Science.gov

Sample records for copper perchlorates

  1. Crystal structures of copper(II) nitrate, copper(II) chloride, and copper(II) perchlorate complexes with 2-formylpyridine semicarbazone

    SciTech Connect

    Chumakov, Yu. M.; Tsapkov, V. I.; Antosyak, B. Ya.; Bairac, N. N.; Simonov, Yu. A.; Bocelli, G.; Pahontu, E.; Gulea, A. P.

    2009-05-15

    Compounds dinitrato(2-formylpyridinesemicarbazone)copper (I), dichloro(2-formylpyridinesemicarbazone) copper hemihydrate (II), and bis(2-formylpyridinesemicarbazone)copper(2+) perchlorate hydrate (III) are synthesized and their crystal structures are determined. In compounds I-III, the neutral 2-formylpyridine semicarbazone molecule (L) is tridentately attached to the copper atom via the N,N,O set of donor atoms. In compounds I and II, the Cu: L ratio is equal to 1: 1, whereas, in III, it is 1: 2. In complex I, the coordination sphere of the copper atom includes two nitrate ions with different structural functions in addition to the L ligand. The structure is built as a one-dimensional polymer in which the NO{sub 3} bidentate group fulfills a bridging function. The coordination polyhedron of the copper(2+) atom can be considered a distorted tetragonal bipyramid (4 + 1 + 1). Compound II has an ionic structure in which the main element is the [CuLCl{sub 2} . Cu(H{sub 2}O)LCl]{sup +} dimer. In the dimer, the copper atoms are linked via one of the {mu}{sub 2}-bridging chlorine atoms. The coordination polyhedra of the central atoms of the Cu(H{sub 2})LCl and CuLCl{sub 2} complex fragments are tetragonal bipyramid and tetragonal pyramid, respectively. In compound III, the copper atom is octahedrally surrounded by two L ligands in the mer configuration.

  2. Boron nitride encapsulated copper nanoparticles: a facile one-step synthesis and their effect on thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Caijin; liu, Qiuwen; Fan, Wenjie; Qiu, Xiaoqing

    2015-01-01

    Reactivity is of great importance for metal nanoparticles used as catalysts, biomaterials and advanced sensors, but seeking for high reactivity seems to be conflict with high chemical stability required for metal nanoparticles. There is a subtle balance between reactivity and stability. This could be reached for colloidal metal nanoparticles using organic capping reagents, whereas it is challenging for powder metal nanoparticles. Here, we developed an alternative approach to encapsulate copper nanoparticles with a chemical inertness material—hexagonal boron nitride. The wrapped copper nanoparticles not only exhibit high oxidation resistance under air atmosphere, but also keep excellent promoting effect on thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate. This approach opens the way to design metal nanoparticles with both high stability and reactivity for nanocatalysts and their technological application. PMID:26567862

  3. Boron nitride encapsulated copper nanoparticles: a facile one-step synthesis and their effect on thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Caijin; Liu, Qiuwen; Fan, Wenjie; Qiu, Xiaoqing

    2015-11-01

    Reactivity is of great importance for metal nanoparticles used as catalysts, biomaterials and advanced sensors, but seeking for high reactivity seems to be conflict with high chemical stability required for metal nanoparticles. There is a subtle balance between reactivity and stability. This could be reached for colloidal metal nanoparticles using organic capping reagents, whereas it is challenging for powder metal nanoparticles. Here, we developed an alternative approach to encapsulate copper nanoparticles with a chemical inertness material—hexagonal boron nitride. The wrapped copper nanoparticles not only exhibit high oxidation resistance under air atmosphere, but also keep excellent promoting effect on thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate. This approach opens the way to design metal nanoparticles with both high stability and reactivity for nanocatalysts and their technological application.

  4. PERCHLORATE FACTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate is an anion (negative ion) with the formula C1O 4-. Perchlorate salts are famous in inorganic chemistry on account of their high solubilities. As a result, they are very difficult to remove. Although hot and concentrated perchloric acid is a strong oxidizing agent,...

  5. Di-mu-hydroxido-bis{[bis(6-methyl-2-pyridylmethyl)(2-phenylethyl)amine-kappa(3)N',N'',N''']copper(II)} bis(perchlorate).

    PubMed

    García, Ana María; Manzur, Jorge; Vega, Andrés

    2007-07-01

    The title compund, [Cu(2)(OH)(2)(C(22)H(25)N(3))(2)](ClO(4))(2), is a copper(II) dimer, with two [CuL](2+) units [L is bis(6-methyl-2-pyridylmethyl)(2-phenylethyl)amine] bridged by hydroxide groups to define the {[CuL](mu-OH)(2)[CuL]}(2+) cation. Charge balance is provided by perchlorate counter-anions. The cation has a crystallographic inversion centre halfway between the Cu(II) ions, which are separated by 3.0161 (8) Angstrom. The central core of the cation is an almost regular Cu(2)O(2) parallelogram of sides 1.931 (2) and 1.935 (2) Angstrom, with a Cu-O-Cu angle of 102.55 (11) degrees . The coordination geometry around each Cu(II) centre can be best described as a square-based pyramid, with three N atoms from L ligands and two hydroxide O atoms completing the coordination environment. Each cationic unit is hydrogen bonded to two perchlorate anions by means of hydroxide-perchlorate O-H...O interactions. PMID:17609560

  6. Cocrystallization of photosensitive energetic copper(II) perchlorate complexes with the nitrogen-rich ligand 1,2-Di(1H-tetrazol-5-yl)ethane.

    PubMed

    Evers, Jürgen; Gospodinov, Ivan; Joas, Manuel; Klapötke, Thomas M; Stierstorfer, Jörg

    2014-11-01

    Two recently introduced concepts in the design of new energetic materials, namely complexation and cocrystallization, have been applied in the synthesis and characterization of the energetic copper(II) compound "[Cu(dt-5-e)2(H2O)](ClO4)2," which consists of two different complex cations and can be described as a model energetic ionic cocrystal. The presence of both the N-rich 1,2-di(1H-tetrazol-5-yl)ethane ligand and oxidizing perchlorate counterion results in a new type of energetic material. The ionic complex cocrystal consists of a mononuclear and a trinuclear complex unit. It can be obtained by precipitation from perchloric acid or by dehydration of the related mononuclear coordination compound [Cu(dt-5-e)2(H2O)2](ClO4)2·2H2O at 70 °C in the solid state. The transformation starting at 60 °C was monitored by X-ray powder diffraction and thermal analysis. The energetic ionic cocrystal was shown to be a new primary explosive suitable for laser ignition. The different coordination spheres within the ionic cocrystal (octahedral and square pyramidal) were shown by UV/vis/NIR spectroscopy to result in excellent light absorption. PMID:25310513

  7. Perchlorate Questions and Answers

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Environmental Epidemiology. This study reports on the estimated average dietary intakes of perchlorate and iodine based ... Dietary Intake of Perchlorate and Iodine" study? The estimated lower bound to upper bound average perchlorate intakes ...

  8. Perchlorate (ClO4) and Perchlorate Salts

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Perchlorate ( ClO4 - ) and Perchlorate Salts CASRN 7790 - 98 - 9 Ammonium perchlorate CASRN 7791 - 03 - 9 Lithium perchlorate CASRN 7778 - 74 - 7 Potassium perchlorate CASRN 7601 - 89 - 0 Sodium perchlorate This U.S . EPA IRIS Summary is based on the U.S . Government - sponsored technical review of

  9. Crystal structure of μ-oxalodi­hydroxamato-bis­[(2,2′-bipyrid­yl)(di­methyl sulfoxide-κO)copper(II)] bis­(perchlorate)

    PubMed Central

    Odarich, Irina A.; Pavlishchuk, Anna V.; Kalibabchuk, Valentina A.; Haukka, Matti

    2016-01-01

    The centrosymmetric binuclear complex, [Cu2(C2H2N2O4)(C10H8N2)2(C2H6OS)2](ClO4)2, contains two copper(II) ions, connected through an N-deprotonated oxalodi­hydroxamic acid dianion, two terminal 2,2′-bi­pyridine ligands, and two apically coordinating dimethylsulfoxide mol­ecules. Two non-coordinating perchlorate anions assure electrical neutrality. The copper(II) ions in the complex dication [Cu2(C10H8N2)2(μ-C2H2N2O4)(C2H6SO)2]2+ are in an O2N3 square-pyramidal donor environment, the Cu–Cu separation being 5.2949 (4) Å. Two hydroxamate groups in the deprotonated oxalodi­hydroxamic acid are located trans to one each other. In the crystal, O—H⋯O and C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds link the complex cations to the perchlorate anions. Further C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds combine with π–π contacts with a centroid-to-centroid separation of 3.6371 (12) Å to stack the mol­ecules along the a-axis direction. PMID:26958375

  10. Perchlorate isotope forensics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Böhlke, J.K.; Sturchio, N.C.; Gu, B.; Horita, J.; Brown, G.M.; Jackson, W.A.; Batista, J.; Hatzinger, P.B.

    2005-01-01

    Perchlorate has been detected recently in a variety of soils, waters, plants, and food products at levels that may be detrimental to human health. These discoveries have generated considerable interest in perchlorate source identification. In this study, comprehensive stable isotope analyses ( 37Cl/35Cl and 18O/17O/ 16O) of perchlorate from known synthetic and natural sources reveal systematic differences in isotopic characteristics that are related to the formation mechanisms. In addition, isotopic analyses of perchlorate extracted from groundwater and surface water demonstrate the feasibility of identifying perchlorate sources in contaminated environments on the basis of this technique. Both natural and synthetic sources of perchlorate have been identified in water samples from some perchlorate occurrences in the United States by the isotopic method. ?? 2005 American Chemical Society.

  11. PERCHLORATE IDENTIFICATION IN FERTILIZERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate has contaminated groundwater, drinking water, and soils at several locations in the United States. The primary source of contamination at sites that have been investigated to date seems to be from industrial and military operations that use perchlorate as an oxidizing...

  12. Los Alamos National Laboratory Perchlorate Issues.

    SciTech Connect

    Hjeresen, Denny; Rae, Steve; Beers, Bob; Saladen, Mike; Barr, Alice; Pope, Alicia; Dziewinski, Lacek; Scott, Jim; Holcomb, Robert; Hollis, Diana; Leslie Dale,; Williams, Laurie; Strietelmeier, Betty; Carlson, Bryan; Alexander, Rick; Worland, Pete; Hanson, Steve; Stine, Jim; Hiskey, Mike; Archuleta, Jose; Kinkead, Scott; Sherrard, Ann; Longmire, Pat; Witkowski, Marc; Gard, Marvin

    2003-08-04

    This document reviews the chemical structure of the perchlorate anion and the uses of perchlorates, related health issues, applicable drinking water regulations, water supply system monitoring, current laboratory perchlorate use, management of perchlorate compound risks, potential perchlorate sites and sources, the search for a lower perchlorate detection limit, and treatment of perchlorate contamination.

  13. PERCHLORATE AS AN ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINANT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate anion (C104) has been found in drinking water supplies throughout the southwestern United States. I t is primarily associated with releases of ammonium perdhlorate by defense contractors, military operations, and aerospace programs. Ammonium perchlorate is used as ...

  14. Bioelectrical Perchlorate Remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thrash, C.; Achenbach, L. A.; Coates, J. D.

    2007-12-01

    Several bioreactor designs are currently available for the ex-situ biological attenuation of perchlorate- contaminated waters and recently, some of these reactor designs were conditionally approved by the California Department of Health Services for application in the treatment of perchlorate contaminated drinking water. However, all of these systems are dependent on the continual addition of a chemical electron donor to sustain microbial activity and are always subject to biofouling and downstream water quality issues. In addition, residual labile electron donor in the reactor effluent can stimulate microbial growth in water distribution systems and contribute to the formation of potentially toxic trihalomethanes during disinfection by chlorination. As part of our ongoing studies into microbial perchlorate reduction we investigated the ability of dissimilatory perchlorate reducing bacteria (DPRB) to metabolize perchlorate using a negatively charged electrode (cathode) in the working chamber of a bioelectrical reactor (BER) as the primary electron donor. In this instance the DPRB use the electrons on the electrode surface either directly or indirectly in the form of electrolytically produced H2 as a source of reducing equivalents for nitrate and perchlorate reduction. As part of this investigation our fed-batch studies showed that DPRB could use electrons from a graphite cathode poised at -500mV (vs. Ag/AgCl) for the reduction of perchlorate and nitrate. We isolated a novel organism, Dechlorospirillum strain VDY, from the cathode surface after 70 days operation which readily reduced 100 mg.L-1 perchlorate in a mediatorless batch bioelectrical reactor (BER) in 6 days. Continuous up-flow BERs (UFBERs) seeded with active cultures of strain VDY continuously treated waters containing 100 mg.L-1 perchlorate with almost 100% efficiency throughout their operation achieving a non-optimized volumetric loading of 60 mg.L-1 reactor volume.day-1. The same UFBERs also treated

  15. Synthesis and crystal structure of [2,7,12-trimethyl-3,7,11,17-tetra-aza-bicyclo-[11.3.1]hepta-deca-1(17),13,15-triene-κ(4) N]copper(II) bis-(perchlorate).

    PubMed

    Hilvano, Edward Gabrielle V; Yang, Guang; Emnacen, Inno A; Rybak-Akimova, Elena V; Billones, Junie B; Carrillo, Maria Constancia O; Noll, Bruce C; Organo, Voltaire G

    2016-07-01

    The title copper(II) complex of a pyridine-containing macrocycle (PyMAC), [Cu(C16H28N4)](ClO4)2, has been prepared. The crystal structure reveals the Cu(II) atom to be octahedrally coordinated by a tetradentate aminopyridine macrocyclic ligand surrounding the metal cation in a square-planar geometry. Two weakly bound perchlorate counter-ions occupy the axial sites above and below the macrocyclic plane. The crystal studied was refined as a two-component pseudo-merohedral twin; the refined fractional contribution of the minor component is 38.77 (8). PMID:27555952

  16. Synthesis and crystal structure of [2,7,12-trimethyl-3,7,11,17-tetra­aza­bicyclo­[11.3.1]hepta­deca-1(17),13,15-triene-κ4 N]copper(II) bis­(perchlorate)

    PubMed Central

    Hilvano, Edward Gabrielle V.; Yang, Guang; Emnacen, Inno A.; Rybak-Akimova, Elena V.; Billones, Junie B.; Carrillo, Maria Constancia O.; Noll, Bruce C.; Organo, Voltaire G.

    2016-01-01

    The title copper(II) complex of a pyridine-containing macrocycle (PyMAC), [Cu(C16H28N4)](ClO4)2, has been prepared. The crystal structure reveals the CuII atom to be octahedrally coordinated by a tetradentate aminopyridine macrocyclic ligand surrounding the metal cation in a square-planar geometry. Two weakly bound perchlorate counter-ions occupy the axial sites above and below the macrocyclic plane. The crystal studied was refined as a two-component pseudo-merohedral twin; the refined fractional contribution of the minor component is 38.77 (8)% PMID:27555952

  17. COPPER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is a review of current knowledge of the distribution of copper in the environment and living things. Metabolism and the effects of copper in the biosphere are also considered. Copper compounds are common and widely distributed in nature. They are also extensively mined...

  18. Temperature Independent Catalytic Two-Electron Reduction of Dioxygen by Ferrocenes with a Tris[2-(2-pyridyl)ethyl]amine-Copper(II) Catalyst in the Presence of Perchloric Acid

    PubMed Central

    Das, Dipanwita; Lee, Yong-Min; Ohkubo, Kei; Nam, Wonwoo; Karlin, Kenneth D.; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2013-01-01

    Selective two-electron plus two-proton (2e−/2H+) reduction of O2 to hydrogen peroxide by ferrocene (Fc) or 1,1′-dimethylferrocene (Me2Fc) in the presence of perchloric acid is catalyzed efficiently by a mononuclear copper(II) complex, [CuII(tepa)]2+ {tepa = tris[2-(2-pyridyl)ethyl]amine} (1) in acetone. The E1/2 value for [CuII(tepa)]2+ as measured by cyclic voltammetry is 0.07 V vs Fc/Fc+ in acetone, being significantly positive, which makes it possible to use relatively weak one-electron reductants such as Fc and Me2Fc for the overall two-electron reduction of O2. Fast electron transfer from Fc or Me2Fc to 1 affords the corresponding CuI complex, [CuI(tepa)]+ (2), which reacts at low temperature (193 K) with O2, however only in presence of HClO4 to afford the hydroperoxo complex, [CuII(tepa)(OOH)]2+ (3). The detailed kinetic study on the homogeneous catalytic system reveals the rate-determining step to be the O2-binding process in the presence of HClO4 at lower temperature as well as at room temperature. The O2-binding kinetics in the presence of HClO4 were studied, demonstrating that the rate of formation of the hydroperoxo complex (3) as well as the overall catalytic reaction remained virtually the same with changing temperature. The apparent lack of an activation energy for the catalytic two-electron reduction of O2 is shown to result from the existence of a pre-equilibrium between 2 and O2 prior to the formation of the hydroperoxo complex 3. No further reduction of [CuII(tepa)(OOH)]2+ (3) by Fc or Me2Fc occurred, and instead 3 is protonated by HClO4 to yield H2O2 accompanied by regeneration of 1, thus completing the catalytic cycle for the two-electron reduction of O2 by Fc or Me2Fc. PMID:23394287

  19. Copper

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Copper ; CASRN 7440 - 50 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effects )

  20. Effect of nitrate on microbial perchlorate reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y.; Coates, J. D.

    2007-12-01

    Over the last decade perchlorate has been recognized as an important emerging water contaminant that poses a significant public health threat. Because of its chemical stability, low ionic charge density, and significant water solubility microbial remediation has been identified as the most feasible method for its in situ attenuation. Our previous studies have demonstrated that dissimilatory perchlorate reducing bacteria (DPRB) capable of the respiratory reduction of perchlorate into innocuous chloride are ubiquitous in soil and sedimentary environments. As part of their metabolism these organisms reduce perchlorate to chlorite which is subsequently dismutated into chloride and molecular oxygen. These initial steps are mediated by the perchlorate reductase and chlorite dismutase enzymes respectively. Previously we found that the activity of these organisms is dependent on the presence of molybdenum and is inhibited by the presence of oxygen and to different extents nitrate. However, to date, there is little understanding of the mechanisms involved in the regulation of perchlorate reduction by oxygen and nitrate. As a continuation of our studies into the factors that control DPRB activity we investigated these regulatory mechanisms in more detail as a model organism, Dechloromonas aromatica strain RCB, transitions from aerobic metabolism through nitrate reduction to perchlorate reduction. In series of growth transition studies where both nitrate and perchlorate were present, preference for nitrate to perchlorate was observed regardless of the nitrate to perchlorate ratio. Even when the organism was pre-grown anaerobically in perchlorate, nitrate was reduced prior to perchlorate. Using non-growth washed cell suspension, perchlorate- grown D. aromatica was capable of reducing both perchlorate and nitrate concomitantly suggesting the preferentially utilization of nitrate was not a result of enzyme functionality. To elucidate the mechanism for preferential utilization of

  1. Perchlorate uptake in spinach as related to perchlorate, nitrate and chloride concentrations in irrigation water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several studies have reported on the detection of perchlorate in edible leafy vegetables irrigated with Colorado River water. However, there is no information on spinach as related to perchlorate in irrigation water nor on the effect of other anions on perchlorate uptake. A greenhouse perchlorate up...

  2. PERCHLORATE CROP INTERACTIONS VIA CONTAMINATED IRRIGATION WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate has contaminated water and sods at several locations in the United States. Perchlorate is water soluble, exceedingly mobile in aqueous systems, and can persist for many decades under typical ground- and surface water conditions. Perchlorate is of concern because of un...

  3. Perchlorate Reduction by Yeast for Mars Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Alaisha

    2015-01-01

    Martian soil contains high levels (0.6 percentage by mass) of calcium perchlorate (Ca(ClO4)2), which readily dissociates into calcium and the perchlorate ion (ClO4-) in water. Even in trace amounts, perchlorates are toxic to humans and have been implicated in thyroid dysfunction. Devising methods to lessen perchlorate contamination is crucial to minimizing the health risks associated with human exploration and colonization of Mars. We designed a perchlorate reduction pathway, which sequentially reduces perchlorate to chloride (Cl-) and oxygen (O2), for implementation in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using genes obtained from perchlorate reducing bacteria Azospira oryzae and Dechloromonas aromatica, we plan to assemble this pathway directly within S. cerevisiae through recombinational cloning. A perchlorate reduction pathway would enable S. cerevisiae to lower perchlorate levels and produce oxygen, which may be harvested or used directly by S. cerevisiae for aerobic growth and compound synthesis. Moreover, using perchlorate as an external electron acceptor could improve the efficiency of redox-imbalanced production pathways in yeast. Although several perchlorate reducing bacteria have been identified and utilized in water treatment systems on Earth, the widespread use of S. cerevisiae as a synthetic biology platform justifies the development of a perchlorate reducing strain for implementation on Mars.

  4. catena-Poly[[[di-aqua-bis-[1,2-bis-(pyridin-4-yl)diazene]copper(II)]-μ-1,2-bis-(pyridin-4-yl)diazene] bis-(perchlorate)].

    PubMed

    Ballestero-Martínez, Ernesto; Campos-Fernández, Cristian Saul; Soto-Tellini, Victor Hugo; Gonzalez-Montiel, Simplicio; Martínez-Otero, Diego

    2013-06-01

    In the title compound, {[Cu(C10H8N4)3(H2O)2](ClO4)2} n , the coordination environment of the cationic Cu(II) atom is distorted octa-hedral, formed by pairs of symmetry-equivalent 1,2-bis-(pyridin-4-yl)diazene ligands, bridging 1,2-bis-(pyridin-4-yl)diazene ligands and two non-equivalent water mol-ecules. The 1,2-bis-(pyridin-4-yl)diazene mol-ecules form polymeric chains parallel to [-101] via azo bonds which are situated about inversion centres. Since the Cu(II) atom is situated on a twofold rotation axis, the monomeric unit has point symmetry 2. The perchlorate anions are disordered in a 0.536 (9):0.464 (9) ratio and are acceptors of water H atoms in medium-strong O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds with graph set R 4 (4)(12). The water mol-ecules, which are coordinated to the Cu(II) atom and are hydrogen-bonded to the perchlorate anions, form columns parallel to [010]. A π-π inter-action [centroid-centroid distance = 3.913 (2) Å] occurs between pyridine rings, and weak C-H⋯O inter-actions also occur. PMID:23794983

  5. catena-Poly[[[di­aqua­bis­[1,2-bis­(pyridin-4-yl)diazene]copper(II)]-μ-1,2-bis­(pyridin-4-yl)diazene] bis­(perchlorate)

    PubMed Central

    Ballestero-Martínez, Ernesto; Campos-Fernández, Cristian Saul; Soto-Tellini, Victor Hugo; Gonzalez-Montiel, Simplicio; Martínez-Otero, Diego

    2013-01-01

    In the title compound, {[Cu(C10H8N4)3(H2O)2](ClO4)2}n, the coordination environment of the cationic CuII atom is distorted octa­hedral, formed by pairs of symmetry-equivalent 1,2-bis­(pyridin-4-yl)diazene ligands, bridging 1,2-bis­(pyridin-4-yl)diazene ligands and two non-equivalent water mol­ecules. The 1,2-bis­(pyridin-4-yl)diazene mol­ecules form polymeric chains parallel to [-101] via azo bonds which are situated about inversion centres. Since the CuII atom is situated on a twofold rotation axis, the monomeric unit has point symmetry 2. The perchlorate anions are disordered in a 0.536 (9):0.464 (9) ratio and are acceptors of water H atoms in medium–strong O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds with graph set R 4 4(12). The water mol­ecules, which are coordinated to the CuII atom and are hydrogen-bonded to the perchlorate anions, form columns parallel to [010]. A π–π inter­action [centroid–centroid distance = 3.913 (2) Å] occurs between pyridine rings, and weak C—H⋯O inter­actions also occur. PMID:23794983

  6. Environmental Perchlorate Exposure: Potential Adverse Thyroid Effects

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Angela M.; Pearce, Elizabeth N.; Braverman, Lewis E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review This review will present a general overview of the sources, human studies, and proposed regulatory action regarding environmental perchlorate exposure. Recent findings Some recent studies have reported significant associations between urinary perchlorate concentrations, thyroid dysfunction, and decreased infant IQ in groups who would be particularly susceptible to perchlorate effects. An update regarding the recent proposed regulatory actions and potential costs surrounding amelioration of perchlorate contamination is provided. Summary The potential adverse thyroidal effects of environmental perchlorate exposure remain controversial, and further research is needed to further define its relationship to human health among pregnant and lactating women and their infants. PMID:25106002

  7. Organic carbon biostimulates rapid rhizodegradation of perchlorate.

    PubMed

    Yifru, Dawit D; Nzengung, Valentine A

    2008-12-01

    Previous hydroponics and field studies identified phytodegradation and rhizodegradation as the two main mechanisms by which plants metabolize perchlorate. Plant uptake and phytodegradation of perchlorate is a slower and undesired process that poses ecological risks resulting from phytoaccumulation of some fraction of the perchlorate. Meanwhile, rhizodegradation is a more rapid and favored process involving perchlorate-degrading bacteria utilizing dissolved organic carbon (DOC) as a carbon and energy (electron) source to rapidly degrade perchlorate to innocuous chloride. In the present study, rhizodegradation of perchlorate by willow trees (Salix nigra) was biostimulated using electron sources obtained from natural and artificial carbon sources. In bioreactors provided with carbon sources as 500 mg/L DOC, 25 to 40 mg/L of initial perchlorate concentrations were removed to below the ion chromatography method detection limit of 2 microg/L in approximately 9 d. For planted controls provided with no electron donors, the time required for the complete removal of the same doses of perchlorate was up to 70 d. Enhancement of rhizodegradation by organic carbon reduced the phytoaccumulated fraction of perchlorate by an order of magnitude from approximately 430 to 20 mg/kg. The implication of the present study is that the high fraction uptake and phytoaccumulation of perchlorate in agricultural products and the recycling of perchlorate into the ecosystem can be significantly curtailed by supplying electron donors derived from organic carbon sources to the root zone of plants. PMID:18593217

  8. Phytoremediation of perchlorate by free floating macrophytes.

    PubMed

    Bhaskaran, Krishnakumar; Vijaya Nadaraja, Anupama; Tumbath, Soumya; Babu Shah, Liji; Gangadharan Puthiya Veetil, Prajeesh

    2013-09-15

    Phytoremediation of perchlorate by free floating macrophytes (Eichornia, Pistia, Salvinia and Lemna) was evaluated in this study. Among the plants tested, Pistia showed 63.8 ± 4% (w/v) removal of 5 mg/L level perchlorate in 7 days, whereas the removal was absent in other plants. Phyto-accumulation (18.2%) and rhizo-degradation (45.68%) were identified as the mechanisms involved in perchlorate removal in Pistia. Whole plant extraction yielded 45.4 μg perchlorate/g dry weight biomass in 7 days period. High intensity of light and presence of nitrate negatively affected perchlorate removal by Pistia. An enrichment of Pistia root homogenate exhibited faster reduction of perchlorate where 100mg/L of the compound was reduced completely in 48 h under anoxic condition. A novel perchlorate reducing bacterium, isolated from Pistia root homogenate enrichment was identified as Acinetobacter sp. NIIST (Genbank JX467695). PMID:23872336

  9. ASSESSMENT OF PERCHLORATE IN FERTILIZERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate has been positively detected only in those materials known to be derived from Chilean caliche, which constitute less than 0.2% of U.S. fertilizer application. The data obtained in the preponderance of investigations suggest that fertilizers do not contribute to envir...

  10. PERCHLORATE BEHAVIOR IN A MUNICIPAL LAKE FOLLOWING FIREWORKS DISPLAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate salts of potassium and ammonium are the primary oxidants in pyrotechnic mixtures, yet insufficient information is available regarding the relationship between fireworks displays and the environmental occurrence of perchlorate. Here we document changes in perchlorate ...

  11. Crystal structure of ortho­rhom­bic {bis­[(pyridin-2-yl)meth­yl](3,5,5,5-tetra­chloro­pent­yl)amine-κ3 N,N′,N′′}chlorido­copper(II) perchlorate

    PubMed Central

    Bussey, Katherine A.; Cavalier, Annie R.; Connell, Jennifer R.; Mraz, Margaret E.; Oshin, Kayode D.; Pintauer, Tomislav; Gray, Danielle L.; Parkin, Sean

    2015-01-01

    In the title compound, [CuCl(C17H19Cl4N3)]ClO4, the CuII ion adopts a distorted square-planar geometry defined by one chloride ligand and the three nitro­gen atoms from the bis­[(pyridin-2-yl)meth­yl](3,5,5,5-tetra­chloro­pent­yl)amine ligand. The perchlorate counter-ion is disordered over three sets of sites with refined occupancies 0.0634 (17), 0.221 (16) and 0.145 (7). In addition, the hetero-scorpionate arm of the bis­[(pyridin-2-yl)meth­yl](3,5,5,5-tetra­chloro­pent­yl)amine ligand is disordered over two sets of sites with refined occupancies 0.839 (2) and 0.161 (2). In the crystal, weak Cu⋯Cl inter­actions between symmetry-related mol­ecules create a dimerization with a chloride occupying the apical position of the square-pyramidal geometry typical of many copper(II) chloride hetero-scorpionate complexes. PMID:26279883

  12. ADSORPTION CHARACTERISTICS OF PERCHLORATE IN SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate(CI04) is an oxyanion that originates as a contaminant in ground and surface waters from the dissolution of ammonium, potassium, magnesium or sodium salts. Perchlorate is mainly used in solid rocket fuels, explosives, and military batteries. Because of its potential ha...

  13. Biodegradation of rocket propellant waste, ammonium perchlorate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naqvi, S. M. Z.; Latif, A.

    1975-01-01

    The short term effects of ammonium perchlorate on selected organisms were studied. A long term experiment was also designed to assess the changes incurred by ammonium perchlorate on the nitrogen and chloride contents of soil within a period of 3 years. In addition, an attempt was made to produce methane gas from anaerobic fermentation of the aquatic weed, Alternanthera philoxeroides.

  14. PERCHLORATE IN FERTILIZERS?: ANALYSIS BY RAMAN SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recently, we and others found perchlorate at high levels (approximately 500 - 8000 mg/kg) in 90+% of 25+ fertilizers (primarily lawn-and-garden products) that are not identified as containing components derived from mined Chile saltpeter, which is known to contain perchlorate as ...

  15. PHYTOREMEDIATION OF PERCHLORATE BY TOBACCO PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous studies have shown that tobacco plants are tolerant of perchlorate and will accumulate perchlorate in the plant tissues. The objective of this research was to determine the effectiveness of tobacco plants in phytoremediation, a technology that employs plants to degrade,...

  16. PERCHLORATE ACCUMULATION FROM FERTILIZER IN LEAFY VEGETATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate contaminated water and soil has been identified in many areas of the United States. Previous studies indicated that the primary source of contamination was from industry and military operations that use perchlorate as an oxidzing agent. However, recent studies have fo...

  17. PHYTOTRANSFORMATION OF PERCHLORATE USING PARROT-FEATHER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate is an oxvanion that has been extensively is a strong oxidizing
    agent in solid rocket fuel. Contamination of groundwater has occurred as the result of Perchlorate use. Standard disposal practices during the 1950s through the 1970s did not reflect the current knowled...

  18. ACCUMULATION AND FATE OF PERCHLORATE IN PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate, a component of solid rocket fuels, has emerged as a potential threat to surface water and groundwater at several locations in the U.S. Perchlorate levels up to 16 ug/L were detected in Lake Mead and 5-9 ug/L in the lower Colorado River. The water from the Colorado Ri...

  19. Novel biomarkers of perchlorate exposure in zebrafish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mukhi, S.; Carr, J.A.; Anderson, T.A.; Patino, R.

    2005-01-01

    Perchlorate inhibits iodide uptake by thyroid follicles and lowers thyroid hormone production. Although several effects of perchlorate on the thyroid system have been reported, the utility of these pathologies as markers of environmental perchlorate exposures has not been adequately assessed. The present study examined time-course and concentration-dependent effects of perchlorate on thyroid follicle hypertrophy, colloid depletion, and angiogenesis; alterations in whole-body thyroxine (T4) levels; and somatic growth and condition factor of subadult and adult zebrafish. Changes in the intensity of the colloidal T4 ring previously observed in zebrafish also were examined immunohistochemically. Three-month-old zebrafish were exposed to ammonium perchlorate at measured perchlorate concentrations of 0, 11, 90, 1,131, and 11,480 ppb for 12 weeks and allowed to recover in clean water for 12 weeks. At two weeks of exposure, the lowest-observed-effective concentrations (LOECs) of perchlorate that induced angiogenesis and depressed the intensity of colloidal T4 ring were 90 and 1,131 ppb, respectively; other parameters were not affected (whole-body T4 was not determined at this time). At 12 weeks of exposure, LOECs for colloid depletion, hypertrophy, angiogenesis, and colloidal T4 ring were 11,480, 1,131, 90, and 11 ppb, respectively. All changes were reversible, but residual effects on angiogenesis and colloidal T4 ring intensity were still present after 12 weeks of recovery (LOEC, 11,480 ppb). Whole-body T 4 concentration, body growth (length and weight), and condition factor were not affected by perchlorate. The sensitivity and longevity of changes in colloidal T4 ring intensity and angiogenesis suggest their usefulness as novel markers of perchlorate exposure. The 12-week LOEC for colloidal T4 ring is the lowest reported for any perchlorate biomarker in aquatic vertebrates. ?? 2005 SETAC.

  20. Perchlorate exposure and dose estimates in infants.

    PubMed

    Valentín-Blasini, Liza; Blount, Benjamin C; Otero-Santos, Samaret; Cao, Yang; Bernbaum, Judy C; Rogan, Walter J

    2011-05-01

    Perchlorate is a naturally occurring inorganic anion used as a component of solid rocket fuel, explosives, and pyrotechnics. Sufficiently high perchlorate intakes can modify thyroid function by competitively inhibiting iodide uptake in adults; however, little is known about perchlorate exposure and health effects in infants. Food intake models predict that infants have higher perchlorate exposure doses than adults. For this reason, we measured perchlorate and related anions (nitrate, thiocyanate, and iodide) in 206 urine samples from 92 infants ages 1-377 days and calculated perchlorate intake dose for this sample of infants. The median estimated exposure dose for this sample of infants was 0.160 μg/kg/day. Of the 205 individual dose estimates, 9% exceeded the reference dose of 0.7 μg/kg/day; 6% of infants providing multiple samples had multiple perchlorate dose estimates above the reference dose. Estimated exposure dose differed by feeding method: breast-fed infants had a higher perchlorate exposure dose (geometric mean 0.220 μg/kg/day) than infants consuming cow milk-based formula (geometric mean 0.103 μg/kg/day, p < 0.0001) or soy-based formula (geometric mean 0.027 μg/kg/day, p < 0.0001), consistent with dose estimates based on dietary intake data. The ability of perchlorate to block adequate iodide uptake by the thyroid may have been reduced by the iodine-sufficient status of the infants studied (median urinary iodide 125 μg/L). Further research is needed to see whether these perchlorate intake doses lead to any health effects. PMID:21449579

  1. Perchlorate exposure and dose estimates in infants

    PubMed Central

    Valentín-Blasini, Liza; Blount, Benjamin C.; Otero-Santos, Samaret; Cao, Yang; Bernbaum, Judy C.; Rogan, Walter J.

    2011-01-01

    Perchlorate is a naturally occurring inorganic anion used as a component of solid rocket fuel, explosives, and pyrotechnics. Sufficiently high perchlorate intakes can modify thyroid function by competitively inhibiting iodide uptake in adults; however little is known about perchlorate exposure and health effects in infants. Food intake models predict that infants have higher perchlorate exposure doses than adults. For this reason, we measured perchlorate and related anions (nitrate, thiocyanate, and iodide) in 206 urine samples from 92 infants ages 1–377 days and calculated perchlorate intake dose for this population of infants. The median estimated exposure dose for this population of infants was 0.160 μg/kg/day. Of the 205 individual dose estimates, 9% exceeded the reference dose of 0.7 μg/kg/day; 6% of infants providing multiple samples had multiple perchlorate dose estimates above the reference dose. Estimated exposure dose differed by feeding method: breast-fed infants had a higher perchlorate exposure dose (geometric mean 0.220 μg/kg/day) than infants consuming cow milk-based formula (geometric mean 0.103 μg/kg/day, p<0.0001) or soy-based formula (geometric mean 0.027 μg/kg/day, p<0.0001), consistent with dose estimates based on dietary intake data. The ability of perchlorate to block adequate iodide uptake by the thyroid may have been reduced by the iodine-sufficient status of the infants studied (median urinary iodide 125 μg/L). Further research is needed to see whether these perchlorate intake doses lead to any health effects. PMID:21449579

  2. Perchlorate reduction by microbes inhabiting oil reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebensteiner, Martin; Stams, Alfons; Lomans, Bart

    2014-05-01

    Microbial perchlorate and chlorate reduction is a unique type of anaerobic respiration as during reduction of (per)chlorate chlorite is formed, which is then split into chloride and molecular oxygen. In recent years it was demonstrated that (per)chlorate-reducing bacteria may employ oxygenase-dependent pathways for the degradation of aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons. These findings suggested that (per)chlorate may be used as oxygen-releasing compound in anoxic environments that contain hydrocarbons, such as polluted soil sites and oil reservoirs. We started to study perchlorate reduction by microbes possibly inhabiting oil reservoirs. One of the organisms studied was Archaeoglobus fulgidus. This extremely thermophilic archaeon is known as a major contributor to souring in hot oil reservoirs. A. fulgidus turned out to be able to use perchlorate as terminal electron acceptor for growth with lactate (Liebensteiner et al 2013). Genome based physiological experiments indicated that A. fulgidus possesses a novel perchlorate reduction pathway. Perchlorate is first reduced to chlorite, but chlorite is not split into chloride and molecular oxygen as occurs in bacteria. Rather, chlorite reacts chemically with sulfide, forming oxidized sulfur compounds, which are reduced to sulfide in the electron transport chain by the archaeon. The dependence of perchlorate reduction on sulfur compounds could be shown. The implications of our findings as novel strategy for microbiological enhanced oil recovery and for souring mitigation are discussed. Liebensteiner MG, Pinkse MWH, Schaap PJ, Stams AJM and Lomans BP (2013) Archaeal (per)chlorate reduction at high temperature, a matter of abiotic-biotic reactions. Science 340: 85-87

  3. Biodegradation of rocket propellent waste, ammonium perchlorate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naqui, S. M. Z.

    1975-01-01

    The impact of the biodegradation rate of ammonium perchlorate on the environment was studied in terms of growth, metabolic rate, and total biomass of selected animal and plant species. Brief methodology and detailed results are presented.

  4. Precipitation titration of perchlorate using new titrants

    SciTech Connect

    Selig, W.

    1980-05-01

    We have evaluated the following new titrants for the potentiometric precipitation titration of perchlorate: cetyltrimethylammonium chloride (CETAC), cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CETAB), cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC), and benzyldimethyltetradecylammonium chloride (BDTAC). Titrations were monitored with a fluoroborate ion-selective electrode (ISE) and a double-junction reference electrode. The titration system was controlled by a Tektronix 4051 graphics system. The perchlorate, nitrate, and calcium ISE may also be used to monitor emf's. 7 tables, 2 figures.

  5. A Colorimetric Bioassay for Perchlorate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinnickel, M. L.; Smith, S.; Coates, J. D.

    2007-12-01

    Recognition of perchlorate (ClO4-) as a widespread contaminant across the United States and its potential adverse affects towards human health has motivated the EPA to place ClO4- on its contaminant candidate list for drinking water supplies. While a federal MCL has not yet been set, a recommended public health goal of 1 ppb (μg.L-1) was established by the US EPA in 2002. To date, methods of detection require use of sensitive ion chromatographic equipment that are expensive, time consuming, and require highly trained personnel for use. Our studies are focused on the development of a highly sensitive, simple, and robust colorimetric bioassay based on the primary enzyme involved in microbial ClO4- reduction, the perchlorate reductase (Pcr). A previously published assay used reduced methyl viologen (MV, the dye is reduced with sodium hydrosulfite) as an electron donor to demonstrate Pcr activity. The assay directly correlates the amount of MV oxidized with the amount of ClO4- reduced by assuming a transfer of four electrons. To test this assumption, we compared actual concentrations of MV oxidized to ClO4- reduced in this assay. ClO4- concentrations were determined using a Dionex ICS-500 ion chromatography system, while MV concentrations were determined using a standard curve generated at 578 nm. Comparisons between the two revealed that twelve molecules of MV were oxidized for each molecule of ClO4- reduced. The oxidation of these additional eight MV molecules is explained by the interaction of the dye with chlorite (the product of the Pcr reaction) and other contaminants that could be present in the enzyme prep. This unsettling result indicated this assay would be problematic for the detection of ClO4- in soil, which has many chemicals that could react with MV. To improve upon this assay, we have tried to reduce ClO4- using less reactive dyes and reductants. The reductants ascorbic acid, NADH, and dithiothreitol drive Pcr catalyzed ClO4- reduction, however, they

  6. The Microbiology of Perchlorate in the Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coates, J. D.

    2007-12-01

    In the last decade perchlorate has been identified as an important groundwater component that poses potential health threat. Although primarily sourced anthropogenically, many recent studies have identified significant natural pools throughout the US and the natural mechanisms of its synthesis remain a mystery. As such, the true perchlorate concentrations naturally present in the environment are still unknown making its regulation problematic. Because of its solubility and non-reactivity the fate and transport of perchlorate in the environment is primarily a function of microbial activity. In the last seven years more than forty specialized perchlorate respiring organisms have been identified and characterized. These dissimilatory perchlorate reducing bacteria (DPRB) are metabolically diverse and environmental populations tend to be dominated by two primary genotypes, the Dechloromonas and the Azospira species. As such, the majority of our understanding of this metabolism is based on these organisms. These organisms are readily found in soil and sedimentary environments and often associate with the rhizosphere. Recent research has demonstrated an accumulation of these organisms along plant roots suggesting their catabolism of root exudates and molecular studies has demonstrated their existence as endophytic infections of the stem and leaves of actively growing Brachypodium grass plants although their exact role under these conditions is unknown. These microorganisms are generally not nutritionally fastidious and vitamin supplementation is unnecessary for growth although molybdenum is a required trace element for perchlorate reduction. The Dechloromonas and Azospira species generally grow optimally at pH values near neutrality in freshwater environments. Even so, recent field studies have shown that related deep-branching members of these genera often predominate in sites of adverse pH or salinity with some species being capable of growth and perchlorate respiration

  7. Perchlorate and nitrate in situ bioremediation of ground water

    SciTech Connect

    Strietelmeier, E. A.; Nuttall, H. Eric; Hatzinger, Paul; Goltz, Mark

    2002-01-01

    Nitrate and perchlorate are growing worldwide problems as mobile anionic groundwater contaminants. Biological rduction of nitrate and perchlorate in groundwater is under development as a technology to address these problems.

  8. SURVEY OF FERTILIZERS AND RELATED MATERIALS FOR PERCHLORATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The most comprehensive survey of fertilizers and other raw materials for perchlorate to date has been conducted to determine whether these could be significant contributors to environmental perchlorate contamination. Although the data span a large range of commercial products, th...

  9. INVESTIGATION OF AGRICULTURAL FERTILIZERS AND RELATED MATERIALS FOR PERCHLORATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The most comprehensive survey of fertilizers and other raw materials for perchlorate to date has been conducted to determine whether these could be significant contributors to environmental perchlorate contamination. Although the data span a large range of commercial products, th...

  10. PERCHLORATE INDUCES HERMAPHRODITISM IN THREESPINE STICKLEBACKS

    PubMed Central

    Bernhardt, Richard R.; von Hippel, Frank A.; Cresko, William A.

    2011-01-01

    Recently, concern regarding perchlorate contamination has arisen in many contexts. Perchlorate has many military, commercial, and domestic applications, and it has been found in milk, drinking and irrigation water, and produce. Perchlorate is harmful at low levels, yet it remains unregulated in the United States while the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency attempts to establish acceptable exposure levels. The present study investigated potential reproductive effects on vertebrates using a model fish species, the threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus). Sticklebacks were raised from syngamy through sexual maturity in untreated water and in three target concentrations of sodium perchlorate–treated water. Perchlorate was found to interfere with the expression of nuptial coloration, courtship behavior, and normal sexual development. Genetic testing revealed that some females were masculinized to the extent that they produced both sperm and eggs, and histological analysis showed that these individuals had intersexual gonads (ovotestes) containing both oocytes and cells undergoing spermatogenesis. In vitro fertilizations revealed that those gametes were capable of self- and cross-fertilization. However, crosses using sperm derived from genetic females died either during the blastula phase or near the onset of organogenesis. Sperm derived from genetic males produced viable fry when crossed with eggs derived from genetic females from all treatments. To our knowledge, the present study provides the first evidence that perchlorate produces androgenic effects and is capable of inducing functional hermaphroditism in a nonhermaphroditic vertebrate. PMID:16916028

  11. PERCHLORATE PHYTOREMEDIATION USING HARDWOOD TREES AND VASCULAR PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate has contaminated water and soils at several locations in the United States. Perchlorate is
    water soluble, exceedingly mobile in aqueous systems, and can persist for many decades under typical ground and surface water conditions. Perchlorate is of concern because of...

  12. ACCUMULATION OF PERCHLORATE IN TOBACCO PLANTS AND TOBACCO PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous field and laboratory studies with vascular plants have shown that perchlorate is transported from perchlorate fortified soils and is accumulated in the plant tissues and organs. This paper reports results of initial investigations on the accumulation of perchlorate in t...

  13. DETERMINATION OF PERCHLORATE IN TOBACCO PLANTS AND TOBACCO PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous field and laboratory studies with vascular plants have shown that perchlorate is transported from perchlorate fortified soils and is accumulated in the plant tissues and organs. This paper reports results of initial investigations on the accumulation of perchlorate in t...

  14. Project Overview: PERCHLORATE ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINATION - TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW AND RISK CHARACTERIZATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The human health and ecological assessment issues related to environmental contamination by perchlorate are complex and continue to emerge. Perchlorate, ClO4-, is an anion that originates as a contaminant from the solid salts of ammonium, potassium or sodium perchlorate. These ...

  15. Perchlorate behavior in a municipal lake following fireworks displays.

    PubMed

    Wilkin, Richard T; Fine, Dennis D; Burnett, Nicole G

    2007-06-01

    Perchlorate salts of potassium and ammonium are the primary oxidants in pyrotechnic mixtures, yet insufficient information is available regarding the relationship between fireworks displays and the environmental occurrence of perchlorate. Here we document changes in perchlorate concentrations in surface water adjacent to a site of fireworks displays from 2004 to 2006. Preceding fireworks displays, perchlorate concentrations in surface water ranged from 0.005 to 0.081 microg/L, with a mean value of 0.043 microg/L. Within 14 h after the fireworks, perchlorate concentrations spiked to values ranging from 24 to 1028x the mean baseline value. A maximum perchlorate concentration of 44.2 microg/L was determined following the July 4th event in 2006. After the fireworks displays, perchlorate concentrations decreased toward the background level within 20 to 80 days, with the rate of attenuation correlating to surface water temperature. Adsorption tests indicate that sediments underlying the water column have limited (< 100 nmol/g) capacity to remove perchlorate via chemical adsorption. Microcosms showed comparatively rapid intrinsic perchlorate degradation in the absence of nitrate consistent with the observed disappearance of perchlorate from the study site. This suggests that at sites with appropriate biogeochemical conditions, natural attenuation may be an important factor affecting the fate of perchlorate following fireworks displays. PMID:17612176

  16. Perchlorate levels in soil and waters from the Atacama Desert.

    PubMed

    Calderón, R; Palma, P; Parker, D; Molina, M; Godoy, F A; Escudey, M

    2014-02-01

    Perchlorate is an anion that originates as a contaminant in ground and surface waters. The presence of perchlorate in soil and water samples from northern Chile (Atacama Desert) was investigated by ion chromatography-electrospray mass spectrometry. Results indicated that perchlorate was found in five of seven soils (cultivated and uncultivated) ranging from 290 ± 1 to 2,565 ± 2 μg/kg. The greatest concentration of perchlorate was detected in Humberstone soil (2,565 ± 2 μg/kg) associated with nitrate deposits. Perchlorate levels in Chilean soils are greater than those reported for uncultivated soils in the United States. Perchlorate was also found in superficial running water ranging from 744 ± 0.01 to 1,480 ± 0.02 μg/L. Perchlorate water concentration is 30-60 times greater than levels established by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (24.5 μg/L) for drinking. PMID:24165784

  17. Perchlorate in Water Supplies: Sources, Exposures, and Health Effects.

    PubMed

    Steinmaus, Craig M

    2016-06-01

    Perchlorate exposure occurs from ingestion of natural or man-made perchlorate in food or water. Perchlorate is used in a variety of industrial products including missile fuel, fireworks, and fertilizers, and industrial contamination of drinking water supplies has occurred in a number of areas. Perchlorate blocks iodide uptake into the thyroid and decreases the production of thyroid hormone, a critical hormone for metabolism, neurodevelopment, and other physiologic functions. Occupational and clinical dosing studies have not identified clear adverse effects, but may be limited by small sample sizes, short study durations, and the inclusion of mostly healthy adults. Expanding evidence suggests that young children, pregnant women, fetuses, and people co-exposed to similarly acting agents may be especially susceptible to perchlorate. Given the ubiquitous nature of perchlorate exposure, and the importance of thyroid hormone for brain development, studying the impact of perchlorate on human health could have far-reaching public health implications. PMID:27026358

  18. PERCHLORATE CHEMISTRY: IMPLICATIONS FOR ANALYSIS AND REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Since the discovery of perchlorate in the ground and surface waters of several western states, there has been increasing interest in the health effects resulting from chronic exposure to low (ppb) levels. With this concern has come a need to investigate technologies that might be...

  19. PERCHLORATE UPTAKE AND TRANSFORMATION IN AQUATIC PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ammonium Perchlorate (AP) is produced on a large scale by the chemical industry, for a wide range of applications for example, as a strong oxidizing agent in solid rocket fuel. AP must be washed out of the inventory periodically due to its limited shelf-life,and replaced with a f...

  20. Fate and Transport of Perchlorate at California's Stringfellow Superfund Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenoyer, G. J.; Nuttall, H. E.; Paulson, R.; Wolfenden, A.; Aldern, J.

    2007-12-01

    Geologic conditions exert primary control over the fate and transport of perchlorate at the Stringfellow Superfund site. A buried valley filled with alluvium has been defined that extends from Pyrite Canyon, location of the former Stringfellow acid pits, down to near the Santa Ana River. The buried valley is cut into the underlying granitic bedrock, and appears to be a paleo-channel of the ancestral Pyrite Creek. The groundwater hydraulic gradient aligns closely with the buried valley, as does the perchlorate plume. The buried valley appears to be a preferential pathway for contaminant migration. Perchlorate concentrations in the downgradient portion of the plume have been slowly decreasing over time, suggesting that the groundwater extraction wells are effective at cutting off the source. Perchlorate degradation, however, appears to be minimal over most of the sandy aerobic aquifer, as concentrations of perchlorate persist over a 5-mile long plume. Scattered concentrations of perchlorate in the 1 to 12 ug/L range are widespread over a broad area adjacent to the plume and appear to be unrelated to the plume. Hydrogeologic analysis and perchlorate isotope analysis are being used to investigate whether these outlying concentrations may be related to the historic use of perchlorate- bearing mineral nitrate fertilizer. At the distal end of the plume, a marked change in the fate of perchlorate occurs beneath the Santa Ana River. Sampling of mini-piezometers installed into the river sediments shows that the perchlorate and nitrate concentrations fall to below detection as the aquifer environment changes from oxidizing to reducing conditions. In this local environment, it appears that anaerobic biodegradation reduces the perchlorate and nitrate. As a result of degradation of perchlorate, and possibly mixing of infiltrating river water beneath the losing portions of the river, perchlorate concentrations decrease to below 6 ug/L downgradient of the river. This presentation

  1. Plant-mediated transformation of perchlorate into chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Nzengung, V.A.; Wang, C.; Harvey, G.

    1999-05-01

    The decontamination of perchlorate-contaminated water by woody plants was investigated in sand and hydroponic bioreactors. Willow trees were found to be the most favorable woody plants with phraetophytic characteristics in comparative screen tests with eastern cottonwoods and Eucalyptus cineria. Willows decontaminated aqueous solutions dosed with 10--100 mg/.L of perchlorate to below the method detection limit of 2 {micro}g/L. Two phytoprocesses were identified as important in the remediation of perchlorate-contaminated water: (1) uptake and phytodegradation of perchlorate in the tree branches and leaves and (2) rhizodegradation. Exposure of rooted willow trees to perchlorate-dosed media stimulated rhizodegradation. Homogeneous degradation studies using media from the root zone of dosed willow trees confirmed that rhizosphere-associated microorganisms mediated the degradation of perchlorate to chloride. Experiments conducted with varying ranges of nitrate concentrations clearly indicated that high nitrate concentrations interfered with rhizodegradation of perchlorate. This study provides evidence that the efficacy of phytoremediation of perchlorate-contaminated environments may depend on the concentration of competing terminal electron acceptors, such as nitrate, and the nitrogen source of the nutrient solution., Since perchlorate does not volatilize from water readily, a perchlorate remediation scheme may involve an intensively cultivated plantation of trees with phraetophytic characteristics and irrigation with the contaminated water.

  2. Atmospheric origins of perchlorate on Mars and in the Atacama

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catling, D. C.; Claire, M. W.; Zahnle, K. J.; Quinn, R. C.; Clark, B. C.; Hecht, M. H.; Kounaves, S.

    2010-01-01

    Isotopic studies indicate that natural perchlorate is produced on Earth in arid environments by the oxidation of chlorine species through pathways involving ozone or its photochemical products. With this analogy, we propose that the arid environment on Mars may have given rise to perchlorate through the action of atmospheric oxidants. A variety of hypothetical pathways can be proposed including photochemical reactions, electrostatic discharge, and gas-solid reactions. Because perchlorate-rich deposits in the Atacama desert are closest in abundance to perchlorate measured at NASA's Phoenix Lander site, we made a preliminary study of the means to produce Atacama perchlorate to help shed light on the origin of Martian perchlorate. We investigated gas phase pathways using a 1-D photochemical model. We found that perchlorate can be produced in sufficient quantities to explain the abundance of perchlorate in the Atacama from a proposed gas phase oxidation of chlorine volatiles to perchloric acid. The feasibility of gas phase production for the Atacama provides justification for future investigations of gas phase photochemistry as a possible source for Martian perchlorate.

  3. Perchlorate and Diet: Human Exposures, Risks, and Mitigation Strategies.

    PubMed

    Maffini, Maricel V; Trasande, Leonardo; Neltner, Thomas G

    2016-06-01

    Perchlorate is an endocrine-disrupting chemical that interferes with the normal functioning of the thyroid gland. Maternal thyroid dysfunction during gestation may alter fetal brain development. Perchlorate contamination is widespread: it is present in the body of all Americans tested and the majority of foods tested. The main sources of food contamination appear to be hypochlorite bleach, a disinfectant and sanitizer, that when poorly managed quickly degrades to perchlorate and perchlorate-laden plastic food packaging for dry food or localized contamination from manufacturing or processing of the chemical. Eliminating perchlorate from food packaging and improving bleach management, such as reducing concentration and storage time and temperature, would result in reduced perchlorate contamination of food and water. PMID:27029550

  4. Aquifer susceptibility to perchlorate contamination in a highly urbanized environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woolfenden, Linda R.

    2007-01-01

    Perchlorate contamination from anthropogenic sources has been released into the Rialto-Colton, California, USA, groundwater flow system since the 1940s during its production, distribution, storage, and use. Preliminary analysis of lithological, geophysical, and water-chemistry data provided new understanding of the pathways of perchlorate migration that aid in assessing the susceptibility of drinking-water supplies to contamination within the Rialto-Colton basin. Vertical migration of perchlorate into the main water-producing aquifers is restricted by an areally extensive old soil surface; however, perchlorate data indicate contamination below this soil surface. Possible pathways for the downward migration of the contaminated water include wellbore flow and discontinuities in the old soil surface. Horizontal migration of perchlorate is influenced by lithology and faults within the basin. The basin fill is a heterogeneous mixture of boulders, gravel, sand, silt, and clay, and internal faults may restrict perchlorate migration in some areas.

  5. DEVELOPMENT AND VALIDATION OF AN ION CHROMATOGRAPHIC METHOD FOR DETERMINING PERCHLORATE IN FERTILIZERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method has been developed for the determination of perchlorate in fertilizers. Materials are leached with deionized water to dissolve any soluble perchlorate compounds. Ion chromatographic separation is followed by suppressed conductivity for detection. Perchlorate is retained ...

  6. ACCUMULATION OF PERCHLORATE IN TOBACCO PLANTS: DEVELOPMENT OF A PLANT KINETIC MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous studies have shown that tobacco plants are tolerant of perchlorate and will accumulate perchlorate in plant tissues. This research determined the uptake, translocation, and accumulation of perchlorate in tobacco plants. Three hydroponics growth studies were completed u...

  7. Perchlorate and nitrate in leafy vegetables of North America.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, C A; Crump, K S; Krieger, R I; Khandaker, N R; Gibbs, J P

    2005-12-15

    In previous studies trace levels of perchlorate were found in lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) irrigated with Colorado River water, which is contaminated with low levels of perchlorate from aerospace and defense related industries. In this paper, we report the results of a survey conducted across North America to evaluate the occurrence of perchlorate in leafy vegetables produced outside the lower Colorado River region, and evaluate the relative iodide uptake inhibition potential to perchlorate and nitrate in these leafy vegetables. Conventionally and organically produced lettuce and other leafy vegetable samples were collected from production fields and farmers' markets in the central and coastal valleys of California, New Mexico, Colorado, Michigan, Ohio, New York, Quebec, and New Jersey. Results show that 16% of the conventionally produced samples and 32% of the organically produced samples had quantifiable levels of perchlorate using ion chromatography. Estimated perchlorate exposure from organically produced leafy vegetables was approximately 2 times that of conventional produce, but generally less than 10% of the reference dose recommended by the National Academy of Sciences. Furthermore, the iodide uptake inhibition potential of perchlorate was less than 1% of that of the nitrate present. These data are consistent with those of other reported perchlorate survey work with lettuce, bottled water, breast milk, dairy milk, and human urine, and suggest a wide national presence of perchlorate. PMID:16475313

  8. Atmospheric Production of Perchlorate on Earth and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claire, M.; Catling, D. C.; Zahnle, K. J.

    2009-12-01

    Natural production and preservation of perchlorate on Earth occurs only in arid environments. Isotopic evidence suggests a strong role for atmospheric oxidation of chlorine species via pathways including ozone or its photochemical derivatives. As the Martian atmosphere is both oxidizing and drier than the driest places on Earth, we propose an atmospheric origin for the Martian perchlorates measured by NASA's Phoenix Lander. A variety of hypothetical formation pathways can be proposed including atmospheric photochemical reactions, electrostatic discharge, and gas-solid reactions. Here, we investigate gas phase formation pathways using a 1-D photochemical model (Catling et al. 2009, accepted by JGR). Because perchlorate-rich deposits in the Atacama desert are closest in abundance to perchlorate measured at NASA's Phoenix Lander site, we start with a study of the means to produce Atacama perchlorate. We found that perchlorate can be produced in sufficient quantities to explain the abundance of perchlorate in the Atacama from a proposed gas phase oxidation of chlorine volatiles to perchloric acid. These results are sensitive to estimated reaction rates for ClO3 species. The feasibility of gas phase production for the Atacama provides justification for further investigations of gas phase photochemistry as a possible source for Martian perchlorate. In addition to the Atacama results, we will present a preliminary study incorporating chlorine chemistry into an existing Martian photochemical model (Zahnle et al. JGR 2008).

  9. Perchlorate as an emerging contaminant in soil, water and food.

    PubMed

    Kumarathilaka, Prasanna; Oze, Christopher; Indraratne, S P; Vithanage, Meththika

    2016-05-01

    Perchlorate ( [Formula: see text] ) is a strong oxidizer and has gained significant attention due to its reactivity, occurrence, and persistence in surface water, groundwater, soil and food. Stable isotope techniques (i.e., ((18)O/(16)O and (17)O/(16)O) and (37)Cl/(35)Cl) facilitate the differentiation of naturally occurring perchlorate from anthropogenic perchlorate. At high enough concentrations, perchlorate can inhibit proper function of the thyroid gland. Dietary reference dose (RfD) for perchlorate exposure from both food and water is set at 0.7 μg kg(-1) body weight/day which translates to a drinking water level of 24.5 μg L(-1). Chromatographic techniques (i.e., ion chromatography and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry) can be successfully used to detect trace level of perchlorate in environmental samples. Perchlorate can be effectively removed by wide variety of remediation techniques such as bio-reduction, chemical reduction, adsorption, membrane filtration, ion exchange and electro-reduction. Bio-reduction is appropriate for large scale treatment plants whereas ion exchange is suitable for removing trace level of perchlorate in aqueous medium. The environmental occurrence of perchlorate, toxicity, analytical techniques, removal technologies are presented. PMID:26868023

  10. Interaction of perchlorate and trichloroethene bioreductions in mixed anaerobic culture.

    PubMed

    Wen, Li-Lian; Yang, Qiang; Zhang, Zhao-Xin; Yi, Yang-Yi; Tang, Youneng; Zhao, He-Ping

    2016-11-15

    This work evaluated the interaction of perchlorate and trichloroethene (TCE), two common co-contaminants in groundwater, during bioreduction in serum bottles containing synthetic mineral salts media and microbial consortia. TCE at concentrations up to 0.3mM did not significantly affect perchlorate reduction; however, perchlorate concentrations higher than 0.1mM made the reduction of TCE significantly slower. Perchlorate primarily inhibited the reduction of vinyl chloride (VC, a daughter product of TCE) to ethene. Mechanistic analysis showed that the inhibition was mainly because perchlorate reduction is thermodynamically more favorable than reduction of TCE and its daughter products and not because of toxicity due to accumulation of dissolved oxygen produced during perchlorate reduction. As the initial perchlorate concentration increased from 0 to 600mg/L in a set of serum bottles, the relative abundance of Rhodocyclaceae (a putatively perchlorate-reducing genus) increased from 6.3 to 80.6%, while the relative abundance of Dehalococcoides, the only known genus that is able to reduce TCE all the way to ethene, significantly decreased. Similarly, the relative abundance of Proteobacteria (a phylum to which most known perchlorate-reducing bacteria belong) increased from 22% to almost 80%. PMID:27449607

  11. Potential perchlorate exposure from Citrus sp. irrigated with contaminated water.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, C A; Krieger, R I; Khandaker, N R; Valentin-Blasini, L; Blount, B C

    2006-05-10

    Citrus produced in the southwestern United States is often irrigated with perchlorate-contaminated water. This irrigation water includes Colorado River water which is contaminated with perchlorate from a manufacturing plant previously located near the Las Vegas Wash, and ground water from wells in Riverside and San Bernardino counties of California which are affected by a perchlorate plume associated with an aerospace facility once located near Redlands, California. Studies were conducted to evaluate the uptake and distribution of perchlorate in citrus irrigated with contaminated water, and estimate potential human exposure to perchlorate from the various citrus types including lemon (Citrus limon), grapefruit (Citrus paradise), and orange (Citrus sinensis) produced in the region. Perchlorate concentrations ranged from less than 2-9 microg/L for Colorado River water and from below detection to approximately 18 microg/L for water samples from wells used to irrigate citrus. Destructive sampling of lemon trees produced with Colorado River water show perchlorate concentrations larger in the leaves (1835 microg/kg dry weight (dw)) followed by the fruit (128 microg/kg dw). Mean perchlorate concentrations in roots, trunk, and branches were all less than 30 microg/kg dw. Fruit pulp analyzed in the survey show perchlorate concentrations ranged from below detection limit to 38 microg/kg fresh weight (fw), and were related to the perchlorate concentration of irrigation water. Mean hypothetical exposures (mug/person/day) of children and adults from lemons (0.005 and 0.009), grapefruit (0.03 and 0.24), and oranges (0.51 and 1.20) were estimated. These data show that potential perchlorate exposures from citrus in the southwestern United States are negligible relative to the reference dose recommended by the National Academy of Sciences. PMID:17723376

  12. Perchlorate Clinical Pharmacology and Human Health: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Soldin, Offie Porat; Braverman, Lewis E.; Lamm, Steven H.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Potassium perchlorate has been used at various times during the last 50 years to treat hyperthyroidism. Since World War II ammonium perchlorate has been used as a propellant for rockets. In 1997, the assay sensitivity for perchlorate in water was improved from 0.4 mg/L (ppm) to 4 µg/L (ppb). As a result, public water supplies in Southern California were found to contain perchlorate ions in the range of 5 to 8 ppb, and those in Southern Nevada were found to contain 5 to 24 ppb. Research programs have been developed to assess the safety or risk from these exposures and to assist state and regulatory agencies in setting a reasonable safe level for perchlorate in drinking water. This report reviews the evidence on the human health effects of perchlorate exposure. Perchlorate is a competitive inhibitor of iodine uptake. All of its pharmacologic effects at current therapeutic levels or lower are associated with inhibition of the sodium-iodide symporter (NIS) on the thyroid follicular cell membrane. A review of the medical and occupational studies has been undertaken to identify perchlorate exposure levels at which thyroid hormone levels may be reduced or thyrotropin levels increased. This exposure level may begin in the 35 to 100 mg/d range. Volunteer studies have been designed to determine the exposure levels at which perchlorate begins to affect iodine uptake in humans. Such effects may begin at levels of approximately 1 mg/d. Environmental studies have assessed the thyroidal health of newborns and adults at current environmental exposures to perchlorate and have concluded that the present levels appear to be safe. Whereas additional studies are underway both in laboratory animals and in the field, it appears that a safe level can be established for perchlorate in water and that regulatory agencies and others are now trying to determine that level. PMID:11477312

  13. Perchlorate in the Great Lakes: isotopic composition and origin.

    PubMed

    Poghosyan, Armen; Sturchio, Neil C; Morrison, Candice G; Beloso, Abelardo D; Guan, Yunbin; Eiler, John M; Jackson, W Andrew; Hatzinger, Paul B

    2014-10-01

    Perchlorate is a persistent and mobile contaminant in the environment with both natural and anthropogenic sources. Stable isotope ratios of oxygen (δ(18)O, Δ(17)O) and chlorine (δ(37)Cl) along with the abundance of the radioactive isotope (36)Cl were used to trace perchlorate sources and behavior in the Laurentian Great Lakes. These lakes were selected for study as a likely repository of recent atmospheric perchlorate deposition. Perchlorate concentrations in the Great Lakes range from 0.05 to 0.13 μg per liter. δ(37)Cl values of perchlorate from the Great Lakes range from +3.0‰ (Lake Ontario) to +4.0‰ (Lake Superior), whereas δ(18)O values range from -4.1‰ (Lake Superior) to +4.0‰ (Lake Erie). Great Lakes perchlorate has mass-independent oxygen isotopic variations with positive Δ(17)O values (+1.6‰ to +2.7‰) divided into two distinct groups: Lake Superior (+2.7‰) and the other four lakes (∼+1.7‰). The stable isotopic results indicate that perchlorate in the Great Lakes is dominantly of natural origin, having isotopic composition resembling that measured for indigenous perchlorate from preindustrial groundwaters of the western USA. The (36)Cl/Cl ratio of perchlorate varies widely from 7.4 × 10(-12) (Lake Ontario) to 6.7 × 10(-11) (Lake Superior). These (36)ClO4(-) abundances are consistent with an atmospheric origin of perchlorate in the Great Lakes. The relatively high (36)ClO4(-) abundances in the larger lakes (Lakes Superior and Michigan) could be explained by the presence of (36)Cl-enriched perchlorate deposited during the period of elevated atmospheric (36)Cl activity following thermonuclear bomb tests in the Pacific Ocean. PMID:25171443

  14. Predicting perchlorate uptake in greenhouse lettuce from perchlorate, nitrate and chloride irrigation water concentrations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Perchlorate (ClO4-) has been detected in edible leafy vegetables irrigated with Colorado River water. The primary concern has been the ClO4- concentration in lettuce. There has been a limited number of studies on ClO4- uptake but the interactive effect of other anions on ClO4- uptake is not known in...

  15. High ozone increases soil perchlorate but does not affect foliar perchlorate content

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ozone (O3) is implicated in the natural source inventory of perchlorate (ClO4-), a hydrophilic salt that migrates to ground water and interferes with uptake of iodide in mammals, including humans. Tropospheric O3 is elevated in many areas. We previously showed (Grantz et al., 2013; Environmental Pol...

  16. PERCHLORATE IDENTIFICATION IN FERTILIZERS AND ACCUMULATION IN LETTUCE SEEDLINGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate has contaminated groundwater, drinking water and soils at several locations in the U.S. The primary source of contamination at sites that have been investigated to date seems to be from industrial and military operations that use Perchlorate as an oxidizing agent. How...

  17. Perchlorate Exposure Through Water and Milk in Istanbul.

    PubMed

    Can, Ozge; Blount, Ben; Valentin-Blasini, Liza; Erdemgil, Yigit; Uzunoglu, Deniz; Aksoy, Murat; Coskun, Abdurrahman; Serteser, Mustafa; Unsal, Ibrahim; Ozpinar, Aysel

    2016-09-01

    Perchlorate is a chemical pollutant that inhibits iodide uptake and may possibly impair thyroid function. Our previous study found widespread perchlorate exposure in non-pregnant, non-lactating, healthy women residing in Istanbul. The aim of this study is to assess the relative amounts of perchlorate exposure attributable to consumption of municipal water, bottled water and boxed milk available in Istanbul. Only trace levels of perchlorate were found in treated municipal water (58 % detectable, mean = 0.13 µg/L, maximum = 0.75 µg/L) and bottled water (7.4 % detectable, mean = perchlorate (mean = 4.53 µg/L; maximum = 6.21 µg/L). Median perchlorate exposure attributable to water and milk (0.007 µg/kg/day) is small compared both to the reference dose (0.7 µg/kg/day) and to total perchlorate exposure (0.13 µg/kg/day) in Istanbul. Therefore, additional studies are needed to identify the major sources of perchlorate exposure in Istanbul. PMID:27435977

  18. Predicting Perchlorate Exposure in Milk From Concentrations in Dairy Feed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Perchlorate has been detected in US milk samples from many different states. To attempt to manage this problem it is important to know the pathways for its possible accumulation. Data taken from a recently reported 9-week perchlorate experiment dosing 16 Holstein dairy cows allowed us to derive an...

  19. Experimental chlorine stable isotope fractionation of perchlorate respiring bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ader, M.; Coleman, M.; Coates, J.; Chaudhuri, S.

    2006-12-01

    Perchlorate natural occurrences on earth are very limited and seem restricted to extremely arid environments such as nitrate deposits of the Atacama Desert of northern Chile, where perchlorate contents can reach 0.1 to 1%. Anthropogenically sourced perchlorate however is extensively used as a major component of explosives and rocket fuels. Careless disposal of these highly soluble and very stable perchlorates locally led to the contamination of drinking water, now recognised as posing a significant health threat. Recent studies have demonstrated that some microorganisms are able to completely reduce perchlorate to innocuous chloride, and offer a great potential for the bioremediation of contaminated waters. Provided that the isotopic fractionation associated with this reduction is significant, the measurement of the chloride isotopic composition of contaminated water is a powerful tool for monitoring the progress of in-situ remediation. We report here, the characterisation of the isotopic fractionation associated with perchlorate reduction performed by Dechlorosoma suillum strain PS during 3 culture experiments performed in a batch fermentor (anoxic, 37°°C, pH =7). The basal medium contained acetate as the electron donor and perchlorate as the electron acceptor. When possible, chloride salts were replaced by sulphate salts so as to lower the initial chloride content. The paired chlorine isotopic compositions of chloride and perchlorate in solutions sampled throughout the experiment were measured using the method described in Ader et al. 2001. The fractionation between chloride and perchlorate was calculated independently for each sample, using on the one hand the chloride content and isotopic composition and on the other hand the perchlorate content and isotopic composition. The results show that the fractionation is constant within error throughout the experiment for the 3 experiments with a weighted mean of -14.94±0.14‰. This value is much lower than the

  20. Bioremediation Potential of Perchlorate Contaminated Deep Vadose Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal, H.; Ronen, Z.; Weisbrod, N.; Dahan, O.; Nativ, R.

    2007-12-01

    Widespread perchlorate contamination was found in the vadose zone near a plant that manufactures ammonium perchlorate above the coastal aquifer of Israel in Ramat Hasharon. As part of the plant's operations, untreated industrial wastewater was disposed of for over 30 years in unlined wastewater ponds and nearby washes, causing contamination of the unsaturated zone (up to 2200 mg kg-1 sediment at a depth of 20 m) and the groundwater below it (up to 300 mg L-1). In this study, we examined the potential for microbial metabolism of perchlorate reduction in the contaminated deep vadose zone profile by native microbial communities. Microbial reduction of perchlorate was found in three of the four sediment samples taken from different depths. The sediments taken from 1 m (shallowest) and 35 m (deepest- close to the water table) showed the fastest degradation rates, while the sediment taken from 15 m showed the slowest rate. No perchlorate reduction was observed in the sediment taken from 20 m, where perchlorate concentrations were highest. These results were correlated to the viable microorganism counts in the profile. In experiments in which the effect of nitrate was examined, the lag time for perchlorate degradation was found to be inversely correlated to the initial nitrate concentration, while the perchlorate-reduction rates were faster in treatments with higher initial nitrate concentrations. We found no perchlorate degradation as long as nitrate was present in the system: perchlorate reduction was initiated only after all of the nitrate had been reduced. Nitrate-reduction rates were correlated to the initial nitrate concentrations and no lag period was observed. Nitrite was temporarily accumulated during nitrate reduction and was totally reduced, like nitrate, after 4 days. Count of viable microbial communities as well as PCR analysis of the chlorite dismutase gene in the native microbial population exposed to high concentrations of perchlorate (10,000-20,000 mg L-1

  1. Trace level perchlorate analysis by ion chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Johnson; Gandhi, Jay; Hedrick, Joe

    2005-08-26

    Perchlorate is commonly used as an oxidant in solid fuel propellant for rockets and missiles. Recently perchlorate contamination was found in many aquifers associated with Colorado River and other sites. Perchlorate was also found at elevated level in crops that use contaminated water for irrigation. Ion chromatography with conductivity detection could be used to measure perchlorate levels in drinking and wastewaters as per United States Environmental Protection Agency method 314, but at lower levels and with complexity of the matrix there could be false positive and/or false negative. This study was done to demonstrate the detection of perchlorate with lower detection limit with high ionic matrix by ion chromatography-mass spectrometry. PMID:16106848

  2. CHRONIC PERCHLORATE EXPOSURE CAUSES MORPHOLOGICAL ABNORMALITIES IN DEVELOPING STICKLEBACK

    PubMed Central

    Bernhardt, Richard R.; Von Hippel, Frank A.; O’Hara, Todd M.

    2011-01-01

    Few studies have examined the effects of chronic perchlorate exposure during growth and development, and fewer still have analyzed the effects of perchlorate over multiple generations. We describe morphological and developmental characteristics for threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) that were spawned and raised to sexual maturity in perchlorate-treated water (G1,2003) and for their offspring (G2,2004) that were not directly treated with perchlorate. The G1,2003 displayed a variety of abnormalities, including impaired formation of calcified traits, slower growth rates, aberrant sexual development, poor survivorship, and reduced pigmentation that allowed internal organs to be visible. Yet these conditions were absent when the offspring of contaminated fish (G2,2004) were raised in untreated water, suggesting a lack of transgenerational effects and that surviving populations may be able to recover following remediation of perchlorate-contaminated sites PMID:21465539

  3. Proteomic detection of proteins involved in perchlorate and chlorate metabolism.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Reema; Deobald, Lee A; Crawford, Ronald L; Paszczynski, Andrzej J

    2009-09-01

    Mass spectrometry and a time-course cell lysis method were used to study proteins involved in perchlorate and chlorate metabolism in pure bacterial cultures and environmental samples. The bacterial cultures used included Dechlorosoma sp. KJ, Dechloromonas hortensis, Pseudomonas chloritidismutans ASK-1, and Pseudomonas stutzeri. The environmental samples included an anaerobic sludge enrichment culture from a sewage treatment plant, a sample of a biomass-covered activated carbon matrix from a bioreactor used for treating perchlorate-contaminated drinking water, and a waste water effluent sample from a paper mill. The approach focused on detection of perchlorate (and chlorate) reductase and chlorite dismutase proteins, which are the two central enzymes in the perchlorate (or chlorate) reduction pathways. In addition, acetate-metabolizing enzymes in pure bacterial samples and housekeeping proteins from perchlorate (or chlorate)-reducing microorganisms in environmental samples were also identified. PMID:19199051

  4. Perchlorate isotope forensics with naturally produced 36Cl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillegonds, D.; Parker, D.; Singleton, M.; Buchholz, B.; Esser, B.; Moran, J.; Rood, D.; Finkel, R.

    2008-12-01

    The source of perchlorate (ClO4-) in many surface and groundwaters is not known. Recent studies (Parker et al., 2008) suggest that natural production is widespread and common, and may involve atmospheric processes. The isotopic composition of perchlorate chlorine and oxygen has proven useful for identifying anthropogenic/natural perchlorate sources (Bohlke et al, 2005) and for exploring biodegradation in environmental samples (Sturchio et al, 2007). The stable isotope approach, however, requires processing very large volumes of water to obtain milligrams of rigorously separated perchlorate for analysis, limiting its widespread application. Chlorine-36 (36Cl) is a long-lived and rare radionuclide produced cosmogenically in the upper atmosphere. The measurement of 36Cl/Cl by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) only requires micrograms of sample chlorine enabling lower volume extractions (less than 1/10th that required for stable isotope techniques), and potentially less rigorous perchlorate chemistry. The primary technical goal of our work is to determine the utility of 36Cl in distinguishing perchlorate source and in constraining mechanisms of natural perchlorate formation. We expect that synthetic perchlorate compounds produced using chloride brines from ancient sources and concentrated modern deposits will have low 36Cl/Cl ratios that will be distinct from natural perchlorate produced in the atmosphere. High levels of 36Cl in groundwater or rainwater perchlorate would then be an unambiguous indication of a natural atmospheric production, and the distribution of 36Cl/Cl in precipitation and groundwater (in conjunction with stable isotope compositions) would constrain the mechanism for natural perchlorate production in the atmosphere. Using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), we have measured 36Cl/Cl in a number of synthetic perchlorate salts (including potassium, sodium, magnesium, and ammonium salts). Synthetic salt 36Cl/Cl atom ratios range from 1 to 35 e-15

  5. Weakening of ice by magnesium perchlorate hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenferink, Hendrik J.; Durham, William B.; Stern, Laura A.; Pathare, Asmin V.

    2013-08-01

    We show that perchlorate hydrates, which have been detected at high circumpolar martian latitudes, have a dramatic effect upon the rheological behavior of polycrystalline water ice under conditions applicable to the North Polar Layered Deposits (NPLD). We conducted subsolidus creep tests on mixtures of ice and magnesium perchlorate hydrate, Mg(ClO4)2·6H2O (MP6), of 0.02, 0.05, 0.10, and 0.47 volume fraction MP6. We found these mixtures to be increasingly weak with increasing MP6 content. For mixtures with ⩽0.10 volume fraction MP6, we resolved a stress exponent of n ≈ 2 at low stresses transitioning to n ≈ 4 above 10 MPa. Scanning electron microscopy of deformed specimens revealed MP6 to be distributed as an interconnected film between ice grains. These results suggest that grain boundary sliding (GBS) may be enhanced with respect to pure ice. As the enhancement of GBS is expected in polycrystalline aggregates containing a few percent melt or otherwise weak material distributed along grain boundaries, the observed n ≈ 2 is consistent with the mutual accommodation of basal slip and GBS. If ice containing trace concentrations of MP6 is also much weaker than pure ice at low stresses, flow in the NPLD could be significantly enhanced, particularly at the warmer basal temperatures associated with higher martian obliquities.

  6. Weakening of ice by magnesium perchlorate hydrate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lenferinka, Hendrick J.; Durhama, William B.; Sternb, Laura A.; Patharec, Asmin V.

    2013-01-01

    We show that perchlorate hydrates, which have been detected at high circumpolar martian latitudes, have a dramatic effect upon the rheological behavior of polycrystalline water ice under conditions applicable to the North Polar Layered Deposits (NPLD). We conducted subsolidus creep tests on mixtures of ice and magnesium perchlorate hydrate, Mg(ClO4)2·6H2O (MP6), of 0.02, 0.05, 0.10, and 0.47 volume fraction MP6. We found these mixtures to be increasingly weak with increasing MP6 content. For mixtures with ⩽0.10 volume fraction MP6, we resolved a stress exponent of n ≈ 2 at low stresses transitioning to n ≈ 4 above 10 MPa. Scanning electron microscopy of deformed specimens revealed MP6 to be distributed as an interconnected film between ice grains. These results suggest that grain boundary sliding (GBS) may be enhanced with respect to pure ice. As the enhancement of GBS is expected in polycrystalline aggregates containing a few percent melt or otherwise weak material distributed along grain boundaries, the observed n ≈ 2 is consistent with the mutual accommodation of basal slip and GBS. If ice containing trace concentrations of MP6 is also much weaker than pure ice at low stresses, flow in the NPLD could be significantly enhanced, particularly at the warmer basal temperatures associated with higher martian obliquities.

  7. Perchlorate in water, soil, vegetation, and rodents collected from the Las Vegas Wash, Nevada, USA.

    PubMed

    Smith, Philip N; Yu, Lu; McMurry, Scott T; Anderson, Todd A

    2004-11-01

    Water, soil, vegetation, and rodents were collected from three areas along the Las Vegas Wash, a watershed heavily contaminated with perchlorate. Perchlorate was detected at elevated concentrations in water, soil, and vegetation, but was not frequently detected in rodent liver or kidney tissues. Broadleaf weeds contained the highest concentrations of perchlorate among all plant types examined. Perchlorate in rodent tissues and vegetation was correlated with perchlorate concentrations in soil as expected, however rodent residues were not highly correlated with plant perchlorate concentrations. This indicates that soil may be a greater source, or a more constant source of perchlorate exposure in rodents than vegetation. PMID:15276280

  8. Reduction of perchlorate and nitrate by salt tolerant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Okeke, Benedict C; Giblin, Tara; Frankenberger, William T

    2002-01-01

    Spent regenerant brine from ion-exchange technology for the removal of perchlorate and nitrate produces a high salt waste stream, which requires remediation before disposal. Bioremediation is an attractive treatment option. In this study, we enriched for salt tolerant bacteria from sediments from Cargill salt evaporation facility (California, USA), the Salton Sea (California, USA), and a high density hydrocarbon oxidizing bacterial cocktail. The bacterial cocktail enrichment culture reduced ClO4- from 500 to 260 mg 1 in 4 weeks. Salt tolerant bacterial isolates from the enrichment cultures and two denitrifying salt tolerant bacteria, Haloferax denitrificans and Parococcus halodenitricans, substantially reduced perchlorate. The highest rate of perchlorate removal was recorded with the isolate, Citrobacter sp.: 32% reduction in 1 week. This bacterium substantially reduced perchlorate in 0-5% NaCl solutions and maximally at 30 degrees C and at an initial pH 7.5. In simulated brines containing 7.5% total solids, the Citrobacter sp. significantly reduced both perchlorate and nitrate with 34.9 and 15.6% reduction, respectively, in 1 week. Coculture of a potent perchlorate reducing, non-salt tolerant (non-saline) bacterium, perclace and the Citrobacter sp. proved most effective for perchlorate removal in the brine (46.4% in 1 week). This study demonstrates that both anions can be reduced in treatment of brines from ion exchange systems. PMID:12009133

  9. Effects of Perchlorate on Organic Molecules under Simulated Mars Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrier, B. L.; Kounaves, S. P.

    2014-12-01

    Perchlorate (ClO4-) was discovered in the northern polar region of Mars by the Mars Phoenix Lander in 2008 and has also been recently detected by the Curiosity Rover in Gale Crater [1,2]. Perchlorate has also been shown to be formed under current Mars conditions via the oxidation of mineral chlorides, further supporting the theory that perchlorate is present globally on Mars [3]. The discovery of perchlorate on Mars has raised important questions about the effects of perchlorate on the survival and detection of organic molecules. Although it has been shown that pyrolysis in the presence of perchlorate results in the alteration or destruction of organic molecules [4], few studies have been conducted on the potential effects of perchlorate on organic molecules under martian surface conditions. Although perchlorate is typically inert under Mars-typical temperatures [5], perchlorate does absorb high energy UV radiation, and has been shown to decompose to form reactive oxychlorine species such as chlorite (ClO2-) when exposed to martian conditions including UV or ionizing radiation [6,7]. Here we investigate the effects of perchlorate on the organic molecules tryptophan, benzoic acid and mellitic acid in order to determine how perchlorate may alter these compounds under Mars conditions. Experiments are performed in a Mars Simulation Chamber (MSC) capable of reproducing the temperature, pressure, atmospheric composition and UV flux found on Mars. Soil simulants are prepared consisting of SiO2 and each organic, as well as varying concentrations of perchlorate salts, and exposed in the MSC. Subsequent to exposure in the MSC samples are leached and the leachate analyzed by HPLC and LC-MS to determine the degree of degradation of the original organic and the identity of any potential decomposition products formed by oxidation or chlorination. References: [1] Kounaves et al., J. Geophys. Res. Planets, Vol. 115, p. E00E10, 2010 [2] Glavin et al., J. Geophys. Res. Planets, Vol

  10. Electron donors and co-contaminants affect microbial community composition and activity in perchlorate degradation.

    PubMed

    Guan, Xiangyu; Xie, Yuxuan; Wang, Jinfeng; Wang, Jing; Liu, Fei

    2015-04-01

    Although microbial reduction of perchlorate (ClO4(-)) is a promising and effective method, our knowledge on the changes in microbial communities during ClO4(-) degradation is limited, especially when different electron donors are supplied and/or other contaminants are present. Here, we examined the effects of acetate and hydrogen as electron donors and nitrate and ammonium as co-contaminants on ClO4(-) degradation by anaerobic microcosms using six treatments. The process of degradation was divided into the lag stage (SI) and the accelerated stage (SII). Quantitative PCR was used to quantify four genes: pcrA (encoding perchlorate reductase), cld (encoding chlorite dismutase), nirS (encoding copper and cytochrome cd1 nitrite reductase), and 16S rRNA. While the degradation of ClO4(-) with acetate, nitrate, and ammonia system (PNA) was the fastest with the highest abundance of the four genes, it was the slowest in the autotrophic system (HYP). The pcrA gene accumulated in SI and played a key role in initiating the accelerated degradation of ClO4(-) when its abundance reached a peak. Degradation in SII was primarily maintained by the cld gene. Acetate inhibited the growth of perchlorate-reducing bacteria (PRB), but its effect was weakened by nitrate (NO3(-)), which promoted the growth of PRB in SI, and therefore, accelerated the ClO4(-) degradation rate. In addition, ammonia (NH4(+)), as nitrogen sources, accelerated the growth of PRB. The bacterial communities' structure and diversity were significantly affected by electron donors and co-contaminants. Under heterotrophic conditions, both ammonia and nitrate promoted Azospira as the most dominant genera, a fact that might significantly influence the rate of ClO4(-) natural attenuation by degradation. PMID:25382499

  11. Simultaneous removal of perchlorate and energetic compounds in munitions wastewater by zero-valent iron and perchlorate-respiring bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Se Chang; Hubbard, Brian; Cha, Daniel K; Kim, Byung J

    2014-01-01

    Ammonium perchlorate is one of the main constituents in Army's insensitive melt-pour explosive, PAX-21 in addition to RDX and 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN). The objective of this study is to develop an innovative treatment process to remove both perchlorate and energetic compounds simultaneously from PAX-21 production wastewater. It was hypothesized that the pretreatment of PAX-21 wastewater with zero-valent iron (ZVI) would convert energetic compounds to products that are more amenable for biological oxidation and that these products serve as electron donors for perchlorate-reducing bacteria. Results of batch ZVI reduction experiments showed that DNAN was completely reduced to 2,4-diaminoanisole and RDX was completely reduced to formaldehyde. Anaerobic batch biodegradation experiments showed that perchlorate (30 mg L(-1)) in ZVI-treated PAX-21 wastewater was decreased to an undetectable level after 5 days. Batch biodegradation experiments also confirmed that formaldehyde in ZVI-treated wastewater was the primary electron donor for perchlorate-respiring bacteria. The integrated iron-anaerobic bioreactor system was effective in completely removing energetic compounds and perchlorate from the PAX-21 wastewater without adding an exogenous electron donor. This study demonstrated that ZVI pretreatment not only removed energetic compounds, but also transformed energetic compounds to products that can serve as the source of electrons for perchlorate-respiring bacteria. PMID:24410688

  12. Shock Compression of Ammonium Perchlorate Single Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Y. M.; Yuan, Gang; Feng, Ruqiang

    1997-07-01

    The shock response of ammonium perchlorate (AP) single crystals has been examined for uniaxial strain compression along the [210] and [001] directions. Quartz gauge and VISAR measurements have provided the wave profiles at the impact surface and after propagation through thin samples (1-3 mm thickness) for peak stresses ranging between 10 and 65 kbar. A two wave structure due to elastic-plastic deformation was observed for both orientations. The measured HEL values for the [210] and [001] orientations were about 4.3 and 3.5 kbar, respectively. Data for the two orientations reveal small stress relaxation effects and small differences due to crystal orientation effects. We have chosen to fit both sets of results with a simple elastic-perfectly plastic model used for isotropic materials. Reasonable agreement between the calculations and experimental results was obtained. Over the stress range examined to date, no evidence of chemical decomposition was observed for the time durations in our experiments.

  13. High pressure studies of potassium perchlorate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pravica, Michael; Wang, Yonggang; Sneed, Daniel; Reiser, Sharissa; White, Melanie

    2016-09-01

    Two experiments are reported on KClO4 at extreme conditions. A static high pressure Raman study was first conducted to 18.9 GPa. Evidence for at least two new phases was observed: one between 2.4 and 7.7 GPa (possibly sluggish), and the second near 11.7 GPa. Then, the X-ray induced decomposition rate of potassium perchlorate (KClO4 → hν KCl + 2O2) was studied up to 15.2 GPa. The time-dependent growth of KCl and O2 was monitored. The decomposition rate slowed at higher pressures. We present the first direct evidence for O2 crystallization at higher pressures, demonstrating that O2 molecules aggregate at high pressure.

  14. The NAS Perchlorate Review: Adverse Effects?

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, Richard B.; Corley, Richard; Cowan, Linda; Utiger, Robert D.

    2005-11-01

    To the editor: Drs. Ginsberg and Rice argue that the reference dose for perchlorate of 0.0007 mg/kg per day recommended by the National Academies’ Committee to Assess the Health Implications of Perchlorate Ingestion is not adequately protective. As members of the committee, we disagree. Ginsberg and Rice base their conclusion on three points. The first involves the designation of the point of departure as a NOEL (no-observed-effect level) versus a LOAEL (lowest-observed-adverse- effect level). The committee chose as its point of departure a dose of perchlorate (0.007 mg/kg per day) that when given for 14 days to 7 normal subjects did not cause a significant decrease in the group mean thyroid iodide uptake (Greer et al. 2002). Accordingly, the committee considered it a NOEL. Ginsberg and Rice focus on the fact that only 7 subjects were given that dose, and they 1seem to say that attention should be paid only to the results in those subjects in whom there was a 1fall in thyroid iodide uptake, and that the results in those in whom there was no fall or an increase should be ignored. They consider the dose to be a LOAEL because of the fall in uptake in those few subjects. It is important to note that a statistically significant decrease of, for example, 5% or even 10%, would not be biologically important and, more important, would not be sustained. For example, in another study (Braverman et al. 2004), administration of 0.04 mg/kg per day to normal subjects for 6 months had no effect on thyroid iodide uptake when measured at 3 and 6 months, and no effect on serum thyroid hormone or thyrotropin concentrations measured monthly (inspection of Figure 5A in the paper by Greer et al. suggests that this dose would inhibit thyroid iodide uptake by about 25% if measured at 2 weeks). The second issue involves database uncertainty. In clinical studies, perchlorate has been administered prospectively to 68 normal subjects for 2 weeks to 6 months. In one study (Brabant et al. 1992

  15. DETERMINATION OF PERCHLORATE IN INDUSTRIAL AND FOODGRADE CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate anion has been found in numerous drinking water supplies at concentrations that recent studies indicate may adversely affect human health. In collaboration with the Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water (OGWDW) and Dionex Corporation, the National Exposure Resea...

  16. POLISHING THE EFFLUENT FROM AN ANAEROBIC BIOLOGICAL PERCHLORATE TREATMENT PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Anaerobic biological processes effectively reduce perchlorate to chloride. However, the effluent can be biologically unstable, high in particulates and high in disinfection by-product precursor compounds. Such an effluent would be unsuitable for transmission into a drinking water...

  17. Dealing With Perchlorate in the Santa Clarita Valley, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulos, L.; Min, J.; Juby, G.; McLean, S.; Prasifka, D.; Brown, J.

    2004-05-01

    Castaic Lake Water Agency was faced with a dilemma: how to support the increasing water needs of a growing population in the Santa Clarita Valley with three to five wells in the area shut-down due to the presence of perchlorate. Carollo Engineers was hired to design a treatment program for the removal of perchlorate from Saugus Aquifer. Several unknowns challenged the project including an uncertainty in a regulatory MCL for perchlorate, lack of brine line in the area, and low chloride limits in LACSD sewer lines. The preliminary phase of the project was to identify and recommend perchlorate treatment processes for further bench and/or pilot-scale testing. Two alternatives were selected: 1) Three NSF certified perchlorate-selective ion exchange resins and 2) Two types of biological treatment systems. Selection criteria included: cost, minimal formation of wastes and full-scale demonstration of the processes. This paper will focus on the basis, design, and findings from three perchlorate-selective ion-exchange resins. Bench-scale testing of the ion-exchange resins was conducted over a period of 3 months. NDMA formation following chlorination and chloramination was investigated. The spent resins were further characterized for metals and uranium. Results: Adsorption cycles of two of the resins lasted more than 70,000 bed volumes before perchlorate was detected in the effluent of the columns (approximately 200,000- 550,000 gal/cu-ft resin). No NDMA was formed as a result of post-chlorination with free and combined chlorine, or as a result of prechlorination with free chlorine. The metals measured in the spent results were well below the TTLC and STLC limits, despite the long run times. Ion-exchange is therefore a feasible technology for treatment perchlorate in the Santa Clarita Valley.

  18. Novel miniaturized sensors for potentiometric batch and flow-injection analysis (FIA) of perchlorate in fireworks and propellants.

    PubMed

    Almeer, Saeed H M A; Zogby, Ibrahim A; Hassan, Saad S M

    2014-11-01

    Three planar miniaturized perchlorate membrane sensors (3×5 mm(2)) are prepared using a flexible Kaptan substrate coated with nitron-perchlorate (NT-ClO4) [sensor 1], methylene blue-perchlorate (MB-ClO4) [sensor II] and indium-porphyrin (In-Por) [sensor III] as electroactive materials in PVC membranes plasticized with 2-NPPE. Sensors I, II and III display near-Nernstian response for 1.0×10(-5)-1.0×10(-2), 3.1×10(-5)-1.0×10(-2) and 3.1×10(-6)-1.0×10(-2) mol L(-1) ClO4(-) with lower detection limits of 6.1×10(-6), 6.9×10(-6) and 1.2×10(-6) mol L(-1), and anionic calibration slopes of 50.9±0.4, 48.4±0.4 and 57.7±0.3 mV decade(-1), respectively. Methods for determining perchlorate using these sensors offer many attractive advantages including simplicity, flexibility, cost effectiveness, wide linear dynamic response range (0.1-1000 ppm), low detection limit (<1.2×10(-6) mol L(-1)≡0.1 ppm), small sample test volume (100 μL), safety, short response time (<20 s), long life span (~8 weeks), and extended wide working pH range (4.5-8.0). The sensors show high selectivity in the presence of some inorganic ions (e.g., PO4(3-), SO4(2-), S2O3(2-), NO2(-), NO3(-), N3(-), CN(-), Cl(-), Br(-), I(-)) and automation feasibility. Indium-porphyrin based membrane sensor (sensor III) is used as a detector in a wall-jet flow injection set-up to enable accurate flow injection analysis (FIA) of perchlorate in some fireworks without interferences from the associated reducing agents (sulfur and charcoal), binders (dextrin, lactose), coloring agents (calcium, strontium, copper, iron, sodium), color brighten (linseed oil) and regulators (aluminum flakes) which are commonly used in the formulations. The sensor is also used for perchlorate assessment in some propellant powders. The results fairly agree with data obtained by ion-chromatography. PMID:25127583

  19. (Per)chlorate in Biology on Earth and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Youngblut, Matthew D; Wang, Ouwei; Barnum, Tyler P; Coates, John D

    2016-09-01

    Respiration of perchlorate and chlorate [collectively, (per)chlorate] was only recognized in the last 20 years, yet substantial advances have been made in our understanding of the underlying metabolisms. Although it was once considered solely anthropogenic, pervasive natural sources, both terrestrial and extraterrestrial, indicate an ancient (per)chlorate presence across our solar system. These discoveries stimulated interest in (per)chlorate microbiology, and the application of advanced approaches highlights exciting new facets. Forward and reverse genetics revealed new information regarding underlying molecular biology and associated regulatory mechanisms. Structural and functional analysis characterized core enzymes and identified novel reaction sequences. Comparative genomics elucidated evolutionary aspects, and stress analysis identified novel response mechanisms to reactive chlorine species. Finally, systems biology identified unique metabolic versatility and novel mechanisms of (per)chlorate respiration, including symbiosis and a hybrid enzymatic-abiotic metabolism. While many published studies focus on (per)chlorate and their basic metabolism, this review highlights seminal advances made over the last decade and identifies new directions and potential novel applications. PMID:27482739

  20. Perchlorate Reductase Is Distinguished by Active Site Aromatic Gate Residues.

    PubMed

    Youngblut, Matthew D; Tsai, Chi-Lin; Clark, Iain C; Carlson, Hans K; Maglaqui, Adrian P; Gau-Pan, Phonchien S; Redford, Steven A; Wong, Alan; Tainer, John A; Coates, John D

    2016-04-22

    Perchlorate is an important ion on both Earth and Mars. Perchlorate reductase (PcrAB), a specialized member of the dimethylsulfoxide reductase superfamily, catalyzes the first step of microbial perchlorate respiration, but little is known about the biochemistry, specificity, structure, and mechanism of PcrAB. Here we characterize the biophysics and phylogeny of this enzyme and report the 1.86-Å resolution PcrAB complex crystal structure. Biochemical analysis revealed a relatively high perchlorate affinity (Km = 6 μm) and a characteristic substrate inhibition compared with the highly similar respiratory nitrate reductase NarGHI, which has a relatively much lower affinity for perchlorate (Km = 1.1 mm) and no substrate inhibition. Structural analysis of oxidized and reduced PcrAB with and without the substrate analog SeO3 (2-) bound to the active site identified key residues in the positively charged and funnel-shaped substrate access tunnel that gated substrate entrance and product release while trapping transiently produced chlorate. The structures suggest gating was associated with shifts of a Phe residue between open and closed conformations plus an Asp residue carboxylate shift between monodentate and bidentate coordination to the active site molybdenum atom. Taken together, structural and mutational analyses of gate residues suggest key roles of these gate residues for substrate entrance and product release. Our combined results provide the first detailed structural insight into the mechanism of biological perchlorate reduction, a critical component of the chlorine redox cycle on Earth. PMID:26940877

  1. Chemolithotrophic perchlorate reduction linked to the oxidation of elemental sulfur.

    PubMed

    Ju, Xiumin; Field, Jim A; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Salazar, Margarita; Bentley, Harold; Bentley, Richard

    2007-04-15

    Perchlorate (ClO(4)(-)) contamination of ground and surface water has been recently recognized as a widespread environmental problem. Biological methods offer promising perspectives of perchlorate remediation. Facultative anaerobic bacteria couple the oxidation of organic and inorganic electron-donating substrates to the reduction of perchlorate as a terminal electron acceptor, converting it completely to the benign end-product, chloride. Insoluble inorganic substrates are of interest for low maintenance bioreactor or permeable reactive barrier systems because they can provide a long-term supply of electron donor without generating organic residuals. The main objective of this research was to investigate the feasibility of utilizing elemental sulfur (S(0)) as an insoluble electron donor for the biological reduction of perchlorate. A chemolithotrophic enrichment culture derived from aerobic activated sludge was obtained which effectively coupled the oxidation of elemental sulfur to sulfate with the reduction of perchlorate to chloride and gained energy from the process for cell growth. The enrichment culture grew at a rate of 0.41 or 0.81 1/d in the absence and presence of added organic carbon for cell growth, respectively. The enrichment culture was also shown to carry out sulfur disproportionation to a limited extent as evidenced by the formation of sulfide and sulfate in the absence of added electron acceptor. When nitrate and perchlorate were added together, the two electron acceptors were removed simultaneously after an initial partial decrease in the nitrate concentration. PMID:17009322

  2. Occurrence of Perchlorate in Various Water Sources in South India.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, D; Rajesh, M P; Venkataraman, P; Purushoth, E; Darshan, B S; Chandraprabha, N

    2014-04-01

    Iodine is necessary for synthesis of thyroxine within the thyroid gland. Iodine deficiency leads to hypothyroidism and goitre. Sometimes, even when sufficient iodine is present in food and water, goitre occurs. This could be due to some other competing ions in the ingested food and water, which prevent incorporation of iodine into the thyroid gland. Perchlorate is one such ion and has thirty times more affinity to thyroid, than iodine. Perchlorate is discharged into the environment by fireworks and explosives industries. Hence, the perchlorate levels would be higher in and around such industries. This study was done to determine the perchlorate exposure to humans in their habitat. In this study, perchlorate levels in different water sources in localities with and without such industries were ascertained. The estimation was done by two methods (i) Thionine ion pair spectrophotometry and (ii) ion exchange chromatography with conductivity detection methods. In the results, perchlorate level was significantly high in different water sources of industrialized areas, when compared to non-industrial areas. These high levels could be the explanation for the high prevalence of goitre in areas with sufficient iodine availability. PMID:26563060

  3. Thermal and Evolved Gas Analysis of Magnesium Perchlorate: Implications for Perchlorates in Soils at the Mars Phoenix Landing Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ming, Douglas W.; Morris, R.V.; Lauer, H. V.; Sutter, B.; Golden, D.C.; Boynton, W.V.

    2009-01-01

    Perchlorate salts were discovered in the soils around the Phoenix landing site on the northern plains of Mars [1]. Perchlorate was detected by an ion selective electrode that is part of the MECA Wet Chemistry Laboratory (WCL). The discovery of a mass 32 fragment (likely 02) by the Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer (TEGA) provided additional confirmation of a strong oxidizer in the soils around the landing site. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the thermal and evolved gas behavior of perchlorate salts using TEGA-like laboratory testbed instruments. TEGA ovens were fabricated from high purity Ni. Hence, an additional objective of this paper is to determine the effects that Ni might have on the evolved gas behavior of perchlorate salts.

  4. Perchlorate in The Great Lakes: Distribution, Isotopic Composition and Origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poghosyan, A.; Sturchio, N. C.; Jackson, W. A.; Guan, Y.; Eiler, J. M.; Hatzinger, P. B.

    2013-12-01

    Concentrations, stable chlorine and oxygen isotopic compositions, and 36Cl abundances of perchlorate were investigated in the five Laurentian Great Lakes. Samples were collected during monitoring cruises in 2007 and 2008 of the U.S. EPA's RV Lake Guardian and in 2010 at the water supply intake of Marquette, MI on the southern shore of Lake Superior. Concentrations of perchlorate were measured by IC/MS/MS at 24 locations, including one or two depth profiles in each lake. Mean concentrations (μg/L) are: Superior, 0.06 × 0.01; Michigan, 0.10 × 0.01; Huron, 0.11 × 0.01; Erie, 0.08 × 0.01, and Ontario, 0.09 × 0.01. Concentration vs. depth is nearly constant in each lake, indicating well-mixed conditions. Perchlorate was extracted from near-surface water by passing 15,000 to 80,000 L of water through 1-L cartridges containing Purolite A530E bifunctional anion-exchange resin. In the laboratory, perchlorate was eluted from the resin, purified, and precipitated as a >99% pure crystalline phase. Milligram amounts were recovered from each lake. Chlorine and oxygen isotopic analyses were performed at Caltech using the Cameca 7f-GEO SIMS instrument, following validation of the SIMS method with analyses of USGS-37 and USGS-38 isotopic reference materials. Results indicate a relatively narrow range in δ37Cl values (+2.9 to +3.9 ‰) and a wider range in δ18O values (-4.0 to +4.1 ‰), with a general geographic trend of increasing δ18O from west to east. Oxygen-17 was measured at UIC using dual-inlet IRMS of O2 produced by decomposition of KClO4. Great Lakes perchlorate has mass-independent oxygen isotopic variations with positive Δ17O values (+1.6 ‰ to +2.7 ‰) divided into two distinct groups: Lake Superior (+2.7 ‰) and the other four lakes (~ +1.7 ‰). The isotopic data indicate that perchlorate is dominantly of natural origin, having stable isotopic compositions resembling those of perchlorate from pre-industrial groundwaters in the western USA. The 36Cl

  5. A perchlorate sensitive iodide transporter in frogs

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Deborah L.; Carr, James A.; Willis, Ray E.; Pressley, Thomas A.

    2008-01-01

    Nucleotide sequence comparisons have identified a gene product in the genome database of African clawed frogs (Xenopus laevis) as a probable member of the solute carrier family of membrane transporters. To confirm its identity as a putative iodide transporter, we examined the function of this sequence after heterologous expression in mammalian cells. A green monkey kidney cell line transfected with the Xenopus nucleotide sequence had significantly greater 125I uptake than sham-transfected control cells. The uptake in carrier-transfected cells was significantly inhibited in the presence of perchlorate, a competitive inhibitor of mammalian Na+/iodide symporter. Tissue distributions of the sequence were also consistent with a role in iodide uptake. The mRNA encoding the carrier was found to be expressed in the thyroid gland, stomach, and kidney of tadpoles from X. laevis, as well as the bullfrog Rana catesbeiana. The ovaries of adult X. laevis also were found to express the carrier. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that the putative X. laevis iodide transporter is orthologous to vertebrate Na+-dependent iodide symporters. We conclude that the amphibian sequence encodes a protein that is indeed a functional Na+/iodide symporter in Xenopus laevis, as well as Rana catesbeiana. PMID:18275962

  6. Natural attenuation of perchlorate in denitrified groundwater.

    PubMed

    Robertson, William D; Roy, James W; Brown, Susan J; Van Stempvoort, Dale R; Bickerton, Greg

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring of a well-defined septic system groundwater plume and groundwater discharging to two urban streams located in southern Ontario, Canada, provided evidence of natural attenuation of background low level (ng/L) perchlorate (ClO4⁻) under denitrifying conditions in the field. The septic system site at Long Point contains ClO4⁻ from a mix of waste water, atmospheric deposition, and periodic use of fireworks, while the nitrate plume indicates active denitrification. Plume nitrate (NO3⁻ -N) concentrations of up to 103 mg/L declined with depth and downgradient of the tile bed due to denitrification and anammox activity, and the plume was almost completely denitrified beyond 35 m from the tile bed. The ClO4⁻ natural attenuation occurs at the site only when NO3⁻ -N concentrations are <0.3 mg/L, after which ClO4⁻ concentrations decline abruptly from 187 ± 202 to 11 ± 15 ng/L. A similar pattern between NO3⁻ -N and ClO4⁻ was found in groundwater discharging to the two urban streams. These findings suggest that natural attenuation (i.e., biodegradation) of ClO4⁻ may be commonplace in denitrified aquifers with appropriate electron donors present, and thus, should be considered as a remediation option for ClO4⁻ contaminated groundwater. PMID:23448242

  7. Thermal Decomposition Behavior of Ammonium Perchlorate and of an Ammonium-Perchlorate-Based Composite Propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behrens, R.; Minier, L.

    1998-01-01

    The thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP) and ammonium-perchlorate-based composite propellants is studied using the simultaneous thermogravimetric modulated beam mass spectrometry (STMBMS) technique. The main objective of the present work is to evaluate whether the STMBMS can provide new data on these materials that will have sufficient detail on the reaction mechanisms and associated reaction kinetics to permit creation of a detailed model of the thermal decomposition process. Such a model is a necessary ingredient to engineering models of ignition and slow-cookoff for these AP-based composite propellants. Results show that the decomposition of pure AP is controlled by two processes. One occurs at lower temperatures (240 to 270 C), produces mainly H2O, O2, Cl2, N2O and HCl, and is shown to occur in the solid phase within the AP particles. 200(micro) diameter AP particles undergo 25% decomposition in the solid phase, whereas 20(micro) diameter AP particles undergo only 13% decomposition. The second process is dissociative sublimation of AP to NH3 + HClO4 followed by the decomposition of, and reaction between, these two products in the gas phase. The dissociative sublimation process occurs over the entire temperature range of AP decomposition, but only becomes dominant at temperatures above those for the solid-phase decomposition. AP-based composite propellants are used extensively in both small tactical rocket motors and large strategic rocket systems.

  8. The thermal decomposition behavior of ammonium perchlorate and of an ammonium-perchlorate-based composite propellant

    SciTech Connect

    Behrens, R.; Minier, L.

    1998-03-24

    The thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP) and ammonium-perchlorate-based composite propellants is studied using the simultaneous thermogravimetric modulated beam mass spectrometry (STMBMS) technique. The main objective of the present work is to evaluate whether the STMBMS can provide new data on these materials that will have sufficient detail on the reaction mechanisms and associated reaction kinetics to permit creation of a detailed model of the thermal decomposition process. Such a model is a necessary ingredient to engineering models of ignition and slow-cookoff for these AP-based composite propellants. Results show that the decomposition of pure AP is controlled by two processes. One occurs at lower temperatures (240 to 270 C), produces mainly H{sub 2}O, O{sub 2}, Cl{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O and HCl, and is shown to occur in the solid phase within the AP particles. 200{micro} diameter AP particles undergo 25% decomposition in the solid phase, whereas 20{micro} diameter AP particles undergo only 13% decomposition. The second process is dissociative sublimation of AP to NH{sub 3} + HClO{sub 4} followed by the decomposition of, and reaction between, these two products in the gas phase. The dissociative sublimation process occurs over the entire temperature range of AP decomposition, but only becomes dominant at temperatures above those for the solid-phase decomposition. AP-based composite propellants are used extensively in both small tactical rocket motors and large strategic rocket systems.

  9. Developmental exposure to perchlorate alters synaptic transmission in hippocampus of the adult rat: in vivo studies.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate, a contaminant found in food and water supplies throughout the USA, blocks iodine uptake into the thyroid gland to reduce circulating levels of thyroid hormone. Neurological function accompanying developmental exposure to perchlorate was evaluated in the present study...

  10. Interaction of Perchlorate with JSC Mars-1 During Evolved Gas Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ten Kate, I. L.; Stern, J.; Malespin, C. A.; Glavin, D. P.

    2011-03-01

    Within the context of the recent findings of perchlorates on Mars and the implications for organic detection using evolved gas analysis (EGA), we have analyzed JSC Mars-1 spiked with Na-perchlorate using EGA. First results are presented.

  11. Removal of Perchlorate and Chlorate in Aquatic SystemsUsing Integrated Technologies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because of its extremely low concentrations and strong resistance to most treatment technologies, perchlorate has become one of the biggest challenges currently being faced by the drinking water industry. Few studies have looked at electrochemical reduction of aqueous perchlorate...

  12. PHYTOREMEDIATION OF PERCHLORATE AND N-NITROSODIMETHYLAMINE AS SINGLE AND CO-CONTAMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although potential plant species suitable for phytoremediation of perchlorate and the phytoprocesses involved (rhizodegradation and phytodegradation) have been identified in previous research, regulators and some critics argue that plants recycle the perchlorate fract...

  13. ASSOCIATION OF URINARY PERCHLORATE WITH INDIRECT MEASURES OFTHYROID DYSFUNCTION BASED ON NHANES 2001-2002

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background/Aims: Perchlorate is a widespread environmental pollutant. Previous population studies based on the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2001-2002, showed that urinary perchlorate concentrations were associated with increased levels of thyroid stim...

  14. ALTERNATIVE TECHNIQUES FOR MEASUREMENT OF PERCHLORATE IN FERTILIZER AND ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Perchlorate anion has been implicated as a potentially serious environmental pollutant, being found in drinking water and irrigated crops. Commercial fertilizers have recently been shown to contain high levels of Perchlorate impurities and thus be potentially important source...

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF AN ELECTROSPRAY MASS SPECTROMETRIC METHOD FOR DETERMINING PERCHLORATE IN FERTILIZERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An electrospray mass spectrometric method has been developed for application to agricultural and horticultural fertilizers to determine perchlorate. After fertilizers are leached or dissolved in water, the method relies on the formation of stable ion pair complex of the perchlor...

  16. Perchlorate removal in sand and plastic media bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Min, Booki; Evans, Patrick J; Chu, Allyson K; Logan, Bruce E

    2004-01-01

    The treatment of perchlorate-contaminated groundwater was examined using two side-by-side pilot-scale fixed-bed bioreactors packed with sand or plastic media, and bioaugmented with the perchlorate-degrading bacterium Dechlorosoma sp. KJ. Groundwater containing perchlorate (77microg/L), nitrate (4mg-NO(3)/L), and dissolved oxygen (7.5mg/L) was amended with a carbon source (acetic acid) and nutrients (ammonium phosphate). Perchlorate was completely removed (<4microg/L) in the sand medium bioreactor at flow rates of 0.063-0.126L/s (1-2gpm or hydraulic loading rate of 0.34-0.68L/m(2)s) and in the plastic medium reactor at flow rates of <0.063L/s. Acetate in the sand reactor was removed from 43+/-8 to 13+/-8mg/L (after day 100), and nitrate was completely removed in the reactor (except day 159). A regular (weekly) backwashing cycle was necessary to achieve consistent reactor performance and avoid short-circuiting in the reactors. For example, the sand reactor detention time was 18min (hydraulic loading rate of 0.68L/m(2)s) immediately after backwashing, but it decreased to only 10min 1 week later. In the plastic medium bioreactor, the relative changes in detention time due to backwashing were smaller, typically changing from 60min before backwashing to 70min after backwashing. We found that detention times necessary for complete perchlorate removal were more typical of those expected for mixed cultures (10-18min) than those for the pure culture (<1min) reported in our previous laboratory studies. Analysis of intra-column perchlorate profiles revealed that there was simultaneous removal of dissolved oxygen, nitrate, and perchlorate, and that oxygen and nitrate removal was always complete prior to complete perchlorate removal. This study demonstrated for the first time in a pilot-scale system, that with regular backwashing cycles, fixed-bed bioreactors could be used to remove perchlorate in groundwater to a suitable level for drinking water. PMID:14630102

  17. Chronic perchlorate exposure impairs stickleback reproductive behaviour and swimming performance

    PubMed Central

    Bernhardt, Richard R.; von Hippel, Frank A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary We describe behavioural changes in two generations of threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) exposed to environmentally relevant concentrations of perchlorate. The first generation (G0,2002) was exposed as two-year-old adults to perchlorate in experimental groups ranging in concentration from less than the method detection limit (<1.1 ppb) to 18.6 ppm for up to 22 days during their courtship, spawning, egg guarding, and first five days of fry guarding. No differences were noted in the behaviour or reproductive output of these fish that were exposed as adults. However, perchlorate exposure throughout development caused widespread effects in the second generation (G1,2003), which was spawned and raised through sexual maturity in one of four nominal experimental groups (0, 30 and 100 ppm, and a ‘variable’ treatment that progressively increased from <1.1 ppb to approximately 60 ppm perchlorate). Dose-dependent effects were found during the G1,2003’s swimming and behavioural evaluations, including higher mortality rates among treated fish following stressful events. Perchlorate-exposed fish had higher failure rates during swimming trials and failed at lower flow rates than control fish. A number of treated fish exhibited seizures. Progressively fewer males completed benchmark metrics, such as nest building, spawning, nursery formation, or fry production, in a dose-dependent manner. Fewer males from higher treatments courted females, and those that did initiated courtship later and had a reduced behavioural repertoire compared to fish from lower treatments. The lowest observed adverse effect level (LOAEL) for swimming performance, reproductive behaviour, survivorship and recruitment was 30 ppm perchlorate (our lowest G1,2003 treatment), and near complete inhibition of reproductive activity was noted among males raised in 100 ppm perchlorate. A small number of treated G1,2003 females were isolated in aquaria, and some performed reproductive

  18. Stable Cl And O Isotope Ratios Of Anthropogenic And Natural Perchlorates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beloso, A.; Sturchio, N. C.; Böhlke, J.; Gu, B.; Horita, J.; Brown, G.; Hatzinger, P.

    2004-12-01

    Perchlorate (ClO4-) in aqueous systems, even in low concentrations, is recognized to have potential human health risks. The drinking and irrigation water supplies of millions of people in the U.S. have recently been found to be contaminated with perchlorate, and this problem continues to become even more widespread. Perchlorate, as a highly soluble and relatively inert anion, tends to persist over long time periods and its removal by conventional water treatment technologies is difficult and expensive. Many known sources of perchlorate contamination are anthropogenic, resulting from its extensive use as an oxidizer component in solid propellants for missiles, rockets, and fireworks. However, certain fertilizers derived from Chilean nitrate evaporate deposits are known to contain a low percentage of perchlorate (<0.5%) that may contaminate groundwater. New isotopic evidence provides insights on the possible natural sources of perchlorate in surface and ground waters. Stable isotope ratios of Cl and O can now be used to determine whether the source of perchlorates in a given area is natural or anthropogenic. Microbial perchlorate reduction has a large (˜15 per mil) kinetic isotope effect, and this may be used to identify whether natural attenuation of perchlorate is occurring. Anthropogenic perchlorate salts in milligram amounts are readily analyzed for 37Cl and 18O isotopes. Extracting an isotopically measurable amount of perchlorate from natural waters, which are usually within ppb range of concentrations, is a challenge. But with the use of a new class of highly-selective bifunctional anion exchange resins, recovery of trace amounts of perchlorate for accurate isotopic analysis has been demonstrated. Isotopic characterization is being conducted on anthropogenic perchlorate reagents, natural perchlorate-bearing salt deposits, and perchlorate-bearing groundwaters. Significant and consistent isotopic differences in both the Cl and O isotope ratios between

  19. Perchlorates are compatible with life on Earth: Why not Mars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Vera M.; Hoover, Richard

    2013-09-01

    Perchlorates have been found on the surface of Mars. Since they are strongly oxidizing, it is important to discuss how this fact is reflected both on the existence of organic compounds on the surface of Mars and possibly life. We have previously reported that perchlorates, although strongly oxidizing, do not destroy some amino acids, such as glycine and alanine, among others, and also spare other classes of organic compounds. Others have found that perchlorates are utilized by bacteria and Archaea as energy sources. Particularly important are the findings about Archaea, since they show a combination of a biotic and abiotic processing of perchlorates, which implies ancient origins of these pathways, which may have been typical on prebiotic Earth. There are also numerous reports of the presence of organohalogen compounds on Earth which are made by natural sources or living organisms. Such compounds may be simple, such as chloromethane, or very complicated. They are utilized or produced by living organisms on Earth. Significantly, some such compounds are extremely stable to high temperatures, over 400oC, which should be taken into account for the chemical analyses on Mars. Finally, organohalogen compounds have been also detected on the meteorites. This combined evidence indicates that eventual finding of the organohalogen compounds on Mars is expected, and that the presence of the strongly oxidizing perchlorates does not rule out life on Mars.

  20. [Should we fear the perchlorate ion in the environment?].

    PubMed

    Desailloud, Rachel; Wemeau, Jean-Louis

    2016-01-01

    Perchlorate ions (ClO4(-)) are present in groundwater and are then present in distribution networks of drinking water destined for human consumption. The perchlorate ion comes mainly from ammonium salt manufactured for industrial activities or from arms of the First World War. Perchlorate ion is a competitive inhibitor of the sodium-iodide symporter and inhibits the synthesis of thyroid hormones. Values of toxicity have been published by the French agency ANSES and are used by authorities to limit the consumption of drinking water of some distribution networks by children and pregnant women especially in Nord-Pas-de-Calais and Picardie. Epidemiological data in other countries show no or little clinical effect in areas with similar contamination; it is therefore a precautionary principle. An effective substitution with iodine would limit the effects of the iodine deficiency itself but also would counteract the potential effects of an excess of perchlorate ions and also of other symporter inhibitors (thiocyanate, nitrate). Further studies are nevertheless needed to determine possible extra-thyroid effects of perchlorate ions. PMID:26585272

  1. Developmental timing of perchlorate exposure alters threespine stickleback dermal bone

    PubMed Central

    Furin, Christoff G.; von Hippel, Frank A.; Postlethwait, John; Buck, C. Loren; Cresko, William A.; O’Hara, Todd M.

    2015-01-01

    Adequate levels of thyroid hormone are critical during development and metamorphosis, and for maintaining metabolic homeostasis. Perchlorate, a common contaminant of water sources, inhibits thyroid function in vertebrates. We utilized threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) to determine if timing of perchlorate exposure during development impacts adult dermal skeletal phenotypes. Fish were exposed to water contaminated with perchlorate (30 mg/L or 100 mg/L) beginning at 0, 3, 7, 14, 21, 42, 154 or 305 days post fertilization until sexual maturity at one year of age. A reciprocal treatment moved stickleback from contaminated to clean water on the same schedule providing for different stages of initial exposure and different treatment durations. Perchlorate exposure caused concentration-dependent significant differences in growth for some bony traits. Continuous exposure initiated within the first 21 days post fertilization had the greatest effects on skeletal traits. Exposure to perchlorate at this early stage can result in small traits or abnormal skeletal morphology of adult fish which could affect predator avoidance and survival. PMID:25753171

  2. Chlorine isotopic composition of perchlorate in human urine as a means of distinguishing among exposure sources.

    PubMed

    Poghosyan, Armen; Morel-Espinosa, Maria; Valentin-Blasini, Liza; Blount, Benjamin C; Ferreccio, Catterina; Steinmaus, Craig M; Sturchio, Neil C

    2016-05-01

    Perchlorate (ClO4(-)) is a ubiquitous environmental contaminant with high human exposure potential. Natural perchlorate forms in the atmosphere from where it deposits onto the surface of Earth, whereas synthetic perchlorate is manufactured as an oxidant for industrial, aerospace, and military applications. Perchlorate exposure can potentially cause adverse health effects in humans by interfering with the production of thyroid hormones through competitively blocking iodide uptake. To control and reduce perchlorate exposure, the contributions of different sources of perchlorate exposure need to be quantified. Thus, we demonstrate a novel approach for determining the contribution of different perchlorate exposure sources by quantifying stable and radioactive chlorine isotopes of perchlorate extracted from composite urine samples from two distinct populations: one in Atlanta, USA and one in Taltal, Chile (Atacama region). Urinary perchlorate from the Atlanta region resembles indigenous natural perchlorate from the western USA (δ(37)Cl=+4.1±1.0‰; (36)Cl/Cl=1 811 (±136) × 10(-15)), and urinary perchlorate from the Taltal, Chile region is similar to natural perchlorate in nitrate salt deposits from the Atacama Desert of northern Chile (δ(37)Cl=-11.0±1.0‰; (36)Cl/Cl=254 (±40) × 10(-15)). Neither urinary perchlorate resembled the isotopic pattern found in synthetic perchlorate. These results indicate that natural perchlorate of regional provenance is the dominant exposure source for the two sample populations, and that chlorine isotope ratios provide a robust tool for elucidating perchlorate exposure pathways. PMID:25805252

  3. Using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model to link urinary biomarker concentrations to dietary exposure of perchlorate

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to perchlorate is widespread in the United States and many studies have attempted to character the perchlorate exposure by estimating the average daily intakes of perchlorate. These approaches provided population-based estimates, but did not provide individual-level exp...

  4. TISSUE DISTRIBUTION, ELIMINATION, AND METABOLISM OF SODIUM 36CL-PERCHLORATE IN LACTATING GOATS.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Perchlorate has contaminated water sources throughout the US, but particularly in the arid Southwest, an area containing large numbers of people and few water sources. Recent studies have demonstrated that perchlorate is present in alfalfa and that perchlorate is secreted into the milk of cows. Only...

  5. TRANSFER OF PERCHLORATE FROM DAIRY FEED TO MILK: POSSIBLE EXPOSURE SCENARIOS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Concern for human exposure to perchlorate has been a subject of intense debate for several years. Adding to this debate are recent discoveries of low levels of perchlorate in milk. Determining the extent to which perchlorate in feed is transferred to milk will aid in managing human exposure. In a...

  6. TISSUE DISTRIBUTION, ELIMINATION, AND METABOLISM OF SODIUM [36CL]PERCHLORATE IN LACTATING GOATS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Perchlorate has contaminated water sources throughout the US, but particularly in the arid Southwest, an area containing large numbers of people and few water sources. Recent studies have demonstrated that perchlorate is present in alfalfa and that perchlorate is secreted into the milk of cows. Stud...

  7. PERCHLORATE-CROP INTERACTIONS FROM CONTAMINATED IRRIGATION WATER AND FERTILIZER APPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate has contaminated water and soils at several locations in the United States. Perchlorate is water soluble, exceedingly mobile in aqueous systems, and can persist for many decades under typical ground and surface water conditions. Perchlorate is of concern because of un...

  8. THE REDUCTIVE TRANSFORMATION OF PERCHLORATE IN A FRESH WATER SEDIMENT: LABORATORY BATCH STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate is widely used as a propellant in solid rocket fuel, and has recently been found in ground, surface, and drinking water, in many cases above the interim action level of 18 ppb. Perchlorate is recalcitrant to chemical reduction, however, studies of perchlorate in pure ...

  9. THE REDUCTIVE TRANSFORMATION OF PERCHLORATE IN A FRESH WATER SEDIMENT: LABORATORY BATCH STUDIES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate is widely used as a propellant in solid rocket fuel, and has recently been found in ground, surface, and drinking water, in many cases above the interim action level of 18 ppb. Perchlorate is recalcitrant to chemical reduction, however, studies of perchlorate in pure ...

  10. Crystal structure of iron(III) perchlorate nona-hydrate.

    PubMed

    Hennings, Erik; Schmidt, Horst; Voigt, Wolfgang

    2014-12-01

    Since the discovery of perchlorate salts on Mars and the known occurrence of ferric salts in the regolith, there is a distinct possibility that the title compound could form on the surface of Mars. [Fe(H2O)6](ClO4)3·3H2O was crystallized from aqueous solutions at low temperatures according to the solid-liquid phase diagram. It consists of Fe(H2O)6 octa-hedra (point group symmetry -3.) and perchlorate anions (point group symmetry .2) as well as non-coordinating water mol-ecules, as part of a second hydrogen-bonded coordination sphere around the cation. The perchlorate appears to be slightly disordered, with major-minor component occupancies of 0.773 (9):0.227 (9). PMID:25552970

  11. Direct measurement of perchlorate exposure biomarkers in a highly exposed population: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    English, Paul; Blount, Ben; Wong, Michelle; Copan, Lori; Olmedo, Luis; Patton, Sharyle; Haas, Robert; Atencio, Ryan; Xu, Juhua; Valentin-Blasini, Liza

    2011-01-01

    Exposure to perchlorate is ubiquitous in the United States and has been found to be widespread in food and drinking water. People living in the lower Colorado River region may have perchlorate exposure because of perchlorate in ground water and locally-grown produce. Relatively high doses of perchlorate can inhibit iodine uptake and impair thyroid function, and thus could impair neurological development in utero. We examined human exposures to perchlorate in the Imperial Valley among individuals consuming locally grown produce and compared perchlorate exposure doses to state and federal reference doses. We collected 24-hour urine specimen from a convenience sample of 31 individuals and measured urinary excretion rates of perchlorate, thiocyanate, nitrate, and iodide. In addition, drinking water and local produce were also sampled for perchlorate. All but two of the water samples tested negative for perchlorate. Perchlorate levels in 79 produce samples ranged from non-detect to 1816 ppb. Estimated perchlorate doses ranged from 0.02 to 0.51 µg/kg of body weight/day. Perchlorate dose increased with the number of servings of dairy products consumed and with estimated perchlorate levels in produce consumed. The geometric mean perchlorate dose was 70% higher than for the NHANES reference population. Our sample of 31 Imperial Valley residents had higher perchlorate dose levels compared with national reference ranges. Although none of our exposure estimates exceeded the U. S. EPA reference dose, three participants exceeded the acceptable daily dose as defined by bench mark dose methods used by the California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment. PMID:21394205

  12. Direct Measurement of Perchlorate Exposure Biomarkers in a Highly Exposed Population: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Michelle; Copan, Lori; Olmedo, Luis; Patton, Sharyle; Haas, Robert; Atencio, Ryan; Xu, Juhua; Valentin-Blasini, Liza

    2011-01-01

    Exposure to perchlorate is ubiquitous in the United States and has been found to be widespread in food and drinking water. People living in the lower Colorado River region may have perchlorate exposure because of perchlorate in ground water and locally-grown produce. Relatively high doses of perchlorate can inhibit iodine uptake and impair thyroid function, and thus could impair neurological development in utero. We examined human exposures to perchlorate in the Imperial Valley among individuals consuming locally grown produce and compared perchlorate exposure doses to state and federal reference doses. We collected 24-hour urine specimen from a convenience sample of 31 individuals and measured urinary excretion rates of perchlorate, thiocyanate, nitrate, and iodide. In addition, drinking water and local produce were also sampled for perchlorate. All but two of the water samples tested negative for perchlorate. Perchlorate levels in 79 produce samples ranged from non-detect to 1816 ppb. Estimated perchlorate doses ranged from 0.02 to 0.51 µg/kg of body weight/day. Perchlorate dose increased with the number of servings of dairy products consumed and with estimated perchlorate levels in produce consumed. The geometric mean perchlorate dose was 70% higher than for the NHANES reference population. Our sample of 31 Imperial Valley residents had higher perchlorate dose levels compared with national reference ranges. Although none of our exposure estimates exceeded the U. S. EPA reference dose, three participants exceeded the acceptable daily dose as defined by bench mark dose methods used by the California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment. PMID:21394205

  13. [Fluorescence enhancement character of terbium perchlorate and thulium perchlorate with phenylcarboxymethyl sulfoxide coordination compounds].

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-xian; Wu, Guo-jiun; Liu, Zhong-shi; Han, Feng-mei

    2002-12-01

    (Tb1-x Tmx).L2.(ClO4).2H2O(x = 0.000 to 0.200, L = C6H5SOCH2COO-) have been synthesized. The coordination compounds have been studied by means of composition analysis, molar conductivity, IR, and the condition of coordination have been inferred. In the fluorescent spectra it was found that Tm3+ has a strongly sensitization effect to the fluorescence of Tb3+. The fluorescent emission intensity of Terbium perchlorate with phenylcarboxymethyl sulfoxide coordination compounds would be enhanced by Tm3+ in mixing. Tm3+ has a sensitization to the fluorescence of Tb3+ in the ratio of Tb3+:Tm3+ = 0.999:0.001-0.900:0.100. In the solubility experiment it was found that the complexes have high solubility in ethanol. PMID:12914160

  14. Combined bio-regeneration and ion-exchange system for perchlorate removal.

    PubMed

    Bae, B U

    2014-01-01

    In order to prove that perchlorate-laden resins could be bio-regenerated through direct contact with perchlorate-reducing bacteria (PRB), a combined bio-regeneration and ion-exchange (IX) system was operated. Two kinds of perchlorate-laden resins, nitrate-selective A520E and perchlorate-selective A530E, were successfully regenerated by PRB cultivated under anaerobic conditions. The bio-regeneration efficiency of perchlorate-laden resins increased with the amount of flow passed through the IX column. When the fully exhausted resin was bio-regenerated for 10 days at the flow rate of 2 BV (bed volume)/min and mixed liquor suspended solids concentration of 80 mg/L, almost 100% of IX capacity was recovered. A520E resin had higher bio-regeneration efficiency than A530E under all conditions, probably due to the fact that the perchlorate ion is more strongly bonded to the functional group of perchlorate-selective A530E resin. Measurement of perchlorate concentrations in the column effluents also revealed that the amount of perchlorate eluted from A520E resin was higher than that from A530E resin. Since only 10-20% of perchlorate was eluted from the resin during 10 days of bio-regeneration, the main mechanism of bio-regeneration appears to be the direct reduction of perchlorate by PRB on the resin. PMID:24804673

  15. Seasonal variation and factors influencing perchlorate in water, snow, soil and corns in Northeastern China.

    PubMed

    Ye, Long; You, Hong; Yao, Jie; Kang, Xi; Tang, Lu

    2013-03-01

    Seasonal variation and influencing factors of perchlorate in snow, surface soil, rain, surface water, groundwater and corn were studied. Seven hundreds and seventy samples were collected in different periods in Harbin and its vicinity, China. Perchlorate concentrations were analyzed by ion chromatography-electrospray mass spectrometry. Results indicate that fireworks and firecrackers display from the Spring Festival to the Lantern Festival (February 2, 2011-February 17, 2011) can result in the occurrence of perchlorate in surface soil and snow. Perchlorate distribution is affected by wind direction in winter. Melting snow which contained perchlorate can dissolve perchlorate in surface soil, and then perchlorate can percolate into groundwater so that perchlorate concentrations in groundwater increased in spring. Perchlorate concentrations in groundwater and surface water decrease after rainy season in summer. Groundwater samples collected in the floodplain areas of the Songhua River and the Ashi River contained higher perchlorate concentrations than that far away with the rivers. The corns have the ability to accumulate perchlorate. PMID:23287025

  16. Potential Influence of Perchlorate on Organic Carbon in Martian Regolith

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oze, C.; Vithanage, M. S.; Kumarathilaka, P. R.; Indraratne, S.; Horton, T. W.

    2014-12-01

    Perchlorate is a strong oxidizer present at elevated concentrations in surface martian regolith. Chemical and isotopic modification of potential organic carbon with perchlorate in martian regolith during H2O(l) interactions is unknown. Here we assess the relationship between martian levels of perchlorate and organic carbon present in life harbouring geologic material from Earth. These materials represent chemical (i.e., processed serpentine soils from Sri Lanka) and temperature (i.e., hydrothermal jarosite/goethite deposit from White Island, New Zealand) extremes to where life exists on Earth. Preliminary evidence demonstrates that organic carbon decreases and δ13C values are modified for ultramafic sediment in both perchlorate kinetic and incubation experiments. In hydrothermal jarosite/goethite with microbial communities present, total and organic carbon is maintained and little modification in δ13C values is apparent. These preliminary results suggest that surface hydrothermal deposits with mineralogically 'protected' organic carbon are preferable sites to assess the potential of life on Mars.

  17. The Impact of Temperature on Anaerobic Biological Perchlorate Treatment

    EPA Science Inventory

    A 20-month pilot-scale study was conducted to examine the impact of temperature on the performance of an anaerobic biological contactor used to treat perchlorate-contaminated water. The contactor was successfully acclimated with indigenous micro-organisms. Influent temperatures...

  18. THE EFFECTS OF AMMONIUM PERCHLORATE ON THYROIDS (2000)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In response to recommendations made at the February 1999 external peer review of the December 1998 document entitled, Perchlorate Environmental Contamination: Toxicology Review and Risk Characterization , ...

  19. RAMAN SPECTROSCOPIC ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS AND PLANT TISSUE FOR PERCHLORATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Raman spectroscopy, without the need for prior chromatographic separation, was used for qualitative and quantitative analysis of 59 samples of fertilizers for perchlorate (ClO4-). These primarily lawn and garden products had no known link to Chile saltpeter, which is known to con...

  20. POLISHING EFFLUENT FROM A PERCHLORATE-REDUCING ANAEROBIC BIOLOGICAL CONTACTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency undertook at 3 ½ year pilot-scale biological perchlorate treatment study that included two long (311 and 340 days) examinations of anaerobic effluent polishing. The polishing system consisted of hydrogen peroxide addition and aeration, fo...

  1. Iodine supplementation and drinking-water perchlorate mitigation.

    PubMed

    Lewandowski, Thomas A; Peterson, Michael K; Charnley, Gail

    2015-06-01

    Ensuring adequate iodine intake is important, particularly among women of reproductive age, because iodine is necessary for early life development. Biologically based dose-response modeling of the relationships among iodide status, perchlorate dose, and thyroid hormone production in pregnant women has indicated that iodide intake has a profound effect on the likelihood that exposure to goitrogens will produce hypothyroxinemia. We evaluated the possibility of increasing iodine intake to offset potential risks from perchlorate exposure. We also explored the effect of dietary exposures to nitrate and thiocyanate on iodine uptake and thyroid hormone production. Our modeling indicates that the level of thyroid hormone perturbation associated with perchlorate exposures in the range of current regulatory limits is extremely small and would be overwhelmed by other goitrogen exposures. Our analysis also shows that microgram levels of iodine supplementation would be sufficient to prevent the goitrogenic effects of perchlorate exposure at current regulatory limits among at risk individuals. The human health risks from supplementing drinking water with iodine are negligible; therefore, this approach is worthy of regulatory consideration. PMID:25796570

  2. PREDICTING FIELD PERFORMANCE OF HERBACEOUS SPECIES FOR PHYTOREMEDIATION OF PERCHLORATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Results of these short-term experiments coupled with ecological knowledge of the nine herbaceous plant species tested suggest that several species may by successful in on-site remediation of perchlorate. The two wetland species which appear to be most suitable for field experimen...

  3. Perinatal exposure to perchlorate, thiocyanate, and nitrate in New Jersey mothers and newborns

    PubMed Central

    Blount, Benjamin C.; Rich, David Q.; Valentin-Blasini, Liza; Lashley, Susan; Ananth, Cande V.; Murphy, Eileen; Smulian, John C.; Spain, Betty J.; Barr, Dana B.; Ledoux, Thomas; Hore, Paromita; Robson, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Perchlorate is a commonly occurring environmental toxicant that may be transported across the placental barrier by the sodium-iodide symporter (NIS), possibly resulting in both increased perchlorate exposure and decreased iodide uptake by the fetus. Therefore, we measured levels of three physiologically relevant NIS-inhibitors (perchlorate, nitrate and thiocyanate) and iodide in maternal and fetal fluids collected during cesarean-section surgeries on 150 U.S. women. Geometric means of perchlorate, thiocyanate and nitrate levels in maternal urine (2.90, 947 and 47900 µg/L, respectively) were similar to previously published results, while urinary iodide levels (1420 µg/L) were significantly higher (p<0.0001), likely because of prevalent prenatal vitamin use in the study population (74%). Thiocyanate levels were higher in the maternal serum, cord serum, and amniotic fluid of smokers compared to women with environmental tobacco smoke exposure and non-smokers (p-values of 0.0006, p=0.0011, and 0.0026, respectively). Perchlorate was detected in most samples: urine (100%), maternal serum (94%), cord serum (67%), and amniotic fluid (97%). Maternal urinary perchlorate levels were positively correlated with perchlorate levels in amniotic fluid (r=0.57), indicating that maternal urine perchlorate is an effective biomarker of fetal perchlorate exposure. Maternal serum perchlorate was generally higher than cord serum perchlorate (median ratio 2.4:1 for paired samples), and maternal urine perchlorate was always higher than fetal amniotic fluid perchlorate levels (mean ratio 22:1); conversely, iodide levels were typically higher in fetal fluids compared to maternal fluids. We found no evidence of either disproportionate perchlorate accumulation or lack of iodide in the fetal compartment. In this panel of healthy infants, we found no association between cord blood levels of these anions and newborn weight, length and head circumference. PMID:19848174

  4. Perchlorate reduction by autotrophic bacteria in the presence of zero-valent iron.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xueyuan; Amrhein, Christopher; Deshusses, Marc A; Matsumoto, Mark R

    2006-02-15

    A series of batch experiments were performed to study the combination of zero-valent iron (ZVI) with perchlorate-reducing microorganisms (PRMs) to remove perchlorate from groundwater. In this method, H2 produced during the process of iron corrosion by water is used by PRMs as an electron donor to reduce perchlorate to chloride. Perchlorate degradation rates followed Monod kinetics, with a normalized maximum utilization rate (rmax) of 9200 microg g(-1) (dry wt) h(-1) and a half-velocity constant (Ks) of 8900 microg L(-1). The overall rate of perchlorate reduction was affected by the biomass density within the system. An increase in the OD600 from 0.025 to 0.08 led to a corresponding 4-fold increase of perchlorate reduction rate. PRM adaptation to the local environment and initiation of perchlorate reduction was rapid under neutral pH conditions. At the initial OD600 of 0.015, perchlorate reduction followed pseudo-first-order reaction rates with constants of 0.059 and 0.033 h(-1) at initial pH 7 and 8, respectively. Once perchlorate reduction was established, the bioreductive process was insensitive to the increases of pH from near neutral to 9.0. In the presence of nitrate, perchlorate reduction rate was reduced, but not inhibited completely. PMID:16572793

  5. [Perchlorate removal from underground water by anaerobic biological reduction with bark].

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui; Liu, Fei; Chen, Nan; Chen, Hong-Han

    2013-07-01

    Batch experiments were conducted to check the feasibility of perchlorate removal from underground water with bark as a carbon source and reaction media, the effect of bark dosage, temperature and initial perchlorate concentrations on perchlorate reduction were also investigated. The results indicated that compared to corn cob, sweet potato and potato, bark in combination with perchlorate reducing microorganisms (PRMs) can efficiently achieve perchlorate removal from underground water, the concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) which was available to PRMs was the limiting factor that affected the perchlorate removal efficiency. Degradation of 10 mg perchlorate needed to consume 35-40 mg DOC when using bark as the solid carbon source. The removal rate of perchlorate was increased by about 3 fold when the bark dosage was increased from 1:500 to 3:500; however, further increase of solid-liquid ratio (over 5:500) provided no further benefit to the perchlorate reduction rate. The rate constant reached 1.365 mg x (L x d)(-1) at (38 +/- 1) degrees C which was the highest in the batch experiments. The activation energy was 31.08 kJ x mol(-1). Anaerobic biological reduction supported by bark had a good impact on the water quality; the high perchlorate concentration did not cause substrate inhibition. PMID:24028002

  6. Reduction of Perchlorate and Nitrate by Microbial Communities in Vadose Soil

    PubMed Central

    Nozawa-Inoue, Mamie; Scow, Kate M.; Rolston, Dennis E.

    2005-01-01

    Perchlorate contamination is a concern because of the increasing frequency of its detection in soils and groundwater and its presumed inhibitory effect on human thyroid hormone production. Although significant perchlorate contamination occurs in the vadose (unsaturated) zone, little is known about perchlorate biodegradation potential by indigenous microorganisms in these soils. We measured the effects of electron donor (acetate and hydrogen) and nitrate addition on perchlorate reduction rates and microbial community composition in microcosm incubations of vadose soil. Acetate and hydrogen addition enhanced perchlorate reduction, and a longer lag period was observed for hydrogen (41 days) than for acetate (14 days). Initially, nitrate suppressed perchlorate reduction, but once perchlorate started to be degraded, the process was stimulated by nitrate. Changes in the bacterial community composition were observed in microcosms enriched with perchlorate and either acetate or hydrogen. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis and partial sequencing of 16S rRNA genes recovered from these microcosms indicated that formerly reported perchlorate-reducing bacteria were present in the soil and that microbial community compositions were different between acetate- and hydrogen-amended microcosms. These results indicate that there is potential for perchlorate bioremediation by native microbial communities in vadose soil. PMID:16000806

  7. Effects of perchlorate on growth of four wetland plants and its accumulation in plant tissues.

    PubMed

    He, Hongzhi; Gao, Haishuo; Chen, Guikui; Li, Huashou; Lin, Hai; Shu, Zhenzhen

    2013-10-01

    Perchlorate contamination in water is of concern because of uncertainties about toxicity and health effects, impact on ecosystems, and possible indirect exposure pathways to humans. Therefore, it is very important to investigate the ecotoxicology of perchlorate and to screen plant species for phytoremediation. Effects of perchlorate (20, 200, and 500 mg/L) on the growth of four wetland plants (Eichhornia crassipes, Acorus calamus L., Thalia dealbata, and Canna indica) as well as its accumulation in different plant tissues were investigated through water culture experiments. Twenty milligrams per liter of perchlorate had no significant effects on height, root length, aboveground part weight, root weight, and oxidizing power of roots of four plants, except A. calamus, and increasing concentrations of perchlorate showed that out of the four wetland plants, only A. calamus had a significant (p<0.05) dose-dependent decrease in these parameters. When treated with 500 mg/L perchlorate, these parameters and chlorophyll content in the leaf of plants showed significant decline contrasted to control groups, except the root length of E. crassipes and C. indica. The order of inhibition rates of perchlorate on root length, aboveground part weight and root weight, and oxidizing power of roots was: A. calamus > C. indica > T. dealbata > E. crassipes and on chlorophyll content in the leaf it was: A. calamus > T. dealbata > C. indica > E. crassipes. The higher the concentration of perchlorate used, the higher the amount of perchlorate accumulation in plants. Perchlorate accumulation in aboveground tissues was much higher than that in underground tissues and leaf was the main tissue for perchlorate accumulation. The order of perchlorate accumulation content and the bioconcentration factor in leaf of four plants was: E. crassipes > C. indica > T. dealbata > A. calamus. Therefore, E. crassipes might be an ideal plant with high tolerance ability and accumulation ability for constructing

  8. Interaction between perchlorate and iodine in the metamorphosis of Hyla versicolor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sparling, D.; Harvey, G.; Nzengung, V.

    2003-01-01

    Perchlorate (ClO4-) is a water-soluble, inorganic anion that is often combined with ammonium, potassium or other cations for use in industry and agriculture. Ammonium perchlorate, for example, is a potent oxidizer and is used in various military applications including rocket fuel. It has also been found in an historically widely used fertilizer, Chilean nitrate and in other fertilizers. It has been found in ground and surface waters of over 30 states and is considered a human health risk. Because of its similar atomic radius and volume, perchlorate competes with iodide for thyroid uptake and storage and thereby inhibits production of thyroid hormones. Amphibians may be particularly affected by perchlorate because they rely on the thyroid for metamorphosis. This study exposed early larval Hyla versicolor to concentrations of perchlorate ranging from 2.2 to 50 ppm to determine the effects of perchlorate on a native amphibian. In addition, three controls, 0 perchlorate, 0 perchlorate with 0.10 ppm iodide (C + I) and 50 ppm perchlorate + 0.10 ppm iodide (50 + I) were tested. Mortality (< 11% with all treatments) and growth appeared to be unaffected by perchlorate. Inhibition of development started with 2.2 ppm perchlorate and little or no development occurred at 22.9 ppm and above. This inhibition was particularly apparent at the latter stages of development including hindlimb formation and metamorphosis. The estimated EC50 for total inhibition of metamorphosis at 70 days of treatment was 3.63 ppm. There was no evidence of inhibition of development with the 50 + I, C + I, or controls, indicating that the presence of small concentrations of iodide could counter the effects of perchlorate. When tadpoles that had been inhibited by perchlorate were subsequently treated with iodide, development through prometamorphosis progressed but mortality was very high.

  9. Interaction between perchlorate and iodine in the metamorphosis of Hyla versicolor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sparling, D.W.; Harvey, G.; Nzengung, V.

    2003-01-01

    Perchlorate (ClO4-) is a water-soluble, inorganic anion that is often combined with ammonium, potassium or other cations for use in industry and agriculture. Ammonium perchlorate, for example, is a potent oxidizer and is used in various military applications including rocket fuel. It has also been found in an historically widely used fertilizer, Chilean nitrate and in other fertilizers. It has been found in ground and surface waters of over 30 states and is considered a human health risk. Because of its similar atomic radius and volume, perchlorate competes with iodide for thyroid uptake and storage and thereby inhibits production of thyroid hormones. Amphibians may be particularly affected by perchlorate because they rely on the thyroid for metamorphosis. This study exposed early larval Hyla versicolor to concentrations of perchlorate ranging from 2.2 to 50 ppm to determine the effects of perchlorate on a native amphibian. In addition, three controls, 0 perchlorate, 0 perchlorate with 0.10 ppm iodide (C + I) and 50 ppm perchlorate + 0.10 ppm iodide (50 + I) were tested. Mortality (<11% with all treatments) and growth appeared to be unaffected by perchlorate. Inhibition of development started with 2.2 ppm perchlorate and little or no development occurred at 22.9 ppm and above. This inhibition was particularly apparent at the latter stages of development including hindlimb formation and metamorphosis. The estimated EC50 for total inhibition of metamorphosis at 70 days of treatment was 3.63 ppm. There was no evidence of inhibition of development with the 50 + I, C + I, or controls, indicating that the presence of small concentrations of iodide could counter the effects of perchlorate. When tadpoles that had been inhibited by perchlorate were subsequently treated with iodide, development through prometamorphosis progressed but mortality was very high.

  10. Detection of Perchlorate Anion on Functionalized Silver Colloids Using Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Tio, J.; Wang, W.; Gu, B.

    2005-01-01

    Perchlorate anion interferes with the uptake of iodide by the human thyroid gland and consequently disrupts the regulation of metabolism. Chronic exposure to high levels of perchlorate may lead to the formation of thyroid gland tumors. Although the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has not set a maximum contaminant level (MCL) for perchlorate, a draft drinking water range of 4-18 ppb based on 2 liter daily consumption of water has been established. The current EPA approved method for detecting perchlorate uses ion chromatography which has a detection limit of ~1ppb and involves lengthy analytical time in the laboratory. A unique combination of the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) effect and the bifunctional anion exchange resin’s high selectivity may provide an alternative way to detect perchlorate at such low concentrations and with high specificity. SERS, which uses laser excitation of adsorbed perchlorate anions on silver nanoparticles, has been shown to detect perchlorate anions at concentrations as low as 50 ppb. Normal micro-Raman analysis of perchlorate sorbed onto the resin beads has detected an even lower concentration of 10 ppb. In an effort to integrate these two effects, silver nanoparticles were coated with N-trimethoxysilylpropyl-N,N,N-trimethylammonium chloride, a functional group similar to that found on the resin bead, and subsequently inserted into different perchlorate concentration environments. This method has resulted in perchlorate detection down to ~10 ppb and a more consistent detection of perchlorate anion at ~50 ppb than that of earlier methods. As suggested by the direct insertion of functionalized silver colloids into perchlorate samples, this technique may potentially allow for the development of a probe using on-site Raman spectrometry to detect significantly low concentrations of perchlorate in situ rather than in the laboratory.

  11. Sensitivity and adaptability of methanogens to perchlorates: Implications for life on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kral, Timothy A.; Goodhart, Timothy H.; Harpool, Joshua D.; Hearnsberger, Christopher E.; McCracken, Graham L.; McSpadden, Stanley W.

    2016-01-01

    In 2008, the Mars Phoenix Lander discovered perchlorate at its landing site, and in 2012, the Curiosity rover confirmed the presence of perchlorate on Mars. The research reported here was designed to determine if certain methanogens could grow in the presence of three different perchlorate salt solutions. The methanogens tested were Methanothermobacter wolfeii, Methanosarcina barkeri, Methanobacterium formicicum and Methanococcus maripaludis. Media were prepared containing 0%, 0.5%, 1.0%, 2%, 5% and 10% wt/vol magnesium perchlorate, sodium perchlorate, or calcium perchlorate. Organisms were inoculated into their respective media followed by incubation at each organism's growth temperature. Methane production, commonly used to measure methanogen growth, was measured by gas chromatography of headspace gas samples. Methane concentrations varied with species and perchlorate salt tested. However, all four methanogens produced substantial levels of methane in the presence of up to 1.0% perchlorate, but not higher. The standard procedure for growing methanogens typically includes sodium sulfide, a reducing agent, to reduce residual molecular oxygen. However, the sodium sulfide may have been reducing the perchlorate, thus allowing for growth of the methanogens. To investigate this possibility, experiments were conducted where stainless steel nails were used instead of sodium sulfide as the reducing agent. Prior to the addition of perchlorate and inoculation, the nails were removed from the liquid medium. Just as in the prior experiments, the methanogens produced methane at comparable levels to those seen with sodium sulfide as the reductant, indicating that sodium sulfide did not reduce the perchlorate to any significant extent. Additionally, cells metabolizing in 1% perchlorate were transferred to 2%, cells metabolizing in 2% were transferred to 5%, and finally cells metabolizing in 5% were transferred to 10%. All four species produced methane at 2% and 5%, but not 10

  12. Copper transport.

    PubMed

    Linder, M C; Wooten, L; Cerveza, P; Cotton, S; Shulze, R; Lomeli, N

    1998-05-01

    In adult humans, the net absorption of dietary copper is approximately 1 mg/d. Dietary copper joins some 4-5 mg of endogenous copper flowing into the gastrointestinal tract through various digestive juices. Most of this copper returns to the circulation and to the tissues (including liver) that formed them. Much lower amounts of copper flow into and out of other major parts of the body (including heart, skeletal muscle, and brain). Newly absorbed copper is transported to body tissues in two phases, borne primarily by plasma protein carriers (albumin, transcuprein, and ceruloplasmin). In the first phase, copper goes from the intestine to the liver and kidney; in the second phase, copper usually goes from the liver (and perhaps also the kidney) to other organs. Ceruloplasmin plays a role in this second phase. Alternatively, liver copper can also exit via the bile, and in a form that is less easily reabsorbed. Copper is also present in and transported by other body fluids, including those bathing the brain and central nervous system and surrounding the fetus in the amniotic sac. Ceruloplasmin is present in these fluids and may also be involved in copper transport there. The concentrations of copper and ceruloplasmin in milk vary with lactational stage. Parallel changes occur in ceruloplasmin messenger RNA expression in the mammary gland (as determined in pigs). Copper in milk ceruloplasmin appears to be particularly available for absorption, at least in rats. PMID:9587137

  13. Archaeal (Per)Chlorate Reduction at High Temperature: An Interplay of Biotic and Abiotic Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebensteiner, Martin G.; Pinkse, Martijn W. H.; Schaap, Peter J.; Stams, Alfons J. M.; Lomans, Bart P.

    2013-04-01

    Perchlorate and chlorate anions [(per)chlorate] exist in the environment from natural and anthropogenic sources, where they can serve as electron acceptors for bacteria. We performed growth experiments combined with genomic and proteomic analyses of the hyperthermophile Archaeoglobus fulgidus that show (per)chlorate reduction also extends into the archaeal domain of life. The (per)chlorate reduction pathway in A. fulgidus relies on molybdo-enzymes that have similarity with bacterial enzymes; however, chlorite is not enzymatically split into chloride and oxygen. Evidence suggests that it is eliminated by an interplay of abiotic and biotic redox reactions involving sulfur compounds. Biological (per)chlorate reduction by ancient archaea at high temperature may have prevented accumulation of perchlorate in early terrestrial environments and consequently given rise to oxidizing conditions on Earth before the rise of oxygenic photosynthesis.

  14. Environmental impacts of perchlorate with special reference to fireworks--a review.

    PubMed

    Sijimol, M R; Mohan, Mahesh

    2014-11-01

    Perchlorate is an inorganic anion that is used in solid rocket propellants, fireworks, munitions, signal flares, etc. The use of fireworks is identified as one of the main contributors in the increasing environmental perchlorate contamination. Although fireworks are displayed for entertainment, its environmental costs are dire. Perchlorates are also emerging as potent thyroid disruptors, and they have an impact on the ecology too. Many studies have shown that perchlorate contaminates the groundwater and the surface water, especially in the vicinity of fireworks manufacturing sites and fireworks display sites. The health and ecological impacts of perchlorate released in fireworks are yet to be fully assessed. This paper reviews fireworks as a source of perchlorate contamination and its expected adverse impacts. PMID:25004859

  15. Stability and compatibility studies with the inorganic explosive 2-(5-cyanotetrazolato)pentaamminecobalt(III) perchlorate (CP)

    SciTech Connect

    Massis, T.M.; Morenus, P.K.; Huskisson, D.H.; Merrill, R.M.

    1980-01-01

    2-(5-Cyanotetrazolato)pentaamminecobalt(III) perchlorate (CP) is an inorganic secondary explosive that has been developed for applications involving deflagration-to-detonation transition. Previously the primary explosives lead azide and lead styphnate had been used. Stability and compatibility studies with CP have been conducted for periods up to three years. By using the rate of formation of cobalt(II) as the prime stability measurement for CP no reaction above baseline has been observed at temperatures at or below 80/sup 0/C. At 120/sup 0/C, approximately 2.2% reaction has been measured after three years with the concentration approaching a constant value. With the typical materials of construction in low voltage detonators, no compatibility problems with CP have been found. Adhesives such as epoxies have also shown good compatibility characteristics with CP. The only material tested thus far that exhibits potential compatibility problems with CP has been copper.

  16. BTA copper complexes.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Manfred; Gálvez-Ruiz, Juan Carlos; Klapötke, Thomas M; Mayer, Peter; Weber, Birgit; Weigand, Jan J

    2005-10-31

    Cupric oxide is one of the most important additives used (a) to catalyze decomposition reactions in gas generators to obtain cooler reaction gases, (b) as burning enhancer for ammonium perchlorate-based composite propellants, and (c) as coloring agent in pyrotechnics. In this context, the reaction of Cu(2+) ions in aqueous ammonia solution with bis(tetrazolyl)amine (H(2)bta) was investigated. Depending on the reaction conditions three complexes were obtained: Cu(bta)(NH(3))(2) (1), Cu(bta)(NH(3))(2).H(2)O (2), and (NH(4))(2)Cu(bta)(2).2.5H(2)O (3). The crystal structures of 1 and 2 are discussed with respect to the coordination mode of the dianion of N,N-bis(1(2)H-tetrazol-5-yl)-amine (bta), which mediates in the case of 1 and 2 weak superexchange interactions between the adjacent magnetic transition-metal Cu(II) cations. These antiferromagnetic interactions result from 1D copper chains over an hidden azide end-to-end bridge. Interestingly, the structural arrangement of 1 completely changes in the presence of crystal-bound water. Moreover, some physicochemical properties (e.g., heat of formation, friction, and impact sensitivity, DSC) of these complexes with respect to high-energetic materials are discussed. PMID:16241154

  17. Parameters for the Pyrolysis of Organic Material - Perchlorate Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steininger, Harald; Goesmann, Fred; Goetz, Walter

    2013-04-01

    The ESA-lead Mars rover ExoMars (launch in 2018) will carry a suit of instruments, one of the in-struments is the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer MOMA. Organic material in the Martian soil will be either pyrolyzed at temperatures of up to 1000°C and separated by gas chromatography or volatilized with the help of an UV-laser. A mass spectrometer will be the detector for both methods. Chlorinated organics have been detected in pyroly-sis GC-MS experiments on Mars two times. The first time during the Viking mission in 1976 and a second time with the Sample Analysis on Mars (SAM) in-strument onboard the Curiosity rover in 2012. [1] [2] The presence of perchlorates found by the Phoenix mission in 2008 [3] lead to the discovery that organic molecules not only get oxidized during pyrolysis, but also chlorinated organic compounds can be pro-duced. [4] The parameters used for pyrolysis and the sample composition especially the distribution of organics and perchlorates within the sample and the concentrations of organics and perchlorate have a huge influence on the products created. It is possible to change the condi-tions of the pyrolysis by spatially separating the organ-ics from the perchlorates that the chloromethanes get the major product of the pyrolysis. This might help to understand the results of the (SAM) instrument yield-ing mono-, di- and trichloromethane and a chlorinated 4-hydrocarbon molecule. References: [1] Biemann K et al. (1977) JGR, 82, 4641-4658. [2] Grotzinger J. P et al. (2011) AGU Fall Meeting U13A-01 [3] Hecht M. H., et al. (2009) Science, 325 64-67. [4] Steininger H., Goesmann F., Goetz W. (2011) Planet. & Space Sci., 71, 9-17. Acknowledgments: This work was funded by DLR (FKZ 50QX1001)

  18. Lithium perchlorate-nitromethane-promoted alkylation of anilines with arylmethanols.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jun; Mao, Hai-Feng; Wang, Lu; Zou, Jian-Ping; Zhang, Wei

    2011-11-01

    A new application of lithium perchlorate-nitromethane (LPNM) for the formation of aromatic C-N and C-C bonds is introduced. LPNM-promoted reactions of anilines with diarylmethanols selectively generate N-alkylated anilines or mono and double Friedel-Crafts alkylation products under different conditions by changing the reaction time, reaction temperature, and the ratio of the reactants. This method does not require the use of transition metal catalysts to prepare alkylated aniline derivatives. PMID:21547437

  19. Spectroscopic and Visual Evidence of Perchlorate Deliquescence Under Martian Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolakakos, George; Whiteway, James

    2015-04-01

    One of the key findings during the Phoenix and Mars Science Laboratory landed Mars missions has been the detection of perchlorate, a highly deliquescent salt. Perchlorates are of great interest on Mars due to their high affinity for water vapour as well as their ability to greatly depress the freezing point of water when in solution. This has intriguing biological implications as resulting brines could potentially provide a habitable environment for living organisms. Additionally, it has been speculated that these salts may play a significant role in influencing the hydrological cycle on Mars. In order to experimentally study water exchange processes between the surface and atmosphere on Mars and assess the feasibility of a future landed detection tool, a stand-off Raman spectroscopy instrument and environmental simulation chamber have been developed at York University. A sample of magnesium perchlorate consistent with the size of patches found at the Phoenix site has been subjected to the low water vapour pressure and temperatures found at polar Martian latitudes. Results indicate that at a water vapour pressure of ~2 Pa (-54°C frost point temperature), Raman spectroscopy is able to detect the onset of brine formation and provide a relative estimate of the quantity of water taken up by the sample until complete deliquescence is reached. Significant uptake of water from the atmosphere is observed to occur prior to the frost point temperature being reached and on time scales relevant to the Martian diurnal cycle. This result suggests that perchlorates in the Martian regolith can contribute to the hydrological cycle, pre-emptively reducing the water vapour pressure before saturation is reached.

  20. Analysis and Exposure Assessment of Perchlorate in Korean Dairy Products with LC-MS/MS

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Sung-Hee; Lee, Ji-Woo; Mandy, Pawlas

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Perchlorate is an emerging contaminant that is found everywhere, including various foods. Perchlorate is known to disturb the production of thyroid hormones and leads to mental disorders in fetuses and infants, as well as metabolic problems in adults. In this study, we attempted to establish an LC-MS/MS method for measuring perchlorate in dairy products and used this developed method to investigate perchlorate levels in Korean milk and yogurt samples. Methods The developed method of perchlorate analysis requires a shaker and 1% acetic acid/acetonitrile as the extracting solvent. Briefly, the samples were extracted and then centrifuged (4000 rpm, 1hour), and the supernatant was then passed through a Envi™ Carb SPE cartridge that had been prewashed sequentially with 6 mL of acetonitrile and 6 mL of 1% acetic acid in water. The final volume of the sample extract was adjusted to 40 mL with reagent water and the final sample was filtered through a 0.20-µm pore size PTFE (Polytetrafluoroethylene) syringe filter prior to LC-MS/MS. Results The average levels of perchlorate in milk and yogurt samples were 5.63 ± 3.49 µg/L and 3.65 ± 2.42 µg/L, respectively. The perchlorate levels observed in milk samples in this study were similar to those reported from China, Japan, and the United States. Conclusions The exposure of Koreans to perchlorate through the consumption of dairy products was calculated based on the results of this study. For all age groups, the calculated exposure to perchlorate was below the reference of dose (0.7 µg/kg-day) proposed by the National Academy of Science, USA, but the perchlorate exposure of children was higher than that of adults. Therefore, further investigation of perchlorate in other food samples is needed to enable a more exact assessment of exposure of children to perchlorate. PMID:22125772

  1. A novel perchlorate- and nitrate-reducing bacterium, Azospira sp. PMJ.

    PubMed

    Nam, Ji-Hyun; Ventura, Jey-R S; Yeom, Ick Tae; Lee, Yongwoo; Jahng, Deokjin

    2016-07-01

    A novel perchlorate-reducing bacterium (PCRB), PMJ, was isolated from the mixed liquor suspended solids in the aerobic tank of a wastewater treatment plant. The 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA), perchlorate reductase, and chlorite dismutase gene sequences revealed that PMJ belonged to the genus Azospira. PMJ was removed high-strength (700 mg/L) perchlorate and also removed low-strength (≤50 mg/L) perchlorate below the detection limit (2 μg/L) when acetate was used as a sole and carbon source. The maximum specific perchlorate utilization rate, q max, was 0.96 mg ClO4 (-)/mg dry cell weight day, and the half-saturation constant, K S , was lower than 0.002 mg ClO4 (-)/L. PMJ also utilized inorganic electron donors [(H2, S(0), and Fe(II)] with perchlorate as an electron acceptor. Perchlorate reduction by PMJ was completely inhibited by oxygen and chlorate but was not inhibited by nitrate. In the presence of similar concentrations (100∼140 mg/L) of nitrate and perchlorate, PMJ simultaneously removed both electron acceptors. Therefore, it was concluded that the strains PMJ might possess separate pathways for perchlorate and nitrate reduction. These results indicated that Azospira sp. PMJ could be efficiently used for treating perchlorate-contaminated groundwater and wastewater because many of these water bodies are known to contain both perchlorate and nitrate. In addition, low K S value and autotrophic perchlorate reduction of PMJ might be useful to design the biological treatment systems. PMID:26971497

  2. Changes in cross-fostered Sprague-Dawley rat litters exposed to perchlorate.

    PubMed

    Mahle, Deirdre A; Yu, Kyung O; Narayanan, Latha; Mattie, David R; Fisher, Jeffrey W

    2003-01-01

    Ammonium perchlorate is used as an oxidizer in rocket fuel. It has become a groundwater contaminant, dissociating to ammonium cation and perchlorate anion. The perchlorate ion competes with iodide for uptake into the thyroid, reducing thyroid hormone production. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were given either untreated or perchlorate (1 mg/kg-day) treated drinking water beginning on gestation day 2. One set of control and exposed dams was sacrificed on gestation day 20. The litters from the second set of control and exposed dams were crossed immediately after parturition and were sacrificed at postnatal day 10. Dam serum and thyroid, pooled fetal sera, and male and female pup sera were collected and analyzed for perchlorate, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), triiodothyronine (T(3)), and thyroxine (T(4)). Control pups receiving perchlorate through lactation had serum levels at postnatal day 10 of 0.54 microg/ml and 0.56 microg/ml for male and female pups, respectively, whereas exposed fetuses had serum perchlorate levels of 0.38 +/- 0.04 microg/ml. Female pups receiving perchlorate lactationally had significantly lower levels of serum T(4) than control pups and prenatally exposed pups. Serum T(4) levels in male pups were not affected by perchlorate. Serum thyroid hormone levels from gestational perchlorate exposure were restored to control values by postnatal day 10. In utero perchlorate-exposure decreased serum T(4) levels in the fetus. Gestational studies in conjunction with a cross-fostering study design helped discern thyroid hormonal changes caused by perchlorate exposure during the perinatal period. PMID:12745989

  3. Hypochlorite treatments are not a significant source of perchlorate exposure in lettuce.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, C A; Fonseca, J M; Blount, B C; Krieger, R I

    2009-03-25

    Leafy vegetables, such as lettuce ( Lactuca sativa L), have been identified as a potential source of perchlorate exposure to humans. Perchlorate is of concern because excessive amounts may impair thyroid function by inhibiting iodide uptake by the sodium iodide symporter. Perchlorate has been identified as an oxidation product in sodium hypochlorite. Dilute hypochlorite solutions are widely used on lettuce as a preservative and as a treatment to reduce microbial food risks. However, the potential of hypochlorite to be a source of human perchlorate exposure from lettuce had not been evaluated. Studies were conducted with lettuce collected in the San Luis Valley of southern Colorado and in the lower Colorado River Valley of southwestern Arizona to represent conditions under which hypochlorite is applied to lettuce in the field and in salad processing facilities. We used spray and dipping solutions that were dilutions of concentrated sodium hypochlorite that would contain from 12000 and 120000 microg/L perchlorate. The perchlorate content of iceberg and romaine lettuce averaged 6.2 and 7.2 microg/kg fw in southern Colorado and 14.0 and 56.7 microg/kg fw in southwestern Arizona and there were no significant (P > 0.05) increases in the perchlorate content of lettuce due to hypochlorite treatments. Because of the relatively low concentrations of perchlorate present after dilution and the low volumes applied to lettuce, hypochlorite solutions do not appear to be a significant source of the perchlorate levels found in lettuce. PMID:19245207

  4. The effects of ammonium perchlorate on thyroid homeostasis and thyroid-specific gene expression in rat.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fenghong; Zhou, Xuan; Zhang, Rao; Pan, Meizhu; Peng, Kai-Liang

    2012-08-01

    Perchlorate, a kind of inorganic chemical, is mainly used in defense industry and widely used in other civilian areas. It was well known that perchlorate exerts its thyrotoxicant effect on thyroid homeostasis via competitive inhibition of iodide uptake. However, some details of mechanism by which perchlorate disturb thyroid homeostasis are unknown and remain to be elucidated. The present study aimed to investigate if iodide insufficiency in the thyroid is the main mechanism by which perchlorate exerts its effect on the thyroid gland. We highlighted and measured the gene expression of NIS, Tg, and TPO which involved in thyroid hormone biosynthesis. Thyroid effects of perchlorate were identified by assessing different responses of these genes at the treatments of perchlorate and iodine deficiency. The results indicated that high dose perchlorate (520 mg kg(-1) b.wt.) can induce a significant decrease in body weight and cause hypertrophy of thyroid gland, with a decreased level of FT3, FT4 and a remarkable increased level of TSH. In addition, the significant decreased gene expression of Thyroglobulin (Tg) and thyroperoxidase (TPO) were both observed at the treatment of high dose perchlorate. These results suggested that perchlorate can suppress gene expression of Tg and TPO which directly involved in biosynthesis of thyroid hormones, and may therefore aggravate the perturbation of thyroid homeostasis in addition to competitive inhibition of iodide uptake. PMID:20882593

  5. Perchlorate in sewage sludge, rice, bottled water and milk collected from different areas in China.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yali; Zhang, Ping; Wang, Yawei; Shi, Jianbo; Cai, Yaqi; Mou, Shifen; Jiang, Guibin

    2007-10-01

    As a new emerging environmental contaminant, perchlorate has prompted people to pay more attention. The presence of perchlorate in the human body can result in improper regulation of metabolism for adults. Furthermore, it also causes developmental and behavioral problems for infants and children because it can interfere with iodide uptake into the thyroid tissue. In this paper, perchlorate in sewage sludge, rice, bottled drinking water and milk was detected for investigating the perchlorate pollution status in China. The places, where the samples were collected, cover most regions of China. Therefore, the final data on perchlorate levels will give an indication of the perchlorate pollution status in China. The final determination of perchlorate was performed by ion chromatography-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry with negative mode. The concentration of perchlorate in sewage sludge, rice, bottled drinking water and milk was in the range of 0.56-379.9 microg/kg, 0.16-4.88 mug/kg, 0.037-2.013 microg/L and 0.30-9.1 microg/L, respectively. The results show that perchlorate has been widespread in China. PMID:17604836

  6. Highly-selective and Regenerable Ion Exchange for Perchlorate Remediation, Recovery, and Environmental Forensics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, B.; Brown, G.

    2007-12-01

    Perchlorate (ClO4-) has recently emerged as a widespread contaminant found in drinking water and groundwater supplies in the United States and is known to disrupt thyroid function by inhibiting iodide uptake. Among various treatment technologies, the highly-selective and regenerable ion-exchange technology has recently been developed at ORNL for removing ClO4- from contaminated water. The selective ion exchange technology relies on a unique, highly specific resin to trap ClO4- from contaminated water. The treatment system is then regenerated and perchlorate is destroyed. The reaction that destroys ClO4- produces Cl- and Fe(III) that are used to regenerate the resin, resulting in practically zero secondary waste production. In comparison with conventional non-selective ion-exchange technology, this new treatment process is expected to result in not only a reduced O&M cost but also the elimination of the disposal of hazardous wastes containing perchlorate. Additionally, the selective and regenerable ion exchange technology has allowed the quantitative recovery of perchlorate from contaminated water for reuse, or from other environmental matrices such as sediment, groundwater, and salt deposits for perchlorate isotopic and source identification. Naturally-forming perchlorate has been found to contain distinct oxygen and chlorine isotope signatures or anomalies as compared with anthropogenic perchlorate and can thus provide unambiguous identification of the sources of perchlorate contamination as a powerful tool for the forensics of perchlorate in the environment.

  7. 77 FR 64335 - Notification of a Public Teleconference of the Science Advisory Board; Perchlorate Advisory Panel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-19

    ... Considerations and Interpretation of Recent Epidemiological Evidence to Develop a Maximum Contaminant Level Goal... Epidemiological Evidence to Develop a Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG) for Perchlorate. The SAB...

  8. Formation Of Perchlorate By Ozonation Of Aqueous Oxy-chlorine Anions: An Insight To Natural Perchlorate Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, B.; Jackson, A.; Kang, N.; Redder, A.

    2007-12-01

    Perchlorate (ClO4-) is a natural and anthropogenic contaminant of increasing concern. Natural perchlorate was first identified in Chilean nitrates from the Atacama dessert over 100 years ago. However, only in the last two years has the occurrence of natural perchlorate been seriously considered as a potential exposure source. Although there has been considerable research effort in understanding the occurrence, remediation, and impact of ClO4- in the environment, relatively little information is available regarding the mechanism(s) responsible for ClO4- formation. Perchlorate productions from ozone oxidation of chlorine and oxy- chlorine anions (Cl-, OCl-, ClO2-and ClO3-) were conducted in continuous flow reactors at constant ozone concentrations (approximately 6 mg L-1) and at varying concentrations of chlorine materials (ranging from 10 to 1000 mg L-1). Sub samples from both the main reaction flask and alkaline trapping flasks were taken over varying time intervals and the concentrations of oxy-chlorine anions including ClO4- were measured using various ion chromatographic methods whereas OCl- was determined iodometrically using the spectrophotometer. The experiment time ranged from 6 hrs to 7 days depending on the rate of decomposition of the reactants. Results indicate that ClO4- is readily formed during the ozonation of ClO2- and OCl- solutions (maximum conversion of 2.7 %) whereas the Cl- and ClO3- solutions produced relatively lower quantities of ClO4- ( maximum conversion of 0.02 %) . Further the presence of ClO2- in the initial OCl- solution is suspected to significantly contribute the total ClO4- generated augmenting the role of ClO2- in ClO4- formation as mentioned in recent study on the photochemical reactions of oxy-chlorine anions.

  9. Containerized Wetland Bioreactor Evaluated for Perchlorate and Nitrate Degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Dibley, V R; Krauter, P W

    2004-12-02

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLNL) designed and constructed an innovative containerized wetlands (bioreactor) system that began operation in November 2000 to biologically degrade perchlorate and nitrate under relatively low-flow conditions at a remote location at Site 300 known as Building 854. Since initial start-up, the system has processed over 3,463,000 liters of ground water and treated over 38 grams of perchlorate and 148 kilograms of nitrate. Site 300 is operated by the University of California as a high-explosives and materials testing facility supporting nuclear weapons research. The 11-square mile site located in northern California was added to the NPL in 1990 primarily due to the presence of elevated concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in ground water. At the urging of the regulatory agencies, perchlorate was looked for and detected in the ground water in 1999. VOCs, nitrate and perchlorate were released into the soil and ground water in the Building 854 area as the result of accidental leaks during stability testing of weapons or from waste discharge practices that are no longer permitted at Site 300. Design of the wetland bioreactors was based on earlier studies showing that indigenous chlorate-respiring bacteria could effectively degrade perchlorate into nontoxic concentrations of chlorate, chlorite, oxygen, and chloride. Studies also showed that the addition of organic carbon would enhance microbial denitrification. Early onsite testing showed acetic acid to be a more effective carbon source than dried leaf matter, dried algae, or milk replacement starter; a nutrient and carbon source used in a Department of Defense phytoremediation demonstration. No inocula were added to the system. Groundwater was allowed to circulate through the bioreactor for three weeks to acclimate the wetland plants and to build a biofilm from indigenous flora. Using solar energy, ground water is pumped into granular

  10. Modeling aqueous perchlorate chemistries with applications to Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marion, G. M.; Catling, D. C.; Zahnle, K. J.; Claire, M. W.

    2010-06-01

    NASA's Phoenix lander identified perchlorate and carbonate salts on Mars. Perchlorates are rare on Earth, and carbonates have largely been ignored on Mars following the discovery by NASA's Mars Exploration Rovers of acidic precipitated minerals such as jarosite. In light of the Phoenix results, we updated the aqueous thermodynamic model FREZCHEM to include perchlorate chemistry. FREZCHEM models the Na-K-Mg-Ca-Fe(II)-Fe(III)-Al-H-Cl-Br-SO 4-NO 3-OH-HCO 3-CO 3-CO 2-O 2-CH 4-Si-H 2O system, with 95 solid phases. We added six perchlorate salts: NaClO 4·H 2O, NaClO 4·2H 2O, KClO 4, Mg(ClO 4) 2·6H 2O, Mg(ClO 4) 2·8H 2O, and Ca(ClO 4) 2·6H 2O. Modeled eutectic temperatures for Na, Mg, and Ca perchlorates ranged from 199 K (-74 °C) to 239 K (-34 °C) in agreement with experimental data. We applied FREZCHEM to the average solution chemistry measured by the Wet Chemistry Laboratory (WCL) experiment at the Phoenix site when soil was added to water. FREZCHEM was used to estimate SO42- and alkalinity concentrations that were missing from the WCL data. The amount of SO42- is low compared to estimates from elemental abundance made by other studies on Mars. In the charge-balanced solution, the dominant cations were Mg 2+ and Na + and the dominant anions were ClO4-,SO42-, and alkalinity. The abundance of calcite measured at the Phoenix site has been used to infer that the soil may have been subject to liquid water in the past, albeit not necessarily locally; so we used FREZCHEM to evaporate (at 280.65 K) and freeze (from 280.65 to 213.15 K) the WCL-measured solution to provide insight into salts that may have been in the soil. Salts that precipitated under both evaporation and freezing were calcite, hydromagnesite, gypsum, KClO 4, and Mg(ClO 4) 2·8H 2O. Epsomite (MgSO 4·7H 2O) and NaClO 4·H 2O were favored by evaporation at temperatures >0 °C, while meridianite (MgSO 4·11H 2O), MgCl 2·12H 2O, and NaClO 4·2H 2O were favored at subzero temperatures. Incongruent melting

  11. Perchlorate in the Hydrologic Cycle - An Overview of Sources and Occurrence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stonestrom, D. A.; Jackson, W.; Mayer, K.; Orris, G. J.

    2007-12-01

    Perchlorate (ClO4-) in water and food is of concern due to deleterious health affects associated with hypothyroidism. The presence of widespread perchlorate in 0-to-28 ka-old pristine ground water of the Middle Rio Grande Basin (Plummer et al., 2006, ES&T, DOI:10.1021/es051739h), in ground water >1 mile from agricultural activities in the Southern High Plains (Rajagapolan et al., 2006, ES&T, DOI:10.1021/es052155i), and in unsaturated zones throughout the arid and semiarid southwestern United States (Rao et al., 2007, ES&T, DOI:10.1021/es062853i) clearly indicates that perchlorate is a non-exotic component of the hydrologic cycle, at least in dry environments. The natural system has been greatly perturbed in places by human activities. Most anthropogenic inputs are associated with the manufacture and use of explosives and rocket fuel, providing concentrated sources of excess perchlorate to the hydrologic cycle. Perchlorate-containing fertilizers and irrigation provide dispersed sources within and down-gradient from agricultural areas. Natural sources include photochemically mediated reactions involving ozone at the land surface and in the lower atmosphere. A growing body of work indicates that a small, but persistent, meteoric source acting over thousands of years can explain observed accumulations of unsaturated-zone perchlorate in arid regions. In addition to meteoric sources, oxyanions produced during volcanogenic processes can include appreciable amounts of natural perchlorate. Terrestrial plants take up perchlorate in soil water, with some species of xerophytic succulents concentrating the anion to high levels. Similarly, perchlorate in marine plants indicates that perchlorate is part of marine biochemical cycles. Perchlorate-bearing marine sediments of late Tertiary age suggest that perchlorate has been part of global geochemical cycles for millions of years and, furthermore, can be preserved in the subsurface despite the nearly ubiquitous presence of

  12. Perchlorate exposure from food crops produced in the lower Colorado River region.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Charles A; Barraj, Leila M; Blount, Benjamin C; Scrafford, Carolyn G; Valentin-Blasini, Liza; Smith, Kimberly M; Krieger, Robert I

    2009-05-01

    The Colorado River shows low levels of perchlorate derived from aerospace- and defense-related fuel industries once located near the Las Vegas Wash. At sufficiently high dosages perchlorate can disrupt thyroid function by inhibiting uptake of iodide. The Colorado River is the primary source of irrigation water for most food crops grown in Southern California and Southwestern Arizona. The objective of this study was to evaluate potential perchlorate exposure from food crops produced in the lower Colorado River region (LCRR). The major food commodities produced in the region were sampled and perchlorate levels were determined by ion chromatography followed by detection using either conductivity or tandem mass spectrometry, depending on analyte levels. The Monte Carlo module of the Dietary Exposure Evaluation Model (DEEM) was used to derive an estimate of the 2-day average perchlorate intakes. Data were derived assuming that individuals residing in the LCRR get their fruits and vegetables from within the LCRR as well as from other areas in the United States, or assuming individuals living in the LCRR get their fruits and vegetables from the LCRR only. Perchlorate exposure estimates derived in this study are comparable to exploratory estimates by the US Food and Drug Administration. For infants and children, over 50% of the estimated perchlorate exposure was from milk. The relative impact of vegetables and fruit toward perchlorate exposure increased by age through adulthood. Cumulative perchlorate exposure estimates based on this hypothetical analysis could approach or exceed the NAS reference dose (RfD) for some population groups as drinking water levels exceeded 6 microg/l. However, few individuals are exposed to perchlorate in drinking water at levels above 4 microg/l in the United States and very few would be exposed to perchlorate levels exceeding the RfD, whether consuming food crops from within or outside the LCRR. PMID:18506207

  13. Fate of dietary perchlorate in lactating dairy cows: Relevance to animal health and levels in the milk supply

    PubMed Central

    Capuco, A. V.; Rice, C. P.; Baldwin, R. L.; Bannerman, D. D.; Paape, M. J.; Hare, W. R.; Kauf, A. C. W.; McCarty, G. W.; Hapeman, C. J.; Sadeghi, A. M.; Starr, J. L.; McConnell, L. L.; Van Tassell, C. P.

    2005-01-01

    Perchlorate is a goitrogenic anion that competitively inhibits the sodium iodide transporter and has been detected in forages and in commercial milk throughout the U.S. The fate of perchlorate and its effect on animal health were studied in lactating cows, ruminally infused with perchlorate for 5 weeks. Milk perchlorate levels were highly correlated with perchlorate intake, but milk iodine was unaffected, and there were no demonstrable health effects. We provide evidence that up to 80% of dietary perchlorate was metabolized, most likely in the rumen, which would provide cattle with a degree of refractoriness to perchlorate. Data presented are important for assessing the environmental impact on perchlorate concentrations in milk and potential for relevance to human health. PMID:16260728

  14. High-nitrogen-based pyrotechnics: development of perchlorate-free green-light illuminants for military and civilian applications.

    PubMed

    Sabatini, Jesse J; Raab, James M; Hann, Ronald K; Damavarapu, Reddy; Klapötke, Thomas M

    2012-06-01

    The development of perchlorate-free hand-held signal illuminants for the US Army's M195 green star parachute is described. Compared with the perchlorate-containing control, the optimized perchlorate-free illuminants were less sensitive toward various ignition stimuli while offering comparable burn times and visible-light outputs. The results were also important from the perspective of civilian fireworks because the development of perchlorate-free illuminants remains an important objective of the commercial fireworks industry. PMID:22488721

  15. Copper(II)-mediated oxidative transformation of vic-dioxime to furoxan: evidence for a copper(II)-dinitrosoalkene intermediate.

    PubMed

    Das, Oindrila; Paria, Sayantan; Zangrando, Ennio; Paine, Tapan Kanti

    2011-11-21

    The mononuclear copper(II) complex [Cu(H(2)L(1))(2)(H(2)O)](ClO(4))(2) (1) (where H(2)L(1) = 1,10-phenanthroline-5,6-dioxime) reacts with copper(II) perchlorate in acetonitrile at ambient conditions in the presence of triethylamine to afford a copper(II) complex, [Cu(L(3))(2)(H(2)O)](ClO(4))(2) (2a), of 1,10-phenanthroline furoxan. A similar complex [Cu(L(3))(2)Cl](ClO(4)) (2) is isolated from the reaction of H(2)L(1) with copper(II) chloride, triethylamine, and sodium perchlorate in acetonitrile. The two-electron oxidation of the vic-dioxime to furoxan is confirmed from the X-ray single crystal structure of 2. An intermediate species, showing an absorption band at 608 nm, is observed at -20 °C during the conversion of 1 to 2a. A similar blue intermediate is formed during the reaction of [Cu(HDMG)(2)] (H(2)DMG = dimethylglyoxime) with ceric ammonium nitrate, but H(2)DMG treated with ceric ammonium nitrate does not form any intermediate. This suggests the involvement of a copper(II) complex in the intermediate step. The intermediate species is also observed during the two-electron oxidation of other vic-dioximes. On the basis of the spectroscopic evidence and the nature of the final products, the intermediate is proposed to be a mononuclear copper(II) complex ligated by a vic-dioxime and a dinitrosoalkene. The dinitrosoalkene is generated upon two-electron oxidation of the dioxime. The transient blue color of the dioxime-copper(II)-dinitrosoalkene complex may be attributed to the ligand-to-ligand charge transfer transition. The intermediate species slowly decays to the corresponding two-electron oxidized form of vic-dioxime, i.e. furoxan and [Cu(CH(3)CN)(4)](ClO(4)). The formation of two isomeric furoxans derived from the reaction of an asymmetric vic-dioxime, hexane-2,3-dioxime, and copper(II) perchlorate supports the involvement of a dinitrosoalkene species in the intermediate step. In addition, the oxidation of 2,9-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline-5,6-dioxime (H(2)L

  16. ELECTROCHEMICAL TREATMENT AND RECYCLING OF SPENT PERCHLORATE-CONTAMINATED ION-EXCHANGE REGENERATION BRINE - PHASE I

    EPA Science Inventory

    Eltron Research & Development, Inc. (Eltron) proposes to develop an ion-selective, polymer membrane electrode capable of detecting perchlorate in water at low parts per billion (ppb) concentrations. With the discovery of perchlorate contamination in an increasing number of...

  17. PERCHLORATE ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINATION: TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW AND RISK CHARACTERIZATION BASED ON EMERGING INFORMATION (EXTERNAL REVIEW DRAFT) 1998

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate (ClO4-) is an anion that originates as a contaminant in ground water and surface waters from the dissolution of ammonium, potassium, magnesium, or sodium salts. Because perchlorate is nonlabile kinetically (i.e., the reduction of the central chlorine atom occurs extre...

  18. REMOTE SENSING OF PERCHLORATE EFFECTS ON SALT CEDAR PRELIMINARY RESULTS FROM THE LAS VEGAS WASH

    EPA Science Inventory



    Sodium Perchlorate and ammonium Perchlorate, major components of solid rocket fuel, have been manufactured in the Las Vegas Valley immediately up gradient from the Las Vegas Wash, since 1945 and 1956, respectively. Measurements of emerging ground water quality in the vici...

  19. RAMAN SPECTRAL ANALYSIS OF PERCHLORATE CONTAMINATION IN COMMONLY-USED FERTILIZERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Raman spectroscopy (RS) was used for qualitative and quantitative analysis of perchlorate (ClO4-1) in 30+ commonly-used fertilizers. Perchlorate contamination is emerging as an important environmental issue since its discovery in water resources that are widely used for drinking...

  20. COMMENT ON "PERCHLORATE IDENTIFICATION IN FERTILIZERS" AND THE SUBSEQUENT ADDITION/CORRECTION [LETTER TO EDITOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate contamination has been reported in several fertilizer materials and not just in mined Chile saltpeter, where it is a welo-known natural impurity. To survey fertilizers for perchlorate, two analytical techniques have been applied to 45 products that span agricultural, ...

  1. Monitoring of perchlorate in diverse foods and its estimated dietary exposure for Korea populations.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji-Woo; Oh, Sung-Hee; Oh, Jeong-Eun

    2012-12-01

    The perchlorate concentrations in various Korean food samples were monitored, and 663 samples belonging to 39 kinds of food were analyzed. The analysis results revealed that dairy products contain the highest average concentration of 6.34 μg/kg and high detection frequency of over 85%. Fruit and vegetables showed the next highest perchlorate concentration with an average of 6.17 μg/kg. Especially, with its average concentration of 39.9 μg/kg, spinach showed the highest perchlorate level among all target food samples studied. Tomato was followed by spinach, which showed a high perchlorate average concentration of 19.8 μg/kg, and over 7 μg/kg was detected in ham and sausage (avg. 7.31 μg/kg) and in instant noodles (avg. 7.58 μg/kg). Less than 2 μg/kg was detected in fishes, meats and beverages. The exposure dose of perchlorate in Korean by food intake was calculated on the basis of the analyzed perchlorate levels in this study. The daily perchlorate dose to which Korean adults are exposed is 0.04 μg/kg bw/day, which is lower than the RfD (0.7 μg/kg bw/day) value suggested by US NAS. This result indicates that Korean people's current exposure to perchlorate from domestic food consumption is evaluated as safe. PMID:23116718

  2. Equilibrium dialysis and ultrafiltration investigations of perchlorate removal from aqueous solution using poly(diallyldimethylammonium) chloride.

    PubMed

    Roach, Jim D; Tush, Daniel

    2008-02-01

    Use of perchlorate salts in military activities and the aerospace industry is widespread. These salts are highly water-soluble and are, to a large extent, kinetically inert as aqueous species. As a groundwater contaminant, perchlorate is now being detected in an increasing number of locations and is believed to interfere with the uptake of iodide by the thyroid, which can result in decreased hormone production. The United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) has established a reference dose for perchlorate of 0.0007 mg/kg/day, which translates to a drinking water equivalent level of 24.5 ppb. This study investigated the application of polyelectrolyte-enhanced ultrafiltration (PEUF) for the selective removal of perchlorate from aqueous solution through equilibrium dialysis and ultrafiltration experiments. Using poly(diallyldimethylammonium) chloride, the effectiveness and efficiency of PEUF in the removal of perchlorate from other aqueous solution components was investigated by testing parameters such as polyelectrolyte concentration, pH, and ionic strength. Removal of perchlorate from synthetic groundwater initially containing 10.3 ppm perchlorate and also containing chloride, sulfate, and carbonate was also examined. Perchlorate separations of greater than 95% were achieved, even in the presence of 10-fold excesses of competing ions. PMID:17915279

  3. MICROSCALE EXTRACTION OF PERCHLORATE IN DRINKING WATER WITH LOW LEVEL DETECTION BY ELECTROSPRAY-MASS SPECTROMETRY.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Improper treatment and disposal of perchlorate can be an environmental hazard in regions where solid rocket motors are used, tested, or stored. The solubility and mobility of perchlorate lends itself to ground water contamination, and some of these sources are used for drinking ...

  4. PERCHLORATE UPTAKE BY SALT CEDAR (TAMARIX RAMOSISSIMA) IN THE LAS VEGAS WASH RIPARIAN ECOSYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate ion (CIO4-) has been identified in samples of dormant salt cedar (Tamarix ramosissima) growing in the Las vegas Wash. Perchlorate is an oxidenat, but its reduction is kineticaly hindered. CXoncern over thyrpoid effects caused the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA...

  5. Perchlorate and chlorate reduction by the Crenarchaeon Aeropyrum pernix and two thermophilic Firmicutes.

    PubMed

    Liebensteiner, Martin G; Pinkse, Martijn W H; Nijsse, Bart; Verhaert, Peter D E M; Tsesmetzis, Nicolas; Stams, Alfons J M; Lomans, Bart P

    2015-12-01

    This study reports the ability of one hyperthermophilic and two thermophilic microorganisms to grow anaerobically by the reduction of chlorate and perchlorate. Physiological, genomic and proteome analyses suggest that the Crenarchaeon Aeropyrum pernix reduces perchlorate with a periplasmic enzyme related to nitrate reductases, but that it lacks a functional chlorite-disproportionating enzyme (Cld) to complete the pathway. Aeropyrum pernix, previously described as a strictly aerobic microorganism, seems to rely on the chemical reactivity of reduced sulfur compounds with chlorite, a mechanism previously reported for perchlorate-reducing Archaeoglobus fulgidus. The chemical oxidation of thiosulfate (in excessive amounts present in the medium) and the reduction of chlorite result in the release of sulfate and chloride, which are the products of a biotic-abiotic perchlorate reduction pathway in Ae. pernix. The apparent absence of Cld in two other perchlorate-reducing microorganisms, Carboxydothermus hydrogenoformans and Moorella glycerini strain NMP, and their dependence on sulfide for perchlorate reduction is consistent with the observations made on Ar. fulgidus. Our findings suggest that microbial perchlorate reduction at high temperature differs notably from the physiology of perchlorate- and chlorate-reducing mesophiles and that it is characterized by the lack of a chlorite dismutase and is enabled by a combination of biotic and abiotic reactions. PMID:26332065

  6. Occurrence and exposure evaluation of perchlorate in indoor dust and diverse food from Chengdu, China.

    PubMed

    Gan, Zhiwei; Pi, Lu; Li, Yiwen; Hu, Wenli; Su, Shijun; Qin, Xiaolei; Ding, Sanglan; Sun, Hongwen

    2015-12-01

    A total of 688 samples, including 520 food samples belonging to 29 food types in 10 groups, 63 drinking water, and 105 indoor dust samples were collected during May to November in 2014 in Chengdu and Tianjin (only dust samples in Tianjin), China to investigate the perchlorate levels in these samples and to estimate the related exposure to Chinese people. Significant difference in indoor dust perchlorate levels was found between Chengdu and Tianjin, with the concentrations ranging from 0.11 to 38.8 mg/kg in Chengdu, and from 0.72 to 119 mg/kg in Tianjin. The mean perchlorate levels in 10 groups of food samples were in the order of vegetables>wheaten flour≈egg, and wheaten flour>milk>sea food>livestock meats≈poultry≈freshwater fish>fruits>steamed rice, while no statistical difference in perchlorate levels was found between egg and milk. Exposure evaluation indicated that indoor dust contributed little (less than 5%) to the total daily perchlorate intake, and food consumption was the primary perchlorate exposure route for Chengdu people, followed by drinking water. Based on the median perchlorate levels obtained in this study, the daily perchlorate intake was below the reference does suggested by the US EPA. PMID:26218568

  7. Perchlorate and halophilic prokaryotes: implications for possible halophilic life on Mars.

    PubMed

    Oren, Aharon; Elevi Bardavid, Rahel; Mana, Lily

    2014-01-01

    In view of the finding of perchlorate among the salts detected by the Phoenix Lander on Mars, we investigated the relationships of halophilic heterotrophic microorganisms (archaea of the family Halobacteriaceae and the bacterium Halomonas elongata) toward perchlorate. All strains tested grew well in NaCl-based media containing 0.4 M perchlorate, but at the highest perchlorate concentrations, tested cells were swollen or distorted. Some species (Haloferax mediterranei, Haloferax denitrificans, Haloferax gibbonsii, Haloarcula marismortui, Haloarcula vallismortis) could use perchlorate as an electron acceptor for anaerobic growth. Although perchlorate is highly oxidizing, its presence at a concentration of 0.2 M for up to 2 weeks did not negatively affect the ability of a yeast extract-based medium to support growth of the archaeon Halobacterium salinarum. These findings show that presence of perchlorate among the salts on Mars does not preclude the possibility of halophilic life. If indeed the liquid brines that may exist on Mars are inhabited by salt-requiring or salt-tolerant microorganisms similar to the halophiles on Earth, presence of perchlorate may even be stimulatory when it can serve as an electron acceptor for respiratory activity in the anaerobic Martian environment. PMID:24150694

  8. Supercooling and Ice Formation of Perchlorate Brines under Mars-relevant Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Primm, K.; Gough, R. V.; Tolbert, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Perchlorate salts, discovered in the Martian regolith at multiple landing sites, may provide pathways for liquid water stability on current Mars. It has previously been assumed that if perchlorate brines form in the Martian regolith via melting or deliquescence, they would be present only briefly because efflorescence into a crystal or freezing to ice would soon occur. Here, we used a Raman microscope to study the temperature and relative humidity (RH) conditions at which magnesium perchlorate brine will form ice. Although ice is thermodynamically predicted to form whenever the saturation with respect to ice (Sice) is greater than or equal to 1, ice formation by perchlorate brines did not occur until elevated Sice values were reached: Sice= 1.17, 1.29, and 1.25 at temperatures of 218 K, 230.5 K, and 244 K, respectively. If a magnesium perchlorate particle was allowed to deliquesce completely prior to experiencing ice supersaturation, the extent of supercooling was increased even further. These high supersaturation values imply perchlorate brines can exist over a wider range of conditions than previously believed. From these experiments it has been found that magnesium perchlorate exhibits supercooling well into the previous theoretical ice region of the stability diagram and that liquid brines on Mars could potentially exist for up to two additional hours per sol. This supercooling of magnesium perchlorate will help with the exploration of Mars by the Mars 2020 spacecraft by helping to understand the phase and duration of water existing in the Martian subsurface.

  9. Thyroid hormones and thyroid disease in relation to perchlorate dose and residence near a superfund site.

    PubMed

    Gold, Ellen B; Blount, Benjamin C; O'Neill Rasor, Marianne; Lee, Jennifer S; Alwis, Udeni; Srivastav, Anup; Kim, Kyoungmi

    2013-07-01

    Perchlorate is a widely occurring contaminant, which can competitively inhibit iodide uptake and thus thyroid hormone production. The health effects of chronic low dose perchlorate exposure are largely unknown. In a community-based study, we compared thyroid function and disease in women with differing likelihoods of prior and current perchlorate exposure. Residential blocks were randomly selected from areas: (1) with potential perchlorate exposure via drinking water; (2) with potential exposure to environmental contaminants; and (3) neighboring but without such exposures. Eligibility included having lived in the area for ≥6 months and aged 20-50 years during 1988-1996 (during documented drinking water well contamination). We interviewed 814 women and collected blood samples (assayed for thyroid stimulating hormone and free thyroxine) from 431 interviewed women. Daily urine samples were assayed for perchlorate and iodide for 178 premenopausal women with blood samples. We performed multivariable regression analyses comparing thyroid function and disease by residential area and by urinary perchlorate dose adjusted for urinary iodide levels. Residential location and current perchlorate dose were not associated with thyroid function or disease. No persistent effect of perchlorate on thyroid function or disease was found several years after contaminated wells were capped. PMID:22968349

  10. PERFORMANCE OF POLYVINYL ALCOHOL GEL COLUMNS ON THE ION CHROMATOGRAPHIC DETERMINATION OF PERCHLORATE IN FERTILIZERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Interest in possible sources of perchlorate (ClO4-) that could lead to environmental release has been heightened since the EPA placed this anion on its Contaminant Candidate List (CCL) for drinking water. Besides its association with defense and aerospace activities, perchlorate ...

  11. PERCHLORATE ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINATION: TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW AND RISK CHARACTERIZATION (EXTERNAL REVIEW DRAFT) 2002

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate (ClO4-) is an anion that originates as a contaminant in ground water and surface waters when the salts of ammonium, potassium, magnesium, or sodium dissolve in water. One major source of contamination is the manufacture or improper disposal of ammonium perchlorate th...

  12. Microscale extraction of perchlorate in drinking water with low level detection by electrospray-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Magnuson, M L; Urbansky, E T; Kelty, C A

    2000-06-21

    Improper treatment and disposal of perchlorate can be an environmental hazard in regions where solid rocket motors are used, tested, or stored. The solubility and mobility of perchlorate lends itself to ground water contamination, and some of these sources are used for drinking water. Perchlorate in drinking water has been determined at sub-mug l(-1) levels by extraction of the ion-pair formed between the perchlorate ion and a cationic surfactant with electrospray-mass spectrometry detection. Confidence in the selective quantification of the perchlorate ion is increased through both the use of the mass based detection as well as the selectivity of the ion pair. This study investigates several extraction solvents and experimental work-up procedures in order to achieve high sample throughput. The method detection limit for perchlorate based on 3.14sigma(n-1) of seven replicate injections was 300 ng l(-1) (parts-per-trillion) for methylene chloride extraction and 270 ng l(-1) for methyl isobutyl ketone extraction. Extraction with methylene chloride produces linear calibration curves, enabling standard addition to be used to quantify perchlorate in drinking water. Perchlorate determination of a contaminated water compared favorably with results determined by ion chromatography. PMID:18967987

  13. Thyroid Hormones and Thyroid Disease in Relation to Perchlorate Dose and Residence Near a Superfund Site

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Ellen B.; Blount, Benjamin C.; Rasor, Marianne O’Neill; Lee, Jennifer S.; Alwis, Udeni; Srivastav, Anup; Kim, Kyoungmi

    2013-01-01

    Background Perchlorate is a widely occurring contaminant, which can competitively inhibit iodide uptake and thus thyroid hormone production. The health effects of chronic low dose perchlorate exposure are largely unknown. Objectives In a community-based study, we compared thyroid function and disease in women with differing likelihoods of prior and current perchlorate exposure. Methods Residential blocks were randomly selected from areas: 1) with potential perchlorate exposure via drinking water; 2) with potential exposure to environmental contaminants; and 3) neighboring but without such exposures. Eligibility included having lived in the area for ≥6 months and aged 20–50 years during 1988–1996 (during documented drinking water well contamination). We interviewed 814 women and collected blood samples (assayed for thyroid stimulating hormone [TSH] and free thyroxine [fT4]) from 431 interviewed women. Daily urine samples were assayed for perchlorate and iodide for 178 premenopausal women with blood samples. We performed multivariable regression analyses comparing thyroid function and disease by residential area and by urinary perchlorate dose adjusted for urinary iodide levels. Results Residential location and current perchlorate dose were not associated with thyroid function or disease. Conclusions No persistent effect of perchlorate on thyroid function or disease was found several years after contaminated wells were capped. PMID:22968349

  14. PERCHLORATE TROPHIC TRANSFER INCREASES TISSUE CONCENTRATIONS ABOVE AMBIENT WATER EXPOSURE ALONE IN A PREDATORY FISH

    PubMed Central

    Furin, Christoff G.; von Hippel, Frank A.; Hagedorn, Birgit; O’Hara, Todd M.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined effects of varying concentrations of the environmental contaminant perchlorate in northern pike (Esox lucius) based on exposure in water and/or from prey (threespine stickleback, Gasterosteus aculeatus). Routes of exposure to pike were through contaminated water at 0, 10 or 100 mg/L perchlorate for 49 days and/or through feeding one stickleback per day over 14 days that were previously maintained in water at 0, 10 or 100 mg/L perchlorate. Both water and food significantly contributed to pike tissue concentrations of perchlorate as compared to controls, but, as expected for a water-soluble contaminant, perchlorate did not biomagnify from prey to predatory fish. Pike gastrointestinal tissue retained significantly more perchlorate than other tissues combined. Route of exposure and concentration of perchlorate in various media are important to consider in risk assessment when evaluating uptake and tissue concentration of perchlorate because significantly higher tissue concentrations may result from combined prey and water exposures than from prey or water exposures alone in a concentration dependent manner. PMID:24188192

  15. METHOD DEVELOPMENT FOR THE LOW-LEVEL DETERMINATION OF PERCHLORATE IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate anion has been found in numerous drinking water supplies at concentrations that recent studies indicate may adversely affect human health. In order to measure perchlorate at levels of health concern in drinking water, there is a need to be able to quantify perchlorat...

  16. DEVELOPMENT OF A BETTER METHOD TO IDENTIFY AND MEASURE PERCHLORATE IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate (ClO4 -) is an oxidant used primarily in solid propellant for rockets, missiles, pyrotechnics, as a component in air bag inflators, and in highway safety flares. Perchlorate tainted water has been found throughout the southwestern United States where its source has o...

  17. Perchlorate content of plant foliage reflects a wide range of species-dependent accumulation but not ozone-induced biosynthesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Perchlorate interferes with uptake of iodide in humans. Emission inventories do not explain observed distributions. Ozone is implicated in the natural origin of perchlorate, and has increased since pre-industrial times. Ozone produces perchlorate in vitro from chloride, and plant tissues contain chl...

  18. FATE OF DIETARY PERCHLORATE IN LACTATING DAIRY COWS: RELEVANCE TO ANIMAL HEALTH AND LEVELS IN THE MILK SUPPLY.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Perchlorate is a goitrogenic anion that competitively inhibits the sodium iodide transporter and has been detected in forages and in commercial milk throughout the U.S. The fate of perchlorate and its effect on animal health were studied in lactating cows, ruminally infused with perchlorate for fiv...

  19. Comparative DFT study of crystalline ammonium perchlorate and ammonium dinitramide.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Weihua; Wei, Tao; Zhu, Wei; Xiao, Heming

    2008-05-22

    The electronic structure, vibrational properties, absorption spectra, and thermodynamic properties of crystalline ammonium perchlorate (AP) and ammonium dinitramide (ADN) have been comparatively studied using density functional theory in the local density approximation. The results shows that the p states for the two solids play a very important role in their chemical reaction. From the low frequency to high frequency region, ADN has more motion modes for the vibrational frequencies than AP. The absorption spectra of AP and ADN display a few, strong bands in the fundamental absorption region. The thermodynamic properties show that ADN is easier to decompose than AP as the temperature increases. PMID:18396853

  20. Reflectance spectra of hydrated sulfates, phosphates and perchlorates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, J. L.; Lane, M. D.; Dyar, M. D.

    2012-12-01

    Reflectance spectra of hydrated sulfates, phosphates, and perchlorates have multiple strong absorptions in the VNIR region. These bands are important for identification of hydrated salt minerals on Mars using CRISM and OMEGA data. Detecting specific minerals or mineral classes in this group provides constraints on the geochemical environments during their formation. Orbital detections of hydrated salt minerals by CRISM on Mars can support characterization of minerals on the surface by the MER and MSL rovers and the Phoenix lander. VNIR SPECTRAL CHARACTER OF HYDRATED SALTS Many spectral features are diagnostic of specific minerals, but others are common to all of these hydrated salts. Monohydrated sulfate spectra have strong bands near 2.1 and 2.4 μm, while polyhydrated sulfate spectra generally exhibit a band near 1.92-1.98 μm and a drop in reflectance near 2.4 μm. Phosphates appear to exhibit spectral properties similar to sulfates with features near 1.4-1.5 and 1.92-1.98 μm for hydrated samples. Several OH-bearing minerals exhibit features near 2.2 μm that could be confused with the band near 2.2 μm that is commonly attributed to Al/Si-OH bearing clays/silica on Mars. Perchlorate spectra have three dominant bands near 1.43-1.47, 1.93-2.0, and 2.41-2.44 μm depending on the type of cation present. Spectra are shown from 0.4-2.65 μm for selected sulfates (Figure 1) and phosphates/perchlorates (Figure 2) as this region is predominantly used by CRISM for identification of minerals. Figure 1. Spectra of selected hydrated sulfates: coquimbite, (Fe3+)2(SO4)3●9H2O, butlerite, Fe3+SO4(OH)●2H2O, rozenite, Fe2+SO4●4H2O, and szomolnokite, Fe2+SO4●H2O. Figure 2. Spectra of selected perchlorates and phosphates: wavellite, Al3(PO4)2(OH,F)3●5H2O, and baricite, (Mg,Fe2+)3(PO4)2●H2O.

  1. Detoxification of PAX-21 ammunitions wastewater by zero-valent iron for microbial reduction of perchlorate.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Se Chang; Cha, Daniel K; Kim, Byung J; Oh, Seok-Young

    2011-08-30

    US Army and the Department of Defense (DoD) facilities generate perchlorate (ClO(4)(-)) from munitions manufacturing and demilitarization processes. Ammonium perchlorate is one of the main constituents in Army's new main charge melt-pour energetic, PAX-21. In addition to ammonium perchlorate, hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) and 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN) are the major constituents of PAX-21. In order to evaluate microbial perchlorate reduction as a practical option for the treatment of perchlorate in PAX-21 wastewater, we conducted biodegradation experiments using glucose as the primary sources of electrons and carbon. Batch experiments showed that negligible perchlorate was removed in microbial reactors containing PAX-21 wastewater while control bottles containing seed bacteria and glucose rapidly and completely removed perchlorate. These results suggested that the constituents in PAX-21 wastewater may be toxic to perchlorate reducing bacteria. A series of batch toxicity test was conducted to identify the toxic constituents in PAX-21 and DNAN was identified as the primary toxicant responsible for inhibiting the activity of perchlorate reducing bacteria. It was hypothesized that pretreatment of PAX-21 by zero-valent iron granules will transform toxic constituents in PAX-21 wastewater to non-toxic products. We observed complete reduction of DNAN to 2,4-diaminoanisole (DAAN) and RDX to formaldehyde in abiotic iron reduction study. After a 3-day acclimation period, perchlorate in iron-treated PAX-21 wastewater was rapidly decreased to an undetectable level in 2 days. This result demonstrated that iron treatment not only removed energetic compounds but also eliminated the toxic constituents that inhibited the subsequent microbial process. PMID:21700387

  2. Perchlorate levels found in tap water collected from several cities in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Erdemgil, Yiğit; Gözet, Tuba; Can, Özge; Ünsal, İbrahim; Özpınar, Aysel

    2016-03-01

    Perchlorate is an inorganic anion that inhibits iodide transport to the thyroid by sodium-iodide transporters. Because perchlorate is highly soluble, stable, and mobile in water, drinking water is a potential source of perchlorate exposure. When exposed to perchlorate, thyroid dysfunction can be observed in sensitive populations (pregnant woman, infants, and children), especially those with iodide deficiency. The aim of this study was to determine the perchlorate levels in tap water from five cities in Turkey. Perchlorate concentrations of 145 tap water samples collected from Ankara, Isparta, Istanbul, Kayseri, and Sakarya were determined by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Mean and median values were found to be 0.15 and 0.07 μg/L, respectively. The median values (25-75 % percentile) of Istanbul, Ankara, Sakarya, Isparta, and Kayseri were 0.08 μg/L (0.04-0.09 μg/L), 0.07 μg/L (0.07-0.21 μg/L), 0.04 μg/L (0.04-0.04 μg/L), 0.03 μg/L (0.02-0.07 μg/L), and 0.25 μg/L (0.23-0.31 μg/L), respectively. The median perchlorate level observed in Kayseri was significantly higher than those found at other cities (p < 0.05). Perchlorate concentrations in water samples were lower than the interim drinking water health advisory level (15 μg/L) determined by the US Environmental Protection Agency. This study showed that perchlorate in drinking water is not the main source of exposure in these cities. Future studies should be performed to determine perchlorate levels in other potential sources, such as food products. PMID:26869048

  3. Characterization of Perchlorate in a New Frozen Human Urine Standard Reference Material

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lee L.; Jarrett, Jeffery M.; Davis, W. Clay; Kilpatrick, Eric L.; Oflaz, Rabia; Turk, Gregory C.; Leber, Dennis D.; Valentin, Liza; Morel-Espinosa, Maria; Blount, Benjamin C.

    2015-01-01

    Perchlorate, an inorganic anion, has recently been recognized as an environmental contaminant by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Urine is the preferred matrix for assessment of human exposure to perchlorate. Although the measurement technique for perchlorate in urine was developed in 2005, the calibration and quality assurance aspects of the metrology infrastructure for perchlorate are still lacking in that there is no certified reference material (CRM) traceable to the International System of Units (SI). To meet the quality assurance needs in biomonitoring measurements of perchlorate and the related anions that affect thyroid health, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) developed Standard Reference Material (SRM) 3668 Mercury, Perchlorate, and Iodide in Frozen Human Urine. SRM 3668 consists of perchlorate, nitrate, thiocyanate, iodine, and mercury in urine at two levels that represent the 50th and 95th percentiles, respectively, of the concentrations (with some adjustments) in the U.S. population. It is the first CRM being certified for perchlorate. Measurements leading to the certification of perchlorate were made collaboratively at NIST and CDC using three methods based on liquid or ion chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS or IC-MS/MS). Potential sources of bias were analyzed and results were compared for the three methods. Perchlorate in SRM 3668 Level I urine was certified to be 2.70 μg L−1 ± 0.21 μg L−1, and for SRM 3668 Level II urine, the certified value is 13.47 μg L−1 ± 0.96 μg L−1. PMID:22850897

  4. Specific adsorption of perchlorate anions on Pt{hkl} single crystal electrodes.

    PubMed

    Attard, Gary A; Brew, Ashley; Hunter, Katherine; Sharman, Jonathan; Wright, Edward

    2014-07-21

    The voltammetry of Pt{111}, Pt{100}, Pt{110} and Pt{311} single crystal electrodes as a function of perchloric acid concentration (0.05-2.00 M) has been studied in order to test the assertion made in recent reports by Watanabe et al. that perchlorate anions specifically adsorb on polycrystalline platinum. Such an assertion would have significant ramifications for our understanding of electrocatalytic processes at platinum surfaces since perchlorate anions at low pH have classically been assumed not to specifically adsorb. For Pt{111}, it is found that OHad and electrochemical oxide states are both perturbed significantly as perchloric acid concentration is increased. We suggest that this is due to specific adsorption of perchlorate anions competing with OHad for adsorption sites. The hydrogen underpotential deposition (H UPD) region of Pt{111} however remains unchanged although evidence for perchlorate anion decomposition to chloride on Pt{111} is reported. In contrast, for Pt{100} no variation in the onset of electrochemical oxide formation is found nor any shift in the potential of the OHad state which normally results from the action of specifically adsorbing anions. This suggests that perchlorate anions are non-specifically adsorbed on this plane although strong changes in all H UPD states are observed as perchloric acid concentration is increased. This manifests itself as a redistribution of charge from the H UPD state situated at more positive potential to the one at more negative potential. For Pt{110} and Pt{311}, marginal changes in the onset of electrochemical oxide formation are recorded, associated with specific adsorption of perchlorate. Specific adsorption of perchlorate anions on Pt{111} is deleterious to electrocatalytic activity in relation to the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) as measured using a rotating disc electrode (RDE) in a hanging meniscus configuration. This study supports previous work suggesting that a large component of the ORR

  5. Occurrence of perchlorate in drinking water, groundwater, surface water and human saliva from India.

    PubMed

    Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Praamsma, Meredith L; Oldi, John F; Kunisue, Tatsuya; Sinha, Ravindra K

    2009-06-01

    Perchlorate (ClO(4)(-)), which is used as an oxidizer in jet and rocket fuels, pyrotechnic devices and explosives, is a widespread contaminant in surface waters and groundwater of many countries. Perchlorate is known to affect thyroid function. Despite the compound's widespread occurrence and potential health effects, perchlorate levels in drinking water in India are not known. In this study, water samples collected from 13 locations in six states (n=66), and saliva samples collected from four locations in three states (n=74) in India, were analyzed for perchlorate using high performance liquid chromatography interfaced with tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS). Perchlorate was detected in most (76%) of the water samples analyzed at concentrations above the quantitation limit of 0.02 microg L(-1); concentrations ranged from <0.02 to 6.9 microg L(-1) (mean: 0.42+/-1.1 microg L(-1); median: 0.07 microg L(-1)). Mean concentrations of perchlorate in drinking water, groundwater, bottled water, surface water and rain water were 0.1, 1.0, <0.02, 0.05 and <0.02 microg L(-1), respectively. From a total of 66 water samples analyzed, only three samples contained perchlorate levels above 1 microg L(-1); all three were groundwater samples. Perchlorate was found in the saliva samples analyzed at concentrations above 0.2 microg L(-1) and up to 4.7 microg L(-1) (mean: 1.3+/-1.3 microg L(-1); median: 0.91 microug L(-1)). No remarkable differences in perchlorate concentrations were found among the sampling locations of water or saliva or in subgroups stratified by gender or age. Perchlorate concentrations in water samples from India are one to two orders of magnitude lower than the concentrations reported for the United States. PMID:19328520

  6. Dispersion strengthened copper

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, Haskell; Meek, Thomas T.; Blake, Rodger D.

    1990-01-01

    A composition of matter comprised of copper and particles which are dispersed throughout the copper, where the particles are comprised of copper oxide and copper having a coating of copper oxide, and a method for making this composition of matter.

  7. Dispersion strengthened copper

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, Haskell; Meek, Thomas T.; Blake, Rodger D.

    1989-01-01

    A composition of matter comprised of copper and particles which are dispersed throughout the copper, where the particles are comprised of copper oxide and copper having a coating of copper oxide, and a method for making this composition of matter.

  8. Copper Metallochaperones

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Nigel J.; Winge, Dennis R.

    2014-01-01

    The current state of knowledge on how copper metallochaperones support the maturation of cuproproteins is reviewed. Copper is needed within mitochondria to supply the CuA and intramembrane CuB sites of cytochrome oxidase, within the trans-Golgi network to supply secreted cuproproteins and within the cytosol to supply superoxide dismutase 1 (Sod1). Subpopulations of copper-zinc superoxide dismutase also localize to mitochondria, the secretory system, the nucleus and, in plants, the chloroplast, which also requires copper for plastocyanin. Prokaryotic cuproproteins are found in the cell membrane and in the periplasm of gram-negative bacteria. Cu(I) and Cu(II) form tight complexes with organic molecules and drive redox chemistry, which unrestrained would be destructive. Copper metallochaperones assist copper in reaching vital destinations without inflicting damage or becoming trapped in adventitious binding sites. Copper ions are specifically released from copper metallochaperones upon contact with their cognate cuproproteins and metal transfer is thought to proceed by ligand substitution. PMID:20205585

  9. Perchlorate, thiocyanate, and nitrate in edible cole crops (Brassica sp.) produced in the lower Colorado River region.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, C A; Blount, B C; Valentin-Blasini, L; Krieger, R I

    2007-12-01

    The Colorado River is contaminated with low levels of perchlorate. Perchlorate has the potential to disrupt thyroid function by inhibiting the uptake of iodide. Brassica are rich sources of thiocyanate and nitrate, also inhibitors of iodide uptake. This study was conducted to estimate potential human exposure to perchlorate, thiocyanate, and nitrate from Brassica sp. irrigated with Colorado River water. Results indicate that Brassica sp. irrigated with Colorado River water do accumulate trace levels of perchlorate. However, the levels of perchlorate observed are low relative to the nitrate and thiocyanate naturally present in these species and low relative to the reference dose recommended by the NAS and the USEPA. PMID:17962898

  10. Long-Range Transport of Perchlorate Observed in the Atmospheric Aerosols Collected at Okinawa Island, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handa, D.; Okada, K.; Kuroki, Y.; Nakama, Y.; Nakajima, H.; Arakaki, T.; Tanahara, A.; Oomori, T.; Miyagi, T.; Kadena, H.; Ishizaki, T.; Nakama, F.

    2007-12-01

    The study of perchlorate has become quite active in the U.S. in the last several years. Perchlorate has been recognized as a new environmental pollutant and it attracted much attention quickly in the world. The health concern about perchlorate stems from the fact that it displaces iodide in the thyroid gland, while iodine-containing thyroid hormones are essential for proper neural development from the fetal stage through the first years of life. In this study, we determined the concentrations of perchlorate ion present in the atmospheric aerosols collected in Okinawa Island, Japan. We then examined the relationships between the perchlorate concentrations and the environmental parameters and the climatic conditions peculiar to Okinawa. Bulk aerosol samples were collected on quartz filters by using a high volume air sampler at Cape Hedo Atmosphere and Aerosol Monitoring Station (CHAAMS). Each sampling duration was one week. The quartz filters with aerosols were stirred with Milli-Q pure water for three hours before perchlorate ion was extracted. The extracted perchlorate ion concentrations were determined by ion chromatography (ICS-2000, DIONEX). The mean perchlorate concentration for the samples collected at CHAAMS was 1.83 ng/m3, and the minimum was 0.18 ng/m3. The samples collected during November 21-27, 2005, January 23-30, 2006 and April 24-01, 2006 had highest perchlorate concentrations. For these three samples, we performed back trajectory analysis, and found that the air mass for the three samples arrived from the Asian continent. A relatively strong correlation (r2 = 0.55) was found between perchlorate and nss-sulfate concentrations for the CHAAMS samples. Furthermore, we analyzed perchlorate in the soils and the fertilizers used for sugar cane farming around the CHAAMS area. The Milli-Q extract of the soil and the fertilizers did not contain any detectable levels of perchlorate ions. Therefore, it was suggested that perchlorate found in the atmospheric

  11. Particle size distribution and perchlorate levels in settled dust from urban roads, parks, and roofs in Chengdu, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Yiwen; Shen, Yang; Pi, Lu; Hu, Wenli; Chen, Mengqin; Luo, Yan; Li, Zhi; Su, Shijun; Ding, Sanglan; Gan, Zhiwei

    2016-01-01

    A total of 27 settled dust samples were collected from urban roads, parks, and roofs in Chengdu, China to investigate particle size distribution and perchlorate levels in different size fractions. Briefly, fine particle size fractions (<250 μm) were the dominant composition in the settled dust samples, with mean percentages of 80.2%, 69.5%, and 77.2% for the urban roads, roofs, and the parks, respectively. Perchlorate was detected in all of the size-fractionated dust samples, with concentrations ranging from 73.0 to 6160 ng g(-1), and the median perchlorate levels increased with decreasing particle size. The perchlorate level in the finest fraction (<63 μm) was significantly higher than those in the coarser fractions. To our knowledge, this is the first report on perchlorate concentrations in different particle size fractions. The calculated perchlorate loadings revealed that perchlorate was mainly associated with finer particles (<125 μm). An exposure assessment indicated that exposure to perchlorate via settled road dust intake is safe to both children and adults in Chengdu, China. However, due to perchlorate mainly existing in fine particles, there is a potential for perchlorate to transfer into surface water and the atmosphere by runoff and wind erosion or traffic emission, and this could act as an important perchlorate pollution source for the indoor environment, and merits further study. PMID:26608047

  12. Determination of perchlorate in infant formula by isotope dilution ion chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Z.; Lau, B.P.-Y.; Tague, B.; Sparling, M.; Forsyth, D.

    2011-01-01

    A sensitive and selective isotope dilution ion chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (ID IC-MS/MS) method was developed and validated for the determination of perchlorate in infant formula. The perchlorate was extracted from infant formula by using 20 ml of methanol and 5 ml of 1% acetic acid. All samples were spiked with 18O4 isotope-labelled perchlorate internal standard prior to extraction. After purification on a graphitised carbon solid-phase extraction column, the extracts were injected into an ion chromatography system equipped with an Ionpac AS20 column for separation of perchlorate from other anions. The presence of perchlorate in samples was quantified by isotope dilution mass spectrometry. Analysis of both perchlorate and its isotope-labelled internal standard was carried out on a Waters Quattro Ultima triple quadrupole mass spectrometer operating in a multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) negative ionisation mode. The method was validated for linearity and range, accuracy, precision, sensitivity, and matrix effects. The limit of quantification (LOQ) was 0.4 μg 1−1 for liquid infant formula and 0.95 μg kg−1 for powdered infant formula. The recovery ranged from 94% to 110% with an average of 98%. This method was used to analyse 39 infant formula, and perchlorate concentrations ranging from

  13. Potential mechanisms for bioregeneration of perchlorate-containing ion-exchange resin.

    PubMed

    Sharbatmaleki, Mohamadali; Unz, Richard F; Batista, Jacimaria R

    2015-05-15

    Ion-exchange (IX) is the most feasible technology for perchlorate removal from drinking water. Reuse of resins present challenges, however. Selective resins are non-regenerable, and are incinerated after one time use, while non-selective resins, when regenerable, produce a waste stream that contains high concentration of perchlorate that must be disposed of. A process to bioregenerate spent resin containing perchlorate with perchlorate-reducing bacteria (PRB) has been recently developed. In this research, potential mechanisms for bioregeneration of resin-attached perchlorate (RAP) were investigated. Batch bioregeneration experiments were performed using gel-type and macroporous-type resins. Various initial chloride concentrations and various resin bead sizes were used. The results of the bioregeneration experiments suggested that chloride, i.e. the product of perchlorate biodegradation, is more likely the desorbing agent of RAP; and increasing the concentration of chloride enhances the bioregeneration process. Both film and pore diffusion were found to be relevant with respect to the rate of perchlorate mass-transfer to the bulk liquid. Bioregeneration was found to be more effective for macroporous than for gel-type resins, especially in the case of macroporous resins with relatively small bead size in the presence of higher chloride concentration. PMID:25746957

  14. Exposure to perchlorate induces the formation of macrophage aggregates in the trunk kidney of zebrafish and mosquitofish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Capps, T.; Mukhi, S.; Rinchard, J.J.; Theodorakis, C.W.; Blazer, V.S.; Patino, R.

    2004-01-01

    Environmental contamination of ground and surface waters by perchlorate, derived from ammonium perchlorate (AP) and other perchlorate salts, is of increasing concern. Exposure to perchlorate can impair the thyroid endocrine system, which is thought to modulate renal and immune function in vertebrates. This study with zebrafish Danio rerio and eastern mosquitofish Gambusia holbrooki examined the histological effects of perchlorate on the trunk kidney, which in teleosts serves excretory and hemopoietic functions and therefore may be a target of perchlorate effects. Adult zebrafish of both sexes were exposed in the laboratory to waterborne, AP-derived perchlorate at measured concentrations of 18 mg/L for 8 weeks. Adult male mosquitofish were exposed to waterborne sodium perchlorate at measured perchlorate concentrations of 1-92 mg/L for 8 weeks. Control fish were kept in untreated water. The region of the body cavity containing the trunk kidney was processed from each fish for histological analysis. Macrophage aggregates (MAs), possible markers of contaminant exposure or immunotoxic effect, were present in the hemopoietic region of the kidney in both species exposed to perchlorate. The estimated percent area of kidney sections occupied by MAs was greater in zebrafish exposed to perchlorate at 18 mg/L (P < 0.05) than in controls. In male mosquitofish, the incidence of renal MAs increased proportionally with sodium perchlorate concentration and was significantly different from that of controls at 92 mg/L (P < 0.05). These observations confirm that in fish the kidney is affected by exposure to perchlorate. The concentrations of perchlorate at which the effects were noted are relatively high but within the range reported in some contaminated habitats.

  15. Perchlorate Exposure Reduces Primordial Germ Cell Number in Female Threespine Stickleback

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Ann M.; Earp, Nathanial C.; Redmond, Mandy E.; Postlethwait, John H.; von Hippel, Frank A.; Buck, C. Loren; Cresko, William A.

    2016-01-01

    Perchlorate is a common aquatic contaminant that has long been known to affect thyroid function in vertebrates, including humans. More recently perchlorate has been shown to affect primordial sexual differentiation in the aquatic model fishes zebrafish and threespine stickleback, but the mechanism has been unclear. Stickleback exposed to perchlorate from fertilization have increased androgen levels in the embryo and disrupted reproductive morphologies as adults, suggesting that perchlorate could disrupt the earliest stages of primordial sexual differentiation when primordial germ cells (PGCs) begin to form the gonad. Female stickleback have three to four times the number of PGCs as males during the first weeks of development. We hypothesized that perchlorate exposure affects primordial sexual differentiation by reducing the number of germ cells in the gonad during an important window of stickleback sex determination at 14–18 days post fertilization (dpf). We tested this hypothesis by quantifying the number of PGCs at 16 dpf in control and 100 mg/L perchlorate-treated male and female stickleback. Perchlorate exposure from the time of fertilization resulted in significantly reduced PGC number only in genotypic females, suggesting that the masculinizing effects of perchlorate observed in adult stickleback may result from early changes to the number of PGCs at a time critical for sex determination. To our knowledge, this is the first evidence of a connection between an endocrine disruptor and reduction in PGC number prior to the first meiosis during sex determination. These findings suggest that a mode of action of perchlorate on adult reproductive phenotypes in vertebrates, including humans, such as altered fecundity and sex reversal or intersex gonads, may stem from early changes to germ cell development. PMID:27383240

  16. Stability of low levels of perchlorate in drinking water and natural water samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stetson, S.J.; Wanty, R.B.; Helsel, D.R.; Kalkhoff, S.J.; Macalady, D.L.

    2006-01-01

    Perchlorate ion (ClO4-) is an environmental contaminant of growing concern due to its potential human health effects, impact on aquatic and land animals, and widespread occurrence throughout the United States. The determination of perchlorate cannot normally be carried out in the field. As such, water samples for perchlorate analysis are often shipped to a central laboratory, where they may be stored for a significant period before analysis. The stability of perchlorate ion in various types of commonly encountered water samples has not been generally examined-the effect of such storage is thus not known. In the present study, the long-term stability of perchlorate ion in deionized water, tap water, ground water, and surface water was examined. Sample sets containing approximately 1000, 100, 1.0, and 0.5 ??g l-1 perchlorate ion in deionized water and also in local tap water were formulated. These samples were analyzed by ion chromatography for perchlorate ion concentration against freshly prepared standards every 24 h for the first 7 days, biweekly for the next 4 weeks, and periodically after that for a total of 400 or 610 days for the two lowest concentrations and a total of 428 or 638 days for the high concentrations. Ground and surface water samples containing perchlorate were collected, held and analyzed for perchlorate concentration periodically over at least 360 days. All samples except for the surface water samples were found to be stable for the duration of the study, allowing for holding times of at least 300 days for ground water samples and at least 90 days for surface water samples. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of ammonium perchlorate on the reproductive performance and thyroid follicle histology of zebrafish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patino, R.; Wainscott, M.R.; Cruz-Li, E. I.; Balakrishnan, S.; McMurry, C.; Blazer, V.S.; Anderson, T.A.

    2003-01-01

    Adult zebrafish were reared up to eight weeks in control water or in water containing ammonium perchlorate (AP) at measured perchlorate concentrations of 18 (environmentally relevant, high) and 677 ppm. Groups of eight females were paired with four males on a weekly basis to assess AP effects on spawned egg volume, an index of reproductive performance. All treatments were applied to four to five spawning replicates. At 677 ppm, spawn volume was reduced within one week and became negligible after four weeks. At 18 ppm, spawn volume was unaffected even after eight weeks. Also, perchlorate at 18 ppm did not affect percentage egg fertilization. Fish were collected at the end of the exposures (677 ppm, four weeks; control and 18 ppm, eight weeks) for whole-body perchlorate content and thyroid histopathological analysis. Fish perchlorate levels were about one-hundredth of those of treatment water levels, indicating that waterborne perchlorate does not accumulate in whole fish. At 677 ppm for four weeks, perchlorate caused thyroid follicle cell (nuclear) hypertrophy and angiogenesis, whereas at 18 ppm for eight weeks, its effects were more pronounced and included hypertrophy, angiogenesis, hyperplasia, and colloid depletion. In conclusion, an eight-week exposure of adult zebrafish to 18 ppm perchlorate (high environmentally relevant concentrations) affected the histological condition of their thyroid follicles but not their reproductive performance. The effect of 677 ppm perchlorate on reproduction may be due to extrathyroidal toxicity. Further research is needed to determine if AP at lower environmentally relevant concentrations also affects the thyroid follicles of zebrafish.

  18. Bacterial reduction of highly concentrated perchlorate: Kinetics and influence of co-existing electron acceptors, temperature, pH and electron donors.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yanping; Gao, Naiyun; Chu, Wenhai; Wang, Shuaifeng; Xu, Jianhong

    2016-04-01

    Perchlorate reduction kinetics and effects of various environmental conditions on removal of perchlorate from synthetic water were investigated to seek high-strength perchlorate removal using mixed perchlorate reducing bacteria. Results demonstrated that perchlorate (50-1500 mg L(-1)) could be degraded rapidly within 28 h under the optimal conditions. The maximum specific perchlorate reduction rate (qmax) and half saturation constant (Ks) were 0.92 mg-perchlorate (mg-dry weight)(-1) h(-1) and 157.7 mg L(-1), respectively. In the ClO4(-)-NO3(-) systems obvious but recoverable lags were caused in perchlorate reduction and the lag time increased with the ratio of nitrate to perchlorate concentration increasing from 0.5 to 3. While in the ClO4(-)-SO4(2-) systems inhibitions didn't occur until the ratio of sulfate to perchlorate concentration exceeded 10. The optimum temperature and pH value were 35 °C and 6.85, respectively. The optimal acetate-to-perchlorate ratio that could consume all perchlorate and acetate simultaneously was about 2. Dechloromonas, one of the most prominent perchlorate reducing bacteria, was identified as the dominant bacterium in the acclimated culture (69.33% of the whole clones). The study demonstrated that the perchlorate-acclimated mixed microorganisms can readily and efficiently realize reduction of highly concentrated perchlorate in wastewater. PMID:26807938

  19. Ammonium perchlorate structure and dynamics at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prask, H. J.; Choi, C. S.; Chesser, N. J.; Rosasco, G. J.

    1988-04-01

    Single-crystal and powder neutron diffraction, coherent neutron inelastic scattering, and Raman spectroscopy have been used to study the low temperature structure and dynamics of ammonium perchlorate. No evidence for a phase transition is found. Based on analysis of thermal motion amplitudes and inelastic neutron-scattering data for ND4ClO4 a Raman-active B3g symmetry zone-center mode at 45 cm-1 is identified as a libration. Another Raman-active mode, B1g symmetry at 33 cm-1, and a previously unobserved Au symmetry mode at 12 cm-1, are inferred to have significant librational character at q=0. Comparison of these results with earlier incoherent neutron scattering results suggests that, because of the low activation energy of ammonium ions, classical jump reorientations strongly influence ammonium-ion sublattice dynamics even to temperatures as low as 20 K. Partial dispersion curves are also presented.

  20. Equation of state and temperature measurements for shocked ammonium perchlorate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winey, J. M.; Dreger, Z. A.; Gruzdkov, Y. A.; Jensen, B. J.; Gupta, Y. M.

    2000-04-01

    A thermodynamically consistent equation of state (EOS) was developed for unreacted, single-crystal ammonium perchlorate (AP) for shock compression along the [210] and [001] directions. The specific heat, cv, the pressure-temperature coefficient, (∂P/∂T)v, and the isothermal bulk modulus, BT, were determined from Hugoniot and isothermal compression curves, along with available data at atmospheric pressure. The mechanical response of each orientation of the AP crystal was modeled as an isotropic elastic-plastic solid. Above the HEL, the rate dependent yielding of AP was described with a simple overstress model. Time-resolved Raman spectroscopy experiments were carried out to obtain temperatures in the shocked state. These temperature measurements were used to constrain the values of various EOS parameters.

  1. Crystallization kinetics of ammonium perchlorate in MSMPR crystallizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanrıkulu, S. Ü.; Eroğlu, İ.; Bulutcu, A. N.; Özkar, S.

    2000-01-01

    The effects of supersaturation level, sodium chloride (NaCl) as impurity, and the suspension density of the crystallizer content on the crystallization kinetics of ammonium perchlorate (AP) were studied in a mixed-suspension mixed-product removal crystallizer. The product crystals have a plate-like morphology. The crystal size distribution is not affected by the supersaturation level. There was a deviation from the ideal population density where the growth rate of pure AP crystallization was size dependent with the order of 0.4 according to Abegg, Stevens and Larson (ASL) model. However, the ASL model was not found to be suitable to express the growth rate of the crystals in NaCl containing AP solution. Also when suspension density of the crystallizer increased, secondary nucleation was observed.

  2. Iron/potassium perchlorate pellet burn rate measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, J.W.; Walters, R.R.

    1995-01-25

    A burn rate test having several advantages for low gas-producing pyrotechnic compacts has been developed. The technique involves use of a high speed video motion analysis system that allows immediate turnaround and produces all required data for rate computation on magnetic tape and becomes immediately available on the display screen. The test technique provides a quick method for material qualification along with data for improved reliability and function. Burn rate data has been obtained for both UPI and Eagle Pitcher Iron/Potassium Perchlorate blends. The data obtained for the UPI blends cover a range of composition, pellet density, and ambient (before ignition) pellet temperature. Burn rate data for the E-P blends were extended to include surface conditions or particle size as a variable parameter.

  3. Effect of nitrate, acetate and hydrogen on native perchlorate-reducing microbial communities and their activity in vadose soil

    PubMed Central

    Nozawa-Inoue, Mamie; Jien, Mercy; Yang, Kun; Rolston, Dennis E.; Hristova, Krassimira R.; Scow, Kate M.

    2011-01-01

    Effect of nitrate, acetate and hydrogen on native perchlorate-reducing bacteria (PRB) was examined by conducting microcosm tests using vadose soil collected from a perchlorate-contaminated site. The rate of perchlorate reduction was enhanced by hydrogen amendment and inhibited by acetate amendment, compared to unamendment. Nitrate was reduced before perchlorate in all amendments. In hydrogen-amended and unamended soils, nitrate delayed perchlorate reduction, suggesting the PRB preferentially use nitrate as an electron acceptor. In contrast, nitrate eliminated the inhibitory effect of acetate amendment on perchlorate reduction and increased the rate and the extent, possibly because the preceding nitrate reduction/denitrification decreased the acetate concentration which was inhibitory to the native PRB. In hydrogen-amended and unamended soils, perchlorate reductase gene (pcrA) copies, representing PRB densities, increased with either perchlorate or nitrate reduction, suggesting either perchlorate or nitrate stimulates growth of the PRB. In contrast, in acetate-amended soil pcrA increased only when perchlorate was depleted: a large portion of the PRB may have not utilized nitrate in this amendment. Nitrate addition did not alter the distribution of the dominant pcrA clones in hydrogen-amended soil, likely because of the functional redundancy of PRB as nitrate-reducers/denitrifiers, whereas acetate selected different pcrA clones from those with hydrogen amendment. PMID:21284679

  4. Perchlorate disrupts embryonic androgen synthesis and reproductive development in threespine stickleback without changing whole-body levels of thyroid hormone

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Ann M.; Dillon, Danielle; Bernhardt, Richard A.; Torunsky, Roberta; Postlethwait, John H.; von Hippel, Frank A.; Buck, C. Loren; Cresko, William A.

    2014-01-01

    Perchlorate, an environmental contaminant, disrupts normal functioning of the thyroid. We previously showed that perchlorate disrupts behavior and gonad development, and induces external morphological changes in a vertebrate model organism, the threespine stickleback. Whether perchlorate alters these phenotypes via a thyroid-mediated mechanism, and the extent to which the effects depend on dose, are unknown. To address these questions, we chronically exposed stickleback to control conditions and to three concentrations of perchlorate (10, 30 and 100 ppm) at various developmental stages from fertilization to reproductive maturity. Adults chronically exposed to perchlorate had increased numbers of thyroid follicles and decreased numbers of thyrocytes. Surprisingly, T4 and T3 levels in larval, juvenile, and adult whole fish chronically exposed to perchlorate did not differ from controls, except at the lowest perchlorate dose, suggesting a non-monotonic dose response curve. We found no detectable abnormalities in external phenotype at any dose of perchlorate, indicating that the increased number of thyroid follicles compensated for the disruptive effects of these doses. In contrast to external morphology, gonadal development was altered substantially, with the highest dose of perchlorate causing the largest effects. Perchlorate increased the number both of early stage ovarian follicles in females and of advanced spermatogenic stages in males. Perchlorate also disrupted embryonic androgen levels. We conclude that chronic perchlorate exposure may not result in lasting adult gross morphological changes but can produce lasting modifications to gonads when compensation of T3 and T4 levels occurs by thyroid follicle hyperplasia. Perchlorate may therefore affect vertebrate development via both thyroidal and non-thyroidal mechanisms. PMID:25448260

  5. The growth and dissolution of ammonium perchlorate crystals in a fluidized bed crystallizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanrikulu, S. Ü.; Eroğlu, I.; Bulutcu, A. N.; Özkar, S.

    1998-11-01

    The growth and the dissolution of ammonium perchlorate crystals were studied in pure and in sodium chloride containing aqueous solutions, in a fluidized bed crystallizer. The presence of sodium chloride in the solution reduced the growth and the dissolution rates of ammonium perchlorate crystals. The growth rates were interpreted in terms of supersaturation levels. The orders and rate constants were reported. The effectiveness factors were estimated from the growth rate data to evaluate the relative magnitude of the two resistances in series, diffusion and integration. The controlling mechanism is mainly by diffusion for the crystal growth of ammonium perchlorate in pure aqueous solution. However, both diffusion and integration steps affect the growth of ammonium perchlorate crystals in the presence of sodium chloride in solution.

  6. Differential potentiometric determination of perchlorate and iodide ions in industrial wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Kolbyagin, N.P.; Vlasova, E.G.; Zhilina, O.D.; Renkova, Z.S.

    1986-12-01

    The determination of perchlorates and iodides present together in industrial wastes is hampered by the fact that these anions either are precipitated by the same organic reagents or form colored complexes with similar absorption maxima. Determining them by separation or by deducting one from their sum is a multi-step analysis which takes more time and decreases accuracy. In this paper, the authors report a rapid, single-step determination of co-present perchlorate and iodide by precipitative titration with nitron solution and potentiometric indication of the equivalence point by a perchlorate-selective membrane electrode. The perchlorate and iodide determinations were unaffected by surfactant, suspensions, and ions not precipitated with nitron. A single analysis takes 15-20 minutes. This method may also be used for analyzing single salts.

  7. Perchlorate: health effects and technologies for its removal from water resources.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Asha; Viraraghavan, Thiruvenkatachari

    2009-04-01

    Perchlorate has been found in drinking water and surface waters in the United States and Canada. It is primarily associated with release from defense and military operations. Natural sources include certain fertilizers and potash ores. Although it is a strong oxidant, perchlorate is very persistent in the environment. At high concentrations perchlorate can affect the thyroid gland by inhibiting the uptake of iodine. A maximum contaminant level has not been set, while a guidance value of 6 ppb has been suggested by Health Canada. Perchlorate is measured in environmental samples primarily by ion chromatography. It can be removed from water by anion exchange or membrane filtration. Biological and chemical processes are also effective in removing this species from water. PMID:19440526

  8. ANALYSIS OF HYDROPONIC FERTILIZER MATRIXES FOR PERCHLORATE: COMPARISON OF ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Seven retail hydroponic nitrate fertilizer products, two liquid and five solid, were comparatively analyzed for the perchlorate anion (ClO4-) by ion chromatography (IC) with suppressed conductivity detection, complexation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (cESI-MS), norma...

  9. Perchlorate: water and infant formulae contamination in France and risk assessment in infants.

    PubMed

    Vigreux-Besret, Carole; Mahé, Aurélie; Ledoux, Gérald; Garnier, Alexandra; Rosin, Christophe; Baert, Alain; Joyeux, Michel; Badot, Pierre-Marie; Panetier, Pascale; Rivière, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Perchlorate ions ClO4(-), known to inhibit competitively the uptake of iodine by the thyroid, have been detected in drinking water in France as well as in infant formulae. A tolerable daily intake (TDI) has been established at 0.7 µg kg(-1) bw day(-1) based on the inhibition of iodine uptake. Due to this mechanism of action, the iodine status could strongly influence the biological effect of perchlorate. Perchlorate concentrations in water and infant formulae were measured and the exposure of children under 6 months of age calculated. It appeared that the TDI could be exceeded in some children. As the iodine status is not optimal within the entire French population, there appears to be a need to clarify the sources of perchlorate ultimately to decrease exposure. PMID:25830716

  10. Hydrogen generation by tin corrosion in lactic acid solution promoted by sodium perchlorate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deyab, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    A method to produce high purity hydrogen using the corrosion of tin metal in lactic acid solutions is studied. The addition of sodium perchlorate has been also investigated for promoting the tin-lactic acid reaction. The data reveal that the rate of hydrogen production increases with increasing lactic acid concentration. The presence of perchlorate ions in lactic acid solution enhances the active dissolution of tin metal and tends to breakdown the passive film and promoting the hydrogen generation rate. Polarization measurements show that the breakdown potential (Epit) decreases with increase in sodium perchlorate concentration. An increase in temperature accelerates the rate of solubility of passive layer on the tin surface. Moreover, a synergistic effect of sodium perchlorate in combination with increasing the solution temperature is key in promoting the hydrogen generation rate. Results obtained from hydrogen and polarization measurements are in good agreement. These measurements are complemented with SEM, EDX and XRD examinations of the electrode surface.

  11. Perchlorate: Health Effects and Technologies for Its Removal from Water Resources

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Asha; Viraraghavan, Thiruvenkatachari

    2009-01-01

    Perchlorate has been found in drinking water and surface waters in the United States and Canada. It is primarily associated with release from defense and military operations. Natural sources include certain fertilizers and potash ores. Although it is a strong oxidant, perchlorate is very persistent in the environment. At high concentrations perchlorate can affect the thyroid gland by inhibiting the uptake of iodine. A maximum contaminant level has not been set, while a guidance value of 6 ppb has been suggested by Health Canada. Perchlorate is measured in environmental samples primarily by ion chromatography. It can be removed from water by anion exchange or membrane filtration. Biological and chemical processes are also effective in removing this species from water. PMID:19440526

  12. 77 FR 52633 - Notice of a Public Meeting: Stakeholder Meeting Concerning EPA's Intent To Regulate Perchlorate...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Parts 141 and 142 Notice of a Public Meeting: Stakeholder Meeting Concerning EPA's Intent To Regulate Perchlorate Levels in Drinking Water AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency...

  13. POLISHING THE EFFLUENT FROM AN ANAEROBIC BIOLOGICAL PERCHLORATE TREATMENT PROCESS - SLIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Anaerobic biological processes effectively reduce perchlorate to chloride. However, the effluent can be biologically unstable, high in particulates and high in disinfection by-product precursor compounds. Such an effluent would be unsuitable for transmission into a drinking water...

  14. Multi-Objective Optimization of an In situ Bioremediation Technology to Treat Perchlorate-Contaminated Groundwater

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation shows how a multi-objective optimization method is integrated into a transport simulator (MT3D) for estimating parameters and cost of in-situ bioremediation technology to treat perchlorate-contaminated groundwater.

  15. The Impact of Temperature on the Performance of Anaerobic Biological Treatment of Perchlorate in Drinking Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    A 20 month pilot-scale study was conducted to examine the impact of temperature on the performance of an anaerobic biological contactor used to treat perchlorate-contaminated water. The contactor was successfully acclimated with indigenous microorganisms. Influent temperatures ...

  16. Deliquescence of calcium perchlorate: A route to liquid water on Mars and other possibly habitable planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolbert, M.; Nuding, D.; Gough, R. V.

    2013-05-01

    The Wet Chemistry Laboratory (WCL) aboard the Phoenix Mars Lander identified the presence of 0.5% perchlorate (ClO4-). Reanalysis of the Viking gas chromatography-mass spectrometry results also suggests perchlorate was present in the soil and the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover has potentially found perchlorate as well. Perchlorate salts are known to readily absorb water vapor from the atmosphere and deliquesce into an aqueous solution. We have previously performed laboratory studies to better understand the deliquescence (crystalline solid to aqueous salt) and also efflorescence (aqueous salt to crystalline solid) of several perchlorate salts at low temperatures. We found that NaClO4 and Mg(ClO4)2 are highly deliquescent, forming aqueous solutions at humidity values as low as 40% RH and at temperatures as low as 223 K. We also observed a significant hysteresis that occurs during efflorescence of these salt solutions, expected due to the kinetic inhibition of crystal nucleation. The efflorescence relative humidity values of sodium and magnesium perchlorate solutions are 13% RH and 19% RH, respectively, indicating that perchlorate salts could exist as stable or metastable aqueous solutions over a wide range of Martian RH and temperature conditions. Although the low temperature deliquescence of several perchlorate salts is now well characterized, instruments onboard Phoenix and MSL have identified calcium perchlorate (Ca(ClO4)2) as the likely parent salt. Calcium perchlorate is known for its highly deliquescent properties and low eutectic point; however, the deliquescence and efflorescence of this salt have not yet been quantified as a function of temperature. We have used Raman microscopy to examine the deliquescence and efflorescence of Ca(ClO4)2 under relevant Martian temperatures. A extremely low DRH of ~1% for the anhydrous Ca(ClO4)2 at 273 K was observed, which could allow for formation of aqueous solutions under very low RH environmental conditions

  17. Thyroid Hormones and Moderate Exposure to Perchlorate during Pregnancy in Women in Southern California

    PubMed Central

    Steinmaus, Craig; Pearl, Michelle; Kharrazi, Martin; Blount, Benjamin C.; Miller, Mark D.; Pearce, Elizabeth N.; Valentin-Blasini, Liza; DeLorenze, Gerald; Hoofnagle, Andrew N.; Liaw, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Background: Findings from national surveys suggest that everyone in the United States is exposed to perchlorate. At high doses, perchlorate, thiocyanate, and nitrate inhibit iodide uptake into the thyroid and decrease thyroid hormone production. Small changes in thyroid hormones during pregnancy, including changes within normal reference ranges, have been linked to cognitive function declines in the offspring. Objectives: We evaluated the potential effects of low environmental exposures to perchlorate on thyroid function. Methods: Serum thyroid hormones and anti-thyroid antibodies and urinary perchlorate, thiocyanate, nitrate, and iodide concentrations were measured in 1,880 pregnant women from San Diego County, California, during 2000–2003, a period when much of the area’s water supply was contaminated from an industrial plant with perchlorate at levels near the 2007 California regulatory standard of 6 μg/L. Linear regression was used to evaluate associations between urinary perchlorate and serum thyroid hormone concentrations in models adjusted for urinary creatinine and thiocyanate, maternal age and education, ethnicity, and gestational age at serum collection. Results: The median urinary perchlorate concentration was 6.5 μg/L, about two times higher than in the general U.S. population. Adjusted associations were identified between increasing log10 perchlorate and decreasing total thyroxine (T4) [regression coefficient (β) = –0.70; 95% CI: –1.06, –0.34], decreasing free thyroxine (fT4) (β = –0.053; 95% CI: –0.092, –0.013), and increasing log10 thyroid-stimulating hormone (β = 0.071; 95% CI: 0.008, 0.133). Conclusions: These results suggest that environmental perchlorate exposures may affect thyroid hormone production during pregnancy. This could have implications for public health given widespread perchlorate exposure and the importance of thyroid hormone in fetal neurodevelopment. Citation: Steinmaus C, Pearl M, Kharrazi M, Blount BC

  18. Perchlorate in dust fall and indoor dust in Malta: An effect of fireworks.

    PubMed

    Vella, Alfred J; Chircop, Cynthia; Micallef, Tamara; Pace, Colette

    2015-07-15

    We report on the presence of perchlorate in the settleable dust of Malta, a small central Mediterranean island. Both dust fall collected directly as it precipitated from atmosphere over a period of one month and deposited indoor dust from domestic residences were studied. Perchlorate was determined by ion chromatography of water extracts of the collected dusts. Dust fall was collected from 43 towns during 2011 to 2013 and indoor dust was sampled from homes in the same localities. Perchlorate was detected in 108 of 153 samples of dust fall (71%) and in 28 of 37 indoor dust samples (76%). Detectable perchlorate in dust fall ranged from 0.52μgg(-1) to 561μgg(-1) with a median value of 6.2μgg(-1); in indoor dust, levels were from 0.79μgg(-1) to 53μgg(-1) with a median value of 7.8μgg(-1), the highest recorded anywhere to date. Statistical analysis suggested that there was no significant difference in perchlorate content of indoor dust and dust fall. Perchlorate levels in dust fall escalate during the summer in response to numerous religious feasts celebrated with fireworks and perchlorate persists at low μgg(-1) concentrations for several months beyond the summer festive period. In Malta, perchlorate derives exclusively from KClO4, imported for fireworks manufacture. Its residue in dust presents an exposure risk to the population, especially via ingestion by hand to mouth transfer. Our results suggest that wherever intensive burning of fireworks takes place, the environmental impact may be much longer lived than realised, mainly due to re-suspension and deposition of contaminated settled dust in the urban environment. PMID:25828411

  19. Effects of Ammonium Perchlorate on Thyroid Function in Developing Fathead Minnows, Pimephales promelas

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Helen M.; Pickford, Daniel B.; Hutchinson, Thomas H.; Brown, J. Anne

    2005-01-01

    Perchlorate is a known environmental contaminant, largely due to widespread military use as a propellant. Perchlorate acts pharmacologically as a competitive inhibitor of thyroidal iodide uptake in mammals, but the impacts of perchlorate contamination in aquatic ecosystems and, in particular, the effects on fish are unclear. Our studies aimed to investigate the effects of concentrations of ammonium perchlorate that can occur in the environment (1, 10, and 100 mg/L) on the development of fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas. For these studies, exposures started with embryos of < 24-hr postfertilization and were terminated after 28 days. Serial sectioning of thyroid follicles showed thyroid hyperplasia with increased follicular epithelial cell height and reduced colloid in all groups of fish that had been exposed to perchlorate for 28 days, compared with control fish. Whole-body thyroxine (T4) content (a measure of total circulating T4) in fish exposed to 100 mg/L perchlorate was elevated compared with the T4 content of control fish, but 3,5,3′-triiodothyronine (T3) content was not significantly affected in any exposure group. Despite the apparent regulation of T3, after 28 days of exposure to ammonium perchlorate, fish exposed to the two higher levels (10 and 100 mg/L) were developmentally retarded, with a lack of scales and poor pigmentation, and significantly lower wet weight and standard length than were control fish. Our study indicates that environmental levels of ammonium perchlorate affect thyroid function in fish and that in the early life stages these effects may be associated with developmental retardation. PMID:15811828

  20. Use of surfactant modified ultrafiltration for perchlorate (Cl(O)(4-)) removal.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jaekyung; Yoon, Yeomin; Amy, Gary; Cho, Jaeweon; Foss, David; Kim, Tae-Hyung

    2003-05-01

    Determinations of perchlorate anion (ClO(4)(-)) transport and rejection were performed using a surfactant modified ultrafiltration (UF) membrane. Perchlorate anion (at a concentration of 100 microg/L of ClO(4)(-), spiked with KClO(4)) was introduced to the membrane as a pure component, in binary mixtures with other salts, cationic and anionic surfactants, and at various ionic strength conditions (conductivity). Also, a natural source water was spiked with perchlorate in the presence of cationic and anionic surfactants and used to determine the effects of a complex mixture (including natural organic matter (NOM)) on the observed rejection. All filtration measurements were performed at approximately the same permeate flow rate in order to minimize artifacts from mass transfer at the membrane interface. The objective of this study was to modify a negatively charged UF membrane in terms of the fundamental mechanisms, steric/size exclusion and electrostatic exclusion and to enhance perchlorate rejection, with synthetic water and a blend of Colorado River water and State Project water (CRW/SPW). Previous work suggested that perchlorate was dominantly rejected by electrostatic exclusion for charged nanofiltration (NF) and UF membranes (Rejection of perchlorate by reverse osmosis, nanofiltration and ultrafiltration (UF) membranes: mechanism and modeling. Ph.D. dissertation, University of Colorado, Boulder, USA, 2001). In that research, perchlorate rejection capability was quickly lost in the presence of a sufficient amount of other ions. However, this study showed that ClO(4)(-) was excluded from a (negatively) charged UF membrane with pores large with respect to the size of the ion. Although perchlorate rejection capability due to apparent electrostatic force was reduced in the presence of a cationic surfactant, a desired amount of the ClO(4)(-) was excluded by steric exclusion. The steric exclusion was due to decreasing membrane pore size caused by the adsorption of the

  1. The Relationship between Perchlorate in Drinking Water and Cord Blood Thyroid Hormones: First Experience from Iran

    PubMed Central

    Javidi, Ashraf; Rafiei, Nasim; Amin, Mohammad Mehdi; Hovsepian, Silva; Hashemipour, Mahin; Kelishadi, Roya; Taghian, Zahra; Mofateh, Samaneh; Poursafa, Parinaz

    2015-01-01

    Background: Considering the controversial information regarding the effects of perchlorate on thyroid function of high risk population as neonates, and given the high prevalence rate of thyroid disorders specially congenital hypothyroidism in our region, this study aims to investigate for the first time in Iran, the relationship between drinking groundwater perchlorate and cord blood thyroid hormones level in an industrial region. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, drinking groundwater perchlorate level of rural areas of Zarinshahr, Isfahan was measured. Simultaneously, cord blood level of thyroid hormones of neonates born in the studied region was measured. Thyroid function test of neonates in regions with low and high perchlorate level were compared. Results: In this study, 25 tap water samples were obtained for perchlorate measurement. Level of cord blood thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), T4 and T3 of 25 neonates were measured. Mean (standard deviation) of perchlorate, TSH, T4 and T3 was 3.59 (5.10) μg/l, 7.81 (4.14) mIU/m, 6.06 (0.85) mg/dl, and 63.46 (17.53) mg/dl, respectively. Mean levels of thyroid function tests were not different in low (<5 μg/l) and high level of drinking ground water perchlorate (P > 0.05). Conclusions: Perchlorate did not appear to be related to thyroid function of neonates in the studied industrial region. It seems that iodine status of the regions, as well as other environmental contaminants and genetic background, could impact on its relation with thyroid function of neonates. PMID:25789149

  2. Accumulation and perchlorate exposure potential of lettuce produced in the Lower Colorado River region.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, C A; Krieger, R I; Khandaker, N; Moore, R C; Holts, K C; Neidel, L L

    2005-06-29

    The Colorado River is contaminated with perchlorate concentrations of 1.5-8 microg/L, an anion linked to thyroid dysfunction. Over 90% of the lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) consumed during the winter months in the United States is produced in the Lower Colorado River region. Studies were conducted in this region to survey the potential for lettuce perchlorate accumulation and estimate potential human exposure to perchlorate from lettuce. Total uptake of perchlorate in the above-ground plant of iceberg lettuce was approximately 5 g/ha. Exposure estimates ranged from 0.45 to 1.8 microg/day depending on lettuce types and trimming. For all lettuce types, hypothetical exposures were less than 4% of the reference dose recommended by the National Academy of Sciences. Results show the relative iodide uptake inhibition potential because of lettuce nitrate was 2 orders of magnitude greater than that associated with the corresponding trace levels of perchlorate. These data support the conclusion that potential perchlorate exposures from lettuce irrigated with Colorado River water are negligible relative to acute or long-term harmful amounts. PMID:15969537

  3. Preliminary analyses for perchlorate in selected natural materials and their derivative products

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orris, G.J.; Harvey, G.J.; Tsui, D.T.; Eldrige, J.E.

    2003-01-01

    Increasing concern about sources of perchlorate contamination in ground and surface waters has led to interest in identifying potential sources of natural perchlorate and products derived from these natural sources. To date, most perchlorate found in ground and surface waters has been attributed to its major uses as an oxidizer in solid propellants for rockets, in fireworks and other explosives, and a variety of other uses of man-made perchlorate salts. However, perchlorate found in the soils, surface water, and ground water of some locations cannot be linked to an anthropogenic source. This paper contains preliminary data on the detection and non-detection of perchlorate in a variety of natural materials and their products, including some fertilizer materials. These data were previously presented at two conferences; once in poster session and once orally (Harvey and others, 1999; Orris and others, 2000). Although the results presented here are included in a journal article awaiting publication, the lack of public information on this topic has led to repeated requests for the data used as the basis for our presentations in 1999 and 2000.

  4. Perchlorate contamination of groundwater from fireworks manufacturing area in South India.

    PubMed

    Isobe, Tomohiko; Ogawa, Shohei P; Sugimoto, Rina; Ramu, Karri; Sudaryanto, Agus; Malarvannan, Govindan; Devanathan, Gnanasekaran; Ramaswamy, Babu Rajendran; Munuswamy, Natesan; Ganesh, Deavaraj Sankar; Sivakumar, Jeyaraj; Sethuraman, A; Parthasarathy, V; Subramanian, Annamalai; Field, Jennifer; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2013-07-01

    Perchlorate contamination was investigated in groundwater and surface water from Sivakasi and Madurai in the Tamil Nadu State of South India. Sensitive determination of perchlorate (LOQ = 0.005 μg/L) was achieved by large-volume (500 μL) injection ion chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. Concentrations of perchlorate were <0.005-7,690 μg/L in groundwater (n = 60), <0.005-30.2 μg/L in surface water (n = 11), and 0.063-0.393 μg/L in tap water (n = 3). Levels in groundwater were significantly higher in the fireworks factory area than in the other locations, indicating that the fireworks and safety match industries are principal sources of perchlorate pollution. This is the first study that reports the contamination status of perchlorate in this area and reveals firework manufacture to be the pollution source. Since perchlorate levels in 17 out of 57 groundwater samples from Sivakasi, and none from Madurai, exceeded the drinking water guideline level proposed by USEPA (15 μg/L), further investigation on human health is warranted. PMID:23108714

  5. Mechanistic Studies on the Radiolytic Decomposition of Perchlorates on the Martian Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Andrew M.; Abplanalp, Matthew J.; Kaiser, Ralf I.

    2016-04-01

    Perchlorates—inorganic compounds carrying the perchlorate ion ({{ClO}}4{}-)—were discovered at the north polar landing site of the Phoenix spacecraft and at the southern equatorial landing site of the Curiosity Rover within the Martian soil at levels of 0.4-0.6 wt%. This study explores in laboratory experiments the temperature-dependent decomposition mechanisms of hydrated perchlorates—namely magnesium perchlorate hexahydrate (Mg(ClO4)2·6H2O)—and provides yields of the oxygen-bearing species formed in these processes at Mars-relevant surface temperatures from 165 to 310 K in the presence of galactic cosmic-ray particles (GCRs). Our experiments reveal that the response of the perchlorates to the energetic electrons is dictated by the destruction of the perchlorate ion ({{ClO}}4{}-) and the inherent formation of chlorates ({{ClO}}3{}-) plus atomic oxygen (O). Isotopic substitution experiments reveal that the oxygen is released solely from the perchlorate ion and not from the water of hydration (H2O). As the mass spectrometer detects only molecular oxygen (O2) and no atomic oxygen (O), atomic oxygen recombines to molecular oxygen within the perchlorates, with the overall yield of molecular oxygen increasing as the temperature drops from 260 to 160 K. Absolute destruction rates and formation yields of oxygen are provided for the planetary modeling community.

  6. Anaerobic treatment of army ammunition production wastewater containing perchlorate and RDX.

    PubMed

    Atikovic, Emina; Suidan, Makram T; Maloney, Stephen W

    2008-08-01

    Perchlorate is an oxidizer that has been routinely used in solid rocket motors by the Department of Defense and National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Royal Demolition Explosive (RDX) is a major component of military high explosives and is used in a wide variety of munitions. Perchlorate bearing wastewater typically results from production of solid rocket motors, while RDX is transferred to Army industrial wastewaters during load, assemble and pack operations for new munitions, and hot water or steam washout for disposal and deactivation of old munitions (commonly referred to as demilitarization, or simply demil). Biological degradation in Anaerobic Fluidized Bed Reactors (AFBR), has been shown to be an effective method for the removal of both perchlorate and RDX in contaminated wastewater. The focus of this study was to determine the effectiveness of removal of perchlorate and RDX, individually and when co-mingled, using ethanol as an electron donor under steady state conditions. Three AFBRs were used to assess the effectiveness of this process in treating the wastewater. The performance of the bioreactors was monitored relative to perchlorate, RDX, and chemical oxygen demand removal effectiveness. The experimental results demonstrated that the biodegradation of perchlorate and RDX was more effective in bioreactors receiving the single contaminant than in the bioreactor where both contaminants were fed. PMID:18586300

  7. Perchlorate reduction by hydrogen autotrophic bacteria and microbial community analysis using high-throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Wan, Dongjin; Liu, Yongde; Niu, Zhenhua; Xiao, Shuhu; Li, Daorong

    2016-02-01

    Hydrogen autotrophic reduction of perchlorate have advantages of high removal efficiency and harmless to drinking water. But so far the reported information about the microbial community structure was comparatively limited, changes in the biodiversity and the dominant bacteria during acclimation process required detailed study. In this study, perchlorate-reducing hydrogen autotrophic bacteria were acclimated by hydrogen aeration from activated sludge. For the first time, high-throughput sequencing was applied to analyze changes in biodiversity and the dominant bacteria during acclimation process. The Michaelis-Menten model described the perchlorate reduction kinetics well. Model parameters q(max) and K(s) were 2.521-3.245 (mg ClO4(-)/gVSS h) and 5.44-8.23 (mg/l), respectively. Microbial perchlorate reduction occurred across at pH range 5.0-11.0; removal was highest at pH 9.0. The enriched mixed bacteria could use perchlorate, nitrate and sulfate as electron accepter, and the sequence of preference was: NO3(-) > ClO4(-) > SO4(2-). Compared to the feed culture, biodiversity decreased greatly during acclimation process, the microbial community structure gradually stabilized after 9 acclimation cycles. The Thauera genus related to Rhodocyclales was the dominated perchlorate reducing bacteria (PRB) in the mixed culture. PMID:26714962

  8. High-nitrogen-based pyrotechnics: perchlorate-free red- and green-light illuminants based on 5-aminotetrazole.

    PubMed

    Sabatini, Jesse J; Moretti, Jared D

    2013-09-16

    Prototype testing of perchlorate-free hand-held signal illuminants for the US Army's M126 A1 red-star and M195 green-star parachute illuminants are described. Although previous perchlorate-free variants for these items have been developed based on high-nitrogen compounds that are not readily available, the new formulations consist of anhydrous 5-aminotetrazole as the suitable perchlorate replacement. Compared to the perchlorate-containing control, the disclosed illuminants exhibited excellent stabilities toward various ignition stimuli and had excellent pyrotechnic performance. The illuminants are important from both military and civil fireworks perspectives, as the perchlorate-free nature of the illuminants adequately address environmental concerns associated with perchlorate-containing red- and green-light-emitting illuminants. PMID:23950104

  9. Catalytic destruction of perchlorate in ferric chloride and hydrochloric acid solution with control of temperature, pressure and chemical reagents

    DOEpatents

    Gu, Baohua; Cole, David R.; Brown, Gilbert M.

    2004-10-05

    A method is described to decompose perchlorate in a FeCl.sub.3 /HCl aqueous solution such as would be used to regenerate an anion exchange resin used to remove perchlorate. The solution is mixed with a reducing agent, preferably an organic alcohol and/or ferrous chloride, and can be heated to accelerate the decomposition of perchlorate. Lower temperatures may be employed if a catalyst is added.

  10. High-performing red-light-emitting pyrotechnic illuminants through the use of perchlorate-free materials.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Jared D; Sabatini, Jesse J; Poret, Jay C

    2014-07-01

    The development of perchlorate-free M662 40 mm illuminating pyrotechnic compositions is described. On the bases of cost, performance, and sensitivity, potassium periodate was determined to be most effective potassium perchlorate replacement in the compositions tested. The optimal periodate-based composition exceeded the performance of the perchlorate-containing control, exhibited low sensitivity values to impact, friction, and electrostatic discharge, and had high thermal onset temperatures. PMID:24939042