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Sample records for copolymer-1 immunization reduces

  1. Increasing Immunization Compliance by Reducing Provisional Admittance.

    PubMed

    Davis, Wendy S; Varni, Susan E; Barry, Sara E; Frankowski, Barbara L; Harder, Valerie S

    2016-08-01

    Students in Vermont with incomplete or undocumented immunization status are provisionally admitted to schools and historically had a calendar year to resolve their immunization status. The process of resolving these students' immunization status was challenging for school nurses. We conducted a school-based quality improvement effort to increase student compliance with Vermont immunization regulations using a collaborative learning approach with public health school liaisons and school nurses from public schools to reduce provisional admittance in 2011-2012. Strategies included using a tracking system, accessing the immunization registry, promoting immunization importance, tracking immunization plans, and working with medical homes to update records. Participating school nurses observed decreases in the number of provisionally admitted students, although this reduction was not significantly different than matched comparison schools. We also found the number of provisionally admitted students fluctuated throughout the year and resolving the immunization status of New Americans and exchange students required special attention. Our approach supports the coordinated school health model and demonstrates the critical role school nurses play in improving population health outcomes. PMID:26699951

  2. Increasing Immunization Compliance by Reducing Provisional Admittance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Wendy S.; Varni, Susan E.; Barry, Sara E.; Frankowski, Barbara L.; Harder, Valerie S.

    2016-01-01

    Students in Vermont with incomplete or undocumented immunization status are provisionally admitted to schools and historically had a calendar year to resolve their immunization status. The process of resolving these students' immunization status was challenging for school nurses. We conducted a school-based quality improvement effort to increase…

  3. Altered Immunity in Crowded Locust Reduced Fungal (Metarhizium anisopliae) Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yundan; Yang, Pengcheng; Cui, Feng; Kang, Le

    2013-01-01

    The stress of living conditions, similar to infections, alters animal immunity. High population density is empirically considered to induce prophylactic immunity to reduce the infection risk, which was challenged by a model of low connectivity between infectious and susceptible individuals in crowded animals. The migratory locust, which exhibits polyphenism through gregarious and solitary phases in response to population density and displays different resistance to fungal biopesticide (Metarhizium anisopliae), was used to observe the prophylactic immunity of crowded animals. We applied an RNA-sequencing assay to investigate differential expression in fat body samples of gregarious and solitary locusts before and after infection. Solitary locusts devoted at least twice the number of genes for combating M. anisopliae infection than gregarious locusts. The transcription of immune molecules such as pattern recognition proteins, protease inhibitors, and anti-oxidation proteins, was increased in prophylactic immunity of gregarious locusts. The differentially expressed transcripts reducing gregarious locust susceptibility to M. anisopliae were confirmed at the transcriptional and translational level. Further investigation revealed that locust GNBP3 was susceptible to proteolysis while GNBP1, induced by M. anisopliae infection, resisted proteolysis. Silencing of gnbp3 by RNAi significantly shortened the life span of gregarious locusts but not solitary locusts. By contrast, gnbp1 silencing did not affect the life span of both gregarious and solitary locusts after M. anisopliae infection. Thus, the GNBP3-dependent immune responses were involved in the phenotypic resistance of gregarious locusts to fungal infection, but were redundant in solitary locusts. Our results indicated that gregarious locusts prophylactically activated upstream modulators of immune cascades rather than downstream effectors, preferring to quarantine rather than eliminate pathogens to conserve energy

  4. Reducing methane emissions in sheep by immunization against rumen methanogens.

    PubMed

    Wright, A D G; Kennedy, P; O'Neill, C J; Toovey, A F; Popovski, S; Rea, S M; Pimm, C L; Klein, L

    2004-09-28

    This work was conducted to determine if methane emissions from sheep immunized with an anti-methanogen vaccine were significantly lower than methane emissions from non-immunized sheep, to test the effectiveness of two different vaccine formulations (VF) on methane abatement, and to compare methane emissions measured using a closed-circuit respiration chamber and the sulphur-hexafluoride (SF6) tracer technique. Thirty mature wether sheep were randomly allocated to three treatment groups (n = 10). One group received an immunization of adjuvant only on days 0 and 153 (control), a second group received an immunization with a 3-methanogen mix on days 0 and 153 (VF3 + 3), and a third group received an immunization of a 7-methanogen mix on day 0 followed by a 3-methanogen mix on day 153 (VF7 + 3). Four weeks post-secondary immunization, there was a significant 7.7% reduction in methane production per kg dry matter intake in the VF7 + 3 group compared to the controls (P = 0.051). However, methane emissions from sheep immunized with VF7 + 3 were not significantly different when compared to the sheep in the control group (P = 0.883). The average IgG and IgA antibody titres in both plasma and saliva of the VF3 + 3 immunized sheep were four to nine times higher than those immunized with VF7 + 3 (P< 0.001) at both 3 and 6 weeks post-secondary immunization. Data also revealed that SF6 methane estimates were consistently higher than the respiration chamber estimates and that there was no significant correlation between the SF6 methane estimates and the respiration chamber methane estimates (R2 = 0.11). PMID:15364447

  5. Immune Activation Reduces Sperm Quality in the Great Tit

    PubMed Central

    Losdat, Sylvain; Richner, Heinz; Blount, Jonathan D.; Helfenstein, Fabrice

    2011-01-01

    Mounting an immune response against pathogens incurs costs to organisms by its effects on important life-history traits, such as reproductive investment and survival. As shown recently, immune activation produces large amounts of reactive species and is suggested to induce oxidative stress. Sperm are highly susceptible to oxidative stress, which can negatively impact sperm function and ultimately male fertilizing efficiency. Here we address the question as to whether mounting an immune response affects sperm quality through the damaging effects of oxidative stress. It has been demonstrated recently in birds that carotenoid-based ornaments can be reliable signals of a male's ability to protect sperm from oxidative damage. In a full-factorial design, we immune-challenged great tit males while simultaneously increasing their vitamin E availability, and assessed the effect on sperm quality and oxidative damage. We conducted this experiment in a natural population and tested the males' response to the experimental treatment in relation to their carotenoid-based breast coloration, a condition-dependent trait. Immune activation induced a steeper decline in sperm swimming velocity, thus highlighting the potential costs of an induced immune response on sperm competitive ability and fertilizing efficiency. We found sperm oxidative damage to be negatively correlated with sperm swimming velocity. However, blood resistance to a free-radical attack (a measure of somatic antioxidant capacity) as well as plasma and sperm levels of oxidative damage (lipid peroxidation) remained unaffected, thus suggesting that the observed effect did not arise through oxidative stress. Towards the end of their breeding cycle, swimming velocity of sperm of more intensely colored males was higher, which has important implications for the evolution of mate choice and multiple mating in females because females may accrue both direct and indirect benefits by mating with males having better quality sperm

  6. Prolonged organ culture reduces the incidence of endothelial immune reactions.

    PubMed

    Maier, P; Heinzelmann, S; Böhringer, D; Reinhard, T

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The number of antigen-presenting cells decreases during organ culture of corneoscleral discs. This might result in a decrease of immune reactions with increasing duration of organ culture. To investigate this hypothesis, we performed a retrospective analysis of all penetrating keratoplasties that were consecutively performed over the last 5 years.PATIENTS AND METHODS All cases of penetrating keratoplasties (n=1006) were divided into two groups, with the division made at the median of the storage time (21 days). These two groups were compared by a Cox proportional hazards survival model regarding the incidence of endothelial immune reactions, clear graft survival, and chronic endothelial cell loss following penetrating keratoplasty considering patient's age, donor's age, and risk situation as co-variates.RESULTS We observed statistically significantly fewer endothelial immune reactions (20.1% (95% confidence interval 15.5-24.5%) after 2 years) in the group with a storage time of more than 21 days compared with the group with a storage time of <21 days (26.5% (95% confidence interval 21.6-31.2%) after 2 years). However, the duration of organ culture did not have a statistically significant effect on clear graft survival or chronic endothelial cell loss.CONCLUSION Our results demonstrate that an increased duration of organ culture leads to a lower incidence of endothelial immune reactions following penetrating keratoplasty. However, we do not recommend increased storage times in general as overall graft survival did not improve. The reason for this apparent paradox may be that the endothelial cell count decreases during storage time. PMID:26493031

  7. Reducing Toxicity of Immune Therapy Using Aptamer-Targeted Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Gilboa, Eli; Berezhnoy, Alexey; Schrand, Brett

    2015-11-01

    Modulating the function of immune receptors with antibodies is ushering in a new era in cancer immunotherapy. With the notable exception of PD-1 blockade used as monotherapy, immune modulation can be associated with significant toxicities that are expected to escalate with the development of increasingly potent immune therapies. A general way to reduce toxicity is to target immune potentiating drugs to the tumor or immune cells of the patient. This Crossroads article discusses a new class of nucleic acid-based immune-modulatory drugs that are targeted to the tumor or to the immune system by conjugation to oligonucleotide aptamer ligands. Cell-free chemically synthesized short oligonucleotide aptamers represent a novel and emerging platform technology for generating ligands with desired specificity that offer exceptional versatility and feasibility in terms of development, manufacture, and conjugation to an oligonucleotide cargo. In proof-of-concept studies, aptamer ligands were used to target immune-modulatory siRNAs or aptamers to induce neoantigens in the tumor cells, limit costimulation to the tumor lesion, or enhance the persistence of vaccine-induced immunity. Using increasingly relevant murine models, the aptamer-targeted immune-modulatory drugs engendered protective antitumor immunity that was superior to that of current "gold-standard" therapies in terms of efficacy and lack of toxicity or reduced toxicity. To overcome immune exhaustion aptamer-targeted siRNA conjugates could be used to downregulate intracellular mediators of exhaustion that integrate signals from multiple inhibitory receptors. Recent advances in aptamer development and second-generation aptamer-drug conjugates suggest that we have only scratched the surface. PMID:26541880

  8. Recombinant varicella vaccines induce neutralizing antibodies and cellular immune responses to SIV and reduce viral loads in immunized rhesus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Traina-Dorge, V.; Pahar, B.; Marx, P.; Kissinger, P.; Montefiori, D.; Ou, Y.; Gray, W.L.

    2010-01-01

    The development of an effective AIDS vaccine remains one of the highest priorities in HIV research. The live, attenuated varicella-zoster virus (VZV) Oka vaccine, safe and effective for prevention of chickenpox and zoster, also has potential as a recombinant vaccine against other pathogens, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The simian varicella model, utilizing simian varicella virus (SVV), offers an approach to evaluate recombinant varicella vaccine candidates. Recombinant SVV (rSVV) vaccine viruses expressing simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) env and gag antigens were constructed. The hypothesis tested was that a live, attenuated rSVV-SIV vaccine will induce immune responses against SIV in the rhesus macaques and provide protection against SIV challenge. The results demonstrated that rSVV-SIV vaccination induced low levels of neutralizing antibodies and cellular immune responses to SIV in immunized rhesus macaques and significantly reduced viral loads following intravenous challenge with pathogenic SIVmac251-CX-1. PMID:20654666

  9. Copolymer-1 promotes neurogenesis and improves functional recovery after acute ischemic stroke in rats.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Yolanda; Lorea, Jonathan; Mestre, Humberto; Kim-Lee, Jennifer Hyuna; Herrera, Judith; Mellado, Raúl; Gálvez, Vanesa; Cuellar, Leopoldo; Musri, Carolina; Ibarra, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Stroke triggers a systemic inflammatory response that exacerbates the initial injury. Immunizing with peptides derived from CNS proteins can stimulate protective autoimmunity (PA). The most renowned of these peptides is copolymer-1 (Cop-1) also known as glatiramer acetate. This peptide has been approved for use in the treatment of multiple sclerosis. Cop-1-specific T cells cross the blood-brain barrier and secrete neurotrophins and anti-inflammatory cytokines that could stimulate proliferation of neural precursor cells and recruit them to the injury site; making it an ideal therapy for acute ischemic stroke. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of Cop-1 on neurogenesis and neurological recovery during the acute phase (7 days) and the chronic phase of stroke (60 days) in a rat model of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAo). BDNF and NT-3 were quantified and infarct volumes were measured. We demonstrated that Cop-1 improves neurological deficit, enhances neurogenesis (at 7 and 60 days) in the SVZ, SGZ, and cerebral cortex through an increase in NT-3 production. It also decreased infarct volume even at the chronic phase of tMCAo. The present manuscript fortifies the support for the use of Cop-1 in acute ischemic stroke. PMID:25821957

  10. Copolymer-1 Promotes Neurogenesis and Improves Functional Recovery after Acute Ischemic Stroke in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Yolanda; Lorea, Jonathan; Mestre, Humberto; Kim-Lee, Jennifer Hyuna; Herrera, Judith; Mellado, Raúl; Gálvez, Vanesa; Cuellar, Leopoldo; Musri, Carolina; Ibarra, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Stroke triggers a systemic inflammatory response that exacerbates the initial injury. Immunizing with peptides derived from CNS proteins can stimulate protective autoimmunity (PA). The most renowned of these peptides is copolymer-1 (Cop-1) also known as glatiramer acetate. This peptide has been approved for use in the treatment of multiple sclerosis. Cop-1-specific T cells cross the blood-brain barrier and secrete neurotrophins and anti-inflammatory cytokines that could stimulate proliferation of neural precursor cells and recruit them to the injury site; making it an ideal therapy for acute ischemic stroke. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of Cop-1 on neurogenesis and neurological recovery during the acute phase (7 days) and the chronic phase of stroke (60 days) in a rat model of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAo). BDNF and NT-3 were quantified and infarct volumes were measured. We demonstrated that Cop-1 improves neurological deficit, enhances neurogenesis (at 7 and 60 days) in the SVZ, SGZ, and cerebral cortex through an increase in NT-3 production. It also decreased infarct volume even at the chronic phase of tMCAo. The present manuscript fortifies the support for the use of Cop-1 in acute ischemic stroke. PMID:25821957

  11. Immunization with excreted-secreted antigens reduces tissue cyst formation in pigs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanhua; Zhang, Delin; Wang, Guangxiang; Yin, Hong; Wang, Meng

    2013-11-01

    It has been demonstrated that tachyzoite-pooled excreted-secreted antigens (ESAs) of Toxoplasma gondii are highly immunogenic and can be used in vaccine development. However, most of the information regarding protective immunity induced by immunization with ESAs is derived from studies using mouse model systems. These results cannot be extrapolated to pigs due to important differences in the susceptibility and immune response mechanisms between pigs and mice. We show that the immunization of pigs with ESAs emulsified in Freund's adjuvant induced not only a humoral immune response but also a cellular response. The cellular immune response was associated with the production of IFN-γ and IL-4. The humoral immune response was mainly directed against the antigens with molecular masses between 34 and 116 kDa. After intraperitoneal challenge with 10(7) T. gondii of the Gansu Jingtai strain (GJS) of tachyzoites, the immunized pigs remained clinically normal except for a brief low-grade fever (≤40.5 °C), while the control pigs developed clinical signs of toxoplasmosis (cough, anorexia, prostration, and high fever). At necropsy, visible lesions were found at multiple locations (enlarged mesenteric lymph nodes, an enlarged spleen with focal necrosis, and enlarged lungs with miliary or focal necrosis and off-white lesions) in all of the control pigs but not in the pigs that had been immunized. We also found that immunization with ESAs reduced tissue cyst formation in the muscle (P < 0.01). Our data demonstrate that immunization with ESAs can trigger a strong immune response against T. gondii infection in pigs. PMID:23949245

  12. Oxazolone-Induced Contact Hypersensitivity Reduces Lymphatic Drainage but Enhances the Induction of Adaptive Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Aebischer, David; Willrodt, Ann-Helen; Halin, Cornelia

    2014-01-01

    Contact hypersensitivity (CHS) induced by topical application of haptens is a commonly used model to study dermal inflammatory responses in mice. Several recent studies have indicated that CHS-induced skin inflammation triggers lymphangiogenesis but may negatively impact the immune-function of lymphatic vessels, namely fluid drainage and dendritic cell (DC) migration to draining lymph nodes (dLNs). On the other hand, haptens have been shown to exert immune-stimulatory activity by inducing DC maturation. In this study we investigated how the presence of pre-established CHS-induced skin inflammation affects the induction of adaptive immunity in dLNs. Using a mouse model of oxazolone-induced skin inflammation we observed that lymphatic drainage was reduced and DC migration from skin to dLNs was partially compromised. At the same time, a significantly stronger adaptive immune response towards ovalbumin (OVA) was induced when immunization had occurred in CHS-inflamed skin as compared to uninflamed control skin. In fact, immunization with sterile OVA in CHS-inflamed skin evoked a delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response comparable to the one induced by conventional immunization with OVA and adjuvant in uninflamed skin. Striking phenotypic and functional differences were observed when comparing DCs from LNs draining uninflamed or CHS-inflamed skin. DCs from LNs draining CHS-inflamed skin expressed higher levels of co-stimulatory molecules and MHC molecules, produced higher levels of the interleukin-12/23 p40 subunit (IL-12/23-p40) and more potently induced T cell activation in vitro. Immunization experiments revealed that blockade of IL-12/23-p40 during the priming phase partially reverted the CHS-induced enhancement of the adaptive immune response. Collectively, our findings indicate that CHS-induced skin inflammation generates an overall immune-stimulatory milieu, which outweighs the potentially suppressive effect of reduced lymphatic vessel function. PMID:24911791

  13. Immune activation by life-shortening Wolbachia and reduced filarial competence in mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Kambris, Zakaria; Cook, Peter E.; Phuc, Hoang K.; Sinkins, Steven P.

    2010-01-01

    Wolbachia strain wMelPop reduces longevity of its Drosophila melanogaster host and halves lifespan when introduced into the mosquito Aedes aegypti. We show that wMelPop induces upregulation of the mosquito innate immune system and that its presence inhibits the development of filarial nematodes in the mosquito. These data suggest that wMelPop could be used in the global effort to eliminate lymphatic filariasis, and possibly the control of other mosquito-borne parasites where immune preactivation inhibits their development. The cost of constitutive immune upregulation may contribute to the life-shortening phenotype. PMID:19797660

  14. Immunization with Brucella VirB Proteins Reduces Organ Colonization in Mice through a Th1-Type Immune Response and Elicits a Similar Immune Response in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Pollak, Cora N.; Wanke, María Magdalena; Estein, Silvia M.; Delpino, M. Victoria; Monachesi, Norma E.; Comercio, Elida A.; Fossati, Carlos A.

    2014-01-01

    VirB proteins from Brucella spp. constitute the type IV secretion system, a key virulence factor mediating the intracellular survival of these bacteria. Here, we assessed whether a Th1-type immune response against VirB proteins may protect mice from Brucella infection and whether this response can be induced in the dog, a natural host for Brucella. Splenocytes from mice immunized with VirB7 or VirB9 responded to their respective antigens with significant and specific production of gamma interferon (IFN-γ), whereas interleukin-4 (IL-4) was not detected. Thirty days after an intraperitoneal challenge with live Brucella abortus, the spleen load of bacteria was almost 1 log lower in mice immunized with VirB proteins than in unvaccinated animals. As colonization reduction seemed to correlate with a Th1-type immune response against VirB proteins, we decided to assess whether such a response could be elicited in the dog. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from dogs immunized with VirB proteins (three subcutaneous doses in QuilA adjuvant) produced significantly higher levels of IFN-γ than cells from control animals upon in vitro stimulation with VirB proteins. A skin test to assess specific delayed-type hypersensitivity was positive in 4 out of 5 dogs immunized with either VirB7 or VirB9. As both proteins are predicted to locate in the outer membrane of Brucella organisms, the ability of anti-VirB antibodies to mediate complement-dependent bacteriolysis of B. canis was assessed in vitro. Sera from dogs immunized with either VirB7 or VirB9, but not from those receiving phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), produced significant bacteriolysis. These results suggest that VirB-specific responses that reduce organ colonization by Brucella in mice can be also elicited in dogs. PMID:25540276

  15. Immunization with Brucella VirB proteins reduces organ colonization in mice through a Th1-type immune response and elicits a similar immune response in dogs.

    PubMed

    Pollak, Cora N; Wanke, María Magdalena; Estein, Silvia M; Delpino, M Victoria; Monachesi, Norma E; Comercio, Elida A; Fossati, Carlos A; Baldi, Pablo C

    2015-03-01

    VirB proteins from Brucella spp. constitute the type IV secretion system, a key virulence factor mediating the intracellular survival of these bacteria. Here, we assessed whether a Th1-type immune response against VirB proteins may protect mice from Brucella infection and whether this response can be induced in the dog, a natural host for Brucella. Splenocytes from mice immunized with VirB7 or VirB9 responded to their respective antigens with significant and specific production of gamma interferon (IFN-γ), whereas interleukin-4 (IL-4) was not detected. Thirty days after an intraperitoneal challenge with live Brucella abortus, the spleen load of bacteria was almost 1 log lower in mice immunized with VirB proteins than in unvaccinated animals. As colonization reduction seemed to correlate with a Th1-type immune response against VirB proteins, we decided to assess whether such a response could be elicited in the dog. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from dogs immunized with VirB proteins (three subcutaneous doses in QuilA adjuvant) produced significantly higher levels of IFN-γ than cells from control animals upon in vitro stimulation with VirB proteins. A skin test to assess specific delayed-type hypersensitivity was positive in 4 out of 5 dogs immunized with either VirB7 or VirB9. As both proteins are predicted to locate in the outer membrane of Brucella organisms, the ability of anti-VirB antibodies to mediate complement-dependent bacteriolysis of B. canis was assessed in vitro. Sera from dogs immunized with either VirB7 or VirB9, but not from those receiving phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), produced significant bacteriolysis. These results suggest that VirB-specific responses that reduce organ colonization by Brucella in mice can be also elicited in dogs. PMID:25540276

  16. Efficacy of immune suppression tapering in treating relapse after reduced intensity allogeneic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kekre, Natasha; Kim, Haesook T.; Thanarajasingam, Gita; Armand, Philippe; Antin, Joseph H.; Cutler, Corey; Nikiforow, Sarah; Ho, Vincent T.; Koreth, John; Alyea, Edwin P.; Soiffer, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    For patients who relapse after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation while still on immune suppression, there is anecdotal evidence that tapering the immune suppression may result in graft-versus-tumor activity. We reviewed the medical records of all patients with documented histological or radiographic disease recurrence within 1 year of stem cell transplantation while on immune suppression at our institution. The median time to relapse was 110 days (range, 18–311) after transplant. Among 123 patients with relapse treated with immune suppression tapering without chemotherapy, radiation, or donor lymphocyte infusion, 34 responded (33/101 reduced intensity conditioning transplant and 1/22 myeloablative conditioning transplant, 32.7% and 4.5% respectively; P=0.007). The median time to response after initiation of immune suppression tapering was 82 days (range, 16–189). Thirty-three patients (97.1%) had development or progression of acute or chronic graft-versus-host disease as a consequence of immune suppression tapering, at a median time of 39 days (range, 16–98). Six patients subsequently relapsed late after initial response to immune suppression tapering at a median time of 2 years (range, 0.9–3.8). The median overall survival from immune suppression tapering for responders was 5.1 years (range, 1.9-not estimable). When clinically feasible, immune suppression tapering alone in patients who relapse early after reduced intensity conditioning allogeneic stem cell transplantation can produce durable remissions, but is almost always associated with graft-versus-host disease. PMID:26088931

  17. Enriched environment reduces glioma growth through immune and non-immune mechanisms in mice.

    PubMed

    Garofalo, Stefano; D'Alessandro, Giuseppina; Chece, Giuseppina; Brau, Frederic; Maggi, Laura; Rosa, Alessandro; Porzia, Alessandra; Mainiero, Fabrizio; Esposito, Vincenzo; Lauro, Clotilde; Benigni, Giorgia; Bernardini, Giovanni; Santoni, Angela; Limatola, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Mice exposed to standard (SE) or enriched environment (EE) were transplanted with murine or human glioma cells and differences in tumour development were evaluated. We report that EE exposure affects: (i) tumour size, increasing mice survival; (ii) glioma establishment, proliferation and invasion; (iii) microglia/macrophage (M/Mφ) activation; (iv) natural killer (NK) cell infiltration and activation; and (v) cerebral levels of IL-15 and BDNF. Direct infusion of IL-15 or BDNF in the brain of mice transplanted with glioma significantly reduces tumour growth. We demonstrate that brain infusion of IL-15 increases the frequency of NK cell infiltrating the tumour and that NK cell depletion reduces the efficacy of EE and IL-15 on tumour size and of EE on mice survival. BDNF infusion reduces M/Mφ infiltration and CD68 immunoreactivity in tumour mass and reduces glioma migration inhibiting the small G protein RhoA through the truncated TrkB.T1 receptor. These results suggest alternative approaches for glioma treatment. PMID:25818172

  18. Reproductive effort reduces long-term immune function in breeding tree swallows (Tachycineta bicolor).

    PubMed Central

    Ardia, Daniel R; Schat, Karel A; Winkler, David W

    2003-01-01

    We examined whether strategies of reproductive allocation may reduce long-term immunocompetence through the effects of manipulated effort on secondary or acquired immunity. We tested whether increased reproductive effort leads to reduced immune function and survival by manipulating brood size in tree swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) and exposing breeding females to a primary and secondary exposure of sheep red blood cells to elicit a humoral immune response. Females raising enlarged broods produced fewer secondary antibodies than did females raising control or reduced broods. Most importantly, individuals with high secondary responses were more likely to survive to breed 3 years after brood manipulations, suggesting that differences in disease susceptibility may be caused by trade-offs in reproductive allocation. We also found that individual quality, measured by clutch initiation date, mediated the effects of brood manipulations, with higher-quality birds showing a greater ability to deal with increases in effort. PMID:12964994

  19. Protein-poor diet reduces host-specific immune gene expression in Bombus terrestris

    PubMed Central

    Brunner, Franziska S.; Schmid-Hempel, Paul; Barribeau, Seth M.

    2014-01-01

    Parasites infect hosts non-randomly as genotypes of hosts vary in susceptibility to the same genotypes of parasites, but this specificity may be modulated by environmental factors such as nutrition. Nutrition plays an important role for any physiological investment. As immune responses are costly, resource limitation should negatively affect immunity through trade-offs with other physiological requirements. Consequently, nutritional limitation should diminish immune capacity in general, but does it also dampen differences among hosts? We investigated the effect of short-term pollen deprivation on the immune responses of our model host Bombus terrestris when infected with the highly prevalent natural parasite Crithidia bombi. Bumblebees deprived of pollen, their protein source, show reduced immune responses to infection. They failed to upregulate a number of genes, including antimicrobial peptides, in response to infection. In particular, they also showed less specific immune expression patterns across individuals and colonies. These findings provide evidence for how immune responses on the individual-level vary with important elements of the environment and illustrate how nutrition can functionally alter not only general resistance, but also alter the pattern of specific host–parasite interactions. PMID:24850921

  20. Increased activity correlates with reduced ability to mount immune defenses to endotoxin in zebra finches.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Patricia C; Springthorpe, Dwight; Bentley, George E

    2014-10-01

    When suffering from infection, animals experience behavioral and physiological alterations that potentiate the immune system's ability to fight pathogens. The behavioral component of this response, termed "sickness behavior," is characterized by an overall reduction in physical activity. A growing number of reports demonstrate substantial flexibility in these sickness behaviors, which can be partially overcome in response to mates, intruders and parental duties. Since it is hypothesized that adopting sickness behaviors frees energetic resources for mounting an immune response, we tested whether diminished immune responses coincided with reduced sickness behaviors by housing male zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) in social conditions that alter their behavioral response to an endotoxin. To facilitate our data collection, we developed and built a miniaturized sensor capable of detecting changes in dorsoventral acceleration and categorizing them as different behaviors when attached to the finches. We found that the immune defenses (quantified as haptoglobin-like activity, ability to change body temperature and bacterial killing capacity) increased as a function of increased time spent resting. The findings indicate that when animals are sick attenuation of sickness behaviors may exact costs, such as reduced immune function. The extent of these costs depends on how relevant the affected components of immunity are for fighting a specific infection. PMID:24888267

  1. Immunomodulation of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis by Oral Administration of Copolymer 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teitelbaum, Dvora; Arnon, Ruth; Sela, Michael

    1999-03-01

    The activity of copolymer 1 (Cop 1, Copax-one, glatiramer acetate) in suppressing experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and in the treatment of multiple sclerosis patients when injected parenterally has been extensively demonstrated. In the present study we addressed the question of whether Cop 1 can induce oral tolerance to EAE similar to myelin basic protein (MBP). We now have demonstrated that oral Cop 1 inhibited EAE induction in both rats and mice. Furthermore, oral Cop 1 was more effective than oral MBP in suppressing EAE in rats. The beneficial effect of oral Cop 1 was found to be associated with specific inhibition of the proliferative and Th1 cytokine secretion responses to MBP of spleen cells from Cop 1-fed mice and rats. In all of these assays, oral Cop 1 was more effective than oral MBP. The tolerance induced by Cop 1 could be adoptively transferred with spleen cells from Cop 1-fed animals. Furthermore, Cop 1-specific T cell lines, which inhibit EAE induction in vivo, could be isolated from the above spleen cells. These T cell lines secrete the anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10 and transforming growth factor type β , but not IL-4, in response to both Cop 1 and MBP. In conclusion, oral Cop 1 has a beneficial effect on the development of EAE that is associated with down-regulation of T cell immune responses to MBP and is mediated by Th2/3 type regulatory cells. These results suggest that oral administration of Cop 1 may modulate multiple sclerosis as well.

  2. Adaptive immunity against gut microbiota enhances apoE-mediated immune regulation and reduces atherosclerosis and western-diet-related inflammation.

    PubMed

    Saita, Diego; Ferrarese, Roberto; Foglieni, Chiara; Esposito, Antonio; Canu, Tamara; Perani, Laura; Ceresola, Elisa Rita; Visconti, Laura; Burioni, Roberto; Clementi, Massimo; Canducci, Filippo

    2016-01-01

    Common features of immune-metabolic and inflammatory diseases such as metabolic syndrome, diabetes, obesity and cardiovascular diseases are an altered gut microbiota composition and a systemic pro-inflammatory state. We demonstrate that active immunization against the outer membrane protein of bacteria present in the gut enhances local and systemic immune control via apoE-mediated immune-modulation. Reduction of western-diet-associated inflammation was obtained for more than eighteen weeks after immunization. Immunized mice had reduced serum cytokine levels, reduced insulin and fasting glucose concentrations; and gene expression in both liver and visceral adipose tissue confirmed a reduced inflammatory steady-state after immunization. Moreover, both gut and atherosclerotic plaques of immunized mice showed reduced inflammatory cells and an increased M2 macrophage fraction. These results suggest that adaptive responses directed against microbes present in our microbiota have systemic beneficial consequences and demonstrate the key role of apoE in this mechanism that could be exploited to treat immune-metabolic diseases. PMID:27383250

  3. Adaptive immunity against gut microbiota enhances apoE-mediated immune regulation and reduces atherosclerosis and western-diet-related inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Saita, Diego; Ferrarese, Roberto; Foglieni, Chiara; Esposito, Antonio; Canu, Tamara; Perani, Laura; Ceresola, Elisa Rita; Visconti, Laura; Burioni, Roberto; Clementi, Massimo; Canducci, Filippo

    2016-01-01

    Common features of immune-metabolic and inflammatory diseases such as metabolic syndrome, diabetes, obesity and cardiovascular diseases are an altered gut microbiota composition and a systemic pro-inflammatory state. We demonstrate that active immunization against the outer membrane protein of bacteria present in the gut enhances local and systemic immune control via apoE-mediated immune-modulation. Reduction of western-diet-associated inflammation was obtained for more than eighteen weeks after immunization. Immunized mice had reduced serum cytokine levels, reduced insulin and fasting glucose concentrations; and gene expression in both liver and visceral adipose tissue confirmed a reduced inflammatory steady-state after immunization. Moreover, both gut and atherosclerotic plaques of immunized mice showed reduced inflammatory cells and an increased M2 macrophage fraction. These results suggest that adaptive responses directed against microbes present in our microbiota have systemic beneficial consequences and demonstrate the key role of apoE in this mechanism that could be exploited to treat immune-metabolic diseases. PMID:27383250

  4. Constant illumination reduces circulating melatonin and impairs immune function in the cricket Teleogryllus commodus.

    PubMed

    Durrant, Joanna; Michaelides, Ellie B; Rupasinghe, Thusitha; Tull, Dedreia; Green, Mark P; Jones, Therésa M

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to constant light has a range of negative effects on behaviour and physiology, including reduced immune function in both vertebrates and invertebrates. It is proposed that the associated suppression of melatonin (a ubiquitous hormone and powerful antioxidant) in response to the presence of light at night could be an underlying mechanistic link driving the changes to immune function. Here, we investigated the relationship between constant illumination, melatonin and immune function, using a model invertebrate species, the Australian black field cricket, Teleogryllus commodus. Crickets were reared under either a 12 h light: 12 h dark regimen or a constant 24 h light regimen. Circulating melatonin concentration and immune function (haemocyte concentration, lytic activity and phenoloxidase (PO) activity) were assessed in individual adult crickets through the analysis of haemolymph. Constant illumination reduced melatonin and had a negative impact on haemocyte concentrations and lytic activity, but its effect on PO activity was less apparent. Our data provide the first evidence, to our knowledge, of a link between exposure to constant illumination and variation in haemocyte concentration in an invertebrate model, while also highlighting the potential complexity of the immune response following exposure to constant illumination. This study provides insight into the possible negative effect of artificial night-time lighting on the physiology of invertebrates, but whether lower and potentially more ecologically relevant levels of light at night produce comparable results, as has been reported in several vertebrate taxa, remains to be tested. PMID:26339535

  5. Constant illumination reduces circulating melatonin and impairs immune function in the cricket Teleogryllus commodus

    PubMed Central

    Michaelides, Ellie B.; Rupasinghe, Thusitha; Tull, Dedreia; Green, Mark P.; Jones, Therésa M.

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to constant light has a range of negative effects on behaviour and physiology, including reduced immune function in both vertebrates and invertebrates. It is proposed that the associated suppression of melatonin (a ubiquitous hormone and powerful antioxidant) in response to the presence of light at night could be an underlying mechanistic link driving the changes to immune function. Here, we investigated the relationship between constant illumination, melatonin and immune function, using a model invertebrate species, the Australian black field cricket, Teleogryllus commodus. Crickets were reared under either a 12 h light: 12 h dark regimen or a constant 24 h light regimen. Circulating melatonin concentration and immune function (haemocyte concentration, lytic activity and phenoloxidase (PO) activity) were assessed in individual adult crickets through the analysis of haemolymph. Constant illumination reduced melatonin and had a negative impact on haemocyte concentrations and lytic activity, but its effect on PO activity was less apparent. Our data provide the first evidence, to our knowledge, of a link between exposure to constant illumination and variation in haemocyte concentration in an invertebrate model, while also highlighting the potential complexity of the immune response following exposure to constant illumination. This study provides insight into the possible negative effect of artificial night-time lighting on the physiology of invertebrates, but whether lower and potentially more ecologically relevant levels of light at night produce comparable results, as has been reported in several vertebrate taxa, remains to be tested. PMID:26339535

  6. Reduced Tumor Growth after Low-Dose Irradiation or Immunization against Blastic Suppressor T Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilkin, A. F.; Schaaf-Lafontaine, N.; van Acker, A.; Boccadoro, M.; Urbain, J.

    1981-03-01

    Suppressor T cells have been shown to be much more radiosensitive than other lymphoid cells, and we have tried to reduce tumor growth by low-dose irradiation. Syngeneic DBA/2 mice received whole-body irradiation (150 rads; 1 rad = 0.01 J/kg) 6 days after P815 tumor inoculation. Tumor growth is significantly reduced in mildly irradiated mice. We also attempted to reduce syngeneic tumor growth by raising immunity against suppressor T cells in two different systems. DBA/2 mice were immunized against splenic T cells collected after disappearance of cytotoxicity and then injected with P815 tumor cells. These mice develop a very high primary cytotoxicity against P815 cells. C57BL/6 mice were immunized against blastic suppressor T cells, before injection of T2 tumor cells. Some of these mice reject the tumor and others develop smaller tumors than control mice. These results could be explained by the induction of antiidiotypic activity directed against the immunological receptors of suppressor T lymphocytes, because immunization with blastic suppressor T cells from mice bearing the T2 tumor does not modify the growth of another tumor, T10.

  7. Chloroquine and beyond: exploring anti-rheumatic drugs to reduce immune hyperactivation in HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Savarino, Andrea; Shytaj, Iart Luca

    2015-01-01

    The restoration of the immune system prompted by antiretroviral therapy (ART) has allowed drastically reducing the mortality and morbidity of HIV infection. However, one main source of clinical concern is the persistence of immune hyperactivation in individuals under ART. Chronically enhanced levels of T-cell activation are associated with several deleterious effects which lead to faster disease progression and slower CD4(+) T-cell recovery during ART. In this article, we discuss the rationale, and review the results, of the use of antimalarial quinolines, such as chloroquine and its derivative hydroxychloroquine, to counteract immune activation in HIV infection. Despite the promising results of several pilot trials, the most recent clinical data indicate that antimalarial quinolines are unlikely to exert a marked beneficial effect on immune activation. Alternative approaches will likely be required to reproducibly decrease immune activation in the setting of HIV infection. If the quinoline-based strategies should nevertheless be pursued in future studies, particular care must be devoted to the dosage selection, in order to maximize the chances to obtain effective in vivo drug concentrations. PMID:26084487

  8. Immunization

    MedlinePlus

    ... a lot worse. Some are even life-threatening. Immunization shots, or vaccinations, are essential. They protect against things like measles, ... B, polio, tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis (whooping cough). Immunizations are important for adults as well as children. ...

  9. Immunizations

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Immunizations KidsHealth > For Teens > Immunizations Print A A A ... That Shot? en español Las vacunas Why Are Vaccinations Important? Measles, mumps, and whooping cough may seem ...

  10. Immunization

    MedlinePlus

    ... a lot worse. Some are even life-threatening. Immunization shots, or vaccinations, are essential. They protect against ... B, polio, tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis (whooping cough). Immunizations are important for adults as well as children. ...

  11. Thiazolides Elicit Anti-Viral Innate Immunity and Reduce HIV Replication

    PubMed Central

    Trabattoni, Daria; Gnudi, Federica; Ibba, Salomè V.; Saulle, Irma; Agostini, Simone; Masetti, Michela; Biasin, Mara; Rossignol, Jean-Francois; Clerici, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Nitazoxanide (Alinia®, NTZ) and tizoxanide (TIZ), its active circulating metabolite, belong to a class of agents known as thiazolides (TZD) endowed with broad anti-infective activities. TIZ and RM-4848, the active metabolite of RM-5038, were shown to stimulate innate immunity in vitro. Because natural resistance to HIV-1 infection in HIV-exposed seronegative (HESN) individuals is suggested to be associated with strong innate immune responses, we verified whether TIZ and RM-4848 could reduce the in vitro infectiousness of HIV-1. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 20 healthy donors were infected in vitro with HIV-1BaL in the presence/absence of TIZ or RM4848. HIV-1 p24 were measured at different timepoints. The immunomodulatory abilities of TZD were evaluated by the expression of type I IFN pathway genes and the production of cytokines and chemokines. TZD drastically inhibited in vitro HIV-1 replication (>87%). This was associated with the activation of innate immune responses and with the up-regulation of several interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs), including those involved in cholesterol pathway, particularly the cholesterol-25 hydroxylase (CH25H). TZD inhibition of HIV-1 replication in vitro could be due to their ability to stimulate potent and multifaceted antiviral immune responses. These data warrant the exploration of TZD as preventive/therapeutic agent in HIV infection. PMID:27250526

  12. Thiazolides Elicit Anti-Viral Innate Immunity and Reduce HIV Replication.

    PubMed

    Trabattoni, Daria; Gnudi, Federica; Ibba, Salomè V; Saulle, Irma; Agostini, Simone; Masetti, Michela; Biasin, Mara; Rossignol, Jean-Francois; Clerici, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Nitazoxanide (Alinia(®), NTZ) and tizoxanide (TIZ), its active circulating metabolite, belong to a class of agents known as thiazolides (TZD) endowed with broad anti-infective activities. TIZ and RM-4848, the active metabolite of RM-5038, were shown to stimulate innate immunity in vitro. Because natural resistance to HIV-1 infection in HIV-exposed seronegative (HESN) individuals is suggested to be associated with strong innate immune responses, we verified whether TIZ and RM-4848 could reduce the in vitro infectiousness of HIV-1. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 20 healthy donors were infected in vitro with HIV-1BaL in the presence/absence of TIZ or RM4848. HIV-1 p24 were measured at different timepoints. The immunomodulatory abilities of TZD were evaluated by the expression of type I IFN pathway genes and the production of cytokines and chemokines. TZD drastically inhibited in vitro HIV-1 replication (>87%). This was associated with the activation of innate immune responses and with the up-regulation of several interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs), including those involved in cholesterol pathway, particularly the cholesterol-25 hydroxylase (CH25H). TZD inhibition of HIV-1 replication in vitro could be due to their ability to stimulate potent and multifaceted antiviral immune responses. These data warrant the exploration of TZD as preventive/therapeutic agent in HIV infection. PMID:27250526

  13. Substantially reduced pre-patent parasite multiplication rates are associated with naturally acquired immunity to Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Douglas, A D; Andrews, L; Draper, S J; Bojang, K; Milligan, P; Gilbert, S C; Imoukhuede, E B; Hill, A V S

    2011-05-01

    Naturally acquired immunity to Plasmodium falciparum's asexual blood stage reduces parasite multiplication at microscopically detectable densities. The effect of natural immunity on initial prepatent parasite multiplication during the period following a new infection has been uncertain, contributing to doubt regarding the utility of experimental challenge models for blood-stage vaccine trials. Here we present data revealing that parasite multiplication rates during the initial prepatent period in semi-immune Gambian adults are substantially lower than in malaria-naive participants. This supports the view that a blood-stage vaccine capable of emulating the disease-reducing effect of natural immunity could achieve a detectable effect during the prepatent period. PMID:21459819

  14. Peptidylarginine Deiminase Inhibition Reduces Vascular Damage and Modulates Innate Immune Responses in Murine Models of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Jason S.; Luo, Wei; O’Dell, Alexander A.; Yalavarthi, Srilakshmi; Zhao, Wenpu; Subramanian, Venkataraman; Guo, Chiao; Grenn, Robert C.; Thompson, Paul R.; Eitzman, Daniel T.; Kaplan, Mariana J.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation promotes vascular damage, thrombosis, and activation of interferon-α-producing plasmacytoid dendritic cells in diseased arteries. Peptidylarginine deiminase inhibition is a strategy that can decrease in vivo NET formation. Objective To test whether peptidylarginine deiminase inhibition, a novel approach to targeting arterial disease, can reduce vascular damage and inhibit innate immune responses in murine models of atherosclerosis. Methods and Results Apolipoprotein-E (Apoe)−/− mice demonstrated enhanced NET formation, developed autoantibodies to NETs, and expressed high levels of interferon-α in diseased arteries. Apoe−/− mice were treated for 11 weeks with daily injections of Cl-amidine, a peptidylarginine deiminase inhibitor. Peptidylarginine deiminase inhibition blocked NET formation, reduced atherosclerotic lesion area, and delayed time to carotid artery thrombosis in a photochemical injury model. Decreases in atherosclerosis burden were accompanied by reduced recruitment of netting neutrophils and macrophages to arteries, as well as by reduced arterial interferon-α expression. Conclusions Pharmacological interventions that block NET formation can reduce atherosclerosis burden and arterial thrombosis in murine systems. These results support a role for aberrant NET formation in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis through modulation of innate immune responses. PMID:24425713

  15. Activation of innate immunity to reduce lung metastases in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Julie L; Nowak, A; Lee, T D G

    2010-05-01

    Breast cancer continues to be one of the leading causes of cancer death in women. Mortality is primarily due to the development of metastases. Although therapies exist, they lack efficacy in preventing metastatic growth. As a result, novel agents are being investigated. In particular, treatments that target the immune system are being examined as potential anti-neoplastic agents. Cordyceps sinensis (Cs) is a fungus that has been used for over 2,000 years in China as a treatment for a variety of conditions including neoplasms. The available evidence suggests that efficacy of Cs as an anti-neoplastic therapeutic agent is related to a role as an activator of innate immune responses. The objectives of this study were: to investigate the ability of Cs to activate macrophages to produce factors that will induce protective responses against tumour growth; to study the ability of Cs to reduce primary tumour growth in vivo; and to examine the ability of Cs to reduce lung metastasis growth in vivo. We found that oral Cs does not reduce primary tumour growth but can reduce lung metastasis occurrence in a surgical excision model of metastatic mammary carcinoma. The evidence we have shown to date suggests that the reduction in metastases growth may be due to the effects of macrophage-derived factors on tumour cell cycle. PMID:19956948

  16. Seamustard (Undaria pinnatifida) Improves Growth, Immunity, Fatty Acid Profile and Reduces Cholesterol in Hanwoo Steers.

    PubMed

    Hwang, J A; Islam, M M; Ahmed, S T; Mun, H S; Kim, G M; Kim, Y J; Yang, C J

    2014-08-01

    The study was designed to evaluate the effect of 2% seamustard (Undaria pinnatifida) by-product (SW) on growth performance, immunity, carcass characteristics, cholesterol content and fatty acid profile in Hanwoo steers. A total of 20 Hanwoo steers (ave. 22 months old; 619 kg body weight) were randomly assigned to control (basal diet) and 2% SW supplemented diet. Dietary SW supplementation significantly (p<0.05) improved average daily gain and gain:feed ratio as well as serum immunoglobulin G concentration. Chemical composition and quality grade of meat and carcass yield grades evaluated at the end of the trial were found to be unaffected by SW supplementation. Dietary SW significantly reduced meat cholesterol concentration (p<0.05). Dietary SW supplementation significantly reduced the myristic acid (C14:0) and palmitoleic acid (C16:ln-7) concentration, while SW increased the concentration of stearic acid (C18:0) and linolenic acid (C18:3n-3) compared to control (p<0.05). Dietary SW supplementation had no effect on saturated fatty acids (SFA), unsaturated fatty acids, poly unsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) or mono unsaturated fatty acid content in muscles. A reduced ratio of PUFA/SFA and n-6/n-3 were found in SW supplemented group (p<0.05). In conclusion, 2% SW supplementation was found to improve growth, immunity and fatty acid profile with significantly reduced cholesterol of beef. PMID:25083105

  17. Seamustard (Undaria pinnatifida) Improves Growth, Immunity, Fatty Acid Profile and Reduces Cholesterol in Hanwoo Steers

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, J. A.; Islam, M. M.; Ahmed, S. T.; Mun, H. S.; Kim, G. M.; Kim, Y. J.; Yang, C. J.

    2014-01-01

    The study was designed to evaluate the effect of 2% seamustard (Undaria pinnatifida) by-product (SW) on growth performance, immunity, carcass characteristics, cholesterol content and fatty acid profile in Hanwoo steers. A total of 20 Hanwoo steers (ave. 22 months old; 619 kg body weight) were randomly assigned to control (basal diet) and 2% SW supplemented diet. Dietary SW supplementation significantly (p<0.05) improved average daily gain and gain:feed ratio as well as serum immunoglobulin G concentration. Chemical composition and quality grade of meat and carcass yield grades evaluated at the end of the trial were found to be unaffected by SW supplementation. Dietary SW significantly reduced meat cholesterol concentration (p<0.05). Dietary SW supplementation significantly reduced the myristic acid (C14:0) and palmitoleic acid (C16:ln-7) concentration, while SW increased the concentration of stearic acid (C18:0) and linolenic acid (C18:3n-3) compared to control (p<0.05). Dietary SW supplementation had no effect on saturated fatty acids (SFA), unsaturated fatty acids, poly unsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) or mono unsaturated fatty acid content in muscles. A reduced ratio of PUFA/SFA and n-6/n-3 were found in SW supplemented group (p<0.05). In conclusion, 2% SW supplementation was found to improve growth, immunity and fatty acid profile with significantly reduced cholesterol of beef. PMID:25083105

  18. High Dietary Folate in Mice Alters Immune Response and Reduces Survival after Malarial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Meadows, Danielle N.; Bahous, Renata H.; Best, Ana F.; Rozen, Rima

    2015-01-01

    Malaria is a significant global health issue, with nearly 200 million cases in 2013 alone. Parasites obtain folate from the host or synthesize it de novo. Folate consumption has increased in many populations, prompting concerns regarding potential deleterious consequences of higher intake. The impact of high dietary folate on the host’s immune function and response to malaria has not been examined. Our goal was to determine whether high dietary folate would affect response to malarial infection in a murine model of cerebral malaria. Mice were fed control diets (CD, recommended folate level for rodents) or folic acid-supplemented diets (FASD, 10x recommended level) for 5 weeks before infection with Plasmodium berghei ANKA. Survival, parasitemia, numbers of immune cells and other infection parameters were assessed. FASD mice had reduced survival (p<0.01, Cox proportional hazards) and higher parasitemia (p< 0.01, joint model of parasitemia and survival) compared with CD mice. FASD mice had lower numbers of splenocytes, total T cells, and lower numbers of specific T and NK cell sub-populations, compared with CD mice (p<0.05, linear mixed effects). Increased brain TNFα immunoreactive protein (p<0.01, t-test) and increased liver Abca1 mRNA (p<0.01, t-test), a modulator of TNFα, were observed in FASD mice; these variables correlated positively (rs = 0.63, p = 0.01). Bcl-xl/Bak mRNA was increased in liver of FASD mice (p<0.01, t-test), suggesting reduced apoptotic potential. We conclude that high dietary folate increases parasite replication, disturbs the immune response and reduces resistance to malaria in mice. These findings have relevance for malaria-endemic regions, when considering anti-folate anti-malarials, food fortification or vitamin supplementation programs. PMID:26599510

  19. Passive immunization to reduce Campylobacter jejuni colonization and transmission in broiler chickens

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is the most common cause of bacterium-mediated diarrheal disease in humans worldwide. Poultry products are considered the most important source of C. jejuni infections in humans but to date no effective strategy exists to eradicate this zoonotic pathogen from poultry production. Here, the potential use of passive immunization to reduce Campylobacter colonization in broiler chicks was examined. For this purpose, laying hens were immunized with either a whole-cell lysate or the hydrophobic protein fraction of C. jejuni and their eggs were collected. In vitro tests validated the induction of specific ImmunoglobulinY (IgY) against C. jejuni in the immunized hens’ egg yolks, in particular. In seeder experiments, preventive administration of hyperimmune egg yolk significantly (P < 0.01) reduced bacterial counts of seeder animals three days after oral inoculation with approximately 104 cfu C. jejuni, compared with control birds. Moreover, transmission to non-seeder birds was dramatically reduced (hydrophobic protein fraction) or even completely prevented (whole-cell lysate). Purified IgY promoted bacterial binding to chicken intestinal mucus, suggesting enhanced mucosal clearance in vivo. Western blot analysis in combination with mass spectrometry after two-dimensional gel-electrophoresis revealed immunodominant antigens of C. jejuni that are involved in a variety of cell functions, including chemotaxis and adhesion. Some of these (AtpA, EF-Tu, GroEL and CtpA) are highly conserved proteins and could be promising targets for the development of subunit vaccines. PMID:24589217

  20. Drug treatment of malaria infections can reduce levels of protection transferred to offspring via maternal immunity

    PubMed Central

    Staszewski, Vincent; Reece, Sarah E.; O'Donnell, Aidan J.; Cunningham, Emma J. A.

    2012-01-01

    Maternally transferred immunity can have a fundamental effect on the ability of offspring to deal with infection. However, levels of antibodies in adults can vary both quantitatively and qualitatively between individuals and during the course of infection. How infection dynamics and their modification by drug treatment might affect the protection transferred to offspring remains poorly understood. Using the rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium chabaudi, we demonstrate that curing dams part way through infection prior to pregnancy can alter their immune response, with major consequences for offspring health and survival. In untreated maternal infections, maternally transferred protection suppressed parasitaemia and reduced pup mortality by 75 per cent compared with pups from naïve dams. However, when dams were treated with anti-malarial drugs, pups received fewer maternal antibodies, parasitaemia was only marginally suppressed, and mortality risk was 25 per cent higher than for pups from dams with full infections. We observed the same qualitative patterns across three different host strains and two parasite genotypes. This study reveals the role that within-host infection dynamics play in the fitness consequences of maternally transferred immunity. Furthermore, it highlights a potential trade-off between the health of mothers and offspring suggesting that anti-parasite treatment may significantly affect the outcome of infection in newborns. PMID:22357264

  1. Lead exposure reduces carotenoid-based coloration and constitutive immunity in wild mallards.

    PubMed

    Vallverdú-Coll, Núria; Mougeot, François; Ortiz-Santaliestra, Manuel E; Rodriguez-Estival, Jaime; López-Antia, Ana; Mateo, Rafael

    2016-06-01

    The ingestion of spent lead (Pb) from ammunition is a known cause of mortality in waterfowl, but little is known about sublethal effects produced by Pb poisoning on birds, especially in wild populations. The authors studied potential sublethal effects associated with Pb exposure in mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) from the Ebro delta (northeastern Spain) after a ban on Pb ammunition. They analyzed the relationships between blood Pb levels and oxidative stress, immune response, and carotenoid-based coloration, which are known to be influenced by oxidative stress. Levels of Pb were reduced by half from 6 yr to 9 yr after the ban. Lipid peroxidation was positively related to Pb levels in females. The δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase activity was suppressed by Pb exposure and negatively associated with the activity of antioxidant enzymes. Carotenoid levels were positively associated with blood Pb concentration in both sexes, and males with higher Pb levels presented a less intense coloration in legs and beak. Levels of Pb were positively related to hemolytic activity of circulating immune system components and negatively related to lysozyme levels. In summary, Pb exposure was associated in a gender-specific way with increased oxidative stress, consequences on color expression, and impaired constitutive immunity. In females, antioxidants seemed to be allocated mostly in reproduction rather than in self-maintenance, whereas males seemed to better maintain oxidative balance to the detriment of coloration. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1516-1525. © 2015 SETAC. PMID:26551027

  2. GEC-targeted HO-1 expression reduces proteinuria in glomerular immune injury.

    PubMed

    Duann, Pu; Lianos, Elias A

    2009-09-01

    Induction of heme oxygenase (HO)-1 is a key defense mechanism against oxidative stress. Compared with tubules, glomeruli are refractory to HO-1 upregulation in response to injury. This can be a disadvantage as it may be associated with insufficient production of cytoprotective heme-degradation metabolites. We, therefore, explored whether 1) targeted HO-1 expression can be achieved in glomeruli without altering their physiological integrity and 2) this expression reduces proteinuria in immune injury induced by an anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) antibody (Ab). We employed a 4.125-kb fragment of a mouse nephrin promoter downstream to which a FLAG-tagged hHO-1 cDNA sequence was inserted and subsequently generated transgenic mice from the FVB/N parental strain. There was a 16-fold higher transgene expression in the kidney than nonspecific background (liver) while the transprotein immunolocalized in glomerular epithelial cells (GEC). There was no change in urinary protein excretion, indicating that GEC-targeted HO-1 expression had no effect on glomerular protein permeability. Urinary protein excretion in transgenic mice with anti-GBM Ab injury (days 3 and 6) was significantly lower compared with wild-type controls. There was no significant change in renal expression levels of profibrotic (TGF-beta1) or anti-inflammatory (IL-10) cytokines in transgenic mice with anti-GBM Ab injury. These observations indicate that GEC-targeted HO-1 expression does not alter glomerular physiological integrity and reduces proteinuria in glomerular immune injury. PMID:19587144

  3. Immunizations.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Christopher A; Jong, Elaine C

    2016-03-01

    Vaccinations are a cornerstone of the pretravel consultation. The pretravel provider should assess a traveler's past medical history, planned itinerary, activities, mode of travel, and duration of stay and make appropriate vaccine recommendations. Given that domestic vaccine-preventable illnesses are more common in international travelers than are exotic or low-income nation-associated vaccine-preventable illnesses, clinicians should first ensure that travelers are current regarding routine immunizations. Additional immunizations may be indicated in some travelers. Familiarity with geographic distribution and seasonality of infectious diseases is essential. Clinicians should be cognizant of which vaccines are live, as there exist contraindications for live vaccines. PMID:26900111

  4. Immunization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guerin, Nicole; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Contents of this double journal issue concern immunization and primary health care of children. The issue decribes vaccine storage and sterilization techniques, giving particular emphasis to the role of the cold chain, i.e., the maintenance of a specific temperature range to assure potency of vaccines as they are moved from a national storage…

  5. Curdlan blocks the immune suppression by myeloid-derived suppressor cells and reduces tumor burden.

    PubMed

    Rui, Ke; Tian, Jie; Tang, Xinyi; Ma, Jie; Xu, Ping; Tian, Xinyu; Wang, Yungang; Xu, Huaxi; Lu, Liwei; Wang, Shengjun

    2016-08-01

    Tumor-elicited immunosuppression is one of the essential mechanisms for tumor evasion of immune surveillance. It is widely thought to be one of the main reasons for the failure of tumor immunotherapy. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) comprise a heterogeneous population of cells that play an important role in tumor-induced immunosuppression. These cells expand in tumor-bearing individuals and suppress T cell responses via various mechanisms. Curdlan, the linear (1 → 3)-β-glucan from Agrobacterium, has been applied in the food industry and other sectors. The anti-tumor property of curdlan has been recognized for a long time although the underlying mechanism still needs to be explored. In this study, we investigated the effect of curdlan on MDSCs and found that curdlan could promote MDSCs to differentiate into a more mature state and then significantly reduce the suppressive function of MDSCs, decrease the MDSCs in vivo and down-regulate the suppression in tumor-bearing mice, thus leading to enhanced anti-tumor immune responses. We, therefore, increase the understanding of further mechanisms by which curdlan achieves anti-tumor effects. PMID:26832917

  6. Protective Immunity and Reduced Renal Colonization Induced by Vaccines Containing Recombinant Leptospira interrogans Outer Membrane Proteins and Flagellin Adjuvant

    PubMed Central

    Monaris, D.; Sbrogio-Almeida, M. E.; Dib, C. C.; Canhamero, T. A.; Souza, G. O.; Vasconcellos, S. A.; Ferreira, L. C. S.

    2015-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a global zoonotic disease caused by different Leptospira species, such as Leptospira interrogans, that colonize the renal tubules of wild and domestic animals. Thus far, attempts to develop effective leptospirosis vaccines, both for humans and animals, have failed to induce immune responses capable of conferring protection and simultaneously preventing renal colonization. In this study, we evaluated the protective immunity induced by subunit vaccines containing seven different recombinant Leptospira interrogans outer membrane proteins, including the carboxy-terminal portion of the immunoglobulinlike protein A (LigAC) and six novel antigens, combined with aluminum hydroxide (alum) or Salmonella flagellin (FliC) as adjuvants. Hamsters vaccinated with the different formulations elicited high antigen-specific antibody titers. Immunization with LigAC, either with alum or flagellin, conferred protective immunity but did not prevent renal colonization. Similarly, animals immunized with LigAC or LigAC coadministered with six leptospiral proteins with alum adjuvant conferred protection but did not reduce renal colonization. In contrast, immunizing animals with the pool of seven antigens in combination with flagellin conferred protection and significantly reduced renal colonization by the pathogen. The present study emphasizes the relevance of antigen composition and added adjuvant in the efficacy of antileptospirosis subunit vaccines and shows the complex relationship between immune responses and renal colonization by the pathogen. PMID:26108285

  7. Protective Immunity and Reduced Renal Colonization Induced by Vaccines Containing Recombinant Leptospira interrogans Outer Membrane Proteins and Flagellin Adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Monaris, D; Sbrogio-Almeida, M E; Dib, C C; Canhamero, T A; Souza, G O; Vasconcellos, S A; Ferreira, L C S; Abreu, P A E

    2015-08-01

    Leptospirosis is a global zoonotic disease caused by different Leptospira species, such as Leptospira interrogans, that colonize the renal tubules of wild and domestic animals. Thus far, attempts to develop effective leptospirosis vaccines, both for humans and animals, have failed to induce immune responses capable of conferring protection and simultaneously preventing renal colonization. In this study, we evaluated the protective immunity induced by subunit vaccines containing seven different recombinant Leptospira interrogans outer membrane proteins, including the carboxy-terminal portion of the immunoglobulinlike protein A (LigA(C)) and six novel antigens, combined with aluminum hydroxide (alum) or Salmonella flagellin (FliC) as adjuvants. Hamsters vaccinated with the different formulations elicited high antigen-specific antibody titers. Immunization with LigA(C), either with alum or flagellin, conferred protective immunity but did not prevent renal colonization. Similarly, animals immunized with LigA(C) or LigA(C) coadministered with six leptospiral proteins with alum adjuvant conferred protection but did not reduce renal colonization. In contrast, immunizing animals with the pool of seven antigens in combination with flagellin conferred protection and significantly reduced renal colonization by the pathogen. The present study emphasizes the relevance of antigen composition and added adjuvant in the efficacy of antileptospirosis subunit vaccines and shows the complex relationship between immune responses and renal colonization by the pathogen. PMID:26108285

  8. Microneedle-mediated immunization of an adenovirus-based malaria vaccine enhances antigen-specific antibody immunity and reduces anti-vector responses compared to the intradermal route

    PubMed Central

    Carey, John B.; Vrdoljak, Anto; O'Mahony, Conor; Hill, Adrian V. S.; Draper, Simon J.; Moore, Anne C.

    2014-01-01

    Substantial effort has been placed in developing efficacious recombinant attenuated adenovirus-based vaccines. However induction of immunity to the vector is a significant obstacle to its repeated use. Here we demonstrate that skin-based delivery of an adenovirus-based malaria vaccine, HAdV5-PyMSP142, to mice using silicon microneedles induces equivalent or enhanced antibody responses to the encoded antigen, however it results in decreased anti-vector responses, compared to intradermal delivery. Microneedle-mediated vaccine priming and resultant induction of low anti-vector antibody titres permitted repeated use of the same adenovirus vaccine vector. This resulted in significantly increased antigen-specific antibody responses in these mice compared to ID-treated mice. Boosting with a heterologous vaccine; MVA-PyMSP142 also resulted in significantly greater antibody responses in mice primed with HAdV5-PyMSP142 using MN compared to the ID route. The highest protection against blood-stage malaria challenge was observed when a heterologous route of immunization (MN/ID) was used. Therefore, microneedle-mediated immunization has potential to both overcome some of the logistic obstacles surrounding needle-and-syringe-based immunization as well as to facilitate the repeated use of the same adenovirus vaccine thereby potentially reducing manufacturing costs of multiple vaccines. This could have important benefits in the clinical ease of use of adenovirus-based immunization strategies. PMID:25142082

  9. Hemagglutinin Stalk Immunity Reduces Influenza Virus Replication and Transmission in Ferrets

    PubMed Central

    Nachbagauer, Raffael; Miller, Matthew S.; Hai, Rong; Ryder, Alex B.; Rose, John K.; Palese, Peter; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2015-01-01

    We assessed whether influenza virus hemagglutinin stalk-based immunity protects ferrets against aerosol-transmitted H1N1 influenza virus infection. Immunization of ferrets by a universal influenza virus vaccine strategy based on viral vectors expressing chimeric hemagglutinin constructs induced stalk-specific antibody responses. Stalk-immunized ferrets were cohoused with H1N1-infected ferrets under conditions that permitted virus transmission. Hemagglutinin stalk-immunized ferrets had lower viral titers and delayed or no virus replication at all following natural exposure to influenza virus. PMID:26719251

  10. Hemagglutinin Stalk Immunity Reduces Influenza Virus Replication and Transmission in Ferrets.

    PubMed

    Nachbagauer, Raffael; Miller, Matthew S; Hai, Rong; Ryder, Alex B; Rose, John K; Palese, Peter; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Krammer, Florian; Albrecht, Randy A

    2016-03-01

    We assessed whether influenza virus hemagglutinin stalk-based immunity protects ferrets against aerosol-transmitted H1N1 influenza virus infection. Immunization of ferrets by a universal influenza virus vaccine strategy based on viral vectors expressing chimeric hemagglutinin constructs induced stalk-specific antibody responses. Stalk-immunized ferrets were cohoused with H1N1-infected ferrets under conditions that permitted virus transmission. Hemagglutinin stalk-immunized ferrets had lower viral titers and delayed or no virus replication at all following natural exposure to influenza virus. PMID:26719251

  11. PD-1 immune checkpoint blockade reduces pathology and improves memory in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Baruch, Kuti; Deczkowska, Aleksandra; Rosenzweig, Neta; Tsitsou-Kampeli, Afroditi; Sharif, Alaa Mohammad; Matcovitch-Natan, Orit; Kertser, Alexander; David, Eyal; Amit, Ido; Schwartz, Michal

    2016-02-01

    Systemic immune suppression may curtail the ability to mount the protective, cell-mediated immune responses that are needed for brain repair. By using mouse models of Alzheimer's disease (AD), we show that immune checkpoint blockade directed against the programmed death-1 (PD-1) pathway evokes an interferon (IFN)-γ-dependent systemic immune response, which is followed by the recruitment of monocyte-derived macrophages to the brain. When induced in mice with established pathology, this immunological response leads to clearance of cerebral amyloid-β (Aβ) plaques and improved cognitive performance. Repeated treatment sessions were required to maintain a long-lasting beneficial effect on disease pathology. These findings suggest that immune checkpoints may be targeted therapeutically in AD. PMID:26779813

  12. Selection of broilers with improved innate immune responsiveness to reduce on-farm infection by foodborne pathogens: A review

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Economic pressure on the modern poultry industry has directed the selection process towards fast-growing broilers that have a reduced feed conversion ratio. Selection based heavily on growth characteristics could adversely affect immune competence leaving chickens more susceptible to disease. Sinc...

  13. Overwintering Is Associated with Reduced Expression of Immune Genes and Higher Susceptibility to Virus Infection in Honey Bees

    PubMed Central

    Steinmann, Nadja; Corona, Miguel; Neumann, Peter; Dainat, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    The eusocial honey bee, Apis mellifera, has evolved remarkable abilities to survive extreme seasonal differences in temperature and availability of resources by dividing the worker caste into two groups that differ in physiology and lifespan: summer and winter bees. Most of the recent major losses of managed honey bee colonies occur during the winter, suggesting that winter bees may have compromised immune function and higher susceptibility to diseases. We tested this hypothesis by comparing the expression of eight immune genes and naturally occurring infection levels of deformed wing virus (DWV), one of the most widespread viruses in A. mellifera populations, between summer and winter bees. Possible interactions between immune response and physiological activity were tested by measuring the expression of vitellogenin and methyl farnesoate epoxidase, a gene coding for the last enzyme involved in juvenile hormone biosynthesis. Our data show that high DWV loads in winter bees correlate with reduced expression of genes involved in the cellular immune response and physiological activity and high expression of humoral immune genes involved in antibacterial defense compared with summer bees. This expression pattern could reflect evolutionary adaptations to resist bacterial pathogens and economize energy during the winter under a pathogen landscape with reduced risk of pathogenic viral infections. The outbreak of Varroa destructor infestation could have overcome these adaptations by promoting the transmission of viruses. Our results suggest that reduced cellular immune function during the winter may have increased honey bee’s susceptibility to DWV. These results contribute to our understanding of honey bee colony losses in temperate regions. PMID:26121358

  14. Overwintering Is Associated with Reduced Expression of Immune Genes and Higher Susceptibility to Virus Infection in Honey Bees.

    PubMed

    Steinmann, Nadja; Corona, Miguel; Neumann, Peter; Dainat, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    The eusocial honey bee, Apis mellifera, has evolved remarkable abilities to survive extreme seasonal differences in temperature and availability of resources by dividing the worker caste into two groups that differ in physiology and lifespan: summer and winter bees. Most of the recent major losses of managed honey bee colonies occur during the winter, suggesting that winter bees may have compromised immune function and higher susceptibility to diseases. We tested this hypothesis by comparing the expression of eight immune genes and naturally occurring infection levels of deformed wing virus (DWV), one of the most widespread viruses in A. mellifera populations, between summer and winter bees. Possible interactions between immune response and physiological activity were tested by measuring the expression of vitellogenin and methyl farnesoate epoxidase, a gene coding for the last enzyme involved in juvenile hormone biosynthesis. Our data show that high DWV loads in winter bees correlate with reduced expression of genes involved in the cellular immune response and physiological activity and high expression of humoral immune genes involved in antibacterial defense compared with summer bees. This expression pattern could reflect evolutionary adaptations to resist bacterial pathogens and economize energy during the winter under a pathogen landscape with reduced risk of pathogenic viral infections. The outbreak of Varroa destructor infestation could have overcome these adaptations by promoting the transmission of viruses. Our results suggest that reduced cellular immune function during the winter may have increased honey bee's susceptibility to DWV. These results contribute to our understanding of honey bee colony losses in temperate regions. PMID:26121358

  15. Immunization with Staphylococcus aureus Clumping Factor B, a Major Determinant in Nasal Carriage, Reduces Nasal Colonization in a Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Schaffer, Adam C.; Solinga, Robert M.; Cocchiaro, Jordan; Portoles, Marta; Kiser, Kevin B.; Risley, Allison; Randall, Suzanne M.; Valtulina, Viviana; Speziale, Pietro; Walsh, Evelyn; Foster, Timothy; Lee, Jean C.

    2006-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is responsible for a wide range of infections, including soft tissue infections and potentially fatal bacteremias. The primary niche for S. aureus in humans is the nares, and nasal carriage is a documented risk factor for staphylococcal infection. Previous studies with rodent models of nasal colonization have implicated capsule and teichoic acid as staphylococcal surface factors that promote colonization. In this study, a mouse model of nasal colonization was utilized to demonstrate that S. aureus mutants that lack clumping factor A, collagen binding protein, fibronectin binding proteins A and B, polysaccharide intercellular adhesin, or the accessory gene regulator colonized as well as wild-type strains colonized. In contrast, mutants deficient in sortase A or clumping factor B (ClfB) showed reduced nasal colonization. Mice immunized intranasally with killed S. aureus cells showed reduced nasal colonization compared with control animals. Likewise, mice that were immunized systemically or intranasally with a recombinant vaccine composed of domain A of ClfB exhibited lower levels of colonization than control animals exhibited. A ClfB monoclonal antibody (MAb) inhibited S. aureus binding to mouse cytokeratin 10. Passive immunization of mice with this MAb resulted in reduced nasal colonization compared with the colonization observed after immunization with an isotype-matched control antibody. The mouse immunization studies demonstrate that ClfB is an attractive component for inclusion in a vaccine to reduce S. aureus nasal colonization in humans, which in turn may diminish the risk of staphylococcal infection. As targets for vaccine development and antimicrobial intervention are assessed, rodent nasal colonization models may be invaluable. PMID:16552044

  16. Oral tungstate (Na2WO4) exposure reduces adaptive immune responses in mice after challenge.

    PubMed

    Osterburg, Andrew R; Robinson, Chad T; Mokashi, Vishwesh; Stockelman, Michael; Schwemberger, Sandy J; Chapman, Gail; Babcock, George F

    2014-01-01

    Tungstate (WO²⁻₄) has been identified as a ground water contaminant at military firing ranges and can be absorbed by ingestion. In this study, C57BL6 mice were exposed to sodium tungstate (Na2WO4·2H2O) (0, 2, 62.5, 125, and 200 mg/kg/day) in their drinking water for an initial 28-day screen and in a one-generation (one-gen) model. Twenty-four hours prior to euthanasia, mice were intraperitoneally injected with Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) (20 μg/mouse) or saline as controls. After euthanasia, splenocytes and blood were collected and stained with lymphocyte and/or myeloid immunophenotyping panels and analyzed by flow cytometry. In the 28-day and one-gen exposure, statistically significant reductions were observed in the quantities of activated cytotoxic T-cells (TCTL; CD3(+)CD8(+)CD71(+)) and helper T-cells (TH; CD3(+)CD4(+)CD71(+)) from spleens of SEB-treated mice. In the 28-day exposures, CD71(+) TCTL cells were 12.87 ± 2.05% (SE) in the 0 tungstate (control) group compared to 4.44 ± 1.42% in the 200 mg/kg/day (p < 0.001) group. TH cells were 4.85 ± 1.23% in controls and 2.76 ± 0.51% in the 200 mg/kg/day (p < 0.003) group. In the one-gen exposures, TCTL cells were 7.98 ± 0.49% and 6.33 ± 0.49% for P and F1 mice after 0 mg/kg/day tungstate vs 1.58 ± 0.23% and 2.52 ± 0.25% after 200 mg/kg/day of tungstate (p < 0.001). Similarly, TH cells were reduced to 6.21 ± 0.39% and 7.20 ± 0.76%, respectively, for the 0 mg/kg/day P and F1 mice, and 2.28 ± 0.41% and 2.85 ± 0.53%, respectively, for the 200 mg/kg/day tungstate P and F1 groups (p < 0.001). In delayed-type hypersensitivity Type IV experiments, tungstate exposure prior to primary and secondary antigen challenge significantly reduced footpad swelling at 20 and 200 mg/kg/day. These data indicate that exposure to tungstate can result in immune suppression that may, in turn, reduce host defense against

  17. Prevalence of Plasmodium falciparum transmission reducing immunity among primary school children in a malaria moderate transmission region in Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Paul, Noah H; Vengesai, Arthur; Mduluza, Takafira; Chipeta, James; Midzi, Nicholas; Bansal, Geetha P; Kumar, Nirbhay

    2016-11-01

    Malaria continues to cause alarming morbidity and mortality in more than 100 countries worldwide. Antigens in the various life cycle stages of malaria parasites are presented to the immune system during natural infection and it is widely recognized that after repeated malaria exposure, adults develop partially protective immunity. Specific antigens of natural immunity represent among the most important targets for the development of malaria vaccines. Immunity against the transmission stages of the malaria parasite represents an important approach to reduce malaria transmission and is believed to become an important tool for gradual elimination of malaria. Development of immunity against Plasmodium falciparum sexual stages was evaluated in primary school children aged 6-16 years in Makoni district of Zimbabwe, an area of low to modest malaria transmission. Malaria infection was screened by microscopy, rapid diagnostic tests and finally using nested PCR. Plasma samples were tested for antibodies against recombinant Pfs48/45 and Pfs47 by ELISA. Corresponding serum samples were used to test for P. falciparum transmission reducing activity in Anopheles stephensi and An. gambiae mosquitoes using the membrane feeding assay. The prevalence of malaria diagnosed by rapid diagnostic test kit (Paracheck)™ was 1.7%. However, of the randomly tested blood samples, 66% were positive by nested PCR. ELISA revealed prevalence (64% positivity at 1:500 dilution, in randomly selected 66 plasma samples) of antibodies against recombinant Pfs48/45 (mean A 405nm=0.53, CI=0.46-0.60) and Pfs47 (mean A405nm=0.91, CI=0.80-1.02); antigens specific to the sexual stages. The mosquito membrane feeding assay demonstrated measurable transmission reducing ability of the samples that were positive for Pfs48/45 antibodies by ELISA. Interestingly, 3 plasma samples revealed enhancement of infectivity of P. falciparum in An. stephensi mosquitoes. These studies revealed the presence of antibodies with

  18. Managing population immunity to reduce or eliminate the risks of circulation following the importation of polioviruses.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Kimberly M; Kalkowska, Dominika A; Duintjer Tebbens, Radboud J

    2015-03-24

    Poliovirus importations into polio-free countries represent a major concern during the final phases of global eradication of wild polioviruses (WPVs). We extend dynamic transmission models to demonstrate the dynamics of population immunity out through 2020 for three countries that only used inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) for routine immunization: the US, Israel, and The Netherlands. For each country, we explore the vulnerability to re-established transmission following an importation for each poliovirus serotype, including the impact of immunization choices following the serotype 1 WPV importation that occurred in 2013 in Israel. As population immunity declines below the threshold required to prevent transmission, countries become at risk for re-established transmission. Although importations represent stochastic events that countries cannot fully control because people cross borders and polioviruses mainly cause asymptomatic infections, countries can ensure that any importations die out. Our results suggest that the general US population will remain above the threshold for transmission through 2020. In contrast, Israel became vulnerable to re-established transmission of importations of live polioviruses by the late 2000s. In Israel, the recent WPV importation and outbreak response use of bivalent oral poliovirus vaccine (bOPV) eliminated the vulnerability to an importation of poliovirus serotypes 1 and 3 for several years, but not serotype 2. The Netherlands experienced a serotype 1 WPV outbreak in 1992-1993 and became vulnerable to re-established transmission in religious communities with low vaccine acceptance around the year 2000, although the general population remains well-protected from widespread transmission. All countries should invest in active management of population immunity to avoid the potential circulation of imported live polioviruses. IPV-using countries may wish to consider prevention opportunities and/or ensure preparedness for response

  19. Immune reconstitution after haploidentical hematopoietic cell transplantation: impact of reduced intensity conditioning and CD3/CD19 depleted grafts.

    PubMed

    Federmann, B; Hägele, M; Pfeiffer, M; Wirths, S; Schumm, M; Faul, C; Vogel, W; Handgretinger, R; Kanz, L; Bethge, W A

    2011-01-01

    Haploidentical hematopoietic cell transplantation (HHCT) using CD34 selected grafts is complicated by slow engraftment and immune reconstitution. Engraftment and immune reconstitution might be improved using CD3/CD19-depleted grafts and reduced intensity conditioning (RIC). We report on 28 patients after HHCT with CD3/CD19-depleted grafts using RIC, which were prospectively evaluated for engraftment and immune reconstitution. Engraftment was rapid with full chimerism reached on day +15 after HHCT. T-cell reconstitution was delayed with a median of 205 CD3+ cells/μl, 70 CD3+CD4+ cells/μl and 66 CD3+ CD8+ cells/μl on day +100, respectively. A skewed T-cell receptor-Vβ repertoire with oligoclonal T-cell expansions to day +100 and normalization after day +200 was observed. B-cell reconstitution was slow with a median of 100 CD19+ CD20+ cells/μl on day +150. Natural killer (NK) cell engraftment was fast reaching normal values on day +20. An increased natural cytotoxicity receptor and NKG2A, but decreased NKG2D and KIR expressions were observed on NK cells until day +100. We observed a positive impact of donor lymphocyte infusions on immune reconstitution. In conclusion, after HHCT, using CD3/CD19-depleted grafts and RIC, T- and B-cell reconstitution is delayed, whereas NK-cell reconstitution occurs early and fast. PMID:20944677

  20. Functions of innate and acquired immune system are reduced in domestic pigeons (Columba livia domestica) given a low protein diet.

    PubMed

    Mabuchi, Yuko; Frankel, Theresa L

    2016-03-01

    Racing pigeons are exposed to and act as carriers of diseases. Dietary protein requirement for their maintenance has not been determined experimentally despite their being domesticated for over 7000 years. A maintenance nitrogen (protein) requirement (MNR) for pigeons was determined in a balance study using diets containing 6, 10 and 14% crude protein (CP). Then, the effects of feeding the diets were investigated to determine whether they were adequate to sustain innate and acquired immune functions. Nitrogen intake from the 6% CP diet was sufficient to maintain nitrogen balance and body weight in pigeons. However, the immune functions of phagocytosis, oxidative burst and lymphocyte proliferation in pigeons fed this diet were reduced compared with those fed 10 and 14% CP diets. Pigeons given the 6 and 10% CP diets had lower antibody titres following inoculation against Newcastle disease (ND) than those on the 14% CP diet. A confounding factor found on autopsy was the presence of intestinal parasites in some of the pigeons given the 6 and 10% CP diets; however, none of the pigeons used to measure MNR or acquired immunity to ND were infested with parasites. In conclusion, neither the 6 nor 10% CP diets adequately sustained acquired immune function of pigeons. PMID:27069640

  1. Functions of innate and acquired immune system are reduced in domestic pigeons (Columba livia domestica) given a low protein diet

    PubMed Central

    Mabuchi, Yuko; Frankel, Theresa L.

    2016-01-01

    Racing pigeons are exposed to and act as carriers of diseases. Dietary protein requirement for their maintenance has not been determined experimentally despite their being domesticated for over 7000 years. A maintenance nitrogen (protein) requirement (MNR) for pigeons was determined in a balance study using diets containing 6, 10 and 14% crude protein (CP). Then, the effects of feeding the diets were investigated to determine whether they were adequate to sustain innate and acquired immune functions. Nitrogen intake from the 6% CP diet was sufficient to maintain nitrogen balance and body weight in pigeons. However, the immune functions of phagocytosis, oxidative burst and lymphocyte proliferation in pigeons fed this diet were reduced compared with those fed 10 and 14% CP diets. Pigeons given the 6 and 10% CP diets had lower antibody titres following inoculation against Newcastle disease (ND) than those on the 14% CP diet. A confounding factor found on autopsy was the presence of intestinal parasites in some of the pigeons given the 6 and 10% CP diets; however, none of the pigeons used to measure MNR or acquired immunity to ND were infested with parasites. In conclusion, neither the 6 nor 10% CP diets adequately sustained acquired immune function of pigeons. PMID:27069640

  2. Antiparasite treatments reduce humoral immunity and impact oxidative status in raptor nestlings

    PubMed Central

    Hanssen, Sveinn Are; Bustnes, Jan Ove; Schnug, Lisbeth; Bourgeon, Sophie; Johnsen, Trond Vidar; Ballesteros, Manuel; Sonne, Christian; Herzke, Dorte; Eulaers, Igor; Jaspers, Veerle L B; Covaci, Adrian; Eens, Marcel; Halley, Duncan J; Moum, Truls; Ims, Rolf Anker; Erikstad, Kjell Einar

    2013-01-01

    Parasites are natural stressors that may have multiple negative effects on their host as they usurp energy and nutrients and may lead to costly immune responses that may cause oxidative stress. At early stages, animals may be more sensitive to infectious organisms because of their rapid growth and partly immature immune system. The objective of this study was to explore effects of parasites by treating chicks of two raptor species (northern goshawk Accipiter gentilis and white-tailed sea eagle Haliaeetus albicilla) against both endoparasites (internal parasites) and ectoparasites (external parasites). Nests were either treated against ectoparasites by spraying with pyrethrin or left unsprayed as control nests. Within each nest, chicks were randomly orally treated with either an antihelminthic medication (fenbendazole) or sterile water as control treatment. We investigated treatment effects on plasma (1) total antioxidant capacity TAC (an index of nonenzymatic circulating antioxidant defenses), (2) total oxidant status TOS (a measure of plasmatic oxidants), and (3) immunoglobulin levels (a measure of humoral immune function). Treatment against ectoparasites led to a reduction in circulating immunoglobulin plasma levels in male chicks. TOS was higher when not receiving any parasite reduction treatment and when receiving both endo- and ectoparasitic reduction treatment compared with receiving only one treatment. TAC was higher in all treatment groups, when compared to controls. Despite the relatively low sample size, this experimental study suggests complex but similar relationships between treatment groups and oxidative status and immunoglobulin levels in two raptor species. PMID:24455145

  3. Angiogenin Reduces Immune Inflammation via Inhibition of TANK-Binding Kinase 1 Expression in Human Corneal Fibroblast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Min, Kyong-Mi; Kim, Kyu-Wan; Chang, Soo-Ik

    2014-01-01

    Angiogenin (ANG) is reportedly multifunctional, with roles in angiogenesis and autoimmune diseases. This protein is involved in the innate immune system and has been implicated in several inflammatory diseases. Although ANG may be involved in the anti-inflammatory response, there is no evidence that it has direct anti-inflammatory effects. In this study we sought to determine whether ANG has an anti-inflammatory effect in human corneal fibroblasts (HCFs) exposed to media containing tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). We found that ANG reduced the mRNA expression of interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), -6, -8 and TNF-α receptors (TNFR) 1 and 2. In contrast, ANG increased the mRNA expression of IL-4 and -10. Protein levels of TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1) were reduced by ANG in HCFs treated with TNF-α. Moreover, ANG diminished the expression of IL-6 and -8 and monocyte chemotactic protein- (MCP-) 1. The protein expression of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) was downregulated by ANG treatment. These findings suggest that ANG suppressed the TNF-α-induced inflammatory response in HCFs through inhibition of TBK1-mediated NF-κB nuclear translocation. These novel results are likely to play a significant role in the selection of immune-mediated inflammatory therapeutic targets and may shed light on the pathogenesis of immune-mediated inflammatory diseases. PMID:24860242

  4. Passive Immunization Reduces Behavioral and Neuropathological Deficits in an Alpha-Synuclein Transgenic Model of Lewy Body Disease

    PubMed Central

    Masliah, Eliezer; Rockenstein, Edward; Mante, Michael; Crews, Leslie; Spencer, Brian; Adame, Anthony; Patrick, Christina; Trejo, Margarita; Ubhi, Kiren; Rohn, Troy T.; Mueller-Steiner, Sarah; Seubert, Peter; Barbour, Robin; McConlogue, Lisa; Buttini, Manuel; Games, Dora; Schenk, Dale

    2011-01-01

    Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and Parkinson's Disease (PD) are common causes of motor and cognitive deficits and are associated with the abnormal accumulation of alpha-synuclein (α-syn). This study investigated whether passive immunization with a novel monoclonal α-syn antibody (9E4) against the C-terminus (CT) of α-syn was able to cross into the CNS and ameliorate the deficits associated with α-syn accumulation. In this study we demonstrate that 9E4 was effective at reducing behavioral deficits in the water maze, moreover, immunization with 9E4 reduced the accumulation of calpain-cleaved α-syn in axons and synapses and the associated neurodegenerative deficits. In vivo studies demonstrated that 9E4 traffics into the CNS, binds to cells that display α-syn accumulation and promotes α-syn clearance via the lysosomal pathway. These results suggest that passive immunization with monoclonal antibodies against the CT of α-syn may be of therapeutic relevance in patients with PD and DLB. PMID:21559417

  5. Immunization with recombinant Pb27 protein reduces the levels of pulmonary fibrosis caused by the inflammatory response against Paracoccidioides brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Morais, Elis Araujo; Martins, Estefânia Mara do Nascimento; Boelone, Jankerle Neves; Gomes, Dawidson Assis; Goes, Alfredo Miranda

    2015-02-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) is a systemic mycosis in which the host response to the infectious agent typically consists of a chronic granulomatous inflammatory process. This condition causes lesions that impair lung function and lead to chronic pulmonary insufficiency resulting from fibrosis development, which is a sequel and disabling feature of the disease. The rPb27 protein has been studied for prophylactic and therapeutic treatment against PCM. Previous studies from our laboratory have shown a protective effect of rPb27 against PCM. However, these studies have not determined whether rPb27 immunization prevents lung fibrosis. We therefore conducted this study to investigate fibrosis resulting from infection by Paracoccidioides brasiliensis in the lungs of animals immunized with rPb27. Animals were immunized with rPb27 and subsequently infected with a virulent strain of P. brasiliensis. Fungal load was evaluated by counting colony-forming units, and Masson's trichrome staining was performed to evaluate fibrosis at 30 and 90 days post-infection. The levels of CCR7, active caspase 3, collagen and cytokines were analyzed. At the two time intervals mentioned, the rPb27 group showed lower levels of fibrosis on histology and reduced levels of collagen and the chemokine receptor CCR7 in the lungs. CCR7 was detected at higher levels in the control groups that developed very high levels of pulmonary fibrosis. Additionally, the immunized groups showed high levels of active caspase 3, IFN-γ, TGF-β and IL-10 in the early phase of P. brasiliensis infection. Immunization with Pb27, in addition to its protective effect, was shown to prevent pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:25487973

  6. Orthotopic bone transplantation in mice. III. Methods of reducing the immune response and their effect on healing

    SciTech Connect

    Kliman, M.; Halloran, P.F.; Lee, E.; Esses, S.; Fortner, P.; Langer, F.

    1981-01-01

    Various methods of reducing the immune response to allogeneic bone grafts, either by pretreating the graft or by immunosuppressing the recipient, were compared. Tibial grafts from B10.D2 mice, either untreated or pretreated in various ways, were transplanted into B10 recipients. The antibody response was followed and the extent of bone healing at 4 months was assessed. Pretreatment of the graft by X-irradiation, freezing, or by incubation in alloantisera (either anti-H-2 or anti-Ia) reduced or abolished the immunogenicity of the graft. Immunosuppression of the recipient with methotrexate or antilymphocyte serum (ALS) also greatly depressed the antibody response. But when healing was assessed, none of these treatments except ALS improved the delayed healing of the bone allografts. The reason for this failure was probably that X-irradiation, freezing, alloantiserum pretreatment, and methotrexate all interfered with bone healing directly, whereas ALS did not. We conclude that many methods will reduce the immune response to allogeneic bone, but that only ALS will improve the healing of the allogeneic bone. Furthermore, as a corollary to the observation that pretreatment with anti-Ia serum markedly reduced the immunogenicity of bone allografts, we conclude that much of the immunogenicity of bone allografts is attributable to a population of Ia-positive cells.

  7. Altered peptide ligands of myelin basic protein (MBP87–99) conjugated to reduced mannan modulate immune responses in mice

    PubMed Central

    Katsara, Maria; Yuriev, Elizabeth; Ramsland, Paul A; Tselios, Theodore; Deraos, George; Lourbopoulos, Athanasios; Grigoriadis, Nikolaos; Matsoukas, John; Apostolopoulos, Vasso

    2009-01-01

    Mutations of peptides to generate altered peptide ligands, capable of switching immune responses from T helper 1 (Th1) to T helper 2 (Th2), are promising candidates for the immunotherapy of autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS). We synthesized two mutant peptides from myelin basic protein 87–99 (MBP87–99), an immunodominant peptide epitope identified in MS. Mutations of residues K91 and P96, known to be critical T-cell receptor (TCR) contact sites, resulted in the mutant peptides [R91, A96]MBP87–99 and [A91, A96]MBP87–99. Immunization of mice with these altered peptide ligands emulsified in complete Freund’s adjuvant induced both interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and interleukin-4 (IL-4) responses compared with only IFN-γ responses induced to the native MBP87–99 peptide. It was of interest that [R91, A96]MBP87–99 conjugated to reduced mannan induced 70% less IFN-γ compared with the native MBP87–99 peptide. However, [A91, A96]MBP87–99 conjugated to reduced mannan did not induce IFN-γ-secreting T cells, but elicited very high levels of interleukin-4 (IL-4). Furthermore, antibodies generated to [A91, A96]MBP87–99 peptide conjugated to reduced mannan did not cross-react with the native MBP87–99 peptide. By molecular modelling of the mutant peptides in complex with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II, I-As, novel interactions were noted. It is clear that the double-mutant peptide analogue [A91, A96]MBP87–99 conjugated to reduced mannan is able to divert immune responses from Th1 to Th2 and is a promising mutant peptide analogue for use in studies investigating potential treatments for MS. PMID:19930042

  8. Reduced immune function predicts disease susceptibility in frogs infected with a deadly fungal pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Anna E.; Terrell, Kimberly A.; Gratwicke, Brian; Mattheus, Nichole M.; Augustine, Lauren; Fleischer, Robert C.

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between amphibian immune function and disease susceptibility is of primary concern given current worldwide declines linked to the pathogenic fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd). We experimentally infected lowland leopard frogs (Lithobates yavapaiensis) with Bd to test the hypothesis that infection causes physiological stress and stimulates humoral and cell-mediated immune function in the blood. We measured body mass, the ratio of circulating neutrophils to lymphocytes (a known indicator of physiological stress) and plasma bacterial killing ability (BKA; a measure of innate immune function). In early exposure (1–15 days post-infection), stress was elevated in Bd-positive vs. Bd-negative frogs, whereas other metrics were similar between the groups. At later stages (29–55 days post-infection), stress was increased in Bd-positive frogs with signs of chytridiomycosis compared with both Bd-positive frogs without disease signs and uninfected control frogs, which were similar to each other. Infection decreased growth during the same period, demonstrating that sustained resistance to Bd is energetically costly. Importantly, BKA was lower in Bd-positive frogs with disease than in those without signs of chytridiomycosis. However, neither group differed from Bd-negative control frogs. The low BKA values in dying frogs compared with infected individuals without disease signs suggests that complement activity might signify different immunogenetic backgrounds or gene-by-environment interactions between the host, Bd and abiotic factors. We conclude that protein complement activity might be a useful predictor of Bd susceptibility and might help to explain differential disease outcomes in natural amphibian populations. PMID:27293759

  9. Reduced immune function predicts disease susceptibility in frogs infected with a deadly fungal pathogen.

    PubMed

    Savage, Anna E; Terrell, Kimberly A; Gratwicke, Brian; Mattheus, Nichole M; Augustine, Lauren; Fleischer, Robert C

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between amphibian immune function and disease susceptibility is of primary concern given current worldwide declines linked to the pathogenic fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd). We experimentally infected lowland leopard frogs (Lithobates yavapaiensis) with Bd to test the hypothesis that infection causes physiological stress and stimulates humoral and cell-mediated immune function in the blood. We measured body mass, the ratio of circulating neutrophils to lymphocytes (a known indicator of physiological stress) and plasma bacterial killing ability (BKA; a measure of innate immune function). In early exposure (1-15 days post-infection), stress was elevated in Bd-positive vs. Bd-negative frogs, whereas other metrics were similar between the groups. At later stages (29-55 days post-infection), stress was increased in Bd-positive frogs with signs of chytridiomycosis compared with both Bd-positive frogs without disease signs and uninfected control frogs, which were similar to each other. Infection decreased growth during the same period, demonstrating that sustained resistance to Bd is energetically costly. Importantly, BKA was lower in Bd-positive frogs with disease than in those without signs of chytridiomycosis. However, neither group differed from Bd-negative control frogs. The low BKA values in dying frogs compared with infected individuals without disease signs suggests that complement activity might signify different immunogenetic backgrounds or gene-by-environment interactions between the host, Bd and abiotic factors. We conclude that protein complement activity might be a useful predictor of Bd susceptibility and might help to explain differential disease outcomes in natural amphibian populations. PMID:27293759

  10. EndoS Reduces the Pathogenicity of Anti-mCOL7 IgG through Reduced Binding of Immune Complexes to Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xinhua; Zheng, Junfeng; Collin, Mattias; Schmidt, Enno; Zillikens, Detlef; Petersen, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase (EndoS) has been shown to act as a potent pathogen-derived immunomodulatory molecule in autoimmune diseases. Here we investigated how EndoS treatment reduces the pathogenicity of rabbit anti-mCOL7 IgG using different experimental models of epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA). Our results show that the EndoS treatment does not interfere with the binding of the antibody to the antigen but reduces immune complex (IC)-mediated neutrophil activation by impairing the binding of the IC to FcγR on neutrophils. On the basis of this newly identified EndoS-mediated mechanism we hope to develop new strategies in the treatment of the disease. PMID:24504190

  11. Repeated Administration of Hyaluronic Acid Coated Liposomes with Improved Pharmacokinetics and Reduced Immune Response.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Quan; Deng, Caifeng; Fu, Yao; Sun, Xun; Gong, Tao; Zhang, Zhirong

    2016-06-01

    PEGylated liposomes (PEG-Lip) have been widely used as a drug carrier for their good stealth property in blood circulation. However, the second injection of PEG-Lip was reported to result in the accelerated blood clearance (ABC) phenomenon and trigger hypersensitivity reactions in sensitive individuals for its complement activation effect. To avoid adverse immune responses, HA was selected to modify liposomes to afford HA modified liposomes (HA-Lip). Repeated administrations of PEG-Lip and HA-Lip were performed in rats. Our results showed that PEG-Lip induced the ABC phenomenon accompanied by a greatly increased accumulation of PEG-Lip in the liver. In contrast, HA-Lip showed good stealth property without inducing either the ABC phenomenon or an increase in liver uptake. Moreover, HA-Lip did not trigger complement activation in human serum in vitro and in rat blood in vivo. Consequently, HA modification represents a viable strategy to prolong the blood circulation time of liposomes without inducing the ABC phenomenon and adverse immune responses. PMID:27112287

  12. A reduced immunization scheme to obtain an experimental anti-Loxosceles laeta ("violinist spider") venom.

    PubMed

    de Roodt, Adolfo Rafael; Litwin, Silvana; Dokmetjian, José Christian; Vidal, Juan Carlos

    2002-08-01

    Bites by Loxosceles (L.) laeta spiders can produce severe envenomation in humans. The only specific treatment is the early administration of antivenom. The production of anti-Loxosceles antivenom is hampered by the extremely low venom yield by these spiders and by the difficulties in maintaining a large breeder of Loxosceles. We developed an experimental equinum L. laeta antivenom, using as immunogen venom glands homogenates from spiders captured in Argentina. Horses immunized with venom gland homogenate (1.0 mg total protein per horse) by the subcutaneous route were bled after completion of the immunization scheme. Plasma was fractionated by ammonium sulfate precipitation and treated with pepsin to obtain F(ab')2 fragments. The protein composition of the experimental antivenom was assessed by SDS-PAGE, and its immunochemical reactivity was compared with those of other anti-Loxosceles antivenoms available for therapeutic use in Argentina by ELISA and Western blot. The experimental, homologous anti-L. laeta antivenom appeared to be more efficient in neutralizing the lethal potency in mice and the necrotizing activity in rabbits than of the heterologous antivenom. PMID:12182539

  13. Ionizing Radiation Selectively Reduces Skin Regulatory T Cells and Alters Immune Function

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yu; Ni, Houping; Balint, Klara; Sanzari, Jenine K.; Dentchev, Tzvete; Diffenderfer, Eric S.; Wilson, Jolaine M.; Cengel, Keith A.; Weissman, Drew

    2014-01-01

    The skin serves multiple functions that are critical for life. The protection from pathogens is achieved by a complicated interaction between aggressive effectors and controlling functions that limit damage. Inhomogeneous radiation with limited penetration is used in certain types of therapeutics and is experienced with exposure to solar particle events outside the protection of the Earth’s magnetic field. This study explores the effect of ionizing radiation on skin immune function. We demonstrate that radiation, both homogeneous and inhomogeneous, induces inflammation with resultant specific loss of regulatory T cells from the skin. This results in a hyper-responsive state with increased delayed type hypersensitivity in vivo and CD4+ T cell proliferation in vitro. The effects of inhomogeneous radiation to the skin of astronauts or as part of a therapeutic approach could result in an unexpected enhancement in skin immune function. The effects of this need to be considered in the design of radiation therapy protocols and in the development of countermeasures for extended space travel. PMID:24959865

  14. The Compatible Solute Ectoine Reduces the Exacerbating Effect of Environmental Model Particles on the Immune Response of the Airways

    PubMed Central

    Gotić, Marijan

    2014-01-01

    Exposure of humans to particulate air pollution has been correlated with the incidence and aggravation of allergic airway diseases. In predisposed individuals, inhalation of environmental particles can lead to an exacerbation of immune responses. Previous studies demonstrated a beneficial effect of the compatible solute ectoine on lung inflammation in rats exposed to carbon nanoparticles (CNP) as a model of environmental particle exposure. In the current study we investigated the effect of such a treatment on airway inflammation in a mouse allergy model. Ectoine in nonsensitized animals significantly reduced the neutrophilic lung inflammation after CNP exposure. This effect was accompanied by a reduction of inflammatory factors in the bronchoalveolar lavage. Reduced IL-6 levels in the serum also indicate the effects of ectoine on systemic inflammation. In sensitized animals, an aggravation of the immune response was observed when animals were exposed to CNP prior to antigen provocation. The coadministration of ectoine together with the particles significantly reduced this exacerbation. The data indicate the role of neutrophilic lung inflammation in the exacerbation of allergic airway responses. Moreover, the data suggest to use ectoine as a preventive treatment to avoid the exacerbation of allergic airway responses induced by environmental air pollution. PMID:24822073

  15. Blocking Type I Interferon Production: A New Therapeutic Option to Reduce the HIV-1-Induced Immune Activation

    PubMed Central

    Ries, Moritz; Pritschet, Kathrin; Schmidt, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy has dramatically improved the morbidity and mortality of HIV-1-infected individuals. A total of 25 licensed drugs provide the basis for an optimized virus-suppressive treatment of nearly each subject. The promises of immune reconstitution and normal life expectancy, however, fall short for a number of patients, either through inadequate recovery of CD4+ T-cell counts or the occurrence of non-AIDS defining malignancies. In this respect, the prevalence of Epstein-Barr virus-associated Hodgkin lymphoma and human papillomavirus-related anal neoplasia is rising in aging HIV-1-infected individuals despite antiretroviral therapy. An important cause appears to be the HIV-1-induced chronic immune activation, propagated by inappropriate release of proinflammatory cytokines and type I interferons. This immune dysregulation can be reduced in vitro by inhibitors blocking the endosomal acidification. Recent data suggest that this concept is also of relevance in vivo, which opens the door for adjuvant immunomodulatory therapies in HIV-1 infection. PMID:22203858

  16. Immunization with chlamydial type III secretion antigens reduces vaginal shedding and prevents fallopian tube pathology following live C. muridarum challenge.

    PubMed

    Bulir, David C; Liang, Steven; Lee, Amanda; Chong, Sylvia; Simms, Elizabeth; Stone, Christopher; Kaushic, Charu; Ashkar, Ali; Mahony, James B

    2016-07-25

    Chlamydia trachomatis infections in women are often asymptomatic and if left untreated can lead to significant late sequelae including pelvic inflammatory disease and tubal factor infertility. Vaccine development efforts over the past three decades have been unproductive and there is no vaccine approved for use in humans. The existence of serologically distinct strains or serovars of C. trachomatis mandates a vaccine that will provide protection against multiple serovars. Chlamydia spp. use a highly conserved type III secretion system (T3SS) composed of both structural and effector proteins which is an essential virulence factor for infection and intracellular replication. In this study we evaluated a novel fusion protein antigen (BD584) which consists of three T3SS proteins from C. trachomatis (CopB, CopD, and CT584) as a potential chlamydial vaccine candidate. Intranasal immunization with BD584 elicited serum neutralizing antibodies that inhibited C. trachomatis infection in vitro. Following intravaginal challenge with C. muridarum, immunized mice had a 95% reduction in chlamydial shedding from the vagina at the peak of infection and cleared the infection sooner than control mice. Immunization with BD584 also reduced the rate of hydrosalpinx by 87.5% compared to control mice. Together, these results suggest that highly conserved proteins of the chlamydial T3SS may represent good candidates for a Chlamydia vaccine. PMID:27325352

  17. Sublingual immunization with the phosphate-binding-protein (PstS) reduces oral colonization by Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, E L; Batista, M T; Cavalcante, R C M; Pegos, V R; Passos, H M; Silva, D A; Balan, A; Ferreira, L C S; Ferreira, R C C

    2016-10-01

    Bacterial ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters play a crucial role in the physiology and pathogenicity of different bacterial species. Components of ABC transporters have also been tested as target antigens for the development of vaccines against different bacterial species, such as those belonging to the Streptococcus genus. Streptococcus mutans is the etiological agent of dental caries, and previous studies have demonstrated that deletion of the gene encoding PstS, the substrate-binding component of the phosphate uptake system (Pst), reduced the adherence of the bacteria to abiotic surfaces. In the current study, we generated a recombinant form of the S. mutans PstS protein (rPstS) with preserved structural features, and we evaluated the induction of antibody responses in mice after sublingual mucosal immunization with a formulation containing the recombinant protein and an adjuvant derived from the heat-labile toxin from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strains. Mice immunized with rPstS exhibited systemic and secreted antibody responses, measured by the number of immunoglobulin A-secreting cells in draining lymph nodes. Serum antibodies raised in mice immunized with rPstS interfered with the adhesion of bacteria to the oral cavity of naive mice challenged with S. mutans. Similarly, mice actively immunized with rPstS were partially protected from oral colonization after challenge with the S. mutans NG8 strain. Therefore, our results indicate that S. mutans PstS is a potential target antigen capable of inducing specific and protective antibody responses after sublingual administration. Overall, these observations raise interesting perspectives for the development of vaccines to prevent dental caries. PMID:26462737

  18. Interleukin-2/Anti-Interleukin-2 Immune Complex Expands Regulatory T Cells and Reduces Angiotensin II-Induced Aortic Stiffening.

    PubMed

    Majeed, Beenish; Tawinwung, Supannikar; Eberson, Lance S; Secomb, Timothy W; Larmonier, Nicolas; Larson, Douglas F

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive immune function is implicated in the pathogenesis of vascular disease. Inhibition of T-lymphocyte function has been shown to reduce hypertension, target-organ damage, and vascular stiffness. To study the role of immune inhibitory cells, CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs), on vascular stiffness, we stimulated the proliferation of Treg lymphocytes in vivo using a novel cytokine immune complex of Interleukin-2 (IL-2) and anti-IL-2 monoclonal antibody clone JES6-1 (mAbCD25). Three-month-old male C57BL/6J mice were treated with IL-2/mAbCD25 concomitantly with continuous infusion of angiotensin type 1 receptor agonist, [Val(5)]angiotensin II. Our results indicate that the IL-2/mAbCD25 complex effectively induced Treg phenotype expansion by 5-fold in the spleens with minimal effects on total CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-lymphocyte numbers. The IL-2/mAbCD25 complex inhibited angiotensin II-mediated aortic collagen remodeling and the resulting stiffening, analyzed with in vivo pulse wave velocity and effective Young's modulus. Furthermore, the IL-2/mAbCD25 complex suppressed angiotensin II-mediated Th17 responses in the lymphoid organs and reduced gene expression of IL-17 as well as T cell and macrophage infiltrates in the aortic tissue. This study provides data that support the protective roles of Tregs in vascular stiffening and highlights the use of the IL-2/mAbCD25 complex as a new potential therapy in angiotensin II-related vascular diseases. PMID:25258681

  19. Immune evasion or avoidance: fungal skin infection linked to reduced defence peptides in Australian green-eyed treefrogs, Litoria serrata.

    PubMed

    Woodhams, Douglas C; Bell, Sara C; Kenyon, Nicole; Alford, Ross A; Rollins-Smith, Louise A

    2012-12-01

    Many parasites and pathogens suppress host immunity to maintain infection or initiate disease. On the skin of many amphibians, defensive peptides are active against the fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), the causative agent of the emerging infectious disease chytridiomycosis. We tested the hypothesis that infection with the fungus may be linked to lower levels of defensive peptides. We sampled both ambient (or constitutive) skin peptides on the ventral surface immediately upon capture, and stored skin peptides induced from granular glands by norepinephrine administration of Australian green-eyed treefrogs, Litoria serrata. Upon capture, uninfected frogs expressed an array of antimicrobial peptides on their ventral surface, whereas infected frogs had reduced skin peptide expression. Expression of ambient skin peptides differed with infection status, and antimicrobial peptides maculatin 1.1 and 2.1 were on average three times lower on infected frogs. However, the repertoire of skin peptides stored in granular glands did not differ with infection status; on average equal quantities were recovered from infected and from uninfected frogs. Our results could have at least two causes: (1) frogs with reduced peptide expression are more likely to become infected; (2) Bd infection interferes with defence peptides by inhibiting release or causing selective degradation of peptides on the skin surface. Immune evasion therefore may contribute to the pathogenesis of chytridiomycosis and a mechanistic understanding of this fungal strategy may lead to improved methods of disease control. PMID:23245614

  20. Feasibility of reducing rabies immunoglobulin dosage for passive immunization against rabies: results of In vitro and In vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Madhusudana, Shampur Narayan; Ashwin, Belludi Yajaman; Sudarshan, Sampada

    2013-09-01

    Passive immunization is a crucial parameter for prevention of human rabies. Presently as World Health Organization (WHO) strongly advocates local infiltration of rabies immunoglobulin in and around the bite wound, we feel that there is no basis for calculating the dose of immunoglobulin based on body weight. Keeping this in view we conducted both in vitro and in vivo studies to know whether the dose of immunoglobulin can be reduced and still obtain complete neutralization of the virus. In vitro neutralization studies were conducted using CVS strain of virus and BHK 21 cells. In vivo experiments were conducted in 4 weeks old Swiss albino mice by initial challenge with CVS followed by infiltration with increasing dilutions of either human rabies immunoglobulin (HRIG) and equine rabies immunoglobulin (ERIG). In vitro studies showed that a dose of 100 FFD 50 of CVS was neutralized by increasing dilution of both HRIG and ERIG and 100% neutralization was observed with HRIG and ERIG in as low quantities as 0.025 IU. In mice studies there was 100% survival of mice infiltrated with 0.025 IU of both HRIG and ERIG compared with 100% mortality in mice infiltrated with normal saline. These results suggest that it is possible to reduce the dose of rabies immunoglobulins by at least 16 times the presently advocated dose. These findings needs to be further evaluated using larger animal models and street viruses prevalent in nature but cannot serve as recommendations for use of RIG for passive immunization in humans. PMID:23792347

  1. Iron (FeII) Chelation, Ferric Reducing Antioxidant Power, and Immune Modulating Potential of Arisaema jacquemontii (Himalayan Cobra Lily)

    PubMed Central

    Sudan, Rasleen; Bhagat, Madhulika; Singh, Jasvinder; Koul, Anupurna

    2014-01-01

    This study explored the antioxidant and immunomodulatory potential of ethnomedicinally valuable species, namely, Arisaema jacquemontii of north-western Himalayan region. The tubers, leaves, and fruits of this plant were subjected to extraction using different solvents. In vitro antioxidant studies were performed in terms of chelation power on ferrous ions and FRAP assay. The crude methanol extract of leaves was found to harbour better chelating capacity (58% at 100 μg/mL) and reducing power (FRAP value 1085.4 ± 0.11 μMFe3+/g dry wt.) than all the other extracts. The crude methanol extract was thus further partitioned with solvents to yield five fractions. Antioxidant study of fractions suggested that the methanol fraction possessed significant chelation capacity (49.7% at 100 μg/mL) and reducing power with FRAP value of 1435.4 μM/g dry wt. The fractions were also studied for immune modulating potential where it was observed that hexane fraction had significant suppressive effect on mitogen induced T-cell and B-cell proliferation and remarkable stimulating effect on humoral response by 141% and on DTH response by 168% in immune suppressed mice as compared to the controls. Therefore, it can be concluded that A. jacquemontii leaves hold considerable antioxidant and immunomodulating potential and they can be explored further for the identification of their chemical composition for a better understanding of their biological activities. PMID:24895548

  2. Cytomegalovirus Infection May Contribute to the Reduced Immune Function, Growth, Development, and Health of HIV-Exposed, Uninfected African Children

    PubMed Central

    Filteau, Suzanne; Rowland-Jones, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    With increasing access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Africa, most children born to HIV-infected mothers are not themselves HIV-infected. These HIV-exposed, uninfected (HEU) children are at increased risk of mortality and have immune, growth, development, and health deficits compared to HIV-unexposed children. HEU children are known to be at higher risk than HIV-unexposed children of acquiring cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection in early life. This risk is largely unaffected by ART and is increased by breastfeeding, which itself is critically important for child health and survival. Early CMV infection, namely in utero or during early infancy, may contribute to reduced growth, altered or impaired immune functions, and sensory and cognitive deficits. We review the evidence that CMV may be responsible for the health impairments of HEU children. There are currently no ideal safe and effective interventions to reduce postnatal CMV infection. If a clinical trial showed proof of the principle that decreasing early CMV infection improved health and development of HEU children, this could provide the impetus needed for the development of better interventions to improve the health of this vulnerable population. PMID:27446087

  3. THERAPEUTIC NEUTRALIZATION OF THE NLRP1 INFLAMMASOME REDUCES THE INNATE IMMUNE RESPONSE AND IMPROVES HISTOPATHOLOGY AFTER TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY

    PubMed Central

    de Rivero Vaccari, Juan Pablo; Lotocki, George; Alonso, Ofelia F.; Bramlett, Helen M.; Dietrich, W. Dalton; Keane, Robert W.

    2010-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) elicits acute inflammation that in turn exacerbates primary brain damage. A crucial part of innate immunity in the immune privileged central nervous system involves production of proinflammatory cytokines mediated by inflammasome signaling. Here we show that the nucleotide-binding, leucine-rich repeat pyrin domain containing protein 1 (NLRP1) inflammasome consisting of NLRP1, caspases-1 and -11, apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase recruitment domain (ASC), the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) and pannexin 1 is expressed in neurons of the cerebral cortex. Moderate parasagittal fluid percussion injury (FPI) induced processing of interleukin-1β (IL-1β), activation of caspase-1, cleavage of XIAP and promoted assembly of the NLRP1 inflammasome complex. Anti-ASC neutralizing antibodies administered immediately after FPI to injured rats reduced caspase-1 activation, XIAP cleavage and processing of IL-1β resulting in a significant decrease in contusion volume. These studies show that the NLRP1 inflammasome constitutes an important component of the innate CNS inflammatory response after TBI and may be a novel therapeutic target for reducing the damaging effects of post-traumatic brain inflammation. PMID:19401709

  4. Hyperbaric oxygen reduces delayed immune-mediated neuropathology in experimental carbon monoxide toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Thom, Stephen R. . E-mail: sthom@mail.med.upenn.edu; Bhopale, Veena M.; Fisher, Donald

    2006-06-01

    The goal of this investigation was to determine whether exposure to hyperbaric oxygen (HBO{sub 2}) would ameliorate biochemical and functional brain abnormalities in an animal model of carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning. In this model, CO-mediated oxidative stress causes chemical alterations in myelin basic protein (MBP), which initiates an adaptive immunological response that leads to a functional deficit. CO-exposed rats do not show improvements in task performance in a radial maze. We found that HBO{sub 2} given after CO poisoning will prevent this deficit, but not eliminate all of the CO-mediated biochemical alterations in MBP. MBP from HBO{sub 2} treated CO-exposed rats is recognized normally by a battery of antibodies, but exhibits an abnormal charge pattern. Lymphocytes from HBO{sub 2}-treated and control rats do not become activated when incubated with MBP, immunohistological evidence of microglial activation is not apparent, and functional deficits did not occur, unlike untreated CO-exposed rats. The results indicate that HBO{sub 2} prevents immune-mediated delayed neurological dysfunction following CO poisoning.

  5. Immunization with DAT fragments is associated with long-term striatal impairment, hyperactivity and reduced cognitive flexibility in mice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Possible interactions between nervous and immune systems in neuro-psychiatric disorders remain elusive. Levels of brain dopamine transporter (DAT) have been implicated in several impulse-control disorders, like attention deficit / hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Here, we assessed the interplay between DAT auto-immunity and behavioural / neurochemical phenotype. Methods Male CD-1 mice were immunized with DAT peptide fragments (DAT-i), or vehicle alone (VEH), to generate elevated circulating levels of DAT auto-antibodies (aAbs). Using an operant delay-of-reward task (20 min daily sessions; timeout 25 sec), mice had a choice between either an immediate small amount of food (SS), or a larger amount of food after a delay (LL), which increased progressively across sessions (from 0 to 150 sec). Results DAT-i mice exhibited spontaneous hyperactivity (2 h-longer wake-up peak; a wake-up attempt during rest). Two sub-populations differing in behavioural flexibility were identified in the VEH control group: they showed either a clear-cut decision to select LL or clear-cut shifting towards SS, as expected. Compared to VEH controls, choice-behaviour profile of DAT-i mice was markedly disturbed, together with long-lasting alterations of the striatal monoamines. Enhanced levels of DA metabolite HVA in DAT-i mice came along with slower acquisition of basal preferences and with impaired shifting; elevation also in DOPAC levels was associated with incapacity to change a rigid selection strategy. This scarce flexibility of performance is indicative of a poor adaptation to task contingencies. Conclusions Hyperactivity and reduced cognitive flexibility are patterns of behaviour consistent with enduring functional impairment of striatal regions. It is yet unclear how anti-DAT antibodies could enter or otherwise affect these brain areas, and which alterations in DAT activity exactly occurred after immunization. Present neuro

  6. Decreased protective efficacy of reduced and alkylated human immune serum globulin in experimental infection with Haemophilus influenzae type b.

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, J R; Barrus, V A; Siber, G R

    1985-01-01

    Conventionally prepared immune serum globulin frequently produces severe side effects when administered intravenously. A modified preparation in which 4 to 5 interchain disulfide bonds have been reduced and alkylated has been made for intravenous use. However, reduction and alkylation may affect Fc-mediated functions of immunoglobulin G, particularly its ability to fix complement by the classical pathway. To determine whether reduction and alkylation alters the protective activity of immune serum globulin in vivo we compared it with two less harshly prepared globulins (pH 4 treated or ultrafiltered) in an infant rat model of Haemophilus influenzae b infection. Antibody binding to the capsular and noncapsular components of H. influenzae b and in vitro bactericidal activity were similar in the globulin preparations. Infant rats were treated with various doses of globulins adjusted to provide identical concentrations of anticapsular antibodies as measured by the Farr radioactive antigen binding assay. At high doses of anticapsular antibody (greater than 1,500 ng per pup), all preparations protected well. At marginal doses (750 ng per pup), however, rats given reduced and alkylated globulin had a significantly greater incidence of bacteremia (P less than 0.05), meningitis (P less than 0.01), and death (P less than 0.05) and a higher magnitude of bacteremia (P less than 0.02) than rats who received pH4-treated or ultrafiltered globulins. These differences were not due to differences in anticapsular antibody concentrations achieved in the serum. The 50% protective serum concentrations of anticapsular antibody in this model were 200 to 300 ng/ml for reduced and alkylated globulin and 100 to 200 ng/ml for acid-treated globulin. Absorption of the globulins with purified H. influenzae b capsule reduced in vitro bactericidal activity and rat protective activity. However, the magnitude of bacteremia was lower in rats receiving absorbed pH 4-treated globulin than in those

  7. RNAi targeting multiple cell adhesion molecules reduces immune cell recruitment and vascular inflammation after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Sager, Hendrik B; Dutta, Partha; Dahlman, James E; Hulsmans, Maarten; Courties, Gabriel; Sun, Yuan; Heidt, Timo; Vinegoni, Claudio; Borodovsky, Anna; Fitzgerald, Kevin; Wojtkiewicz, Gregory R; Iwamoto, Yoshiko; Tricot, Benoit; Khan, Omar F; Kauffman, Kevin J; Xing, Yiping; Shaw, Taylor E; Libby, Peter; Langer, Robert; Weissleder, Ralph; Swirski, Filip K; Anderson, Daniel G; Nahrendorf, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) leads to a systemic surge of vascular inflammation in mice and humans, resulting in secondary ischemic complications and high mortality. We show that, in ApoE(-/-) mice with coronary ligation, increased sympathetic tone up-regulates not only hematopoietic leukocyte production but also plaque endothelial expression of adhesion molecules. To counteract the resulting arterial leukocyte recruitment, we developed nanoparticle-based RNA interference (RNAi) that effectively silences five key adhesion molecules. Simultaneously encapsulating small interfering RNA (siRNA)-targeting intercellular cell adhesion molecules 1 and 2 (Icam1 and Icam2), vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (Vcam1), and E- and P-selectins (Sele and Selp) into polymeric endothelial-avid nanoparticles reduced post-MI neutrophil and monocyte recruitment into atherosclerotic lesions and decreased matrix-degrading plaque protease activity. Five-gene combination RNAi also curtailed leukocyte recruitment to ischemic myocardium. Therefore, targeted multigene silencing may prevent complications after acute MI. PMID:27280687

  8. Innate immune response after acute myocardial infarction and pharmacomodulatory action of tacrolimus in reducing infarct size and preserving myocardial integrity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This study investigated the association between innate immune reaction and myocardial damage after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and anti-inflammatory role of tacrolimus in reducing infarct size. Male mini-pigs (n=18) were equally categorized into sham control (SC), untreated AMI (by ligation of left anterior descending coronary artery), and AMI-Tacrolimus (AMI-Tac) (0.5 mg intra-coronary injection 30 minutes post-AMI). Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed at post-AMI days 2, 5 and 21 before sacrificing the animals. Results By post-AMI day 21, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was lowest in untreated AMI animals, significantly higher in SC than in AMI-Tac group (all p<0.003). Infarct areas at basal, middle, and apical levels, numbers of CD14+ and iNOS+ cells in infarct area (IA) and peri-IA, and protein expression of CD14, CD68, and Ly6g from circulating inflammatory cells showed an opposite pattern compared with that of LVEF in all groups (all p<0.005). Protein expressions of MCP-1, MIP-1, TNF-α, NF-κB, iNOS, and IL-12 in IA and peri-IA exhibited an identical pattern compared to that of CD14, CD68, and Ly6g from circulating inflammatory cells (all p<0.01). Expressions of myocardial damage biomarkers in IA and peri-IA [γ-H2AX, β-myosin heavy chain (MHC), Smad3, TGF-β] were highest in AMI and higher in AMI-Tac than in SC, whereas expressions of myocardial integrity biomarkers (connexin43, mitochondrial cytochrome-C, α-MHC, BMP-2, Smad1/5) were opposite to those of damage biomarkers (all p<0.001). Conclusion Innate immune responses were markedly augmented and LVEF was significantly reduced after AMI but were remarkably improved after tacrolimus treatment. PMID:24165293

  9. Butyrylcholinesterase nanocapsule as a long circulating bioscavenger with reduced immune response.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Jain, Priyesh; Tsao, Caroline; Sinclair, Andrew; Sun, Fang; Hung, Hsiang-Chieh; Bai, Tao; Wu, Kan; Jiang, Shaoyi

    2016-05-28

    Butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) is the most promising bioscavenger candidate to treat or prevent organophosphate (OP) poisoning. However, the clinical application of BChE is limited by two obstacles: an inadequate circulation half-life and limited sources for production. Although several modification technologies including glycosylation and PEGylation have been developed to improve its pharmacokinetics, none of them have been able to outperform blood-derived native BChE. In this work, we designed a long-circulating bioscavenger nanogel by coating equine serum-derived BChE with a zwitterionic polymer gel layer. This zwitterionic gel coating protected BChE from denaturation and degradation under harsh conditions. Notably, the nanocapsule exhibited a long circulation half-life of ~45h, a three-fold increase from the unmodified native version, enabling both therapeutic and prophylactic applications. In addition, the gel coating reduced the immunogenicity of equine BChE, unlocking the possibility to use non-human derived BChE as an OP bioscavenger in humans. PMID:27063423

  10. Cannabidiol reduces host immune response and prevents cognitive impairments in Wistar rats submitted to pneumococcal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Barichello, Tatiana; Ceretta, Renan A; Generoso, Jaqueline S; Moreira, Ana Paula; Simões, Lutiana R; Comim, Clarissa M; Quevedo, João; Vilela, Márcia Carvalho; Zuardi, Antonio Waldo; Crippa, José A; Teixeira, Antônio Lucio

    2012-12-15

    Pneumococcal meningitis is a life-threatening disease characterized by an acute infection affecting the pia matter, arachnoid and subarachnoid space. The intense inflammatory response is associated with a significant mortality rate and neurologic sequelae, such as, seizures, sensory-motor deficits and impairment of learning and memory. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of acute and extended administration of cannabidiol on pro-inflammatory cytokines and behavioral parameters in adult Wistar rats submitted to pneumococcal meningitis. Male Wistar rats underwent a cisterna magna tap and received either 10μl of sterile saline as a placebo or an equivalent volume of S. pneumoniae suspension. Rats subjected to meningitis were treated by intraperitoneal injection with cannabidiol (2.5, 5, or 10mg/kg once or daily for 9 days after meningitis induction) or a placebo. Six hours after meningitis induction, the rats that received one dose were killed and the hippocampus and frontal cortex were obtained to assess cytokines/chemokine and brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels. On the 10th day, the rats were submitted to the inhibitory avoidance task. After the task, the animals were killed and samples from the hippocampus and frontal cortex were obtained. The extended administration of cannabidiol at different doses reduced the TNF-α level in frontal cortex. Prolonged treatment with canabidiol, 10mg/kg, prevented memory impairment in rats with pneumococcal meningitis. Although descriptive, our results demonstrate that cannabidiol has anti-inflammatory effects in pneumococcal meningitis and prevents cognitive sequel. PMID:23085269

  11. Acyclovir Therapy Reduces the CD4+ T Cell Response against the Immunodominant pp65 Protein from Cytomegalovirus in Immune Competent Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Pachnio, Annette; Begum, Jusnara; Fox, Ashini; Moss, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infects the majority of the global population and leads to the development of a strong virus-specific immune response. The CMV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell immune response can comprise between 10 and 50% of the T cell pool within peripheral blood and there is concern that this may impair immunity to other pathogens. Elderly individuals with the highest magnitude of CMV-specific immune response have been demonstrated to be at increased risk of mortality and there is increasing interest in interventions that may serve to moderate this. Acyclovir is an anti-viral drug with activity against a range of herpes viruses and is used as long term treatment to suppress reactivation of herpes simplex virus. We studied the immune response to CMV in patients who were taking acyclovir to assess if therapy could be used to suppress the CMV-specific immune response. The T cell reactivity against the immunodominant late viral protein pp65 was reduced by 53% in people who were taking acyclovir. This effect was seen within one year of therapy and was observed primarily within the CD4+ response. Acyclovir treatment only modestly influenced the immune response to the IE-1 target protein. These data show that low dose acyclovir treatment has the potential to modulate components of the T cell response to CMV antigen proteins and indicate that anti-viral drugs should be further investigated as a means to reduce the magnitude of CMV-specific immune response and potentially improve overall immune function. PMID:25923913

  12. Long-Term Follow-Up of Patients Immunized with AN1792: Reduced Functional Decline in Antibody Responders

    PubMed Central

    Vellas, Bruno; Black, R; Thal, Leon J; Fox, Nick C; Daniels, M; McLennan, G; Tompkins, C; Leibman, C; Pomfret, M; Grundman, Michael

    2009-01-01

    .6 years after immunization with AN1792, patients defined as responders in the phase 2a study maintained low but detectable, sustained anti-AN1792 antibody titers and demonstrated significantly reduced functional decline compared with placebo-treated patients. Brain volume loss in antibody responders was not significantly different from placebo-treated patients approximately 3.6 years from the end of the original study. No further cases of encephalitis were noted. These data support the hypothesis that Aβ immunotherapy may have long-term functional benefits. PMID:19355849

  13. Immune reconstitution following reduced-intensity transplantation with cladribine, busulfan, and antithymocyte globulin: serial comparison with conventional myeloablative transplantation.

    PubMed

    Saito, T; Kanda, Y; Nakai, K; Kim, S-W; Arima, F; Kami, M; Tanosaki, R; Tobinai, K; Wakasugi, H; Heike, Y; Mineishi, S; Takaue, Y

    2003-09-01

    The primary object of the conditioning regimen for allogeneic reduced-intensity stem cell transplantation (RIST) is immunosuppression to achieve stable engraftment of donor cells, rather than bone marrow ablation. Therefore, immune reconstitution after RIST might be different from that after conventional stem cell transplantation (CST). In this study, 22 patients underwent RIST and 28 underwent CST. The RIST regimen consisted of cladribine (2-CdA; 0.11 mg/kg/day for 6 days), BU (4 mg/kg/day for 2 days), and rabbit anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG; 2.5 mg/kg/day for 2-4 days). The CST group received either the BU (4 mg/kg/day x 4 days)/CY (60 mg/kg/day x 2 days) (n=13) or CY (60 mg/kg/day x 2 days)/TBI (4 Gy/day x 3 days) regimen (n=15). All patients underwent transplantation with G-CSF-mobilized blood stem cells. Engraftment speed after RIST was fast and seven of 22 patients did not require platelet transfusion. We noted that the numbers of CD4+, CD4+CD45RA+, and CD4+CD45RO+ T cells after transplant in the RIST group were significantly lower than those in the CST group (P=0.0001 for both the comparisons). However, the reconstitution of CD20+ B cells was faster in the RIST group (P=0.0001). The response of T cells to PHA stimulation was lower in the RIST group (P=0.0001 on day 30 and P=0.02 on day 90). Nevertheless, there were no significant differences in the incidence of bacterial, fungal, or viral infections between the two groups. We concluded that our RIST regimen might delay laboratory-evaluated T-cell immune reconstitution compared to CST; however, the observed setbacks did not directly translate into clinically significant increases in infectious episodes. PMID:12953133

  14. Forced expression of stabilized c-Fos in dendritic cells reduces cytokine production and immune responses in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Ryoko; Suzuki, Mayu; Sakaguchi, Ryota; Hasegawa, Eiichi; Kimura, Akihiro; Shichita, Takashi; Sekiya, Takashi; Shiraishi, Hiroshi; Shimoda, Kouji; Yoshimura, Akihiko

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dendritic cells expressing stabilized c-Fos produced less inflammatory cytokines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dendritic cells expressing stabilized c-Fos activated T cells less efficiently. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transgenic mice expressing stabilized c-Fos were resistant to EAE model. -- Abstract: Intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) suppresses innate immunity by inhibiting proinflammatory cytokine production by monocytic cells. We have shown that the transcription factor c-Fos is responsible for cAMP-mediated suppression of inflammatory cytokine production, and that c-Fos protein is stabilized by IKK{beta}-mediated phosphorylation. We found that S308 is one of the major phosphorylation sites, and that the S308D mutation prolongs c-Fos halflife. To investigate the role of stabilized c-Fos protein in dendritic cells (DCs) in vivo, we generated CD11c-promoter-deriven c-FosS308D transgenic mice. As expected, bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs) from these Tg mice produced smaller amounts of inflammatory cytokines, including TNF-{alpha}, IL-12, and IL-23, but higher levels of IL-10, in response to LPS, than those from wild-type (Wt) mice. When T cells were co-cultured with BMDCs from Tg mice, production of Th1 and Th17 cytokines was reduced, although T cell proliferation was not affected. Tg mice demonstrated more resistance to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) than did Wt mice. These data suggest that c-Fos in DCs plays a suppressive role in certain innate and adaptive immune responses.

  15. Substance P reduces apoptotic cell death possibly by modulating the immune response at the early stage after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Mei Hua; Lim, Ji Eun; Chi, Guang Fan; Ahn, Woosung; Zhang, Mingzi; Chung, Eunkyung; Son, Youngsook

    2013-10-23

    Previously, we have reported that substance P (SP) enhanced functional recovery from spinal cord injury (SCI) possibly by the anti-inflammatory modulation associated with the induction of M2-type macrophages at the injured lesion. In this study, we explored the cytokine expression profiles and apoptotic cell death in the lesion site of the SCI after an immediate intravenous injection of SP. SP injection increased the levels of interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-6, and IL-10 at day 1 after the SCI approximately by 2-, 9-, and 10-folds when compared with the control SCI, respectively. On the basis of double immunofluorescence staining with IL-10 and CD11b, activated macrophages or microglia expressing IL-10 appeared in the margin of the lesion site at day 1 only after the SP injection. This SP-mediated alteration in the lesion microenvironment was shown to be associated with the lower cell death of neuronal cells at day 1 and oligodendrocytes at day 5 by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay, which was also accompanied by a decrease in caspase-3 activation. These findings suggest that SP may reduce the inflammation-induced secondary cell death, possibly through immune modulation at an early stage after the SCI. PMID:23995292

  16. Galvanic zinc-copper microparticles produce electrical stimulation that reduces the inflammatory and immune responses in skin.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Simarna; Lyte, Peter; Garay, Michelle; Liebel, Frank; Sun, Ying; Liu, Jue-Chen; Southall, Michael D

    2011-10-01

    The human body has its own innate electrical system that regulates the body's functions via communications among organs through the well-known neural system. While the effect of low-level electrical stimulation on wound repair has been reported, few studies have examined the effect of electric potential on non-wounded, intact skin. A galvanic couple comprised of elemental zinc and copper was used to determine the effects of low-level electrical stimulation on intact skin physiology using a Dermacorder device. Zn-Cu induced the electrical potential recorded on intact skin, enhanced H(2)O(2) production and activated p38 MAPK and Hsp27 in primary keratinocytes. Treatment with Zn-Cu was also found to reduce pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-1α, IL-2, NO and TNF-α in multiple cell types after stimulation with PHA or Propionibacterium acnes bacteria. The Zn-Cu complex led to a dose-dependent inhibition of TNF-α-induced NF-κB levels in keratinocytes as measured by a dual-luciferase promoter assay, and prevented p65 translocation to the nucleus observed via immunofluorescence. Suppression of NF-κB activity via crosstalk with p38 MAPK might be one of the potential pathways by which Zn-Cu exerted its inflammatory effects. Topical application of Zn-Cu successfully mitigated TPA-induced dermatitis and oxazolone-induced hypersensitivity in mice models of ear edema. Anti-inflammatory activity induced by the Zn-Cu galvanic couple appears to be mediated, at least in part, by production of low level of hydrogen peroxide since this activity is reversed by the addition of Catalase enzyme. Collectively, these results show that a galvanic couple containing Zn-Cu strongly reduces the inflammatory and immune responses in intact skin, providing evidence for the role of electric stimulation in non-wounded skin. PMID:21465312

  17. World Health Organization perspectives on the contribution of the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunization on reducing child mortality.

    PubMed

    Bustreo, F; Okwo-Bele, J-M; Kamara, L

    2015-02-01

    Child mortality has decreased substantially globally-from 12.6 million in 1990 to 6.3 million in 2013-due, in large part to of governments' and organisations' work, to prevent pneumonia, diarrhoea and malaria, the main causes of death in the postneonatal period. In 2012, the World Health Assembly adopted the Decade of Vaccines Global Vaccine Action Plan 2011-2020 as the current framework aimed at preventing millions of deaths through more equitable access to existing vaccines for people in all communities. The Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunization (GAVI) plays a critical role in this effort by financing and facilitating delivery platforms for vaccines, with focused support for the achievements of improved vaccination coverage and acceleration of the uptake of WHO-recommended lifesaving new vaccines in 73 low-income countries. The GAVI Alliance has contributed substantially towards the progress of Millennium Development Goal 4 and to improving women's lives. By 2013, the GAVI Alliance had immunised 440 million additional children and averted six million future deaths from vaccine-preventable diseases in the world's poorest countries. The GAVI Alliance is on track to reducing child mortality to 68 per 1000 live births by 2015 in supported countries. This paper discusses the GAVI Alliance achievements related to Millennium Development Goal 4 and its broader contribution to improving women's lives and health systems, as well as challenges and obstacles it has faced. Additionally, it looks at challenges for the future and how it will continue its work related to reducing child mortality and improving women's health. PMID:25613965

  18. Immune stimulatory CpG oligodeoxynucleotides reduces Salmonella enterica subsp. Arizonae organ colonization and mortality in young turkeys

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) containing CpG dinucleotides (CpG ODN) mimic bacterial DNA and are stimulatory to the innate immune system of most vertebrate species. The immunostimulatory activities of CpG ODN have been studied extensively and are well characterized in human and murine immun...

  19. Oral administration of Saccharomyces cerevisiae boulardii reduces mortality associated with immune and cortisol responses to Escherichia coli endotoxin in pigs.

    PubMed

    Collier, C T; Carroll, J A; Ballou, M A; Starkey, J D; Sparks, J C

    2011-01-01

    The effects of active dry yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae boulardii (Scb), on the immune/cortisol response and subsequent mortality to Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration were evaluated in newly weaned piglets (26.1 ± 3.4 d of age). Barrows were assigned to 1 of 2 treatment groups: with (Scb; n = 15) and without (control; n = 15) the in-feed inclusion of Scb (200 g/t) for 16 d. On d 16, all piglets were dosed via indwelling jugular catheters with LPS (25 μg/kg of BW) at 0 h. Serial blood samples were collected at 30-min intervals from -1 to 6 h and then at 24 h. Differential blood cell populations were enumerated hourly from 0 to 6 h and at 24 h. Serum cortisol, IL-1β, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) concentrations were determined via porcine-specific ELISA at all time points. In Scb-treated piglets, cumulative ADG increased (P < 0.05) by 39.9% and LPS-induced piglet mortality was reduced 20% compared with control piglets. White blood cells, lymphocytes, and neutrophils were increased (P < 0.05) in Scb-treated animals before LPS dosing compared with control piglets before being equally suppressed (P < 0.05) from baseline in both treatments after LPS dosing with a return to baseline by 24 h. Suppression of circulating cortisol concentrations (P < 0.05) was observed in Scb-treated piglets from -1 h to 1 h relative to LPS dosing compared with control animals before both peaked equally and subsequently returned to baseline. Peak production (P < 0.05) of IL-1β and IL-6 was less in Scb-treated piglets after LPS administration compared with controls before both equally returned to baseline. Peak TNF-α production in Scb-treated animals was accelerated 0.5 h and was greater (P < 0.05) than peak production in control piglets, after which both equally returned to baseline. The peak production of IFN-γ was greater and had increased (P < 0.05) amplitude persistence for 3 h in Scb-treated animals compared with

  20. Tsetse immune responses and trypanosome transmission: Implications for the development of tsetse-based strategies to reduce trypanosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Zhengrong; Kasumba, Irene; Lehane, Michael J.; Gibson, Wendy C.; Kwon, Johnny; Aksoy, Serap

    2001-01-01

    Tsetse flies are the medically and agriculturally important vectors of African trypanosomes. Information on the molecular and biochemical nature of the tsetse/trypanosome interaction is lacking. Here we describe three antimicrobial peptide genes, attacin, defensin, and diptericin, from tsetse fat body tissue obtained by subtractive cloning after immune stimulation with Escherichia coli and trypanosomes. Differential regulation of these genes shows the tsetse immune system can discriminate not only between molecular signals specific for bacteria and trypanosome infections but also between different life stages of trypanosomes. The presence of trypanosomes either in the hemolymph or in the gut early in the infection process does not induce transcription of attacin and defensin significantly. After parasite establishment in the gut, however, both antimicrobial genes are expressed at high levels in the fat body, apparently not affecting the viability of parasites in the midgut. Unlike other insect immune systems, the antimicrobial peptide gene diptericin is constitutively expressed in both fat body and gut tissue of normal and immune stimulated flies, possibly reflecting tsetse immune responses to the multiple Gram-negative symbionts it naturally harbors. When flies were immune stimulated with bacteria before receiving a trypanosome containing bloodmeal, their ability to establish infections was severely blocked, indicating that up-regulation of some immune responsive genes early in infection can act to block parasite transmission. The results are discussed in relation to transgenic approaches proposed for modulating vector competence in tsetse. PMID:11592981

  1. A subcutaneous cellular implant for passive immunization against amyloid-β reduces brain amyloid and tau pathologies.

    PubMed

    Lathuilière, Aurélien; Laversenne, Vanessa; Astolfo, Alberto; Kopetzki, Erhard; Jacobsen, Helmut; Stampanoni, Marco; Bohrmann, Bernd; Schneider, Bernard L; Aebischer, Patrick

    2016-05-01

    Passive immunization against misfolded toxic proteins is a promising approach to treat neurodegenerative disorders. For effective immunotherapy against Alzheimer's disease, recent clinical data indicate that monoclonal antibodies directed against the amyloid-β peptide should be administered before the onset of symptoms associated with irreversible brain damage. It is therefore critical to develop technologies for continuous antibody delivery applicable to disease prevention. Here, we addressed this question using a bioactive cellular implant to deliver recombinant anti-amyloid-β antibodies in the subcutaneous tissue. An encapsulating device permeable to macromolecules supports the long-term survival of myogenic cells over more than 10 months in immunocompetent allogeneic recipients. The encapsulated cells are genetically engineered to secrete high levels of anti-amyloid-β antibodies. Peripheral implantation leads to continuous antibody delivery to reach plasma levels that exceed 50 µg/ml. In a proof-of-concept study, we show that the recombinant antibodies produced by this system penetrate the brain and bind amyloid plaques in two mouse models of the Alzheimer's pathology. When encapsulated cells are implanted before the onset of amyloid plaque deposition in TauPS2APP mice, chronic exposure to anti-amyloid-β antibodies dramatically reduces amyloid-β40 and amyloid-β42 levels in the brain, decreases amyloid plaque burden, and most notably, prevents phospho-tau pathology in the hippocampus. These results support the use of encapsulated cell implants for passive immunotherapy against the misfolded proteins, which accumulate in Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:26956423

  2. Low-dose AgNPs reduce lung mechanical function and innate immune defense in the absence of cellular toxicity.

    PubMed

    Botelho, Danielle J; Leo, Bey Fen; Massa, Christopher B; Sarkar, Srijata; Tetley, Terry D; Chung, Kian Fan; Chen, Shu; Ryan, Mary P; Porter, Alexandra E; Zhang, Junfeng; Schwander, Stephan K; Gow, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Multiple studies have examined the direct cellular toxicity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). However, the lung is a complex biological system with multiple cell types and a lipid-rich surface fluid; therefore, organ level responses may not depend on direct cellular toxicity. We hypothesized that interaction with the lung lining is a critical determinant of organ level responses. Here, we have examined the effects of low dose intratracheal instillation of AgNPs (0.05 μg/g body weight) 20 and 110 nm diameter in size, and functionalized with citrate or polyvinylpyrrolidone. Both size and functionalization were significant factors in particle aggregation and lipid interaction in vitro. One day post-intratracheal instillation lung function was assessed, and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and lung tissue collected. There were no signs of overt inflammation. There was no change in surfactant protein-B content in the BAL but there was loss of surfactant protein-D with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)-stabilized particles. Mechanical impedance data demonstrated a significant increase in pulmonary elastance as compared to control, greatest with 110 nm PVP-stabilized particles. Seven days post-instillation of PVP-stabilized particles increased BAL cell counts, and reduced lung function was observed. These changes resolved by 21 days. Hence, AgNP-mediated alterations in the lung lining and mechanical function resolve by 21 days. Larger particles and PVP stabilization produce the largest disruptions. These studies demonstrate that low dose AgNPs elicit deficits in both mechanical and innate immune defense function, suggesting that organ level toxicity should be considered. PMID:26152688

  3. Inhibition of viral replication reduces regulatory T cells and enhances the antiviral immune response in chronic hepatitis B

    SciTech Connect

    Stoop, Jeroen N. . E-mail: j.n.stoop@erasmusmc.nl; Molen, Renate G. van der . E-mail: r.vandermolen@erasmusmc.nl; Kuipers, Ernst J. . E-mail: e.j.kuipers@erasmusmc.nl; Kusters, Johannes G. . E-mail: j.g.kusters@erasmusmc.nl; Janssen, Harry L.A. . E-mail: h.janssen@erasmusmc.nl

    2007-04-25

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) play a key role in the impaired immune response that is typical for a chronic Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. To gain more insight in the mechanism that is responsible for this impaired immune response, the effect of viral load reduction resulting from treatment with the nucleotide analogue adefovir dipivoxil on the percentages of Treg and HBV-specific T-cell responses was analyzed. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of 12 patients were collected at baseline and during treatment. In parallel to the decline in viral load, we found a decline in circulating Treg, combined with an increase in HBV core antigen-specific IFN-{gamma} production and proliferation. The production of IL10 did not decrease during therapy. In conclusion, adefovir induced viral load reduction results in a decline of circulating Treg together with a partial recovery of the immune response.

  4. Dietary supplementation with lacto-wolfberry enhances the immune response and reduces pathogenesis to influenza infection in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite the availability of vaccines, influenza is a significant public health problem, emphasizing the need for development of additional strategies to enhance host defense against influenza. Wolfberry or Goji berry, long used as a medicinal food in China, has recently been shown to improve immune ...

  5. Role of reduced intensity conditioning in T-cell and B-cell immune reconstitution after HLA-identical bone marrow transplantation in ADA-SCID

    PubMed Central

    Cancrini, Caterina; Ferrua, Francesca; Scarselli, Alessia; Brigida, Immacolata; Romiti, Maria Luisa; Barera, Graziano; Finocchi, Andrea; Roncarolo, Maria Grazia; Caniglia, Maurizio; Aiuti, Alessandro

    2010-01-01

    The treatment of choice for severe combined immunodeficiency is bone marrow transplantation from an HLA-identical donor sibling without conditioning. However, this may result in low donor stem cell chimerism, leading to reduced long-term immune reconstitution. We compared engraftment, metabolic, and T-cell and B-cell immune reconstitution of HLA-identical sibling bone marrow transplantation performed in 2 severe combined immunodeficiency infants with adenosine deaminase deficiency from the same family treated with or without a reduced intensity conditioning regimen (busulfan/fludarabine). Only the patient who received conditioning showed a stable mixed chimerism in all lineages, including bone marrow myeloid and B cells. The use of conditioning resulted in higher thymus-derived naïve T cells and T-cell receptor excision circles, normalization of the T-cell repertoire, and faster and complete B-cell and metabolic reconstitution. These results suggest the utility of exploring the use of reduced intensity conditioning in bone marrow transplantation from HLA-identical donor in severe combined immunodeficiency to improve long-term immune reconstitution. PMID:20460637

  6. Genipin crosslinking reduced the immunogenicity of xenogeneic decellularized porcine whole-liver matrices through regulation of immune cell proliferation and polarization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yujia; Bao, Ji; Wu, Xiujuan; Wu, Qiong; Li, Yi; Zhou, Yongjie; Li, Li; Bu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Decellularized xenogeneic whole-liver matrices are plausible biomedical materials for the bioengineering of liver transplantation. A common method to reduce the inflammatory potential of xenogeneic matrices is crosslinking. Nevertheless, a comprehensive analysis of the immunogenic features of cross-linked decellularized tissue is still lacking. We aimed to reduce the immunogenicity of decellularized porcine whole-liver matrix through crosslinking with glutaraldehyde or genipin, a new natural agent, and investigated the mechanism of the immune-mediated responses. The histologic assessment of the host’s immune reaction activated in response to these scaffolds, as well as the M1/M2 phenotypic polarization profile of macrophages, was studied in vivo. The genipin-fixed scaffold elicited a predominantly M2 phenotype response, while the glutaraldehyde-fixed scaffold resulted in disrupted host tissue remodeling and a mixed macrophage polarization profile. The specific subsets of immune cells involved in the responses to the scaffolds were identified in vitro. Crosslinking alleviated the host response by reducing the proliferation of lymphocytes and their subsets, accompanied by a decreased release of both Th1 and Th2 cytokines. Therefore, we conclude that the natural genipin crosslinking could lower the immunogenic potential of xenogeneic decellularized whole-liver scaffolds. PMID:27098308

  7. Genipin crosslinking reduced the immunogenicity of xenogeneic decellularized porcine whole-liver matrices through regulation of immune cell proliferation and polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yujia; Bao, Ji; Wu, Xiujuan; Wu, Qiong; Li, Yi; Zhou, Yongjie; Li, Li; Bu, Hong

    2016-04-01

    Decellularized xenogeneic whole-liver matrices are plausible biomedical materials for the bioengineering of liver transplantation. A common method to reduce the inflammatory potential of xenogeneic matrices is crosslinking. Nevertheless, a comprehensive analysis of the immunogenic features of cross-linked decellularized tissue is still lacking. We aimed to reduce the immunogenicity of decellularized porcine whole-liver matrix through crosslinking with glutaraldehyde or genipin, a new natural agent, and investigated the mechanism of the immune-mediated responses. The histologic assessment of the host’s immune reaction activated in response to these scaffolds, as well as the M1/M2 phenotypic polarization profile of macrophages, was studied in vivo. The genipin-fixed scaffold elicited a predominantly M2 phenotype response, while the glutaraldehyde-fixed scaffold resulted in disrupted host tissue remodeling and a mixed macrophage polarization profile. The specific subsets of immune cells involved in the responses to the scaffolds were identified in vitro. Crosslinking alleviated the host response by reducing the proliferation of lymphocytes and their subsets, accompanied by a decreased release of both Th1 and Th2 cytokines. Therefore, we conclude that the natural genipin crosslinking could lower the immunogenic potential of xenogeneic decellularized whole-liver scaffolds.

  8. Dietary Apigenin Exerts Immune-Regulatory Activity in Vivo by Reducing NF-κB Activity, Halting Leukocyte Infiltration and Restoring Normal Metabolic Function

    PubMed Central

    Cardenas, Horacio; Arango, Daniel; Nicholas, Courtney; Duarte, Silvia; Nuovo, Gerard J.; He, Wei; Voss, Oliver H.; Gonzalez-Mejia, M. Elba; Guttridge, Denis C.; Grotewold, Erich; Doseff, Andrea I.

    2016-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of inflammatory diseases and the adverse effects associated with the long-term use of current anti-inflammatory therapies prompt the identification of alternative approaches to reestablish immune balance. Apigenin, an abundant dietary flavonoid, is emerging as a potential regulator of inflammation. Here, we show that apigenin has immune-regulatory activity in vivo. Apigenin conferred survival to mice treated with a lethal dose of Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) restoring normal cardiac function and heart mitochondrial Complex I activity. Despite the adverse effects associated with high levels of splenocyte apoptosis in septic models, apigenin had no effect on reducing cell death. However, we found that apigenin decreased LPS-induced apoptosis in lungs, infiltration of inflammatory cells and chemotactic factors’ accumulation, re-establishing normal lung architecture. Using NF-κB luciferase transgenic mice, we found that apigenin effectively modulated NF-κB activity in the lungs, suggesting the ability of dietary compounds to exert immune-regulatory activity in an organ-specific manner. Collectively, these findings provide novel insights into the underlying immune-regulatory mechanisms of dietary nutraceuticals in vivo. PMID:26938530

  9. Maternal immunization

    PubMed Central

    Moniz, Michelle H; Beigi, Richard H

    2014-01-01

    Maternal immunization holds tremendous promise to improve maternal and neonatal health for a number of infectious conditions. The unique susceptibilities of pregnant women to infectious conditions, as well as the ability of maternally-derived antibody to offer vital neonatal protection (via placental transfer), together have produced the recent increased attention on maternal immunization. The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) currently recommends 2 immunizations for all pregnant women lacking contraindication, inactivated Influenza and tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria toxoid, and acellular pertussis (Tdap). Given ongoing research the number of vaccines recommended during pregnancy is likely to increase. Thus, achieving high vaccination coverage of pregnant women for all recommended immunizations is a key public health enterprise. This review will focus on the present state of vaccine acceptance in pregnancy, with attention to currently identified barriers and determinants of vaccine acceptance. Additionally, opportunities for improvement will be considered. PMID:25483490

  10. Vaccination prepartum enhances the beneficial effects of melatonin on the immune response and reduces platelet responsiveness in sheep

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Melatonin regulates several physiological processes and its powerful action as antioxidant has been widely reported. Melatonin acts modulating the immune system, showing a protective effect on the cardiovascular system and improving vaccine administration as an adjuvant-like agent. Here, we have investigated the role of melatonin as an adjuvant of the Clostridium perfringens vaccine in prepartum sheep and whether melatonin modulates platelet physiology during peripartum. Results The experiments were carried out in peripartum sheep from a farm located in an area of Mediterranean-type ecosystem. Plasma melatonin levels were determined by ELISA and sheep platelet aggregation was monitored using an aggregometer. Here we demonstrated for the first time that plasma melatonin concentration were higher in pregnant (125 pg/mL) than in non-pregnant sheep (15 pg/mL; P < 0.05). Administration of melatonin prepartum did not significantly modify platelet function but significantly improved the immune response to vaccination against C. perfringens. Conclusion Administration of melatonin as an adjuvant provides a significant improvement in the immune response to vaccine administration prepartum against C. perfringens. PMID:22716226

  11. Propofol Increases Host Susceptibility to Microbial Infection by Reducing Subpopulations of Mature Immune Effector Cells at Sites of Infection

    PubMed Central

    Visvabharathy, Lavanya; Xayarath, Bobbi; Weinberg, Guy; Shilling, Rebecca A.; Freitag, Nancy E.

    2015-01-01

    Anesthetics are known to modulate host immune responses, but separating the variables of surgery from anesthesia when analyzing hospital acquired infections is often difficult. Here, the bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) was used to assess the impact of the common anesthetic propofol on host susceptibility to infection. Brief sedation of mice with physiologically relevant concentrations of propofol increased bacterial burdens in target organs by more than 10,000-fold relative to infected control animals. The adverse effects of propofol sedation on immune clearance of Lm persisted after recovery from sedation, as animals given the drug remained susceptible to infection for days following anesthesia. In contrast to propofol, sedation with alternative anesthetics such as ketamine/xylazine or pentobarbital did not increase susceptibility to systemic Lm infection. Propofol altered systemic cytokine and chemokine expression during infection, and prevented effective bacterial clearance by inhibiting the recruitment and/or activity of immune effector cells at sites of infection. Propofol exposure induced a marked reduction in marginal zone macrophages in the spleens of Lm infected mice, resulting in bacterial dissemination into deep tissue. Propofol also significantly increased mouse kidney abscess formation following infection with the common nosocomial pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. Taken together, these data indicate that even brief exposure to propofol severely compromises host resistance to microbial infection for days after recovery from sedation. PMID:26381144

  12. Tumoral NKG2D alters cell cycle of acute myeloid leukemic cells and reduces NK cell-mediated immune surveillance.

    PubMed

    Tang, Mingying; Acheampong, Desmond Omane; Wang, Youfu; Xie, Wei; Wang, Min; Zhang, Juan

    2016-06-01

    The stimulatory natural killer group 2 member D (NKG2D) lymphocyte receptor, initially discovered and expressed mostly on natural killer (NK) cells, T cells and natural killer T cells, can promote tumor immune surveillance. However, with increasing tumor grade, tumors themselves express NKG2D to self-stimulate oncogenic pathways. To confirm that cancer cells themselves express NKG2D, we have now investigated the role of the tumoral NKG2D in NK cell-mediated immune surveillance. Both anti-NKG2D and shRNA to that down-regulated tumoral NKG2D increased the number of cells in G1 phase and S phase, increased the expression of cyclin E-CDK2 and decreased P21. In addition, CD107a, IFN-γ and TNF-α increased when the cells were treated with anti-NKG2D which suggests that blocking tumoral NKG2D could augment tumor surveillance of NK cells. Altogether, tumoral NKG2D stimulates cell propagation and immune escape in acute myeloid leukemia cells. PMID:26740330

  13. The Use of Feed Additives to Reduce the Effects of Aflatoxin and Deoxynivalenol on Pig Growth, Organ Health and Immune Status during Chronic Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Alexandra C.; See, M. Todd; Hansen, Jeff A.; Kim, Yong B.; De Souza, Anna L. P.; Middleton, Tina F.; Kim, Sung Woo

    2013-01-01

    Three feed additives were tested to improve the growth and health of pigs chronically challenged with aflatoxin (AF) and deoxynivalenol (DON). Gilts (n = 225, 8.8 ± 0.4 kg) were allotted to five treatments: CON (uncontaminated control); MT (contaminated with 150 µg/kg AF and 1100 µg/kg DON); A (MT + a clay additive); B (MT + a clay and dried yeast additive); and C (MT + a clay and yeast culture additive). Average daily gain (ADG) and feed intake (ADFI) were recorded for 42 days, blood collected for immune analysis and tissue samples to measure damage. Feeding mycotoxins tended to decrease ADG and altered the immune system through a tendency to increase monocytes and immunoglobulins. Mycotoxins caused tissue damage in the form of liver bile ductule hyperplasia and karyomegaly. The additives in diets A and B reduced mycotoxin effects on the immune system and the liver and showed some ability to improve growth. The diet C additive played a role in reducing liver damage. Collectively, we conclude that AF and DON can be harmful to the growth and health of pigs consuming mycotoxins chronically. The selected feed additives improved pig health and may play a role in pig growth. PMID:23867763

  14. Immune response

    MedlinePlus

    Innate immunity; Humoral immunity; Cellular immunity; Immunity; Inflammatory response; Acquired (adaptive) immunity ... and usually does not react against them. INNATE IMMUNITY Innate, or nonspecific, immunity is the defense system ...

  15. Axitinib increases the infiltration of immune cells and reduces the suppressive capacity of monocytic MDSCs in an intracranial mouse melanoma model

    PubMed Central

    Du Four, Stephanie; Maenhout, Sarah K.; De Pierre, Kari; Renmans, Dries; Niclou, Simone P; Thielemans, Kris; Neyns, Bart; Aerts, Joeri L

    2015-01-01

    Melanoma patients are at a high risk of developing brain metastases, which are strongly vascularized and therefore have a significant risk of spontaneous bleeding. VEGF not only plays a role in neo-angiogenesis but also in the antitumor immune response. VEGFR-targeted therapy might not only have an impact on the tumor vascularization but also on tumor-infiltrating immune cells. In this study, we investigated the effect of axitinib, a small molecule TKI of VEGFR-1, -2, and -3, on tumor growth and on the composition of tumor-infiltrating immune cells in subcutaneous and intracranial mouse melanoma models. In vivo treatment with axitinib induced a strong inhibition of tumor growth and significantly improved survival in both tumor models. Characterization of the immune cells within the spleen and tumor of tumor-bearing mice respectively showed a significant increase in the number of CD3+CD8+ T cells and CD11b+ cells of axitinib-treated mice. More specifically, we observed a significant increase of intratumoral monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (moMDSCs; CD11b+Ly6ChighLy6G-). Interestingly, in vitro proliferation assays showed that moMDSCs isolated from spleen or tumor of axitinib-treated mice had a reduced suppressive capacity on a per cell basis as compared to those isolated from vehicle-treated mice. Moreover, MDSCs from axitinib-treated animals displayed the capacity to stimulate allogeneic T cells. Thus, treatment with axitinib induces differentiation of moMDSC toward an antigen-presenting phenotype. Based on these observations, we conclude that the impact of axitinib on tumor growth and survival is most likely not restricted to direct anti-angiogenic effects but also involves important effects on tumor immunity. PMID:26137411

  16. Community Immunity (Herd Immunity)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area ​Community Immunity ("Herd" Immunity) Vaccines can prevent outbreaks of disease and save ... disease is contained. This is known as "community immunity." In the illustration below, the top box depicts ...

  17. The Duration of Chlamydia muridarum Genital Tract Infection and Associated Chronic Pathological Changes Are Reduced in IL-17 Knockout Mice but Protection Is Not Increased Further by Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Andrew, Dean W.; Cochrane, Melanie; Schripsema, Justin H.; Ramsey, Kyle H.; Dando, Samantha J.; O’Meara, Connor P.; Timms, Peter; Beagley, Kenneth W.

    2013-01-01

    IL-17 is believed to be important for protection against extracellular pathogens, where clearance is dependent on neutrophil recruitment and local activation of epithelial cell defences. However, the role of IL-17 in protection against intracellular pathogens such as Chlamydia is less clear. We have compared (i) the course of natural genital tract C. muridarum infection, (ii) the development of oviduct pathology and (iii) the development of vaccine-induced immunity against infection in wild type (WT) BALB/c and IL-17 knockout mice (IL-17-/-) to determine if IL-17-mediated immunity is implicated in the development of infection-induced pathology and/or protection. Both the magnitude and duration of genital infection was significantly reduced in IL-17-/- mice compared to BALB/c. Similarly, hydrosalpinx was also greatly reduced in IL-17-/- mice and this correlated with reduced neutrophil and macrophage infiltration of oviduct tissues. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 9 and MMP2 were increased in WT oviducts compared to IL-17-/- animals at day 7 post-infection. In contrast, oviducts from IL-17-/- mice contained higher MMP9 and MMP2 at day 21. Infection also elicited higher levels of Chlamydia-neutralizing antibody in serum of IL-17-/- mice than WT mice. Following intranasal immunization with C. muridarum Major Outer Membrane Protein (MOMP) and cholera toxin plus CpG adjuvants, significantly higher levels of chlamydial MOMP-specific IgG and IgA were found in serum and vaginal washes of IL-17-/- mice. T cell proliferation and IFNγ production by splenocytes was greater in WT animals following in vitro re-stimulation, however vaccination was only effective at reducing infection in WT, not IL-17-/- mice. Intranasal or transcutaneous immunization protected WT but not IL-17-/- mice against hydrosalpinx development. Our data show that in the absence of IL-17, the severity of C. muridarum genital infection and associated oviduct pathology are significantly attenuated, however

  18. Reduced innate immune response, apoptosis, and virus release in cells cured of respiratory syncytial virus persistent infection.

    PubMed

    Herranz, Cristina; Melero, José A; Martínez, Isidoro

    2011-02-01

    It has been reported that cell clones isolated at different passages from a culture of HEp-2 cells infected persistently with human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) were cured of the virus. Further studies on one of these clones (31C1) are reported here, showing that 31C1 cells can still be infected by HRSV but release low amounts of virus to the culture supernatant, develop smaller and less numerous syncytia than the original HEp-2 cells, and display only a weak innate immune response to the infection. Accordingly, uninfected 31C1 cells, but not clones derived from uninfected HEp-2 cells, express low levels of TLR3 and RIG-I. In addition, 31C1 cells are partly resistant to apoptosis. These results indicate that persistent infection of HEp-2 cells by HRSV has selected cell variants, with changes affecting cell survival, virus growth and the innate immune response that may be valuable for studies of virus-cell interaction. PMID:21093006

  19. Hyperreactive onchocerciasis is characterized by a combination of Th17-Th2 immune responses and reduced regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Katawa, Gnatoulma; Layland, Laura E; Debrah, Alex Y; von Horn, Charlotte; Batsa, Linda; Kwarteng, Alexander; Arriens, Sandra; W Taylor, David; Specht, Sabine; Hoerauf, Achim; Adjobimey, Tomabu

    2015-01-01

    Clinical manifestations in onchocerciasis range from generalized onchocerciasis (GEO) to the rare but severe hyperreactive (HO)/sowda form. Since disease pathogenesis is associated with host inflammatory reactions, we investigated whether Th17 responses could be related to aggravated pathology in HO. Using flow cytometry, filarial-specific cytokine responses and PCR arrays, we compared the immune cell profiles, including Th subsets, in individuals presenting the two polar forms of infection and endemic normals (EN). In addition to elevated frequencies of memory CD4+ T cells, individuals with HO showed accentuated Th17 and Th2 profiles but decreased CD4+CD25hiFoxp3+ regulatory T cells. These profiles included increased IL-17A+, IL-4+, RORC2+ and GATA3+CD4+ T cell populations. Flow cytometry data was further confirmed using a PCR array since Th17-related genes (IL-17 family members, IL-6, IL-1β and IL-22) and Th2-related (IL-4, IL-13, STAT6) genes were all significantly up-regulated in HO individuals. In addition, stronger Onchocerca volvulus-specific Th2 responses, especially IL-13, were observed in vitro in hyperreactive individuals when compared to GEO or EN groups. This study provides initial evidence that elevated frequencies of Th17 and Th2 cells form part of the immune network instigating the development of severe onchocerciasis. PMID:25569210

  20. Evidence for Immune Response, Axonal Dysfunction and Reduced Endocytosis in the Substantia Nigra in Early Stage Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dijkstra, Anke A.; Ingrassia, Angela; de Menezes, Renee X.; van Kesteren, Ronald E.; Rozemuller, Annemieke J. M.; Heutink, Peter; van de Berg, Wilma D. J.

    2015-01-01

    Subjects with incidental Lewy body disease (iLBD) may represent the premotor stage of Parkinson’s disease (PD). To elucidate molecular mechanisms underlying neuronal dysfunction and alpha-synuclein pathology in the premotor phase of PD, we investigated the transcriptome of the substantia nigra (SN) of well-characterized iLBD, PD donors and age-matched controls with Braak alpha-synuclein stage ranging from 0–6. In Braak alpha-synuclein stages 1 and 2, we observed deregulation of pathways linked to axonal degeneration, immune response and endocytosis, including axonal guidance signaling, mTOR signaling, EIF2 signaling and clathrin-mediated endocytosis in the SN. In Braak stages 3 and 4, we observed deregulation of pathways involved in protein translation and cell survival, including mTOR and EIF2 signaling. In Braak stages 5 and 6, we observed deregulation of dopaminergic signaling, axonal guidance signaling and thrombin signaling. Throughout the progression of PD pathology, we observed a deregulation of mTOR, EIF2 and regulation of eIF4 and p70S6K signaling in the SN. Our results indicate that molecular mechanisms related to axonal dysfunction, endocytosis and immune response are an early event in PD pathology, whereas mTOR and EIF2 signaling are impaired throughout disease progression. These pathways may hold the key to altering the disease progression in PD. PMID:26087293

  1. Statins reduce spirochetal burden and modulate immune responses in the C3H/HeN mouse model of Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Van Laar, Tricia A; Hole, Camaron; Rajasekhar Karna, S L; Miller, Christine L; Reddick, Robert; Wormley, Floyd L; Seshu, J

    2016-06-01

    Lyme disease (LD) is a systemic disorder caused by Borrelia burgdorferi. Lyme spirochetes encode for a functional 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGR EC 1.1.1.88) serving as a rate limiting enzyme of the mevalonate pathway that contribute to components critical for cell wall biogenesis. Statins have been shown to inhibit B. burgdorferi in vitro. Using a mouse model of Lyme disease, we found that statins contribute to reducing bacterial burden and altering the murine immune response to favor clearance of spirochetes. PMID:26993029

  2. Reduced photoreceptor death and improved retinal function during retinal degeneration in mice lacking innate immunity adaptor protein MyD88

    PubMed Central

    Syeda, Sarah; Patel, Amit K.; Lee, Tinthu; Hackam, Abigail S.

    2015-01-01

    The injury inflammatory response mediated by the innate immune system is an important contributor to neurodegeneration in the central nervous system (CNS) and retina. A major branch of the innate immune system is regulated by the Toll-like receptors (TLRs), which are receptors for endogenous damage associated molecules released from injured cells as well as pathogen-derived molecules, and interleukin-1 receptors (IL-1R), which are activated by IL-1α, IL-1β and IL-18 cytokines. TLRs and IL-1R are expressed on immune and non-immune cell types and act as first responders to cell damage, which results in tissue repair, or inflammation and apoptosis. Both TLR and IL-1R require the adaptor protein myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88) for signaling. Although inflammation is implicated in neuronal death in the retina, the role of MyD88-dependent TLR and IL-1R signaling in retinal degeneration is unknown. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the role of MyD88-mediated signaling in neuronal degeneration in the retinal degeneration 1 (rd1) mouse model, which exhibits a phenotype of rapid photoreceptor death and inflammation. To generate rd1 mice lacking the MyD88 gene, rd1 were bred with MyD88 knockout mice (MyD88-/-) for several generations to produce rd1/MyD88+/+ and rd1/MyD88-/- genotypes. Chemokine mRNA expression levels were analyzed by qRT-PCR, and recruitment of activated microglia was quantified by immunodetection of the IBA-1 protein. Retinal outer nuclear layer cell counts were performed to quantify photoreceptor degeneration, and retinal function was assessed using electroretinograms (ERG). Our results revealed that retinal expression of Ccl2, Ccl4, Ccl7 and Cxcl10 was reduced by 2 to 8-fold in rd1/MyD88-/- mice compared with rd1/MyD88+/+ mice (p<0.05), which coincided with attenuated microglial activation, higher numbers of photoreceptors and higher retina responses to photopic and scotopic stimuli. At later ages, rd1/MyD88

  3. Reduced maternal levels of common viruses during pregnancy predict offspring psychosis: potential role of enhanced maternal immune activity?

    PubMed

    Canuti, Marta; Buka, Stephen; Jazaeri Farsani, Seyed Mohammad; Oude Munnink, Bas B; Jebbink, Maarten F; van Beveren, Nico J M; de Haan, Lieuwe; Goldstein, Jill; Seidman, Larry J; Tsuang, Ming T; Storosum, Jitschak G; van der Hoek, Lia

    2015-08-01

    Viral infections during the prenatal or early childhood periods are one of the environmental factors which might play an etiological role in psychoses. Several studies report higher antibody levels against viruses during pregnancy in blood of mothers of offspring with psychotic disorders, but the presence of such viruses has never been demonstrated. The goal of this study was to investigate the potential association between viral infections during pregnancy and progeny with psychotic disorders and, for this purpose, we performed a nested case-control study involving pregnant mothers of offspring with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder with psychotic features (cases, N=43) and pregnant women with healthy offspring (controls, N=95). Since several potential viral candidates have been suggested in prior work, a broad-spectrum virus detection system was necessary. A metagenomic analysis performed with the virus discovery method VIDISCA-454 revealed only common blood-associated viruses in all cohorts. However, a significantly lower viral prevalence was detected in the group of cases and in the sub-population of pregnant mothers of offspring with schizophrenia (p<0.05). Consistent with the existing inverse correlation between the level of these viruses and the immunocompetence of an individual, we hypothesized the presence of a higher immune activity during pregnancy in mothers whose offspring later develop a psychotic disorder as compared to controls. Combining our results with previously available literature data on antibody levels during the gestation period suggests that a more prominent maternal immune activity can be considered a risk factor for developing psychosis. PMID:26004694

  4. KIR and HLA Genotypes Implicated in Reduced Killer Lymphocytes Immunity Are Associated with Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada Disease.

    PubMed

    Levinson, Ralph D; Yung, Madeline; Meguro, Akira; Ashouri, Elham; Yu, Fei; Mizuki, Nobuhisa; Ohno, Shigeaki; Rajalingam, Raja

    2016-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) and natural killer (NK) cells are killer lymphocytes that provide defense against viral infections and tumor transformation. Analogous to that of CTL, interactions of killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) with specific human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I ligands calibrate NK cell education and response. Gene families encoding KIRs and HLA ligands are located on different chromosomes, and feature variation in the number and type of genes. The independent segregation of KIR and HLA genes results in variable KIR-HLA interactions in individuals, which may impact disease susceptibility. We tested whether KIR-HLA combinations are associated with Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada (VKH) disease, a bilateral granulomatous panuveitis that has strong association with HLA-DR4. We present a case control study of 196 VKH patients and 209 controls from a highly homogeneous native population of Japan. KIR and HLA class I genes were typed using oligonucleotide hybridization method and analyzed using two-tailed Fisher's exact probabilities. The incidence of Bx-KIR genotypes was decreased in VKH patients (odds ratio [OR] 0.58, P = 0.007), due primarily to a decrease in centromeric B-KIR motif and its associated KIRs 2DS2, 2DL2, 2DS3, and 2DL5B. HLA-B22, implicated in poor immune response, was increased in VKH (OR = 4.25, P = 0.0001). HLA-Bw4, the ligand for KIR3DL1, was decreased in VKH (OR = 0.59, P = 0.01). The KIR-HLA combinations 2DL2+C1/C2 and 3DL1+Bw4, which function in NK education, were also decreased in VKH (OR = 0.49, P = 0.012; OR = 0.59, P = 0.013). Genotypes missing these two inhibitory KIR-HLA combinations in addition to missing activating KIRs 2DS2 and 2DS3 were more common in VKH (OR = 1.90, P = 0.002). These results suggest that synergistic hyporesponsiveness of NK cells (due to poor NK education along with missing of activating KIRs) and CTL (due to HLA-B22 restriction) fail to mount an effective immune response against viral

  5. KIR and HLA Genotypes Implicated in Reduced Killer Lymphocytes Immunity Are Associated with Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada Disease

    PubMed Central

    Levinson, Ralph D.; Yung, Madeline; Meguro, Akira; Ashouri, Elham; Yu, Fei; Mizuki, Nobuhisa; Ohno, Shigeaki

    2016-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) and natural killer (NK) cells are killer lymphocytes that provide defense against viral infections and tumor transformation. Analogous to that of CTL, interactions of killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) with specific human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I ligands calibrate NK cell education and response. Gene families encoding KIRs and HLA ligands are located on different chromosomes, and feature variation in the number and type of genes. The independent segregation of KIR and HLA genes results in variable KIR-HLA interactions in individuals, which may impact disease susceptibility. We tested whether KIR-HLA combinations are associated with Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada (VKH) disease, a bilateral granulomatous panuveitis that has strong association with HLA-DR4. We present a case control study of 196 VKH patients and 209 controls from a highly homogeneous native population of Japan. KIR and HLA class I genes were typed using oligonucleotide hybridization method and analyzed using two-tailed Fisher’s exact probabilities. The incidence of Bx-KIR genotypes was decreased in VKH patients (odds ratio [OR] 0.58, P = 0.007), due primarily to a decrease in centromeric B-KIR motif and its associated KIRs 2DS2, 2DL2, 2DS3, and 2DL5B. HLA-B22, implicated in poor immune response, was increased in VKH (OR = 4.25, P = 0.0001). HLA-Bw4, the ligand for KIR3DL1, was decreased in VKH (OR = 0.59, P = 0.01). The KIR-HLA combinations 2DL2+C1/C2 and 3DL1+Bw4, which function in NK education, were also decreased in VKH (OR = 0.49, P = 0.012; OR = 0.59, P = 0.013). Genotypes missing these two inhibitory KIR-HLA combinations in addition to missing activating KIRs 2DS2 and 2DS3 were more common in VKH (OR = 1.90, P = 0.002). These results suggest that synergistic hyporesponsiveness of NK cells (due to poor NK education along with missing of activating KIRs) and CTL (due to HLA-B22 restriction) fail to mount an effective immune response against viral

  6. Differential Gender Effects of a Reduced Calorie Diet on Systemic Inflammatory and Immune Parameters in Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Ebersole, J.L; Steffen, M.J; Reynolds, M.A.; Branch-Mays, G.L; Dawson, D.R; Novak, K.F; Gunsolley, J.C; Mattison, J.A.; Ingram, D.K.; Novak, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    Dietary manipulation, including caloric restriction, has been shown to significantly impact host response capabilities, particularly associated with aging. This investigation compared systemic inflammatory and immune response molecules in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) on continuous long term calorie-restricted (CR) diets with a matched group of animals on a control diet, examining the effects of both gender and aging. The results demonstrated that haptoglobin and α1anti-glycoprotein were elevated in serum of male monkeys. Serum IgG antibody responses to C. rectus, A. actinomycetemcomitans, and P. gingivalis were significantly elevated in female monkeys. While only the antibody to F. nucleatum was significantly affected by the calorie-restricted diet in females, antibody levels to P. intermedia, C. rectus and T. denticola demonstrated a similar trend. In this investigation, only selected serum antibody levels were influenced by the age in male animals, seemingly related to increasing clinical disease in this gender. More generally, analytes were modulated by gender and/or diet in this oral model system of mucosal microbial challenge. PMID:18565132

  7. Triple drug immunosuppression significantly reduces immune activation and allograft arteriosclerosis in cytomegalovirus-infected rat aortic allografts and induces early latency of viral infection.

    PubMed Central

    Lemström, K. B.; Bruning, J. H.; Bruggeman, C. A.; Lautenschlager, I. T.; Häyry, P. J.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of triple drug immunosuppression (cyclosporine A 10 mg/kg/day+methylprednisolone 0.5 mg/kg/day+azathioprine 2 mg/kg/day) on rat cytomegalovirus (RCMV)-enhanced allograft arteriosclerosis was investigated applying WF (AG-B2, RT1v) recipients of DA (AG-B4, RT1a) aortic allografts. The recipients were inoculated intraperitoneally with 10(5) plaque-forming units of RCMV 1 day after transplantation or left noninfected. The grafts were removed on 7 and 14 days, and at 1, 3, and 6 months after transplantation. The presence of viral infection was demonstrated by plaque assays, cell proliferation by [3H]thymidine autoradiography, and vascular wall alterations by quantitative histology and immunohistochemistry. Triple drug immunosuppression reduced the presence of infectious virus in plaque assays and induced early latency of viral infection. It significantly reduced the peak adventitial inflammatory response (P < 0.05) and reduced and delayed intimal nuclear intensity and intimal thickening (P < 0.05) in RCMV-infected allografts. The proliferative response of smooth muscle cells was reduced by triple drug immunosuppression to 50% of that observed in nonimmunosuppressed RCMV-infected allografts, but still the proliferative peak response was seen at 1 month. Only low level immune activation, ie, the expression of interleukin-2 receptor (P < 0.05) and MHC class II, was observed under triple drug immunosuppression in the adventitia of RCMV-infected allografts, whereas there was no substantial change in the phenotypic distribution of inflammatory cells. In conclusion, although RCMV infection significantly enhances allograft arteriosclerosis also in immunosuppressed allografts, triple drug immunosuppression has no additional detrimental effect but rather a protective one on vascular wall histology. These results further suggest that RCMV-enhanced allograft arteriosclerosis may be an immunopathological condition linked to the host immune response toward the graft and

  8. Encenicline, an α7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Partial Agonist, Reduces Immune Cell Infiltration in the Colon and Improves Experimental Colitis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Salaga, M; Blomster, L V; Piechota-Polańczyk, A; Zielińska, M; Jacenik, D; Cygankiewicz, A I; Krajewska, W M; Mikkelsen, J D; Fichna, Jakub

    2016-01-01

    The α7 pentamer nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are a target in transduction of anti-inflammatory signals from the central nervous system to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-inflammatory action of the novel α7 nAChR partial agonist encenicline and to determine the mechanism underlying its activity. Anti-inflammatory activity of encenicline was evaluated using trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS)- and dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced models of colitis. Macroscopic score, ulcer score, colon length and thickness, as well as myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity were recorded. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was used to measure the infiltration of immune cells in the colon. Furthermore, we employed flow cytometry to determine the effect of encenicline on frequencies of FoxP3(+) and interleukin (IL)-17A(+) T cells in the mouse colon. Encenicline attenuated TNBS- and DSS-induced colitis in mice via α7 nAChRs, as indicated by significantly reduced macroscopic parameters and MPO activity. Treatment with encenicline significantly reduced the infiltration of macrophages, neutrophils, and B cells in the colon of TNBS-treated animals, as indicated by IHC. In the TNBS model encenicline reduced the frequency of FoxP3(+) IL-17A(+) T cells in the colon. In the DSS-model treatment encenicline increased the frequency of FoxP3(+) T cells and reduced IL-17A(+) T cells. Stimulation of α7 nAChR with partial agonist encenicline alleviates colitis via alteration of the number and/or activation status of the immune cells in the gut, emphasizing a potential role of α7 nAChRs as a target for anticolitic drugs. PMID:26462538

  9. Comparative Transcriptomic Analysis of Rectal Tissue from Beef Steers Revealed Reduced Host Immunity in Escherichia coli O157:H7 Super-Shedders.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ou; Liang, Guanxiang; McAllister, Tim A; Plastow, Graham; Stanford, Kim; Selinger, Brent; Guan, Le Luo

    2016-01-01

    Super-shedder cattle are a major disseminator of E. coli O157:H7 into the environment, and the terminal rectum has been proposed as the primary E. coli O157:H7 colonization site. This study aimed to identify host factors that are associated with the super-shedding process by comparing transcriptomic profiles in rectal tissue collected from 5 super-shedder cattle and 4 non-shedder cattle using RNA-Seq. In total, 17,859 ± 354 genes and 399 ± 16 miRNAs were detected, and 11,773 genes were expressed in all animals. Fifty-eight differentially expressed (DE) genes (false discovery rate < 0.05) including 11 up-regulated and 47 down-regulated (log 2 (fold change) ranged from -5.5 to 4.2), and 2 up-regulated DE miRNAs (log 2 (fold change) = 2.1 and 2.5, respectively) were identified in super-shedders compared to non-shedders. Functional analysis of DE genes revealed that 31 down-regulated genes were potentially associated with reduced innate and adaptive immune functions in super-shedders, including 13 lymphocytes membrane receptors, 3 transcription factors and 5 cytokines, suggesting the decreased key host immune functions in the rectal tissue of super-shedders, including decreased quantity and migration of immune cells such as lymphocytes, neutrophils and dendritic cells. The up-regulation of bta-miR-29d-3p and the down regulation of its predicted target gene, regulator of G-protein signaling 13, suggested a potential regulatory role of this miRNA in decreased migration of lymphocytes in super-shedders. Based on these findings, the rectal tissue of super-shedders may inherently exhibit less effective innate and adaptive immune protection. Further study is required to confirm if such effect on host immunity is due to the nature of the host itself or due to actions mediated by E. coli O157:H7. PMID:26959367

  10. Comparative Transcriptomic Analysis of Rectal Tissue from Beef Steers Revealed Reduced Host Immunity in Escherichia coli O157:H7 Super-Shedders

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ou; Liang, Guanxiang; McAllister, Tim A.; Plastow, Graham; Stanford, Kim; Selinger, Brent; Guan, Le Luo

    2016-01-01

    Super-shedder cattle are a major disseminator of E. coli O157:H7 into the environment, and the terminal rectum has been proposed as the primary E. coli O157:H7 colonization site. This study aimed to identify host factors that are associated with the super-shedding process by comparing transcriptomic profiles in rectal tissue collected from 5 super-shedder cattle and 4 non-shedder cattle using RNA-Seq. In total, 17,859 ± 354 genes and 399 ± 16 miRNAs were detected, and 11,773 genes were expressed in all animals. Fifty-eight differentially expressed (DE) genes (false discovery rate < 0.05) including 11 up-regulated and 47 down-regulated (log 2 (fold change) ranged from -5.5 to 4.2), and 2 up-regulated DE miRNAs (log 2 (fold change) = 2.1 and 2.5, respectively) were identified in super-shedders compared to non-shedders. Functional analysis of DE genes revealed that 31 down-regulated genes were potentially associated with reduced innate and adaptive immune functions in super-shedders, including 13 lymphocytes membrane receptors, 3 transcription factors and 5 cytokines, suggesting the decreased key host immune functions in the rectal tissue of super-shedders, including decreased quantity and migration of immune cells such as lymphocytes, neutrophils and dendritic cells. The up-regulation of bta-miR-29d-3p and the down regulation of its predicted target gene, regulator of G-protein signaling 13, suggested a potential regulatory role of this miRNA in decreased migration of lymphocytes in super-shedders. Based on these findings, the rectal tissue of super-shedders may inherently exhibit less effective innate and adaptive immune protection. Further study is required to confirm if such effect on host immunity is due to the nature of the host itself or due to actions mediated by E. coli O157:H7. PMID:26959367

  11. Use of a reduced (4-dose) vaccine schedule for postexposure prophylaxis to prevent human rabies: recommendations of the advisory committee on immunization practices.

    PubMed

    Rupprecht, Charles E; Briggs, Deborah; Brown, Catherine M; Franka, Richard; Katz, Samuel L; Kerr, Harry D; Lett, Susan M; Levis, Robin; Meltzer, Martin I; Schaffner, William; Cieslak, Paul R

    2010-03-19

    This report summarizes new recommendation and updates previous recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) for postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) to prevent human rabies (CDC. Human rabies prevention---United States, 2008: recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices. MMWR 2008;57[No. RR-3]). Previously, ACIP recommended a 5-dose rabies vaccination regimen with human diploid cell vaccine (HDCV) or purified chick embryo cell vaccine (PCECV). These new recommendations reduce the number of vaccine doses to four. The reduction in doses recommended for PEP was based in part on evidence from rabies virus pathogenesis data, experimental animal work, clinical studies, and epidemiologic surveillance. These studies indicated that 4 vaccine doses in combination with rabies immune globulin (RIG) elicited adequate immune responses and that a fifth dose of vaccine did not contribute to more favorable outcomes. For persons previously unvaccinated with rabies vaccine, the reduced regimen of 4 1-mL doses of HDCV or PCECV should be administered intramuscularly. The first dose of the 4-dose course should be administered as soon as possible after exposure (day 0). Additional doses then should be administered on days 3, 7, and 14 after the first vaccination. ACIP recommendations for the use of RIG remain unchanged. For persons who previously received a complete vaccination series (pre- or postexposure prophylaxis) with a cell-culture vaccine or who previously had a documented adequate rabies virus-neutralizing antibody titer following vaccination with noncell-culture vaccine, the recommendation for a 2-dose PEP vaccination series has not changed. Similarly, the number of doses recommended for persons with altered immunocompetence has not changed; for such persons, PEP should continue to comprise a 5-dose vaccination regimen with 1 dose of RIG. Recommendations for pre-exposure prophylaxis also remain unchanged, with 3 doses of vaccine

  12. Carbon monoxide down-modulates Toll-like receptor 4/MD2 expression on innate immune cells and reduces endotoxic shock susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Riquelme, Sebastián A; Bueno, Susan M; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2015-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) has been recently reported as the main anti-inflammatory mediator of the haem-degrading enzyme haem-oxygenase 1 (HO-1). It has been shown that either HO-1 induction or CO treatment reduces the ability of monocytes to respond to inflammatory stimuli, such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS), due to an inhibition of the signalling pathways leading to nuclear factor-κB, mitogen-activated protein kinases and interferon regulatory factor 3 activation. Hence, it has been suggested that CO impairs the stimulation of the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)/myeloid differentiation factor-2 (MD2) complex located on the surface of immune cells. However, whether CO can negatively modulate the surface expression of the TLR4/MD2 complex in immune cells remains unknown. Here we report that either HO-1 induction or treatment with CO decreases the surface expression of TLR4/MD2 in dendritic cells (DC) and neutrophils. In addition, in a septic shock model of mice intraperitoneally injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), prophylactic treatment with CO protected animals from hypothermia, weight loss, mobility loss and death. Further, mice pre-treated with CO and challenged with LPS showed reduced recruitment of DC and neutrophils to peripheral blood, suggesting that this gas causes a systemic tolerance to endotoxin challenge. No differences in the amount of innate cells in lymphoid tissues were observed in CO-treated mice. Our results suggest that CO treatment reduces the expression of the TLR4/MD2 complex on the surface of myeloid cells, which renders them resistant to LPS priming in vitro, as well as in vivo in a model of endotoxic shock. PMID:25179131

  13. Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate inhibits B cell proliferation and reduces the abundance of IgM-secreting cells in cultured immune tissues of the rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Martins, Kelly; Applegate, Ben; Hagedorn, Birgit; Kennish, John; Zwollo, Patty

    2015-05-01

    Plasticizer di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) and its active metabolite MEHP have important immunotoxic effects in mammalian species, including inhibition of cell proliferation, inflammation inhibition, lowering of the antibody response, and apoptosis. Virtually nothing is known about the potential detrimental effects of DEHP/MEHP on the teleost immune system, although phthalates are a likely threat to fish health. Here we investigated whether short-term in vitro DEHP exposure would affect B lineage cells in the rainbow trout, using cultured immune tissues. Cell culture conditions, evidence of cellular incorporation of DEHP, and possible effects of DEHP on immune genes were first established using the mouse pre-B cell line PD31 and data confirmed a dose-dependent cellular uptake of DEHP using liquid chromatography-coupled ion trap mass spectrometry. Effects of in vitro DEHP exposure on trout B cell proliferation were tested by flow cytometry. Significant, dose-dependent inhibition was evident in both anterior and posterior kidney cultures after 24 h exposure to ≥4 μM DEHP. DEHP-induced cell death was not significant for the range of DEHP tested. Further, the abundance of IgM-secreting plasmablasts and plasma cells was significantly reduced after in vitro exposure of ≥16 μM DEHP for 2 or 7 days. Finally, in vitro DEHP exposure significantly lowered the levels of secreted HCmu transcripts in a dose-dependent manner. B lineage cells from posterior kidney were more sensitive to effects of in vitro DEHP exposure than those from anterior kidney. Together, the data support a model where DEHP modifies the normal B cell activation pathways in rainbow trout, promoting B cell differentiation while suppressing plasmablast expansion, resulting in fewer IgM-secreting plasma cells. Insufficient production of protective antibody make fish more susceptible to infection, and increases their risk for disease and mortality in polluted waters. PMID:25748607

  14. Active immunization with GnRH-tandem-dimer peptide in young male rats reduces serum reproductive hormone concentrations, testicular development and spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Han, Xing-Fa; Li, Jun-Li; Zhou, Yu-Qin; Ren, Xiao-Hua; Liu, Gong-Cheng; Cao, Xiao-Han; Du, Xiao-Gang; Zeng, Xian-Yin

    2016-01-01

    GnRH sterilization vaccines have been developed for various practical and clinical reasons. However, conjugation of GnRH peptide to carrier protein has many drawbacks, hampering the further commercialization of GnRH vaccines. In this study, a new nonconjugated GnRH vaccine, D-Lys6-GnRH-tandem-dimer peptide (TDK), emulsified in Specol adjuvant was investigated for its immunocastration efficacy in young male rats. Prepubertal male rats were randomly allocated into three groups (n = 12): control (no treatment), surgically castrated or immunized against 100 μg TDK in Specol adjuvant at 6 weeks of age (with a booster 8 weeks later). Blood samples (for antibody titers and hormone concentrations) were collected at 2-week intervals until rats were killed (18 weeks of age). Compared to intact controls, active immunization against TDK reduced (P < 0.05) serum concentrations of testosterone, inhibin B, LH and FSH, prevented the onset of spermatogenesis at puberty. Furthermore, mRNA expressions of GnRH receptor, LH-β and FSH-β in the pituitary, LH receptor, FSH receptor, inhibin α, βA and βB subunit in the testes were decreased in immunocastrated rats compared to intact controls (P < 0.05). These results demonstrate for the first time that GnRH-tandem-dimer peptide emulsified in Specol is a promising veterinary sterilization medicine. PMID:26208395

  15. Acute Morphine Administration Reduces Cell-Mediated Immunity and Induces Reactivation of Latent Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 in BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mojadadi, Shafi; Jamali, Abbas; Khansarinejad, Behzad; Soleimanjahi, Hoorieh; Bamdad, Taravat

    2009-01-01

    Acute morphine administration is known to alter the course of herpes simplex virus infection. In this study, the effect of acute morphine administration on the reactivation of latent herpes was investigated in a mouse model. Because of the important role of cytolytic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity in the inhibition of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) reactivation, the effect of acute morphine administration on CTL responses was also evaluated. Furthermore, lymphocyte proliferation and IFN-γ production were evaluated for their roles in the induction of the CTL response. The findings showed that acute morphine administration significantly reduced CTL responses, lymphocyte proliferation, and IFN-γ production. Furthermore, acute morphine administration has been shown to reactivate latent HSV-1. Previous studies have shown that cellular immune responses have important roles in the inhibition of HSV reactivation. These findings suggest that suppression of a portion of the cellular immune response after acute morphine administration may constitute one part of the mechanism that induces HSV reactivation. PMID:19403060

  16. Delayed neutralization of interleukin 6 reduces organ injury, selectively suppresses inflammatory mediator, and partially normalizes immune dysfunction following trauma and hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Jinxiang; Korff, Sebastian; Ayoob, Faez; Vodovotz, Yoram; Billiar, Timothy R

    2014-09-01

    An excessive and uncontrolled systemic inflammatory response is associated with organ failure, immunodepression, and increased susceptibility to nosocomial infection following trauma. Interleukin 6 (IL-6) plays a particularly prominent role in the host immune response after trauma with hemorrhage. However, as a result of its pleiotropic functions, the effect of IL-6 in trauma and hemorrhage is still controversial. It remains unclear whether suppression of IL-6 after hemorrhagic shock and trauma will attenuate organ injury and immunosuppression. In this study, C57BL/6 mice were treated with anti-mouse IL-6 monoclonal antibody immediately prior to resuscitation in an experimental model combining hemorrhagic shock and lower-extremity injury. Interleukin 6 levels and signaling were transiently suppressed following administrations of anti-IL-6 monoclonal antibody following hemorrhagic shock and lower-extremity injury. This resulted in reduced lung and liver injury, as well as suppression in the levels of key inflammatory mediators including IL-10, keratinocyte-derived chemokine, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1, and macrophage inhibitory protein 1α at both 6 and 24 h. Furthermore, the shift to TH2 cytokine production and suppressed lymphocyte response were partly prevented. These results demonstrate that IL-6 is not only a biomarker but also an important driver of injury-induced inflammation and immune suppression in mice. Rapid measurement of IL-6 levels in the early phase of postinjury care could be used to guide IL-6-based interventions. PMID:24978887

  17. Novel oxazolo-oxazole derivatives of FTY720 reduce endothelial cell permeability, immune cell chemotaxis and symptoms of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Imeri, Faik; Fallegger, Daniel; Zivkovic, Aleksandra; Schwalm, Stephanie; Enzmann, Gaby; Blankenbach, Kira; Meyer zu Heringdorf, Dagmar; Homann, Thomas; Kleuser, Burkhard; Pfeilschifter, Josef; Engelhardt, Britta; Stark, Holger; Huwiler, Andrea

    2014-10-01

    The immunomodulatory FTY720 (fingolimod) is presently approved for the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. It is a prodrug that acts by modulating sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptor signaling. In this study, we have developed and characterized two novel oxazolo-oxazole derivatives of FTY720, ST-968 and the oxy analog ST-1071, which require no preceding activating phosphorylation, and proved to be active in intact cells and triggered S1P1 and S1P3, but not S1P2, receptor internalization as a result of receptor activation. Functionally, ST-968 and ST-1071 acted similar to FTY720 to abrogate S1P-triggered chemotaxis of mouse splenocytes, mouse T cells and human U937 cells, and reduced TNFa- and LPS-stimulated endothelial cell permeability. The compounds also reduced TNFα-induced ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 mRNA expression, but restored TNFα-mediated downregulation of PECAM-1 mRNA expression. In an in vivo setting, the application of ST-968 or ST-1071 to mice resulted in a reduction of blood lymphocytes and significantly reduced the clinical symptoms of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in C57BL/6 mice comparable to FTY720 either by prophylactic or therapeutic treatment. In parallel to the reduced clinical symptoms, infiltration of immune cells in the brain was strongly reduced, and in isolated tissues of brain and spinal cord, the mRNA and protein expressions of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1, as well as of matrix metalloproteinase-9 were reduced by all compounds, whereas PECAM-1 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase TIMP-1 were upregulated. In summary, the data suggest that these novel butterfly derivatives of FTY720 could have considerable implication for future therapies of multiple sclerosis and other autoimmune diseases. PMID:24863045

  18. Probiotic Lactobacillus casei Shirota supplementation does not modulate immunity in healthy men with reduced natural killer cell activity.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Stephanie; Bub, Achim; Franz, Charles M A P; Watzl, Bernhard

    2011-05-01

    Oral intake of probiotic bacteria may beneficially modulate functions of NK cells. In healthy individuals, contradictory results exist as to whether NK cell functions can be modulated by probiotic bacteria. Therefore, the primary objective of our randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was to determine the effects of the probiotic strain Lactobacillus casei Shirota (LcS) on the activity of NK cells in healthy men who had been preselected for a reduced lytic function of their NK cells. Study participants (n = 68) were supplemented for 4 wk with a probiotic drink providing 1.95 × 10(10) CFU LcS/d or with a similar milk drink without probiotic additive. A run-in period of 2 wk preceded the probiotic supplementation followed by a 2-wk follow-up phase without the probiotic or control drink. Changes in the relative proportions of NK cells and other leukocytes as well as multiple functional measurements were determined longitudinally at baseline, after the 4-wk supplementation, and at the end of the follow-up. The probiotic supplementation had no significant effect on NK cell numbers and function or on phagocytosis, respiratory burst, or cytokine secretion of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. In conclusion, 4 wk of supplementation with LcS does not increase NK cell activity in healthy men with a reduced NK cell lytic activity. However, other doses of LcS, time of intervention, or differences, e.g. in the background diet, may result in a different outcome. PMID:21430250

  19. (p40)2-Fc reduces immune-inflammatory response through the activation of T cells in collagen induced arthritis mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seon-Yeong; Lee, Seung Hoon; Park, Seong-Jeong; Kim, Doo-Jin; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Jae-Kyung; Yang, Se-Hwan; Park, Sung-Hwan; Sung, Young-Chul; Kim, Ho-Youn; Cho, Mi-La

    2016-08-01

    IL-12p40 homodimer, a natural antagonist of IL-12 and IL-23, performs an important role in the expression of proinflammatory cytokines that is essential for Th1 and Th17 immune responses. Here, we reveal the therapeutic and immunosuppressive effect of the IL-12p40 subunit ((p40)2-Fc) in an experimental autoimmune arthritis model. We hypothesized that (p40)2-Fc may reduce the inflammatory response and the activation of T cells. In this study, we intraperitoneally injected (p40)2-Fc into collagen induced arthritis (CIA) mice to identify whether (p40)2-Fc attenuates CIA severity. (p40)2-Fc reduced the development of CIA, joint inflammation and cartilage destruction. (p40)2-Fc also significantly decreased the concentration of serum immunoglobulin as well as the number of T cells and C II specific T cells. In addition, osteoclastogenesis in (p40)2-Fc treated mice was down-regulated compared to the mice treated with (p40)2-Fc control. We observed that (p40)2-Fc treatment alleviates arthritis in mice with CIA, reducing inflammation and osteoclast differentiation. These findings suggest that (p40)2-Fc can be a potential therapeutic approach for autoimmune arthritis. PMID:27229912

  20. Targeting the EP1 receptor reduces Fas ligand expression and increases the antitumor immune response in an in vivo model of colon cancer.

    PubMed

    O'Callaghan, Grace; Ryan, Aideen; Neary, Peter; O'Mahony, Caitlin; Shanahan, Fergus; Houston, Aileen

    2013-08-15

    Despite studies demonstrating that inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)-derived prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 ) has significant chemotherapeutic benefits in vitro and in vivo, inhibition of COX enzymes is associated with serious gastrointestinal and cardiovascular side effects, limiting the clinical utility of these drugs. PGE2 signals through four different receptors (EP1-EP4) and targeting individual receptor(s) may avoid these side effects, while retaining significant anticancer benefits. Here, we show that targeted inhibition of the EP1 receptor in the tumor cells and the tumor microenvironment resulted in the significant inhibition of tumor growth in vivo. Both dietary administration and direct injection of the EP1 receptor-specific antagonist, ONO-8713, effectively reduced the growth of established CT26 tumors in BALB/c mice, with suppression of the EP1 receptor in the tumor cells alone less effective in reducing tumor growth. This antitumor effect was associated with reduced Fas ligand expression and attenuated tumor-induced immune suppression. In particular, tumor infiltration by CD4(+) CD25(+) Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells was decreased, whereas the cytotoxic activity of isolated splenocytes against CT26 cells was increased. F4/80(+) macrophage infiltration was also decreased; however, there was no change in macrophage phenotype. These findings suggest that the EP1 receptor represents a potential target for the treatment of colon cancer. PMID:23390011

  1. Reduced in vitro immune responses of purified human Leu-3 (helper/inducer phenotype) cells after total lymphoid irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Field, E.H.; Engleman, E.G.; Terrell, C.P.; Strober, S.

    1984-02-01

    Patients treated with total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) for intractible rheumatoid arthritis showed marked decreases in the in vitro proliferative responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBM) to antigens and mitogens. To determine whether an intrinsic deficit in helper/inducer cell proliferation contributed to decreased responses, cells of the helper/inducer phenotype were purified from the PBM of treated patients by using monoclonal anti-Leu-3 antibody and a modified panning procedure. The purified Leu-3 cells obtained after TLI showed a marked reduction in (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation in response to allogeneic lymphocytes, PHA, Con A, and several protein antigens, as compared with that of cells from the same patients obtained before TLI. In addition, the quantity of Leu-3 surface antigen on the panned cells was reduced after TLI. The results suggest that TLI induces prolonged qualitative as well as quantitative changes in circulating Leu-3 T cells. These changes may contribute to the clinical effects of TLI.

  2. Worm Proteins of Schistosoma mansoni Reduce the Severity of Experimental Chronic Colitis in Mice by Suppressing Colonic Proinflammatory Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Heylen, Marthe; Ruyssers, Nathalie E.; De Man, Joris G.; Timmermans, Jean-Pierre; Pelckmans, Paul A.; Moreels, Tom G.; De Winter, Benedicte Y.

    2014-01-01

    Although helminthic therapy as a possible new option to treat inflammatory bowel disease is a well-established concept by now, the search for immunomodulatory helminth-derived compounds and their mechanisms of action is still ongoing. We investigated the therapeutic potential and the underlying immunological mechanisms of Schistosoma mansoni soluble worm proteins (SmSWP) in an adoptive T cell transfer mouse model of chronic colitis. Both a curative and a preventive treatment protocol were included in this study. The curative administration of SmSWP (started when colitis was established), resulted in a significant improvement of the clinical disease score, colonoscopy, macroscopic and microscopic inflammation score, colon length and myeloperoxidase activity. The therapeutic potential of the preventive SmSWP treatment (started before colitis was established), was less pronounced compared with the curative SmSWP treatment but still resulted in an improved clinical disease score, body weight loss, colon length and microscopic inflammation score. Both the curative and preventive SmSWP treatment downregulated the mRNA expression of the proinflammatory cytokines IFN-γ and IL-17A and upregulated the mRNA expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-4 in the colon at the end of the experiment. This colonic immunomodulatory effect of SmSWP could not be confirmed at the protein level. Moreover, the effect of SmSWP appeared to be a local colonic phenomenon, since the flow cytometric T cell characterization of the mesenteric lymph nodes and the cytokine measurements in the serum did not reveal any effect of SmSWP treatment. In conclusion, SmSWP treatment reduced the severity of colitis in the adoptive transfer mouse model via the suppression of proinflammatory cytokines and the induction of an anti-inflammatory response in the colon. PMID:25313594

  3. Tadalafil Reduces Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells and Regulatory T Cells and Promotes Tumor Immunity in Patients with Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Vella, Jennifer L.; Reis, Isildinha M.; De la fuente, Adriana C.; Gomez, Carmen; Sargi, Zoukaa; Nazarian, Ronen; Califano, Joseph; Borrello, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) and regulatory T cells (Treg) play a key role in the progression of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). On the basis of our preclinical data demonstrating that phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE5) inhibition can modulate these cell populations, we evaluated whether the PDE5 inhibitor tadalafil can revert tumor-induced immunosuppression and promote tumor immunity in patients with HNSCC. Experimental Design First, we functionally and phenotypically characterized MDSCs in HNSCCs and determined, retrospectively, whether their presence at the tumor site correlates with recurrence. Then, we performed a prospective single-center, double-blinded, randomized, three-arm study in which patients with HNSCC undergoing definitive surgical resection of oral and oropharyngeal tumors were treated with tadalafil 10 μg/day, 20 μg/day, or placebo for at least 20 days preoperatively. Blood and tumor MDSC and Treg presence and CD8+ T-cell reactivity to tumor antigens were evaluated before and after treatment. Results MDSCs were characterized in HNSCC and their intratumoral presence significantly correlates with recurrence. Tadalafil treatment was well tolerated and significantly reduced both MDSCs and Treg concentrations in the blood and in the tumor (P < 0.05). In addition, the concentration of blood CD8+ T cells reactive to autologous tumor antigens significantly increased after treatment (P < 0.05). Tadalafil immunomodulatory activity was maximized at an intermediate dose but not at higher doses. Mechanistic analysis suggests a possible off-target effect on PDE11 at high dosages that, by increasing intracellular cAMP, may negatively affect antitumor immunity. Conclusions Tadalafil seems to beneficially modulate the tumor micro- and macro-environment in patients with HNSCC by lowering MDSCs and Tregs and increasing tumor-specific CD8+ T cells in a dose-dependent fashion. PMID:25320361

  4. Common γ-chain blocking peptide reduces in vitro immune activation markers in HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis.

    PubMed

    Massoud, Raya; Enose-Akahata, Yoshimi; Tagaya, Yutaka; Azimi, Nazli; Basheer, Asjad; Jacobson, Steven

    2015-09-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) is a progressive inflammatory myelopathy occurring in a subset of HTLV-1-infected individuals. Despite advances in understanding its immunopathogenesis, an effective treatment remains to be found. IL-2 and IL-15, members of the gamma chain (γc) family of cytokines, are prominently deregulated in HAM/TSP and underlie many of the characteristic immune abnormalities, such as spontaneous lymphocyte proliferation (SP), increased STAT5 phosphorylation in the lymphocytes, and increased frequency and cytotoxicity of virus-specific cytotoxic CD8(+) T lymphocytes (CTLs). In this study, we describe a novel immunomodulatory strategy consisting of selective blockade of certain γc family cytokines, including IL-2 and IL-15, with a γc antagonistic peptide. In vitro, a PEGylated form of the peptide, named BNZ132-1-40, reduced multiple immune activation markers such as SP, STAT5 phosphorylation, spontaneous degranulation of CD8(+) T cells, and the frequency of transactivator protein (Tax)-specific CD8(+) CTLs, thought to be major players in the immunopathogenesis of the disease. This strategy is thus a promising therapeutic approach to HAM/TSP with the potential of being more effective than single monoclonal antibodies targeting either IL-2 or IL-15 receptors and safer than inhibitors of downstream signaling molecules such as JAK1 inhibitors. Finally, selective cytokine blockade with antagonistic peptides might be applicable to multiple other conditions in which cytokines are pathogenic. PMID:26283355

  5. Peripheral blood mononuclear cell supernatants from asymptomatic dogs immunized and experimentally challenged with Leishmania chagasi can stimulate canine macrophages to reduce infection in vitro.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Cleusa Alves Theodoro; Batista, Luís Fábio da Silva; Teixeira, Márcia Cristina Aquino; Pereira, Andréa Mendes; Santos, Patrícia Oliveira Meira; de Sá Oliveira, Geraldo Gileno; de Freitas, Luiz Antônio Rodrigues; Veras, Patrícia Sampaio Tavares

    2007-02-28

    Leishmania chagasi is the causative agent of visceral leishmaniasis in both humans and dogs in the New World. The dog is the main domestic reservoir and its infection displays different clinical presentations, from asymptomatic to severe disease. Macrophages play an important role in the control of Leishmania infection. Although it is not an area of intense study, some data suggest a role for canine macrophages in parasite killing by a NO-dependent mechanism. It has been proposed that control of human disease could be possible with the development of an effective vaccine against canine visceral leishmaniasis. Development of a rapid in vitro test to predict animal responses to Leishmania infection or vaccination should be helpful. In this study, an in vitro model was established to test whether peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) supernatants from dogs immunized with promastigote lysates and infected with L. chagasi promastigotes could stimulate macrophages from healthy dogs in order to control parasite infection. PBMC from a majority of the immunized and experimentally infected dogs expressed IFN-gamma mRNA and secreted IFN-gamma when stimulated with soluble L. chagasi antigen (SLA) in vitro. Additionally, the supernatants from stimulated PBMC were able to reduce the percentage of infected donor macrophages. The results also indicate that parasite killing in this system is dependent on NO, since aminoguanidine (AMG) reversed this effect. This in vitro test appears to be useful for screening animal responses to parasite inoculation as well as studying the lymphocyte effector mechanisms involved in pathogen killing by canine macrophages. PMID:17045743

  6. Immunization with recombinant varicella-zoster virus expressing herpes simplex virus type 2 glycoprotein D reduces the severity of genital herpes in guinea pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Heineman, T C; Connelly, B L; Bourne, N; Stanberry, L R; Cohen, J

    1995-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is an attractive candidate for a live-virus vector for the delivery of foreign antigens. The Oka vaccine strain of VZV is safe and effective in humans, and recombinant Oka VZV (ROka) can be generated by transfecting cells with a set of overlapping cosmid DNAs. By this method, the herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) glycoprotein D (gD2) gene was inserted into an intergenic site in the unique short region of the Oka VZV genome. Expression of gD2 in cells infected with the recombinant Oka strain VZV (ROka-gD2) was confirmed by antibody staining of fixed cells and by immunoblot analysis. Immune electron microscopy demonstrated the presence of gD2 in the envelope of ROka-gD2 virions. The ability of ROka-gD2 to protect guinea pigs against HSV-2 challenge was assessed by inoculating animals with three doses of uninfected human fibroblasts, fibroblasts infected with ROka VZV, or fibroblasts infected with ROka-gD2. Neutralizing antibodies specific for HSV-2 developed in animals immunized with ROka-gD2. Forty days after the third inoculation, animals were challenged intravaginally with HSV-2. Inoculation of guinea pigs with ROka-gD2 significantly reduced the severity of primary HSV-2 infection (P < 0.001). These experiments demonstrate that the Oka strain of VZV can be used as a live virus vector to protect animals from disease with a heterologous virus. PMID:7494331

  7. Immune System

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Immune System KidsHealth > For Teens > Immune System Print A A ... could put us out of commission. What the Immune System Does The immune (pronounced: ih-MYOON) system, which ...

  8. Loss of SOCS3 in T helper cells resulted in reduced immune responses and hyperproduction of interleukin 10 and transforming growth factor–β1

    PubMed Central

    Kinjyo, Ichiko; Inoue, Hiromasa; Hamano, Shinjiro; Fukuyama, Satoru; Yoshimura, Takeru; Koga, Keiko; Takaki, Hiromi; Himeno, Kunisuke; Takaesu, Giichi; Kobayashi, Takashi; Yoshimura, Akihiko

    2006-01-01

    Suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS)3 is a major negative feedback regulator of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)3-activating cytokines. Transgenic mouse studies indicate that high levels of SOCS3 in T cells result in type 2 T helper cell (Th2) skewing and lead to hypersensitivity to allergic diseases. To define the physiological roles of SOCS3 in T cells, we generated T cell–specific SOCS3 conditional knockout mice. We found that the mice lacking SOCS3 in T cells showed reduced immune responses not only to ovalbumin-induced airway hyperresponsiveness but also to Leishmania major infection. In vitro, SOCS3-deficient CD4+ T cells produced more transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and interleukin (IL)-10, but less IL-4 than control T cells, suggesting preferential Th3-like differentiation. We found that STAT3 positively regulates TGF-β1 promoter activity depending on the potential STAT3 binding sites. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation assay revealed that more STAT3 was recruited to the TGF-β1 promoter in SOCS3-deficient T cells than in control T cells. The activated STAT3 enhanced TGF-β1 and IL-10 expression in T cells, whereas the dominant-negative form of STAT3 suppressed these. From these findings, we propose that SOCS3 regulates the production of the immunoregulatory cytokines TGF-β1 and IL-10 through modulating STAT3 activation. PMID:16606674

  9. The Effects of Reduced Gluten Barley Diet on Humoral and Cell-Mediated Systemic Immune Responses of Gluten-Sensitive Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Sestak, Karol; Thwin, Hazel; Dufour, Jason; Aye, Pyone P.; Liu, David X.; Moehs, Charles P.

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) affects approximately 1% of the general population while an estimated additional 6% suffers from a recently characterized, rapidly emerging, similar disease, referred to as non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS). The only effective treatment of CD and NCGS requires removal of gluten sources from the diet. Since required adherence to a gluten-free diet (GFD) is difficult to accomplish, efforts to develop alternative treatments have been intensifying in recent years. In this study, the non-human primate model of CD/NCGS, e.g., gluten-sensitive rhesus macaque, was utilized with the objective to evaluate the treatment potential of reduced gluten cereals using a reduced gluten (RG; 1% of normal gluten) barley mutant as a model. Conventional and RG barleys were used for the formulation of experimental chows and fed to gluten-sensitive (GS) and control macaques to determine if RG barley causes a remission of dietary gluten-induced clinical and immune responses in GS macaques. The impacts of the RG barley diet were compared with the impacts of the conventional barley-containing chow and the GFD. Although remission of the anti-gliadin antibody (AGA) serum responses and an improvement of clinical diarrhea were noted after switching the conventional to the RG barley diet, production of inflammatory cytokines, e.g., interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) by peripheral CD4+ T helper lymphocytes, persisted during the RG chow treatment and were partially abolished only upon re-administration of the GFD. It was concluded that the RG barley diet might be used for the partial improvement of gluten-induced disease but its therapeutic value still requires upgrading—by co-administration of additional treatments. PMID:25756783

  10. Caloric Restriction reduces inflammation and improves T cell-mediated immune response in obese mice but concomitant consumption of curcumin/piperine adds no further benefit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Obesity is associated with low-grade inflammation and impaired immune response. Caloric restriction (CR) has been shown to inhibit inflammatory response and enhance cell-mediated immune function. Curcumin, the bioactive phenolic component of turmeric spice, is proposed to have anti-obesity and anti-...

  11. Intramammary Immunization of Pregnant Mice with Staphylococcal Protein A Reduces the Post-Challenge Mammary Gland Bacterial Load but Not Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Gogoi-Tiwari, Jully; Williams, Vincent; Waryah, Charlene Babra; Mathavan, Sangeetha; Tiwari, Harish Kumar; Costantino, Paul; Mukkur, Trilochan

    2016-01-01

    Protein A, encoded by the spa gene, is one of the major immune evading MSCRAMM of S. aureus, demonstrated to be prevalent in a significant percentage of clinical bovine mastitis isolates in Australia. Given its’ reported significance in biofilm formation and the superior performance of S. aureus biofilm versus planktonic vaccine in the mouse mastitis model, it was of interest to determine the immunogenicity and protective potential of Protein A as a potential vaccine candidate against bovine mastitis using the mouse mastitis model. Pregnant Balb/c mice were immunised with Protein A emulsified in an alum-based adjuvant by subcutaneous (s/c) or intramammary (i/mam) routes. While humoral immune response of mice post-immunization were determined using indirect ELISA, cell-mediated immune response was assessed by estimation of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) produced by protein A-stimulated splenocyte supernatants. Protective potential of Protein A against experimental mastitis was determined by challenge of immunized versus sham-vaccinated mice by i/mam route, based upon manifestation of clinical symptoms, total bacterial load and histopathological damage to mammary glands. Significantly (p<0.05) higher levels of IgG1 isotype were produced in mice immunized by the s/c route. In contrast, significantly higher levels of the antibody isotype IgG2a were produced in mice immunized by the i/mam route (p<0.05). There was significant reduction (p<0.05) in bacterial loads of the mammary glands of mice immunized by Protein A regardless of the route of immunization, with medium level of clinical symptoms observed up to day 3 post-challenge. However, Protein A vaccine failed to protect immunized mice post-challenge with biofilm producing encapsulated S. aureus via i/mam route, regardless of the route of immunization, as measured by the level of mammary tissue damage. It was concluded that, Protein A in its’ native state was apparently not a suitable candidate for inclusion in a cell

  12. Intramammary Immunization of Pregnant Mice with Staphylococcal Protein A Reduces the Post-Challenge Mammary Gland Bacterial Load but Not Pathology.

    PubMed

    Gogoi-Tiwari, Jully; Williams, Vincent; Waryah, Charlene Babra; Mathavan, Sangeetha; Tiwari, Harish Kumar; Costantino, Paul; Mukkur, Trilochan

    2016-01-01

    Protein A, encoded by the spa gene, is one of the major immune evading MSCRAMM of S. aureus, demonstrated to be prevalent in a significant percentage of clinical bovine mastitis isolates in Australia. Given its' reported significance in biofilm formation and the superior performance of S. aureus biofilm versus planktonic vaccine in the mouse mastitis model, it was of interest to determine the immunogenicity and protective potential of Protein A as a potential vaccine candidate against bovine mastitis using the mouse mastitis model. Pregnant Balb/c mice were immunised with Protein A emulsified in an alum-based adjuvant by subcutaneous (s/c) or intramammary (i/mam) routes. While humoral immune response of mice post-immunization were determined using indirect ELISA, cell-mediated immune response was assessed by estimation of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) produced by protein A-stimulated splenocyte supernatants. Protective potential of Protein A against experimental mastitis was determined by challenge of immunized versus sham-vaccinated mice by i/mam route, based upon manifestation of clinical symptoms, total bacterial load and histopathological damage to mammary glands. Significantly (p<0.05) higher levels of IgG1 isotype were produced in mice immunized by the s/c route. In contrast, significantly higher levels of the antibody isotype IgG2a were produced in mice immunized by the i/mam route (p<0.05). There was significant reduction (p<0.05) in bacterial loads of the mammary glands of mice immunized by Protein A regardless of the route of immunization, with medium level of clinical symptoms observed up to day 3 post-challenge. However, Protein A vaccine failed to protect immunized mice post-challenge with biofilm producing encapsulated S. aureus via i/mam route, regardless of the route of immunization, as measured by the level of mammary tissue damage. It was concluded that, Protein A in its' native state was apparently not a suitable candidate for inclusion in a cell

  13. Immune Restoration

    MedlinePlus

    ... marrow cells immune to HIV infection. Letting the immune system repair itself: CD4 counts have increased for many ... have taken ART. Some scientists believe that the immune system might be able to heal and repair itself ...

  14. Immune response

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... cells. T cells are responsible for cell-mediated immunity. This type of immunity becomes deficient in persons with HIV, the virus ... blood. B lymphocytes provide the body with humoral immunity as they circulate in the fluids in search ...

  15. Intranasal immunization with SAG1 protein of Toxoplasma gondii in association with cholera toxin dramatically reduces development of cerebral cysts after oral infection.

    PubMed Central

    Debard, N; Buzoni-Gatel, D; Bout, D

    1996-01-01

    SAG1 protein of Toxoplasma gondii was evaluated as a protective antigen in mucosal immunization with cholera toxin as an adjuvant. CBA/J mice intranasally immunized with a combination of SAG1 and cholera toxin exhibited significantly fewer cysts in the brain after oral infection with the 76K strain of T. gondii than control mice. This acquired protection lasted at least 5 months. Protected mice developed high levels of serum anti-SAG1 immunoglobulin G antibodies as well as an enhanced systemic cellular response, as assessed by the proliferation of splenocytes in response to SAG1 restimulation in vitro. This cellular proliferation was associated with an increase of interleukin-2 and interleukin-5 synthesis and with barely detectable gamma interferon production. Splenic immune T cells were shown to convey modest protection to recipients against development of brain cysts following oral infection with T. gondii. Significant production of anti-SAG1 immunoglobulin A was induced in intestinal secretions of protected mice. These results indicate that intranasal immunization with SAG1 and cholera toxin can induce mucosal and systemic immune responses and affords partial and long-lasting resistance against the establishment of chronic toxoplasmosis. PMID:8675321

  16. Immunization with malondialdehyde-modified low-density lipoprotein (LDL) reduces atherosclerosis in LDL receptor-deficient mice challenged with Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    PubMed

    Turunen, S Pauliina; Kummu, Outi; Wang, Chunguang; Harila, Kirsi; Mattila, Riikka; Sahlman, Marjo; Pussinen, Pirkko J; Hörkkö, Sohvi

    2015-05-01

    Periodontal infections increase the risk of atherosclerotic vascular disease via partly unresolved mechanisms. Of the natural IgM Abs that recognize molecular mimicry on bacterial epitopes and modified lipid and protein structures, IgM directed against oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is associated with atheroprotective properties. Here, the effect of natural immune responses to malondialdehyde-modified LDL (MDA-LDL) in conferring protection against atherosclerosis, which was accelerated by the major periodontopathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis, was investigated. LDL receptor-deficient (LDLR(-/-)) mice were immunized with mouse MDA-LDL without adjuvant before topical application challenge with live P. gingivalis. Atherosclerosis was analyzed after a high-fat diet, and plasma IgG and IgM Ab levels were measured throughout the study, and the secretion of IL-5, IL-10 and IFN-γ in splenocytes stimulated with MDA-LDL was determined. LDLR(-/-) mice immunized with MDA-LDL had elevated IgM and IgG levels to MDA-LDL compared with saline-treated controls. MDA-LDL immunization diminished aortic lipid depositions after challenge with P. gingivalis compared with mice receiving only P. gingivalis challenge. Immunization of LDLR(-/-) mice with homologous MDA-LDL stimulated the production of IL-5, implicating general activation of B-1 cells. Immune responses to MDA-LDL protected from the P. gingivalis-accelerated atherosclerosis. Thus, the linkage between bacterial infectious burden and atherogenesis is suggested to be modulated via natural IgM directed against cross-reactive epitopes on bacteria and modified LDL. PMID:25134521

  17. Effectiveness of an immunocastration vaccine formulation to reduce the gonadal function in female and male mice by Th1/Th2 immune response.

    PubMed

    Siel, Daniela; Vidal, Sonia; Sevilla, Rafael; Paredes, Rodolfo; Carvallo, Francisco; Lapierre, Lisette; Maino, Mario; Pérez, Oliver; Sáenz, Leonardo

    2016-10-01

    Immunocastration has emerged as an alternative to surgical castration in different animal species. This study examined the effectiveness of a new vaccine formulation for immunocastration using the biopolymer chitosan as adjuvant. First, female and male mice (n = 4), in three subsequent experiments were vaccinated at Days 1 and 30 of the study, to determine the immune response profile and gonadal alterations due to immunization. The results demonstrated that the vaccine was able to elicit strong antibody responses against native GnRH hormone (P < 0.01), with a T helper (Th) 1/Th2 immune response profile. Along with this, a suppression of gonadal activity with a decrease of luteal bodies (1.08 ± 0.22 and 4.08 ± 0.39) and antral follicles (1.17 ± 0.32 and 4.5 ± 0.38) in the ovaries of immunized females and control, respectively, and a reduction of seminiferous tubules size (142.3 ± 5.58 mm and 198.0 ± 6.11 mm) and germinal cellular layers (3.58 ± 0.26 and 5.08 ± 0.29) of immunized males and control animals, respectively, were observed (P < 0.01). Then, in a study of long-term immune response due to vaccination in female and male mice (n = 4) from two subsequent experiments, a suppression of gonadal function and an induction of a Th1/Th2 immune response was also observed, determined by both, immunoglobulin and cytokine profiles, which lasted until the end of the study (7 months; P < 0.01). The findings of this study have demonstrated that vaccination with a new immunocastration vaccine inducing a Th1/Th2 immune response against GnRH (P < 0.01) elicit a decrease of gonadal function in male and female mice (P < 0.01). Owing to long-term duration of the antibody levels generated, this vaccine formulation appears as a promising alternative for immunocastration of several animal species where long-lasting reproductive block is needed. PMID:27344434

  18. Immunization with Recombinant Adenoviral Vectors Expressing HCV Core or F Proteins Leads to T Cells with Reduced Effector Molecules Granzyme B and IFN-γ: A Potential New Strategy for Immune Evasion in HCV Infection.

    PubMed

    Samrat, Subodh Kumar; Vedi, Satish; Singh, Shakti; Li, Wen; Kumar, Rakesh; Agrawal, Babita

    2015-01-01

    Multispecific, broad, and potent T cell responses have been correlated with viral clearance in hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. However, the majority of infected patients develop chronic infection, suggesting that natural infection mostly leads to development of inefficient T cell immunity. Multiple mechanisms of immune modulation and evasion have been shown in HCV infection through various investigations. This study examined the generation and modulation of T cell responses against core and frameshift (F) proteins of HCV. A single immunization of mice with replication incompetent recombinant adenovirus vectors encoding for F or core antigens induces poor T cell responses and leads to generation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells with low granzyme B (GrB) expression. These T cells have impaired GrB enzyme activity and are unable to kill peptide loaded target cells. The low intracellular expression of GrB is not due to degranulation of cytotoxic granules containing cytotoxic T cells. Addition of exogenous IL-2 in in vitro cultures leads to partial recovery of GrB production, whereas immunization with the Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonist poly I:C leads to complete restoration of GrB expression in both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Thus, a possible new strategy of T cell modulation is recognized wherein effector T cells are caused to be dysfunctional by HCV-derived antigens F or core, and strategies are also delineated to overcome this dysfunction. These studies are important in the investigation of prophylactic vaccine and immunotherapy strategies for HCV infection. PMID:26133045

  19. Integrated Immune

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, Brian; Mehta, Satish; Stowe, Raymond; Uchakin, Peter; Quiriarte, Heather; Pierson, Duane; Sams, Clarnece

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the program to replace several recent studies about astronaut immune systems with one comprehensive study that will include in-flight sampling. The study will address lack of in-flight data to determine the inflight status of immune systems, physiological stress, viral immunity, to determine the clinical risk related to immune dysregulation for exploration class spaceflight, and to determine the appropriate monitoring strategy for spaceflight-associated immune dysfunction, that could be used for the evaluation of countermeasures.

  20. Behavioral Immunity in Insects

    PubMed Central

    de Roode, Jacobus C.; Lefèvre, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    Parasites can dramatically reduce the fitness of their hosts, and natural selection should favor defense mechanisms that can protect hosts against disease. Much work has focused on understanding genetic and physiological immunity against parasites, but hosts can also use behaviors to avoid infection, reduce parasite growth or alleviate disease symptoms. It is increasingly recognized that such behaviors are common in insects, providing strong protection against parasites and parasitoids. We review the current evidence for behavioral immunity in insects, present a framework for investigating such behavior, and emphasize that behavioral immunity may act through indirect rather than direct fitness benefits. We also discuss the implications for host-parasite co-evolution, local adaptation, and the evolution of non-behavioral physiological immune systems. Finally, we argue that the study of behavioral immunity in insects has much to offer for investigations in vertebrates, in which this topic has traditionally been studied. PMID:26466629

  1. Bacillus cereus var. Toyoi modulates the immune reaction and reduces the occurrence of diarrhea in piglets challenged with Salmonella Typhimurium DT104.

    PubMed

    Scharek-Tedin, L; Pieper, R; Vahjen, W; Tedin, K; Neumann, K; Zentek, J

    2013-12-01

    suspensions were compared. The infection rate (IR) of γδ T cells was higher in all six cell suspensions than the IR of CD8β expressing T cells (P = 0.002). In conclusion, B. cereus var. Toyoi supplementation of sows and their piglets had a positive impact on the health status of the piglets after a challenge with Salmonella, likely due to an altered immune response marked by reduced frequencies of CD8+ γδ T cells in the peripheral blood and the jejunal epithelium. PMID:24126275

  2. The immune response to vaccinia virus is significantly reduced after scarification with TK- recombinants as compared to wild-type virus.

    PubMed

    Phillpotts, R J; Lescott, T; Gates, A J; Jones, L

    2000-01-01

    Although it is unlikely that large-scale vaccination against smallpox will ever be required again, it is conceivable that the need may arise to vaccinate against a human orthopoxvirus infection. A possible example could be the emergence of monkey poxvirus (MPV) as a significant human disease in Africa. Vaccinia virus (VV) recombinants, genetically modified to carry the immunogenic proteins of other pathogenic organisms, have potential use as vaccines against other diseases present in this region. The immune response to parental wild-type (wt) or recombinant VV was examined by binding and functional assays, relevant to protection: total IgG, IgG subclass profile, B5R gene product (gp42)-specific IgG, neutralizing antibodies and class 1-mediated cytotoxic lymphocyte activity. There was a substantial reduction in the immune response to VV after scarification with about 10(8) PFU of recombinant as compared to wt virus. These data suggest that to achieve the levels of immunity associated with protection against human orthopoxvirus infection, and to control a possible future outbreak of orthopoxvirus disease, the use of wt VV would be necessary. PMID:11155357

  3. The nuclear factor-κB inhibitor pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate reduces polyinosinic-polycytidilic acid-induced immune response in pregnant rats and the behavioral defects of their adult offspring

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Epidemiological studies have indicated that maternal infection during pregnancy may lead to a higher incidence of schizophrenia in the offspring. It is assumed that the maternal infection increases the immune response, leading to neurodevelopmental disorders in the offspring. Maternal polyinosinic-polycytidilic acid (PolyI:C) treatment induces a wide range of characteristics in the offspring mimicking some schizophrenia symptoms in humans. These observations are consistent with the neurodevelopmental hypothesis of schizophrenia. Methods We examined whether suppression of the maternal immune response could prevent neurodevelopmental disorders in adult offspring. PolyI:C or saline was administered to early pregnant rats to mimic maternal infection, and the maternal immune response represented by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) levels was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). The NF-κB inhibitor pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) was used to suppress the maternal immune response. Neurodevelopmental disorders in adult offspring were examined by prepulse inhibition (PPI), passive avoidance, and active avoidance tests. Results PolyI:C administration to early pregnant rats led to elevated serum cytokine levels as shown by massive increases in serum TNF-α and IL-10 levels. The adult offspring showed defects in prepulse inhibition, and passive avoidance and active avoidance tests. PDTC intervention in early pregnant rats suppressed cytokine increases and reduced the severity of neurodevelopmental defects in adult offspring. Conclusions Our findings suggest that PDTC can suppress the maternal immune response induced by PolyI:C and partially prevent neurodevelopmental disorders of adult offspring. PMID:22208616

  4. Childhood Immunization

    MedlinePlus

    ... lowest levels in history, thanks to years of immunization. Children must get at least some vaccines before ... child provide protection for many years, adults need immunizations too. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  5. Immunizations - diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000331.htm Immunizations - diabetes To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Immunizations (vaccines or vaccinations) help protect you from some ...

  6. FTY720 and two novel butterfly derivatives exert a general anti-inflammatory potential by reducing immune cell adhesion to endothelial cells through activation of S1P(3) and phosphoinositide 3-kinase.

    PubMed

    Imeri, Faik; Blanchard, Olivier; Jenni, Aurelio; Schwalm, Stephanie; Wünsche, Christin; Zivkovic, Aleksandra; Stark, Holger; Pfeilschifter, Josef; Huwiler, Andrea

    2015-12-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a key lipid regulator of a variety of cellular responses including cell proliferation and survival, cell migration, and inflammatory reactions. Here, we investigated the effect of S1P receptor activation on immune cell adhesion to endothelial cells under inflammatory conditions. We show that S1P reduces both tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α- and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated adhesion of Jurkat and U937 cells to an endothelial monolayer. The reducing effect of S1P was reversed by the S1P1+3 antagonist VPC23019 but not by the S1P1 antagonist W146. Additionally, knockdown of S1P3, but not S1P1, by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) abolished the reducing effect of S1P, suggesting the involvement of S1P3. A suppression of immune cell adhesion was also seen with the immunomodulatory drug FTY720 and two novel butterfly derivatives ST-968 and ST-1071. On the molecular level, S1P and all FTY720 derivatives reduced the mRNA expression of LPS- and TNF-α-induced adhesion molecules including ICAM-1, VCAM-1, E-selectin, and CD44 which was reversed by the PI3K inhibitor LY294002, but not by the MEK inhibitor U0126.In summary, our data demonstrate a novel molecular mechanism by which S1P, FTY720, and two novel butterfly derivatives acted anti-inflammatory that is by suppressing gene transcription of various endothelial adhesion molecules and thereby preventing adhesion of immune cells to endothelial cells and subsequent extravasation. PMID:26267293

  7. BRAF V600E mutation correlates with suppressive tumor immune microenvironment and reduced disease-free survival in Langerhans cell histiocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Kaixuan; Wang, Zhe; Ohshima, Koichi; Liu, Yixiong; Zhang, Weichen; Wang, Lu; Fan, Linni; Li, Mingyang; Li, Xia; Wang, Yingmei; Yu, Zhou; Yan, Qingguo; Guo, Shuangping; Wei, Jie; Guo, Ying

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a neoplasm of myeloid origin characterized by a clonal proliferation of CD1a+/CD207+ dendritic cells. Recurrent BRAF V600E mutation has been reported in LCH. In the present report, we confirm the feasibility of the high-specificity monoclonal antibody VE1 for detecting BRAF V600E mutation in 36/97 (37.1%) retrospectively enrolled patients with LCH; concordant immunohistochemistry and Sanger sequencing results were seen in 94.8% of cases. We then assessed the tumor immune microenvironment status in LCH, and found that the GATA binding protein 3 (GATA3)+/T-bet+ ratio could distinguish between clinical multi-system/single-system (SS) multifocal and SS unifocal LCH. Notably, we found that BRAF V600E mutation is significantly correlated with increased programmed cell death 1 ligand 1 (PDL1) expression and forkhead box protein 3 (FOXP3)+ regulatory T cells (p < 0.001, 0.009, respectively). Moreover, Cox multivariate survival analysis showed that BRAF V600E mutation and PDL1 were independent prognostic factors of poor disease-free survival (DFS) in LCH (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.38, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02–5.56, p = 0.044; HR = 3.06, 95%CI 1.14–7.14, p = 0.025, respectively), and the superiority of PDL1 in sensitivity and specificity as biomarker for DFS in LCH was demonstrated by receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves when compared with BRAF V600E and risk category. Collectively, this study identifies for the first time relationship between BRAF V600E mutation and a suppressive tumor immune microenvironment in LCH, resulting in disruption of host–tumor immune surveillance, which is DFS. Our findings may provide a rationale for combining immunotherapy and BRAF-targeted therapy for treating patients with BRAF V600E mutant LCH. PMID:27622040

  8. BRAF V600E mutation correlates with suppressive tumor immune microenvironment and reduced disease-free survival in Langerhans cell histiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Kaixuan; Wang, Zhe; Ohshima, Koichi; Liu, Yixiong; Zhang, Weichen; Wang, Lu; Fan, Linni; Li, Mingyang; Li, Xia; Wang, Yingmei; Yu, Zhou; Yan, Qingguo; Guo, Shuangping; Wei, Jie; Guo, Ying

    2016-07-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a neoplasm of myeloid origin characterized by a clonal proliferation of CD1a(+)/CD207(+) dendritic cells. Recurrent BRAF V600E mutation has been reported in LCH. In the present report, we confirm the feasibility of the high-specificity monoclonal antibody VE1 for detecting BRAF V600E mutation in 36/97 (37.1%) retrospectively enrolled patients with LCH; concordant immunohistochemistry and Sanger sequencing results were seen in 94.8% of cases. We then assessed the tumor immune microenvironment status in LCH, and found that the GATA binding protein 3 (GATA3)(+)/T-bet(+) ratio could distinguish between clinical multi-system/single-system (SS) multifocal and SS unifocal LCH. Notably, we found that BRAF V600E mutation is significantly correlated with increased programmed cell death 1 ligand 1 (PDL1) expression and forkhead box protein 3 (FOXP3)(+) regulatory T cells (p < 0.001, 0.009, respectively). Moreover, Cox multivariate survival analysis showed that BRAF V600E mutation and PDL1 were independent prognostic factors of poor disease-free survival (DFS) in LCH (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.38, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02-5.56, p = 0.044; HR = 3.06, 95%CI 1.14-7.14, p = 0.025, respectively), and the superiority of PDL1 in sensitivity and specificity as biomarker for DFS in LCH was demonstrated by receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves when compared with BRAF V600E and risk category. Collectively, this study identifies for the first time relationship between BRAF V600E mutation and a suppressive tumor immune microenvironment in LCH, resulting in disruption of host-tumor immune surveillance, which is DFS. Our findings may provide a rationale for combining immunotherapy and BRAF-targeted therapy for treating patients with BRAF V600E mutant LCH. PMID:27622040

  9. Sublethal red tide toxin exposure in free-ranging manatees (Trichechus manatus) affects the immune system through reduced lymphocyte proliferation responses, inflammation, and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Catherine J; Butawan, Matthew; Yordy, Jennifer; Ball, Ray; Flewelling, Leanne; de Wit, Martine; Bonde, Robert K

    2015-04-01

    The health of many Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris) is adversely affected by exposure to blooms of the toxic dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis. K. brevis blooms are common in manatee habitats of Florida's southwestern coast and produce a group of cyclic polyether toxins collectively referred to as red tide toxins, or brevetoxins. Although a large number of manatees exposed to significant levels of red tide toxins die, several manatees are rescued from sublethal exposure and are successfully treated and returned to the wild. Sublethal brevetoxin exposure may potentially impact the manatee immune system. Lymphocyte proliferative responses and a suite of immune function parameters in the plasma were used to evaluate effects of brevetoxin exposure on health of manatees rescued from natural exposure to red tide toxins in their habitat. Blood samples were collected from rescued manatees at Lowry Park Zoo in Tampa, FL and from healthy, unexposed manatees in Crystal River, FL. Peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) isolated from whole blood were stimulated with T-cell mitogens, ConA and PHA. A suite of plasma parameters, including plasma protein electrophoresis profiles, lysozyme activity, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and reactive oxygen/nitrogen (ROS/RNS) species, was also used to assess manatee health. Significant decreases (p<0.05) in lymphocyte proliferation were observed in ConA and PHA stimulated lymphocytes from rescued animals compared to non-exposed animals. Significant correlations were observed between oxidative stress markers (SOD, ROS/RNS) and plasma brevetoxin concentrations. Sublethal exposure to brevetoxins in the wild impacts some immune function components, and thus, overall health, in the Florida manatee. PMID:25678466

  10. Immunization of lambs with the S48 strain of Toxoplasma gondii reduces tissue cyst burden following oral challenge with a complete strain of the parasite.

    PubMed

    Katzer, Frank; Canton, German; Burrells, Alison; Palarea-Albaladejo, Javier; Horton, Ben; Bartley, Paul M; Pang, Yvonne; Chianini, Francesca; Innes, Elisabeth A; Benavides, Julio

    2014-09-15

    This study evaluates the influence of immunizing lambs with the incomplete S48 strain of Toxoplasma gondii, on parasite dissemination following a live oral challenge with a complete strain of T. gondii (M4). Lambs were culled at 14, 28 and 42 days post challenge. Parasite DNA was detected at significantly (p<0.0001) lower levels in samples from the vaccinated/challenged group (0% in heart and 5.9% in skeletal muscles), when compared to the non-vaccinated/challenged animals (75% heart, 87.9% skeletal muscle). S48 T. gondii DNA was found in muscle or lymph nodes until 42 days post infection, suggesting that parasite DNA or tachyzoites could persist longer after immunization than previously thought. Non-vaccinated/challenged animals showed more frequent lesions in muscles and central nervous system than the vaccinated animals. These results demonstrate that vaccination of lambs with the incomplete S48 T. gondii strain, can protect against establishment of tissue cysts following challenge with a complete strain of T. gondii. Consumption of undercooked meat containing T. gondii cysts is a major route of transmission to people, therefore vaccination of food animals may improve the safety of meat for human consumption. PMID:25062897

  11. NK cells inhibit humoral immunity by reducing the abundance of CD4+ T follicular helper cells during a chronic virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Kevin D.; Kline, Hannah C.; Whitmire, Jason K.

    2015-01-01

    There is a need to understand better how to improve B cell responses and immunity to persisting virus infections, which often cause debilitating illness or death. People with chronic virus infection show evidence of improved virus control when there is a strong neutralizing antibody response, and conversely, B cell dysfunction is associated with higher viral loads. We showed previously that NK cells inhibit CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses to disseminating LCMV infection and that depletion of NK cells attenuates chronic infection. Here, we examined the effect of NK cell depletion on B cell responses to LCMV infection in mice. Whereas mice infected acutely generated a peak level of antibody soon after the infection was resolved, mice infected chronically showed a continued increase in antibody levels that exceeded those after acute infection. We found that early NK cell depletion rapidly increased virus-specific antibody levels to chronic infection, and this effect depended on CD4+ T cells and was associated with elevated numbers of CXCR5+CD4+ TFH cells. However, the NK cell-depleted mice controlled the infection and by 1 mo pi, had lower TFH cell numbers and antibody levels compared with mice with sustained infection. Finally, we show that NK cell depletion improved antiviral CD8+ T cell responses only when B cells and virus-specific antibody were present. Our data indicate that NK cells diminish immunity to chronic infection, in part, by suppressing TFH cell and antibody responses. PMID:25986014

  12. Echinoderm immunity.

    PubMed

    Smith, L Courtney; Ghosh, Julie; Buckley, Katherine M; Clow, Lori A; Dheilly, Nolwenn M; Haug, Tor; Henson, John H; Li, Chun; Lun, Cheng Man; Majeske, Audrey J; Matranga, Valeria; Nair, Sham V; Rast, Jonathan P; Raftos, David A; Roth, Mattias; Sacchi, Sandro; Schrankel, Catherine S; Stensvåg, Klara

    2010-01-01

    A survey for immune genes in the genome for the purple sea urchin has shown that the immune system is complex and sophisticated. By inference, immune responses of all echinoderms maybe similar. The immune system is mediated by several types of coelomocytes that are also useful as sensors of environmental stresses. There are a number of large gene families in the purple sea urchin genome that function in immunity and of which at least one appears to employ novel approaches for sequence diversification. Echinoderms have a simpler complement system, a large set of lectin genes and a number of antimicrobial peptides. Profiling the immune genes expressed by coelomocytes and the proteins in the coelomic fluid provide detailed information about immune functions in the sea urchin. The importance of echinoderms in maintaining marine ecosystem stability and the disastrous effects of their removal due to disease will require future collaborations between ecologists and immunologists working towards understanding and preserving marine habitats. PMID:21528703

  13. Immune interventions in stroke

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Ying; Liu, Qiang; Anrather, Josef

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory and immune responses in the brain can shape the clinical presentation and outcome of stroke. Approaches for effective management of acute stroke are sparse and many measures for brain protection fail, but our ability to modulate the immune system and modify the disease progression of multiple sclerosis is increasing. As a result, immune interventions are currently being explored as therapeutic interventions in acute stroke. In this Review, we compare the immunological features of acute stroke with those of multiple sclerosis, identify unique immunological features of stroke, and consider the evidence for immune interventions. In acute stroke, microglia activation and cell death products trigger an inflammatory cascade that damages vessels and the parenchyma within minutes to hours of the ischaemia or haemorrhage. Immune interventions that restrict brain inflammation, vascular permeability and tissue oedema must be administered rapidly to reduce acute immune-mediated destruction and to avoid subsequent immunosuppression. Preliminary results suggest that the use of drugs that modify disease in multiple sclerosis might accomplish these goals in ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke. Further elucidation of the immune mechanisms involved in stroke is likely to lead to successful immune interventions. PMID:26303850

  14. DNA Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shixia; Lu, Shan

    2013-01-01

    DNA immunization was discovered in early 1990s and its use has been expanded from vaccine studies to a broader range of biomedical research, such as the generation of high quality polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies as research reagents. In this unit, three common DNA immunization methods are described: needle injection, electroporation and gene gun. In addition, several common considerations related to DNA immunization are discussed. PMID:24510291

  15. Inhibition of RelA-Ser536 Phosphorylation by a Competing Peptide Reduces Mouse Liver Fibrosis Without Blocking the Innate Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Moles, Anna; Sanchez, Ana M; Banks, Paul S; Murphy, Lindsay B; Luli, Saimir; Borthwick, Lee; Fisher, Andrew; O’Reilly, Steven; van Laar, Jacob M; White, Steven A; Perkins, Neil D; Burt, Alastair D; Mann, Derek A; Oakley, Fiona

    2013-01-01

    Phosphorylation of the RelA subunit at serine 536 (RelA-P-Ser536) is important for hepatic myofibroblast survival and is mechanistically implicated in liver fibrosis. Here, we show that a cell-permeable competing peptide (P6) functions as a specific targeted inhibitor of RelA-P-Ser536 in vivo and exerts an antifibrogenic effect in two progressive liver disease models, but does not impair hepatic inflammation or innate immune responses after lipopolysaccharide challenge. Using kinase assays and western blotting, we confirm that P6 is a substrate for the inhibitory kappa B kinases (IKKs), IKKα and IKKβ, and, in human hepatic myofibroblasts, P6 prevents RelA-P-Ser536, but does not affect IKK activation of IκBα. We demonstrate that RelA-P-Ser536 is a feature of human lung and skin fibroblasts, but not lung epithelial cells, in vitro and is present in sclerotic skin and diseased lungs of patients suffering from idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Conclusion: RelA-P-Ser536 may be a core fibrogenic regulator of fibroblast phenotype. (Hepatology 2013) PMID:22996371

  16. Immune System

    EPA Science Inventory

    A properly functioning immune system is essential to good health. It defends the body against infectious agents and in some cases tumor cells. Individuals with immune deficiencies resulting from genetic defects, diseases (e.g., AIDS, leukemia), or drug therapies are more suscepti...

  17. Maternal Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Helen Y.; Englund, Janet A.

    2014-01-01

    Maternal immunization has the potential to protect the pregnant woman, fetus, and infant from vaccine-preventable diseases. Maternal immunoglobulin G is actively transported across the placenta, providing passive immunity to the neonate and infant prior to the infant's ability to respond to vaccines. Currently inactivated influenza, tetanus toxoid, and acellular pertussis vaccines are recommended during pregnancy. Several other vaccines have been studied in pregnancy and found to be safe and immunogenic and to provide antibody to infants. These include pneumococcus, group B Streptococcus, Haemophilus influenzae type b, and meningococcus vaccines. Other vaccines in development for potential maternal immunization include respiratory syncytial virus, herpes simplex virus, and cytomegalovirus vaccines. PMID:24799324

  18. Immunity challenge.

    PubMed

    Davenport, R John

    2003-06-11

    As people get older, their immune systems falter. The elderly are more susceptible to infections than youngsters are, and hyperactive inflammatory responses appear to contribute to some age-associated illnesses, including Alzheimer's disease and atherosclerosis. Investigating the effect of aging on the immune system was once a scientific stepchild, but card-carrying immunologists are now tackling the problem head-on. Despite the immune system's complexity, researchers have started to make sense of how its components change with age. As the research progresses, scientists hope to bolster elderly people's response to infectious diseases and quiet the inflammation that can make aging a painful experience. PMID:12844525

  19. Prognostic impact of immune status and hematopoietic recovery before and after fludarabine, IV busulfan, and antithymocyte globulins (FB2 regimen) reduced-intensity conditioning regimen (RIC) allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT).

    PubMed

    Le Bourgeois, Amandine; Lestang, Elsa; Guillaume, Thierry; Delaunay, Jacques; Ayari, Sameh; Blin, Nicolas; Clavert, Aline; Tessoulin, Benoit; Dubruille, Viviane; Mahe, Beatrice; Roland, Virginie; Gastinne, Thomas; Le Gouill, Steven; Moreau, Philippe; Mohty, Mohamad; Planche, Lucie; Chevallier, Patrice

    2013-03-01

    This retrospective analysis aimed to assess hematopoietic and immune recovery in a cohort of 53 patients [males: n = 33; median age: 59 yr (range: 22-70)] who received a FB2 (fludarabine 120-150 mg/m² + IV busulfan 6.4 mg/kg + antithymocyte globulin thymoglobulin 5 mg/kg) reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) allo-stem cells transplantations (SCT). With a median follow-up of 19 months (range: 2-53), the 2-yr overall survival, disease-free survival (DFS), relapse incidence, and non-relapse mortality were 63%, 59.5%, 35%, and 6%, respectively. In univariate analysis, the factors correlated with a significantly higher 2-yr OS and DFS were a higher total circulating lymphocytes count at transplant (>730/mm(3) ; OS: 81% vs. 43%, P = 0.02; DFS: 73% vs. 45.5%, P = 0.03) and a higher recovery of leukocytes (>5300/mm(3) ) (2-yr OS: 81% vs. 44%, P = 0.007; 2-yr DFS: 72% vs. 46%, P = 0.08), neutrophils (>3200/mm(3) ) (2-yr OS: 76% vs. 50%, P = 0.03; 2-yr DFS: 67% vs. 52.0%, P = 0.1), and monocytes (>590/mm(3) ; 2-yr OS: 80% vs. 45%, P = 0.004; 2-yr DFS: 76% vs. 42%, P = 0.01) at day +30 post-transplant. In multivariate analysis, the only independent factors associated with a significantly higher OS and DFS were a better immune status at transplant (lymphocytes count >730/mm(3) ) and a higher monocytes count (>590/mm(3) ) at day +30 post-transplant. These results suggest that immune status and hematopoietic recovery before and after FB2 RIC allo-SCT can be significant predictors of outcome. This paves the way for future studies aiming to closely monitor the kinetics of immune recovery after RIC allo-SCT and to evaluate the impact of growth factors and other immunostimulatory cytokines in the setting of RIC allo-SCT. PMID:23301689

  20. Decreasing the frequency and rate of wet brewers grains supplementation did not impact growth but reduced humoral immune response of preconditioning beef heifers.

    PubMed

    Moriel, P; Piccolo, M B; Artioli, L F A; Poore, M H; Marques, R S; Cooke, R F

    2016-07-01

    This study evaluated growth and measurements of innate and humoral immunity of preconditioning beef heifers supplemented with wet brewers grains (WBG) at 2 supplementation rates and frequencies. At 14 d after weaning (d 0), Angus heifers ( = 36; 213 ± 2 kg BW and 254 ± 7 d of age) were stratified by BW and age and randomly assigned to 1 of 12 drylot pens (3 heifers/pen). Treatments were randomly assigned to pens, in a 2 × 2 factorial design, and consisted of heifers provided ground tall fescue hay ad libitum (55% TDN and 12% CP of DM) and supplemented with WBG (75% TDN and 36% CP of DM) either daily (7X) or 3 times weekly (3X; Monday, Wednesday, and Friday) at 0.5 or 1.0% of BW (DM basis) for 42 d. Heifers were vaccinated against infectious bovine rhinotracheitis (IBR), bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), Mannheimia haemolytica, and Clostridium on d 14 and 28. Individual BW was measured before feeding on d 0 and 42 following 12 h of feed and water withdrawal. Blood samples were collected via jugular venipuncture 4 h after WBG supplementation on d 14, 15, 16, 17, 21, 28, 29, 30, 31, 35, and 42. Heifers fed WBG 3X had less hay DMI (2.6 ± 0.16 vs. 3.2 ± 0.16 kg/d; < 0.0001) but greater total DMI (5.6 ± 0.16 vs. 3.8 ± 0.16 kg/d; < 0.0001) than 7X heifers on days that all heifers received WBG supplementation. However, overall hay and total DMI was not affected ( ≥ 0.40) by supplementation frequency. Therefore, ADG, BW, and G:F from d 0 to 42 did not differ among treatments ( ≥ 0.29). Plasma concentrations of haptoglobin on d 15 and cortisol on d 14 were greater for 3X heifers vs. 7X heifers ( ≤ 0.04). Heifers fed WBG at 0.5% of BW tended to have greater plasma cortisol concentrations on d 15, 17, and 35 ( ≤ 0.09) than heifers fed at 1.0% of BW. Serum BVDV-1a titers were greater ( = 0.04) for 7X heifers vs. 3X heifers on d 42 (4.2 ± 0.28 vs. 3.3 ± 0.28 log), whereas serum titers against BVDV-2 and IBR were greater for heifers fed WBG at 1.0% of BW vs

  1. Immunization Coverage

    MedlinePlus

    ... underused vaccines is increasing. Immunization currently averts an estimated 2 to 3 million deaths every year. An ... avoided, however, if global vaccination coverage improves. An estimated 19.4 million infants worldwide are still missing ...

  2. Immune response

    MedlinePlus

    ... inflammation and tissue repair. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 24th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ... and adaptive immune systems. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 24th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  3. Childhood Immunization

    MedlinePlus

    Today, children in the United States routinely get vaccines that protect them from more than a dozen ... lowest levels in history, thanks to years of immunization. Children must get at least some vaccines before ...

  4. Immune response

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    The immune system includes specialized white blood cells, called lymphocytes that adapt themselves to fight specific foreign invaders. These cells develop into two groups in the bone marrow. From the bone ...

  5. Ensuring excellence in immunization services.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Pauline

    2016-01-01

    In order to increase uptake of measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine, a domiciliary immunization service was established in Dudley primary care trust in England in 2010. Parents of unimmunized children were offered vaccines at home. Uptake of MMR vaccine among 2 year olds rose from 89% in 2007/08 to 96.9% in 2015. Children were also given any other outstanding immunizations. The domiciliary immunization service reached vulnerable unimmunized children who may otherwise have remained unprotected against life threatening childhood illnesses. Domiciliary immunization service was set up in 2010 to reduce inequalities in uptake of MMR vaccine among children aged between 2 and 5 years. PMID:26618244

  6. Update on global immunization.

    PubMed

    Weber, Carol J

    2007-10-01

    The international community recognizes that investing in the health development of poor and disadvantaged countries is central to reducing poverty. Immunization is one strategy in the global effort to reduce infant mortality, improve maternal health, and combat infectious disease. In this day of global interdependence, all countries are vulnerable to uncontrolled spread of disease through epidemics. Achieving the Millennium Development Goals will not only help developing countries, but it will also contribute to improving health and security for all. PMID:17990623

  7. Microfabricated microporous membranes reduce the host immune response and prolong the functional lifetime of a closed-loop insulin delivery implant in a type 1 diabetic rat model.

    PubMed

    Li, Jason; Chu, Michael K L; Gordijo, Claudia R; Abbasi, Azhar Z; Chen, Kuan; Adissu, Hibret A; Löhn, Matthias; Giacca, Adria; Plettenburg, Oliver; Wu, Xiao Yu

    2015-04-01

    Implantation of a medical implant within the body inevitably triggers a host inflammatory response that negatively impacts its function and longevity. Nevertheless, the degree and severity of this response may be reduced by selecting appropriate materials, implant geometry, surface topography and surface treatment. Here we demonstrate a strategy to improve the biocompatibility of a chemically-driven closed-loop insulin delivery implant. A microfabricated microporous, poly(ethylene glycol)-grafted polydimethylsiloxane membrane was placed on top of the glucose-responsive insulin release plug of the implant. Implant biocompatibility was assessed in healthy rats while implant function was evaluated in a type 1 diabetic rat model. The microporous membrane with a small distance to the plug provided a geometric barrier to inflammatory cell migration and prevented leukocyte-mediated degradation of the plug for at least 30 days. Membrane-protected devices elicited a significantly milder inflammatory response and formation of a well-defined fibrous capsule at the device opening compared to unprotected devices. The device's glucose-responsiveness was nearly unchanged, although the insulin release rate decreased with decreasing pore size. The microporous membrane improved biocompatibility and prolonged in vivo efficacy of the implant by ∼3-fold. This work suggests the importance of implant design in modulating inflammatory response and thereby extending the functional duration of the implant. PMID:25682160

  8. Subcutaneous Injections of the Mannose-Sensitive Hemagglutination Pilus Strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Stimulate Host Immunity, Reduce Bladder Cancer Size and Improve Tumor Survival in Mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Tao; Yang, Li; Fu, Sheng-Jun; Xiao, Er-Long; Yuan, Xuan; Lu, Jian-Zhong; Ma, Bao-Liang; Shi, Ting-Kai; Wang, Zhi-Ping

    2015-09-01

    We wished to evaluate the effects of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (mannose-sensitive hemagglutination pilus strain, PA-MSHA) as an immunostimulating and anti-tumor agent for treatment of bladder cancer. Immunostimulating effects were assessed by the in vitro proliferation assay of murine splenic lymphocytes. Anti-tumor effects were studied in a subcutaneous tumor model established in female C57BL/6 mice using the MB49 bladder cell line. These mice received subcutaneous injections of normal saline (control group) or PA-MSHA (high, medium, or low dose, respectively, 1.6-2.0 × 10(9), 3.2- .0 × 10(8), 6.4-8.0 × 10(7) CFU/ml) twice a week for 3 weeks. Mice survival, tumor volume, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression, microvessel density (MVD), serum levels of TNF-α and IFN-γ, and blood CD4(+) /CD8(+) counts were the study outcomes. We observed that PA-MSHA promoted the growth of splenic lymphocytes in vitro. In the murine tumor model, PA-MSHA prolonged mice survival and reduced tumor growth. Furthermore, VEGF and MVD were also diminished by PA-MSHA. Mice that received high and medium dose of PA-MSHA had significantly higher serum levels of IFN-γ and TNF-α (days 21 and 28), and higher levels of CD4(+) /CD8(+) cells (days 21 and 28). In conclusion, PA-MSHA exerts beneficial effects on increasing proliferation of murine splenic lymphocytes in vitro and inhibits the growth of bladder tumor in a murine model. Therefore, PA-MSHA may be useful an immunostimulating and anti-tumor agent for bladder cancer therapy. PMID:25724441

  9. Prenatal immune challenge in rats: altered responses to dopaminergic and glutamatergic agents, prepulse inhibition of acoustic startle, and reduced route-based learning as a function of maternal body weight gain after prenatal exposure to poly IC.

    PubMed

    Vorhees, Charles V; Graham, Devon L; Braun, Amanda A; Schaefer, Tori L; Skelton, Matthew R; Richtand, Neil M; Williams, Michael T

    2012-08-01

    Prenatal maternal immune activation has been used to test the neurodevelopmental hypothesis of schizophrenia. Most of the data are in mouse models; far less is available for rats. We previously showed that maternal weight change in response to the immune activator polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (Poly IC) in rats differentially affects offspring. Therefore, we treated gravid Harlan Sprague-Dawley rats i.p. on embryonic day 14 with 8 mg/kg of Poly IC or Saline. The Poly IC group was divided into those that lost or gained the least weight, Poly IC (L), versus those that gained the most weight, Poly IC (H), following treatment. The study design controlled for litter size, litter sampling, sex distribution, and test experience. We found no effects of Poly IC on elevated zero maze, open-field activity, object burying, light-dark test, straight channel swimming, Morris water maze spatial acquisition, reversal, or shift navigation or spatial working or reference memory, or conditioned contextual or cued fear or latent inhibition. The Poly IC (H) group showed a significant decrease in the rate of route-based learning when visible cues were unavailable in the Cincinnati water maze and reduced prepulse inhibition of acoustic startle in females, but not males. The Poly IC (L) group exhibited altered responses to acute pharmacological challenges: exaggerated hyperactivity in response to (+)-amphetamine and an attenuated hyperactivity in response to MK-801. This model did not exhibit the cognitive, or latent inhibition deficits reported in Poly IC-treated rats but showed changes in response to drugs acting on neurotransmitter systems implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia (dopaminergic hyperfunction and glutamatergic hypofunction). PMID:22473973

  10. Prenatal immune challenge in rats: Altered responses to dopaminergic and glutamatergic agents, prepulse inhibition of acoustic startle, and reduced route-based learning as a function of maternal body weight gain after prenatal exposure to Poly IC

    PubMed Central

    Vorhees, Charles V.; Graham, Devon L.; Braun, Amanda A.; Schaefer, Tori L.; Skelton, Matthew R.; Richtand, Neil M.; Williams, Michael T.

    2012-01-01

    Prenatal maternal immune activation has been used to test the neurodevelopmental hypothesis of schizophrenia. Most of the data are in mouse models; far less is available for rats. We previously showed that maternal weight change in response to the immune activator polyinosinic-polycytidylic (Poly IC) in rats differentially affects offspring. Therefore, we treated gravid Harlan Sprague-Dawley rats i.p. on embryonic day 14 with 8 mg/kg of Poly IC or Saline. The Poly IC group was divided into those that lost or gained the least weight, Poly IC (L), versus those that gained the most weight, Poly IC (H), following treatment. The study design controlled for litter size, litter sampling, sex distribution, and test experience. We found no effects of Poly IC on elevated zero-maze, open-field activity, object burying, light-dark test, straight channel swimming, Morris water maze spatial acquisition, reversal, or shift navigation or spatial working or reference memory, or conditioned contextual or cued fear or latent inhibition. The Poly IC (H) group showed a significant decrease in the rate of route-based learning when visible cues unavailable in the Cincinnati water maze and reduced prepulse inhibition of acoustic startle in females, but not males. The Poly IC (L) group exhibited altered responses to acute pharmacological challenges: exaggerated hyperactivity in response to (+)-amphetamine and an attenuated hyperactivity in response to MK-801. This model did not exhibit the cognitive, acoustic startle, or latent inhibition deficits reported in Poly IC-treated rats, but showed changes in response to drugs acting on neurotransmitter systems implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia (dopaminergic hyperfunction and glutamatergic hypofunction). PMID:22473973

  11. Immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Kistangari, Gaurav; McCrae, Keith R

    2013-06-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is a common hematologic disorder characterized by isolated thrombocytopenia. ITP presents as a primary or a secondary form. ITP may affect individuals of all ages, with peaks during childhood and in the elderly, in whom the age-specific incidence of ITP is greatest. Bleeding is the most common clinical manifestation of ITP. The pathogenesis of ITP is complex, involving alterations in humoral and cellular immunity. Corticosteroids remain the most common first line therapy for ITP. This article summarizes the classification and diagnosis of primary and secondary ITP, as well as the pathogenesis and options for treatment. PMID:23714309

  12. Plant Immunity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plants are faced with defending themselves against a multitude of pathogens, including bacteria, fungi, viruses, nematodes, etc. Immunity is multi-layered and complex. Plants can induce defenses when they recognize small peptides, proteins or double-stranded RNA associated with pathogens. Recognitio...

  13. Skin Immunization Obviates Alcohol-Related Immune Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Rhonda M.; Stottlemyer, John Mark; Cline, Rachel A.; Donahue, Cara; Behari, Jaideep; Falo, Louis D.

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholics suffer from immune dysfunction that can impede vaccine efficacy. If ethanol (EtOH)-induced immune impairment is in part a result of direct exposure of immune cells to EtOH, then reduced levels of exposure could result in less immune dysfunction. As alcohol ingestion results in lower alcohol levels in skin than blood, we hypothesized that the skin immune network may be relatively preserved, enabling skin-targeted immunizations to obviate the immune inhibitory effects of alcohol consumption on conventional vaccines. We employed the two most common chronic EtOH mouse feeding models, the liver-damaging Lieber-DeCarli (LD) and liver-sparing Meadows-Cook (MC) diets, to examine the roles of EtOH and/or EtOH-induced liver dysfunction on alcohol related immunosuppression. Pair-fed mice were immunized against the model antigen ovalbumin (OVA) by DNA immunization or against flu by administering the protein-based influenza vaccine either systemically (IV, IM), directly to liver (hydrodynamic), or cutaneously (biolistic, ID). We measured resulting tissue EtOH levels, liver stress, regulatory T cell (Treg), and myeloid-derived suppressor cell (MDSC) populations. We compared immune responsiveness by measuring delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH), antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL), and antibody induction as a function of delivery route and feeding model. We found that, as expected, and independent of the feeding model, EtOH ingestion inhibits DTH, CTL lysis, and antigen-specific total IgG induced by traditional systemic vaccines. On the other hand, skin-targeted vaccines were equally immunogenic in alcohol-exposed and non-exposed subjects, suggesting that cutaneous immunization may result in more efficacious vaccination in alcohol-ingesting subjects. PMID:26561838

  14. Increased cellular immune responses and CD4+ T-cell proliferation correlate with reduced plasma viral load in SIV challenged recombinant simian varicella virus - simian immunodeficiency virus (rSVV-SIV) vaccinated rhesus macaques

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background An effective AIDS vaccine remains one of the highest priorities in HIV-research. Our recent study showed that vaccination of rhesus macaques with recombinant simian varicella virus (rSVV) vector – simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) envelope and gag genes, induced neutralizing antibodies and cellular immune responses to SIV and also significantly reduced plasma viral loads following intravenous pathogenic challenge with SIVMAC251/CX1. Findings The purpose of this study was to define cellular immunological correlates of protection in rSVV-SIV vaccinated and SIV challenged animals. Immunofluorescent staining and multifunctional assessment of SIV-specific T-cell responses were evaluated in both Experimental and Control vaccinated animal groups. Significant increases in the proliferating CD4+ T-cell population and polyfunctional T-cell responses were observed in all Experimental-vaccinated animals compared with the Control-vaccinated animals. Conclusions Increased CD4+ T-cell proliferation was significantly and inversely correlated with plasma viral load. Increased SIV-specific polyfunctional cytokine responses and increased proliferation of CD4+ T-cell may be crucial to control plasma viral loads in vaccinated and SIVMAC251/CX1 challenged macaques. PMID:22889373

  15. Immune Thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Kistanguri, Gaurav; McCrae, Keith R.

    2013-01-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is a common hematologic disorder characterized by isolated thrombocytopenia. ITP presents as a primary form characterized by isolated thrombocytopenia (platelet count < 100 × 109/L) in the absence of other causes or disorders that may be associated with thrombocytopenia, or a secondary form in which immune thrombocytopenia develops in association with another disorder that is usually immune or infectious. ITP may affect individuals of all ages, with peaks during childhood and in the elderly, in whom the age specific incidence of ITP is greatest. Bleeding is the most common clinical manifestation of ITP, with the risk of bleeding and related morbidity increased in elderly patients. The pathogenesis of ITP is complex, involving alterations in humoral and cellular immunity. Thrombocytopenia is caused by antibodies that react with glycoproteins expressed on platelets and megakaryocytes (glycoprotein IIb/IIIa, Ib/IX and others), causing shortened survival of circulating platelets and impairing platelet production. Diminished numbers and function of regulatory T cells, as well as the effects of cytotoxic T cells also contribute to the pathogenesis of ITP. Corticosteroids remain the most common first line therapy for ITP, occasionally in conjunction with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) and anti-Rh(D). However, these agents do not lead to durable remissions in the majority of adults with ITP, and considerable heterogeneity exists in the use of second line approaches, which may include splenectomy, Rituximab, or thrombopoietin receptor agonists (TRAs). This review summarizes the classification and diagnosis of primary and secondary ITP, as well as the pathogenesis and options for treatment. Remarkable advances in the understanding and management of ITP have been achieved over the last decade, though many questions remain. PMID:23714309

  16. Immunization Schedules for Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... ACIP Vaccination Recommendations Why Immunize? Vaccines: The Basics Immunization Schedules for Adults in Easy-to-read Formats ... previous immunizations. View or Print a Schedule Recommended Immunizations for Adults (19 Years and Older) by Age ...

  17. Combined immunization using DNA-Sm14 and DNA-Hsp65 increases CD8+ memory T cells, reduces chronic pathology and decreases egg viability during Schistosoma mansoni infection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Schistosomiasis is one of the most important neglected diseases found in developing countries and affects 249 million people worldwide. The development of an efficient vaccination strategy is essential for the control of this disease. Previous work showed partial protection induced by DNA-Sm14 against Schistosoma mansoni infection, whereas DNA-Hsp65 showed immunostimulatory properties against infectious diseases, autoimmune diseases, cancer and antifibrotic properties in an egg-induced granuloma model. Methods C57BL/6 mice received 4 doses of DNA-Sm14 (100 μg/dose) and DNA-Hsp65 (100 μg/dose), simultaneously administrated, or DNA-Sm14 alone, once a week, during four weeks. Three groups were included: 1- Control (no immunization); 2- DNA-Sm14; 3- DNA-Sm14/DNA-Hsp65. Two weeks following last immunization, animals were challenged subcutaneously with 30 cercariae. Fifteen, 48 and 69 days after infection splenocytes were collected to evaluate the number of CD8+ memory T cells (CD44highCD62low) using flow cytometry. Forty-eight days after challenge adult worms were collected by portal veins perfusion and intestines were collected to analyze the intestinal egg viability. Histological, immunohistochemical and soluble quantification of collagen and α-SMA accumulation were performed on the liver. Results In the current work, we tested a new vaccination strategy using DNA-Sm14 with DNA-Hsp65 to potentiate the protection against schistosomiasis. Combined vaccination increased the number of CD8+ memory T cells and decreased egg viability on the intestinal wall of infected mice. In addition, simultaneous vaccination with DNA-Sm14/DNA-Hsp65 reduced collagen and α-SMA accumulation during the chronic phase of granuloma formation. Conclusion Simultaneous vaccination with DNA-Sm14/DNA-Hsp65 showed an immunostimulatory potential and antifibrotic property that is associated with the reduction of tissue damage on Schistosoma mansoni experimental infection. PMID

  18. Efficient immunization strategies to prevent financial contagion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Teruyoshi; Hasui, Kohei

    2014-01-01

    Many immunization strategies have been proposed to prevent infectious viruses from spreading through a network. In this work, we study efficient immunization strategies to prevent a default contagion that might occur in a financial network. An essential difference from the previous studies on immunization strategy is that we take into account the possibility of serious side effects. Uniform immunization refers to a situation in which banks are ``vaccinated'' with a common low-risk asset. The riskiness of immunized banks will decrease significantly, but the level of systemic risk may increase due to the de-diversification effect. To overcome this side effect, we propose another immunization strategy, called counteractive immunization, which prevents pairs of banks from failing simultaneously. We find that counteractive immunization can efficiently reduce systemic risk without altering the riskiness of individual banks.

  19. Dietary low or excess levels of lipids reduced growth performance, and impaired immune function and structure of head kidney, spleen and skin in young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) under the infection of Aeromonas hydrophila.

    PubMed

    Ni, Pei-Jun; Jiang, Wei-Dan; Wu, Pei; Liu, Yang; Kuang, Sheng-Yao; Tang, Ling; Tang, Wu-Neng; Zhang, Yong-An; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu; Feng, Lin

    2016-08-01

    Our study explored the effect of dietary lipids on growth and immunity and structure (head kidney, spleen and skin) of young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella). A total of 540 young grass carp with an average initial weight of 261.41 ± 0.53 g were fed diets containing six graded levels of lipids at 5.9-80.1 g/kg diet for 8 weeks. After that, a challenge trial was conducted by injection of Aeromonas hydrophila over 2 weeks. The results indicated that compared with optimal lipids supplementation, low and excess levels of lipids down-regulated the mRNA levels of antimicrobial peptides, anti-inflammatory cytokines, inhibitor of κBα (IκBα) and ribosomal p70S6 kinase (S6K1), and up-regulated pro-inflammatory cytokines, nuclear factor κB p65 (NF-κB p65), NF-κB c-Rel (not p52), IκB kinase α (IKKα), IKKβ, IKKγ, and eIF4E-binding protein (4EBP) mRNA levels in the head kidney and spleen of young grass carp (P < 0.05). Low or excess levels of lipids also increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and malondialdehyde (MDA) and protein carbonyl (PC) contents, reduced the activities of antioxidant enzymes (P < 0.05), down-regulate the relative mRNA levels of antioxidant enzymes and NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), and up-regulated the expression levels of Kelch-like ECH-associating protein 1a (Keap1a) and Keap1b in the head kidney and spleen. In addition, low or excess levels of lipids down-regulated the mRNA levels of B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) and inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP) in the head kidney and spleen, whereas up-regulated the mRNA levels of apoptotic protease activating factor-1 (Apaf-1), caspase 3, 7, 8 and 9 mRNA levels in the head kidney and spleen and Fas ligand (FasL) mRNA levels in the spleen of young grass carp, suggesting that low or excess levels of lipids could decrease the head kidney and spleen immune function, induce oxidative damage and apoptosis and impair antioxidant system of young grass carp. At last, low or excess

  20. Integrated Circuit Immunity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sketoe, J. G.; Clark, Anthony

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a DOD E3 program overview on integrated circuit immunity. The topics include: 1) EMI Immunity Testing; 2) Threshold Definition; 3) Bias Tee Function; 4) Bias Tee Calibration Set-Up; 5) EDM Test Figure; 6) EMI Immunity Levels; 7) NAND vs. and Gate Immunity; 8) TTL vs. LS Immunity Levels; 9) TP vs. OC Immunity Levels; 10) 7805 Volt Reg Immunity; and 11) Seventies Chip Set. This paper is presented in viewgraph form.

  1. Immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Maher, George M

    2014-10-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) in children is a relatively uncommon and generally benign condition presenting as abrupt onset of bruising, petechiae and thrombocytopenia in an otherwise healthy child due to production of anti-platelet autoantibodies. Diagnosis is largely clinical and laboratory investigation should be kept to a minimum. Indications for treatment have not been standardized and include bleeding, parental anxiety and quality of life. Multiple treatments are available that have been proven to increase the platelet count; the most commonly employed include IVIG, steroids and WinRho (anti-D). Intracranial hemorrhage is the most serious potential complication but is extremely rare and splenectomy is reserved for chronically symptomatic patients who have not responded to other modalities. Identification of molecular targets may be a promising avenue for future research. PMID:25423768

  2. Corneal Transplantation and Immune Privilege

    PubMed Central

    Niederkorn, Jerry Y.

    2013-01-01

    Corneal transplants have been successfully performed in human subjects for over 100 years and enjoy an immune privilege that is unrivaled in the field of transplantation. Immune privilege is defined as the reduced incidence and tempo in the immune rejection of corneal allografts compared to other categories of organ allografts performed under the same conditions. Skin allografts transplanted across various MHC or minor histocompatibility barriers undergo rejection in approximately 100% of the hosts. By contrast, orthotopic corneal allografts experience long-term survival in 50% to >90% of the hosts, depending on the histocompatibility barriers that confront the host. The capacity of corneal allografts to evade immune rejection is attributable to multiple anatomical, physiological, and immunoregulatory conditions that conspire to prevent the induction and expression of alloimmunity. PMID:23360158

  3. The immune consequences of preterm birth

    PubMed Central

    Melville, Jacqueline M.; Moss, Timothy J. M.

    2013-01-01

    Preterm birth occurs in 11% of live births globally and accounts for 35% of all newborn deaths. Preterm newborns have immature immune systems, with reduced innate and adaptive immunity; their immune systems may be further compromised by various factors associated with preterm birth. The immune systems of preterm infants have a smaller pool of monocytes and neutrophils, impaired ability of these cells to kill pathogens, and lower production of cytokines which limits T cell activation and reduces the ability to fight bacteria and detect viruses in cells, compared to term infants. Intrauterine inflammation is a major contributor to preterm birth, and causes premature immune activation and cytokine production. This can induce immune tolerance leading to reduced newborn immune function. Intrauterine inflammation is associated with an increased risk of early-onset sepsis and likely has long-term adverse immune consequences. Requisite medical interventions further impact on immune development and function. Antenatal corticosteroid treatment to prevent newborn respiratory disease is routine but may be immunosuppressive, and has been associated with febrile responses, reductions in lymphocyte proliferation and cytokine production, and increased risk of infection. Invasive medical procedures result in an increased risk of late-onset sepsis. Respiratory support can cause chronic inflammatory lung disease associated with increased risk of long-term morbidity. Colonization of the infant by microorganisms at birth is a significant contributor to the establishment of the microbiome. Caesarean section affects infant colonization, potentially contributing to lifelong immune function and well-being. Several factors associated with preterm birth alter immune function. A better understanding of perinatal modification of the preterm immune system will allow for the refinement of care to minimize lifelong adverse immune consequences. PMID:23734091

  4. Immunization and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    Immunization & Pregnancy Vaccines help keep apregnant woman and her growing family healthy. Vaccine Before pregnancy Hepatitis A ... 232-4636) • English or Spanish National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases Immunization Services Division CS238938B 03/ ...

  5. Immune System Involvement

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tips" to find out more! Email * Zipcode The Immune System and Psoriatic Disease What is an autoimmune disease? ... swollen and painful joints and tendons. Treating the immune system The immune system is not only the key ...

  6. Childhood Immunization Schedule

    MedlinePlus

    ... Recommendations Why Immunize? Vaccines: The Basics Instant Childhood Immunization Schedule Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Get ... date. See Disclaimer for additional details. Based on Immunization Schedule for Children 0 through 6 Years of ...

  7. Immune System and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... substances that are usually not harmful Immune deficiency diseases - disorders in which the immune system is missing one or more of its parts Autoimmune diseases - diseases causing your immune system to attack your ...

  8. [Vitamin C and immune function].

    PubMed

    Ströhle, Alexander; Hahn, Andreas

    2009-02-01

    The immune system is strongly influenced by the intake of nutrients. For a long time there has been a controversy whether vitamin C can contribute to the prevention and therapy of the common cold. Several cells of the immune system can indeed accumulate vitamin C and need the vitamin to perform their task, especially phagocytes and t-cells. Thus a vitamin C deficiency results in a reduced resistance against certain pathogens whilst a higher supply enhances several immune system parameters. With regard to the common cold different studies including meta-analyses underline that the prophylactic intake of vitamin C may slightly reduce the duration of the illness in healthy persons but does not affect its incidence and severity. Supplementation of vitamin C is most effective in cases of physical strain or insufficient intake of the vitamin. With regard to the therapy of the common cold the application of vitamin C alone is without clinical effects. PMID:19263912

  9. Mexico's immunization programme gets results.

    PubMed

    1994-04-01

    With a decline of almost 60% over the past decade in the mortality of children under age 5 years old to the current rate of 33 child deaths/1000 live births, Mexico has joined the 20 countries listed by UNICEF as making the most progress in reducing child mortality since 1980. Much of this progress can be attributed to Mexico's immunization program, which has brought the proportion of fully immunized children under age 5 years to 94% over the past 5 years. Mexico's president has been instrumental in the program's success, having a personal interest in childhood vaccination and supervising the twice-yearly immunization coverage surveys. Even though presidential elections are being held this year, the immunization program should remain strong regardless of who wins because all of Mexico's political parties have pledged to remain committed to immunization. Awareness in the population about the need for vaccination is maintained with the help of the mass media, especially radio and television. The country's enthusiasm for vaccination seems to be paying off in terms of declining child mortality and the eradication of wild poliovirus. The immunization program reaches all but 2-3% of Mexico's children, despite some logistical difficulties and resistance to vaccines among certain religious groups such as the Mennonites and Jehovah's witnesses. PMID:12321777

  10. Interactions between the immune and nervous systems in pain

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Ke; Dubner, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    Immune cells and glia interact with neurons to alter pain sensitivity and to mediate the transition from acute to chronic pain. In response to injury, resident immune cells are activated and blood-borne immune cells are recruited to the site of injury. Immune cells not only contribute to immune protection but also initiate the sensitization of peripheral nociceptors. Through the synthesis and release of inflammatory mediators and interactions with neurotransmitters and their receptors, the immune cells, glia and neurons form an integrated network that coordinates immune responses and modulates the excitability of pain pathways. The immune system also reduces sensitization by producing immune-derived analgesic and anti-inflammatory or proresolution agents. A greater understanding of the role of the immune system in pain processing and modulation reveals potential targets for analgesic drug development and new therapeutic opportunities for managing chronic pain. PMID:20948535

  11. Our Immune System

    MedlinePlus

    Our Immune System A story for children with primary immunodeficiency diseases Written by Sara LeBien IMMUNE DEFICIENCY FOUNDATION A note ... who are immune deficient to better understand their immune system. What is a “ B-cell, ” a “ T-cell, ” ...

  12. Immunization for Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... nfid.org/#sthash.eZ72dCSP.dpuf Diseases & Vaccines Overview Immunization Schedules Talk to you doctor about your immunization ... years Immunization Schedule for Children, 7-18 years Immunization News July 8, 2016 HPV-related cancers on ...

  13. Your Child's Immunizations

    MedlinePlus

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Your Child's Immunizations KidsHealth > For Parents > Your Child's Immunizations Print A A A Text Size What's in ... But in both cases, the protection is temporary. Immunization (vaccination) is a way of creating immunity to ...

  14. The modulation of immunity

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, M.S.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 13 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Modulation of Immunity by Thymus-Derived Lymphocytes; Modulation of Immunity by Macrophages; Modulation of Immunity by Soluble Mediators; Viruses and the Immune Response; and Methanol Extraction Residue: Effects and Mechanisms of Action.

  15. Epigenetic Control of Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Busslinger, Meinrad; Tarakhovsky, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Immunity relies on the heterogeneity of immune cells and their ability to respond to pathogen challenges. In the adaptive immune system, lymphocytes display a highly diverse antigen receptor repertoire that matches the vast diversity of pathogens. In the innate immune system, the cell's heterogeneity and phenotypic plasticity enable flexible responses to changes in tissue homeostasis caused by infection or damage. The immune responses are calibrated by the graded activity of immune cells that can vary from yeast-like proliferation to lifetime dormancy. This article describes key epigenetic processes that contribute to the function of immune cells during health and disease. PMID:24890513

  16. Integrated Immune Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, Brian

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews NASA's Integrated Immune Experiment. The objectives include: 1) Address significant lack of data regarding immune status during flight; 2) Replace several recent immune studies with one comprehensive study that will include in-flight sampling; 3) Determine the in-flight status of immunity, physiological stress, viral immunity/reactivation; 4) Determine the clinical risk related to immune dysregulation for exploration class spaceflight; and 5) Determine the appropriate monitoring strategy for spaceflight-associated immune dysfunction, that could be used for the evaluation of countermeasures.

  17. Immune Suppression and Immune Activation in Depression

    PubMed Central

    Blume, Joshua; Douglas, Steven D.; Evans, Dwight L.

    2010-01-01

    Depression has been characterized as a disorder of both immune suppression and immune activation. Markers of impaired cellular immunity (decreased natural killer cell cytotoxicity) and inflammation (elevated IL-6, TNFα, CRP) have been associated with depression. These immunological markers have been associated with other medical illnesses, suggesting that immune dysregulation may be a central feature common to both depression and to its frequent medical comorbidities. Yet the significant associations of findings of both immune suppression and immune activation with depression raise questions concerning the relationship between these two classes of immunological observations. Depressed populations are heterogeneous groups, and there may be differences in the immune profiles of populations that are more narrowly defined in terms of symptom profile and/or demographic features. There have been few reports concurrently investigating markers of immune suppression and immune activation in the same depressed individuals. An emerging preclinical literature suggests that chronic inflammation may directly contribute to the pathophysiology of immune suppression in the context of illnesses such as cancer and rheumatoid arthritis. This literature provides us with specific immunoregulatory mechanisms mediating these relationships that could also explain differences in immune disturbances between subsets of depressed individuals We propose a research agenda emphasizing the assessment of these immunoregulatory mechanisms in large samples of depressed subjects as a means to define the relationships among immune findings (suppression and/or activation) within the same depressed individuals and to characterize subsets of depressed subjects based on shared immune profiles. Such a program of research, building on and integrating our knowledge of the psychoneuroimmunology of depression, could lead to innovation in the assessment and treatment of depression and its medical comorbidities

  18. In vivo high-resolution magic angle spinning magnetic resonance spectroscopy of Drosophila melanogaster at 14.1 T shows trauma in aging and in innate immune-deficiency is linked to reduced insulin signaling

    PubMed Central

    RIGHI, VALERIA; APIDIANAKIS, YIORGOS; MINTZOPOULOS, DIONYSSIOS; ASTRAKAS, LOUKAS; RAHME, LAURENCE G.; TZIKA, A. ARIA

    2010-01-01

    In vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), a non-destructive biochemical tool for investigating live organisms, has yet to be used in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, a useful model organism for investigating genetics and physiology. We developed and implemented a high-resolution magic-angle-spinning (HRMAS) MRS method to investigate live Drosophila at 14.1 T. We demonstrated, for the first time, the feasibility of using HRMAS MRS for molecular characterization of Drosophila with a conventional MR spectrometer equipped with an HRMAS probe. We showed that the metabolic HRMAS MRS profiles of injured, aged wild-type (wt) flies and of immune deficient (imd) flies were more similar to chico flies mutated at the chico gene in the insulin signaling pathway, which is analogous to insulin receptor substrate 1–4 (IRS1–4) in mammals and less to those of adipokinetic hormone receptor (akhr) mutant flies, which have an obese phenotype. We thus provide evidence for the hypothesis that trauma in aging and in innate immune-deficiency is linked to insulin signaling. This link may explain the mitochondrial dysfunction that accompanies insulin resistance and muscle wasting that occurs in trauma, aging and immune system deficiencies, leading to higher susceptibility to infection. Our approach advances the development of novel in vivo non-destructive research approaches in Drosophila, suggests biomarkers for investigation of biomedical paradigms, and thus may contribute to novel therapeutic development. PMID:20596596

  19. Tipping a favorable CNS intratumoral immune response using immune stimulation combined with inhibition of tumor-mediated immune suppression.

    PubMed

    Kong, Ling-Yuan; Wei, Jun; Fuller, Gregory N; Schrand, Brett; Gabrusiewicz, Konrad; Zhou, Shouhao; Rao, Ganesh; Calin, George; Gilboa, Eli; Heimberger, Amy B

    2016-05-01

    High-grade gliomas are notoriously heterogeneous regarding antigen expression, effector responses, and immunosuppressive mechanisms. Therefore, combinational immune therapeutic approaches are more likely to impact a greater number of patients and result in longer, durable responses. We have previously demonstrated the monotherapeutic effects of miR-124, which inhibits the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) immune suppressive pathway, and immune stimulatory 4-1BB aptamers against a variety of malignancies, including genetically engineered immune competent high-grade gliomas. To evaluate potential synergy, we tested an immune stimulatory aptamer together with microRNA-124 (miRNA-124), which blocks tumor-mediated immune suppression, and found survival to be markedly enhanced, including beyond that produced by monotherapy. The synergistic activity appeared to be not only secondary to enhanced CD3(+) cell numbers but also to reduced macrophage immune tumor trafficking, indicating that a greater therapeutic benefit can be achieved with approaches that both induce immune activation and inhibit tumor-mediated immune suppression within the central nervous system (CNS) tumors. PMID:27467917

  20. Influence of dynamic immunization on epidemic spreading in networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qingchu; Fu, Xinchu; Jin, Zhen; Small, Michael

    2015-02-01

    We introduce a new dynamic immunization method based on the static immunization algorithm and study the relationship between dynamic and static immunization. By nodes to be immunized according to static immunization strategies, we build a connection between dynamic and static immunization. Using theoretical arguments and computational simulation we show that dynamic immunization (from a finite vaccine reservoir) is not sufficient to prevent epidemic outbreak, nor does it significantly change the asymptotic prevalence. Nonetheless, we do find that less total vaccine is required to implement this strategy. To help understand this better, we examine the extent and distribution of dynamic immunization required to achieve this reduced vaccine demand. Our results suggest that it is not necessary to increase the immunization rate when the infection rate is relatively small.

  1. Immune interactions in endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Herington, Jennifer L; Bruner-Tran, Kaylon L; Lucas, John A; Osteen, Kevin G

    2011-01-01

    Endometriosis is a common, complex gynecologic disorder characterized by the presence of endometrial glands and stroma at extrauterine (ectopic) sites. In women who develop this disease, alterations in specific biological processes involving both the endocrine and immune systems have been observed, which may explain the survival and growth of displaced endometrial tissue in affected women. In the past decade, a considerable amount of research has implicated a role for alterations in progesterone action at both eutopic and ectopic sites of endometrial growth which may contribute to the excessive inflammation associated with progression of endometriosis; however, it remains unclear whether these anomalies induce the condition or are simply a consequence of the disease process. In this article, we summarize current knowledge of alterations within the immune system of endometriosis patients and discuss how endometrial cells from women with this disease not only have the capacity to escape immunosurveillance, but also use inflammatory mechanisms to promote their growth within the peritoneal cavity. Finally, we discuss evidence that exposure to an environmental endocrine disruptor, such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, can mediate the development of an endometrial phenotype that exhibits both reduced progesterone responsiveness and hypersensitivity to proinflammatory stimuli mimicking the endometriosis phenotype. Future studies in women with endometriosis should consider whether a heightened inflammatory response within the peritoneal microenvironment contributes to the development and persistence of this disease. PMID:21895474

  2. Investing in Immunity: Prepandemic Immunization to Combat Future Influenza Pandemics.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Jesse L

    2016-02-15

    We are unlikely, with current technologies, to have sufficient pandemic influenza vaccine ready in time to impact the first wave of the next pandemic. Emerging data show that prior immunization with an immunologically distinct hemagglutinin of the same subtype offers the potential to "prime" recipients for rapid protection with a booster dose, years later, of a vaccine then manufactured to match the pandemic strain. This article proposes making prepandemic priming vaccine(s) available for voluntary use, particularly to those at high risk of early occupational exposure, such as first responders and healthcare workers, and to others maintaining critical infrastructure. In addition to providing faster protection and potentially reducing social disruption, being able, early in a pandemic, to immunize those who had received prepandemic vaccine with one dose of the pandemic vaccine, rather than the 2 doses typically required, would reduce the total doses of pandemic vaccine then needed, extending vaccine supplies. PMID:26585520

  3. Immunizations: Active vs. Passive

    MedlinePlus

    ... they’ve been exposed. For example, the passive rabies immunization (rabies immune globulin) is commonly used after a certain ... of your pediatrician. There may be variations in treatment that your pediatrician may recommend based on individual ...

  4. Immune Responses in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Basha, Saleem; Surendran, Naveen; Pichichero, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Neonates have little immunological memory and a developing immune system, which increases their vulnerability to infectious agents. Recent advances in understanding of neonatal immunity indicate that both innate and adaptive responses are dependent on precursor frequency of lymphocytes, antigenic dose and mode of exposure. Studies in neonatal mouse models and human umbilical cord blood cells demonstrate the capability of neonatal immune cells to produce immune responses similar to adults in some aspects but not others. This review focuses mainly on the developmental and functional mechanisms of the human neonatal immune system. In particular, the mechanism of innate and adaptive immunity and the role of neutrophils, antigen presenting cells, differences in subclasses of T lymphocytes (Th1, Th2, Tregs) and B cells are discussed. In addition, we have included the recent developments in neonatal mouse immune system. Understanding neonatal immunity is essential to development of therapeutic vaccines to combat newly emerging infectious agents. PMID:25088080

  5. Immune system structures (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The immune system protects the body from potentially harmful substances. The inflammatory response (inflammation) is part of innate immunity. It occurs when tissues are injured by bacteria, trauma, toxins, heat or any other cause.

  6. Immune system structures (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The immune system protects the body from potentially harmful substances. The inflammatory response (inflammation) is part of innate immunity. It occurs when tissues are injured by bacteria, trauma, toxins, heat, or any other cause.

  7. Aging changes in immunity

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/004008.htm Aging changes in immunity To use the sharing features ... cells and antibodies that destroy these harmful substances. Aging Changes and Their Effects on the Immune System ...

  8. Immune System and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Your immune system is a complex network of cells, tissues, and organs that work together to defend against germs. It ... t, to find and destroy them. If your immune system cannot do its job, the results can be ...

  9. Pneumonia - weakened immune system

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000093.htm Pneumonia - weakened immune system To use the sharing features on this page, ... fighting off infection because of problems with the immune system. This type of disease is called "pneumonia in ...

  10. Immunity to cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Reif, A.E.; Mitchell, M.S.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains five sections, each containing several papers. The section titles are: Identification and Characterization of Tumor Antigens; Immune Responses to Tumor Antigens; Regulation of the Immune Response to Tumor Cells, Immunotherapy and Biomodulators, and Immunotherapy and Immunoprophylaxis.

  11. NATIONAL IMMUNIZATION SURVEY (NIS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Immunization Survey (NIS) is sponsored by the National Immunization Program (NIP) and conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

  12. Exercise and immunity

    MedlinePlus

    ... know exactly if or how exercise increases your immunity to certain illnesses, but there are several theories ( ... not exercise more intensely just to increase their immunity. Heavy, long-term exercise (such as marathon running ...

  13. Immune System Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Quiz: Immune System KidsHealth > For Kids > Quiz: Immune System Print A A A Text Size How much do you know about your immune system? Find out by taking this quiz! View Survey ...

  14. Immune Disorder HSCT Protocol

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-09

    Immune Deficiency Disorders:; Severe Combined Immunodeficiency; Chronic Granulomatous Disease; X-linked Agammaglobulinemia; Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome; Hyper-IgM; DiGeorge Syndrome; Chediak-Higashi Syndrome; Common Variable Immune Deficiency; Immune Dysregulatory Disorder:; Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis; IPEX; Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome; X-linked Lymphoproliferative Syndrome

  15. The Immune System Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Work, Kirsten A.; Gibbs, Melissa A.; Friedman, Erich J.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a card game that helps introductory biology students understand the basics of the immune response to pathogens. Students simulate the steps of the immune response with cards that represent the pathogens and the cells and molecules mobilized by the immune system. In the process, they learn the similarities and differences between the…

  16. Chapter 2: Innate Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Turvey, Stuart E.; Broide, David H.

    2009-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed an explosion of interest in the innate immune system. Questions about how the innate immune system senses infection and empowers a protective immune response are being answered at the molecular level. These basic science discoveries are being translated into a more complete understanding of the central role innate immunity plays in the pathogenesis of many human infectious and inflammatory diseases. It is particularly exciting that we are already seeing a return on these scientific investments with the emergence of novel therapies to harness the power of the innate immune system. In this review we explore the defining characteristics of the innate immune system, and through more detailed examples, we highlight recent breakthroughs that have advanced our understanding of the role of innate immunity in human health and disease. PMID:19932920

  17. Extracellular Adenosine Mediates a Systemic Metabolic Switch during Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Bajgar, Adam; Kucerova, Katerina; Jonatova, Lucie; Tomcala, Ales; Schneedorferova, Ivana; Okrouhlik, Jan; Dolezal, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    Immune defense is energetically costly, and thus an effective response requires metabolic adaptation of the organism to reallocate energy from storage, growth, and development towards the immune system. We employ the natural infection of Drosophila with a parasitoid wasp to study energy regulation during immune response. To combat the invasion, the host must produce specialized immune cells (lamellocytes) that destroy the parasitoid egg. We show that a significant portion of nutrients are allocated to differentiating lamellocytes when they would otherwise be used for development. This systemic metabolic switch is mediated by extracellular adenosine released from immune cells. The switch is crucial for an effective immune response. Preventing adenosine transport from immune cells or blocking adenosine receptor precludes the metabolic switch and the deceleration of development, dramatically reducing host resistance. Adenosine thus serves as a signal that the “selfish” immune cells send during infection to secure more energy at the expense of other tissues. PMID:25915062

  18. [Olive oil, immune system and infection].

    PubMed

    Puertollano, M A; Puertollano, E; Alvarez de Cienfuegos, G; de Pablo Martínez, Manuel Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids contribute to the suppression of immune system functions. For this reason, n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids have been applied in the resolution of inflammatory disorders. Although the inhibition of several immune functions promotes beneficial effects on the human health, this state may lead to a significant reduction of immune protection against infectious microorganisms (viruses, bacteria, fungi and parasites). Nevertheless, less attention has been paid to the action of olive oil in immunonutrition. Olive oil, a main constituent of the Mediterranean diet, is capable of modulating several immune functions, but it does not reduce host immune resistance to infectious microorganisms. Based on these criteria, we corroborate that olive oil administration may exert beneficial effects on the human health and especially on immune system, because it contributes to the reduction of typical inflammatory activity observed in patients suffering from autoimmune disorders, but without exacerbating the susceptibility to pathogen agents. The administration of olive oil in lipid emulsions may exert beneficial effects on the health and particularly on the immune system of immunocompromised patients. Therefore, this fact acquires a crucial importance in clinical nutrition. This review contributes to clarify the interaction between the administration of diets containing olive oil and immune system, as well as to determine the effect promoted by this essential component of Mediterranean diet in the immunomodulation against an infectious agent. PMID:20204249

  19. Sequential Immune Responses: The Weapons of Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Charles D.; Ley, Klaus; Buchmann, Kurt; Canton, Johnathan

    2016-01-01

    Sequential immune responses (SIR) is a new model that describes what ‘immunity’ means in higher animals. Existing models, such as self/nonself discrimination or danger, focus on how immune responses are initiated. However, initiation is not protection. SIR describes the actual immune responses that provide protection. SIR resulted from a comprehensive analysis of the evolution of immune systems that revealed that several very different types of host innate responses occur (and at different tempos) which together provide host protection. SIR1 uses rapidly activated enzymes like the NADPH oxidases and is present in all animal cells. SIR2 is mediated by the first ‘immune’ cells: macrophage-like cells. SIR3 evolved in animals like invertebrates and provides enhanced protection through advanced macrophage recognition and killing of pathogens and through other innate immune cells such as neutrophils. Finally, in vertebrates, macrophages developed SIR4: the ability to present antigens to T cells. Though much slower than SIR1–3, adaptive responses provide a unique new protection for higher vertebrates. Importantly, newer SIR responses were added on top of older, evolutionarily conserved functions to provide ‘layers’ of host protection. SIR transcends existing models by elucidating the different weapons of immunity that provide host protection in higher animals. PMID:25871013

  20. Assessing barriers to immunization.

    PubMed

    Niederhauser, Victoria; Ferris, Catherine

    2016-05-01

    Parental barriers to childhood immunizations vary among countries, states and communities. There is a plethora of studies that exist to examine barriers to immunizations including many intervention studies designed to improve immunization rates in children. Often, intervention studies designed to minimize barriers and increase immunization uptake among children lack the inclusion of a standardized instrument to measure accurately parental barriers to childhood immunizations before and after interventions. The Searching for Hardships and Obstacles To Shots (SHOTS) survey is a standardized survey instrument to measure parental barriers to childhood immunizations. In several studies, the SHOTS survey has demonstrated consistent reliability and has been validated in diverse populations. The inclusion of the SHOTS survey instrument in studies to examine barriers to childhood immunization will provide researchers and clinicians with a better understanding of parents' individualized barriers to immunizations. Furthermore, use of the SHOTS survey instrument to collect information about parental barriers to immunizations can lead to targeted interventions to minimize these obstacles at the individual and community level and to help us to achieve our national, state and community childhood immunization goals. PMID:26810618

  1. Pulmonary surfactant in innate immunity and the pathogenesis of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, J S; Schlesinger, L S

    2000-01-01

    Components of the innate immune system serve to protect the host from invading pathogens prior to the generation of a directed immune response, and influence the manner in which the directed immune response develops. The pulmonary surfactant system consists of a complex array of proteins and lipids that reduce surface tension of the alveoli, and appears to play an essential role in innate immunity. Investigators have recently gained insight into the interactions between components of the surfactant system and the respiratory pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis. It is likely that pulmonary surfactant and other innate immune determinants play significant roles in the pathogenesis of tuberculosis. PMID:11052906

  2. Origins of adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Liongue, Clifford; John, Liza B; Ward, Alister

    2011-01-01

    Adaptive immunity, involving distinctive antibody- and cell-mediated responses to specific antigens based on "memory" of previous exposure, is a hallmark of higher vertebrates. It has been argued that adaptive immunity arose rapidly, as articulated in the "big bang theory" surrounding its origins, which stresses the importance of coincident whole-genome duplications. Through a close examination of the key molecules and molecular processes underpinning adaptive immunity, this review suggests a less-extreme model, in which adaptive immunity emerged as part of longer evolutionary journey. Clearly, whole-genome duplications provided additional raw genetic materials that were vital to the emergence of adaptive immunity, but a variety of other genetic events were also required to generate some of the key molecules, whereas others were preexisting and simply co-opted into adaptive immunity. PMID:21395512

  3. Neural circuitry and immunity.

    PubMed

    Pavlov, Valentin A; Tracey, Kevin J

    2015-12-01

    Research during the last decade has significantly advanced our understanding of the molecular mechanisms at the interface between the nervous system and the immune system. Insight into bidirectional neuro-immune communication has characterized the nervous system as an important partner of the immune system in the regulation of inflammation. Neuronal pathways, including the vagus nerve-based inflammatory reflex, are physiological regulators of immune function and inflammation. In parallel, neuronal function is altered in conditions characterized by immune dysregulation and inflammation. Here, we review these regulatory mechanisms and describe the neural circuitry modulating immunity. Understanding these mechanisms reveals possibilities to use targeted neuromodulation as a therapeutic approach for inflammatory and autoimmune disorders. These findings and current clinical exploration of neuromodulation in the treatment of inflammatory diseases define the emerging field of Bioelectronic Medicine. PMID:26512000

  4. Immunization of complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastor-Satorras, Romualdo; Vespignani, Alessandro

    2002-03-01

    Complex networks such as the sexual partnership web or the Internet often show a high degree of redundancy and heterogeneity in their connectivity properties. This peculiar connectivity provides an ideal environment for the spreading of infective agents. Here we show that the random uniform immunization of individuals does not lead to the eradication of infections in all complex networks. Namely, networks with scale-free properties do not acquire global immunity from major epidemic outbreaks even in the presence of unrealistically high densities of randomly immunized individuals. The absence of any critical immunization threshold is due to the unbounded connectivity fluctuations of scale-free networks. Successful immunization strategies can be developed only by taking into account the inhomogeneous connectivity properties of scale-free networks. In particular, targeted immunization schemes, based on the nodes' connectivity hierarchy, sharply lower the network's vulnerability to epidemic attacks.

  5. Lipid antigens in immunity

    PubMed Central

    Dowds, C. Marie; Kornell, Sabin-Christin

    2014-01-01

    Lipids are not only a central part of human metabolism but also play diverse and critical roles in the immune system. As such, they can act as ligands of lipid-activated nuclear receptors, control inflammatory signaling through bioactive lipids such as prostaglandins, leukotrienes, lipoxins, resolvins, and protectins, and modulate immunity as intracellular phospholipid- or sphingolipid-derived signaling mediators. In addition, lipids can serve as antigens and regulate immunity through the activation of lipid-reactive T cells, which is the topic of this review. We will provide an overview of the mechanisms of lipid antigen presentation, the biology of lipid-reactive T cells, and their contribution to immunity. PMID:23999493

  6. Improving immunization strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallos, Lazaros K.; Liljeros, Fredrik; Argyrakis, Panos; Bunde, Armin; Havlin, Shlomo

    2007-04-01

    We introduce an immunization method where the percentage of required vaccinations for immunity are close to the optimal value of a targeted immunization scheme of highest degree nodes. Our strategy retains the advantage of being purely local, without the need for knowledge on the global network structure or identification of the highest degree nodes. The method consists of selecting a random node and asking for a neighbor that has more links than himself or more than a given threshold and immunizing him. We compare this method to other efficient strategies on three real social networks and on a scale-free network model and find it to be significantly more effective.

  7. Nutritional strategies to optimize dairy cattle immunity.

    PubMed

    Sordillo, L M

    2016-06-01

    Dairy cattle are susceptible to increased incidence and severity of both metabolic and infectious diseases during the periparturient period. A major contributing factor to increased health disorders is alterations in bovine immune mechanisms. Indeed, uncontrolled inflammation is a major contributing factor and a common link among several economically important infectious and metabolic diseases including mastitis, retained placenta, metritis, displaced abomasum, and ketosis. The nutritional status of dairy cows and the metabolism of specific nutrients are critical regulators of immune cell function. There is now a greater appreciation that certain mediators of the immune system can have a reciprocal effect on the metabolism of nutrients. Thus, any disturbances in nutritional or immunological homeostasis can provide deleterious feedback loops that can further enhance health disorders, increase production losses, and decrease the availability of safe and nutritious dairy foods for a growing global population. This review will discuss the complex interactions between nutrient metabolism and immune functions in periparturient dairy cattle. Details of how either deficiencies or overexposure to macro- and micronutrients can contribute to immune dysfunction and the subsequent development of health disorders will be presented. Specifically, the ways in which altered nutrient metabolism and oxidative stress can interact to compromise the immune system in transition cows will be discussed. A better understanding of the linkages between nutrition and immunity may facilitate the design of nutritional regimens that will reduce disease susceptibility in early lactation cows. PMID:26830740

  8. Adult immunization-Need of the hour.

    PubMed

    Chakravarthi, P Srinivas; Ganta, Avani; Kattimani, Vivekanand S; Tiwari, Rahul V C

    2016-01-01

    Immunization is the process or the act of making individuals immune, which is usually done during childhood. Everyone is aware about immunization during childhood, however, very few know about adult immunization. This led us to review the adult immunization literature for the preventive strategies through various vaccination protocols. Adults do require vaccination protocols with booster doses for hepatitis B, Shingles, communicable diseases, traveler's diseases, etc. In this context, this article revises much of the available adult immunization literature and presents comprehensive guidelines. This article will increase the awareness regarding the importance of vaccination for adults to prevent a variety of conditions prevalent in our country as well as epidemics. The article comprehensively provides insights into the available vaccination and preventive strategy of human papilloma virus (HPV), hepatitis, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in this part of the review. We strongly recommend all the health care professionals to educate their co-professionals and the public to use the benefits of adult immunization. It is the need of the hour and reduces the burden of treatment and increases productivity. PMID:27583212

  9. Immune defence under extreme ambient temperature

    PubMed Central

    Seppälä, Otto; Jokela, Jukka

    2011-01-01

    Owing to global climate change, the extreme weather conditions are predicted to become more frequent, which is suggested to have an even greater impact on ecological interactions than the gradual increase in average temperatures. Here, we examined whether exposure to high ambient temperature affects immune function of the great pond snail (Lymnaea stagnalis). We quantified the levels of several immune traits from snails maintained in a non-stressful temperature (15°C) and in an extreme temperature (30°C) that occurs in small ponds during hot summers. We found that snails exposed to high temperature had weaker immune defence, which potentially predisposes them to infections. However, while phenoloxidase and antibacterial activity of snail haemolymph were reduced at high temperature, haemocyte concentration was not affected. This suggests that the effect of high temperature on snail susceptibility to infections may vary across different pathogens because different components of invertebrate immune defence have different roles in resistance. PMID:20610417

  10. Exploiting Mucosal Immunity for Antiviral Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Akiko

    2016-05-20

    Mucosal surfaces provide a remarkably effective barrier against potentially dangerous pathogens. Therefore, enhancing mucosal immunity through vaccines-strengthening that first line of defense-holds significant promise for reducing the burden of viral diseases. The large and varied class of viral pathogens, however, continues to present thorny challenges to vaccine development. Two primary difficulties exist: Viruses exhibit a stunning diversity of strategies for evading the host immune response, and even when we understand the nature of effective immune protection against a given virus, eliciting that protection is technically challenging. Only a few mucosal vaccines have surmounted these obstacles thus far. Recent developments, however, could greatly improve vaccine design. In this review, we first sketch out our understanding of mucosal immunity and then compare the herpes simplex virus, human immunodeficiency virus, and influenza virus to illustrate the distinct challenges of developing successful vaccines and to outline potential solutions. PMID:27168245

  11. Immunizations. Position Statement. Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bobo, Nichole; Garrett, Jennifer; Teskey, Carmen; Duncan, Kay; Strasser, Kathy; Burrows-Mezu, Alicia L.

    2015-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that immunizations are essential to primary prevention of disease from infancy through adulthood. Promotion of immunizations by the registered professional school nurse (hereinafter referred to as school nurse) is central to the public health focus of school nursing practice…

  12. Chemoimmunotherapy: reengineering tumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gang

    2013-01-01

    Cancer chemotherapy drugs have long been considered immune suppressive. However, more recent data indicate that some cytotoxic drugs effectively treat cancer in part by facilitating an immune response to the tumor when given at the standard dose and schedule. These drugs induce a form of tumor cell death that is immunologically active, thereby inducing an adaptive immune response specific for the tumor. In addition, cancer chemotherapy drugs can promote tumor immunity through ancillary and largely unappreciated immunologic effects on both the malignant and normal host cells present within the tumor microenvironment. These more subtle immunomodulatory effects are dependent on the drug itself, its dose, and its schedule in relation to an immune-based intervention. The recent approvals of two new immune-based therapies for prostate cancer and melanoma herald a new era in cancer treatment and have led to heightened interest in immunotherapy as a valid approach to cancer treatment. A detailed understanding of the cellular and molecular basis of interactions between chemotherapy drugs and the immune system is essential for devising the optimal strategy for integrating new immune-based therapies into the standard of care for various cancers, resulting in the greatest long-term clinical benefit for cancer patients. PMID:23389507

  13. Innate immunity and adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Akira, Shizuo

    2011-10-12

    Innate immunity was for a long time considered to be non-specific because the major function of this system is to digest pathogens and present antigens to the cells involved in acquired immunity. However, recent studies have shown that innate immunity is not non-specific, but is instead sufficiently specific to discriminate self from pathogens through evolutionarily conserved receptors, designated Toll-like receptors (TLRs). Indeed, innate immunity has a crucial role in early host defence against invading pathogens. Furthermore, TLRs were found to act as adjuvant receptors that create a bridge between innate and adaptive immunity, and to have important roles in the induction of adaptive immunity. This paradigm shift is now changing our thinking on the pathogenesis and treatment of infectious, immune and allergic diseases, as well as cancers. Besides TLRs, recent findings have revealed the presence of a cytosolic detector system for invading pathogens. I will review the mechanisms of pathogen recognition by TLRs and cytoplasmic receptors, and then discuss the roles of these receptors in the development of adaptive immunity in response to viral infection. PMID:21893536

  14. Immunization alters body odor.

    PubMed

    Kimball, Bruce A; Opiekun, Maryanne; Yamazaki, Kunio; Beauchamp, Gary K

    2014-04-10

    Infections have been shown to alter body odor. Because immune activation accompanies both infection and immunization, we tested the hypothesis that classical immunization might similarly result in the alteration of body odors detectable by trained biosensor mice. Using a Y-maze, we trained biosensor mice to distinguish between urine odors from rabies-vaccinated (RV) and unvaccinated control mice. RV-trained mice generalized this training to mice immunized with the equine West Nile virus (WNV) vaccine compared with urine of corresponding controls. These results suggest that there are similarities between body odors of mice immunized with these two vaccines. This conclusion was reinforced when mice could not be trained to directly discriminate between urine odors of RV- versus WNV-treated mice. Next, we trained biosensor mice to discriminate the urine odors of mice treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS; a general elicitor of innate immunological responses) from the urine of control mice. These LPS-trained biosensors could distinguish between the odors of LPS-treated mouse urine and RV-treated mouse urine. Finally, biosensor mice trained to distinguish between the odors of RV-treated mouse urine and control mouse urine did not generalize this training to discriminate between the odors of LPS-treated mouse urine and control mouse urine. From these experiments, we conclude that: (1) immunization alters urine odor in similar ways for RV and WNV immunizations; and (2) immune activation with LPS also alters urine odor but in ways different from those of RV and WNV. PMID:24524972

  15. Swine immune system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Probably no area of veterinary medicine has seen a greater explosion in knowledge then the immune system and its implications in disease and vaccination. In this chapter on the Swine Immune System for the 10th Edition of Diseases of Swine we expand on the information provided in past editions by in...

  16. Innate immunity and adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Akira, Shizuo

    2011-01-01

    Innate immunity was for a long time considered to be non-specific because the major function of this system is to digest pathogens and present antigens to the cells involved in acquired immunity. However, recent studies have shown that innate immunity is not non-specific, but is instead sufficiently specific to discriminate self from pathogens through evolutionarily conserved receptors, designated Toll-like receptors (TLRs). Indeed, innate immunity has a crucial role in early host defence against invading pathogens. Furthermore, TLRs were found to act as adjuvant receptors that create a bridge between innate and adaptive immunity, and to have important roles in the induction of adaptive immunity. This paradigm shift is now changing our thinking on the pathogenesis and treatment of infectious, immune and allergic diseases, as well as cancers. Besides TLRs, recent findings have revealed the presence of a cytosolic detector system for invading pathogens. I will review the mechanisms of pathogen recognition by TLRs and cytoplasmic receptors, and then discuss the roles of these receptors in the development of adaptive immunity in response to viral infection. PMID:21893536

  17. The Genetics of Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Lazzaro, Brian P.; Schneider, David S.

    2014-01-01

    In this commentary, Brian P. Lazzaro and David S. Schneider examine the topic of the Genetics of Immunity as explored in this month's issues of GENETICS and G3: Genes|Genomes|Genetics. These inaugural articles are part of a joint Genetics of Immunity collection (ongoing) in the GSA journals. PMID:24939182

  18. Immunity and Nutrition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dupin, Henri; Guerin, Nicole

    1990-01-01

    The three articles in this issue of a periodical focussed on various aspects of the life and health of children in the tropics concern: (1) immune defenses; (2) interactions between nutrition disorders and infection; and (3) immunity and vaccination. The science of immunology has progressed rapidly in recent years. A brief review of present…

  19. Resident commensals shaping immunity

    PubMed Central

    Erturk-Hasdemir, Deniz; Kasper, Dennis L.

    2013-01-01

    All animals coexist with myriad commensal microorganisms in a symbiotic relationship that plays a key role in health and disease. Continuous commensal–host interactions profoundly affect the development and regulation of the host’s immune system. The complex interaction of the commensal microbiota with the immune system is a topic of substantial interest. An understanding of these interactions and the mechanisms through which commensal microbes actively shape host immunity may yield new insights into the pathogenesis of many immune-mediated diseases and lead to new prophylactic and therapeutic interventions. This review examines recent advances in this field and their potential implications not just for the colonized tissues but also for the entire immune system. PMID:23830047

  20. Autophagy and Immune Senescence.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hanlin; Puleston, Daniel J; Simon, Anna Katharina

    2016-08-01

    With extension of the average lifespan, aging has become a heavy burden in society. Immune senescence is a key risk factor for many age-related diseases such as cancer and increased infections in the elderly, and hence has elicited much attention in recent years. As our body's guardian, the immune system maintains systemic health through removal of pathogens and damage. Autophagy is an important cellular 'clearance' process by which a cell internally delivers damaged organelles and macromolecules to lysosomes for degradation. Here, we discuss the most current knowledge of how impaired autophagy can lead to cellular and immune senescence. We also provide an overview, with examples, of the clinical potential of exploiting autophagy to delay immune senescence and/or rejuvenate immunity to treat various age-related diseases. PMID:27395769

  1. Endocannabinoids and immune regulation☆

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Rupal; Mousawy, Khalida; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Nagarkatti, Prakash

    2010-01-01

    Cannabinoid pharmacology has made important advances in recent years after the discovery of the cannabinoid receptors. These discoveries have added to our understanding of exogenous and endogenous cannabinoid signaling along with exploring the various pathways of their biosynthesis, molecular structure, inactivation, and anatomical distribution of their receptors throughout the body. The endocannabinoid system is involved in immunoregulation and neuroprotection. In this article, we have reviewed the possible mechanisms of the regulation of the immune response by endocannabinoids which include modulation of immune response in different cell types, effect on cytokine network, induction of apoptosis in immune cells and downregulation of innate and adaptive immune response. Studies from our laboratory have suggested that administration of endocannabinoids or use of inhibitors of enzymes that breakdown the endocannabinoids, leads to immunosuppression and recovery from immune-mediated injury to organs such as the liver. Thus, manipulation of endocannabinoids in vivo may constitute a novel treatment modality against inflammatory disorders. PMID:19428268

  2. Siglecs and Immune Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Pillai, Shiv; Netravali, Ilka Arun; Cariappa, Annaiah; Mattoo, Hamid

    2013-01-01

    Sialic acid binding Ig-like lectins or Siglecs vary in their specificity for sialic acid containing ligands and are mainly expressed by cells of the immune system. Many siglecs are inhibitory receptors expressed in innate immune cells that regulate inflammation mediated by DAMPs and PAMPs. This family also includes molecules involved in adhesion and phagocytosis and receptors that can associate with the ITAM containing DAP12 adaptor. Siglecs contribute to the inhibition of immune cells both by binding to cis-ligands (expressed in the same cells) as well as by responding to pathogen derived sialoglycoconjugates. They can help maintain tolerance in B lymphocytes, modulate the activation of conventional and plasmacytoid dendritic cells, and contribute to the regulation of T cell function both directly and indirectly. Siglecs modulate immune responses influencing almost every cell in the immune system, and are of relevance both in health and disease. PMID:22224769

  3. Neuroimmunoregulation and natural immunity.

    PubMed

    Berczi, I; Chow, D A; Sabbadini, E R

    1998-09-01

    The development and function of the immune system is regulated by neuroendocrine factors. Immune function may be divided into adaptive and natural immunity. Adaptive immune responses are driven by specific determinants of the antigen (epitopes), require 5-10 d to fully develop, and show an accelerated or memory response after repeated exposure to the same antigen. Natural immunity may be divided into host defense mediated by non-immune factors (e.g., antimicrobial proteins, enzymes, mucus etc.) and polyspecific responses of the immune system. This polyspecific response relies on natural antibodies and on some other serum proteins (e.g., lipopolysaccharide-binding protein-LBP, C-reactive protein-CRP), and on surface receptors of macrophages, natural killer cells and B and T lymphocytes for activation. Highly conserved homologous (crossreactive) epitopes, or homotopes for short, are recognized by the natural immune system. Natural antibodies, LBP, and CRP are capable of activating the entire immune system after combination with the appropriate homotope. During febrile illness natural immune host defense is promptly elevated because of the rapid rise of natural antibodies, LBP, and CRP in the serum. This is known as the acute phase response (APR), which is initiated by a sudden rise of cytokines in the circulation, such as IL-1, IL-6, and TNF-alpha. The cytokines act on the brain, the neuroendocrine system, and on other tissues and organs, which leads to fever and profound hormonal and metabolic changes. The hypothalamus-pituitary adrenal axis is activated and serves as the primary regulator of immune and inflammatory reactions. Insulin, glucagon, and catecholeamine levels are also raised. Bone marrow activity and leukocyte function are high and the liver is converted to the rapid production of acute-phase proteins (APP). APP include LBP, CRP, fibrinogen, some complement components, enzyme inhibitors, and anti-inflammatory proteins, which may rise in the serum from

  4. Exercise, immunity and aging.

    PubMed

    Venjatraman, J T; Fernandes, G

    1997-01-01

    In general population, many protective immune responses are impaired in old age, leading to an increased risk of infection. However, recent studies in SENIEUR subjects (healthy centenarians who are examples of successful aging) suggest that complex remodeling and reshaping of the immune system occurs with aging. An appropriate regular regimen of endurance exercise might help elderly to lead a quality of life by preserving immune function. However, very little is known regarding the interaction between exercise, aging and the immune system. Given that a number of age-related changes occur in many physiological systems which are known to alter the immune function both at rest and during exercise, it would be of value to learn the extent to which both acute and chronic exercise influence immune function in the elderly. The immune system response to exercise is multifaceted, depending on the nature of exercise. Significant interaction between the neuroendocrine and immune systems, and the role of lifestyle factors in immune function are known to occur. In theory, moderate exercise should help to reverse the adverse effects of aging upon the immune system by increasing the production of endocrine hormones which may contribute to less accumulation of autoreactive immune cells by enhancing the programmed cell death. Active elderly subjects demonstrated a significantly greater proliferative response to phytohemagglutinins (PHA) and to pokeweed mitogen (PWM), and higher rates of interleukin-2 (IL-2), interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and interleukin-4 (IL-4) production. A moderate training program can enhance the resting natural killer (NK) cell function of healthy elderly people, potentially increasing resistance to both viral infections and preventing the formation of malignant cells. Recent studies have suggested that endurance training in later life is associated with a lesser age-related decline in certain aspects of circulating T cell function and related cytokine

  5. Recommended Immunizations for Adults 50+

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn Javascript on. Health Screenings and Immunizations Recommended Immunizations For Adults 50+ The content in this section ... out more, visit How Vaccines Prevent Disease . Vaccines, Vaccinations, and Immunizations Understanding the difference between vaccines, vaccinations, ...

  6. Innate immune targets of hepatitis B virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Zhi-Qiang; Wang, Li; Wang, Kai; Yu, Ji-Guang

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 400 million people are chronically infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV) globally despite the widespread immunization of HBV vaccine and the development of antiviral therapies. The immunopathogenesis of HBV infection is initiated and driven by complexed interactions between the host immune system and the virus. Host immune responses to viral particles and proteins are regarded as the main determinants of viral clearance or persistent infection and hepatocyte injury. Innate immune system is the first defending line of host preventing from virus invasion. It is acknowledged that HBV has developed active tactics to escape innate immune recognition or actively interfere with innate immune signaling pathways and induce immunosuppression, which favor their replication. HBV reduces the expression of pattern-recognition receptors in the innate immune cells in humans. Also, HBV may interrupt different parts of antiviral signaling pathways, leading to the reduced production of antiviral cytokines such as interferons that contribute to HBV immunopathogenesis. A full comprehension of the mechanisms as to how HBV inactivates various elements of the innate immune response to initiate and maintain a persistent infection can be helpful in designing new immunotherapeutic methods for preventing and eradicating the virus. In this review, we aimed to summarize different branches the innate immune targeted by HBV infection. The review paper provides evidence that multiple components of immune responses should be activated in combination with antiviral therapy to disrupt the tolerance to HBV for eliminating HBV infection. PMID:27330680

  7. Use of genetically modified bacteria to modulate adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Susan M; González, Pablo A; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2009-06-01

    Infectious diseases caused by virulent bacteria are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, especially in developing countries. However, attenuated strains derived from pathogenic bacteria, such as Salmonella, are highly immunogenic and can be used as vaccines to promote immunity against parental pathogenic bacteria strains. Further, they can be genetically manipulated to either express foreign antigens or deliver exogenous DNA, in order to induce immunity against other pathogens or antigens. Contrarily, specific structural modifications in attenuated Salmonella have allowed the generation of strains that can be well tolerated by the immune system and reduce inflammatory responses. It is thought that those strains could be considered as vectors to promote specific immune tolerance for certain auto-antigens or allergens and reduce unwanted or self-reactive immune responses. In addition, some structural features of Salmonella can contribute to defining the nature and type of polarization of the adaptive immune response induced after immunization, which can be considered as a tool to modulate antigen-specific immunity. In this article we discuss recent advances in the understanding of immune system modulation by molecular components of bacteria and their exploitation for the rational induction of pathogen immunity or antigen-specific tolerance. PMID:19519362

  8. Innate immune targets of hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Zou, Zhi-Qiang; Wang, Li; Wang, Kai; Yu, Ji-Guang

    2016-06-18

    Approximately 400 million people are chronically infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV) globally despite the widespread immunization of HBV vaccine and the development of antiviral therapies. The immunopathogenesis of HBV infection is initiated and driven by complexed interactions between the host immune system and the virus. Host immune responses to viral particles and proteins are regarded as the main determinants of viral clearance or persistent infection and hepatocyte injury. Innate immune system is the first defending line of host preventing from virus invasion. It is acknowledged that HBV has developed active tactics to escape innate immune recognition or actively interfere with innate immune signaling pathways and induce immunosuppression, which favor their replication. HBV reduces the expression of pattern-recognition receptors in the innate immune cells in humans. Also, HBV may interrupt different parts of antiviral signaling pathways, leading to the reduced production of antiviral cytokines such as interferons that contribute to HBV immunopathogenesis. A full comprehension of the mechanisms as to how HBV inactivates various elements of the innate immune response to initiate and maintain a persistent infection can be helpful in designing new immunotherapeutic methods for preventing and eradicating the virus. In this review, we aimed to summarize different branches the innate immune targeted by HBV infection. The review paper provides evidence that multiple components of immune responses should be activated in combination with antiviral therapy to disrupt the tolerance to HBV for eliminating HBV infection. PMID:27330680

  9. Rebuilding immunity with Remune.

    PubMed

    Whitfield, L

    1998-01-01

    Remune, an immune response therapy composed of inactivated HIV, is designed to enhance the immune system's ability to recognize and kill HIV proteins. Developed by Dr. Jonas Salk, researchers hope Remune's actions can alter the course of HIV infection and slow disease progression. Remune has gained Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval to enter the critical Phase III trial stage. Two clinical trials are tracking Remune's immunogenicity (ability to provoke an immune response), its immunogenicity relative to dose level, and its effect on viral load. An ongoing trial, approved in February of 1996, enrolled 2,500 patients at 74 sites. The manufacturer, Immune Response Corporation (IRC), announced earlier this year that treatment with Remune induces an immune response to HIV that cross-reacts with different strains of the virus. This immune response is crucial for developing an effective worldwide treatment. Remune decreases levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-a). IRC recently began a Phase I clinical trial in Great Britain that combines Remune with a protease inhibitor, two antiviral nucleoside analogues, and Interleukin-2. The trial is designed to determine the role that the drug may play in restoring immune response. PMID:11365486

  10. Immunizations for foreign travel.

    PubMed Central

    Hill, D. R.

    1992-01-01

    One of the most important aspects of preparing travelers for destinations throughout the world is providing them with immunizations. Before administering any vaccines, however, a careful health and immunization history and travel itinerary should be obtained in order to determine vaccine indications and contraindications. There are three categories of immunizations for foreign travel. The first category includes immunizations which are routinely recommended whether or not the individual is traveling. Many travelers are due for primary vaccination or boosting against tetanus-diphtheria, measles-mumps-rubella, pneumococcal pneumonia, and influenza, for example, and the pre-travel visit is an ideal time to administer these. The second category are immunizations which might be required by a country as a condition for entry; these are yellow fever and cholera. The final category contains immunizations which are recommended because there is a risk of acquiring a particular disease during travel. Typhoid fever, meningococcal disease, rabies, and hepatitis are some examples. Travelers who are pregnant or who are infected with the human immunodeficiency virus require special consideration. Provision of appropriate immunizations for foreign travel is an important aspect of preventing illness in travelers. PMID:1337807

  11. Immunity to Francisella

    PubMed Central

    Cowley, Siobhán C.; Elkins, Karen L.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, studies on the intracellular pathogen Francisella tularensis have greatly intensified, generating a wealth of new information on the interaction of this organism with the immune system. Here we review the basic elements of the innate and adaptive immune responses that contribute to protective immunity against Francisella species, with special emphasis on new data that has emerged in the last 5 years. Most studies have utilized the mouse model of infection, although there has been an expansion of work on human cells and other new animal models. In mice, basic immune parameters that operate in defense against other intracellular pathogen infections, such as interferon gamma, TNF-α, and reactive nitrogen intermediates, are central for control of Francisella infection. However, new important immune mediators have been revealed, including IL-17A, Toll-like receptor 2, and the inflammasome. Further, a variety of cell types in addition to macrophages are now recognized to support Francisella growth, including epithelial cells and dendritic cells. CD4+ and CD8+ T cells are clearly important for control of primary infection and vaccine-induced protection, but new T cell subpopulations and the mechanisms employed by T cells are only beginning to be defined. A significant role for B cells and specific antibodies has been established, although their contribution varies greatly between bacterial strains of lower and higher virulence. Overall, recent data profile a pathogen that is adept at subverting host immune responses, but susceptible to many elements of the immune system's antimicrobial arsenal. PMID:21687418

  12. Testicular defense systems: immune privilege and innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shutao; Zhu, Weiwei; Xue, Shepu; Han, Daishu

    2014-09-01

    The mammalian testis possesses a special immunological environment because of its properties of remarkable immune privilege and effective local innate immunity. Testicular immune privilege protects immunogenic germ cells from systemic immune attack, and local innate immunity is important in preventing testicular microbial infections. The breakdown of local testicular immune homeostasis may lead to orchitis, an etiological factor of male infertility. The mechanisms underlying testicular immune privilege have been investigated for a long time. Increasing evidence shows that both a local immunosuppressive milieu and systemic immune tolerance are involved in maintaining testicular immune privilege status. The mechanisms underlying testicular innate immunity are emerging based on the investigation of the pattern recognition receptor-mediated innate immune response in testicular cells. This review summarizes our current understanding of testicular defense mechanisms and identifies topics that merit further investigation. PMID:24954222

  13. Immunogenomics: towards a digital immune system.

    PubMed

    Beck, Stephan

    2003-01-01

    One of the major differences that set apart vertebrates from non-vertebrates is the presence of a complex immune system. Over the past 400-500 million years, many novel immune genes and gene families have emerged and their products form sophisticated pathways providing protection against most pathogens. The Human Genome Project has laid the foundation to study these genes and pathways in unprecedented detail. Members of the immunoglobulin (Ig) superfamily alone were found to make up over 2% of human genes possibly constituting the largest gene family in the human genome. A subgroup of these human immune genes, those (among others) involved in antigen processing and presentation, are encoded in a single region, the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) on the short arm of chromosome 6. My laboratory has a long-standing interest in understanding the molecular organization and evolution of the MHC. To this end, we have been generating a range of MHC genomic resources that we make available in the form of maps and databases. Much of the complex data of the immune system can be reduced to binary (on/off) information that can easily be made available and analysed by bioinformatics approaches, thus contributing to better understand immune function via a 'digital immune system'. PMID:14712940

  14. Mechanisms by which pesticides affect insect immunity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The known effects of pesticides on insect immunity is reviewed here. A basic understanding of these interactions is needed for several reasons, including to improve methods for controlling pest insects in agricultural settings, for controlling insect vectors of human diseases, and for reducing morta...

  15. Immune System (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... lock onto them. T cells are like the soldiers, destroying the invaders that the intelligence system has ... can't be prevented, you can help your child's immune system stay stronger and fight illnesses by ...

  16. Immunizations for Preterm Babies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Immunizations For Preterm Babies Page Content Some parents of ... full-term and preterm babies. The hepatitis B vaccine deserves special mention. In most circumstances, the AAP ...

  17. Immunization Action Coalition

    MedlinePlus

    ... IAC | Contact | A-Z Index | Donate | Shop | SUBSCRIBE Immunization Action Coalition Handouts for Patients & Staff A-Z ... Index Supplies Checklist Administering Vaccines Temperature Logs Adult Vaccination Topics of Interest Documenting Vaccination Translations Parent Handouts ...

  18. FastStats: Immunization

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button NCHS Home Immunization Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Data are ... Percent of children 19-35 months old receiving vaccinations for: Diphtheria, Tetanus, Pertussis (4+ doses DTP, DT, ...

  19. Immune System 101

    MedlinePlus

    ... your healthy cells. How HIV Affects This Complex Process HIV disrupts this process by directly infecting the helper T-cells. Your ... T-cells are destroyed in the HIV replication process. For more information, see NIAID's The Immune System . ...

  20. Immunization Against Infectious Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mortimer, Edward A., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The success of present and future immunization programs is endangered by public and physician complacency and by complex legal and ethical problems related to informed consent and responsibility for rare, vaccine-related injury. (BB)

  1. Immune Gamma Globulin Therapeutic Indications in Immune Deficiency and Autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Luanna; Wu, Eveline Y; Tarrant, Teresa K

    2016-07-01

    Immune gamma globulin (IgG) has a long history in the treatment of both primary immune deficiency and autoimmune disorders. Disease indications continue to expand and new-generation products increase the versatility of delivery. This review encompasses a historical perspective as well as current and future implications of human immune globulin for the treatment of immune-mediated illness. PMID:27401913

  2. Innate Immunity and Neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    Bonifati, Domenico Marco

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation of central nervous system (CNS) is usually associated with trauma and infection. Neuroinflammation occurs in close relation to trauma, infection, and neurodegenerative diseases. Low-level neuroinflammation is considered to have beneficial effects whereas chronic neuroinflammation can be harmful. Innate immune system consisting of pattern-recognition receptors, macrophages, and complement system plays a key role in CNS homeostasis following injury and infection. Here, we discuss how innate immune components can also contribute to neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration. PMID:23843682

  3. Incorporating immunizations into routine obstetric care to facilitate Health Care Practitioners in implementing maternal immunization recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Heather; Street, Jackie; Marshall, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Immunization against pertussis, influenza, and rubella reduces morbidity and mortality in pregnant women and their offspring. Health care professionals (HCPs) caring for women perinatally are uniquely placed to reduce maternal vaccine preventable diseases (VPDs). Despite guidelines recommending immunization during the perinatal period, maternal vaccine uptake remains low. This qualitative study explored the role of obstetricians, general practitioners, and midwives in maternal vaccine uptake. Semi-structured interviews (n = 15) were conducted with perinatal HCPs at a tertiary maternity hospital in South Australia. HCPs were asked to reflect on their knowledge, beliefs, and practice relating to immunization advice and vaccine provision. Interviews were transcribed and coded using thematic analysis. Data collection and analysis was an iterative process, with collection ceasing with theoretical saturation. Participants unanimously supported maternal vaccination as an effective way of reducing risk of disease in this vulnerable population, however only rubella immunity detection and immunization is embedded in routine care. Among these professionals, delegation of responsibility for maternal immunization was unclear and knowledge about maternal immunization was variable. Influenza and pertussis vaccine prevention measures were not included in standard pregnancy record documentation, information provision to patients was “ad hoc” and vaccinations not offered on-site. The key finding was that the incorporation of maternal vaccinations into standard care through a structured process is an important facilitator for immunization uptake. Incorporating vaccine preventable disease management measures into routine obstetric care including incorporation into the Pregnancy Record would facilitate HCPs in implementing recommendations. Rubella prevention provides a useful “template” for other vaccines. PMID:24509790

  4. Using a registry to improve immunization delivery.

    PubMed

    Kairys, Steven W; Gubernick, Ruth S; Millican, Adrienne; Adams, William G

    2006-07-01

    The NJIPSP was successful in encouraging a group of small urban practices to adopt the use of immunization registry and to transform immunization delivery from a mechanistic well-child service to a visible, monitored process of care. The project represents a unique combination of technology, public-private collaboration, and well-established quality improvement techniques. The change process involved the whole office as a team in adopting new immunization delivery roles and services. The greatest barrier to acceptance of the registry was (and continues to be) the need for manual data entry as the primary source of data collection, rather than electronic data transfer from other systems. The manual entry of data was labor intensive for participating practices and affected data measurement. Despite this barrier, however, the majority of practices substantially improved the quality of their immunization delivery practices in multiple areas. The rapid movement of primary care practices toward some form of electronic record may reduce this barrier and increase the percentage of practices willing to use a community registry. Practices that engaged collectively in the change process gained momentum from the group effort. Equally important was the public health partnership that helped identify and reduce improvement obstacles. Sustainability of practice-based immunization changes will rely, in part, on the registry's ease of use and the continued visibility of public health at the practice level. Active practice level collaboration by public health adds great value to change efforts. We believe that the best possible immunization delivery relies on both technology (registries and the EMR) and effective office systems. Projects like the NJIPSP are models for systems that integrate technology, practice change, and quality improvement, and their success has the potential to foster the spread of this approach to other primary care practices (especially in New Jersey). The

  5. Problematic Internet Usage and Immune Function.

    PubMed

    Reed, Phil; Vile, Rebecca; Osborne, Lisa A; Romano, Michela; Truzoli, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Problematic internet use has been associated with a variety of psychological comorbidities, but it relationship with physical illness has not received the same degree of investigation. The current study surveyed 505 participants online, and asked about their levels of problematic internet usage (Internet Addiction Test), depression and anxiety (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scales), social isolation (UCLA Loneliness Questionnaire), sleep problems (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index), and their current health - General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28), and the Immune Function Questionnaire. The results demonstrated that around 30% of the sample displayed mild or worse levels of internet addiction, as measured by the IAT. Although there were differences in the purposes for which males and females used the internet, there were no differences in terms of levels of problematic usage between genders. The internet problems were strongly related to all of the other psychological variables such as depression, anxiety, social-isolation, and sleep problems. Internet addiction was also associated with reduced self-reported immune function, but not with the measure of general health (GHQ-28). This relationship between problematic internet use and reduced immune function was found to be independent of the impact of the co-morbidities. It is suggested that the negative relationship between level of problematic internet use and immune function may be mediated by levels of stress produced by such internet use, and subsequent sympathetic nervous activity, which related to immune-supressants, such as cortisol. PMID:26244339

  6. Problematic Internet Usage and Immune Function

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Phil; Vile, Rebecca; Osborne, Lisa A.; Romano, Michela; Truzoli, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Problematic internet use has been associated with a variety of psychological comorbidities, but it relationship with physical illness has not received the same degree of investigation. The current study surveyed 505 participants online, and asked about their levels of problematic internet usage (Internet Addiction Test), depression and anxiety (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scales), social isolation (UCLA Loneliness Questionnaire), sleep problems (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index), and their current health – General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28), and the Immune Function Questionnaire. The results demonstrated that around 30% of the sample displayed mild or worse levels of internet addiction, as measured by the IAT. Although there were differences in the purposes for which males and females used the internet, there were no differences in terms of levels of problematic usage between genders. The internet problems were strongly related to all of the other psychological variables such as depression, anxiety, social-isolation, and sleep problems. Internet addiction was also associated with reduced self-reported immune function, but not with the measure of general health (GHQ-28). This relationship between problematic internet use and reduced immune function was found to be independent of the impact of the co-morbidities. It is suggested that the negative relationship between level of problematic internet use and immune function may be mediated by levels of stress produced by such internet use, and subsequent sympathetic nervous activity, which related to immune-supressants, such as cortisol. PMID:26244339

  7. Is sporozoite refractile body protein expression different in Eimeria acervulina sporozoites isolated from non-immune versus immune chickens?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A hallmark of Eimeria infection in avians is the establishment of immunity against clinical signs of coccidiosis. Resistant birds experience improved weight gain and feed conversion efficiency and lack intestinal lesions. Oocysts excretion is reduced, but not eliminated, in such immune chickens. ...

  8. Occurrence of circulating immune complexes in beta-thalassaemia major.

    PubMed

    Casali, P; Borzini, P; Vergani, D; Mieli-Vergani, G; Masera, G; Zanussi, C

    1978-02-01

    The presence of circulating soluble immune complexes and the level of complement were investigated in sera from 21 patients with beta-thalassaemia major, including both splenectomised and nonsplenectomised patients. A high level of immune complexes was found in half of these cases. Reduced complement levels were seen less frequently. There was no correlation between the presence of circulating immune complexes, decreased complement levels, and thpresence or absence of the spleen. The level of immune complexes increased with the age ofthe individual, i.e. with the duration of the disease. PMID:646416

  9. Exercise and immune function. Recent developments.

    PubMed

    Nieman, D C; Pedersen, B K

    1999-02-01

    recovery period after strenuous exercise. Studies on the influence of moderate exercise training on host protection and immune function have shown that near-daily brisk walking compared with inactivity reduced the number of sickness days by half over a 12- to 15-week period without change in resting immune function. Positive effects on immunosurveillance and host protection that come with moderate exercise training are probably related to a summation effect from acute positive changes that occur during each exercise bout. No convincing data exist that moderate exercise training is linked with improved T helper cell counts in patients with HIV, or enhanced immunity in elderly participants. PMID:10091272

  10. Adaptive immunity in the liver.

    PubMed

    Shuai, Zongwen; Leung, Miranda Wy; He, Xiaosong; Zhang, Weici; Yang, Guoxiang; Leung, Patrick Sc; Eric Gershwin, M

    2016-05-01

    The anatomical architecture of the human liver and the diversity of its immune components endow the liver with its physiological function of immune competence. Adaptive immunity is a major arm of the immune system that is organized in a highly specialized and systematic manner, thus providing long-lasting protection with immunological memory. Adaptive immunity consists of humoral immunity and cellular immunity. Cellular immunity is known to have a crucial role in controlling infection, cancer and autoimmune disorders in the liver. In this article, we will focus on hepatic virus infections, hepatocellular carcinoma and autoimmune disorders as examples to illustrate the current understanding of the contribution of T cells to cellular immunity in these maladies. Cellular immune suppression is primarily responsible for chronic viral infections and cancer. However, an uncontrolled auto-reactive immune response accounts for autoimmunity. Consequently, these immune abnormalities are ascribed to the quantitative and functional changes in adaptive immune cells and their subsets, innate immunocytes, chemokines, cytokines and various surface receptors on immune cells. A greater understanding of the complex orchestration of the hepatic adaptive immune regulators during homeostasis and immune competence are much needed to identify relevant targets for clinical intervention to treat immunological disorders in the liver. PMID:26996069

  11. Adaptive immunity in the liver

    PubMed Central

    Shuai, Zongwen; Leung, Miranda WY; He, Xiaosong; Zhang, Weici; Yang, Guoxiang; Leung, Patrick SC; Eric Gershwin, M

    2016-01-01

    The anatomical architecture of the human liver and the diversity of its immune components endow the liver with its physiological function of immune competence. Adaptive immunity is a major arm of the immune system that is organized in a highly specialized and systematic manner, thus providing long-lasting protection with immunological memory. Adaptive immunity consists of humoral immunity and cellular immunity. Cellular immunity is known to have a crucial role in controlling infection, cancer and autoimmune disorders in the liver. In this article, we will focus on hepatic virus infections, hepatocellular carcinoma and autoimmune disorders as examples to illustrate the current understanding of the contribution of T cells to cellular immunity in these maladies. Cellular immune suppression is primarily responsible for chronic viral infections and cancer. However, an uncontrolled auto-reactive immune response accounts for autoimmunity. Consequently, these immune abnormalities are ascribed to the quantitative and functional changes in adaptive immune cells and their subsets, innate immunocytes, chemokines, cytokines and various surface receptors on immune cells. A greater understanding of the complex orchestration of the hepatic adaptive immune regulators during homeostasis and immune competence are much needed to identify relevant targets for clinical intervention to treat immunological disorders in the liver. PMID:26996069

  12. Harmful and beneficial antibodies in immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed Central

    Imbach, P A

    1994-01-01

    Two facts support the definition of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) as an immune disorder. First, antibodies against platelets, which often appear after a viral infection, provoke the increased elimination of these cells. Viral disease may change the complex immune response of the host at different levels. In chronic ITP, the consequences of the dysregulated immune system are autoantibodies, primarily against platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa. Second, pooled immunoglobulins from healthy blood donors may influence the imbalanced immune response in ITP. The initial study dose of 5 x 0.4 g of intact 7S IgG/kg body weight can now be reduced to 2 x 0.4 g/kg body weight in the majority of patients. The possible mechanisms of action of intravenous immune globulin (IVIG) are reviewed and updated in this article. The combination of effects on the humoral and cellular immune responses using IVIG in concert with cytokines may open up new therapeutic possibilities. PMID:8033430

  13. Females gain survival benefits from immune-boosting ejaculates.

    PubMed

    Worthington, Amy M; Kelly, Clint D

    2016-04-01

    Females in many animal taxa incur significant costs from mating in the form of injury or infection, which can drastically reduce survival. Therefore, immune function during reproduction can be important in determining lifetime fitness. Trade-offs between reproduction and immunity have been extensively studied, yet a growing number of studies demonstrate that mated females have a stronger immune response than virgins. Here, we use the Texas field cricket, Gryllus texensis, to test multiple hypotheses proposed to explain this postmating increase in immune function. Using host-resistance tests, we found that courtship, copulation, and accessory fluids alone do not affect female immunity; rather, only females that acquire intact ejaculates containing testes-derived components exhibit significant increases in survival after exposure to bacterial pathogens. Our data suggest that male-derived components originating from an intact ejaculate and transferred to females during sex are required for the increased immune function characteristic of mated female crickets to occur. PMID:26920335

  14. Immune profile alterations in thalassaemic patients.

    PubMed

    Quintiliani, L; Mastromonaco, A; Giuliani, E; Buzzonetti, A; Sisti, P; Guglielmetti, M; Iudicone, P; Greca, E; Damiano, A M; Ciancamerla, A M

    1983-01-01

    Aspects of the humoral and cellular immune response have been studied in polytransfused patients with beta-thalassaemia major. Serum immunoglobulins (G, A, M) levels were significantly higher than in controls; reduced C4 serum level and high incidence of circulating immune complexes and anti-nuclear autoantibodies were found in the majority of patients. Marked increases were also observed in absolute and relative numbers of lymphocytes and their subpopulations. Such results suggested that the allogenic stimulation, by frequent transfusion, is the mainly responsible of the immunological alterations observed in these patients. PMID:6677264

  15. Ontogeny of Early Life Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Dowling, David J.; Levy, Ofer

    2014-01-01

    The human immune system is comprised of cellular and molecular components designed to coordinately prevent infection while avoiding potentially harmful inflammation and auto-immunity. Immunity varies with age, reflecting unique age-dependent challenges including fetal gestation, the neonatal phase and infancy. Herein, we review novel mechanistic insights into early life immunity, with emphasis on emerging models of human immune ontogeny, which may inform age-specific translational development of novel anti-infectives, immunomodulators and vaccines. PMID:24880460

  16. Reproduction-Immunity Trade-Offs in Insects.

    PubMed

    Schwenke, Robin A; Lazzaro, Brian P; Wolfner, Mariana F

    2016-01-01

    Immune defense and reproduction are physiologically and energetically demanding processes and have been observed to trade off in a diversity of female insects. Increased reproductive effort results in reduced immunity, and reciprocally, infection and activation of the immune system reduce reproductive output. This trade-off can manifest at the physiological level (within an individual) and at the evolutionary level (genetic distinction among individuals in a population). The resource allocation model posits that the trade-off arises because of competition for one or more limiting resources, and we hypothesize that pleiotropic signaling mechanisms regulate allocation of that resource between reproductive and immune processes. We examine the role of juvenile hormone, 20-hydroxyecdysone, and insulin/insulin-like growth factor-like signaling in regulating both oogenesis and immune system activity, and propose a signaling network that may mechanistically regulate the trade-off. Finally, we discuss implications of the trade-off in an ecological and evolutionary context. PMID:26667271

  17. Organising for immunization.

    PubMed

    Michie, S

    1993-06-01

    In the late 1960s, health workers from a mission hospital in rural Zambia began registering children under 14 years old within 30 miles of the hospital (about 3000 children) by incorporating the cooperation of community leaders. They wanted to give every 0-4 year old child a Road to Health card and every 5-14 year old a vaccine record card and to promote the significance of immunization to parents and community leaders. The mission hospital established mobile health units to conduct regular visits in the center of villages. Staff hugh scales from a tree and borrowed a table to conduct the clinic. They kept a good relationship and communication with the community, leading successful education and communication activities. By 1988, many younger mothers were unfamiliar with a measles or whooping cough epidemic so they tended to not have their infants immunized. Epidemics began killing children nationwide, frightening these mothers so they brought their children for immunizations. The medical mission achieved an 85-90% vaccination coverage rate with immunization clinic attendance climbing quickly. 1 mother even walked 30 miles to have her infant injected with the DPT vaccine, but 10 years earlier, she did not bring her children. Further, measles had not reached her area because the immunization level was so high that it stopped the epidemic. PMID:12318293

  18. Immune memory in invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Milutinović, Barbara; Kurtz, Joachim

    2016-08-01

    Evidence for innate immune memory (or 'priming') in invertebrates has been accumulating over the last years. We here provide an in-depth review of the current state of evidence for immune memory in invertebrates, and in particular take a phylogenetic viewpoint. Invertebrates are a very heterogeneous group of animals and accordingly, evidence for the phenomenon of immune memory as well as the hypothesized molecular underpinnings differ largely for the diverse invertebrate taxa. The majority of research currently focuses on Arthropods, while evidence from many other groups of invertebrates is fragmentary or even lacking. We here concentrate on immune memory that is induced by pathogenic challenges, but also extent our view to a non-pathogenic context, i.e. allograft rejection, which can also show forms of memory and can inform us about general principles of specific self-nonself recognition. We discuss definitions of immune memory and a number of relevant aspects such as the type of antigens used, the route of exposure, and the kinetics of reactions following priming. PMID:27402055

  19. Immunity to fish rhabdoviruses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Purcell, Maureen K.; Laing, Kerry J.; Winton, James R.

    2012-01-01

    Members of the family Rhabdoviridae are single-stranded RNA viruses and globally important pathogens of wild and cultured fish and thus relatively well studied in their respective hosts or other model systems. Here, we review the protective immune mechanisms that fish mount in response to rhabdovirus infections. Teleost fish possess the principal components of innate and adaptive immunity found in other vertebrates. Neutralizing antibodies are critical for long-term protection from fish rhabdoviruses, but several studies also indicate a role for cell-mediated immunity. Survival of acute rhabdoviral infection is also dependent on innate immunity, particularly the interferon (IFN) system that is rapidly induced in response to infection. Paradoxically, rhabdoviruses are sensitive to the effects of IFN but virulent rhabdoviruses can continue to replicate owing to the abilities of the matrix (M) protein to mediate host-cell shutoff and the non-virion (NV) protein to subvert programmed cell death and suppress functional IFN. While many basic features of the fish immune response to rhabdovirus infections are becoming better understood, much less is known about how factors in the environment affect the ecology of rhabdovirus infections in natural populations of aquatic animals.

  20. Immunity to Fish Rhabdoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Purcell, Maureen K.; Laing, Kerry J.; Winton, James R.

    2012-01-01

    Members of the family Rhabdoviridae are single-stranded RNA viruses and globally important pathogens of wild and cultured fish and thus relatively well studied in their respective hosts or other model systems. Here, we review the protective immune mechanisms that fish mount in response to rhabdovirus infections. Teleost fish possess the principal components of innate and adaptive immunity found in other vertebrates. Neutralizing antibodies are critical for long-term protection from fish rhabdoviruses, but several studies also indicate a role for cell-mediated immunity. Survival of acute rhabdoviral infection is also dependent on innate immunity, particularly the interferon (IFN) system that is rapidly induced in response to infection. Paradoxically, rhabdoviruses are sensitive to the effects of IFN but virulent rhabdoviruses can continue to replicate owing to the abilities of the matrix (M) protein to mediate host-cell shutoff and the non‑virion (NV) protein to subvert programmed cell death and suppress functional IFN. While many basic features of the fish immune response to rhabdovirus infections are becoming better understood, much less is known about how factors in the environment affect the ecology of rhabdovirus infections in natural populations of aquatic animals. PMID:22355456

  1. Immunization of Baboons with Schistosoma mansoni Cercariae attenuated by gamma irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Stek, M.; Minard, P.; Dean, D.A.; Hall, J.E.

    1981-06-01

    Studies on the efficacy of a vaccine against schistosomiasis in young baboons (Papio anubis) disclosed that immunization with Schistosoma mansoni cercariae attenuated by gamma irradiation induced significant protection against subsequent infection with normal, viable S. mansoni cercariae. Such immunization resulted in reduced worm burdens (70 percent) and egg excretion rates (82 percent). These results support immunization as a potential method for schistosomiasis control.

  2. Immunization of baboons with Schistosoma mansoni cercariae attenuated by gamma irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Stek, M. Jr.; Minard, P.; Dean, D.A.; Hall, J.E.

    1981-06-26

    Studies on the efficacy of a vaccine against schistosomiasis in young baboons (Papio anubis) disclosed that immunization with Schistosoma mansoni cercariae attenuated by gamma irradiation induced significant protection against subsequent infection with normal, viable S. mansoni cercariae. Such immunization resulted in reduced worm burdens (70%) and egg excretion rates (82%). These results support immunization as a potential method for schistosomiasis control.

  3. Rotavirus immune responses and correlates of protection

    PubMed Central

    Angel, Juana; Franco, Manuel A.; Greenberg, Harry B.

    2012-01-01

    Selected topics in the field of rotavirus immunity are reviewed focusing on recent developments that may improve efficacy and safety of current and future vaccines. Rotaviruses have developed multiple mechanisms to evade interferon-mediated innate immunity. Compared to more developed regions of the world, protection induced by natural infection and vaccination is reduced in developing countries where, among other factors, high viral challenge loads are common and where infants are infected at an early age. Studies in developing countries indicate that rotavirus-specific serum IgA levels are not an optimal correlate of protection following vaccination, and better correlates need to be identified. Protection against rotavirus following vaccination is substantially heterotypic; nonetheless, a role for homotypic immunity in selection of circulating post vaccination strains needs further study. PMID:22677178

  4. Mosquito immune responses to arbovirus infections

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Carol D.; Olson, Ken E.

    2014-01-01

    The principal mosquito innate immune response to virus infections, RNA interference (RNAi), differs substantially from the immune response to bacterial and fungal infections. The exo-siRNA pathway constitutes the major anti-arboviral RNAi response and its essential genetic components have been identified. Recent research has also implicated the Piwi-interacting RNA pathway in mosquito anti-arboviral immunity, but Piwi gene-family components involved are not well-defined. Arboviruses must evade or suppress RNAi without causing pathogenesis in the vector to maintain their transmission cycle, but little is known about mechanisms of arbovirus modulation of RNAi. Genetic manipulation of mosquitoes to enhance their RNAi response can limit arbovirus infection and replication and could be used in novel strategies for interruption of arbovirus transmission and greatly reduce disease. PMID:25401084

  5. Immune Therapies for Neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Navid, Fariba; Armstrong, Michael; Barfield, Raymond C.

    2009-01-01

    Neuroblastoma, a solid tumor arising from developing cells of the sympathetic nervous system, is the most common extracranial tumor in children. The prognosis for high-risk neuroblastoma remains poor with conventional treatment, and new approaches are therefore being explored to treat this disease. One such alternative therapy that holds promise is immune therapy. We review here the recent advances in 4 types of immune therapy – cytokine, vaccine, antibody, and cellular therapy – to treat neuroblastoma. We present preclinical research and clinical trials on several promising candidates such as IL-12, dendritic cell vaccines, anti-GD2 antibodies, and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant. An optimal treatment plan for neuroblastoma will most likely involve multimodal approaches and combinations of immune therapies. PMID:19342881

  6. [Immune-mediated neuropathies].

    PubMed

    Stoll, G; Reiners, K

    2016-08-01

    The Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) are the most common immune-mediated polyneuropathies, which can show variable clinical and electrophysiological manifestations. Rarer immune-mediated neuropathies encompass paraproteinemic neuropathies (PPN), multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) and vasculitic neuropathies. The diagnosis usually relies on the history of symptom evolution, distribution of nerve dysfunction and particularly on characteristic features in nerve conduction studies, aided by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination and nerve biopsy findings. The therapeutic toolbox encompasses corticosteroids, immunoglobulins and plasmapheresis often accompanied by long-term immunosuppression. It is important to note that immune-mediated neuropathies selectively respond to treatment and contraindications need to be considered. Despite treatment a considerable number of patients suffer from permanent neurological deficits. PMID:27474733

  7. Vitamin D and immunity

    PubMed Central

    Gorman, Shelley; Geldenhuys, Sian; Hart, Prue H.

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency has been linked to an increased risk of a wide range of adverse health outcomes. The active form of vitamin D has an important role in calcium metabolism and in bone mineralisation, but the evidence for other health outcomes is mixed, with the strongest effects seen in the weakest epidemiological study designs. There are plausible pathways whereby vitamin D deficiency can impair immune function, resulting in both overactivity and increased risk of autoimmune disease, as well as immune suppression with poorer resistance to infection. Vitamin D status may influence the bacterial flora that constitute the microbiome and affect immune function through this route. Exposure of the skin to ultraviolet radiation causes the production of a range of chemicals, including vitamin D, and new research is exploring possible vitamin D-independent immunomodulatory pathways. PMID:25580272

  8. [Immune mechanisms in uremia].

    PubMed

    Dobbelstein, H

    1975-05-15

    There is both clinical and experimental evidence that cellular and humoral immunity are suppressed in patients with renal insufficiency: observations in organ transplantation and in vitro stimulation of lymphocytes from uraemic patients, investigations of acute and late hypersensitivity reactions, the immune response after active immunization as well as changes of immunoglobulins and lymphatic organs in uraemia are discussed in the paper. The underlying mechanisms are complex and not yet fully understood. Lymphopenia, atrophy of the thymus gland, toxic serum factors, induction of enhancing mechanisms by certain serum fractions and metabolic defects of lymphocytes--all were shown to be involved or at least considered to be. At present, however, it is impossible to define their rank of importance and the exact place they may occupy in the genesis of this type of "natural immunosuppression". PMID:540

  9. Mechanisms of immune resolution

    PubMed Central

    Ayala, Alfred; Chung, Chun-Shiang; Grutkoski, Patricia S.; Song, Grace Y.

    2008-01-01

    Initially after injury, the innate/proinflammatory and some aspects of the acquired immune response are up-regulated to maintain a defense against foreign pathogens, clear tissue debris present at the wound site, and orchestrate aspects of tissue remodeling, cell proliferation and angiogenic process, associated with the wound response. However, for proper wound healing to progress, this initial inflammatory response has to be regulated or shut down so as to allow for the reestablishment of matrix, recellularization, and tissue remodeling. Inability to properly resolve the extent of innate/acquired response at a site of injury can lead to poor wound healing, immune suppression, and recurrent infectious episodes. This review attempts to summarize information on regulatory mechanisms that are thought to be involved in controlling/resolving innate or acquired immune responses so as to provide a framework for use in thinking about the impact these processes and their manipulation may have on wound healing and its potential management. PMID:12907886

  10. Immune System and Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Norbert; Schwarz, Markus J.

    2010-01-01

    Although an immune dysfunction and the involvement of infectious agents in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia are discussed since decades, the field never came into the mainstream of research. In schizophrenia a blunted type-1 immune response seems to be associated with a dysbalance in the activation of the enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and in the tryptophan - kynurenine metabolism resulting in increased production of kynurenic acid in schizophrenia. This is associated with an imbalance in the glutamatergic neurotransmission, leading to an NMDA antagonism in schizophrenia. The immunological effects of antipsychotics rebalance partly the immune imbalance and the overweight of the production of the kynurenic acid. This immunological imbalance results in an inflammatory state combined with increased prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production and increased cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression. COX-2 inhibitors have been tested in clinical trials, pointing to favourable effects in schizophrenia. PMID:21057585

  11. Inflammatory bowel disease related innate immunity and adaptive immunity

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yuan; Chen, Zhonge

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic nonspecific intestinal inflammatory disease, including ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn’s disease (CD). Its pathogenesis remains not yet clear. Current researchers believe that after environmental factors act on individuals with genetic susceptibility, an abnormal intestinal immune response is launched under stimulation of intestinal flora. However, previous studies only focused on adaptive immunity in the pathogenesis of IBD. Currently, roles of innate immune response in the pathogenesis of intestinal inflammation have also drawn much attention. In this study, IBD related innate immunity and adaptive immunity were explained, especially the immune mechanisms in the pathogenesis of IBD. PMID:27398134

  12. Autophagy in immunity

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xu-Jie; Zang, Hong

    2012-01-01

    Autophagy is now emerging as a spotlight in trafficking events that activate innate and adaptive immunity. It facilitates innate pathogen detection and antigen presentation, as well as pathogen clearance and lymphocyte homeostasis. In this review, we first summarize new insights into its functions in immunity, which underlie its associations with autoimmunity. As some lines of evidence are emerging to support its role in autoimmune and autoinflammatory diseases, we further discuss whether and how it affects autoimmune diseases including systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes mellitus and multiple sclerosis, as well as autoinflammatory diseases, such as Crohn disease and vitiligo. PMID:22878595

  13. Quercetin, Inflammation and Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yao; Yao, Jiaying; Han, Chunyan; Yang, Jiaxin; Chaudhry, Maria Tabassum; Wang, Shengnan; Liu, Hongnan; Yin, Yulong

    2016-01-01

    In vitro and some animal models have shown that quercetin, a polyphenol derived from plants, has a wide range of biological actions including anti-carcinogenic, anti-inflammatory and antiviral activities; as well as attenuating lipid peroxidation, platelet aggregation and capillary permeability. This review focuses on the physicochemical properties, dietary sources, absorption, bioavailability and metabolism of quercetin, especially main effects of quercetin on inflammation and immune function. According to the results obtained both in vitro and in vivo, good perspectives have been opened for quercetin. Nevertheless, further studies are needed to better characterize the mechanisms of action underlying the beneficial effects of quercetin on inflammation and immunity. PMID:26999194

  14. Quercetin, Inflammation and Immunity.

    PubMed

    Li, Yao; Yao, Jiaying; Han, Chunyan; Yang, Jiaxin; Chaudhry, Maria Tabassum; Wang, Shengnan; Liu, Hongnan; Yin, Yulong

    2016-03-01

    In vitro and some animal models have shown that quercetin, a polyphenol derived from plants, has a wide range of biological actions including anti-carcinogenic, anti-inflammatory and antiviral activities; as well as attenuating lipid peroxidation, platelet aggregation and capillary permeability. This review focuses on the physicochemical properties, dietary sources, absorption, bioavailability and metabolism of quercetin, especially main effects of quercetin on inflammation and immune function. According to the results obtained both in vitro and in vivo, good perspectives have been opened for quercetin. Nevertheless, further studies are needed to better characterize the mechanisms of action underlying the beneficial effects of quercetin on inflammation and immunity. PMID:26999194

  15. Aged Garlic Extract Modifies Human Immunity.

    PubMed

    Percival, Susan S

    2016-02-01

    Garlic contains numerous compounds that have the potential to influence immunity. Immune cells, especially innate immune cells, are responsible for the inflammation necessary to kill pathogens. Two innate lymphocytes, γδ-T and natural killer (NK) cells, appear to be susceptible to diet modification. The purpose of this review was to summarize the influence of aged garlic extract (AGE) on the immune system. The author's laboratory is interested in AGE's effects on cell proliferation and activation and inflammation and to learn whether those changes might affect the occurrence and severity of colds and flu. Healthy human participants (n = 120), between 21 and 50 y of age, were recruited for a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled parallel-intervention study to consume 2.56 g AGE/d or placebo supplements for 90 d during the cold and flu season. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated before and after consumption, and γδ-T and NK cell function was assessed by flow cytometry. The effect on cold and flu symptoms was determined by using daily diary records of self-reported illnesses. After 45 d of AGE consumption, γδ-T and NK cells proliferated better and were more activated than cells from the placebo group. After 90 d, although the number of illnesses was not significantly different, the AGE group showed reduced cold and flu severity, with a reduction in the number of symptoms, the number of days participants functioned suboptimally, and the number of work/school days missed. These results suggest that AGE supplementation may enhance immune cell function and may be partly responsible for the reduced severity of colds and flu reported. The results also suggest that the immune system functions well with AGE supplementation, perhaps with less accompanying inflammation. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01390116. PMID:26764332

  16. Immune dysfunction in acute alcoholic hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Dhanda, Ashwin D; Collins, Peter L

    2015-01-01

    Acute alcoholic hepatitis (AAH) is a serious complication of alcohol misuse and has high short term mortality. It is a clinical syndrome characterised by jaundice and coagulopathy in a patient with a history of recent heavy alcohol use and is associated with profound immune dysfunction with a primed but ineffective immune response against pathogens. Here, we review the current knowledge of the pathogenesis and immune defects of AAH and identify areas requiring further study. Alcohol activates the immune system primarily through the disruption of gut tight junction integrity allowing the escape of pathogen-associated molecular particles (PAMPs) into the portal venous system. PAMPs stimulate cells expressing toll-like receptors (mainly myeloid derived cells) and initiate a network of intercellular signalling by secretion of many soluble mediators including cytokines and chemokines. The latter coordinates the infiltration of neutrophils, monocytes and T cells and results in hepatic stellate cell activation, cellular damage and hepatocyte death by necrosis or apoptosis. On the converse of this immune activation is the growing evidence of impaired microbial defence. Neutrophils have reduced phagocytic capacity and oxidative burst and there is recent evidence that T cell exhaustion plays a role in this. PMID:26576079

  17. Haemophilus parasuis: infection, immunity and enrofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Nubia; Rovira, Albert; Torremorell, Montserrat

    2015-01-01

    Haemophilus parasuis is an early colonizer of the porcine upper respiratory tract and is the etiological agent of Glasser's disease. The factors responsible for H. parasuis colonization and systemic infection are not yet well understood, while prevention and control of Glasser's disease continues to be challenging. Recent studies on innate immunity to H. parasuis have demonstrated that porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs) are able to differentially up-regulate several genes related to inflammation and phagocytosis, and several pro-inflammatory cytokines are produced by porcine cells upon exposure to H. parasuis. The susceptibility of H. parasuis strains to phagocytosis by PAMs and the bactericidal effect of complement are influenced by the virulent phenotype of the strains. While non-virulent strains are susceptible to phagocytosis and complement, virulent strains are resistant to both. However, in the presence of specific antibodies against H. parasuis, virulent strains become susceptible to phagocytosis. More information is still needed, though, in order to better understand the host immune responses to H. parasuis. Antimicrobials are commonly used in the swine industry to help treat and control Glasser's disease. Some of the common antimicrobials have been shown to reduce colonization by H. parasuis, which may have implications for disease dynamics, development of effective immune responses and immunomodulation. Here, we provide the current state of research on innate and adaptive immune responses to H. parasuis and discuss the potential effect of enrofloxacin on the development of a protective immune response against H. parasuis infection. PMID:26511717

  18. Adult immunization in India: Importance and recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Ramesh; Khanna, Pardeep; Chawla, Suraj

    2015-01-01

    Vaccination is recommended throughout life to prevent infectious diseases and their sequelae. Vaccines are crucial to prevent mortality in that >25% of deaths are due to infections. Vaccines are recommended for adults on the basis of a range of factors. Substantial improvement and increases in adult vaccination are needed to reduce the health consequences of vaccine-preventable diseases among adults. Incomplete and inadequate immunization in India against these communicable diseases results in substantial and unnecessary costs both in terms of hospitalization and treatment. The government of India as well as the World Health Organization (WHO) consider childhood vaccination as the first priority, but there is not yet focus on adult immunization. Adult immunization in India is the most ignored part of heath care services. The Expert Group recommended that data on infectious diseases in India should be updated, refined, and reviewed periodically and published regularly. This group suggested that the consensus guidelines about adult immunization should be reviewed every 3 years to incorporate new strategies from any emerging research from India. There is an immediate need to address the problem of adult immunization in India. Although many issues revolving around efficacy, safety, and cost of introducing vaccines for adults at the national level are yet to be resolved, there is an urgent need to sensitize the health planners as well as health care providers regarding this pertinent issue. PMID:25483654

  19. Immune response during space flight.

    PubMed

    Criswell-Hudak, B S

    1991-01-01

    The health status of an astronaut prior to and following space flight has been a prime concern of NASA throughout the Apollo series of lunar landings, Skylab, Apollo-Soyuz Test Projects (ASTP), and the new Spacelab-Shuttle missions. Both humoral and cellular immunity has been studied using classical clinical procedures. Serum proteins show fluctuations that can be explained with adaptation to flight. Conversely, cellular immune responses of lymphocytes appear to be depressed in both in vivo as well as in vitro. If this depression in vivo and in vitro is a result of the same cause, then man's adaptation to outer space living will present interesting challenges in the future. Since the cause may be due to reduced gravity, perhaps the designs of the experiments for space flight will offer insights at the cellular levels that will facilitate development of mechanisms for adaptation. Further, if the aging process is viewed as an adaptational concept or model and not as a disease process then perhaps space flight could very easily interact to supply some information on our biological time clocks. PMID:1915698

  20. Immunization by a bacterial aerosol.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Contreras, Lucila; Wong, Yun-Ling; Muttil, Pavan; Padilla, Danielle; Sadoff, Jerry; Derousse, Jessica; Germishuizen, Willem Andreas; Goonesekera, Sunali; Elbert, Katharina; Bloom, Barry R; Miller, Rich; Fourie, P Bernard; Hickey, Anthony; Edwards, David

    2008-03-25

    By manufacturing a single-particle system in two particulate forms (i.e., micrometer size and nanometer size), we have designed a bacterial vaccine form that exhibits improved efficacy of immunization. Microstructural properties are adapted to alter dispersive and aerosol properties independently. Dried "nanomicroparticle" vaccines possess two axes of nanoscale dimensions and a third axis of micrometer dimension; the last one permits effective micrometer-like physical dispersion, and the former provides alignment of the principal nanodimension particle axes with the direction of airflow. Particles formed with this combination of nano- and micrometer-scale dimensions possess a greater ability to aerosolize than particles of standard spherical isotropic shape and of similar geometric diameter. Here, we demonstrate effective application of this biomaterial by using the live attenuated tuberculosis vaccine bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG). Prepared as a spray-dried nanomicroparticle aerosol, BCG vaccine exhibited high-efficiency delivery and peripheral lung targeting capacity from a low-cost and technically simple delivery system. Aerosol delivery of the BCG nanomicroparticle to normal guinea pigs subsequently challenged with virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis significantly reduced bacterial burden and lung pathology both relative to untreated animals and to control animals immunized with the standard parenteral BCG. PMID:18344320

  1. Cytokines and antitumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Müller, Ludmila; Pawelec, Graham

    2003-06-01

    Currently, the notion of immunosurveillance against tumors is enjoying something of a renaissance. Even if we still refuse to accept that tumors arising in the normal host are unable to trigger an immune response because of the lack of initiation ("danger") signals, there is no doubt that the immune system can be manipulated experimentally and by implication therapeutically to exert anti-tumor effects. For this activity to be successful, the appropriate cytokine milieu has to be provided, making cytokine manipulation central to immunotherapy. On the other hand, the major hurdle currently preventing successful immunotherapy is the ability of tumors to evolve resistant variants under the pressure of immune selection. Here, too, the cytokine milieu plays an essential role. The purpose of this brief review is to consider the current status of the application of cytokines in facilitating antitumor immunity, as well their role in inhibiting responses to tumors. Clearly, encouraging the former but preventing the latter will be the key to the effective clinical application of cancer immunotherapy. PMID:12779349

  2. Immunizations - general overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... to a very small, very safe amount of viruses or bacteria that have been weakened or killed. Your immune system then learns to recognize and attack the infection if you are exposed to it later in life. As a result, you will not become ill, ...

  3. Bed rest and immunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald; Aviles, Hernan; Butel, Janet S.; Shearer, William T.; Niesel, David; Pandya, Utpal; Allen, Christopher; Ochs, Hans D.; Blancher, Antoine; Abbal, Michel

    2007-02-01

    Space flight has been shown to result in altered immune responses. The current study was designed to investigate this possibility by using the bed rest model of some space flight conditions. A large number of women are included as subjects in the study. The hypothesis being tested is: 60 days head-down tilt bed rest of humans will affect the immune system and resistance to infection. Blood, urine and saliva samples will be obtained from bed rest subjects prior to, at intervals during, and after completion of 60 days of head-down tilt bed rest. Leukocyte blastogenesis, cytokine production and virus reactivation will be assessed. The ability of the subjects to respond appropriately to immunization with the neoantigen bacteriophage φX-174 will also be determined. Bed rest is being carried out at MEDES, Toulouse France, and the University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX. The studies to be carried out in France will also allow assessment of the effects of muscle/bone exercise and nutritional countermeasures on the immune system in addition to the effects of bed rest.

  4. Increasing Immunization Compliance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toole, Kimberly; Perry, Cynthia S.

    2004-01-01

    School nurses often have the responsibility to ensure that students meet all immunization requirements for school entry and school attendance. In large inner-city school districts, many obstacles exist which make this task daunting and often result in lengthy absences and exclusions for students. It is critical that school nurses find creative and…

  5. Dioxin and immune regulation

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Nikki B.; Kerkvliet, Nancy I.

    2014-01-01

    The immune toxicity of the ubiquitous environmental contaminant 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), commonly referred to as dioxin, has been studied for over 35 years but only recently has the profound immune suppression induced by TCDD exposure been linked to induction of regulatory T cells (Tregs). The effects of TCDD are mediated through its binding to the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), a ligand-activated transcription factor. The subsequent AHR-dependent effects on immune responses are determined by the cell types involved, their activation status, and the type of antigenic stimulus. Collectively, studies indicate that TCDD inhibits CD4+ T cell differentiation into T helper (Th)1, Th2, and Th17 effector cells, while inducing Foxp3-negative and/or preserving Foxp3+ Tregs. Although it is not yet clear how activation of AHR by TCDD induces Tregs, there is a potential therapeutic role for alternative AHR ligands in the treatment of immune-mediated disorders. PMID:20146706

  6. Photodynamic immune modulation (PIM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    North, John R.; Hunt, David W. C.; Simkin, Guillermo O.; Ratkay, Leslie G.; Chan, Agnes H.; Lui, Harvey; Levy, Julia G.

    1999-09-01

    Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) is accepted for treatment of superficial and lumen-occluding tumors in regions accessible to activating light and is now known to be effective in closure of choroidal neovasculature in Age Related Macular Degeneration. PDT utilizes light absorbing drugs (photosensitizers) that generate the localized formation of reactive oxygen species after light exposure. In a number of systems, PDT has immunomodulatory effects; Photodynamic Immune Modulation (PIM). Using low- intensity photodynamic regimens applied over a large body surface area, progression of mouse autoimmune disease could be inhibited. Further, this treatment strongly inhibited the immunologically- medicated contact hypersensitivity response to topically applied chemical haptens. Immune modulation appears to result from selective targeting of activated T lymphocytes and reduction in immunostimulation by antigen presenting cells. Psoriasis, an immune-mediated skin condition, exhibits heightened epidermal cell proliferation, epidermal layer thickening and plaque formation at different body sites. In a recent clinical trial, approximately one-third of patients with psoriasis and arthritis symptoms (psoriatic arthritis) displayed a significant clinical improvement in several psoriasis-related parameters after four weekly whole-body PIM treatments with verteporfin. The safety profile was favorable. The capacity of PIM to influence other human immune disorders including rheumatoid arthritis is under extensive evaluation.

  7. Epidemic processes with immunization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Dalmaroni, Andrea; Hinrichsen, Haye

    2003-09-01

    We study a model of directed percolation (DP) with immunization, i.e., with different probabilities for the first infection and subsequent infections. The immunization effect leads to an additional non-Markovian term in the corresponding field theoretical action. We consider immunization as a small perturbation around the DP fixed point in d<6, where the non-Markovian term is relevant. The immunization causes the system to be driven away from the neighborhood of the DP critical point. In order to investigate the dynamical critical behavior of the model, we consider the limits of low and high first-infection rate, while the second-infection rate remains constant at the DP critical value. Scaling arguments are applied to obtain an expression for the survival probability in both limits. The corresponding exponents are written in terms of the critical exponents for ordinary DP and DP with a wall. We find that the survival probability does not obey a power-law behavior, decaying instead as a stretched exponential in the low first-infection probability limit and to a constant in the high first-infection probability limit. The theoretical predictions are confirmed by optimized numerical simulations in 1+1 dimensions.

  8. Lymphatic vessels regulate immune microenvironments in human and murine melanoma.

    PubMed

    Lund, Amanda W; Wagner, Marek; Fankhauser, Manuel; Steinskog, Eli S; Broggi, Maria A; Spranger, Stefani; Gajewski, Thomas F; Alitalo, Kari; Eikesdal, Hans P; Wiig, Helge; Swartz, Melody A

    2016-09-01

    Lymphatic remodeling in tumor microenvironments correlates with progression and metastasis, and local lymphatic vessels play complex and poorly understood roles in tumor immunity. Tumor lymphangiogenesis is associated with increased immune suppression, yet lymphatic vessels are required for fluid drainage and immune cell trafficking to lymph nodes, where adaptive immune responses are mounted. Here, we examined the contribution of lymphatic drainage to tumor inflammation and immunity using a mouse model that lacks dermal lymphatic vessels (K14-VEGFR3-Ig mice). Melanomas implanted in these mice grew robustly, but exhibited drastically reduced cytokine expression and leukocyte infiltration compared with those implanted in control animals. In the absence of local immune suppression, transferred cytotoxic T cells more effectively controlled tumors in K14-VEGFR3-Ig mice than in control mice. Furthermore, gene expression analysis of human melanoma samples revealed that patient immune parameters are markedly stratified by levels of lymphatic markers. This work suggests that the establishment of tumor-associated inflammation and immunity critically depends on lymphatic vessel remodeling and drainage. Moreover, these results have implications for immunotherapies, the efficacies of which are regulated by the tumor immune microenvironment. PMID:27525437

  9. Increasing immunization coverage.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Lawrence D; Curry, Edward S; Harlor, Allen D; Laughlin, James J; Leeds, Andrea J; Lessin, Herschel R; Rodgers, Chadwick T; Granado-Villar, Deise C; Brown, Jeffrey M; Cotton, William H; Gaines, Beverly Marie Madry; Gambon, Thresia B; Gitterman, Benjamin A; Gorski, Peter A; Kraft, Colleen A; Marino, Ronald Vincent; Paz-Soldan, Gonzalo J; Zind, Barbara

    2010-06-01

    In 1977, the American Academy of Pediatrics issued a statement calling for universal immunization of all children for whom vaccines are not contraindicated. In 1995, the policy statement "Implementation of the Immunization Policy" was published by the American Academy of Pediatrics, followed in 2003 with publication of the first version of this statement, "Increasing Immunization Coverage." Since 2003, there have continued to be improvements in immunization coverage, with progress toward meeting the goals set forth in Healthy People 2010. Data from the 2007 National Immunization Survey showed that 90% of children 19 to 35 months of age have received recommended doses of each of the following vaccines: inactivated poliovirus (IPV), measles-mumps-rubella (MMR), varicella-zoster virus (VZB), hepatitis B virus (HBV), and Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib). For diphtheria and tetanus and acellular pertussis (DTaP) vaccine, 84.5% have received the recommended 4 doses by 35 months of age. Nevertheless, the Healthy People 2010 goal of at least 80% coverage for the full series (at least 4 doses of DTaP, 3 doses of IPV, 1 dose of MMR, 3 doses of Hib, 3 doses of HBV, and 1 dose of varicella-zoster virus vaccine) has not yet been met, and immunization coverage of adolescents continues to lag behind the goals set forth in Healthy People 2010. Despite these encouraging data, a vast number of new challenges that threaten continued success toward the goal of universal immunization coverage have emerged. These challenges include an increase in new vaccines and new vaccine combinations as well as a significant number of vaccines currently under development; a dramatic increase in the acquisition cost of vaccines, coupled with a lack of adequate payment to practitioners to buy and administer vaccines; unanticipated manufacturing and delivery problems that have caused significant shortages of various vaccine products; and the rise of a public antivaccination movement that uses the

  10. Host immunity to Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Rohatgi, Soma; Pirofski, Liise-anne

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcosis is caused by the fungal genus Cryptococcus. Cryptococcosis, predominantly meningoencephalitis, emerged with the HIV pandemic, primarily afflicting HIV-infected patients with profound T-cell deficiency. Where in use, combination antiretroviral therapy has markedly reduced the incidence of and risk for disease, but cryptococcosis continues to afflict those without access to therapy, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa and Asia. However, cryptococcosis also occurs in solid organ transplant recipients and patients with other immunodeficiencies as well as those with no known immunodeficiency. This article reviews innate and adaptive immune responses to C. neoformans, with an emphasis on recent studies on the role of B cells, natural IgM and Fc gamma receptor polymorphisms in resistance to cryptococcosis. PMID:25865194

  11. Host immunity to Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Rohatgi, Soma; Pirofski, Liise-Anne

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcosis is caused by the fungal genus Cryptococcus. Cryptococcosis, predominantly meningoencephalitis, emerged with the HIV pandemic, primarily afflicting HIV-infected patients with profound T-cell deficiency. Where in use, combination antiretroviral therapy has markedly reduced the incidence of and risk for disease, but cryptococcosis continues to afflict those without access to therapy, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa and Asia. However, cryptococcosis also occurs in solid organ transplant recipients and patients with other immunodeficiencies as well as those with no known immunodeficiency. This article reviews innate and adaptive immune responses to C. neoformans, with an emphasis on recent studies on the role of B cells, natural IgM and Fc gamma receptor polymorphisms in resistance to cryptococcosis. PMID:25865194

  12. Quantitative reduction of the TCR adapter protein SLP-76 unbalances immunity and immune regulation.

    PubMed

    Siggs, Owen M; Miosge, Lisa A; Daley, Stephen R; Asquith, Kelly; Foster, Paul S; Liston, Adrian; Goodnow, Christopher C

    2015-03-15

    Gene variants that disrupt TCR signaling can cause severe immune deficiency, yet less disruptive variants are sometimes associated with immune pathology. Null mutations of the gene encoding the scaffold protein Src homology 2 domain-containing leukocyte protein of 76 kDa (SLP-76), for example, cause an arrest of T cell positive selection, whereas a synthetic membrane-targeted allele allows limited positive selection but is associated with proinflammatory cytokine production and autoantibodies. Whether these and other enigmatic outcomes are due to a biochemical uncoupling of tolerogenic signaling, or simply a quantitative reduction of protein activity, remains to be determined. In this study we describe a splice variant of Lcp2 that reduced the amount of wild-type SLP-76 protein by ~90%, disrupting immunogenic and tolerogenic pathways to different degrees. Mutant mice produced excessive amounts of proinflammatory cytokines, autoantibodies, and IgE, revealing that simple quantitative reductions of SLP-76 were sufficient to trigger immune dysregulation. This allele reveals a dose-sensitive threshold for SLP-76 in the balance of immunity and immune dysregulation, a common disturbance of atypical clinical immune deficiencies. PMID:25662996

  13. Evolutionary responses of innate Immunity to adaptive immunity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Innate immunity is present in all metazoans, whereas the evolutionarily more novel adaptive immunity is limited to jawed fishes and their descendants (gnathostomes). We observe that the organisms that possess adaptive immunity lack diversity in their innate pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), rais...

  14. Reconfiguration of the immune system network during food limitation in the caterpillar Manduca sexta.

    PubMed

    Adamo, Shelley A; Davies, Gillian; Easy, Russell; Kovalko, Ilya; Turnbull, Kurtis F

    2016-03-01

    Dwindling resources might be expected to induce a gradual decline in immune function. However, food limitation has complex and seemingly paradoxical effects on the immune system. Examining these changes from an immune system network perspective may help illuminate the purpose of these fluctuations. We found that food limitation lowered long-term (i.e. lipid) and short-term (i.e. sugars) energy stores in the caterpillar Manduca sexta. Food limitation also: altered immune gene expression, changed the activity of key immune enzymes, depressed the concentration of a major antioxidant (glutathione), reduced resistance to oxidative stress, reduced resistance to bacteria (Gram-positive and -negative bacteria) but appeared to have less effect on resistance to a fungus. These results provide evidence that food limitation led to a restructuring of the immune system network. In severely food-limited caterpillars, some immune functions were enhanced. As resources dwindled within the caterpillar, the immune response shifted its emphasis away from inducible immune defenses (i.e. those responses that are activated during an immune challenge) and increased emphasis on constitutive defenses (i.e. immune components that are produced consistently). We also found changes suggesting that the activation threshold for some immune responses (e.g. phenoloxidase) was lowered. Changes in the configuration of the immune system network will lead to different immunological strengths and vulnerabilities for the organism. PMID:26747906

  15. Innate immune memory in plants.

    PubMed

    Reimer-Michalski, Eva-Maria; Conrath, Uwe

    2016-08-01

    The plant innate immune system comprises local and systemic immune responses. Systemic plant immunity develops after foliar infection by microbial pathogens, upon root colonization by certain microbes, or in response to physical injury. The systemic plant immune response to localized foliar infection is associated with elevated levels of pattern-recognition receptors, accumulation of dormant signaling enzymes, and alterations in chromatin state. Together, these systemic responses provide a memory to the initial infection by priming the remote leaves for enhanced defense and immunity to reinfection. The plant innate immune system thus builds immunological memory by utilizing mechanisms and components that are similar to those employed in the trained innate immune response of jawed vertebrates. Therefore, there seems to be conservation, or convergence, in the evolution of innate immune memory in plants and vertebrates. PMID:27264335

  16. Technique Selectively Represses Immune System

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Matters December 3, 2012 Technique Selectively Represses Immune System Myelin (green) encases and protects nerve fibers (brown). A new technique prevents the immune system from attacking myelin in a mouse model of ...

  17. A peptide immunization approach to counteract a Staphylococcus aureus protease defense against host immunity.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Robert E; Fernandez, Jeffrey; Brezski, Randall J; Greenplate, Allison R; Knight, David M; Raju, T Shantha; Lynch, A Simon

    2016-04-01

    Pathogens that induce acute and chronic infections, as well as certain cancers, employ numerous strategies to thwart host cellular and humoral immune defenses. One proposed evasion mechanism against humoral immunity is a localized expression of extracellular proteases that cleave the IgG hinge and disable host IgG functions. Host immunity appears to be prepared to counter such a proteolytic tactic by providing a group of autoantibodies, denoted anti-hinge antibodies that specifically bind to cleaved IgGs and provide compensating functional restoration in vitro. These respective counter-measures highlight the complex interrelationships among pathogens and host immunity and suggested to us a possible means for therapeutic intervention. In this study, we combined an investigation of pathogen-mediated proteolysis of host IgGs with an immunization strategy to boost host anti-hinge antibodies. In a Staphylococcus aureus infection model using an artificial tissue cage (wiffle ball) implanted into rabbits, cleaved rabbit IgGs were detected in abundance in the abscesses of untreated animals early after infection. However, in animals previously immunized with peptide analogs of the cleaved IgG hinge to generate substantial anti-hinge antibody titers, S. aureus colony formation was markedly reduced compared to control animals or those similarly immunized with a scrambled peptide sequence. The results of this study demonstrate that extensive local proteolysis of IgGs occurs in a test abscess setting and that immunization to increase host anti-hinge antibodies provided substantial acute protection against bacterial growth. PMID:26905931

  18. Reducing Dropouts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timpane, Michael; And Others

    A group of three conference papers, all addressing the subject of effective programs to decrease the number of school dropouts, is presented in this document. The first paper, "Systemic Approaches to Reducing Dropouts" (Michael Timpane), asserts that dropping out is a symptom of failures in the social, economic, and educational systems. Dropping…

  19. Ocular immune privilege and ocular melanoma: parallel universes or immunological plagiarism?

    PubMed

    Niederkorn, Jerry Y

    2012-01-01

    Evidence of immune privilege in the eye was recorded almost 140 years ago, yet interest in immune privilege languished for almost a century. However, the past 35 years have witnessed a plethora of research and a rekindled interest in the mechanisms responsible for immune privilege in the anterior chamber of the eye. This research has demonstrated that multiple anatomical, structural, physiological, and immunoregulatory processes contribute to immune privilege and remind us of the enormous complexity of this phenomenon. It is widely accepted that immune privilege is an adaptation for reducing the risk of immune-mediated inflammation in organs such as the eye and brain whose tissues have a limited capacity to regenerate. Recent findings suggest that immune privilege also occurs in sites where stem cells reside and raise the possibility that immune privilege is also designed to prevent the unwitting elimination of stem cells by immune-mediated inflammation at these sites. Uveal melanoma arises within the eye and as such, benefits from ocular immune privilege. A significant body of research reveals an intriguing parallel between the mechanisms that contribute to immune privilege in the eye and those strategies used by uveal melanoma cells to evade immune elimination once they have disseminated from the eye and establish metastatic foci in the liver. Uveal melanoma metastases seem to have "plagiarized" the blueprints used for ocular immune privilege to create "ad hoc immune privileged sites" in the liver. PMID:22707951

  20. Adaptive immune resistance: How cancer protects from immune attack

    PubMed Central

    Ribas, Antoni

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive immune resistance is a process where the cancer changes its phenotype in response to a cytotoxic or pro-inflammatory immune response, thereby evading it. This adaptive process is triggered by the specific recognition of cancer cells by T cells, which leads to the production of immune-activating cytokines. Cancers then hijack mechanisms developed to limit inflammatory and immune responses and protect themselves from the T cell attack. Inhibiting adaptive immune resistance is the mechanistic basis of responses to PD-1 or PD-L1 blocking antibodies, and may be of relevance for the development of other cancer immunotherapy strategies. PMID:26272491

  1. Biosignatures of Exposure/Transmission and Immunity

    PubMed Central

    King, Christopher L.; Davies, D. Huw; Felgner, Phil; Baum, Elizabeth; Jain, Aarti; Randall, Arlo; Tetteh, Kevin; Drakeley, Christopher J.; Greenhouse, Bryan

    2015-01-01

    A blood test that captures cumulative exposure over time and assesses levels of naturally acquired immunity (NAI) would provide a critical tool to monitor the impact of interventions to reduce malaria transmission and broaden our understanding of how NAI develops around the world as a function of age and exposure. This article describes a collaborative effort in multiple International Centers of Excellence in Malaria Research (ICEMRs) to develop such tests using malaria-specific antibody responses as biosignatures of transmission and immunity. The focus is on the use of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax protein microarrays to identify a panel of the most informative antibody responses in diverse malaria-endemic settings representing an unparalleled spectrum of malaria transmission and malaria species mixes before and after interventions to reduce malaria transmission. PMID:26259938

  2. Biosignatures of Exposure/Transmission and Immunity.

    PubMed

    King, Christopher L; Davies, D Huw; Felgner, Phil; Baum, Elizabeth; Jain, Aarti; Randall, Arlo; Tetteh, Kevin; Drakeley, Christopher J; Greenhouse, Bryan

    2015-09-01

    A blood test that captures cumulative exposure over time and assesses levels of naturally acquired immunity (NAI) would provide a critical tool to monitor the impact of interventions to reduce malaria transmission and broaden our understanding of how NAI develops around the world as a function of age and exposure. This article describes a collaborative effort in multiple International Centers of Excellence in Malaria Research (ICEMRs) to develop such tests using malaria-specific antibody responses as biosignatures of transmission and immunity. The focus is on the use of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax protein microarrays to identify a panel of the most informative antibody responses in diverse malaria-endemic settings representing an unparalleled spectrum of malaria transmission and malaria species mixes before and after interventions to reduce malaria transmission. PMID:26259938

  3. Cost-effectiveness of an immunization programme in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Barnum, H. N.; Tarantola, D.; Setiady, I. F.

    1980-01-01

    The economic analysis reported below, based on hypothetical estimates of the programme impact, indicates that an expanded programme of immunization for diphtheria, pertussis, tetanus, and tuberculosis can be expected to be highly cost-effective in comparison with treatment. Sensitivity tests illustrate that this conclusion remains valid even when costs are increased by 20% and benefits reduced by 50%. A separate analysis was made of the DPT—tetanus toxoid and BCG components of the programme. The analysis revealed that although the BCG programme may not be justifiable when operated independently, its inclusion in a joint immunization programme is strongly justifiable on economic grounds (assuming a vaccine efficacy of 0.5). This result confirms one of the basic arguments advanced for the WHO programmes of expanded immunization and illustrates that other immunizations, such as for poliomyelitis and measles, which may not be cost-efficient by themselves may be economically justifiable when included as part of a larger immunization programme. PMID:6774826

  4. The mucosal immune system for vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Lamichhane, Aayam; Azegamia, Tatsuhiko; Kiyonoa, Hiroshi

    2014-11-20

    Mucosal surfaces are continuously exposed to the external environment and therefore represent the largest lymphoid organ of the body. In the mucosal immune system, gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALTs), including Peyer's patches and isolated lymphoid follicles, play an important role in the induction of antigen-specific immune responses in the gut. GALTs have unique organogenesis characteristics and interact with the network of dendritic cells and T cells for the simultaneous induction and regulation of IgA responses and oral tolerance. In these lymphoid tissues, antigens are up taken by M cells in the epithelial layer, and antigen-specific immune responses are subsequently initiated by GALT cells. Nasopharynx- and tear-duct-associated lymphoid tissues (NALTs and TALTs) are key organized lymphoid structures in the respiratory tract and ocular cavities, respectively, and have been shown to interact with each other. Mucosal surfaces are also characterized by host-microbe interactions that affect the genesis and maturation of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissues and the induction and regulation of innate and acquired mucosal immune responses. Because most harmful pathogens enter the body through mucosal surfaces by ingestion, inhalation, or sexual contact, the mucosa is a candidate site for vaccination. Mucosal vaccination has some physiological and practical advantages, such as decreased costs and reduced risk of needle-stick injuries and transmission of bloodborne diseases, and it is painless. Recently, the application of modern bioengineering and biochemical engineering technologies, including gene transformation and manipulation systems, resulted in the development of systems to express vaccine antigens in transgenic plants and nanogels, which will usher in a new era of delivery systems for mucosal vaccine antigens. In this review, based on some of our research group's thirty seven years of progress and effort, we highlight the unique features of mucosal immune

  5. Recombinant lentivector as a genetic immunization vehicle for antitumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    He, Yukai; Munn, David; Falo, Louis D

    2011-01-01

    Summary Encouraged by remarkable successes in preventing infectious diseases and by the well established potential of immune system for controlling tumor growth, active therapeutic immunization approaches hold great promise for treating malignant tumors. In recent years, engineered recombinant viral vectors have been carefully examined as genetic immunization vehicles and have been demonstrated to induce potent T cell mediated immune responses that can control tumor growth. Very recent efforts suggest that lentivectors possess important advantages over other candidate recombinant viral vectors for genetic immunization. Here we review the development of recombinant lentivectors and the characteristics of T cell immune responses elicited by lentivector immunization, including the mechanism of T cell priming with a focus on the role of skin dendritic cells (DC) and potential applications for tumor immunotherapy. PMID:18377355

  6. Humoral immunity in bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Barker, A F; Craig, S; Bardana, E J

    1987-09-01

    Bronchiectasis occurs in patients with immunodeficiency and fungal hypersensitivity disorders. To assess the prevalence of abnormal humoral immune parameters in bronchiectasis, a retrospective study was carried out on sera from 30 patients. Studies included immunoglobulin quantitation and specific antibody to fungal species. Eleven patients were found to have immunodeficiency (nine with panhypoglobulinemia and two with selective IgM deficiency). Six patients had elevations of serum IgA and four patients had elevations of serum IgE. Six patients had elevated total antibody to Aspergillus or Candida species and six had precipitin bands to one or more fungal antigens. This study indicates that immunodeficiency is prevalent and plays a causative role in some patients with bronchiectasis. Hypersensitivity reactions to Aspergillus, Candida, and other ubiquitous environmental fungi may also play an etiopathogenic role in this disease (bronchiectasis, humoral immunity, immunodeficiency). PMID:3631652

  7. Effector triggered immunity

    PubMed Central

    Rajamuthiah, Rajmohan; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria produce virulence factors called effectors, which are important components of the infection process. Effectors aid in pathogenesis by facilitating bacterial attachment, pathogen entry into or exit from the host cell, immunoevasion, and immunosuppression. Effectors also have the ability to subvert host cellular processes, such as hijacking cytoskeletal machinery or blocking protein translation. However, host cells possess an evolutionarily conserved innate immune response that can sense the pathogen through the activity of its effectors and mount a robust immune response. This “effector triggered immunity” (ETI) was first discovered in plants but recent evidence suggest that the process is also well conserved in metazoans. We will discuss salient points of the mechanism of ETI in metazoans from recent studies done in mammalian cells and invertebrate model hosts. PMID:25513770

  8. Immunization Strategies Against Henipaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Geisbert, Thomas W.; Xu, Kai; Nikolov, Dimitar B.; Wang, Lin-Fa; Middleton, Deborah; Pallister, Jackie; Bossart, Katharine N.

    2015-01-01

    Hendra virus and Nipah virus are recently discovered and closely related emerging viruses that now comprise the genus henipavirus within the subfamily Paramyxoviridae and are distinguished by their broad species tropism and ability to cause fatal disease in a wide variety of mammalian hosts including humans. The high mortality associated with human and animal henipavirus infections has highlighted the importance and necessity of developing effective immunization strategies. The development of suitable animal models of henipavirus infection and pathogenesis has been critical for testing the efficacy of potential therapeutic approaches. Several henipavirus challenge models have been used and recent successes in both active and passive immunization strategies against henipaviruses have been reported which have all targeted the viral envelope glycoproteins. PMID:22481140

  9. Auto immune hepatitis.

    PubMed

    van Gerven, Nicole Mf; de Boer, Ynto S; Mulder, Chris Jj; van Nieuwkerk, Carin Mj; Bouma, Gerd

    2016-05-21

    To provide an update of the latest trends in epidemiology, clinical course, diagnostics, complications and treatment of auto immune hepatitis (AIH). A search of the MEDLINE database was performed using the search terms: "auto immune hepatitis", "clinical presentation", "symptoms", "signs", "diagnosis", "auto antibodies", "laboratory values", "serology", "histopathology", "histology", "genetics", "HLA genes", "non-HLA genes", "environment", "epidemiology", "prevalence", "incidence", "demographics", "complications", "HCC", "PBC", "PSC", "corticosteroid", "therapy", "treatment", "alternative treatment". English-language full-text articles and abstracts were considered. Articles included reviews, meta-analysis, prospective retrospective studies. No publication date restrictions were applied. AIH is an immune meditated progressive inflammatory liver disease that predominantly affects middle-aged females but may affect people of all ages. The clinical spectrum of AIH is wide, ranging from absent or mild symptoms to fulminant hepatic failure. The aetiology of AIH is still unknown, but is believed to occur as the consequence of an aberrant immune response towards an un-known trigger in a genetically susceptible host. In the absence of a gold standard, diagnosis is based on the combination of clinical, biochemical and histopathological criteria. Immunosuppressive treatment has been the cornerstone of treatment since the earliest description of the disease in 1950 by Waldenström. Such treatment is often successful at inducing remission and generally leads to normal life expectancy. Nevertheless, there remain significant areas of unmet aetiological a clinical needs including fundamental insight in disease pathogenesis, optimal therapy, duration of treatment and treatment alternatives in those patients unresponsive to standard treatment regimens. PMID:27217697

  10. Auto immune hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    van Gerven, Nicole MF; de Boer, Ynto S; Mulder, Chris JJ; van Nieuwkerk, Carin MJ; Bouma, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    To provide an update of the latest trends in epidemiology, clinical course, diagnostics, complications and treatment of auto immune hepatitis (AIH). A search of the MEDLINE database was performed using the search terms: “auto immune hepatitis”, “clinical presentation”, “symptoms”, “signs”, “diagnosis”, “auto antibodies”, “laboratory values”, “serology”, “histopathology”, “histology”, “genetics”, “HLA genes”, “non-HLA genes”, “environment”, “epidemiology”, “prevalence”, “incidence”, “demographics”, “complications”, “HCC”, “PBC”, “PSC”, “corticosteroid”, “therapy”, “treatment”, “alternative treatment”. English-language full-text articles and abstracts were considered. Articles included reviews, meta-analysis, prospective retrospective studies. No publication date restrictions were applied. AIH is an immune meditated progressive inflammatory liver disease that predominantly affects middle-aged females but may affect people of all ages. The clinical spectrum of AIH is wide, ranging from absent or mild symptoms to fulminant hepatic failure. The aetiology of AIH is still unknown, but is believed to occur as the consequence of an aberrant immune response towards an un-known trigger in a genetically susceptible host. In the absence of a gold standard, diagnosis is based on the combination of clinical, biochemical and histopathological criteria. Immunosuppressive treatment has been the cornerstone of treatment since the earliest description of the disease in 1950 by Waldenström. Such treatment is often successful at inducing remission and generally leads to normal life expectancy. Nevertheless, there remain significant areas of unmet aetiological a clinical needs including fundamental insight in disease pathogenesis, optimal therapy, duration of treatment and treatment alternatives in those patients unresponsive to standard treatment regimens. PMID:27217697

  11. Minocycline reduces ethanol drinking.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, R G; Hewetson, A; George, C M; Syapin, P J; Bergeson, S E

    2011-06-01

    Alcoholism is a disease characterized by continued alcohol consumption despite recurring negative consequences. Thus, medications that reduce the drive to consume alcohol can be beneficial in treating alcoholism. The neurobiological systems that regulate alcohol consumption are complex and not fully understood. Currently, medications are available to treat alcoholism that act either by causing accumulation of a toxic metabolite of ethanol, or by targeting specific transmitter receptors. The purpose of our study was to investigate a new potential therapeutic pathway, neuroimmune interactions, for effects on ethanol consumption. We hypothesized that neuroimmune activity of brain glia may have a role in drinking. We utilized minocycline, a second generation tetracycline antibiotic that has immune modulatory actions, to test our hypothesis because it is known to suppress microglia, and to a lesser extent astroglia, activity following many types of insults to the brain. Treatment with 50mg/kg minocycline significantly reduced ethanol intake in male and female C57Bl/6J mice using a free choice voluntary drinking model. Saline injections did not alter ethanol intake. Minocycline had little effect on water intake or body weight change. The underlying mechanism whereby minocycline reduced ethanol intake requires further study. The results suggest that drugs that alter neuroimmune pathways may represent a new approach to developing additional therapies to treat alcoholism. PMID:21397005

  12. Brucella evasion of adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Martirosyan, Anna; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre

    2013-02-01

    The complex immune system of mammals is the result of evolutionary forces that include battles against pathogens, as sensing and defeating intruders is a prerequisite to host survival. On the other hand, microorganisms have evolved multiple mechanisms to evade both arms of immunity: the innate and the adaptive immune systems. The successful pathogenic intracellular bacterium Brucella is not an exception to the rule: Brucella displays mechanisms that allow evasion of immune surveillance in order to establish persistent infections in mammals. In this review, we highlight some key mechanisms that pathogenic Brucella use to evade the adaptive immune system. PMID:23374122

  13. Pentraxins in humoral innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Inforzato, Antonio; Bottazzi, Barbara; Garlanda, Cecilia; Valentino, Sonia; Mantovani, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Innate immunity represents the first line of defence against pathogens and plays key roles in activation and orientation of the adaptive immune response. The innate immune system comprises both a cellular and a humoral arm. Components of the humoral arm include soluble pattern recognition molecules (PRMs) that recognise pathogens associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and initiate the immune response in coordination with the cellular arm, therefore acting as functional ancestors of antibodies. The long pentraxin PTX3 is a prototypic soluble PRM that is produced at sites of infection and inflammation by both somatic and immune cells. Gene targeting of this evolutionarily conserved protein has revealed a non-redundant role in resistance to selected pathogens. Moreover, PTX3 exerts important functions at the crossroad between innate immunity, inflammation and female fertility. Here we review the studies on PTX3, with emphasis on pathogen recognition and crosstalk with other components of the innate immune system. PMID:21948359

  14. Ocular Immune Privilege and Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Andrew W.

    2016-01-01

    Allografts are afforded a level of protection from rejection within immune-privileged tissues. Immune-privileged tissues involve mechanisms that suppress inflammation and promote immune tolerance. There are anatomical features, soluble factors, membrane-associated proteins, and alternative antigen-presenting cells (APC) that contribute to allograft survival in the immune-privileged tissue. This review presents the current understanding of how the mechanism of ocular immune privilege promotes tolerogenic activity by APC, and T cells in response to the placement of foreign antigen within the ocular microenvironment. Discussed will be the unique anatomical, cellular, and molecular mechanisms that lessen the chance for graft destroying immune responses within the eye. As more is understood about the molecular mechanisms of ocular immune privilege greater is the potential for using these molecular mechanisms in therapies to prevent allograft rejection. PMID:26904026

  15. Insect Immunity to Entomopathogenic Fungi.

    PubMed

    Lu, H-L; St Leger, R J

    2016-01-01

    The study of infection and immunity in insects has achieved considerable prominence with the appreciation that their host defense mechanisms share many fundamental characteristics with the innate immune system of vertebrates. Studies on the highly tractable model organism Drosophila in particular have led to a detailed understanding of conserved innate immunity networks, such as Toll. However, most of these studies have used opportunistic human pathogens and may not have revealed specialized immune strategies that have arisen through evolutionary arms races with natural insect pathogens. Fungi are the commonest natural insect pathogens, and in this review, we focus on studies using Metarhizium and Beauveria spp. that have addressed immune system function and pathogen virulence via behavioral avoidance, the use of physical barriers, and the activation of local and systemic immune responses. In particular, we highlight studies on the evolutionary genetics of insect immunity and discuss insect-pathogen coevolution. PMID:27131327

  16. Comparative immune systems in animals.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shaochun; Tao, Xin; Huang, Shengfeng; Chen, Shangwu; Xu, Anlong

    2014-02-01

    Animal immune systems can be classified into those of innate immunity and those of adaptive immunity. It is generally thought that the former are universal for all animals and depend on germline-encoded receptors that recognize highly conserved pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), whereas the latter are vertebrate specific and are mediated primarily by lymphocytes bearing a unique antigen receptor. However, novel adaptive or adaptive-like immunities have been found in invertebrates and jawless vertebrates, and extraordinarily complex innate immunities, created through huge expansions of many innate gene families, have recently been found in the cephalochordate amphioxus and the echinoderm sea urchin. These studies not only inspire immunologists to seek novel immune mechanisms in invertebrates but also raise questions about the origin and evolution of vertebrate immunities. PMID:25384142

  17. big bang gene modulates gut immune tolerance in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Bonnay, François; Cohen-Berros, Eva; Hoffmann, Martine; Kim, Sabrina Y; Boulianne, Gabrielle L; Hoffmann, Jules A; Matt, Nicolas; Reichhart, Jean-Marc

    2013-02-19

    Chronic inflammation of the intestine is detrimental to mammals. Similarly, constant activation of the immune response in the gut by the endogenous flora is suspected to be harmful to Drosophila. Therefore, the innate immune response in the gut of Drosophila melanogaster is tightly balanced to simultaneously prevent infections by pathogenic microorganisms and tolerate the endogenous flora. Here we describe the role of the big bang (bbg) gene, encoding multiple membrane-associated PDZ (PSD-95, Discs-large, ZO-1) domain-containing protein isoforms, in the modulation of the gut immune response. We show that in the adult Drosophila midgut, BBG is present at the level of the septate junctions, on the apical side of the enterocytes. In the absence of BBG, these junctions become loose, enabling the intestinal flora to trigger a constitutive activation of the anterior midgut immune response. This chronic epithelial inflammation leads to a reduced lifespan of bbg mutant flies. Clearing the commensal flora by antibiotics prevents the abnormal activation of the gut immune response and restores a normal lifespan. We now provide genetic evidence that Drosophila septate junctions are part of the gut immune barrier, a function that is evolutionarily conserved in mammals. Collectively, our data suggest that septate junctions are required to maintain the subtle balance between immune tolerance and immune response in the Drosophila gut, which represents a powerful model to study inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:23378635

  18. Genetic selection of cattle for improved immunity and health.

    PubMed

    Mallard, Bonnie A; Emam, Mehdi; Paibomesai, Marlene; Thompson-Crispi, Kathleen; Wagter-Lesperance, Lauraine

    2015-02-01

    The immune system is a sensing structure composed of tissues and molecules that are well integrated with the neuroendocrine system. This integrate system ensures non-self from self-discrimination. In this capacity the immune system provides detection and protection from a wide range of pathogens. In mammals, the immune system is regulated by several thousand genes (8-9% of the genome) which indicate its high genetic priority as a critical fitness trait providing survival of the species. Identifying and selectively breeding livestock with the inherent ability to make superior immune responses can reduce disease occurrence, improve milk quality and increase farm profitability. Healthier animals also may be expected to demonstrate improvements in other traits, including reproductive fitness. Using the University of Guelph's patented High Immune Response technology it is possible to classify animals as high, average, or low responders based on their genetic estimated breeding value for immune responsiveness. High responders have the inherent ability to produce more balanced and robust immune responses compared with average or low responders. High responders dairy cattle essentially have about one-half the disease occurrence of low responders, and can pass their superior immune response genes on to future generations thereby accumulating health benefits within the dairy herd. PMID:25872325

  19. Epigenetic and immune function profiles associated with posttraumatic stress disorder

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Monica; Aiello, Allison E.; Wildman, Derek E.; Koenen, Karestan C.; Pawelec, Graham; de los Santos, Regina; Goldmann, Emily; Galea, Sandro

    2010-01-01

    The biologic underpinnings of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have not been fully elucidated. Previous work suggests that alterations in the immune system are characteristic of the disorder. Identifying the biologic mechanisms by which such alterations occur could provide fundamental insights into the etiology and treatment of PTSD. Here we identify specific epigenetic profiles underlying immune system changes associated with PTSD. Using blood samples (n = 100) obtained from an ongoing, prospective epidemiologic study in Detroit, the Detroit Neighborhood Health Study, we applied methylation microarrays to assay CpG sites from more than 14,000 genes among 23 PTSD-affected and 77 PTSD-unaffected individuals. We show that immune system functions are significantly overrepresented among the annotations associated with genes uniquely unmethylated among those with PTSD. We further demonstrate that genes whose methylation levels are significantly and negatively correlated with traumatic burden show a similar strong signal of immune function among the PTSD affected. The observed epigenetic variability in immune function by PTSD is corroborated using an independent biologic marker of immune response to infection, CMV—a typically latent herpesvirus whose activity was significantly higher among those with PTSD. This report of peripheral epigenomic and CMV profiles associated with mental illness suggests a biologic model of PTSD etiology in which an externally experienced traumatic event induces downstream alterations in immune function by reducing methylation levels of immune-related genes. PMID:20439746

  20. The Bidirectional Relationship between Sleep and Immunity against Infections

    PubMed Central

    Ibarra-Coronado, Elizabeth G.; Pantaleón-Martínez, Ana Ma.; Velazquéz-Moctezuma, Javier; Prospéro-García, Oscar; Méndez-Díaz, Mónica; Pérez-Tapia, Mayra; Pavón, Lenin; Morales-Montor, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Sleep is considered an important modulator of the immune response. Thus, a lack of sleep can weaken immunity, increasing organism susceptibility to infection. For instance, shorter sleep durations are associated with a rise in suffering from the common cold. The function of sleep in altering immune responses must be determined to understand how sleep deprivation increases the susceptibility to viral, bacterial, and parasitic infections. There are several explanations for greater susceptibility to infections after reduced sleep, such as impaired mitogenic proliferation of lymphocytes, decreased HLA-DR expression, the upregulation of CD14+, and variations in CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes, which have been observed during partial sleep deprivation. Also, steroid hormones, in addition to regulating sexual behavior, influence sleep. Thus, we hypothesize that sleep and the immune-endocrine system have a bidirectional relationship in governing various physiological processes, including immunity to infections. This review discusses the evidence on the bidirectional effects of the immune response against viral, bacterial, and parasitic infections on sleep patterns and how the lack of sleep affects the immune response against such agents. Because sleep is essential in the maintenance of homeostasis, these situations must be adapted to elicit changes in sleep patterns and other physiological parameters during the immune response to infections to which the organism is continuously exposed. PMID:26417606

  1. The Bidirectional Relationship between Sleep and Immunity against Infections.

    PubMed

    Ibarra-Coronado, Elizabeth G; Pantaleón-Martínez, Ana Ma; Velazquéz-Moctezuma, Javier; Prospéro-García, Oscar; Méndez-Díaz, Mónica; Pérez-Tapia, Mayra; Pavón, Lenin; Morales-Montor, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Sleep is considered an important modulator of the immune response. Thus, a lack of sleep can weaken immunity, increasing organism susceptibility to infection. For instance, shorter sleep durations are associated with a rise in suffering from the common cold. The function of sleep in altering immune responses must be determined to understand how sleep deprivation increases the susceptibility to viral, bacterial, and parasitic infections. There are several explanations for greater susceptibility to infections after reduced sleep, such as impaired mitogenic proliferation of lymphocytes, decreased HLA-DR expression, the upregulation of CD14+, and variations in CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes, which have been observed during partial sleep deprivation. Also, steroid hormones, in addition to regulating sexual behavior, influence sleep. Thus, we hypothesize that sleep and the immune-endocrine system have a bidirectional relationship in governing various physiological processes, including immunity to infections. This review discusses the evidence on the bidirectional effects of the immune response against viral, bacterial, and parasitic infections on sleep patterns and how the lack of sleep affects the immune response against such agents. Because sleep is essential in the maintenance of homeostasis, these situations must be adapted to elicit changes in sleep patterns and other physiological parameters during the immune response to infections to which the organism is continuously exposed. PMID:26417606

  2. Addressing Immunization Registry Population Inflation in Adolescent Immunization Rates

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective While U.S. adolescent immunization rates are available annually at national and state levels, finding pockets of need may require county or sub-county information. Immunization information systems (IISs) are one tool for assessing local immunization rates. However, the presence of IIS records dating back to early childhood and challenges in capturing mobility out of IIS areas typically leads to denominator inflation. We examined the feasibility of weighting adolescent immunization records by length of time since last report to produce more accurate county adolescent counts and immunization rates. Methods We compared weighted and unweighted adolescent denominators from the Oregon ALERT IIS, along with county-level Census Bureau estimates, with school enrollment counts from Oregon's annual review of seventh-grade school immunization compliance for public and private schools. Adolescent immunization rates calculated using weighted data, for the state as a whole, were also checked against comparable National Immunization Survey (NIS) rates. Results Weighting individual records by the length of time since last activity substantially improved the fit of IIS data to county populations for adolescents. A nonlinear logarithmic (ogive) weight produced the best fit to the school count data of all examined estimates. Overall, the ogive weighted results matched NIS adolescent rates for Oregon. Conclusion The problem of mobility-inflated counts of teenagers can be addressed by weighting individual records based on time since last immunization. Well-populated IISs can rely on their own data to produce adolescent immunization rates and find pockets of need. PMID:25729105

  3. Inhibition of immune functions by antiviral drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Heagy, W; Crumpacker, C; Lopez, P A; Finberg, R W

    1991-01-01

    Immune functions were evaluated in vitro for PBMC isolated from healthy donors and cultured with the antiviral agents, 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AZT), ribavirin, ganciclovir, 2'3'-dideoxyinosine (ddI), or acyclovir. To identify methods for assessing the effects of antiviral drugs on immune cells, the PBMC response to mitogens, Con A, or phytohemagglutinin was evaluated from measurements of [3H]thymidine and [14C]-leucine incorporation, cell growth, cellular RNA, DNA, and protein levels, and the PBMC proliferative cycle (i.e., progression from G0----G1----S----G2 + M). At clinically relevant concentrations, AZT, ribavirin, or ganciclovir diminished PBMC responsiveness to mitogen. The numbers of proliferating cells in G1, S, and G2 + M phases of the cell cycle, DNA content, and [3H]thymidine uptake were decreased in cultures treated with AZT, ribavirin, or ganciclovir. AZT or ribavirin but not ganciclovir reduced RNA and protein in the cultures and inhibited cell growth. Whereas AZT, ribavirin, or ganciclovir were antiproliferative, ddI or acyclovir had little, if any, effect on PBMC mitogenesis. The inhibitory effects of antivirals on immune cells may contribute to the immune deterioration observed in patients following prolonged use of the drugs. PMID:1904068

  4. Hemocyte Differentiation Mediates Innate Immune Memory in Anopheles gambiae Mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Janneth; Brayner, Fábio André; Alves, Luiz Carlos; Dixit, Rajnikant; Barillas-Mury, Carolina

    2012-01-01

    Mosquito midgut invasion by ookinetes of the malaria parasite Plasmodium disrupts the barriers that normally prevent the gut microbiota from coming in direct contact with epithelial cells. This triggers a long-lived response characterized by increased abundance of granulocytes, a subpopulation of hemocytes, circulating in the insect’s hemocoel, and enhanced immunity to bacteria that indirectly reduces survival of Plasmodium parasites upon reinfection. In mosquitoes, differentiation of hemocytes was necessary and sufficient to confer innate immune memory. PMID:20829487

  5. Hemocyte differentiation mediates innate immune memory in Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Janneth; Brayner, Fábio André; Alves, Luiz Carlos; Dixit, Rajnikant; Barillas-Mury, Carolina

    2010-09-10

    Mosquito midgut invasion by ookinetes of the malaria parasite Plasmodium disrupts the barriers that normally prevent the gut microbiota from coming in direct contact with epithelial cells. This triggers a long-lived response characterized by increased abundance of granulocytes, a subpopulation of hemocytes that circulates in the insect's hemocoel, and enhanced immunity to bacteria that indirectly reduces survival of Plasmodium parasites upon reinfection. In mosquitoes, differentiation of hemocytes was necessary and sufficient to confer innate immune memory. PMID:20829487

  6. The acute phase protein haptoglobin regulates host immunity

    PubMed Central

    Huntoon, Kristin M.; Wang, Yanping; Eppolito, Cheryl A.; Barbour, Karen W.; Berger, Franklin G.; Shrikant, Protul A.; Baumann, Heinz

    2008-01-01

    The contribution of acute phase plasma proteins to host immune responses remains poorly characterized. To better understand the role of the acute phase reactant and major hemoglobin-binding protein haptoglobin (Hp) on the function of immune cells, we generated Hp-deficient C57BL/6J mice. These mice exhibit stunted development of lymphoid organs associated with lower counts of mature T and B cells in the blood and secondary lymphoid compartments. Moreover, these mice show markedly reduced adaptive immune responses as represented by reduced accumulation of IgG antibody after immunization with adjuvant and nominal antigen, abrogation of Th1-dominated delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction, loss of mitogenic responses mounted by T cells, and reduced T cell responses conveyed by APCs. Collectively, these defects are in agreement with the observations that Hp-deficient mice are not capable of generating a recall response or deterring a Salmonella infection as well as failing to generate tumor antigen-specific responses. The administration of Hp to lymphocytes in tissue culture partially ameliorates these functional defects, lending further support to our contention that the acute phase response protein Hp has the ability to regulate immune cell responses and host immunity. The phenotype of Hp-deficient mice suggests a major regulatory activity for Hp in supporting proliferation and functional differentiation of B and T cells as part of homeostasis and in response to antigen stimulation. PMID:18436583

  7. Exercise, nutrition and immune function.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, Michael; Nieman, David C; Pedersen, Bente K

    2004-01-01

    Strenuous bouts of prolonged exercise and heavy training are associated with depressed immune cell function. Furthermore, inadequate or inappropriate nutrition can compound the negative influence of heavy exertion on immunocompetence. Dietary deficiencies of protein and specific micronutrients have long been associated with immune dysfunction. An adequate intake of iron, zinc and vitamins A, E, B6 and B12 is particularly important for the maintenance of immune function, but excess intakes of some micronutrients can also impair immune function and have other adverse effects on health. Immune system depression has also been associated with an excess intake of fat. To maintain immune function, athletes should eat a well-balanced diet sufficient to meet their energy requirements. An athlete exercising in a carbohydrate-depleted state experiences larger increases in circulating stress hormones and a greater perturbation of several immune function indices. Conversely, consuming 30-60 g carbohydrate x h(-1) during sustained intensive exercise attenuates rises in stress hormones such as cortisol and appears to limit the degree of exercise-induced immune depression. Convincing evidence that so-called 'immune-boosting' supplements, including high doses of antioxidant vitamins, glutamine, zinc, probiotics and Echinacea, prevent exercise-induced immune impairment is currently lacking. PMID:14971437

  8. Physical Theory of the Competition that Allows HIV to Escape from the Immune System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guanyu; Deem, Michael W.

    2006-11-01

    Competition within the immune system may degrade immune control of viral infections. We formalize the evolution that occurs in both HIV-1 and the immune system quasispecies. Inclusion of competition in the immune system leads to a novel balance between the immune response and HIV-1, in which the eventual outcome is HIV-1 escape rather than control. The analytical model reproduces the three stages of HIV-1 infection. We propose a vaccine regimen that may be able to reduce competition between T cells, potentially eliminating the third stage of HIV-1.

  9. A Physical Theory of the Competition that Allows HIV to Escape from the Immune System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deem, Michael

    2007-03-01

    Competition within the immune system may degrade immune control of viral infections. We formalize the evolution that occurs in both HIV-1 and the immune system quasispecies [1]. Inclusion of competition in the immune system leads to a novel balance between the immune response and HIV-1, in which the eventual outcome is HIV-1 escape rather than control. The analytical model reproduces the three stages of HIV-1 infection. We propose a vaccine regimen that may be able to reduce competition between T cells, potentially eliminating the third stage of HIV-1. 1) G. Wang and M. W. Deem, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97 (2006) 188106.

  10. Passive Immunization Against Poliomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldo, Charles R.

    2005-01-01

    Poliomyelitis has gone from being one of the worst scourges of the 20th century to nearing eradication in the 21st. This success is well known to be attributable to the Salk inactivated and Sabin attenuated poliovirus vaccines. However, before introduction of these vaccines, William McDowall Hammon of the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health led the first major breakthrough in prevention of the disease by using passive immunization in one of the earliest double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials. This study provided the first evidence that antibodies to poliovirus could prevent the disease in humans. PMID:15855454

  11. Silencing Nociceptor Neurons Reduces Allergic Airway Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Talbot, Sébastien; Abdulnour, Raja-Elie E; Burkett, Patrick R; Lee, Seungkyu; Cronin, Shane J F; Pascal, Maud A; Laedermann, Cedric; Foster, Simmie L; Tran, Johnathan V; Lai, Nicole; Chiu, Isaac M; Ghasemlou, Nader; DiBiase, Matthew; Roberson, David; Von Hehn, Christian; Agac, Busranour; Haworth, Oliver; Seki, Hiroyuki; Penninger, Josef M; Kuchroo, Vijay K; Bean, Bruce P; Levy, Bruce D; Woolf, Clifford J

    2015-07-15

    Lung nociceptors initiate cough and bronchoconstriction. To elucidate if these fibers also contribute to allergic airway inflammation, we stimulated lung nociceptors with capsaicin and observed increased neuropeptide release and immune cell infiltration. In contrast, ablating Nav1.8(+) sensory neurons or silencing them with QX-314, a charged sodium channel inhibitor that enters via large-pore ion channels to specifically block nociceptors, substantially reduced ovalbumin- or house-dust-mite-induced airway inflammation and bronchial hyperresponsiveness. We also discovered that IL-5, a cytokine produced by activated immune cells, acts directly on nociceptors to induce the release of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). VIP then stimulates CD4(+) and resident innate lymphoid type 2 cells, creating an inflammatory signaling loop that promotes allergic inflammation. Our results indicate that nociceptors amplify pathological adaptive immune responses and that silencing these neurons with QX-314 interrupts this neuro-immune interplay, revealing a potential new therapeutic strategy for asthma. PMID:26119026

  12. Induction of mucosal immunity through systemic immunization: Phantom or reality?

    PubMed

    Su, Fei; Patel, Girishchandra B; Hu, Songhua; Chen, Wangxue

    2016-04-01

    Generation of protective immunity at mucosal surfaces can greatly assist the host defense against pathogens which either cause disease at the mucosal epithelial barriers or enter the host through these surfaces. Although mucosal routes of immunization, such as intranasal and oral, are being intensely explored and appear promising for eliciting protective mucosal immunity in mammals, their application in clinical practice has been limited due to technical and safety related challenges. Most of the currently approved human vaccines are administered via systemic (such as intramuscular and subcutaneous) routes. Whereas these routes are acknowledged as being capable to elicit antigen-specific systemic humoral and cell-mediated immune responses, they are generally perceived as incapable of generating IgA responses or protective mucosal immunity. Nevertheless, currently licensed systemic vaccines do provide effective protection against mucosal pathogens such as influenza viruses and Streptococcus pneumoniae. However, whether systemic immunization induces protective mucosal immunity remains a controversial topic. Here we reviewed the current literature and discussed the potential of systemic routes of immunization for the induction of mucosal immunity. PMID:26752023

  13. Hypothalamic neurohormones and immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Quintanar, J. Luis; Guzmán-Soto, Irene

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive examination of the current literature describing the neural-immune interactions, with emphasis on the most recent findings of the effects of neurohormones on immune system. Particularly, the role of hypothalamic hormones such as Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH), Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). In the past few years, interest has been raised in extrapituitary actions of these neurohormones due to their receptors have been found in many non-pituitary tissues. Also, the receptors are present in immune cells, suggesting an autocrine or paracrine role within the immune system. In general, these neurohormones have been reported to exert immunomodulatory effects on cell proliferation, immune mediators release and cell function. The implications of these findings in understanding the network of hypothalamic neuropeptides and immune system are discussed. PMID:23964208

  14. Immune Privilege of Corneal Allografts

    PubMed Central

    Niederkorn, Jerry Y.; Larkin, D. Frank P.

    2013-01-01

    Corneal transplantation has been performed successfully for over 100 years. Normally, HLA typing and systemic immunosuppressive drugs are not utilized, yet 90% of corneal allografts survive. In rodents, corneal allografts representing maximal histoincompatibility enjoy >50% survival even without immunosuppressive drugs. By contrast, other categories of transplants are invariably rejected in such donor/host combinations. The acceptance of corneal allografts compared to other categories of allografts is called immune privilege. The cornea expresses factors that contribute to immune privilege by preventing the induction and expression of immune responses to histocompatibility antigens on the corneal allograft. Among these are soluble and cell membrane molecules that block immune effector elements and also apoptosis of T lymphocytes. However, some conditions rob the corneal allograft of its immune privilege and promote rejection, which remains the leading cause of corneal allograft failure. Recent studies have examined new strategies for restoring immune privilege to such high-risk hosts. PMID:20482389

  15. Immune Aspects of Female Infertility

    PubMed Central

    Brazdova, Andrea; Senechal, Helene; Peltre, Gabriel; Poncet, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Immune infertility, in terms of reproductive failure, has become a serious health issue involving approximately 1 out of 5 couples at reproductive age. Semen that is defined as a complex fluid containing sperm, cellular vesicles and other cells and components, could sensitize the female genital tract. The immune rejection of male semen in the female reproductive tract is explained as the failure of natural tolerance leading to local and/or systemic immune response. Present active immune mechanism may induce high levels of anti-seminal/sperm antibodies. It has already been proven that iso-immunization is associated with infertility. Comprehensive studies with regards to the identification of antibody-targets and the determination of specific antibody class contribute to the development of effective immuno-therapy and, on the other hand, potential immuno-contraception, and then of course to complex patient diagnosis. This review summarizes the aspects of female immune infertility. PMID:27123194

  16. Hyperthyroidism and immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, P.; Majoos, F.; Perrotta, A.

    1984-01-01

    Hyperthyroidism and immune thrombocytopenia occurred concurrently in five patients; in a sixth, thyrotoxicosis developed after successful treatment of the thrombocytopenia. Correction of the hyperthyroidism was followed by a variable pattern of clinical response. In one case with mild asymptomatic thrombocytopenia spontaneous complete remission occurred. Two patients required adrenocorticosteroids to control severe thrombocytopenic purpura during the period of hyperthyroidism, after which complete remission occurred. Another patient with severe symptomatic thrombocytopenia remains with a partially compensated thrombocytolytic state but is without purpura and off all therapy. A fifth patient required splenectomy for drug-resistant thrombocytopenia and remains critically dependent on immunosuppressive therapy. The sixth patient had a relapse of immune thrombocytopenia with subsequent development of thyrotoxicosis but platelet count spontaneously returned to normal after correction of the hyperthyroidism. Pregnancy in two of these six patients was not associated with recurrence of either hyperthyroidism or thrombocytopenia. Management of symptomatic purpura in adults with co-existent hyperthyroidism may differ from that customarily employed since adrenocorticosteroid therapy may need to be extended until euthyroidism has been established before proceeding to splenectomy. When surgery is necessary, the risk of thyrotoxic storm should be anticipated, and the patient appropriately premedicated. PMID:6494085

  17. Protective immunity against plague.

    PubMed

    Cornelius, Claire; Quenee, Lauriane; Anderson, Deborah; Schneewind, Olaf

    2007-01-01

    Plague, an infectious disease that reached catastrophic proportions during three pandemics, continues to be a legitimate public health concern worldwide. Although antibiotic therapy for the causative agent Yersinia pestis is available, pharmaceutical supply limitations, multi-drug resistance from natural selection as well as malicious bioengineering are a reality. Consequently, plague vaccinology is a priority for biodefense research. Development of a multi-subunit vaccine with Fraction 1 and LcrV as protective antigens seems to be receiving the most attention. However, LcrV has been shown to cause immune suppression and Y. pestis mutants lacking F1 expression are thought to be fully virulent in nature and in animal experiments. The LcrV variant, rV10, retains the well documented protective antigenic properties of LcrV but with diminished inhibitory effects on the immune system. More research is required to examine the molecular mechanisms of vaccine protection afforded by surface protein antigens and to decipher the host mechanisms responsible for vaccine success. PMID:17966437

  18. Immune thrombocytopenia and pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Sankaran, Srividhya; Robinson, Susan E

    2011-01-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is not infrequently encountered during reproductive years with an estimated incidence of 0.1–1 per 1000 pregnancies. An international consensus group recently re-defined ITP and outlined standardized response criteria and up-to-date investigation and management. The pathogenesis encompasses autoantibody platelet destruction and immune-mediated decreased platelet production. Maternal antibodies may cross the placenta and have the potential to cause fetal and/or neonatal thrombocytopenia. The diagnosis and subsequent management of ITP in pregnancy requires a multidisciplinary approach involving the midwife, obstetrician, haematologist and anaesthetist. Women with ITP diagnosed prior to pregnancy should receive preconception counselling to outline potential treatments and provide information regarding expected maternal and neonatal outcome. Management prior to 36 weeks aims to avoid treatment in the absence of bleeding and ensure an acceptable platelet count for planned procedures. At 34–36 weeks, women are generally reviewed to consider whether a tailored course of treatment is required in preparation for delivery. Further research is required to determine a suitable platelet count for neuraxial anaesthesia. The mode of delivery should be guided by obstetric indication. It is pertinent to consider both the risk of maternal bleeding and thrombosis in maternal ITP. The risk of neonatal intracranial haemorrhage in association with ITP is less than 1%. Postpartum a cord blood platelet count should be checked. Additional management is dependent upon the neonatal platelet count. Data collection using the new standardized terminology should provide robust comparable epidemiological data regarding ITP in pregnancy.

  19. Chemokines and immunity

    PubMed Central

    Palomino, Diana Carolina Torres; Marti, Luciana Cavalheiro

    2015-01-01

    Chemokines are a large family of small cytokines and generally have low molecular weight ranging from 7 to 15kDa. Chemokines and their receptors are able to control the migration and residence of all immune cells. Some chemokines are considered pro-inflammatory, and their release can be induced during an immune response at a site of infection, while others are considered homeostatic and are involved in controlling of cells migration during tissue development or maintenance. The physiologic importance of this family of mediators is resulting from their specificity − members of the chemokine family induce recruitment of well-defined leukocyte subsets. There are two major chemokine sub-families based upon cysteine residues position: CXC and CC. As a general rule, members of the CXC chemokines are chemotactic for neutrophils, and CC chemokines are chemotactic for monocytes and sub-set of lymphocytes, although there are some exceptions. This review discusses the potential role of chemokines in inflammation focusing on the two best-characterized chemokines: monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, a CC chemokine, and interleukin-8, a member of the CXC chemokine sub-family. PMID:26466066

  20. Neural Tube Defects, Folate, and Immune Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Fathe, Kristin; Finnell, Richard H.; Taylor, Stephen M.; Woodruff, Trent M.

    2014-01-01

    Periconceptional supplementation with folic acid has led to a significant worldwide reduction in the incidence of neural tube defects (NTDs). However, despite increasing awareness of the benefits of folic acid supplementation and the implementation of food fortification programs in many countries, NTDs continue to be a leading cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality worldwide. Furthermore, there exists a significant subgroup of women who appear to be resistant to the protective effects of folic acid supplementation. The following review addresses emerging clinical and experimental evidence for a role of the immune system in the etiopathogenesis of NTDs, with the aim of developing novel preventative strategies to further reduce the incidence of NTD-affected pregnancies. In particular, recent studies demonstrating novel roles and interactions between innate immune factors such as the complement cascade, neurulation, and folate metabolism are explored. PMID:24078477

  1. Cellular immune responses to HIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMichael, Andrew J.; Rowland-Jones, Sarah L.

    2001-04-01

    The cellular immune response to the human immunodeficiency virus, mediated by T lymphocytes, seems strong but fails to control the infection completely. In most virus infections, T cells either eliminate the virus or suppress it indefinitely as a harmless, persisting infection. But the human immunodeficiency virus undermines this control by infecting key immune cells, thereby impairing the response of both the infected CD4+ T cells and the uninfected CD8+ T cells. The failure of the latter to function efficiently facilitates the escape of virus from immune control and the collapse of the whole immune system.

  2. Marathon training and immune function.

    PubMed

    Nieman, David C

    2007-01-01

    Many components of the immune system exhibit adverse change after marathon-type exertion. These immune changes occur in several compartments of the immune system and body (e.g. the skin, upper respiratory tract mucosal tissue, lung, peritoneal cavity, blood and muscle). Of all immune cells, natural killer (NK) cells, neutrophils and macrophages (of the innate immune system) exhibit the greatest changes in response to marathon competition, both in terms of numbers and function. Many mechanisms appear to be involved, including exercise-induced changes in stress hormone and cytokine concentrations, body temperature changes, increases in blood flow and dehydration. During this 'open window' of immune dysfunction (which may last between 3 and 72 hours, depending on the immune measure), viruses and bacteria may gain a foothold, increasing the risk of subclinical and clinical infection. Of the various nutritional and pharmacological countermeasures to marathon-induced immune perturbations that have been evaluated thus far, ingestion of carbohydrate beverages during intense and prolonged exercise has emerged as the most effective. However, carbohydrate ingestion during a marathon attenuates increases in plasma cytokines and stress hormones, but is largely ineffective against changes in other immune components including suppression of NK and T-cell function, and salivary IgA output. Other countermeasures, such as glutamine, antioxidant supplements and ibuprofen, have had disappointing results and thus the search for companion agents to carbohydrate continues. PMID:17465622

  3. Ubiquitin signaling in immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hongbo; Sun, Shao-Cong

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquitination has emerged as a crucial mechanism that regulates signal transduction in diverse biological processes, including different aspects of immune functions. Ubiquitination regulates pattern-recognition receptor signaling that mediates both innate immune responses and dendritic cell maturation required for initiation of adaptive immune responses. Ubiquitination also regulates the development, activation, and differentiation of T cells, thereby maintaining efficient adaptive immune responses to pathogens and immunological tolerance to self-tissues. Like phosphorylation, ubiquitination is a reversible reaction tightly controlled by the opposing actions of ubiquitin ligases and deubiquitinases. Deregulated ubiquitination events are associated with immunological disorders, including autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. PMID:27012466

  4. Host Resistance and Immune Aging.

    PubMed

    Bandaranayake, Thilinie; Shaw, Albert C

    2016-08-01

    Human immune system aging results in impaired responses to pathogens or vaccines. In the innate immune system, which mediates the earliest pro-inflammatory responses to immunologic challenge, processes ranging from Toll-like Receptor function to Neutrophil Extracellular Trap formation are generally diminished in older adults. Dysregulated, enhanced basal inflammation with age reflecting activation by endogenous damage-associated ligands contributes to impaired innate immune responses. In the adaptive immune system, T and B cell subsets and function alter with age. The control of cytomegalovirus infection, particularly in the T lineage, plays a dominant role in the differentiation and diversity of the T cell compartment. PMID:27394014

  5. Innate Immune Recognition of EBV.

    PubMed

    Lünemann, Anna; Rowe, Martin; Nadal, David

    2015-01-01

    The ability of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) to establish latency despite specific immune responses and to successfully persist lifelong in the human host shows that EBV has developed powerful strategies and mechanisms to exploit, evade, abolish, or downsize otherwise effective immune responses to ensure its own survival. This chapter focuses on current knowledge on innate immune responses against EBV and its evasion strategies for own benefit and summarizes the questions that remain to be tackled. Innate immune reactions against EBV originate both from the main target cells of EBV and from nontarget cells, which are elements of the innate immune system. Thus, we structured our review accordingly but with a particular focus on the innate recognition of EBV in its two stages in its life cycle, latent state and lytic replication. Specifically, we discuss (I) innate sensing and resulting innate immune responses against EBV by its main target cells, focusing on (i) EBV transmission between epithelial cells and B cells and their life cycle stages; and (ii) elements of innate immunity in EBV's target cells. Further, we debate (II) the innate recognition and resulting innate immune responses against EBV by cells other than the main target cells, focusing on (iii) myeloid cells: dendritic cells, monocytes, macrophages, and neutrophil granulocytes; and (iv) natural killer cells. Finally, we address (III) how EBV counteracts or exploits innate immunity in its latent and lytic life cycle stages, concentrating on (v) TLRs; (vi) EBERs; and (vii) microRNAs. PMID:26428378

  6. The microbiome and innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Thaiss, Christoph A; Zmora, Niv; Levy, Maayan; Elinav, Eran

    2016-07-01

    The intestinal microbiome is a signalling hub that integrates environmental inputs, such as diet, with genetic and immune signals to affect the host's metabolism, immunity and response to infection. The haematopoietic and non-haematopoietic cells of the innate immune system are located strategically at the host-microbiome interface. These cells have the ability to sense microorganisms or their metabolic products and to translate the signals into host physiological responses and the regulation of microbial ecology. Aberrations in the communication between the innate immune system and the gut microbiota might contribute to complex diseases. PMID:27383981

  7. Oral immune therapy: targeting the systemic immune system via the gut immune system for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Ilan, Yaron

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are associated with an altered systemic immune response leading to inflammation-mediated damage to the gut and other organs. Oral immune therapy is a method of systemic immune modulation via alteration of the gut immune system. It uses the inherit ability of the innate system of the gut to redirect the systemic innate and adaptive immune responses. Oral immune therapy is an attractive clinical approach to treat autoimmune and inflammatory disorders. It can induce immune modulation without immune suppression, has minimal toxicity and is easily administered. Targeting the systemic immune system via the gut immune system can serve as an attractive novel therapeutic method for IBD. This review summarizes the current data and discusses several examples of oral immune therapeutic methods for using the gut immune system to generate signals to reset systemic immunity as a treatment for IBD. PMID:26900473

  8. Integration of hepatitis B immunization in the Expanded Program on Immunization of the Child Survival Project.

    PubMed

    Mansour, E; Abdul-Rahim, S; Batouty, G; Zaghloul, I; Abdel-Hadi, S

    1993-01-01

    The Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI) is a component of the Child Survival Project (CSP) whose objectives are to reduce the incidence rates of six childhood diseases (Measles, Diphtheria, Pertussis, Tetanus, Tuberculosis, Poliomyelitis) and to reduce the number of infant deaths from those diseases by increasing effective vaccination coverage. In 1991, the CSP/EPI developed a national plan to introduce national immunization of infants against hepatitis B in an attempt to control the magnitude and seriousness of the damage which viral hepatitis causes in terms of morbidity, mortality and serious sequelae as hepatitis B is an endemic disease in Egypt causing an important public health problem which requires urgent control. This presentation will discuss the integrated effort undertaken to plan and implement the program, the different challenges it faces, control studies being performed as well as the proposed objectives of the hepatitis B vaccination program. PMID:7775876

  9. Anti-PEG immunity: emergence, characteristics, and unaddressed questions

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qi; Lai, Samuel K.

    2015-01-01

    The modification of protein and nanoparticle therapeutics with polyethylene glycol (PEG), a flexible, uncharged and highly hydrophilic polymer, is a widely adopted approach to reduce RES clearance, extend circulation time, and improve drug efficacy. Nevertheless, an emerging body of literature, generated by numerous research groups, demonstrates that the immune system can produce antibodies that specifically bind PEG, which can lead to the “accelerated blood clearance” of PEGylated therapeutics. In animals, anti-PEG immunity is typically robust but short-lived and consists of a predominantly anti-PEG IgM response. Rodent studies suggest that the induction of anti-PEG antibodies (α-PEG Abs) primarily occurs through a type 2 T-cell independent mechanism. Although anti-PEG immunity is less well-studied in humans, the presence of α-PEG Abs has been correlated with reduced efficacy of PEGylated therapeutics in clinical trials. The prevalence of anti-PEG IgG and reports of memory immune responses, as well as the existence of α-PEG Abs in healthy untreated individuals, suggests that the mechanism(s) and features of human anti-PEG immune responses may differ from those of animal models. Many questions, including the incidence rate of pre-existing α-PEG Abs and immunological mechanism(s) of α-PEG Ab formation in humans, must be answered in order to fully address the potential complications of anti-PEG immunity. PMID:25707913

  10. [Immunization schedule in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Gavazzi, Gaëtan; Berrut, Gilles; Jeandel, Claude

    2015-09-01

    Elderly people are more likely to develop severe infections diseases. Given the significant increase in the number of the elderly population, reducing the risk of infection by vaccination is a major preventive approach. The immunization schedule for 2014 in France yields, for the first time, vaccination recommendations for patients over 65 years. Tetanus-Diphtheria-Poliomyelitis vaccination is recommended to be given at the age of 65 years and then every 10 years, together with the pertussis vaccine to protect infants less than 6 months. Recommendation for vaccinations against seasonal influenza in autumn is maintained by the High Council for Public Health, which estimates that the population benefit persists despite the lower individual effectiveness in the elderly. The pneumococcal vaccine is recommended only in high-risk populations, and only once after the age 65. Zoster vaccine is recommended between 65 and 74, and the first year of its availability, can be proposed to elderly patients between 75 and 79 years. Vaccination in the elderly must be enhanced, and information about its advantages should be disseminated. PMID:26967928

  11. Mosquito Immunity against Arboviruses

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Shuzhen; Jupatanakul, Natapong; Dimopoulos, George

    2014-01-01

    Arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) pose a significant threat to global health, causing human disease with increasing geographic range and severity. The recent availability of the genome sequences of medically important mosquito species has kick-started investigations into the molecular basis of how mosquito vectors control arbovirus infection. Here, we discuss recent findings concerning the role of the mosquito immune system in antiviral defense, interactions between arboviruses and fundamental cellular processes such as apoptosis and autophagy, and arboviral suppression of mosquito defense mechanisms. This knowledge provides insights into co-evolutionary processes between vector and virus and also lays the groundwork for the development of novel arbovirus control strategies that target the mosquito vector. PMID:25415198

  12. Microscale Immune Studies Laboratory.

    SciTech Connect

    Poschet, Jens Fredrich; Carroll-Portillo, Amanda; Wu, Meiye; Manginell, Ronald Paul; Herr, Amy Elizabeth; Martino, Anthony A.; Perroud, Thomas D.; Branda, Catherine; Srivastava, Nimisha; Sinclair, Michael B.; Moorman, Matthew Wallace; Apblett, Christopher Alan; Sale, Kenneth L.; James, Conrad D.; Carles, Elizabeth L.; Lidke, Diane S.; Van Benthem, Mark Hilary; Rebeil, Roberto; Kaiser, Julie; Seaman, William; Rempe, Susan; Brozik, Susan Marie; Jones, Howland D. T.; Gemperline, Paul; Throckmorton, Daniel J.; Misra, Milind; Murton, Jaclyn K.; Carson, Bryan D.; Zhang, Zhaoduo; Plimpton, Steven James; Renzi, Ronald F.; Lane, Todd W.; Ndiaye-Dulac, Elsa; Singh, Anup K.; Haaland, David Michael; Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Davis, Ryan W.; Ricken, James Bryce; Branda, Steven S.; Patel, Kamlesh D.; Joo, Jaewook; Kubiak, Glenn D.; Brennan, James S.; Martin, Shawn Bryan; Brasier, Allan

    2009-01-01

    The overarching goal is to develop novel technologies to elucidate molecular mechanisms of the innate immune response in host cells to pathogens such as bacteria and viruses including the mechanisms used by pathogens to subvert/suppress/obfuscate the immune response to cause their harmful effects. Innate immunity is our first line of defense against a pathogenic bacteria or virus. A comprehensive 'system-level' understanding of innate immunity pathways such as toll-like receptor (TLR) pathways is the key to deciphering mechanisms of pathogenesis and can lead to improvements in early diagnosis or developing improved therapeutics. Current methods for studying signaling focus on measurements of a limited number of components in a pathway and hence, fail to provide a systems-level understanding. We have developed a systems biology approach to decipher TLR4 pathways in macrophage cell lines in response to exposure to pathogenic bacteria and their lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Our approach integrates biological reagents, a microfluidic cell handling and analysis platform, high-resolution imaging and computational modeling to provide spatially- and temporally-resolved measurement of TLR-network components. The Integrated microfluidic platform is capable of imaging single cells to obtain dynamic translocation data as well as high-throughput acquisition of quantitative protein expression and phosphorylation information of selected cell populations. The platform consists of multiple modules such as single-cell array, cell sorter, and phosphoflow chip to provide confocal imaging, cell sorting, flow cytomtery and phosphorylation assays. The single-cell array module contains fluidic constrictions designed to trap and hold single host cells. Up to 100 single cells can be trapped and monitored for hours, enabling detailed statistically-significant measurements. The module was used to analyze translocation behavior of transcription factor NF-kB in macrophages upon activation by E

  13. An Immunization Education Program for Childcare Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayney, Mary S.; Bartell, Julie C.

    2005-01-01

    The childhood immunization schedule includes at least 17 scheduled immunizations prior to the age of 24 months. Immunization laws require childcare centers to maintain immunization records and enforce immunization standards for children who attend these centers. Childcare providers generally receive little formal education about infectious…

  14. Nutrition and immunity in ruminant animals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The immune system can be generally separated into three broad components; natural immunity, innate immunity, and acquired immunity, all of which must be fully developed and functioning properly to provide adequate immunological protection. Natural and innate immunity are typically grouped together u...

  15. [Bone marrow stromal damage mediated by immune response activity].

    PubMed

    Vojinović, J; Kamenov, B; Najman, S; Branković, Lj; Dimitrijević, H

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this work was to estimate influence of activated immune response on hematopoiesis in vitro, using the experimental model of BCG immunized BALB/c mice and in patients with chronic immunoactivation: long-lasting infections, autoimmunity or malignancy. We correlated changes in long term bone marrow cultures (Dexter) and NBT reduction with appearance of anemia in patients and experimental model of immunization by BCG. Increased spontaneous NBT reduction pointed out role of macrophage activation in bone marrow stroma damage. Long-term bone marrow cultures showed reduced number of hematopoietic cells, with predomination of fibroblasts and loss of fat cells. This results correlated with anemia and leucocytosis with stimulated myelopoiesis in peripheral blood. Activation of immune response, or acting of any agent that directly changes extracellular matrix and cellularity of bone marrow, may result in microenviroment bone marrow damage that modify hematopoiesis. PMID:18173180

  16. Immune-Mediated Complications after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhuoyan; Rubinstein, Samuel M; Thota, Ramya; Savani, Malvi; Brissot, Eolia; Shaw, Bronwen E; Majhail, Navneet S; Mohty, Mohamad; Savani, Bipin N

    2016-08-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has an integral role in the treatment of malignant and nonmalignant diseases. Long-term complications after HSCT have been well established and include graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), conditioning regimen-related toxicities, disease relapse, and infections. Immune-mediated phenomena are increasingly described after HSCT with clinically significant sequelae. Diagnosis is challenging because of features that overlap with other commonly reported post-transplantation complications. Patients who experience immune-mediated disease after HSCT tend to have poor outcomes. Early recognition of immune-mediated complications is imperative to reduce preventable morbidity and mortality. This review looks at the currently available literature on pathogenesis, incidence, risk factors, treatment, and outcomes of immune-mediated disease (other than GVHD) after HSCT. PMID:27095688

  17. Psychoimmunomodulatory effect of phenotropil in animals with immune stress.

    PubMed

    Samotrueva, M A; Tyurenkov, I N; Teplyi, D L; Serezhnikova, T K; Khlebtsova, E B

    2011-05-01

    We studied the effect of phenotropil (25 mg/kg intraperitoneally, 5 days) on the immune and psychoemotional state of Wistar rats with LPS-induced immune stress. Hyperactivity of the immune system in animals after treatment with Pseudomonas aeruginosa LPS (100 μg/kg intraperitoneally, 3 days) manifested in a significant increase in the delayed-type hypersensitivity index, antibody titer in the reaction of passive hemagglutination, and phagocytic activity of peripheral blood neutrophils. Locomotor, orientation, and exploratory activities were reduced, while anxiety increased in animals with immune stress. Phenotropil exhibited the psychoimmunomodulatory effect under these conditions, which manifested in prevention of anxiety and fear response, increase in horizontal locomotion and exploratory behavior, and improvement of immunoreactivity. PMID:22442801

  18. Effect of intranasal immunization with inactivated avian influenza virus on local and systemic immune responses in ducks.

    PubMed

    Kang, H; Wang, H; Yu, Q; Yang, Q

    2012-05-01

    To evaluate the effects of co-administration of inactivated avian influenza H9N2 virus and adjuvants in waterfowls, 10-d-old ducks were immunized intranasally with inactivated avian influenza virus (IAIV) combined with CpG DNA and sodium cholate. Immunoglobulin A and IgG antibody levels in throat and tracheal tissues increased significantly, as did specific IgA and IgG antibody levels in the serum after intranasal immunization with IAIV combined with CpG DNA and sodium cholate, compared with immunization with IAIV only. Furthermore, enhanced hemagglutination inhibition titers were also detected in serum samples taken between the third and seventh weeks after immunization with IAIV and both adjuvants compared with IAIV alone. The expression of IL-2 and IL-6 in tracheal and lung tissues increased significantly in the early period after booster immunization. However, the enhancement induced by a single adjuvant was insignificant, and no significant change was detected in the antibody titers or cytokine levels between the ducks that received IAIV alone or saline. In the viral challenge study, prior administration of both CpG DNA and sodium cholate with IAIV reduced the viral titers in the oropharynx and cloaca swabs. Our study suggests that the combination of CpG DNA and sodium cholate could be beneficial to immunization with inactivated H9N2 virus by enhancing the local and systemic immune responses. PMID:22499863

  19. Plain Talk about Childhood Immunizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska State Dept. of Health and Social Services, Juneau. Div. of Family and Youth Services.

    This booklet provides parents with information about immunizations and vaccine-preventable diseases, balances the benefits and risk of vaccination, and responds to inaccuracies or misinformation about immunizations and vaccine-preventable diseases. Section 1 presents a message to parents about vaccination. Section 2 offers facts about…

  20. Recommendations for Institutional Prematriculation Immunizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of American College Health, 2006

    2006-01-01

    The "Recommendations for Institutional Prematriculation Immunizations" described in this article are provided to colleges and universities to facilitate the implementation of a comprehensive institutional prematriculation immunization policy. In response to changing epidemiology and the introduction of new vaccines, the American College Health…

  1. Questions of Mind Over Immunity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bower, Bruce

    1991-01-01

    Discussed is the possibility of disturbed immunity among people experiencing either clinical depression or some type of severe stress. Psychoneuroimmunology, the study of psychological treatment and its ability to shore up a person's immunity and slow the spread of infectious disease, is reviewed. (KR)

  2. Myeloid IKKβ promotes antitumor immunity by modulating CCL11 and the innate immune response.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jinming; Hawkins, Oriana E; Barham, Whitney; Gilchuk, Pavlo; Boothby, Mark; Ayers, Gregory D; Joyce, Sebastian; Karin, Michael; Yull, Fiona E; Richmond, Ann

    2014-12-15

    Myeloid cells are capable of promoting or eradicating tumor cells and the nodal functions that contribute to their different roles are still obscure. Here, we show that mice with myeloid-specific genetic loss of the NF-κB pathway regulatory kinase IKKβ exhibit more rapid growth of cutaneous and lung melanoma tumors. In a BRAF(V600E/PTEN(-/-)) allograft model, IKKβ loss in macrophages reduced recruitment of myeloid cells into the tumor, lowered expression of MHC class II molecules, and enhanced production of the chemokine CCL11, thereby negatively regulating dendritic-cell maturation. Elevated serum and tissue levels of CCL11 mediated suppression of dendritic-cell differentiation/maturation within the tumor microenvironment, skewing it toward a Th2 immune response and impairing CD8(+) T cell-mediated tumor cell lysis. Depleting macrophages or CD8(+) T cells in mice with wild-type IKKβ myeloid cells enhanced tumor growth, where the myeloid cell response was used to mediate antitumor immunity against melanoma tumors (with less dependency on a CD8(+) T-cell response). In contrast, myeloid cells deficient in IKKβ were compromised in tumor cell lysis, based on their reduced ability to phagocytize and digest tumor cells. Thus, mice with continuous IKKβ signaling in myeloid-lineage cells (IKKβ(CA)) exhibited enhanced antitumor immunity and reduced melanoma outgrowth. Collectively, our results illuminate new mechanisms through which NF-κB signaling in myeloid cells promotes innate tumor surveillance. PMID:25336190

  3. Plant Innate Immunity Multicomponent Model.

    PubMed

    Andolfo, Giuseppe; Ercolano, Maria R

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of plant-pathogen interactions is making rapid advances in order to address issues of global importance such as improving agricultural productivity and sustainable food security. Innate immunity has evolved in plants, resulting in a wide diversity of defense mechanisms adapted to specific threats. The postulated PTI/ETI model describes two perception layers of plant innate immune system, which belong to a first immunity component of defense response activation. To better describe the sophisticated defense system of plants, we propose a new model of plant immunity. This model considers the plant's ability to distinguish the feeding behavior of their many foes, such as a second component that modulates innate immunity. This hypothesis provides a new viewpoint highlighting the relevance of hormone crosstalk and primary metabolism in regulating plant defense against the different behaviors of pathogens with the intention to stimulate further interest in this research area. PMID:26617626

  4. Immune Mechanisms in Myelodysplastic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Glenthøj, Andreas; Ørskov, Andreas Due; Hansen, Jakob Werner; Hadrup, Sine Reker; O'Connell, Casey; Grønbæk, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a spectrum of diseases, characterized by debilitating cytopenias and a propensity of developing acute myeloid leukemia. Comprehensive sequencing efforts have revealed a range of mutations characteristic, but not specific, of MDS. Epidemiologically, autoimmune diseases are common in patients with MDS, fueling hypotheses of common etiological mechanisms. Both innate and adaptive immune pathways are overly active in the hematopoietic niche of MDS. Although supportive care, growth factors, and hypomethylating agents are the mainstay of MDS treatment, some patients-especially younger low-risk patients with HLA-DR15 tissue type-demonstrate impressive response rates after immunosuppressive therapy. This is in contrast to higher-risk MDS patients, where several immune activating treatments, such as immune checkpoint inhibitors, are in the pipeline. Thus, the dual role of immune mechanisms in MDS is challenging, and rigorous translational studies are needed to establish the value of immune manipulation as a treatment of MDS. PMID:27314337

  5. Melatonin: Buffering the Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Carrillo-Vico, Antonio; Lardone, Patricia J.; Álvarez-Sánchez, Nuria; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Ana; Guerrero, Juan M.

    2013-01-01

    Melatonin modulates a wide range of physiological functions with pleiotropic effects on the immune system. Despite the large number of reports implicating melatonin as an immunomodulatory compound, it still remains unclear how melatonin regulates immunity. While some authors argue that melatonin is an immunostimulant, many studies have also described anti-inflammatory properties. The data reviewed in this paper support the idea of melatonin as an immune buffer, acting as a stimulant under basal or immunosuppressive conditions or as an anti-inflammatory compound in the presence of exacerbated immune responses, such as acute inflammation. The clinical relevance of the multiple functions of melatonin under different immune conditions, such as infection, autoimmunity, vaccination and immunosenescence, is also reviewed. PMID:23609496

  6. Immune Mechanisms in Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Glenthøj, Andreas; Ørskov, Andreas Due; Hansen, Jakob Werner; Hadrup, Sine Reker; O’Connell, Casey; Grønbæk, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a spectrum of diseases, characterized by debilitating cytopenias and a propensity of developing acute myeloid leukemia. Comprehensive sequencing efforts have revealed a range of mutations characteristic, but not specific, of MDS. Epidemiologically, autoimmune diseases are common in patients with MDS, fueling hypotheses of common etiological mechanisms. Both innate and adaptive immune pathways are overly active in the hematopoietic niche of MDS. Although supportive care, growth factors, and hypomethylating agents are the mainstay of MDS treatment, some patients—especially younger low-risk patients with HLA-DR15 tissue type—demonstrate impressive response rates after immunosuppressive therapy. This is in contrast to higher-risk MDS patients, where several immune activating treatments, such as immune checkpoint inhibitors, are in the pipeline. Thus, the dual role of immune mechanisms in MDS is challenging, and rigorous translational studies are needed to establish the value of immune manipulation as a treatment of MDS. PMID:27314337

  7. Plant Innate Immunity Multicomponent Model

    PubMed Central

    Andolfo, Giuseppe; Ercolano, Maria R.

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of plant–pathogen interactions is making rapid advances in order to address issues of global importance such as improving agricultural productivity and sustainable food security. Innate immunity has evolved in plants, resulting in a wide diversity of defense mechanisms adapted to specific threats. The postulated PTI/ETI model describes two perception layers of plant innate immune system, which belong to a first immunity component of defense response activation. To better describe the sophisticated defense system of plants, we propose a new model of plant immunity. This model considers the plant’s ability to distinguish the feeding behavior of their many foes, such as a second component that modulates innate immunity. This hypothesis provides a new viewpoint highlighting the relevance of hormone crosstalk and primary metabolism in regulating plant defense against the different behaviors of pathogens with the intention to stimulate further interest in this research area. PMID:26617626

  8. Overview of the Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Chaplin, David D.

    2010-01-01

    The immune system has evolved to protect the host from a universe of pathogenic microbes that are themselves constantly evolving. The immune system also helps the host eliminate toxic or allergenic substances that enter through mucosal surfaces. Central to the immune system’s ability to mobilize a response to an invading pathogen, toxin or allergen is its ability to distinguish self from non-self. The host uses both innate and adaptive mechanisms to detect and eliminate pathogenic microbes. Both of these mechanisms include self-nonself discrimination. This overview identifies key mechanisms used by the immune system to respond to invading microbes and other exogenous threats and identifies settings in which disturbed immune function exacerbates tissue injury. PMID:20176265

  9. Immune Response of Amebiasis and Immune Evasion by Entamoeba histolytica

    PubMed Central

    Nakada-Tsukui, Kumiko; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is a protozoan parasite and the causative agent of amebiasis. It is estimated approximately 1% of humans are infected with E. histolytica, resulting in an estimate of 100,000 deaths annually. Clinical manifestations of amebic infection range widely from asymptomatic to severe symptoms, including dysentery and extra-intestinal abscesses. Like other infectious diseases, it is assumed that only ~20% of infected individuals develop symptoms, and genetic factors of both the parasite and humans as well as the environmental factors, e.g., microbiota, determine outcome of infection. There are multiple essential steps in amebic infection: degradation of and invasion into the mucosal layer, adherence to the intestinal epithelium, invasion into the tissues, and dissemination to other organs. While the mechanisms of invasion and destruction of the host tissues by the amebae during infection have been elucidated at the molecular levels, it remains largely uncharacterized how the parasite survive in the host by evading and attacking host immune system. Recently, the strategies for immune evasion by the parasite have been unraveled, including immunomodulation to suppress IFN-γ production, elimination of immune cells and soluble immune mediators, and metabolic alterations against reactive oxygen and nitrogen species to fend off the attack from immune system. In this review, we summarized the latest knowledge on immune reaction and immune evasion during amebiasis. PMID:27242782

  10. Trained immunity: A smart way to enhance innate immune defence.

    PubMed

    van der Meer, Jos W M; Joosten, Leo A B; Riksen, Niels; Netea, Mihai G

    2015-11-01

    The innate arm of the immune system is generally viewed as primitive and non-specific and - in contrast to the adaptive immune arm - not to possess memory. However in plants and invertebrate animals that lack adaptive immunity, innate immunity will exhibit a prolonged enhanced functional state after adequate priming. A similar enhancement of function of the innate immunity has occasionally been described in vertebrates, including humans. Over the past few years we have studied this phenomenon in greater detail and we have coined the term 'Trained (innate) immunity' (TI). TI can be induced by a variety of stimuli, of which we have studied BCG and β-glucan in greater detail. The non-specific protective effects of BCG that have been observed in vaccination studies in the literature are probably due to TI. Monocytes and macrophages are among the main cells of the innate immune arm that can be trained. We have discovered that both BCG (via NOD2 signalling) and β-glucan (via dectin-1) induce epigenetic reprogramming, in particular stable changes in histone trimethylation at H3K4. These epigenetic changes lead to cellular activation, enhanced cytokine production and a change in the metabolic state of the cell with a shift from oxidative phosphorylation to aerobic glycolysis. TI is not only important for host defence and vaccine responses, but most probably also for diseases like atherosclerosis. Modulation of TI is a promising area for new treatments. PMID:26597205

  11. Immune Response of Amebiasis and Immune Evasion by Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Nakada-Tsukui, Kumiko; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is a protozoan parasite and the causative agent of amebiasis. It is estimated approximately 1% of humans are infected with E. histolytica, resulting in an estimate of 100,000 deaths annually. Clinical manifestations of amebic infection range widely from asymptomatic to severe symptoms, including dysentery and extra-intestinal abscesses. Like other infectious diseases, it is assumed that only ~20% of infected individuals develop symptoms, and genetic factors of both the parasite and humans as well as the environmental factors, e.g., microbiota, determine outcome of infection. There are multiple essential steps in amebic infection: degradation of and invasion into the mucosal layer, adherence to the intestinal epithelium, invasion into the tissues, and dissemination to other organs. While the mechanisms of invasion and destruction of the host tissues by the amebae during infection have been elucidated at the molecular levels, it remains largely uncharacterized how the parasite survive in the host by evading and attacking host immune system. Recently, the strategies for immune evasion by the parasite have been unraveled, including immunomodulation to suppress IFN-γ production, elimination of immune cells and soluble immune mediators, and metabolic alterations against reactive oxygen and nitrogen species to fend off the attack from immune system. In this review, we summarized the latest knowledge on immune reaction and immune evasion during amebiasis. PMID:27242782

  12. Mucosal Regulatory T Cells and T Helper 17 Cells in HIV-Associated Immune Activation

    PubMed Central

    Pandiyan, Pushpa; Younes, Souheil-Antoine; Ribeiro, Susan Pereira; Talla, Aarthi; McDonald, David; Bhaskaran, Natarajan; Levine, Alan D.; Weinberg, Aaron; Sekaly, Rafick P.

    2016-01-01

    Residual mucosal inflammation along with chronic systemic immune activation is an important feature in individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and has been linked to a wide range of co-morbidities, including malignancy, opportunistic infections, immunopathology, and cardiovascular complications. Although combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) can reduce plasma viral loads to undetectable levels, reservoirs of virus persist, and increased mortality is associated with immune dysbiosis in mucosal lymphoid tissues. Immune-based therapies are pursued with the goal of improving CD4+ T-cell restoration, as well as reducing chronic immune activation in cART-treated patients. However, the majority of research on immune activation has been derived from analysis of circulating T cells. How immune cell alterations in mucosal tissues contribute to HIV immune dysregulation and the associated risk of non-infectious chronic complications is less studied. Given the significant differences between mucosal T cells and circulating T cells, and the immediate interactions of mucosal T cells with the microbiome, more attention should be devoted to mucosal immune cells and their contribution to systemic immune activation in HIV-infected individuals. Here, we will focus on mucosal immune cells with a specific emphasis on CD4+ T lymphocytes, such as T helper 17 cells and CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs), which play crucial roles in maintaining mucosal barrier integrity and preventing inflammation, respectively. We hypothesize that pro-inflammatory milieu in cART-treated patients with immune activation significantly contributes to enhanced loss of Th17 cells and increased frequency of dysregulated Tregs in the mucosa, which in turn may exacerbate immune dysfunction in HIV-infected patients. We also present initial evidence to support this hypothesis. A better comprehension of how pro-inflammatory milieu impacts these two types of cells in the mucosa will shed light

  13. Adaptive immunity to murine skin commensals

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Wei; Li, Wenqing; Hixon, Julie A.; Bouladoux, Nicolas; Belkaid, Yasmine; Dzutzev, Amiran; Durum, Scott K.

    2014-01-01

    The adaptive immune system provides critical defense against pathogenic bacteria. Commensal bacteria have begun to receive much attention in recent years, especially in the gut where there is growing evidence of complex interactions with the adaptive immune system. In the present study, we observed that commensal skin bacteria are recognized by major populations of T cells in skin-draining lymph nodes of mice. Recombination activating gene 1 (Rag1)−/− mice, which lack adaptive immune cells, contained living skin-derived bacteria and bacterial sequences, especially mycobacteria, in their skin-draining lymph nodes. T cells from skin-draining lymph nodes of normal mice were shown, in vitro, to specifically recognize bacteria of several species that were grown from Rag1−/− lymph nodes. T cells from skin-draining lymph nodes, transferred into Rag1−/− mice proliferated in skin-draining lymph nodes, expressed a restricted T-cell receptor spectrotype and produced cytokines. Transfer of T cells into Rag1−/− mice had the effect of reducing bacterial sequences in skin-draining lymph nodes and in skin itself. Antibacterial effects of transferred T cells were dependent on IFNγ and IL-17A. These studies suggest a previously unrecognized role for T cells in controlling skin commensal bacteria and provide a mechanism to account for cutaneous infections and mycobacterial infections in T-cell–deficient patients. PMID:25002505

  14. Vaccines and immunization strategies for dengue prevention.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Liu, Jianying; Cheng, Gong

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is currently the most significant arboviral disease afflicting tropical and sub-tropical countries worldwide. Dengue vaccines, such as the multivalent attenuated, chimeric, DNA and inactivated vaccines, have been developed to prevent dengue infection in humans, and they function predominantly by stimulating immune responses against the dengue virus (DENV) envelope (E) and nonstructural-1 proteins (NS1). Of these vaccines, a live attenuated chimeric tetravalent DENV vaccine developed by Sanofi Pasteur has been licensed in several countries. However, this vaccine renders only partial protection against the DENV2 infection and is associated with an unexplained increased incidence of hospitalization for severe dengue disease among children younger than nine years old. In addition to the virus-based vaccines, several mosquito-based dengue immunization strategies have been developed to interrupt the vector competence and effectively reduce the number of infected mosquito vectors, thus controlling the transmission of DENV in nature. Here we summarize the recent progress in the development of dengue vaccines and novel immunization strategies and propose some prospective vaccine strategies for disease prevention in the future. PMID:27436365

  15. Heme on innate immunity and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Dutra, Fabianno F.; Bozza, Marcelo T.

    2014-01-01

    Heme is an essential molecule expressed ubiquitously all through our tissues. Heme plays major functions in cellular physiology and metabolism as the prosthetic group of diverse proteins. Once released from cells and from hemeproteins free heme causes oxidative damage and inflammation, thus acting as a prototypic damage-associated molecular pattern. In this context, free heme is a critical component of the pathological process of sterile and infectious hemolytic conditions including malaria, hemolytic anemias, ischemia-reperfusion, and hemorrhage. The plasma scavenger proteins hemopexin and albumin reduce heme toxicity and are responsible for transporting free heme to intracellular compartments where it is catabolized by heme-oxygenase enzymes. Upon hemolysis or severe cellular damage the serum capacity to scavenge heme may saturate and increase free heme to sufficient amounts to cause tissue damage in various organs. The mechanism by which heme causes reactive oxygen generation, activation of cells of the innate immune system and cell death are not fully understood. Although heme can directly promote lipid peroxidation by its iron atom, heme can also induce reactive oxygen species generation and production of inflammatory mediators through the activation of selective signaling pathways. Heme activates innate immune cells such as macrophages and neutrophils through activation of innate immune receptors. The importance of these events has been demonstrated in infectious and non-infectious diseases models. In this review, we will discuss the mechanisms behind heme-induced cytotoxicity and inflammation and the consequences of these events on different tissues and diseases. PMID:24904418

  16. Powering the Immune System: Mitochondria in Immune Function and Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Melissa A.; Sims, Katherine B.; Walter, Jolan E.; Traggiai, Elisabetta

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria are critical subcellular organelles that are required for several metabolic processes, including oxidative phosphorylation, as well as signaling and tissue-specific processes. Current understanding of the role of mitochondria in both the innate and adaptive immune systems is expanding. Concurrently, immunodeficiencies arising from perturbation of mitochondrial elements are increasingly recognized. Recent observations of immune dysfunction and increased incidence of infection in patients with primary mitochondrial disorders further support an important role for mitochondria in the proper function of the immune system. Here we review current findings. PMID:25309931

  17. Drug-induced immune hemolytic anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Immune hemolytic anemia secondary to drugs; Anemia - immune hemolytic - secondary to drugs ... In some cases, a drug can cause the immune system to mistake your own red blood cells for foreign substances. The body responds by making ...

  18. Immunization Schedules for Preteens and Teens

    MedlinePlus

    ... ACIP Vaccination Recommendations Why Immunize? Vaccines: The Basics Immunization Schedules for Preteens and Teens Recommend on Facebook ... on track. View or Print a Schedule Recommended Immunizations for Preteens and Teens (7-18 years) 2016 ...

  19. Immunization Schedules for Infants and Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... ACIP Vaccination Recommendations Why Immunize? Vaccines: The Basics Immunization Schedules for Infants and Children Recommend on Facebook ... any questions. View or Print a Schedule Recommended Immunizations for Children (Birth through 6 years) Schedule for ...

  20. Climate change, nutrition and immunity: Effects of elevated CO2 and temperature on the immune function of an insect herbivore.

    PubMed

    Gherlenda, Andrew N; Haigh, Anthony M; Moore, Ben D; Johnson, Scott N; Riegler, Markus

    2016-02-01

    Balanced nutrition is fundamental to health and immunity. For herbivorous insects, nutrient-compositional shifts in host plants due to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations and temperature may compromise this balance. Therefore, understanding their immune responses to such shifts is vital if we are to predict the outcomes of climate change for plant-herbivore-parasitoid and pathogen interactions. We tested the immune response of Paropsis atomaria Olivier (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) feeding on Eucalyptus tereticornis Sm. seedlings exposed to elevated CO2 (640 μmol mol(-1); CE) and temperature (ambient plus 4 °C; TE). Larvae were immune-challenged with a nylon monofilament in order to simulate parasitoid or pathogen attack without other effects of actual parasitism or pathology. The cellular (in vivo melanisation) and humoral (in vitro phenoloxidase PO activity) immune responses were assessed, and linked to changes in leaf chemistry. CE reduced foliar nitrogen (N) concentrations and increased C:N ratios and concentrations of total phenolics. The humoral response was reduced at CE. PO activity and haemolymph protein concentrations decreased at CE, while haemolymph protein concentrations were positively correlated with foliar N concentrations. However, the cellular response increased at CE and this was not correlated with any foliar traits. Immune parameters were not impacted by TE. Our study revealed that opposite cellular and humoral immune responses occurred as a result of plant-mediated effects at CE. In contrast, elevated temperatures within the tested range had minimal impact on immune responses. These complex interactions may alter the outcomes of parasitoid and pathogen attack in future climates. PMID:26678330

  1. Immune responses in DNA vaccine formulated with PMMA following immunization and after challenge with Leishmania major.

    PubMed

    Zarrati, Somayeh; Mahdavi, Mehdi; Tabatabaie, Fatemeh

    2016-06-01

    Leishmaniasis is a major infectious disease caused by protozoan parasites of the genus Leishmania. Despite of many efforts toward vaccine against Leishmania no effective vaccine has been approved yet. DNA vaccines can generate more powerful and broad immune responses than conventional vaccines. In order to increase immunity, the DNA vaccine has been supplemented with adjuvant. In this study a new nano-vaccine containing TSA recombinant plasmid and poly(methylmethacrylate) nanoparticles (act as adjuvant) was designed and its immunogenicity tested on BALB/c mouse. After three intramuscular injection of nano-vaccine (100 μg), the recombinant TSA protein (20 μg) was injected subcutaneously. Finally as a challenge animals were infected by Leishmania major. After the last injection of nano-vaccine, after protein booster injection, and also after challenge, cellular immune and antibody responses were evaluated by ELISA method. The findings of this study showed the new nano-vaccine was capable of induction both cytokines secretion and specific antibody responses, but predominant Th1 immune response characterized by IFN-γ production compared to control groups. Moreover, results revealed that nano-vaccine was effective in reducing parasite burden in the spleen of Leishmania major-infected BALB/c mice. Base on results, current candidate vaccine has potency for further studies. PMID:27413316

  2. Purinergic regulation of the immune system.

    PubMed

    Cekic, Caglar; Linden, Joel

    2016-03-01

    Cellular stress or apoptosis triggers the release of ATP, ADP and other nucleotides into the extracellular space. Extracellular nucleotides function as autocrine and paracrine signalling molecules by activating cell-surface P2 purinergic receptors that elicit pro-inflammatory immune responses. Over time, extracellular nucleotides are metabolized to adenosine, leading to reduced P2 signalling and increased signalling through anti-inflammatory adenosine (P1 purinergic) receptors. Here, we review how local purinergic signalling changes over time during tissue responses to injury or disease, and we discuss the potential of targeting purinergic signalling pathways for the immunotherapeutic treatment of ischaemia, organ transplantation, autoimmunity or cancer. PMID:26922909

  3. Proteomic Insight Reveals Elevated Levels of Albumin in Circulating Immune Complexes in Diabetic Plasma.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Shweta; Jagadeeshaprasad, Mashanipalya G; Patil, Yugendra R; Shaikh, Mahemud L; Regin, Bhaskaran S; Mohan, Viswanathan; Giri, Ashok P; Balasubramanyam, Muthuswamy; Boppana, Ramanamurthy; Kulkarni, Mahesh J

    2016-06-01

    A Hyperglycemic condition in diabetes promotes formation of advanced glycation end products, which are known to elicit immune response and form complexes with immunoglobulins called circulating immune complexes. To investigate the involvement of advanced glycation end product (AGE)-modified proteins in the elicitation of an immune response, circulating immune complexes were isolated and proteins associated were identified and characterized. Label-free-based mass spectrometric analysis of circulating immune complexes in clinical plasma of prediabetic, newly diagnosed diabetes, and diabetic microalbuminurea revealed elevated levels of serum albumin in the circulating immune complexes, which were also observed to be AGE modified. Further, to examine the role of glycation, circulating immune complexeswere analyzed in the streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice treated with or without aminoguanidine, a prototype glycation inhibitor. Mass spectrometric analysis of circulating immune complexes showed elevated levels of serum albumin in plasma from diabetic mice over that of control animals. Aminoguanidine-treated diabetic mice displayed decreased AGE modification of plasma albumin, accompanied by a reduced level of albumin in the circulating immune complexes. In addition, elevated levels of proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-1b, IL-2, and TNF-alpha were observed in diabetes, which were reduced with aminoguanidine treatment, suggesting the involvement of glycation in the immune response. PMID:27056913

  4. Dynamics of immune system vulnerabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stromberg, Sean P.

    The adaptive immune system can be viewed as a complex system, which adapts, over time, to reflect the history of infections experienced by the organism. Understanding its operation requires viewing it in terms of tradeoffs under constraints and evolutionary history. It typically displays "robust, yet fragile" behavior, meaning common tasks are robust to small changes but novel threats or changes in environment can have dire consequences. In this dissertation we use mechanistic models to study several biological processes: the immune response, the homeostasis of cells in the lymphatic system, and the process that normally prevents autoreactive cells from entering the lymphatic system. Using these models we then study the effects of these processes interacting. We show that the mechanisms that regulate the numbers of cells in the immune system, in conjunction with the immune response, can act to suppress autoreactive cells from proliferating, thus showing quantitatively how pathogenic infections can suppress autoimmune disease. We also show that over long periods of time this same effect can thin the repertoire of cells that defend against novel threats, leading to an age correlated vulnerability. This vulnerability is shown to be a consequence of system dynamics, not due to degradation of immune system components with age. Finally, modeling a specific tolerance mechanism that normally prevents autoimmune disease, in conjunction with models of the immune response and homeostasis we look at the consequences of the immune system mistakenly incorporating pathogenic molecules into its tolerizing mechanisms. The signature of this dynamic matches closely that of the dengue virus system.

  5. The biological significance of immunity.

    PubMed

    Ratcliffe, N A

    1989-01-01

    The classical definition of immunity as the resistance of the body to disease, views the immune system in simple mechanistic terms. In this brief overview, possible reasons and consequences of the presence of an effective immune system across a range of invertebrate and vertebrate animals are considered. Topics discussed include the forces favouring the development of immunity, such as the acquisition of the colonial habit and terrestrial mode of life by many primitive animals, the constant threats of microbial and macrobial invasion, and the need to eliminate somatic mutations. The consequences of immunity in terms of the development of autoimmunity and hypersensitivity reactions, as well as the interaction of the immune system with the brain, the neuroendocrine organs and environmental factors, are also examined. Finally, the possibilities that the delicate balance maintained between many parasites and the immune systems of their hosts results in the spread of disease, and may also determine the maintenance of sexual reproduction and the choice of mate, are discussed. PMID:2680665

  6. Photosensitizers for photodynamic immune modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    North, John R.; Boch, Ronald; Hunt, David W. C.; Ratkay, Leslie G.; Simkin, Guillermo O.; Tao, Jing-Song; Richter, Anna M.; Levy, Julia G.

    2000-06-01

    PDT may be an effective treatment for certain immune-mediated disorders. The immunomodulatory action of PDT is likely a consequence of effects exerted at a number of levels including stimulation of specific cell signaling pathways, selective depletion of activated immune cells, alteration of receptor expression by immune and non-immune cells, and the modulation of cytokine availability. QLT0074, a potent photosensitizer that exhibits rapid clearance kinetics in vivo, is in development for the treatment of immune disorders. In comparison to the well-characterized and structurally related photosensitizer verteporfin, lower concentrations of QLT0074 were required to induce apoptosis in human blood T cells and keratinocytes using blue light for photoactivation. Both photosensitizers triggered the stress activated protein kinase (SAPK) and p38 (HOG1) pathways but not extracellularly regulated kinase (ERK) activity in mouse Pam212 keratinocytes. In cell signaling responses, QLT0074 was active at lower concentrations than verteporfin. For all in vitro test systems, the stronger photodynamic activity of QLT0074 was associated with a greater cell uptake of this photosensitize than verteporfin. In mouse immune models, sub-erythemogenic doses of QLT0074 in combination with whole body blue light irradiation inhibited the contact hypersensitivity response and limited the development of adjuvant-induced arthritis. QLT0074 exhibits activities that indicate it may be a favorable agent for the photodynamic treatment of human immune disease.

  7. Immunity-Based Aircraft Fault Detection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dasgupta, D.; KrishnaKumar, K.; Wong, D.; Berry, M.

    2004-01-01

    In the study reported in this paper, we have developed and applied an Artificial Immune System (AIS) algorithm for aircraft fault detection, as an extension to a previous work on intelligent flight control (IFC). Though the prior studies had established the benefits of IFC, one area of weakness that needed to be strengthened was the control dead band induced by commanding a failed surface. Since the IFC approach uses fault accommodation with no detection, the dead band, although it reduces over time due to learning, is present and causes degradation in handling qualities. If the failure can be identified, this dead band can be further A ed to ensure rapid fault accommodation and better handling qualities. The paper describes the application of an immunity-based approach that can detect a broad spectrum of known and unforeseen failures. The approach incorporates the knowledge of the normal operational behavior of the aircraft from sensory data, and probabilistically generates a set of pattern detectors that can detect any abnormalities (including faults) in the behavior pattern indicating unsafe in-flight operation. We developed a tool called MILD (Multi-level Immune Learning Detection) based on a real-valued negative selection algorithm that can generate a small number of specialized detectors (as signatures of known failure conditions) and a larger set of generalized detectors for unknown (or possible) fault conditions. Once the fault is detected and identified, an adaptive control system would use this detection information to stabilize the aircraft by utilizing available resources (control surfaces). We experimented with data sets collected under normal and various simulated failure conditions using a piloted motion-base simulation facility. The reported results are from a collection of test cases that reflect the performance of the proposed immunity-based fault detection algorithm.

  8. Rh immunization in Manitoba: progress in prevention and management.

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, J. M.; Pollock, J.

    1983-01-01

    For two decades the perinatal mortality caused by erythroblastosis has been decreasing in Manitoba. The improved management of Rh-immunized pregnancies has lowered the death rate among affected infants from 10.8% to 3.4%, while the prevention of Rh immunization has reduced its incidence from 9.1 to 2.2 per 1000 total births. In its first 6 years and 8 months Manitoba's antenatal prophylaxis program, in which immunoglobulin is administered to Rh-negative women at 28 weeks' gestation, reduced the incidence of Rh immunization during pregnancy by 93%. In combination with post-abortion and postpartum prophylaxis the antenatal treatment has provided a protection rate of 98.6% among primigravidas at risk. Further improvements are expected. PMID:6409390

  9. Immune Exhaustion and Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Fueyo, A; Markmann, J F

    2016-07-01

    Exhaustion of lymphocyte function through chronic exposure to a high load of foreign antigen is well established for chronic viral infection and antitumor immunity and has been found to be associated with a distinct molecular program and characteristic cell surface phenotype. Although exhaustion has most commonly been studied in the context of CD8 viral responses, recent studies indicate that chronic antigen exposure may affect B cells, NK cells and CD4 T cells in a parallel manner. Limited information is available regarding the extent of lymphocyte exhaustion development in the transplant setting and its impact on anti-graft alloreactivity. By analogy to the persistence of a foreign virus, the large mass of alloantigen presented by an allograft in chronic residence could provide an ideal setting for exhausting donor-reactive T cells. The extent of T cell exhaustion occurring with various allografts, the kinetics of its development, whether exhaustion is influenced positively or negatively by different immunosuppressants, and the impact of exhaustion on graft survival and tolerance development remains a fertile area for investigation. Harnessing or encouraging the natural processes of exhaustion may provide a novel means to promote graft survival and transplantation tolerance. PMID:26729653

  10. Immunity to Acanthamoeba.

    PubMed

    Ferrante, A

    1991-01-01

    Human serum contains antibodies, mainly of the IgM and IgG isotypes, to pathogenic species of Acanthamoeba. This, as well as the capacity of these amebas to activate complement via the alternative pathway, may be a first-line defense against acanthamoeba infections in humans. Both antibody and complement appear to be important in promoting recognition of these amebas by phagocytic cells such as neutrophils. However, killing of amebas by neutrophils is dependent on lymphokine/monokine priming of the neutrophil. This priming augments the respiratory-burst activity and release of lysosomal enzymes of neutrophils in their response to the ameba. The products of the oxygen-dependent respiratory burst appear to be of prime importance in the killing of this free-living ameba. Antibodies also may prevent tissue invasion by Acanthamoeba by inhibiting its adherence, phagocytic activity, and migration and by neutralizing cytopathogenic amebic agents. Studies on experimental Acanthamoeba infections in mice showed marked species and strain specificity with regard to induction of protection with amebic antigens. Immune compromise or, alternatively, invasion at unique body sites in healthy individuals may form the basis for human infection with Acanthamoeba. PMID:2047675

  11. Immune responses to improving welfare.

    PubMed

    Berghman, L R

    2016-09-01

    The relationship between animal welfare and the immune status of an animal has a complex nature. Indeed, the intuitive notion that "increased vigilance of the immune system is by definition better" because it is expected to better keep the animal healthy, does not hold up under scrutiny. This is mostly due to the fact that the immune system consists of 2 distinct branches, the innate and the adaptive immune system. While they are intimately intertwined and synergistic in the living organism, they are profoundly different in their costs, both in terms of performance and wellbeing. In contrast to the adaptive immune system, the action of the innate immune system has a high metabolic cost as well as undesirable behavioral consequences. When a pathogen breaches the first line of defense (often a mucosal barrier), that organism's molecular signature is recognized by resident macrophages. The macrophages respond by releasing a cocktail of pro-inflammatory cytokines (including interleukin-1 and -6) that signal the brain via multiple pathways (humoral as well as neural) of the ongoing peripheral innate immune response. The behavioral response to the release of proinflammatory cytokines, known as "sickness behavior," includes nearly all the behavioral aspects that are symptomatic for clinical depression in humans. Hence, undesired innate immune activity, such as chronic inflammation, needs to be avoided by the industry. From an immunological standpoint, one of the most pressing poultry industry needs is the refinement of our current veterinary vaccine arsenal. The response to a vaccine, especially to a live attenuated vaccine, is often a combination of innate and adaptive immune activities, and the desired immunogenicity comes at the price of high reactogenicity. The morbidity, albeit limited and transient, caused by live vaccines against respiratory diseases and coccidiosis are good examples. Thankfully, the advent of various post-genomics technologies, such as DNA

  12. Mesenchymal stem cells: immune evasive, not immune privileged

    PubMed Central

    Ankrum, James A.; Ong, Joon Faii; Karp, Jeffrey M.

    2014-01-01

    The diverse immunomodulatory properties of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) may be exploited for treatment of a multitude of inflammatory conditions. MSCs have long been reported to be hypoimmunogenic or ‘immune privileged’; this property is thought to enable MSC transplantation across major histocompatibility barriers and the creation of off-the-shelf therapies consisting of MSCs grown in culture. However, recent studies describing generation of antibodies against and immune rejection of allogeneic donor MSCs suggest that MSCs may not actually be immune privileged. Nevertheless, whether rejection of donor MSCs influences the efficacy of allogeneic MSC therapies is not known, and no definitive clinical advantage of autologous MSCs over allogeneic MSCs has been demonstrated to date. Although MSCs may exert therapeutic function through a brief ‘hit and run’ mechanism, protecting MSCs from immune detection and prolonging their persistence in vivo may improve clinical outcomes and prevent patient sensitization toward donor antigens. PMID:24561556

  13. Precision Immunization: NASA Studies Immune Response to Flu Vaccine

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Human Research Program Twins Study investigator Emmanuel Mignot, M.D., Ph.D, known for discovering the cause of narcolepsy is related to the immune system, is studying twin astronauts Scott an...

  14. Immune Dysfunction in Aged Horses.

    PubMed

    McFarlane, Dianne

    2016-08-01

    The aging process in people is associated with changes in adaptive and innate immune responses. Similar changes occur in aged horses. Age-related progressive impairment in the ability to respond to pathogen challenge and an increased inflammatory reactivity may predispose geriatric horses to many diseases of old age. Specific recommendations for immune modification of older horses, including an age-appropriate vaccination schedule, are not currently available. In addition, the effect of old age on risk of infectious disease is poorly documented. More work is needed to better understand the interactions of age on immunity, vaccine response, and disease risk in horses. PMID:27329495

  15. Immune modulation following immunization with polyvalent vaccines in dogs.

    PubMed

    Strasser, Alois; May, Bettina; Teltscher, Andrea; Wistrela, Eva; Niedermüller, Hans

    2003-08-15

    A decline in T-cell-mediated immunity and transient state of immunosuppression after immunization has been reported in dogs. Nevertheless, dogs are still routinely vaccinated with polyvalent live vaccines and severe disease does not generally occur. In order to investigate these effects on the canine immune system and to elucidate possible mechanisms we determined the following immune parameters in the blood of 33 clinically sound German shepherd dogs before and after standard vaccination with a polyvalent vaccine against distemper, parvovirus, viral hepatitis, leptospirosis, kennel cough and rabies: white and differential blood cell count, the serum concentrations and/or activities of IL-1, IL-2, IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, neopterin and IgG, natural killer (NK) cell activity, bactericidal activity and complement hemolytic activity, lymphocyte proliferation test (LPT) and nitroblue tetrazolium test (NBT). Our major findings were that significant postvaccinal decreases in T-cell mitogenic response to PHA and in neutrophil function and neopterin serum concentration were accompanied by simultaneous increase in plasma IgG and hemolytic complement activity. This suggests a transient shift in the balance between cell-mediated and humoral (T(H)1/T(H)2) immunity rather than immunosuppression. These results do not imply that dogs should not receive live vaccines, as the response to vaccines just seems to create a state of altered homeostasis when immunization elicits protection by humoral and cell-mediated immunity. However, these recognized compromises of immune function should be considered and vaccines still be applied only in healthy animals and strictly according to the rules and regulations given by the manufacturer. PMID:12909408

  16. Social immunity in honey bees (Apis mellifera): transcriptome analysis of varroa-hygienic behaviour

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Honey bees tend to have a reduced number of immune genes compared to solitary insects. They actually developed an alternative collective defence consisting in the cooperation of individuals to decrease disease development. We identified a set of genes involved in this social immunity by comparing br...

  17. Immunization Uptake in Younger Siblings of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuwaik, Ghassan Abu; Roberts, Wendy; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Bryson, Susan; Smith, Isabel M.; Szatmari, Peter; Modi, Bonnie M.; Tanel, Nadia; Brian, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    Background: Parental concerns persist that immunization increases the risk of autism spectrum disorder, resulting in the potential for reduced uptake by parents of younger siblings of children with autism spectrum disorder ("younger sibs"). Objective: To compare immunization uptake by parents for their younger child relative to their…

  18. Are there Economic Advantages for the Use of Immune Enhancer Strategies in Aquaculture?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper focuses on the perception that immune enhancer strategies provide reduced disease incidence, drug residues and increased growth performance. Disease control and growth performance results are inconsistent on the use of immune enhancers in both experimental and field trials. The uncertain...

  19. Exercise, Immunity, and Susceptibility to Infection: A J-Shaped Relationship?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shephard, Roy J.; Shek, Pang N.

    1999-01-01

    Epidemiologic data suggest that regular moderate exercise boosts immunity, but intense training may reduce it. Objective data do not clearly show a J-shaped relationship between exercise and immune function. Nutritional, hygienic, exercise, environmental, and pharmacologic strategies can minimize risks of infection. Practical measures to reduce…

  20. Modulation of immune responses in stress by Yoga

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Sarika; Bhattacharjee, Jayashree

    2008-01-01

    Stress is a constant factor in today's fastpaced life that can jeopardize our health if left unchecked. It is only in the last half century that the role of stress in every ailment from the common cold to AIDS has been emphasized, and the mechanisms involved in this process have been studied. Stress influences the immune response presumably through the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal axis, hypothalamic pituitary-gonadal axis, and the sympathetic-adrenal-medullary system. Various neurotransmitters, neuropeptides, hormones, and cytokines mediate these complex bidirectional interactions between the central nervous system (CNS) and the immune system. The effects of stress on the immune responses result in alterations in the number of immune cells and cytokine dysregulation. Various stress management strategies such as meditation, yoga, hypnosis, and muscle relaxation have been shown to reduce the psychological and physiological effects of stress in cancers and HIV infection. This review aims to discuss the effect of stress on the immune system and examine how relaxation techniques such as Yoga and meditation could regulate the cytokine levels and hence, the immune responses during stress. PMID:21829284

  1. Mating triggers dynamic immune regulations in wood ant queens.

    PubMed

    Castella, G; Christe, P; Chapuisat, M

    2009-03-01

    Mating can affect female immunity in multiple ways. On the one hand, the immune system may be activated by pathogens transmitted during mating, sperm and seminal proteins, or wounds inflicted by males. On the other hand, immune defences may also be down-regulated to reallocate resources to reproduction. Ants are interesting models to study post-mating immune regulation because queens mate early in life, store sperm for many years, and use it until their death many years later, while males typically die after mating. This long-term commitment between queens and their mates limits the opportunity for sexual conflict but raises the new constraint of long-term sperm survival. In this study, we examine experimentally the effect of mating on immunity in wood ant queens. Specifically, we compared the phenoloxidase and antibacterial activities of mated and virgin Formica paralugubris queens. Queens had reduced levels of active phenoloxidase after mating, but elevated antibacterial activity 7 days after mating. These results indicate that the process of mating, dealation and ovary activation triggers dynamic patterns of immune regulation in ant queens that probably reflect functional responses to mating and pathogen exposure that are independent of sexual conflict. PMID:19170815

  2. High altitude impairs in vivo immunity in humans.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Samuel J; Macdonald, Jamie H; Harper Smith, Adam D; Lawley, Justin S; Gallagher, Carla A; Di Felice, Umberto; Walsh, Neil P

    2013-06-01

    The aim was to assess the effect of high altitude on the development of new immune memory (induction) using a contact sensitization model of in vivo immunity. We hypothesized that high-altitude exposure would impair induction of the in vivo immune response to a novel antigen, diphenylcyclopropenone (DPCP). DPCP was applied (sensitization) to the lower back of 27 rested controls at sea level and to ten rested mountaineers 28 hours after passive ascent to 3777 m. After sensitization, mountaineers avoided strenuous exercise for a further 24 hours, after which they completed alpine activities for 11-18 days. Exactly 4 weeks after sensitization, the strength of immune memory induction was quantified in rested mountaineers and controls at sea level, by measuring the response to a low, dose-series DPCP challenge, read at 48 hours as skin measures of edema (skinfold thickness) and redness (erythema). Compared with control responses, skinfold thickness and erythema were reduced in the mountaineers (skinfold thickness,-52%, p=0.01, d=0.86; erythema, -36%, p=0.02, d=0.77). These changes in skinfold thickness and erythema were related to arterial oxygen saturation (r=0.7, p=0.04), but not cortisol (r<0.1, p>0.79), at sensitization. In conclusion, this is the first study to show, using a contact sensitization model of in vivo immunity, that high altitude exposure impairs the development of new immunity in humans. PMID:23795734

  3. Nutritional support to maintain proper immune status during intense training.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Prolonged exercise and heavy training are associated with depressed immune function which can increase the risk of picking up minor infections. To maintain robust immunity, athletes should eat a well-balanced diet sufficient to meet their energy, carbohydrate, protein, and micronutrient requirements. Dietary deficiencies of protein and specific micronutrients have long been associated with immune dysfunction and an adequate intake of iron, zinc, and vitamins A, D, E, B6 and B12 is particularly important in the maintenance of immune function. Consuming carbohydrate during prolonged strenuous exercise attenuates rises in stress hormones and appears to limit the degree of exercise-induced immune depression. Similar effects can be seen with daily ingestion of high-dose antioxidant vitamin supplements, though concerns have been expressed that excessive antioxidant intake may impair exercise training adaptations. It is safe to say with reasonable confidence that individual amino acids, colostrum, Echinacea, and zinc are unlikely to boost immunity or reduce infection risk in athletes. The ingestion of carbohydrate during exercise and daily consumption of probiotic and plant polyphenol (e.g. quercetin)-containing supplements or foodstuffs (e.g. non-alcoholic beer) currently offer the best chance of success. This approach is likely to be most effective for individuals who are particularly prone to illness. PMID:23765353

  4. Transplantation Immunity in the Isologous Mouse Radiation Chimaera

    PubMed Central

    Bridges, J. B.; Loutit, J. F.; Micklem, H. S.

    1960-01-01

    The survival of skin homo- and heterografts on isologous CBA mouse chimaeras has been investigated. Homografts usually persist for considerably longer than on normal unirradiated mice. Immunization of the host against the appropriate foreign antigens before irradiation neither reduces nor increases the duration of this persistence. When an irradiated non-immune host is restored with bone marrow from an immunized donor, a measure of immunity is transferred. If adult spleen cells from normal or immunized donors are added to the restorative inoculum, strongly antigenic foreign skins are shed with something like normal rapidity, but weakly antigenic skins may be retained for 100 days or more, and even indefinitely. Heterografts do not enjoy a span of survival comparable with that of homografts. These findings are discussed, and it is concluded that two factors are of importance in the prolongation of graft survival: (1) A weakening of the mechanism by which antigens are recognized as foreign, (2) an overall central depression of the immune response. ImagesPLATE IPLATE IIPLATE III PMID:13804388

  5. Zinc and its role in immunity and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Bonaventura, Paola; Benedetti, Giulia; Albarède, Francis; Miossec, Pierre

    2015-04-01

    Zinc (Zn) nutritional importance has been known for a long time, but in the last decades its importance in immune modulation has arisen. This review aims at describing the mechanisms involved in the regulation of Zn homeostasis and their effects on the immune response focusing on those which are implicated in the physiopathology of rheumatoid arthritis. Zn functions as a modulator of the immune response through its availability, which is tightly regulated by several transporters and regulators. When this mechanism is disturbed, Zn availability is reduced, altering survival, proliferation and differentiation of the cells of different organs and systems and, in particular, cells of the immune system. Zn deficiency affects cells involved in both innate and adaptive immunity at the survival, proliferation and maturation levels. These cells include monocytes, polymorphonuclear-, natural killer-, T-, and B-cells. T cell functions and the balance between the different T helper cell subsets are particularly susceptible to changes in Zn status. While acute Zn deficiency causes a decrease in innate and adaptive immunity, chronic deficiency increases inflammation. During chronic deficiency, the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines increases, influencing the outcome of a large number of inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:25462582

  6. Innate Immunity to Adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Hendrickx, Rodinde; Stichling, Nicole; Koelen, Jorien; Kuryk, Lukasz; Lipiec, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Human adenoviruses are the most widely used vectors in gene medicine, with applications ranging from oncolytic therapies to vaccinations, but adenovirus vectors are not without side effects. In addition, natural adenoviruses pose severe risks for immunocompromised people, yet infections are usually mild and self-limiting in immunocompetent individuals. Here we describe how adenoviruses are recognized by the host innate defense system during entry and replication in immune and nonimmune cells. Innate defense protects the host and represents a major barrier to using adenoviruses as therapeutic interventions in humans. Innate response against adenoviruses involves intrinsic factors present at constant levels, and innate factors mounted by the host cell upon viral challenge. These factors exert antiviral effects by directly binding to viruses or viral components, or shield the virus, for example, soluble factors, such as blood clotting components, the complement system, preexisting immunoglobulins, or defensins. In addition, Toll-like receptors and lectins in the plasma membrane and endosomes are intrinsic factors against adenoviruses. Important innate factors restricting adenovirus in the cytosol are tripartite motif-containing proteins, nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like inflammatory receptors, and DNA sensors triggering interferon, such as DEAD (Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp) box polypeptide 41 and cyclic guanosine monophosphate–adenosine monophosphate synthase. Adenovirus tunes the function of antiviral autophagy, and counters innate defense by virtue of its early proteins E1A, E1B, E3, and E4 and two virus-associated noncoding RNAs VA-I and VA-II. We conclude by discussing strategies to engineer adenovirus vectors with attenuated innate responses and enhanced delivery features. PMID:24512150

  7. Immune Infiltration and Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Strasner, Amy; Karin, Michael

    2015-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that inflammation influences prostate cancer (PCa) development and that immune cells are among the primary drivers of this effect. This information has launched numerous clinical trials testing immunotherapy drugs in PCa patients. The results of these studies are promising but have yet to generate a complete response. Importantly, the precise immune profile that determines clinical outcome remains unresolved. Individual immune cell types are divided into various functional subsets whose effects on tumor development may differ depending on their particular phenotype and functional status, which is often shaped by the tumor microenvironment. Thus, this review aims to examine the current knowledge regarding the role of inflammation and specific immune cell types in mediating PCa progression to assist in directing and optimizing immunotherapy targets, regimens, and responses and to uncover areas in which further research is needed. Finally, a summary of ongoing immunotherapy clinical trials in PCa is provided. PMID:26217583

  8. Synthetic vaccines: Immunity without harm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, Abhinav P.; Murthy, Niren

    2011-03-01

    Multilamellar lipid vesicles with crosslinked walls carrying protein antigens in the vesicle core and immunostimulatory drugs in the vesicle walls generate immune responses comparable to the strongest live vector vaccines.

  9. High noise immunity one shot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaffer, G. L.

    1972-01-01

    Multivibrator circuit, which includes constant current source, isolates line noise from timing circuitry and field effect transistor controls circuit's operational modes. Circuit has high immunity to supply line noise.

  10. Primer on the Immune System.

    PubMed

    Spiering, Martin J

    2015-01-01

    The human body regularly encounters and combats many pathogenic organisms and toxic molecules. Its ensuing responses to these disease-causing agents involve two interrelated systems: innate immunity and adaptive (or acquired) immunity. Innate immunity is active at several levels, both at potential points of entry and inside the body (see figure). For example, the skin represents a physical barrier preventing pathogens from invading internal tissues. Digestive enzymes destroy microbes that enter the stomach with food. Macrophages and lymphocytes, equipped with molecular detectors, such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs), which latch onto foreign structures and activate cellular defenses, patrol the inside of the body. These immune cells sense and devour microbes, damaged cells, and other foreign materials in the body. Certain proteins in the blood (such as proteins of the complement system and those released by natural killer cells, along with antimicrobial host-defense peptides) attach to foreign organisms and toxins to initiate their destruction. PMID:26695756

  11. Immune Modulation by Volatile Anesthetics.

    PubMed

    Stollings, Lindsay M; Jia, Li-Jie; Tang, Pei; Dou, Huanyu; Lu, Binfeng; Xu, Yan

    2016-08-01

    Volatile general anesthetics continue to be an important part of clinical anesthesia worldwide. The impact of volatile anesthetics on the immune system has been investigated at both mechanistic and clinical levels, but previous studies have returned conflicting findings due to varied protocols, experimental environments, and subject species. While many of these studies have focused on the immunosuppressive effects of volatile anesthetics, compelling evidence also exists for immunoactivation. Depending on the clinical conditions, immunosuppression and activation due to volatile anesthetics can be either detrimental or beneficial. This review provides a balanced perspective on the anesthetic modulation of innate and adaptive immune responses as well as indirect effectors of immunity. Potential mechanisms of immunomodulation by volatile anesthetics are also discussed. A clearer understanding of these issues will pave the way for clinical guidelines that better account for the impact of volatile anesthetics on the immune system, with the ultimate goal of improving perioperative management. PMID:27286478

  12. Harnessing nanoparticles for immune modulation

    PubMed Central

    Getts, Daniel R.; Shea, Lonnie D; Miller, Stephen D.; King, Nicholas J.C.

    2015-01-01

    Recent approaches using nanoparticles engineered for immune regulation have yielded promising results in preclinical models of disease. The number of nanoparticle therapies is growing, fueled by innovations in nanotechnology and advances in understanding of the underlying pathogenesis of immune-mediated diseases. In particular, recent mechanistic insight into the ways in which nanoparticles interact with the mononuclear phagocyte system and impact its function during homeostasis and inflammation have highlighted the potential of nanoparticle-based therapies for controlling severe inflammation while concurrently restoring peripheral immune tolerance in autoimmune disease. Here we review recent advances in nanoparticle-based approaches aimed at immune-modulation, and discuss these in the context of concepts in polymeric nanoparticle development, including particle modification, delivery and the factors associated with successful clinical deployment. PMID:26088391

  13. Genetics Home Reference: immune thrombocytopenia

    MedlinePlus

    ... develop frequent bruising or red or purple spots (purpura) on the skin caused by bleeding just under ... of immune thrombocytopenia: Genetic Testing Registry: Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura Johns Hopkins Medicine MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura ( ...

  14. Frequently Asked Questions about Immunizations

    MedlinePlus

    ... the most current information. Do immunizations cause SIDS, multiple sclerosis, or other problems? There are concerns, many of ... circulate on the Internet, linking some vaccines to multiple sclerosis, sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) , and other problems. ...

  15. Hypo-gravity and immune system effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Paul D.; Barnes, Frank

    1990-01-01

    Recent studies on the effects of hypo-gravity on astronauts have shown depressed response of the immune system component cells (e.g. T-lymphocytes activity) and associated bone-mass loss due to demineralization. The widespread use of various electrical stimulation techniques in fracture repair and bone growth make use of the inherent piezoelectric and streaming potentials in Ca(2++) depositation. In-vitro and in-vivo experiments were designed to determine if these potentials, absent or greatly reduced in space, could be artificially enhanced to advantageously effect the bone marrow and, consequently, immune system cells. The bone marrow plays an extremely important role in the development and maturation of all blood cells and, specifically, T- and B-lymphocytes. It is our belief that simulated E-fields will enhance this development when 'ambient' physiological fields are absent during spaceflight or extended bedrest. Our investigation began with a look at the component immune system cells and their growth patterns in vitro. The first chamber will induce E-fields by current densities produced from an agar-bridge electrode arrangement. The cells are immersed in a nutrient agar and isolated from the electrodes by an agar bridge to prevent electrolytic contamination. The second chamber induces current densities by mutual induction from a magnetic field produced by a solenoid coil. Cells are isolated in a small radial area to reduce (1/r) effects and for accurate field calculations. We anticipate inducing currents in the nano- and microampere range as indicated by our calculations of physiological fields.

  16. NEW CONCEPTS OF IMMUNE MODULATION IN XENOTRANSPLANTATION

    PubMed Central

    Satyananda, Vikas; Hara, Hidetaka; Ezzelarab, Mohamed B.; Phelps, Carol; Ayares, David; Cooper, David K.C.

    2013-01-01

    The shortage of human organs for transplantation has focused research on the possibility of transplanting pig organs into humans. Many factors contribute to the failure of a pig organ graft in a primate. A rapid innate immune response (natural anti-pig antibody, complement activation, and an innate cellular response, e.g., neutrophils, monocytes, macrophages, NK cells) is followed by an adaptive immune response, although T cell infiltration of the graft has rarely been reported. Other factors (e.g., coagulation dysregulation, inflammation) appear to play a significantly greater role than in allotransplantation. The immune responses to a pig xenograft cannot therefore be controlled simply by suppression of T cell activity. Before xenotransplantation can be introduced successfully into the clinic, the problems of the innate, coagulopathic, and inflammatory responses will have to be overcome, most likely by the transplantation of organs from genetically-engineered pigs. Many of the genetic manipulations aimed at protecting against these responses also reduce the adaptive response. The T cell and elicited antibody responses can be prevented by the biologic and/or pharmacologic agents currently available, in particular, by costimulation blockade-based regimens. The exogenous immunosuppressive regimen may be significantly reduced by the presence of a graft from a pig transgenic for a mutant (human) class II transactivator gene, resulting in downregulation of SLA class II expression, or from a pig with ‘local’ vascular endothelial cell expression of an immunosuppressive gene, e.g., CTLA4-Ig. The immunomodulatory efficacy of regulatory T cells or mesenchymal stromal cells has been demonstrated in vitro, but not yet in vivo. PMID:23851935

  17. Physiology of the Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Denburg, J. A.; Bienenstock, J.

    1979-01-01

    The established mechanisms of immune responsiveness to foreign or self components are reviewed, with particular reference to relevant clinical problems and current research. A multitiered immunological system of cellular and subcellular elements are involved when the body deals with perturbations from without or within. The concept exists that a delicate balance between positive ('helper') and negative ('suppressor') forces is essential to maintaining health. Brief discussion is given to diagnosis of immune abnormalities in the light of these facts. PMID:21297689

  18. Portable Immune-Assessment System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane L.; Stowe, Raymond P.; Mishra, Saroj K.

    1995-01-01

    Portable immune-assessment system developed for use in rapidly identifying infections or contaminated environment. System combines few specific fluorescent reagents for identifying immune-cell dysfunction, toxic substances, buildup of microbial antigens or microbial growth, and potential identification of pathogenic microorganisms using fluorescent microplate reader linked to laptop computer. By using few specific dyes for cell metabolism, DNA/RNA conjugation, specific enzyme activity, or cell constituents, one makes immediate, onsite determination of person's health or of contamination of environment.

  19. Nutritionally Mediated Programming of the Developing Immune System12

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Amanda C.

    2011-01-01

    A growing body of evidence highlights the importance of a mother’s nutrition from preconception through lactation in programming the emerging organ systems and homeostatic pathways of her offspring. The developing immune system may be particularly vulnerable. Indeed, examples of nutrition-mediated immune programming can be found in the literature on intra-uterine growth retardation, maternal micronutrient deficiencies, and infant feeding. Current models of immune ontogeny depict a “layered” expansion of increasingly complex defenses, which may be permanently altered by maternal malnutrition. One programming mechanism involves activation of the maternal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in response to nutritional stress. Fetal or neonatal exposure to elevated stress hormones is linked in animal studies to permanent changes in neuroendocrine-immune interactions, with diverse manifestations such as an attenuated inflammatory response or reduced resistance to tumor colonization. Maternal malnutrition may also have a direct influence, as evidenced by nutrient-driven epigenetic changes to developing T regulatory cells and subsequent risk of allergy or asthma. A 3rd programming pathway involves placental or breast milk transfer of maternal immune factors with immunomodulatory functions (e.g. cytokines). Maternal malnutrition can directly affect transfer mechanisms or influence the quality or quantity of transferred factors. The public health implications of nutrition-mediated immune programming are of particular importance in the developing world, where prevalent maternal undernutrition is coupled with persistent infectious challenges. However, early alterations to the immune system, resulting from either nutritional deficiencies or excesses, have broad relevance for immune-mediated diseases, such as asthma, and chronic inflammatory conditions like cardiovascular disease. PMID:22332080

  20. Eliminating Encephalitogenic T Cells without Undermining Protective Immunity

    PubMed Central

    McNally, Jonathan P.; Elfers, Eileen E.; Terrell, Catherine E.; Grunblatt, Eli; Hildeman, David A.

    2014-01-01

    The current clinical approach for treating autoimmune diseases is to broadly blunt immune responses as a means of preventing autoimmune pathology. Among the major side effects of this strategy are depressed beneficial immunity and increased rates of infections and tumors. Using the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis model for human multiple sclerosis, we report a novel alternative approach for purging autoreactive T cells that spares beneficial immunity. The moderate and temporally limited use of etoposide, a topoisomerase inhibitor, to eliminate encephalitogenic T cells significantly reduces the onset and severity of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, dampens cytokine production and overall pathology, while dramatically limiting the off-target effects on naive and memory adaptive immunity. Etoposide-treated mice show no or significantly ameliorated pathology with reduced antigenic spread, yet have normal T cell and T-dependent B cell responses to de novo antigenic challenges as well as unimpaired memory T cell responses to viral rechallenge. Thus, etoposide therapy can selectively ablate effector T cells and limit pathology in an animal model of autoimmunity while sparing protective immune responses. This strategy could lead to novel approaches for the treatment of autoimmune diseases with both enhanced efficacy and decreased treatment-associated morbidities. PMID:24277699

  1. Immunization and private sector participation.

    PubMed

    1998-10-01

    Representatives from Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, and Panama met August 19-20 in Honduras to discuss promoting and strengthening the participation of the private medical sector in immunization and surveillance programs for vaccine-preventable diseases. Participants met to analyze countries' experiences in incorporating the private medical sector into immunization and surveillance activities for vaccine-preventable diseases; to review regional and global goals for vaccine-preventable diseases, cold chain requirements, and issues related to introducing new vaccines into routine immunization schedules; and to sign agreements to facilitate the incorporation of the private medical sector into immunization and surveillance activities in the region. Country experiences are outlined. The Ministries of Health and the Societies/Associations of Pediatrics established specific objectives designed to develop and/or strengthen private medical sector participation in immunization. Agreements reached on epidemiological surveillance, a basic vaccination schedule, quality vaccines, the cold chain, national committees on immunization practices, annual work plans, technical cooperation, monitoring, and information, education, and promotion are described. PMID:12321836

  2. Pathobiology of secondary immune thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Cines, Douglas B.; Liebman, Howard; Stasi, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    Primary immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) remains a diagnosis of exclusion both from nonimmune causes of thrombocytopenia and immune thrombocytopenia that develops in the context of other disorders (secondary immune thrombocytopenia). The pathobiology, natural history, and response to therapy of the diverse causes of secondary ITP differ from each other and from primary ITP, so accurate diagnosis is essential. Immune thrombocytopenia can be secondary to medications or to a concurrent disease, such as an autoimmune condition (eg, systemic lupus erythematosus [SLE], antiphospholipid antibody syndrome [APS], immune thyroid disease, or Evans syndrome), a lymphoproliferative disease (eg, chronic lymphocytic leukemia or large granular T-lymphocyte lymphocytic leukemia), or chronic infection, eg, with Helicobacter pylori, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), or hepatitis C virus (HCV). Response to infection may generate antibodies that cross-react with platelet antigens (HIV, H pylori) or immune complexes that bind to platelet Fcγ receptors (HCV) and platelet production may be impaired by infection of megakaryocyte bone marrow-dependent progenitor cells (HCV and HIV), decreased production of thrombopoietin (TPO), and splenic sequestration of platelets secondary to portal hypertension (HCV). Sudden and severe onset of thrombocytopenia has been observed in children after vaccination for measles, mumps, and rubella or natural viral infections, including Epstein-Barr virus, cytomegalovirus, and varicella zoster virus. This thrombocytopenia may be caused by cross-reacting antibodies and closely mimics acute ITP of childhood. Proper diagnosis and treatment of the underlying disorder, where necessary, play an important role in patient management. PMID:19245930

  3. How to give an immunization.

    PubMed

    1986-07-01

    This article provides information on the 6 major childhood immunizations and the 3 basic types of injections (intradermal, subcutaneous, and intramuscular). The Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI) has recommended the following vaccination schedule: birth, Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG), oral polio; 6 weeks, diphtheria-pertussis-tetanus (DPT), oral polio; 10 weeks, DPT, oral polio; 14 weeks, DPT, oral polio; and 9 months, measles. The timing of immunization is crucial. DPT and measles vaccines may be ineffective if administered too early since maternal antibodies block new immune response; however, the longer the time between the wearing off of maternal protection and vaccination, the longer the unprotected exposure to disease. 3.5 million children in the Third World die each year from the 6 childhood diseases against which immunization provides protection. Of the 90 million 1-year-olds in January 1986, only 18% had received injections against measles, 38% had received DPT injections, and 34% had received oral polio vacine. The EPI is endeavoring to achieve the goal of universal child immunization by 1990. PMID:12314495

  4. Gut immunity in Lepidopteran insects.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kai; Yang, Bing; Huang, Wuren; Dobens, Leonard; Song, Hongsheng; Ling, Erjun

    2016-11-01

    Lepidopteran insects constitute one of the largest fractions of animals on earth, but are considered pests in their relationship with man. Key to the success of this order of insects is its ability to digest food and absorb nutrition, which takes place in the midgut. Because environmental microorganisms can easily enter Lepidopteran guts during feeding, the innate immune response guards against pathogenic bacteria, virus and microsporidia that can be devoured with food. Gut immune responses are complicated by both resident gut microbiota and the surrounding peritrophic membrane and are distinct from immune responses in the body cavity, which depend on the function of the fat body and hemocytes. Due to their relevance to agricultural production, studies of Lepidopteran insect midgut and immunity are receiving more attention, and here we summarize gut structures and functions, and discuss how these confer immunity against different microorganisms. It is expected that increased knowledge of Lepidopteran gut immunity may be utilized for pest biological control in the future. PMID:26872544

  5. Immunization and epidemic threshold of an SIS model in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qingchu; Fu, Xinchu

    2016-02-01

    We propose an improved mean-field model to investigate immunization strategies of an SIS model in complex networks. Unlike the traditional mean-field approach, the improved model utilizes the degree information of before and after the immunization. The epidemic threshold of degree-correlated networks can be obtained by linear stability analysis. For degree-uncorrelated networks, the model is reduced to the SIS epidemic model in networks after removing the immunized nodes. Compared to the previous results of random and targeted immunization schemes on degree-uncorrelated networks, we find that the infectious disease has a lower epidemic threshold.

  6. Alternative adaptive immunity strategies: coelacanth, cod and shark immunity.

    PubMed

    Buonocore, Francesco; Gerdol, Marco

    2016-01-01

    The advent of high throughput sequencing has permitted to investigate the genome and the transcriptome of novel non-model species with unprecedented depth. This technological advance provided a better understanding of the evolution of adaptive immune genes in gnathostomes, revealing several unexpected features in different fish species which are of particular interest. In the present paper, we review the current understanding of the adaptive immune system of the coelacanth, the elephant shark and the Atlantic cod. The study of coelacanth, the only living extant of the long thought to be extinct Sarcopterygian lineage, is fundamental to bring new insights on the evolution of the immune system in higher vertebrates. Surprisingly, coelacanths are the only known jawed vertebrates to lack IgM, whereas two IgD/W loci are present. Cartilaginous fish are of great interest due to their basal position in the vertebrate tree of life; the genome of the elephant shark revealed the lack of several important immune genes related to T cell functions, which suggest the existence of a primordial set of TH1-like cells. Finally, the Atlantic cod lacks a functional major histocompatibility II complex, but balances this evolutionary loss with the expansion of specific gene families, including MHC I, Toll-like receptors and antimicrobial peptides. Overall, these data point out that several fish species present an unconventional adaptive immune system, but the loss of important immune genes is balanced by adaptive evolutionary strategies which still guarantee the establishment of an efficient immune response against the pathogens they have to fight during their life. PMID:26423359

  7. Cell-mediated immunity in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed Central

    Cason, J; Ainley, C C; Wolstencroft, R A; Norton, K R; Thompson, R P

    1986-01-01

    Twelve patients with anorexia nervosa were studied for cell-mediated immunity in terms of delayed hypersensitivity reactions to recall antigens, lymphocyte transformation responses to T-cell mitogens, and numbers of circulating leucocytes and T-cell subpopulations. Compared to controls, all patients had reduced cutaneous reactions and four were anergic. There was a mild leucopenia in patients and both T4+ and T3+ numbers were slightly reduced. Mean peak transformation responses for patients were slightly lower than controls for phytohaemagglutinin, but not for concanavalin A; however, patients required greater doses of mitogens to elicit peak transformation responses. Plasmas from patients did not contain inhibitors of transformation responses. We conclude that there are functional cellular abnormalities associated with the under-nutrition of anorexia nervosa. PMID:3742879

  8. Immunization of mice against encephalomyocarditis virus. II. Intraperitoneal and respiratory immunization with ultraviolet-inactivated vaccine: effect of Bordetella pertussis extract on the immune response.

    PubMed

    Bogaerts, W J; Durville-van der Oord

    1972-10-01

    Mice were immunized by intraperitoneal (ip) or respiratory administration of ultraviolet-inactivated virus alone or with Bordetella pertussis extract (BPE) as an adjuvant. The effect of immunization was tested by determination of antibody titers and by survival of a lethal challenge with 200 LD(50) of a virulent (large-plaque variant) strain of EMC virus. For plain vaccine the ip 50% effective dose (ED(50)) was 37 hemagglutination units (HAU; ca. 4 x 10(6) plaque-forming unit equivalents); with adjuvant the ip ED(50) was reduced to 20 HAU. After respiratory immunization by intratracheal injection, an ED(50) value of 100 HAU was found, which was not affected by BPE. After ip vaccination the primary immune response was enhanced by BPE, but the challenge response, measured 3 weeks after challenge, was unaffected. Respiratory immunization induced a primary response which was not influenced by BPE, but here the challenge response was enhanced by the adjuvant. After secondary treatment (challenge or booster vaccination) serum antibodies and protection against challenge persisted for at least 1 year. PMID:4344027

  9. Immunization: a key to primary health care.

    PubMed

    1983-01-01

    Focus of this discussion is on some of the problems enountered by national immunization programs and on the technology that is available now or that will be in the near future to help solve these problems. 4 basic aspects of immunization services are examined: the safety, effectiveness, and stability of vaccines; the cold chain, i.e., the transportation, storage, and handling of heat-sensitives vaccines from manufacturer to health worker in the field; vaccination equipment and sterilization for correct administration of immunization; and program management--schedules, records, training, resource allocation. The section devoted to vaccines focuses on immunization against 6 of (diphtheria, whooping cough, tetanus, measles, polio, and tuberculosis) against 6 of the major killers of children in developing countries: BCG, DPT (diphtheria-pertussis-tetanus), measles and poli vaccines, and tetanus toxiod. The bacillus of Calmette and Guerline (BCG) is considered a very safe vaccine. Questions about the effectiveness of BCG in preventing tuberculosis have been raised throughout its 60-year history. Different studies have produced conflicting results, some showing BCG to be highly effective and others showing no positive effect. Diphtheria toxioid, a very safe and relatively stable vaccine, is very effective in protecting against the development of diphtheria. Live attenuated measles virus vaccine is a safe, highly effective vaccine, but it requires careful handling and storage to prevent damage due to excessive heat or light exposure. The vaccine used for pertussis (whooping cough) is a saline suspension of killed Bordetella pertussis bacteria. The vaccine usually is administered as part of the triple DPT vaccine. Concerns about its safety have led to greatly reduced levels of use in some European countries in recent years. Its effectiveness also has been questioned. 2 types of polio vaccine are available: a live, attenuated vaccine given orally (Sabin) and a killed or

  10. Has innate immunity evolved through different routes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parrinello, Nicolò

    2010-03-01

    Invertebrate self/non-self recognition, defense responses, mating and development share innate immune surveillance and functions challenged by competition and linked to fitness. Independent evolutionary branches of immune responses may use conserved gene traits. On the other hand immunity genes may be conserved due to their role in development. Finally, upregulation of innate immunity genes during ascidian metamorphosis supports the danger hypothesis.

  11. Eicosanoids: Progress Toward Manipulating Insect Immunity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Insect immunity is exclusively innate, lacking the antibody-based adaptive immunity of vertebrates. Innate immunity is a naturally occurring, non-specific system that does not require previous infectious experience. In this essay I describe insect immunity and review the roles of prostaglandins an...

  12. Transfer of Maternal Antimicrobial Immunity to HIV-Exposed Uninfected Newborns

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Raya, Bahaa; Smolen, Kinga K.; Willems, Fabienne; Kollmann, Tobias R.; Marchant, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    The transfer of maternal immune factors to the newborn is critical for protection from infectious disease in early life. Maternally acquired passive immunity provides protection until the infant is beyond early life’s increased susceptibility to severe infections or until active immunity is achieved following infant’s primary immunization. However, as reviewed here, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection alters the transfer of immune factors from HIV-infected mothers to the HIV-exposed newborns and young infants. This may relate to the immune activation in HIV-infected pregnant women, associated with the production of inflammatory cytokines at the maternofetal interface associated with inflammatory responses in the newborn. We also summarize mother-targeting interventions to improve the health of infants born to HIV-infected women, such as immunization during pregnancy and reduction of maternal inflammation. Maternal immunization offers the potential to compensate for the decreased transplacentally transferred maternal antibodies observed in HIV-exposed infants. Current data suggest reduced immunogenicity of vaccines in HIV-infected pregnant women, possibly reducing the protective impact of maternal immunization for HIV-exposed infants. Fortunately, levels of antibodies appear preserved in the breast milk of HIV-infected women, which supports the recommendation to breast-feed during antiretroviral treatment to protect HIV-exposed infants.

  13. Curcumin and tumor immune-editing: resurrecting the immune system.

    PubMed

    Bose, Sayantan; Panda, Abir Kumar; Mukherjee, Shravanti; Sa, Gaurisankar

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin has long been known to posses medicinal properties and recent scientific studies have shown its efficacy in treating cancer. Curcumin is now considered to be a promising anti-cancer agent and studies continue on its molecular mechanism of action. Curcumin has been shown to act in a multi-faceted manner by targeting the classical hallmarks of cancer like sustained proliferation, evasion of apoptosis, sustained angiogenesis, insensitivity to growth inhibitors, tissue invasion and metastasis etc. However, one of the emerging hallmarks of cancer is the avoidance of immune system by tumors. Growing tumors adopt several strategies to escape immune surveillance and successfully develop in the body. In this review we highlight the recent studies that show that curcumin also targets this process and helps restore the immune activity against cancer. Curcumin mediates several processes like restoration of CD4(+)/CD8(+) T cell populations, reversal of type-2 cytokine bias, reduction of Treg cell population and suppression of T cell apoptosis; all these help to resurrect tumor immune surveillance that leads to tumor regression. Thus interaction of curcumin with the immune system is also an important feature of its multi-faceted modes of action against cancer. Finally, we also point out the drawbacks of and difficulties in curcumin administration and indicate the use of nano-formulations of curcumin for better therapeutic efficacy. PMID:26464579

  14. Th1-mediated immunity against Helicobacter pylori can compensate for lack of Th17 cells and can protect mice in the absence of immunization.

    PubMed

    Ding, Hua; Nedrud, John G; Blanchard, Thomas G; Zagorski, Brandon M; Li, Guanghui; Shiu, Jessica; Xu, Jinghua; Czinn, Steven J

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection can be significantly reduced by immunization in mice. Th17 cells play an essential role in the protective immune response. Th1 immunity has also been demonstrated to play a role in the protective immune response and can compensate in the absence of IL-17. To further address the potential of Th1 immunity, we investigated the efficacy of immunization in mice deficient in IL-23p19, a cytokine that promotes Th17 cell development. We also examined the course of Helicobacter infection in unimmunized mice treated with Th1 promoting cytokine IL-12. C57BL/6, IL-12 p35 KO, and IL-23 p19 KO mice were immunized and challenged with H. pylori. Protective immunity was evaluated by CFU determination and QPCR on gastric biopsies. Gastric and splenic IL-17 and IFNγ levels were determined by PCR or by ELISA. Balb/c mice were infected with H. felis and treated with IL-12 therapy and the resulting gastric bacterial load and inflammatory response were assessed by histologic evaluation. Vaccine induced reductions in bacterial load that were comparable to wild type mice were observed in both IL-12 p35 and IL-23 p19 KO mice. In the absence of IL-23 p19, IL-17 levels remained low but IFNγ levels increased significantly in both immunized challenged and unimmunized/challenged mice. Additionally, treatment of H. felis-infected Balb/c mice with IL-12 resulted in increased gastric inflammation and the eradication of bacteria in most mice. These data suggest that Th1 immunity can compensate for the lack of IL-23 mediated Th17 responses, and that protective Th1 immunity can be induced in the absence of immunization through cytokine therapy of the infected host. PMID:23874957

  15. Immunometabolism: Cellular Metabolism Turns Immune Regulator.

    PubMed

    Loftus, Róisín M; Finlay, David K

    2016-01-01

    Immune cells are highly dynamic in terms of their growth, proliferation, and effector functions as they respond to immunological challenges. Different immune cells can adopt distinct metabolic configurations that allow the cell to balance its requirements for energy, molecular biosynthesis, and longevity. However, in addition to facilitating immune cell responses, it is now becoming clear that cellular metabolism has direct roles in regulating immune cell function. This review article describes the distinct metabolic signatures of key immune cells, explains how these metabolic setups facilitate immune function, and discusses the emerging evidence that intracellular metabolism has an integral role in controlling immune responses. PMID:26534957

  16. MMP-25 Metalloprotease Regulates Innate Immune Response through NF-κB Signaling.

    PubMed

    Soria-Valles, Clara; Gutiérrez-Fernández, Ana; Osorio, Fernando G; Carrero, Dido; Ferrando, Adolfo A; Colado, Enrique; Fernández-García, M Soledad; Bonzon-Kulichenko, Elena; Vázquez, Jesús; Fueyo, Antonio; López-Otín, Carlos

    2016-07-01

    Matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) regulate innate immunity acting over proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and other immune-related proteins. MMP-25 (membrane-type 6-MMP) is a membrane-bound enzyme predominantly expressed in leukocytes whose biological function has remained largely unknown. We have generated Mmp25-deficient mice to elucidate the in vivo function of this protease. These mutant mice are viable and fertile and do not show any spontaneous phenotype. However, Mmp25-null mice exhibit a defective innate immune response characterized by low sensitivity to bacterial LPS, hypergammaglobulinemia, and reduced secretion of proinflammatory molecules. Moreover, these immune defects can be tracked to a defective NF-κB activation observed in Mmp25-deficient leukocytes. Globally, our findings provide new mechanistic insights into innate immunity through the activity of MMP-25, suggesting that this proteinase could be a potential therapeutic target for immune-related diseases. PMID:27259858

  17. Seasonal benefits of a natural propolis envelope to honey bee immunity and colony health.

    PubMed

    Borba, Renata S; Klyczek, Karen K; Mogen, Kim L; Spivak, Marla

    2015-11-01

    Honey bees, as social insects, rely on collective behavioral defenses that produce a colony-level immune phenotype, or social immunity, which in turn impacts the immune response of individuals. One behavioral defense is the collection and deposition of antimicrobial plant resins, or propolis, in the nest. We tested the effect of a naturally constructed propolis envelope within standard beekeeping equipment on the pathogen and parasite load of large field colonies, and on immune system activity, virus and storage protein levels of individual bees over the course of a year. The main effect of the propolis envelope was a decreased and more uniform baseline expression of immune genes in bees during summer and autumn months each year, compared with the immune activity in bees with no propolis envelope in the colony. The most important function of the propolis envelope may be to modulate costly immune system activity. As no differences were found in levels of bacteria, pathogens and parasites between the treatment groups, the propolis envelope may act directly on the immune system, reducing the bees' need to activate the physiologically costly production of humoral immune responses. Colonies with a natural propolis envelope had increased colony strength and vitellogenin levels after surviving the winter in one of the two years of the study, despite the fact that the biological activity of the propolis diminished over the winter. A natural propolis envelope acts as an important antimicrobial layer enshrouding the colony, benefiting individual immunity and ultimately colony health. PMID:26449975

  18. Metagenome plasticity of the bovine abomasal microbiota in immune animals in response to Ostertagia ostertagi infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ostertagia ostertagi infections in ruminants result in impaired gastrointestinal function. Partially immune animals were developed after multiple experimental infections. These animals displayed reduced worn burdens and a slightly elevated abomasal pH upon reinfection. In this study, we characterize...

  19. Philippine campaign boosts child immunizations.

    PubMed

    Manuel-santana, R

    1993-03-01

    In 1989, USAID awarded the Philippines a 5-year, US $50 million Child Survival Program targeting improvement in immunization coverage of children, prenatal care coverage for pregnant women, and contraceptive prevalence. Upon successful completion of performance benchmarks at the end of each year, USAID released monies to fund child survival activities for the following year. This program accomplished a major program goal, which was decentralization of health planning. The Philippine Department of Health soon incorporated provincial health planning. The Philippine Department of Health soon incorporated provincial health planning in its determination of allocation of resources. Social marketing activities contributed greatly to success in achieving the goal of boosting the immunization coverage rate for the 6 antigens listed under the Expanded Program for Immunization (51%-85% of infants, 1986-1991). In fact, rural health officers in Tarlac Province in Central Luzon went from household to household to talk to mothers about the benefits of immunizing a 1-year-old child, thereby contributing greatly to their achieving a 95% full immunization coverage rate by December 1991. Social marketing techniques included modern marketing strategies and multimedia channels. They first proved successful in metro Manila which, at the beginning of the campaign, had the lowest immunization rate of all 14 regions. Every Wednesday was designated immunization day and was when rural health centers vaccinated the children. Social marketing also successfully publicized oral rehydration therapy (ORT), breast feeding, and tuberculosis control. Another contributing factor to program success in child survival activities was private sector involvement. For example, the Philippine Pediatric Society helped to promote ORT as the preferred treatment for acute diarrhea. Further, the commercial sector distributed packets of oral rehydration salts and even advertised its own ORT product. At the end of 2

  20. Immune System Disturbances in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Horváth, Szatmár; Mirnics, Károly

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological, genetic, transcriptome, postmortem, peripheral biomarker, and therapeutic studies of schizophrenia all point to a dysregulation of both innate and adaptive immune systems in the disease, and it is likely that these immune changes actively contribute to disease symptoms. Gene expression disturbances in the brain of subjects with schizophrenia show complex, region-specific changes with consistently replicated and potentially interdependent induction of serpin peptidase inhibitor, clade A member 3 (SERPINA3) and interferon inducible transmembrane protein (IFITM) family transcripts in the prefrontal cortex. Recent data suggest that IFITM3 expression is a critical mediator of maternal immune activation. As the IFITM gene family is primarily expressed in the endothelial cells and meninges, and as the meninges play a critical role in interneuron development, we suggest that these two non-neuronal cell populations might play an important role in the disease pathophysiology. Finally, we propose that IFITM3 in particular might be a novel, appealing, knowledge-based drug target for treatment of schizophrenia. Gene*environment interactions play a critical role in the emergence of schizophrenia pathophysiology. Epidemiological, genetic, transcriptome, postmortem, peripheral biomarker, and therapeutic studies of schizophrenia all point to a dysregulation of both innate and adaptive immune systems in the disease (1-3) and it is likely that these immune changes actively contribute to disease symptoms (1, 4, 5). Regardless of the abundance of data obtained to date, our understanding of the mechanism by which the immune system disturbances arise is limited: we do not have a good insight into the origin or sequence of events by which the immune dysregulation develops, and to date we have not taken full advantage of these changes as potential therapeutic targets. PMID:23890736

  1. Trained immunity: A program of innate immune memory in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Netea, Mihai G; Joosten, Leo A B; Latz, Eicke; Mills, Kingston H G; Natoli, Gioacchino; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; O'Neill, Luke A J; Xavier, Ramnik J

    2016-04-22

    The general view that only adaptive immunity can build immunological memory has recently been challenged. In organisms lacking adaptive immunity, as well as in mammals, the innate immune system can mount resistance to reinfection, a phenomenon termed "trained immunity" or "innate immune memory." Trained immunity is orchestrated by epigenetic reprogramming, broadly defined as sustained changes in gene expression and cell physiology that do not involve permanent genetic changes such as mutations and recombination, which are essential for adaptive immunity. The discovery of trained immunity may open the door for novel vaccine approaches, new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of immune deficiency states, and modulation of exaggerated inflammation in autoinflammatory diseases. PMID:27102489

  2. Modulation of Innate Immune Mechanisms to Enhance Leishmania Vaccine-Induced Immunity: Role of Coinhibitory Molecules.

    PubMed

    Gannavaram, Sreenivas; Bhattacharya, Parna; Ismail, Nevien; Kaul, Amit; Singh, Rakesh; Nakhasi, Hira L

    2016-01-01

    No licensed human vaccines are currently available against any parasitic disease including leishmaniasis. Several antileishmanial vaccine formulations have been tested in various animal models, including genetically modified live-attenuated parasite vaccines. Experimental infection studies have shown that Leishmania parasites utilize a broad range of strategies to undermine effector properties of host phagocytic cells, i.e., dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages (MΦ). Furthermore, Leishmania parasites have evolved strategies to actively inhibit TH1 polarizing functions of DCs and to condition the infected MΦ toward anti-inflammatory/alternative/M2 phenotype. The altered phenotype of phagocytic cells is characterized by decreased production of antimicrobial reactive oxygen, nitrogen molecules, and pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as IFN-γ, IL-12, and TNF-α. These early events limit the activation of TH1-effector cells and set the stage for pathogenesis. Furthermore, this early control of innate immunity by the virulent parasites results in substantial alteration in the adaptive immunity characterized by reduced proliferation of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and TH2-biased immunity that results in production of anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as TGF-β, and IL-10. More recent studies have also documented the induction of coinhibitory ligands, such as CTLA-4, PD-L1, CD200, and Tim-3, that induce exhaustion and/or non-proliferation in antigen-experienced T cells. Most of these studies focus on viral infections in chronic phase, thus limiting the direct application of these results to parasitic infections and much less to parasitic vaccines. However, these studies suggest that vaccine-induced protective immunity can be modulated using strategies that enhance the costimulation that might reduce the threshold necessary for T cell activation and conversely by strategies that reduce or block inhibitory molecules, such as PD-L1 and CD200. In this review, we will focus on

  3. Modulation of Innate Immune Mechanisms to Enhance Leishmania Vaccine-Induced Immunity: Role of Coinhibitory Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Gannavaram, Sreenivas; Bhattacharya, Parna; Ismail, Nevien; Kaul, Amit; Singh, Rakesh; Nakhasi, Hira L.

    2016-01-01

    No licensed human vaccines are currently available against any parasitic disease including leishmaniasis. Several antileishmanial vaccine formulations have been tested in various animal models, including genetically modified live-attenuated parasite vaccines. Experimental infection studies have shown that Leishmania parasites utilize a broad range of strategies to undermine effector properties of host phagocytic cells, i.e., dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages (MΦ). Furthermore, Leishmania parasites have evolved strategies to actively inhibit TH1 polarizing functions of DCs and to condition the infected MΦ toward anti-inflammatory/alternative/M2 phenotype. The altered phenotype of phagocytic cells is characterized by decreased production of antimicrobial reactive oxygen, nitrogen molecules, and pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as IFN-γ, IL-12, and TNF-α. These early events limit the activation of TH1-effector cells and set the stage for pathogenesis. Furthermore, this early control of innate immunity by the virulent parasites results in substantial alteration in the adaptive immunity characterized by reduced proliferation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and TH2-biased immunity that results in production of anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as TGF-β, and IL-10. More recent studies have also documented the induction of coinhibitory ligands, such as CTLA-4, PD-L1, CD200, and Tim-3, that induce exhaustion and/or non-proliferation in antigen-experienced T cells. Most of these studies focus on viral infections in chronic phase, thus limiting the direct application of these results to parasitic infections and much less to parasitic vaccines. However, these studies suggest that vaccine-induced protective immunity can be modulated using strategies that enhance the costimulation that might reduce the threshold necessary for T cell activation and conversely by strategies that reduce or block inhibitory molecules, such as PD-L1 and CD200. In this review, we will focus on the

  4. Inflammation, immunity, and vaccines for Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Velin, Dominique; Straubinger, Kathrin; Gerhard, Markus

    2016-09-01

    The tight control of the innate and adaptive immune responses in the stomach mucosa during chronic Helicobacter pylori infection is of prime importance for the bacteria to persist and for the host to prevent inflammation-driven diseases. This review summarizes recent data on the roles of innate and adaptive immune responses during H. pylori/host interactions. In addition, the latest preclinical developments of H. pylori vaccines are discussed with a special focus on the clinical trial reported by Zeng et al., who provided evidence that oral vaccination significantly reduces the acquisition of natural H. pylori infection in children. PMID:27531535

  5. Enteric Immunization of Mice Against Influenza with Recombinant Vaccinia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meitin, Catherine A.; Bender, Bradley S.; Small, Parker A., Jr.

    1994-11-01

    Intrajejunal administration to mice of a recombinant vaccinia virus containing the influenza virus hemagglutinin gene induced IgA antibody in nasal, gut, and vaginal secretions. It also induced IgG antibody in serum and cell-mediated immunity. The immunization provided significant protection against an influenza virus challenge. This work suggests that enteric-coated recombinant vaccinia could be an orally administered, inexpensive, multivalent, temperature-stable, safe, and effective vaccine for children that could be particularly useful in developing nations, where multiple injections are not easily administered. Oral administration of vaccines should also reduce children's fear of shots at the doctor's office.

  6. Trade-offs between sexual advertisement and immune function in the pied flycatcher (Ficedula hypoleuca).

    PubMed Central

    Kilpimaa, Janne; Alatalo, Rauno V.; Siitari, Heli

    2004-01-01

    Good genes models of sexual selection assume that sexual advertisement is costly and thus the level of advertisement honestly reveals heritable viability. Recently it has been suggested that an important cost of sexual advertisement might be impairment of the functioning of the immune system. In this field experiment we investigated the possible trade-offs between immune function and sexual advertisement by manipulating both mating effort and activity of immune defence in male pied flycatchers. Mating effort was increased in a non-arbitrary manner by removing females from mated males during nest building. Widowed males sustained higher haematocrit levels than control males and showed higher expression of forehead patch height, suggesting that manipulation succeeded in increasing mating effort. Males that were experimentally forced to increase mating effort had reduced humoral immune responsiveness compared with control males. In addition, experimental activation of immune defence by vaccination with novel antigens reduced the expression of male ornament dimensions. To conclude, our results indicate that causality behind the trade-off between immune function and sexual advertisement may work in both directions: sexual activity suppresses immune function but immune challenge also reduces sexual advertisement. PMID:15058434

  7. [Cancer immunotherapy. Importance of overcoming immune suppression].

    PubMed

    Malvicini, Mariana; Puchulo, Guillermo; Matar, Pablo; Mazzolini, Guillermo

    2010-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that the immune system is involved in the control of tumor progression. Effective antitumor immune response depends on the interaction between several components of the immune system, including antigen-presenting cells and different T cell subsets. However, tumor cells develop a number of mechanisms to escape recognition and elimination by the immune system. In this review we discuss these mechanisms and address possible therapeutic approaches to overcome the immune suppression generated by tumors. PMID:21163748

  8. Eosinophilia Associated with Disorders of Immune Deficiency or Immune Dysregulation.

    PubMed

    Williams, Kelli W; Milner, Joshua D; Freeman, Alexandra F

    2015-08-01

    Increased serum eosinophil levels have been associated with multiple disorders of immune deficiency or immune dysregulation. Although primary immunodeficiency diseases are rare, it is important to consider these in the differential diagnosis of patients with eosinophilia. In this review, the clinical features, laboratory findings, diagnosis, and genetic basis of disease of several disorders of immune deficiency or dysregulation are discussed. The article includes autosomal dominant hyper IgE syndrome, DOCK8 deficiency, phosphoglucomutase 3 deficiency, ADA-SCID, Omenn syndrome, Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, Loeys-Dietz syndrome, autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome, immunodysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked syndrome, Comel-Netherton syndrome, and severe dermatitis, multiple allergies, and metabolic wasting syndrome. PMID:26209898

  9. Eosinophilia associated with disorders of immune deficiency or immune dysregulation

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Kelli W.; Milner, Joshua D.; Freeman, Alexandra F.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Elevated serum eosinophil levels have been associated with multiple disorders of immune deficiency or immune dysregulation. Although primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDD) are rare, it is important to consider these in the differential diagnosis of patients with eosinophilia. This review discusses the clinical features, laboratory findings, diagnosis, and genetic basis of disease of several disorders of immune deficiency or dysregulation – all which have documented eosinophilia as part of the syndrome. The article includes autosomal dominant hyper IgE syndrome, DOCK8 deficiency, PGM3 deficiency, ADA-SCID, Omenn syndrome, Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, Loeys-Dietz syndrome, autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome, immunodysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked syndrome, Comel-Netherton syndrome, and severe dermatitis, multiple allergies, and metabolic wasting syndrome (SAM). PMID:26209898

  10. Immune-Related Adverse Events From Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Marrone, K A; Ying, W; Naidoo, J

    2016-09-01

    Immunotherapy for cancer treatment has come of age, specifically with the use of immune checkpoint antibodies directed against molecules such as CTLA-4, PD-1, and PD-L1. Single-agent and combinatorial approaches utilizing these agents and other immunotherapies that may enhance antitumor effects are under investigation. With increasing clinical use of these agents, an appreciation for their toxicities comes to the fore. Adverse events that occur as a result of the immunologic effects of these therapies are termed "immune-related adverse events" (irAEs), and range in both frequency and severity in reported single-agent and combination studies. Improvements in our understanding of how and why irAEs develop and how to effectively manage them are needed. Herein we provide a state-of-the-art synopsis of the incidence, clinical features, mechanisms, and management of selected irAEs with immune checkpoint inhibitors currently in use. PMID:27170616

  11. Immune responses to improving welfare

    PubMed Central

    Berghman, L. R.

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between animal welfare and the immune status of an animal has a complex nature. Indeed, the intuitive notion that “increased vigilance of the immune system is by definition better” because it is expected to better keep the animal healthy, does not hold up under scrutiny. This is mostly due to the fact that the immune system consists of 2 distinct branches, the innate and the adaptive immune system. While they are intimately intertwined and synergistic in the living organism, they are profoundly different in their costs, both in terms of performance and wellbeing. In contrast to the adaptive immune system, the action of the innate immune system has a high metabolic cost as well as undesirable behavioral consequences. When a pathogen breaches the first line of defense (often a mucosal barrier), that organism's molecular signature is recognized by resident macrophages. The macrophages respond by releasing a cocktail of pro-inflammatory cytokines (including interleukin-1 and -6) that signal the brain via multiple pathways (humoral as well as neural) of the ongoing peripheral innate immune response. The behavioral response to the release of proinflammatory cytokines, known as “sickness behavior,” includes nearly all the behavioral aspects that are symptomatic for clinical depression in humans. Hence, undesired innate immune activity, such as chronic inflammation, needs to be avoided by the industry. From an immunological standpoint, one of the most pressing poultry industry needs is the refinement of our current veterinary vaccine arsenal. The response to a vaccine, especially to a live attenuated vaccine, is often a combination of innate and adaptive immune activities, and the desired immunogenicity comes at the price of high reactogenicity. The morbidity, albeit limited and transient, caused by live vaccines against respiratory diseases and coccidiosis are good examples. Thankfully, the advent of various post-genomics technologies, such as DNA

  12. Norovirus mechanisms of immune antagonism.

    PubMed

    Roth, Alexa N; Karst, Stephanie M

    2016-02-01

    Noroviruses are a leading cause of gastroenteritis outbreaks globally. Several lines of evidence indicate that noroviruses can antagonize or evade host immune responses, including the absence of long-lasting immunity elicited during a primary norovirus exposure and the ability of noroviruses to establish prolonged infections that are associated with protracted viral shedding. Specific norovirus proteins possessing immune antagonist activity have been described in recent years although mechanistic insight in most cases is limited. In this review, we discuss these emerging strategies used by noroviruses to subvert the immune response, including the actions of two nonstructural proteins (p48 and p22) to impair cellular protein trafficking and secretory pathways; the ability of the VF1 protein to inhibit cytokine induction; and the ability of the minor structural protein VP2 to regulate antigen presentation. We also discuss the current state of the understanding of host and viral factors regulating the establishment of persistent norovirus infections along the gastrointestinal tract. A more detailed understanding of immune antagonism by pathogenic viruses will inform prevention and treatment of disease. PMID:26673810

  13. Is adenomyosis an immune disease?

    PubMed

    Ota, H; Igarashi, S; Hatazawa, J; Tanaka, T

    1998-01-01

    Adenomyosis is characterized as ectopic endometrial tissues within the myometrium in the uterus. The only difference between adenomyosis and endometriosis is the site of endometriotic tissues: inside or outside of the uterus. It is well known that endometriosis is frequently associated with various autoimmune phenomena. This short review covers various aspects of the immune cascade found in adenomyosis. In adenomyosis, a series of immune responses is activated, including changes in both cellular and humoral immunity, i.e. a strong expression of cell surface antigens or adhesion molecules, an increased number of macrophages or immune cells, and deposition of immunoglobulins and complement components. Furthermore, the disease exhibited high frequency of autoantibodies in peripheral blood. Thus, an immunological 'vicious circle' is formed in the endometrium in adenomyosis. Endometrial cells seem to be under immunological stress, protecting themselves by exposing heat shock proteins. It is concluded that the endometrial environment in adenomyosis differs widely from that in normal fertile women. These abnormal immune responses might be involved in poor reproductive performance in adenomyosis. PMID:9825851

  14. Immunity, atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, the major cause of cardiovascular disease (CVD), is a chronic inflammatory condition with immune competent cells in lesions producing mainly pro-inflammatory cytokines. Dead cells and oxidized forms of low density lipoproteins (oxLDL) are abundant. The major direct cause of CVD appears to be rupture of atherosclerotic plaques. oxLDL has proinflammatory and immune-stimulatory properties, causes cell death at higher concentrations and contains inflammatory phospholipids with phosphorylcholine (PC) as an interesting epitope. Antibodies against PC (anti-PC) may be atheroprotective, one mechanism being anti-inflammatory. Bacteria and virus have been discussed, but it has been difficult to find direct evidence, and antibiotic trials have not been successful. Heat shock proteins could be one major target for atherogenic immune reactions. More direct causes of plaque rupture include pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and lipid mediators. To prove that inflammation is a cause of atherosclerosis and CVD, clinical studies with anti-inflammatory and/or immune-modulatory treatment are needed. The potential causes of immune reactions and inflammation in atherosclerosis and how inflammation can be targeted therapeutically to provide novel treatments for CVD are reviewed. PMID:23635324

  15. Immune function during space flight.

    PubMed

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald; Shearer, William T

    2002-10-01

    It is very likely that the human immune system will be altered in astronauts exposed to the conditions of long-term space flight: isolation, containment, microgravity, radiation, microbial contamination, sleep disruption, and insufficient nutrition. In human and animal subjects flown in space, there is evidence of immune compromise, reactivation of latent virus infection, and possible development of a premalignant or malignant condition. Moreover, in ground-based space flight model investigations, there is evidence of immune compromise and reactivation of latent virus infection. All of these observations in space flight itself or in ground-based models of space flight have a strong resonance in a wealth of human pathologic conditions involving the immune system where reactivated virus infections and cancer appear as natural consequences. The clinical conditions of Epstein-Barr-driven lymphomas in transplant patients and Kaposi's sarcoma in patients with autoimmune deficiency virus come easily to mind in trying to identify these conditions. With these thoughts in mind, it is highly appropriate, indeed imperative, that careful investigations of human immunity, infection, and cancer be made by space flight researchers. PMID:12361785

  16. Immune function during space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald; Shearer, William T.

    2002-01-01

    It is very likely that the human immune system will be altered in astronauts exposed to the conditions of long-term space flight: isolation, containment, microgravity, radiation, microbial contamination, sleep disruption, and insufficient nutrition. In human and animal subjects flown in space, there is evidence of immune compromise, reactivation of latent virus infection, and possible development of a premalignant or malignant condition. Moreover, in ground-based space flight model investigations, there is evidence of immune compromise and reactivation of latent virus infection. All of these observations in space flight itself or in ground-based models of space flight have a strong resonance in a wealth of human pathologic conditions involving the immune system where reactivated virus infections and cancer appear as natural consequences. The clinical conditions of Epstein-Barr-driven lymphomas in transplant patients and Kaposi's sarcoma in patients with autoimmune deficiency virus come easily to mind in trying to identify these conditions. With these thoughts in mind, it is highly appropriate, indeed imperative, that careful investigations of human immunity, infection, and cancer be made by space flight researchers.

  17. The exosomes in tumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yanfang; Gu, Yan; Cao, Xuetao

    2015-01-01

    Exosomes are a kind of nanometric membrane vesicles and can be released by almost all kinds of cells, including cancer cells. As the important mediators in intercellular communications, exosomes mediate exchange of protein and genetic material derived from parental cells. Emerging evidences show that exosomes secreted by either host cells or cancer cells are involved in tumor initiation, growth, invasion and metastasis. Moreover, communications between immune cells and cancer cells via exosomes play dual roles in modulating tumor immunity. In this review, we focus on exosome-mediated immunosuppression via inhibition of antitumor responses elicited by immune cells (DCs, NK cells, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, etc.) and induction of immunosuppressive or regulatory cell populations (MDSCs, Tregs and Bregs). Transfer of cytokines, microRNAs (miRNAs) and functional mRNAs by tumor-derived exosomes (TEXs) is crucial in the immune escape. Furthermore, exosomes secreted from several kinds of immune cells (DCs, CD4+ and CD8+ Tregs) also participate in immunosuppression. On the other hand, we summarize the current application of DC-derived and modified tumor-derived exosomes as tumor vaccines. The potential challenges about exosome-based vaccines for clinical application are also discussed. PMID:26405598

  18. Hepatitis B immunization in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, M H; Goldstein, M A

    1995-10-01

    This article reviews the epidemiology of hepatitis B in the United States, previous vaccination strategy, and reasons for its failure and issues leading to the recommendation to vaccinate all adolescents. A review of specific hepatitis B virus risk behaviors of adolescents and barriers to vaccinating adolescents is covered. Strategies that favor successful completion of the immunization series are also examined. Hepatitis B infection is an important public health concern for adolescents. The previous vaccine strategy to immunize only individuals though to be at high risk was unsuccessful, especially because providers of care could not identify these individuals. Furthermore, many individuals thought not to be at high risk for infection were exposed through contacts which could not be identified. Challenges to immunization of adolescents include logistical issues, patient education, cost of the vaccine, and patient compliance. Several of these issues can be addressed by a school-based hepatitis B immunization program. The body of evidence and national policy is rapidly changing to support the recommendation that all adolescents receive the hepatitis B immunization series. The series would be most effective if administered during the middle-school years. A universal adolescent hepatitis B vaccination program would result in the most immediate health benefits and acceleration toward the eradication of hepatitis B in the United States. PMID:8580124

  19. Adipose tissue immunity and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Catalán, Victoria; Gómez-Ambrosi, Javier; Rodríguez, Amaia; Frühbeck, Gema

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation and altered immune response are important components of obesity and contribute greatly to the promotion of obesity-related metabolic complications, especially cancer development. Adipose tissue expansion is associated with increased infiltration of various types of immune cells from both the innate and adaptive immune systems. Thus, adipocytes and infiltrating immune cells secrete pro-inflammatory adipokines and cytokines providing a microenvironment favorable for tumor growth. Accumulation of B and T cells in adipose tissue precedes macrophage infiltration causing a chronic low-grade inflammation. Phenotypic switching toward M1 macrophages and Th1 T cells constitutes an important mechanism described in the obese state correlating with increased tumor growth risk. Other possible synergic mechanisms causing a dysfunctional adipose tissue include fatty acid-induced inflammation, oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and hypoxia. Recent investigations have started to unravel the intricacy of the cross-talk between tumor cell/immune cell/adipocyte. In this sense, future therapies should take into account the combination of anti-inflammatory approaches that target the tumor microenvironment with more sophisticated and selective anti-tumoral drugs. PMID:24106481

  20. The Public Health Service action plan to improve access to immunization services. The Interagency Committee to Improve Access to Immunization Services.

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    The Public Health Service's Interagency Committee to Improve Access to Immunization Services (ICI) has responsibility for improving the immunization protection of the nation's children and other vulnerable populations. ICI's Action Plan to Improve Access to Immunization Services sets 14 goals with 120 action steps for improving immunization services nationwide by (a) increasing coordination among Federal health, income, housing, education, and nutrition programs; (b) reducing policy and management barriers that limit access to delivery systems, and (c) strengthening the delivery infrastructure. To accomplish the goals of the plan, there is a $72.0 million increase in funding appropriated in fiscal year 1992 specifically for this purpose. The President's Budget for fiscal year 1993 includes a $24.5 million increase for continued program implementation. The additional resources will be used to address delivery and access problems, which have been determined to be the primary factors limiting immunization for many children. PMID:1594732