a biobased vulcanized unsaturated aliphatic polyester elastomer (UPE) was fabricated via peroxide-induced dynamic vulcanization. Interfacial compatibilization between PLA and UPE took place during dynamic vulcanization, which was confirmed by gel measurement and NMR analysis. After vulcanization, the TPV exhibited a quasi cocontinuous morphology with vulcanized UPE compactly dispersed in PLA matrix, which was different from the pristine PLA/UPE blend, exhibiting typically phase-separated morphology with unvulcanized UPE droplets discretely dispersed in matrix. The TPV showed significantly improved tensile and impact toughness with values up to about 99.3 MJ/m(3) and 586.6 J/m, respectively, compared to those of 3.2 MJ/m(3) and 16.8 J/m for neat PLA, respectively. The toughening mechanisms under tensile and impact tests were investigated and deduced as massive shear yielding of the PLA matrix triggered by internal cavitation of VUPE. The fully biobased supertough PLA vulcanizate could serve as a promising alternative to traditional commodity plastics. PMID:25287757

  8. Thermoplastic vulcanizate nanocomposites based on polypropylene/ethylene propylene diene terpolymer (PP/EPDM) prepared by reactive extrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzadeh, Amin

    For this work, different grades of polypropylene-g-maleic anhydride polymers were chosen to elucidate the effect of compatibilizer on the nanoclay dispersion level in thermoplastic phase. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns along with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) micrographs confirmed that prepared PP nanocomposites ranged from intercalated structure to a coexistence of intercalated tactoids and exfoliated layers namely “partially exfoliated” nanocomposite. Among various factors affecting the compatibilizer performance, it is shown that only the relaxation behaviour of compatibilizer correlates directly with the nanocomposites characterization results; higher relaxation times of the compatibilizer are associated with better dispersion of nanoclay. To study the co-continuity development of the nonreactive blends, EPDM and the mentioned PP nanocomposites at various compositions were melt blended using an internal mixer. Based on continuity measurements of TPEs and TPE nanocomposites for both thermoplastic and rubber phase, it is shown that the presence of nanoclay decreases the co-continuity composition range and alters its symmetrical feature. However, this effect is more pronounced in the intercalated nanocomposites than in partially exfoliated nanocomposites. It seems that better nanoclay dispersion limits the reduction of the thermoplastic phase continuity in a manner that the continuity index of the thermoplastic phase for partially exfoliated TPE nanocomposite prepared at high EPDM content (i.e. at 70 wt%) is greater than that of corresponding TPE without nanoclay. According to these results, it is possible to shift to higher EPDM content using partially exfoliated system before formation of matrix-dispersed particle structure which limits thermoplastic vulcanizate production. This should be mentioned that gamma irradiation was carried out in order to fix the EPDM morphology to estimate the continuity of PP

  9. Polypropylene/natural rubber thermoplastic vulcanizates by eco-friendly and sustainable electron induced reactive processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Manas; Gohs, Uwe; Wagenknecht, Udo; Heinrich, Gert

    2013-07-01

    TPVs are a special class of thermoplastic and elastomer blend where cross-linking of elastomeric phase takes place during melt mixing process known as dynamic vulcanization (DV). A 50/50 blend of natural rubber (NR) and polypropylene (PP) were dynamically vulcanized using Electron Induced Reactive Processing (EIReP) as a function of absorbed dose (150, 250, and 350 kGy) at fixed electron energy (1.5 MeV) and dose per rotation. Different methods like tensile test, DSC, melt rheology, and SEM have been employed to understand the structure-property relationship of the prepared samples. The results suggest that EIReP is a novel technique to offer handful of additional features without compromising the end user property.

  10. In situ reactive compatibilization of polypropylene/ethylene-propylene-diene monomer thermoplastic vulcanizate by zinc dimethacrylate via peroxide-induced dynamic vulcanization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yukun; Xu, Chuanhui; Liang, Xingquan; Cao, Liming

    2013-09-12

    This work demonstrates an approach of in situ reactive compatibilization between polypropylene (PP) and ethylene-propylene-diene monomer (EPDM) by using zinc dimethacrylate (ZDMA) as a compatibilizer and, simultaneously, as a very strong reinforcing agent. With the incorporation of 7phr ZDMA in the PP/EPDM (30/70, w/w) thermoplastic vulcanizate (TPV), the tensile strength, tear strength, elongation at break, and hardness of PP/EPDM/ZDMA TPV were increased from 5.3 MPa, 31.3 kN/m, 222%, and 78 up to 11.2 MPa, 64.2 kN/m, 396%, and 83, respectively. This tremendous reinforcing as well as the compatibilization effect of the ZDMA was understood by polymerization of ZDMA and ZDMA reacted with EPDM and PP during peroxide-induced dynamic vulcanization. A peculiar phase structure that rubber particles were surrounded and "bonded" by a thick transition zone that contained numerous of nanoparticles with dimensions of about 20-30 nm was observed from transmission electron microscopy. Scanning electron microscopy results confirmed that incorporation of ZDMA reduced the size of the cross-linked EPDM particles. Moreover, we found that the compatibilized TPV showed a higher tan δ peak temperature for EPDM phase and a lower tan δ peak temperature for PP phase. The suggested method for in situ reactive compatibilization of PP and EPDM offers routes to the design of new TPV-based technical products for diversified applications. PMID:23981036

  11. Supertoughened Biobased Poly(lactic acid)-Epoxidized Natural Rubber Thermoplastic Vulcanizates: Fabrication, Co-continuous Phase Structure, Interfacial in Situ Compatibilization, and Toughening Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Youhong; Chen, Kunling; Xu, Chuanhui; Chen, Yukun

    2015-09-10

    In the presence of dicumyl peroxide (DCP), biobased thermoplastic vulcanizates (TPVs) composed of poly(lactic acid) (PLA) and epoxidized natural rubber (ENR) were prepared through dynamic vulcanization. Interfacial in situ compatibilization between PLA and ENR phases was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). A novel "sea-sea" co-continuous phase in the PLA/ENR TPVs was observed through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and differed from the typical "sea-island" morphology that cross-linked rubber particles dispersed in plastic matrix. A sharp, brittle-ductile transition occurred with 40 wt % of ENR, showing a significantly improved impact strength of 47 kJ/m(2), nearly 15 times that of the neat PLA and 2.6 times that of the simple blend with the same PLA/ENR ratio. Gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) results suggested that a certain amount of DCP was consumed in the PLA phase, causing a slight cross-linking or branching of PLA molecules. the effects of various DCP contents on the impact property were investigated. The toughening mechanism under impact testing was researched, and the influence factors for toughening were discussed. PMID:26301924

  12. Recent Developments on Thermoplastic Elastomers by Dynamic Vulcanization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babu, R. Rajesh; Naskar, Kinsuk

    A comprehensive overview is given of the recent developments of thermoplastic vulcanizates (TPVs) with special reference to the technological advancements. TPVs combine the high volume molding capability of thermoplastics with the elastomeric properties of thermoset rubber. Therefore, they lend themselves to a broad range of applications in various fields. TPVs represent the second largest group of soft thermoplastic elastomers, after styrenic-based block copolymers. TPVs have undergone evolutionary changes in terms of the selection of polymers, design of crosslinking, compounding techniques, and methods of production, and have achieved better elastic recovery, easy processability and low hardness etc.

  13. Lignin-derived thermoplastic co-polymers and methods of preparation

    DOEpatents

    Naskar, Amit K.; Saito, Tomonori; Pickel, Joseph M.; Baker, Frederick S.; Eberle, Claude Clifford; Norris, Robert E.; Mielenz, Jonathan Richard

    2014-06-10

    The present invention relates to a crosslinked lignin comprising a lignin structure having methylene or ethylene linking groups therein crosslinking between phenyl ring carbon atoms, wherein said crosslinked lignin is crosslinked to an extent that it has a number-average molecular weight of at least 10,000 g/mol, is melt-processible, and has either a glass transition temperature of at least 100.degree. C., or is substantially soluble in a polar organic solvent or aqueous alkaline solution. Thermoplastic copolymers containing the crosslinked lignin are also described. Methods for producing the crosslinked lignin and thermoplastic copolymers are also described.

  14. Thermoplastic rubber comprising ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer, asphalt and fluxing oil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendel, F. J. (Inventor)

    1970-01-01

    A thermoplastic rubber is made from a mixture of between about 10 percent and about 50 percent of asphalt, between about 5 percent and about 30 percent fluxing oil, and between about 35 percent and about 70 percent of a copolymer of polyethylene and vinyl acetate.

  15. Thermoplastic Adhesives based on polyolefin and olefinic copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Rituparna

    2014-03-01

    H.B. Fuller has been a leading global industrial adhesive manufacturer for over 125 years. It is a company with a rich history of consistently delivering adhesive innovations for enhancing product performance in the market place. H.B. Fuller technologies/products find application in several markets including packaging, personal hygiene and nonwovens, durable assembly and electronics. In this presentation, H. B. Fuller's technology innovation journey will be shared with emphasis on groundbreaking technologies/products based on polyolefin and olefin copolymers.

  16. Injection molding of thermoplastic elastomers for microstructured substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkar, Smita

    Amorphous and semi-crystalline thermoplastic polymers have been widely investigated for injection molding of parts with microstructured surfaces. Microstructured surfaces injection molded from thermoplastic elastomers have emerging applications as superhydrobic surfaces and patterned adhesives, but there is a limited understanding of the factors affecting replication with these materials. This research was a continued investigation of block copolymer thermoplastic elastomers as well as the first in-depth examination of thermoplastic vulcanizates for injection molding microfeatures. The first focus of this research was the interactions between tooling aspect ratio and feature orientation (negative and positive tooling) and thermoplastic elastomer hard segment content on microfeature replication. Electroformed nickel tooling having positive and negative features with different geometries and aspect ratios of 0.02:1 to 2:1 were molded from three copolyester thermoplastic elastomers with similar chemistry and different hardness values. The tooling and part features were characterized for feature depth and height as well as feature definition using scanning electron microscopy and optical profilometry. Results were correlated with elastomer properties. In the second parts of this research, the effects of microfeature spacing on the replication of thermoplastic elastomer features was investigated using micropillars with two diameters (10 and 20 mum) and three spacing ratios (0.5:1, 1:1, and 2:1). The tooling and part features were characterized for feature depth and height as well as feature definition using scanning electron microscopy and optical profilometry. Feature spacing significantly affected the replication of micropillars using a thermoplastic elastomer. This replication was competition between cooling and pressurization of the melt. Wider spacing between smaller features allowed cooling in the tooling lands to dominate the feature filling. Higher pressures did

  17. New blends of ethylene-butyl acrylate copolymers with thermoplastic starch. Characterization and bacterial biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Morro, A; Catalina, F; Corrales, T; Pablos, J L; Marin, I; Abrusci, C

    2016-09-20

    Ethylene-butyl acrylate copolymer (EBA) with 13% of butyl acrylate content was used to produce blends with 10, 30 and 60% of thermoplastic starch (TPS) plasticized with glycerol. Ethylene-acrylic acid copolymer (EAA) was used as compatibilizer at 20% content with respect to EBA. The blends were characterized by X-ray diffraction, ATR-Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), water-Contact Angle measurements (CA), Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Stress-strain mechanical tests. Initiated autoxidation of the polymer blends was studied by chemiluminescence (CL) confirming that the presence of the polyolefin-TPS interphase did not substantially affect the oxidative thermostability of the materials. Three bacterial species have been isolated from the blend films buried in soil and identified as Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus borstelensis and Bacillus licheniformis. Biodegradation of the blends (28days at 45°C) was evaluated by carbon dioxide measurement using the indirect impedance technique. PMID:27261731

  18. Combination of magnetic and enhanced mechanical properties for copolymer-grafted magnetite composite thermoplastic elastomers.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Feng; Zhang, Yaqiong; Wang, Zhongkai; Wang, Wentao; Xu, Zhaohua; Wang, Zhigang

    2015-05-20

    Composite thermoplastic elastomers (CTPEs) of magnetic copolymer-grafted nanoparticles (magnetite, Fe3O4) were synthesized and characterized to generate magnetic CTPEs, which combined the magnetic property of Fe3O4 nanoparticles and the thermoplastic elasticity of the grafted amorphous polymer matrix. Fe3O4 nanoparticles served as stiff, multiple physical cross-linking points homogeneously dispersed in the grafted poly(n-butyl acrylate-co-methyl methacrylate) rubbery matrix synthesized via the activators regenerated by electron transfer for atom transfer radical polymerization method (ARGET ATRP). The preparation technique for magnetic CTPEs opened a new route toward developing a wide spectrum of magnetic elastomeric materials with strongly enhanced macroscopic properties. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used to measure the glass transition temperatures, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was used to examine thermal stabilities of these CTPEs. The magnetic property could be conveniently tuned by adjusting the content of Fe3O4 nanoparticles in CTPEs. Compared to their linear copolymers, these magnetic CTPEs showed significant increases in tensile strength and elastic recovery. In situ small-angle X-ray scattering measurement was conducted to reveal the microstructural evolution of CTPEs during tensile deformation. PMID:25954980

  19. Thermoplastic biodegradable elastomers based on ε-caprolactone and L-lactide block co-polymers: a new synthetic approach.

    PubMed

    Lipik, Vitali T; Kong, Jen Fong; Chattopadhyay, Sujay; Widjaja, Leonardus K; Liow, Sing S; Venkatraman, Subbu S; Abadie, Marc J M

    2010-11-01

    Although biodegradable polymers have found extensive application in medical devices, there are very few commercially available elastomeric biodegradable polymers. In this work, starting with the well-known monomers L-lactide and ε-caprolactone, we developed elastomers using a multiblock co-polymer approach. This ensures that the degradation products of such elastomers are also acceptable from a cytotoxicity standpoint. A series of polymers with various structures was synthesized utilizing a design of experiment approach. The basic structure is that of a diblock, with each block being modified by the addition of co-monomer. The synthesized polymers exhibited a range of mechanical properties from a typical thermoplastic polymer to that approaching a good thermoplastic elastomer. 13C nuclear magnetic resonance analysis, size exclusion chromatography and differential scanning calorimetry measurements have been utilized to relate the observed range of mechanical properties to the structure. In addition, the elastomeric nature has been established with the use of creep and recovery measurements. Such elastomers may find a variety of biomedical applications, ranging from stent coatings to atrial septal defect occluders. PMID:20566308

  20. Self-Consistent Field Theory for the Design of Thermoplastic Elastomers from Miktoarm Block Copolymer - Homopolymer Blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Andrew Lawrence

    We have used self-consistent field theory to study the morphological characteristics of blends of miktoarm block copolymers and homopolymers. More specifically, we have studied the effects of segregation strength, miktoarm block copolymer composition, and homopolymer size and volume fraction on the phase diagrams of these systems. A15 domains with discrete A-monomer spherical domains were found to be stable with A-monomer loading fractions of at least as high as 52%. Hexagonally-packed cylindrical domains were found to be stable at A-monomer loadings of at least as high as 72%. These findings represent a significant improvement from the loading fractions of 43% and 60% reported by Lynd et al. for spherical and cylindrical domains in neat miktoarm block copolymers, respectively. It is also quite possible that even greater loading fractions are achievable in systems too large for our simulations. These results predict exciting new materials for next-generation thermoplastic elastomers, since the ideal TPE has a large loading of A monomers in discrete, crystalline or glassy domains, surrounded by a continuous matrix of elastomeric B domains. Additionally, we have performed SCFT simulations modelled after experimental blends of polystyrene and polyisoprene-based miktoarm block copolymers and homopolymers. Certain experimental samples showed fascinating new "bricks and mortar" phases and swollen asymmetric lamellar phases. In both cases, the A domains are highly swollen with homopolymer, forcing the miktoarm block copolymer to segregate near the interface and adopt the role of a surfactant. The resulting structures maintain separate A and B domains, but lack long-range order. While it is not possible to study these mesophases using SCFT, since they lack long-range order and therefore well-defined symmetry, our SCFT results show the onset of macrophase separation at similar homopolymer loadings, for both the bricks and mortar phases and the highly swollen lamellae. This

  1. Heat shrinkability of electron-beam-modified thermoplastic elastomeric films from blends of ethylene-vinylacetate copolymer and polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, S.; Chaki, T. K.; Bhowmick, Anil K.

    2000-11-01

    The heat shrinkability of electron-beam-irradiated thermoplastic elastomeric films from blends of ethylene-vinylacetate copolymer (EVA) and low-density polyethylene (LDPE) has been investigated in this paper. The effects of temperature, time and extent of stretching and shrinkage temperature and time have been reported. Based on the above data, the optimized conditions in terms of high heat shrinkage and low amnesia rating have been evaluated. Influence of radiation doses (0-500 kGy), multifunctional sensitizer levels (ditrimethylol propane tetraacrylate, DTMPTA), and blend proportions on heat shrinkability has been explained with the help of gel fraction and X-ray data. With the increase in radiation dose, gel fraction increases, which in turn gives rise to low values of heat shrinkage and amnesia rating. At a constant radiation dose and blend ratio, percent heat shrinkage is found to decrease with increase in DTMPTA level. Gel content increases with the increase in EVA content of the blend at a constant radiation dose and monomer level, giving rise to decrease in heat shrinkability. Heat shrinkage increases with the increase in percent crystallinity, although the amnesia rating follows the reverse trend.

  2. Investigation into the structure-property relationship and technical properties of TPEs and TPVs derived from ethylene octene copolymer (EOC) and polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS) rubber blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padmanabhan, R.; Naskar, Kinsuk; Nando, Golok B.

    2015-10-01

    This work focuses on the study of thermoplastic vulcanizates based on ethylene octene copolymer (EOC) and poly dimethyl siloxane (PDMS) rubber prepared by melt mixing technique using dicumyl peroxide (DCP). It is found that the addition of peroxide causes crosslinking in both the phases. However, crosslinking without affecting the crystallinity of the EOC polymer leads to tremendous improvement in the mechanical properties, including the tensile strength which has improved by nearly 60%. For better understanding about the crosslinking characteristics of thermoplastic vulcanizates (TPVs), significant correlation has been made between the vulcanized network and the physico-mechanical properties. Further, the dynamic mechanical properties and creep behavior of these thermoplastic elastomers (TPEs) and TPVs have also been studied. It is inferred that the TPVs show a 19% decrease in the creep compliance, i.e. higher creep resistance compared to uncrosslinked blends. Subsequently, the morphology of the blends before and after vulcanization shows a decrease in the spherical PDMS domains from 0.8 μm to > 0.4 μm. Ageing and reprocessing studies of the prepared TPVs also show better physico-mechanical properties even after reprocessing twice. Thus, the prepared TPVs may have tremendous applications in automobile sectors.

  3. Deformational characteristics of thermoplastic elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indukuri, Kishore K.

    This thesis focuses primarily on the structure-property relationships of poly (styrene-ethylene-butylene-styrene) triblock copolymer TPEs. First evidence for strain-induced crystallization occurring in certain SEBS block copolymers has been established using unique techniques like deformation calorimetry, combined in-situ small angle X-ray and wide angle X-ray diffraction (SAXD/WAXD). Also the ramifications of such strain-induced crystallization on the mechanical properties like cyclic hysteresis, stress relaxation/creep retention of these SEBS systems have been studied. In addition, the structural changes in the morphology of these systems on deformation have been investigated using combined SAXD/WAXD setup. Small angle X-ray diffraction probed the changes at the nano-scale of polystyrene (PS) cylinders, while wide angle X-ray diffraction probed the changes at molecular length scales of the amorphous/crystalline domains of the elastomeric mid-block in these systems. New structural features at both these length scales have been observed and incorporated into the overall deformation mechanisms of the material. Continuous processing techniques like extrusion have been used to obtain ultra long-range order and orientation in these SEBS systems. Thus well ordered crystal like hexagonal packing of cylinders, where in each element in this hexagonal lattice can be individually addressed without any grain boundaries can be realized using these robust techniques. The effect of long-range order/orientation on the mechanical properties has been studied. In addition, these well ordered systems serve as model systems for evaluating deformation mechanisms of these SEBS systems, where the relative contributions of each of the phases can be estimated. EPDM/i-PP thermoplastic vulcanizates (TPVs) have micron size scale phase separated morphologies of EPDM rubber dispersed in a semicrystalline i-PP matrix as a result of the dynamic vulcanization process. Confocal microscopy studies

  4. Neutron absorbing room temperature vulcanizable silicone rubber compositions

    DOEpatents

    Zoch, Harold L.

    1979-11-27

    A neutron absorbing composition comprising a one-component room temperature vulcanizable silicone rubber composition or a two-component room temperature vulcanizable silicone rubber composition in which the composition contains from 25 to 300 parts by weight based on the base silanol or vinyl containing diorganopolysiloxane polymer of a boron compound or boron powder as the neutron absorbing ingredient. An especially useful boron compound in this application is boron carbide.

  5. Thermoplastic rubberlike material produced at low cost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendel, F. J.

    1966-01-01

    Thermoplastic rubberlike material is prepared by blending a copolymer of ethylene and vinyl acetate with asphalt and a petroleum distillate. This low cost material is easily molded or extruded and is compatible with a variety of fillers.

  6. Basic physical properties/structure of polystyrene-polyisobutylene-polystyrene triblock copolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Kaszas, G.

    1993-12-31

    Polystyrene-b-polyisobutylene-b-polystyrene (PSt-PIB-PSt) triblock copolymers, with various molecular architectures, have been synthesized to establish basic physical properties/structure correlations for this novel thermoplastics elastomer (TPE). The test results have confirmed that these triblock copolymers have a unique combination of physical properties which is currently unavailable on the TPE market. The fully saturated character of the PIB backbone provides excellent ozone resistance. Barrier, electrical, and low-temperature properties, were measured, and found to be equivalent to those of conventional butyl vulcanizates. The low initial modules of PIB, and the fact that the PSt content can be kept low without significant loss in tensile properties, renders the material soft. The high incompatibility of PIB and PSt allows the overall chain length and, therefore, the melt viscosity, to be kept low. This could bring an important advantage, in processing, over other TPE`s. The combination of the above properties, and the inherent properties of PIB, makes this material in excellent candidate for wire and cable coating, seal and gasket, adhesive and vibration damping applications.

  7. Tough, Soluble, Aromatic, Thermoplastic Copolyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Tough, soluble, aromatic, thermoplastic copolyimides were prepared by reacting 4,4'-oxydiphthalic anhydride, 3,4,3',4'-biphenyltetracarboxylic dianhydride and 3,4'-oxydianiline. These copolyimides were found to be soluble in common amide solvents such as N,N'-dimethyl acetamide, N-methylpyrrolidinone, and dimethylformamide allowing them to be applied as the fully imidized copolymer and to be used to prepare a wide range of articles.

  8. The role of water on the structure and mechanical properties of a thermoplastic natural block co-polymer from squid sucker ring teeth.

    PubMed

    Rieu, Clément; Bertinetti, Luca; Schuetz, Roman; Salinas-Zavala, Cesar Ca; Weaver, James C; Fratzl, Peter; Miserez, Ali; Masic, Admir

    2016-01-01

    Hard biological polymers exhibiting a truly thermoplastic behavior that can maintain their structural properties after processing are extremely rare and highly desirable for use in advanced technological applications such as 3D-printing, biodegradable plastics and robust composites. One exception are the thermoplastic proteins that comprise the sucker ring teeth (SRT) of the Humboldt jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas). In this work, we explore the mechanical properties of reconstituted SRT proteins and demonstrate that the material can be re-shaped by simple processing in water and at relatively low temperature (below 100 °C). The post-processed material maintains a high modulus in the GPa range, both in the dry and the wet states. When transitioning from low to high humidity, the material properties change from brittle to ductile with an increase in plastic deformation, where water acts as a plasticizer. Using synchrotron x-ray scattering tools, we found that water mostly influences nano scale structure, whereas at the molecular level, the protein structure remains largely unaffected. Furthermore, through simultaneous in situ x-ray scattering and mechanical tests, we show that the supramolecular network of the reconstituted SRT material exhibits a progressive alignment along the strain direction, which is attributed to chain alignment of the amorphous domains of SRT proteins. The high modulus in both dry and wet states, combined with their efficient thermal processing characteristics, make the SRT proteins promising substitutes for applications traditionally reserved for petroleum-based thermoplastics. PMID:27588938

  9. Microscale Patterning of Thermoplastic Polymer Surfaces by Selective Solvent Swelling

    PubMed Central

    Rahmanian, Omid; Chen, Chien-Fu; DeVoe, Don L.

    2012-01-01

    A new method for the fabrication of microscale features in thermoplastic substrates is presented. Unlike traditional thermoplastic microfabrication techniques, in which bulk polymer is displaced from the substrate by machining or embossing, a unique process termed orogenic microfabrication has been developed in which selected regions of a thermoplastic surface are raised from the substrate by an irreversible solvent swelling mechanism. The orogenic technique allows thermoplastic surfaces to be patterned using a variety of masking methods, resulting in three-dimensional features that would be difficult to achieve through traditional microfabrication methods. Using cyclic olefin copolymer as a model thermoplastic material, several variations of this process are described to realize growth heights ranging from several nanometers to tens of microns, with patterning techniques include direct photoresist masking, patterned UV/ozone surface passivation, elastomeric stamping, and noncontact spotting. Orogenic microfabrication is also demonstrated by direct inkjet printing as a facile photolithography-free masking method for rapid desktop thermoplastic microfabrication. PMID:22900539

  10. Drying Thermoplastics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    In searching for an improved method of removing water from polyester type resins without damaging the materials, Conair Inc. turned to the NASA Center at the University of Pittsburgh for assistance. Taking an organized, thorough look at existing technology before beginning research has helped many companies save significant time and money. They searched the NASA and other computerized files for microwave drying of thermoplastics. About 300 relevant citations were retrieved - eight of which were identified as directly applicable to the problem. Company estimates it saved a minimum of a full year in compiling research results assembled by the information center.

  11. Development of Internal Fine Structure in Stretched Rubber Vulcanizates

    SciTech Connect

    M Tosaka; S Toki; J Che; L Rong; B Hsiao

    2011-12-31

    Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) pattern and tensile stress during relaxation of stretched rubber vulcanizates (synthetic polyisoprene) were measured simultaneously at room temperature and at 0 C. The samples were quickly stretched to the prefixed strain and then allowed to relax for 1 h. In every SAXS pattern, the intensity distribution was elongated along the equator, indicating the formation of structures elongated in the stretching direction. The so-called two-spots pattern corresponding to the long period of stacked lamellar crystals did not appear even when the critical strain to induce crystallization was exceeded. On the other hand, even below the critical strain, additional development of equatorial streaks was detected in the differential SAXS patterns. This result suggests the growth of the density fluctuation elongated in the stretching direction, which is not directly related to strain-induced crystallization.

  12. Dynamically cured thermoplastic olefin polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Hazelton, D.R.; Puydak, R.C.; Booth, D.A.

    1986-08-19

    A thermoplastic composition is described comprising a polyolefin resin, a first rubber component selected from the group consisting of polyisobutylene, and ethylene propylene copolymer (EPM) and EPDM and a second rubber component selected from the group consisting of halogenated butyl rubber and polychoroprene, the second rubber component being cured utilizing a curative other than a peroxide, which is a vulcanizing agent for the second rubber but not for the first rubber, the second rubber being cured to a fully vulcanized state by dynamic vulcanization in the presence of the polyolefin resin and first rubber compound.

  13. Polyisobutylene based thermoplastic elastomers. IV. Synthesis of poly(styrene-b-isobutylene-b-styrene) triblock copolymers usig n-butyl chloride as solvent

    SciTech Connect

    Fordor, Zs.; Faust, R.

    1995-12-31

    The polymerization of isobutylene and styrene was studied using the 2-chloro-2,4,4-trimethylpentane/TiCl{sub 4} initiating system in the presence of proton trap in halogenated hydrocarbons as solvents at {approximately}80{degrees}C. The polymerization of isobutylene was found to be living and both homopolymers were soluble in n-butyl chloride. However, side reactions, namely polymerization by direct initiation and intermolecular alkylation are operational in the polymerization of styrene in n-butyl chloride. Polymerization by direct initiation can be minimized by increasing the initiator concentration and intermolecular alkylation can be reduced by quenching the polymerization system when the conversion reaches {approximately}100%. Polystyrene-polyisobutylene-polystyrene triblock copolymers prepared by sequential monomer addition in n-butyl chloride exhibited {approximately}24 MPa tensile strength indicating the virtual absence of diblock contamination.

  14. Development of Lignin-Based Polyurethane Thermoplastics

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Tomonori; Perkins, Joshua H; Jackson, Daniel C; Trammell, Neil E; Hunt, Marcus A; Naskar, Amit K

    2013-01-01

    In our continued effort to develop value-added thermoplastics from lignin, here we report utilizing a tailored feedstock to synthesize mechanically robust thermoplastic polyurethanes at very high lignin contents (75 65 wt %). The molecular weight and glass transition temperature (Tg) of lignin were altered through cross-linking with formaldehyde. The cross-linked lignin was coupled with diisocyanate-based telechelic polybutadiene as a network-forming soft segment. The appearance of two Tg s, around 35 and 154 C, for the polyurethanes indicates the existence of two-phase morphology, a characteristic of thermoplastic copolymers. A calculated Flory-Huggins interaction parameter of 7.71 also suggests phase immiscibility in the synthesized lignin polyurethanes. An increase in lignin loading increased the modulus, and an increase in crosslink-density increased the modulus in the rubbery plateau region of the thermoplastic. This path for synthesis of novel lignin-based polyurethane thermoplastics provides a design tool for high performance lignin-based biopolymers.

  15. A nanostructured carbon-reinforced polyisobutylene-based thermoplastic elastomer.

    PubMed

    Puskas, Judit E; Foreman-Orlowski, Elizabeth A; Lim, Goy Teck; Porosky, Sara E; Evancho-Chapman, Michelle M; Schmidt, Steven P; El Fray, Mirosława; Piatek, Marta; Prowans, Piotr; Lovejoy, Krystal

    2010-03-01

    This paper presents the synthesis and characterization of a polyisobutylene (PIB)-based nanostructured carbon-reinforced thermoplastic elastomer. This thermoplastic elastomer is based on a self-assembling block copolymer having a branched PIB core carrying -OH functional groups at each branch point, flanked by blocks of poly(isobutylene-co-para-methylstyrene). The block copolymer has thermolabile physical crosslinks and can be processed as a plastic, yet retains its rubbery properties at room temperature. The carbon-reinforced thermoplastic elastomer had more than twice the tensile strength of the neat polymer, exceeding the strength of medical grade silicone rubber, while remaining significantly softer. The carbon-reinforced thermoplastic elastomer displayed a high T(g) of 126 degrees C, rendering the material steam-sterilizable. The carbon also acted as a free radical trap, increasing the onset temperature of thermal decomposition in the neat polymer from 256.6 degrees C to 327.7 degrees C. The carbon-reinforced thermoplastic elastomer had the lowest water contact angle at 82 degrees and surface nano-topography. After 180 days of implantation into rabbit soft tissues, the carbon-reinforced thermoplastic elastomer had the thinnest tissue capsule around the microdumbbell specimens, with no eosinophiles present. The material also showed excellent integration into bones. PMID:20034664

  16. Tough soluble aromatic thermoplastic copolyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Tough, soluble, aromatic, thermoplastic copolyimides were prepared by reacting 4,4'-oxydiphthalic anhydride, 3,4,3',4'-biphenyltetracarboxylic dianhydride and 3,4'-oxydianiline. Alternatively, these copolyimides may be prepared by reacting 4,4'-oxydiphthalic anhydride with 3,4,3',4'-biphenyltetracarboxylic dianhydride and 3,4'-oxydiisocyanate. Also, the copolyimide may be prepared by reacting the corresponding tetra acid and ester precursors of 4,4'-oxydiphthalic anhydride and 3,4,3',4'-biphenyltetracarboxylic dianhydride with 3,4'-oxydianiline. These copolyimides were found to be soluble in common amide solvents such as N,N'-dimethyl acetamide, N-methylpyrrolidinone, and dimethylformamide allowing them to be applied as the fully imidized copolymer and to be used to prepare a wide range of articles.

  17. Pen microfluidics: rapid desktop manufacturing of sealed thermoplastic microchannels

    PubMed Central

    Rahmanian, Omid

    2013-01-01

    A unique technique for the rapid fabrication of thermoplastic microfluidic chips is described. The method enables the realization of fully-sealed microchannels in around one hour while requiring only minimal infrastructure by taking advantage of a solvent swelling mechanism that allows raised features to be patterned on the surface of homogeneous thermoplastic materials. Patterning is achieved without photolithography by simply drawing the desired microchannel pattern onto the polymer surface using a suitable ink as a masking layer, either manually or under robotic control, followed by timed exposure to solvent vapor to yield a desired depth for the masked channel features. The channels are then permanently sealed through solvent bonding of the microchannel chip to a mating thermoplastic substrate. The process is demonstrated using cyclic olefin copolymer as a thermoplastic material, with fully operational microfluidic devices fabricated following a true desktop manufacturing model suitable for rapid prototyping. PMID:23344819

  18. Preparation of sulfonic acid-containing rubbers from natural rubber vulcanizates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poonsawat, Worapong; Poompradub, Sirilux; Ngamcharussrivichai, Chawalit

    2014-06-01

    In this work, a series of sulfonic acid-containing rubbers were prepared by aqueous phase oxidation of natural rubber vulcanizates in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and formic acid (HCOOH). The starting vulcanizates were neatly prepared via an efficient vulcanization (EV) system by varying mass ratio of N-cyclohexyl-2-benzothiazole sulfonamide (CBS), as an accelerator, to sulfur. The oxidation conditions were controlled at the molar ratio of H2O2: HCOOH = 1:1, the concentration of H2O2 = 15 wt.%, the temperature = 50 °C, and the reaction time = 3 h. The rubber materials before and after the oxidation were characterized for their physicochemical properties by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, bomb calorimetry, acid-base titration and swelling measurements. The results indicated the presence of sulfonic acid group in the oxidized rubbers, generated by the oxidative cleaves of sulfide crosslinks in the rubber vulcanizates. The oxidation decreased the sulfur content of the rubber in which the level of sulfur loss was determined by the CBS/sulfur ratio. Moreover, the acidity of the oxidized products was correlated with the amount of sulfur remaining.

  19. The network and properties of the NR/SBR vulcanizate modified by electron beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jing; Wen, Shipeng; Du, Yishi; Li, Ning; Zhang, Liqun; Yang, Yusheng; Liu, Li

    2013-11-01

    A natural rubber/styrene butadiene rubber (NR/SBR) vulcanizate filled with carbon black was modified by high-energy electron beam (EB) irradiation in this work. The crosslinked structure was studied by a special chemical probe method. The influence of EB irradiation on mechanical properties, filler network, and dynamic properties including abrasion resistance, rolling resistance, and wet skid resistance was also investigated. The results revealed that the crosslink structure significantly changed after EB treatment, indicating that the amount of poly- and di-sulfide crosslinked bonds decreased and that of mono-sulfide bonds increased. The polymer-filler interaction was enhanced after EB irradiation. An EB dose of 600 kGy reduced the abrasion loss of the NR/SBR vulcanizate, and one of 300 kGy reduced the rolling resistance by 11.4%. Meanwhile, EB doses below 200 kGy had no obvious effect on the wet skid resistance. This EB-modified NR/SBR vulcanizate can be used to prepare high-performance tires with good abrasion resistance and low rolling resistance.

  20. Segmented polyether-ester copolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Souffie, R.D.

    1982-08-01

    This article touches on the chemistry of manufacture and structure of thermoplastic elastomers. The physical properties and environmental resistance characteristics of these copolymers are related to their molecular makeup. Results indicate that segmented polyether esters, because of their basic chemical structure, are resistant to a wide range of oils, solvents and chemicals. They are also highly elastic, resilient polymers which can be both cost and performance effective when used in a number of industrial applications.

  1. Soft Semicrystalline Thermoplastic Elastomers by Arrested Crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Adam; Register, Richard

    2014-03-01

    Thermoplastic elastomers (TPEs) marry the solid-state behavior of vulcanized rubbers with the melt processability of thermoplastics. Archetypal soft TPEs consist of triblock copolymers comprising a rubbery mid-block flanked by two identical glassy end-blocks. Incorporating crystalline blocks into TPEs can confer solvent resistance as well as reduce the processing costs by giving access to single-phase melts. However, simply substituting crystalline for glassy end-blocks dramatically degrades the solid-state mechanical properties, particularly at large strains. We seek to integrate the benefits of crystallinity into TPEs, while maintaining the desired mechanical properties, using the block architecture: crystalline-glassy-rubbery-glassy-crystalline. Methods have been developed to synthesize highly symmetric, narrow-distribution block copolymers with this architecture using anionic polymerization of butadiene, styrene, and isoprene followed by hydrogenation. Judicious choices of block molecular weights indeed yield homogeneous melts above the melting point of the crystalline component. Upon cooling, crystallization--rather than interblock repulsion--establishes the solid-state microstructure which physically crosslinks the rubbery mid-block, ultimately conferring elasticity. Subsequent vitrification of the adjacent glassy blocks arrests the growth of the crystallites, and protects them from yielding under applied load. As a result, our materials show low initial moduli, strain hardening, and high extensibility, typical of commercial TPEs.

  2. Effect of silica nanoparticles on reinforcement of poly(phenylene ether) based thermoplastic elastomer.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Samik; Maiti, Parnasree; Krishnamoorthy, Kumar; Krishnamurthy, Raja; Menon, Ashok; Bhowmick, Anil K

    2008-04-01

    Reinforcement of a novel poly(phenylene ether) (PPE) based thermoplastic elastomer (TPE), i.e., styrene-ethylene-butylene-styrene (SEBS)/ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) and PPE-polystyrene (PS), was studied to develop a reinforced thermoplastic elastomer or thermoplastic vulcanizate (TPV). An effort was made to reinforce selectively the elastomeric dispersed phase of EVA by silica nanoparticles and silica sol-gel precursors, like alkoxy orthosilanes, using twin-screw extrusion and injection molding processes. Improvement of tensile strength and percent elongation at break was observed both with silica nanoparticles and tetraethoxy orthosilane (TEOS). Addition of TEOS transformed the dispersed EVA lamellar morphology into semispherical domains as a consequence of possible crosslinking. Soxhlet extraction was done on the silica and TEOS reinforced materials. The insoluble residues collected from both the silica and TEOS reinforced samples were analyzed in detail using both morphological and spectroscopic studies. This extensive study also provided an in-depth conceptual understanding of the PPE based TPE behavior upon reinforcement with silica nanoparticles and silica sol-gel precursors and the effect of reinforcement on recycling behavior. PMID:18572622

  3. Making Thermoplastics Flame-Resistant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, W. A.; Ingham, J. D.; Reilly, W. W.

    1984-01-01

    Inorganic hydrate-salt filler coated with elastomer containing acidic groups imparts flame and smoke retardancy to thermoplastics while preventing degradation of impact resistance that results from high filler loadings in thermoplastic.

  4. Welds in thermoplastic composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, N. S.

    Welding methods are reviewed that can be effectively used for joining of thermoplastic composites and continuous-fiber thermoplastics. Attention is given to the use of ultrasonic, vibration, hot-plate, resistance, and induction welding techniques. The welding techniques are shown to provide complementary weld qualities for the range of thermoplastic materials that are of interest to industrial and technological applications.

  5. Simple room temperature bonding of thermoplastics and poly(dimethylsiloxane).

    PubMed

    Sunkara, Vijaya; Park, Dong-Kyu; Hwang, Hyundoo; Chantiwas, Rattikan; Soper, Steven A; Cho, Yoon-Kyoung

    2011-03-01

    We describe a simple and versatile method for bonding thermoplastics to elastomeric polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) at room temperature. The bonding of various thermoplastics including polycarbonate (PC), cyclic olefin copolymer (COC), polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), and polystyrene (PS), to PDMS has been demonstrated at room temperature. An irreversible bonding was formed instantaneously when the thermoplastics, activated by oxygen plasma followed by aminopropyltriethoxysilane modification, were brought into contact with the plasma treated PDMS. The surface modified thermoplastics were characterized by water contact angle measurements and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The tensile strength of the bonded hybrid devices fabricated with PC, COC, PMMA, and PS was found to be 430, 432, 385, and 388 kPa, respectively. The assembled devices showed high burst resistance at a maximum channel pressure achievable by an in-house built syringe pump, 528 kPa. Furthermore, they displayed very high hydrolytic stability; no significant change was observed even after the storage in water at 37 °C over a period of three weeks. In addition, this thermoplastic-to-PDMS bonding technique has been successfully employed to fabricate a relatively large sized device. For example, a lab-on-a-disc with a diameter of 12 cm showed no leakage when it spins for centrifugal fluidic pumping at a very high rotating speed of 6000 rpm. PMID:21152492

  6. Lignin-Based Thermoplastic Materials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Kelley, Stephen S; Venditti, Richard A

    2016-04-21

    Lignin-based thermoplastic materials have attracted increasing interest as sustainable, cost-effective, and biodegradable alternatives for petroleum-based thermoplastics. As an amorphous thermoplastic material, lignin has a relatively high glass-transition temperature and also undergoes radical-induced self-condensation at high temperatures, which limits its thermal processability. Additionally, lignin-based materials are usually brittle and exhibit poor mechanical properties. To improve the thermoplasticity and mechanical properties of technical lignin, polymers or plasticizers are usually integrated with lignin by blending or chemical modification. This Review attempts to cover the reported approaches towards the development of lignin-based thermoplastic materials on the basis of published information. Approaches reviewed include plasticization, blending with miscible polymers, and chemical modifications by esterification, etherification, polymer grafting, and copolymerization. Those lignin-based thermoplastic materials are expected to show applications as engineering plastics, polymeric foams, thermoplastic elastomers, and carbon-fiber precursors. PMID:27059111

  7. UV-absorbent lignin-based multi-arm star thermoplastic elastomers.

    PubMed

    Yu, Juan; Wang, Jifu; Wang, Chunpeng; Liu, Yupeng; Xu, Yuzhi; Tang, Chuanbing; Chu, Fuxiang

    2015-02-01

    Lignin-grafted copolymers, namely lignin-graft-poly(methyl methacrylate-co-butyl acrylate) (lignin-g-P(MMA-co-BA)), are synthesized via "grafting from" atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) with the aid of lignin-based macroinitiators. By manipulating the monomer feed ratios of MMA/BA, grafted copolymers with tunable glass transition temperatures (-10-40 °C) are obtained. These copolymers are evaluated as sustainable thermoplastic elastomers (TPEs). The results suggest that the mechanical properties of these TPEs lignin-g-P(MMA-co-BA) copolymers are improved significantly by comparing with those of linear P(MMA-co-BA) copolymer counterparts, and the elastic strain recovery is nearly 70%. Lignin-g-P(MMA-co-BA) copolymers exhibit high absorption in the range of the UV spectrum, which might allow for applications in UV-blocking coatings. PMID:25545630

  8. 40 CFR 414.40 - Applicability; description of the thermoplastic resins subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the products classified under SIC 28213 thermoplastic resins including those resins and resin groups... Butyrates Cellulose Acetate Resin *Cellulose Acetates *Cellulose Acetates Propionates Cellulose Nitrate... Polymers Nylon 11 Resin *Nylon 6-66 Copolymers *Nylon 6—Nylon 11 Blends Nylon 6 Resin Nylon 612 Resin...

  9. 40 CFR 414.40 - Applicability; description of the thermoplastic resins subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the products classified under SIC 28213 thermoplastic resins including those resins and resin groups... Butyrates Cellulose Acetate Resin *Cellulose Acetates *Cellulose Acetates Propionates Cellulose Nitrate... Polymers Nylon 11 Resin *Nylon 6-66 Copolymers *Nylon 6—Nylon 11 Blends Nylon 6 Resin Nylon 612 Resin...

  10. 40 CFR 414.40 - Applicability; description of the thermoplastic resins subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the products classified under SIC 28213 thermoplastic resins including those resins and resin groups... Butyrates Cellulose Acetate Resin *Cellulose Acetates *Cellulose Acetates Propionates Cellulose Nitrate... Polymers Nylon 11 Resin *Nylon 6-66 Copolymers *Nylon 6—Nylon 11 Blends Nylon 6 Resin Nylon 612 Resin...

  11. 40 CFR 414.40 - Applicability; description of the thermoplastic resins subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the products classified under SIC 28213 thermoplastic resins including those resins and resin groups... Butyrates Cellulose Acetate Resin *Cellulose Acetates *Cellulose Acetates Propionates Cellulose Nitrate... Polymers Nylon 11 Resin *Nylon 6-66 Copolymers *Nylon 6—Nylon 11 Blends Nylon 6 Resin Nylon 612 Resin...

  12. 40 CFR 414.40 - Applicability; description of the thermoplastic resins subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the products classified under SIC 28213 thermoplastic resins including those resins and resin groups... Butyrates Cellulose Acetate Resin *Cellulose Acetates *Cellulose Acetates Propionates Cellulose Nitrate... Polymers Nylon 11 Resin *Nylon 6-66 Copolymers *Nylon 6—Nylon 11 Blends Nylon 6 Resin Nylon 612 Resin...

  13. Renewable-resource thermoplastic elastomers based on polylactide and polymenthide.

    PubMed

    Wanamaker, Carolyn L; O'Leary, Leslie E; Lynd, Nathaniel A; Hillmyer, Marc A; Tolman, William B

    2007-11-01

    An alpha,omega-functionalized polymenthide was synthesized by the ring-opening polymerization of menthide in the presence of diethylene glycol with diethyl zinc as the catalyst. Termination with water afforded the dihydroxy polymenthide. The reaction of this telechelic polymer with triethylaluminum formed the corresponding aluminum alkoxide macroinitiator that was used for the controlled polymerization of lactide to yield biorenewable polylactide-b-polymenthide-b-polylactide triblock copolymers. The molecular weight and chemical composition were easily adjusted by the monomer-to-initiator ratios. Microphase separation in these triblock copolymers was confirmed by small-angle X-ray scattering and differential scanning calorimetry. A representative triblock was prepared with a hexagonally packed cylindrical morphology as determined by small-angle X-ray scattering, and tensile testing was employed to assess the mechanical behavior. On the basis of the ultimate elongations and elastic recovery, these triblock copolymers behaved as thermoplastic elastomers. PMID:17960909

  14. Nucleobase-functionalized ABC triblock copolymers: self-assembly of supramolecular architectures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Keren; Fahs, Gregory B; Aiba, Motohiro; Moore, Robert B; Long, Timothy E

    2014-08-21

    RAFT polymerization afforded acrylic ABC triblock copolymers with self-complementary nucleobase-functionalized external blocks and a low-Tg soft central block. ABC triblock copolymers self-assembled into well-defined lamellar microphase-separated morphologies for potential applications as thermoplastic elastomers. Complementary hydrogen bonding within the hard phase facilitated self-assembly and enhanced mechanical performance. PMID:24984613

  15. A thermoplastic polyimidesulfone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, T. L.; Yamaki, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    A polymer system has been prepared which has the excellent thermoplastic properties generally associated with polysulfones, and the solvent resistance and thermal stability of aromatic polyimides. This material, with improved processability over the base polyimide, can be processed in the 260-325 C range in such a manner as to yield high quality, tough unfilled moldings; strong, high-temperature-resistant adhesive bonds; and well consolidated, graphite-fiber-reinforced moldings (composities). The unfilled moldings have physical properties that are similar to aromatic polysulfones which demonstrates the potential as an engineering thermoplastic. The adhesive bonds exhibit excellent retention of initial strength levels even after thermal aging for 5000 hours at 232 C. The graphite-fiber-reinforced moldings have mechanical properties which makes this polymer attractive for the fabrication of structural composites.

  16. High temperature thermoplastic elastomers synthesized by living anionic polymerization in hydrocarbon solvent at room temperature

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Schlegel, Ralf; Williams, Katherine; Voyloy, Dimitry; Steren, Carlos A.; Goodwin, Andrew; Coughlin, E. Bryan; Gido, Samuel; Beiner, Mario; Hong, Kunlun; Kang, Nam -Goo; et al

    2016-03-30

    We present the synthesis and characterization of a new class of high temperature thermoplastic elastomers composed of polybenzofulvene–polyisoprene–polybenzofulvene (FIF) triblock copolymers. All copolymers were prepared by living anionic polymerization in benzene at room temperature. Homopolymerization and effects of additives on the glass transition temperature (Tg) of polybenzofulvene (PBF) were also investigated. Among all triblock copolymers studied, FIF with 14 vol % of PBF exhibited a maximum stress of 14.3 ± 1.3 MPa and strain at break of 1390 ± 66% from tensile tests. The stress–strain curves of FIF-10 and 14 were analyzed by a statistical molecular approach using a nonaffinemore » tube model to estimate the thermoplastic elastomer behavior. Dynamic mechanical analysis showed that the softening temperature of PBF in FIF was 145 °C, much higher than that of thermoplastic elastomers with polystyrene hard blocks. Microphase separation of FIF triblock copolymers was observed by small-angle X-ray scattering, even though long-range order was not achieved under the annealing conditions employed. Additionally, the microphase separation of the resulting triblock copolymers was examined by atomic force microscopy.« less

  17. Reinforcement of SBR/waste rubber powder vulcanizate with in situ generated zinc dimethacrylate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X. P.; Cheng, B. K.; Zhang, X.; Jia, D. M.

    2016-07-01

    Methyl acrylic acid/zinc oxide (MAA/ZnO) was introduced to modify styrene- butadiene rubber/waste rubber powder (SBR/WRP) composites by blending. The enhanced mechanical properties and processing ability were presumably originated from improved compatibility and interfacial interaction between WRP and the SBR matrix by the in situ polymerization of zinc dimethacrylate (ZDMA). A refined interface of the modified SBR/WRP composite was observed by scanning electron microscopy. The formation of ZDMA significantly increased the ionic bond content in the vulcanizate, resulting in exceptional mechanical performance. The comprehensive mechanical properties including tensile strength, tear strength and dynamic heat-building performance reached optimum values with 16 phr MAA.

  18. Bonding thermoplastic polymers

    DOEpatents

    Wallow, Thomas I.; Hunter, Marion C.; Krafcik, Karen Lee; Morales, Alfredo M.; Simmons, Blake A.; Domeier, Linda A.

    2008-06-24

    We demonstrate a new method for joining patterned thermoplastic parts into layered structures. The method takes advantage of case-II permeant diffusion to generate dimensionally controlled, activated bonding layers at the surfaces being joined. It is capable of producing bonds characterized by cohesive failure while preserving the fidelity of patterned features in the bonding surfaces. This approach is uniquely suited to production of microfluidic multilayer structures, as it allows the bond-forming interface between plastic parts to be precisely manipulated at micrometer length scales. The bond enhancing procedure is easily integrated in standard process flows and requires no specialized equipment.

  19. THERMOPLASTIC WAVES IN MAGNETARS

    SciTech Connect

    Beloborodov, Andrei M.; Levin, Yuri E-mail: yuri.levin@monash.edu.au

    2014-10-20

    Magnetar activity is generated by shear motions of the neutron star surface, which relieve internal magnetic stresses. An analogy with earthquakes and faults is problematic, as the crust is permeated by strong magnetic fields which greatly constrain crustal displacements. We describe a new deformation mechanism that is specific to strongly magnetized neutron stars. The magnetically stressed crust begins to move because of a thermoplastic instability, which launches a wave that shears the crust and burns its magnetic energy. The propagating wave front resembles the deflagration front in combustion physics. We describe the conditions for the instability, the front structure, and velocity, and discuss implications for observed magnetar activity.

  20. Arylenesiloxane copolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breed, L. W.; Elliott, R. L.

    1967-01-01

    Arylenesiloxane copolymers with regularly ordered structures were discovered during efforts to develop organosilicon polymers. Arylenesilane and siloxane monomers were both synthesized in these experiments.

  1. Graphite fiber reinforced thermoplastic resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    Mechanical properties of neat resin samples and graphite fiber reinforced samples of thermoplastic resins were characterized with particular emphasis directed to the effects of environmental exposure (humidity, temperature and ultraviolet radiation). Tensile, flexural, interlaminar shear, creep and impact strengths were measured for polysulfone, polyarylsulfone and a state-of-the-art epoxy resin samples. In general, the thermoplastic resins exhibited environmental degradation resistance equal to or superior to the reference epoxy resin. Demonstration of the utility and quality of a graphite/thermoplastic resin system was accomplished by successfully thermoforming a simulated compressor blade and a fan exit guide vane.

  2. Multiple-length-scale deformation analysis in a thermoplastic polyurethane.

    PubMed

    Sui, Tan; Baimpas, Nikolaos; Dolbnya, Igor P; Prisacariu, Cristina; Korsunsky, Alexander M

    2015-01-01

    Thermoplastic polyurethane elastomers enjoy an exceptionally wide range of applications due to their remarkable versatility. These block co-polymers are used here as an example of a structurally inhomogeneous composite containing nano-scale gradients, whose internal strain differs depending on the length scale of consideration. Here we present a combined experimental and modelling approach to the hierarchical characterization of block co-polymer deformation. Synchrotron-based small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering and radiography are used for strain evaluation across the scales. Transmission electron microscopy image-based finite element modelling and fast Fourier transform analysis are used to develop a multi-phase numerical model that achieves agreement with the combined experimental data using a minimal number of adjustable structural parameters. The results highlight the importance of fuzzy interfaces, that is, regions of nanometre-scale structure and property gradients, in determining the mechanical properties of hierarchical composites across the scales. PMID:25758945

  3. Multiple-length-scale deformation analysis in a thermoplastic polyurethane

    PubMed Central

    Sui, Tan; Baimpas, Nikolaos; Dolbnya, Igor P.; Prisacariu, Cristina; Korsunsky, Alexander M.

    2015-01-01

    Thermoplastic polyurethane elastomers enjoy an exceptionally wide range of applications due to their remarkable versatility. These block co-polymers are used here as an example of a structurally inhomogeneous composite containing nano-scale gradients, whose internal strain differs depending on the length scale of consideration. Here we present a combined experimental and modelling approach to the hierarchical characterization of block co-polymer deformation. Synchrotron-based small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering and radiography are used for strain evaluation across the scales. Transmission electron microscopy image-based finite element modelling and fast Fourier transform analysis are used to develop a multi-phase numerical model that achieves agreement with the combined experimental data using a minimal number of adjustable structural parameters. The results highlight the importance of fuzzy interfaces, that is, regions of nanometre-scale structure and property gradients, in determining the mechanical properties of hierarchical composites across the scales. PMID:25758945

  4. Multiple-length-scale deformation analysis in a thermoplastic polyurethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Tan; Baimpas, Nikolaos; Dolbnya, Igor P.; Prisacariu, Cristina; Korsunsky, Alexander M.

    2015-03-01

    Thermoplastic polyurethane elastomers enjoy an exceptionally wide range of applications due to their remarkable versatility. These block co-polymers are used here as an example of a structurally inhomogeneous composite containing nano-scale gradients, whose internal strain differs depending on the length scale of consideration. Here we present a combined experimental and modelling approach to the hierarchical characterization of block co-polymer deformation. Synchrotron-based small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering and radiography are used for strain evaluation across the scales. Transmission electron microscopy image-based finite element modelling and fast Fourier transform analysis are used to develop a multi-phase numerical model that achieves agreement with the combined experimental data using a minimal number of adjustable structural parameters. The results highlight the importance of fuzzy interfaces, that is, regions of nanometre-scale structure and property gradients, in determining the mechanical properties of hierarchical composites across the scales.

  5. Graphite/Thermoplastic-Pultrusion Die

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Maywood L.; Frye, Mark W.; Johnson, Gary S.; Stanfield, Clarence E.

    1990-01-01

    Attachment to extruder produces thermoplastic-impregnated graphite tape. Consists of profile die, fiber/resin collimator, and crosshead die body. Die designed to be attached to commercially available extrusion machine capable of extruding high-performance thermoplastics. Simple attachment to commercial extruder enables developers of composites to begin experimenting with large numbers of proprietary resins, fibers, and hybrid composite structures. With device, almost any possible fiber/resin combination fabricated.

  6. Poly(butylene succinate) and its copolymers: research, development and industrialization.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jun; Guo, Bao-Hua

    2010-11-01

    Poly(butylene succinate) (PBS) and its copolymers are a family of biodegradable polymers with excellent biodegradability, thermoplastic processability and balanced mechanical properties. In this article, production of the monomers succinic acid and butanediol, synthesis, processing and properties of PBS and its copolymers are reviewed. The physical properties and biodegradation rate of PBS materials can be varied in a wide range through copolymerization with different types and various contents of monomers. PBS has a wide temperature window for thermoplastic processing, which makes the resin suitable for extrusion, injection molding, thermoforming and film blowing. Finally, we summarized industrialization and applications of PBS. PMID:21058317

  7. Thermoplastic tape compaction device

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, V.W.

    1994-12-27

    A device is disclosed for bonding a thermoplastic tape to a substrate to form a fully consolidated composite. This device has an endless chain associated with a frame so as to rotate in a plane that is perpendicular to a long dimension of the tape, the chain having pivotally connected chain links with each of the links carrying a flexible foot member that extends outwardly from the chain. A selected number of the foot members contact the tape, after the heating thereof, to cause the heated tape to bond to the substrate. The foot members are each a thin band of metal oriented transversely to the chain, with a flexibility and width and length to contact the tape so as to cause the tape to conform to the substrate to achieve consolidation of the tape and the substrate. A biased leaf-type spring within the frame bears against an inner surface of the chain to provide the compliant pressure necessary to bond the tape to the substrate. The chain is supported by sprockets on shafts rotatably supported in the frame and, in one embodiment, one of the shafts has a drive unit to produce rotation such that the foot members in contact with the tape move at the same speed as the tape. Cooling jets are positioned along the frame to cool the resultant consolidated composite. 5 figures.

  8. Thermoplastic tape compaction device

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Vincent W.

    1994-01-01

    A device for bonding a thermoplastic tape to a substrate to form a fully consolidated composite. This device has an endless chain associated with a frame so as to rotate in a plane that is perpendicular to a long dimension of the tape, the chain having pivotally connected chain links with each of the links carrying a flexible foot member that extends outwardly from the chain. A selected number of the foot members contact the tape, after the heating thereof, to cause the heated tape to bond to the substrate. The foot members are each a thin band of metal oriented transversely to the chain, with a flexibility and width and length to contact the tape so as to cause the tape to conform to the substrate to achieve consolidation of the tape and the substrate. A biased leaf-type spring within the frame bears against an inner surface of the chain to provide the compliant pressure necessary to bond the tape to the substrate. The chain is supported by sprockets on shafts rotatably supported in the frame and, in one embodiment, one of the shafts has a drive unit to produce rotation such that the foot members in contact with the tape move at the same speed as the tape. Cooling jets are positioned along the frame to cool the resultant consolidated composite.

  9. Applicability of thermoplastic composites for space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoggatt, J. T.; Kushner, M.

    1978-01-01

    The discussion defines a thermoplastic resin and compares the structural and environmental properties and the fabrication and repairability of the thermoplastic composite with a typical epoxy composite. Low labor costs exhibited by the thermoplastic composites make them a priority consideration for use in space structure.

  10. Advanced thermoplastic resins, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, C. L.; Hill, S. G.; Falcone, A.; Gerken, N. T.

    1991-01-01

    Eight thermoplastic polyimide resin systems were evaluated as composite matrix materials. Two resins were selected for more extensive mechanical testing and both were versions of LaRC-TPI (Langley Research Center - Thermoplastic Polyimide). One resin was made with LaRC-TPI and contained 2 weight percent of a di(amic acid) dopant as a melt flow aid. The second system was a 1:1 slurry of semicrystalline LaRC-TPI powder in a polyimidesulfone resin diglyme solution. The LaRC-TPI powder melts during processing and increases the melt flow of the resin. Testing included dynamic mechanical analysis, tension and compression testing, and compression-after-impact testing. The test results demonstrated that the LaRC-TPI resins have very good properties compared to other thermoplastics, and that they are promising matrix materials for advanced composite structures.

  11. Structure and thermoplasticity of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Komaki, I.; Itagaki, S.; Miura, T.

    2004-07-01

    Chapters cover: molecular structure and thermoplastic properties of coal; {sup 1}H-nmr study of relaxation mechanisms of coal aggregate; structural changes of coal macromolecules during softening; quantitative estimation of metaplsat in heat-treated coal by solvent extraction; effects of surface oxidation on thermoplastic properties of coal; analysis of dilatation and contraction of coal during carbonization; formation mechanisms of coke texture during resolidification; modified CPD model for coal devolatilization; mathematical modelling of coke mechanical structure; and simulating particulate dynamics in the carbonization process based on discrete element treatment.

  12. Nano-Structural Elucidation in Carbon Black Loaded NR Vulcanizate by 3D-TEM and In Situ WAXD Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda,Y.; Kato, A.; Shimanuki, J.; Kohjiya, S.; Tosaka, M.; Poompradub, S.; Toki, S.; Hsiao, B.

    2007-01-01

    Three dimensional (3D) visualization of nanometer structure of carbon black dispersion in rubbery matrix has successfully been studied and reported in this paper. Use of 3D-TEM, which is computerized tomography combined with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), enabled us to reconstruct 3D images of carbon black aggregates in natural rubber (NR) matrix. The TEM measurements were conducted by a bright-field method on thin samples without any electron staining. The sample was subject to uni-axial tilting (+65 degree to -65 degree with 2 degree increment) in the sample chamber, and 66 TEM images were taken on each sample. These TEM images were used for computerized tomography to reconstruct the 3D image. This technique is designated as 3D-TEM. The nano-structural features observed by 3D-TEM were in conformity with the electron-conductivity results, and the percolation behavior was recognized. These results were further supplemented by in situ wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD), i.e., simultaneous WAXD and tensile measurements on the sample to observe the strain-induced crystallization in NR vulcanizate. Upon tensile elongation, the crystallization was clearly observed in WAXD in the presence of carbon black, and it contributed to the tensile properties. In order to understand the performances of filled NR vulcanizates, it surely is necessary to know the structural states of the mixed nano-filler and the crystallites produced upon elongation.

  13. Property and morphology development in nanocomposite thermoplastic elastomer gels.

    PubMed

    van Maanen, Guillermo J; Seeley, Sabrina L; Capracotta, Michael D; White, Scott A; Bukovnik, Rudolf R; Hartmann, Jürgen; Martin, James D; Spontak, Richard J

    2005-03-29

    Thermoplastic elastomer gels (TPEGs), molecular networks composed of a microphase-separated multiblock copolymer swollen to a large extent by a low-volatility midblock-selective solvent, are ubiquitous in a wide range of contemporary technologies, including home and office products, athletic equipment, and telecommunications devices. In this work, we investigate the effect of several network-forming nanoscale modifiers-two different silica nanoparticles, three different nanoclays, and a multiwalled carbon nanotube-on the property and morphology development of a TPEG prepared from a microphase-ordered poly(styrene-b-(ethylene-co-butylene)-b-styrene) (SEBS) triblock copolymer imbibed with an EB-compatible aliphatic mineral oil. Dynamic rheological measurements of the resultant nanocomposite TPEGs confirm that addition of these modifiers affects the linear viscoelastic threshold and increases, to different extents, the dynamic elastic modulus, the dynamic yield stress, and the maximum operating temperature of the parent TPEG. X-ray diffraction analysis reveals that the nanoclays used to generate three series of modified TPEGs are generally swollen with copolymer and/or solvent. PMID:15779992

  14. Semicrystalline thermoplastic elastomeric polyolefins: Advances through catalyst development and macromolecular design

    PubMed Central

    Hotta, Atsushi; Cochran, Eric; Ruokolainen, Janne; Khanna, Vikram; Fredrickson, Glenn H.; Kramer, Edward J.; Shin, Yong-Woo; Shimizu, Fumihiko; Cherian, Anna E.; Hustad, Phillip D.; Rose, Jeffrey M.; Coates, Geoffrey W.

    2006-01-01

    We report the design, synthesis, morphology, phase behavior, and mechanical properties of semicrystalline, polyolefin-based block copolymers. By using living, stereoselective insertion polymerization catalysts, syndiotactic polypropylene-block-poly(ethylene-co-propylene)-block-syndiotactic polypropylene and isotactic polypropylene-block-regioirregular polypropylene-block-isotactic polypropylene triblock copolymers were synthesized. The volume fraction and composition of the blocks, as well as the overall size of the macromolecules, were controlled by sequential synthesis of each block of the polymers. These triblock copolymers, with semicrystalline end-blocks and mid-segments with low glass-transition temperatures, show significant potential as thermoplastic elastomers. They have low Young's moduli, large strains at break, and better than 90% elastic recovery at strains of 100% or less. An isotactic polypropylene-block-regioirregular polypropylene-block-isotactic polypropylene-block-regioirregular polypropylene-block-isotactic polypropylene pentablock copolymer was synthesized that also shows exceptional elastomeric properties. Notably, microphase separation is not necessary in the semicrystalline isotactic polypropylenes to achieve good mechanical performance, unlike commercial styrenic thermoplastic elastomers. PMID:17032769

  15. Turning Renewable Resources into Recyclable Polymer: Development of Lignin-Based Thermoplastic

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Tomonori; Brown, Rebecca H; Hunt, Marcus A; Pickel, Deanna L; Pickel, Joseph M; Messman, Jamie M; Baker, Frederick S; Keller, Martin; Naskar, Amit K

    2012-01-01

    Productive uses of lignin, the third most abundant natural polymer, have been sought for decades. One especially attractive possibility is that of developing value-added products including thermoplastics based on lignin. This possibility warrants special attention due to growth of the modern biofuel industries. However, the polydisperse molecular weight and hyper-branched structure of lignin has hindered the creation of high-performance biopolymers. Here, we report the preparation and characterization of novel lignin-based, partially carbon-neutral thermoplastics. We first altered the molecular weight of lignin, either by fractionation with methanol, or by formaldehyde crosslinking. A crosslinking of lignin increases the molecular weight, exhibiting Mn = 31000 g/mol, whereas that of native lignin is 1840 g/mol. Tuning the molecular weight of lignin enabled successful preparation of novel lignin-derived thermoplastics, when coupled with telechelic polybutadiene soft-segments at proper feed ratios. Characteristic to thermoplastic rubbers, free-standing films of the resulting copolymers exhibit two-phase morphology and associated relaxations in the dynamic mechanical loss spectrum. To our knowledge this article is the first report to demonstrate phase immiscibility, melt-processibility, and biphasic morphology of soft and hard segments in a lignin-based copolymer for all feed ratios of two macromolecular components. The use of higher molecular weight lignin enhanced the resulting shear modulus due to efficient network formation of telechelic polybutadiene bridges. The storage modulus in the rubbery plateau region increased with increasing lignin content. The successful synthesis of novel lignin-based thermoplastics will open a new pathway to biomass utilization and will help conserve petrochemicals.

  16. Multigraft Copolymer Superelastomers: Synthesis Morphology, and Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Uhrig, David; Schlegel, Ralf; Weidisch, Roland; Mays, Jimmy

    2011-01-01

    The synthesis of well-defined multigraft copolymers having a polydiene backbone with polystyrene side chains is briefly reviewed, with particular focus on controlling branch point spacing and branch point functionality. Use of living anionic polymerization and chlorosilane linking chemistry has led to the synthesis of series of materials having regularly spaced trifunctional (comb), tetrafunctional (centipede), and hexafunctional (barbwire) branch points. The morphologies of these materials were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering, and it was found that the morphologies were controlled by the local architectural asymmetry associated with each branch point. Mechanical properties studies revealed that such multigraft copolymers represent a new class of thermoplastic elastomers (TPEs) with superior elongation at break and low residual strains as compared to conventional TPEs.

  17. The reclaiming of butyl rubber and in-situ compatibilization of thermoplastic elastomer by power ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Wenlai

    This is a study of the continuous ultrasound aided extrusion process for the in-situ compatibilization of isotactic polypropylene (iPP)/ethylene-propylene diene rubber (EPDM) thermoplastic elastomer (TPE) using a newly developed ultrasonic treatment reactor. The rheological, mechanical properties and morphology of the TPE with and without ultrasonic treatment were studied. In-situ compatibilization in the ultrasonically treated blends was observed as evident by their more stable morphology after annealing, improved mechanical properties and IR spectra. The obtained results indicated that ultrasonic treatment induced the thermo-mechanical degradations and led to the possibility of enhanced molecular transport and chemical reactions at the interfaces. Processing conditions were established for enhanced in situ compatibilization of the PP/EPDM TPE. The ultrasonic treatments of butyl rubber gum and ultrasonic devulcanization of butyl rubber, tire-curing bladder during extrusion using a grooved barrel ultrasonic reactor were carried out. The ultrasonic treatment of gum caused degradation of the polymer main chain leading to lower molecular weight, broader molecular weight distribution, less unsaturation and changes in physical properties. The devulcanization of butyl rubber was successfully accomplished only at severe conditions of ultrasonic treatment. The mechanical properties of vulcanizates prepared from devulcanized butyl rubber are comparable to that of the virgin vulcanizate. The molecular characterization of sol fraction of devulcanized butyl rubber showed the devulcanization and degradation of butyl rubber occurred simultaneously. 1H NMR transverse relaxation was also used to study butyl rubber gum before and after ultrasonic treatment, and ultrasonically devulcanized unfilled butyl rubber. The T2 relaxation decays were successfully described using a two-component model. The recyclability of tire-curing bladder was also investigated. Gel fraction, crosslink

  18. Thermoplastic Elastomers via polyolefin/Layered Silicate Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalluru, Sri; Cochran, Eric

    2013-03-01

    Here we report the synthesis of fully exfoliated polyolefin nanocomposites via Surface-Initiated Ring Opening Metathesis Polymerization (SI-ROMP). Montmorillonite (MMT) clay platelets were rendered hydrophobic through ion exchange with alkyl-ammonium surfactants terminated with norbornene. We were then able to form block copolymer brushes of (substituted) norbornenes and cyclopentene via SI-ROMP. Subsequent hydrogenation yielded highly crystalline polyethylene and rubbery saturated polynorbornenes, thus giving a thermoplastic elastomer. Nanocomposites were prepared with different nanofiller percentages and were characterized for morphological (XRD, TEM), thermal (TGA, DSC), and mechanical (DMA, Rheology) properties. Complete exfoliation of nanocomposites was confirmed by XRD and TEM. A fraction of the polymer brushes were subsequently removed from their substrate by reverse ion exchange and characterized in parallel with their corresponding nanocomposite analogs. In this way we were able to directly assess the role of the filler particle in the thermal properties, melt rheology, morphology, and tensile properties.

  19. Thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU)/polyolefin (PO) blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Qiwei

    Thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) is a very important material with high versatility and superior physical properties. Melt blending TPU with metallocene polyolefin (PO) can lower TPU cost and improve polyolefin properties like abrasion resistance, adhesion, and paintability. Since TPU and non-polar PO blends are completely immiscible, efficient compatibilizers become the key issue and remain challenging. My main thesis work is to develop and study compatibilized TPU/PO blends. Although reactive compatibilization is considered the most efficient method, fast interfacial reactions between highly reactive functional groups are necessary to generate compatibilizers within usually short processing time. It is known that the urethane linkage (carbamate -NHCOO-) in TPU can reversibly dissociate to generate highly reactive isocyanates at melt temperatures. To find out the best reactive compatibilization, three approaches were employed on different molecular scales: (1) model urethane compound (dibutyl & dioctyl 4,4'-methylenebis(phenyl carbamate)) and small functional molecule (primary amine, secondary amine, hydroxyl, acid, anhydride, and epoxide) reactions at 200°C monitored by nuclear magnetic resonance and Fourier-transform infrared to examine the basic chemistry; (2) short, model TPU's with different chemical structures blended with functional polymers including poly(ethylene glycol) and polybutadiene to explore the effect of interface in immiscible mixtures; (3) melt blending of a commercial TPU with polypropylene (PP), further involving more complicated morphology, using different types of functional PP's (note: amine functional PP's were prepared by melt amination) as compatibilizers followed by rheological, morphological, thermal, and mechanical characterizations. Besides the core thesis project on TPU blends, other related work that has been accomplished includes: (1) adhesion between TPU and PP; (2) rheological properties of TPU; (3) block copolymer formation

  20. Characterization of a thermoplastic polyimidesulfone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dezern, J. F.; Young, P. R.

    1985-01-01

    The detailed characterization of an experimental thermoplastic polyimidesulfone adhesive based on 3,3 prime-diaminodiphenylsulfone and 3,3 prime,4,4 prime-benzophenone tetracarboxylic dianhydride was studied. Model compounds were also examined. Thermal cyclization of the amide-acid to the imide was studied by a variety of techniques including DSC, TGA, MS, in situ diffuse reflectance-FTIR, and flow mearsurement. Characterizations were continued during the processing of adhesive tapes and the fabrication, bonding, and testing of lap shear specimens. Results provide fundamental insights into the role of cure chemistry, and the effects of residual solvent and volatile produces on processing and performance. These insights and the resulting chemical models should lead to more efficient processing cycles for these and other related thermoplastic adhesive systems.

  1. Portable Device Slices Thermoplastic Prepregs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Beverly A.; Boston, Morton W.; Wilson, Maywood L.

    1993-01-01

    Prepreg slitter designed to slit various widths rapidly by use of slicing bar holding several blades, each capable of slicing strip of preset width in single pass. Produces material evenly sliced and does not contain jagged edges. Used for various applications in such batch processes involving composite materials as press molding and autoclaving, and in such continuous processes as pultrusion. Useful to all manufacturers of thermoplastic composites, and in slicing B-staged thermoset composites.

  2. Electrostatic prepregging of thermoplastic matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muzzy, John D.; Varughese, Babu; Thammongkol, Vivan; Tincher, Wayne

    1989-01-01

    Thermoplastic towpregs of PEEK/AS-4, PEEK/S-2 glass and LaRC-TPI/AS-4, produced by electrostatic deposition of charged and fluidized polymer powders on spread continuous fiber tows, are described. Processing parameters for combining PEEK 150 powder with unsized 3k AS-4 carbon fiber are presented. The experimental results for PEEK 150/AS-4 reveal that electrostatic fluidized bed coating may be an economically attractive process for producing towpreg.

  3. Diamond turning of thermoplastic polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, E.; Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01

    Single point diamond turning studies were made using a series of thermoplastic polymers with different glass transition temperatures. Variations in surface morphology and surface roughness were observed as a function of cutting speed. Lower glass transition temperatures facilitate smoother surface cuts and better surface finish. This can be attributed to the frictional heating that occurs during machining. Because of the very low glass transition temperatures in polymeric compared to inorganic glasses, the precision machining response can be very speed sensitive.

  4. Thermoplastic elastomers in medical applications.

    PubMed

    Radley, Huw

    2003-05-01

    TPEs provide medical designers with a broad spectrum of soft-feel, hygienic materials that can readily fulfill accepted medical industry standards with the exception of body implants. Ultimate performance is a combination of tailor-made formulations coupled with innovative design that captures the capability of the material's properties and thermoplastic processing techniques, including combination with other polymers by coinjection moulding or coextrusion. PMID:12774579

  5. Hemocompatibility of styrenic block copolymers for use in prosthetic heart valves.

    PubMed

    Brubert, Jacob; Krajewski, Stefanie; Wendel, Hans Peter; Nair, Sukumaran; Stasiak, Joanna; Moggridge, Geoff D

    2016-02-01

    Certain styrenic thermoplastic block copolymer elastomers can be processed to exhibit anisotropic mechanical properties which may be desirable for imitating biological tissues. The ex-vivo hemocompatibility of four triblock (hard-soft-hard) copolymers with polystyrene hard blocks and polyethylene, polypropylene, polyisoprene, polybutadiene or polyisobutylene soft blocks are tested using the modified Chandler loop method using fresh human blood and direct contact cell proliferation of fibroblasts upon the materials. The hemocompatibility and durability performance of a heparin coating is also evaluated. Measures of platelet and coagulation cascade activation indicate that the test materials are superior to polyester but inferior to expanded polytetrafluoroethylene and bovine pericardium reference materials. Against inflammatory measures the test materials are superior to polyester and bovine pericardium. The addition of a heparin coating results in reduced protein adsorption and ex-vivo hemocompatibility performance superior to all reference materials, in all measures. The tested styrenic thermoplastic block copolymers demonstrate adequate performance for blood contacting applications. PMID:26704549

  6. Rheology of Hyperbranched Poly(triglyceride)-Based Thermoplastic Elastomers via RAFT polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Mengguo; Cochran, Eric

    2014-03-01

    In this contribution we discuss how melt- and solid-state properties are influenced by the degree of branching and molecular weight in a family of hyperbranched thermoplastics derived from soybean oil. Acrylated epoxidized triglycerides from soybean oils have been polymerized to hyperbranched thermoplastic elastomers using reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization. With the proper choice of chain transfer agent, both homopolymer and block copolymer can be synthesized. By changing the number of acrylic groups per triglycerides, the chain architectures can range from nearly linear to highly branched. We show how the fundamental viscoelastic properties (e.g. entanglement molecular weight, plateau modulus, etc.) are influenced by chain architecture and molecular weight.

  7. Single-use thermoplastic microfluidic burst valves enabling on-chip reagent storage

    PubMed Central

    Rahmanian, Omid D.

    2014-01-01

    A simple and reliable method for fabricating single-use normally closed burst valves in thermoplastic microfluidic devices is presented, using a process flow that is readily integrated into established workflows for the fabrication of thermoplastic microfluidics. An experimental study of valve performance reveals the relationships between valve geometry and burst pressure. The technology is demonstrated in a device employing multiple valves engineered to actuate at different inlet pressures that can be generated using integrated screw pumps. On-chip storage and reconstitution of fluorescein salt sealed within defined reagent chambers are demonstrated. By taking advantage of the low gas and water permeability of cyclic olefin copolymer, the robust burst valves allow on-chip hermetic storage of reagents, making the technology well suited for the development of integrated and disposable assays for use at the point of care. PMID:25972774

  8. Rapid, controllable and environmentally benign fabrication of thermoplastic nanofibers and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong

    In situ fibrillar and lamellar hybrid morphology was found in various immiscible polymer blends prepared by melt ram extrusion of cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB)/Thermoplastics at a weight ratio of 80 to 20. The formation process was analyzed and proposed. The presence of the elongational flow field determines the formation of the fibrils, and the improvement of the mixing efficiency can significantly reduce the dimensions of formed fibrils into the submicro- or nano-scale. With above results, continuous and uniform yarns of thermoplastic nanofibers were prepared via direct melt twin-screw extrusion, providing better mixing efficiency of immiscible blends of thermoplastic polymers with cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB), and subsequent extraction removal of CAB matrix. The thermoplastics which can be made into nanofibers include polyesters, polyolefins, thermoplastic polyurethane and functional copolymers, such as PE-co-GMA (Poly(Ethylene-co-Glycidyl Methacrylate)), PVA-co-PE (Poly(Vinyl Alcohol-co-Ethylene)). Ratios of thermoplastics to sacrificial CAB matrix, melt viscosity, and interfacial tensions affect formation of the nanofibers. Moreover, the crystal structures of isotactic polypropylene (iPP) nanofiber prepared were characterized with DSC and WAXD. To further demonstrate the size and shape controllability of the thermoplastic nanomaterials, polyethylene materials were selected and prepared into micro- or submicrospheres or nanofibers with different diameters and shapes by varying the composition ratio and modifying the interface properties via melt blending or extrusion of cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB)/LDPE melt blends and subsequent removal of the CAB. The surface structures of the LDPE micro- or submicrospheres and nanofibers were analyzed using SEM, FTIR-ATR spectroscopy, DSC and torque rheometer. The biotechnological applications of the thermoplastic nanofibers are also exploited. Poly(ethylene-co-glycidyl methacrylate) (PE-co-GMA) nanofibers with

  9. An overview of long fiber reinforced thermoplastics

    SciTech Connect

    Bockstedt, R.J.; Skarlupka, R.J.

    1995-12-01

    Long fiber reinforced thermoplastics (LFRTP) are a class of injection molding materials that extend the physical property envelope of thermoplastics polymers. These materials are manufactured by pulling continuous fiber tows through a thermoplastic polymer melt in a specialized processing die. The strands are subsequently cooled and chopped into pellets of equal length. LFRTP materials are available in virtually every common thermoplastic resin with glass, aramid, stainless steel, or carbon fiber reinforcement at levels up to 60% by weight. Unlike short fiber reinforced thermoplastics manufactured by conventional screw compounding processes, LFRTP exhibit simultaneous improvements in both flexural modulus and impact resistance. Improvements in load transfer, creep resistance at elevated temperatures, and dimensional stability can also be attributed to the long fiber network formed in the molded part. This unique combination of properties makes LFRTP the material of choice for replacement of metal structural assemblies in many automotive, industrial, consumer and recreational applications.

  10. Thermoplastic polymides and composites therefrom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Frank W. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A new class polyimide and polyimide precursors based on diaryl oxyalkylene diamines, such as 1,3-bis[4-aminophenoxy]-2,2-dimethyl propane, a process for their preparation and their use as the continuous phase for the manufacture of composites and composite laminates reinforced by reinforcing agents such as carbon fibers, Kevlar.TM., and other similar high strength reinforcing agents. The polyimides and molecular composites obtained from the diamines according to the invention show thermoplastic properties, excellent flex fatigue and fracture resistance, and excellent thermal and oxidative stability.

  11. Thermoplastic coating of carbon fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edie, D. D.; Lickfield, G. C.; Allen, L. E.; Mccollum, J. R.

    1989-01-01

    A continuous powder coating system was developed for coating carbon fiber with LaRC-TPI (Langley Research Center-Thermoplastic Polyimide), a high-temperature thermoplastic polymide invented by NASA-Langley. The coating line developed used a pneumatic fiber spreader to separate the individual fibers. The polymer was applied within a recirculating powder coating chamber then melted using a combination of direct electrical resistance and convective heating to make it adhere to the fiber tow. The tension and speed of the line were controlled with a dancer arm and an electrically driven fiber wind-up and wind-off. The effects of heating during the coating process on the flexibility of the prepreg produced were investigated. The uniformity with which the fiber tow could be coated with polymer also was examined. Composite specimens were fabricated from the prepreg and tested to determine optimum process conditions. The study showed that a very uniform and flexible prepeg with up to 50 percent by volume polymer could be produced with this powder coating system. The coating line minimized powder loss and produced prepeg in lengths of up to 300 m. The fiber spreading was found to have a major effect on the coating uniformity and flexibility. Though test results showed low composite tensile strengths, analysis of fracture surfaces under scanning electron microscope indicated that fiber/matrix adhesion was adequate.

  12. Thermoplastic film prevents proppant flowback

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, P.D.; Weaver, J.D.; Parker, M.A.; King, D.G.

    1996-02-05

    Thermoplastic film added to proppants is effective and economical for preventing proppant flowback after an hydraulic fracturing treatment. Most other methods, such as resin-coated proppant and fiber, for controlling proppant flowback have drawbacks that added to treatment costs by requiring long downtime, costly additives, or frequent equipment replacement. Thermoplastic film does not react chemically with fracturing fluids. After the proppant is placed in the fracture, the film strips intertwine with the proppant grains or at higher temperatures, the strips become adhesive and shrink forming consolidated clusters that hold open the newly created fractures and prevent proppant from flowing back. The low cost of the film means that the strips can be used throughout the fracturing job or in selected stages. The strips are compatible with fracturing fluid chemistry, including breakers and crosslinkers, and can be used in wells with a wide range of bottom hole temperatures. The end result is a well that can be brought back on-line in a short time with little proppant flowback. This paper reviews the cost benefits and performance of these proppants.

  13. Joining of thermoplastic substrates by microwaves

    DOEpatents

    Paulauskas, Felix L.; Meek, Thomas T.

    1997-01-01

    A method for joining two or more items having surfaces of thermoplastic material includes the steps of depositing an electrically-conductive material upon the thermoplastic surface of at least one of the items, and then placing the other of the two items adjacent the one item so that the deposited material is in intimate contact with the surfaces of both the one and the other items. The deposited material and the thermoplastic surfaces contacted thereby are then exposed to microwave radiation so that the thermoplastic surfaces in contact with the deposited material melt, and then pressure is applied to the two items so that the melted thermoplastic surfaces fuse to one another. Upon discontinuance of the exposure to the microwave energy, and after permitting the thermoplastic surfaces to cool from the melted condition, the two items are joined together by the fused thermoplastic surfaces. The deposited material has a thickness which is preferably no greater than a skin depth, .delta..sub.s, which is related to the frequency of the microwave radiation and characteristics of the deposited material in accordance with an equation.

  14. Thermoplastic composites for ballistic application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, John Whachong

    2003-08-01

    Systematic studies of thermoplastic composites on ballistic impact failure and kinetic energy absorption mechanisms were examined on both semicrystalline and amorphous polymer matrix composites. By taking advantages of the nature of thermoplastic polymers, the main objective of this research was to develop armor grade composites with thermoplastic resin matrices through a understanding of the microscopic as well as macroscopic characteristics of the composites. In both semicrystalline neat resin and composites, the crystal formation and the degree of crystallinity of the polymer matrix were greatly influenced by processing conditions, especially, the cooling rate. As the cooling rate is decreased, more perfect crystal formation and amorphous rearrangements were evident vs cooling at higher rates. The relative degree of crystallinity of semicrystalline matrix composites was calculated using dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). These values were in good agreement with neat resin values obtained via differantial scanning calorimeter (DSC). Unfortunately, the morphological perfection of the semicrystalline matrix exhibits negligible advantage on ballistic impact resistance. Failure of the composites under ballistic impact was localized and the kinetic energy absorption was low. Amorphous polymers were also greatly influenced by processing conditions. Furthermore, amorphous polymers exhibit large processing windows in terms of processing temperature, which allows the various processing manipulations for ballistic composite fabrication. As increasing processing temperature, glass transition temperature of the polymer and stiffness of the composite increased due to the morphological perfection and level of wetting, respectively. Ballistic impact resistance was found to be inversely proportional to the stiffness of the composites. Fiber wetting characteristics and polymer morphology changes during the cooling process are considered to be major contributors of this behavior

  15. Nonlinear rheology and strain recovery of short chain branched polyolefin elastomers and thermoplastic olefin blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patham, Bhaskar

    Polyolefin elastomers are random copolymers having a polyethylene backbone with the higher olefinic comonomer incorporated as short-chain branches. These random copolymers are widely used as polymer modifiers for thermoplastic materials such as polypropylenes, resulting in thermoplastic olefin (TPO) blends. This thesis addresses the nonlinear rheological behavior of the elastomers and then of the TPO blends. The effects of varying short chain branch density (SCB) on the melt rheology of three ethylene-octene random copolymers have been investigated. In particular, the strain-hardening behavior in extensional flow and strain recovery following nonlinear shear creep has been evaluated. The zero-shear viscosity followed trends in the backbone molecular weight closely. While the three copolymers were indistinguishable in linear viscoelastic creep and recovery, recovery following nonlinear shear creep decreased progressively with increasing SCB density. This reveals that the extent of rapid chain equilibration that occurs over Rouse time scales at higher strains was progressively lower with increasing SCB density. Strain hardening in uniaxial extensional flow was observed for all three copolymers. At strain rates below the primitive chain equilibration rates, strain hardening increases progressively with increasing SCB density. At higher rates, upon onset of primitive chain stretch, the strain hardening behavior for the three melts merges. Two thermoplastic olefin (TPO) blends were characterized in the context of injection molding; the surface morphology of injection molded tensile bars with these materials showed surface defects or flow marks to different extents. The flow marks were traced to different degrees of strain recovery in the dispersed phases of the two blends. This recovery occurred over injection molding timescales of the order of a few seconds. Strain recovery after shear creep was higher in the blend that displayed more severe flow marks in injection

  16. Block and Graft Copolymers of Polyhydroxyalkanoates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchessault, Robert H.; Ravenelle, François; Kawada, Jumpei

    2004-03-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) were modified for diblock copolymer and graft polymer by catalyzed transesterification in the melt and by chemical synthesis to extend the side chains of the PHAs, and the polymers were studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) X-ray diffraction, thermal analysis and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Catalyzed transesterification in the melt is used to produce diblock copolymers of poly[3-hydroxybutyrate] (PHB) and monomethoxy poly[ethylene glycol] (mPEG) in a one-step process. The resulting diblock copolymers are amphiphilic and self-assemble into sterically stabilized colloidal suspensions of PHB crystalline lamellae. Graft polymer was synthesized in a two-step chemical synthesis from biosynthesized poly[3-hydroxyoctanoate-co-3-hydroxyundecenoate] (PHOU) containing ca. 25 mol chains. 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid reacts with the side chain alkenes of PHOU by the radical addition creating thioether linkage with terminal carboxyl functionalities. The latter groups were subsequently transformed into the amide or ester linkage by tridecylamine or octadecanol, respectively, producing new graft polymers. The polymers have different physical properties than poly[3-hydroxyoctanoate] (PHO) which is the main component of the PHOU, such as non-stickiness and higher thermal stability. The combination of biosynthesis and chemical synthesis produces a hybrid thermoplastic elastomer with partial biodegradability.

  17. Plastic wastes as modifiers of the thermoplasticity of coal

    SciTech Connect

    M.A. Diez; C. Barriocanal; R. Alvarez

    2005-12-01

    Plastic waste recycling represents a major challenge in environmental protection with different routes now available for dealing with mechanical, chemical, and energy recycling. New concepts in plastic waste recycling have emerged so that now such wastes can be used to replace fossil fuels, either as an energy source or as a secondary raw material. Our objective is to explore the modification of the thermoplastic properties of coal in order to assess the possibility of adding plastic waste to coal for the production of metallurgical coke. Two bituminous coals of different rank and thermoplastic properties were used as a base component of blends with plastic wastes such as high-density polyethylene (HDPE), low-density polyethylene (LDPE), polypropylene (PP), polystyrene (PS), poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET), and acrilonitrile-butadiene-styrene copolymer (ABS). In all cases, the addition of plastic waste led to a reduction in Gieseler maximum fluidity, the extent of the reduction depending on the fluidity of the base coal, and the amount, the molecular structure, and the thermal behavior of the polymer. As a consequence, the amount of volatile matter released by the plastic waste before, during, and after the maximum fluidity of the coal and the hydrogen-donor and hydrogen-acceptor capacities of the polymer were concluded to be key factors in influencing the extent of the reduction in fluidity and the development of anisotropic carbons. The incorporation of the plastic to the carbon matrix was clearly established in semicokes produced from blends of a high-fluid coal and the plastic tested by SEM examination. 42 refs., 10 figs., 7 tabs.

  18. Thermoplastic matrix composite processing model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dara, P. H.; Loos, A. C.

    1985-01-01

    The effects the processing parameters pressure, temperature, and time have on the quality of continuous graphite fiber reinforced thermoplastic matrix composites were quantitatively accessed by defining the extent to which intimate contact and bond formation has occurred at successive ply interfaces. Two models are presented predicting the extents to which the ply interfaces have achieved intimate contact and cohesive strength. The models are based on experimental observation of compression molded laminates and neat resin conditions, respectively. Identified as the mechanism explaining the phenomenon by which the plies bond to themselves is the theory of autohesion (or self diffusion). Theoretical predictions from the Reptation Theory between autohesive strength and contact time are used to explain the effects of the processing parameters on the observed experimental strengths. The application of a time-temperature relationship for autohesive strength predictions is evaluated. A viscoelastic compression molding model of a tow was developed to explain the phenomenon by which the prepreg ply interfaces develop intimate contact.

  19. Interlaminar fracture toughness of thermoplastic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkley, J. A.; Johnston, N. J.; Obrien, T. K.

    1988-01-01

    Edge delamination tension and double cantilever beam tests were used to characterize the interlaminar fracture toughness of continuous graphite-fiber composites made from experimental thermoplastic polyimides and a model thermoplastic. Residual thermal stresses, known to be significant in materials processed at high temperatures, were included in the edge delamination calculations. In the model thermoplastic system (polycarbonate matrix), surface properties of the graphite fiber were shown to be significant. Critical strain energy release rates for two different fibers having similar nominal tensile properties differed by 30 to 60 percent. The reason for the difference is not clear. Interlaminar toughness values for the thermoplastic polyimide composites (LARC-TPI and polyimidesulfone) were 3 to 4 in-lb/sq in. Scanning electron micrographs of the EDT fracture surfaces suggest poor fiber/matrix bonding. Residual thermal stresses account for up to 32 percent of the strain energy release in composites made from these high-temperature resins.

  20. Interlaminar fracture toughness of thermoplastic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkley, Jeffrey A.; Johnston, Norman J.; O'Brien, T. Kevin

    1989-01-01

    Edge delamination tension and double cantilever beam tests were used to characterize the interlaminar fracture toughness of continuous graphite-fiber composites made from experimental thermoplastic polyimides and a model thermoplastic. Residual thermal stresses, known to be significant in materials processed at high temperatures, were included in the edge delamination calculations. In the model thermoplastic system (polycarbonate matrix), surface properties of the graphite fiber were shown to be significant. Cricital strain energy release rates for two different fibers having similar nominal tensile properties differed by 30 to 60 percent. The reason for the difference is not clear. Interlaminar toughness values for the thermoplastic polyimide composites (LARC-TPI and polyimidesulfone) were 3 to 4 in-lb/sq in. Scanning electron micrographs of the EDT fracture surfaces suggest poor fiber/matrix bonding. Residual thermal stresses account for up to 32 percent of the strain energy release in composites made from these high-temperature resins.

  1. Thermoplastic-carbon fiber hybrid yarn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ketterer, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    Efforts were directed to develop processing methods to make carbon fiber/thermoplastic fiber preforms that are easy to handle and drapeable, and to consolidate them into low void content laminates. The objectives were attained with the development of the hybrid yarn concept; whereby, thermoplastic fiber can be intimately intermixed with carbon fiber into a hybrid yarn. This was demonstrated with the intermixing of Celion 3000 with a Celanese liquid crystal polymer fiber, polybutylene terepthalate fiber, or polyetheretherketone fiber. The intermixing of the thermoplastic matrix fiber and the reinforcing carbon fiber gives a preform that can be easily fabricated into laminates with low void content. Mechanical properties of the laminates were not optimized; however, initial results indicated properties typical of a thermoplastic/carbon fiber composites prepared by more conventional methods.

  2. Tough, High-Performance, Thermoplastic Addition Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pater, Ruth H.; Proctor, K. Mason; Gleason, John; Morgan, Cassandra; Partos, Richard

    1991-01-01

    Series of addition-type thermoplastics (ATT's) exhibit useful properties. Because of their addition curing and linear structure, ATT polymers have toughness, like thermoplastics, and easily processed, like thermosets. Work undertaken to develop chemical reaction forming stable aromatic rings in backbone of ATT polymer, combining high-temperature performance and thermo-oxidative stability with toughness and easy processibility, and minimizing or eliminating necessity for tradeoffs among properties often observed in conventional polymer syntheses.

  3. Improved thermoplastic materials for offshore flexible pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Dawans, F.; Jarrin, J.; Hardy, J.

    1988-08-01

    Long-term aging tests representative of field operating conditions have been conducted on various thermoplastic materials proposed for the inner tube of flexible pipes for offshore drilling and production applications. In particular, experimental data are provided about the changes of the mechanical properties of selected thermoplastic materials owing to optimized formulation when the pipes are exposed over time to crude oil in the presence of gas and water.

  4. Multi angle laser light scattering evaluation of field exposed thermoplastic photovoltaic encapsulant materials

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kempe, Michael D.; Miller, David C.; Wohlgemuth, John H.; Kurtz, Sarah R.; Moseley, John M.; Nobles, Dylan L.; Stika, Katherine M.; Brun, Yefim; Samuels, Sam L.; Shah, Qurat Annie; et al

    2016-01-08

    As creep of polymeric materials is potentially a safety concern for photovoltaic modules, the potential for module creep has become a significant topic of discussion in the development of IEC 61730 and IEC 61215. To investigate the possibility of creep, modules were constructed, using several thermoplastic encapsulant materials, into thin-film mock modules and deployed in Mesa, Arizona. The materials examined included poly(ethylene)-co-vinyl acetate (EVA, including formulations both cross-linked and with no curing agent), polyethylene/polyoctene copolymer (PO), poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), polyvinyl butyral (PVB), and thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU). The absence of creep in this experiment is attributable to several factors of which themore » most notable one was the unexpected cross-linking of an EVA formulation without a cross-linking agent. It was also found that some materials experienced both chain scission and cross-linking reactions, sometimes with a significant dependence on location within a module. The TPU and EVA samples were found to degrade with cross-linking reactions dominating over chain scission. In contrast, the PO materials degraded with chain scission dominating over cross-linking reactions. Furthermore, we found no significant indications that viscous creep is likely to occur in fielded modules capable of passing the qualification tests, we note that one should consider how a polymer degrades, chain scission or cross-linking, in assessing the suitability of a thermoplastic polymer in terrestrial photovoltaic applications.« less

  5. Precision synthesis of bio-based acrylic thermoplastic elastomer by RAFT polymerization of itaconic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Kotaro; Lee, Dong-Hyung; Nagai, Kanji; Kamigaito, Masami

    2014-01-01

    Bio-based polymer materials from renewable resources have recently become a growing research focus. Herein, a novel thermoplastic elastomer is developed via controlled/living radical polymerization of plant-derived itaconic acid derivatives, which are some of the most abundant renewable acrylic monomers obtained via the fermentation of starch. The reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer (RAFT) polymerizations of itaconic acid imides, such as N-phenylitaconimide and N-(p-tolyl)itaconimide, and itaconic acid esters, such as di-n-butyl itaconate and bis(2-ethylhexyl) itaconate, are examined using a series of RAFT agents to afford well-defined polymers. The number-average molecular weights of these polymers increase with the monomer conversion while retaining relatively narrow molecular weight distributions. Based on the successful controlled/living polymerization, sequential block copolymerization is subsequently investigated using mono- and di-functional RAFT agents to produce block copolymers with soft poly(itaconate) and hard poly(itaconimide) segments. The properties of the obtained triblock copolymer are evaluated as bio-based acrylic thermoplastic elastomers. PMID:24243816

  6. Phase separations in a copolymer copolymer mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jin-Jun; Jin, Guojun; Ma, Yuqiang

    2006-01-01

    We propose a three-order-parameter model to study the phase separations in a diblock copolymer-diblock copolymer mixture. The cell dynamical simulations provide rich information about the phase evolution and structural formation, especially the appearance of onion-rings. The parametric dependence and physical reason for the domain growth of onion-rings are discussed.

  7. Synthesis and Structure - Property Relationships for Regular Multigraft Copolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Mays, Jimmy; Uhrig, David; Gido, Samuel; Zhu, Yuqing; Weidisch, Roland; Iatrou, Hermis; Hadjichristidis, Nikos; Hong, Kunlun; Beyer, Frederick; Lach, Ralph

    2004-01-01

    Multigraft copolymers with polyisoprene backbones and polystyrene branches, having multiple regularly spaced branch points, were synthesized by anionic polymerization high vacuum techniques and controlled chlorosilane linking chemistry. The functionality of the branch points (1, 2 and 4) can be controlled, through the choice of chlorosilane linking agent. The morphologies of the various graft copolymers were investigated by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray scattering. It was concluded that the morphology of these complex architectures is governed by the behavior of the corresponding miktoarm star copolymer associated with each branch point (constituting block copolymer), which follows Milner's theoretical treatment for miktoarm stars. By comparing samples having the same molecular weight backbone and branches but different number of branches it was found that the extent of long range order decreases with increasing number of branch points. The stress-strain properties in tension were investigated for some of these multigraft copolymers. For certain compositions thermoplastic elastomer (TPE) behavior was observed, and in many instances the elongation at break was much higher (2-3X) than that of conventional triblock TPEs.

  8. Dynamic viscoelasticities for short fiber-thermoplastic elastomer composites

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Wuyun; Ashida, Michio . Graduate School of Science and Technology)

    1993-11-20

    Dynamic moduli, E[prime] and E[double prime], and loss tangent tan [delta] were investigated for thermoplastic elastomers (TPEs), styrene-isoprene-styrene copolymers (SISs), styrene-butadiene-styrene copolymer (SBS), and Hytrel and composites reinforced by poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) short fibers. The styrenic TPEs have a typical rubbery behavior and the Hytrel TPE has medial characteristics between rubber and plastic. Both E[prime] and E[double prime] of the composites depended on the matrix as well as the fiber loading and fiber length. Based on the viewpoint of different extensibility between the fiber and the matrix elastomer, a triblock model was considered for estimating the storage modulus of the short fiber-TPE composites as follows: E[sub c] = [alpha] V[sub f]E[sub f] + [beta](1 [minus] V[sub f])E[sub m], where [alpha] and [beta] are the effective deformation coefficients for the fiber and the matrix elastomer, respectively. They can be quantitatively represented by modulus ratio M (= E[sub m]/E[sub f]) and fiber length L: [alpha] = (L[sup n] + k)M/(L[sup n]M + k), [beta] = (1 [minus] [alpha]V[sub f])/(1 [minus] V[sub f]), where the constants n and k are obtained experimentally. When k = 0.0222 and n = 0.45, E[sub c] of the TPE composites agreed well with the prediction of the proposed model. The relaxation spectrum of the composites showed a distinct main peak ascribed to the matrix elastomer, but no peak to the PET fiber.

  9. Polyaryl ethers and related polysiloxane copolymer molecular coatings preparation and radiation degradation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mcgrath, J.E.; Hedrick, J.L.; Webster, D.C.; Johnson, B.C.; Mohanty, D.K.; Yilgor, I.

    1983-06-01

    Poly(arylene ether sulfones) comprise a class of materials known as engineering thermoplastics which have a variety of important applications. These polymers are tough, rigid materials with good mechanical properties over a wide temperature range, and they are processed by conventional methods into products typically having excellent hydrolytic, thermal, oxidative and dimensional stability. Wholly aromatic random copolymers of hydroquinone and biphenol with 4.4 prime dichlorodiphenyl sulfone were synthesized via mechanical nucleophilic displacement. Their structures were characterized and mechanical behavior studied. These tough, ductile copolymers show excellent radiation resistance to electron beam treatment and retain much of the mechanical properties up to at least 700 Mrads under argon.

  10. Polyaryl ethers and related polysiloxane copolymer molecular coatings preparation and radiation degrdation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgrath, J. E.; Hedrick, J. L.; Webster, D. C.; Johnson, B. C.; Mohanty, D. K.; Yilgor, I.

    1983-01-01

    Poly(arylene ether sulfones) comprise a class of materials known as engineering thermoplastics which have a variety of important applications. These polymers are tough, rigid materials with good mechanical properties over a wide temperature range, and they are processed by conventional methods into products typically having excellent hydrolytic, thermal, oxidative and dimensional stability. Wholly aromatic random copolymers of hydroquinone and biphenol with 4.4 prime dichlorodiphenyl sulfone were synthesized via mechanical nucleophilic displacement. Their structures were characterized and mechanical behavior studied. These tough, ductile copolymers show excellent radiation resistance to electron beam treatment and retain much of the mechanical properties up to at least 700 Mrads under argon.

  11. Analysis of ageing of amorphous thermoplastic polymers by PVT analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greco, Antonio; Maffezzoli, Alfonso; Gennaro, Riccardo; Rizzo, Michele

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this work is the analysis of ageing phenomenon occurring in amorphous thermoplastic polymers below their glass transition temperature by pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) analysis. The ageing behavior of different polymers as a function of the heating and cooling rates has been widespread studied. Also, different works in literature are aimed to study the effect of the applied pressure on the glass transition behavior. Another relevant aspect related to the glass transition behavior is related to the ageing effects, which can also be influenced by the applied pressure. This is a very relevant issue, since most of the polymers, during ageing, are subjected to mechanical loading. PVT analysis was used to study the ageing of amorphous PET copolymer (PETg) at different pressure levels. Specific volume-temperature curves measured during the cooling and the heating steps were used for calculating the relaxed specific volume, showing that ageing effects increase with increasing applied pressure. The evolution of the fictive temperature as a function of time was calculated from experimental data.

  12. Microstructure and thermomechanical properties relationship of segmented thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frick, Achim; Borm, Michael; Kaoud, Nouran; Kolodziej, Jan; Neudeck, Jens

    2014-05-01

    Thermoplastic polyurethanes (TPU) are important polymeric materials for seals. In competition with Acrylonitrile butadiene rubbers (NBR), TPU exhibits higher strength and a considerable better abrasion resistance. The advantage of NBR over TPU is a smaller compression set but however TPU excels in its much shorter processing cycle times. Generally a TPU is a block copolymer composed of hard and soft segments, which plays an important role in determining the material properties. TPU can be processed either to ready moulded parts or can be incorporated by multi component moulding, in both cases it shows decent mechanical properties. In the present work, the relationship between melt-process induced TPU morphology and resultant thermo mechanical properties were examined and determined by means of quasi-static tensile test, creep experiment, tension test and dynamical mechanical analysis (DMA). Scanning electron beam microscope (SEM) and differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) were used to study the morphology of the samples. A significant mathematical description of the stress-strain behaviour of TPU was found using a 3 term approach. Moreover it became evident that processing conditions such as processing temperature have crucial influence on morphology as well as short and long-term performance. To be more precise, samples processed at higher temperatures showed a lack of large hard segment agglomerates, a smaller strength for strains up to 250% and higher creep compliance.

  13. Microstructure and thermomechanical properties relationship of segmented thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU)

    SciTech Connect

    Frick, Achim Borm, Michael Kaoud, Nouran Kolodziej, Jan Neudeck, Jens

    2014-05-15

    Thermoplastic polyurethanes (TPU) are important polymeric materials for seals. In competition with Acrylonitrile butadiene rubbers (NBR), TPU exhibits higher strength and a considerable better abrasion resistance. The advantage of NBR over TPU is a smaller compression set but however TPU excels in its much shorter processing cycle times. Generally a TPU is a block copolymer composed of hard and soft segments, which plays an important role in determining the material properties. TPU can be processed either to ready moulded parts or can be incorporated by multi component moulding, in both cases it shows decent mechanical properties. In the present work, the relationship between melt-process induced TPU morphology and resultant thermo mechanical properties were examined and determined by means of quasi-static tensile test, creep experiment, tension test and dynamical mechanical analysis (DMA). Scanning electron beam microscope (SEM) and differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) were used to study the morphology of the samples. A significant mathematical description of the stress-strain behaviour of TPU was found using a 3 term approach. Moreover it became evident that processing conditions such as processing temperature have crucial influence on morphology as well as short and long-term performance. To be more precise, samples processed at higher temperatures showed a lack of large hard segment agglomerates, a smaller strength for strains up to 250% and higher creep compliance.

  14. Investigations into the mechanical and physical behavior of thermoplastic elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Kathryn Janelle

    This thesis describes investigations into the physical and mechanical characteristics of two commercial thermoplastic elastomer (TPE) systems. Both systems studied exhibit elastomeric behavior similar to more traditional crosslinked elastomers; however, in these TPEs non-conventional polymer architectures and morphologies are used to produce their elastomeric behavior. The two TPEs of interest are ethylene-propylene random copolymers and dynamically vulcanized blends of ethylene-propylene-diene monomer (EPDM) and isotactic polypropylene (iPP). Very few studies have examined the mechanical behavior of these materials in terms of their composition and morphology. As such, the primary goal of this research is to both qualitatively and quantitatively understand the influence of composition and morphology on mechanical behavior. In additional very little information is available that compares their performance with that of crosslinked elastomers. As a result, the secondary goal is to qualitatively compare the mechanical responses of these TPEs with that of their more traditional counterparts. The ethylene-propylene copolymers studied have very high comonomer contents and exhibit slow crystallization kinetics. Their morphology consists of nanoscale crystallites embedded in an amorphous rubbery matrix. These crystallites act as physical crosslinks that allow for elasticity. Slow crystallization causes subsequent changes in mechanical behavior that take place over days and even weeks. Physical responses (e.g., density, crystallization kinetics, and crystal structure) of five copolymer compositions are investigated. Mechanical responses (e.g., stiffness, ductility, yielding, and reversibility) are also examined. Finally, the influence of morphology on deformation is studied using in situ analytical techniques. The EPDM/iPP blends are dynamically vulcanized which produces a complex morphology consisting of chemically crosslinked EPDM domains embedded within a semicrystalline

  15. Recycling concepts for thermoplastic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Lochem, J.H. van; Henriksen, C.; Lund, H.H.

    1995-10-01

    Thermoplastic short fiber composite materials are increasingly being used as insulating materials in electricity distribution. Economically they possess good opportunities for material recycling and reuse due to the high virgin price. To investigate the recycling potential of post-consumer components, PPS40%GF and PBT30%GF, representing commonly used insulating materials, have been artificially aged and recycled. To simulate 10 years of service life, injection molded tensile bars have been aged in different environments varying temperature, humidity and pH. After accelerated aging, the aging state has been characterized by tensile and impact strength, viscoelastic behavior (DMTA), molecular weight, crystallinity (DSC) and fracture behavior (SEM). These properties have been compared to virgin material. The aged materials have been recycled by regranulation and compounds with different ratios virgin/aged material and different coupling agents to repair the glass-matrix interface. Injection molded compounds were characterized by short and long term properties. Recompounding PBT30%GF with virgin material and no added coupling agents results in a partial recovery of the fiber-matrix adhesion. Based on the first short-term characterizations PBT30%GF seems not very suitable for reuse in primary applications. PPS40%GF seems more suitable for reuse in primary applications after recycling. Although the short-term mechanical properties of the aged batches do not recover after recycling, the fiber-matrix adhesion improves especially when adding coupling agents. Further long-term testing in creep and humid environments during the remaining part of this project will show whether the improved interface properties make recycled materials valuable for reuse in various industrial applications.

  16. Method of forming a foamed thermoplastic polymer

    DOEpatents

    Duchane, David V.; Cash, David L.

    1986-01-01

    A method of forming a foamed thermoplastic polymer. A solid thermoplastic lymer is immersed in an immersant solution comprising a compatible carrier solvent and an infusant solution containing an incompatible liquid blowing agent for a time sufficient for the immersant solution to infuse into the polymer. The carrier solvent is then selectively extracted, preferably by a solvent exchange process in which the immersant solution is gradually diluted with and replaced by the infusant solution, so as to selectively leave behind the infusant solution permanently entrapped in the polymer. The polymer is then heated to volatilize the blowing agent and expand the polymer into a foamed state.

  17. Protein based Block Copolymers

    PubMed Central

    Rabotyagova, Olena S.; Cebe, Peggy; Kaplan, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Advances in genetic engineering have led to the synthesis of protein-based block copolymers with control of chemistry and molecular weight, resulting in unique physical and biological properties. The benefits from incorporating peptide blocks into copolymer designs arise from the fundamental properties of proteins to adopt ordered conformations and to undergo self-assembly, providing control over structure formation at various length scales when compared to conventional block copolymers. This review covers the synthesis, structure, assembly, properties, and applications of protein-based block copolymers. PMID:21235251

  18. Ultrasonic Welding of Graphite/Thermoplastic Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardy, S. S.; Page, D. B.

    1982-01-01

    Ultrasonic welding of graphite/thermoplastic composite materials eliminates need for fasteners (which require drilling or punching, add weight, and degrade stiffness) and can be totally automated in beam fabrication and assembly jigs. Feasibility of technique has been demonstrated in laboratory tests which show that neither angular orientation nor vacuum affect weld quality.

  19. Thermoplastic Composite Materials for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casula, G.; Lenzi, F.; Vitiello, C.

    2008-08-01

    Mechanical and thermo-physical properties of composites materials with thermoplastic matrix (PEEK/IM7, TPI/IM7 and PPS/IM7) used for aerospace applications have been analyzed as function of two different process techniques: compression molding and fiber placement process "hot gas assisted."

  20. Biodegradation Of thermoplastic polyurethanes from vegetable oils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thermoplastic urethanes based on polyricinoleic acid soft segments and MDI/BD hard segments with varied soft segment concentration were prepared. Soft segment concentration was varied fro, 40 to 70 wt %. Biodegradation was studied by respirometry. Segmented polyurethanes with soft segments based ...

  1. Silicone/Acrylate Copolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, W. E.

    1982-01-01

    Two-step process forms silicone/acrylate copolymers. Resulting acrylate functional fluid is reacted with other ingredients to produce copolymer. Films of polymer were formed by simply pouring or spraying mixture and allowing solvent to evaporate. Films showed good weatherability. Durable, clear polymer films protect photovoltaic cells.

  2. Confinement of block copolymers

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The following were studied: confinement of block copolymers, free surface confinement, effects of substrate interactions, random copolymers at homopolymer interfaces, phase separation in thin film polymer mixtures, buffing of polymer surfaces, and near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy.

  3. Blends of thermoplastic polyurethane and polydimethylsiloxane rubber: assessment of biocompatibility and suture holding strength of membranes.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Krishna Prasad; Al-Ghamdi, Ahmed; Parameswar, Ramesh; Nando, G B

    2013-01-01

    In the present investigation, a compatibilized blend of thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is prepared by using copolymer of ethylene and methyl acrylate (EMA) as a reactive compatibilizer. Detailed in vitro biocompatibility studies were carried out for this compatibilized blend and the material was found noncytotoxic towards L929 mouse fibroblast subcutaneous connective tissue cell line. Microporosity was created on the surface of membranes prepared from the blend material by adopting the crazing mechanism. Cell proliferation and growth studies on the membranes surface showed that the microporous surface favoured ingrowth of the cells compared with a nonmicroporous surface. Suture holding strength studies indicate that the microporous membranes have enough strength to withstand the cutting and tearing forces through the suture hole. This blend material could be evaluated further to find its suitability in various implant applications. PMID:24454376

  4. Blends of Thermoplastic Polyurethane and Polydimethylsiloxane Rubber: Assessment of Biocompatibility and Suture Holding Strength of Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ghamdi, Ahmed; Parameswar, Ramesh; Nando, G. B.

    2013-01-01

    In the present investigation, a compatibilized blend of thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is prepared by using copolymer of ethylene and methyl acrylate (EMA) as a reactive compatibilizer. Detailed in vitro biocompatibility studies were carried out for this compatibilized blend and the material was found noncytotoxic towards L929 mouse fibroblast subcutaneous connective tissue cell line. Microporosity was created on the surface of membranes prepared from the blend material by adopting the crazing mechanism. Cell proliferation and growth studies on the membranes surface showed that the microporous surface favoured ingrowth of the cells compared with a nonmicroporous surface. Suture holding strength studies indicate that the microporous membranes have enough strength to withstand the cutting and tearing forces through the suture hole. This blend material could be evaluated further to find its suitability in various implant applications. PMID:24454376

  5. Controlling sub-microdomain structure in microphase-ordered block copolymers and their nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, Michelle Kathleen

    Block copolymers exhibit a wealth of morphologies that continue to find ubiquitous use in a diverse variety of mature and emergent (nano)technologies, such as photonic crystals, integrated circuits, pharmaceutical encapsulents, fuel cells and separation membranes. While numerous studies have explored the effects of molecular confinement on such copolymers, relatively few have examined the sub-microdomain structure that develops upon modification of copolymer molecular architecture or physical incorporation of nanoscale objects. This work will address two relevant topics in this vein: (i) bidisperse brushes formed by single block copolymer molecules and (ii) copolymer nanocomposites formed by addition of molecular or nanoscale additives. In the first case, an isomorphic series of asymmetric poly(styrene-b -isoprene-b-styrene) (S1IS2) triblock copolymers of systematically varied chain length has been synthesized from a parent SI diblock copolymer. Small-angle x-ray scattering, coupled with dynamic rheology and self-consistent field theory (SCFT), reveals that the progressively grown S2 block initially resides in the I-rich matrix and effectively reduces the copolymer incompatibility until a critical length is reached. At this length, the S2 block co-locates with the S1 block so that the two blocks generate a bidisperse brush (insofar as the S1 and S2 lengths differ). This single-molecule analog to binary block copolymer blends affords unique opportunities for materials design at sub-microdomain length scales and provides insight into the transition from diblock to triblock copolymer (and thermoplastic elastomeric nature). In the second case, I explore the distribution of molecular and nanoscale additives in microphase-ordered block copolymers and demonstrate via SCFT that an interfacial excess, which depends strongly on additive concentration, selectivity and relative size, develops. These predictions are in agreement with experimental findings. Moreover, using a

  6. Hierarchically UVO patterned elastomeric and thermoplastic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ying; Kulkarni, Manish; Marshall, Allan; Karim, Alamgir

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate a simple yet versatile method to fabricate tunable hierarchical micro-nanostructures on flexible Poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) elastomer and thermoplastic polymer surface by a two-step process. Nanoscale patterned PDMS was obtained by imprinting compact disc (CD)/digital video disc (DVD) patterns. The second micro pattern was superposed by selective densification of PDMS by exposing to ultraviolet-ozone radiation (UVO) through micro-patterned TEM grid as a mask. The nanoscale patterns are preserved through UVO exposure step leading to formation of deep hierarchical patterns, so that for a 19 um square mesh, the micro pattern has a depth of 600nm with 6h PDMS UVO exposure time. This simple method can be promoted to fabricate hierarchical structures of thermoplastic materials (such as polystyrene), from which the mechanism of capillary imprinting and thermal stability of hierarchical patterns are investigated. This study is potentially important to various applications ranging from biomimetic scaffolds to solar cell.

  7. Process optimization of a thermoplastic polyimidesulphone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dezern, J. F.; Young, P. R.

    1985-01-01

    The detailed characterization of an experimental thermoplastic polyimidesulfane adhesive based on 3,3 prime-diaminodiphenylsulfone and 3,3 prime,4,4 prime-benzophenone tetracarboxylic dianhydride was studied. Model compounds were also examined. Thermal cyclization of the amide-acid to the imide was studied by a variety of techniques including DSC, TGA, MS, in situ diffuse reflectance-FTIR, and flow measurement. Characterizations were continued during the processing of adhesive tapes and the fabrication, bonding, and testing of lap shear specimens. Results provide fundamental insights into the role of cure chemistry, and the effects of residual solvent and volatile produces on processing and performance. These insights and the resulting chemical models should lead to more efficient processing cycles for these and other related thermoplastic adhesive systems.

  8. Fiber reinforced thermoplastic resin matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Robert J. (Inventor); Chang, Glenn E. C. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Polyimide polymer composites having a combination of enhanced thermal and mechanical properties even when subjected to service temperatures as high as 700.degree. F. are described. They comprise (a) from 10 to 50 parts by weight of a thermoplastic polyimide resin prepared from 2,2-bis[4-(4-aminophenoxy)phenyl]hexafluoropropane and (b) from 90 to 50 parts by weight of continuous reinforcing fibers, the total of (a) and (b) being 100 parts by weight. Composites based on polyimide resin formed from 2,2-bis[4-(4-aminophenoxy)phenyl]hexafluoropropane and pyromellitic dianhydride and continuous carbon fibers retained at least about 50% of their room temperature shear strength after exposure to 700.degree. F. for a period of 16 hours in flowing air. Preferably, the thermoplastic polyimide resin is formed in situ in the composite material by thermal imidization of a corresponding amide-acid polymer prepared from 2,2-bis[4-(4-aminophenoxy)phenyl]hexafluoropropane. It is also preferred to initially size the continuous reinforcing fibers with up to about one percent by weight of an amide-acid polymer prepared from 2,2-bis[4-(4-aminophenoxy)phenyl]hexafluoropropane. In this way imidization at a suitable elevated temperature results in the in-situ formation of a substantially homogeneous thermoplastic matrix of the polyimide resin tightly and intimately bonded to the continuous fibers. The resultant composites tend to have optimum thermo-mechanical properties.

  9. Thermoforming of Continuous Fibre Reinforced Thermoplastic Composites

    SciTech Connect

    McCool, Rauri; Murphy, Adrian; Wilson, Ryan; Jiang Zhenyu; Price, Mark

    2011-05-04

    The introduction of new materials, particularly for aerospace products, is not a simple, quick or cheap task. New materials require extensive and expensive qualification and must meet challenging strength, stiffness, durability, manufacturing, inspection and maintenance requirements. Growth in industry acceptance for fibre reinforced thermoplastic composite systems requires the determination of whole life attributes including both part processing and processed part performance data. For thermoplastic composite materials the interactions between the processing parameters, in-service structural performance and end of life recyclability are potentially interrelated. Given the large number and range of parameters and the complexity of the potential relationships, understanding for whole life design must be developed in a systematic building block approach. To assess and demonstrate such an approach this article documents initial coupon level thermoforming trials for a commercially available fibre reinforced thermoplastic laminate, identifying the key interactions between processing and whole life performance characteristics. To examine the role of the thermoforming process parameters on the whole life performance characteristics of the formed part requires a series of manufacturing trials combined with a series of characterisation tests on the manufacturing trial output. Using a full factorial test programme and considering all possible process parameters over a range of potential magnitudes would result in a very large number of manufacturing trials and accompanying characterisation tests. Such an approach would clearly be expensive and require significant time to complete, therefore failing to address the key requirement for a future design methodology capable of rapidly generating design knowledge for new materials and processes. In this work the role of mould tool temperature and blank forming temperature on the thermoforming of a commercially available

  10. Bismaleimide Copolymer Matrix Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, John A.; Heimbuch, Alvin H.; Hsu, Ming-Ta S.; Chen, Timothy S.

    1987-01-01

    Graphite composites, prepared from 1:1 copolymer of two new bismaleimides based on N,N'-m-phenylene-bis(m-amino-benzamide) structure have mechanical properties superior to those prepared from other bismaleimide-type resins. New heat-resistant composites replace metal in some structural applications. Monomers used to form copolymers with superior mechanical properties prepared by reaction of MMAB with maleic or citraconic anhydride.

  11. Antimicrobial Graft Copolymer Gels.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Amanda C; Madsen, Jeppe; Douglas, C W Ian; MacNeil, Sheila; Armes, Steven P

    2016-08-01

    In view of the growing worldwide rise in microbial resistance, there is considerable interest in designing new antimicrobial copolymers. The aim of the current study was to investigate the relationship between antimicrobial activity and copolymer composition/architecture to gain a better understanding of their mechanism of action. Specifically, the antibacterial activity of several copolymers based on 2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl phosphorylcholine [MPC] and 2-hydroxypropyl methacrylate (HPMA) toward Staphylococcus aureus was examined. Both block and graft copolymers were synthesized using either atom transfer radical polymerization or reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization and characterized via (1)H NMR, gel permeation chromatography, rheology, and surface tensiometry. Antimicrobial activity was assessed using a range of well-known assays, including direct contact, live/dead staining, and the release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), while transmission electron microscopy was used to study the morphology of the bacteria before and after the addition of various copolymers. As expected, PMPC homopolymer was biocompatible but possessed no discernible antimicrobial activity. PMPC-based graft copolymers comprising PHPMA side chains (i.e. PMPC-g-PHPMA) significantly reduced both bacterial growth and viability. In contrast, a PMPC-PHPMA diblock copolymer comprising a PMPC stabilizer block and a hydrophobic core-forming PHPMA block did not exhibit any antimicrobial activity, although it did form a biocompatible worm gel. Surface tensiometry studies and LDH release assays suggest that the PMPC-g-PHPMA graft copolymer exhibits surfactant-like activity. Thus, the observed antimicrobial activity is likely to be the result of the weakly hydrophobic PHPMA chains penetrating (and hence rupturing) the bacterial membrane. PMID:27409712

  12. A modeling approach to thermoplastic pultrusion. I - Formulation of models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astrom, B. T.; Pipes, R. B.

    1993-06-01

    Models to predict temperature and pressure distributions within a thermoplastic composed as it travels through a pultrusion line and a model to predict the pulling resistance of a die are presented and discussed. A set of mathematical models of the thermoplastic pultrusion process comprising temperature, pressure, and pulling force models are discussed and extensively verified with experimental data.

  13. Imprinting of confining sites for cell cultures on thermoplastic substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cone, C. D.; Fleenor, E. N.

    1969-01-01

    Prevention of test cell migration beyond the field of observation involves confining cells or cultures in microlagoons made in either a layer of grease or a thermoplastic substrate. Thermoplastic films or dishes are easily imprinted with specifically designed patterns of microlagoons.

  14. Microscopic deformation mechanisms in model thermoplastic elastomers by molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Amanda; Rottler, Jörg

    Thermoplastic elastomers (TPEs) can be formed by exploiting the nanostructured morphology of triblock copolymers. Glassy end-blocks phase separate to form spherical regions which act as physical cross-links for the soft rubbery phase. Molecular dynamics simulations of TPEs allow us to relate the microscopic mechanisms active during plastic deformation to the macroscopic stress response. A coarse-grained bead-spring model of linear ABA triblock copolymers which forms the desired spherical morphology is used for pure stress and pure strain uniaxial deformations. The systems are first equilibrated using a soft pair potential. We observe increased strain hardening in triblocks when compared to homopolymers of the same chain length in accordance with experiments. We connect variations in the stress response for systems of different chain lengths to the non-affine deformation of chains and to the scale of phase separated regions. The stress response is also compared to rubbery elasticity models, taking into account the evolution of chain entanglements during deformation. We observe void formation at the interfaces of glassy regions or where these regions have broken up at large strain.

  15. Structure and properties of thermoplastic polyurethanes based on poly(dimethylsiloxane): assessment of biocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Pergal, Marija V; Nestorov, Jelena; Tovilović, Gordana; Ostojić, Sanja; Gođevac, Dejan; Vasiljević-Radović, Dana; Djonlagić, Jasna

    2014-11-01

    Properties and biocompatibility of a series of thermoplastic poly(urethane-siloxane)s (TPUSs) based on α,ω-dihydroxy ethoxy propyl poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) for potential biomedical application were studied. Thin films of TPUSs with a different PDMS soft segment content were characterized by (1) H NMR, quantitative (13) C NMR, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), atomic force microscopy (AFM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), contact angle, and water absorption measurements. Different techniques (FTIR, AFM, and DMA) showed that decrease of PDMS content promotes microphase separation in TPUSs. Samples with a higher PDMS content have more hydrophobic surface and better waterproof performances, but lower degree of crystallinity. Biocompatibility of TPUSs was examined after attachment of endothelial cells to the untreated copolymer surface or surface pretreated with multicomponent protein mixture, and by using competitive protein adsorption assay. TPUSs did not exhibit any cytotoxicity toward endothelial cells, as measured by lactate dehydrogenase and 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide assays. The untreated and proteins preadsorbed TPUS samples favored endothelial cells adhesion and growth, indicating good biocompatibility. All TPUSs adsorbed more albumin than fibrinogen in competitive protein adsorption experiment, which is feature regarded as beneficial for biocompatibility. The results indicate that TPUSs have good surface, thermo-mechanical, and biocompatible properties, which can be tailored for biomedical application requirements by adequate selection of the soft/hard segments ratio of the copolymers. PMID:24376027

  16. Tailoring Phase Behavior and Mechanical Properties in Thermoplastic Elastomers through Block Sequence and Macromolecular Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Adam; Register, Richard

    2015-03-01

    Block copolymers exhibit unique properties which depend not only on the identities of the constituent blocks but also the block sequence and macromolecular architecture. Thermoplastic elastomers (TPEs) are a prime example. In TPEs the arrangement of glassy end blocks flanking a long rubbery midblock gives rise to a physically cross-linked, elastic solid. Exchanging the glassy blocks for crystalline blocks can improve the processability and solvent resistance, but adversely affects the mechanical performance. The block sequence crystalline-glassy-rubbery-glassy-crystalline has been developed to combine the advantages of both crystalline and glassy blocks. Careful selection of block lengths produces materials in which the order-disorder transition temperature lies below the melting point of the crystalline block, ensuring that the melt will be homogeneous above the melting point. Access to single-phase melts provides a large reduction in viscosity and elasticity over conventional TPEs, which remain microphase-separated in the melt. Inserting the glassy blocks between the crystalline and rubbery blocks produces a vitreous layer surrounding the crystalline domains, which improves the room-temperature mechanical performance. Incorporating the crystalline-glassy-rubbery motif into the arms of star block copolymers adds another level of control. The star architecture introduces a permanent cross-link at the center of the star without appreciably affecting the phase behavior.

  17. Tough poly(arylene ether) thermoplastics as modifiers for bismaleimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenzenberger, H. D.; Roemer, W.; Hergenrother, P. M.; Jensen, B. J.

    1989-01-01

    Several aspects of research on thermoplastics as toughness modifiers are discussed, including the contribution of the backbone chemistry and the concentration of the poly(arylene ether) thermoplastic to fracture toughness, influence of the molecular weight of the poly(arylene ether) thermoplastic on neat resin fracture toughness, and the morphology of the thermoplastic modified networks. The results show that fracture toughness of brittle bismaleimide resins can be improved significantly with poly(arylene ether) thermoplastic levels of 20 percent by weight, and that high molecular weight poly(arylene ether) based on bisphenol A provides the highest degree of toughening. Preliminary composite evaluation shows that improvements in neat resin toughness translate into carbon fabric composite.

  18. Program For Two-Dimensional Thermoplastic Deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orient, George E.

    1993-01-01

    SOLAS contains number of utility programs for use with finite-element simulations. Designed to handle two-dimensional problems of quasi-static thermoplastic deformation. Includes optional postprocessing software, independent of solution codes, generating unified element-by-element list of quantitative results of computation, plus file containing signed equivalent stresses, equivalent strains, and multiaxiality factor parameter. Signs of equivalent quantities expressed either with respect to maximum principal quantities or with respect to directions defined by user. Written in UNIX shell script and FORTRAN 77.

  19. Trigeminal trophic syndrome treated with thermoplastic occlusion.

    PubMed

    Kurien, Anil M; Damian, Diona L; Moloney, Fergal J

    2011-02-01

    A 72-year-old man with a history of thrombotic CVA causing lateral medullary infarction presented with non-healing ulcers of the right side of the face of 5 months' duration. After extensive investigations, a diagnosis of trigeminal trophic syndrome was made. The ulcers progressed relentlessly despite amitriptyline and gabapentin, and he was treated with a combination of carbamazepine and thermoplastic mask occlusion of the right side of his face. Over the next 10 weeks the shallower facial ulcers began to diminish in depth and diameter, and the deeper ulcers stopped progressing. Although the patient showed early signs of healing, he died because of complications from the CVA. PMID:21332680

  20. Development of thermoplastic coated multifunctional transmission elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golaz, B.; Michaud, V.; de Oliveira, R.; Månson, J.-A. E.

    2012-04-01

    We report on key challenges of the development of steel cords reinforced thermoplastic elastomer composites with smart functionalities: adhesion tailoring for a durable mechanical load transfer through steel cords or other transmission elements by the use of surface treatments and primers, and integrated distributed temperature and strain sensing by the use of embedded fiber optic sensors. Traditional surface treatments including silane coupling agent were outperformed in processing time, adhesion and durability by a fast-curing coupling method using a UV-curable primer; and the integrated distributed temperature and strain sensing capability was demonstrated. The practical applications of the resulting multifunctional transmission element are then discussed in light of these results.

  1. Method of forming a foamed thermoplastic polymer

    DOEpatents

    Duchane, D.V.; Cash, D.L.

    1984-11-21

    A solid thermoplastic polymer is immersed in an immersant solution comprising a compatible carrier solvent and an infusant solution containing an incompatible liquid blowing agent for a time sufficient for the immersant solution to infuse into the polymer. The carrier solvent is then selectively extracted, preferably by a solvent exchange process in which the immersant solution is gradually diluted with and replaced by the infusant solution, so as to selectively leave behind the infustant solution permanently entrapped in the polymer. The polymer is then heated to volatilize the blowing agent and expand the polymer into a foamed state.

  2. Multiblock thermoplastic polyurethanes for biomedical and shape memory applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Xinzhu

    Polyurethanes are a class of polymers that are capable of tailoring the overall polymer structure and thus final properties by many factors. The great potential in tailoring polymer structures imparts PUs unique mechanical properties and good cytocompatibility, which make them good candidates for many biomedical devices. In this dissertation, three families of multiblock thermoplastic polyurethanes are synthesized and characterized for biomedical and shape memory applications. In the first case described in Chapters 2, 3 and 4, a novel family of multiblock thermoplastic polyurethanes consisting of poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL) and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) are presented. These materials were discovered to be very durable, with strain-to-break higher than 1200%. Heat-triggered reversible plasticity shape memory (RPSM) was observed, where the highly deformed samples completely recovered their as-cast shape within one minute when heating above the transition temperature. Instead of conventional "hard" blocks, entanglements, which result from high molecular weight, served as the physical crosslinks in this system, engendering shape recovery and preventing flow. Moreover, water-triggered shape memory effect of PCL-PEG TPUs is explored, wherein water permeated into the initially oriented PEG domains, causing rapid shape recovery toward the equilibrium shape upon contact with liquid water. The recovery behavior is found to be dependent on PEG weight percentage in the copolymers. By changing the material from bulk film to electrospun fibrous mat, recovery speed was greatly accelerated. The rate of water recovery was manipulated through structural variables, including thickness of bulk film and diameter of e-spun webs. A new, yet simple shape memory cycle, "wet-fixing" is also reported, where both the fixing and recovery ratios can be greatly improved. A detailed microstructural study on one particular composition is presented, revealing the evolution of microphase

  3. Star-like copolymer stabilized noble-metal nanoparticle powders.

    PubMed

    Cao, Peng-Fei; Yan, Yun-Hui; Mangadlao, Joey Dacula; Rong, Li-Han; Advincula, Rigoberto

    2016-03-31

    The amphiphilic star-like copolymer polyethylenimine-block-poly(ε-caprolactone) (PEI-b-PCL) was utilized to transfer the pre-synthesized citrate-capped noble metal nanoparticles (NMNPs) from an aqueous layer to an organic layer without any additional reagents. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were utilized to study the assembly of the polymers coated on the surface of the citrate-capped NMNPs. After removing the organic solvent, the polymer-coated NMNPs in powder form (PCP-NMNPs) were obtained. The excellent solubility of the PEI-b-PCL allows the PCP-NMNPs to be easily dispersed in most of the organic solvents without any significant aggregation. Moreover, the good thermal stability and long-term stability make PCP-NMNPs an excellent NMNP-containing hybrid system for different specific applications, such as surface coating, catalysis and thermoplastic processing of nanocomposite materials. PMID:26659728

  4. Structure property behavior of polyimide siloxane segmented copolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, C. A.; Summers, J. D.; Bott, R. H.; Taylor, L. T.; Ward, T. C.

    1987-01-01

    Procedures were developed for preparing soluble fully imidized polyimide-polydimethyl siloxane segmented copolymers of wide ranging compositions. At low siloxane levels, the materails behave as modified polyimides. At higher concentrations, the materials are analogous to thermoplastic elastomers. Characterization by dynamic mechanical and thermal analysis methods will be reported along with an assesment of the bulk mechanical properties and the surface behavior. The surface behavior is particularly interesting since the materials can be tailored to have siloxane surfaces even at rather low siloxane contents. This influences a number of properties such as the coefficient of friction and, importanly, the degradation of these materials under aggressive oxygen environments (e.g., atomic oxygen, oxygen plasma).

  5. Supportability evaluation of thermoplastic and thermoset composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chanani, G. R.; Boldi, D.; Cramer, S. G.; Heimerdinger, M. W.

    1990-01-01

    Nearly 300 advanced composite components manufactured by Northrop Corporation are flying on U.S. Air Force and U.S. Navy supersonic aircraft as part of a three-year Air Force/Navy/Northrop supportability evaluation. Both thermoplastic and high-temperature thermoset composites were evaluated for their in-service performance on 48 USAF and Navy F-5E fighter and USAFT-38 trainer aircraft in the first large-scale, long-term maintenance evaluation of these advanced materials. Northrop manufactured four types of doors for the project-avionics bay access, oil fill, inlet duct inspection, and a main landing gear door. The doors are made of PEEK (polyetheretherketone) thermoplastic, which is tougher and potentially less expensive to manufacture than conventional composites; and 5250-3 BMI (bismaleimide) thermoset, which is manufactured like a conventional epoxy composite but can withstand higher service temperatures. Results obtained so far indicate that both the BMI and PEEK are durable with PEEK being somewhat better than BMI.

  6. A 69 cent look at thermoplastic softening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanasupa, Linda S.

    1993-01-01

    The objectives are to demonstrate the change in mechanical properties of a thermoplastic polymer when the polymer is heated above the glass transition temperature. The instructor or student can perform this demonstration. In preparation for the demonstration, fill the flask or beaker 3/4 full with water and bring the water to a boil. First observe the initial stiffness of the toothbrush by slightly flexing it. Note that it is fairly stiff and retains its initial shape when the forces are removed. If you were to apply enough force, the toothbrush would break in a somewhat brittle fashion. Now place the toothbrush in the boiling water for 2 minutes. After the 2 minutes are up, remove the toothbrush from the boiling water with the washcloth. At this time, you will be able to bend the toothbrush easily. When it cools it will retain this bent shape. You've just demonstrated heating the polymer above the glass transition temperature, demonstrating thermoplastic softening. Instructor notes are provided.

  7. Low Cost Processing of Commingled Thermoplastic Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiasson, Matthew Lee

    A low cost vacuum consolidation process has been investigated for use with commingled thermoplastic matrix composites. In particular, the vacuum consolidation behaviour of commingled polypropylene/glass fibre and commingled nylon/carbon fibre precursors were studied. Laminates were consolidated in a convection oven under vacuum pressure. During processing, the consolidation of the laminate packs was measured by use of non-contact eddy current sensors. The consolidation curves are then used to tune an empirical consolidation model. The overall quality of the resulting laminates is also discussed. Dynamic mechanical analysis, differential scanning calorimetry and mechanical tensile testing were also performed in order to determine the effects of varying processing parameters on the physical and mechanical properties of the laminates. Through this analysis, it was determined that the nylon/carbon fibre blend was not suitable for vacuum consolidation, while the polypropylene/glass fibre blend is a viable option for vacuum consolidation. The ultimate goal of this work is to provide a foundation from which low cost unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) components can be designed and manufactured from thermoplastic matrix composites using a low cost processing technique as an alternative to traditional thermoset composite materials.

  8. Bactericidal block copolymer micelles.

    PubMed

    Vyhnalkova, Renata; Eisenberg, Adi; van de Ven, Theo

    2011-05-12

    Block copolymer micelles with bactericidal properties were designed to deactivate pathogens such as E. coli bacteria. The micelles of PS-b-PAA and PS-b-P4VP block copolymers were loaded with biocides TCMTB or TCN up to 20 or 30 wt.-%, depending on the type of antibacterial agent. Bacteria were exposed to loaded micelles and bacterial deactivation was evaluated. The micelles loaded with TCN are bactericidal; bacteria are killed in less than two minutes of exposure. The most likely interpretation of the data is that the biocide is transferred to the bacteria by repeated micelle/bacteria contacts, and not via the solution. PMID:21275041

  9. Block copolymer blends with improved oil absorption resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Himes, G.R.; Sanders, A.

    1989-11-14

    This patent describes a thermoplastic blend. It comprises: about 80 to about 20 parts by weight of an elastometric block copolymer having the general configuration A-B-A, wherein: each A block is a polymerized monoalkenyl aromatic hydrocarbon block having an average molecular weight of about 4000 to about 115,000; the A blocks, in combination, comprise about 5 to about 35w% of the elastomeric block copolymer; and each B block is a non-hydrogenated butadiene hydrocarbon block consisting of 8 to 55 mole percent condensed butadiene units in the 1,2 configuration, or a hydrogenated butadiene hydrocarbon block consisting of 35 to 55 mole percent condensed butadiene units in the 1,2 configuration, and the B block has an average molecular weight of between about 20,000 and about 450,000; and about 20 to about 80 parts by weight of a block copolymer having the general configuration A-B-A wherein: each A block is a polymerized monoalkenyl aromatic hydrocarbon block having an average molecular weight of about 4000 to about 115,000; the A blocks, in combination, comprise about 5 to about 35 w % of the block copolymer; each B block is a polymerized butadiene hydrocarbon block consisting of about 18 to 34 mole percent condensed butadiene units in the 1,2 configuration, and the B block has an average molecular weight of between about 20,000 and about 450,000; and the B blocks are hydrogenated to an unsaturation that is less than about 5% of the original unsaturation.

  10. Synthesis and characterization of brush-like multigraft copolymers PnBA-g-PMMA by a combination of emulsion AGET ATRP and emulsion polymerization.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Wang, Wenwen; Li, Chunmei; Tan, Jiaojun; Yin, Dezhong; Zhang, Hepeng; Zhang, Baoliang; Yin, Changjie; Zhang, Qiuyu

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, poly(n-butyl acrylate)-g-poly(methyl methacrylate) multigraft copolymers were synthesized by macromonomer technique and miniemulsion copolymerization. The PMMA macromonomers were obtained by an activator generated by electron transfer atom transfer radical polymerization (AGET ATRP) in emulsion system and subsequent allylation. Then the copolymerization of different macromonomers with nBA was carried out in miniemulsion system, obtaining multigraft copolymers with high molecular weight. The latex particles and distribution of emulsion AGET ATRP and miniemulsion copolymerization were characterized using laser light scattering. The molecular weight and polydispersity indices of macromonomers and multigraft copolymers were analyzed by gel permeation chromatography, and the number-average molecular weight range is 187,600-554,800 g/mol for PnBA-g-PMMA copolymers. In addition, the structural characteristics of macromonomer and brush-like copolymers were determined by infrared spectra and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The thermal performance of brush-like copolymers were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis. Atomic force microscopy results showed that the degree of microphase separation was varying with increasing PMMA content in PnBA-g-PMMA. The dynamic rheometer analysis revealed that multigraft copolymer with PMMA content of 31.4% exhibited good elastomeric properties to function as a TPE. These multigraft copolymers show a promising low cost and environmental friendly thermoplastic elastomer. PMID:25988487

  11. Non-aqueous emulsions stabilized by block copolymers: application to liquid disinfectant-filled elastomeric films.

    PubMed

    Riess, Gérard; Cheymol, André; Hoerner, Pierre; Krikorian, Raffi

    2004-05-20

    The emulsifying and stabilization efficiency of polybutadiene-b-poly(ethylene oxide) and poly(ter butylstyrene)-poly(ethylene oxide) diblock copolymers is examined in non-aqueous emulsions. These emulsions are formed by a dispersion of polyethylene glycol mixed with a cationic surfactant acting as a biocide, in a continuous phase of a thermoplastic elastomer (SEBS) dissolved in methylcyclohexane. Emulsions with controlled droplet size and excellent stability could be obtained, which by solvent evaporation lead to elastomeric films containing droplets of confined disinfecting liquids. PMID:15072927

  12. Thermal monitoring of the thermoplastic injection molding process with FBGs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberto, Nélia J.; Nogueira, Rogério N.; Neto, Victor F.

    2014-08-01

    Injection molding is an important polymer processing method for manufacturing plastic components. In this work, the thermal monitoring of the thermoplastic injection molding is presented, since temperature is a critical parameter that influences the process features. A set of fiber Bragg gratings were multiplexed, aiming a two dimensional monitoring of the mold. The results allowed to identify the different stages of the thermoplastic molding cycle. Additionally, the data provide information about the heat transfer phenomena, an important issue for the thermoplastic injection sector, and thus for an endless number of applications that employ this type of materials.

  13. Positron lifetime studies in thermoplastic polyimide test specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Stclair, T. L.; Holt, W. H.; Mock, W., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Positron lifetime measurements were made in two thermoplastic polyimide materials recently developed at Langley. The long component lifetime values in polyimidesulfone samples are 847 + or - 81 Ps (dry) and 764 + or - 91 Ps (saturated). The corresponding values in LARC thermoplastic imides are 1080 + or - 139 Ps (dry) and 711 + or - 96 Ps (saturated). Clearly, the presence of moisture has greater effect on positron lifetime in LARC thermoplastic imides than in the case of polyimidesulfones. This result is consistent with the photomicrographic observations made on frozen water saturated specimens of these materials.

  14. Block coordination copolymers

    DOEpatents

    Koh, Kyoung Moo; Wong-Foy, Antek G.; Matzger, Adam J.; Benin, Annabelle I.; Willis, Richard R.

    2012-12-04

    The present invention provides compositions of crystalline coordination copolymers wherein multiple organic molecules are assembled to produce porous framework materials with layered or core-shell structures. These materials are synthesized by sequential growth techniques such as the seed growth technique. In addition, the invention provides a simple procedure for controlling functionality.

  15. Block coordination copolymers

    DOEpatents

    Koh, Kyoung Moo; Wong-Foy, Antek G; Matzger, Adam J; Benin, Annabelle I; Willis, Richard R

    2012-11-13

    The present invention provides compositions of crystalline coordination copolymers wherein multiple organic molecules are assembled to produce porous framework materials with layered or core-shell structures. These materials are synthesized by sequential growth techniques such as the seed growth technique. In addition, the invention provides a simple procedure for controlling functionality.

  16. Block coordination copolymers

    DOEpatents

    Koh, Kyoung Moo; Wong-Foy, Antek G; Matzger, Adam J; Benin, Annabelle I; Willis, Richard R

    2014-11-11

    The present invention provides compositions of crystalline coordination copolymers wherein multiple organic molecules are assembled to produce porous framework materials with layered or core-shell structures. These materials are synthesized by sequential growth techniques such as the seed growth technique. In addition, the invention provides a simple procedure for controlling functionality.

  17. Ultraviolet absorbing copolymers

    DOEpatents

    Gupta, Amitava; Yavrouian, Andre H.

    1982-01-01

    Photostable and weather stable absorping copolymers have been prepared from acrylic esters such as methyl methacrylate containing 0.1 to 5% of an 2-hydroxy-allyl benzophenone, preferably the 4,4' dimethoxy derivative thereof. The pendant benzophenone chromophores protect the acrylic backbone and when photoexcited do not degrade the ester side chain, nor abstract hydrogen from the backbone.

  18. Dissipative particle dynamics of triblock copolymer melts: A midblock conformational study at moderate segregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tallury, Syamal S.; Spontak, Richard J.; Pasquinelli, Melissa A.

    2014-12-01

    As thermoplastic elastomers, triblock copolymers constitute an immensely important class of shape-memory soft materials due to their unique ability to form molecular networks stabilized by physical, rather than chemical, cross-links. The extent to which such networks develop in triblock and higher-order multiblock copolymers is sensitive to the formation of midblock bridges, which serve to connect neighboring microdomains. In addition to bridges, copolymer molecules can likewise form loops and dangling ends upon microphase separation or they can remain unsegregated. While prior theoretical and simulation studies have elucidated the midblock bridging fraction in triblock copolymer melts, most have only considered strongly segregated systems wherein dangling ends and unsegregated chains become relatively insignificant. In this study, simulations based on dissipative particle dynamics are performed to examine the self-assembly and networkability of moderately segregated triblock copolymers. Utilizing a density-based cluster-recognition algorithm, we demonstrate how the simulations can be analyzed to extract information about microdomain formation and permit explicit quantitation of the midblock bridging, looping, dangling, and unsegregated fractions for linear triblock copolymers varying in chain length, molecular composition, and segregation level. We show that midblock conformations can be sensitive to variations in chain length, molecular composition, and bead repulsion, and that a systematic investigation can be used to identify the onset of strong segregation where the presence of dangling and unsegregated fractions are minimal. In addition, because this clustering approach is robust, it can be used with any particle-based simulation method to quantify network formation of different morphologies for a wide range of triblock and higher-order multiblock copolymer systems.

  19. Dissipative particle dynamics of triblock copolymer melts: a midblock conformational study at moderate segregation.

    PubMed

    Tallury, Syamal S; Spontak, Richard J; Pasquinelli, Melissa A

    2014-12-28

    As thermoplastic elastomers, triblock copolymers constitute an immensely important class of shape-memory soft materials due to their unique ability to form molecular networks stabilized by physical, rather than chemical, cross-links. The extent to which such networks develop in triblock and higher-order multiblock copolymers is sensitive to the formation of midblock bridges, which serve to connect neighboring microdomains. In addition to bridges, copolymer molecules can likewise form loops and dangling ends upon microphase separation or they can remain unsegregated. While prior theoretical and simulation studies have elucidated the midblock bridging fraction in triblock copolymer melts, most have only considered strongly segregated systems wherein dangling ends and unsegregated chains become relatively insignificant. In this study, simulations based on dissipative particle dynamics are performed to examine the self-assembly and networkability of moderately segregated triblock copolymers. Utilizing a density-based cluster-recognition algorithm, we demonstrate how the simulations can be analyzed to extract information about microdomain formation and permit explicit quantitation of the midblock bridging, looping, dangling, and unsegregated fractions for linear triblock copolymers varying in chain length, molecular composition, and segregation level. We show that midblock conformations can be sensitive to variations in chain length, molecular composition, and bead repulsion, and that a systematic investigation can be used to identify the onset of strong segregation where the presence of dangling and unsegregated fractions are minimal. In addition, because this clustering approach is robust, it can be used with any particle-based simulation method to quantify network formation of different morphologies for a wide range of triblock and higher-order multiblock copolymer systems. PMID:25554184

  20. Acoustic and ultrasonic characterization constraints of self-healing (ethylene-co-methacrylic acid) copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pestka, Kenneth, II; Buckley, Jonathan; Kalista, Stephen; Bowers, Nicholas

    Recent experiments indicate that small sample poly (ethylene-co-methacrylic acid) copolymers (EMAA copolymers) exhibit time dependent variation in their acoustic and ultrasonic resonant spectra after exposure to a damage event. However, due to the relatively soft nature of these thermoplastic materials, several experimental constraints affect efficacy of resonant spectral analysis. In this work we will the address the effect of several characterization constraints on a self-healing EMAA ionomer (commercially known as Dupont Surlyn 8920) including the effects of transducer loading, continuous rapid resonant excitation and temporally separated long-term resonant excitation. In some circumstances, these experimental constraints can influence the time dependence of sample resonant frequency evolution, quality factor, and variation in spectral waveform. By quantifying these effects, robust characterization of post-damage self-healing EMAA samples is possible and will be presented.

  1. Effect of end-anchored chains on the adhesion at a thermoset-thermoplastic interface

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, L.J.; Smigolova, V.; Pralle, M.U.; Hubenko, A.; Dai, K.H.; Kramer, E.J.; Hahn, S.; Berglund, C.; DeKoven, B.

    1995-03-13

    The asymmetric double cantilever beam fracture test was used to measure the critical energy release rate, or fracture toughness, G, of an epoxy-polystyrene (PS) interface as a function of the grafting density, S, and degree of polymerization, N, of carboxylic acid terminated deuterated polystyrene chains (dPS-COOH), The chain ends anchor to the epoxy, and their tails penetrate into the PS homopolymer. Forward recoil spectrometry on the fracture surfaces provided a method to determine the total S as well as the mechanism of interface failure. For N = 159 the grafted chains were too short to entangle and pull out of the PS, leading to no enhancement in G over that of a bare interface. When the chain length was increased to N = 412 and 535, there was sufficient stress transfer to initiate crazes in the PS that break down by either disentanglement or scission of DPS-COOH chains in the craze fibrils. For chains of N = 688, 838, and 1478 the chains broke near the epoxy-PS interface at low S before significant crazing of the PS occurs. A transition from chain scission to crazing occurred at S{sub c} = 0.03 chains/nm{sup 2} for all three chain lengths, agreeing with experiments on diblock copolymer modified thermoplastic-thermoplastic interfaces and with the prediction from the fracture mechanism map that the transition is independent of chain length. The authors observed a nearly linear decrease in the maximum achievable S as N increased that can be explained in part by an entropic barrier that opposes the addition of new chains to the grafted brush. The toughest interfaces occurred with intermediate length grafted chains, N = 838, when the chains were well entangled and the grafted brush was dense enough, S > S{sub c}, to cause energy dissipation through craze formation.

  2. Thermoplastic Ribbon-Ply Bonding Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkley, Jeffrey A.; Marchello, Joseph M.; Messier, Bernadette C.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to identify key variables in rapid weldbonding of thermoplastic tow (ribbon) and their relationship to matrix polymer properties and to ribbon microstructure. Theoretical models for viscosity, establishment of ply-ply contact, instantaneous (Velcro) bonding, molecular interdiffusion (healing), void growth suppression, and gap filling were reviewed and synthesized. Consideration of the theoretical bonding mechanisms and length scales and of the experimental weld/peel data allow the prediction of such quantities as the time and pressure required to achieve good contact between a ribbon and a flat substrate, the time dependence of bond strength, pressures needed to prevent void growth from dissolved moisture and conditions for filling gaps and smoothing overlaps.

  3. ACT/ICAPS: Thermoplastic composite activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renieri, M. P.; Burpo, S. J.; Roundy, L. M.; Todd, S. M.

    1992-01-01

    McDonnell Aircraft Company (MCAIR) is teamed with Douglas Aircraft Company (DAC) under NASA's Advanced Composite Technology (ACT) initiative in a program entitled Innovative Composite Aircraft Primary Structures (ICAPS). Efforts at MCAIR have focused on the use of thermoplastic composite materials in the development of structural details associated with an advanced fighter fuselage section with applicability to transport design. Based on innovative design/manufacturing concepts for the fuselage section primary structure, elements were designed, fabricated, and structurally tested. These elements focused on key issues such as thick composite lugs and low cost forming of fastenerless, stiffener/moldline concepts. Manufacturing techniques included autoclave consideration, single diaphragm co-consolidation (SDCC), and roll-forming.

  4. Thermoplastic polymers for improved fire safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, D. A.; Parker, J. A.; Hilado, C. J.

    1976-01-01

    The thermochemical and flammability characteristics of some typical thermoplastic materials currently in use and others being considered for use in aircraft interiors are described. The properties studied included (1) thermomechanical properties such as glass transition and melt temperature, (2) changes in polymer enthalpy by differential scanning calorimetry, (3) thermogravimetric analysis in anaerobic and oxidative environments, (4) oxygen index, (5) smoke evolution, (6) relative toxicity of the volatile products of pyrolysis, and (7) selected physical properties. The generic polymers that were evaluated included: acrylonitrile butadiene styrene, bisphenol A polycarbonate, 9,9 bis (4-hydroxyphenyl) fluorene polycarbonatepoly (dimethyl siloxane) block polymer, phenolphthalein bisphenol A polycarbonate, phenolphthalein polycarbonate, polyether sulfone, polyphenylene oxide, polyphenylene sulfide, polyaryl sulfone, chlorinated polyvinyl chloride homopolymer, polyvinyl fluoride, and polyvinylidene fluoride. Processing parameters, including molding characteristics of some of the advanced polymers, are described. Test results and relative ranking of some of the flammability, smoke, and toxicity properties are presented.

  5. Thermoplastic polyimide NEW-TPI (trademark)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Tan-Hung; Reddy, Rakasi M.

    1990-01-01

    Thermal and rheological properties of a commercial thermoplastic polyimide, NEW-TPI (trademark), were characterized. The as-received material possesses initially a transient crystallite form with a bimodal distribution in peak melting temperatures. After the melting of the initial crystallite structure, the sample can be recrystallized by various thermal treatments. A bimodal or single modal melting peak distribution is formed for annealing temperatures below or above 360 C, respectively. The recrystallized crystallinities are all transient in nature. The polymers are unable to be recrystallized after being subjected to elevated temperature annealing above 450 C. The recrystallization mechanism was postulated, and a simple kinetics model was found to describe the behavior rather satisfactory under the conditions of prolonged thermal annealing. Rheological measurements made in the linear viscoelastic range support the evidence observed in the thermal analysis. Furthermore, the measurements sustain the manufacturer's recommended processing window of 400 to 420 C for this material.

  6. Thermoplastic microcantilevers fabricated by nanoimprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greve, Anders; Keller, Stephan; Vig, Asger L.; Kristensen, Anders; Larsson, David; Yvind, Kresten; Hvam, Jørn M.; Cerruti, Marta; Majumdar, Arunava; Boisen, Anja

    2010-01-01

    Nanoimprint lithography has been exploited to fabricate micrometre-sized cantilevers in thermoplastic. This technique allows for very well defined microcantilevers and gives the possibility of embedding structures into the cantilever surface. The microcantilevers are fabricated in TOPAS and are up to 500 µm long, 100 µm wide, and 4.5 µm thick. Some of the cantilevers have built-in ripple surface structures with heights of 800 nm and pitches of 4 µm. The yield for the cantilever fabrication is 95% and the initial out-of-plane bending is below 10 µm. The stiffness of the cantilevers is measured by deflecting the cantilever with a well-characterized AFM probe. An average stiffness of 61.3 mN m-1 is found. Preliminary tests with water vapour indicate that the microcantilevers can be used directly for vapour sensing applications and illustrate the influence of surface structuring of the cantilevers.

  7. Giant magnetoimpedance effect enhanced by thermoplastic drawing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, Jian; Estevez, Diana; Dong, Yaqiang; Man, Qikui; Chang, Chuntao; Wang, Xinmin; Li, Run-Wei

    2014-09-01

    We performed thermoplastic forming (TPF) on FeCoNbB metallic glass ribbons with a supercooled liquid region exceeding 100 K, and found the sample after TPF is still completely amorphous. More importantly, the giant magnetoimpedance (GMI) effect was improved after the forming process: the maximum GMI ratio and sensitivity increased from 41% to 12.3%/Oe in the case of as-cast sample to 280% and 358.2%/Oe in the case of resulting sample after TPF, respectively. The hysteresis loops and domain patterns were subsequently studied, which revealed that the primary factor leading to the improvement of the GMI effect was the enhanced longitudinal magnetic anisotropy induced by the TPF process. We therefore assume that TPF is an effective way that improves the GMI effect, which differs from conventional annealing methods.

  8. Monitoring impact damaging of thermoplastic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boccardi, S.; Carlomagno, G. M.; Meola, C.; Russo, P.; Simeoli, G.

    2015-11-01

    Thermoplastic composites are becoming ever more attractive also to the aeronautical sector. The main advantage lies in the possibility to modify the interface strength of polypropylene based laminates by adjusting the composition of the matrix. Understanding these aspects is of great importance to establish a possible link between the material toughness and the matrix ingredients. The aim of the present work is to ascertain the ability of an infrared imaging device to visualize any change, in the material behaviour to low energy impact, induced by changes in the matrix composition. Attention is given to image processing algorithms; in particular, an original procedure to measure the extension of the impact-affected area is proposed.

  9. Life prediction of elastomeric and thermoplastic components

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, A.

    1994-12-31

    Life prediction tests for polymeric materials have been in use for a considerable period of time. However there are still fundamental problems with their usage and interpretation in terms of engineering performance. In particular, it is not yet in general possible to relate the rate of change of physical properties that arise as a consequence of chemical aging to the rate of change in the underlying chemical structure or morphology. Also, different physical properties may change at different rates and these materials are generally non-linear. This renders accelerated life prediction testing potentially unreliable. This paper reviews this general problem area and discusses advances which need to be made with respect to the roles of the permeation of fluids, mechanical fatigue crack growth and time dependent changes. Illustrative examples are discussed of both thermoplastics and crosslinked elastomers. Finally, a general scheme is discussed for future research in this area, related to the development of interactive numerical modelling.

  10. Long-short fiber reinforced thermoplastics

    SciTech Connect

    Gore, C.R.; Cuff, G.; Cianelli, D.A.; Travis, J.E.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents information on a new family of fiber-reinforced thermoplastic compounds developed by ICI PLC and now produced by LNP under the trade mark ''Verton.'' Production is by a pultrusion process, rather than by the usual compounding extruder, which enables a high level of impregnation to be achieved without damaging the fibers. The result in molded parts is a 0.24-0.40 inch (6-10 mm) typical fiber length versus 0.008-0.016 inches (0.2-0.4 mm) for conventional short fiber products. Consequently, this enables fabricators to achieve typically a 10 to 20-fold increase in average fiber length in the finished component. These long-short fiber reinforced compounds exhibit substantial property improvements over short fiber system. Processing conditions are similar to corresponding short fiber compounds.

  11. Microfluidic device fabrication by thermoplastic hot-embossing.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuang; Devoe, Don L

    2013-01-01

    Due to their low cost compatibility with replication-based fabrication methods, thermoplastics represent an exceptionally attractive family of materials for the fabrication of lab-on-a-chip platforms. A diverse range of thermoplastic materials suitable for microfluidic fabrication is available, offering a wide selection of mechanical and chemical properties that can be leveraged and further tailored for specific applications. While high-throughput embossing methods such as reel-to-reel processing of thermoplastics is an attractive method for industrial microfluidic chip production, the use of single chip hot embossing is a cost-effective technique for realizing high-quality microfluidic devices during the prototyping stage. Here we describe methods for the replication of microscale features in two thermoplastics, polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and polycarbonate (PC), using hot embossing from a silicon template fabricated by deep reactive-ion etching. PMID:23329439

  12. Induction Consolidation/Molding of Thermoplastic Composites Using Smart Susceptors

    SciTech Connect

    2009-02-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose objective is to explore and define the technical and economic viability of induction consolidation for thermoplastic composites and to fabricate a wide spectrum of components in an energy-efficient manner.

  13. Heating of thermoplastic-based unidirectional composite prepregs

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.; Weber, M.E.; Charrier, J.M. )

    1989-04-01

    Thermoplastic-based prepregs offer a potential for faster manufacture of composite products than with thermoset-based prepregs. The winding or controlled placement of thermoplastic-based prepreg tapes requires the rapid heating of the moving tape, just prior to its contact with the substrate on the mandrel. In the case of complex shapes, geometrical constraints and significant variations in tape speeds in the course of manufacture, make it particularly desirable to be able to model the heating process. A mathematical model and its experimental verification for convection/conduction heat transfer to and through either a homogeneous thermoplastic material, or thermoplastic-based unidirectional composites featuring glass, aramid and carbon fibers, is discussed. 12 refs.

  14. Thermoplastic Single-Ply Roof Relieves Water Damage and Inconvenience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Jennifer Lynn

    2002-01-01

    Assesses use of thermoplastic single-ply roofs by North Carolina's Mars Hill College to prevent leaks, reduce maintenance costs, and enhance the value of their older historic buildings. Administrators comment on the roof's installation efficiency and cleanliness. (GR)

  15. Forming of fiber reinforced thermoplastic sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, D.; Burt, C.R.; Martin, T.A.

    1993-12-31

    The development of fiber reinforced thermoplastic (FRTP) sheets has added a new dimension to the manufacturing industry. The ability of the thermoplastic matrix to soften and melt with the application of heat allows secondary processing of these composites. The material can be formed into components using conventional sheet metal forming processes with necessary modification. Ideally this opens the way for low cycle-time, non-labor intensive manufacturing processes. However, before there can be any wide scale application of the fiber reinforced sheet material, a better understanding is required regarding the formability of these reinforced sheets and the parameters influencing their forming characteristics. In sheet metal industry the term formability is described as the ease of forming and can be judged by various factors which may vary with the needs of a particular manufacturer. It is not always easy to prejudge formability as in many instances the actual sheet forming mechanism is quite complex. However, often a reasonable understanding of the process characteristics can be obtained through some relatively simple laboratory experiments. The present paper describes the results of a series of such tests namely hemispherical dome forming, cup drawing and vee bending using mainly polypropylene/glass fiber composite sheets with various fiber architecture, forming temperature and speed. Grid strain analysis has been applied to measure the magnitudes and directions of the principal strains and how they are influenced by fiber orientation. A kinematic approach has been shown to theoretically predict the deformation pattern with reasonable accuracy. Some salient features such as fiber buckling, sheet wrinkling, springback have been discussed in the context of forming process variables.

  16. Effect of annealing history on free volume in thermoplastics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; St.clair, T. L.

    1986-01-01

    Two different types of thermoplastic glassy polymers have been investigated for the effects of thermal annealing on their free volumes. It has been observed that free volumes in glassy polymers decrease asymptotically to a steady level after about four thermal anneals lasting for 24 hours at a temperature about 50 C below their glass transition temperatures. These results indicate that composites incorporating properly annealed thermoplastic matrices may not experience any additional internal stresses due to subsequent thermal excursions experienced while in service.

  17. Large area in situ fabrication of poly(pyrrole)-nanowires on flexible thermoplastic films using nanocontact printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Cruz, Alvaro; Lee, Michael; Marote, Pedro; Zine, Nadia; Sigaud, Monique; Bonhomme, Anne; Pruna, Raquel; Lopez, Manuel; Bausells, Joan; Jaffrezic, Nicole; Errachid, Abdelhamid

    2016-08-01

    Highly efficient nano-engineering tools will certainly revolutionize the biomedical and sensing devices research and development in the years to come. Here, we present a novel high performance conducting poly(pyrrole) nanowires (PPy-NW) patterning technology on thermoplastic surfaces (poly(ethylene terephthalate (PETE), poly(ethylene 2,6-naphthalate (PEN), polyimide (PI), and cyclic olefin copolymer) using nanocontact printing and controlled chemical polymerization (nCP-CCP) technique. The technique uses a commercial compact disk as a template to produce nanopatterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stamps. The PDMS nanopatterned stamp was applied to print the PPy-NWs and the developed technology of nCP-CCP produced 3D conducting nanostructures. This new and very promising nanopatterning technology was achieved in a single step and with a low cost of fabrication over large areas.

  18. Spontaneously Healable Thermoplastic Elastomers Achieved through One-Pot Living Ring-Opening Metathesis Copolymerization of Well-Designed Bulky Monomers.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ji-Xing; Long, Ying-Yun; Pan, Li; Men, Yong-Feng; Li, Yue-Sheng

    2016-05-18

    We report here a series of novel spontaneously healable thermoplastic elastomers (TPEs) with a combination of improved mechanical and good autonomic self-healing performances. Hard-soft diblock and hard-soft-hard triblock copolymers with poly[exo-1,4,4a,9,9a,10-hexahydro-9,10(1',2')-benzeno-l,4-methanoanthracene] (PHBM) as the hard block and secondary amide group containing norbornene derivative polymer as the soft block were synthesized via living ring-opening metathesis copolymerization by use of Grubbs third-generation catalyst through sequential monomer addition. The microstructure, mechanical, self-healing, and surface morphologies of the block copolymers were thoroughly studied. Both excellent mechanical performance and self-healing capability were achieved for the block copolymers because of the interplayed physical cross-link of hard block and dynamic interaction formed by soft block in the self-assembled network. Under an optimized hard block (PHBM) weight ratio of 5%, a significant recovery of tensile strength (up to 100%) and strain at break (ca. 85%) was achieved at ambient temperature without any treatment even after complete rupture. Moreover, the simple reaction operations and well-designed monomers offer versatility in tuning the architectures and properties of the resulting block copolymers. PMID:27136676

  19. The use of polyurethane as an elastomer in thermoplastic microfluidic devices and the study of its creep properties.

    PubMed

    Gu, Pan; Nishida, Toshikazu; Fan, Z Hugh

    2014-02-01

    We report using polyurethane (PU) as an elastomer in microvalves integrated with thermoplastic microfluidic devices. Elastomer-based microvalves have been used in a number of applications and the elastomer often used is PDMS. Although it is a convenient material for prototyping, PDMS has been recognized to possess shortcomings such as solvent incompatibility and unfavorable manufacturability. We investigated the use of PU as an elastomer to address the challenges. A reliable method was developed to bond hybrid materials such as PU and cyclic olefin copolymer. The film thickness from 3.5 to 24.5 μm was studied to identify an appropriate thickness of PU films for desirable elasticity in microvalves. We integrated PU with thermally actuated, elastomer-based microvalves in thermoplastic devices. Valve actuations were demonstrated, and the relationship between the valve actuation time and heater power was studied. We compared PU with PDMS in terms of their microvalve performance. Valves with PDMS failed to function after two weeks since the thermal-sensitive solution evaporated through porous PDMS membrane, whereas the same valve with PU functioned properly after eight months. In addition, we evaluated the creep and creep recovery of PU, which is a common phenomenon of viscoelastic materials and is related to the long-term elastic property of PU after prolonged use. PMID:23868507

  20. The Use of Polyurethane as an Elastomer in Thermoplastic Microfluidic Devices and the Study of its Creep Properties

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Pan; Nishida, Toshikazu; Fan, Z. Hugh

    2013-01-01

    We report using polyurethane (PU) as an elastomer in microvalves integrated with thermoplastic microfluidic devices. Elastomer-based microvalves have been used in a number of applications and the elastomer often used is polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). Although it is a convenient material for prototyping, PDMS has been recognized to possess shortcomings such as solvent incompatibility and unfavorable manufacturability. We investigated the use of PU as an elastomer to address the challenges. A reliable method was developed to bond hybrid materials such as PU and cyclic olefin copolymer (COC). The film thickness from 3.5 to 24.5 μm was studied to identify an appropriate thickness of PU films for desirable elasticity in microvalves. We integrated PU with thermally actuated, elastomer-based microvalves in thermoplastic devices. Valve actuations were demonstrated, and the relationship between the valve actuation time and heater power was studied. We compared PU with PDMS in terms of their microvalve performance. Valves with PDMS failed to function after 2 weeks since the thermal-sensitive solution evaporated through porous PDMS membrane, whereas the same valve with PU functioned properly after 8 months. In addition, we evaluated the creep and creep recovery of PU, which is a common phenomenon of viscoelastic materials and is related to the long-term elastic property of PU after prolonged use. PMID:23868507

  1. Imide/arylene ether copolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Brian J. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor); Bass, Robert G. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    Imide/arylene ether block copolymers are prepared by reacting anhydride terminated poly(amic acids) with amine terminated poly(arylene ethers) in polar aprotic solvents and by chemically or thermally cyclodehydrating the resulting intermediate poly(amic acids). The resulting block copolymers have one glass transition temperature or two, depending upon the particular structure and/or the compatibility of the block units. Most of these block copolymers form tough, solvent resistant films with high tensile properties.

  2. Block copolymer battery separator

    DOEpatents

    Wong, David; Balsara, Nitash Pervez

    2016-04-26

    The invention herein described is the use of a block copolymer/homopolymer blend for creating nanoporous materials for transport applications. Specifically, this is demonstrated by using the block copolymer poly(styrene-block-ethylene-block-styrene) (SES) and blending it with homopolymer polystyrene (PS). After blending the polymers, a film is cast, and the film is submerged in tetrahydrofuran, which removes the PS. This creates a nanoporous polymer film, whereby the holes are lined with PS. Control of morphology of the system is achieved by manipulating the amount of PS added and the relative size of the PS added. The porous nature of these films was demonstrated by measuring the ionic conductivity in a traditional battery electrolyte, 1M LiPF.sub.6 in EC/DEC (1:1 v/v) using AC impedance spectroscopy and comparing these results to commercially available battery separators.

  3. Imide/Arylene Ether Copolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Brian J.; Hergenrother, Paul M.; Bass, Robert G.

    1991-01-01

    New imide/arylene ether copolymers prepared by reacting anhydride-terminated poly(amic acids) with amine-terminated poly(arylene ethers) in polar aprotic solvents. Each resulting copolymer may have one glass-transition temperature or two, depending on chemical structure and/or compatibility of block units. Most of copolymers form tough, solvent-resistant films with high tensile properties. Films cast from solution tough and flexible, and exhibit useful thermal and mechanical properties. Potentially useful as moldings, adhesives, or composite matrices. Because of flexible arylene ether blocks, these copolymers easier to process than polyimides.

  4. Partial Miscibility in Copolymer Blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Elizabeth; Lipson, Jane

    2011-03-01

    Copolymers can be used to affect the miscibility of otherwise immiscible polymer blends by acting as compatibilizers. To better understand the energetics of these types of systems, we use a simple lattice model to study phase separation in binary copolymer/homopolymer blends. We focus on a copolymer that contains both A and B type monomers and a homopolymer that contains purely A type monomer. An example of a system that we are investigating is polyethylene mixed with either random or alternating poly(ethylene-co-propylene). The sequence effect on miscibility as the copolymer microstructure is varied from random to alternating is investigated as well. The support of GAANN is gratefully acknowledged.

  5. Alignment of Fatty Acid-Derived Triblock Copolymers under Large Amplitude Oscillatory Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Wenyue; Wang, Shu; Kesava, Sameer; Gomez, Enrique; Robertson, Megan

    Linear ABA triblock copolymers find widespread utilization as thermoplastic elastomers (TPEs): materials which exhibit elastomeric behavior at room temperature and can be readily processed at elevated temperatures. Traditional TPEs are derived from fossil fuels; however, the finite availability of petroleum and the environmental impact of petroleum processing has led to an increased interest in developing alternative sources for polymers. Vegetable oils and their fatty acids are promising replacements for petroleum sources due to their abundance, low cost, lack of toxicity, biodegradability and ease of functionalization that provides convenient routes to polymerization. In this study, triblock copolymer TPEs were synthesized containing lauryl and stearyl acrylate, derived from fatty acids found in vegetable oils. Small-angle X-ray scattering experiments revealed highly aligned triblock copolymer morphologies after the application of large amplitude oscillatory shear. The temperature and frequency dependence of the degree of alignment was investigated. In contrast to prior studies on shear-aligned morphologies in bulk and thin film block copolymers, hexagonal close packed and face centered cubic spherical structures were observed.

  6. Self-organization of graft copolymers at surfaces, interfaces and in bulk

    SciTech Connect

    Rabeony, M.; Peiffer, D.G.; Behal, S.K.; Disko, M.; Dozier, W.D.; Thiyagarajan, P.; Lin, M.Y.

    1994-07-01

    The morphology in bulk and thin film of high-integrity graft copolymers has been investigated by small angle neutron and light scattering, neutron reflectivity, and transmission electron microscopy. The model graft copolymers are based on two chemically incompatible-blocks composed of an elastomeric polyethylacrylate backbone onto which pendant monodisperse thermoplastic polystyrene are statistically placed. Two different levels of graft corresponding to an average of 1 and 3 per chain were investigated. In the bulk phase, the low graft level shows irregular fractal-like structures while the high graft level exhibits lamellar microdomains. In thin film, ordered structures were observed also in both compositions. The interphase adhesion between the polystyrene and the polyethylacrylate microdomain was investigated by uniaxially elongating the copolymer films. The low level graft material exhibits normal behavior characteristic of filler-reinforced rubber: the isotropic scattering pattern deforms in an anisotropic manner, i.e., ellipsoid-shaped with the long axis perpendicular to the stretching direction. An ``abnormal Butterfly`` pattern was observed with the high graft level. The butterfly pattern is attributed to the deformation of the lamellar morphology of the copolymer.

  7. Impact of morphological orientation in determining mechanical properties in triblock copolymer systems

    SciTech Connect

    Honeker, C.C.; Thomas, E.L.

    1996-08-01

    In contrast to other types of segmented multiblock thermoplastic elastomers, simple ABA block copolymers represent a class of well-defined nanostructured materials. Due to the inherent block lengths built in during the polymerization, the microdomain structure of block copolymers exhibits a size scale of typically 10-100 nm. The ability to control the individual chemistry of each block as well as the size and the shape of the domains in a block copolymer affords enormous advantages to tailor physical properties. By globally orienting the microdomains, a well-defined initial morphological state aids greatly in the interpretation and modeling of mechanical deformation and allows for exploitation of the inherent anisotropy of the cylindrical and lamellar structures. Several types of orientation techniques are reviewed. Experiments investigating structure-mechanical properties in styrene-diene triblock copolymers with spherical, cylindrical, and lamellar morphologies are discussed, with emphasis on the clarifying role of global morphological orientation in data interpretation. Composite theory which treats each microphase as a continuum describes small strain behavior of cylinders and lamellae quite well. Molecular variables such as the number of effective bridge vs loop conformations in the rubber midblock become more important at large strains. With controlled chemistry and morphology structure in influencing the deformation process is expected. 145 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Novel polymer blends with thermoplastic starch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taghizadeh, Ata

    A new class of polymers known as "bioplastics" has emerged and is expanding rapidly. This class consists of polymers that are either bio-based or biodegradable, or both. Among these, polysaccharides, namely starch, are of great interest for several reasons. By gelatinizing starch via plasticizers, it can be processed in the same way as thermoplastic polymers with conventional processing equipment. Hence, these bio-based and biodegradable plastics, with their low source and refinery costs, as well as relatively easy processability, have made them ideal candidates for incorporation into various current plastic products. Four different plasticizers have been chosen here for gelatinization of thermoplastic starch (TPS): glycerol, sorbitol, diglycerol and polyglycerol, with the latter two being used for the first time in such a process. Two methodological categories are used. The first involves a calorimetric method (Differential Scanning Calorimetry) as well as optical microscopy; these are "static" methods where no shear is applied A wide range of starch/water/plasticizer compositions were prepared to explore the gelatinization regime for each plasticizer. The onset and conclusion gelatinization temperatures for sorbitol and glycerol were found to be in the same vicinity, while diglycerol and polyglycerol showed significantly higher transition temperatures. The higher molecular weight and viscosity of polyglycerol allow this transition to occur at an even higher temperature than with diglycerol. This is due to the increase in molecular weight and viscosity of the two new plasticizers, as well as their significant decrease in water solubility. It is demonstrated that the water/plasticizer ratio has a pronounced effect on gelatinization temperatures. When plasticizer content was held constant and water content was increased, it was found that the gelatinization temperature decreased for all the plasticizers. Meanwhile, when the water content was held constant and the

  9. Novel polymer blends with thermoplastic starch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taghizadeh, Ata

    A new class of polymers known as "bioplastics" has emerged and is expanding rapidly. This class consists of polymers that are either bio-based or biodegradable, or both. Among these, polysaccharides, namely starch, are of great interest for several reasons. By gelatinizing starch via plasticizers, it can be processed in the same way as thermoplastic polymers with conventional processing equipment. Hence, these bio-based and biodegradable plastics, with their low source and refinery costs, as well as relatively easy processability, have made them ideal candidates for incorporation into various current plastic products. Four different plasticizers have been chosen here for gelatinization of thermoplastic starch (TPS): glycerol, sorbitol, diglycerol and polyglycerol, with the latter two being used for the first time in such a process. Two methodological categories are used. The first involves a calorimetric method (Differential Scanning Calorimetry) as well as optical microscopy; these are "static" methods where no shear is applied A wide range of starch/water/plasticizer compositions were prepared to explore the gelatinization regime for each plasticizer. The onset and conclusion gelatinization temperatures for sorbitol and glycerol were found to be in the same vicinity, while diglycerol and polyglycerol showed significantly higher transition temperatures. The higher molecular weight and viscosity of polyglycerol allow this transition to occur at an even higher temperature than with diglycerol. This is due to the increase in molecular weight and viscosity of the two new plasticizers, as well as their significant decrease in water solubility. It is demonstrated that the water/plasticizer ratio has a pronounced effect on gelatinization temperatures. When plasticizer content was held constant and water content was increased, it was found that the gelatinization temperature decreased for all the plasticizers. Meanwhile, when the water content was held constant and the

  10. Block copolymer investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yufa, Nataliya A.

    The research presented in this thesis deals with various aspects of block copolymers on the nanoscale: their behavior at a range of temperatures, their use as scaffolds, or for creation of chemically striped surfaces, as well as the behavior of metals on block copolymers under the influence of UV light, and the healing behavior of copolymers. Invented around the time of World War II, copolymers have been used for decades due to their macroscopic properties, such as their ability to be molded without vulcanization, and the fact that, unlike rubber, they can be recycled. In recent years, block copolymers (BCPs) have been used for lithography, as scaffolds for nano-objects, to create a magnetic hard drive, as well as in photonic and other applications. In this work we used primarily atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), described in Chapter II, to conduct our studies. In Chapter III we demonstrate a new and general method for positioning nanoparticles within nanoscale grooves. This technique is suitable for nanodots, nanocrystals, as well as DNA. We use AFM and TEM to demonstrate selective decoration. In Chapters IV and V we use AFM and TEM to study the structure of polymer surfaces coated with metals and self-assembled monolayers. We describe how the surfaces were created, exhibit their structure on the nanoscale, and prove that their macroscopic wetting properties have been altered compared to the original polymer structures. Finally, Chapters VI and VII report out in-situ AFM studies of BCP at high temperatures, made possible only recently with the invention of air-tight high-temperature AFM imaging cells. We locate the transition between disordered films and cylinders during initial ordering. Fluctuations of existing domains leading to domain coarsening are also described, and are shown to be consistent with reptation and curvature minimization. Chapter VII deals with the healing of PS-b-PMMA following AFM-tip lithography or

  11. Improved Thermoplastic/Iron-Particle Transformer Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Russell A.; Bryant, Robert G.; Namkung, Min

    2004-01-01

    A method of fabricating improved transformer cores from composites of thermoplastic matrices and iron-particles has been invented. Relative to commercially available laminated-iron-alloy transformer cores, the cores fabricated by this method weigh less and are less expensive. Relative to prior polymer-matrix/ iron-particle composite-material transformer cores, the cores fabricated by this method can be made mechanically stronger and more magnetically permeable. In addition, whereas some prior cores have exhibited significant eddy-current losses, the cores fabricated by this method exhibit very small eddy-current losses. The cores made by this method can be expected to be attractive for use in diverse applications, including high-signal-to-noise transformers, stepping motors, and high-frequency ignition coils. The present method is a product of an experimental study of the relationships among fabrication conditions, final densities of iron particles, and mechanical and electromagnetic properties of fabricated cores. Among the fabrication conditions investigated were molding pressures (83, 104, and 131 MPa), and molding temperatures (250, 300, and 350 C). Each block of core material was made by uniaxial-compression molding, at the applicable pressure/temperature combination, of a mixture of 2 weight percent of LaRC (or equivalent high-temperature soluble thermoplastic adhesive) with 98 weight percent of approximately spherical iron particles having diameters in the micron range. Each molded block was cut into square cross-section rods that were used as core specimens in mechanical and electromagnetic tests. Some of the core specimens were annealed at 900 C and cooled slowly before testing. For comparison, a low-carbon-steel core was also tested. The results of the tests showed that density, hardness, and rupture strength generally increased with molding pressure and temperature, though the correlation was rather weak. The weakness of the correlation was attributed to

  12. Polylactide-Poly(6-methyl-ε-caprolactone)-Polylactide Thermoplastic Elastomers

    SciTech Connect

    Martello, Mark T; Hillmyer, Marc A

    2012-11-14

    Amorphous ABA type block aliphatic polyesters can be useful as degradable and biorenewable thermoplastic elastomers. These materials can be prepared by sequential ring-opening transesterification polymerization (ROTEP) reactions and can exhibit a range of physical properties and morphologies. In this work a set of amorphous polylactide-poly(6-methyl-ε-caprolactone)-polylactide aliphatic polyester ABA triblock copolymers were prepared by consecutive controlled ring-opening polymerizations. Ring-opening polymerization of neat 6-methyl-ε-caprolactone in the presence of 1,4-benzenedimethanol and tin(II) octoate afforded α,ω-hydroxyl-terminated poly(6-methyl-ε-caprolactone). High conversions of 6-methyl-ε-caprolactone (>96%) afforded polymers with molar masses ranging from 12 to 98 kg mol-1, depending on monomer-to-initiator ratios, polymers with narrow, monomodal molecular weight distributions. An array of polylactide-poly(6-methyl-ε-caprolactone)-polylactide triblock copolymers with controlled molecular weights and narrow molecular weight distributions were synthesized using the telechelic poly(6-methyl-ε-caprolactone) samples as macroinitiators for the ring-opening polymerization of D,L-lactide. The morphological, thermal, and mechanical behaviors of these materials were explored. Several triblocks adopted well-ordered microphase-separated morphologies, and both hexagonally packed cylindrical and lamellar structures were observed. The Flory-Huggins interaction parameter was determined, x(T) = 61.2 T-1 - 0.1, based on the order-to-disorder transition temperatures of two symmetric triblocks using the calculated mean field theory result. The elastomeric mechanical behavior of two high molecular weight triblocks was characterized by tensile and elastic recovery experiments.

  13. Polyether/Polyester Graft Copolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Vernon L., Jr.; Wakelyn, N.; Stoakley, D. M.; Proctor, K. M.

    1986-01-01

    Higher solvent resistance achieved along with lower melting temperature. New technique provides method of preparing copolymers with polypivalolactone segments grafted onto poly (2,6-dimethyl-phenylene oxide) backbone. Process makes strong materials with improved solvent resistance and crystalline, thermally-reversible crosslinks. Resulting graft copolymers easier to fabricate into useful articles, including thin films, sheets, fibers, foams, laminates, and moldings.

  14. Thermoplastic Polyurethanes with Isosorbide Chain Extender

    SciTech Connect

    Javni, Ivan; Bilic, Olivera; Bilic, Nikola; Petrovic, Zoran; Eastwood, Eric; Zhang, Fan; Ilavsky, Jan

    2015-12-15

    Isosorbide, a renewable diol derived from starch, was used alone or in combination with butane diol (BD) as the chain extender in two series of thermoplastic polyurethanes (TPU) with 50 and 70% polytetramethylene ether glycol (PTMEG) soft segment concentration (SSC), respectively. In the synthesized TPUs, the hard segment composition was systematically varied in both series following BD/isosorbide molar ratios of 100 : 0; 75 : 25; 50 : 50; 25 : 75, and 0 : 100 to examine in detail the effect of chain extenders on properties of segmented polyurethane elastomers with different morphologies. We found that polyurethanes with 50% SSC were hard elastomers with Shore D hardness of around 50, which is consistent with assumed co-continuous morphology. Polymers with 70% SSC displayed lower Shore A hardness of 74–79 (Shore D around 25) as a result of globular hard domains dispersed in the soft matrix. Insertion of isosorbide increased rigidity, melting point and glass transition temperature of hard segments and tensile strength of elastomers with 50% SSC. These effects were weaker or non-existent in 70% SSC series due to the short hard segments and low content of isosorbide. We also found that the thermal stability was lowered by increasing isosorbide content in both series.

  15. Accelerated Strength Testing of Thermoplastic Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeder, J. R.; Allen, D. H.; Bradley, W. L.

    1998-01-01

    Constant ramp strength tests on unidirectional thermoplastic composite specimens oriented in the 90 deg. direction were conducted at constant temperatures ranging from 149 C to 232 C. Ramp rates spanning 5 orders of magnitude were tested so that failures occurred in the range from 0.5 sec. to 24 hrs. (0.5 to 100,000 MPa/sec). Below 204 C, time-temperature superposition held allowing strength at longer times to be estimated from strength tests at shorter times but higher temperatures. The data indicated that a 50% drop in strength might be expected for this material when the test time is increased by 9 orders of magnitude. The shift factors derived from compliance data applied well to the strength results. To explain the link between compliance and strength, a viscoelastic fracture model was investigated. The model, which used compliance as input, was found to fit the strength data only if the critical fracture energy was allowed to vary with temperature reduced stress rate. This variation in the critical parameter severely limits its use in developing a robust time-dependent strength model. The significance of this research is therefore seen as providing both the indication that a more versatile acceleration method for strength can be developed and the evidence that such a method is needed.

  16. Development of thermoplastic composite aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renieri, Michael P.; Burpo, Steven J.; Roundy, Lance M.; Todd, Stephanie A.; Kim, H. J.

    1992-01-01

    Efforts focused on the use of thermoplastic composite materials in the development of structural details associated with an advanced fighter fuselage section with applicability to transport design. In support of these designs, mechanics developments were conducted in two areas. First, a dissipative strain energy approach to material characterization and failure prediction, developed at the Naval Research Laboratory, was evaluated as a design/analysis tool. Second, a finite element formulation for thick composites was developed and incorporated into a lug analysis method which incorporates pin bending effects. Manufacturing concepts were developed for an upper fuel cell cover. A detailed trade study produced two promising concepts: fiber placement and single-step diaphragm forming. Based on the innovative design/manufacturing concepts for the fuselage section primary structure, elements were designed, fabricated, and structurally tested. These elements focused on key issues such as thick composite lugs and low cost forming of fastenerless, stiffener/moldine concepts. Manufacturing techniques included autoclave consolidation, single diaphragm consolidation (SDCC) and roll-forming.

  17. Development and characterization of hybrid thermoplastic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karkhanis, Priyanka Chandrashekhar

    This work is aimed at studying the possibility of using interply hybrid woven thermoplastic semi-pregs in secondary structures in aircrafts at TenCate Advanced Composites, Netherlands and Purdue University. Three different interply hybrids were designed from combination of Cetex(c) carbon-PPS semi-preg, Owen corning's woven glass with PPS sheets and discontinuous chopped Cetex(c) carbon-PPS semi-preg to get desired flexural, out of plane and bearing properties. The design calculations are done based on classical laminate theory and the selection of materials to be used with carbon-PPS was done based on cost and availability. The Hybrid laminate performances are analyzed and compared to the conventional Cetex (c) Carbon-PPS semi-preg laminates. Observations are reported on three point bend test (European standard 2562), four point bend test(ASTM D6415-99) and bearing test (Airbus standards AITM 1-0009) for the laminates and it was found that hybrid laminates show a reduction of 5-10% in bending stiffness, 20-40% reduction in out-of-plane strength and 2-5%reduction in bearing with a cost reduction of 20-30%. The research identifies and documents the different factors responsible for failures and reduction in strength in the Hybrids.

  18. Chemical Modification and Structure-property Relationships of Acrylic and Ionomeric Thermoplastic Elastomer Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargantwar, Pruthesh Hariharrao

    Block copolymers (BCs) have remained at the forefront of materials research due to their versatility in applications ranging from hot-melt/pressure-sensitive adhesives and impact modifiers to compatibilizing agents and vibration-dampening/nanotemplating media. Of particular interest are macromolecules composed of two or more chemically dissimilar blocks covalently linked together to form triblock or pentablock copolymers. If the blocks are sufficiently incompatible and the copolymer behaves as a thermoplastic elastomer, the molecules can spontaneously self-assemble to form nanostructured materials that exhibit shape memory due to the formation of a supramolecular network. The BCs of these types are termed as conventional. When BCs contain blocks having ionic moieties such as sulfonic acid groups, they are termed as block ionomers. Designing new systems based on either conventional or ionic BCs, characterizing their structure-property relationships and later using them as electroacive polymers form the essential objectives of this work. Electroactive polymers (EAPs) exhibit electromechanical actuation when stimulated by an external electric field. In the first part of this work, it is shown that BCs resolve some of the outstanding problems presently encountered in the design of two different classes of EAP actuators: dielectric elastomers (DEs) and ionic polymer metal composites (IPMCs). All-acrylic triblock copolymer gels used as DEs actuate with high efficacy without any requirement of mechanical prestrain and, thus, eliminate the need for bulky and heavy hardware essential with prestrained dielectric actuators, as well as material problems associated with stress relaxation. The dependence of actuation behavior on gel morphology as evaluated from mechanical and microstructure studies is observed. In the case of IPMCs, ionic BCs employed in this study greatly facilitate processing compared to other contenders such as NafionRTM, which is commonly used in this class

  19. Thermoplastic Micro-Forming of Bulk Metallic Glasses: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ning; Chen, Wen; Liu, Lin

    2016-04-01

    Bulk metallic glasses are a fascinating class of metallic alloys with an isotropic amorphous structure that is rapidly quenched from liquid melts. The absence of a crystalline micro-structure endows them with a portfolio of properties such as high strength, high elasticity, and excellent corrosion resistance. Whereas the limited plasticity and hence poor workability at ambient temperature impede the structural application of bulk metallic glasses, the unique superplasticity within the supercooled liquid region opens an alternative window of so-called thermoplastic forming, which allows precise and versatile net-shaping of complex geometries on length scales ranging from nanometers to centimeters that were previously unachievable with conventional crystalline metal processing. Thermoplastic forming not only breaks through the bottleneck of the manufacture of bulk metallic glasses at ambient temperature but also offers an alluring prospect in micro-engineering applications. This paper comprehensively reviews some pivotal aspects of bulk metallic glasses during thermoplastic micro-forming, including an in-depth understanding of the crystallization kinetics of bulk metallic glasses and the thermoplastic processing time window, the thermoplastic forming map that clarifies the relationship between the flow characteristics and the formability, the interfacial friction in micro-forming and novel forming methods to improve the formability, and the potential applications of the hot-embossed micro-patterns/components.

  20. Materials for Heated Head Automated Thermoplastic Tape Placement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Brian J.; Kinney, Megan C.; Cano, Roberto J.; Grimsley, Brian W.

    2012-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) is currently pursuing multiple paths to develop out of autoclave (OOA) polymeric composite materials and processes. Polymeric composite materials development includes the synthesis of new and/or modified thermosetting and thermoplastic matrix resins designed for specific OOA processes. OOA processes currently under investigation include vacuum bag only (VBO) prepreg/composite fabrication, resin transfer molding (RTM), vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) and heated head automated thermoplastic tape placement (HHATP). This paper will discuss the NASA Langley HHATP facility and capabilities and recent work on characterizing thermoplastic tape quality and requirements for quality part production. Samples of three distinct versions of APC-2 (AS4/PEEK) thermoplastic dry tape were obtained from two materials vendors, TENCATE, Inc. and CYTEC Engineered Materials** (standard grade and an experimental batch). Random specimens were taken from each of these samples and subjected to photo-microscopy and surface profilometry. The CYTEC standard grade of APC-2 tape had the most voids and splits and the highest surface roughness and/or waviness. Since the APC-2 tape is composed of a thermoplastic matrix, it offers the flexibility of reprocessing to improve quality, and thereby improve final quality of HHATP laminates. Discussions will also include potential research areas and future work that is required to advance the state of the art in the HHATP process for composite fabrication.

  1. Effects of Compression and Filler Particle Coating on the Electrical Conductivity of Thermoplastic Elastomer Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albers, Willem M.; Karttunen, Mikko; Wikström, Lisa; Vilkman, Taisto

    2013-10-01

    Elastomeric polymers can be filled with metallic micro- or nanoparticles to obtain electrical conductivity, in which the conductivity is largely determined by the intrinsic conductivity of and contact resistance between the particles. Electrons will flow through the material effectively when the percolation threshold for near-neighbor contacts is exceeded and sufficiently close contacts between the filler particles are realized for electron tunneling to occur. Silver-coated glass microparticles of two types (fibers and spheres) were used as fillers in a thermoplastic elastomer composite based on styrene-ethylene-butylene-styrene copolymer, and the direct-current (DC) resistance and radiofrequency impedance were significantly reduced by coating the filler particles with octadecylmercaptan. Not only was the resistance reduced but also the atypical positive piezoresistivity effect observed in these elastomers was strongly reduced, such that resistivity values below 0.01 Ω cm were obtained for compression ratios up to 20%. In the DC measurements, an additional decrease of resistivity was obtained by inclusion of π-extended aromatic compounds, such as diphenylhexatriene. Some qualitative theories are presented to illuminate the possible mechanisms of action of these surface coatings on the piezoresistivity.

  2. Green technology for conversion of food scraps to biodegradable thermoplastic polyhydroxyalkanoates.

    PubMed

    Du, Guocheng; Yu, Jian

    2002-12-15

    A new technology is developed and demonstrated that couples anaerobic digestion of food scraps with production of biodegradable thermoplastics, polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs). The food wastes were digested in an anaerobic reactor producing four major organic acids. The concentrations of acetic, propionic, butyric, and lactic acids reached 5.5, 1.8, 27.4, and 32.7 g/L, respectively. The fermentative acids were transferred through membranes via molecule diffusion into an air-bubbling reactor where the acids were utilized to produce PHAs in an enriched culture of Ralstonia eutropha. With a silicone rubber membrane, butyric acid and small amounts of acetic and propionic acids were transferred and used, producing a homopolymer PHA, poly(3-hydroxybutyrate). The dry cell weight and PHA content reached 11.3 g/L and 60.2% (w/w), respectively. With a dialysis membrane, the mass transfer rates of fermentative acids were enhanced, and the PHA production was significantly improved. The dry cell weight and its PHA content reached 22.7 g/L and 72.6% (w/w), respectively. The formed PHA was a copolymer of 3-hydroxybutyrate and 3-hydroxyvalerate (HV) with 2.8 mol % HV monomer unit. The polymer content (72.6% of dry cell mass) reported in this study is the highest one obtained from organic wastes and is comparable with the PHA content from pure glucose fermentation. PMID:12521183

  3. Thermoplastic elastomer gels: an advanced substrate for microfluidic chemical analysis systems.

    PubMed

    Sudarsan, Arjun P; Wang, Jian; Ugaz, Victor M

    2005-08-15

    We demonstrate the use of thermoplastic elastomer gels as advanced substrates for construction of complex microfluidic networks suitable for use in miniaturized chemical analysis systems. These gels are synthesized by combining inexpensive polystyrene-(polyethylene/polybutylene)-polystyrene triblock copolymers with a hydrocarbon extender oil for which the ethylene/butylene midblocks are selectively miscible. The insoluble styrene end blocks phase separate into localized nanodomains, resulting in the formation of an optically transparent, viscoelastic, and biocompatible gel network that is melt-processable at temperatures in the vicinity of 100 degrees C. This unique combination of properties allows microfluidic channels to be fabricated in a matter of minutes by simply making impressions of the negative relief structures on heated master molds. Melt processability allows multiple impressions to be made against different masters to construct complex geometries incorporating multi-height features within the same microchannel. Intricate interconnected multilayered structures are also easily fabricated owing to the ability to bond and seal multiple layers by briefly heating the material at the bond interface. Thermal and mechanical properties are tunable over a wide range through proper selection of gel composition. PMID:16097755

  4. Thickness and fit of mouthguards adjusted by notching thermoplastic sheets under different heating conditions.

    PubMed

    Mizuhashi, Fumi; Koide, Kaoru; Takahashi, Mutsumi

    2015-08-01

    This study examines the thickness and fit of mouthguards by notching thermoplastic copolymer ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) sheets and then heating them to various degrees. The material used was a 3.8-mm-thick sports mouthguard. Notches with a length of 90 and 80 mm were cut into an EVA sheet 20 mm from the anterior and posterior margins and 15 mm from the right and left margins, respectively, and the sheet was compared with the original. The sheets were formed using a vacuum former when the sheets were heated until they hung 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, and 3.0 cm from the baseline. We measured the thickness and fit of the mouthguard at the central incisor and first molar. Differences in thickness and fit according to the measurement parts, sheet type, and heating conditions were analyzed by three-way anova. The measurement parts and sheet type significantly differed (P < 0.01), and the notched sheet maintained the required thickness. Fit differed among the measurement parts and by heating conditions (P < 0.01), but was not affected by the notching. The mouthguard fit was optimal when the sheets were heated to a hanging distance of 3.0 cm. These results suggest that the thickness and fit of the EVA sheet could be maintained by notching and heating the sheet to a hanging distance of 3.0 cm. These findings could be useful for fabricating appropriate mouthguards. PMID:25358687

  5. Initiation of shape-memory effect by inductive heating of magnetic nanoparticles in thermoplastic polymers.

    PubMed

    Mohr, R; Kratz, K; Weigel, T; Lucka-Gabor, M; Moneke, M; Lendlein, A

    2006-03-01

    In shape-memory polymers, changes in shape are mostly induced by heating, and exceeding a specific switching temperature, T(switch). If polymers cannot be warmed up by heat transfer using a hot liquid or gaseous medium, noncontact triggering will be required. In this article, the magnetically induced shape-memory effect of composites from magnetic nanoparticles and thermoplastic shape-memory polymers is introduced. A polyetherurethane (TFX) and a biodegradable multiblock copolymer (PDC) with poly(p-dioxanone) as hard segment and poly(epsilon-caprolactone) as soft segment were investigated as matrix component. Nanoparticles consisting of an iron(III)oxide core in a silica matrix could be processed into both polymers. A homogeneous particle distribution in TFX could be shown. Compounds have suitable elastic and thermal properties for the shape-memory functionalization. Temporary shapes of TFX compounds were obtained by elongating at increased temperature and subsequent cooling under constant stress. Cold-drawing of PDC compounds at 25 degrees C resulted in temporary fixation of the mechanical deformation by 50-60%. The shape-memory effect of both composite systems could be induced by inductive heating in an alternating magnetic field (f = 258 kHz; H = 30 kA x m(-1)). The maximum temperatures achievable by inductive heating in a specific magnetic field depend on sample geometry and nanoparticle content. Shape recovery rates of composites resulting from magnetic triggering are comparable to those obtained by increasing the environmental temperature. PMID:16537442

  6. Thermal properties of thermoplastic starch/synthetic polymer blends with potential biomedical applicability.

    PubMed

    Mano, J F; Koniarova, D; Reis, R L

    2003-02-01

    Previous studies shown that thermoplastic blends of corn starch with some biodegradable synthetic polymers (poly(epsilon-caprolactone), cellulose acetate, poly(lactic acid) and ethylene-vinyl alcohol copolymer) have good potential to be used in a series of biomedical applications. In this work the thermal behavior of these structurally complex materials is investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). In addition, Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to investigate the chemical interactions between the different components. The endothermic gelatinization process (or water evaporation) observed by DSC in starch is also observed in the blends. Special attention was paid to the structural relaxation that can occur in the blends with poly(lactic acid) at body temperature that may change the physical properties of the material during its application as a biomaterial. At least three degradation mechanisms were identified in the blends by means of using TGA, being assigned to the mass loss due to the plasticizer leaching, and to the degradation of the starch and the synthetic polymer fractions. The non-isothermal kinetics of the decomposition processes was analyzed using two different integral methods. The analysis included the calculation of the activation energy of the correspondent reactions. PMID:15348484

  7. A high throughput, controllable and environmentally benign fabrication process of thermoplastic nanofibers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Continuous and uniform yarns of thermoplastic nanofibers were prepared via direct melt extrusion of immiscible blends of thermoplastic polymers with CAB and subsequent extraction removal of CAB. Ratios of thermoplastic/sacrificial polymers, melt viscosity, and interfacial tensions affect the formati...

  8. Adhesion study of thermoplastic polyimides with Ti-6Al-4V alloy and PEEK-graphite composites

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon Taeho.

    1991-01-01

    High glass transition (e.g. 360C) melt processable thermoplastic polyimide homopolymers and poly(imide-siloxane) segmented copolymers were prepared from a number of diamines and dianhydrides via solution imidization, polydimethylsilxane segment incorporation and molecular weight control with non-reactive phthalimide end-groups. The adhesive bond performance of these polyimides was investigated as a function of molecular weight, siloxane incorporation, residual solvent, test temperature, and polyimide structure via single-lap shear samples prepared from treated Ti-6Al-4V alloy adherends and compression-molded film adhesives of scrim-cloth adhesives. The adhesive bond strengths increased greatly with siloxane-segment incorporation at 10, 20 and 30 wt% and decreased slightly with total polymer molecular weight. As the test temperature was increased, adhesive bond strength increased, decreased or showed a maximum at some temperatures depending on the polyimide structure and siloxane content. The poly(imide-30% siloxane) segmented copolymer and a miscible poly(ether-imide) also demonstrated excellent adhesive bond strength with poly(arylene ether ketone) PEEK{reg sign}-graphite composites.

  9. Effect of chain microstructure on physical properties of olefin copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poon, Benjamin Chunman

    The effect of chain microstructure on various physical properties was studied in polyethylene and polypropylene copolymers. Adhesion of Ziegler-Natta (ZNPE) and metallocene (mPE) catalyzed ethylene-octene copolymers to polypropylene (PP) were studied by measuring the delamination toughness G of coextruded microlayers using the T-peel test. It was found that the heterogeneous ZNPE exhibited poor adhesion to polypropylene. It was proposed that the low molecular weight, highly branched ZNPE fractions migrate to the interface to form an amorphous layer. The homogeneous mPE with the same short chain branch content showed very high G. Blending ZNPE with an mPE increased G. Atomic force microscopy revealed that blending mPE into ZNPE reduced or eliminated the amorphous interfacial layer. It was hypothesized that mPE increased miscibility of low molecular weight, highly branched fractions of ZNPE and prevented their segregation at the interface. The solid state structure and properties of homogeneous propylene-octene copolymers were examined. Based on the combined observations from melting behavior, dynamic mechanical response, morphology with primarily atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and tensile deformation, a classification scheme with 4 distinct categories is proposed. The homopolymer with 60 wt% crystallinity constitutes Type IV. It is characterized by large alpha-positive spherulite. Copolymers with up to 5 mol% octene, with at least 35 wt% crystallinity, are classified as Type III. They crystallize as alpha-positive spherulites that are smaller than the homopolymer. Both Type IV and Type III materials exhibit thermoplastic behavior. Copolymers classified as Type II have between 5 and 10 mol% octene with crystallinity in the range of 20--35%. Type II materials have smaller impinging spherulites than Type III copolymers and they are negative. The materials in this category have plastomeric behavior. Type I copolymers have more than 10 mol% octene and less

  10. Preparation of polypropylene thermoplastic container via thermoforming process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruqiyah Nik Hassan, Nik; Amira Mohd Ghazali, Farah; Aziz Jaafar, Abdul; Mazni Ismail, Noor

    2016-02-01

    In this study, plastic containers made of polypropylene (PP) sheets were fabricated via vacuum thermoforming. Thermoforming is a process used in fabricating plastic parts by changing flat thermoplastic sheet to three dimensional shapes. In preparing these thermoplastic containers, the design and fabrication of mould were first done by using Catia V5 software and CNC milling machine, respectively. The thermoforming process was then performed at various temperatures ranging from 160°C until 200°C on the PP sheet to form the container. From the experiment, it can be suggested that the outcomes of final thermoplastic containers are significantly depends on temperature control during thermoforming process and also the vent holes design of the mould.

  11. Nanocellular thermoplastic foam and process for making the same

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Lingbo; Costeux, Stephane; Patankar, Kshitish A.; Moore, Jonathan D.

    2015-09-29

    Prepare a thermoplastic polymer foam having a porosity of 70% or more and at least one of: (i) an average cell size of 200 nanometers or less; and (ii) a nucleation density of at least 1.times.1015 effective nucleation sites per cubic centimeter of foamable polymer composition not including blowing agent using a foamable polymer composition containing a thermoplastic polymer selected from styrenic polymer and (meth)acrylic polymers, a blowing agent comprising at least 20 mole-percent carbon dioxide based on moles of blowing agent and an additive having a Total Hansen Solubility Parameter that differs from that of carbon dioxide by less than 2 and that is present at a concentration of 0.01 to 1.5 weight parts per hundred weight parts thermoplastic polymer.

  12. Mössbauer spectroscopic study of FeII-doped sulphonated poly(ether-urethane)—styrene-acrylate copolymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamnev, A. A.; Grigoryeva, O. P.; Fainleib, A. M.; Kuzmann, E.

    2013-04-01

    Thermoplastic linear ionomer based on sulphonated poly(ether-urethane)—styrene-acrylate copolymer, doped with natural Fe2 + , was studied by Mössbauer spectroscopy at T = 78 and 290 K to monitor the chemical state of Fe species. The Fe2 + added to aqueous suspension of the system was only partly oxidised in the course of polymer film preparation and drying in air. The oxidised part comprised a magnetic phase (~19 % of total Fe both at T = 78 and 298 K) and a quadrupole doublet (~40 %), while FeII (over 40 %) stabilised in two types of microenvironments.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of thermoplastic polyphenoxyquinoxalines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdem, Haci Bayram

    This research was divided into two main parts. In the first part, a new facile route to relatively inexpensive thermoplastic polyphenoxyquinoxalines was developed. The synthetic route involves the aromatic nucleophilic substitution reaction of bisphenols with 2,3-dichloroquinoxaline. The dichloro monomer was prepared in two steps. In the first step, oxalic acid was condensed with o-phenylenediamine to give 2,3-dihydroxyquinoxaline. In the second step, 2,3-dihydroxyquinoxaline was treated with thionyl chloride to give 2,3-dichloroquinoxaline. This monomer was successfully polymerized with bisphenol-A, bisphenol-S, hexafluorobisphenol-A and 9,9-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)fluorenone. Hydroquinone and biphenol, however, can not be polymerized to high molecular weight polymers because of the premature precipitation of crystalline oligomers. The glass transition temperatures of the high molecular weight polymers prepared from a series of bisphenols range from 191 °C to 279 °C, and their thermal decomposition temperatures are around 500 °C. The polymers are soluble in a wide range of solvents and can be solution-cast into thin films that are colorless and transparent. The polymers have tensile strengths ranging from 61 to 107 MPa, and tensile moduli ranging from 3.5 to 2.3 GPa. The synthesis of polymer obtained from 2,3-dichloroquinoxaline and bisphenol-A was scaled up to afford 500 g of material. This polymer is a thermoplastic with a melt-viscosity less than 1000 Pa.s. at 300 °C. The notched Izod impact strength of injection-molded samples of this polymer is 40.7 J/m. In the second part of this research, the synthetic method has been modified to allow the preparation of quinoxaline containing polyimides. Thus, 2,3-dichloroquinoxaline was treated either with p-nitrophenol followed by reduction of nitro groups, or with p-aminophenols to directly obtain the desired 2,3-(4-aminophenoxy)quinoxaline. This diamine was polymerized with 3,3',4,4'-biphenyldianhydride, 4

  14. Experimental investigation of laser-assisted thermoplastic tape consolidation

    SciTech Connect

    Beyeler, E.; Phillips, W.; Guseri, S.I.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental investigation of a novel approach for manufacturing of thermoplastic matrix composites, is described. The technique is based on using laser energy as the focused heat source to melt the matrix material for subsequent consolidation, and appears to be particularly suited for thermoplastic filament winding opertions. An experimental set up is defined to produce multi ply rings, and the feasibility of this technique is demonstrated by discussing several samples that were produced using Ryton AC40-60 prepreg tapes. The quality of consolidation is examined through cross-sectional micrographs. 12 references.

  15. Analysis of diaphragm forming of powder impregnated thermoplastic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutolo, D.; Canonico, P.; Marchetti, M.; Porcari, A. M.

    A new technology for making thermoplastic prepreg uses a fiber impregnated thermoplastic (FIT) process. Fabric woven from FIT tow prepreg shows a great deal of drapability. A study has been conducted on diaphragm forming technology, using FIT woven fabric made of glass fibers and polyimide. A double curvature mold was used to form hemispherical parts by applying differential pressures across double polyimide diaphragms. Effects of forming rate, lay-up, and cross-section thickness have been investigated. Deformation of diaphragms has been also investigated.

  16. Carbon fiber reinforced thermoplastic composites for future automotive applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, K.

    2016-05-01

    After a brief introduction to polymer composite properties and markets, the state of the art activities in the field of manufacturing of advanced composites for automotive applications are elucidated. These include (a) long fiber reinforced thermoplastics (LFT) for secondary automotive components, and (b) continuous carbon fiber reinforced thermosetting composites for car body applications. It is followed by future possibilities of carbon fiber reinforced thermoplastic composites for e.g. (i) crash elements, (ii) racing car seats, and (iii) production and recycling of automotive fenders.

  17. Pultrusion process development of a graphite reinforced polyetherimide thermoplastic composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Maywood L.; Buckley, John D.; Dickerson, George E.; Johnson, Gary S.; Taylor, Edward C.; Covington, Edward W.

    1989-01-01

    High performance thermoplastic polymers do not contain reactants and solvents able to react with a pultrusion die to yield polymerization; consolidation is therefore performed with a rigid or a boardy prepreg, and consolidation must occur with polymers whose viscosities are of the order of 1 million centipoises or more. Die temperatures are typically above 400 C, by comparison with the 150-200 C encountered in thermosets. A methodical approach is presented here for the development of a pultrusion process suitable for polyetherimide and other engineering thermoplastics, employing SEM, DSC, TGA, and ultrasonic C-scanning.

  18. Absorption depth profile of water on thermoplastic starch films

    SciTech Connect

    Bonno, B.; Laporte, J.L.; Paris, D.; D'Leon, R.T.

    2000-01-01

    It is well known that petroleum derived polymers are primary environmental contaminants. The study of new packing biodegradable materials has been the object of numerous papers in past years. Some of these new materials are the thermoplastic films derived from wheat starch. In the present paper, the authors study some of properties of wheat starch thermoplastic films, with various amounts of absorbed water, using photoacoustic spectroscopy techniques. The absorption depth profile of water in the starch substrate is determined for samples having a variable water level.

  19. Adsorption depth profile of water on thermoplastic starch films

    SciTech Connect

    Bonno, B.; Laporte, J.L.; Paris, D.; D'Leon, R.T.

    2000-01-01

    It is well known that petroleum derived polymers are primary environmental contaminants. The study of new packing biodegradable materials has been the object of numerous papers in past years. Some of these new materials are the thermoplastic films derived from wheat starch. In the present paper, the authors study some of properties of wheat starch thermoplastic films, with various amounts of absorbed water, using photoacoustic spectroscopy techniques. The absorption depth profile of water in the starch substrate is determined for samples having a variable water level.

  20. LARC-TPI: A multi-purpose thermoplastic polyimide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, A. K.; St.clair, T. L.

    1982-01-01

    A linear thermoplastic polyimide, LARC-TPI, was characterized and developed for a variety of high temperature applications. In its fully imidized form, this material can be used as an adhesive for bonding metals such as titanium, aluminum, copper, brass, and stainless steel. LARC-TPI was evaluated as a thermoplastic for bonding large pieces of polyimide film to produce flexible, 100 void-free laminates for flexible circuit applications. The development of LARC-TPI as a potential molding powder, composite matrix resin, high temperature film and fiber is also discussed.

  1. Star-like copolymer stabilized noble-metal nanoparticle powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Peng-Fei; Yan, Yun-Hui; Mangadlao, Joey Dacula; Rong, Li-Han; Advincula, Rigoberto

    2016-03-01

    The amphiphilic star-like copolymer polyethylenimine-block-poly(ε-caprolactone) (PEI-b-PCL) was utilized to transfer the pre-synthesized citrate-capped noble metal nanoparticles (NMNPs) from an aqueous layer to an organic layer without any additional reagents. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were utilized to study the assembly of the polymers coated on the surface of the citrate-capped NMNPs. After removing the organic solvent, the polymer-coated NMNPs in powder form (PCP-NMNPs) were obtained. The excellent solubility of the PEI-b-PCL allows the PCP-NMNPs to be easily dispersed in most of the organic solvents without any significant aggregation. Moreover, the good thermal stability and long-term stability make PCP-NMNPs an excellent NMNP-containing hybrid system for different specific applications, such as surface coating, catalysis and thermoplastic processing of nanocomposite materials.The amphiphilic star-like copolymer polyethylenimine-block-poly(ε-caprolactone) (PEI-b-PCL) was utilized to transfer the pre-synthesized citrate-capped noble metal nanoparticles (NMNPs) from an aqueous layer to an organic layer without any additional reagents. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were utilized to study the assembly of the polymers coated on the surface of the citrate-capped NMNPs. After removing the organic solvent, the polymer-coated NMNPs in powder form (PCP-NMNPs) were obtained. The excellent solubility of the PEI-b-PCL allows the PCP-NMNPs to be easily dispersed in most of the organic solvents without any significant aggregation. Moreover, the good thermal stability and long-term stability make PCP-NMNPs an excellent NMNP-containing hybrid system for different specific applications, such as surface coating, catalysis and thermoplastic processing of nanocomposite materials. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Synthesis scheme and the 1H NMR spectrum of PEI

  2. Nanotube reinforced thermoplastic polymer matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shofner, Meisha Lei

    The inherent high strength, thermal conductivity, and electrical conductivity make nanotubes attractive reinforcements for polymer matrix composites. However, the structure that makes them desirable also causes highly anisotropic properties and limited reactivity with other materials. This thesis isolates these problems in two separate studies aimed at improving mechanical properties with single wall nanotube (SWNT) reinforced thermoplastic polymer composites. The two studies demonstrate the effect of solid freeform fabrication (SFF) and chemical functionalization on anisotropy and limited reactivity, respectively. Both studies showed mechanical property improvements. The alignment study demonstrates a maximum increase of 93% in tensile modulus with single wall nanotubes (SWNTs). The chemical functionalization study shows a larger increase in storage modulus for functionalized SWNTs as compared to purified SVWNTs with respective increases of 9% and 44% in storage modulus. Improved interfacial properties are also observed as a decrease in mechanical damping. Maximum property increases in composites are obtained when nanotubes are aligned, requiring additional processing consideration to the anisotropic structure. Melt spinning and extrusion processing effectively align nanotubes, but the end product of these techniques, composite fibers, requires further processing to be incorporated into finished parts. Extrusion-based SFF is a novel technique for processing nanotube reinforced composites because it allows for the direct fabrication of finished parts containing aligned nanotubes. SFF processing produces parts containing preferentially oriented nanotubes with improved mechanical properties when compared to isotropic composites. Functionalization of the nanotube surface disrupts the rope structure to obtain smaller ropes and promote further interfacial bonding. The chemically inert nature of nanotubes resulting from a structure containing few defects and the

  3. Processing and characterization of unidirectional thermoplastic nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narasimhan, Kameshwaran

    The manufacture of continuous fibre-reinforced thermoplastic nanocomposites is discussed for the case of E-Glass reinforced polypropylene (PP) matrix and for E-Glass reinforced Polyamide-6 (Nylon-6), with and without dispersed nanoclay (montmorillonite) platelets. The E-Glass/PP nanocomposite was manufactured using pultrusion, whereas the E-Glass/Nylon-6 nanocomposite was manufactured using compression molding. Mechanical characterization of nanocomposites were performed and compared with traditional microcomposites. Compressive as well as shear strength of nanocomposites was improved by improving the yield strength of the surrounding matrix through the dispersion of nanoclay. Significant improvements were achieved in compressive strength and shear strength with relatively low nanoclay loadings. Initially, polypropylene with and without nanoclay were melt intercalated using a single-screw extruder and the pultruded nanocomposite was fabricated using extruded pre-impregnated (pre-preg) tapes. Compression tests were performed as mandated by ASTM guidelines. SEM and TEM characterization revealed presence of nanoclay in an intercalated and partially exfoliated morphology. Mechanical tests confirmed significant improvements in compressive strength (˜122% at 10% nanoclay loading) and shear strength (˜60% at 3% nanoclay loading) in modified pultruded E-Glass/PP nanocomposites in comparison with baseline properties. Uniaxial tensile tests showed a small increase in tensile strength (˜3.4%) with 3% nanoclay loading. Subsequently, E-Glass/Nylon-6 nanocomposite panels were manufactured by compression molding. Compression tests were performed according to IITRI guidelines, whereas short beam shear and uni-axial tensile tests were performed according to ASTM standards. Mechanical tests confirmed strength enhancement with nanoclay addition, with a significant improvement in compressive strength (50% at 4% nanoclay loading) and shear strength (˜36% at 4% nanoclay loading

  4. Advanced thermoplastic materials for district heating piping systems

    SciTech Connect

    Raske, D.T.; Karvelas, D.E.

    1988-04-01

    The work described in this report represents research conducted in the first year of a three-year program to assess, characterize, and design thermoplastic piping for use in elevated-temperature district heating (DH) systems. The present report describes the results of a program to assess the potential usefulness of advanced thermoplastics as piping materials for use in DH systems. This includes the review of design rules for thermoplastic materials used as pipes, a survey of candidate materials and available mechanical properties data, and mechanical properties testing to obtain baseline data on a candidate thermoplastic material extruded as pipe. The candidate material studied in this phase of the research was a polyetherimide resin, Ultem 1000, which has a UL continuous service temperature rating of 338/degree/F (170/degree/C). The results of experiments to determine the mechanical properties between 68 and 350/degree/F (20 and 177/degree/C) were used to establish preliminary design values for this material. Because these prototypic pipes were extruded under less than optimal conditions, the mechanical properties obtained are inferior to those expected from typical production pipes. Nevertheless, the present material in the form of 2-in. SDR 11 pipe (2.375-in. O. D. by 0.216-in. wall) would have a saturated water design pressure rating of /approximately/34 psig at 280/degree/F. 16 refs., 6 figs., 8 tabs.

  5. Development and evaluation of thermoplastic street maintenance material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siemens, W. D.

    1973-01-01

    An all-weather permanent street patching material was investigated for flexible and rigid pavements. The economic, operational, and material requirements are discussed along with the results of field tests with various mixtures of EVA resins and asphalt. Cost analyses for thermoplastic patching methods are included.

  6. Method for preparing spherical thermoplastic particles of uniform size

    DOEpatents

    Day, J.R.

    1975-11-17

    Spherical particles of thermoplastic material of virtually uniform roundness and diameter are prepared by cutting monofilaments of a selected diameter into rod-like segments of a selected uniform length which are then heated in a viscous liquid to effect the formation of the spherical particles.

  7. TPE's with low permeability, high damping. [ThermoPlastic Elastomers

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, M.J.; Lebel, M.A.; Robinson, K.J.

    1991-06-01

    This article examines the characteristics of the thermoplastic elastomer Sarlink 2000. Topics discussed include morphology, rheology, thermo-mechanical properties, thermal properties, and physical properties. These properties are compared to the properties of thermoset butyl rubber compounds which Sarlink 2000 is targeted to replace in many applications.

  8. Antimicrobial thermoplastic materials for biomedical applications prepared by melt processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botta, L.; Scaffaro, R.; Ceraulo, M.; Gallo, G.

    2014-05-01

    In this work thermoplastic polymers with antimicrobial properties were prepared by incorporating an antibiotic, i.e., ciprofloxacin (CFX), by melt processing. Two different polymers were used as matrices, i.e., polypropylene (PP) and poly(lactid acid) (PLA) and different concentrations of CFX have been incorporated. The antimicrobial properties, the release kinetic and the mechanical performances of the prepared materials were evaluated.

  9. Synthesis and characterization of novel thermoplastic elastomers employing polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane physical crosslinks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seurer, Bradley

    Polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS) are molecularly precise isotropic particles with average diameters of 1-2 nm. A typical T 8 POSS nanoparticle has an inorganic Si8O12 core surrounded by eight aliphatic or aromatic groups attached to the silicon vertices of the polyhedron promoting solubility in conventional solvents. Previously, efficient synthetic methods have been developed whereby one of the aliphatic groups on the periphery is substituted by a functional group capable of undergoing either homo- or copolymerization. In the current investigations, preparative methods for the chemical incorporation of POSS macromonomers in a series elastomers have been developed. Analysis of the copolymers using WAXD reveals that pendant POSS groups off the polymer backbones aggregate, and can crystallize as nanocrystals. From both line-broadening of the diffraction maxima, and also the oriented diffraction in a drawn material, the individual POSS sub-units are crystallizing as anisotropically shaped crystallites. The formation of POSS particle aggregation is strongly dependent on the nature of the polymeric matrix and the POSS peripheral group. X-ray studies show aggregation of POSS in ethylene-propylene elastomers occurred only with a phenyl periphery, whereas POSS particles with isobutyl and ethyl peripheries disperse within the polymer matrix. By altering the polymer matrix to one containing chain repulsive fluorine units, aggregation is observed with both the phenyl and isobutyl peripheries. Altering the polymer chain to poly(dimethylcyclooctadiene), POSS aggregates with isobutyl, ethyl, cyclopentyl, and phenyl peripheries. The formation of POSS nanocrystals increases the mechanical properties of these novel thermoplastic elastomers, including an increase in the tensile storage modulus and formation of a rubbery plateau region. Tensile tests of these elastomers show an increase in elastic modulus with increasing POSS loading. The elongation at break was as high as

  10. Thermodynamics of coil-hyperbranched poly(styrene-b-acrylated epoxidized soybean oil) block copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Fang-Yi; Hohmann, Austin; Hernández, Nacú; Cochran, Eric

    Here we present the phase behavior of a new type of coil-hyperbranched diblock copolymer: poly(styrene- b-acrylated epoxidized soybean oil), or PS-PAESO. PS-PAESO is an example of a biorenewable thermoplastic elastomer (bio-TPE). To date, we have shown that bio-TPEs can be economical commercial substitutes for their petrochemically derived analogues--such as poly(styrene- b-butadiene- b-styrene) (SBS)--in a range of applications including pressure sensitive adhesives and bitumen modification. From a polymer physics perspective, PS-PAESO is an interesting material in that it couples a linear coil-like block with a highly branched block. Thus in contrast to the past five decades of studies on linear AB diblock copolymers, coil-hyperbranched block copolymers are relatively unknown to the community and can be expected to deviate substantially from the standard ``universal'' phase behavior in the AB systems. To explore these new materials, we have constructed a library of PS-PAESO materials spanning a range of molecular weight and composition values. The phase transition behavior and the morphology information will be interpreted by isochronal temperature scanning in dynamic shear rheology, small angle X-ray scattering and the corresponding transmission electron microscopy.

  11. Skin delivery by block copolymer nanoparticles (block copolymer micelles).

    PubMed

    Laredj-Bourezg, Faiza; Bolzinger, Marie-Alexandrine; Pelletier, Jocelyne; Valour, Jean-Pierre; Rovère, Marie-Rose; Smatti, Batoule; Chevalier, Yves

    2015-12-30

    Block copolymer nanoparticles often referred to as "block copolymer micelles" have been assessed as carriers for skin delivery of hydrophobic drugs. Such carriers are based on organic biocompatible and biodegradable materials loaded with hydrophobic drugs: poly(lactide)-block-poly(ethylene glycol) copolymer (PLA-b-PEG) nanoparticles that have a solid hydrophobic core made of glassy poly(d,l-lactide), and poly(caprolactone)-block-poly(ethylene glycol) copolymer (PCL-b-PEG) nanoparticles having a liquid core of polycaprolactone. In vitro skin absorption of all-trans retinol showed a large accumulation of retinol in stratum corneum from both block copolymer nanoparticles, higher by a factor 20 than Polysorbate 80 surfactant micelles and by a factor 80 than oil solution. Additionally, skin absorption from PLA-b-PEG nanoparticles was higher by one order of magnitude than PCL-b-PEG, although their sizes (65nm) and external surface (water-swollen PEG layer) were identical as revealed by detailed structural characterizations. Fluorescence microscopy of histological skin sections provided a non-destructive picture of the storage of Nile Red inside stratum corneum, epidermis and dermis. Though particle cores had a different physical states (solid or liquid as measured by (1)H NMR), the ability of nanoparticles for solubilization of the drug assessed from their Hildebrand solubility parameters appeared the parameter of best relevance regarding skin absorption. PMID:26602293

  12. ABC triblock surface active block copolymer with grafted ethoxylated fluoroalkyl amphiphilic side chains for marine antifouling/fouling-release applications.

    PubMed

    Weinman, Craig J; Finlay, John A; Park, Daewon; Paik, Marvin Y; Krishnan, Sitaraman; Sundaram, Harihara S; Dimitriou, Michael; Sohn, Karen E; Callow, Maureen E; Callow, James A; Handlin, Dale L; Willis, Carl L; Kramer, Edward J; Ober, Christopher K

    2009-10-20

    An amphiphilic triblock surface-active block copolymer (SABC) possessing ethoxylated fluoroalkyl side chains was synthesized through the chemical modification of a polystyrene-block-poly(ethylene-ran-butylene)-block-polyisoprene polymer precursor. Bilayer coatings on glass slides consisting of a thin layer of the amphiphilic SABC spray coated on a thick layer of a polystyrene-block-poly(ethylene-ran-butylene)-block-polystyrene (SEBS) thermoplastic elastomer were prepared for biofouling assays with the green alga Ulva and the diatom Navicula. Dynamic water contact angle analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize the surfaces. Additionally, the effect of the Young's modulus of the coating on the release properties of sporelings (young plants) of the green alga Ulva was examined through the use of two different SEBS thermoplastic elastomers possessing modulus values of an order of magnitude in difference. The amphiphilic SABC was found to reduce the settlement density of zoospores of Ulva as well as the strength of attachment of sporelings. The attachment strength of the sporelings was further reduced for the amphiphilic SABC on the "low"-modulus SEBS base layer. The weaker adhesion of diatoms, relative to a PDMS standard, further highlights the antifouling potential of this amphiphilic triblock hybrid copolymer. PMID:19821626

  13. Imide/arylene ether copolymers. I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, B. J.; Hergenrother, P. M.; Bass, R. G.

    1991-01-01

    The preparation of a series of novel imide/arylene ether copolymers is described together with the results of viscosity and DSC Tg(Tm) measurements. The copolymers were synthesized from an arylene ether block and either an amorphous or semicrystalline imide block. One block copolymer was end-capped, and the molecular weight was controlled to improve compression moldability. The paper also presents results of mechanical properties tests on copolymer samples.

  14. Interfacial strength development in thermoplastic resins and fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howes, Jeremy C.; Loos, Alfred C.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental program to develop test methods to be used to characterize interfacial (autohesive) strength development in polysulfone thermoplastic resin and graphite-polysulfone prepreg during processing is reported. Two test methods were used to examine interfacial strength development in neat resin samples. These included an interfacial tension test and a compact tension (CT) fracture toughness test. The interfacial tensile test proved to be very difficult to perform with a considerable amount of data scatter. Thus, the interfacial test was discarded in favor of the fracture toughness test. Interfacial strength development was observed by measuring the refracture toughness of precracked compact tension specimens that were rehealed at a given temperature and contact time. The measured refracture toughness was correlated with temperature and contact time. Interfacial strength development in graphite-polysulfone unidirectional composites was measured using a double cantilever beam (DCB) interlaminar fracture toughness test. The critical strain energy release rate of refractured composite specimens was measured as a function of healing temperature and contact time.

  15. Processing and Damage Tolerance of Continuous Carbon Fiber Composites Containing Puncture Self-Healing Thermoplastic Matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimsley, Brian W.; Gordon, Keith L.; Czabaj, Michael W.; Cano, Roberto J.; Siochi, Emilie J.

    2012-01-01

    Research at NASA Langley Research Center (NASA LaRC) has identified several commercially available thermoplastic polymers that self-heal after ballistic impact and through-penetration. One of these resins, polybutadiene graft copolymer (PB(sub g)), was processed with unsized IM7 carbon fibers to fabricate reinforced composite material for further evaluation. Temperature dependent characteristics, such as the degradation point, glass transition (T(sub g)), and viscosity of the PBg polymer were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and dynamic parallel plate rheology. The PBg resin was processed into approximately equal to 22.0 cm wide unidirectional prepreg tape in the NASA LaRC Advanced Composites Processing Research Laboratory. Data from polymer thermal characterization guided the determination of a processing cycle used to fabricate quasi-isotropic 32-ply laminate panels in various dimensions up to 30.5cm x 30.5cm in a vacuum press. The consolidation quality of these panels was analyzed by optical microscopy and acid digestion. The process cycle was further optimized based on these results and quasi-isotropic, [45/0/-45/90]4S, 15.24cm x 15.24cm laminate panels were fabricated for mechanical property characterization. The compression strength after impact (CAI) of the IM7/pBG composites was measured both before and after an elevated temperature and pressure healing cycle. The results of the processing development effort of this composite material as well as the results of the mechanical property characterization are presented in this paper.

  16. Initiation of shape-memory effect by inductive heating of magnetic nanoparticles in thermoplastic polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohr, R.; Kratz, K.; Weigel, T.; Lucka-Gabor, M.; Moneke, M.; Lendlein, A.

    2006-03-01

    In shape-memory polymers, changes in shape are mostly induced by heating, and exceeding a specific switching temperature, Tswitch. If polymers cannot be warmed up by heat transfer using a hot liquid or gaseous medium, noncontact triggering will be required. In this article, the magnetically induced shape-memory effect of composites from magnetic nanoparticles and thermoplastic shape-memory polymers is introduced. A polyetherurethane (TFX) and a biodegradable multiblock copolymer (PDC) with poly(p-dioxanone) as hard segment and poly(-caprolactone) as soft segment were investigated as matrix component. Nanoparticles consisting of an iron(III)oxide core in a silica matrix could be processed into both polymers. A homogeneous particle distribution in TFX could be shown. Compounds have suitable elastic and thermal properties for the shape-memory functionalization. Temporary shapes of TFX compounds were obtained by elongating at increased temperature and subsequent cooling under constant stress. Cold-drawing of PDC compounds at 25°C resulted in temporary fixation of the mechanical deformation by 50-60%. The shape-memory effect of both composite systems could be induced by inductive heating in an alternating magnetic field (f = 258 kHz; H = 30 kA·m-1). The maximum temperatures achievable by inductive heating in a specific magnetic field depend on sample geometry and nanoparticle content. Shape recovery rates of composites resulting from magnetic triggering are comparable to those obtained by increasing the environmental temperature. nanocomposite | shape-memory polymer | stimuli-sensitive polymer


  17. Influence of carbon nanotubes on the properties of epoxy based composites reinforced with a semicrystalline thermoplastic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díez-Pascual, A.; Shuttleworth, P.; Gónzalez-Castillo, E.; Marco, C.; Gómez-Fatou, M.; Ellis, G.

    2014-08-01

    Novel ternary nanocomposites based on a thermoset (TS) system composed of triglycidyl p-aminophenol (TGAP) epoxy resin and 4,4'-diaminodiphenylsulfone (DDS) curing agent incorporating 5 wt% of a semicrystalline thermoplastic (TP), an ethylene/1-octene copolymer, and 0.5 or 1.0 wt% multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) have been prepared via physical blending and curing. The influence of the TP and the MWCNTs on the curing process, morphology, thermal and mechanical properties of the hybrid nanocomposites has been analyzed. Different morphologies evolved depending on the CNT content: the material with 0.5 wt% MWCNTs showed a matrix-dispersed droplet-like morphology with well-dispersed nanofiller that selectively located at the TS/TP interphase, while that with 1.0 wt% MWCNTs exhibited coarse dendritic TP areas containing agglomerated MWCNTs. Although the cure reaction was accelerated in its early stage by the nanofillers, curing occurred at a lower rate since these obstructed chain crosslinking. The nanocomposite with lower nanotube content displayed two crystallization peaks at lower temperature than that of pure TP, while a single peak appearing at similar temperature to that of TP was observed for the blend with higher nanotube loading. The highest thermal stability was found for TS/TP (5.0 wt%)/MWCNTs (0.5 wt%), due to a synergistic barrier effect of both TP and the nanofiller. Moreover, this nanocomposite displayed the best mechanical properties, with an optimal combination of stiffness, strength and toughness. However, poorer performance was found for TS/TP (5.0 wt%)/MWCNTs (1.0 wt%) due to the less effective reinforcement of the agglomerated nanotubes and the coalescence of the TP particles into large areas. Therefore, finely tuned morphologies and properties can be obtained by adjusting the nanotube content in the TS/TP blends, leading to high-performance hybrid nanocomposites suitable for structural and high-temperature applications.

  18. The relative fire resistance of select thermoplastic materials. [for aircraft interiors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, D. A.; Parker, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    The relative thermal stability, flammability, and related thermochemical properties of some thermoplastic materials currently used in aircraft interiors as well as of some candidate thermoplastics were investigated. Currently used materials that were evaluated include acrylonitrile butadiene styrene, bisphenol A polycarbonate, polyphenylene oxide, and polyvinyl fluoride. Candidate thermoplastic materials evaluated include: 9,9-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)fluorene polycarbonate-poly(dimethylsiloxane) block polymer, chlorinated polyvinylchloride homopolymer, phenolphthalein polycarbonate, polyethersulfone, polyphenylene sulfide, polyarylsulfone, and polyvinylidene fluoride.

  19. An asymmetric A-B-A' metallo-supramolecular triblock copolymer linked by Ni(2+)-bis-terpyridine complexes at one junction.

    PubMed

    Li, Haixia; Wei, Wei; Xiong, Huiming

    2016-02-01

    A metallo-supramolecular triblock copolymer polystyrene-b-polyisoprene-[Ni(2+)]-polystyrene (SI-[Ni(2+)]-S') has been efficiently prepared using a one-pot, two-step procedure, where the blocks are held by bis-terpyridine complexes at the junction of SI-S'. This specific metallo-supramolecular chemistry is demonstrated to be a robust approach to potentially broaden the diversity of block copolymers. The location of the metal-ligand complexes has a profound influence on the phase separation of the triblock copolymer in the bulk, which results in a distinctive phase segregation between the end blocks and leads to an unexpected asymmetry of the triblock copolymer. The metal-ligand complexes are found to be preferentially located on the adjacent spherical domain and form a core-shell structure. The resulting multiphase material exhibits distinct elastomeric properties with significant toughness and creep recovery behavior. This type of triblock copolymer is anticipated to be a novel class of hybrid thermo-plastic elastomeric material with wide tunability and functionality. PMID:26660271

  20. Copolymers For Capillary Gel Electrophoresis

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Changsheng; Li, Qingbo

    2005-08-09

    This invention relates to an electrophoresis separation medium having a gel matrix of at least one random, linear copolymer comprising a primary comonomer and at least one secondary comonomer, wherein the comonomers are randomly distributed along the copolymer chain. The primary comonomer is an acrylamide or an acrylamide derivative that provides the primary physical, chemical, and sieving properties of the gel matrix. The at least one secondary comonomer imparts an inherent physical, chemical, or sieving property to the copolymer chain. The primary and secondary comonomers are present in a ratio sufficient to induce desired properties that optimize electrophoresis performance. The invention also relates to a method of separating a mixture of biological molecules using this gel matrix, a method of preparing the novel electrophoresis separation medium, and a capillary tube filled with the electrophoresis separation medium.

  1. Microwave facilities for welding thermoplastic composites and preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Ku, H S; Siores, E; Ball, J A

    1999-01-01

    The wide range of applications of microwave technology in manufacturing industries has been well documented (NRC, 1994; Thuery, 1992). In this paper, a new way of joining fibre reinforced thermoplastic composites with or without primers is presented. The microwave facility used is also discussed. The effect of power input and cycle time on the heat affected zone (HAZ) is detailed together with the underlying principles of test piece material interactions with the electromagnetic field. The process of autogenous joining of 33% by weight of random glass fibre reinforced Nylon 66, polystyrene (PS) and low density polyethylene (LDPE) as well as 23.3% by weight of carbon fibre reinforced PS thermoplastic composites is discussed together with developments using filler materials, or primers in the heterogenous joining mode. The weldability dependence on the dielectric loss tangent of these materials at elevated temperatures is also described. PMID:10687151

  2. Micro hot embossing of thermoplastic polymers: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Linfa; Deng, Yujun; Yi, Peiyun; Lai, Xinmin

    2014-01-01

    Micro hot embossing of thermoplastic polymers is a promising process to fabricate high precision and high quality features in micro/nano scale. This technology has experienced more than 40 years development and has been partially applied in industrial production. Three modes of micro hot embossing including plate-to-plate, roll-to-plate and roll-to-roll have been successively developed to meet the increasing demand for large-area patterned polymeric films. This review surveys recent progress of micro hot embossing in terms of polymeric material behavior, embossing process and corresponding apparatus. Besides, challenges and innovations in mold fabrication techniques are comprehensively summarized and industrial applications are systematically cataloged as well. Finally, technical challenges and future trends are presented for micro hot embossing of thermoplastic polymers.

  3. A critical mass flux model for the flammability of thermoplastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staggs, J. E. J.; Nelson, M. I.

    2001-09-01

    The combustion of thermoplastics is modelled using a critical mass flux hypothesis as the ignition and extinction criteria. Polymer degradation is modelled as a single-step first-order Arrhenius reaction term. A simple model for mass transport of polymer through the sample during pyrolysis is included. The degradation products are assumed to move out of the polymer instantaneously. The model consists of a nonlinear integral-differential advection-diffusion equation for the temperature in the thermoplastic, coupled to an ordinary differential equation, for the regression rate. Results are presented which quantify the effect that the thickness of the test sample has on the mass-loss rate, or equivalently heat-release rate, curve. From these we conclude that thermally thick samples are characterized by a region of steady burning which is independent of the initial sample thickness. The test method that we have in mind is the cone calorimeter.

  4. Method for shaping sheet thermoplastic and the like

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akilian, Mireille K. (Inventor); Schattenburg, Mark L. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Processes and apparati for shaping sheet glass or thermoplastic materials use force from a layer of a flowing fluid, such as air, between the sheet and a mandrel at close to the softening temperature of the thermoplastic. The shape is preserved by cooling. The shape of the air bearing mandrel and the pressure distribution of the fluid contribute to the final shape. A process can be conducted on one or two surfaces such that the force from the air layer is on one or two surfaces of the sheet. The gap size between the sheet and mandrel determines the pressure profile in the gap, which also determines the final sheet shape. In general, smaller gaps lead to larger viscous forces. The pressure profile depends on the shape of the mandrel, the size of the fluid gap and the sheet and the fluid supply pressure.

  5. Development and application of a process model for thermoplastic pultrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astrom, B. T.

    A fundamental understanding of the effects of processing parameters and die geometry in a pultrusion process requires a mathematical model in order to minimize the number of necessary experiments. Previous investigators have suggested a variety of models for thermoset pultrusion, while comparatively little effort has been spent modelling its less well-understood thermoplastic counterpart. Herein, models to describe temperature and pressure distributions within a thermoplastic composite as it travels through the pultrusion line, as well as a model to calculate the accumulated pulling resistance from a pultrusion die, are presented. The predictions of the models are compared to experimentally obtained data in terms of composite temperature and pressure and process pulling force; the correlations between predictions and experimental data are found to be good, indicating the soundness of the models. The practical usefulness of the models in terms of die design and the effects of changes in processing parameters is demonstrated with examples.

  6. Pultrusion with thermoplastics for the fabrication of structures in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Maywood L.; Macconochie, Ian O.; Johnson, Gary S.

    1988-01-01

    The use of the pultrusion method to produce structures in space is proposed. This technique is based on transporting materials in coils or bundles and fabricating the structures in space. Two methods for thermoplastic impregnation of advanced composite are described. The properties of three pultruded thermoplastic matrix materials, polyphenylene sulfide, polyetherimide (PEI), and polyetheretherketone (PEEK) are discussed and evaluated. It is observed that the pultrusions containing PEI and PEEK reveal post-fabrication potential of lightweight, high strength advanced composites and this method of fabrication produces strength values comparable to those of conventional techniques. Earth-based and space-based planetary shelter models are developed and compared. It is noted that cargo storage volume is dependent on a combination of profiles, packaging, and manufacturing methods.

  7. Toroid Joining Gun. [thermoplastic welding system using induction heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, J. D.; Fox, R. L.; Swaim, R J.

    1985-01-01

    The Toroid Joining Gun is a low cost, self-contained, portable low powered (100-400 watts) thermoplastic welding system developed at Langley Research Center for joining plastic and composite parts using an induction heating technique. The device developed for use in the fabrication of large space sructures (LSST Program) can be used in any atmosphere or in a vacuum. Components can be joined in situ, whether on earth or on a space platform. The expanded application of this welding gun is in the joining of thermoplastic composites, thermosetting composites, metals, and combinations of these materials. Its low-power requirements, light weight, rapid response, low cost, portability, and effective joining make it a candidate for solving many varied and unique bonding tasks.

  8. Multiaxial Cyclic Thermoplasticity Analysis with Besseling's Subvolume Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcknight, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    A modification was formulated to Besseling's Subvolume Method to allow it to use multilinear stress-strain curves which are temperature dependent to perform cyclic thermoplasticity analyses. This method automotically reproduces certain aspects of real material behavior important in the analysis of Aircraft Gas Turbine Engine (AGTE) components. These include the Bauschinger effect, cross-hardening, and memory. This constitutive equation was implemented in a finite element computer program called CYANIDE. Subsequently, classical time dependent plasticity (creep) was added to the program. Since its inception, this program was assessed against laboratory and component testing and engine experience. The ability of this program to simulate AGTE material response characteristics was verified by this experience and its utility in providing data for life analyses was demonstrated. In this area of life analysis, the multiaxial thermoplasticity capabilities of the method have proved a match for the actual AGTE life experience.

  9. Process for Preparing a Tough, Soluble, Aromatic, Thermoplastic Copolyimide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A process for preparing a tough, soluble, aromatic, thermoplastic copolyimide is provided. The process comprises the steps of (a) providing 4.4'-oxydiphthalic anhydride to 3,4,3',4'-biphenyltetracarboxylic dianhydride at a mole ratio ranging from about 25 mole percent to 75 mole percent to 75 mole percent to about 25 mole percent; (b) adding 3,4'-oxydianiline to form a mixture; (c) adding a polar aprotic or polar protic solvent to the mixture to form a solution having a percentage of solids capable of maintaining polymer solubility; (d) stirring the solution to allow it to react; (e) adding an azeotropic solvent to the solution and heating to remove water; (f) cooling the solution of step (e) to room temperature and recovering the tough, soluble, aromatic, thermoplastic copolyimide.

  10. Thermoset-thermoplastic aromatic polyamide containing N-propargyl groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, T. L.; Wolfe, J. F.; Greenwood, T. D. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    The compounds of the class of aromatic polyamides useful as matrix resins in the manufacture of composites or laminate fabrication were developed. The process for preparing this thermoplastic-thermoset polyamide system involves incorporating a latent crosslinking moiety along the backbone of the polyamide to improve the temperature range of fabrication thereof wherein the resin softens at a relatively low temperature (approx. 154 C) and subsequently sets-up or undergoes crosslinking when subjected to higher temperature (approx. 280 C).