Science.gov

Sample records for copper-clad fr-4 laminates

  1. The effect of lead content and surface roughness on wetting and spreading of low-lead and no-lead solders on copper-clad FR-4 laminates

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, J.O.; Roberts, J.L.; Davidson, R.N.; Yost, F.G.; Hosking, F.M.

    1997-02-01

    Environmental and health concerns pertaining to lead have encouraged research into low-lead alloys for electronic soldering. The development of solder alloys containing lower amounts of lead than Sn/Pb eutectic (37 wt.% lead), but possessing similar properties, is an industry-wide goal. To determine the wettability of low-lead solders, 21 alloys each of Sn/Ag and Sn/Cu eutectic (containing 0 to 10 wt.% lead and/or indium) were tested on as-received copper-clad FR-4. Contact angles for the alloys ranged from 12.5 to 38.9{degrees} and area of spread measurements ranged from 5.2 to 17.3 mm{sup 2} compared with 5 to 150 and {approximately}19 mm{sup 2}, respectively, for Sn/Pb eutectic. Alloys with 8 to 10 wt.% lead showed contact angles and areas of spread similar to Sn/Pb eutectic under similar conditions. The best results on the as-received substrates, compared to the Sn/Pb eutectic, were obtained from the Sn/Ag eutectic with 10 wt.% lead. The very low-lead (less than 10 wt.% lead) and lead-free alloys, however, failed to achieve the performance level of eutectic Sn/Pb solders. A desire to improve the spreading of very low-lead and lead-free solders provided the impetus for these efforts to produce {open_quotes}engineered{close_quotes} rough surfaces. In an attempt to improve the wettability and spreading behavior of very low-lead and lead-free alloys, the very low-lead and lead-free members of the Sn/Ag system were tested on roughened copper-clad FR-4. Every alloy in the test suite demonstrated improvement in area of spread on the roughened substrates. The best results on the roughened substrates, compared to the Sn/Pb eutectic, were obtained from the Sn/Ag eutectic with 8 wt.% lead. The effects of surface roughness on the wettability and flow behavior of solder alloys has provided insight into surface morphologies that lead to improved solderability.

  2. Thermally Stable Siloxane Hybrid Matrix with Low Dielectric Loss for Copper-Clad Laminates for High-Frequency Applications.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong Ho; Lim, Young-Woo; Kim, Yun Hyeok; Bae, Byeong-Soo

    2016-04-01

    We report vinyl-phenyl siloxane hybrid material (VPH) that can be used as a matrix for copper-clad laminates (CCLs) for high-frequency applications. The CCLs, with a VPH matrix fabricated via radical polymerization of resin blend consisting of sol-gel-derived linear vinyl oligosiloxane and bulky siloxane monomer, phenyltris(trimethylsiloxy)silane, achieve low dielectric constant (Dk) and dissipation factor (Df). The CCLs with the VPH matrix exhibit excellent dielectric performance (Dk = 2.75, Df = 0.0015 at 1 GHz) with stability in wide frequency range (1 MHz to 10 GHz) and at high temperature (up to 275 °C). Also, the VPH shows good flame resistance without any additives. These results suggest the potential of the VPH for use in high-speed IC boards. PMID:26982015

  3. A study of adhesion at the E-glass/FR4 interface

    SciTech Connect

    Kent, M.S.; Baca, P.; McNarama, W.F.; Jones, G.; Fein, D.; Wright, W.; Domeier, L.; Wu, W.L.; Wong, A.

    1995-11-01

    The majority of printed circuit boards are copper clad laminates composed of fiberglass cloth impregnated with FR4 epoxy. An important factor affecting the reliability of these assemblies is the integrity of the epoxy/glass fiber interface. The goal of this work is to investigate mechanisms for the loss of adhesive strength between E-glass and FR4 epoxy upon humidity and temperature conditioning. In this paper the authors discuss the distribution of moisture between the interface region and the bulk epoxy examined by neutron reflection, and the relationship of this data to adhesive strength.

  4. Interfacial microstructure and properties of copper clad steel produced using friction stir welding versus gas metal arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Z.; Chen, Y.; Haghshenas, M.; Nguyen, T.; Galloway, J.; Gerlich, A.P.

    2015-06-15

    A preliminary study compares the feasibility and microstructures of pure copper claddings produced on a pressure vessel A516 Gr. 70 steel plate, using friction stir welding versus gas metal arc welding. A combination of optical and scanning electron microscopy is used to characterize the grain structures in both the copper cladding and heat affected zone in the steel near the fusion line. The friction stir welding technique produces copper cladding with a grain size of around 25 μm, and no evidence of liquid copper penetration into the steel. The gas metal arc welding of copper cladding exhibits grain sizes over 1 mm, and with surface microcracks as well as penetration of liquid copper up to 50 μm into the steel substrate. Transmission electron microscopy reveals that metallurgical bonding is produced in both processes. Increased diffusion of Mn and Si into the copper cladding occurs when using gas metal arc welding, although some nano-pores were detected in the FSW joint interface. - Highlights: • Cladding of steel with pure copper is possible using either FSW or GMAW. • The FSW yielded a finer grain structure in the copper, with no evidence of cracking. • The FSW joint contains some evidence of nano-pores at the interface of the steel/copper. • Copper cladding by GMAW contained surface cracks attributed to high thermal stresses. • The steel adjacent to the fusion line maintained a hardness value below 248 HV.

  5. Design of handwriting drawing board based on common copper clad laminate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongyuan; Gao, Wenzhi; Wang, Yuan

    2015-02-01

    Handwriting drawing board is not only a subject which can be used to write and draw, but also a method to measure and process weak signals. This design adopts 8051 single chip microprocessor as the main controller. It applies a constant-current source[1][2] to copper plate and collects the voltage value according to the resistance divider effect. Then it amplifies the signal with low-noise and high-precision amplifier[3] AD620 which is placed in the low impedance and anti-interference pen. It converts analog signal to digital signal by an 11-channel, 12-bit A/D converter TLC2543. Adoption of average filtering algorithm can effectively improve the measuring accuracy, reduce the error and make the collected voltage signal more stable. The accurate position can be detected by scanning the horizontal and vertical ordinates with the analog switch via the internal bridge of module L298 which can change the direction of X-Y axis signal scan. DM12864 is used as man-machine interface and this hominization design is convenient for man-machine communication. This collecting system has high accuracy, high stability and strong anti-interference capability. It's easy to control and has very large development space in the future.

  6. Initial corrosion behavior of a copper-clad plate in typical outdoor atmospheric environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Pan; Xiao, Kui; Ding, Kangkang; Yan, Lidan; Dong, Chaofang; Li, Xiaogang

    2016-01-01

    A copper-clad printed circuit board (PCB-Cu) was subjected to long-term exposure test under typical Chinese atmospheric environments to study corrosion failure mechanisms. The corrosion behavior was investigated by analyzing electrochemical impedance, scanning Kelvin probes, stereo and scanning electron microscopes, and energy-dispersive spectra. Results showed that the initial surface potential was unevenly distributed. The outdoor PCB-Cu samples suffered severe corrosion caused by dust particles, contaminated media, and microorganisms after long-term atmospheric exposure. The initial localized corrosion was exacerbated and progressed to general corrosion for samples in Turpan, Beijing, and Wuhan under prolonged exposure, whereas PCB-Cu in Xishuangbanna was only slightly corroded. The tendency for electrochemical migration (ECM) of PCB-Cu was relatively low when applied with a bias voltage of 12 V. ECM was only observed in the PCB-Cu samples in Beijing. Contaminated medium and high humidity synergistically affected ECM corrosion in PCB-Cu materials. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  7. Numerical simulation of temperature field in horizontal core-filling continuous casting for copper cladding aluminum rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Ya-jun; Liu, Xin-hua; Wu, Yong-fu; Huang, Hai-you; Xie, Jian-xin

    2013-07-01

    The steady-state temperature field of horizontal core-filling continuous casting (HCFC) for producing copper cladding aluminum rods was simulated by finite element method to investigate the effects of key processing parameters on the positions of solid-liquid interfaces (SLIs) of copper and aluminum. It is found that mandrel tube length and mean withdrawing speed have significant effects on the SLI positions of both copper and aluminum. Aluminum casting temperature ( T Al) (1003-1123 K) and secondary cooling water flux (600-900 L·h-1) have little effect on the SLI of copper but cause the SLI of aluminum to move 2-4 mm. When T Al is in a range of 1043-1123 K, the liquid aluminum can fill continuously into the pre-solidified copper tube. Based on the numerical simulation, reasonable processing parameters were determined.

  8. Effects of Processing Parameters on the Fabrication of Copper Cladding Aluminum Rods by Horizontal Core-Filling Continuous Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Ya-Jun; Liu, Xin-Hua; Huang, Hai-You; Wu, Chun-Jing; Liu, Xue-Feng; Xie, Jian-Xin

    2011-02-01

    Copper cladding aluminum (CCA) rods with a diameter of 30 mm and a sheath thickness of 3 mm were fabricated by horizontal core-filling continuous casting (HCFC) technology. The effects of key processing parameters, such as the length of the mandrel tube of composite mold, aluminum casting temperature, flux of the secondary cooling water, and mean withdrawing speed were optimized based on some quality criteria, including the uniformity of the sheath thickness, integrality of the rods, and thickness of the interface. The causes of internal flaws formation of CCA rods were also discussed. The results showed that the continuity of the liquid aluminum core-filling process and the interface reaction control between solid copper and liquid aluminum were two key problems that strongly affected the stability of the casting process and the product quality. Our research indicated that for the CCA rod with the previously mentioned size, the optimal length of mandrel tube was 210 mm. A shorter mandrel tube allowed of easier erosion at the interface, which led to a nonuniform sheath thickness. Conversely, it tended to result in a discontinuous filling process of liquid aluminum, which causes shrinkage or cold shuts. The optimal casting temperatures of copper and aluminum were 1503 K (1230 °C) and 1043 K to 1123 K (770 °C to 850 °C), respectively. When the casting temperature of aluminum was below 1043 K (770 °C), the casting process would be discontinuous, resulting in shrinkages or cold shuts. Nevertheless, when the casting temperature of aluminum was higher than 1123 K (850 °C), a severe interface reaction between solid copper and liquid aluminum would occur. The proper flux of the secondary cooling water and the mean withdrawing speed were determined as 600 to 800 L/h and 60 to 87 mm/min, respectively. In the previously mentioned proper ranges of processing parameters, the interfacial shear strengths of CCA rods were 40.5 to 67.9 MPa.

  9. Interfacial Microstructure and Bonding Strength of Copper Cladding Aluminum Rods Fabricated by Horizontal Core-Filling Continuous Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Ya-Jun; Liu, Xin-Hua; Huang, Hai-You; Liu, Xue-Feng; Xie, Jian-Xin

    2011-12-01

    Copper cladding aluminum (CCA) rods with a diameter of 30 mm and a sheath thickness of 3 mm were fabricated by horizontal core-filling continuous casting (HCFC) technology. The microstructure and morphology, distribution of chemical components, and phase composition of the interface between Cu and Al were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS). The formation mechanism of the interface and the effects of key processing parameters, e.g., aluminum casting temperature, secondary cooling intensity, and mean withdrawing speed on the interfacial microstructure and bonding strength were investigated. The results show that the CCA rod has a multilayered interface, which is composed of three sublayers—sublayer I is Cu9Al4 layer, sublayer II is CuAl2 layer, and sublayer III is composed of α-Al/CuAl2 pseudo eutectic. The thickness of sublayer III, which occupies 92 to 99 pct of the total thickness of the interface, is much larger than the thicknesses of sublayers I and II. However, the interfacial bonding strength is dominated by the thicknesses of sublayers I and II; i.e., the bonding strength decreases with the rise of the thicknesses of sublayers I and II. When raising the aluminum casting temperature, the total thickness of the interface increases while the thicknesses of sublayers I and II decrease and the bonding strength increases. Either augmenting the secondary cooling intensity or increasing the mean withdrawing speed results in the decrease in both total thickness of the interface and the thicknesses of sublayers I and II, and an increase in the interfacial bonding strength. The CCA rod with the largest interfacial bonding strength of 67.9 ± 0.5 MPa was fabricated under such processing parameters as copper casting temperature 1503 K (1230 °C), aluminum casting temperature 1063 K (790 °C), primary cooling water flux 600 L/h, secondary cooling water flux 700 L/h, and

  10. Invertebrate lamins

    SciTech Connect

    Melcer, Shai; Gruenbaum, Yosef . E-mail: gru@vms.huji.ac.il; Krohne, Georg . E-mail: krohne@biozentrum.uni-wuerzburg.de

    2007-06-10

    Lamins are the main component of the nuclear lamina and considered to be the ancestors of all intermediate filament proteins. They are localized mainly at the nuclear periphery where they form protein complexes with integral proteins of the nuclear inner membrane, transcriptional regulators, histones and chromatin modifiers. Studying lamins in invertebrate species has unique advantages including the smaller number of lamin genes in the invertebrate genomes and powerful genetic analyses in Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster. These simpler nuclear lamina systems allow direct analyses of their structure and functions. Here we give an overview of recent advances in the field of invertebrate nuclear lamins with special emphasis on their evolution, assembly and functions.

  11. Photoresist laminate

    DOEpatents

    Andrade, A.D.; Galbraith, L.K.

    1979-10-01

    The disclosure relates to a laminated negative dry-film photoresist for the production of thick, as well as thin, patterns with vertical sidewalls. Uniform depthwise exposure in a photoresist layer is effected by the use of an ultraviolet filtering top layer.

  12. Laminate article

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Robert K.; Paranthaman, Mariappan; Chirayil, Thomas G.; Lee, Dominic F.; Goyal, Amit; Feenstra, Roeland

    2002-01-01

    A laminate article comprises a substrate and a biaxially textured (RE.sub.x A.sub.(1-x)).sub.2 O.sub.2-(x/2) buffer layer over the substrate, wherein 0laminate article can include a layer of YBCO over the (RE.sub.x A.sub.(1-x)).sub.2 O.sub.2-(x/2) buffer layer. A layer of CeO.sub.2 between the YBCO layer and the (RE.sub.x A.sub.(1-x)).sub.2 O.sub.2-(x/2) buffer layer can also be include. Further included can be a layer of YSZ between the CeO.sub.2 layer and the (RE.sub.x A.sub.(1-x)).sub.2 O.sub.2-(x/2) buffer layer. The substrate can be a biaxially textured metal, such as nickel. A method of forming the laminate article is also disclosed.

  13. Hybrid composite laminate structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Lark, R. F. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An invention which relates to laminate structures and specifically to essentially anisotropic fiber composite laminates is described. Metal foils are selectively disposed within the laminate to produce increased resistance to high velocity impact, fracture, surface erosion, and other stresses within the laminate.

  14. Lamins as cancer biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Foster, Clare R; Przyborski, Stefan A; Wilson, Robert G; Hutchison, Christopher J

    2010-02-01

    Lamins are multifunctional proteins that are often aberrantly expressed or localized in tumours. Here, we endeavour to assess their uses as cancer biomarkers: to diagnose tumours, analyse cancer characteristics and predict patient survival. It appears that the nature of lamin function in cancer is very complex. Lamin expression can be variable between and even within cancer subtypes, which limits their uses as diagnostic biomarkers. Expression of A-type lamins is a marker of differentiated tumour cells and has been shown to be a marker of good or poor patient survival depending on tumour subtype. Further research into the functions of lamins in cancer cells and the mechanisms that determine its patterns of expression may provide more potential uses of lamins as cancer biomarkers. PMID:20074078

  15. Honeycomb-laminate composite structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilwee, W. J., Jr.; Parker, J. A. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A honeycomb-laminate composite structure was comprised of: (1) a cellular core of a polyquinoxaline foam in a honeycomb structure, and (2) a layer of a noncombustible fibrous material impregnated with a polyimide resin laminated on the cellular core. A process for producing the honeycomb-laminate composite structure and articles containing the honeycomb-laminate composite structure is described.

  16. Laminate armor and related methods

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Henry S; Lillo, Thomas M; Zagula, Thomas M

    2013-02-26

    Laminate armor and methods of manufacturing laminate armor. Specifically, laminate armor plates comprising a commercially pure titanium layer and a titanium alloy layer bonded to the commercially pure titanium outer layer are disclosed, wherein an average thickness of the titanium alloy inner layer is about four times an average thickness of the commercially pure titanium outer layer. In use, the titanium alloy layer is positioned facing an area to be protected. Additionally, roll-bonding methods for manufacturing laminate armor plates are disclosed.

  17. Laminated BEAM loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danisch, Lee A.

    1996-10-01

    BEAM sensors include treated loops of optical fiber that modulate optical throughput with great sensitivity and linearity, in response to curvature of the loop out of its plane. This paper describes BEAM sensors that have two loops treated in opposed fashion, hermetically sealed in flexible laminations. The sensors include an integrated optoelectronics package that extracts curvature information from the treated portion of the loops while rejecting common mode errors. The laminated structure is used to sense various parameters including displacement, force, pressure, flow, and acceleration.

  18. 78 FR 19007 - Certain Products Having Laminated Packaging, Laminated Packaging, and Components Thereof...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-28

    ... COMMISSION Certain Products Having Laminated Packaging, Laminated Packaging, and Components Thereof.... 1337, on behalf of Lamina Packaging Innovations LLC of Longview, Texas. An amended complaint was filed... importation of certain products having laminated packaging, laminated packaging, and components thereof...

  19. 78 FR 13083 - Products Having Laminated Packaging, Laminated Packaging, and Components Thereof; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-26

    ... COMMISSION Products Having Laminated Packaging, Laminated Packaging, and Components Thereof; Notice of... Commission has received a complaint entitled Products Having Laminated ] Packaging, Laminated Packaging, and... filed on behalf of Lamina Packaging Innovations LLC on February 20, 2013. The complaint...

  20. Thermally stable laminating resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. J.; Vaughan, R. W.; Burns, E. A.

    1972-01-01

    Improved thermally stable laminating resins were developed based on the addition-type pyrolytic polymerization. Detailed monomer and polymer synthesis and characterization studies identified formulations which facilitate press molding processing and autoclave fabrication of glass and graphite fiber reinforced composites. A specific resin formulation, termed P10P was utilized to prepare a Courtaulds HMS reinforced simulated airfoil demonstration part by an autoclave molding process.

  1. Laminated piezoelectric transformer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vazquez Carazo, Alfredo (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A laminated piezoelectric transformer is provided using the longitudinal vibration modes for step-up voltage conversion applications. The input portions are polarized to deform in a longitudinal plane and are bonded to an output portion. The deformation of the input portions is mechanically coupled to the output portion, which deforms in the same longitudinal direction relative to the input portion. The output portion is polarized in the thickness direction relative its electrodes, and piezoelectrically generates a stepped-up output voltage.

  2. An overview of laminate materials with enhanced dielectric properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mumby, Stephen J.

    1989-03-01

    This report focuses on laminate materials (resins and reinforcements) having potential applications in the manufacture of multi-layer printed wiring boards (PWBs) that are required to efficiently transmit high-speed digital pulses. It is intended to be a primer and a reference for selection of candidate materials for such high-performance PWBs. Included are dielectric and physical properties, and where available chemical composition and/or structure, commercial availability, compatibility with typical PWB processing schemes and approximate relative cost. Recommendations are made as to the most viable candidate materials for this type of PWB application, based on a comparison of electrical and physical properties together with processing and cost considerations. The cyanate ester resin system appears promising. Such a resin may be reinforced with regular E-glass, or the more newly available S-glass, to produce a laminate useful for intermediate performance applications. For more demanding applications the E-glass will have to be replaced by a material of much lower relative permittivity. The expanded-PTFE reinforced laminates from W. L. Gore appear to be a good choice for these applications. The processing of the Gore materials can be expected to deviate from that used with FR-4 type materials, but is likely to be less problematic than laminates comprised of a fluorinated resin. Processing is a key obstacle to the implementation of any of the new materials herein. If implementation is to be successful, programs must be established to develop and optimize processing procedures. Cost will remain an important issue. However, the higher cost of the new materials may be justified in high-end products by the performance they deliver.

  3. Symmetric Composite Laminate Stress Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, T.; Smolinski, K. F.; Gellin, S.

    1985-01-01

    It is demonstrated that COSMIC/NASTRAN may be used to analyze plate and shell structures made of symmetric composite laminates. Although general composite laminates cannot be analyzed using NASTRAN, the theoretical development presented herein indicates that the integrated constitutive laws of a symmetric composite laminate resemble those of a homogeneous anisotropic plate, which can be analyzed using NASTRAN. A detailed analysis procedure is presented, as well as an illustrative example.

  4. Solar cell module lamination process

    DOEpatents

    Carey, Paul G.; Thompson, Jesse B.; Aceves, Randy C.

    2002-01-01

    A solar cell module lamination process using fluoropolymers to provide protection from adverse environmental conditions and thus enable more extended use of solar cells, particularly in space applications. A laminate of fluoropolymer material provides a hermetically sealed solar cell module structure that is flexible and very durable. The laminate is virtually chemically inert, highly transmissive in the visible spectrum, dimensionally stable at temperatures up to about 200.degree. C. highly abrasion resistant, and exhibits very little ultra-violet degradation.

  5. Beach lamination: Nature and origin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clifton, H.E.

    1969-01-01

    A distinctive two-fold sedimentation unit characterizes lamination in the upper swash zone of beaches. Within the unit a fine and/or a heavy mineral rich layer at the base grades upward into a coarser and/or a heavy mineral poor layer at the top. This distinctive type of lamination results from grain segregation within bed flow during wave backwash. ?? 1969.

  6. Holographic nondestructive testing of laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuckenberg, F. H.

    1973-01-01

    Very small differences in laminate thickness result in interference fringes in holograph image. These indicate presence of unbonded area. Theoretical knowledge of membrane deflection may be used in conjunction with reduced number of pretest experiments to determine number of optical fringes that should appear for given laminate.

  7. Self-Healing Laminate System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beiermann, Brett A. (Inventor); Keller, Michael W. (Inventor); White, Scott R. (Inventor); Sottos, Nancy R. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A laminate material may include a first flexible layer, and a self-healing composite layer in contact with the first flexible layer. The composite layer includes an elastomer matrix, a plurality of first capsules including a polymerizer, and a corresponding activator for the polymerizer. The laminate material may self-heal when subjected to a puncture or a tear.

  8. Lamin B receptor

    PubMed Central

    Olins, Ada L; Rhodes, Gale; Welch, David B Mark; Zwerger, Monika

    2010-01-01

    Lamin B receptor (LBR) is an integral membrane protein of the interphase nuclear envelope (NE). The N-terminal end resides in the nucleoplasm, binding to lamin B and heterochromatin, with the interactions disrupted during mitosis. The C-terminal end resides within the inner nuclear membrane, retreating with the ER away from condensing chromosomes during mitotic NE breakdown. Some of these properties are interpretable in terms of our current structural knowledge of LBR, but many of the structural features remain unknown. LBR apparently has an evolutionary history which brought together at least two ancient conserved structural domains (i.e., Tudor and sterol reductase). This convergence may have occurred with the emergence of the chordates and echinoderms. It is not clear what survival values have maintained LBR structure during evolution. But it seems likely that roles in post-mitotic nuclear reformation, interphase NE growth and compartmentalization of nuclear architecture might have provided some evolutionary advantage to preservation of the LBR gene. PMID:21327105

  9. Vacuum lamination of photovoltaic modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burger, D. R.

    1982-01-01

    Vacuum lamination of terrestrial photovoltaic modules is a new high volume process requiring new equipment and newly develop materials. Equipment development, materials research, and some research in related fields and testing methods are discussed.

  10. Internal Stresses in Laminated Construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heim, A L; Knauss, A C; Seutter, Louis

    1923-01-01

    This report reviews the procedure employed in an investigation of the sources and influence of internal stresses in laminated construction, and discusses the influence of shrinkage and swelling stresses caused by atmospheric conditions upon the tensile strength across grain in laminated construction with special reference to airplane propellers. The investigation covered three sources of internal stress, namely, the combination of plain-sawed and quarter-sawed material in the same construction, the gluing together of laminations of different moisture contents, and the gluing together of laminations of different densities. Glued specimens and free specimens, made up under various manufacturing conditions, were subjected to various climatic changes inducing internal stresses and then were tested.

  11. Laminated electromagnetic pump stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, A.W.

    1995-08-08

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially abutting tapered laminations extending radially outwardly from a centerline axis to collectively define a radially inner bore and a radially outer circumference. Each of the laminations includes radially inner and outer edges and has a thickness increasing from the inner edge toward the outer edge to provide a substantially continuous path adjacent the circumference. This pump is used in nuclear fission reactors. 19 figs.

  12. Laminated electromagnetic pump stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, Alan W.

    1995-01-01

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially abutting tapered laminations extending radially outwardly from a centerline axis to collectively define a radially inner bore and a radially outer circumference. Each of the laminations includes radially inner and outer edges and has a thickness increasing from the inner edge toward the outer edge to provide a substantially continuous path adjacent the circumference.

  13. Interphase phosphorylation of lamin A.

    PubMed

    Kochin, Vitaly; Shimi, Takeshi; Torvaldson, Elin; Adam, Stephen A; Goldman, Anne; Pack, Chan-Gi; Melo-Cardenas, Johanna; Imanishi, Susumu Y; Goldman, Robert D; Eriksson, John E

    2014-06-15

    Nuclear lamins form the major structural elements that comprise the nuclear lamina. Loss of nuclear structural integrity has been implicated as a key factor in the lamin A/C gene mutations that cause laminopathies, whereas the normal regulation of lamin A assembly and organization in interphase cells is still undefined. We assumed phosphorylation to be a major determinant, identifying 20 prime interphase phosphorylation sites, of which eight were high-turnover sites. We examined the roles of these latter sites by site-directed mutagenesis, followed by detailed microscopic analysis - including fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and nuclear extraction techniques. The results reveal three phosphorylation regions, each with dominant sites, together controlling lamin A structure and dynamics. Interestingly, two of these interphase sites are hyper-phosphorylated in mitotic cells and one of these sites is within the sequence that is missing in progerin of the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome. We present a model where different phosphorylation combinations yield markedly different effects on the assembly, subunit turnover and the mobility of lamin A between, and within, the lamina, the nucleoplasm and the cytoplasm of interphase cells. PMID:24741066

  14. Lamin A, farnesylation and aging.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Sita; Comai, Lucio

    2012-01-01

    Lamin A is a component of the nuclear envelope that is synthesized as a precursor prelamin A molecule and then processed into mature lamin A through sequential steps of posttranslational modifications and proteolytic cleavages. Remarkably, over 400 distinct point mutations have been so far identified throughout the LMNA gene, which result in the development of at least ten distinct human disorders, collectively known as laminopathies, among which is the premature aging disease Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS). The majority of HGPS cases are associated with a single point mutation in the LMNA gene that causes the production of a permanently farnesylated mutant lamin A protein termed progerin. The mechanism by which progerin leads to premature aging and the classical HGPS disease phenotype as well as the relationship between this disorder and the onset of analogous symptoms during the lifespan of a normal individual are not well understood. Yet, recent studies have provided critical insights on the cellular processes that are affected by accumulation of progerin and have suggested that cellular alterations in the lamin A processing pathway leading to the accumulation of farnesylated prelamin A intermediates may play a role in the aging process in the general population. In this review we provide a short background on lamin A and its maturation pathway and discuss the current knowledge of how progerin or alterations in the prelamin A processing pathway are thought to influence cell function and contribute to human aging. PMID:21871450

  15. Lamin A, farnesylation and aging

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, Sita; Comai, Lucio

    2012-01-01

    Lamin A is a component of the nuclear envelope that is synthesized as a precursor prelamin A molecule and then processed into mature lamin A through sequential steps of posttranslational modifications and proteolytic cleavages. Remarkably, over 400 distinct point mutations have been so far identified throughout the LMNA gene, which result in the development of at least ten distinct human disorders, collectively known as laminopathies, among which is the premature aging disease Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS). The majority of HGPS cases are associated with a single point mutation in the LMNA gene that causes the production of a permanently farnesylated mutant lamin A protein termed progerin. The mechanism by which progerin leads to premature aging and the classical HGPS disease phenotype as well as the relationship between this disorder and the onset of analogous symptoms during the lifespan of a normal individual are not well understood. Yet, recent studies have provided critical insights on the cellular processes that are affected by accumulation of progerin and have suggested that cellular alterations in the lamin A processing pathway leading to the accumulation of farnesylated prelamin A intermediates may play a role in the aging process in the general population. In this review we provide a short background on lamin A and its maturation pathway and discuss the current knowledge of how progerin or alterations in the prelamin A processing pathway are thought to influence cell function and contribute to human aging.

  16. Thermoelastic analysis of laminated plates. I - Symmetric specially orthotropic laminates

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, C.H.; Tauchert, T.R.

    1980-04-01

    Thermally induced deformations and stress resultants in symmetric laminated plates are analyzed. The method of M. Levy is used to study the transverse bending of a specially orthotropic laminate having two simply supported edges and subject to a temperature distribution that does not vary in a direction parallel to the simple supports. A solution is also obtained for the problem of in-plane stretching of the plate middle surface caused by a general three-dimensional temperature field. As an illustrative example, the thermoelastic response of a unidirectionally fiber-reinforced plate to a temperature variation that is linear in the thickness direction is computed.

  17. Both lamin A and lamin C mutations cause lamina instability as well as loss of internal nuclear lamin organization

    SciTech Connect

    Broers, Jos L.V. . E-mail: jos.broers@molcelb.unimaas.nl; Kuijpers, H.J.H.; Oestlund, C.; Worman, H.J.; Endert, J.; Ramaekers, F.C.S.

    2005-04-01

    We have applied the fluorescence loss of intensity after photobleaching (FLIP) technique to study the molecular dynamics and organization of nuclear lamin proteins in cell lines stably transfected with green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged A-type lamin cDNA. Normal lamin A and C proteins show abundant decoration of the inner layer of the nuclear membrane, the nuclear lamina, and a generally diffuse localization in the nuclear interior. Bleaching studies revealed that, while the GFP-tagged lamins in the lamina were virtually immobile, the intranuclear fraction of these molecules was partially mobile. Intranuclear lamin C was significantly more mobile than intranuclear lamina A. In search of a structural cause for the variety of inherited diseases caused by A-type lamin mutations, we have studied the molecular organization of GFP-tagged lamin A and lamin C mutants R453W and R386K, found in Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD), and lamin A and lamin C mutant R482W, found in patients with Dunnigan-type familial partial lipodystrophy (FPLD). In all mutants, a prominent increase in lamin mobility was observed, indicating loss of structural stability of lamin polymers, both at the perinuclear lamina and in the intranuclear lamin organization. While the lamin rod domain mutant showed overall increased mobility, the tail domain mutants showed mainly intranuclear destabilization, possibly as a result of loss of interaction with chromatin. Decreased stability of lamin mutant polymers was confirmed by flow cytometric analyses and immunoblotting of nuclear extracts. Our findings suggest a loss of function of A-type lamin mutant proteins in the organization of intranuclear chromatin and predict the loss of gene regulatory function in laminopathies.

  18. FR4-based electromagnetic energy harvester for wireless sensor nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatipoglu, G.; Ürey, H.

    2010-01-01

    Electromagnetic (EM) energy harvesting seems to be one of the most promising ways to power wireless sensors in a wireless sensor network. In this paper, FR4, the most commonly used PCB material, is utilized as a mechanical vibrating structure for EM energy harvesting for body-worn sensors and intelligent tire sensors, which involve impact loadings. FR4 can be a better material for such applications compared to silicon MEMS devices due to lower stiffness and broadband response. In order to demonstrate FR4 performance and broadband response, three moving magnet type EM generator designs are developed and investigated throughout the paper. A velocity-damped harvester simulation model is first developed, including a detailed magnetic model and the magnetic damping effects. The numerical results agree well with the experimental results. Human running acceleration at the hip area that is obtained experimentally is simulated in order to demonstrate system performance, which results in a scavenged power of about 40 µW with 15 m s-2 acceleration input. The designed FR4 energy scavengers with mechanical stoppers implemented are particularly well suited for nearly periodic and non-sinusoidal high- g excitations with rich harmonic content. For the intelligent tire applications, a special compact FR4 scavenger is designed that is able to withstand large shocks and vibrations due to mechanical shock stoppers built into the structure. Using our design, 0.4 mW power across a load resistance at off-resonance operation is obtained in shaker experiments. In the actual operation, the tangential accelerations as a result of the tire-road contact are estimated to supply power around 1 mW with our design, which is sufficient for powering wireless tire sensors. The normalized power density (NPD) of the designed actuators compares favorably with most actuators reported in the literature.

  19. Impedances of Laminated Vacuum Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Burov, A.; Lebedev, V.; /Fermilab

    2011-06-22

    First publications on impedance of laminated vacuum chambers are related to early 70s: those are of S. C. Snowdon [1] and of A. G. Ruggiero [2]; fifteen years later, a revision paper of R. Gluckstern appeared [3]. All the publications were presented as Fermilab preprints, and there is no surprise in that: the Fermilab Booster has its laminated magnets open to the beam. Being in a reasonable mutual agreement, these publications were all devoted to the longitudinal impedance of round vacuum chambers. The transverse impedance and the flat geometry case were addressed in more recent paper of K. Y. Ng [4]. The latest calculations of A. Macridin et al. [5] revealed some disagreement with Ref. [4]; this fact stimulated us to get our own results on that matter. Longitudinal and transverse impendances are derived for round and flat laminated vacuum chambers. Results of this paper agree with Ref. [5].

  20. Lamin-Binding Proteins in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Dobrzynska, Agnieszka; Askjaer, Peter; Gruenbaum, Yosef

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear lamina, composed of lamins and numerous lamin-associated proteins, is required for mechanical stability, mechanosensing, chromatin organization, developmental gene regulation, mRNA transcription, DNA replication, nuclear assembly, and nuclear positioning. Mutations in lamins or lamin-binding proteins cause at least 18 distinct human diseases that affect specific tissues such as muscle, adipose, bone, nerve, or skin, and range from muscular dystrophies to lipodystrophy, peripheral neuropathy, or accelerated aging. Caenorhabditis elegans has unique advantages in studying lamin-binding proteins. These advantages include the low complexity of genes encoding lamin and lamin-binding proteins, advanced transgenic techniques, simple application of RNA interference, sophisticated genetic strategies, and a large collection of mutant lines. This chapter provides detailed and comprehensive protocols for the genetic and phenotypic analysis of lamin-binding proteins in C. elegans. PMID:26778571

  1. Basic mechanics of laminated composite plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, Alan T.

    1994-01-01

    The mechanics of laminated composite materials is presented in a clear manner with only essential derivations included. The constitutive equations in all of their forms are developed and then summarized in a separate section. The effects of hygrothermal effects are included. The prediction of the engineering constants for a laminate are derived. Strength of laminated composites is not covered.

  2. PCB glass-fibre laminates: Thermal conductivity measurements and their effect on simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarvar, F.; Poole, N. J.; Witting, P. A.

    1990-12-01

    Accurate values of thermal conductivity are required for the simulation of temperature phenomena in electronic circuits. This paper presents the results of measurements carried out to determine the thermal conductivity along and normal to the plane of fibre glass laminates used in the manufacture of printed circuit boards. It has been found that the reinforced fibre-glass substrates used in PCBs are strongly anisotropic with the conductivity normal to the boards being much smaller than tangential to it. The test samples were type FR4 epoxy/glass laminates. An experiment has been designed which determines the thermal conductivity in-the-plane of the laminates by matching the measured temperature distribution along a heated specimen with a finite difference solution. An electrically heated Lees’ disc apparatus is also used to measure the thermal conductivity of these boards in a direction normal to their plane. The samples tested yielded values of 0.343 W/mK and 1.059 W/mK for thermal conductivity through and along the plane of the boards, respectively.

  3. Multilayer printed wiring board lamination

    SciTech Connect

    Lula, J.W.

    1980-06-01

    The relationship of delamination resistance of multilayer PWBs made from GF material to manufacturing process variables was investigated. A unique quantitative test method developed during this project shows that delamination resistance is highly sensitive to material conditioning, to innerlayer surface treatment, and to post-lamination storage conditions, but is relatively insensitive to cure cycle variations.

  4. Steady state response of unsymmetrically laminated plates

    SciTech Connect

    Hosokawa, Kenji; Kawashima, Katsuya; Sakata, Toshiyuki

    1995-11-01

    A numerical approach for analyzing the forced vibration problem of a symmetrically laminated FRP (fiber reinforced plastic) composite plate was proposed by the authors. In the present paper, this approach is modified for application to an unsymmetrically laminated FRP composite plate. Numerical calculations are carried out for the clamped antisymmetrically laminated rectangular and elliptical plates which are a kind of unsymmetrically laminated plate. Then,, the effects of the lamina material and the fiber orientation angle on the steady state response are discussed. Furthermore, it is investigated that what structural damping factor is most influenced on the steady state response of an antisymmetrically laminated plate.

  5. Vacuum multilayer lamination of printed wiring boards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkus, J. W.

    1992-11-01

    This experiment investigates vacuum multilayer lamination of rigid/flex, epoxy glass, polyimide glass, and polyimide quartz printed wiring boards. The effectiveness of the vacuum in removing entrapped air during the lamination cycle is demonstrated. The results of the experiment have also shown that vacuum lamination of epoxy glass multilayers improves the delamination resistance. Thus, epoxy glass multilayers that have been vacuum laminated will be able to withstand soldering temperatures longer without delaminating. Also, the experiment shows that vacuum multilayer lamination does not significantly change thickness, layer-to-layer registration, glass transition temperature, dielectric spacing between conductors, electrical resistance following thermal shock test, and other critical printed wiring board properties.

  6. Microstress prediction in composite laminate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutapea, Parsaoran

    2000-10-01

    The objective of this research is to develop a macroscopic theory, which can provide the connection between macromechanics and micromechanics in characterizing the micro-stress of composite laminates near edges and holes. The micropolar theory, a class of higher-order elasticity theory, of composite laminate mechanics is implemented in a well-known Pipes-Pagano free edge boundary problem. The micropolar homogenization method to determine the micropolar anisotropic effective elastic moduli is presented. A displacement-based finite element method based on micropolar theory in anisotropic solids is developed in analyzing composite laminates. The effects of fiber volume fraction and cell size on the normal stress along the artificial interface of the composite laminate are also investigated. The stress response based on micropolar theory is compared with those deduced from the micromechanics and classical elasticity theory. Special attention of the investigation focuses on the stress fields near the free edge where the high macrostress gradient occurs. The normal stresses along the artificial interface and especially, the microstress along the fiber/matrix interface on the critical cell near the free edge where the high macrostress gradient detected are the focus of this investigation. These microstresses are expected to dominate the failure initiation process in composite laminate. The implementation of micropolar analysis on the prediction of microstress of the critical cell near the free edge is found to be in very good agreement with "exact" microstress solutions. It is demonstrated that the micropolar theory is able to capture the microstress correctly from the homogenized solutions.

  7. Lamin in inflammation and aging.

    PubMed

    Tran, Joseph R; Chen, Haiyang; Zheng, Xiaobin; Zheng, Yixian

    2016-06-01

    Aging is characterized by a progressive loss of tissue function and an increased susceptibility to injury and disease. Many age-associated pathologies manifest an inflammatory component, and this has led to the speculation that aging is at least in part caused by some form of inflammation. However, whether or not inflammation is truly a cause of aging, or is a consequence of the aging process is unknown. Recent work using Drosophila has uncovered a mechanism where the progressive loss of lamin-B in the fat body upon aging triggers systemic inflammation. This inflammatory response perturbs the local immune response of the neighboring gut tissue and leads to hyperplasia. Here, we will discuss the literature connecting lamins to aging and inflammation. PMID:27023494

  8. Specific contribution of lamin A and lamin C in the development of laminopathies

    SciTech Connect

    Sylvius, Nicolas Hathaway, Andrea; Boudreau, Emilie; Gupta, Pallavi; Labib, Sarah; Bolongo, Pierrette M.; Rippstein, Peter; McBride, Heidi; Bilinska, Zofia T.; Tesson, Frederique

    2008-08-01

    Mutations in the lamin A/C gene are involved in multiple human disorders for which the pathophysiological mechanisms are partially understood. Conflicting results prevail regarding the organization of lamin A and C mutants within the nuclear envelope (NE) and on the interactions of each lamin to its counterpart. We over-expressed various lamin A and C mutants both independently and together in COS7 cells. When expressed alone, lamin A with cardiac/muscular disorder mutations forms abnormal aggregates inside the NE and not inside the nucleoplasm. Conversely, the equivalent lamin C organizes as intranucleoplasmic aggregates that never connect to the NE as opposed to wild type lamin C. Interestingly, the lamin C molecules present within these aggregates exhibit an abnormal increased mobility. When co-expressed, the complex formed by lamin A/C aggregates in the NE. Lamin A and C mutants for lipodystrophy behave similarly to the wild type. These findings reveal that lamins A and C may be differentially affected depending on the mutation. This results in multiple possible physiological consequences which likely contribute in the phenotypic variability of laminopathies. The inability of lamin C mutants to join the nuclear rim in the absence of lamin A is a potential pathophysiological mechanism for laminopathies.

  9. Postbuckling of laminated anisotropic panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeffrey, Glenda L.

    1987-01-01

    A two-part study of the buckling and postbuckling of laminated anisotropic plates with bending-extensional coupling is presented. The first part involves the development and application of a modified Rayleigh-Ritz analysis technique. Modifications made to the classical technique can be grouped into three areas. First, known symmetries of anisotropic panels are exploited in the selection of approximation functions. Second, a reduced basis technique based on these same symmetries is applied in the linear range. Finally, geometric boundary conditions are enforced via an exterior penalty function approach, rather than relying on choice of approximation functions to satisfy these boundary conditions. Numerical results are presented for both the linear and nonlinear range, with additional studies made to determine the effect of variation in penalty parameter and number of basis vectors. In the second part, six panels possessing anisotropy and bending-extensional coupling are tested. Detailed comparisons are made between experiment and finite element results in order to gain insight into the postbuckling and failure characteristics of such panels. The panels are constructed using two different lamination sequences, and panels with three different aspect ratios were constructed for each lamination sequence.

  10. Mammalian telomeres and their partnership with lamins

    PubMed Central

    Burla, Romina; La Torre, Mattia; Saggio, Isabella

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chromosome ends are complex structures, which require a panel of factors for their elongation, replication, and protection. We describe here the mechanics of mammalian telomeres, dynamics and maintainance in relation to lamins. Multiple biochemical connections, including association of telomeres to the nuclear envelope and matrix, of telomeric proteins to lamins, and of lamin-associated proteins to chromosome ends, underline the interplay between lamins and telomeres. Paths toward senescence, such as defective telomere replication, altered heterochromatin organization, and impaired DNA repair, are common to lamins' and telomeres' dysfunction. The convergence of phenotypes can be interpreted through a model of dynamic, lamin-controlled functional platforms dedicated to the function of telomeres as fragile sites. The features of telomeropathies and laminopathies, and of animal models underline further overlapping aspects, including the alteration of stem cell compartments. We expect that future studies of basic biology and on aging will benefit from the analysis of this telomere-lamina interplay. PMID:27116558

  11. Laminate delamination due to thermal gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchinson, J.W.; Lu, T.J.

    1995-10-01

    Flaw-induced delamination of orthotropic laminates subject to through-thickness temperature gradients is analyzed. A crack-like flaw impedes heat flow through the laminate, producing thermal stresses and crack tip stress intensities. The focus is on delamination cracks which propagate under steady-state conditions. The steady-state analysis becomes accurate for a crack whose length is about one laminate thickness. Moreover, the analysis provides realistic fail-safe criteria for excluding delamination.

  12. Lamins at the crossroads of mechanosignaling

    PubMed Central

    Osmanagic-Myers, Selma; Dechat, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The intermediate filament proteins, A- and B-type lamins, form the nuclear lamina scaffold adjacent to the inner nuclear membrane. B-type lamins confer elasticity, while A-type lamins lend viscosity and stiffness to nuclei. Lamins also contribute to chromatin regulation and various signaling pathways affecting gene expression. The mechanical roles of lamins and their functions in gene regulation are often viewed as independent activities, but recent findings suggest a highly cross-linked and interdependent regulation of these different functions, particularly in mechanosignaling. In this newly emerging concept, lamins act as a “mechanostat” that senses forces from outside and responds to tension by reinforcing the cytoskeleton and the extracellular matrix. A-type lamins, emerin, and the linker of the nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC) complex directly transmit forces from the extracellular matrix into the nucleus. These mechanical forces lead to changes in the molecular structure, modification, and assembly state of A-type lamins. This in turn activates a tension-induced “inside-out signaling” through which the nucleus feeds back to the cytoskeleton and the extracellular matrix to balance outside and inside forces. These functions regulate differentiation and may be impaired in lamin-linked diseases, leading to cellular phenotypes, particularly in mechanical load-bearing tissues. PMID:25644599

  13. Geometrically nonlinear analysis of laminated elastic structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, J. N.

    1984-01-01

    Laminated composite plates and shells that can be used to model automobile bodies, aircraft wings and fuselages, and pressure vessels among many other were analyzed. The finite element method, a numerical technique for engineering analysis of structures, is used to model the geometry and approximate the solution. Various alternative formulations for analyzing laminated plates and shells are developed and their finite element models are tested for accuracy and economy in computation. These include the shear deformation laminate theory and degenerated 3-D elasticity theory for laminates.

  14. Symmetries in laminated composite plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K.

    1976-01-01

    The different types of symmetry exhibited by laminated anisotropic fibrous composite plates are identified and contrasted with the symmetries of isotropic and homogeneous orthotropic plates. The effects of variations in the fiber orientation and the stacking sequence of the layers on the symmetries exhibited by composite plates are discussed. Both the linear and geometrically nonlinear responses of the plates are considered. A simple procedure is presented for exploiting the symmetries in the finite element analysis. Examples are given of square, skew and polygonal plates where use of symmetry concepts can significantly reduce the scope and cost of analysis.

  15. Impact damage in composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, Joseph E.

    1988-01-01

    Damage tolerance requirements have become an important consideration in the design and fabrication of composite structural components for modern aircraft. The ability of a component to contain a flaw of a given size without serious loss of its structural integrity is of prime concern. Composite laminates are particularly susceptible to damage caused by transverse impact loading. The ongoing program described is aimed at developing experimental and analytical methods that can be used to assess damage tolerance capabilities in composite structures subjected to impulsive loading. Some significant results of this work and the methodology used to obtain them are outlined.

  16. Silicone modified resins for graphite fiber laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, L. W.; Bower, G. M.

    1980-01-01

    Six silicone modified resins were selected for evaluation in unidirectional filament wound graphite laminates. Neat samples of these resins had 1,000 C char residues of 6-63%. The highest flexural values measured for the laminates were a strength of 1,220 MPa and a modulus of 105 GPa. The highest interlaminar shear strength was 72 MPa.

  17. Universality of the frequency spectrum of laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shmuel, Gal; Band, Ram

    2016-07-01

    We show that the frequency spectrum of two-component elastic laminates admits a universal structure, independent of the geometry of the periodic-cell and the specific physical properties. The compactness of the structure enables us to rigorously derive the maximal width, the expected width, and the density of the band-gaps - ranges of frequencies at which waves cannot propagate. In particular, we find that the density of these band-gaps is a universal property of classes of laminates. Rules for tailoring laminates according to desired spectrum properties thereby follow. We show that the frequency spectrum of various finitely deformed laminates are also endowed with the same compact structure. Finally, we explain how our results generalize for laminates with an arbitrary number of components, based on the form of their dispersion relation.

  18. Wettability of graphene-laminated micropillar structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bong, Jihye; Seo, Keumyoung; Park, Ji-Hoon; Ahn, Joung Real; Ju, Sanghyun

    2014-12-01

    The wetting control of graphene is of great interest for electronic, mechanical, architectural, and bionic applications. In this study, the wettability of graphene-laminated micropillar structures was manipulated by changing the height of graphene-laminated structures and employing the trichlorosilane (HDF-S)-based self-assembly monolayer. Graphene-laminated micropillar structures with HDF-S exhibited higher hydrophobicity (contact angle of 129.5°) than pristine graphene thin film (78.8°), pristine graphene-laminated micropillar structures (97.5°), and HDF-S self-assembled graphene thin film (98.5°). Wetting states of the graphene-laminated micropillar structure with HDF-S was also examined by using a urea solution, which flowed across the surface without leaving any residues.

  19. Wettability of graphene-laminated micropillar structures

    SciTech Connect

    Bong, Jihye; Seo, Keumyoung; Ju, Sanghyun E-mail: shju@kgu.ac.kr; Park, Ji-Hoon; Ahn, Joung Real E-mail: shju@kgu.ac.kr

    2014-12-21

    The wetting control of graphene is of great interest for electronic, mechanical, architectural, and bionic applications. In this study, the wettability of graphene-laminated micropillar structures was manipulated by changing the height of graphene-laminated structures and employing the trichlorosilane (HDF-S)-based self-assembly monolayer. Graphene-laminated micropillar structures with HDF-S exhibited higher hydrophobicity (contact angle of 129.5°) than pristine graphene thin film (78.8°), pristine graphene-laminated micropillar structures (97.5°), and HDF-S self-assembled graphene thin film (98.5°). Wetting states of the graphene-laminated micropillar structure with HDF-S was also examined by using a urea solution, which flowed across the surface without leaving any residues.

  20. Stationary turbine component with laminated skin

    DOEpatents

    James, Allister W.

    2012-08-14

    A stationary turbine engine component, such as a turbine vane, includes a internal spar and an external skin. The internal spar is made of a plurality of spar laminates, and the external skin is made of a plurality of skin laminates. The plurality of skin laminates interlockingly engage the plurality of spar laminates such that the external skin is located and held in place. This arrangement allows alternative high temperature materials to be used on turbine engine components in areas where their properties are needed without having to make the entire component out of such material. Thus, the manufacturing difficulties associated with making an entire component of such a material and the attendant high costs are avoided. The skin laminates can be made of advanced generation single crystal superalloys, intermetallics and refractory alloys.

  1. Critical current of laminated and non-laminated BSCCO superconducting composite tape under bending strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsubayashi, H.; Mukai, Y.; Arai, T.; Shin, J. K.; Ochiai, S.; Okuda, H.; Osamura, K.; Otto, A.; Malozemoff, A.

    2009-10-01

    It has been reported that, when the (Bi,Pb) 2Sr 2Ca 2Cu 3O x (hereafter noted as BSCCO)/Ag/Ag-alloy tape is laminated with stainless steel, the tensile strain tolerance of critical current is much improved. In this study, using the non-laminated and laminated BSCCO composite tapes fabricated at American Superconductor Corporation, the influences of lamination on the critical current and its distribution under bending strain were studied. The analysis of the measured variation of average critical current with bending strain based on the damage evolution model revealed that the laminated stainless steel acts to suppress the fracture of the BSCCO filaments. The experimentally observed high critical current retention of the laminated tape up to high bending strain was accounted for by the suppression of fracture of BSCCO filaments stated above and enhancement of the compressive residual strain in the filaments. The distributions of local critical current in non-laminated and laminated composite tape were described well by the three-parameter Weibull distribution function within the bending strain lower than 1.1%. The coefficient of variation of distribution of critical current of the laminated tape was similar to that of the non-laminated one under the same strain distribution in the core.

  2. Direct Composite Laminate Veneers: Three Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Korkut, Bora; Yanıkoğlu, Funda; Günday, Mahir

    2013-01-01

    Re-establishing a patient’s lost dental esthetic appearance is one of the most important topics for contemporary dentistry. New treatment materials and methods have been coming on the scene, day by day, in order to achieve such an aim. Most dentists prefer more conservative and aesthetic approaches, such as direct and indirect laminate veneer restorations, instead of full-ceramic crowns for anteriors where aesthetics is really important. Laminate veneers are restorations which are envisioned to correct existing abnormalities, esthetic deficiencies and discolo-rations. Laminate veneer restorations may be processed in two different ways: direct or indirect. Direct laminate veneers have no need to be prepared in the laboratory and are based on the principle of application of a composite material directly to the prepared tooth surface in the dental clinic. Indirect laminate veneers may be produced from composite materials or ceramics, which are cemented to the tooth with an adhesive resin. In this case report, direct composite laminate veneer technique used for three patients with esthetic problems related to fractures, discolorations and an old prolapsed restoration, is described and six-month follow-ups are discussed. As a conclusion, direct laminate veneer restorations may be a treatment option for patients with the esthetic problems of anterior teeth in cases similar to those reported here. PMID:23875090

  3. Indentation law for composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, S. H.

    1981-01-01

    Static indentation tests are described for glass/epoxy and graphite/epoxy composite laminates with steel balls as the indentor. Beam specimens clamped at various spans were used for the tests. Loading, unloading, and reloading data were obtained and fitted into power laws. Results show that: (1) contact behavior is not appreciably affected by the span; (2) loading and reloading curves seem to follow the 1.5 power law; and (3) unloading curves are described quite well by a 2.5 power law. In addition, values were determined for the critical indentation, alpha sub cr which can be used to predict permanent indentations in unloading. Since alpha sub cr only depends on composite material properties, only the loading and an unloading curve are needed to establish the complete loading-unloading-reloading behavior.

  4. Damage of hybrid composite laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haery, Haleh A.; Kim, Ho Sung

    2013-08-01

    Hybrid laminates consisting of woven glass fabric/epoxy composite plies and woven carbon fabric/epoxy composite plies are studied for fatigue damage and residual strength. A theoretical framework based on the systems approach is proposed as a guide to deal with the complexity involving uncertainties and a large number of variables in the hybrid composite system. A relative damage sensitivity factor expression was developed for quantitative comparisons between non-hybrid and hybrid composites. Hypotheses derived from the theoretical framework were tested and verified. The first hypothesis was that the difference between two different sets of properties produces shear stress in interface between carbon fibre reinforced plastics (CRP) and glass fibre reinforced plastics (GRP), and eventually become a source for CRP/GRP interfacial delamination or longitudinal cracking. The second hypothesis was that inter-fibre bundle delamination occurs more severely to CRP sub-system than GRP sub-system.

  5. Systematic identification of pathological lamin A interactors

    PubMed Central

    Dittmer, Travis A.; Sahni, Nidhi; Kubben, Nard; Hill, David E.; Vidal, Marc; Burgess, Rebecca C.; Roukos, Vassilis; Misteli, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Laminopathies are a collection of phenotypically diverse diseases that include muscular dystrophies, cardiomyopathies, lipodystrophies, and premature aging syndromes. Laminopathies are caused by >300 distinct mutations in the LMNA gene, which encodes the nuclear intermediate filament proteins lamin A and C, two major architectural elements of the mammalian cell nucleus. The genotype–phenotype relationship and the basis for the pronounced tissue specificity of laminopathies are poorly understood. Here we seek to identify on a global scale lamin A–binding partners whose interaction is affected by disease-relevant LMNA mutations. In a screen of a human genome–wide ORFeome library, we identified and validated 337 lamin A–binding proteins. Testing them against 89 known lamin A disease mutations identified 50 disease-associated interactors. Association of progerin, the lamin A isoform responsible for the premature aging disorder Hutchinson–Gilford progeria syndrome, with its partners was largely mediated by farnesylation. Mapping of the interaction sites on lamin A identified the immunoglobulin G (IgG)–like domain as an interaction hotspot and demonstrated that lamin A variants, which destabilize the Ig-like domain, affect protein–protein interactions more globally than mutations of surface residues. Analysis of a set of LMNA mutations in a single residue, which result in three phenotypically distinct diseases, identified disease-specific interactors. The results represent a systematic map of disease-relevant lamin A interactors and suggest loss of tissue-specific lamin A interactions as a mechanism for the tissue-specific appearance of laminopathic phenotypes. PMID:24623722

  6. Systematic identification of pathological lamin A interactors.

    PubMed

    Dittmer, Travis A; Sahni, Nidhi; Kubben, Nard; Hill, David E; Vidal, Marc; Burgess, Rebecca C; Roukos, Vassilis; Misteli, Tom

    2014-05-01

    Laminopathies are a collection of phenotypically diverse diseases that include muscular dystrophies, cardiomyopathies, lipodystrophies, and premature aging syndromes. Laminopathies are caused by >300 distinct mutations in the LMNA gene, which encodes the nuclear intermediate filament proteins lamin A and C, two major architectural elements of the mammalian cell nucleus. The genotype-phenotype relationship and the basis for the pronounced tissue specificity of laminopathies are poorly understood. Here we seek to identify on a global scale lamin A-binding partners whose interaction is affected by disease-relevant LMNA mutations. In a screen of a human genome-wide ORFeome library, we identified and validated 337 lamin A-binding proteins. Testing them against 89 known lamin A disease mutations identified 50 disease-associated interactors. Association of progerin, the lamin A isoform responsible for the premature aging disorder Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome, with its partners was largely mediated by farnesylation. Mapping of the interaction sites on lamin A identified the immunoglobulin G (IgG)-like domain as an interaction hotspot and demonstrated that lamin A variants, which destabilize the Ig-like domain, affect protein-protein interactions more globally than mutations of surface residues. Analysis of a set of LMNA mutations in a single residue, which result in three phenotypically distinct diseases, identified disease-specific interactors. The results represent a systematic map of disease-relevant lamin A interactors and suggest loss of tissue-specific lamin A interactions as a mechanism for the tissue-specific appearance of laminopathic phenotypes. PMID:24623722

  7. Flat laminated microbial mat communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franks, Jonathan; Stolz, John F.

    2009-10-01

    Flat laminated microbial mats are complex microbial ecosystems that inhabit a wide range of environments (e.g., caves, iron springs, thermal springs and pools, salt marshes, hypersaline ponds and lagoons, methane and petroleum seeps, sea mounts, deep sea vents, arctic dry valleys). Their community structure is defined by physical (e.g., light quantity and quality, temperature, density and pressure) and chemical (e.g., oxygen, oxidation/reduction potential, salinity, pH, available electron acceptors and donors, chemical species) parameters as well as species interactions. The main primary producers may be photoautotrophs (e.g., cyanobacteria, purple phototrophs, green phototrophs) or chemolithoautophs (e.g., colorless sulfur oxidizing bacteria). Anaerobic phototrophy may predominate in organic rich environments that support high rates of respiration. These communities are dynamic systems exhibiting both spatial and temporal heterogeneity. They are characterized by steep gradients with microenvironments on the submillimeter scale. Diel oscillations in the physical-chemical profile (e.g., oxygen, hydrogen sulfide, pH) and species distribution are typical for phototroph-dominated communities. Flat laminated microbial mats are often sites of robust biogeochemical cycling. In addition to well-established modes of metabolism for phototrophy (oxygenic and non-oxygenic), respiration (both aerobic and anaerobic), and fermentation, novel energetic pathways have been discovered (e.g., nitrate reduction couple to the oxidation of ammonia, sulfur, or arsenite). The application of culture-independent techniques (e.g., 16S rRNA clonal libraries, metagenomics), continue to expand our understanding of species composition and metabolic functions of these complex ecosystems.

  8. Severe laminitis in multiple zoo species.

    PubMed

    Wiedner, Ellen; Holland, Jeff; Trupkiewicz, John; Uzal, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    A 10-year record review from a zoological institution in the western USA identified four cases of severe laminitis resulting in rotation and protrusion of the third phalanx through the sole. Laminitis is reported in a Masai giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis tippelskirchi), a Sichuan takin (Budorcas taxicolor tibetana), a greater Malayan chevrotain (Tragulus napu) and a giant eland (Taurotragus derbianus). This is the first report of severe laminitis with pedal bone rotation and protrusion in multiple species of non-domestic hoofstock, and the first report of this disease in three of these species (takin, chevrotain, and giant eland). PMID:24730432

  9. Probabilistic methods for the calculation of laminate properties

    SciTech Connect

    Mcmanus, H.L. )

    1993-06-01

    A method for calculating the properties of advanced composite laminates, including their variations due to known variations in the properties of the individual plies and the laminate geometry, is presented. The method is useful for understanding scatter in the measured properties of composite laminates. This scatter is particularly important in the design of ultra-low coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) laminates. Such laminates are designed with a theoretically zero CTE, but in practice have a distribution of nonzero CTEs. Information useful for designing ultra-low expansion laminates is discussed. A practical limit on how close to zero the CTE of a laminate can be assumed to be is found. 10 refs.

  10. Behaviour of Mechanically Laminated CLT Members

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuklík, P.; Velebil, L.

    2015-11-01

    Cross laminated timber (CLT) is one of the structural building systems based on the lamination of multiple layers, where each layer is oriented perpendicularly to each other. Recent requirements are placed to develop an alternative process based on the mechanical lamination of the layers, which is of particular interest to our research group at the University Centre for Energy Efficient Buildings. The goal is to develop and verify the behaviour of mechanically laminated CLT wall panels exposed to shear stresses in the plane. The shear resistance of mechanically jointed CLT is ensured by connecting the layers by screws. The paper deals with the experimental analysis focused on the determination of the torsional stiffness and the slip modulus of crossing areas for different numbers of orthogonally connected layers. The results of the experiments were compared with the current analytical model.

  11. Method for fabricating laminated uranium composites

    DOEpatents

    Chapman, L.R.

    1983-08-03

    The present invention is directed to a process for fabricating laminated composites of uranium or uranium alloys and at least one other metal or alloy. The laminated composites are fabricated by forming a casting of the molten uranium with the other metal or alloy which is selectively positioned in the casting and then hot-rolling the casting into a laminated plate in or around which the casting components are metallurgically bonded to one another to form the composite. The process of the present invention provides strong metallurgical bonds between the laminate components primarily since the bond disrupting surface oxides on the uranium or uranium alloy float to the surface of the casting to effectively remove the oxides from the bonding surfaces of the components.

  12. Free edge effects in laminated composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herakovich, C. T.

    1989-01-01

    The fundamental mechanics of free-edge effects in laminated fiber-reinforced composites is examined, reviewing the results of recent experimental and analytical investigations. The derivation of the governing equations for the basic problem is outlined, including the equilibrium and mismatch conditions and the elasticity formulation, and experimental data on axial displacement and shear strain in angle-ply laminates are summarized. Numerical predictions of free-edge deformation and interlaminar and through-thickness stress distributions are presented for cross-ply, angle-ply, and quasi-isotropic laminates, and the mechanisms of edge damage and failure in angle-ply laminates are briefly characterized. Extensive diagrams, drawings, graphs, and photographs are provided.

  13. Development of a laminate fatigue analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roderick, G. L.; Obrien, T. K.; Whitcomb, J. D.

    1980-01-01

    A fatigue analysis technique developed to predict damage growth in notched laminates is described. Features of the analysis include: criteria to relate matrix failure to cyclic stresses in and between plies; correlation of delamination growth with strain-release rate; and in-plane shear modulus change is related to cyclic shear stresses. A simplified finite element model is used to determine stresses in laminates that contain matrix damage. Failure criteria are integrated with the finite element model to form the fatigue analysis.

  14. Lamin B1 and lamin B2 are long-lived proteins with distinct functions in retinal development.

    PubMed

    Razafsky, David; Ward, Candace; Potter, Chloe; Zhu, Wanqiu; Xue, Yunlu; Kefalov, Vladimir J; Fong, Loren G; Young, Stephen G; Hodzic, Didier

    2016-06-15

    Lamin B1 and lamin B2 are essential building blocks of the nuclear lamina, a filamentous meshwork lining the nucleoplasmic side of the inner nuclear membrane. Deficiencies in lamin B1 and lamin B2 impair neurodevelopment, but distinct functions for the two proteins in the development and homeostasis of the CNS have been elusive. Here we show that embryonic depletion of lamin B1 in retinal progenitors and postmitotic neurons affects nuclear integrity, leads to the collapse of the laminB2 meshwork, impairs neuronal survival, and markedly reduces the cellularity of adult retinas. In stark contrast, a deficiency of lamin B2 in the embryonic retina has no obvious effect on lamin B1 localization or nuclear integrity in embryonic retinas, suggesting that lamin B1, but not lamin B2, is strictly required for nucleokinesis during embryonic neurogenesis. However, the absence of lamin B2 prevents proper lamination of adult retinal neurons, impairs synaptogenesis, and reduces cone photoreceptor survival. We also show that lamin B1 and lamin B2 are extremely long-lived proteins in rod and cone photoreceptors. OF interest, a complete absence of both proteins during postnatal life has little or no effect on the survival and function of cone photoreceptors. PMID:27075175

  15. Lamin B1 and lamin B2 are long-lived proteins with distinct functions in retinal development

    PubMed Central

    Razafsky, David; Ward, Candace; Potter, Chloe; Zhu, Wanqiu; Xue, Yunlu; Kefalov, Vladimir J.; Fong, Loren G.; Young, Stephen G.; Hodzic, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Lamin B1 and lamin B2 are essential building blocks of the nuclear lamina, a filamentous meshwork lining the nucleoplasmic side of the inner nuclear membrane. Deficiencies in lamin B1 and lamin B2 impair neurodevelopment, but distinct functions for the two proteins in the development and homeostasis of the CNS have been elusive. Here we show that embryonic depletion of lamin B1 in retinal progenitors and postmitotic neurons affects nuclear integrity, leads to the collapse of the laminB2 meshwork, impairs neuronal survival, and markedly reduces the cellularity of adult retinas. In stark contrast, a deficiency of lamin B2 in the embryonic retina has no obvious effect on lamin B1 localization or nuclear integrity in embryonic retinas, suggesting that lamin B1, but not lamin B2, is strictly required for nucleokinesis during embryonic neurogenesis. However, the absence of lamin B2 prevents proper lamination of adult retinal neurons, impairs synaptogenesis, and reduces cone photoreceptor survival. We also show that lamin B1 and lamin B2 are extremely long-lived proteins in rod and cone photoreceptors. OF interest, a complete absence of both proteins during postnatal life has little or no effect on the survival and function of cone photoreceptors. PMID:27075175

  16. Mechanical Behavior of Fabric-Film Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Said, Magdi S.

    1999-01-01

    Inflatable structures are gaining wide support in planetary scientific missions as well as commercial applications. For such applications a new class of materials made of laminating thin homogenous films to lightweight fabrics are being considered us structura1 gas envelops. The emerging composite materials are a result of recent advances in the manufacturing cf 1ightweight, high strength fibers, fabrics and scrims. The lamination of these load-carrying members with the proper gas barrier film results in wide range of materials suitable for various loading and environmental conditions. Polyester - based woven fabrics laminated to thin homogeneus film of polyester (Maylar) is an example of this class. This fabric/ film laminate is being considered for the development a material suitable for building large gas envelopes for use in the NASA Ultra Long Duration Balloon Program (ULDB). Compared to commercial homogeneus films, the material provides relatively high strength to weight ratio as well as better resistance to crack and tear propagation. The purpose of this papers is to introduce the mechanical behavior of this class of multi-layers composite and to highlight some of the concerns observed during the characterization of these laminate composites.

  17. Lamination residual stresses in fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniel, I. M.; Liber, T.

    1975-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the magnitude of lamination residual stresses in angle-ply composites and to evaluate their effects on composite structural integrity. The materials investigated were boron/epoxy, boron/polyimide, graphite/low modulus epoxy, graphite/high modulus epoxy, graphite/polyimide and s-glass/epoxy. These materials were fully characterized. Static properties of laminates were also determined. Experimental techniques using embedded strain gages were developed and used to measure residual strains during curing. The extent of relaxation of lamination residual stresses was investigated. It was concluded that the degree of such relaxation is low. The behavior of angle-ply laminates subjected to thermal cycling, tensile load cycling, and combined thermal cycling with tensile load was investigated. In most cases these cycling programs did not have any measurable influence on residual strength and stiffness of the laminates. In the tensile load cycling tests, the graphite/polyimide shows the highest endurance with 10 million cycle runouts at loads up to 90 percent of the static strength.

  18. Evaluation of Behaviours of Laminated Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sable, L.; Japins, G.; Kalnins, K.

    2015-11-01

    Visual appearance of building facades and other load bearing structures, which now are part of modern architecture, is the reason why it is important to investigate in more detail the reliability of laminated glass for civil structures. Laminated glass in particular has become one of the trendy materials, for example Apple© stores have both load carrying capacity and transparent appearance. Glass has high mechanical strength and relatively medium density, however, the risk of sudden brittle failure like concrete or other ceramics determine relatively high conservatism in design practice of glass structures. This should be changed as consumer requirements evolve calling for a safe and reliable design methodology and corresponding building standards. A design methodology for glass and glass laminates should be urgently developed and included as a chapter in Eurocode. This paper presents initial experimental investigation of behaviour of simple glass sheets and laminated glass samples in 4-point bending test. The aim of the current research is to investigate laminated glass characteristic values and to verify the obtained experimental results with finite element method for glass and EVA material in line with future European Structural Design of Glass Components code.

  19. Development of tough, moisture resistant laminating resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brand, R. A.; Harrison, E. S.

    1982-01-01

    Tough, moisture resistant laminating resins for employment with graphite fibers were developed. The new laminating resins exhibited cost, handleability and processing characteristics equivalent to 394K (250 F) curing epoxies. The laminating resins were based on bisphenol A dicyanate and monofunctional cyanates with hydrophobic substituents. These resins sorb only small quantities of moisture at equilibrium (0.5% or less) with minimal glass transition temperature depression and represent an improvement over epoxies which sorb around 2% moisture at equilibrium. Toughening was accomplished by the precipitation of small diameter particles of butadiene nitrile rubber throughout the resin matrix. The rubber domains act as microcrack termini and energy dissipation sites, allowing increased stress accommodation prior to catastrophic failure. A unique blend of amine terminated butadiene nitrile elastomer (MW 2,000) and a high nitrile content butadiene nitrile rubber yielded the desired resin morphology.

  20. Structural reliability analysis of laminated CMC components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, Stephen F.; Palko, Joseph L.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1991-01-01

    For laminated ceramic matrix composite (CMC) materials to realize their full potential in aerospace applications, design methods and protocols are a necessity. The time independent failure response of these materials is focussed on and a reliability analysis is presented associated with the initiation of matrix cracking. A public domain computer algorithm is highlighted that was coupled with the laminate analysis of a finite element code and which serves as a design aid to analyze structural components made from laminated CMC materials. Issues relevant to the effect of the size of the component are discussed, and a parameter estimation procedure is presented. The estimation procedure allows three parameters to be calculated from a failure population that has an underlying Weibull distribution.

  1. Plated lamination structures for integrated magnetic devices

    DOEpatents

    Webb, Bucknell C.

    2014-06-17

    Semiconductor integrated magnetic devices such as inductors, transformers, etc., having laminated magnetic-insulator stack structures are provided, wherein the laminated magnetic-insulator stack structures are formed using electroplating techniques. For example, an integrated laminated magnetic device includes a multilayer stack structure having alternating magnetic and insulating layers formed on a substrate, wherein each magnetic layer in the multilayer stack structure is separated from another magnetic layer in the multilayer stack structure by an insulating layer, and a local shorting structure to electrically connect each magnetic layer in the multilayer stack structure to an underlying magnetic layer in the multilayer stack structure to facilitate electroplating of the magnetic layers using an underlying conductive layer (magnetic or seed layer) in the stack as an electrical cathode/anode for each electroplated magnetic layer in the stack structure.

  2. Preliminary evaluation of hybrid titanium composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, J. L.; Progar, D. J.; Johnson, W. S.; St.clair, T. L.

    1994-01-01

    In this study, the mechanical response of hybrid titanium composite laminates (HTCL) was evaluated at room and elevated temperatures. Also, the use of an elastic-plastic laminate analysis program for predicting the tensile response from constituent properties was verified. The improvement in mechanical properties achieved by the laminates was assessed by comparing the results of static strength and constant amplitude fatigue tests to those for monolithic titanium sheet. Two HTCL were fabricated with different fiber volume fractions, resin layer thicknesses, and resins. One panel was thicker and was more poorly bonded in comparison to other. Consequently, the former had a lower tensile strength, while fewer cracks grew in this panel and at a slower rate. Both panels showed an improvement in fatigue life of almost two orders of magnitude. The model predictions were also in good agreement with the experimental results for both HTCL panels.

  3. Silicone modified resins for graphite fiber laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, L. W.; Bower, G. M.

    1979-01-01

    The development of silicon modified resins for graphite fiber laminates which will prevent the dispersal of graphite fibers when the composites are burned is discussed. Eighty-five silicone modified resins were synthesized and evaluated including unsaturated polyesters, thermosetting methacrylates, epoxies, polyimides, and phenolics. Neat resins were judged in terms of Si content, homogeneity, hardness, Char formation, and thermal stability. Char formation was estimated by thermogravimetry to 1,000 C in air and in N2. Thermal stability was evaluated by isothermal weight loss measurements for 200 hrs in air at three temperatures. Four silicone modified epoxies were selected for evaluation in unidirectional filament wound graphite laminates. Neat samples of these resins had 1,000 C char residues of 25 to 50%. The highest flexural values measured for the laminates were a strength of 140 kpsi and a modulus of 10 Mpsi. The highest interlaminar shear strength was 5.3 kpsi.

  4. Stochastic damage evolution in textile laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dzenis, Yuris A.; Bogdanovich, Alexander E.; Pastore, Christopher M.

    1993-01-01

    A probabilistic model utilizing random material characteristics to predict damage evolution in textile laminates is presented. Model is based on a division of each ply into two sublaminas consisting of cells. The probability of cell failure is calculated using stochastic function theory and maximal strain failure criterion. Three modes of failure, i.e. fiber breakage, matrix failure in transverse direction, as well as matrix or interface shear cracking, are taken into account. Computed failure probabilities are utilized in reducing cell stiffness based on the mesovolume concept. A numerical algorithm is developed predicting the damage evolution and deformation history of textile laminates. Effect of scatter of fiber orientation on cell properties is discussed. Weave influence on damage accumulation is illustrated with the help of an example of a Kevlar/epoxy laminate.

  5. Nonlinear effects on composite laminate thermal expansion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hashin, Z.; Rosen, B. W.; Pipes, R. B.

    1979-01-01

    Analyses of Graphite/Polyimide laminates shown that the thermomechanical strains cannot be separated into mechanical strain and free thermal expansion strain. Elastic properties and thermal expansion coefficients of unidirectional Graphite/Polyimide specimens were measured as a function of temperature to provide inputs for the analysis. The + or - 45 degrees symmetric Graphite/Polyimide laminates were tested to obtain free thermal expansion coefficients and thermal expansion coefficients under various uniaxial loads. The experimental results demonstrated the effects predicted by the analysis, namely dependence of thermal expansion coefficients on load, and anisotropy of thermal expansion under load. The significance of time dependence on thermal expansion was demonstrated by comparison of measured laminate free expansion coefficients with and without 15 day delay at intermediate temperature.

  6. On thermal edge effects in composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herakovich, C. T.

    1976-01-01

    Results are presented for a finite-element investigation of the combined influence of edge effects due to mechanical and thermal mismatch in composite laminates with free edges. Laminates of unidirectional boron/epoxy symmetrically bonded to sheets of aluminum and titanium were studied. It is shown that interlaminar thermal stresses may be more significant than the interlaminar stresses due to loading only. In addition, the stresses due to thermal mismatch may be of the same sign as those due to Poisson's mismatch or they may be of opposite sign depending upon material properties, stacking sequence, and direction of loading. The paper concludes with a brief discussion of thermal stresses in all-composite laminates.

  7. Damage initiation and propagation in metal laminates

    SciTech Connect

    Riddle, R.A.; Lesuer, D.R.; Syn, C.K.

    1996-07-26

    The metal laminates proposed here for aircraft structures are Al alloy interlayers between Al alloy based metal matrix composite (MMC) plates reinforced with Si carbide particles. Properties to be tailored for jet engine fan containment and wing and auxiliary support structures include the important property fracture toughness. A method was developed for simulating and predicting crack initiation/growth using finite element analysis and fracture mechanics. An important key in predicting the failure is the tie- break slideline with prescribed (chosen based on J Integral calculations) effective plastic strain to failure in elements along the slideline. More development of the method is needed, particularly in its correlation with experimental data from various fracture toughness and strength tests of metal laminates. Results show that delamination at the interface of the ductile interlayer and MMC material can add significantly to the energy required to propagate a crack through a metal laminate. 11 figs, 7 refs.

  8. Elastic constants of layers in isotropic laminates.

    PubMed

    Heyliger, Paul R; Ledbetter, Hassel; Kim, Sudook; Reimanis, Ivar

    2003-11-01

    The individual laminae elastic constants in multilayer laminates composed of dissimilar isotropic layers were determined using ultrasonic-resonance spectroscopy and the linear theory of elasticity. Ultrasonic resonance allows one to measure the free-vibration response spectrum of a traction-free solid under periodic vibration. These frequencies depend on pointwise density, laminate dimensions, layer thickness, and layer elastic constants. Given a material with known mass but unknown constitution, this method allows one to extract the elastic constants and density of the constituent layers. This is accomplished by measuring the frequencies and then minimizing the differences between these and those calculated using the theory of elasticity for layered media to select the constants that best replicate the frequency-response spectrum. This approach is applied to a three-layer, unsymmetric laminate of WpCu, and very good agreement is found with the elastic constants of the two constituent materials. PMID:14649998

  9. Adhesives for laminating polyimide insulated flat conductor cable

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montermoso, J. C.; Saxton, T. R.; Taylor, R. L.

    1967-01-01

    Polymer adhesive laminates polyimide-film flat conductor cable. It is obtained by reacting an appropriate diamine with a dianhydride. The adhesive has also been used in the lamination of copper to copper for the preparation of multilayer circuit boards.

  10. Fracture behavior of laminated discontinuously reinforced aluminum material

    SciTech Connect

    Osman, T.M. |; Lewandowski, J.J.; Lesuer, D.R.; Syn, C.K.; Hunt, W.H. Jr

    1994-05-01

    Laminated metallic composites are being developed for applications which require high specific stiffness and fracture resistance. Recent work with laminated discontinuously reinforced aluminum (DRA) materials has demonstrated the potential for marked improvements in stable crack growth resistance via extrinsic toughening. The purpose of this work is to compare the fracture mechanisms and fracture resistance of laminated DRA materials to unlaminated DRA materials. In particular, the production of extensive stable crack growth and the associated improvement in damage tolerance in DRA laminates is documented.

  11. Reliability analysis of continuous fiber composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, David J.; Wetherhold, Robert C.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes two methods, the maximum distortion energy (MDE) and the principle of independent action (PIA), developed for the analysis of the reliability of a single continuous composite lamina. It is shown that, for the typical laminated plate structure, the individual lamina reliabilities can be combined in order to produce the upper and the lower bounds of reliability for the laminate, similar in nature to the bounds on properties produced from variational elastic methods. These limits were derived for both the interactive and the model failure considerations. Analytical expressions were also derived for the sensitivity of the reliability limits with respect to changes in the Weibull parameters and in loading conditions.

  12. Composite laminate free edge reinforcement concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, W. E.; Gossard, T., Jr.; Jones, R. M.

    1985-01-01

    The presence of a free edge in a laminated composite structure can result in delamination of the composite under certain loading conditions. Linear finite element analysis predicts large or even singular interlaminar stresses near the free edge. Edge reinforcements which will reduce these interlaminar stresses, prevent or delay the onset of delaminations, and thereby increase the strength and life of the structure were studied. Finite element models are used to analyze reinforced laminates which were subsequently fabricated and loaded to failure in order to verify the analysis results.

  13. Ultrasonic transducer with laminated coupling wedge

    DOEpatents

    Karplus, Henry H. B.

    1976-08-03

    An ultrasonic transducer capable of use in a high-temperature environment incorporates a laminated metal coupling wedge including a reflecting edge shaped as a double sloping roof and a transducer crystal backed by a laminated metal sound absorber disposed so as to direct sound waves through the coupling wedge and into a work piece, reflections from the interface between the coupling wedge and the work piece passing to the reflecting edge. Preferably the angle of inclination of the two halves of the reflecting edge are different.

  14. Energy Saving Glass Lamination via Selective Radio Frequency Heating

    SciTech Connect

    Allan, Shawn M; Baranova, Inessa; Poley, Joseph; Reis, Henrique

    2012-02-27

    This project focused on advancing radio-frequency (RF) lamination technology closer to commercial implementation, in order to reduce the energy intensity of glass lamination by up to 90%. Lamination comprises a wide range of products including autoglass, architectural safety and innovative design glass, transparent armor (e.g. bullet proof glass), smart glass, mirrors, and encapsulation of photovoltaics. Lamination is also the fastest growing segment of glass manufacturing, with photovoltaics, architectural needs, and an anticipated transition to laminated side windows in vehicles. The state-of-the-art for glass lamination is to use autoclaves, which apply heat and uniform gas pressure to bond the laminates over the course of 1 to 18 hours. Laminates consist of layers of glass or other materials bonded with vinyl or urethane interlayers. In autoclaving, significant heat energy is lost heating the chamber, pressurized air, glass racks, and the glass. In RF lamination, the heat is generated directly in the vinyl interlayer, causing it to heat and melt quickly, in just 1 to 10 minutes, without significantly heating the glass or the equipment. The main purpose of this project was to provide evidence that low energy, rapid RF lamination quality met the same standards as conventionally autoclaved windows. The development of concepts for laminating curved glass with RF lamination was a major goal. Other primary goals included developing a stronger understanding of the lamination product markets described above, and to refine the potential benefits of commercial implementation. The scope of the project was to complete implementation concept studies in preparation for continuation into advanced development, pilot studies, and commercial implementation. The project consisted of 6 main tasks. The first dealt with lamination with poly-vinyl butyral (PVB) interlayers, which prior work had shown difficulties in achieving good quality laminates, working with Pilkington North

  15. Energy Saving Glass Lamination via Selective Radio Frequency Heating

    SciTech Connect

    Allan, Shawn M.

    2012-02-27

    This project focused on advancing radio-frequency (RF) lamination technology closer to commercial implementation, in order to reduce the energy intensity of glass lamination by up to 90%. Lamination comprises a wide range of products including autoglass, architectural safety and innovative design glass, transparent armor (e.g. bullet proof glass), smart glass, mirrors, and encapsulation of photovoltaics. Lamination is also the fastest growing segment of glass manufacturing, with photovoltaics, architectural needs, and an anticipated transition to laminated side windows in vehicles. The state-of-the-art for glass lamination is to use autoclaves, which apply heat and uniform gas pressure to bond the laminates over the course of 1 to 18 hours. Laminates consist of layers of glass or other materials bonded with vinyl or urethane interlayers. In autoclaving, significant heat energy is lost heating the chamber, pressurized air, glass racks, and the glass. In RF lamination, the heat is generated directly in the vinyl interlayer, causing it to heat and melt quickly, in just 1 to 10 minutes, without significantly heating the glass or the equipment. The main purpose of this project was to provide evidence that low energy, rapid RF lamination quality met the same standards as conventionally autoclaved windows. The development of concepts for laminating curved glass with RF lamination was a major goal. Other primary goals included developing a stronger understanding of the lamination product markets described above, and to refine the potential benefits of commercial implementation. The scope of the project was to complete implementation concept studies in preparation for continuation into advanced development, pilot studies, and commercial implementation. The project consisted of 6 main tasks. The first dealt with lamination with poly-vinyl butyral (PVB) interlayers, which prior work had shown difficulties in achieving good quality laminates, working with Pilkington North

  16. Multi-layer laminate structure and manufacturing method

    DOEpatents

    Keenihan, James R.; Cleereman, Robert J.; Eurich, Gerald; Graham, Andrew T.; Langmaid, Joe A.

    2012-04-24

    The present invention is premised upon a multi-layer laminate structure and method of manufacture, more particularly to a method of constructing the multi-layer laminate structure utilizing a laminate frame and at least one energy activated flowable polymer.

  17. Multi-layer laminate structure and manufacturing method

    SciTech Connect

    Keenihan, James R.; Cleereman, Robert J.; Eurich, Gerald; Graham, Andrew T.; Langmaid, Joe A.

    2013-01-29

    The present invention is premised upon a multi-layer laminate structure and method of manufacture, more particularly to a method of constructing the multi-layer laminate structure utilizing a laminate frame and at least one energy activated flowable polymer.

  18. Reliability analysis of continuous fiber composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, David J.; Wetherhold, Robert C.

    1990-01-01

    A composite lamina may be viewed as a homogeneous solid whose directional strengths are random variables. Calculation of the lamina reliability under a multi-axial stress state can be approached by either assuming that the strengths act separately (modal or independent action), or that they interact through a quadratic interaction criterion. The independent action reliability may be calculated in closed form, while interactive criteria require simulations; there is currently insufficient data to make a final determination of preference between them. Using independent action for illustration purposes, the lamina reliability may be plotted in either stress space or in a non-dimensional representation. For the typical laminated plate structure, the individual lamina reliabilities may be combined in order to produce formal upper and lower bounds of reliability for the laminate, similar in nature to the bounds on properties produced from variational elastic methods. These bounds are illustrated for a (0/plus or minus 15)sub s Graphite/Epoxy (GR/EP) laminate. And addition, simple physically plausible phenomenological rules are proposed for redistribution of load after a lamina has failed. These rules are illustrated by application to (0/plus or minus 15)sub s and (90/plus or minus 45/0)sub s GR/EP laminates and results are compared with respect to the proposed bounds.

  19. Doped LZO buffer layers for laminated conductors

    DOEpatents

    Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans [Knoxville, TN; Schoop, Urs [Westborough, MA; Goyal, Amit [Knoxville, TN; Thieme, Cornelis Leo Hans [Westborough, MA; Verebelyi, Darren T [Oxford, MA; Rupich, Martin W [Framingham, MA

    2010-03-23

    A laminated conductor includes a metallic substrate having a surface, a biaxially textured buffer layer supported by the surface of the substrate, the biaxially textured buffer layer comprising LZO and a dopant for mitigating metal diffusion through the LZO, and a biaxially textured conductor layer supported by the biaxially textured buffer layer.

  20. Laminated insulators having heat dissipation means

    DOEpatents

    Niemann, R.C.; Mataya, K.F.; Gonczy, J.D.

    1980-04-24

    A laminated body is provided with heat dissipation capabilities. The insulator body is formed by dielectric layers interleaved with heat conductive layers, and bonded by an adhesive to form a composite structure. The heat conductive layers include provision for connection to an external thermal circuit.

  1. Compression failure of angle-ply laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peel, Larry D.; Hyer, Michael W.; Shuart, Mark J.

    1991-01-01

    The present work deals with modes and mechanisms of failure in compression of angle-ply laminates. Experimental results were obtained from 42 angle-ply IM7/8551-7a specimens with a lay-up of ((plus or minus theta)/(plus or minus theta)) sub 6s where theta, the off-axis angle, ranged from 0 degrees to 90 degrees. The results showed four failure modes, these modes being a function of off-axis angle. Failure modes include fiber compression, inplane transverse tension, inplane shear, and inplane transverse compression. Excessive interlaminar shear strain was also considered as an important mode of failure. At low off-axis angles, experimentally observed values were considerably lower than published strengths. It was determined that laminate imperfections in the form of layer waviness could be a major factor in reducing compression strength. Previously developed linear buckling and geometrically nonlinear theories were used, with modifications and enhancements, to examine the influence of layer waviness on compression response. The wavy layer is described by a wave amplitude and a wave length. Linear elastic stress-strain response is assumed. The geometrically nonlinear theory, in conjunction with the maximum stress failure criterion, was used to predict compression failure and failure modes for the angle-ply laminates. A range of wave length and amplitudes were used. It was found that for 0 less than or equal to theta less than or equal to 15 degrees failure was most likely due to fiber compression. For 15 degrees less than theta less than or equal to 35 degrees, failure was most likely due to inplane transverse tension. For 35 degrees less than theta less than or equal to 70 degrees, failure was most likely due to inplane shear. For theta less than 70 degrees, failure was most likely due to inplane transverse compression. The fiber compression and transverse tension failure modes depended more heavily on wave length than on wave amplitude. Thus using a single

  2. Determining Shear Stress Distribution in a Laminate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Aboudi, Jacob; Yarrington, Phillip W.

    2010-01-01

    A "simplified shear solution" method approximates the through-thickness shear stress distribution within a composite laminate based on an extension of laminated beam theory. The method does not consider the solution of a particular boundary value problem; rather, it requires only knowledge of the global shear loading, geometry, and material properties of the laminate or panel. It is thus analogous to lamination theory in that ply-level stresses can be efficiently determined from global load resultants at a given location in a structure and used to evaluate the margin of safety on a ply-by-ply basis. The simplified shear solution stress distribution is zero at free surfaces, continuous at ply boundaries, and integrates to the applied shear load. The method has been incorporated within the HyperSizer commercial structural sizing software to improve its predictive capability for designing composite structures. The HyperSizer structural sizing software is used extensively by NASA to design composite structures. In the case of through-thickness shear loading on panels, HyperSizer previously included a basic, industry-standard, method for approximating the resulting shear stress distribution in sandwich panels. However, no such method was employed for solid laminate panels. The purpose of the innovation is to provide an approximation of the through-thickness shear stresses in a solid laminate given the through-thickness shear loads (Qx and Qy) on the panel. The method was needed for implementation within the HyperSizer structural sizing software so that the approximated ply-level shear stresses could be utilized in a failure theory to assess the adequacy of a panel design. The simplified shear solution method was developed based on extending and generalizing bi-material beam theory to plate-like structures. It is assumed that the through-thickness shear stresses arise due to local bending of the laminate induced by the through-thickness shear load, and by imposing

  3. Fatigue damage development of various CFRP-laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulte, K.; Baron, CH.

    1988-01-01

    The chronic strength and fatigue behavior of a woven carbon-fiber reinforced laminate in a balanced eight-shaft satin weave style was compared to nonwoven laminates with an equivalent cross-ply layup. Half the fibers were arranged in the direction of the load and the other half perpendicular to it. Two types of nonwoven laminates consisting of continuous fibers and aligned discontinuous fibers, both produced from carbon fiber prepregs, were studied. The cross-ply laminate with continuous fiber showed the best characteristics with regard to both static strength and fatigue. The similarities and differences in damage mechanisms in the laminates are described.

  4. Nonlinear laminate analysis for metal matrix fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sinclair, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    A nonlinear laminate analysis is described for predicting the mechanical behavior (stress-strain relationships) of angle-ply laminates in which the matrix is strained nonlinearly by both the residual stress and the mechanical load and in which additional nonlinearities are induced due to progressive fiber fractures and ply relative rotations. The nonlinear laminate analysis is based on linear composite mechanics and a piece-wise linear laminate analysis to handle the nonlinear responses. Results obtained by using this nonlinear analysis on boron-fiber/aluminum-matrix angle-ply laminates agree well with experimental data. The results shown illustrate the in situ ply stress-strain behavior and synergistic strength enhancement.

  5. Nonlinear laminate analysis for metal matrix fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sinclair, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    A nonlinear laminate analysis is described for predicting the mechanical behavior (stress-strain relationships) of angleplied laminates in which the matrix is strained nonlinearly by both the residual stress and the mechanical load and in which additional nonlinearities are induced due to progressive fiber fractures and ply relative rotations. The nonlinear laminate analysis (NLA) is based on linear composite mechanics and a piece wise linear laminate analysis to handle the nonlinear responses. Results obtained by using this nonlinear analysis on boron fiber/aluminum matrix angleplied laminates agree well with experimental data. The results shown illustrate the in situ ply stress-strain behavior and synergistic strength enhancement.

  6. Progressive delamination in polymer matrix composite laminates: A new approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Minnetyan, L.

    1992-01-01

    A new approach independent of stress intensity factors and fracture toughness parameters has been developed and is described for the computational simulation of progressive delamination in polymer matrix composite laminates. The damage stages are quantified based on physics via composite mechanics while the degradation of the laminate behavior is quantified via the finite element method. The approach accounts for all types of composite behavior, laminate configuration, load conditions, and delamination processes starting from damage initiation, to unstable propagation, and to laminate fracture. Results of laminate fracture in composite beams, panels, plates, and shells are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness and versatility of this new approach.

  7. Edge effects in angle-ply composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, P. W.; Herakovich, C. T.

    1977-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a zeroth-order solution for edge effects in angle-ply composite laminates obtained using perturbation techniques and a limiting free body approach. The general solution for edge effects in laminates of arbitrary angle ply is applied to the special case of a (+ or - 45)s graphite/epoxy laminate. Interlaminar stress distributions are obtained as a function of the laminate thickness-to-width ratio and compared to finite difference results. The solution predicts stable, continuous stress distributions, determines finite maximum tensile interlaminar normal stress and provides mathematical evidence for singular interlaminar shear stresses in (+ or - 45) graphite/epoxy laminates.

  8. Novel Remanufacturing Process of Recycled Polytetrafluoroethylene(PTFE)/GF Laminate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Z.; Ghita, O. R.; Johnston, P.; Evans, K. E.

    2011-01-01

    Currently, the PTFE/GF laminate and PTFE PCB manufacturers are under considerable pressure to address the recycling issues due to Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) Directive, shortage of landfill capacity and cost of disposal. This study is proposing a novel manufacture method for reuse of the mechanical ground PTFE/Glass fibre (GF) laminate and production of the first reconstitute PTFE/GF laminate. The reconstitute PTFE/GF laminate proposed here consists of a layer of recycled sub-sheet, additional layers of PTFE and PTFE coated glass cloth, also covered by copper foils. The reconstitute PTFE/GF laminate showed good dielectric properties. Therefore, there is potential to use the mechanical ground PTFE/GF laminate powder to produce reconstitute PTFE/GF laminate, for use in high frequencies PCB applications.

  9. Ultrasonic monitoring of asymmetric carbon fibre reinforced aluminum laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Junqing; Yang, Fan; Wang, Rongguo

    2013-08-01

    Asymmetric carbon fibre reinforced aluminum alloy laminates was manufactured for the purpose with repeat tensile test, which will be applied in composite pressure vessel. Ultrasonic C scan and A scan approach are used to evaluate the damage of the asymmetric CFRP-Al (carbon fibre reinforced aluminum alloy) laminates. Nondestructive detection is carried out for the CFRP-Al laminates before and after tensile test. Comparison results and pulse echo analysis show that when subjected to repeat tensile test with 70% elastic limit strain load of the CFRP laminates, the interface debonding between CFRP and Al will not occur but the delamination within CFRP laminates becomes the main damage of the asymmetric CFRP-Al laminates. This investigation indicated that combined ultrasonic C scan and A scan is available for damage evaluation of fibre metal laminates.

  10. Tensile stress-strain behavior of boron/aluminum laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sova, J. A.; Poe, C. C., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The tensile stress-strain behavior of five types of boron/aluminum laminates was investigated. Longitudinal and transverse stress-strain curves were obtained for monotonic loading to failure and for three cycles of loading to successively higher load levels. The laminate strengths predicted by assuming that the zero deg plies failed first correlated well with the experimental results. The stress-strain curves for all the boron/aluminum laminates were nonlinear except at very small strains. Within the small linear regions, elastic constants calculated from laminate theory corresponded to those obtained experimentally to within 10 to 20 percent. A limited amount of cyclic loading did not affect the ultimate strength and strain for the boron/aluminum laminates. The laminates, however, exhibited a permanent strain on unloading. The Ramberg-Osgood equation was fitted to the stress-strain curves to obtain average curves for the various laminates.

  11. A study of adhesion at the E-glass/FR4 interface

    SciTech Connect

    Kent, M.S.; Baca, P.; McNamara, W.F.

    1995-12-31

    The goal of this work is to investigate mechanisms for the loss of adhesive strength between E-glass and FR4 epoxy upon-humidity and temperature conditioning. In this paper we discuss the distribution of moisture between the interface region and the bulk epoxy examined by neutron reflection, and the relationship of this data to adhesive strength.

  12. Micromechanical Modeling of Impact Damage Mechanisms in Unidirectional Composite Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qinghua; Wang, Zhenqing

    2016-05-01

    Composite laminates are susceptible to the transverse impact loads resulting in significant damage such as matrix cracking, fiber breakage and delamination. In this paper, a micromechanical model is developed to predict the impact damage of composite laminates based on microstructure and various failure models of laminates. The fiber and matrix are represented by the isotropic and elastic-plastic solid, and their impact failure behaviors are modeled based on shear damage model. The delaminaton failure is modeling by the interface element controlled by cohesive damage model. Impact damage mechanisms of laminate are analyzed by using the micromechanical model proposed. In addition, the effects of impact energy and laminated type on impact damage behavior of laminates are investigated. Due to the damage of the surrounding matrix near the impact point caused by the fiber deformation, the surface damage area of laminate is larger than the area of ​​impact projectile. The shape of the damage area is roughly rectangle or elliptical with the major axis extending parallel to the fiber direction in the surface layer of laminate. The alternating laminated type with two fiber directions is more propitious to improve the impact resistance of laminates.

  13. Transverse shear stiffness of laminated anisotropic shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, G. A.

    1978-01-01

    Equations are derived for the transverse shear stiffness of laminated anisotropic shells. Without making assumptions for thickness distribution for either transverse shear stresses or strains, constitutive equations for the transverse shear deformation theory of anisotropic heterogeneous shells are found. The equations are based on Taylor series expansions about a generic point for stress resultants and couples, identically satisfying plate equilibrium equations. These equations are used to find statically correct expressions for in-surface stresses, transverse shear stresses, and the area density of transverse shear strain energy, in terms of transverse shear stress resultants and redundants. The application of Castigliano's theorem of least work minimizes shear strain energy with respect to the redundants. Examples are presented for several laminated walls. Good agreement is found between the results and those of exact three-dimensional elasticity solutions for the cylindrical bending of a plate.

  14. Indirect laminate veneer: a conservative novel approach.

    PubMed

    Prajapati, Paranjay; Sethuraman, Rajesh; Naveen, Y G; Patel, Jayanti R

    2013-01-01

    Various treatment options and materials are available for restoration of an endodontically treated tooth. Laminate veneer is conservative treatment usually employed for aesthetic correction or improvement. The indirect composite is available in a wide range of shades and specific characterisation is easily performed chair side in the operatory area, which makes it a quick procedure and time saving for both the patient and the dentist. The physical properties and optical properties are good enough to use it as indirect restorative material, so in this particular case it was the material of choice for fabrication of laminate veneer on anterior tooth. In this case, the endodontically treated tooth with a fractured incisal edge was restored with indirect composite material. PMID:23975914

  15. Investigating Delamination Migration in Composite Tape Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratcliffe, James G.; DeCarvalho, Nelson V.

    2014-01-01

    A modification to a recently developed test specimen designed to investigate migration of a delamination between neighboring ply interfaces in tape laminates is presented. The specimen is a cross-ply laminated beam consisting of 40 plies with a polytetrafluoroethylene insert spanning part way along its length. The insert is located between a lower 0-degree ply (specimen length direction) and a stack of four 90-degree plies (specimen width direction). The modification involved a stacking sequence that promotes stable delamination growth prior to migration, and included a relocation of the insert from the specimen midplane to the interface between plies 14 and 15. Specimens were clamped at both ends onto a rigid baseplate and loaded on their upper surface via a piano hinge assembly, resulting in a predominantly flexural loading condition. Tests were conducted with the load-application point positioned at various locations along a specimen's span. This position affected the sequence of damage events during a test.

  16. Thermal stresses in thick laminated composite shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, F. G.

    1993-01-01

    The paper provides an analytical formulation to investigate the thermomechanical behavior of thick composite shells subjected to a temperature distribution which varies arbitrarily in the radial direction. For illustrative purposes, shells under uniform temperature change are presented. It is found that thermal twist would occur even for symmetric laminated shells. Under uniform temperature rise, results for off-axis graphite/epoxy shells show that extensional-shear coupling can cause tensile radial stress throughout the shell and tensile hoop stress in the inner region. Laminated graphite/epoxy shells can exhibit negative effective thermal expansion coefficients in the longitudinal and transverse directions. Finally, the stacking sequence has a strong influence on the thermal stress distributions.

  17. Laminated grid and web magnetic cores

    DOEpatents

    Sefko, John; Pavlik, Norman M.

    1984-01-01

    A laminated magnetic core characterized by an electromagnetic core having core legs which comprise elongated apertures and edge notches disposed transversely to the longitudinal axis of the legs, such as high reluctance cores with linear magnetization characteristics for high voltage shunt reactors. In one embodiment the apertures include compact bodies of microlaminations for more flexibility and control in adjusting permeability and/or core reluctance.

  18. Process Yields Strong, Void-Free Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, L. E.; Covington, E. W., III; Dale, W. J.; Hall, E. T., Jr; Justice, J. E.; Taylor, E. C.; Wilson, M. L.

    1983-01-01

    Need for lightweight materials as structural components for future space transportation systems stimulated development of systematic method for manufacturing a polyimide/graphite composite. Laminates manufactured by process are void-free, exhibit excellent thermo-oxidative stability up to 315 degrees C (600 degrees F) and are 40 percent lighter than aluminum. Process is precise, repeatable, and ideally suited for researchers and small-lot producers of composite materials.

  19. Triangular Element For Analyzing Elasticity Of Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, C. Wayne; Lung, S. F.; Gupta, K. K.

    1991-01-01

    Flat triangular element developed for use in finite-element analyses of stress and strain in laminated plates made of such materials as plywood or advanced fiber/epoxy composite materials. Has multiple layers, each of which can have different isotropic or orthotropic elastic properties. Many such elements used in finite-element mesh to calculate stiffness of plate. Formulation of element straight-forward, and calculation of its stiffness matrix simple and fast.

  20. Nondimensional impact models for composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankar, B. V.; Nguyen, P. T.; Ku, C.

    1990-01-01

    The equations governing the problem of low-velocity impact of a simply supported rectangular laminated plate are nondimensionalized such that the problem is defined in terms of five dimensionless parameters. A parametric study using the Graeco-Latin Factorial Plan is performed. Semi-empirical formulas for maximum impact force, impact duration, and maximum back surface strains are obtained. It is found that some of the simple impact models provide the bounds for the case of impact on a finite extent plate.

  1. Characteristics of laminates with delamination control strips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, C. T.; Goering, J. C.; Alper, J. M.; Gause, L. W.

    1992-01-01

    Tough resin is needed to resist delamination crack propagation. However, modulus often has to be compromised because it is difficult to retain both high modulus and toughness in a matrix material. A potential solution is to use a hybrid system in which tough resin strips are included within a conventional matrix composite. By adjusting the spacing of the tough resin strips, maximum delamination size can be controlled. Experimental results for impact damage and subsequent damage propagation in laminates containing tough resin strips are reported. Plain adhesive strips and fiber-reinforced tough resin composite strips were used in constructing the hybrid laminates. Test results indicated that size of delamination inflicted by impact was confined between the tough resin strips. As a result, significantly increased residual compressive strength was obtained. Impacted laminates containing tough resin strips were also fatigue tested. It was found that these strips reduced the growth of the impact damage area relative to the growth seen in coupons with no tough resin strips. Damage growth from an open hole under tension fatigue was evaluated using both tough resin strips and glass fiber reinforced tough resin strips. Unreinforced tough resin strips retarded delamination growth from the open hole, but did not stop matrix cracks growing in the fiber direction. Fiber reinforced tough resin strips did not contain axial delamination growth from the open hole. However, they did act as crack arresters, stopping the through-the-thickness tension crack originating from the hole.

  2. Modeling Composite Laminate Crushing for Crash Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, David C.; Jones, Lisa (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Crash modeling of composite structures remains limited in application and has not been effectively demonstrated as a predictive tool. While the global response of composite structures may be well modeled, when composite structures act as energy-absorbing members through direct laminate crushing the modeling accuracy is greatly reduced. The most efficient composite energy absorbing structures, in terms of energy absorbed per unit mass, are those that absorb energy through a complex progressive crushing response in which fiber and matrix fractures on a small scale dominate the behavior. Such failure modes simultaneously include delamination of plies, failure of the matrix to produce fiber bundles, and subsequent failure of fiber bundles either in bending or in shear. In addition, the response may include the significant action of friction, both internally (between delaminated plies or fiber bundles) or externally (between the laminate and the crushing surface). A figure shows the crushing damage observed in a fiberglass composite tube specimen, illustrating the complexity of the response. To achieve a finite element model of such complex behavior is an extremely challenging problem. A practical crushing model based on detailed modeling of the physical mechanisms of crushing behavior is not expected in the foreseeable future. The present research describes attempts to model composite crushing behavior using a novel hybrid modeling procedure. Experimental testing is done is support of the modeling efforts, and a test specimen is developed to provide data for validating laminate crushing models.

  3. Hygrothermal stability of laminated CFRP composite mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pryor, Mark K.

    2000-07-01

    This paper is intended to address accuracy issues associated with hygrothermal stability of ultra-lightweight composite mirror structures. Hygrothermal stability of a mirror is ultimately defined as its optical performance when subjected to temperature or moisture variations. Stability is dictated by a combination of material behavior and geometric configuration. Ideally, an isotropic material could be used that is lightweight, has high stiffness, and has no response to temperature or moisture variances. This type of material would therefore be independent of geometry. Quasi-isotropic laminated CFRP composite materials offer most of these characteristics, but are transversely isotropic with near zero hygrothermal response in the plane of the laminate and a relatively high response through the thickness. Typically, mirrors made from laminated material consist of a thin curved shell supported by an array of ribs. Interference problems arise at the rib/shell interface resulting in a `print-through' effect by the ribs. Also, adhesive used to bond the ribs to the shell pull the shell causing additional `print-through'. Additional sources of instabilities result from material variances, processing, and assembly. These multiple sources of instabilities superimpose onto each other resulting in the structures overall hygrothermal stability.

  4. Superconductivity in Ca-doped graphene laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, J.; Su, Y.; Howard, C. A.; Kundys, D.; Grigorenko, A. N.; Guinea, F.; Geim, A. K.; Grigorieva, I. V.; Nair, R. R.

    2016-03-01

    Despite graphene’s long list of exceptional electronic properties and many theoretical predictions regarding the possibility of superconductivity in graphene, its direct and unambiguous experimental observation has not been achieved. We searched for superconductivity in weakly interacting, metal decorated graphene crystals assembled into so-called graphene laminates, consisting of well separated and electronically decoupled graphene crystallites. We report robust superconductivity in all Ca-doped graphene laminates. They become superconducting at temperatures (Tc) between ≈4 and ≈6 K, with Tc’s strongly dependent on the confinement of the Ca layer and the induced charge carrier concentration in graphene. We find that Ca is the only dopant that induces superconductivity in graphene laminates above 1.8 K among several dopants used in our experiments, such as potassium, caesium and lithium. By revealing the tunability of the superconducting response through doping and confinement of the metal layer, our work shows that achieving superconductivity in free-standing, metal decorated monolayer graphene is conditional on an optimum confinement of the metal layer and sufficient doping, thereby bringing its experimental realization within grasp.

  5. Distributed dynamic load on composite laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langella, A.; Lopresto, V.; Caprino, G.

    2016-05-01

    An experimental activity conducted in order to assess the impact behavior at room and low temperature of carbon fibre in vinylester resin laminates used in the shipbuilding industry, was reported. The conditions which reproduce the impact of a hull at low temperature with a solid body suspended in the water was reproduced. A test equipment was designed and realized to reproduce the real material behaviour in water to obtain a load distribution on the entire surface of the specimen. The results were obtained impacting the laminates placed between the cilyndrical steel impactor and a bag containing water. A falling weight machine, equipped with an instrumented steel impactor and a thermal chamber, was adopted for the experimental tests. The impact behaviour in hostile environments was compared to the behaviour at room temperature and the data obtained under distributed load conditions were compared with the results from concentrated loads: a completely different behaviour was observed between the two different loading conditions in terms of load-displacement curve. The effect of the impact on the laminates has been related with the delaminations, evaluated by ultrasonic scanning, and the indentation.

  6. Characteristics of laminates with delamination control strips

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, C.T.; Goering, J.C.; Alper, J.M.; Gause, L.W.

    1992-09-01

    Tough resin is needed to resist delamination crack propagation. However, modulus often has to be compromised because it is difficult to retain both high modulus and toughness in a matrix material. A potential solution is to use a hybrid system in which tough resin strips are included within a conventional matrix composite. By adjusting the spacing of the tough resin strips, maximum delamination size can be controlled. Experimental results for impact damage and subsequent damage propagation in laminates containing tough resin strips are reported. Plain adhesive strips and fiber-reinforced tough resin composite strips were used in constructing the hybrid laminates. Test results indicated that size of delamination inflicted by impact was confined between the tough resin strips. As a result, significantly increased residual compressive strength was obtained. Impacted laminates containing tough resin strips were also fatigue tested. It was found that these strips reduced the growth of the impact damage area relative to the growth seen in coupons with no tough resin strips. Damage growth from an open hole under tension fatigue was evaluated using both tough resin strips and glass fiber reinforced tough resin strips. Unreinforced tough resin strips retarded delamination growth from the open hole, but did not stop matrix cracks growing in the fiber direction. Fiber reinforced tough resin strips did not contain axial delamination growth from the open hole. However, they did act as crack arresters, stopping the through-the-thickness tension crack originating from the hole.

  7. Superconductivity in Ca-doped graphene laminates.

    PubMed

    Chapman, J; Su, Y; Howard, C A; Kundys, D; Grigorenko, A N; Guinea, F; Geim, A K; Grigorieva, I V; Nair, R R

    2016-01-01

    Despite graphene's long list of exceptional electronic properties and many theoretical predictions regarding the possibility of superconductivity in graphene, its direct and unambiguous experimental observation has not been achieved. We searched for superconductivity in weakly interacting, metal decorated graphene crystals assembled into so-called graphene laminates, consisting of well separated and electronically decoupled graphene crystallites. We report robust superconductivity in all Ca-doped graphene laminates. They become superconducting at temperatures (Tc) between ≈4 and ≈6 K, with Tc's strongly dependent on the confinement of the Ca layer and the induced charge carrier concentration in graphene. We find that Ca is the only dopant that induces superconductivity in graphene laminates above 1.8 K among several dopants used in our experiments, such as potassium, caesium and lithium. By revealing the tunability of the superconducting response through doping and confinement of the metal layer, our work shows that achieving superconductivity in free-standing, metal decorated monolayer graphene is conditional on an optimum confinement of the metal layer and sufficient doping, thereby bringing its experimental realization within grasp. PMID:26979564

  8. Superconductivity in Ca-doped graphene laminates

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, J.; Su, Y.; Howard, C. A.; Kundys, D.; Grigorenko, A. N.; Guinea, F.; Geim, A. K.; Grigorieva, I. V.; Nair, R. R.

    2016-01-01

    Despite graphene’s long list of exceptional electronic properties and many theoretical predictions regarding the possibility of superconductivity in graphene, its direct and unambiguous experimental observation has not been achieved. We searched for superconductivity in weakly interacting, metal decorated graphene crystals assembled into so-called graphene laminates, consisting of well separated and electronically decoupled graphene crystallites. We report robust superconductivity in all Ca-doped graphene laminates. They become superconducting at temperatures (Tc) between ≈4 and ≈6 K, with Tc’s strongly dependent on the confinement of the Ca layer and the induced charge carrier concentration in graphene. We find that Ca is the only dopant that induces superconductivity in graphene laminates above 1.8 K among several dopants used in our experiments, such as potassium, caesium and lithium. By revealing the tunability of the superconducting response through doping and confinement of the metal layer, our work shows that achieving superconductivity in free-standing, metal decorated monolayer graphene is conditional on an optimum confinement of the metal layer and sufficient doping, thereby bringing its experimental realization within grasp. PMID:26979564

  9. Laminate articles on biaxially textured metal substrates

    DOEpatents

    Beach, David B.; Morrell, Jonathan S.; Paranthaman, Mariappan; Chirayil, Thomas; Specht, Eliot D.; Goyal, Amit

    2003-12-16

    A laminate article comprises a substrate and a biaxially textured (RE.sup.1.sub.x RE.sup.2.sub.(1-x)).sub.2 O.sub.3 buffer layer over the substrate, wherein 0laminate article can include a layer of YBCO over the (RE.sup.1.sub.x RE.sup.2.sub.(1-x)).sub.2 O.sub.3 buffer layer. A layer of CeO.sub.2 between the YBCO layer and the (RE.sup.1.sub.x RE.sup.2.sub.(1-x)).sub.2 O.sub.3 buffer can also be include. Further included can be a layer of YSZ between the CeO.sub.2 layer and the (R.sup.1.sub.x RE.sup.2.sub.(1-x)).sub.2 O.sub.3 buffer layer. The substrate can be a biaxially textured metal, such as nickel. A method of forming the laminate article is also disclosed.

  10. The tail domain of lamin B1 is more strongly modulated by divalent cations than lamin A

    PubMed Central

    Ganesh, Sairaam; Qin, Zhao; Spagnol, Stephen T; Biegler, Matthew T; Coffey, Kelli A; Kalinowski, Agnieszka; Buehler, Markus J; Dahl, Kris Noel

    2015-01-01

    The nucleoskeleton contains mainly nuclear intermediate filaments made of lamin proteins. Lamins provide nuclear structure and also play a role in various nuclear processes including signal transduction, transcription regulation and chromatin organization. The disparate functions of lamins may be related to the intrinsic disorder of the tail domains, which allows for altered and promiscuous binding. Here, we show modulation of lamin tail domain structures in the presence of divalent cations. We utilize changes in fluorescence of tryptophan residues within the Ig-fold flanked by disordered regions to experimentally measure protein thermodynamics. Using spectroscopy experiments and molecular dynamics simulations, we show that the tail domain of lamin B1 shows enhanced association with both Ca2+ and Mg2+ compared to the tail domain of lamin A. Binding curves show a similar KD between protein and ion (250–300 μM) for both proteins with both ions. However, we observe a maximum binding of ions to lamin B1 tail domain which is 2–3 times greater than that for lamin A tail domain by both experiment and simulation. Using simulations, we show that divalent ion association alters the Ig-fold by pinning flanking regions. With cells in culture, we observe altered lamin B1 organization in the presence of excess Mg2+ more so than for lamin A. We suggest that the differential sensitivity to divalent cations contributes to the vastly different functionalities and binding of the 2 proteins. PMID:25807068

  11. Homogenized Creep Behavior of CFRP Laminates at High Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuta, Y.; Matsuda, T.; Kawai, M.

    In this study, creep behavior of a CFRP laminate subjected to a constant stress is analyzed based on the time-dependent homogenization theory developed by the present authors. The laminate is a unidirectional carbon fiber/epoxy laminate T800H/#3631 manufactured by Toray Industries, Inc. Two kinds of creep analyses are performed. First, 45° off-axis creep deformation of the laminate at high temperature (100°C) is analyzed with three kinds of creep stress levels, respectively. It is shown that the present theory accurately predicts macroscopic creep behavior of the unidirectional CFRP laminate observed in experiments. Then, high temperature creep deformations at a constant creep stress are simulated with seven kinds of off-axis angles, i.e., θ = 0°, 10°, 30°, 45°, 60°, 75°, 90°. It is shown that the laminate has marked in-plane anisotropy with respect to the creep behavior.

  12. Phosphorylation of lamins determine their structural properties and signaling functions

    PubMed Central

    Torvaldson, Elin; Kochin, Vitaly; Eriksson, John E

    2015-01-01

    Lamin A/C is part of the nuclear lamina, a meshwork of intermediate filaments underlying the inner nuclear membrane. The lamin network is anchoring a complex set of structural and linker proteins and is either directly or through partner proteins also associated or interacting with a number of signaling protein and transcription factors. During mitosis the nuclear lamina is dissociated by well established phosphorylation- dependent mechanisms. A-type lamins are, however, also phosphorylated during interphase. A recent study identified 20 interphase phosphorylation sites on lamin A/C and explored their functions related to lamin dynamics; movements, localization and solubility. Here we discuss these findings in the light of lamin functions in health and disease. PMID:25793944

  13. Lamin A is not synthesized as a larger precursor polypeptide.

    PubMed

    Lebel, S; Raymond, Y

    1987-12-16

    Isolation of rat liver nuclei in the presence of N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) led to the recovery in the final nuclear matrix of a higher molecular weight form of lamin A. The 2 kDa larger form was identified as lamin A by isoelectric point determination, recognition by an anti-lamin A and C monoclonal antibody and peptide mapping using V8 protease and N-chlorosuccinimide. The 2 kDa extension was tentatively localized to the carboxy-terminus of lamin A. Pulse-chase labeling and immunoprecipitation studies using baby hamster kidney cells showed that lysis of the cells in the presence of NEM allowed the recovery of a stable higher molecular weight form of lamin A. We conclude from these results that NEM prevented the degradation of the native form of lamin A previously thought to represent a higher molecular weight transient precursor form. PMID:3426582

  14. Processing and mechanical characterization of alumina laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, John K.

    2002-08-01

    Single-phase ceramics that combine property gradients or steps in monolithic bodies are sought as alternatives to ceramic composites made of dissimilar materials. This work describes novel processing methods to produce stepped-density (or laminated) alumina single-phase bodies that maintain their mechanical integrity. One arrangement consists of a stiff, dense bulk material with a thin, flaw tolerant, porous exterior layer. Another configuration consists of a lightweight, low-density bulk material with a thin, hard, wear resistant exterior layer. Alumina laminates with strong interfaces have been successfully produced in this work using two different direct-casting processes. Gelcasting is a useful near-net shape processing technique that has been combined with several techniques, such as reaction bonding of aluminum oxide and the use of starch as a fugative filler, to successfully produced stepped-density alumina laminates. The other direct casting process that has been developed in this work is thermoreversible gelcasting (TRG). This is a reversible gelation process that has been used to produce near-net shape dense ceramic bodies. Also, individual layers can be stacked together and heated to produce laminates. Bilayer laminate samples were produced with varied thickness of porous and dense layers. It was shown that due to the difference in modulus and hardness, transverse cracking is found upon Hertzian contact when the dense layer is on the exterior. In the opposite arrangement, compacted damage zones formed in the porous material and no damage occurred in the underlying dense layer. Flaw tolerant behavior of the porous exterior/dense underlayer was examined by measuring biaxial strength as a function of Vickers indentation load. It was found that the thinnest layer of porous material results in the greatest flaw tolerance. Also, higher strength was exhibited at large indentation loads when compared to dense monoliths. The calculated stresses on the surfaces

  15. A peculiar lamin in a peculiar mammal: Expression of lamin LIII in platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus).

    PubMed

    Peter, Annette; Khandekar, Shaunak; Deakin, Janine E; Stick, Reimer

    2015-11-01

    Platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) holds a unique phylogenetic position at the base of the mammalian lineage due to an amalgamation of mammalian and sauropsid-like features. Here we describe the set of four lamin genes for platypus. Lamins are major components of the nuclear lamina, which constitutes a main component of the nucleoskeleton and is involved in a wide range of nuclear functions. Vertebrate evolution was accompanied by an increase in the number of lamin genes from a single gene in their closest relatives, the tunicates and cephalochordates, to four genes in the vertebrate lineage. Of the four genes the LIII gene is characterized by the presence of two alternatively spliced CaaX-encoding exons. In amphibians and fish LIII is the major lamin protein in oocytes and early embryos. The LIII gene is conserved throughout the vertebrate lineage, with the notable exception of marsupials and placental mammals, which have lost the LIII gene. Here we show that platypus has retained an LIII gene, albeit with a significantly altered structure and with a radically different expression pattern. The platypus LIII gene contains only a single CaaX-encoding exon and the head domain together with coil 1a and part of coil1b of the platypus LIII protein is replaced by a novel short non-helical N-terminus. It is expressed exclusively in the testis. These features resemble those of male germ cell-specific lamins in placental mammals, in particular those of lamin C2. Our data suggest (i) that the specific functions of LIII, which it fulfills in all other vertebrates, is no longer required in mammals and (ii) once it had been freed from these functions has undergone structural alterations and has adopted a new functionality in monotremes. PMID:26213206

  16. A unified theory for laminated plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guiamatsia Tafeuvoukeng, Irene

    A literature survey on plate and beam theories show how the advent of the finite element method and the variational method circa 1940 have been a great stimulant for the research in this field. The initial thin plate formulation has been incrementally expanded to treat the isotropic thick plate, the anisotropic single layer, and then laminated plates. It appears however that current formulations still fall into one of two categories: (1) The formulation is tailored for a specific laminate and/or loading case; (2) or the formulation is too complicated to be of practical relevance. In this work a new unifying approach to laminated plate formulation is presented. All laminated plates, including sandwich panels, subjected to any surface load and with any boundary conditions are treated within a single model. In addition, the fundamental behavior of the plate as a two-dimensional structural element is explained. The novel idea is the introduction of fundamental state solutions, which are analytical far field stress and strain solutions of the laminated plate subjected to a set of hierarchical primary loads, the fundamental loads. These loads are carefully selected to form a basis of the load space, and corresponding solutions are superposed to obtain extremely accurate predictions of the three dimensional solution. six,y,z =aklx,y sikl z where i = 1,..., 6; 1=1,...,l max is a substate of the kth fundamental state k=1,2,3,... Typically, a fundamental state solution is expressed as a through-thickness function (z), while the amplitudes of each fundamental load are found from two dimensional finite element solution as a function of in-plane coordinates (x,y). Three major contributions are produced in this work: (1) A complete calibration of the plate as a two-dimensional structure is performed with pure bending and constant shear fundamental states. (2) There are four independent ways to apply a constant shear resultant on a plate, as opposed to one for a beam. This makes

  17. Energy Saving Glass Lamination via Selective Radio-Frequency Heating

    SciTech Connect

    Shulman, Holly S.; Allan, Shawn M.

    2009-11-11

    This Inventions and Innovations program supported the technical and commercial research and development needed to elevate Ceralink's energy saving process for flat glass lamination from bench scale to a self-supporting technology with significant potential for growth. Radio-frequency heating was any un-explored option for laminating glass prior to this program. With significant commercial success through time and energy savings in the wood, paper, and plastics industries, RF heating was found to have significant promise for the energy intensive glass lamination industry. A major technical goal of the program was to demonstrate RF lamination across a wide range of laminate sizes and materials. This was successfully accomplished, dispelling many skeptics' concerns about the abilities of the technology. Ceralink laminated panels up to 2 ft x 3 ft, with four sets processed simultaneously, in a 3 minute cycle. All major categories of interlayer materials were found to work with RF lamination. In addition to laminating glass, other materials including photovoltaic silicon solar cells, light emitting diodes, metallized glass, plastics (acrylic and polycarbonate), and ceramics (alumina) were found compatible with the RF process. This opens up a wide range of commercial opportunities beyond the initially targeted automotive industry. The dramatic energy savings reported for RF lamination at the bench scale were found to be maintained through the scale up of the process. Even at 2 ft x 3 ft panel sizes, energy savings are estimated to be at least 90% compared to autoclaving or vacuum lamination. With targeted promotion through conference presentations, press releases and internet presence, RF lamination has gained significant attention, drawing large audiences at American Ceramic Society meetings. The commercialization success of the project includes the establishment of a revenue-generating business model for providing process development and demonstrations for potential RF

  18. Fracture behavior of thick, laminated graphite/epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, C. E.; Morris, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of laminate thickness on the fracture behavior of laminated graphite epoxy (T300/5208) composites was studied. The predominantly experimental research program included the study of the 0/+ or - 45/90 sub ns and 0/90 sub ns laminates with thickness of 8, 32, 64, 96 and 120 plies and the 0/+ or - 45 sub ns laminate with thickness of 6, 30, 60, 90 and 120 plies. The research concentrated on the measurement of fracture toughness utilizing the center-cracked tension, compact tension and three point bend specimen configurations. The development of subcritical damage at the crack tip was studied nondestructively using enhanced X-ray radiography and destructively using the laminate deply technique. The test results showed fracture toughness to be a function of laminate thickness. The fracture toughness of the 0 + or - 45/90 sub ns and 0/90 sub ns laminates decreased with increasing thickness and asymptotically approached lower bound values of 30 ksi square root of in. (1043 MPa square root of mm and 25 ksi square root of in (869 MPa square root of mm respectively. In contrast to the other two laminates, the fracture toughness of the 0/+ or - 45 sub ns laminate increased sharply with increasing thickness but reached an upper plateau value of 40 ksi square root of in (1390 MPa square root of mm) at 30 plies. Fracture toughness was independent of crack size for both thin and thick laminates for all three laminate types except for the 0/90 sub 2s laminate which spilt extensively. The center cracked tension, three point bend and compact tension specimens gave comparable results.

  19. Tension fatigue analysis and life prediction for composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Brien, T. K.; Rigamonti, M.; Zanotti, C.

    1989-01-01

    A methodology is presented for the tension fatigue analysis and life prediction of composite laminates subjected to tension fatigue loading. The methodology incorporates both the generic fracture mechanics characterization of delamination and the assessment of the infuence of damage on laminate fatigue life. Tension fatigue tests were conducted on quasi-isotropic and orthotropic glass epoxy, graphite epoxy, and glass/graphite epoxy hybrid laminates, demonstrating good agreement between measured and predicted lives.

  20. Impact damage resistance of thin stitched carbon/epoxy laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francesconi, L.; Aymerich, F.

    2015-07-01

    The study examines the influence of through-thickness stitching on the damage response of thin cross-ply carbon/epoxy laminates subjected to low-velocity impacts. Instrumented impact tests were carried out on unstitched and polyethylene stitched laminates and the resulting damage was assessed in detail by X-radiography analyses. The results of the observations carried out during the experimental analyses are illustrated and discussed to identify the mechanical role played by through-thickness reinforcement and to highlight the influence of the laminate layup on the impact resistance of stitched laminates.

  1. Mapping of lamin A- and progerin-interacting genome regions.

    PubMed

    Kubben, Nard; Adriaens, Michiel; Meuleman, Wouter; Voncken, Jan Willem; van Steensel, Bas; Misteli, Tom

    2012-10-01

    Mutations in the A-type lamins A and C, two major components of the nuclear lamina, cause a large group of phenotypically diverse diseases collectively referred to as laminopathies. These conditions often involve defects in chromatin organization. However, it is unclear whether A-type lamins interact with chromatin in vivo and whether aberrant chromatin-lamin interactions contribute to disease. Here, we have used an unbiased approach to comparatively map genome-wide interactions of gene promoters with lamin A and progerin, the mutated lamin A isoform responsible for the premature aging disorder Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) in mouse cardiac myoytes and embryonic fibroblasts. We find that lamin A-associated genes are predominantly transcriptionally silent and that loss of lamin association leads to the relocation of peripherally localized genes, but not necessarily to their activation. We demonstrate that progerin induces global changes in chromatin organization by enhancing interactions with a specific subset of genes in addition to the identified lamin A-associated genes. These observations demonstrate disease-related changes in higher order genome organization in HGPS and provide novel insights into the role of lamin-chromatin interactions in chromatin organization. PMID:22610065

  2. Cured shape prediction of the bistable hybrid composite laminate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Fu-hong; Zhang, Bo-ming; Du, Shan-yi

    2009-07-01

    A bistable unsymmetric hybrid composite laminate with quite high stiffness and large shape change is presented. Rayleigh-Ritz method is used to predict the cured shape and the predited results agree well with the experimentals. The critical loads switching between different shapes are tested. It shows that the critical load for hybrid composite laminates increases greatly (up to 10 times) compared with the pure fiber reinforced polymer matrix composite laminates. The influence of different geometric and material properites on the bistable shape is discussed. It reveals that the present hybrid bistable laminate is more designable and miscellaneous.

  3. Lamins position the nuclear pores and centrosomes by modulating dynein

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yuxuan; Zheng, Yixian

    2015-01-01

    Lamins, the type V nuclear intermediate filament proteins, are reported to function in both interphase and mitosis. For example, lamin deletion in various cell types can lead to an uneven distribution of the nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) in the interphase nuclear envelope, whereas deletion of B-type lamins results in spindle orientation defects in mitotic neural progenitor cells. How lamins regulate these functions is unknown. Using mouse cells deleted of different combinations or all lamins, we show that lamins are required to prevent the aggregation of NPCs in the nuclear envelope near centrosomes in late G2 and prophase. This asymmetric NPC distribution in the absence of lamins is caused by dynein forces acting on NPCs via the dynein adaptor BICD2. We further show that asymmetric NPC distribution upon lamin depletion disrupts the distribution of BICD2 and p150 dynactin on the nuclear envelope at prophase, which results in inefficient dynein-driven centrosome separation during prophase. Therefore lamins regulate microtubule-based motor forces in vivo to ensure proper NPC distribution in interphase and centrosome separation in the mitotic prophase. PMID:26246603

  4. Sound transmission into a laminated composite cylindrical shell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koval, L. R.

    1980-01-01

    In the context of the transmission of airborne noise into an aircraft fuselage, a mathematical model is presented for the transmission of an oblique plane sound wave into a laminated composite circular cylindrical shell. Numerical results are obtained for geometry typical of a narrow-bodied jet transport. Results indicate that from the viewpoint of noise attenuation on laminated composite shell does not appear to offer any significant advantage over an aluminum shell. However, the transmission loss of a laminated composite shell is sensitive to the orientation of the fibers and this suggests the possibility of using a laminated composite shell to tailor the noise attenuation characteristics to meet a specific need.

  5. Mechanical model of blebbing in nuclear lamin meshworks

    PubMed Central

    Funkhouser, Chloe M.; Sknepnek, Rastko; Shimi, Takeshi; Goldman, Anne E.; Goldman, Robert D.; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica

    2013-01-01

    Much of the structural stability of the nucleus comes from meshworks of intermediate filament proteins known as lamins forming the inner layer of the nuclear envelope called the nuclear lamina. These lamin meshworks additionally play a role in gene expression. Abnormalities in nuclear shape are associated with a variety of pathologies, including some forms of cancer and Hutchinson–Gilford Progeria Syndrome, and often include protruding structures termed nuclear blebs. These nuclear blebs are thought to be related to pathological gene expression; however, little is known about how and why blebs form. We have developed a minimal continuum elastic model of a lamin meshwork that we use to investigate which aspects of the meshwork could be responsible for bleb formation. Mammalian lamin meshworks consist of two types of lamin proteins, A type and B type, and it has been reported that nuclear blebs are enriched in A-type lamins. Our model treats each lamin type separately and thus, can assign them different properties. Nuclear blebs have been reported to be located in regions where the fibers in the lamin meshwork have a greater separation, and we find that this greater separation of fibers is an essential characteristic for generating nuclear blebs. The model produces structures with comparable morphologies and distributions of lamin types as real pathological nuclei. Thus, preventing this opening of the meshwork could be a route to prevent bleb formation, which could be used as a potential therapy for the pathologies associated with nuclear blebs. PMID:23401537

  6. Residual stress and crack propagation in laminated composites

    SciTech Connect

    Yttergren, R.M.F.; Zeng, K.; Rowcliffe, D.J.

    1994-12-31

    Residual stress distributions in several laminated ceramic composites were measured by an indentation technique. The material included alumina-zirconia laminated composites, containing strong interfaces, and alumina-porcelain laminated composites with both weak and strong interfaces. The residual stress in these material originates from the mismatch of the thermal properties, differences in elastic properties, and different shrinkage of the laminates during sintering. An experimental technique is presented which gives a direct view of the residual stress state in the materials. Values of residual tensile stress are presented as a function of position relative to the interface in each material.

  7. The Displacement Perspective During Ultimate Failure of Composite Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, P.; Bhar, A.

    2013-04-01

    This paper deals with the studies on the state of displacement of symmetric and anti-symmetric angle-ply and cross-ply laminated composite plates during its ultimate failure, subjected to transverse static load. First-order shear deformation theory (FSDT) is employed in conjunction with the finite element approach using eight-noded quadratic isoparametric element. The free vibration analyses of isotropic and laminated composite plates are carried out to ensure the overall validity of the present finite element formulation. The mid surface of the laminate is considered as the reference plane. The principal material directions in different laminae are oriented to produce a laminated structural element capable of resisting loads in several directions. The stiffness of a composite laminate is obtained from the properties of the constituent laminae. The affected stiffness of the failed lamina is discarded completely after the failure of weakest ply. The rigidity matrix of the laminate with remaining laminae is re-established. The re-evaluation process continues until the laminate fails completely. To investigate the displacement behaviour of laminates during the ultimate failure, parametric studies are carried out for different cases by varying the stacking sequences, fiber orientations, layer thicknesses, aspect ratios and the number of layers in the laminate. The comparison of results in terms of non-dimensional natural frequencies and ply-by-ply failure analyses obtained from the present investigation are made with those available in the reported literature.

  8. Extrinsic fracture mechanisms in two laminated metal composites

    SciTech Connect

    Lesuer, D.; Syn, C.; Riddle, R.; Sherby, O.

    1994-11-29

    The crack growth behavior and fracture toughness of two laminated metal composites (6090/SiC/25p laminated with 5182 and ultrahigh-carbon steel laminated with brass) have been studied in both ``crack arrester`` and ``crack divider`` orientations. The mechanisms of crack growth were analyzed and extrinsic toughening mechanisms were found to contribute significantly to the toughness. The influence of laminate architecture (layer thickness and component volume function), component material properties and residual stress on these mechanisms and the resulting crack growth resistance are discussed.

  9. 78 FR 48903 - Certain Products Having Laminated Packaging, Laminated Packaging, and Components Thereof...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-12

    ... infringement of certain claims of nine patents. 78 FR 19,007. The subject products are certain laminated... industry requirement.'' 78 FR 19,008. The ALJ conducted a hearing on the domestic-industry issue on May 16... the complainant did not satisfy the economic prong of the domestic industry requirement. On...

  10. Micromechanics of composite laminate compression failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guynn, E. Gail; Bradley, Walter L.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this annual progress report is to summarize the work effort and results accomplished from July 1987 through July 1988 on NASA Research Grant NAG1-659 entitled Micromechanics of Composite Laminate Compressive Failure. The report contains: (1) the objective of the proposed research, (2) the summary of accomplishments, (3) a more extensive review of compression literature, (4) the planned material (and corresponding properties) received to date, (5) the results for three possible specimen geometries, experimental procedures planned, and current status of the experiments, and (6) the work planned for the next contract year.

  11. Strength of composite laminates under biaxial loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinton, M. J.; Soden, P. D.; Kaddour, A. S.

    1996-05-01

    Five well known failure criteria and one simple progressive model have been used in conjunction with laminate theory, which allows for nonlinear lamina shear behaviour, to predict the initial and final failure strengths of filament wound composite tubes. The predictions have been compared with experimental leakage and fracture stresses for ±75°, ±55° and ±45° filament wound GRP tubes subjected to a wide range of biaxial stress systems including biaxial compression. In some cases the fracture strengths were a factor of 10 higher than the initial failure predictions. The simple progressive failure theory predictions gave the best agreement with the experimental results.

  12. Laminated anisotropic reinforced plastic plates and shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korolev, V. I.

    1981-01-01

    Basic technical theories and engineering calculation equations for anisotropic plates and shells made of rigid reinforced plastics, mainly laminated fiberglass, are presented and discussed. Solutions are given for many problems of design of structural plates and shells, including curved sections and tanks, as well as two chapters on selection of the optimum materials, are given. Accounting for interlayer shearing and transverse separation, which are new engineering properties, are discussed. Application of the results obtained to thin three ply plates and shells wth a light elastic filler is presented and discussed.

  13. Long-lasting FR-4 surface hydrophilisation towards commercial PCB passive microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilakis, Nikolaos; Moschou, Despina; Carta, Daniela; Morgan, Hywel; Prodromakis, Themistoklis

    2016-04-01

    Printed circuit boards (PCB) technologies are an attractive system for simple sensing and microfluidic systems. Controlling the surface properties of PCB material is an important part of this technology and to date there has been no study on long-term hydrophilisation stability of these materials. In this work, the effect of different oxygen plasma input power and treatment duration times on the wetting properties of FR-4 surfaces was investigated by sessile droplet contact angle measurements. Super and weakly hydrophilic behaviour was achieved and the retention time of these properties was studied, with the hydrophilic nature being retained for at least 26 days. To demonstrate the applicability of this treatment method, a commercially manufactured microfluidic structure made from a multilayer PCB (3-layer FR-4 stack) was exposed to oxygen plasma at the optimum conditions. The structures could be filled with deionised (DI) water under capillary flow unlike the virgin devices.

  14. Fabrication of Multi-Ply Birefringent Fibrous Composite Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniel, I.; Niiro, T.

    1984-01-01

    Fabrication method produces unidirectional, multi-ply, transparent birefringent fibrous composite laminates for use in macromechanical stress analysis conducted by means of anisotropic photoelasticity. New laminates glass-fiber-reinforced plastics for which matrix and fibers have same index of refraction. Method utilized in structural applications of composites.

  15. Buckling of angle-ply laminated circular cylindrical shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirano, Y.

    1979-01-01

    This note presents closed-form solutions for axisymmetrical and axially unsymmetrical buckling of angle-ply laminated circular cylindrical shells under axial compression. The axisymmetrical and axially unsymmetrical buckling stress are found to be different from each other, and the best lamination angles which give the highest buckling stress are obtained.

  16. Identification of differential protein interactors of lamin A and progerin.

    PubMed

    Kubben, Nard; Voncken, Jan Willem; Demmers, Jeroen; Calis, Chantal; van Almen, Geert; Pinto, Yigal; Misteli, Tom

    2010-01-01

    The nuclear lamina is an interconnected meshwork of intermediate filament proteins underlying the nuclear envelope. The lamina is an important regulator of nuclear structural integrity as well as nuclear processes, including transcription, DNA replication and chromatin remodeling. The major components of the lamina are A- and B-type lamins. Mutations in lamins impair lamina functions and cause a set of highly tissue-specific diseases collectively referred to as laminopathies. The phenotypic diversity amongst laminopathies is hypothesized to be caused by mutations affecting specific protein interactions, possibly in a tissue-specific manner. Current technologies to identify interaction partners of lamin A and its mutants are hampered by the insoluble nature of lamina components. To overcome the limitations of current technologies, we developed and applied a novel, unbiased approach to identify lamin A-interacting proteins. This approach involves expression of the high-affinity OneSTrEP-tag, precipitation of lamin-protein complexes after reversible protein cross-linking and subsequent protein identification by mass spectrometry. We used this approach to identify in mouse embryonic fibroblasts and cardiac myocyte NklTAg cell lines proteins that interact with lamin A and its mutant isoform progerin, which causes the premature aging disorder Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS). We identified a total of 313 lamina-interacting proteins, including several novel lamin A interactors, and we characterize a set of 35 proteins which preferentially interact with lamin A or progerin. PMID:21327095

  17. Self-heating forecasting for thick laminate specimens in fatigue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahuerta, F.; Westphal, T.; Nijssen, R. P. L.

    2014-12-01

    Thick laminate sections can be found from the tip to the root in most common wind turbine blade designs. Obtaining accurate and reliable design data for thick laminates is subject of investigations, which include experiments on thick laminate coupons. Due to the poor thermal conductivity properties of composites and the material self-heating that occurs during the fatigue loading, high temperature gradients may appear through the laminate thickness. In the case of thick laminates in high load regimes, the core temperature might influence the mechanical properties, leading to premature failures. In the present work a method to forecast the self-heating of thick laminates in fatigue loading is presented. The mechanical loading is related with the laminate self-heating, via the cyclic strain energy and the energy loss ratio. Based on this internal volumetric heat load a thermal model is built and solved to obtain the temperature distribution in the transient state. Based on experimental measurements of the energy loss factor for 10mm thick coupons, the method is described and the resulting predictions are compared with experimental surface temperature measurements on 10 and 30mm UD thick laminate specimens.

  18. Hole-thru-laminate mounting supports for photovoltaic modules

    SciTech Connect

    Wexler, Jason; Botkin, Jonathan; Culligan, Matthew; Detrick, Adam

    2015-02-17

    A mounting support for a photovoltaic module is described. The mounting support includes a pedestal having a surface adaptable to receive a flat side of a photovoltaic module laminate. A hole is disposed in the pedestal, the hole adaptable to receive a bolt or a pin used to couple the pedestal to the flat side of the photovoltaic module laminate.

  19. Stress concentration factors around a circular hole in laminated composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ueng, C. E. S.

    1976-01-01

    Stress concentration factors around a circular hole in a composite laminate are determined. The specific case investigated is a four layer (-45/45/45/-45 degs) graphite epoxy laminate. The factors are determined experimentally by means of electrical resistance strain gages, and analytically by using a hybrid finite element analysis.

  20. A MEMS lamination technology based on sequential multilayer electrodeposition

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, M; Kim, J; Herrault, F; Schafer, R; Allen, MG

    2013-08-06

    A MEMS lamination technology based on sequential multilayer electrodeposition is presented. The process comprises three main steps: (1) automated sequential electrodeposition of permalloy (Ni80Fe20) structural and copper sacrificial layers to form multilayer structures of significant total thickness; (2) fabrication of polymeric anchor structures through the thickness of the multilayer structures and (3) selective removal of copper. The resulting structure is a set of air-insulated permalloy laminations, the separation of which is sustained by insulating polymeric anchor structures. Individual laminations have precisely controllable thicknesses ranging from 500 nm to 5 mu m, and each lamination layer is electrically isolated from adjacent layers by narrow air gaps of similar scale. In addition to air, interlamination insulators based on polymers are investigated. Interlamination air gaps with very high aspect ratio (>1:100) can be filled with polyvinylalcohol and polydimethylsiloxane. The laminated structures are characterized using scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy to directly examine properties such as the roughness and the thickness uniformity of the layers. In addition, the quality of the electrical insulation between the laminations is evaluated by quantifying the eddy current within the sample as a function of frequency. Fabricated laminations are comprised of uniform, smooth (surface roughness < 100 nm) layers with effective electrical insulation for all layer thicknesses and insulator approaches studied. Such highly laminated structures have potential uses ranging from energy conversion to applications where composite materials with highly anisotropic mechanical or thermal properties are required.

  1. A Laminated Track for the Inductrack System: Theory and Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Post, R F; Hoburg, J F

    2004-01-12

    A laminated structure, composed of stacks of thin conducting sheets, has several advantages over a litz-wire ladder as the ''track'' wherein levitating currents are induced by a permanent magnet array on a moving vehicle. Modeling and experimental results for the laminated track are described and evaluated in this paper.

  2. Better Thermal Insulation in Solar-Array Laminators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burger, D. R.; Knox, J. F.

    1984-01-01

    Glass marbles improve temperature control. Modified vacuum laminator for photovoltaic solar arrays includes thermal insulation made of conventional glass marbles. Marbles serve as insulation for temperature control of lamination process at cure temperatures as high as 350 degrees F. Used to replace original insulation made of asbestos cement.

  3. The strength of laminated composite materials under repeated impact loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rotem, Assa

    1988-01-01

    When low velocity and energy impact is exerted on a laminated composite material, in a perpendicular direction to the plane of the laminate, invisible damage may develop. It is shown analytically and experimentally that the invisible damage occurs during the first stage of contact between the impactor and the laminate and is a result of the contact stresses. However, the residual flexural strength changes only slightly, because it depends mainly on the outer layers, and these remain undamaged. Repeated impact intensifies the damage inside the laminate and causes larger bending under equivalent impact load. Finally, when the damage is most severe, even though it is still invisible, the laminate fails because of bending on the tension side. If the repeated impact is halted before final fracture occurs the residual strength and modulus would decrease by a certain amount.

  4. Deposition of laminated shale: A field and experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, Daniel L.; Roy, David C.

    1985-03-01

    Intermittently laminated shale of the Jemtland Formation in Maine is characterized by thin lenticular silt segregations interlaced with argillaceous and organic material (including graptolites). This shale is thinly interbedded with nonlaminated shale, siltstone, and thicker turbidite graywacke beds. Experiments suggest that the intermittently laminated shale was deposited by silt/clay-laden currents and may have been part of an upward turbidite progression from parallel-laminated silt (>60% silt), through intermittently laminated mud (40 to 60% silt), to nonlaminated mud (20 to 40% silt). Intermittently laminated mud may be produced from silt/clay flows that are: decelerating at a constant silt content, losing silt at constant velocity; or both decelerating and losing silt.

  5. Matrix cracking in laminated composites under monotonic and cyclic loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, David H.; Lee, Jong-Won

    1991-01-01

    An analytical model based on the internal state variable (ISV) concept and the strain energy method is proposed for characterizing the monotonic and cyclic response of laminated composites containing matrix cracks. A modified constitution is formulated for angle-ply laminates under general in-plane mechanical loading and constant temperature change. A monotonic matrix cracking criterion is developed for predicting the crack density in cross-ply laminates as a function of the applied laminate axial stress. An initial formulation for a cyclic matrix cracking criterion for cross-ply laminates is also discussed. For the monotonic loading case, a number of experimental data and well-known models are compared with the present study for validating the practical applicability of the ISV approach.

  6. Near-threshold fatigue crack growth in aluminum composite laminates

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, P.B.; Gibeling, J.C.

    1995-03-15

    One promising method for improving the mechanical properties of particulate MMCs is to laminate the brittle composite with a more ductile component. A system currently being developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is a multilayer laminate consisting of alternating layers of AA6090/SiC/25p and more ductile AA5182. In order to further examine the effects of lamination on fatigue crack propagation mechanics and mechanisms, the fatigue crack growth behavior of the aluminum composite laminate developed at LLNL was examined. The laminate and the AA6090/SiC/25p component were studied in the T6 heat treatment condition for subsequent comparison. Fatigue crack surfaces were examined using scanning electron microscopy for further insight into crack growth mechanisms.

  7. Vibration suppression of composite laminated plate with nonlinear energy sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ye-Wei; Zhang, Hao; Hou, Shuai; Xu, Ke-Fan; Chen, Li-Qun

    2016-06-01

    The composite laminated plate is widely used in supersonic aircraft. So, there are many researches about the vibration suppression of composite laminated plate. In this paper, nonlinear energy sink (NES) as an effective method to suppress vibration is studied. The coupled partial differential governing equations of the composite laminated plate with the nonlinear energy sink (NES) are established by using the Hamilton principle. The fourth-order Galerkin discrete method is used to truncate the partial differential equations, which are solved by numerical integration method. Meanwhile study about the precise effectiveness of the nonlinear energy sink (NES) by discussing the different installation location of the nonlinear energy sink (NES) at the same speed. The results indicate that the nonlinear energy sink (NES) can significantly suppress the severe vibration of the composite laminated plate with speed wind loadings in to protect the composite laminated plate from excessive vibration.

  8. Free Vibration of Uncertain Unsymmetrically Laminated Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapania, Rakesh K.; Goyal, Vijay K.

    2001-01-01

    Monte Carlo Simulation and Stochastic FEA are used to predict randomness in the free vibration response of thin unsymmetrically laminated beams. For the present study, it is assumed that randomness in the response is only caused by uncertainties in the ply orientations. The ply orientations may become random or uncertain during the manufacturing process. A new 16-dof beam element, based on the first-order shear deformation beam theory, is used to study the stochastic nature of the natural frequencies. Using variational principles, the element stiffness matrix and mass matrix are obtained through analytical integration. Using a random sequence a large data set is generated, containing possible random ply-orientations. This data is assumed to be symmetric. The stochastic-based finite element model for free vibrations predicts the relation between the randomness in fundamental natural frequencies and the randomness in ply-orientation. The sensitivity derivatives are calculated numerically through an exact formulation. The squared fundamental natural frequencies are expressed in terms of deterministic and probabilistic quantities, allowing to determine how sensitive they are to variations in ply angles. The predicted mean-valued fundamental natural frequency squared and the variance of the present model are in good agreement with Monte Carlo Simulation. Results, also, show that variations between plus or minus 5 degrees in ply-angles can affect free vibration response of unsymmetrically and symmetrically laminated beams.

  9. Hygrothermally stable laminated composites with optimal coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haynes, Robert Andrew

    This work begins by establishing the necessary and sufficient conditions for hygrothermal stability of composite laminates. An investigation is performed into the range of coupling achievable from within all hygrothermally stable families. The minimum number of plies required to create an asymmetric hygrothermally stable stacking sequence is found to be five. Next, a rigorous and general approach for determining designs corresponding to optimal levels of coupling is established through the use of a constrained optimization procedure. Couplings investigated include extension-twist, bend-twist, extension-bend, shear-twist, and anticlastic. For extension-twist and bend-twist coupling, specimens from five- through ten-ply laminates are manufactured and tested to demonstrate hygrothermal stability and achievable levels of coupling. Nonlinear models and finite element analysis are developed, and predictions are verified through comparison with test results. Sensitivity analyses are performed to demonstrate the robustness of the hygrothermal stability and couplings to deviations in ply angle, typical of manufacturing tolerances. Comparisons are made with current state-of-the-art suboptimal layups, and significant increases in coupling over previously known levels are demonstrated.

  10. Lamins as mediators of oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Sieprath, Tom; Darwiche, Rabih; De Vos, Winnok H.

    2012-05-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nuclear lamina defines structural and functional properties of the cell nucleus. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lamina dysfunction leads to a broad spectrum of laminopathies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recent data is reviewed connecting laminopathies to oxidative stress. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A framework is proposed to explain interactions between lamins and oxidative stress. -- Abstract: The nuclear lamina defines both structural and functional properties of the eukaryotic cell nucleus. Mutations in the LMNA gene, encoding A-type lamins, lead to a broad spectrum of diseases termed laminopathies. While different hypotheses have been postulated to explain disease development, there is still no unified view on the mechanistic basis of laminopathies. Recent observations indicate that laminopathies are often accompanied by altered levels of reactive oxygen species and a higher susceptibility to oxidative stress at the cellular level. In this review, we highlight the role of reactive oxygen species for cell function and disease development in the context of laminopathies and present a framework of non-exclusive mechanisms to explain the reciprocal interactions between a dysfunctional lamina and altered redox homeostasis.

  11. Laminated ceramic components for microfluidic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matson, Dean W.; Martin, Peter M.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Stewart, Donald C.; Bonham, Charles C.

    1999-08-01

    Applications for micro fluidic components continue to expand as the benefits resulting from the small volumes and light weight of such devices are recognized. Such benefits are particularly attractive for man-portable and automotive devices where reduction of weight is critical. As applications expand, so too does the need for the development of methods for producing micro fluidic components from unconventional materials (i.e., materials other than silicon). At the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, we are currently developing processes for producing laminated multilevel ceramic components containing microchannel features that will find applications in micro fluidic chemical processing and energy management systems. Thin layers of green ceramic tape are patterned with micro fluidic flow features using one of a number of cutting processes. The patterned layers are then stacked and laminated with other layers of green tape, ceramic plate, or other materials using a series of processing steps. The resulting monolithic, leak-tight micro fluidic ceramic components are capable of tolerating high temperature or chemically corrosive environments. Fabrication issues associated with the use of the green ceramic tape for this type of application will be discussed, and examples of test components produced using these processes will be presented.

  12. Development of a heterogeneous laminating resin system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biermann, T. F.; Hopper, L. C.

    1985-01-01

    The factors which effect the impact resistance of laminating resin systems and yet retain equivalent performance with the conventional 450 K curing epoxy matrix systems in other areas were studied. Formulation work was conducted on two systems, an all-epoxy and an epoxy/bismaleimide, to gain fundamental information on the effect formulation changes have upon neat resin and composite properties. The all-epoxy work involved formulations with various amounts and combinations of eight different epoxy resins, four different hardeners, fifteen different toughening agents, a filler, and a catalyst. The epoxy/bismaleimide effort improved formulations with various amounts and combinations of nine different resins, four different hardeners, eight different toughening agents, four different catalysts, and a filler. When a formulation appeared to offer the proper combination of properties required for a laminating resin Celion 3K-70P fabric was prepregged. Initial screening tests on composites primarily involved Gardner type impact and measurement of short beam shear strengths under dry and hot/wet conditions.

  13. Magnetic sheet steel lamination detection, phase 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carignan, F. J.; Syniuta, W. D.

    1980-08-01

    Research to assess the feasibility of a nondestructive magnetic inspection technique for detecting defective sheet steel is reported. A major problem in the deep drawing and stamping industry is the failure of sheet steel due to laminations which occur when the steel is formed into various shapes or processed further. A continuous nondestructive testing method was developed based upon differences in magnetic properties of acceptable steel and defective steel. The technique assumes an increase in the magnetic hardness of the defect compared to the base material. Experimental results obtained with the artificial flaw demonstrate that it is possible to sense magnetic differences in sheet steel if the differences are large enough. However, as the differences in magnetic hardness diminish, or where thin surface defects or internal laminations occur, detection becomes increasingly difficult. Moreoever, it has not been established that all sheet steel defects are magnetically harder than unflawed material. It was concluded that the technique, which can detect only some flaws and is incapable of detecting many important defects, would be only marginally useful.

  14. Geometrically nonlinear behavior of piezoelectric laminated plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinovitch, Oded

    2005-08-01

    The geometrically nonlinear behavior of piezo-laminated plates actuated with isotropic or anisotropic piezoelectric layers is analytically investigated. The analytical model is derived using the variational principle of virtual work along with the lamination and plate theories, the von Karman large displacement and moderate rotation kinematic relations, and the anisotropic piezoelectric constitutive laws. A solution strategy that combines the approach of the method of lines, the advantages of the finite element concept, and the variational formulation is developed. This approach yields a set of nonlinear ordinary differential equations with nonlinear boundary conditions, which are solved using the multiple-shooting method. Convergence and verification of the model are examined through comparison with linear and nonlinear results of other approximation methods. The nonlinear response of two active plate structures is investigated numerically. The first plate is actuated in bending using monolithic piezoceramic layers and the second one is actuated in twist using macro-fiber composites. The results quantitatively reveal the complicated in-plane stress state associated with the piezoelectric actuation and the geometrically nonlinear coupling of the in-plane and out-of-plane responses of the plate. The influence of the nonlinear effects ranges from significant stiffening in certain combinations of electrical loads and boundary conditions to amplifications of the induced deflections in others. The paper closes with a summary and conclusions.

  15. Bending analysis of laminated composite box beams

    SciTech Connect

    Tripathy, A.K.; Patel, H.J.; Pang, S.S. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1994-01-01

    Box beams are widely used in weight reduction structures such as aircraft wings. The use of composite box beams further reduces the weight factor for such structures with the same deflection and stress as that of isotropic box beams. The difference in the behavior of composite box beam with different fiber orientation, number of plies, and number of stringers also provides a wide range of designing parameters to achieve the required performance for a given problem. A bending analysis has been carried out for the study of deflections and stresses for box beams of different material (isotropic and laminated composites), size, and number of stringers subjected to different kinds of loading conditions. A finite element model has been developed based on the strain energy principle, and the results are compared with an available commercial code COSMOS/M.'' Experiments using aluminum and scotchply composite laminates were conducted to verify the results. An optimal design for size and number of stiffeners for a given loading condition has been achieved. Investigations have also been carried out to find the effect of transverse shear on the span-wise normal stress.

  16. Buckling analysis of laminated thin shells in a hot environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotsis, Pascal K.; Guptil, James D.

    1993-01-01

    Results are presented of parametric studies to assess the effects of various parameters on the buckling behavior of angle-ply, laminated thin shells in a hot environment. These results were obtained by using a three-dimensional finite element analysis. An angle-ply, laminated thin shell with fiber orientation of (theta/-theta)(sub 2) was subjected to compressive mechanical loads. The laminated thin shell had a cylindrical geometry. The laminate contained T300 graphite fibers embedded in an intermediate-modulus, high-strength (IMHS) matrix. The fiber volume fraction was 55 percent and the moisture content was 2 percent. The residual stresses induced into the laminate structure during the curing were taken into account. Parametric studies were performed to examine the effect on the critical buckling load of the following parameters: cylinder length and thickness, internal hydrostatic pressure, different ply thicknesses, different temperature profiles through the thickness of the structure, and different lay up configurations and fiber volume fractions. In conjunction with these parameters the ply orientation was varied from 0 deg to 90 deg. Seven ply angles were examined: 0 deg, 15 deg, 30 deg, 45 deg, 60 deg, 75 deg, and 90 deg. The results show that the ply angle theta and the laminate thickness had significant effects on the critical buckling load. The fiber volume fraction, the fiber orientations, and the internal hydrostatic pressure had important effects on the critical buckling load. The cylinder length had a moderate influence on the buckling load. The thin shell with (theta/-theta)(sub 2) or (theta/-theta)(sub s) angle-ply laminate had better buckling-load performance than the thin shell with (theta)(sub 4) angle-ply laminate. The temperature profiles through the laminate thickness and various laminates with the different ply thicknesses has insignificant effects on the buckling behavior of the thin shells.

  17. Deficiencies in lamin B1 and lamin B2 cause neurodevelopmental defects and distinct nuclear shape abnormalities in neurons

    PubMed Central

    Coffinier, Catherine; Jung, Hea-Jin; Nobumori, Chika; Chang, Sandy; Tu, Yiping; Barnes, Richard H.; Yoshinaga, Yuko; de Jong, Pieter J.; Vergnes, Laurent; Reue, Karen; Fong, Loren G.; Young, Stephen G.

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal migration is essential for the development of the mammalian brain. Here, we document severe defects in neuronal migration and reduced numbers of neurons in lamin B1–deficient mice. Lamin B1 deficiency resulted in striking abnormalities in the nuclear shape of cortical neurons; many neurons contained a solitary nuclear bleb and exhibited an asymmetric distribution of lamin B2. In contrast, lamin B2 deficiency led to increased numbers of neurons with elongated nuclei. We used conditional alleles for Lmnb1 and Lmnb2 to create forebrain-specific knockout mice. The forebrain-specific Lmnb1- and Lmnb2-knockout models had a small forebrain with disorganized layering of neurons and nuclear shape abnormalities, similar to abnormalities identified in the conventional knockout mice. A more severe phenotype, complete atrophy of the cortex, was observed in forebrain-specific Lmnb1/Lmnb2 double-knockout mice. This study demonstrates that both lamin B1 and lamin B2 are essential for brain development, with lamin B1 being required for the integrity of the nuclear lamina, and lamin B2 being important for resistance to nuclear elongation in neurons. PMID:21976703

  18. Laminated wave turbulence: Generic algorithms iii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartashova, Elena; Kartashov, Alexey

    2007-07-01

    Model of laminated wave turbulence allows to study statistical and discrete layers of turbulence in the frame of the same model. Statistical layer is described by Zakharov-Kolmogorov energy spectra in the case of irrational enough dispersion function. Discrete layer is covered by some system(s) of Diophantine equations while their form is determined by wave dispersion function. This presents a very special computational challenge to solve Diophantine equations in many variables, usually 6 to 8, in high degrees, say 16, in integers of order 1016 and more. Generic algorithms for solving this problem in the case of irrational dispersion function have been presented in our previous papers (corresponds to many types of water waves). In this paper, we present a new algorithm for the case of rational dispersion functions (atmospheric planetary waves, drift waves, etc.)

  19. Eddy current losses in ferromagnetic laminations

    SciTech Connect

    Serpico, C.; Visone, C.; Mayergoyz, I. D.; Basso, V.; Miano, G.

    2000-05-01

    It is demonstrated through the comparison of analytical, numerical, and experimental results that the existence of excess eddy current losses can be explained by the peculiar nature of the nonlinear diffusion of electromagnetic fields in magnetically nonlinear laminations. The essence of this peculiar nature is that nonlinear diffusion occurs as inward progress of almost rectangular profiles of magnetic flux density of variable height. Approximating actual profiles of magnetic flux density by rectangular ones, the problem of nonlinear diffusion can be treated analytically by using a simple model. The accuracy and the limit of applicability of the rectangular profile model are discussed by comparing its predictions with finite elements numerical solutions of nonlinear diffusion equation as well as with experimental results. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  20. Reliability analysis of ceramic matrix composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, David J.; Wetherhold, Robert C.

    1991-01-01

    At a macroscopic level, a composite lamina may be considered as a homogeneous orthotropic solid whose directional strengths are random variables. Incorporation of these random variable strengths into failure models, either interactive or non-interactive, allows for the evaluation of the lamina reliability under a given stress state. Using a non-interactive criterion for demonstration purposes, laminate reliabilities are calculated assuming previously established load sharing rules for the redistribution of load as the failure of laminae occur. The matrix cracking predicted by ACK theory is modeled to allow a loss of stiffness in the fiber direction. The subsequent failure in the fiber direction is controlled by a modified bundle theory. Results using this modified bundle model are compared with previous models which did not permit separate consideration of matrix cracking, as well as to results obtained from experimental data.

  1. Compression failure of angle-ply laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peel, L. D.; Hyer, M. W.; Shuart, M. J.

    1992-01-01

    Test results from the compression loading of (+ or - Theta/ - or + Theta)(sub 6s) angle-ply IM7-8551-7a specimens, 0 less than or = Theta less than or = 90 degs, are presented. The observed failure strengths and modes are discussed, and typical stress-strain relations shown. Using classical lamination theory and the maximum stress criterion, an attempt is made to predict failure stress as a function of Theta. This attempt results in poor correlation with test results and thus a more advanced model is used. The model, which is based on a geometrically nonlinear theory, and which was taken from previous work, includes the influence of observed layer waviness. The waviness is described by the wave length and the wave amplitude. The theory is briefly described and results from the theory are correlated with test results. It is shown that by using levels of waviness observed in the specimens, the correlation between predictions and observations is good.

  2. Impact resistance of composite laminated sandwich plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chun-Gon; Jun, Eui-Jin

    1992-01-01

    Investigated are the effects of face layup sequence and core density of a sandwich plate on the impact delamination area of the laminated facesheet. The sandwich plate is made of graphite/epoxy faces and Nomex honeycomb core. The size and shape of delamination due to impact at each interply location have been measured by the room temperature deply technique. The shape of the interply delamination under impact is, in general, found to be two-lobed. The shape exhibits very peculiar regularity under various experimental conditions. The quantitative measurement of delamination size has shown that the face layup with small relative orientation between adjacent plies and high density core are desirable in sandwich plates to reduce the impact delamination.

  3. Development of a Heterogeneous Laminating Resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosnell, R.

    1984-01-01

    The feasibility of toughening the common types of matrix resins such as Narmco 5208 by utilizing a heterogeneous additive was examined. Some basic concepts and principles in the toughening of matrix resins for advanced composites were studied. The following conclusions were advanced: (1) the use of damage volume as a guide for measurement of impact resistance appears to be a valid determination; (2) short beam shear is a good test to determine the effect of toughening agents on mechanical properties; (3) rubber toughening results in improved laminate impact strength, but with substantial loss in high temperature dry and wet strength; (4) in the all-epoxy systems, the polycarbonate toughening agent seemed to be the most effective, although hot-wet strength is sacrificed; ABS was not as effective; and (5) in general, the toughened all-epoxy systems showed better damage tolerance, but less hot-wet strength; toughened bismaleimides had better hot-wet strength.

  4. Permeability After Impact Testing of Composite Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, Alan T.

    2003-01-01

    Since composite laminates are beginning to be identified for use in reusable launch vehicle propulsion systems, an understanding of their permeance is needed. A foreign object impact event can cause a localized area of permeability (leakage) in a polymer matrix composite and it is the aim of this study to assess a method of quantifying permeability-after-impact results. A simple test apparatus is presented and variables that could affect the measured values of permeability-after-impact were assessed. Once it was determined that valid numbers were being measured, a fiber/resin system was impacted at various impact levels and the resulting permeability measured, first with a leak check solution (qualitative) then using the new apparatus (quantitative). The results showed that as the impact level increased, so did the measured leakage. As the pressure to the specimen was increased, the leak rate was seen to increase in a non-linear fashion for almost all of the specimens tested.

  5. Permeability After Impact Testing of Composite Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, A.T.; Munafo, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Since composite laminates are beginning to be identified for use in reusable launch vehicle propulsion systems, an understanding of their permeance is needed. A foreign object impact event can cause a localized area of permeability (leakage) in a polymer matrix composite and it is the aim of this study to assess a method of quantifying permeability-after-impact results. A simple test apparatus is presented and variables that could affect the measured values of permeability-after-impact were assessed. Once it was determined that valid numbers were being measured, a fiber/resin system was impacted at various impact levels and the resulting permeability measured, first with a leak check solution (qualitative) then using the new apparatus (quantitative). The results showed that as the impact level increased, so did the measured leakage. As the pressure to the specimen was increased, the leak rate was seen to increase in a non-linear fashion for almost all of the specimens tested.

  6. Analysis of "Kiss" Bonds Between Composite Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poveromo, Scott L.; Earthman, James C.

    2014-06-01

    One of the leading challenges to designing lightweight, cost-effective bonded structures is to detect low shear strength "kiss" bonds where no other defects such as voids and cracks exist. To develop a nondestructive testing method that is sensitive to kiss bonds, standards need to be fabricated with known strength values. In the current work, we attempt to create kiss bonds in between carbon fiber composite laminates that have been bonded with epoxy film adhesive and epoxy paste adhesive. Based on ultrasonic testing, when creating true kiss bonds using film adhesives, a complete disbond could not be avoided because of thermally induced stresses during the high-temperature cure. However, further work demonstrated that kiss bonds can be formed using room-temperature curable epoxy paste adhesives by creating an amine blush on the epoxy surface or applying a release agent on the bonding surfaces.

  7. Micromechanics of composite laminate compression failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guynn, E. Gail; Bradley, Walter L.

    1986-01-01

    The Dugdale analysis for metals loaded in tension was adapted to model the failure of notched composite laminates loaded in compression. Compression testing details, MTS alignment verification, and equipment needs were resolved. Thus far, only 2 ductile material systems, HST7 and F155, were selected for study. A Wild M8 Zoom Stereomicroscope and necessary attachments for video taping and 35 mm pictures were purchased. Currently, this compression test system is fully operational. A specimen is loaded in compression, and load vs shear-crippling zone size is monitored and recorded. Data from initial compression tests indicate that the Dugdale model does not accurately predict the load vs damage zone size relationship of notched composite specimens loaded in compression.

  8. Analysis of a hybrid, unidirectional buffer strip laminate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dharani, L. R.; Goree, J. G.

    1983-01-01

    A method of analysis capable of predicting accurately the fracture behavior of a unidirectional composite laminate containing symmetrically placed buffer strips is presented. As an example, for a damaged graphite/epoxy laminate, the results demonstrate the manner in which to select the most efficient combination of buffer strip properties necessary to inhibit crack growth. Ultimate failure of the laminate after crack arrest can occur under increasing load either by continued crack extension through the buffer strips or the crack can jump the buffer strips. For some typical hybrid materials it is found that a buffer strip spacing-to-width ratio of about four to one is the most efficient.

  9. Multi-Layer Laminated Thin Films for Inflatable Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yavrouian, Andre; Plett, Gary; Mannella, Jerami

    2005-01-01

    Special-purpose balloons and other inflatable structures would be constructed as flexible laminates of multiple thin polymeric films interspersed with layers of adhesive, according to a proposal. In the original intended application, the laminate would serve as the envelope of the Titan Aerobot a proposed robotic airship for exploring Titan (one of the moons of Saturn). Potential terrestrial applications for such flexible laminates could include blimps and sails. In the original application, the multi-layered laminate would contain six layers of 0.14-mil (0.0036-mm)-thick Mylar (or equivalent) polyethylene terephthalate film with a layer of adhesive between each layer of Mylar . The overall thickness and areal density of this laminate would be nearly the same as those of 1-mil (0.0254-mm)-thick monolayer polyethylene terephthalate sheet. However, the laminate would offer several advantages over the monolayer sheet, especially with respect to interrelated considerations of flexing properties, formation of pinholes, and difficulty or ease of handling, as discussed next. Most of the damage during flexing of the laminate would be localized in the outermost layers, where the radii of bending in a given bend would be the largest and, hence, the bending stress would be the greatest. The adverse effects of formation of pinholes would be nearly completely mitigated in the laminate because a pinhole in a given layer would not propagate to adjacent layers. Hence, the laminate would tend to remain effective as a barrier to retain gas. Similar arguments can be made regarding cracks: While a crack could form as a result of stress or a defect in the film material, a crack would not propagate into adjacent layers, and the adjacent layer(s) would even arrest propagation of the crack. In the case of the monolayer sheet, surface damage (scratches, dents, permanent folds, pinholes, and the like) caused by handling would constitute or give rise to defects that could propagate through

  10. Accurate stress resultants equations for laminated composite deep thick shells

    SciTech Connect

    Qatu, M.S.

    1995-11-01

    This paper derives accurate equations for the normal and shear force as well as bending and twisting moment resultants for laminated composite deep, thick shells. The stress resultant equations for laminated composite thick shells are shown to be different from those of plates. This is due to the fact the stresses over the thickness of the shell have to be integrated on a trapezoidal-like shell element to obtain the stress resultants. Numerical results are obtained and showed that accurate stress resultants are needed for laminated composite deep thick shells, especially if the curvature is not spherical.

  11. Vibration analysis of rotating thin laminated composite shell of revolution

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, K.; Shikanai, G.; Takayama, K.

    1995-11-01

    An exact solution procedure is presented for solving free vibrations of a rotating thin laminated composite shell of revolution having meridionally constant curvature. Based on the classical lamination theory, equations of motion and boundary conditions are obtained from the stationally conditions of the Lagrangian. The equations of motion are solved exactly by using a power series expansion for symmetrically laminated, cross-ply shells. Frequencies and mode shapes of the shells having both ends clamped and both ends freely supported are presented showing their variations with rotating angular velocity, number of laminae and other parameters.

  12. Axisymmetric vibrations of laminated composite conical shells with varying thickness

    SciTech Connect

    Shikanai, G.; Suzuki, K.; Kojima, M.

    1995-11-01

    An exact solution procedure is presented for solving axisymmetric free vibrations of laminated composite conical shells with varying thickness. Based on the classical lamination theory neglecting shear deformation and rotary inertia, equations of motion and boundary conditions are obtained from the stationary conditions of the Lagrangian. The equations of motion are solved exactly by using a power series expansion for symmetrically laminated, cross-ply conical shells. Numerical studies are made for conical shells having both ends clamped to show the effects of the number of laminae, stacking sequences and other parameters upon the frequencies.

  13. An approximate solution for interlaminar stresses in composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, Cheryl A.; Herakovich, Carl T.

    1993-01-01

    An efficient approximate solution for interlaminar stresses in finite width, symmetric and unsymmetric laminated composites subjected to axial and/or bending loads is presented. The solution is based upon statically admissible stress fields which take into consideration local property mismatch effects and global equilibrium requirements. Unknown constants in the assumed stress states are determined through minimization of the laminate complementary energy. Typical results are presented for through-thickness and interlaminar stress distributions for angle-ply and cross-ply laminates subjected to axial loading. It is shown that the present formulation represents an improved, efficient approximate solution for interlaminar stresses.

  14. Analysis of a hybrid-undirectional buffer strip laminate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dharani, L. R.; Goree, J. G.

    1983-01-01

    A method of analysis capable of predicting accurately the fracture behavior of a unidirectional composite laminate containing symmetrically placed buffer strips is presented. As an example, for a damaged graphite/epoxy laminate, the results demonstrate the manner in which to select the most efficient combination of buffer strip properties necessary to inhibit crack growth. Ultimate failure of the laminate after the arrest can occur under increasing load either by continued crack extension through the buffer strips or the crack can jump the buffer strips. For some typical hybrid materials it is found that a buffer strip spacing to width ratio of about four to one is the most efficient.

  15. Interlaminar stresses in composite laminates: A perturbation analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, P. W.; Herakovich, C. T.

    1976-01-01

    A general method of solution for an elastic balanced symmetric composite laminate subject to a uniaxial extension was developed based upon a perturbation analysis of a limiting free body containing an interfacial plane. The solution satisfies more physical requirements and boundary conditions than previous investigations, and predicts smooth continuous interlaminar stresses with no instabilities. It determines the finite maximum intensity for the interlaminar normal stress in all laminates, provides mathematical evidences for the singular stresses in angle-ply laminates, suggests the need for the experimental determination of an important problem parameter, and introduces a viable means for solving related problems of practical interest.

  16. Improved PMR Polyimides For Heat-Stable Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vannucci, R. D.; Malarik, D. C.; Papadapoulos, D. S.; Waters, John F.

    1994-01-01

    Second-generation PMR-type polyimides (PMR-II polyimides) of enhanced thermo-oxidative stability prepared by substitution of para-aminostyrene (PAS) end caps for nadic-ester (NE) end caps used in prior PMR-II polyimides. Laminates unidirectionally reinforced with graphite fibers and made with PAS-capped resins exhibited thermo-oxidative stabilities significantly greater than those of similar laminates made with NE-capped PMR-II resins. One new laminate exhibited high retention of weight and strength after 1,000 h of exposure to air at 371 degrees C.

  17. Wave propagation in graphite/epoxy laminates due to impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, T. M.; Sun, C. T.

    1982-01-01

    The low velocity impact response of graphite-epoxy laminates is investigated theoretically and experimentally. A nine-node isoparametric finite element in conjunction with an empirical contact law was used for the theoretical investigation. Flat laminates subjected to pendulum impact were used for the experimental investigation. Theoretical results are in good agreement with strain gage experimental data. The collective results of the investigation indicate that the theoretical procedure describes the impact response of the laminate up to about 150 in/sec. impact velocity.

  18. Notched strength of composite laminates: Predictions and experiments - A review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Awerbuch, J.; Madhukar, M. S.

    1985-01-01

    A self-contained review of several semiempirical fracture models for predicting notched strength of composite laminates is presented, based on notched strength data on 70 different laminate configurations of graphite/epoxy, boron/aluminum, and graphite/polyimide. Emphasis is placed on experimental results concerning such failure factors as delamination, splitting, and size of damage zone. Moreover, the fracture model parameters are correlated with the notch sensitivity of composite laminates, and the applicability of the correlations in describing the material notch sensitivity is evaluated. The predictions provided by the different models were found to be identical for all practical purposes.

  19. Laminated metals composites fracture and ballistic impact behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Lesuer, D.R.; Syn, C.K.; Sherby, O.D.; Wadsworth, J.

    1998-01-20

    Recent advances in the fracture and ballistic impact response of laminated metal composites (LMCs) are reviewed. The laminate structure can provide significant improvements to these properties relative to the component materials. Typical fracture and ballistic impact properties in LMCs are illustrated for systems containing Al alloys and Al matrix composites. The unique mechanisms operating in a layered structure that contribute to fracture or ballistic impact resistance are discussed. The influence of laminate architecture, component material properties and interface strength on mechanisms and properties are briefly reviewed for these Al-based LMCs.

  20. Prediction of microcracking in composite laminates under thermomechanical loading

    SciTech Connect

    Maddocks, J.R.; Mcmanus, H.L.

    1995-01-01

    Composite laminates used in space structures are exposed to both thermal and mechanical loads. Cracks in the matrix form, changing the laminate thermoelastic properties. An analytical methodology is developed to predict microcrack density in a general laminate exposed to an arbitrary thermomechanical load history. The analysis uses a shear lag stress solution in conjunction with an energy-based cracking criterion. Experimental investigation was used to verify the analysis. Correlation between analysis and experiment is generally excellent. The analysis does not capture machining-induced cracking, or observed delayed crack initiation in a few ply groups, but these errors do not prevent the model from being a useful preliminary design tool.

  1. Modelling of thick composites using a layerwise laminate theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robbins, D. H., Jr.; Reddy, J. N.

    1993-01-01

    The layerwise laminate theory of Reddy (1987) is used to develop a layerwise, two-dimensional, displacement-based, finite element model of laminated composite plates that assumes a piecewise continuous distribution of the tranverse strains through the laminate thickness. The resulting layerwise finite element model is capable of computing interlaminar stresses and other localized effects with the same level of accuracy as a conventional 3D finite element model. Although the total number of degrees of freedom are comparable in both models, the layerwise model maintains a 2D-type data structure that provides several advantages over a conventional 3D finite element model, e.g. simplified input data, ease of mesh alteration, and faster element stiffness matrix formulation. Two sample problems are provided to illustrate the accuracy of the present model in computing interlaminar stresses for laminates in bending and extension.

  2. Nuclear lamins during gametogenesis, fertilization and early development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maul, G. G.; Schatten, G.

    1986-01-01

    The distribution of lamins (described by Gerace, 1978, as major proteins of nuclear envelope) during gametogenesis, fertilization, and early development was investigated in germ cells of a mouse (Mus musculus), an echinoderm (Lytechinus variegatus), and the surf clam (Spisula solidissima) was investigated in order to determine whether the differences detected could be correlated with differences in the function of cells in these stages of the germ cells. In order to monitor the behavior of lamins, the gametes and embryos were labeled with antibodies to lamins A, C, and B extracted from autoimmune sera of patients with scleroderma and Lupus erythematosus. Results indicated that lamin B could be identified in nuclear envelopes on only those nuclei where chromatin is attached and where RNA synthesis takes place.

  3. Analysis of a unidirectional, symmetric buffer strip laminate with damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dharani, L. R.; Goree, J. G.

    1984-01-01

    A method for predicting the fracture behavior of hybrid buffer strip laminates is presented in which the classical shear-lag model is used to represent the shear stress distribution between adjacent fibers. The method is demonstrated by applying it to a notched graphite/epoxy laminate, and the results show clearly the manner in which the most efficient combination of buffer strip properties can be selected in order to arrest the crack. The ultimate failure stress of the laminate is plotted vs the buffer strip width. It is shown that in the case of graphite-epoxy and S-glass epoxy laminates, the optimum buffer strip spacing to width ratio should be about four to one.

  4. Structural and Dielectric Properties of Subnanometric Laminates of Binary Oxides.

    PubMed

    Kahouli, Abdelkader; Lebedev, Oleg; Ben Elbahri, Marwa; Mercey, Bernard; Prellier, Wilfrid; Riedel, Stefan; Czernohorsky, Malte; Lallemand, Florent; Bunel, Catherine; Lüders, Ulrike

    2015-11-25

    Capacitors with a dielectric material consisting of amorphous laminates of Al2O3 and TiO2 with subnanometer individual layer thicknesses can show strongly enhanced capacitance densities compared to the bulk or laminates with nanometer layer thickness. In this study, the structural and dielectric properties of such subnanometer laminates grown on silicon by state-of-the-art atomic layer deposition are investigated with varying electrode materials. The laminates show a dielectric constant reaching 95 combined with a dielectric loss (tan δ) of about 0.2. The differences of the observed dielectric properties in capacitors with varying electrodes indicate that chemical effects at the interface with the TiN electrode play a major role, while the influence of the local roughness of the individual layers is rather limited. PMID:26523935

  5. Laminated rare earth structure and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Senor, David J [West Richland, WA; Johnson, Roger N [Richland, WA; Reid, Bruce D [Pasco, WA; Larson, Sandra [Richland, WA

    2002-07-30

    A laminated structure having two or more layers, wherein at least one layer is a metal substrate and at least one other layer is a coating comprising at least one rare earth element. For structures having more than two layers, the coating and metal substrate layers alternate. In one embodiment of the invention, the structure is a two-layer laminate having a rare earth coating electrospark deposited onto a metal substrate. In another embodiment of the invention, the structure is a three-layer laminate having the rare earth coating electrospark deposited onto a first metal substrate and the coating subsequently abonded to a second metal substrate. The bonding of the coating to the second metal substrate may be accomplished by hot pressing, hot rolling, high deformation rate processing, or combinations thereof. The laminated structure may be used in nuclear components where reactivity control or neutron absorption is desired and in non-nuclear applications such as magnetic and superconducting films.

  6. Calculation of the room-temperature shapes of unsymmetric laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyer, M. W.

    1981-01-01

    A theory explaining the characteristics of the cured shapes of unsymmetric laminates is presented. The theory is based on an extension of classical lamination theory which accounts for geometric nonlinearities. A Rayleigh-Ritz approach to minimizing the total potential energy is used to obtain quantitative information regarding the room temperature shapes of square T300/5208 (0(2)/90(2))T and (0(4)/90(4))T graphite-epoxy laminates. It is shown that, depending on the thickness of the laminate and the length of the side the square, the saddle shape configuration is actually unstable. For values of length and thickness that render the saddle shape unstable, it is shown that two stable cylindrical shapes exist. The predictions of the theory are compared with existing experimental data.

  7. 11. Detail of laminated arch beams, radiators, pews and portion ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Detail of laminated arch beams, radiators, pews and portion of the office to the left of the sanctuary, facing north - Mountain Home Air Force Base, Base Chapel, 350 Willow Street, Cantonment Area, Mountain Home, Elmore County, ID

  8. Characterization of delamination onset and growth in a composite laminate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, T. K.

    1981-01-01

    The onset and growth of delaminations in unnotched (+ or - 30/+ or - 30/90/90 bar) sub S graphite epoxy laminates is described quantitatively. These laminates, designed to delaminate at the edges under tensile loads, were tested and analyzed. Delamination growth and stiffness loss were monitored nondestructively. Laminate stiffness decreased linearly with delamination size. The strain energy release rate, G, associated with delamination growth, was calculated from two analyses. A critical G for delamination onset was determined, and then was used to predict the onset of delaminations in (+45 sub n/-45 sub n/o sub n/90 sub n) sub s (n=1,2,3) laminates. A delamination resistance curve (R curve) was developed to characterize the observed stable delamination growth under quasi static loading. A power law correlation between G and delamination growth rates in fatigue was established.

  9. Nonlinear analysis of laminated fibrous composites. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renieri, G. D.; Herakovich, C. T.

    1976-01-01

    A computerized analysis of the nonlinear behavior of fibrous composite laminates including axial loading, thermal loading, temperature dependent properties, and edge effects is presented. Ramberg-Osgood approximations are used to represent lamina stress-strain behavior and percent retention curves are employed to model the variation of properties with temperature. Balanced, symmetric laminates comprised of either boron/epoxy, graphite/epoxy, or borsic-aluminum are analyzed using a quasi-three-dimensional finite element analysis. Results are presented for the interlaminar stress distributions in cross-ply, angle-ply, and more complex laminates. Nonlinear stress-strain curves for a variety of composite laminates in tension and compression are obtained and compared to other existing theories and experimental results.

  10. Solar-Cell Encapsulation by One-Step Lamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarbolouki, M. N.

    1983-01-01

    Simple method of potting solar cells reduces encapsulating to one-step lamination process. Simplified process saves time and expense. Potting material is added to two inside faces of solar-cell assembly before they are sandwiched and cured.

  11. Progressive Failure Analysis Methodology for Laminated Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sleight, David W.

    1999-01-01

    A progressive failure analysis method has been developed for predicting the failure of laminated composite structures under geometrically nonlinear deformations. The progressive failure analysis uses C(exp 1) shell elements based on classical lamination theory to calculate the in-plane stresses. Several failure criteria, including the maximum strain criterion, Hashin's criterion, and Christensen's criterion, are used to predict the failure mechanisms and several options are available to degrade the material properties after failures. The progressive failure analysis method is implemented in the COMET finite element analysis code and can predict the damage and response of laminated composite structures from initial loading to final failure. The different failure criteria and material degradation methods are compared and assessed by performing analyses of several laminated composite structures. Results from the progressive failure method indicate good correlation with the existing test data except in structural applications where interlaminar stresses are important which may cause failure mechanisms such as debonding or delaminations.

  12. Tying up loose ends: telomeres, genomic instability and lamins.

    PubMed

    Gonzalo, Susana; Eissenberg, Joel C

    2016-04-01

    On casual inspection, the eukaryotic nucleus is a deceptively simple organelle. Far from being a bag of chromatin, the nucleus is, in some ways, a structural and functional extension of the chromosomes it contains. Recently, interest has intensified in how chromosome compartmentalization and dynamics affect nuclear function. Different studies uncovered functional interactions between chromosomes and the filamentous nuclear meshwork comprised of lamin proteins. Here, we summarize recent research suggesting that telomeres, the capping structures that protect chromosome ends, are stabilized by lamin-binding and that alterations in nuclear lamins lead to defects in telomere compartmentalization, homeostasis and function. Telomere dysfunction contributes to the genomic instability that characterizes aging-related diseases, and might be an important factor in the pathophysiology of lamin-related diseases. PMID:27010504

  13. Laminated metamaterial flat lens at millimeter-wave frequencies.

    PubMed

    Kitayama, Daisuke; Yaita, Makoto; Song, Ho-Jin

    2015-09-01

    A flat and thin shape is obviously advantageous not only in terms of reducing the volume of a device, but also in handling and using it. Particularly, laminating or stacking flat devices is an intuitive and straightforward way of tailoring performance and functions. Here, we experimentally demonstrated a laminated flat lens for millimeter-wave frequencies that is based on split-ring resonators (SRRs) composed of multiple layers with different and/or identical index profiles and that exhibits characteristics that are linear combinations of those of the individual lenses. Since the characteristics of the lenses of each layer are preserved regardless of the neighbouring layers, the desired functionalities can be easily implemented simply by laminating elementary lenses designed already. When we laminated two lenses designed for bending or focusing incoming waves at 120 GHz, we clearly observed that the outgoing waves collimated and bended as desired. PMID:26368436

  14. Optimal Synthesis of Hot Composite Laminates with Interphase Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabzak, Christopher; Saravanos, Dimitris A.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1993-01-01

    A method for the optimal grading of a single interphase layer in metal matrix composite laminates for the minimization of residual stresses is described. The capability to simultaneously tailor some fabrication parameters is also incorporated. Applications for unidirectional, cross-ply and quasi-isotropic Graphite/Copper laminates are investigated to assess the potential of interphase layer in reducing matrix residual stresses in various laminate configurations. Simultaneous optimization of interphase and fabrication characteristics appears to be more effective in decreasing residual stresses. The results also indicate that the interphase layer is more effective in lowering residual stresses in unidirectional composites and selectively within individual plies of a laminate. Embedded interphase layers in all the plies did not produce a significant global reduction in residual stresses.

  15. 10. Detail view of pendant lamps, laminated arch beams and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Detail view of pendant lamps, laminated arch beams and ceiling structure, facing north - Mountain Home Air Force Base, Base Chapel, 350 Willow Street, Cantonment Area, Mountain Home, Elmore County, ID

  16. Fatigue of notched fiber composite laminates. Part 1: Analytical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclaughlin, P. V., Jr.; Kulkarni, S. V.; Huang, S. N.; Rosen, B. W.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of a semi-empirical, deterministic analysis for prediction and correlation of fatigue crack growth, residual strength, and fatigue lifetime for fiber composite laminates containing notches (holes). The failure model used for the analysis is based upon composite heterogeneous behavior and experimentally observed failure modes under both static and fatigue loading. The analysis is consistent with the wearout philosophy. Axial cracking and transverse cracking failure modes are treated together in the analysis. Cracking off-axis is handled by making a modification to the axial cracking analysis. The analysis predicts notched laminate failure from unidirectional material fatique properties using constant strain laminate analysis techniques. For multidirectional laminates, it is necessary to know lamina fatique behavior under axial normal stress, transverse normal stress and axial shear stress. Examples of the analysis method are given.

  17. Fracture analysis of local delaminations in laminated composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sriram, P.; Armanios, Erian A.

    1988-01-01

    A shear deformation model was developed to analyze local delaminations growing from transverse cracks in 90 degree plies located around the mid plane of symmetric laminates. The predictions of the model agree reasonably with experimental data from T300/934 graphite epoxy laminates. The predicted behavior is such that, in combination with an edge delamination model, the critical loads can be predicted accurately in the range of n from .5 to 8.

  18. Laminated microchannel devices, mixing units and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Wendy D [Kennewick, WA; Hammerstrom, Donald J [West Richland, WA; Martin, Peter M [Kennewick, WA; Matson, Dean W [Kennewick, WA

    2002-10-17

    A laminated microchannel device is described in which there is a unit operation process layer that has longitudinal channel. The longitudinal channel is cut completely through the layer in which the unit process operation resides. Both the device structure and method of making the device provide significant advantages in terms of simplicity and efficiency. A static mixing unit that can be incorporated in the laminated microchannel device is also described.

  19. Support Assembly for Composite Laminate Materials During Roll Press Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catella, Luke A.

    2011-01-01

    A composite laminate material is supported during the roll press processing thereof by an assembly having: first and second perforated films disposed adjacent to first and second opposing surfaces of a mixture of uncured resin and fibers defining the composite laminate material, a gas permeable encasement surrounding the mixture and the first and second films, a gas impervious envelope sealed about the gas permeable encasement, and first and second rigid plates clamped about the gas impervious envelope.

  20. Review on antibacterial biocomposites of structural laminated veneer lumber

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zi-xiang; Lei, Qiong; He, Rui-lin; Zhang, Zhong-feng; Chowdhury, Ahmed Jalal Khan

    2015-01-01

    In this review, the characteristics and applications of structural laminated veneer lumber made from planted forest wood is introduced, and its preparation is explained, including various tree species and slab qualities, treatments for multiple effects and reinforced composites. The relevant factors in the bonding technology and pressing processes as well as the mechanical properties, research direction and application prospects of structural laminated veneer lumber made from planted forest wood are discussed. PMID:26858559

  1. Damage Tolerance of Composite Laminates from an Empirical Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, Alan T.

    2009-01-01

    Damage tolerance consists of analysis and experimentation working together. Impact damage is usually of most concern for laminated composites. Once impacted, the residual compression strength is usually of most interest. Other properties may be of more interest than compression (application dependent). A damage tolerance program is application specific (not everyone is building aircraft). The "Building Block Approach" is suggested for damage tolerance. Advantage can be taken of the excellent fatigue resistance of damaged laminates to save time and costs.

  2. Determination of the technical constants of laminates in oblique directions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vidouse, F.

    1979-01-01

    An off-axis tensile test theory based on Hooke's Law is applied to glass fiber reinforced laminates. A corrective parameter dependent on the characteristics of the strain gauge used is introduced by testing machines set up for isotropic materials. Theoretical results for a variety of strain gauges are compared with those obtained by a finite element method and with experimental results obtained on laminates reinforced with glass.

  3. Transparent, resilient human amniotic membrane laminates for corneal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hariya, Takehiro; Tanaka, Yuji; Yokokura, Shunji; Nakazawa, Toru

    2016-09-01

    This study evaluated a new technique to toughen and optically clarify human amniotic membrane (AM) tissue, which is naturally thin and clouded, and determined the suitability of the altered tissue for corneal transplantation. The technique created a tissue laminate by repeatedly depositing wet layers of AM and dehydrating them, followed by chemical cross-linking to tighten integration at the layer interfaces and within the layers, thereby improving the physical properties of the laminates by increasing light transmittance and mechanical strength. Interestingly, this improvement only occurred in laminates with at least 4 layers. Cross-linking also improved the resistance of the laminates to collagenase degradation, such as occurs in corneal melting. This study also confirmed that the AM tissue was biocompatible by inserting AM monolayers into the corneal stroma of rabbits, and by performing lamellar keratoplasty in rabbits with cross-linked AM laminates. The laminates were sufficiently thick and resilient to need only one set of sutures, whereas in previously described multi-layer AM transplantation technique, each layer required separate sutures. The current findings are a promising advance in the engineering of novel biomaterials and the alteration of existing tissues for medical use. PMID:27267629

  4. BioID Identification of Lamin-Associated Proteins.

    PubMed

    Mehus, Aaron A; Anderson, Ruthellen H; Roux, Kyle J

    2016-01-01

    A- and B-type lamins support the nuclear envelope, contribute to heterochromatin organization, and regulate a myriad of nuclear processes. The mechanisms by which lamins function in different cell types and the mechanisms by which lamin mutations cause over a dozen human diseases (laminopathies) remain unclear. The identification of proteins associated with lamins is likely to provide fundamental insight into these mechanisms. BioID (proximity-dependent biotin identification) is a unique and powerful method for identifying protein-protein and proximity-based interactions in living cells. BioID utilizes a mutant biotin ligase from bacteria that is fused to a protein of interest (bait). When expressed in living cells and stimulated with excess biotin, this BioID-fusion protein promiscuously biotinylates directly interacting and vicinal endogenous proteins. Following biotin-affinity capture, the biotinylated proteins can be identified using mass spectrometry. BioID thus enables screening for physiologically relevant protein associations that occur over time in living cells. BioID is applicable to insoluble proteins such as lamins that are often refractory to study by other methods and can identify weak and/or transient interactions. We discuss the use of BioID to elucidate novel lamin-interacting proteins and its applications in a broad range of biological systems, and provide detailed protocols to guide new applications. PMID:26778550

  5. The effect of lamination angle on polymer retention

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, H.W.

    1992-09-01

    Polymer retention may be affected by the reservoir geological structure due to lamination of the mineral surfaces. These laminae are very prevalent in Class I reservoirs. To account for the effect of lamination angle on polymer retention, several corefloods with three fired, rectangular, Berea sandstone cores were conducted. The three cores were cut at three different angles, 0, 30, and 90 degrees, with respect to the direction of laminations. A multiple slug retention method was used to determine the retention of a biopolymer in each core. Tracer tests were conducted before and after the biopolymer flow to determine how the retained biopolymer affected the fluid advance. A computed tomography (CT) scanning method was used to monitor the advance of the tracer. All corefloods and tracer tests were conducted at low flow rates similar to that in reservoirs. Coreflood tests revealed that polymer retention, which was mainly caused by mechanical entrapment, was higher in cores that had laminations parallel to the direction of flow than in cores that had crossbed laminae. In cores that had crossbed laminae, polymer retention increased with an increase in the lamination angle. Retained polymer is harmful to the stability of fluid front in cores that have laminations parallel to the direction of flow, but is helpful in cores that have crossbed laminae.

  6. Coupled actin-lamin biopolymer networks and protecting DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tao; Rocklin, D. Zeb; Mao, Xiaoming; Schwarz, J. M.

    The mechanical properties of cells are largely determined by networks of semiflexible biopolymers forming the cytoskeleton. Similarly, the mechanical properties of cell nuclei are also largely determined by networks of semiflexible biopolymers forming the nuclear cytoskeleton. In particular, a network of filamentous lamin sits just inside the inner nuclear membrane to presumably protect the heart of the cell nucleus--the DNA. It has been demonstrated over the past decade that the actin cytoskeletal biopolymer network and the lamin biopolymer network are coupled via a sequence of proteins bridging the outer and inner nuclear membranes, known as the LINC complex. We, therefore, probe the consequences of such a coupling in a model biopolymer network system via numerical simulations to understand the resulting deformations in the lamin network in response to perturbations in the actin cytoskeletal network. We find, for example, that the force transmission across the coupled system can depend sensitively on the concentration of LINC complexes. Such study could have implications for mechanical mechanisms of the regulation of transcription since DNA couples to lamin via lamin-binding domains so that deformations in the lamin network may result in deformations in the DNA.

  7. The assembly of C. elegans lamins into macroscopic fibers.

    PubMed

    Zingerman-Koladko, Irena; Khayat, Maayan; Harapin, Jan; Shoseyov, Oded; Gruenbaum, Yosef; Salman, Ahmad; Medalia, Ohad; Ben-Harush, Kfir

    2016-10-01

    Intermediate filament (IF) proteins are known mainly by their propensity to form viscoelastic filamentous networks within cells. In addition, IF-proteins are essential parts of various biological materials, such as horn and hagfish slime threads, which exhibit a range of mechanical properties from hard to elastic. These properties and their self-assembly nature made IF-proteins attractive building blocks for biomimetic and biological materials in diverse applications. Here we show that a type V IF-protein, the Caenorhabditis elegans nuclear lamin (Ce-lamin), is a promising building block for protein-based fibers. Electron cryo-tomography of vitrified sections enabled us to depict the higher ordered assembly of the Ce-lamin into macroscopic fibers through the creation of paracrystalline fibers, which are prominent in vitro structures of lamins. The lamin fibers respond to tensile force as other IF-protein-based fibers, i.e., hagfish slime threads, and possess unique mechanical properties that may potentially be used in certain applications. The self-assembly nature of lamin proteins into a filamentous structure, which is further assembled into a complex network, can be easily modulated. This knowledge may lead to a better understanding of the relationship in IF-proteins-based fibers and materials, between their hierarchical structures and their mechanical properties. PMID:27341289

  8. Tracer Lamination in the Stratosphere: A Global Climatology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appenzeller, Christof; Holton, James R.

    1997-01-01

    Vertical soundings of stratospheric ozone often exhibit laminated tracer structures characterized by strong vertical tracer gradients. The change in time of these gradients is used to define a tracer lamination rate. It is shown that this quantity can be calculated by the cross product of the horizontal temperature and horizontal tracer gradients. A climatology based on UARS satellite-borne ozone data and on ozone-like pseudotracer data is presented. Three stratospheric regions with high lamination rates were found: the part of the stratospheric overworld which is influenced by the polar vortex, the part of the lowermost stratosphere which is influenced by the tropopause and a third region in the subtropical lower stratosphere mainly characterized with strong vertical shear. High lamination rates in the stratospheric overworld were absent during summer, whereas in the lowermost stratosphere high lamination rates were found year-round. This is consistent with the occurrence and seasonal variation of the horizontal tracer gradient and vertical shear necessary for tilting the tracer surfaces. During winter, high lamination rates associated with the stratospheric polar vortex are present down to approximately 100 hPa. Several features of the derived climatology are roughly consistent with earlier balloon-borne studies. The patterns in the southern and northern hemisphere are comparable, but details differ as anticipated from a less disturbed and more symmetric southern polar vortex.

  9. Properties of wheat gluten/poly(lactic acid) laminates.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sung-Woo; Gällstedt, Mikael; Hedenqvist, Mikael S

    2010-06-23

    Laminates of compression-molded glycerol-plasticized wheat gluten (WG) films surrounded and supported by poly(lactic acid) (PLA) films have been produced and characterized. The objective was to obtain a fully renewable high gas barrier film with sufficient mechanical integrity to function in, for example, extrusion-coating paper/board applications. It was shown that the lamination made it possible to make films with a broad range of glycerol contents (0-30 wt %) with greater strength than single unsupported WG films. The low plasticizer contents yielded laminates with very good oxygen barrier properties. In addition, whereas the unsupported WG films had an immeasurably high water vapor transmission rate (WVTR), the laminate showed values that were finite and surprisingly, in several cases, also lower than that of PLA. Besides being a mechanical support (as evidenced by bending and tensile data) and a shield between the WG and surrounding moisture, the PLA layer also prevented the loss of the glycerol plasticizer from the WG layer. This was observed after the laminate had been aged on an "absorbing" blotting paper for up to 17 weeks. The interlayer adhesion (peel strength) decreased with decreasing glycerol content and increasing WG film molding temperature (130 degrees C instead of 110 degrees C). The latter effect was probably due to a higher protein aggregation, as revealed by infrared spectroscopy. The lamination temperature (110-140 degrees C) did not, however, have a major effect on the final peel strength. PMID:20504031

  10. Bending Boundary Layers in Laminated-Composite Circular Cylindrical Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Michael P.; Smeltzer, Stanley S., III

    2000-01-01

    An analytical, parametric study of the attenuation of bending boundary layers or edge effects in balanced and unbalanced, symmetrically and unsymmetrically laminated thin cylindrical shells is presented for nine contemporary material systems. The analysis is based on the linear Sanders-Koiter shell equations and specializations to the Love-Kirchhoff shell equations and Donnell's equations are included. Two nondimensional parameters are identified that characterize and quantify the effects of laminate orthotropy and laminate anisotropy on the bending boundary-layer decay length in a very general and encompassing manner. A substantial number of structural design technology results are presented for a wide range of laminated-composite cylinders. For all the laminate constructions considered, the results show that the differences between results that were obtained with the Sanders-Koiter shell equations, the Love-Kirchhoff shell equations, and Donnell's equations are negligible. The results also show that the effect of anisotropy in the form of coupling between pure bending and twisting has a negligible effect on the size of the bending boundary-layer decay length of the balanced, symmetrically laminated cylinders considered. Moreover, the results show that coupling between the various types of shell anisotropies has a negligible effect on the calculation of the bending boundary-layer decay length in most cases. The results also show that in some cases neglecting the shell anisotropy results in underestimating the bending boundary-layer decay length and in other cases it results in an overestimation.

  11. Response of automated tow placed laminates to stress concentrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, Douglas S.; Ilcewicz, Larry B.; Walker, Tom

    1993-01-01

    In this study, the response of laminates with stress concentrations is explored. Automated Tow Placed (ATP, also known as Fiber Placement) laminates are compared to conventional tape layup manufacturing. Previous tensile fracture tests on fiber placed laminates show an improvement in tensile fracture of large notches over 20 percent compared to tape layup laminates. A hierarchial modeling scheme is presented. In this scheme, a global model is developed for laminates with notches. A local model is developed to study the influence of inhomogeneities at the notch tip, which are a consequence of the fiber placement manufacturing technique. In addition, a stacked membrane model was developed to study delaminations and splitting on a ply-by-ply basis. The results indicate that some benefit with respect to tensile fracture (up to 11 percent) can be gained from inhomogeneity alone, but that the most improvement may be obtained with splitting and delaminations which are more severe in the case of fiber placement compared to tape layup. Improvements up to 36 percent were found from the model for fiber placed laminates with damage at the notch tip compared to conventional tape layup.

  12. B-type lamins in health and disease☆

    PubMed Central

    Hutchison, C.J.

    2014-01-01

    For over two decades, B-type lamins were thought to have roles in fundamental processes including correct assembly of nuclear envelopes, DNA replication, transcription and cell survival. Recent studies have questioned these roles and have instead emphasised the role of these proteins in tissue building and tissue integrity, particularly in tissues devoid of A-type lamins. Other studies have suggested that the expression of B-type lamins in somatic cells influences the rate of entry into states of cellular senescence. In humans duplication of the LMNB1 gene (encoding lamin B1) causes an adult onset neurodegenerative disorder, termed autosomal dominant leukodystrophy, whilst very recently, LMNB1 has been implicated as a susceptibility gene in neural tube defects. This is consistent with studies in mice that reveal a critical role for B-type lamins in neuronal migration and brain development. In this review, I will consider how different model systems have contributed to our understanding of the functions of B-type lamins and which of those functions are critical for human health and disease. PMID:24380701

  13. Higher order finite element analysis of thick composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goering, J.; Kim, H. J.

    1992-01-01

    A higher order, sub-parametric, laminated, 3D solid finite element was used for the analysis of very thick laminated composite plates. The geometry of this element is defined by four nodes in the X-Y plane which define a prism of material through the thickness of the laminate. There are twenty-four degrees of freedom at each node; translations at the upper and lower surfaces of the laminate in each of the three coordinate directions, and the derivatives of these translations with respect to each coordinate. This choice of degrees of freedom leads to displacement and strain compatibility at the corners. Stacking sequence effects are accounted for by explicitly integrating the strain energy density through the thickness of the element. The laminated solid element was combined with a gap-contact element to analyze thick laminated composite lugs loaded through flexible pins. The resulting model accounts for pin bending effects that produce non-uniform bearing stresses through the thickness of the lug. A thick composite lug experimental test program was performed, and provided data that was used to validate the analytical model. Two lug geometries and three stacking sequences were tested.

  14. Three dimensional inelastic finite element analysis of laminated composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, O. H., Jr.; Kamat, M. P.

    1980-01-01

    Formulations of the inelastic response of laminated composites to thermal and mechanical loading are used as the basis for development of the computer NALCOM (Nonlinear Analysis of Laminated Composites) computer program which uses a fully three dimensional isoparametric finite element with 24 nodes and 72 degrees of freedom. An incremental solution is performed with nonlinearities introduced as pseudoloads computed for initial strains. Equilibrium iteration may be performed at every step. Elastic and elastic-plastic response of boron/epoxy and graphite/epoxy graphite/epoxy and problems of curing 0/90 sub s Gr/Ep laminates with and without circular holes are analyzed. Mechanical loading of + or - 45sub s Gr/Ep laminates is modeled and symmetry conditions which exist in angle-ply laminates are discussed. Results are compared to experiments and other analytical models when possible. All models are seen to agree reasonably well with experimetnal results for off-axis tensile coupons. The laminate analyses show the three dimensional effects which are present near holes and free corners.

  15. Nuclear localization signal deletion mutants of lamin A and progerin reveal insights into lamin A processing and emerin targeting.

    PubMed

    Wu, Di; Flannery, Andrew R; Cai, Helen; Ko, Eunae; Cao, Kan

    2014-01-01

    Lamin A is a major component of the lamina, which creates a dynamic network underneath the nuclear envelope. Mutations in the lamin A gene (LMNA) cause severe genetic disorders, one of which is Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), a disease triggered by a dominant mutant named progerin. Unlike the wild-type lamin A, whose farnesylated C-terminus is excised during post-translational processing, progerin retains its farnesyl tail and accumulates on the nuclear membrane, resulting in abnormal nuclear morphology during interphase. In addition, membrane-associated progerin forms visible cytoplasmic aggregates in mitosis. To examine the potential effects of cytoplasmic progerin, nuclear localization signal (NLS) deleted progerin and lamin A (PGΔNLS and LAΔNLS, respectively) have been constructed. We find that both ΔNLS mutants are farnesylated in the cytosol and associate with a sub-domain of the ER via their farnesyl tails. While the farnesylation on LAΔNLS can be gradually removed, which leads to its subsequent release from the ER into the cytoplasm, PGΔNLS remains permanently farnesylated and membrane-bounded. Moreover, both ΔNLS mutants dominantly affect emerin's nuclear localization. These results reveal new insights into lamin A biogenesis and lamin A-emerin interaction. PMID:24637396

  16. Nuclear localization signal deletion mutants of lamin A and progerin reveal insights into lamin A processing and emerin targeting

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Di; Flannery, Andrew R; Cai, Helen; Ko, Eunae; Cao, Kan

    2014-01-01

    Lamin A is a major component of the lamina, which creates a dynamic network underneath the nuclear envelope. Mutations in the lamin A gene (LMNA) cause severe genetic disorders, one of which is Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), a disease triggered by a dominant mutant named progerin. Unlike the wild-type lamin A, whose farnesylated C-terminus is excised during post-translational processing, progerin retains its farnesyl tail and accumulates on the nuclear membrane, resulting in abnormal nuclear morphology during interphase. In addition, membrane-associated progerin forms visible cytoplasmic aggregates in mitosis. To examine the potential effects of cytoplasmic progerin, nuclear localization signal (NLS) deleted progerin and lamin A (PGΔNLS and LAΔNLS, respectively) have been constructed. We find that both ΔNLS mutants are farnesylated in the cytosol and associate with a sub-domain of the ER via their farnesyl tails. While the farnesylation on LAΔNLS can be gradually removed, which leads to its subsequent release from the ER into the cytoplasm, PGΔNLS remains permanently farnesylated and membrane-bounded. Moreover, both ΔNLS mutants dominantly affect emerin’s nuclear localization. These results reveal new insights into lamin A biogenesis and lamin A-emerin interaction. PMID:24637396

  17. Damage growth in composite laminates with interleaves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goree, James G.

    1987-01-01

    The influence of placing interleaves between fiber reinforced plies in multilayered composite laminates is investigated. The geometry of the composite is idealized as two dimensional, isotropic, linearly elastic media made of a damaged layer bonded between two half planes and separated by thin interleaves of low extensional and shear moduli. The damage in the layer is taken in the form of a symmetric crack perpendicular to the interface and may extend up to the interface. The case of an H-shaped crack in the form of a broken layer with delamination along the interface is also analyzed. The interleaves are modeled as distributed shear and tension springs. Fourier integral transform techniques are used to develop solutions in terms of singular integral equations. An asymptotic analysis of the integral equations based on Muskhelishvili's techniques reveals logarithmically singular axial stresses in the half plane at the crack tips for the broken layer. For the H shaped crack, similar singularities are found to exist in the axial stresses at the interface crack tips in the layer and the half plane. The solution of the equations is found numerically for the stresses and displacements by using the Hadamard's concept of direct differentiation of Cauchy integrals as well as Gaussian integration techniques.

  18. Progressive Fracture of Laminated Composite Stiffened Plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotsis, Pascalis K.; Chamis, Christos C.; David, Kostantinos; Abdi, Frank

    2007-01-01

    Laminated fiber-reinforced composite stiffened plate with [0/90/plus or minus 45]s plies made of S-Glass/epoxy are evaluated via computational simulation to study damage and fracture progression. The loads are pressure and temperature which varies from 21 to 65.5 C (case I) and from 143.3 to 21 C (case II). An integrated computer code is used for the simulation of the damage progression. Results show that damage initiation begins at low load level, with matrix cracking at the 0 deg. (bottom and top) plies, fiber fracture at the bottom (0 deg.) ply and interply delamination at the top (0 deg. ) ply. Increasing the applied pressure, the damage growth is expended resulting in fracture through the thickness of the structure. At this stage, 90 percent of the plies damage at applied pressure 15.306 MPa for the case I and 15.036 MPa for the case II. After this stage the cracks propagate rapidly and the structure collapses.

  19. Benefits of oxygen incorporation in atomic laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlqvist, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Atomic laminates such as MAX phases benefit from the addition of oxygen in many ways, from the formation of a protective oxide surface layer with self-healing capabilities when cracks form to the tuning of anisotropic conductivity. In this paper oxygen incorporation and vacancy formation in M 2AlC (M  =  Ti, V, Cr) MAX phases have been studied using first-principles calculations where the focus is on phase stability and electronic structure for different oxygen and/or vacancy configurations. Oxygen prefers different lattice sites depending on M-element and this can be correlated to the number of available non-bonding M d-electrons. In Ti2AlC, oxygen substitutes carbon while in Cr2AlC it is located interstitially within the Al-layer. I predict that oxygen incorporation in Ti2AlC stabilizes the material, which explains the experimentally observed 12.5 at% oxygen (x  =  0.5) in Ti2Al(C1‑x O x ). In addition, it is also possible to use oxygen to stabilize the hypothetical Zr2AlC and Hf2AlC. Hence, oxygen incorporation may be beneficial in many ways. Not only can it make a material more stable, but it also can act as a reservoir for internal self-healing with shorter diffusion paths.

  20. Energy-efficient steels for motor laminations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, F. E.; Jaffee, R. I.

    1992-03-01

    Motors use over 60% of all electricity generated, and their losses exceed 200 × 109 kW.hr/year. A significant part of this loss results from eddy currents and hysteretic processes in the motor laminations. These so- called core losses cost motor users about 3 × 109/year. The metallurgy and economics of using various steels are considered, with emphasis on 5- to 125- hp polyphase induction motors. A lower core loss steel, even though it is more expensive, is economically justified most of the time when the operating costs of motors are considered. Impurities must be minimized, and steels can now be made with the principal impurities being less than 30 ppm. Further reduction of core losses depends on using the best steel processing equipment available, production of a consistently low carbon content so that decarburizing during the final anneal can be eliminated, developing a better understanding of the relation between material properties and performance in motors, and an increased willingness by the motor users to pay more for better motors that are cheaper to own in the long run.

  1. Interface fracture and composite deformation of model laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Matthew R.

    Model laminates were studied to improve the understanding of composite mechanical behavior. NiAl/Mo and NiAl/Cr model laminates, with a series of interfaces, were bonded at 1100°C. Reaction layers were present in all laminates, varying in thickness with bonding conditions. Interface fracture strengths and resistances were determined under primarily mode II loading conditions using a novel technique, the asymmetrically-loaded shear (ALS) test, in which one layer of the laminate was loaded in compression, producing a stable interface crack. The NiAl/Mo interface was also fractured in four-point bending. A small amount of plasticity was found to play a role in crack initiation. During steady-state mode II interface fracture of NiAl/Mo model laminates, large-scale slip was observed near the crack tip in the NiAl adjacent to the interface. After testing, the local slope and curvature of the interface were characterized at intervals along the interface and at slip locations to qualitatively describe local stresses present at and just ahead of the crack tip. The greatest percentage of slip occurred where closing forces on the crack tip were below the maximum value and were decreasing with crack growth. A mechanism for crack propagation is presented describing the role of large-scale slip in crack propagation. The mechanical response of structural laminates in 3-D stress states, as would be present in a polycrystalline aggregate composed of lamellar grains, are lacking. In order to understand the response of laminates composed of hard and soft phases, Pb/Zn laminates were prepared and tested in compression with varying lamellar orientation relative to the loading axis. A model describing the mechanical response in a general state assuming elastic-perfectly plastic isotropic layers was developed. For the 90° laminate, a different approach was applied, using the friction hill concepts used in forging analyses. With increasing ratios of cross-sectional radius to layer

  2. Testing and simulation of composite laminates under impact loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Xinglai

    Owing to their high stiffness-to-weight and high strength-to-weight ratios, fiber-reinforced polymer-matrix composite laminates are excellent materials for high-performance structures. However, their properties in the thickness direction are very poor as they are weakly bonded by polymeric matrices through laminate interfaces. Accordingly, when a composite laminate is subjected to impact loading, high interlaminar stresses along with the low interlaminar strengths could easily result in interlaminar damage such as delamination. This thesis investigated the response of composite laminates under low-velocity impact and presented numerical techniques for impact simulation. To begin with, instrumented drop-weight impacts ranging from subperforation to perforation levels were introduced to composite laminates having various dimensions and thicknesses. Damaged composite laminates were then subjected to compression-after-impact tests for evaluations of residual properties. Experimental results revealed that perforation was an important damage milestone since impact parameters such as peak force, contact duration, maximum deflection and energy absorption, and residual properties such as compressive stiffness, strength and energy absorption all reached critical levels as perforation took place. It was also found that thickness played a more important role than in-plane dimensions in perforation process. In order to understand more about the relationship between laminate thickness and perforation resistance and to present an economical method to improve perforation resistance, thick laminated composite plates and their assembled counterparts were investigated and compared. An energy profile correlating the impact energy and absorbed energy at all energy levels for each type of composite plates investigated was established and found to be able to address the relationship between energy and damage. Experimental results concluded that increasing thickness was more efficient

  3. Tape cast bioactive metal-ceramic laminates for structural application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clupper, Daniel Christopher

    Bioglass 45S5, is a silica based glass which is able to rapidly form strong bonds with bone and soft tissue in vivo. It is used clinically to replace damaged ear ossicles and in dental surgery to help maintain the structural integrity of the jaw bone. The goal of the research was to demonstrate that Bioglass can be toughened by lamination with metallic layers while maintaining bioactivity. Improvement of the mechanical properties of Bioglass 45SS would allow for additional clinical applications, such as fracture fixation plates, or vertebral spacers. Bioglass 45S5 was tape cast and laminated with clinically relevant metals (316L, stainless steel and titanium) as well as copper in an effort to demonstrate that the effective toughness, or area under the load-deflection diagram can be increased significantly through ductile layer lamination. The average strength of monolithic tape cast sintered Bioglass was as high as 150 MPa and the toughness measured approximately 1.0 MPa m1/2. Copper-Bioglass laminates clearly demonstrated the toughening effect of metal layers on tape cast sintered Bioglass 45S5. Steel-Bioglass laminates, although less tough than the copper-Bioglass laminates, showed higher strengths. In vitro bioactivity tests of both titanium and steel Bioglass laminates showed the formation of mature and thick hydroxyapatite layers after 24 hours in Tris buffer solution. Under the standard test conditions, the bioactivity of monolithic tape cast sintered Bioglass increased with increasing sintering temperature. For samples sintered at 1000°C, thick crystalline layers of hydroxyapatite formed within 24 hours in Tris buffer solution. The bioactivity of these samples approached that of amorphous bulk Bioglass. Samples processed at 800°C were able to form thick crystalline hydroxyapatite layer after 24 hours when the test solution volume was increased by eight times.

  4. Crush testing, characterizing, and modeling the crashworthiness of composite laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garner, David Michael, Jr.

    Research in the field of crashworthiness of composite materials is presented. A new crush test method was produced to characterize the crush behavior of composite laminates. In addition, a model of the crush behavior and a method for rank ordering the energy absorption capability of various laminates were developed. The new crush test method was used for evaluating the crush behavior of flat carbon/epoxy composite specimens at quasi-static and dynamic rates. The University of Utah crush test fixture was designed to support the flat specimen against catastrophic buckling. A gap, where the specimen is unsupported, allowed unhindered crushing of the specimen. In addition, the specimen's failure modes could be clearly observed during crush testing. Extensive crush testing was conducted wherein the crush force and displacement data were collected to calculate the energy absorption, and high speed video was captured during dynamic testing. Crush tests were also performed over a range of fixture gap heights. The basic failure modes were buckling, crack growth, and fracture. Gap height variations resulted in poorly, properly, and overly constrained specimens. In addition, guidelines for designing a composite laminate for crashworthiness were developed. Modeling of the crush behavior consisted of the delamination and fracture of a single ply or group of like plies during crushing. Delamination crack extension was modeled using the mode I energy release rate, G lc, where an elastica approach was used to obtain the strain energy. Variations in Glc were briefly explored with double cantilever beam tests wherein crack extension occurred along a multidirectional ply interface. The model correctly predicted the failure modes for most of the test cases, and offered insight into how the input parameters affect the model. The ranking method related coefficients of the laminate and sublaminate stiffness matrices, the ply locations within the laminate, and the laminate thickness. The

  5. Fracture behavior of unidirectional boron/aluminum composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goree, J. G.; Jones, W. F.

    1983-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to verify the results of mathematical models which predict the stresses and displacements of fibers and the amount of damage growth in a center-notched lamina as a function of the applied remote stress and the matrix and fiber material properties. A brittle lacquer coating was used to detect the yielding in the matrix while X-ray techniques were used to determine the number of broken fibers in the laminate. The notched strengths and the amounts of damage found in the specimens agree well with those predicted by the mathematical model. It is shown that the amount of damage and the crack opening displacement does not depend strongly on the number of plies in the laminate for a given notch width. By heat-treating certain laminates to increase the yield stress of the alumina matrix, the effect of different matrix properties on the fracture behavior was investigated. The stronger matrix is shown to weaken the notched laminate by decreasing the amount of matrix damage, thereby making the laminate more notch sensitive.

  6. Tunable characteristics of bending resonance frequency in magnetoelectric laminated composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lei; Li, Ping; Wen, Yu-Mei; Zhu, Yong

    2013-07-01

    As the magnetoelectric (ME) effect in piezoelectric/magnetostrictive laminated composites is mediated by mechanical deformation, the ME effect is significantly enhanced in the vicinity of resonance frequency. The bending resonance frequency (fr) of bilayered Terfenol-D/PZT (MP) laminated composites is studied, and our analysis predicts that (i) the bending resonance frequency of an MP laminated composite can be tuned by an applied dc magnetic bias (Hdc) due to the ΔE effect; (ii) the bending resonance frequency of the MP laminated composite can be controlled by incorporating FeCuNbSiB layers with different thicknesses. The experimental results show that with Hdc increasing from 0 Oe (1 Oe=79.5775 A/m) to 700 Oe, the bending resonance frequency can be shifted in a range of 32.68 kHz <= fr <= 33.96 kHz. In addition, with the thickness of the FeCuNbSiB layer increasing from 0 μm to 90 μm, the bending resonance frequency of the MP laminated composite gradually increases from 33.66 kHz to 39.18 kHz. This study offers a method of adjusting the strength of dc magnetic bias or the thicknesses of the FeCuNbSiB layer to tune the bending resonance frequency for ME composite, which plays a guiding role in the ME composite design for real applications.

  7. Bending Boundary Layers in Laminated-Composite Circular Cylindrical Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Michael P.; Smeltzer, Stanley S., III

    2000-01-01

    A study of the attenuation of bending boundary layers in balanced and unbalanced, symmetrically and unsymmetrically laminated cylindrical shells is presented for nine contemporary material systems. The analysis is based on the linear Sanders-Koiter shell equations and specializations to the Love-Kirchhoff shell equations and Donnell's equations are included. Two nondimensional parameters are identified that characterize the effects of laminate orthotropy and anisotropy on the bending boundary-layer decay length in a very general manner. A substantial number of structural design technology results are presented for a wide range of laminated-composite cylinders. For all laminates considered, the results show that the differences between results obtained with the Sanders-Koiter shell equations, the Love-Kirchhoff shell equations, and Donnell's equations are negligible. The results also show that the effect of anisotropy in the form of coupling between pure bending and twisting has a negligible effect on the size of the bending boundary-layer decay length of the balanced, symmetrically laminated cylinders considered. Moreover, the results show that coupling between the various types of shell anisotropies has a negligible effect on the calculation of the bending boundary-layer decay length in most cases. The results also show that, in some cases, neglecting the shell anisotropy results in underestimating the bending boundary-layer decay length and, in other cases, results in an overestimation.

  8. Dynamic Stability of Uncertain Laminated Beams Under Subtangential Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goyal, Vijay K.; Kapania, Rakesh K.; Adelman, Howard (Technical Monitor); Horta, Lucas (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Because of the inherent complexity of fiber-reinforced laminated composites, it can be challenging to manufacture composite structures according to their exact design specifications, resulting in unwanted material and geometric uncertainties. In this research, we focus on the deterministic and probabilistic stability analysis of laminated structures subject to subtangential loading, a combination of conservative and nonconservative tangential loads, using the dynamic criterion. Thus a shear-deformable laminated beam element, including warping effects, is derived to study the deterministic and probabilistic response of laminated beams. This twenty-one degrees of freedom element can be used for solving both static and dynamic problems. In the first-order shear deformable model used here we have employed a more accurate method to obtain the transverse shear correction factor. The dynamic version of the principle of virtual work for laminated composites is expressed in its nondimensional form and the element tangent stiffness and mass matrices are obtained using analytical integration The stability is studied by giving the structure a small disturbance about an equilibrium configuration, and observing if the resulting response remains small. In order to study the dynamic behavior by including uncertainties into the problem, three models were developed: Exact Monte Carlo Simulation, Sensitivity Based Monte Carlo Simulation, and Probabilistic FEA. These methods were integrated into the developed finite element analysis. Also, perturbation and sensitivity analysis have been used to study nonconservative problems, as well as to study the stability analysis, using the dynamic criterion.

  9. Increasing ferromagnetic resonance frequency using lamination and shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Ghazaly, A.; White, R. M.; Wang, S. X.

    2015-05-01

    The magnetic permeability frequency spectrum is one of the most critical properties for the operation of high frequency magnetic devices in the gigahertz regime. Permeability is fairly constant up to the ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) frequency, at which point the relative permeability drops to unity. Extending FMR to higher frequencies is thus imperative for developing GHz-range magnetic devices. The simulation and experimental investigations presented in this paper demonstrate how stacking layers to form a laminated film increases the FMR frequency by allowing flux closure between layers along the induced easy-axis direction. This flux closure reduces the demagnetization factor along the easy-axis direction by two orders of magnitude. This effect, however, is only observable in patterned films where the shape anisotropy is enough to result in variation of the FMR frequency. Experiments using patterned magnetic cores were performed to illustrate this effect. Through detailed investigation of the permeability spectra of both single layer and laminated CoTaZr magnetic films patterned into 500 μm × L films (where L ranged from 200 μm to 1000 μm), the FMR frequency was extracted and proven to increase as a result of lamination. The degree to which the frequency is boosted by lamination increases exponentially as the length of the film is decreased. Through a combination of lamination and shape demagnetization, the effective anisotropy, which directly relates to FMR frequency, was shown to increase by about 100%.

  10. In vitro evidence for a bacterial pathogenesis of equine laminitis.

    PubMed

    Mungall, B A; Kyaw-Tanner, M; Pollitt, C C

    2001-04-01

    Utilizing an in vitro laminitis explant model, we have investigated how bacterial broth cultures and purified bacterial proteases activate matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and alter structural integrity of cultured equine lamellar hoof explants. Four Gram-positive Streptococcus spp. and three Gram-negative bacteria all induced a dose-dependent activation of MMP-2 and MMP-9 and caused lamellar explants to separate. MMP activation was deemed to have occurred if a specific MMP inhibitor, batimastat, blocked MMP activity and prevented lamellar separation. Thermolysin and streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin B (SpeB) both separated explants dose-dependently but only thermolysin was inhibitable by batimastat or induced MMP activation equivalent to that seen with bacterial broths. Additionally, thermolysin and broth MMP activation appeared to be cell dependent as MMP activation did not occur in isolation. These results suggest the rapid increase in streptococcal species in the caecum and colon observed in parallel with carbohydrate induced equine laminitis may directly cause laminitis via production of exotoxin(s) capable of activating resident MMPs within the lamellar structure. Once activated, these MMPs can degrade key components of the basement membrane (BM) hemidesmosome complex, ultimately separating the BM from the epidermal basal cells resulting in the characteristic laminitis histopathology of hoof lamellae. While many different causative agents have been evaluated in the past, the results of this study provide a unifying aetiological mechanism for the development of carbohydrate induced equine laminitis. PMID:11240100

  11. Tension fatigue analysis and life prediction for composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, T. K.; Rigamonti, M.; Zanotti, C.

    1988-01-01

    A tension fatigue life prediction methodology for composite laminates is presented. Tension fatigue tests were conducted on quasi-isotropic and orthotropic glass epoxy, graphite epoxy, and glass/graphite epoxy hybrid laminates. Edge delamination onset data were used to generate plots of strain energy release rate as a function of cycles to delamination onset. These plots were then used along with strain energy release rate analyses of delaminations initiating at matrix cracks to predict local delamination onset. Stiffness loss was measured experimentally to account for the accumulation of matrix cracks and for delamination growth. Fatigue failure was predicted by comparing the increase in global strain resulting from stiffness loss to the decrease in laminate failure strain resulting from delaminations forming at matrix cracks through the laminate thickness. Good agreement between measured and predicted lives indicated that the through-thickness damage accumulation model can accurately describe fatigue failure for laminates where the delamination onset behavior in fatigue is well characterized, and stiffness loss can be monitored in real time to account for damage growth.

  12. Cloning and Characterization of Sf9 Cell Lamin and the Lamin Conformational Changes during Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus Infection.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wenqiang; Wang, Hongju; Li, Xiaoya; Fang, Na; Yang, Shili; Liu, Hongyan; Kang, Xiaonan; Sun, Xiulian; Ji, Shaoping

    2016-01-01

    At present, the details of lamina alterations after baculovirus infection remain elusive. In this study, a lamin gene in the Sf9 cell line of Spodoptera frugiperda was cloned. The open reading frame (orf) of the Sf9 lamin was 1860 bp and encoded a protein with a molecular weight of 70 kDa. A transfection assay with a red fluorescence protein (rfp)-lamin fusion protein indicated that Sf9 lamin was localized in the nuclear rim. Transmission electron microscopy observations indicated that Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) nucleocapsids may pass through the nuclear envelope. Immunofluorescence assay indicated that the lamina showed a ruffled staining pattern with the formation of invaginations in the Sf9 cells infected with AcMNPV, while it was evenly distributed at the nuclear periphery of mock-infected cells. Western blotting results indicated that the total amount of lamin in the baculovirus-infected Sf9 cells was significantly decreased compared with the mock-infected cells. These results imply that AcMNPV infection induces structural and biochemical rearrangements of lamina of Sf9 cells. PMID:27164127

  13. Cloning and Characterization of Sf9 Cell Lamin and the Lamin Conformational Changes during Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wenqiang; Wang, Hongju; Li, Xiaoya; Fang, Na; Yang, Shili; Liu, Hongyan; Kang, Xiaonan; Sun, Xiulian; Ji, Shaoping

    2016-01-01

    At present, the details of lamina alterations after baculovirus infection remain elusive. In this study, a lamin gene in the Sf9 cell line of Spodoptera frugiperda was cloned. The open reading frame (orf) of the Sf9 lamin was 1860 bp and encoded a protein with a molecular weight of 70 kDa. A transfection assay with a red fluorescence protein (rfp)-lamin fusion protein indicated that Sf9 lamin was localized in the nuclear rim. Transmission electron microscopy observations indicated that Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) nucleocapsids may pass through the nuclear envelope. Immunofluorescence assay indicated that the lamina showed a ruffled staining pattern with the formation of invaginations in the Sf9 cells infected with AcMNPV, while it was evenly distributed at the nuclear periphery of mock-infected cells. Western blotting results indicated that the total amount of lamin in the baculovirus-infected Sf9 cells was significantly decreased compared with the mock-infected cells. These results imply that AcMNPV infection induces structural and biochemical rearrangements of lamina of Sf9 cells. PMID:27164127

  14. Mechanisms of compressive failure in woven composites and stitched laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, B. N.; Dadkhah, M. S.; Inman, R. V.; Morris, W. L.; Schroeder, S.

    1992-01-01

    Stitched laminates and angle interlock woven composites have been studied in uniaxial, in-plane, monotonic compression. Failure mechanisms have been found to depend strongly on both the reinforcement architecture and the degree of constraint imposed by the loading grips. Stitched laminates show higher compressive strength, but are brittle, possessing no load bearing capacity beyond the strain for peak load. Post-mortem inspection shows a localized shear band of buckled and broken fibers, which is evidently the product of an unstably propagating kink band. Similar shear bands are found in the woven composites if the constraint of lateral displacements is weak; but, under strong constraint, damage is not localized but distributed throughout the gauge section. While the woven composites tested are weaker than the stitched laminates, they continue to bear significant loads to compressive strains of approx. 15 percent, even when most damage is confined to a shear band.

  15. Low-temperature mechanical properties of glass/epoxy laminates

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, R. P.; Madhukar, M.; Thaicharoenporn, B.; Martovetsky, N. N.

    2014-01-27

    Selected mechanical properties of glass/epoxy laminate candidates for use in the electrical turn and ground insulation of the ITER Central solenoid (CS) modules were measured. Short-beam shear and flexural tests have been conducted on various E-glass cloth weaves/epoxy laminates at 295 and 77 K. Types of glass weave include 1581, 7500, 7781, and 38050, which represent both satin and plain weaves. The epoxy, planned for use for vacuum-pressure impregnation of the CS module, consists of an anhydride-cured bisphenol F resin system. Inter-laminar shear strength, flexural elastic modulus, and flexural strength have been measured. The data indicate that these properties are dependent on the volume percent of glass. Short-beam shear strength was measured as a function of the span-to-thickness ratio for all laminates at 77 K. Comprehensive fractography was conducted to obtain the failure mode of each short-beam shear test sample.

  16. Low-temperature mechanical properties of glass/epoxy laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, R. P.; Madhukar, M.; Thaicharoenporn, B.; Martovetsky, N. N.

    2014-01-01

    Selected mechanical properties of glass/epoxy laminate candidates for use in the electrical turn and ground insulation of the ITER Central solenoid (CS) modules were measured. Short-beam shear and flexural tests have been conducted on various E-glass cloth weaves/epoxy laminates at 295 and 77 K. Types of glass weave include 1581, 7500, 7781, and 38050, which represent both satin and plain weaves. The epoxy, planned for use for vacuum-pressure impregnation of the CS module, consists of an anhydride-cured bisphenol F resin system. Inter-laminar shear strength, flexural elastic modulus, and flexural strength have been measured. The data indicate that these properties are dependent on the volume percent of glass. Short-beam shear strength was measured as a function of the span-to-thickness ratio for all laminates at 77 K. Comprehensive fractography was conducted to obtain the failure mode of each short-beam shear test sample.

  17. Design of composite laminates for optimum frequency response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayikci, Rengin; Sonmez, Fazil O.

    2012-04-01

    In this study, natural frequency response of symmetrically laminated composite plates was optimized. An analytical model accounting for bending-twisting effects was used to determine the laminate natural frequency. Two different problems, fundamental frequency maximization and frequency separation maximization, were considered. Fiber orientation angles were chosen as design variables. Because of the existence of numerous local optimums, a global search algorithm, a variant of simulated annealing, was utilized to find the optimal designs. Results were obtained for different plate aspect ratios. Effects of the number of design variables and the range of values they may take on the optimal frequency were investigated. Problems in which fiber angles showed uncertainty were considered. Optimal frequency response of laminates subjected to static loads was also investigated.

  18. Lamin A/C, laminopathies and premature ageing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Baohua; Zhou, Zhongjun

    2008-06-01

    Lamin A/C belongs to type V intermediate filaments and constitutes the nuclear lamina and nuclear matrix, where a variety of nuclear activities occur. Lamin A/C protein is firstly synthesized as a precursor and is further proteolytically processed by the zinc metallo-proteinase Ste24 (Zmpste24). Lamin A/C mutations cause a series of human diseases, collectively called laminopathies, the most severe of which is Hutchinson Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) and restrictive dermopathy (RD) which arises due to an unsuccessful maturation of prelamin A. Although the exact underlying molecular mechanisms are still poorly understood, genomic instability, defective nuclear mechanics and mechanotransduction, have been hypothesized to be responsible for laminopathy-based premature ageing. Removal of unprocessed prelamin A (progerin) or rescue of defective DNA repair could be potential therapeutic strategies for the treatment of HGPS in future. PMID:18366013

  19. Evaluation of laminated composite structures using ultrasonic attenuation measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Peitao; Houghton, J. R.

    The existence of delamination and porosity in laminated composite structures will degrade the strength of the structures. The detection of delamination can be easily obtained using ultrasonic C-scan or A-scan methods. But, the detection of porosity in laminated structures has been a difficult task for years, especially in production condition. This paper will analytically evaluate the current techniques used in industry, and develop accurate attenuation measurement methods for the evaluation of porosity. The test samples, which are used in the laminated structures of the German airbus by Textron Aerostructures, Inc, will be tested using ultrasonic C-scan and grid-based A-scan methods. The digitized waveforms are stored and analyzed using different attenuation measurement algorithms. The volume of porosity is calculated using digital imaging analysis. Finally, the correlation between ultrasonic attenuation and the volume fraction of porosity are calculated and analyzed.

  20. Snap-Through of Unsymmetric Laminates Using Piezocomposite Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, Marc R.; Hyer, Michael W.; Williams, R. Brett; Wilkie, W. Keats; Inman, Daniel J.

    2006-01-01

    The paper discusses the concept of using a piezoceramic actuator bonded to one side of a two-layer unsymmetric cross-ply [0/90]T laminate to provide the moments necessary to snap the laminate from one stable equilibrium shape to another. This concept could be applied to the morphing of structures. A model of this concept, which is based on the Rayleigh-Ritz technique and the use of energy and variational methods, is developed. The experimental phase of the study is discussed, including the measurement of the voltage level needed to snap the laminate. The voltage measurements and shapes are compared with predictions of the models and the agreement between measurements and the predictions are reasonable, both qualitatively and quantitatively. Suggestions for future activities are presented.

  1. Laminate composites with enhanced pyroelectric effects for energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, H. H. S.; Huang, Z.

    2010-06-01

    A pyroelectric coefficient enhanced 2-2 connectivity laminate composites' energy harvesting credentials have been assessed. The use of the electrothermal coupling factor for laminate composites (kLam2) for such an assessment has been appraised while the experimental samples are evaluated to show a significant improvement in their performance via pyroelectric coefficient enhancement, demonstrative of their great potential in energy harvesting applications. A lead zirconate titanate and stainless steel laminate composite with an 88% pyroelectric coefficient enhancement is shown to increase its maximum power density, efficiency, and electrothermal coupling factor by 254%, while other material pairings have also been evaluated to exhibit great promise in this application owing to a large pyroelectric coefficient enhancement accompanied by a reduction in total thermal mass.

  2. Damage prediction in cross-plied curved composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Roderick H.; Jackson, Wade C.

    1991-01-01

    Analytical and experimental work is detailed which is required to predict delamination onset and growth in a curved cross plied composite laminate subjected to static and fatigue loads. The composite used was AS4/3501/6, graphite/epoxy. Analytically, a closed form stress analysis and 2-D and 3-D finite element analyses were conducted to determine the stress distribution in an undamaged curved laminate. The finite element analysis was also used to determine values of strain energy release rate at a delamination emanating from a matrix crack in a 90 deg ply. Experimentally, transverse tensile strength and fatigue life were determined from flat 90 deg coupons. The interlaminar tensile strength and fatigue life were determined from double cantilevered beam specimens. Cross plied curved laminates were tested statically and in fatigue to give a comparison to the analytical predictions. A comparison of the fracture mechanics life prediction technique and the strength based prediction technique is given.

  3. Finite element analysis of laminated composite paraboloid of revolution shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, A.; Bandyopadhyay, J. N.; Sinha, P. K.

    1992-07-01

    A generalized formulation for the doubly curved laminated composite shell is attempted using eight-noded curved quadratic isoparametric finite elements with all three radii of curvature. The formulation is also applied to the isotropic material as a special case. In the present investigation, only the paraboloid of revolution is taken up for computing the deflections and stress resultants. Various parametric studies are carried out and the current results for both isotropic and laminated composite shells are compared with those available in the published literature. The shape functions are obtained from interpolation polynomial and the element stiffness matrices are formed on the basis of macromechanical analysis of laminates using the principle of minimum potential energy.

  4. A perturbation solution for interlaminar stresses in bidirectional laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, P. W.; Herakovich, C. T.

    1977-01-01

    The paper considers a thin elastic bidirectional symmetric composite laminate subjected to a uniform axial strain. All interlaminar stresses are determined by a zeroth-order perturbation analysis of the governing equations. The method of solution considers the laminate to be composed of an interior region (removed from the free edge) and a boundary layer region. The interior region is analyzed by dropping terms related to powers of the thickness-to-width ratio in the dimensionless elasticity equations. The boundary layer region is studied by introducing a stretching transformation to the governing equations. A uniform solution is then formed by satisfying Prandtl's matching principle of perturbation theory. Results for a four-layer bidirectional graphite-epoxy laminate are compared with existing finite-difference results. It is shown that the perturbation analysis provides more insight into the stress distribution near the free edge.

  5. Predicting viscoelastic response and delayed failures in general laminated composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillard, D. A.; Morris, D. H.; Brinson, H. F.

    1982-01-01

    Although graphite fibers behave in an essentially elastic manner, the polymeric matrix of graphite/epoxy composites is a viscoelastic material which exhibits creep and delayed failures. The creep process is quite slow at room temperature, but may be accelerated by higher temperatures, moisture absorption, and other factors. Techniques are being studied to predict long-term behavior of general laminates based on short-term observations of the unidirectional material at elevated temperatures. A preliminary numerical procedure based on lamination theory is developed for predicting creep and delayed failures in laminated composites. A modification of the Findley nonlinear power law is used to model the constitutive behavior of a lamina. An adaptation of the Tsai-Hill failure criterion is used to predict the time-dependent strength of a lamina. Predicted creep and delayed failure results are compared with typical experimental data.

  6. Proteins that associate with lamins: Many faces, many functions

    SciTech Connect

    Schirmer, Eric C. . E-mail: e.schirmer@ed.ac.uk; Foisner, Roland . E-mail: roland.foisner@meduniwien.ac.at

    2007-06-10

    Lamin-associated polypeptides (LAPs) comprise inner nuclear membrane proteins tightly associated with the peripheral lamin scaffold as well as proteins forming stable complexes with lamins in the nucleoplasm. The involvement of LAPs in a wide range of human diseases may be linked to an equally bewildering range of their functions, including sterol reduction, histone modification, transcriptional repression, and Smad- and {beta}-catenin signaling. Many LAPs are likely to be at the center of large multi-protein complexes, components of which may dictate their functions, and a few LAPs have defined enzymatic activities. Here we discuss the definition of LAPs, review their many binding partners, elaborate their functions in nuclear architecture, chromatin organization, gene expression and signaling, and describe what is currently known about their links to human disease.

  7. Compression and compression fatigue testing of composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, T. R.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of moisture and temperature on the fatigue and fracture response of composite laminates under compression loads were investigated. The structural laminates studied were an intermediate stiffness graphite-epoxy composite (a typical angle ply laimna liminate had a typical fan blade laminate). Full and half penetration slits and impact delaminations were the defects examined. Results are presented which show the effects of moisture on the fracture and fatigue strength at room temperature, 394 K (250 F), and 422 K (300 F). Static tests results show the effects of defect size and type on the compression-fracture strength under moisture and thermal environments. The cyclic tests results compare the fatigue lives and residual compression strength under compression only and under tension-compression fatigue loading.

  8. Fracture behavior of unidirectional boron/aluminum composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, F. W.; Goree, J. G.

    1983-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the fracture behavior of unidirectional boron/aluminum composite laminates was conducted in order to verify the results of mathematical models. These models predict the fiber stresses and displacements and the amount of damage growth in a center-notched lamina as a function of the applied remote stress and the matrix and fiber material properties. A brittle lacquer coating was used to detect the yielding in the matrix while X-ray techniques were used to determine the number of broken fibers in the laminate. The notched strengths and the amounts of damage found in the specimens agreed well with those predicted by the models. It was shown that for thin laminates the amount of damage and the fiber displacements do not depend strongly on the number of plies for a given notch width.

  9. Low velocity impact of inclined CSM composite laminates

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, W.S.; Madjidi, S.; Marshall, I.H.; Robb, M.D.

    1993-12-31

    The damage tolerance of composite laminates subject to low velocity impact is an important aspect of current design philosophies required to ensure the integrity of primary load bearing structures. To the authors knowledge, no work published in the open literature has addressed the damage tolerance of composites subject to impacts at non-perpendicular inclinations, which in practical situations is the most common form of impact. This paper describes an experimental study, devised to assess the influence of inclined impact on the residual strength characteristics of CSM laminates. Preliminary experimental results and comparisons with previous work on flat plate impact tests are presented. The influence of the degree of inclination and impact energy are correlated with the laminates damage area and residual tensile properties.

  10. Multiscale modeling of damage in multidirectional composite laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Chandra Veer

    The problem of damage accumulation in laminated composite materials has received much attention due to their widespread application in the aerospace, automotive, civil, and sports industries. In the aerospace industry, composites are used to make light weight and efficient structural components. In the Boeing 787, for example, more than 50% of the structure is made of composite materials. Although there have been significant developments in analyzing cross-ply laminates, none of the present approaches provides reasonable predictions for multidirectional laminates in which intralaminar cracks may form in multiple orientations. Nevertheless, the prediction of damage accumulation and its effect on structural performance is a very difficult problem due to complexity of the cracking processes. This study presents a synergistic damage mechanics (SDM) methodology to analyze damage behavior in multidirectional composite laminates with intralaminar cracks in plies of multiple orientations. SDM combines the strengths of micro-damage mechanics (MDM) and continuum damage mechanics (CDM) in predicting the stiffness degradation due to these cracks. The micromechanics is performed on a representative unit cell using a three-dimensional finite element analysis to calculate the crack opening displacement accounting for the influence of the surrounding plies, the so-called constraint effect. This information is then incorporated in the CDM formulation dealing with laminates containing cracks in different ply orientations through a 'constraint parameter'. Following CDM, a separate damage mode is defined for each type of crack and the expressions for engineering moduli of the damaged laminate are then derived in terms of crack density and the constraint parameter. The SDM methodology is implemented for [0 m/+/- thetan/0 m/2]s laminates containing cracks in +/-theta plies. It is then extended to [0m /+/- thetan/90 r]s and [0m/90 r/+/- thetan] s laminates with cracks additionally in the

  11. Some engineering properties of cotton-phenolic laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, R. P.; Toplosky, V. J.

    2002-05-01

    Although cotton/phenolic laminates are commonly used at cryogenic temperatures as structural and insulating materials, the available low temperature materials properties data is limited. We have reviewed the existing low temperature database for cotton/phenolic and have identified areas of need. We have conducted a materials test program on the two common types (linen and canvas) of cotton/phenolic laminates to add to the existing database and to generate new data in areas where needed. Also included is a comparison of cotton/phenolic engineering properties to the properties of NEMA G-10 CR glass-cloth reinforced laminate. The properties studied here are tensile and compressive strength, elastic modulus, shear properties and thermal expansion characteristics over the temperature range from 295 K to 4 K.

  12. 40 CFR 426.70 - Applicability; description of the automotive glass laminating subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... automotive glass laminating subcategory. 426.70 Section 426.70 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS GLASS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Automotive Glass Laminating Subcategory § 426.70 Applicability; description of the automotive...

  13. 40 CFR 426.70 - Applicability; description of the automotive glass laminating subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... automotive glass laminating subcategory. 426.70 Section 426.70 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) GLASS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Automotive Glass Laminating Subcategory § 426.70 Applicability; description of the...

  14. 40 CFR 426.70 - Applicability; description of the automotive glass laminating subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... automotive glass laminating subcategory. 426.70 Section 426.70 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) GLASS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Automotive Glass Laminating Subcategory § 426.70 Applicability; description of the...

  15. 40 CFR 426.70 - Applicability; description of the automotive glass laminating subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... automotive glass laminating subcategory. 426.70 Section 426.70 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS GLASS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Automotive Glass Laminating Subcategory § 426.70 Applicability; description of the automotive...

  16. 40 CFR 426.70 - Applicability; description of the automotive glass laminating subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... automotive glass laminating subcategory. 426.70 Section 426.70 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) GLASS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Automotive Glass Laminating Subcategory § 426.70 Applicability; description of the...

  17. Development of laminated fiber-reinforced nanocomposites for bone regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Weijie

    There have been numerous efforts to develop synthetic and/or natural tissue engineering scaffolds that are suitable for bone regeneration applications to replace autograft and allograft bones. Current biomaterials as a scaffold for bone regeneration are limited by the extent of degradation concurrent with bone formation, mechanical strength, and the extent of osteogenic differentiation of marrow stromal cells migrating from the surrounding tissues. In this project, a novel laminated nanocomposite scaffold is fabricated, consisting of poly (L-lactide ethylene oxide fumarate) (PLEOF) hydrogel reinforced with poly (L-lactic acid) (PLLA) electrospun nanofibers and hydroxyapatite (HA) nanoparticles. PLEOF is a novel in situ crosslinkable macromer synthesized from biocompatible building units which can be functionalized with bioactive peptides like the cell-adhesive Arg--Gly--Asp (RGD) amino acid sequence. The hydrophilicity and degradation rate of the macromer can be tailored to a particular application by controlling the ratio of PEG to PLA blocks in the macromer and the unsaturated fumarate units can be used for in-situ crosslinking. The PLLA nanofibers were electrospun from high molecular weight PLLA. The laminated nanocomposites were fabricated by dry-hand lay up technique followed by compression molding and thermal crosslinking. The laminated nanocomposites were evaluated with respect to degradation, water uptake, mechanical strength, and the extent of osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal (BMS) cells. Laminates with or without HA nanoparticles showed modulus values much higher than that of trabecular bone (50-100 MPa). The effect of laminated nanocomposites on osteogenic differentiation of BMS cells was determined in terms of cell number, ALPase activity and calcium content. Our results demonstrate that grafting RGD peptide and HA nanoparticles to a PLEOF hydrogel reinforced with PLLA nanofibers synergistically enhance osteogenic differentiation of BMS

  18. Prelamin A and lamin A appear to be dispensable in the nuclear lamina.

    PubMed

    Fong, Loren G; Ng, Jennifer K; Lammerding, Jan; Vickers, Timothy A; Meta, Margarita; Coté, Nathan; Gavino, Bryant; Qiao, Xin; Chang, Sandy Y; Young, Stephanie R; Yang, Shao H; Stewart, Colin L; Lee, Richard T; Bennett, C Frank; Bergo, Martin O; Young, Stephen G

    2006-03-01

    Lamin A and lamin C, both products of Lmna, are key components of the nuclear lamina. In the mouse, a deficiency in both lamin A and lamin C leads to slow growth, muscle weakness, and death by 6 weeks of age. Fibroblasts deficient in lamins A and C contain misshapen and structurally weakened nuclei, and emerin is mislocalized away from the nuclear envelope. The physiologic rationale for the existence of the 2 different Lmna products lamin A and lamin C is unclear, although several reports have suggested that lamin A may have particularly important functions, for example in the targeting of emerin and lamin C to the nuclear envelope. Here we report the development of lamin C-only mice (Lmna(LCO/LCO)), which produce lamin C but no lamin A or prelamin A (the precursor to lamin A). Lmna(LCO/LCO) mice were entirely healthy, and Lmna(LCO/LCO) cells displayed normal emerin targeting and exhibited only very minimal alterations in nuclear shape and nuclear deformability. Thus, at least in the mouse, prelamin A and lamin A appear to be dispensable. Nevertheless, an accumulation of farnesyl-prelamin A (as occurs with a deficiency in the prelamin A processing enzyme Zmpste24) caused dramatically misshapen nuclei and progeria-like disease phenotypes. The apparent dispensability of prelamin A suggested that lamin A-related progeroid syndromes might be treated with impunity by reducing prelamin A synthesis. Remarkably, the presence of a single Lmna(LCO) allele eliminated the nuclear shape abnormalities and progeria-like disease phenotypes in Zmpste24-/- mice. Moreover, treating Zmpste24-/- cells with a prelamin A-specific antisense oligonucleotide reduced prelamin A levels and significantly reduced the frequency of misshapen nuclei. These studies suggest a new therapeutic strategy for treating progeria and other lamin A diseases. PMID:16511604

  19. Optimum single modal and bimodal buckling design of symmetric laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qian, B.; Reiss, R.; Aung, W.

    1989-01-01

    Variational calculus is used to determine the design that maximizes the resistance of classical symmetric laminates against buckling. The orientations of the constituent orthotropic laminae with respect to the principal axes of the laminate are the design variables. It is shown that the optimal design may not be a point of analyticity of the buckling load. Local analytic extrema are obtained from the design derivatives of the buckling load. Nonanalytic extrema occur whenever the buckling load is a repeated eigenvalue. A novel approach, using a directional design derivative, is employed to determine nonanalytic extrema. Specific examples are presented for biaxial buckling for several different boundary conditions.

  20. Laminated active matrix organic light-emitting devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongyu; Sun, Runguang

    2008-02-01

    Laminated active matrix organic light-emitting device (AMOLED) realizing top emission by using bottom-emitting organic light-emitting diode (OLED) structure was proposed. The multilayer structure of OLED deposited in the conventional sequence is not on the thin film transistor (TFT) backplane but on the OLED plane. The contact between the indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode of TFT backplane and metal cathode of OLED plane is implemented by using transfer electrode. The stringent pixel design for aperture ratio of the bottom-emitting AMOLED, as well as special technology for the top ITO electrode of top-emitting AMOLED, is unnecessary in the laminated AMOLED.

  1. Complex response of a bistable laminated plate: Multiscale entropy analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borowiec, M.; Rysak, A.; Betts, D. N.; Bowen, C. R.; Kim, H. A.; Litak, G.

    2014-10-01

    The use of bistable laminates is a potential approach to realize more broadband piezoelectric based energy harvesting systems. Based on the experimental time series of a bistable laminate plate we have examined its dynamic response. The system was subjected to harmonic excitations showing the existence of single well and snap-through vibrations of periodic and chaotic character. To identify the dynamics of the system response we examine the frequency spectrum, phase portraits and multi-scaled entropy. It is observed that the composite multiscale entropy analysis can be used to identify complexity within the dynamic response successfully.

  2. A higher order theory of laminated composite cylindrical shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishna Murthy, A. V.; Reddy, T. S. R.

    1986-01-01

    A new higher order theory has been proposed for the analysis of composite cylindrical shells. The formulation allows for arbitrary variation of inplane displacements. Governing equations are presented in the form of a hierarchy of sets of partial differential equations. Each set describes the shell behavior to a certain degree of approximation. The natural frequencies of simply-supported isotropic and laminated shells and stresses in a ring loaded composite shell have been determined to various orders of approximation and compared with three dimensional solutions. These numerical studies indicate the improvements achievable in estimating the natural frequencies and the interlaminar shear stresses in laminated composite cylinders.

  3. Postbuckling analysis of composite laminated cylindrical panels under axial compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kweon, J. H.; Hong, C. S.

    1993-08-01

    The nonlinear finite element method is used to analyze the postbuckling behavior of composite laminated cylindrical panels with various stacking sequences under compression. The analysis is based on the updated Lagrangian formulation, an eight-node degenerated shell element, and an improved load-increment method based on the arc-length scheme. Results reveal that the postbuckling loads carrying capacities of laminated cylindrical panels under compression are largely dependent on the bending stiffness component. Not only the buckling loads but also the postbuckling load-carrying capacities should be considered in designing the structure.

  4. Metal Matrix Laminate Tailoring (MMLT) code: User's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, P. L. N.; Morel, M. R.; Saravanos, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    The User's Manual for the Metal Matrix Laminate Tailoring (MMLT) program is presented. The code is capable of tailoring the fabrication process, constituent characteristics, and laminate parameters (individually or concurrently) for a wide variety of metal matrix composite (MMC) materials, to improve the performance and identify trends or behavior of MMC's under different thermo-mechanical loading conditions. This document is meant to serve as a guide in the use of the MMLT code. Detailed explanations of the composite mechanics and tailoring analysis are beyond the scope of this document, and may be found in the references. MMLT was developed by the Structural Mechanics Branch at NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC).

  5. Laminated rubber articulated joint for the Deep Water Gravity Tower

    SciTech Connect

    Sedillot, F.; Stevenson, A.

    1983-12-01

    The Deep Water Gravity Tower is an articulated structure resting on a fixed base through an articulated joint which is composed of curved laminated rubber pads, made from alternate layers of rubber and metallic shims. The paper first outlines the main design concept with the articulated joint. Some analysis is then provided of the response to imposed rotation and vertical load. This includes a brief description of the results of a finite element analysis. The paper then reviews the test performed on laminated rubber during 1980 and 1981 to assess the feasibility of the articulation: fatigue tests; environmental tests (effect of sea water, temperature, pressure).

  6. Transient thermal stress analysis of a laminated composite beam

    SciTech Connect

    Tanigawa, Y.; Murakami, H.; Ootao, Y. California Univ., La Jolla Osaka Prefectural Industrial Technology Research Institute )

    1989-01-01

    This paper considers a transient thermal stress analysis of a laminated beam made of different materials in multilayers. To simplify the problem, the heat conduction problem is treated as a one-dimensional case in the direction of thickness; then, the transient temperature solution is evaluated using the Laplace transform method. For the thermoelastic fields, thermal stress distributions are obtained using the elementary beam theory and Airy's thermal stress function method. As an example, numerical calculations are carried out for a laminated beam made of five layers, and the numerical results are examined.

  7. Laminated structures and methods and compositions for producing same

    DOEpatents

    Fumei, Giancarlo J.; Karabedian, James A.

    1977-04-05

    Methods for bonding two substrates, one of which is polymeric, which comprise coating the surface of at least one substrate with an adhesive composition comprising a major component which is an adhesive for the first substrate and a minor disperse phase which is a solution of a polymer in a solvent for the polymeric substrate and contacting the coated surface of the one substrate with the surface of the other substrate, together with adhesive compositions useful for joining such substrates, laminates so formed, and articles comprised of such laminates.

  8. Analysis of interlaminar stresses in thick composite laminates with and without edge delamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitcomb, J. D.; Raju, I. S.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of laminate thickness on the interlaminar stresses in rectangular quasi-isotropic laminates under uniform axial strain was studied. Laminates from 8-ply to infinitely thick were analyzed. Thick laminates were synthesized by stacking (45/0/-45/90) ply groups, rather than grouping like plies. Laminates with and without delaminations were studied. In laminates without delaminations, the free-edge interlaminar normal stress distribution in the outer ply groups was insensitive to total laminate thickness. The interlaminar normal stress distribution for the interior ply groups was nearly the same as for an infinitely thick laminate. In contrast, the free-edge inter-laminar shear stress distribution was nearly the same for inner and outer ply groups and was insensitive to laminate thickness. In laminates with delaminations those delaminations near the top and bottom surfaces of a thick laminate have much larger total strain-energy-release rates (G sub t) and mode I-to-total (G sub t/G sub t) ratios than delaminations deep in the interior. Therefore, delaminations can be expected to grow more easily near the surfaces of a laminate than in the interior.

  9. Analysis of interlaminar stresses in thick composite laminates with and without edge delamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitcomb, J. D.; Raju, I. S.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of laminate thickness on the interlaminar stresses in rectangular quasi-isotropic laminates under uniform axial strain was studied. Laminates from 8-ply to infinitely thick were analyzed. Thick laminates were synthesized by stacking (45/0/-45/90) ply groups, rather than grouping like plies. Laminates with and without delaminations were studied. In laminates without delaminations, the free-edge interlaminar normal stress distribution in the outer ply groups was insensitive to total laminate thickness. The interlaminar normal stress distribution for the interior ply groups was nearly the same as for an infinitely thick laminate. In contrast, the free-edge inter-laminar shear stress distribution was nearly the same for inner and outer ply groups and was insensitive to laminate thickness. In laminates with delaminations those delaminations near the top and bottom surfaces of a thick laminate have much larger total strain-energy-release rates (G sub t) and mode I-to-total (G sub t/G sub t) ratios than delaminations deep in the interior. Therefore, delaminations can be expected to grow more easily near the surfaces of a laminate than in the interior.

  10. Nuclear envelope remodeling during mouse spermiogenesis: Postmeiotic expression and redistribution of germline lamin B3

    SciTech Connect

    Schuetz, Wolfgang; Alsheimer, Manfred; Oellinger, Rupert; Benavente, Ricardo . E-mail: benavente@biozentrum.uni-wuerzburg.de

    2005-07-15

    Lamins are members of a multigene family of structural nuclear envelope (NE) proteins. Differentiated mammalian somatic cells express lamins A, C, B1, and B2. The composition and organization of the nuclear lamina of mammalian spermatogenic cells differ significantly from that of somatic cells as they express lamin B1 as well as two short germ line-specific isoforms, namely lamins B3 and C2. Here we describe in detail the expression pattern and localization of lamin B3 during mouse spermatogenesis. By combining RT-PCR, immunoblotting, and immunofluorescence microscopy, we show that lamin B3 is selectively expressed during spermiogenesis (i.e., postmeiotic stages of spermatogenesis). In round spermatids, lamin B3 is distributed in the nuclear periphery and, notably, also in the nucleoplasm. In the course of spermiogenesis, lamin B3 becomes redistributed as it concentrates progressively to the posterior pole of spermatid nuclei. Our results show that during mammalian spermiogenesis the nuclear lamina is composed of B-type isoforms only, namely the ubiquitous lamin B1 and the germline-specific lamin B3. Lamin B3 is the first example of a mammalian lamin that is selectively expressed during postmeiotic stages of spermatogenesis.

  11. Altering lamina assembly reveals lamina-dependent and -independent functions for A-type lamins.

    PubMed

    Zwerger, Monika; Roschitzki-Voser, Heidi; Zbinden, Reto; Denais, Celine; Herrmann, Harald; Lammerding, Jan; Grütter, Markus G; Medalia, Ohad

    2015-10-01

    Lamins are intermediate filament proteins that form a fibrous meshwork, called the nuclear lamina, between the inner nuclear membrane and peripheral heterochromatin of metazoan cells. The assembly and incorporation of lamin A/C into the lamina, as well as their various functions, are still not well understood. Here, we employed designed ankyrin repeat proteins (DARPins) as new experimental tools for lamin research. We screened for DARPins that specifically bound to lamin A/C, and interfered with lamin assembly in vitro and with incorporation of lamin A/C into the native lamina in living cells. The selected DARPins inhibited lamin assembly and delocalized A-type lamins to the nucleoplasm without modifying lamin expression levels or the amino acid sequence. Using these lamin binders, we demonstrate the importance of proper integration of lamin A/C into the lamina for nuclear mechanical properties and nuclear envelope integrity. Finally, our study provides evidence for cell-type-specific differences in lamin functions. PMID:26275827

  12. Molecular Genetic Analysis of the Nested Drosophila melanogaster Lamin C Gene

    PubMed Central

    Schulze, Sandra R.; Curio-Penny, Beatrice; Li, Yuhong; Imani, Reza A.; Rydberg, Lena; Geyer, Pamela K.; Wallrath, Lori L.

    2005-01-01

    Lamins are intermediate filaments that line the inner surface of the nuclear envelope, providing structural support and making contacts with chromatin. There are two types of lamins, A- and B-types, which differ in structure and expression. Drosophila possesses both lamin types, encoded by the LamC (A-type) and lamin Dm0 (B-type) genes. LamC is nested within an intron of the essential gene ttv. We demonstrate that null mutations in LamC are lethal, and expression of a wild-type LamC transgene rescues lethality of LamC but not ttv mutants. Mutations in the human A-type lamin gene lead to diseases called laminopathies. To determine if Drosophila might serve as a useful model to study lamin biology and disease mechanisms, we generated transgenic flies expressing mutant LamC proteins modeled after human disease-causing lamins. These transgenic animals display a nuclear lamin aggregation phenotype remarkably similar to that observed when human mutant A-type lamins are expressed in mammalian cells. LamC aggregates also cause disorganization of lamin Dm0, indicating interdependence of both lamin types for proper lamina assembly. Taken together, these data provide the first detailed genetic analysis of the LamC gene and support using Drosophila as a model to study the role of lamins in disease. PMID:15965247

  13. Nuclear lamins and peripheral nuclear antigens during fertilization and embryogenesis in mice and sea urchins

    SciTech Connect

    Schatten, G.; Schatten, H.; Simerly, C.; Maul, G.G.; Chaly, N.

    1985-07-01

    Nuclear structural changes during fertilization and embryogenesis in mice and sea urchins are traced using four antibodies. The oocytes from virgin female mice, morulae and blastocytes from mated females, and gametes from the sea urchin Lytechnius variegatis are studied using mouse monoclonal antibodies to nuclear lamin A/C, monoclonal antibody to P1, human autoimmune antibodies to lamin A/C, and to lamin B. The mouse fertilization data reveal no lamins on the oocyte; however, lamins are present on the pronuclei, and chromosomes are found on the oocytes and pronuclei. It is detected that on the sea urchin sperm the lamins are reduced to acrosomal and centriolar fossae and peripheral antigens are around the sperm nucleus. The mouse sperm bind lamin antibodies regionally and do not contain antigens. Lamins and antigens are observed on both pronuclei and chromosomes during sea urchin fertilization. Mouse embryogenesis reveals that lamin A/C is not recognized at morula and blastocyst stages; however, lamin B stains are retained. In sea urchin embryogenesis lamin recognition is lost at the blastrula, gastrula, and plutei stages. It is noted that nuclear lamins lost during spermatogenesis are restored at fertilization and peripheral antigens are associated with the surface of chromosomes during meiosis and mitosis and with the periphery of the pronuclei and nuclei during interphase. 32 references.

  14. Nuclear lamins and peripheral nuclear antigens during fertilization and embryogenesis in mice and sea urchins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatten, G.; Schatten, H.; Simerly, C.; Maul, G. G.; Chaly, N.

    1985-01-01

    Nuclear structural changes during fertilization and embryogenesis in mice and sea urchins are traced using four antibodies. The oocytes from virgin female mice, morulae and blastocytes from mated females, and gametes from the sea urchin Lytechnius variegatis are studied using mouse monoclonal antibodies to nuclear lamin A/C, monoclonal antibody to P1, human autoimmune antibodies to lamin A/C, and to lamin B. The mouse fertilization data reveal no lamins on the oocyte; however, lamins are present on the pronuclei, and chromosomes are found on the oocytes and pronuclei. It is detected that on the sea urchin sperm the lamins are reduced to acrosomal and centriolar fossae and peripheral antigens are around the sperm nucleus. The mouse sperm bind lamin antibodies regionally and do not contain antigens. Lamins and antigens are observed on both pronuclei and chromosomes during sea urchin fertilization. Mouse embryogenesis reveals that lamin A/C is not recognized at morula and blastocyst stages; however, lamin B stains are retained. In sea urchin embryogenesis lamin recognition is lost at the blastrula, gastrula, and plutei stages. It is noted that nuclear lamins lost during spermatogenesis are restored at fertilization and peripheral antigens are associated with the surface of chromosomes during meiosis and mitosis and with the periphery of the pronuclei and nuclei during interphase.

  15. A study of diamond laminated surfaces in evaporative spray cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sehmbey, M. S.; Pais, M. R.; Chow, L. C.

    This effort is directed towards studying the performance of diamond laminated surfaces under conditions of evaporative spray cooling of high-heat-flux electronic components. The experimental results presented illustrate the robustness of the surface, as well as its heat transfer characteristics, wettability and roughness. Exceptional heat flux rates of over 1100 W/sq cm were obtained within superheats of 40 C.

  16. Damage in woven CFRP laminates subjected to low velocity impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah, H.; Abdel-Wahab, A. A.; Harland, A. R.; Silberschmidt, V. V.

    2012-08-01

    Carbon fabric-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites used in sports products can be exposed to different in-service conditions such as large dynamic bending deformations caused by impact loading. Composite materials subjected to such loads demonstrate various damage modes such as matrix cracking, delamination and, ultimately, fabric fracture. Damage evolution in these materials affects both their in-service properties and performance that can deteriorate with time. These processes need adequate means of analysis and investigation, the major approaches being experimental characterisation and non-destructive examination of internal damage in composite laminates. This research deals with a deformation behaviour and damage in woven composite laminates due to low-velocity dynamic out-of-plane bending. Experimental tests are carried out to characterise the behaviour of such laminates under large-deflection dynamic bending in un-notched specimens in Izod tests using a Resil Impactor. A series of low-velocity impact tests is carried out at various levels of impact energy to assess the energy absorbed and force-time response of CFRP laminates. X-ray micro computed tomography (micro-CT) is used to investigate material damage modes in the impacted specimens. X-ray tomographs revealed that through-thickness matrix cracking, inter-ply delamination and intra-ply delamination, such as tow debonding and fabric fracture, were the prominent damage modes.

  17. Polarized light reveals stress in machined laminated plastics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frankowski, J.

    1967-01-01

    Polarized light applied to drilled laminated plastic components exposes to the human eye the locked-in stresses that will result in fractures and delaminations when the soldering procedure takes place. This technique detects stresses early in the production cycle before appreciable man-hours are invested in an item destined for rejection.

  18. An empirical modified fatigue damage model for impacted GFRP laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naderi, S.; Hassan, M. A.; Bushroa, A. R.

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the present paper is to evaluate the residual strength of GFRP laminates following a low-velocity impact event under cyclic loading. The residual strength is calculated using a linear fatigue damage model. According to an investigation into the effect of low-velocity impact on the fatigue behavior of laminates, it seems laminate fatigue life decreases after impact. By normalizing the fatigue stress against undamaged static strength, the Fatigue Damage parameter “FD” is presented with a linear relationship as its slope which is a linear function of the initial impact energy; meanwhile, the constants were attained from experimental data. FD is implemented into a plane-stress continuum damage mechanics based model for GFRP composite laminates, in order to predict damage threshold in composite structures. An S-N curve is implemented to indicate the fatigue behavior for 2 mm thickness encompassing both undamaged and impacted samples. A decline in lifespan is evident when the impact energy level increases. Finally, the FD is intended to capture the unique GFRP composite characteristics.

  19. Purification of Lamins and Soluble Fragments of NETs.

    PubMed

    Makarov, Alexandr A; Rizzotto, Andrea; Meinke, Peter; Schirmer, Eric C

    2016-01-01

    Lamins and associated nuclear envelope transmembrane proteins (NETs) present unique problems for biochemical studies. Lamins form insoluble intermediate filament networks, associate with chromatin, and are also connected via specific NETs to the cytoskeleton, thus further complicating their isolation and purification from mammalian cells. Adding to this complexity, NETs at the inner nuclear membrane function in three distinct environments: (a) their nucleoplasmic domain(s) can bind lamins, chromatin, and transcriptional regulators; (b) they possess one or more integral transmembrane domains; and (c) their lumenal domain(s) function in the unique reducing environment of the nuclear envelope/ER lumen. This chapter describes strategic considerations and protocols to facilitate biochemical studies of lamins and NET proteins in vitro. Studying these proteins in vitro typically involves first expressing specific polypeptide fragments in bacteria and optimizing conditions to purify each fragment. We describe parameters for choosing specific fragments and designing purification strategies and provide detailed purification protocols. Biochemical studies can provide fundamental knowledge including binding strengths and the molecular consequences of disease-causing mutations that will be essential to understand nuclear envelope-genome interactions and nuclear envelope linked disease mechanisms. PMID:26778554

  20. Liquid crystals detect voids in fiber glass laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollar, W. T.

    1967-01-01

    Liquid crystal solution nondestructively detects voids or poor bond lines in fiber glass laminates. A thin coating of the solution is applied by spray or brush to the test article surface, and when heated indicates the exact location of defects by differences in color.

  1. Analyzing the methods and merits of recycling fiber metal laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tempelman, E.; Dalmijn, W. L.; Vlot, A.

    1996-04-01

    It is technically possible to recycle fiber metal laminates (FMLs) by retrieving the aluminum fraction from FML scrap; this reprocessing becomes economically feasible at a throughput of 50 tonnes or more per year. Until then, FML scrap can be dealt with in conventional ways.

  2. Residual strength of metal-matrix laminated panels

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, M.; Wilson, D.

    1997-12-31

    The primary objective of this study was to investigate the residual strength of ARALL-3 and GLARE-2 center-notched panels without stiffeners. The R-curve approach in linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) was used for the residual strength predictions. The applicability of LEFM was verified through a series of tests of ARALL-3 and GLARE-2 center-notched panels with different layups. They demonstrated limited crack-tip plastic deformation. The R-curves calculated from the tests of different size panels with various initial crack extensions showed that they were independent of initial crack length and specimen width, which is true for the monolithic aluminum alloy. Polynomial curve fitting was used to obtain the R-curves for each laminate and laminate layup to be used for the R-curve residual strength predictions. The predictions were made by superimposing the crack driving force curves onto these R-curves to locate the tangent points. The results of prediction of unidirectional fiber/metal laminates proved that the R-curve approach was not only a suitable but simple method that has a great potential in the damage tolerance characterization of certain unstiffened and stiffened laminate materials.

  3. A survey of strength analysis methods for laminates with holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crews, J. H., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The methods for predicting the strength of composite laminates with fastener holes are reviewed for the cases of unloaded as well as loaded holes. Three categories of methods are discussed: (1) the hole-boundary stress (HBS) methods which compare the peak stresses and the laminate strength; (2) the linear elastic fracture (LEFM) methods which assume cracks emanating from the hole and predict failure when the stress intensity factor for a crack equals the laminate fracture toughness; and (3) two different two-parameter (TP) methods: the average-stress (ASTP) method, which predicts failure when the average stress over a distance from the hole equals the laminate strength; and the point-stress (PSTP) Whitney-Nuismer (1974) approach, which predicts failure when the stress near the hole equals the material strength. The PSTP is relatively accurate and is by far the most widely used of all the prediction methods. However, for large ranges of variables and cases, the current strength predictions may not always be accurate.

  4. Dynamic delamination crack propagation in a graphite/epoxy laminate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, J. E.; Sun, C. T.

    1991-01-01

    Dynamic delamination crack propagation in a (90/0) 5s Graphite/Epoxy laminate with an embedded interfacial crack was investigated experimentally using high speed photography. The dynamic motion was produced by impacting the beamlike laminate specimen with a silicon rubber ball. The threshold impact velocities required to initiate dynamic crack propagation in laminates with varying initial crack positions were determined. The crack propagation speeds were estimated from the photographs. Results show that the through the thickness position of the embedded crack can significantly affect the dominant mechanism and the threshold impact velocity for the onset of crack movement. If the initial delamination is placed near the top of bottom surface of the laminate, local buckling of the delaminated plies may cause instability of the crack. If the initial delamination lies on the midplane, local buckling does not occur and the initiation of crack propagation appears to be dominated by Mode II fracture. The crack propagation and arrest observed was seen to be affected by wave motion within the delamination region.

  5. Direct deposit laminate nanocomposites with enhanced propellent properties.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiangyu; Guerieri, Philip; Zhou, Wenbo; Huang, Chuan; Zachariah, Michael R

    2015-05-01

    One of the challenges in the use of energetic nanoparticles within a polymer matrix for propellant applications is obtaining high particle loading (high energy density) while maintaining mechanical integrity and reactivity. In this study, we explore a new strategy that utilizes laminate structures. Here, a laminate of alternating layers of aluminum nanoparticle (Al-NPs)/copper oxide nanoparticle (CuO-NPs) thermites in a polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) reactive binder, with a spacer layer of PVDF was fabricated by a electrospray layer-by-layer deposition method. The deposited layers containing up to 60 wt % Al-NPs/CuO-NPs thermite are found to be uniform and mechanically flexible. Both the reactive and mechanical properties of laminate significantly outperformed the single-layer structure with the same material composition. These results suggest that deploying a multilayer laminate structure enables the incorporation of high loadings of energetic materials and, in some cases, enhances the reactive properties over the corresponding homogeneous structure. These results imply that an additive manufacturing approach may yield significant advantages in developing a tailored architecture for advanced propulsion systems. PMID:25815706

  6. Laminated plastic microfluidic components for biological and chemical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, P.M.; Matson, D.W.; Bennett, W.D.; Lin, Y.; Hammerstrom, D.J.

    1999-07-01

    Laminated plastic microfluidic components are being developed for biological testing systems and chemical sensors. Applications include a DNA thermal cycler, DNA analytical systems, electrophoretic flow systems, dialysis systems, and metal sensors for ground water. This article describes fabrication processes developed for these plastic microfluidic components, and the fabrication of a chromium metal sensor and a microdialysis device. Most of the components have a stacked architecture. Using this architecture, the fluid flows, or is pumped through, as many as nine laminated functional levels. Functions include pumping, mixing, reaction, detection, reservoirs, separations, and electronics. Polyimide, poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA), and polycarbonate materials with thicknesses between 25 and 125 {mu}m are used to construct the components. This makes the components low cost, inert to many biological fluids and chemicals, and disposable. The components are fabricated by excimer laser micromachining the microchannel patterns and microstructures in the various laminates. In some cases, micropumps are integrated into these components to move the fluids. Vias and interconnects are also cut by the laser and integrated with micropumps. The laminates are sealed and bonded by adhesive and thermal processes and are leak tight. The parts withstand pressures as high as 790 kPa. Typical channel widths are 50 to 100 {mu}m, with aspect ratios near 5. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Vacuum Society.}

  7. Making Ceramic Parts by Laminating and Sintering Thin Sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cawley, J. D.

    1987-01-01

    Chemical composition varies as function of depth. Technique developed to fabricate monolithic ceramic component by sintering laminated body made from thin sheets of green ceramic. Method allows discrete changes in chemistry effected across monolith. Component having one-dimensional variation in material composition fabricated in this manner.

  8. Photodegradation in ballistic laminates: Spectroscopy and lifetime extension

    SciTech Connect

    Renschler, C.L.; Stallard, B.R.; White, C.A.; Garcia, M.J.; Morse, H.E.

    1996-06-01

    Several years ago, the Materials and Process Sciences Center (Org. 1800) was asked by Dept. 9613 to study the materials aging issues which had led to the loss of ballistic protection by Armored Tractor (AT) windshields and windows. The authors speculated that this loss of impact strength was due to photodegradation of the polycarbonate (PC) inboard ply. They developed a spectroscopic method to identify changes in the outboard surface of the PC, and showed that the changes in the surface which occurred upon natural aging in the field could be reproduced by exposing the laminates to a simulated solar flux. Based on these results, they recommended changes in the adhesive interlayers to filter out the ultraviolet (UV) light causing the aging problem. Working with the laminate vendor, PPG, they re-designed the laminates to implement these changes and block essentially all UV light from the inboard ply. The most recent phase of this work involved accelerated solar aging of laminates made with the new design to verify that photoaging effects have been blocked by the new materials. They report here the results of that study, and recommended follow-on work.

  9. Delamination failure in a unidirectional curved composite laminate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Roderick H.

    1992-01-01

    Delamination failure in a unidirectional curved composite laminate was investigated. The curved laminate failed unstably by delaminations developing around the curved region of the laminate at different depths through the thickness until virtually all bending stiffness was lost. Delamination was assumed to initiate at the location of the highest radial stress in the curved region. A closed form curved beam elasticity solution and a 2D finite element analysis (FEA) were conducted to determine this location. The variation in the strain energy release rate, G, with delamination growth was then determined using the FEA. A strength-based failure criteria adequately predicted the interlaminar tension failure which caused initial delamination onset. Using the G analysis the delamination was predicted to extend into the arm and leg of the laminate, predominantly in mode I. As the initial delamination grew around the curved region, the maximum radial stress in the newly formed inner sublaminate increased to a level sufficient to cause a new delamination to initiate in the sublaminate with no increase in applied load. This failure progression was observed experimentally.

  10. Delamination failure in a unidirectional curved composite laminate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Roderick H.

    1990-01-01

    Delamination failure in a unidirectional curved composite laminate was investigated. The curved laminate failed unstably by delaminations developing around the curved region of the laminate at different depths through the thickness until virtually all bending stiffness was lost. Delamination was assumed to initiate at the location of the highest radial stress in the curved region. A closed form curved beam elasticity solution and a 2-D finite element analysis (FEA) were conducted to determine this location. The variation in the strain energy release rate, G, with delamination growth was then determined using the FEA. A strength-based failure criteria adequately predicted the interlaminar tension failure which caused initial delamination onset. Using the G analysis the delamination was predicted to extend into the arm and leg of the laminate, predominantly in mode I. As the initial delamination grew arould the curved region, the maximum radial stress in the newly formed inner sublaminate increased to a level sufficient to cause a new delamination to initiate in the sublaminate with no increase in applied load. This failure progression was observed experimentally.

  11. Analysis of dynamic instability for arbitrarily laminated skew plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, G. Y.; Shih, Y. S.

    2006-04-01

    The dynamic instability and nonlinear response of rectangular and skew laminated plates subjected to periodic in-plane load are studied. Based on von Karman plate theory, the large amplitude dynamic equations of thin laminated plates are derived by applying the approach of generalized double Fourier series. On the assumed mode shape, the governing equations are reduced to the Mathieu equation using Galerkin's method. The incremental harmonic balance (IHB) method is applied to solve the nonlinear temporal equation of motion, and the region of dynamic instability is determined in this work. Calculations are carried out for isotropic, angle-ply and arbitrarily laminated plates under two cases of boundary conditions. The principal region of dynamic instability associated with the effect of the stacking sequence of lamination and the skew angle of plate are also investigated and discussed. The results obtained indicated that the instability behavior of the system is determined by the several parameters, such as the boundary condition, number of the layers, stacking sequence, in-plane load, aspect ratio, amplitude and the skew angle of plate.

  12. Process-induced viscoelastic stress in composite laminates

    SciTech Connect

    Stango, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    In recent years, considerable interest has developed in evaluating the stress response of composite laminates which is associated with cooling the material system from the cure temperature to room temperature. This research examines the fundamental nature of time-dependent residual-thermal stresses in composite laminates which are caused by the extreme temperature reduction encountered during the fabrication process. Viscoelastic stress in finite-width, symmetric composite laminates is examined on the basis of a formulation that employs an incremental hereditary integral approach in conjunction with a quasi-three dimensional finite element analysis. A consistent methodology is developed and employed for the characterization of lamina material properties. Special attention is given to the time-dependent stress response at ply-interface locations near the free-edge. In addition, the influence of cooling path on stress history is examined. Recently published material property data for graphite-epoxy lamina is employed in the analysis. Results of the investigation generally indicate that nominal differences between the thermoelastic and viscoelastic solutions are obtained. Slight changes of the final stress state are observed to result when different cooling paths are selected for the temperature history. The methodology employed is demonstrated to result in an accurate, efficient, and consistent approach for the viscoelastic analysis of advanced composite laminates.

  13. An experimental investigation on the three-point bending behavior of composite laminate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A, Azzam; W, Li

    2014-08-01

    The response of composite laminate structure to three-point bending load was investigated by subjecting two types of stacking sequences of composite laminate structure by using electronic universal tester (Type: WDW-20) machine. Optical microscope was selected in order to characterize bending damage, delamination, and damage shapes in composite laminate structures. The results showed that the [0/90/-45/45]2s exhibits a brittle behavior, while other laminates exhibit a progressive failure mode consisting of fiber failure, debonding (splitting), and delamination. The [45/45/90/0]2s laminate has a highly nonlinear load- displacement curve due to compressive yielding.

  14. Nuclear lamins: major factors in the structural organization and function of the nucleus and chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Dechat, Thomas; Pfleghaar, Katrin; Sengupta, Kaushik; Shimi, Takeshi; Shumaker, Dale K.; Solimando, Liliana; Goldman, Robert D.

    2008-01-01

    Over the past few years it has become evident that the intermediate filament proteins, the types A and B nuclear lamins, not only provide a structural framework for the nucleus, but are also essential for many aspects of normal nuclear function. Insights into lamin-related functions have been derived from studies of the remarkably large number of disease-causing mutations in the human lamin A gene. This review provides an up-to-date overview of the functions of nuclear lamins, emphasizing their roles in epigenetics, chromatin organization, DNA replication, transcription, and DNA repair. In addition, we discuss recent evidence supporting the importance of lamins in viral infections. PMID:18381888

  15. A geometrically nonlinear analysis of interlaminar stresses in unsymmetrically laminated plates subjected to inplane mechanical loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norwood, D. Scott; Shuart, Mark J.; Herakovich, Carl T.

    1991-01-01

    The present analysis of interlaminar stresses in unsymmetrically laminates plates gives attention to the linear elastic large-deflection response of square laminated composite plates subjected to either uniaxial tension or compression loading. The effects of Poisson-ratio and mutual-influence coefficient mismatching between adjacent layers is evaluated in both cross-ply and angle-ply, and symmetric and asymmetric laminates. A global/local analysis procedure is used to obtain improved free-edge depictions; the results obtained indicate that the out-of-plane deflections of the unsymmetric laminates reduce interlaminar shear stresses, while reducing interlaminar normal stresses in some laminates and increasing them in others.

  16. A Micromechanics-Based Damage Model for [+/- Theta/90n]s Composite Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayugo, Joan-Andreu; Camanho, Pedro P.; Maimi, Pere; Davila, Carlos G.

    2006-01-01

    A new damage model based on a micromechanical analysis of cracked [+/- Theta/90n]s laminates subjected to multiaxial loads is proposed. The model predicts the onset and accumulation of transverse matrix cracks in uniformly stressed laminates, the effect of matrix cracks on the stiffness of the laminate, as well as the ultimate failure of the laminate. The model also accounts for the effect of the ply thickness on the ply strength. Predictions relating the elastic properties of several laminates and multiaxial loads are presented.

  17. Lamination of organic solar cells and organic light emitting devices: Models and experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Oyewole, O. K.; Yu, D.; Du, J.; Asare, J.; Fashina, A.; Anye, V. C.; Zebaze Kana, M. G.; Soboyejo, W. O.

    2015-08-21

    In this paper, a combined experimental, computational, and analytical approach is used to provide new insights into the lamination of organic solar cells and light emitting devices at macro- and micro-scales. First, the effects of applied lamination force (on contact between the laminated layers) are studied. The crack driving forces associated with the interfacial cracks (at the bi-material interfaces) are estimated along with the critical interfacial crack driving forces associated with the separation of thin films, after layer transfer. The conditions for successful lamination are predicted using a combination of experiments and computational models. Guidelines are developed for the lamination of low-cost organic electronic structures.

  18. A numerical procedure for predicting creep and delayed failures in laminated composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillard, D. A.; Brinson, H. F.

    1983-01-01

    A numerical procedure is described for predicting the viscoelastic response of general laminates. A nonlinear compliance model is used to predict the creep response of the individual laminae. A biaxial delayed failure model predicts ply failure. The numerical procedure, based on lamination theory, increases by increments through time to predict creep compliance and delayed failures in laminates. Numerical stability problems and experimental verification are discussed. Although the program has been quite successful in predicting creep of general laminates, the assumptions associated with lamination theory have resulted in erroneous bounds on the predicted material response. Delayed failure predictions have been conservative. Several improvements are suggested to increase the accuracy of the procedure.

  19. Effects of Interlayer Interfacial Stiffness on Ultrasonic Wave Propagation in Composite Laminates at Oblique Incidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Yosuke; Biwa, Shiro

    The transmission characteristics of ultrasonic wave impinging obliquely on composite laminates are analyzed. Incorporating the influence of thin resin-rich regions between adjacent plies by spring-type interfaces, the amplitude transmission coefficient of a unidirectional composite laminate immersed in water is calculated by the stiffness-matrix method. Using Floquet's theorem, the dispersion relation for the infinitely laminated structure is also calculated. Comparison between two results reveals that the frequency band-gaps in the dispersion relation agree well with the low-transmission frequency ranges of the finite laminated case. Comparing with the experimental transmission coefficients for an 11-ply carbon-epoxy composite laminate, the theoretical results are verified.

  20. A Micromechanics-Based Damage Model For The Strength Prediction of Composite Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camanho, Pedro P.; Mayugo, Joan A.; Maimi, Pere; Davila, Carlos G.

    2006-01-01

    A new damage model based on a micromechanical analysis of cracked [+/-0deg/90deg(sub n)]s laminates subjected to multiaxial loads is proposed. The model predicts the onset and accumulation of transverse matrix cracks in uniformly stressed laminates, the effect of matrix cracks on the stiffness of the laminate, as well as the ultimate failure of the laminate. The model also accounts for the effect of the ply thickness on the ply strength. Predictions relating the elastic properties of several laminates and multiaxial loads are presented.

  1. Preliminary investigation of crack arrest in composite laminates containing buffer strips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goree, J. G.

    1978-01-01

    The mechanical properties of some hybrid buffer strip laminates and the crack arrest potential of laminates containing buffer strips were determined. The hybrid laminates consisted of graphite with either S-glass, E-glass, or Kevlar. Unnotched tensile coupons and center-cracked fracture coupons were tested. Elastic properties, complete stress/strain curves, and critical stress intensity values are given. The measured elastic properties compare well with those calculated by classical lamination theory for laminates with linear stress/strain behavior. The glass hybrids had more delamination and higher fracture toughness than the all-graphite or the Kevlar hybrid.

  2. Concurrent material-fabrication optimization of metal-matrix laminates under thermo-mechanical loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, D. A.; Morel, M. R.; Chamis, C. C.

    1991-01-01

    A methodology is developed to tailor fabrication and material parameters of metal-matrix laminates for maximum loading capacity under thermomechanical loads. The stresses during the thermomechanical response are minimized subject to failure constrains and bounds on the laminate properties. The thermomechanical response of the laminate is simulated using nonlinear composite mechanics. Evaluations of the method on a graphite/copper symmetric cross-ply laminate were performed. The cross-ply laminate required different optimum fabrication procedures than a unidirectional composite. Also, the consideration of the thermomechanical cycle had a significant effect on the predicted optimal process.

  3. A limiting analysis for edge effects in angle-ply laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, P. W.; Herakovich, C. T.

    1976-01-01

    A zeroth order solution for edge effects in angle ply composite laminates using perturbation techniques and a limiting free body approach was developed. The general method of solution for laminates is developed and then applied to the special case of a graphite/epoxy laminate. Interlaminar stress distributions are obtained as a function of the laminate thickness to width ratio h/b and compared to existing numerical results. The solution predicts stable, continuous stress distributions, determines finite maximum tensile interlaminar normal stress for two laminates, and provides mathematical evidence for singular interlaminar shear stresses.

  4. Mechanics of damping for fiber composite laminates including hygro-thermal effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, D. A.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1989-01-01

    An integrated mechanics theory was developed for the modeling of composite damping from the micromechanics to the laminate level. Simplified, design oriented equations based on hysteretic damping are presented for on-axis plies, off-axis plies, and laminates including the effect of temperature, moisture, and interply hysteretic damping. The temperature rise within vibrating composite laminates resulting from strain energy dissipation is also modeled, and their coupled hygro-thermo-mechanical response is predicted. The method correlates well with reported damping measurements. Application examples illustrate the effect of various ply, laminate, and hygro-thermal parameters on the overall damping performance of composite laminates.

  5. Mechanics of damping for fiber composite laminates including hygro-thermal effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, D. A.; Chamis, C. C.

    1989-01-01

    An integrated mechanics theory has been developed for the modeling of composite damping from the micromechanics to the laminate level. Simplified, design oriented equations based on hysteretic damping are presented for on-axis plies, off-axis plies, and laminates including the effect of temperature, moisture, and interply hysteretic damping. The temperature rise within vibrating composite laminates resulting from strain energy dissipation is also modeled, and their coupled hygro-thermo-mechanical response is predicted. The method correlates well with reported damping measurements. Application examples illustrate the effect of various ply, laminate, and hygro-thermal parameters on the overall damping performance of composite laminates.

  6. The LMNA mutation p.Arg321Ter associated with dilated cardiomyopathy leads to reduced expression and a skewed ratio of lamin A and lamin C proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Saaidi, Rasha; Rasmussen, Torsten B.; Palmfeldt, Johan; Nissen, Peter H.; Beqqali, Abdelaziz; Hansen, Jakob; Pinto, Yigal M.; Boesen, Thomas; Mogensen, Jens; Bross, Peter

    2013-11-15

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a disease of the heart muscle characterized by cardiac chamber enlargement and reduced systolic function of the left ventricle. Mutations in the LMNA gene represent the most frequent known genetic cause of DCM associated with disease of the conduction systems. The LMNA gene generates two major transcripts encoding the nuclear lamina major components lamin A and lamin C by alternative splicing. Both haploinsuffiency and dominant negative effects have been proposed as disease mechanism for premature termination codon (PTC) mutations in LMNA. These mechanisms however are still not clearly established. In this study, we used a representative LMNA nonsense mutation, p.Arg321Ter, to shed light on the molecular disease mechanisms. Cultured fibroblasts from three DCM patients carrying this mutation were analyzed. Quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR and sequencing of these PCR products indicated that transcripts from the mutant allele were degraded by the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) mechanism. The fact that no truncated mutant protein was detectable in western blot (WB) analysis strengthens the notion that the mutant transcript is efficiently degraded. Furthermore, WB analysis showed that the expression of lamin C protein was reduced by the expected approximately 50%. Clearly decreased lamin A and lamin C levels were also observed by immunofluorescence microscopy analysis. However, results from both WB and nano-liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry demonstrated that the levels of lamin A protein were more reduced suggesting an effect on expression of lamin A from the wild type allele. PCR analysis of the ratio of lamin A to lamin C transcripts showed unchanged relative amounts of lamin A transcript suggesting that the effect on the wild type allele was operative at the protein level. Immunofluorescence microscopy analysis showed no abnormal nuclear morphology of patient fibroblast cells. Based on these data, we propose that

  7. Shear degradation in fiber reinforced laminates due to matrix damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salavatian, Mohammedmahdi

    The objective of this study was to develop and implement a shear modulus degradation model to improve the failure analysis of the fiber reinforced composite structures. Matrix damage, involving transverse and shear cracks, is a common failure mode for composite structures, yet little is known concerning their interaction. To understand the material behavior after matrix failure, the nonlinear response of the composite laminate was studied using pressure vessels made from a [+/-o] bias orientation, which tend to exhibit a matrix dominated failure. The result of this work showed laminate matrix hardening in shear and softening in the transverse direction. A modified Iosipescu coupon was proposed to study the evolution of shear and transverse damage and their mutual effects. The proposed method showed good agreement with tubular results and has advantages of simplified specimen fabrication using standard test fixtures. The proposed method was extended by introducing a novel experimental technique to study the shear degradation model under biaxial loading. Experimental results of the transverse modulus reduction were in good agreement with material degradation models, while the predicted shear modulus reduction was higher than experiment. The discrepancy between available models and observations was due to the presence of a traction between the crack surfaces. Accordingly, a closed form solution was proposed for the shear stress-strain field of a cracked laminate by replacing the cracks with cohesive zones. The constitutive equations of the crack laminate were derived including the effects of internal tractions and transverse stress on the shear modulus. The proposed analytical model was shown to be the most comprehensive model for shear modulus degradation reduction of the fiber reinforced laminates. A numerical implementation of the shear degradation model was done using continuum damage mechanics. Through this work it was shown the common assumption of a linear

  8. Conserved lamin A protein expression in differentiated cells in the earthworm Eudrilus eugeniae.

    PubMed

    Kalidas, Ramamoorthy M; Raja, Subramanian Elaiya; Mydeen, Sheik Abdul Kader Nagoor Meeran; Samuel, Selvan Christyraj Johnson Retnaraj; Durairaj, Selvan Christyraj Jackson; Nino, Gopi D; Palanichelvam, Karuppaiah; Vaithi, Arumugaswami; Sudhakar, Sivasubramaniam

    2015-09-01

    Lamin A is an intermediate filament protein found in most of the differentiated vertebrate cells but absent in stem cells. It shapes the skeletal frame structure beneath the inner nuclear membrane of the cell nucleus. As there are few studies of the expression of lamin A in invertebrates, in the present work, we have analyzed the sequence, immunochemical conservation and expression pattern of lamin A protein in the earthworm Eudrilus eugeniae, a model organism for tissue regeneration. The expression of lamin A has been confirmed in E. eugeniae by immunoblot. Its localization in the nuclear membrane has been observed by immunohistochemistry using two different rabbit anti-sera raised against human lamin A peptides, which are located at the C-terminus of the lamin A protein. These two antibodies detected 70 kDa lamin A protein in mice and a single 65 kDa protein in the earthworm. The Oct-4 positive undifferentiated blastemal tissues of regenerating earthworm do not express lamin A, while the Oct-4 negative differentiated cells express lamin A. This pattern was also confirmed in the earthworm prostate gland. The present study is the first evidence for the immunochemical identification of lamin A and Oct-4 in the earthworm. Along with the partial sequence obtained from the earthworm genome, the present results suggest that lamin A protein and its expression pattern is conserved from the earthworm to humans. PMID:25858151

  9. cDNA cloning of the developmentally regulated lamin LIII of Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed Central

    Stick, R

    1988-01-01

    Lamins are nucleoskeletal proteins which form intermediate type filaments in close association with the inner nuclear envelope membrane. Based on molecular and biochemical properties the lamins were grouped as type-A and type-B lamins, respectively. I have cloned the cDNA encoding lamin LIII of Xenopus which is the lamin protein present in oocyte nuclei and in cleavage nuclei. The data presented here indicate that a pool of maternal lamin LIII RNA is synthesized very early in oogenesis and that it continues to be present until gastrulation when the vast majority of the LIII RNA is degraded. Despite the similarities shared by all lamin proteins, the lamin LIII sequence neither possesses the features diagnostic for either type-A or type-B lamins nor does it show greater sequence similarity to one of the lamin types than to the other and thus it may represent a third type of lamin protein which may reflect its special function in oogenesis and early development. Images PMID:3181134

  10. Lamins regulate cell trafficking and lineage maturation of adult human hematopoietic cells

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jae-Won; Spinler, Kyle R.; Swift, Joe; Chasis, Joel A.; Mohandas, Narla; Discher, Dennis E.

    2013-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, as well as nucleated erythroblasts and megakaryocytes, reside preferentially in adult marrow microenvironments whereas other blood cells readily cross the endothelial barrier into the circulation. Because the nucleus is the largest organelle in blood cells, we hypothesized that (i) cell sorting across microporous barriers is regulated by nuclear deformability as controlled by lamin-A and -B, and (ii) lamin levels directly modulate hematopoietic programs. Mass spectrometry-calibrated intracellular flow cytometry indeed reveals a lamin expression map that partitions human blood lineages between marrow and circulating compartments (P = 0.00006). B-type lamins are highly variable and predominate only in CD34+ cells, but migration through micropores and nuclear flexibility in micropipette aspiration both appear limited by lamin-A:B stoichiometry across hematopoietic lineages. Differentiation is also modulated by overexpression or knockdown of lamins as well as retinoic acid addition, which regulates lamin-A transcription. In particular, erythroid differentiation is promoted by high lamin-A and low lamin-B1 expression whereas megakaryocytes of high ploidy are inhibited by lamin suppression. Lamins thus contribute to both trafficking and differentiation. PMID:24191023

  11. Analysis and experiments for composite laminates with holes and subjected to 4-point bending

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuart, M. J.; Prasad, C. B.

    1990-01-01

    Analytical and experimental results are presented for composite laminates with a hole and subjected to four-point bending. A finite-plate analysis is used to predict moment and strain distributions for six-layer quasi-isotropic laminates and transverse-ply laminates. Experimental data are compared with the analytical results. Experimental and analytical strain results show good agreement for the quasi-isotropic laminates. Failure of the two types of composite laminates is described, and failure strain results are presented as a function of normalized hole diameter. The failure results suggest that the initial failure mechanism for laminates subjected to four-point bending are similar to the initial failure mechanisms for corresponding laminates subjected to uniaxial inplane loadings.

  12. Lamin A/C-dependent interaction with 53BP1 promotes cellular responses to DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs-Seymour, Ian; Markiewicz, Ewa; Bekker-Jensen, Simon; Mailand, Niels; Hutchison, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    Lamins A/C have been implicated in DNA damage response pathways. We show that the DNA repair protein 53BP1 is a lamin A/C binding protein. In undamaged human dermal fibroblasts (HDF), 53BP1 is a nucleoskeleton protein. 53BP1 binds to lamins A/C via its Tudor domain, and this is abrogated by DNA damage. Lamins A/C regulate 53BP1 levels and consequently lamin A/C-null HDF display a 53BP1 null-like phenotype. Our data favour a model in which lamins A/C maintain a nucleoplasmic pool of 53BP1 in order to facilitate its rapid recruitment to sites of DNA damage and could explain why an absence of lamin A/C accelerates aging. PMID:25645366

  13. Seismic lamination and anisotropy of the Lower Continental Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meissner, Rolf; Rabbel, Wolfgang; Kern, Hartmut

    2006-04-01

    Seismic lamination in the lower crust associated with marked anisotropy has been observed at various locations. Three of these locations were investigated by specially designed experiments in the near vertical and in the wide-angle range, that is the Urach and the Black Forrest area, both belonging to the Moldanubian, a collapsed Variscan terrane in southern Germany, and in the Donbas Basin, a rift inside the East European (Ukrainian) craton. In these three cases, a firm relationship between lower crust seismic lamination and anisotropy is found. There are more cases of lower-crustal lamination and anisotropy, e.g. from the Basin and Range province (western US) and from central Tibet, not revealed by seismic wide-angle measurements, but by teleseismic receiver function studies with a P-S conversion at the Moho. Other cases of lamination and anisotropy are from exhumed lower crustal rocks in Calabria (southern Italy), and Val Sesia and Val Strona (Ivrea area, Northern Italy). We demonstrate that rocks in the lower continental crust, apart from differing in composition, differ from the upper mantle both in terms of seismic lamination (observed in the near-vertical range) and in the type of anisotropy. Compared to upper mantle rocks exhibiting mainly orthorhombic symmetry, the symmetry of the rocks constituting the lower crust is either axial or orthorhombic and basically a result of preferred crystallographic orientation of major minerals (biotite, muscovite, hornblende). We argue that the generation of seismic lamination and anisotropy in the lower crust is a consequence of the same tectonic process, that is, ductile deformation in a warm and low-viscosity lower crust. This process takes place preferably in areas of extension. Heterogeneous rock units are formed that are generally felsic in composition, but that contain intercalations of mafic intrusions. The latter have acted as heat sources and provide the necessary seismic impedance contrasts. The observed

  14. A nonlinear stretching based electromagnetic energy harvester on FR4 for wideband operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallick, Dhiman; Amann, Andreas; Roy, Saibal

    2015-01-01

    We report a nonlinear stretching-based electromagnetic energy harvester using FR4 as a vibrating spring material due to its low Young’s modulus. We show analytically that the nonlinearity is caused by the stretching, in addition to the bending, of the specially designed spring arms; this gives rise to a wider half-power bandwidth of 10 Hz at 1 g acceleration, which is almost 5 times higher than that of a comparable linear counterpart. The output spectra show the first reported experimental evidence of a symmetry broken nonlinear secondary peak in a single potential well system at frequencies close to the nonlinear jump frequency, which may appear to be due to the dynamic symmetry breaking of the oscillator or to the inherent asymmetry of the built prototype. The presence of this secondary peak is useful in generating a significant amount of power compared to the symmetric states, producing ˜3 times more power at the secondary peak than the nearby symmetric states. 110% of the peak power obtained for 0.5 g acceleration is achieved at the secondary peak during the frequency up-sweep. The experimental results are compared with a deterministic numerical model based on the Duffing oscillator, and we include a qualitative discussion on the influence of noise in an experimental energy harvesting system.

  15. Ancient and Modern Laminated Composites - From the Great Pyramid of Gizeh to Y2K

    SciTech Connect

    Wadsworth, J.; Lesuer, D.R.

    2000-03-14

    Laminated metal composites have been cited in antiquity; for example, a steel laminate that may date as far back as 2750 B.C., was found in the Great Pyramid in Gizeh in 1837. A laminated shield containing bronze, tin, and gold layers, is described in detail by Homer. Well-known examples of steel laminates, such as an Adze blade, dating to 400 B.C. can be found in the literature. The Japanese sword is a laminated composite at several different levels and Merovingian blades were composed of laminated steels. Other examples are also available, including composites from China, Thailand, Indonesia, Germany, Britain, Belgium, France, and Persia. The concept of lamination to provide improved properties has also found expression in modern materials. Of particular interest is the development of laminates including high carbon and low carbon layers. These materials have unusual properties that are of engineering interest; they are similar to ancient welded Damascus steels. The manufacture of collectable knives, labeled ''welded Damascus'', has also been a focus of contemporary knifemakers. Additionally, in the Former Soviet Union, laminated composite designs have been used in engineering applications. Each of the above areas will be briefly reviewed, and some of the metallurgical principles will be described that underlie improvement in properties by lamination. Where appropriate, links are made between these property improvements and those that may have been present in ancient artifacts.

  16. An investigation of the interfacial bond strength of polymeric laminates

    SciTech Connect

    Eby, R.K. )

    1991-08-01

    This report summarizes the results of an investigation of the bond strength of paper - polypropylene - paper (PPP) laminates. The strength has been measured with a peel test for the as--received laminates of different manufacturers, after thermal aging in air and nitrogen, after static thermal age in oil at room temperature and 90{degrees}C as well as after cyclic thermal aging in oil. Differential swelling of the paper and polypropylene at 90{degrees}C leads to a strong decrease in peel strength. Differential thermal expansion at 90{degrees}C is not as important. Cyclic thermal aging in oil leads to the greatest decrease in peel strength. The results further our knowledge of information that should be considered in preparing a PPP specification. 19 refs., 7 figs., 12 tabs.

  17. Geometrically nonlinear bending analysis of laminated composite plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dash, Padmanav; Singh, B. N.

    2010-10-01

    In this work, a transverse bending of shear deformable laminated composite plates in Green-Lagrange sense accounting for the transverse shear and large rotations are presented. Governing equations are developed in the framework of higher order shear deformation theory. All higher order terms arising from nonlinear strain-displacement relations are included in the formulation. The present plate theory satisfies zero transverse shear strains conditions at the top and bottom surfaces of the plate in von-Karman sense. A C0 isoparametric finite element is developed for the present nonlinear model. Numerical results for the laminated composite plates of orthotropic materials with different system parameters and boundary conditions are found out. The results are also compared with those available in the literature. Some new results with different parameters are also presented.

  18. Axisymmetric buckling of laminated thick annular spherical cap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumir, P. C.; Dube, G. P.; Mallick, A.

    2005-03-01

    Axisymmetric buckling analysis is presented for moderately thick laminated shallow annular spherical cap under transverse load. Buckling under central ring load and uniformly distributed transverse load, applied statically or as a step function load is considered. The central circular opening is either free or plugged by a rigid central mass or reinforced by a rigid ring. Annular spherical caps have been analysed for clamped and simple supports with movable and immovable inplane edge conditions. The governing equations of the Marguerre-type, first order shear deformation shallow shell theory (FSDT), formulated in terms of transverse deflection w, the rotation ψ of the normal to the midsurface and the stress function Φ, are solved by the orthogonal point collocation method. Typical numerical results for static and dynamic buckling loads for FSDT are compared with the classical lamination theory and the dependence of the effect of the shear deformation on the thickness parameter for various boundary conditions is investigated.

  19. Non-Linear Vibration Characteristics of Clamped Laminated Shallow Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ABE, A.; KOBAYASHI, Y.; YAMADA, G.

    2000-07-01

    This paper examines non-linear free vibration characteristics of first and second vibration modes of laminated shallow shells with rigidly clamped edges. Non-linear equations of motion for the shells based on the first order shear deformation and classical shell theories are derived by means of Hamilton's principle. We apply Galerkin's procedure to the equations of motion in which eigenvectors for first and second modes of linear vibration obtained by the Ritz method are employed as trial functions. Then simultaneous non-linear ordinary differential equations are derived in terms of amplitudes of the first and second vibration modes. Backbone curves for the first and second vibration modes are solved numerically by the Gauss-Legendre integration method and the shooting method respectively. The effects of lamination sequences and transverse shear deformation on the behavior are discussed. It is also shown that the motion of the first vibration mode affects the response for the second vibration mode.

  20. Air Blast-Induced Vibration of a Laminated Spherical Shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yzgüksel, Hzgüseyin Murat; Türkmen, Halit S.

    The scope of this study is to investigate the dynamic behavior of a laminated spherical shell subjected to air blast load. The shell structure considered here is a hemisphere in shape and made of a glass/epoxy laminated composite material. The blast experiments are performed on the spherical shell. The strain-time history of the center of the spherical shell panel is obtained experimentally. The blast loaded spherical shell is also modeled and analyzed using ANSYS finite element software. The static analysis is performed to characterize the material. The dynamic response of the spherical shell panel obtained numerically is compared to the experimental results. It is observed that the response frequency corresponds to the higher vibration modes of the panel. The qualitative agreement is found between the numerical and experimental results.

  1. Hygrothermal influence on delamination behavior of graphite/epoxy laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, A.; Ishai, O.

    1984-01-01

    The hygrothermal effect on the fracture behavior of graphite-epoxy laminates was investigated to develop a methodology for damage tolerance predictions in advanced composite materials. Several T300/934 laminates were tested using a number of specimen configurations to evaluate the effects of temperature and humidity on delamination fracture toughness under mode 1 and mode 2 loading. It is indicated that moisture has a slightly beneficial influence on fracture toughness or critical strain energy release rate during mode 1 delamination, but has a slightly deleterious effect on mode 2 delamination and mode 1 transverse cracking. The failed specimens are examined by SEM and topographical differences due to fracture modes are identified. It is concluded that the effect of moisture on fracture topography can not be distinguished.

  2. Developments in impact damage modeling for laminated composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dost, Ernest F.; Avery, William B.; Swanson, Gary D.; Lin, Kuen Y.

    1991-01-01

    Damage tolerance is the most critical technical issue for composite fuselage structures studied in the Advanced Technology Composite Aircraft Structures (ATCAS) program. The objective here is to understand both the impact damage resistance and residual strength of the laminated composite fuselage structure. An understanding of the different damage mechanisms which occur during an impact event will support the selection of materials and structural configurations used in different fuselage quadrants and guide the development of analysis tools for predicting the residual strength of impacted laminates. Prediction of the damage state along with the knowledge of post-impact response to applied loads will allow for engineered stacking sequencies and structural configurations; intelligent decisions on repair requirements will also result.

  3. A new local high-order laminate theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chih-Ping; Hsu, Chih-Shun

    A new local high-order deformable theory of laminated composite/sandwich plates is presented here. The displacement fields of each discrete layer were assumed in the present theory to be of a high-order polynomial series through layer-thickness. The displacement and traction continuity conditions at the interface between layers and the traction conditions at the outer surfaces were imposed as the constraint conditions, and introduced into the potential energy functional by the Lagrange multiplier method. The equations of motion and admissible boundary conditions were given on the basis of the present theory by using the generalized variational principle. Pagano's 3-D elasticity solutions of generally rectangular laminated composite/sandwich plates, fully simply supported, subjected to transverse sinusoidal loading were used for assessment of the present theory and other theories discussed in previous literature. The present theory was found to agree very closely with 3-D elasticity solutions.

  4. Analysis of composite laminates with a generalized zigzag theory

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, D.; Li, X.

    1994-12-31

    This study presents a generalized expression for laminate theories, namely a generalized zigzag theory. It unifies shear deformation theories, layerwise theories, and zigzag theories. To begin with, two layer-dependent variables are assumed for each in-plane displacement components. The layer-dependent variables can be converted into layer-independent variables through the enforcement of continuity conditions for both interlaminar displacements and interlaminar shear stresses. The total number of degrees-of-freedom of the theory then becomes layer-number independent and the computational efficiency is thus guaranteed. Since the properties of individual layers are considered in the analysis, the generalized zigzag theory gives excellent in-plane displacements and stresses in the cases examined by Pagano. Satisfactory transverse shear stresses can also be obtained directly from the constitutive equations. Although the interlaminar normal stresses are not forced to be continuous on the laminate interfaces, the discrepancy seems to be very insignificant.

  5. Passively Damped Laminated Piezoelectric Shell Structures with Integrated Electric Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, Dimitris A.

    1999-01-01

    Multi-field mechanics are presented for curvilinear piezoelectric laminates interfaced with distributed passive electric components. The equations of motion for laminated piezoelectric shell structures with embedded passive electric networks are directly formulated and solved using a finite element methodology. The modal damping and frequencies of the piezoelectric shell are calculated from the poles of the system. Experimental and numerical results are presented for the modal damping and frequency of composite beams with a resistively shunted piezoceramic patch. The modal damping and frequency of plates, cylindrical shells and cylindrical composite blades with piezoelectric-resistor layers are predicted. Both analytical and experimental studies illustrate a unique dependence of modal damping and frequencies on the shunting resistance and show the effect of structural shape and curvature on piezoelectric damping.

  6. Contact law and impact responses of laminated composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, C. T.; Yang, S. H.

    1980-01-01

    Static identation tests were performed to determine the law of contact between a steel ball and glass/epoxy and graphite/epoxy laminated composites. For both composites the power law with an index of 1.5 was found to be adequate for the loading curve. Substantial permanent deformations were noted after the unloading. A high order beam finite element was used to compute the dynamic contact force and response of the laminated composite subjected to the impact of an elastic sphere. This program can be used with either the classical Hertzian contact law or the measured contact law. A simple method is introduced for estimating the contact force and contact duration in elastic impacts.

  7. Development of lightweight reinforced plastic laminates for spacecraft interior applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hertz, J.

    1975-01-01

    Lightweight, Kevlar - reinforced laminating systems that are non-burning, generate little smoke in the space shuttle environment, and are physically equivalent to the fiberglass/polyimide system used in the Apollo program for non-structural cabin panels, racks, etc. Resin systems representing five generic classes were screened as matrices for Kevlar 49 reinforced laminates. Of the systems evaluated, the polyimides were the most promising with the phenolics a close second. Skybond 703 was selected as the most promising resin candidate. With the exception of compression strength, all program goals of physical and mechanical properties were exceeded. Several prototype space shuttle mobility and translation handrail segments were manufactured using Kevlar/epoxy and Kevlar-graphite/epoxy. This application shows significant weight savings over the baseline aluminum configuration used previous. The hybrid Kevlar-graphite/epoxy is more suitable from a processing standpoint.

  8. Probabilistic Simulation of Stress Concentration in Composite Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Liaw, D. G.

    1994-01-01

    A computational methodology is described to probabilistically simulate the stress concentration factors (SCF's) in composite laminates. This new approach consists of coupling probabilistic composite mechanics with probabilistic finite element structural analysis. The composite mechanics is used to probabilistically describe all the uncertainties inherent in composite material properties, whereas the finite element is used to probabilistically describe the uncertainties associated with methods to experimentally evaluate SCF's, such as loads, geometry, and supports. The effectiveness of the methodology is demonstrated by using is to simulate the SCF's in three different composite laminates. Simulated results match experimental data for probability density and for cumulative distribution functions. The sensitivity factors indicate that the SCF's are influenced by local stiffness variables, by load eccentricities, and by initial stress fields.

  9. Fiberglass epoxy laminate fatigue properties at 300 and 20 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toth, J. M., Jr.; Bailey, W. J.; Boyce, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    A subcritical liquid hydrogen orbital storage and supply experiment is being designed for flight in the Space Shuttle cargo bay. The Cryogenic Fluid Management Experiment (CFME) includes a liquid hydrogen tank supported in a vacuum jacket by two fiberglass epoxy composite trunnion mounts. The ability of the CFME to last for the required seven missions depends primarily on the fatigue life of the composite trunnions at cryogenic temperatures. To verify the trunnion design and test the performance of the composite material, fatigue property data at 300 and 20 K were obtained for the specific E-glass fabric/S-glass unidirectional laminate that will be used for the CFME trunnions. The fatigue life of this laminate was greater at 20 K than at 300 K, and was satisfactory for the intended application.

  10. Failure criterion of glass fabric reinforced plastic laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haga, O.; Hayashi, N.; Kasuya, K.

    1986-01-01

    Failure criteria are derived for several modes of failure (in unaxial tensile or compressive loading, or biaxial combined tensile-compressive loading) in the case of closely woven plain fabric, coarsely-woven plain fabric, or roving glass cloth reinforcements. The shear strength in the interaction formula is replaced by an equation dealing with tensile or compressive strength in the direction making a 45 degree angle with one of the anisotropic axes, for the uniaxial failure criteria. The interaction formula is useful as the failure criterion in combined tension-compression biaxial failure for the case of closely woven plain fabric laminates, but poor agreement is obtained in the case of coarsely woven fabric laminates.

  11. An experimental investigation of glare and restructured fiber metal laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedict, Adelina Vanessa

    Fiber Metal Laminates (FMLs) are a group of materials fabricated by bonding glass/epoxy layers within metal layers. This class of materials can provide good mechanical properties, as well as weight savings. An FML known as Glass Laminate Aluminum Reinforced Epoxy (GLARE) was studied. An experimental investigation comprising of microscopy and tensile testing was carried out using different grades of GLARE. Microscopy revealed the construction details of GLARE, while tensile testing provided means of measuring and analyzing its stress-strain responses. Next, different metal surface pretreatment methods were explored. These included sandblasting, Phosphoric Acid Anodizing (PAA), and AC-130 Sol-Gel treatment. Woven S-2 glass, an epoxy adhesive, and aluminum alloy sheet metal were used to fabricate restructured FMLs using time and cost effective procedures. Additional microscopy and tensile testing allowed for comparisons with GLARE and aircraft grade aluminum alloys. The restructured FMLs showed similar behaviors to GLARE with potential significant improvements in fabrication efficiency.

  12. High thermal conductivity of hexagonal boron nitride laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jin-Cheng; Zhang, Liang; Kretinin, A. V.; Morozov, S. V.; Wang, Yi Bo; Wang, Tun; Li, Xiaojun; Ren, Fei; Zhang, Jingyu; Lu, Ching-Yu; Chen, Jia-Cing; Lu, Miao; Wang, Hui-Qiong; Geim, A. K.; Novoselov, K. S.

    2016-03-01

    Two-dimensional materials are characterised by a number of unique physical properties which can potentially make them useful to a wide diversity of applications. In particular, the large thermal conductivity of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) has already been acknowledged and these materials have been suggested as novel core materials for thermal management in electronics. However, it was not clear if mass produced flakes of hBN would allow one to achieve an industrially-relevant value of thermal conductivity. Here we demonstrate that laminates of hBN exhibit thermal conductivity of up to 20 W/m·K, which is significantly larger than that currently used in thermal management. We also show that the thermal conductivity of laminates increases with the increasing volumetric mass density, which creates a way of fine tuning its thermal properties.

  13. Iosipescu shear properties of graphite fabric/epoxy composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walrath, D. E.; Adams, D. F.

    1985-01-01

    The Iosipescu shear test method is used to measure the in-plane and interlaminar shear properties of four T300 graphite fabric/934 epoxy composite materials. Different weave geometries tested include an Oxford weave, a 5-harness satin weave, an 8-harness satin weave, and a plain weave with auxiliary warp yarns. Both orthogonal and quasi-isotropic layup laminates were tested. In-plane and interlaminar shear properties are obtained for laminates of all four fabric types. Overall, little difference in shear properties attributable to the fabric weave pattern is observed. The auxiliary warp material is significantly weaker and less stiff in interlaminar shear parallel to its fill direction. A conventional strain gage extensometer is modified to measure shear strains for use with the Iosipescu shear test. While preliminary results are encouraging, several design iterations failed to produce a reliable shear transducer prototype. Strain gages are still the most reliable shear strain transducers for use with this test method.

  14. Tensile stress-strain behavior of graphite/epoxy laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garber, D. P.

    1982-01-01

    The tensile stress-strain behavior of a variety of graphite/epoxy laminates was examined. Longitudinal and transverse specimens from eleven different layups were monotonically loaded in tension to failure. Ultimate strength, ultimate strain, and strss-strain curves wee obtained from four replicate tests in each case. Polynominal equations were fitted by the method of least squares to the stress-strain data to determine average curves. Values of Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio, derived from polynomial coefficients, were compared with laminate analysis results. While the polynomials appeared to accurately fit the stress-strain data in most cases, the use of polynomial coefficients to calculate elastic moduli appeared to be of questionable value in cases involving sharp changes in the slope of the stress-strain data or extensive scatter.

  15. Design of multiple-ply laminated composite tapered beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, P.

    1993-01-01

    A study of a special case of symmetric laminated composite cantilever beams is presented. The approach models beams that are tapered both in depth and width and investigates the effect of the ply layup angle and the ply taper on bending and interlaminar shearing stresses. For the determination of stresses and deflections, the beam stiffness matrices are expressed as linear functions of the beam length. Using classical lamination theory (CLT) the stiffness matrices are determined and assembled at strategic locations along the length of the beam. They are then inverted and necessary stiffness parameters are obtained numerically and extracted for determination of design information at each location chosen. Several ply layup configurations are investigated, and design considerations are presented based on the findings. Finally, recommendations for the design of these beams are presented, and a means for anticipating the location of highest stresses is offered.

  16. On the enhancement of impact damage tolerance of composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, A. T.; Lance, D. G.

    1993-01-01

    This paper examines the use of a thin layer of Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE) on the outer surface of carbon/epoxy composite materials as a method of improving impact resistance and damage tolerance through hybridization. Flat 16-ply laminates as well as honeycomb sandwich structures with eight-ply facesheets were tested in this study. Instrumented drop-weight impact testing was used to inflict damage upon the specimens. Evaluation of damage resistance included instrumented impact data, visual examination, C-scanning and compression after impact (CAI) testing. The results show that only one lamina of UHMWPE did not improve the damage tolerance (strength retention) of the 16-ply flat laminate specimens or the honeycomb sandwich beams, however, a modest gain in impact resistance (detectable damage) was found for the honeycomb sandwich specimens that contained an outer layer of UHMWPE.

  17. Failure analysis of composite laminates including biaxial compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tennyson, R. C.; Elliott, W. G.

    1983-01-01

    This report describes a continued effort on the development and application of the tensor polynomial failure criterion for composite laminate analysis. In particular, emphasis is given to the design, construction and testing of a cross-beam laminate configuration to obtain "pure' biaxial compression failure. The purpose of this test case was to provide to permit "closure' of the cubic form of the failure surface in the 1-2 compression-compression quadrant. This resulted in a revised set of interaction strength parameters and the construction of a failure surface which can be used with confidence for strength predictions, assuming a plane stress state exists. Furthermore, the problem of complex conjugate roots which can occur in some failure regions is addressed and an "engineering' interpretation is provided. Results are presented illustrating this behavior and the methodology for overcoming this problem is discussed.

  18. Status of high-temperature laminating resins and adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, P. M.; Johnston, N. J.

    1980-01-01

    High-temperature polymers now being developed as adhesives and composite matrices are reviewed, including aromatic polyimides, polybenzimidazoles, polyphenylquinoxalines, nadic end-capped imide oligomers, maleimide end-capped oligomers, and acetylene-terminated imide oligomers. The mechanical properties of laminates based on these resins are reported together with preliminary test results on the adhesive properties for titanium-to-titanium and composite-to-composite lap shear specimens.

  19. A life prediction model for laminated composite structural components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, David H.

    1990-01-01

    A life prediction methodology for laminated continuous fiber composites subjected to fatigue loading conditions was developed. A summary is presented of research completed. A phenomenological damage evolution law was formulated for matrix cracking which is independent of stacking sequence. Mechanistic and physical support was developed for the phenomenological evolution law proposed above. The damage evolution law proposed above was implemented to a finite element computer program. And preliminary predictions were obtained for a structural component undergoing fatigue loading induced damage.

  20. Method for alleviating thermal stress damage in laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, C. A.; Weeton, J. W.; Orth, N. W. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    The method is for metallic matrix composites, such as laminated sheet or foil composites. Non-intersecting discrete discontinuities are positively introduced into the interface between the layers so as to reduce the thermal stress produced by unequal expansion of the materials making up the composite. The discontinuities are preferably produced by drilling holes in the metallic matrix layer. However, a plurality of discrete elements may be used between the layers to carry out this purpose.

  1. Finite element analysis of vibration and damping of laminated composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rikards, Rolands

    Simple finite elements are used to form a special laminated beam and plate superelements excluding all degrees of freedom in the nodes of the middle layer, and the finite element analysis of this structure is performed. To estimate damping of structures, modal loss factors are calculated, using two methods: the 'exact' method of complex eigenvalues and the approximate energy method. It was found that both methods give satisfactory results. However, the energy method needs less computer time than the exact method.

  2. Flux distraction effect on magnetoelectric laminate sensors and gradiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Ying; Gao, Junqi; Wang, Yaojin; Hasanyan, Davresh; Finkel, Peter; Li, Jiefang; Viehland, D.

    2013-10-01

    A magnetic flux distraction effect caused by a nearby metallic material was investigated for Metglas/Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-PbTiO3 laminated magnetoelectric (ME) sensors. Using flux distraction, a ME sensor can perform an accurate search for metallic targets of different dimensions at various distances. Detection results and simulations were in good agreement. The findings demonstrate an effective means to employ stationary ME sensors and gradiometers for magnetic search applications.

  3. A Shear Deformable Shell Element for Laminated Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, W. C.; Reddy, J. N.

    1984-01-01

    A three-dimensional element based on the total Lagrangian description of the motion of a layered anisotropic composite medium is developed, validated, and used to analyze layered composite shells. The element contains the following features: geometric nonlinearity, dynamic (transient) behavior, and arbitrary lamination scheme and lamina properties. Numerical results of nonlinear bending, natural vibration, and transient response are presented to illustrate the capabilities of the element.

  4. Fatigue delamination onset prediction in unidirectional tapered laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murri, Gretchen B.; Salpekar, Satish A.; O'Brien, T. K.

    1991-01-01

    Tapered (0 deg) laminates of S2/CE9000 and S2/SP250 glass/epoxies, and IM6/1827I graphite/epoxy were tested in cyclic tension. The specimens usually showed some initial stable delaminations in the tapered region, but these did not affect the stiffness of the specimens, and loading was continued until the specimens either delaminated unstably, or reached 10(exp 6) to 2 x 10 (exp 7) million cycles with no unstable delamination. The final unstable delamination originated at the junction of the thin and tapered regions. A finite-element model was developed for the tapered laminate with and without the initial stable delaminations observed in the tests. The analysis showed that for both cases the most likely place for an opening (Mode I) delamination to originate is at the junction of the taper and thin regions. For each material type, the models were used to calculate the strain energy release rate, G, associated with delaminations originating at that junction and growing either into the thin region or tapered region. For the materials tested, cyclic G(sub Imax) values from DCB tests were used with the maximum strain energy release rates calculated from the finite-element analysis to predict the onset of unstable delamination at the junction as a function of fatigue cycles. The predictions were compared to experimental values of maximum cyclic load as a function of cycles to unstable delamination from fatigue tests in tapered laminates. For the IM6/1827I and S2/SP250 laminates, the predictions agreed very well with the test data. Predicted values for the S2/CE9000 were conservative compared to the test data.

  5. Fatigue delamination onset prediction in tapered composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murri, Gretchen Bostaph; Salpekar, Satish A.; Obrien, T. Kevin

    1989-01-01

    Tapered (0 deg) laminates of S2/CE9000 and S2/SP250 glass/epoxies, and IM6/1827I graphite/epoxy were tested in cyclic tension. The specimens usually showed some initial stable delaminations in the tapered region, but these did not affect the stiffness of the specimens, and loading was continued until the specimens either delaminated unstably, or reached 10(exp 6) to 2 x 10(exp 7) million cycles with no unstable delamination. The final unstable delamination originated at the junction of the thin and tapered regions. A finite-element model was developed for the tapered laminate with and without the initial stable delaminations observed in the tests. The analysis showed that for both cases the most likely place for an opening (Mode 1) delamination to originate is at the junction of the taper and thin regions. For each material type, the models were used to calculate the strain energy release rate, G, associated with delaminations originating at that junction and growing either into the thin region or tapered region. For the materials tested, cyclic G(sub Imax) values from DCB tests were used with the maximum strain energy release rates calculated from the finite-element analysis to predict the onset of unstable delamination at the junction as a function of fatigue cycles. The predictions were compared to experimental values of maximum cyclic load as a function of cycles to unstable delamination from fatigue tests in tapered laminates. For the IM6/1827I and S2/SP250 laminates, the predictions agreed very well with the test data. Predicted values for the S2/CE9000 were conservative compared to the test data.

  6. Test evaluation of a laminated wood wind turbine blade concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faddoul, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    A series of tests conducted on a root end section of a laminated wood wind turbine blade are reported. The blade to hub transition of the wood blade uses steel studs cast into the wood D spar with a filled epoxy. Both individual studs and a full scale, short length, root section were tested. Results indicate that the bonded stud concept is more than adequate for both the 30 year life fatigue loads and for the high wind or hurricane gust loads.

  7. Encapsulant Material For Solar Cell Module And Laminated Glass Applications

    DOEpatents

    Hanoka, Jack I.

    2000-09-05

    An encapsulant material includes a layer of metallocene polyethylene disposed between two layers of ionomer. More specifically, the layer of metallocene polyethylene is disposed adjacent a rear surface of the first ionomer layer, and a second layer of ionomer is disposed adjacent a rear surface of the layer of metallocene polyethylene. The encapsulant material can be used in solar cell module and laminated glass applications.

  8. Encapsulant Material For Solar Cell Module And Laminated Glass Applications

    DOEpatents

    Hanoka, Jack I.; Klemchuk, Peter P.

    2001-02-13

    An encapsulant material includes a layer of metallocene polyethylene disposed between two layers of an acid copolymer of polyethylene. More specifically, the layer of metallocene polyethylene is disposed adjacent a rear surface of the first layer of the acid copolymer of polyethylene, and a second layer of the acid copolymer of polyethlene is disposed adjacent a rear surface of the layer of metallocene polyethylene. The encapsulant material can be used in solar cell module and laminated glass applications.

  9. Response of laminated plates to non-stationary random excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cederbaum, Gabriel; Librescu, Liviu; Elishakoff, Isaac

    1989-01-01

    The response of composite laminated plates subjected to nonstationary random excitation is determined. First-order shear deformation theory is used for the analysis of symmetric cross-ply and antisymmetric angle-ply plates. The time-dependent component of the forcing function is taken as a product of a well-defined, slowly varying envelope function, and a noise function, assumed to be white or narrow-band random excitation.

  10. Fiber Metal Laminates Made by the VARTM Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Brian J.; Cano, Roberto J.; Hales, Stephen J.; Alexa, Joel A.; Weiser, Erik S.; Loos, Alfred; Johnson, W.S.

    2009-01-01

    Fiber metal laminates (FMLs) are multi-component materials utilizing metals, fibers and matrix resins. Tailoring their properties is readily achievable by varying one or more of these components. Established FMLs like GLARE utilize aluminum foils, glass fibers and epoxy matrices and are manufactured using an autoclave. Two new processes for manufacturing FMLs using vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) have been developed at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). A description of these processes and the resulting FMLs are presented.

  11. Analysis of progressive damage in fibrous composite laminates

    SciTech Connect

    Kaveh-Ahangar, A.

    1990-01-01

    A model of a cracked laminate which consisted of three layers of fibrous composite materials where the middle layer is a 90 degree ply and contains an infinite row of equally spaced transverse cracks and the outer layers have arbitrary fiber orientations was proposed to study the progressive transverse cracking phenomena in multi-layered laminates. It was assumed that a microcrack which resembles a slit crack exists in the ply undergoing cracking. The constructed admissible stress field in the tiplet at dilute crack density was utilized to calculate the energy release rate of the microcrack. The thickness of the ply undergoing cracking, fiber orientation, and thickness of its adjacent plies were included in the analysis. Then, linear elastic fracture mechanics was used to predict the strength of a typical ply. The residual thermal stresses were also included in the analysis. The classical laminated plate theory was used to calculate the complementary energy of the cracked triplet in terms of its unknown effective thermoelastic properties and those of its damaged middle layer. The complementary energy of the triplet was also calculated in terms of the local properties of each layer of the triplet, from the constructed admissible stress fields. After calculating the thermoelastic properties of the damaged triplet, the thermoelastic properties of the damaged middle layer of the triplet were extracted from the relations between them which was obtained through the classical laminated plate theory. The energy release rate of a microcrack in the ligament between two existing cracks was calculated based on the constructed admissible stress fields. The effect of the crack density in the ply undergoing progressive cracking, the location of the microcrack, and fiber orientation of the adjacent plies were included in the analysis.

  12. Microcracking in composite laminates under thermal and mechanical loading. Thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Maddocks, J.R.

    1995-05-01

    Composites used in space structures are exposed to both extremes in temperature and applied mechanical loads. Cracks in the matrix form, changing the laminate thermoelastic properties. The goal of the present investigation is to develop a predictive methodology to quantify microcracking in general composite laminates under both thermal and mechanical loading. This objective is successfully met through a combination of analytical modeling and experimental investigation. In the analysis, the stress and displacement distributions in the vicinity of a crack are determined using a shear lag model. These are incorporated into an energy based cracking criterion to determine the favorability of crack formation. A progressive damage algorithm allows the inclusion of material softening effects and temperature-dependent material properties. The analysis is implemented by a computer code which gives predicted crack density and degraded laminate properties as functions of any thermomechanical load history. Extensive experimentation provides verification of the analysis. AS4/3501-6 graphite/epoxy laminates are manufactured with three different layups to investigate ply thickness and orientation effects. Thermal specimens are cooled to progressively lower temperatures down to {minus}184 C. After conditioning the specimens to each temperature, cracks are counted on their edges using optical microscopy and in their interiors by sanding to incremental depths. Tensile coupons are loaded monotonically to progressively higher loads until failure. Cracks are counted on the coupon edges after each loading. A data fit to all available results provides input parameters for the analysis and shows them to be material properties, independent of geometry and loading. Correlation between experiment and analysis is generally very good under both thermal and mechanical loading, showing the methodology to be a powerful, unified tool.

  13. Laminated thermoplastic composite material from recycled high density polyethylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Ping; Waskom, Tommy L.

    1994-01-01

    The design of a materials-science, educational experiment is presented. The student should understand the fundamentals of polymer processing and mechanical property testing of materials. The ability to use American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards is also necessary for designing material test specimens and testing procedures. The objectives of the experiment are (1) to understand the concept of laminated composite materials, processing, testing, and quality assurance of thermoplastic composites and (2) to observe an application example of recycled plastics.

  14. Porcelain laminate veneers: Clinical survey for evaluation of failure

    PubMed Central

    Alhekeir, Diemah F.; Al-Sarhan, Rana A.; Al Mashaan, Abdulmohsen F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the association of the failure of porcelain laminate veneers with factors related to the patient, material, and operator. Methods This clinical survey involved 29 patients (19 women and 10 men) and their dentists, including undergraduate and postgraduate dental students and dental interns. Two questionnaires were distributed to collect information from participants. All patients were clinically examined. Criteria for failure of the porcelain laminate veneers included color change, cracking, fracture, and/or debonding. Results A total of 205 porcelain laminate veneers were evaluated. All of the restorations were fabricated from IPS e.max Press and cemented with Variolink Veneer (Ivoclar Vivadent, Schaan, Principality of Liechtenstein) or RelyX veneer cement (3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA). The preparations were generally located in enamel (58.6%), and most veneers had an overlapped design (89.7%). Ten patients (34.48%) showed veneer failure, most often in terms of color change (60%). Overall, 82.8% of patients were satisfied with their restorations. Conclusion Insufficient clinical skills or operator experience resulted in restoration failure in one-third of patients. PMID:25408598

  15. The shock response of float-glass laminates

    SciTech Connect

    Bourne, N.K.

    2005-09-15

    Interfaces within glass targets give rise to variations in the mode of failure of material components. The wide use of such laminates merits further investigation of the failure mechanism. It is already known that when shocked above a threshold of 4 GPa, glass fails under compression behind a propagating front following the compression front. Work is presented which indicates how this failure process is altered by bonding together two plates to introduce an interface, rather than leaving a monolithic target. After crossing an internal interface, the failure wave propagates only after a delay in soda-lime glass and the failed strength of the material is increased at the inner interface compared with that at the impact face. Addition of a second interface illustrates these effects. Recent work has shown that failure of more than two plates bonded together during impact shapes the pulse transmitted through materials. Indeed it has been suggested that glass sheets bonded together show some of the features of polycrystalline brittle materials. In this work, the stress has been monitored at different stations in the laminate to ascertain the effect of varying the number of tiles within the laminate. It is found that the pulse rises to ca. 4 GPa quickly and then is ramped more gradually as the number of glass sheets is increased.

  16. Damage in woven CFRP laminates under impact loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah, H.; Harland, A. R.; Silberschmidt, V. V.

    2012-08-01

    Carbon fibre-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites used in sports products can be exposed to different in-service conditions such as large dynamic bending deformations caused by impact loading. Composite materials subjected to such loads demonstrate various damage modes such as matrix cracking, delamination and, ultimately, fabric fracture. Damage evolution affects both in-service properties and performance of CFRP that can deteriorate with time. These failure modes need adequate means of analysis and investigation, the major approaches being experimental characterisation and numerical simulations. This research deals with a deformation behaviour and damage in composite laminates due to dynamic bending. Experimental tests are carried out to characterise the behaviour of a woven CFRP material under large-deflection dynamic bending in impact tests carried out to obtain the force-time and absorbed energy profiles for CFRP laminates. Damage in the impacted laminates is analysed using optical microscopy. Numerical simulations are performed to study the deformation behaviour and damage in CFRP for cases of large-deflection bending based on three-dimensional finite-element models implemented in the commercial code Abaqus/Explicit. Multiple layers of bilinear cohesive-zone elements are employed to model the initiation and progression of inter-ply delamination observed in the microscopy studies. The obtained results of simulations show good agreement with experimental data.

  17. Self-biased magnetoelectric response in three-phase laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Su-Chul; Park, Chee-Sung; Cho, Kyung-Hoon; Priya, Shashank

    2010-11-01

    This study reports the experimental observation and analysis of self-biased magnetoelectric (ME) effect in three-phase laminates. The 2-2 L-T mode laminates were fabricated by attaching nickel (Ni) plates and ME particulate composite plates having 3-0 connectivity with 0.948Na0.5K0.5NbO3-0.052LiSbO3 (NKNLS) matrix and Ni0.8Zn0.2Fe2O4 (NZF) dispersant. The presence of two types of ferromagnetic materials, Ni and NZF, results in built-in magnetic bias due to difference in their magnetic susceptibilities and coercivity. This built-in bias (Hbias) provides finite ME effect at zero applied magnetic dc field. The ME response of bending mode trilayer laminate NKNLS-NZF/Ni/NKNLS-NZF in off-resonance and on-resonance conditions was shown to be mathematical combination of the trilayers with configuration NKNLS-NZF/Ni/NKNLS-NZF and NKNLS/Ni/NKNLS representing contributions from magnetic interaction and bending strain.

  18. Development in the elastic analysis of laminated plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, A. J. M.

    1989-05-01

    Some developments in three dimensional analyses of stress and deformation in laminated plates are described. They are based on work by Michell published in 1900. For isotropic and homogeneous plates, Michell obtained a number of classes of exact solutions of the three dimensional elasticity equations which satisfy zero traction conditions on the lateral surfaces of a moderately thick plate. Firstly, for laminates in which the laminae are different isotropic materials, generalizations of Michell's solutions are outlined. Then a more general problem of extending Michell's solutions to materials in which the elastic moduli vary through the plate thickness is considered. The results are then recovered in a direct and simple manner by specializing to the case in which the elastic moduli are piecewise constant through the thickness. For advanced composite materials applications, the main interest is in laminates whose laminae are anisotropic. Michell's solutions cannot be generalized, in closed form, to anisotropic elastic plates. However, the concept of using solutions of the two dimensional thin plate equations to generate relevant solutions of the three dimensional elasticity equations remains valid, although the three dimensional solutions can no longer be presented in closed form. Recent developments along these lines are outlined.

  19. Minimality of invariant laminations for partially hyperbolic attractors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobili, Felipe

    2015-06-01

    Let f : M → M be a C1-diffeomorphism over a compact boundaryless Riemannian manifold M, and Λ a compact f-invariant subset of M admitting a partially hyperbolic spliting TfΛ = Es ⊕ Ec ⊕ Eu over the tangent bundle TfΛ. It's known from the Hirsch-Pugh-Shub theory that Λ admits two invariant laminations associated to the extremal bundles Es and Eu. These laminations are families of dynamically defined immersed submanifolds of the M tangent, respectively, to the bundles Es and Eu at every point in Λ. In this work, we prove that at least one of the invariant laminations of a transitive partially hyperbolic attractor with a one-dimensional center bundle is minimal: the orbit of every leaf intersects Λ densely. This result extends those in Bonatti et al (2002 J. Inst. Math. Jussieu 1 513-41) and Hertz et al (2007 Fields Institute Communications vol 51 (Providence, RI: American Mathematical Society) pp 103-9) about minimal foliations for robustly transitive diffeomorphisms.

  20. Numerical Modelling of Fibre Metal Laminates Subjected to Blast Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Z. W.; Cantwell, W. J.

    2010-05-01

    In this paper, finite element models were developed to simulate fibre metal laminates subjected to various blast loadings with typical pressure-time patterns. The aluminium (alloy grade 2024-0) layer was modelled as an isotropic elasto-plastic material up to the on-set of post failure stage, followed by shear failure and tensile failure to simulate its failure mechanism. The glass fibre laminate (woven glass-fibre/polypropylene matrix composite) layer was modelled as an orthotropic material up to its on-set of damage, followed by damage initiation and evolution using the Hashin criterion. The damage initiation was controlled by failure tensile and compressive stresses within the lamina plane which were primarily determined by tests. The damage evolution was controlled by tensile/compressive fracture energies combined both fibre and matrix. Discussions were given to cover difficulties faced during development of the modelling. The FE models developed for 2/1 and 3/2 fibre metal laminates with different GFPP layer thicknesses were validated against the corresponding experimental results. Good correlation was obtained in terms of failure modes and permanent displacements. Using validated models, parametric studies may be further carried out to cover FMLs made with various stack sequences and layer thicknesses.

  1. Nonlinear probabilistic finite element models of laminated composite shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelstad, S. P.; Reddy, J. N.

    1993-01-01

    A probabilistic finite element analysis procedure for laminated composite shells has been developed. A total Lagrangian finite element formulation, employing a degenerated 3-D laminated composite shell with the full Green-Lagrange strains and first-order shear deformable kinematics, forms the modeling foundation. The first-order second-moment technique for probabilistic finite element analysis of random fields is employed and results are presented in the form of mean and variance of the structural response. The effects of material nonlinearity are included through the use of a rate-independent anisotropic plasticity formulation with the macroscopic point of view. Both ply-level and micromechanics-level random variables can be selected, the latter by means of the Aboudi micromechanics model. A number of sample problems are solved to verify the accuracy of the procedures developed and to quantify the variability of certain material type/structure combinations. Experimental data is compared in many cases, and the Monte Carlo simulation method is used to check the probabilistic results. In general, the procedure is quite effective in modeling the mean and variance response of the linear and nonlinear behavior of laminated composite shells.

  2. Countermeasures for pasture-associated laminitis in ponies and horses.

    PubMed

    Harris, Patricia; Bailey, Simon R; Elliott, Jonathan; Longland, Annette

    2006-07-01

    Laminitis occurs throughout the world in horses and ponies and has major welfare implications. It is obviously important to be able to recognize and treat the condition in its early stages so that pain and suffering are kept to a minimum. However, ideally it would be preferred to be able to recommend certain interventions/countermeasures that avoid or prevent the condition from occurring in the first place. Because pasture-associated laminitis occurs with grass consumption, one obvious way to avoid the condition is to prevent access to pasture and to feed forage alternatives that are known to be low in rapidly fermentable material. For the majority of horses, total restriction is not always a viable or desired option for financial, welfare, and health reasons. It also may not be necessary for those animals that are not predisposed to laminitis. This review discusses the possible countermeasures that could be considered now and in the future in the following 7 key areas: 1) Identifying animals predisposed to the condition; 2) Limiting development of insulin resistance; 3) Avoiding high intakes of rapidly fermentable material; 4) Preventing/reducing the formation and absorption of the various "triggering factors"; 5) Reducing/preventing oxidative damage; 6) Preventing/reducing matrix metalloproteinase activity; and 7) Preventing changes in blood flow. It is unfortunate that little or no hard data exist at present on effective countermeasures, only mechanistic evidence for avoiding risk factors. However, there is much to gain, and research in this area is urgently required. PMID:16772514

  3. Studies in Cup Drawing Behavior of Polymer Laminated Sheet Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elnagmi, M.; Jain, M.; Bruhis, M.; Nielsen, K.

    2011-08-01

    Axisymmetric deep drawing behavior of a polymer laminated sheet metal (PLSM) is investigated using an axisymmetric cup drawing test. PLSMs are of interest as a replacement for painted finishes for automotive applications as they have the potential to achieve good quality long lasting and aesthetically appealing surfaces on stamped parts. However, there is limited understanding of PLSMs in automotive deep drawing situations to produce complex 3-D parts. The tests are carried out using well-controlled, laboratory-based, dual-action, servo-hydraulic forming presses under blank-holder force and punch displacement control conditions. An optical strain mapping system is used to measure the surface strains (and to construct 3D strain maps) from the film side of the deformed samples for a range of forming conditions. Deep drawing characteristics such as punch load versus punch displacement traces, strain distribution along the cup profile, flange wrinkling and fracture characteristics are experimentally assessed for stainless steel-plastic film laminated sheet materials. Also the effect of lamination pressure on wrinkling and delamination is investigated for a decorative pressure sensitive adhesive film affixed to the stainless steel sheet.

  4. Analysis of interlaminar stresses in the torsion of symmetric laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitney, James M.

    1994-03-01

    In the present paper the effect of transverse (interlaminar) normal strain on the torsional response of symmetrically laminated, anisotropic plates is investigated. The analysis is based on a modified form of the global laminate model developed by Pagano and Soni. In-plane stresses are modified in the boundary zone to satisfy free-edge boundary conditions. For the general case of angle-ply layers, a laminated composite behaves in a manner similar to an anisotropic plate. The existence of the bending-twisting coupling phenomenon found in the case of anisotropic plates leads to two classic problems in conjunction with torsional loading. In the first case, referred to as 'pure torsion,' the torsional axis of the plates does not bend. Thus, an axial bending moment is required in addition to the torsional load to suppress plate bending. In the second case, referred to as 'free torsion,' the only loading is torque in which anisotropy induces bending of the torsional axis. For the purposes of this paper it is sufficient to consider the case of pure torsion only.

  5. Fracture analysis of internally delaminated unsymmetric laminated composite plates

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, D.W.; Armanios, E.A.; Hooke, D.A.

    1997-12-31

    A sub laminate analysis is used to develop an analytical solution that determines the effect of mid plane internal delamination on unsymmetric elastically tailored laminated plates. A displacement field that recognizes transverse shear deformation is proposed, and an elasticity boundary value problem is developed. A force-deformation relationship for the delaminated plate is derived. A change in total strain energy release rate and extension-twist coupling with crack length is calculated. The distribution of interlaminar shear and peel stresses on the interface containing the delamination is determined. The analysis is applied to a class of hydrothermally stable unsymmetric laminates under uniform extension. Results show that extension-twist coupling decays monotonically and total strain energy release rate increases monotonically, respectively, with delamination width. Interlaminar shear and peel stress are shown to be of larger magnitude at the free edge than at the delamination tip. The variation of extension-twist coupling with delamination width was verified experimentally. Test results indicate that for the cases under consideration, Teflon FEP film is inadequate for the simulation of internal delamination.

  6. Static and fatigue interlaminar tensile characterization of laminated composites

    SciTech Connect

    Koudela, K.L.; Strait, L.H.; Caiazzo, A.A.; Gipple, K.L.

    1997-12-31

    Spool and curved-beam specimens were evaluated to determine the viability of using either one or both of these configurations to characterize the static and fatigue interlaminar tensile behavior of carbon/epoxy laminates. Unidirectional curved-beam and quasi-isotropic spool specimens were fabricated, nondestructively inspected, and statically tested to failure. Tension-tension fatigue tests were conducted at 10 Hz and an R-ratio ({sigma}{sub min}/{sigma}{sub max}) equal to 0.1 for each specimen configuration. The interlaminar tensile strength of the spool specimen was 12% larger than the strength obtained using curved-beam specimens. In addition, data scatter associated with spool specimens was significantly less than the scatter associated with curved-beam specimens. The difference in data scatter was attributed to the influence of the fabrication process on the quality of the laminates tested. The fatigue limit at 0{sup 7} cycles for both specimen types was shown to be at least 40% of the average interlaminar tensile strength. Based on the results of this study, it was concluded that either the spool or the curved-beam specimens can be used to characterize the interlaminar tensile static and fatigue behavior of carbon/epoxy laminates. However, to obtain the most representative results, the test specimen configuration should be selected so that the specimen fabrication process closely simulates the actual component fabrication process.

  7. Lamination of the Lateral Geniculate Nucleus of Catarrhine Primates

    PubMed Central

    de Sousa, Alexandra A.; Sherwood, Chet C.; Hof, Patrick R.; Zilles, Karl

    2013-01-01

    The lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) of catarrhines – with the exception of gibbons – is typically described as a six-layered structure, comprised of two ventral magnocellular layers, and four dorsal parvocellular layers. The parvocellular layers of the LGN are involved in color vision. Therefore, it is hypothesized that a six-layered LGN is a shared-derived trait among catarrhines. This might suggest that in gibbons the lack of further subdivisions of the parvocellular layers is a recent change, and could be related to specializations of visual information processing in this taxon. To address these hypotheses, the lamination of the LGN was investigated in a range of catarrhine species, including several taxa not previously described, and the evolution of the LGN was reconstructed using phylogenetic information. The findings indicate that while all catarrhine species have four parvocellular leaflets, two main patterns of LGN parvocellular lamination occur: two undivided parvocellular layers in some species, and four parvocellular leaflets (with occasional subleaflets) in other species. LGN size was not found to be related to lamination pattern. Both patterns were found to occur in divergent clades, which is suggestive of homoplasy within the catarrhines in LGN morphology. PMID:23467282

  8. Thermoviscoelastic characterization and predictions of Kevlar/epoxy composite laminates

    SciTech Connect

    Gramoll, K.C.

    1988-01-01

    This study consisted of two main parts, the thermoviscoelastic characterization of Kevlar 49/Fiberite 7714A epoxy composite lamina and the development of a numerical procedure to predict the viscoelastic response of any general laminate constructed from the same material. The four orthotropic material properties, S{sub 11}, S{sub 12}, S{sub 22}, and S{sub 66}, were characterized by 20-minute static creep tests on unidirectional ((0){sub s}, (10){sub s}, and (90){sub 16}) lamina specimens. A new numerical procedure to predict long-term laminate properties from lamina properties (obtained experimentally) was developed. Numerical instabilities and time constraints associated with viscoelastic numerical techniques were discussed and solved. The numerical procedure was incorporated into a user-friendly microcomputer program called Viscoelastic Composite Analysis Program (VCAP), which is available for IBM PC type computers. The program was designed for ease of use and includes graphics, menus, help messages, etc. The final phase of the study involved testing actual laminates constructed from the characterized material, Kevlar/epoxy, at various temperature and load levels for 4 to 5 weeks.

  9. Bounds on Elastic Constants for Random Polycrystals of Laminates

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, J G

    2004-04-30

    A well-known result due to Hill provides an exact expression for the bulk modulus of any multicomponent elastic composite whenever the constituents are isotropic and the shear modulus is uniform throughout. Although no precise analog of Hill's result is available for the opposite case of uniform bulk modulus and varying shear modulus, it is shown here that some similar statements can be made for shear behavior of random polycrystals composed of laminates of isotropic materials. In particular, the Hashin-Shtrikman-type bounds of Peselnick, Meister, and Watt for random polycrystals composed of hexagonal (transversely isotropic) grains are applied to the problem of polycrystals of laminates. An exact product formula relating the Reuss estimate of bulk modulus and an effective shear modulus (of laminated grains composing the system) to products of the eigenvalues for quasi-compressional and quasi-uniaxial shear eigenvectors also plays an important role in the analysis of the overall shear behavior of the random polycrystal. When the bulk modulus is uniform in such a system, the equations are shown to reduce to a simple form that depends prominently on the uniaxial shear eigenvalue - as expected from physical arguments concerning the importance of uniaxial shear in these systems. One application of the analytical results presented here is for benchmarking numerical procedures used for estimating elastic behavior of complex composites.

  10. A single fracture toughness parameter for fibrous composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poe, C. C., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    A general fracture toughness parameter Qc was previously derived and verified to be a material constant, independent of layup, for centrally cracked boron aluminum composite specimens. The specimens were made with various proportions of 0 and + or - 45 degree plies. A limited amount of data indicated that the ratio Qc/epsilon tuf' where epsilon tuf is the ultimate tensile strain of the fibers, might be a constant for all composite laminates, regardless of material and layup. In that case, a single value of Qc/epsilon tuf could be used to predict the fracture toughness of all fibrous composite laminates from only the elastic constants and epsilon tuf. Values of Qc/epsilon tuf were calculated for centrally cracked specimens made from graphite/polyimide, graphite/epoxy, E glass/epoxy, boron/epoxy, and S glass graphite/epoxy materials with numerous layups. Within ordinary scatter, the data indicate that Qc/epsilon tuf is a constant for all laminates that did not split extensively at the crack tips or have other deviate failure modes.

  11. 3D Guided Wave Motion Analysis on Laminated Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, Zhenhua; Leckey, Cara; Yu, Lingyu

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasonic guided waves have proved useful for structural health monitoring (SHM) and nondestructive evaluation (NDE) due to their ability to propagate long distances with less energy loss compared to bulk waves and due to their sensitivity to small defects in the structure. Analysis of actively transmitted ultrasonic signals has long been used to detect and assess damage. However, there remain many challenging tasks for guided wave based SHM due to the complexity involved with propagating guided waves, especially in the case of composite materials. The multimodal nature of the ultrasonic guided waves complicates the related damage analysis. This paper presents results from parallel 3D elastodynamic finite integration technique (EFIT) simulations used to acquire 3D wave motion in the subject laminated carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites. The acquired 3D wave motion is then analyzed by frequency-wavenumber analysis to study the wave propagation and interaction in the composite laminate. The frequency-wavenumber analysis enables the study of individual modes and visualization of mode conversion. Delamination damage has been incorporated into the EFIT model to generate "damaged" data. The potential for damage detection in laminated composites is discussed in the end.

  12. Fracture and crack growth in orthotropic laminates. Part 1: Analysis of a hybrid, unidirectional laminate with damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goree, J. G.

    1982-01-01

    The fracture behavior of unifirectional hybrid (buffer strip) composite laminates is studied. Three particular solutions are discussed: (1) broken fibers in a unidirectional half plane; (2) adjoined half planes of different fiber and matrix properties and (3) the solution of two half planes bounding a third distinct region of finite width. This finite width region represents a buffer strip and the potential of this strip to arrest a crack that originates in one of the half planes is investigated. The analysis is based on a materials modeling approach using the classical shear lag assumption to described the stress transfer between fibers. Explicit fiber and matrix properties of the three regions are retained and changes in the laminate behavior as a function of the relative material properties, buffer strip width and initial crack length are discussed.

  13. Micromechanics analysis of space simulated thermal stresses in composites. I - Theory and unidirectional laminates. II - Multidirectional laminates and failure predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, David E.; Griffin, O. H., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    A micromechanics analysis is used to study the effects of constituent properties on thermally induced stresses in continuous fiber reinforced composites. A finite element formulation is described, and results are presented for unidirectional carbon/epoxy laminates. It is shown that significant stresses develop in composites exposed to thermal excursions typical of spacecraft operating environments and that the fiber thermoelastic properties have a minimal effect on the magnitude of these stresses. The finite element micromechanics analysis is then extended to the study of multidirectional laminates using a simple global/local formulation. Damage initiation predictions are compared with experimental data, and factors controlling the initiation of damage are identified. Ways of improving the durability of composites are discussed.

  14. Micromechanics analysis of space simulated thermal stresses in composites. I - Theory and unidirectional laminates. II - Multidirectional laminates and failure predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Bowles, D.E.; Griffin, O.H. Jr. Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg )

    1991-09-01

    A micromechanics analysis is used to study the effects of constituent properties on thermally induced stresses in continuous fiber reinforced composites. A finite element formulation is described, and results are presented for unidirectional carbon/epoxy laminates. It is shown that significant stresses develop in composites exposed to thermal excursions typical of spacecraft operating environments and that the fiber thermoelastic properties have a minimal effect on the magnitude of these stresses. The finite element micromechanics analysis is then extended to the study of multidirectional laminates using a simple global/local formulation. Damage initiation predictions are compared with experimental data, and factors controlling the initiation of damage are identified. Ways of improving the durability of composites are discussed. 31 refs.

  15. Homogenized In-Plane Elastic-Viscoplastic Behavior of Long Fiber-Reinforced Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Tetsuya; Ohno, Nobutada; Tanaka, Hiroki; Shimizu, Toshihiro

    In this work, the homogenized elastic-viscoplastic behavior of long fiber-reinforced laminates under in-plane loading is predicted by taking into account the microscopic structure and stacking sequence of laminae. A homogenization theory of nonlinear time-dependent composites is applied to such laminates, leading to the macroscopic rate-type constitutive equation of laminates and the evolution equations of microscopic and average stresses in each lamina. The macroscopic constitutive equation is shown to have a stiffness tensor and a stress relaxation function which are evaluated explicitly in terms of the microscopic structure and stacking sequence of laminae. The established theory is then verified by performing in-plane uniaxial tensile tests of unidirectional, cross-ply, and quasi-isotropic carbon fiber/epoxy laminates. It is thus shown that the theory predicts successfully the anisotropic viscoplasticity of unidirectional and cross-ply laminates and the negligible viscoplasticity of quasi-isotropic laminates.

  16. Coupled mixed-field laminate theory and finite element for smart piezoelectric composite shell structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, Dimitris A.

    1996-01-01

    Mechanics for the analysis of laminated composite shells with piezoelectric actuators and sensors are presented. A new mixed-field laminate theory for piezoelectric shells is formulated in curvilinear coordinates which combines single-layer assumptions for the displacements and a layerwise representation for the electric potential. The resultant coupled governing equations for curvilinear piezoelectric laminates are described. Structural mechanics are subsequently developed and an 8-node finite-element is formulated for the static and dynamic analysis of adaptive composite structures of general laminations containing piezoelectric layers. Evaluations of the method and comparisons with reported results are presented for laminated piezoelectric-composite plates, a closed cylindrical shell with a continuous piezoceramic layer and a laminated composite semi-circular cantilever shell with discrete cylindrical piezoelectric actuators and/or sensors.

  17. Study of matrix cracking and delamination in glass/epoxy laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caslini, Massimo; Zanotti, Carlo; O'Brien, T. Kevin

    1987-01-01

    This study focused on characterizing matrix cracking and delamination behavior in multidirectional laminates. Static tension and tension-tension fatigue tests were conducted on two different layups. Damage onset, accumulation, and residual properties were measured. Matrix cracking was shown to have a considerable influence on residual stiffness of glass epoxy laminates, and could be predicted reasonably well for cracks in 90 deg piles using a simple shear lag analysis. A fracture mechanics analysis for the strain energy release rate associated with 90 deg ply-matrix crack formation was developed and was shown to correlate the onset of 90 deg ply cracks in different laminates. The linear degradation of laminate modulus with delamination area, previously observed for graphite epoxy laminates, was predicted for glass epoxy laminates using a simple rule of mixtures analysis. The strain energy release rate associated with edge delamination formation under static and cyclic loading was difficult to analyze because of the presence of several contemporary damage phenomena.

  18. Nuclear envelope lamin-A as a coordinator of T cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Rocha-Perugini, Vera; González-Granado, José M

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear lamins A/C control several critical cellular functions, e.g., chromatin organization, gene transcription, DNA replication, DNA damage responses, cell cycle progression, cell differentiation, and cell polarization during migration. However, few studies have addressed the role of lamins A/C in the control of the functions of immune cells. Recently, we have demonstrated that lamins A/C are induced in T cells upon antigen recognition. Lamins A/C enhance T cell responses by coupling the plasma membrane to the nucleus via the linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC) complex and the actin cytoskeleton. Here, we discuss the possible physiological relevance and functional context of lamin A/C in T cell activation and propose a model in which lamins A/C are key modulators of immune cell functions. PMID:25482193

  19. Influence of residual stresses on the tensile strength of composite-metal sandwich laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herakovich, C. T.; Wong, D. M.

    1977-01-01

    The tensile strength of boron-epoxy/aluminum sandwich laminates is discussed relative to the residual thermal stresses generated by curing and bonding at elevated temperatures. It is shown that the sandwich laminates investigated exhibit three dinstinct modes of failure, depending upon the fiber orientation of the composite. Sandwich laminates with moderate to high percentage of 0-deg fibers exhibit early failures initiated by edge effect; laminates with moderate to high percentage of 90-deg fibers fail according to a first-ply failure criterion; laminates with moderate to high percentages of plus or minus 45 deg plies fail at strains equal to or greater than the failure strain of the corresponding all-composite laminate.

  20. Fracture mechanics of matrix cracking and delamination in glass/epoxy laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caslini, M.; Zanotti, C.; Obrien, T. K.

    1986-01-01

    This study focused on characterizing matrix cracking and delamination behavior in multidirectional laminates. Static tension and tension-tension fatigue tests were conducted on two different layups. Damage onset, accumulation, and residual properties were measured. Matrix cracking was shown to have a considerable influence on residual stiffness of glass epoxy laminates, and could be predicted reasonably well for cracks in 90 deg piles using a simple shear lag analysis. A fracture mechanics analysis for the strain energy release rate associated with 90 deg ply-matrix crack formation was developed and was shown to correlate the onset of 90 deg ply cracks in different laminates. The linear degradation of laminate modulus with delamination area, previously observed for graphite epoxy laminates, was predicted for glass epoxy laminates using a simple rule of mixtures analysis. The strain energy release rate associated with edge delamination formation under static and cyclic loading was difficult to analyze because of the presence of several contemporary damage phenomena.

  1. The telomeric protein AKTIP interacts with A- and B-type lamins and is involved in regulation of cellular senescence

    PubMed Central

    Burla, Romina; Carcuro, Mariateresa; Torre, Mattia La; Fratini, Federica; Crescenzi, Marco; D'Apice, Maria Rosaria; Spitalieri, Paola; Raffa, Grazia Daniela; Astrologo, Letizia; Lattanzi, Giovanna; Cundari, Enrico; Raimondo, Domenico; Biroccio, Annamaria; Gatti, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    AKTIP is a shelterin-interacting protein required for replication of telomeric DNA. Here, we show that AKTIP biochemically interacts with A- and B-type lamins and affects lamin A, but not lamin C or B, expression. In interphase cells, AKTIP localizes at the nuclear rim and in discrete regions of the nucleoplasm just like lamins. Double immunostaining revealed that AKTIP partially co-localizes with lamin B1 and lamin A/C in interphase cells, and that proper AKTIP localization requires functional lamin A. In mitotic cells, AKTIP is enriched at the spindle poles and at the midbody of late telophase cells similar to lamin B1. AKTIP-depleted cells show senescence-associated markers and recapitulate several aspects of the progeroid phenotype. Collectively, our results indicate that AKTIP is a new player in lamin-related processes, including those that govern nuclear architecture, telomere homeostasis and cellular senescence. PMID:27512140

  2. The telomeric protein AKTIP interacts with A- and B-type lamins and is involved in regulation of cellular senescence.

    PubMed

    Burla, Romina; Carcuro, Mariateresa; Torre, Mattia La; Fratini, Federica; Crescenzi, Marco; D'Apice, Maria Rosaria; Spitalieri, Paola; Raffa, Grazia Daniela; Astrologo, Letizia; Lattanzi, Giovanna; Cundari, Enrico; Raimondo, Domenico; Biroccio, Annamaria; Gatti, Maurizio; Saggio, Isabella

    2016-08-01

    AKTIP is a shelterin-interacting protein required for replication of telomeric DNA. Here, we show that AKTIP biochemically interacts with A- and B-type lamins and affects lamin A, but not lamin C or B, expression. In interphase cells, AKTIP localizes at the nuclear rim and in discrete regions of the nucleoplasm just like lamins. Double immunostaining revealed that AKTIP partially co-localizes with lamin B1 and lamin A/C in interphase cells, and that proper AKTIP localization requires functional lamin A. In mitotic cells, AKTIP is enriched at the spindle poles and at the midbody of late telophase cells similar to lamin B1. AKTIP-depleted cells show senescence-associated markers and recapitulate several aspects of the progeroid phenotype. Collectively, our results indicate that AKTIP is a new player in lamin-related processes, including those that govern nuclear architecture, telomere homeostasis and cellular senescence. PMID:27512140

  3. Dynamic Response of Monolithic and Laminate/Particulate Reactive Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Chung-Ting

    Two dynamic compression methods were applied to a monolithic metal and reactive mixtures to investigate their responses: (a) Dynamic experiments using a split Hopkinson pressure bar were applied to reactive mixtures densified by explosive consolidation in order to establish their mechanical response and failure mechanisms. (b) Laser compression and release, which can impart high stresses, up to hundreds GPa, in times of nanoseconds and fractions thereof, was applied to establish the spalling strength of vanadium and the reaction threshold for Ni/Al laminates. The spallation and fragmentation exhibited by recovered mono- and poly-crystalline vanadium prove that the laser intensities and crystal structure play important roles in determining spall strength, fragmentation, and microstructural processes. Densified reactive mixtures with different microstructures (Ni, Mo, W, Nb and Ta with Al) were subjected to the quasi-static and dynamic strain rates. Two distinct failure mechanisms, axial splitting and shear failure, were observed in the recovered specimens. Axial splitting occurred when the bonding between the powders was poor; shear failure was primarily associated with extensive deformation of continuous Ta and Nb phases. Finite element simulations provided valuable information in interpreting the experimental results and predicting failure mechanisms akin to those observed. Ni/Al laminates were subjected to laser compression. The strain rates varied from 105 to 108 s-1, and the initial stress varied from 30 to ˜300 GPa. It is found the thickness of the lamellar and the interlaminar bonding strength are the two critical factors in determining mechanical failure. The intermetallic reaction leading to Ni3Al and NiAl were produced by the laser energies and laser pulse durations in direct laser shock experiments. Laser-driven compression was also applied to study the high temperature synthesis in nano-scale Ni/Al laminates with bilayer thickness 54 nm. Intermetallic

  4. Suppression of interlaminar damage in carbon/epoxy laminates by use of interleaf layers

    SciTech Connect

    Tanimoto, Toshio . Dept. of Materials Science Ceramic Technology)

    1994-10-15

    Carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) have been widely used as a structural material. In general, fiber orientation angle of each lamina in these laminates is variously chosen in order to taylor a material which meets the particular requirement for the material properties in arbitrary direction of laminate. Quasi-isotropic lamination, in which the laminate consisted of laminae with fiber orientation of 0[degree], +45[degree], [minus]45[degree] and 90[degree] to loading axis, is most commonly employed in the actual application. However, quasi-isotropic carbon/epoxy laminates are known to develop the interlaminar stress concentrations near the free edge region. These laminates have a strong tendency to delaminate near the edges when subjected to axial in-plane loading. Such a free edge delamination under loading in the plane of the laminate is a unique problem to laminated composites. This paper summarizes the author's investigation which was performed to reduce the free edge interlaminar stresses in the laminate by incorporating interleaf films between plies and thus to improve the mechanical properties of these materials. In their previous work, the authors have shown that these laminates exhibit a high vibration damping capability. Loss factor values for these CFRP/interleaf laminates which were measured in cantilever beam tests, are 5 to 50 times as large as that for conventional CFRP. In this paper, discussion will be provided on the mechanical properties of the interleaved quasi-isotropic carbon/epoxy laminate, [0/[+-]45/90][sub s], with a special emphasis on the optimum design of interply locations to incorporate the interleaf films for the particular requirement such as static strength, elastic modulus, fatigue resistance and so on.

  5. The effects of embedded internal delaminations on composite laminate compression strength; an experimental review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, Alan T.

    1994-01-01

    Delaminations in laminated composite materials can degrade the compressive strength of these materials. Delaminations can form as a result of impact damage or processing flaws. In order to better understand the effects of these delaminations on the compressive behavior of laminated composite plates, programs have been conducted to assess the criticality of prescribed delaminations of known size, shape, and location on the compression strength of laminated composites. A review of these programs is presented along with highlights of pertinent findings from each.

  6. Prediction of the long-term creep compliance of general composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuttle, M. E.; Brinson, H. F.

    1986-01-01

    An accelerated viscoelastic characterization procedure for use with polymer-based composite materials is presented which employs short term test data obtained using unidirectional specimens to predict the long term viscoelastic behavior of general composite laminates. This procedure is here illustrated using the Schapery (1966, 1969) nonlinear theory as the required viscoelastic constitutive model, as well as classical lamination theory for the lamination scheme. The technique is applied to T300/5208 graphite/epoxy.

  7. Investigating compression failure mechanisms in composite laminates with a transparent fiberglass-epoxy birefringent materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuart, M. J.; Williams, J. G.

    1984-01-01

    The response and failure of a + or - 45s class laminate was studied by transparent fiberglass epoxy composite birefringent material. The birefringency property allows the laminate stress distribution to be observed during the test and also after the test if permanent residual stresses occur. The location of initial laminate failure and of the subsequent failure propagation are observed through its transparency characteristics. Experimental results are presented.

  8. Analytical solutions to the fundamental frequency of arbitrary laminated plates under various boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yingqin; Hong, Ming; Liu, Yuan

    2015-03-01

    In recent years, as the composite laminated plates are widely used in engineering practice such as aerospace, marine and building engineering, the vibration problem of the composite laminated plates is becoming more and more important. Frequency, especially the fundamental frequency, has been considered as an important factor in vibration problem. In this paper, a calculation method of the fundamental frequency of arbitrary laminated plates under various boundary conditions is proposed. The vibration differential equation of the laminated plates is established at the beginning of this paper and the frequency formulae of specialty orthotropic laminated plates under various boundary conditions and antisymmetric angle-ply laminated plates with simply-supported edges are investigated. They are proved to be correct. Simple algorithm of the fundamental frequency for multilayer antisymmetric and arbitrary laminated plates under various boundary conditions is studied by a series of typical examples. From the perspective of coupling, when the number of laminated plates layers N > 8-10, some coupling influence on the fundamental frequency can be neglected. It is reasonable to use specialty orthotropic laminated plates with the same thickness but less layers to calculate the corresponding fundamental frequency of laminated plates. Several examples are conducted to prove correctness of this conclusion. At the end of this paper, the influence of the selected number of layers of specialty orthotropic laminates on the fundamental frequency is investigated. The accuracy and complexity are determined by the number of layers. It is necessary to use proper number of layers of special orthotropic laminates with the same thickness to simulate the fundamental frequency in different boundary conditions.

  9. Effects of moisture profiles and laminate configuration on the hygro stress in advanced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Lark, R. F.; Sinclair, J. H.

    1978-01-01

    A theoretical investigation was performed using a recently developed integrated theory for predicting the hygrothermomechanical response to investigate the effects of three different moisture profiles on the ply hygro stresses in angleplied laminates. The moisture profiles were linear, parabolic and hyperbolic varying from 1 percent at the exposed ply to '0' percent in the protected ply. The angleplied laminates were of two generic configurations. The results obtained are summarized graphically to illustrate the effects of both moisture profile and laminate configuration.

  10. The initiation, propagation, and effect of matrix microcracks in cross-ply and related laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nairn, John A.; Hu, Shoufeng; Liu, Siulie; Bark, Jong

    1991-01-01

    Recently, a variational mechanics approach was used to determine the thermoelastic stress state in cracked laminates. Described here is a generalization of the variational mechanics techniques to handle other cross-ply laminates, related laminates, and to account for delaminations emanating from microcrack tips. Microcracking experiments on Hercules 3501-6/AS4 carbon fiber/epoxy laminates show a staggered cracking pattern. These results can be explained by the variational mechanics analysis. The analysis of delaminations emanating from microcrack tips has resulted in predictions about the structural and material variables controlling competition between microcracking and delamination failure modes.

  11. Nuclear Envelope Lamin-A Couples Actin Dynamics with Immunological Synapse Architecture and T Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    González-Granado, José María; Trigueros-Motos, Laia; Cibrián, Danay; Morlino, Giulia; Blanco-Berrocal, Marta; Osorio, Fernando Garcia; Freije, José María Pérez; López-Otín, Carlos; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Andrés, Vicente

    2014-01-01

    In many cell types, nuclear A-type lamins have been implicated in structural and functional activities, including higher-order genome organization, DNA replication and repair, gene transcription, and signal transduction. However, their role in specialized immune cells remains largely unexplored. Here, we showed that the abundance of A-type lamins is almost negligible in resting naïve T lymphocytes, but that it is substantially increased upon activation of the T cell receptor (TCR), and is an early event that accelerates formation of the immunological synapse between T cells and antigen-presenting cells. We found that lamin-A enhanced the polymerization of F-actin in T cells, a critical step for immunological synapse formation, by physically connecting the nucleus to the plasma membrane through the linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC) complex. We also showed that lamin-A played a key role in other membrane, cytoplasmic, and nuclear events related to TCR activation, including receptor-clustering, downstream signaling, and target gene expression. Notably, the presence of lamin-A was associated with enhanced extracellular signal–regulated kinase 1/2 signaling, and pharmacological inhibition of this pathway reduced the extent of lamin-A–dependent T cell activation. Moreover, mice deficient in lamin-A exhibited impaired T cell responses in vivo. These findings underscore the importance of A-type lamins for TCR activation, and identify lamin-A as a previously unappreciated regulator of the immune response. PMID:24757177

  12. Study on three dimensional transient thermal stress analysis for laminated composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Kin`ya; Zako, Masaru

    1995-11-01

    Transient heat conduction and thermal stress analysis of laminated composite materials are very important because they are hated during manufacturing process. Anisotropy of thermal conductivity has to be considered for heat conduction analysis of composite materials such as FRP. Assuming that heat conducts uniformly in normal direction in thin structures, laminated plates can be modeled as single layers with the equivalent heat conductivities. With this assumption, FEM three dimensional transient heat conduction and thermal stress analysis programs for laminated composite materials are developed. As numerical examples, the heat conduction and thermal stresses of laminated CFRP structure are investigated.

  13. Interlaminar stress singularities at a straight free edge in composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, I. S.; Crews, J. H., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    A quasi-three-dimensional finite-element analysis was used to analyze the edge-stress problem in four-ply, composite laminates. The seven laminates that were considered belong to the laminate family where the outer ply angle is between 0 and 90 deg. Systematic convergence studies were made to explore the existence of stress singularities near the free edge. The present analysis appears to confirm the existence of stress singularities at the intersection of the interface and the free edge. The power of the stress singularity was the same for all seven laminates considered.

  14. Fatigue Damage in Notched Composite Laminates Under Tension-Tension Cyclic Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stinchcomb, W. W.; Henneke, E. G.; Reifsnider, K. L.; Kress, G. R.

    1985-01-01

    The results are given of an investigation to determine the damage states which develop in graphite epoxy laminates with center holes due to tension-tension cyclic loads, to determine the influence of stacking sequence on the initiation and interaction of damage modes and the process of damage development, and to establish the relationships between the damage states and the strength, stiffness, and life of the laminates. Two quasi-isotropic laminates were selected to give different distributions of interlaminar stresses around the hole. The laminates were tested under cyclic loads (R=0.1, 10 Hz) at maximum stresses ranging between 60 and 95 percent of the notched tensile strength.

  15. Modeling and detection of quasi-static nanotesla magnetic field variations using magnetoelectric laminate sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Z. P.; Zhai, J. Y.; Dong, S. X.; Li, J. F.; Viehland, D.; Odendaal, W. G.

    2008-01-01

    Laminated composites of magnetostrictive and piezoelectric layers have been developed for their magnetoelectric (ME) product tensor properties. In spite of the considerable progress in materials aspects, little attention has been given to ME laminate incorporation into a detection technology. Here, we present a ME technology including the laminate equivalent model, detection circuitry consideration and noise mitigation for ME laminate sensors operated at quasi-static (<=10 Hz) frequencies. We then constructed a passive magnetic field prototype sensor unit and detected a 2.6 nanotesla magnetic signal at 1 Hz frequency.

  16. Investigation of Forming Performance of Laminated Steel Sheets Using Finite Element Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wenning; Sun, Xin; Ruokolainen, Robert; Gayden, Xiaohong

    2007-05-01

    Laminated steel sheets have been used in automotive structures for reducing in-cabin noise. However, due to the marked difference in material properties of the different laminated layers, integrating laminated steel parts into the manufacturing processes can be challenging. Especially, the behavior of laminated sheets during forming processes is very different from that of monolithic steel sheets. During the deep-draw forming process, large shear deformation and corresponding high interfacial stress may initiate and propagate interfacial cracks between the core polymer and the metal skin, hence degrading the performance of the laminated sheets. In this paper, the formability of the laminated steel sheets is investigated by means of numerical analysis. The goal of this work is to gain insight into the relationship between the individual properties of the laminated sheet layers and the corresponding formability of the laminated sheet as a whole, eventually leading to reliable design and successful forming process development of such materials. Finite element analyses of laminate sheet forming are presented. Effects of polymer core thickness and viscoelastic properties of the polymer core, as well as punching velocity, are also investigated.

  17. Influence of chamber dimensions on the performance of a conduction micropump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Junyuan; Wan, Zhenping; Wen, Wanyu; Li, Yaochao; Tang, Yong

    2016-05-01

    An electrohydrodynamic (EHD) conduction micropump with symmetric planar electrodes is developed to investigate the effect of micropump chamber dimensions on static pressure and flow rate. The interdigitated electrodes are created on an FR-4 CCL (copper clad laminate) using photolithography. The micropump consists of an electrode plate, chamber plate, top and bottom end cover. A 2D numerical simulation study is conducted to provide details about the ion distribution and fluid flow behaviors within a local domain of micropumps with different chamber height. Experimental results show that, by increasing chamber height, the static pressure and flow rate rise with a big slope under a chamber height of 0.2 mm, and henceforth decrease dramatically. The variation trends of static pressure and flow rate with an increase in chamber height are determined by the combination of ion concentration distribution and fluidic circulation formed between the two electrodes. Additionally, the effect of the chamber width and length is experimentally analyzed for optimum pressure and output flow rate.

  18. Laminate behavior for SiC fiber-reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; Phillips, Ronald E.

    1990-01-01

    The room temperature mechanical properties of SiC fiber reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composite laminates (SiC/RBSN) have been measured. The laminates contained approx 30 volume fraction of aligned 142-micron diameter SiC fiber in a porous RBSN matrix. Three types of laminate studied were unidirectional: (1) (0) sub 8, (2) (10) sub 8, and (3) (45) sub 8, and (90) sub 8; cross plied laminates (0 sub 2/90 sub 2); and angle plied laminates: (+45 sub 2/-45 sub 2). Each laminate contained eight fiber plies. Results of the unidirectionally reinforced composites tested at various angles to the reinforcement direction indicate large anisotropy in in-plane properties. In addition, strength properties of these composites along the fiber direction were independent of specimen gage length and were unaffected by notches normal to the fiber direction. Splitting parallel to the fiber at the notch tip appears to be the dominant crack blunting mechanism responsible for notch insensitive behavior of these composites. In-plane properties of the composites can be improved by 2-D laminate construction. Mechanical property results for (0 sub 2/90 sub 2) sub s and (+45/-45 sub 2) sub s laminates showed that their matrix failure strains were similar to that for (0) sub 8 laminates, but their primary elastic moduli, matrix cracking strengths, and ultimate composite strengths were lower. The elastic properties of unidirectional, cross-ply, and angle-ply composites can be predicted from modified constitutive equations and laminate theory. Further improvements in laminate properties may be achieved by reducing the matrix porosity and by optimizing the bond strength between the SiC fiber and RBSN matrix.

  19. Laminate behavior for SiC fiber-reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhatt, R. T.; Phillips, R. E.

    1988-01-01

    The room temperature mechanical properties of SiC fiber reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composite laminates (SiC/RBSN) have been measured. The laminates contained approx 30 volume fraction of aligned 142-micron diameter SiC fiber in a porous RBSN matrix. Three types of laminate studied were unidirectional: (1) (0) sub 8, (2) (10) sub 8, and (3) (45) sub 8, and (90) sub 8; cross plied laminates (0 sub 2/90 sub 2); and angle plied laminates: (+45 sub 2/-45 sub 2). Each laminate contained eight fiber plies. Results of the unidirectionally reinforced composites tested at various angles to the reinforcement direction indicate large anisotropy in in-plane properties. In addition, strength properties of these composites along the fiber direction were independent of specimen gage length and were unaffected by notches normal to the fiber direction. Splitting parallel to the fiber at the notch tip appears to be the dominant crack blunting mechanism responsible for notch insensitive behavior of these composites. In-plane properties of the composites can be improved by 2-D laminate construction. Mechanical property results for (0 sub 2/90 sub 2)sub s and (+45/-45 sub 2) sub s laminates showed that their matrix failure strains were similar to that for (0) sub 8 laminates, but their primary elastic moduli, matrix cracking strengths, and ultimate composite strengths were lower. The elastic properties of unidirectional, cross-ply, and angle-ply composites can be predicted from modified constitutive equations and laminate theory. Further improvements in laminate properties may be achieved by reducing the matrix porosity and by optimizing the bond strength between the SiC fiber and RBSN matrix.

  20. Fatigue Life Methodology for Tapered Composite Flexbeam Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murri, Gretchen B.; OBrien, T. Kevin; Rousseau, Carl Q.

    1997-01-01

    The viability of a method for determining the fatigue life of composite rotor hub flexbeam laminates using delamination fatigue characterization data and a geometric non-linear finite element (FE) analysis was studied. Combined tension and bending loading was applied to non-linear tapered flexbeam laminates with internal ply drops. These laminates, consisting of coupon specimens cut from a full-size S2/E7T1 glass-epoxy flexbeam were tested in a hydraulic load frame under combined axial-tension and transverse cyclic bending. The magnitude of the axial load remained constant and the direction of the load rotated with the specimen as the cyclic bending load was applied. The first delamination damage observed in the specimens occurred at the area around the tip of the outermost ply-drop group. Subsequently, unstable delamination occurred by complete delamination along the length of the specimen. Continued cycling resulted in multiple delaminations. A 2D finite element model of the flexbeam was developed and a geometrically non-linear analysis was performed. The global responses of the model and test specimens agreed very well in terms of the transverse displacement. The FE model was used to calculate strain energy release rates (G) for delaminations initiating at the tip of the outer ply-drop area and growing toward the thick or thin regions of the flexbeam, as was observed in the specimens. The delamination growth toward the thick region was primarily mode 2, whereas delamination growth toward the thin region was almost completely mode 1. Material characterization data from cyclic double-cantilevered beam tests was used with the peak calculated G values to generate a curve predicting fatigue failure by unstable delamination as a function of the number of loading cycles. The calculated fatigue lives compared well with the test data.

  1. Fatigue Life Methodology for Tapered Composite Flexbeam Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murri, Gretchen B.; O''Brien, T. Kevin; Rousseau, Carl Q.

    1997-01-01

    The viability of a method for determining the fatigue life of composite rotor hub flexbeam laminates using delamination fatigue characterization data and a geometric non-linear finite element (FE) analysis was studied. Combined tension and bending loading was applied to nonlinear tapered flexbeam laminates with internal ply drops. These laminates, consisting of coupon specimens cut from a full-size S2/E7T1 glass-epoxy flexbeam were tested in a hydraulic load frame under combined axial-tension and transverse cyclic bending loads. The magnitude of the axial load remained constant and the direction of the load rotated with the specimen as the cyclic bending load was applied. The first delamination damage observed in the specimens occurred at the area around the tip of the outermost ply-drop group. Subsequently, unstable delamination occurred by complete delamination along the length of the specimen. Continued cycling resulted in multiple delaminations. A 2D finite element model of the flexbeam was developed and a geometrically non-linear analysis was performed. The global responses of the model and test specimens agreed very well in terms of the transverse flexbeam tip-displacement and flapping angle. The FE model was used to calculate strain energy release rates (G) for delaminations initiating at the tip of the outer ply-drop area and growing toward the thick or thin regions of the flexbeam, as was observed in the specimens. The delamination growth toward the thick region was primarily mode 2, whereas delamination growth toward the thin region was almost completely mode 1. Material characterization data from cyclic double-cantilevered beam tests was used with the peak calculated G values to generate a curve predicting fatigue failure by unstable delamination as a function of the number of loading cycles. The calculated fatigue lives compared well with the test data.

  2. Design of sintered, tough, oxide laminate and fibrous monolithic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong-Kyu

    Tough, oxide, laminated and fibrous monolithic composites were fabricated by using tape casting and co-extrusion technique, respectively. Mullite (3Al 2O3·2SiO2), alumina (Al2O 3), 50 vol% alumina · 50 vol% YAG (yttrium aluminum garnet, Y 3Al5O12) in situ composite, 50 vol% alumina · 50 vol% mullite in situ composite, zirconia (ZrO 2), and nickel aluminate (NiAl2O4) were used as matrix materials. Aluminum phosphate (AlPO4), alumina platelets, and 50 vol% alumina · 50 vol% leucite (KAlSi2O6) were chosen as high temperature applicable interphase materials. ICP (Inductively coupled plasma) data indicated no extensive decomposition of AlPO4 heat treated at 1600 and 1800°C. The AlPO4 worked as a stable, porous, weak, crack deflecting interphase material with three point bending strength of 1.5 MPa and 61% of theoretical density after heat treatment at 1600°C for 10h. The 50 vol% alumina · 50 vol% YAG in situ composite had a bending strength of 361 MPa after sintering at the condition of 1700°C/5h. A : B (C) : D (E) bimodal designs were proposed to increase the toughness of the laminated composites. 1 : 5 (6) : 12 (1) bimodal laminated composite had a bending strength and a work of fracture of 142 MPa and 0.51 KJ/m2, respectively. Fibrous monolithic composites with different interphase thickness and interphase composition were fabricated. 2-, 3- and mixed-layer fibrous monolithic composites were made.

  3. Scaling of low-velocity impact for symmetric composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankar, Bhavani V.

    1992-01-01

    The equations governing the problem of low-velocity impact of a simply supported rectangular midplane-symmetric laminated plate are nondimensionalized such that the problem is defined in terms of five dimensionless parameters. A parametric study using the Graeco-Latin Factorial Plan is performed. Semi-empirical formulas for maximum impact force, impact duration, and maximum back surface strains are obtained. It is found that some of the simple impact models provide the bounds for the case of impact on a finite extent plate. A one parameter model is derived for impacts of short duration.

  4. Analysis of delamination growth in compressively loaded composite laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tratt, Matthew D.

    The present analytical and empirical study of composite structure delamination has attempted to predict the threshold stress for the initiation of delamination growth in compressively loaded composite laminates. The strain-energy release-rate distributions around circular delaminations are computed via MSC/NASTRAN analysis in conjunction with a virtual crack-opening technique. Static compression tests were conducted on specimens of graphite fiber-reinforced epoxy having circular delaminations of various sizes. Computed delamination growth threshold-stress prediction results were at substantial variance with the test data, but confirmed trends and gave qualitative insight into quasi-static delamination growth.

  5. Finite element analysis of laminated plates and shells, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seide, P.; Chang, P. N. H.

    1978-01-01

    The finite element method is used to investigate the static behavior of laminated composite flat plates and cylindrical shells. The analysis incorporates the effects of transverse shear deformation in each layer through the assumption that the normals to the undeformed layer midsurface remain straight but need not be normal to the mid-surface after deformation. A digital computer program was developed to perform the required computations. The program includes a very efficient equation solution code which permits the analysis of large size problems. The method is applied to the problem of stretching and bending of a perforated curved plate.

  6. Methods of making metallic glass foil laminate composites

    DOEpatents

    Vianco, Paul T.; Fisher, Robert W.; Hosking, Floyd M.; Zanner, Frank J.

    1996-01-01

    A process for the fabrication of a rapidly solidified foil laminate composite. An amorphous metallic glass foil is flux treated and coated with solder. Before solidification of the solder the foil is collected on a take-up spool which forms the composite into a solid annular configuration. The resulting composite exhibits high strength, resiliency and favorable magnetic and electrical properties associated with amorphous materials. The composite also exhibits bonding strength between the foil layers which significantly exceeds the bulk strength of the solder alone.

  7. Methods of making metallic glass foil laminate composites

    DOEpatents

    Vianco, P.T.; Fisher, R.W.; Hosking, F.M.; Zanner, F.J.

    1996-08-20

    A process for the fabrication of a rapidly solidified foil laminate composite. An amorphous metallic glass foil is flux treated and coated with solder. Before solidification of the solder the foil is collected on a take-up spool which forms the composite into a solid annular configuration. The resulting composite exhibits high strength, resiliency and favorable magnetic and electrical properties associated with amorphous materials. The composite also exhibits bonding strength between the foil layers which significantly exceeds the bulk strength of the solder alone. 6 figs.

  8. Environmental effects on long term behavior of composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singhal, S. N.; Chamis, C. C.

    1992-01-01

    Model equations are presented for approximate methods simulating the long-term behavior of composite materials and structures in hot/humid service environments. These equations allow laminate property upgradings with time, and can account for the effects of service environments on creep response. These methodologies are illustrated for various individual and coupled temperature/moisture, longitudinal/transverse, and composite material type cases. Creep deformation is noted to rise dramatically for cases of matrix-borne, but not of fiber-borne, loading in hot, humid environments; the coupled influence of temperature and moisture is greater than a mere combination of their individual influences.

  9. Evaluation of shear strength of oil treated laminated bamboo.

    PubMed

    Sulaiman, O; Hashim, R; Wahab, R; Ismail, Z A; Samsi, H W; Mohamed, A

    2006-12-01

    Studies were carried out on heat treatment of bamboo species Gigantochloa scortechinii Gamble using palm oil. The samples were laminated and glued. The adhesion results showed that the delamination of glue line increased as the temperature and duration of oil heat treatment increased. Maximum load and shear strength of the glue line reduced as the heat treatment become more severe. It was found that the palm oil used as the heating medium penetrated in some parts of the cell wall as well as in the cell lumen of the bamboo. PMID:16524726

  10. Microcracking in composite laminates under thermal and mechanical loading. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddocks, Jason R.

    1995-01-01

    Composites used in space structures are exposed to both extremes in temperature and applied mechanical loads. Cracks in the matrix form, changing the laminate thermoelastic properties. The goal of the present investigation is to develop a predictive methodology to quantify microcracking in general composite laminates under both thermal and mechanical loading. This objective is successfully met through a combination of analytical modeling and experimental investigation. In the analysis, the stress and displacement distributions in the vicinity of a crack are determined using a shear lag model. These are incorporated into an energy based cracking criterion to determine the favorability of crack formation. A progressive damage algorithm allows the inclusion of material softening effects and temperature-dependent material properties. The analysis is implemented by a computer code which gives predicted crack density and degraded laminate properties as functions of any thermomechanical load history. Extensive experimentation provides verification of the analysis. AS4/3501-6 graphite/epoxy laminates are manufactured with three different layups to investigate ply thickness and orientation effects. Thermal specimens are cooled to progressively lower temperatures down to -184 C. After conditioning the specimens to each temperature, cracks are counted on their edges using optical microscopy and in their interiors by sanding to incremental depths. Tensile coupons are loaded monotonically to progressively higher loads until failure. Cracks are counted on the coupon edges after each loading. A data fit to all available results provides input parameters for the analysis and shows them to be material properties, independent of geometry and loading. Correlation between experiment and analysis is generally very good under both thermal and mechanical loading, showing the methodology to be a powerful, unified tool. Delayed crack initiation observed in a few cases is attributed to a

  11. Analysis of shear test method for composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergner, H. W., Jr.; Davis, J. G., Jr.; Herakovich, C. T.

    1977-01-01

    An elastic plane stress finite element analysis of the stress distributions in four flat test specimens for in-plane shear response of composite materials subjected to mechanical or thermal loads is presented. The shear test specimens investigated include: slotted coupon, cross beam, losipescu, and rail shear. Results are presented in the form of normalized shear contour plots for all three in-plane stess components. It is shown that the cross beam, losipescu, and rail shear specimens have stress distributions which are more than adequate for determining linear shear behavior of composite materials. Laminate properties, core effects, and fixture configurations are among the factors which were found to influence the stress distributions.

  12. Predictable Outcomes with Porcelain Laminate Veneers: A Clinical Report.

    PubMed

    Pimentel, Welson; Teixeira, Marcelo Lucchesi; Costa, Priscila Paganini; Jorge, Mônica Zacharias; Tiossi, Rodrigo

    2016-06-01

    This clinical report describes how to achieve predictable outcomes for anterior teeth esthetic restorations with porcelain laminate veneers by associating the digital planning and design of the restoration with interim restorations. The previous digital smile design of the restoration eliminates the communication barrier with the patient and assists the clinician throughout patient treatment. Interim restorations (diagnostic mock-ups) further enhance communication with the patient and prevent unnecessary tooth reduction for conservative tooth preparation. Adequate communication between patient and clinician contributes to successful definitive restorations and patient satisfaction with the final esthetic outcome. PMID:26633080

  13. Recent developments in semiprocessed cold rolled magnetic lamination steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilinski, E. J.

    2006-09-01

    Over the past 10 years the magnetic property performance of semi-processed cold rolled magnetic lamination steels in North America have approached those of nonoriented, semi-processed silicon steel. This improvement was accomplished via higher alloy levels in conjunction with hot band annealing. New temper rolling strategies can produce weakly oriented steels tailored to specific applications, such as small transformers used in fluorescent lighting ballasts. Recently, production trials for 0.0138 in product cold rolled on tin mills has been undertaken. Efforts to further improve properties through a better understanding of texture control and via implementation of new production processes, such as thin slab or strip casting, continue.

  14. An orthotropic laminate composite containing a layer with a crack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arin, K.

    1974-01-01

    A laminate composite containing an orthotropic layer with a crack situated normal to the interfaces, and bonded to two orthotropic half-planes of dissimilar materials was considered. The solutions for two different classes of orthotropic materials are presented. In each case, the problem was first reduced to a system of dual integral equations, then to a singular integral equation which was subsequently solved numerically for the stress intensity factors at the tip of the crack. The effect of the material properties on the stress intensity factor was investigated. The generalized plane stress and the plane strain were treated simultaneously.

  15. Crystal structures of the coil 2B fragment and the globular tail domain of human lamin B1

    SciTech Connect

    Ruan, Jianbin; Xu, Chao; Bian, Chuanbing; Lam, Robert; Wang, Jia-Pey; Kania, Joanna; Min, Jinrong; Zang, Jianye

    2012-07-18

    We present here the crystal structures of human lamin B1 globular tail domain and coiled 2B domain, which adopt similar folds to Ig-like domain and coiled-coil domain of lamin A, respectively. Despite the overall similarity, we found an extra intermolecular disulfide bond in the lamin B1 coil 2B domain, which does not exist in lamin A/C. In addition, the structural analysis indicates that interactions at the lamin B1 homodimer interface are quite different from those of lamin A/C. Thus our research not only reveals the diversely formed homodimers among lamin family members, but also sheds light on understanding the important roles of lamin B1 in forming the nuclear lamina matrix.

  16. Flaw criticality of circular disbond defects in compressive laminates. M.S. Thesis. Interim Report, 1980 - 1981; [graphite-epoxy laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, J. D.

    1981-01-01

    The compressive behavior of T300/5208 graphite-epoxy laminates containing circular delaminations was studied to determine the flaw criticality of two types of implanted defect, Kapton bag and Teflon film, on several laminate configurations. Defect size was varied. Results, presented in the form of residual strength curves, indicate that the Teflon film defect reduced strength more than the Kapton bad defect in 12-ply samples, but that two laminates (+ or - 45) sub 2s and (90/+ or - 45) sub s were insensitive to any implanted defect. A clear thickness effect was shown to exist for the (o/+ pr 45) sub ns laminate and was attributed to failure mode transition. The analytically predicted buckling loads show excellent agreement with experimental results and are useful in predicting failure mode transition.

  17. Normalization of Impact Energy by Laminate Thickness for Compression After Impact Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, A. T.; Hromisin, S. M.

    2013-01-01

    The amount of impact energy used to damage a composite laminate is a critical parameter when assessing residual strength properties. The compression after impact (CAI) strength of impacted laminates is dependent upon how thick the laminate is and this has traditionally been accounted for by normalizing (dividing) the impact energy by the laminate's thickness. However, when comparing CAI strength values for a given lay-up sequence and fiber/resin system, dividing the impact energy by the specimen thickness has been noted by the author to give higher CAI strength values for thicker laminates. A study was thus undertaken to assess the comparability of CAI strength data by normalizing the impact energy by the specimen thickness raised to a power to account for the higher strength of thicker laminates. One set of data from the literature and two generated in this study were analyzed by dividing the impact energy by the specimen thickness to the 1, 1.5, 2, and 2.5 powers. Results show that as laminate thickness and damage severity decreased, the value which the laminate thickness needs to be raised to in order to yield more comparable CAI data increases.

  18. Experimental and Analytical Evaluation of the Notched Tensile Fracture of CFRP Woven Laminates at 77 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumagai, S.; Shindo, Y.

    2004-06-01

    The cryogenic fracture behavior of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) woven laminates was studied. Experiments and a finite element analysis were conducted on single edge notched CFRP woven laminates subjected to in-plane loading. Damage processes were identified by acoustic emission measurement and digital microscopy.

  19. An analytical and experimental investigation of edge delamination in laminates subjected to tension, bending, and torsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Wen S.

    1989-01-01

    An integrated two-dimensional finite element was developed to calculate interlaminar stresses and strain energy release rates for the study of delamination in composite laminates subjected to uniaxial tension, bending, and torsion loads. Addressed are the formulation, implementation, and verification of the model. Parametric studies were conducted on the effect of Poisson's ratio mismatch between plies and the stacking sequence on interlaminar stress, and on the effect of delamination opening height and delamination length, due to bending, on strain energy release rate for various laminates. A comparison of strain energy release rates in all-graphite and graphite/glass hybrid laminates is included. The preliminary results of laminates subjected to torsion are also included. Fatigue tension tests were conducted on Mode 1 and mixed mode edge-delamination coupons to establish the relationship between fatigue load vs. onset of delamination cycle. The effect on the fatigue delamination onset of different frequencies (1 and 5 Hz) was investigated for glass, graphite,and their hybrid laminates. Although a 20 percent increase in the static onset-of-delamination strength and a 10 percent increase in ultimate strength resulted from hybridizing the all-graphite laminate with a 90 deg glass ply, the fatigue onset is lower in the hybrid laminate than in the all-graphite laminate.

  20. Fiberglass Lamination Program. Course of Instruction for Adult and Post-Secondary Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuin, Dean

    Seven courses of instruction are provided for a fiberglass lamination program for adult and postsecondary classes. The courses cover these areas: (1) mold preparation, (2) gelcoating, (3) fiberglass lamination, (4) stiffening, (5) popping, (6) grinding, and (7) mold making. Information provided at the beginning of each course consists of the…

  1. Compression response of thick layer composite laminates with through-the-thickness reinforcement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.; Smith, Barry T.; Maiden, Janice

    1992-01-01

    Compression and compression-after-impact (CAI) tests were conducted on seven different AS4-3501-6 (0/90) 0.64-cm thick composite laminates. Four of the seven laminates had through-the-thickness (TTT) reinforcement fibers. Two TTT reinforcement methods, stitching and integral weaving, and two reinforcement fibers, Kevlar and carbon, were used. The remaining three laminates were made without TTT reinforcements and were tested to establish a baseline for comparison with the laminates having TTT reinforcement. Six of the seven laminates consisted of nine thick layers whereas the seventh material was composed of 46 thin plies. The use of thick-layer material has the potential for reducing structural part cost because of the reduced part count (layers of material). The compression strengths of the TTT reinforced laminates were approximately one half those of the materials without TTT reinforcements. However, the CAI strengths of the TTT reinforced materials were approximately twice those of materials without TTT reinforcements. The improvement in CAI strength is due to an increase in interlaminar strength produced by the TTT reinforcement. Stitched laminates had slightly higher compression and CAI strengths than the integrally woven laminates.

  2. 78 FR 12716 - Laminated Woven Sacks From the People's Republic of China: Negative Final Determination of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-25

    ...: Laminated Woven Sacks From the People's Republic of China, 73 FR 45941 (August 7, 2008); see also Laminated Woven Sacks From the People's Republic of China: Countervailing Duty Order, 73 FR 45955 (August 7, 2008... of Circumvention of the Antidumping and Countervailing Duty Orders, 76 FR 72161 (November 22,...

  3. 77 FR 61025 - Certain Prepregs, Laminates, and Finished Circuit Boards: Notice of Institution of Formal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-05

    ..., Arizona (``Isola'') on October 6, 2008, and supplemented on October 28, 2008. 73 FR 66919 (November 12... COMMISSION Certain Prepregs, Laminates, and Finished Circuit Boards: Notice of Institution of Formal... States after importation of certain prepregs, laminates, and finished circuit boards that...

  4. Significance of 1B and 2B domains in modulating elastic properties of lamin A.

    PubMed

    Bera, Manindra; Ainavarapu, Sri Rama Koti; Sengupta, Kaushik

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear lamins are type V intermediate filament proteins which form an elastic meshwork underlying the inner nuclear membrane. Lamins directly contribute to maintain the nuclear shape and elasticity. More than 400 mutations have been reported in lamin A that are involved in diseases known as laminopathies. These mutations are scattered mainly in the lamin rod domain along with some in its C-terminal domain. The contribution of the rod domain towards the elasticity of lamin A molecule was hitherto unknown. Here, we have elucidated the significance of the 1B and 2B domains of the rod in modulating the elastic behavior of lamin A by single-molecule force spectroscopy. In addition, we have also studied the network forming capacity of these domains and their corresponding viscoelastic behavior. We have shown that the 1B domain has the ability to form a lamin-like network and resists larger deformation. However at the single-molecular level, both the domains have comparable mechanical properties. The self-assembly of the 1B domain contributes to the elasticity of the lamin A network. PMID:27301336

  5. Improving the fatigue resistance of adhesive joints in laminated wood structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laufenberg, Theodore L.; River, Bryan H.; Murmanis, Lidija L.; Christiansen, Alfred W.

    1988-01-01

    The premature fatigue failure of a laminated wood/epoxy test beam containing a cross section finger joint was the subject of a multi-disciplinary investigation. The primary objectives were to identify the failure mechanisms which occurred during the finger joint test and to provide avenues for general improvements in the design and fabrication of adhesive joints in laminated wood structures.

  6. Significance of 1B and 2B domains in modulating elastic properties of lamin A

    PubMed Central

    Bera, Manindra; Ainavarapu, Sri Rama Koti; Sengupta, Kaushik

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear lamins are type V intermediate filament proteins which form an elastic meshwork underlying the inner nuclear membrane. Lamins directly contribute to maintain the nuclear shape and elasticity. More than 400 mutations have been reported in lamin A that are involved in diseases known as laminopathies. These mutations are scattered mainly in the lamin rod domain along with some in its C-terminal domain. The contribution of the rod domain towards the elasticity of lamin A molecule was hitherto unknown. Here, we have elucidated the significance of the 1B and 2B domains of the rod in modulating the elastic behavior of lamin A by single-molecule force spectroscopy. In addition, we have also studied the network forming capacity of these domains and their corresponding viscoelastic behavior. We have shown that the 1B domain has the ability to form a lamin-like network and resists larger deformation. However at the single-molecular level, both the domains have comparable mechanical properties. The self-assembly of the 1B domain contributes to the elasticity of the lamin A network. PMID:27301336

  7. Probabilistic and structural reliability analysis of laminated composite structures based on the IPACS code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobel, Larry; Buttitta, Claudio; Suarez, James

    1993-01-01

    Probabilistic predictions based on the Integrated Probabilistic Assessment of Composite Structures (IPACS) code are presented for the material and structural response of unnotched and notched, 1M6/3501-6 Gr/Ep laminates. Comparisons of predicted and measured modulus and strength distributions are given for unnotched unidirectional, cross-ply, and quasi-isotropic laminates. The predicted modulus distributions were found to correlate well with the test results for all three unnotched laminates. Correlations of strength distributions for the unnotched laminates are judged good for the unidirectional laminate and fair for the cross-ply laminate, whereas the strength correlation for the quasi-isotropic laminate is deficient because IPACS did not yet have a progressive failure capability. The paper also presents probabilistic and structural reliability analysis predictions for the strain concentration factor (SCF) for an open-hole, quasi-isotropic laminate subjected to longitudinal tension. A special procedure was developed to adapt IPACS for the structural reliability analysis. The reliability results show the importance of identifying the most significant random variables upon which the SCF depends, and of having accurate scatter values for these variables.

  8. Herpes simplex virus 2 UL13 protein kinase disrupts nuclear lamins

    SciTech Connect

    Cano-Monreal, Gina L.; Wylie, Kristine M.; Cao, Feng; Tavis, John E.; Morrison, Lynda A.

    2009-09-15

    Herpesviruses must cross the inner nuclear membrane and underlying lamina to exit the nucleus. HSV-1 US3 and PKC can phosphorylate lamins and induce their dispersion but do not elicit all of the phosphorylated lamin species produced during infection. UL13 is a serine threonine protein kinase conserved among many herpesviruses. HSV-1 UL13 phosphorylates US3 and thereby controls UL31 and UL34 nuclear rim localization, indicating a role in nuclear egress. Here, we report that HSV-2 UL13 alone induced conformational changes in lamins A and C and redistributed lamin B1 from the nuclear rim to intranuclear granular structures. HSV-2 UL13 directly phosphorylated lamins A, C, and B1 in vitro, and the lamin A1 tail domain. HSV-2 infection recapitulated the lamin alterations seen upon expression of UL13 alone, and other alterations were also observed, indicating that additional viral and/or cellular proteins cooperate with UL13 to alter lamins during HSV-2 infection to allow nuclear egress.

  9. Structural organization of nuclear lamins A, C, B1, and B2 revealed by superresolution microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Shimi, Takeshi; Kittisopikul, Mark; Tran, Joseph; Goldman, Anne E.; Adam, Stephen A.; Zheng, Yixian; Jaqaman, Khuloud; Goldman, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear lamina is a key structural element of the metazoan nucleus. However, the structural organization of the major proteins composing the lamina is poorly defined. Using three-dimensional structured illumination microscopy and computational image analysis, we characterized the supramolecular structures of lamin A, C, B1, and B2 in mouse embryo fibroblast nuclei. Each isoform forms a distinct fiber meshwork, with comparable physical characteristics with respect to mesh edge length, mesh face area and shape, and edge connectivity to form faces. Some differences were found in face areas among isoforms due to variation in the edge lengths and number of edges per face, suggesting that each meshwork has somewhat unique assembly characteristics. In fibroblasts null for the expression of either lamins A/C or lamin B1, the remaining lamin meshworks are altered compared with the lamin meshworks in wild-type nuclei or nuclei lacking lamin B2. Nuclei lacking LA/C exhibit slightly enlarged meshwork faces and some shape changes, whereas LB1-deficient nuclei exhibit primarily a substantial increase in face area. These studies demonstrate that individual lamin isoforms assemble into complex networks within the nuclear lamina and that A- and B-type lamins have distinct roles in maintaining the organization of the nuclear lamina. PMID:26310440

  10. Effects of changes in composite lamina properties on laminate coefficient of thermal expansion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tompkins, Stephen S.; Funk, Joan G.

    1992-01-01

    An analytical study of the effects of changes in composite lamina properties on the laminate coefficient of thermal expansion, CTE, has been made. Low modulus graphite/epoxy (T300/934) and high modulus graphite/epoxy (P75/934, P100/934, P120/934), graphite/aluminum (P100/Al), and graphite/glass (HMS/Gl) composite materials were considered in quasi-isotropic and near-zero CTE laminate configurations. The effects of changes in lamina properties on the laminate CTE strongly depend upon the type of composite material as well as the laminate configuration. A 10 percent change in the lamina transverse CTE resulted in changes as large as 0.22 ppm/C in the laminate CTE of a quasi-isotropic Gr/934 laminates. No significant differences were observed in the sensitivities of the laminate CTEs of the P100/934 and P120/934 composite materials due to identical changes in lamina properties. Large changes in laminate CTE can also result from measured temperature and radiation effects on lamina properties.

  11. Oxydative stress alters nuclear shape through lamins dysregulation: a route to senescence.

    PubMed

    Barascu, Aurélia; Le Chalony, Catherine; Pennarun, Gaëlle; Genet, Diane; Zaarour, Nancy; Bertrand, Pascale

    2012-01-01

    Progeroid phenotypes are mainly encountered in 2 types of syndromes: in laminopathies, which are characterized by nuclear shape abnormalities due to lamin A alteration, and in DNA damage response defect syndromes. Because lamin A dysregulation leads to DNA damages, it has been proposed that senescence occurs in both types of syndromes through the accumulation of damages. We recently showed that elevated oxidative stress is responsible for lamin B1 accumulation, nuclear shape alteration and senescence in the DDR syndrome, ataxia telangiectasia (A-T). Interestingly, overexpression of lamin B1 in wild type cells is sufficient to induce senescence without the induction of DNA damages. Here, we will discuss the importance of controlling the lamins level in order for maintenance nuclear architecture and we will comment the relationships of lamins with other senescence mechanisms. Finally, we will describe emerging data reporting redox control by lamins, leading us to propose a general mechanism by which reactive oxygen species can induce senescence through lamin dysregulation and NSA. PMID:22895091

  12. Herpes simplex virus 2 UL13 protein kinase disrupts nuclear lamins

    PubMed Central

    Cano-Monreal, Gina L.; Wylie, Kristine M.; Cao, Feng; Tavis, John E.; Morrison, Lynda A.

    2009-01-01

    Herpesviruses must cross the inner nuclear membrane and underlying lamina to exit the nucleus. HSV-1 US3 and PKC can phosphorylate lamins and induce their dispersion but do not elicit all of the phosphorylated lamin species produced during infection. UL13 is a serine threonine protein kinase conserved among many herpesviruses. HSV-1 UL13 phosphorylates US3 and thereby controls UL31 and UL34 nuclear rim localization, indicating a role in nuclear egress. Here, we report that HSV-2 UL13 alone induced conformational changes in lamins A and C and redistributed lamin B1 from the nuclear rim to intranuclear granular structures. HSV-2 UL13 directly phosphorylated lamins A, C, and B1 in vitro, and the lamin A1 tail domain. HSV-2 infection recapitulated the lamin alterations seen upon expression of UL13 alone, and other alterations were also observed, indicating that additional viral and/or cellular proteins cooperate with UL13 to alter lamins during HSV-2 infection to allow nuclear egress. PMID:19640559

  13. Characteristics of thermally-induced transverse cracks in graphite epoxy composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, D. S.; Bowles, D. E.; Herakovich, C. T.

    1983-01-01

    The characteristics of thermally induced transverse cracks in T300/5208 graphite-epoxy cross-ply and quasi-isotropic laminates were investigated both experimentally and analytically. The formation of transverse cracks and the subsequent crack spacing present during cool down to -250 F (116K) and thermal cycling between 250 and -250 F (116 and 394K) was investigated. The state of stress in the vicinity of a transverse crack and the influence of transverse cracking on the laminate coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) was predicted using a generalized plane strain finite element analysis and a modified shear lag analysis. A majority of the cross-ply laminates experienced transverse cracking during the initial cool down to -250 F whereas the quasi-isotropic laminates remained uncracked. The in situ transverse strength of the 90 degree layers was more than 1.9 times greater than the transverse strength of the unidirectional 90 degree material for all laminates investigated.

  14. A tension-mode fracture model for bolted joints in laminated composites

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, K.C.; Packman, P.F.; Eisenmann, J.R.

    1995-06-01

    A failure prediction model for bolted joints in generally orthotropic laminated composite plates that fail in the tension mode under bearing loading conditions has been developed. The plate is analyzed as a bulk orthotropic plate whose material properties are determined through the application of classical lamination theory to facilitate practical application of the model. Ply-by-ply laminated analysis is not required. Fracture mechanics concepts are applied to a pseudo-flaw which is related to the physical cracking of the laminate at the joint. The maximum circumferential stress concept is extended to orthotropic materials where both the fracture toughness and stress intensity vary with orientation. Excellent correlation between experimental tests conducted on single-bolt joints for two laminate layups and analytical prediction was found.

  15. Analysis of interlaminar stresses in symmetric and unsymmetric laminates under various loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leger, C. A.; Chan, W. S.

    1993-04-01

    A quasi-three-dimensional finite-element model is developed to investigate the interlaminar stresses in a composite laminate under combined loadings. An isoparametric quadrilateral element with eight nodes and three degrees of freedom per node is the finite element used in this study. The element is used to model a composite laminate cross section loaded by tension, torsion, transverse shear, and both beam and chord bending which are representative of loading in a helicopter rotor system. Symmetric and unsymmetric laminates are examined with comparisons made between the interlaminar stress distributions and magnitudes for each laminate. Unsymmetric results are compared favorably to limited results found in literature. The unsymmetric interlaminar normal stress distribution in a symmetric laminate containing a free edge delamination is also examined.

  16. Compression strength failure mechanisms in unidirectional composite laminates containing a hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Eric R.

    1993-01-01

    Experiments on graphite-epoxy laminated plates containing unloaded small holes show that these laminates are notch insensitive. That is, the uniaxial strength of these laminates with small holes exceeds the strength predicted by a point stress criterion using the stress concentration factor for the in-plane stress field. Laminates containing large holes exhibit notch sensitive behavior and consequently their strength is reasonably well predicted by the stress concentration effect. This hole size effect is manifested both in tension and in compression. Apparently, some mechanism must cause in-plane stress relief for laminates containing small holes. The purpose of this research was to study the influence of geometric nonlinearity on the micromechanical response of a filamentary composite material in the presence of a strain gradient caused by a discontinuity such as a hole. A mathematical model was developed at the micromechanical level to investigate this geometrically nonlinear effect.

  17. Roles of Poly(propylene Glycol) During Solvent-Based Lamination of Ceramic Green Tapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suppakarn, Nitinat; Ishida, Hatsuo; Cawley, James D.; Levine, Stanley R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Solvent lamination for alumina green tapes is readily accomplished using a mixture of ethanol, toluene and poly(propylene glycol). After lamination, the PPG is clearly present as a discrete film at the interface between the laminated tapes. This condition, however, does not generate delamination during firing. Systematic sets of experiments are undertaken to determine the role of PPG in the lamination process and, specifically, the mechanism by which it is redistributed during subsequent processing. PPG slowly diffuses through the organic binder film at room temperature. The PPG diffusion rapidly increases as temperature is increased to 80 C. The key to the efficiency of adhesives during green-tape lamination is mutual solubility of the nonvolatile component of the glue and the base polymeric binder.

  18. Mechanical behavior of mother-of-pearl and pearl with flat and spherical laminations.

    PubMed

    Jiao, D; Liu, Z Q; Zhu, Y K; Weng, Z Y; Zhang, Z F

    2016-11-01

    Laminated structure reduces the common inverse relationship of strength and toughness in many biological materials. Here the mechanical behavior of pearl and nacre with spherical and flat laminations was investigated and compared with the geological aragonite counterpart. The biological ceramics demonstrate higher strength, better reliability, and improved damage resistance owing to their laminated arrangement. Kinking and delamination occur in pearl to resist damage in addition to the crack-tip shielding mechanisms as in nacre, such as crack deflection, bridging, and platelet pull-out. The fracture mechanisms were interpreted in terms of the stress state using finite element simulation. This study may help clarify the compressive mechanics of laminated sphere between platens and advance the understanding on the mechanical behavior of biological and bio-inspired laminated materials. PMID:27523990

  19. A-type lamin complexes and regenerative potential: a step towards understanding laminopathic diseases?

    PubMed

    Gotzmann, Josef; Foisner, Roland

    2006-01-01

    The lamins are nuclear intermediate filament-type proteins forming the nuclear lamina meshwork at the inner nuclear membrane as well as complexes in the nucleoplasm. The recent discoveries that mutated A-type lamins and lamin-binding nuclear membrane proteins can be linked to numerous rare human diseases (laminopathies) affecting a multitude of tissues has changed the cell biologist's view of lamins as mere structural nuclear scaffold proteins. It is still unclear how mutations in these ubiquitously expressed proteins give rise to tissue-restricted pathological phenotypes. Potential disease models include mutation-caused defects in lamin structure and stability, the deregulation of gene expression, and impaired cell cycle control. This review brings together various previously proposed ideas and suggests a novel, more general, disease model based on an impairment of adult stem cell function and thus compromised tissue regeneration in laminopathic diseases. PMID:16142451

  20. High temperature mechanical behavior of Nb{sub 5}Si{sub 3}/Nb laminates

    SciTech Connect

    Provancher, W.; Ghosh, A.K.

    1995-07-01

    Two phase alloys based on the intermetallic system Nb{sub 5}Si{sub 3}/Nb system provide potentially superior combination of strength and toughness over their monolithic counterparts at high temperatures. To gain fundamental knowledge of the mechanical behavior of these materials, initial focus has been on the mechanical behavior of Nb{sub 5}Si{sub 3}/Nb laminates and composites at elevated temperatures. In this study, laminates have been fabricated at 32 at% Si with Nb, and a total laminate thickness of 2.1 mm. Tests are being conducted on notched and unnotched tensile specimens. The unnotched specimens provide the overall strength and ductility of the laminate and a basis for comparison with notched specimens which provide information on crack propagation and ductile phase toughening effects. Results from samples with a variety of laminate spacings are being explored, and preliminary data will be presented.

  1. Regulation of lamin properties and functions: does phosphorylation do it all?

    PubMed Central

    Machowska, Magdalena; Piekarowicz, Katarzyna; Rzepecki, Ryszard

    2015-01-01

    The main functions of lamins are their mechanical and structural roles as major building blocks of the karyoskeleton. They are also involved in chromatin structure regulation, gene expression, intracellular signalling pathway modulation and development. All essential lamin functions seem to depend on their capacity for assembly or disassembly after the receipt of specific signals, and after specific, selective and precisely regulated interactions through their various domains. Reversible phosphorylation of lamins is crucial for their functions, so it is important to understand how lamin polymerization and interactions are modulated, and which sequences may undergo such modifications. This review combines experimental data with results of our in silico analyses focused on lamin phosphorylation in model organisms to show the presence of evolutionarily conserved sequences and to indicate specific in vivo phosphorylations that affect particular functions. PMID:26581574

  2. Delaminations of barely visible impact damage in CFRP laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Prashant; Rai, Badri

    CFRP laminates were impacted by projectiles of low masses, accelerated in an air gun, to have barely visible impact damage (BVID) to simulate damage to aircraft by runway debris. The delamination damage on individual interfaces was revealed by the destructive method of thin strips. In sub-BVID and BVID specimens, the damage was confined mostly to the front 30 percent of the laminate thickness. Delamination areas in the BVID specimens were found to be considerable - the largest dimension exceeding 12 mm on several interfaces. Nucleation of delamination damage was observed in interfaces adjacent to the mid plane in BVID specimens. At higher impact energies, about 110 to 150 percent more, the delamination damage was observed on almost all the interfaces with no sign of spalling at the rear surfaces. In comparison with a lightweight projectile of aluminum (4.4 g), a higher density steel projectile ( 11.8 g) caused more delamination damage for the same impact energy and an identical geometry of projectiles.

  3. Structural properties of laminated Douglas fir/epoxy composite material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spera, David A.; Esgar, Jack B.; Gougeon, Meade; Zuteck, Michael D.

    1990-01-01

    This publication contains a compilation of static and fatigue strength data for laminated-wood material made from Douglas fir and epoxy. Results of tests conducted by several organizations are correlated to provide insight into the effects of variables such as moisture, size, lamina-to-lamina joint design, wood veneer grade, and the ratio of cyclic stress to steady stress during fatigue testing. These test data were originally obtained during development of wood rotor blades for large-scale wind turbines of the horizontal-axis (propeller) configuration. Most of the strength property data in this compilation are not found in the published literature. Test sections ranged from round cylinders 2.25 in. in diameter to rectangular slabs 6 by 24 in. in cross section and approximately 30 ft. long. All specimens were made from Douglas fir veneers 0.10 in. thick, bonded together with the WEST epoxy system developed for fabrication and repair of wood boats. Loading was usually parallel to the grain. Size effects (reduction in strength with increase in test volume) are observed in some of the test data, and a simple mathematical model is presented that includes the probability of failure. General characteristics of the wood/epoxy laminate are discussed, including features that make it useful for a wide variety of applications.

  4. High Performance Laminates Using Blended Urethane Resin Chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, Kevin L.; Jones, George G.; Walsh, Sean P.; Wood, Geoff M.

    2005-03-24

    Hybrid blended resin systems have the potential to provide excellent impact performance in structured laminates. Although mostly under development for sheet molding compound (SMC) applications using glass fiber with high levels of fillers, the resins have been found to be useful in liquid molding applications with other high-performance fiber systems. A research pro-gram to develop the molding capability, property data, and capability to model the composites using newly de-veloped codes and modeling techniques was initiated through the Department of Energy’s Office of Freedom-Car and Vehicle Technologies. Results have shown ex-cellent adhesion to different fiber systems as evidenced by mechanical properties, and a capability to develop very good impact results – thereby allowing thin panel structures to be developed. Comparison to predicted me-chanical properties has been achieved and mechanisms for the development of observed high energy absorption under impact loadings are being investigated. Scale ef-fects based on panel thickness, fiber type loading, and position in laminate are being investigated. DOE pro-gram sponsorship was provided by Dr. Sidney Diamond, Technical Area Development Manager for High-Strength Weight-Reduction Materials.

  5. Experimental Verification of Computational Models for Laminated Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Charles E.; Coats, Timothy W.; Glaessgen, Edward H.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of the research reported herein is to develop a progressive damage methodology capable of predicting the residual strength of continuous fiber-reinforced, laminated, polymer matrix composites with through-penetration damage. The fracture behavior of center-notch tension panels with thin crack-like slits was studied. Since fibers are the major load-carrying constituent in polymer matrix composites, predicting the residual strength of a laminate requires a criterion for fiber fracture. The effects on fiber strain due to other damage mechanisms such as matrix cracking and delaminations must also be modeled. Therefore, the research herein examines the damage mechanisms involved in translaminate fracture and identifies the toughening mechanisms responsible for damage growth resistance in brittle epoxy matrix systems. The mechanics of matrix cracking and fiber fracture are discussed as is the mathematical framework for the progressive damage model developed by the authors. The progressive damage analysis algorithms have been implemented into a general purpose finite element code developed by NASA, the Computational Structural Mechanics Testbed (COMET). Damage growth is numerically simulated and the analytical residual strength predictions are compared to experimental results for a variety of notched panel configurations and materials systems.

  6. Analysis of nonlinear deformations and damage in CFRP textile laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah, H.; Harland, A. R.; Lucas, T.; Price, D.; Silberschmidt, V. V.

    2011-07-01

    Carbon fibre-reinforced polymer (CFRP) textile composites are widely used in aerospace, automotive and construction components and structures thanks to their relatively low production costs, higher delamination and impact strength. They can also be used in various products in sports industry. These products are usually exposed to different in-service conditions such as large bending deformation and multiple impacts. Composite materials usually demonstrate multiple modes of damage and fracture due to their heterogeneity and microstructure, in contrast to more traditional homogeneous structural materials like metals and alloys. Damage evolution affects both their in-service properties and performance that can deteriorate with time. These damage modes need adequate means of analysis and investigation, the major approaches being experimental characterisation, numerical simulations and microtomography analysis. This research deals with a deformation behaviour and damage in composite laminates linked to their quasi-static bending. Experimental tests are carried out to characterise the behaviour of woven CFRP material under large-deflection bending. Two-dimensional finite element (FE) models are implemented in the commercial code Abaqus/Explicit to study the deformation behaviour and damage in woven CFRP laminates. Multiple layers of bilinear cohesive-zone elements are employed to model the onset and progression of inter-ply delamination process. X-ray Micro-Computed Tomography (MicroCT) analysis is carried out to investigate internal damage mechanisms such as cracking and delaminations. The obtained results of simulations are in agreement with experimental data and MicroCT scans.

  7. Overexpression of Lamin B Receptor Results in Impaired Skin Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Sola Carvajal, Agustín; McKenna, Tomás; Wallén Arzt, Emelie; Eriksson, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare segmental progeroid disorder commonly caused by a point mutation in the LMNA gene that results in the increased activation of an intra-exonic splice site and the production of a truncated lamin A protein, named progerin. In our previous work, induced murine epidermal expression of this specific HGPS LMNA mutation showed impaired keratinocyte differentiation and upregulated lamin B receptor (LBR) expression in suprabasal keratinocytes. Here, we have developed a novel transgenic animal model with induced overexpression of LBR in the interfollicular epidermis. LBR overexpression resulted in epidermal hypoplasia, along with the downregulation and mislocalization of keratin 10, suggesting impaired keratinocyte differentiation. Increased LBR expression in basal and suprabasal cells did not coincide with increased proliferation. Similar to our previous report of HGPS mice, analyses of γH2AX, a marker of DNA double-strand breaks, revealed an increased number of keratinocytes with multiple foci in LBR-overexpressing mice compared with wild-type mice. In addition, suprabasal LBR-positive cells showed densely condensed and peripherally localized chromatin. Our results show a moderate skin differentiation phenotype, which indicates that upregulation of LBR is not the sole contributor to the HGPS phenotype. PMID:26053873

  8. Structural properties of laminated Douglas fir/epoxy composite material

    SciTech Connect

    Spera, D.A. . Lewis Research Center); Esgar, J.B. ); Gougeon, M.; Zuteck, M.D. )

    1990-05-01

    This publication contains a compilation of static and fatigue and strength data for laminated-wood material made from Douglas fir and epoxy. Results of tests conducted by several organizations are correlated to provide insight into the effects of variables such as moisture, size, lamina-to-lamina joint design, wood veneer grade, and the ratio of cyclic stress to steady stress during fatigue testing. These test data were originally obtained during development of wood rotor blades for large-scale wind turbines of the horizontal-axis (propeller) configuration. Most of the strength property data in this compilation are not found in the published literature. Test sections ranged from round cylinders 2.25 in. in diameter to rectangular slabs 6 in. by 24 in. in cross section and approximately 30 ft long. All specimens were made from Douglas fir veneers 0.10 in. thick, bonded together with the WEST epoxy system developed for fabrication and repair of wood boats. Loading was usually parallel to the grain. Size effects (reduction in strength with increase in test volume) are observed in some of the test data, and a simple mathematical model is presented that includes the probability of failure. General characteristics of the wood/epoxy laminate are discussed, including features that make it useful for a wide variety of applications. 9 refs.

  9. Beyond lamins: other structural components of the nucleoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Zhixia; Wilson, Katherine L.; Dahl, Kris Noel

    2010-01-01

    The nucleus is bordered by a double bilayer nuclear envelope, communicates with the cytoplasm via embedded nuclear pore complexes, and is structurally supported by an underlying nucleoskeleton. The nucleoskeleton includes nuclear intermediate filaments formed by lamin proteins, which provide major structural and mechanical support to the nucleus. However other structural proteins also contribute to the function of nucleoskeleton and help connect it to the cytoskeleton. This chapter reviews nucleoskeletal components beyond lamins, and summarizes specific methods and strategies useful for analyzing nuclear structural proteins including actin, spectrin, titin, LINC complex proteins and nuclear spindle matrix proteins. These components can localize to highly specific functional subdomains at the nuclear envelope or nuclear interior, and can interact either stably or dynamically with a variety of partners. These components confer upon the nucleoskeleton a functional diversity and mechanical resilience that appears to rival the cytoskeleton. To facilitate the exploration of this understudied area of biology, we summarize methods useful for localizing, solubilizing and immunoprecipitating nuclear structural proteins, and a state-of-the-art method to measure a newly-recognized mechanical property of nucleus. PMID:20816232

  10. Internal oxidation of laminated ternary Ru-Ta-Zr coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yung-I.; Lu, Tso-Shen

    2015-10-01

    Researchers have observed the internal oxidation phenomenon in binary alloy coatings when developing refractory alloy coatings for protective purposes by conducting annealing at high temperatures and in oxygen-containing atmospheres. The coatings were assembled using cyclical gradient concentration deposition during cosputtering by employing a substrate holder rotating at a slow speed. The internally oxidized zone demonstrated a laminated structure, comprising alternating oxygen-rich and oxygen-deficient layers stacked in a general orientation. In the current study, Ru-Ta-Zr coatings were prepared with various stacking sequences during cosputtering. The Ru-Ta-Zr coatings were annealed at 600 °C in an atmosphere continuously purged with 1% O2-99% Ar mixed gas for 30 min. A transmission electron microscope was used to examine the periods of the laminated layers and crystallinity of the annealed coatings. Depth profiles produced using an Auger electron spectroscope and X-ray photoelectron spectroscope were used to certify the periodic variation of the related constituents and chemical states of the elements, respectively. The results indicate that the internally oxidized ternary coatings are stacked of Ru-, Ta2O5-, and ZrO2-dominant sublayers and that the stacking sequences of the sublayers affect the crystalline structure of the coatings. Zr is oxidized preferentially in the Ru-Ta-Zr coatings, increasing the surface hardness of the oxidized coatings.

  11. Interlaminar tension strength of graphite/epoxy composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shivakumar, Kunigal N.; Allen, Harold G.; Avva, Vishnu S.

    1994-01-01

    An L-shaped curved beam specimen and a tension loading fixture were proposed to measure the interlaminar tension strength of laminated and textile composites. The specimen size was 2 X 2 in. (51 X 51 mm). The use of a standard tension test machine and the introduction of load nearly at the specimen midthickness were the advantages of the proposed specimen. Modified Lekhnitskii and beam theory equations for calculating interlaminar stresses of an L-beam were verified by finite element analysis. The beam theory equation is simple and accurate for mean radius to thickness ratios greater than 1.5. The modified Lekhnitskii equations can be used for detailed stress field calculation. AS4/3501-6 graphite/epoxy unidirectional specimens with thicknesses of 16, 24, and 32 piles were fabricated and tested. The delamination initiation site agreed with the calculated maximum interlaminar tension stress location for all three thicknesses. Average interlaminar tension strengths of 16-, 24-, and 32-ply laminates were 47.6, 40.9, and 23.4 MPa, respectively.

  12. Laminated microfluidic system for small sample protein analysis

    PubMed Central

    Saedinia, Sara; Nastiuk, Kent L.; Krolewski, John J.; Li, G. P.; Bachman, Mark

    2014-01-01

    We describe a technology based on lamination that allows for the production of highly integrated 3D devices suitable for performing a wide variety of microfluidic assays. This approach uses a suite of microfluidic coupons (“microfloupons”) that are intended to be stacked as needed to produce an assay of interest. Microfloupons may be manufactured in paper, plastic, gels, or other materials, in advance, by different manufacturers, then assembled by the assay designer as needed. To demonstrate this approach, we designed, assembled, and characterized a microfloupon device that performs sodium-dodecyl-sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis on a small sample of protein. This device allowed for the manipulation and transport of small amounts of protein sample, tight injection into a thin polyacrylamide gel, electrophoretic separation of the proteins into bands, and subsequent removal of the gel from the device for imaging and further analysis. The microfloupons are rugged enough to handle and can be easily aligned and laminated, allowing for a variety of different assays to be designed and configured by selecting appropriate microfloupons. This approach provides a convenient way to perform assays that have multiple steps, relieving the need to design highly sophisticated devices that incorporate all functions in a single unit, while still achieving the benefits of small sample size, automation, and high speed operation. PMID:24753728

  13. The effect of adhesive layer on crack propagation in laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gecit, M. R.; Erdogan, F.

    1976-01-01

    The effect of the adhesive layer on crack propagation in composite materials is investigated. The composite medium consists of parallel load carrying laminates and buffer strips arranged periodically and bonded with thin adhesive layers. The strips, assumed to be isotropic and linearly elastic, contain symmetric cracks of arbitrary lengths located normal to the interfaces. Two problems are considered: (1) thin adhesive layers are approximated by uncoupled tension and shear springs distributed along the interfaces of the strips for which only the case of internal cracks can be treated rigorously; (2) broken laminates and the true singular behavior in the presence of the adhesive layer are studied. The adhesive is then treated as an isotropic, linearly elastic continuum. General expressions for field quantities are obtained in terms of infinite Fourier integrals. These expressions give a system of singular integral equations in terms of the crack surface displacement derivatives. By using appropriate quadrature formulas, the integral equations reduce to a system of linear algebraic equations which are solved numerically.

  14. Reliability analysis of laminated CMC components through shell subelement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starlinger, Alois; Duffy, Stephen F.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1992-01-01

    An updated version of the integrated design program Composite Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures (C/CARES) was developed for the reliability evaluation of ceramic matrix composites (CMC) laminated shell components. The algorithm is now split into two modules: a finite-element data interface program and a reliability evaluation algorithm. More flexibility is achieved, allowing for easy implementation with various finite-element programs. The interface program creates a neutral data base which is then read by the reliability module. This neutral data base concept allows easy data transfer between different computer systems. The new interface program from the finite-element code Matrix Automated Reduction and Coupling (MARC) also includes the option of using hybrid laminates (a combination of plies of different materials or different layups) and allows for variations in temperature fields throughout the component. In the current version of C/CARES, a subelement technique was implemented, enabling stress gradients within an element to be taken into account. The noninteractive reliability function is now evaluated at each Gaussian integration point instead of using averaging techniques. As a result of the increased number of stress evaluation points, considerable improvements in the accuracy of reliability analyses were realized.

  15. Energy Saving Glass Lamination via Selective Radio Frequency Heating

    SciTech Connect

    Shawn M. Allan; Patricia M. Strickland; Holly S. Shulman

    2009-11-11

    Ceralink Inc. developed FastFuse™, a rapid, new, energy saving process for lamination of glass and composites using radio frequency (RF) heating technology. The Inventions and Innovations program supported the technical and commercial research and development needed to elevate the innovation from bench scale to a self-supporting technology with significant potential for growth. The attached report provides an overview of the technical and commerical progress achieved for FastFuse™ during the course of the project. FastFuse™ has the potential to revolutionize the laminate manufacturing industries by replacing energy intensive, multi-step processes with an energy efficient, single-step process that allows higher throughput. FastFuse™ transmits RF energy directly into the interlayer to generate heat, eliminating the need to directly heat glass layers and the surrounding enclosures, such as autoclaves or vacuum systems. FastFuse™ offers lower start-up and energy costs (up to 90% or more reduction in energy costs), and faster cycles times (less than 5 minutes). FastFuse™ is compatible with EVA, TPU, and PVB interlayers, and has been demonstrated for glass, plastics, and multi-material structures such as photovoltaics and transparent armor.

  16. Geometry-driven charge accumulation in electrokinetic flows through laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilley, B. S.; Vernescu, B.; Plummer, J. D.

    2010-11-01

    In the remediation of charged species from contaminated saturated soils, electric fields are applied to move the charge from the bulk toward the electrodes. Debye-layers occur at the soil/fluid interface which allows for advective transport of charge through electroosmosis, along with transport due to electrodiffusion (electrophoresis). However, depending on the valence of the species, these effects may act in concert to remove charge or may compete. We model the soil as an array of purely dielectric laminates with nonuniform thickness whose spatial variation in the streamwise direction occurs on a much longer length scale than the spacing between laminates (i.e. pore spacing). We derive an asymptotic model that incorporates lubrication pressures, dispersive effects in the electric field correction, and species equations for ion concentrations in the liquid. Electroneutrality is not assumed in the fluid region. In the case of monovalent species, we find that spatial variations in the pore structure can lead to accumulation of charge where both the fringe electric field converges and the advective transport of charge is weak. Comparisons with results found in experiments are discussed.

  17. Overexpression of Lamin B Receptor Results in Impaired Skin Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Sola Carvajal, Agustín; McKenna, Tomás; Wallén Arzt, Emelie; Eriksson, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare segmental progeroid disorder commonly caused by a point mutation in the LMNA gene that results in the increased activation of an intra-exonic splice site and the production of a truncated lamin A protein, named progerin. In our previous work, induced murine epidermal expression of this specific HGPS LMNA mutation showed impaired keratinocyte differentiation and upregulated lamin B receptor (LBR) expression in suprabasal keratinocytes. Here, we have developed a novel transgenic animal model with induced overexpression of LBR in the interfollicular epidermis. LBR overexpression resulted in epidermal hypoplasia, along with the downregulation and mislocalization of keratin 10, suggesting impaired keratinocyte differentiation. Increased LBR expression in basal and suprabasal cells did not coincide with increased proliferation. Similar to our previous report of HGPS mice, analyses of γH2AX, a marker of DNA double-strand breaks, revealed an increased number of keratinocytes with multiple foci in LBR-overexpressing mice compared with wild-type mice. In addition, suprabasal LBR-positive cells showed densely condensed and peripherally localized chromatin. Our results show a moderate skin differentiation phenotype, which indicates that upregulation of LBR is not the sole contributor to the HGPS phenotype. PMID:26053873

  18. Beyond lamins other structural components of the nucleoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Zhixia; Wilson, Katherine L; Dahl, Kris Noel

    2010-01-01

    The nucleus is bordered by a double bilayer nuclear envelope, communicates with the cytoplasm via embedded nuclear pore complexes, and is structurally supported by an underlying nucleoskeleton. The nucleoskeleton includes nuclear intermediate filaments formed by lamin proteins, which provide major structural and mechanical support to the nucleus. However, other structural proteins also contribute to the function of the nucleoskeleton and help connect it to the cytoskeleton. This chapter reviews nucleoskeletal components beyond lamins and summarizes specific methods and strategies useful for analyzing nuclear structural proteins including actin, spectrin, titin, linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC) complex proteins, and nuclear spindle matrix proteins. These components can localize to highly specific functional subdomains at the nuclear envelope or nuclear interior and can interact either stably or dynamically with a variety of partners. These components confer upon the nucleoskeleton a functional diversity and mechanical resilience that appears to rival the cytoskeleton. To facilitate the exploration of this understudied area of biology, we summarize methods useful for localizing, solubilizing, and immunoprecipitating nuclear structural proteins, and a state-of-the-art method to measure a newly-recognized mechanical property of nucleus. PMID:20816232

  19. Terahertz radiation study on FRP composite solid laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Kwang-Hee; Hsu, David K.; Chiou, Chien-Ping; Barnard, Daniel J.; Yang, In-Young; Park, Je-Woong

    2012-05-01

    Investigation of terahertz time domain spectroscopy (THz TDS) was made and reflection and transmission configurations were studied as a nondestructive evaluation technique. Here carbon fiber-reinforced plastics (CFRP) derived their excellent mechanical strength, stiffness and electrical conductivity from carbon fibers. Especially, the electrical conductivity of CFRP composites depends on the direction of unidirectional fibers since carbon fibers are electrically conducting while the epoxy matrix is not. The THz TDS can be considered as a useful tool using general non-conducting materials; however it is quite limited to conducting materials. In order to solve various material properties, the index of refraction (n) is derived by using the terahertz time domain spectroscopy. Also, for a 48-ply thermoplastic PPS(poly-phenylene sulfide)-based CFRP solid laminate, the terahertz scanning images were made at the angles ranged from 0° to 180° with respect to the nominal fiber axis. So, the images were mapped out based on the electrical field (E-field) direction in the CFRP solid laminates.

  20. Lamination Speeds the Functional Development of Visual Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaou, Nikolas; Meyer, Martin P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary A common feature of the brain is the arrangement of synapses in layers. To examine the significance of this organizational feature, we studied the functional development of direction-selective (DS) circuits in the tectum of astray mutant zebrafish in which lamination of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons is lost. We show that although never laminar, the tuning of DS-RGC axons targeting the mutant tectum is normal. Analysis of mutant tectal neurons at late developmental stages reveals that directional tuning is indistinguishable from wild-type larvae. Furthermore, we show that structural plasticity of tectal dendrites and RGC axons compensates for the loss of lamination, establishing connectivity between DS-RGCs and their normal tectal targets. However, tectal direction selectivity is severely perturbed at earlier developmental stages. Thus, the formation of synaptic laminae is ultimately dispensable for the correct wiring of direction-selective tectal circuits, but it is crucial for the rapid assembly of these networks. Video Abstract PMID:26607001

  1. A unifying strain criterion for fracture of fibrous composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poe, C. C., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Fibrous composite materials, such as graphite/epoxy, are light, stiff, and strong. They have great potential for reducing weight in aircraft structures. However, for a realization of this potential, designers will have to know the fracture toughness of composite laminates in order to design damage tolerant structures. In connection with the development of an economical testing procedure, there is a great need for a single fracture toughness parameter which can be used to predict the stress-intensity factor (K(Q)) for all laminates of interest to the designer. Poe and Sova (1980) have derived a general fracture toughness parameter (Qc), which is a material constant. It defines the critical level of strains in the principal load-carryng plies. The present investigation is concerned with the calculation of values for the ratio of Qc and the ultimate tensile strain of the fibers. The obtained data indicate that this ratio is reasonably constant for layups which fail largely by self-similar crack extension.

  2. Lamination residual stresses in hybrid composites, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniel, I. M.; Liber, T.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to study lamination residual stresses for various material and loading parameters. The effects of hybridization on residual stresses and residual properties after thermal cycling under load were determined in angle-ply graphite/Kevlar/epoxy and graphite/S-glass/epoxy laminates. Residual strains in the graphite plies are not appreciably affected by the type and number of hybridizing plies. Computed residual stresses at room temperature in the S-glass plies reach values up to seventy-five percent of the transverse strength of the material. Computed residual stresses in the graphite plies exceed the static strength by approximately ten percent. In the case of Kevlar plies, computed residual stresses far exceed the static strength indicating possible early failure of these plies. Static testing of the hybrids above indicates that failure is governed by the ultimate strain of the graphite plies. In thermally cycled hybrids, in general, residual moduli were somewhat lower and residual strengths were higher than initial values.

  3. Influence of bruxism on survival of porcelain laminate veneers

    PubMed Central

    Agustín-Panadero, Rubén; Fons-Font, Antonio; Román-Rodríguez, Juan L.; Solá-Ruíz, María F.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This study aims to determine whether bruxism and the use of occlusal splints affect the survival of porcelain laminate veneers in patients treated with this technique. Material and Methods: Restorations were made in 70 patients, including 30 patients with some type of parafunctional habit. A total of 323 veneers were placed, 170 in patients with bruxism activity, and the remaining 153 in patients without it. A clinical examination determined the presence or absence of ceramic failure (cracks, fractures and debonding) of the restorations; these incidents were analyzed for association with bruxism and the use of splints. Results: Analysis of the ceramic failures showed that of the 13 fractures and 29 debonding that were present in our study, 8 fractures and 22 debonding were related to the presence of bruxism. Conclusions: Porcelain laminate veneers are a predictable treatment option that provides excellent results, recognizing a higher risk of failure in patients with bruxism activity. The use of occlusal splints reduces the risk of fractures. Key words:Veneer, fracture, debonding, bruxism, occlusal splint. PMID:23986018

  4. Evaluation of the CO2 laser for porcelain laminate etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rypel, T. S.; Zakariasen, Kenneth L.

    1994-09-01

    Research has shown that CO2 laser energy can both fuse and etch enamel, the effect being dependent on the exposure parameters utilized. Such energy can also fuse dental porcelains, but it is not known whether porcelain can be etched by CO2 laser. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether CO2 laser energy can be utilized to etch porcelain laminates, an effect necessary for resin bonding. Porcelain laminate disks 10 mm in diameter were prepared. The disks were each numbered and divided into quadrants with a small carbide high speed bur. Six disks were utilized, each quadrant receiving a single laser exposure for a total of 24 exposures. Each exposure was at either 10 or 15 W for .01, .05, or .10 seconds, with a focal spot of either 0.8 or 0.35 mm. This range of exposures includes those exposures which cause enamel etching. Two exposures were made at each combination of exposure parameters. Each disk was prepared for scanning electron microscopy and viewed at 75X to examine the exposure sites. All 24 exposure sites were examined and no definite etching was observed.

  5. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Mmmmm of... - Performance Test Requirements for New or Reconstructed Flame Lamination Affected Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... or Reconstructed Flame Lamination Affected Sources 3 Table 3 to Subpart MMMMM of Part 63 Protection... Lamination Affected Sources As stated in § 63.8800, you must comply with the requirements for performance tests for new or reconstructed flame lamination affected sources in the following table using...

  6. Buckling of Carbon Nanotube-Reinforced Polymer Laminated Composite Materials Subjected to Axial Compression and Shear Loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riddick, J. C.; Gates, T. S.; Frankland, S.-J. V.

    2005-01-01

    A multi-scale method to predict the stiffness and stability properties of carbon nanotube-reinforced laminates has been developed. This method is used in the prediction of the buckling behavior of laminated carbon nanotube-polyethylene composites formed by stacking layers of carbon nanotube-reinforced polymer with the nanotube alignment axes of each layer oriented in different directions. Linking of intrinsic, nanoscale-material definitions to finite scale-structural properties is achieved via a hierarchical approach in which the elastic properties of the reinforced layers are predicted by an equivalent continuum modeling technique. Solutions for infinitely long symmetrically laminated nanotube-reinforced laminates with simply-supported or clamped edges subjected to axial compression and shear loadings are presented. The study focuses on the influence of nanotube volume fraction, length, orientation, and functionalization on finite-scale laminate response. Results indicate that for the selected laminate configurations considered in this study, angle-ply laminates composed of aligned, non-functionalized carbon nanotube-reinforced lamina exhibit the greatest buckling resistance with 1% nanotube volume fraction of 450 nm uniformly-distributed carbon nanotubes. In addition, hybrid laminates were considered by varying either the volume fraction or nanotube length through-the-thickness of a quasi-isotropic laminate. The ratio of buckling load-to-nanotube weight percent for the hybrid laminates considered indicate the potential for increasing the buckling efficiency of nanotube-reinforced laminates by optimizing nanotube size and proportion with respect to laminate configuration.

  7. Low velocity impact analysis of composite laminated plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Daihua

    2007-12-01

    In the past few decades polymer composites have been utilized more in structures where high strength and light weight are major concerns, e.g., aircraft, high-speed boats and sports supplies. It is well known that they are susceptible to damage resulting from lateral impact by foreign objects, such as dropped tools, hail and debris thrown up from the runway. The impact response of the structures depends not only on the material properties but also on the dynamic behavior of the impacted structure. Although commercial software is capable of analyzing such impact processes, it often requires extensive expertise and rigorous training for design and analysis. Analytical models are useful as they allow parametric studies and provide a foundation for validating the numerical results from large-scale commercial software. Therefore, it is necessary to develop analytical or semi-analytical models to better understand the behaviors of composite structures under impact and their associated failure process. In this study, several analytical models are proposed in order to analyze the impact response of composite laminated plates. Based on Meyer's Power Law, a semi-analytical model is obtained for small mass impact response of infinite composite laminates by the method of asymptotic expansion. The original nonlinear second-order ordinary differential equation is transformed into two linear ordinary differential equations. This is achieved by neglecting high-order terms in the asymptotic expansion. As a result, the semi-analytical solution of the overall impact response can be applied to contact laws with varying coefficients. Then an analytical model accounting for permanent deformation based on an elasto-plastic contact law is proposed to obtain the closed-form solutions of the wave-controlled impact responses of composite laminates. The analytical model is also used to predict the threshold velocity for delamination onset by combining with an existing quasi

  8. Thermal Effects on the Compressive Behavior of IM7/PET15 Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Sandra Polesky

    2003-01-01

    The effect of changing operating temperature on the compressive response of IM7/PETI5 composite laminates is investigated within this paper. The three temperatures evaluated for this study were 129 C, 21 C, and 177 C, a spectrum from cryogenic to an elevated operating temperature. Laminate compressive strength property testing was conducted using the Wyoming Combined Load Compression fixture to generate strength data at the three operating temperatures of interest for several lay-ups. A three-dimensional finite element analysis model of a [90/0]8s composite laminate subject to compressive loading is developed. The model is used to study the key attributes of the laminate that significantly influence the state of stress in the laminate. Both the resin rich layer located between lamina and the thermal residual stresses present in the laminate due to curing are included in the analysis model. For the laminate modeled, the effect of modeling temperature dependent material properties was determined to be insignificant for the operating temperatures studied. Simply using the material properties measured at the operating temperature of interest was sufficient for predicting stresses accurately in a linear analysis for the current problem. The three-dimensional analysis results revealed that the application of an applied compressive axial load in the 0-degree direction decreased the interlaminar stresses present in the laminate initially due to curing. Therefore, failure was concluded not be attributable to the interlaminar stresses in the composite laminate being studied when a compressive load is applied. The magnitude of the measured laminate compressive strength change with a change in temperature is concluded to be dominated by the change in the lamina compressive axial strength with a change in temperature.

  9. Accelerated Testing for Long-Term Durability of Various FRP Laminates for Marine Use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyano, Yasushi; Nakada, Masayuki

    The prediction of long-term fatigue life of various FRP laminates combined with resins, fibers and fabrics for marine use under temperature and water environments were performed by our developed accelerated testing methodology based on the time-temperature superposition principle (TTSP). The base material of five kinds of FRP laminates employed in this study was plain fabric CFRP laminates T300 carbon fibers/vinylester (T300/VE). The first selection of FRP laminate to T300/VE was the combinations of different fabrics, that is flat yarn plain fabric T700 carbon fibers/vinylester (T700/VE-F) and multi-axial knitted T700 carbon fibers/vinylester (T700/VE-K) for marine use and the second selection of FRP laminates to T300/VE was the combinations with different fibers and matrix resin, that is plain fabric T300 carbon fibers/epoxy (T300/EP) and plain fabric E-glass fibers/vinylester (E-glass/VE). These five kinds of FRP laminates were prepared under three water absorption conditions of Dry, Wet and Wet C Dry after molding. The three-point bending constant strain rate (CSR) tests for these FRP laminates at three conditions of water absorption were carried out at various temperatures and strain rates. Furthermore, the three-point bending fatigue tests for these specimens were carried out at various temperatures and frequencies. The flexural CSR and fatigue strengths of these five kinds of FRP laminates strongly depend on water absorption as well as time and temperature. The mater curves of fatigue strength as well as CSR strength for these FRP laminates at three water absorption conditions are constructed by using the test data based on TTSP. It is possible to predict the long term fatigue life for these FRP laminates under an arbitrary temperature and water absorption conditions by using the master curves.

  10. Myopathic Lamin Mutations Cause Reductive Stress and Activate the Nrf2/Keap-1 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Dialynas, George; Shrestha, Om K.; Ponce, Jessica M.; Zwerger, Monika; Thiemann, Dylan A.; Young, Grant H.; Moore, Steven A.; Yu, Liping; Lammerding, Jan; Wallrath, Lori L.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the human LMNA gene cause muscular dystrophy by mechanisms that are incompletely understood. The LMNA gene encodes A-type lamins, intermediate filaments that form a network underlying the inner nuclear membrane, providing structural support for the nucleus and organizing the genome. To better understand the pathogenesis caused by mutant lamins, we performed a structural and functional analysis on LMNA missense mutations identified in muscular dystrophy patients. These mutations perturb the tertiary structure of the conserved A-type lamin Ig-fold domain. To identify the effects of these structural perturbations on lamin function, we modeled these mutations in Drosophila Lamin C and expressed the mutant lamins in muscle. We found that the structural perturbations had minimal dominant effects on nuclear stiffness, suggesting that the muscle pathology was not accompanied by major structural disruption of the peripheral nuclear lamina. However, subtle alterations in the lamina network and subnuclear reorganization of lamins remain possible. Affected muscles had cytoplasmic aggregation of lamins and additional nuclear envelope proteins. Transcription profiling revealed upregulation of many Nrf2 target genes. Nrf2 is normally sequestered in the cytoplasm by Keap-1. Under oxidative stress Nrf2 dissociates from Keap-1, translocates into the nucleus, and activates gene expression. Unexpectedly, biochemical analyses revealed high levels of reducing agents, indicative of reductive stress. The accumulation of cytoplasmic lamin aggregates correlated with elevated levels of the autophagy adaptor p62/SQSTM1, which also binds Keap-1, abrogating Nrf2 cytoplasmic sequestration, allowing Nrf2 nuclear translocation and target gene activation. Elevated p62/SQSTM1 and nuclear enrichment of Nrf2 were identified in muscle biopsies from the corresponding muscular dystrophy patients, validating the disease relevance of our Drosophila model. Thus, novel connections were made

  11. Mechanical behavior, damage tolerance and durability of fiber metal laminates for aircraft structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Guocai

    This study systematically explores the mechanical behavior, damage tolerance and durability of fiber metal laminates, a promising candidate materials system for next generation aerospace structures. The experimental results indicated that GLARE laminates exhibited a bilinear deformation behavior under static in-plane loading. Both an analytical constitutive model based on a modified classical lamination theory which incorporates the elasto-plastic behavior of aluminum alloy and a numerical simulation based on finite element modeling are used to predict the nonlinear stress-strain response and deformation behavior of GLARE laminates. The blunt notched strength of GLARE laminates increased with decreasing specimen width and decreasing hole diameter. The notched strength of GLARE laminates was evaluated based on a modified point stress criterion. A computer simulation based on finite element method was performed to study stress concentration and distribution around the notch and verify the analytical and experimental results of notched strength. Good agreement is obtained between the model predictions and experimental results. Experimental results also indicate that GLARE laminates exhibited superior impact properties to those of monolithic 2024-T3 aluminum alloy at low velocity impact loading. The GLARE 5-2/1 laminate with 0°/90°/90°/0° fiber configuration exhibits a better impact resistance than the GLARE 4-3/2 laminate with 0°/90°/0° fiber orientation. The characteristic impact energies, the damage area, and the permanent deflection of laminates are used to evaluate the impact damage resistance. The post-impact residual tensile strength under various damage states ranging from the plastic dent, barely visible impact damage (BVID), clearly visible impact damage (CVID) up to the complete perforation was also measured and compared. The post-impact fatigue behavior under various stress levels and impact damage states was extensively explored. The damage

  12. Origin and significance of lamination in Lower Cretaceous stromatolites and proposal for a quantitative approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez-Gonzalez, Pablo; Quijada, I. Emma; Benito, M. Isabel; Mas, Ramón; Merinero, Raúl; Riding, Robert

    2014-03-01

    Stromatolite lamination is typically defined as alternation of dark and light laminae. Study of Lower Cretaceous stromatolites from the Leza Fm (N Spain) supports this statement, but recognises additional complexities in lamination that have implications for interpreting accretion processes. These stromatolites are partial analogues of present-day coarse-grained carbonate stromatolites in the Bahamas and Shark Bay (Australia) that mainly form by trapping and binding carbonate sand. The Leza examples contain both grain-rich and micrite-rich laminae with scarce particles, suggesting that they accreted both by trapping and not trapping grains. Lamination in modern and ancient coarse-grained stromatolites is commonly defined by thin micritic crusts that formed during interruptions in accretion and separate contiguous grainy laminae (repetitive lamination). Leza examples also contain these thin hiatal crusts and locally show repetitive lamination, but their conspicuous macroscopic lamination is defined by thicker alternating grain-rich and micrite-rich laminae (alternating lamination). This indicates that, although hiatuses in accretion occurred, change in accretion process was the main cause of macroscopic lamination. These differences in accretion processes and lamination styles between Leza examples and modern coarse-grained stromatolites may reflect differences in their environmental settings. Modern examples occur in shallow marine tidal environments, whereas Leza Fm coarse-grained stromatolites developed in tide-influenced water-bodies in coastal-wetlands that experienced fluctuations in water salinity and hydrochemistry. Analysis of lamina-thickness in these Cretaceous stromatolites and similar published examples provides a quantitative approach to the processes that underlie stromatolite lamination.

  13. Lamin A/C Is a Risk Biomarker in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Willis, Naomi D.; Cox, Thomas R.; Rahman-Casañs, Syed F.; Smits, Kim; Przyborski, Stefan A.; van den Brandt, Piet; van Engeland, Manon; Weijenberg, Matty; Wilson, Robert G.; de Bruïne, Adriaan; Hutchison, Christopher J.

    2008-01-01

    Background A-type lamins are type V intermediate filament proteins encoded by the gene LMNA. Mutations in LMNA give rise to diverse degenerative diseases related to premature ageing. A-type lamins also influence the activity of the Retinoblastoma protein (pRb) and oncogenes such a β-catenin. Consequently, it has been speculated that expression of A-type lamins may also influence tumour progression. Methodology/Principal Findings An archive of colorectal cancer (CRC) and normal colon tissue was screened for expression of A-type lamins. We used the Cox proportional hazard ratio (HR) method to investigate patient survival. Using CRC cell lines we investigated the effects of lamin A expression on other genes by RT-PCR; on cell growth by FACS analysis; and on invasiveness by cell migration assays and siRNA knockdown of targeted genes. We found that lamin A is expressed in colonic stem cells and that patients with A-type lamin-expressing tumours have significantly worse prognosis than patients with A-type lamin negative tumours (HR = 1.85, p = 0.005). To understand this finding, we established a model system based upon expression of GFP-lamin A in CRC cells. We found that expression of GFP-lamin A in these cells did not affect cell proliferation but did promote greatly increased cell motility and invasiveness. The reason for this increased invasiveness was that expression of lamin A promoted up-regulation of the actin bundling protein T-plastin, leading to down regulation of the cell adhesion molecule E-cadherin. Conclusions Expression of A-type lamins increases the risk of death from CRC because its presence gives rise to increased invasiveness and potentially a more stem cell-like phenotype. This report directly links A-type lamin expression to tumour progression and raises the profile of LMNA from one implicated in multiple but rare genetic conditions to a gene involved in one of the commonest diseases in the Western World. PMID:18714339

  14. A New Approach to Fibrous Composite Laminate Strength Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart-Smith, L. J.

    1990-01-01

    A method of predicting the strength of cross-plied fibrous composite laminates is based on expressing the classical maximum-shear-stress failure criterion for ductile metals in terms of strains. Starting with such a formulation for classical isotropic materials, the derivation is extended to orthotropic materials having a longitudinal axis of symmetry, to represent the fibers in a unidirectional composite lamina. The only modification needed to represent those same fibers with properties normalized to the lamina rather than fiber is a change in axial modulus. A mirror image is added to the strain-based lamina failure criterion for fiber-dominated failures to reflect the cutoffs due to the presence of orthogonal fibers. It is found that the combined failure envelope is now identical with the well-known maximum-strain failure model in the tension-tension and compression-compression quadrants but is truncated in the shear quadrants. The successive application of this simple failure model for fibers in the 0/90 degree and +/- 45 degree orientations, in turn, is shown to be the necessary and sufficient characterization of the fiber-dominated failures of laminates made from fibers having the same tensile and compressive strengths. When one such strength is greater than the other, the failure envelope is appropriately truncated for the lesser direct strain. The shear-failure cutoffs are now based on the higher axial strain to failure since they occur at lower strains than and are usually not affected by such mechanisms as microbuckling. Premature matrix failures can also be covered by appropriately truncating the fiber failure envelope. Matrix failures are excluded from consideration for conventional fiber/polymer composites but the additional features needed for a more rigorous analysis of exotic materials are covered. The new failure envelope is compared with published biaxial test data. The theory is developed for unnotched laminates but is easily shrunk to incorporate

  15. Study of delamination in fiber reinforced composite laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathews, Mary Jacob

    The primary goal of this work was to characterize the fracture toughness of laminated composite materials using a combination of experiments and analyses. This goal was achieved by several contributions that improved the state-of-the-art of numerical analysis techniques for evaluating crack propagation in composite structures. It is shown that currently available finite element techniques do not provide accurate results when nonuniform elements are used to model the structure in the vicinity of the cracks. A new method is proposed in this dissertation to more accurately predict the material toughness in such circumstances. Delamination in composites is often complicated by mixed-mode fractures. Both interlaminar tensile and shear stresses can be present at the delamination front under mixed mode conditions. Although finite element analysis is widely used to calculate energy release rates (ERR), the individual mode I and mode II ERR do not converge when the delamination is at a bimaterial interface. This problem was solved by enclosing the delamination in a homogeneous layer that removes the difficulties associated with the interface cracks. The effect of the additional resin layer is minimized by evaluating the fracture toughness at the limit as the thickness of the interface layer goes to zero. Interlaminar fracture toughness of AS4/3501-6 (carbon/epoxy) composite laminates was measured using single mode and mixed mode bending tests. The results show that the critical mode I ERR for delamination decrease monotonically with increasing mode II loading. Failure loci are developed in this dissertation using the test data and new parameters are established for different failure criteria. An acoustic emission study was performed with the toughness characterization tests. The results indicate that passive emissions can be used as a nondestructive evaluation tool to predict the onset of delamination and other fractures in composites. The final contribution of this

  16. Enhancing tensile ductility of a particulate-reinforced aluminum MMC by lamination with Mg-9% Li alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Syn, C.K.; Lesuer, D.R.; Sherby, O.D.

    1995-05-01

    A laminated metal composite has been made by press bonding alternating layers of a particulate-reinforced aluminum MMC, 6090/SiC/25p, and a Mg-9%Li alloy. The mechanical properties including tensile ductility were evaluated. The tensile ductility of the Al MMC was found to increase from 3.5% to 11.5%. In contrast to other laminates based on ultrahigh carbon, steel, the laminate of this study and other Al MMC laminates exhibited tensile yield strengths that did not follow the rule of averages. This is attributed to interlayer reaction products developed during processing of the Al MMC laminates.

  17. A study of the interlaminar stress continuity theories for composite laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chun-Ying

    In this study, two stress continuity theories are presented. The first one, named interlaminar stress continuity theory (ISCT), accounts for the variation of transverse displacement through the laminate thickness. The continuity of interlaminar shear stresses and normal stress across the laminate interfaces and traction conditions on laminate surfaces are satisfied exactly. The second, interlaminar shear stress continuity (ISSCT), simplifies ISCT by assuming constant transverse displacement through the thickness. Thus, only the continuity of interlaminar shear stresses and shear traction conditions on laminate surfaces are enforced. The merit of these stress continuity theories is the direct calculation of interlaminar stresses from constitutive equations instead of equilibrium equations. The numerical examples for composite laminates with aspect ratio higher than five in cylindrical bending and bidirectional bending using both theories show excellent accuracy compared with elasticity solutions. ISCT provides significant improvement over ISSCT for composite analysis only when the aspect ratio is lower than five. The comparison among other displacement-based laminate theories and present theories is also performed. The further applications of ISSCT in composite analysis, e.g., vibration, buckling, nonlinear bending, nonlinear vibration, and free-edge stresses are studied. The associated numerical examples show the feasibility and potential of using this new theory in the study of composite laminates.

  18. BILAM: a composite laminate failure-analysis code using bilinear stress-strain approximations

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, P.V. Jr.; Dasgupta, A.; Chun, Y.W.

    1980-10-01

    The BILAM code which uses constant strain laminate analysis to generate in-plane load/deformation or stress/strain history of composite laminates to the point of laminate failure is described. The program uses bilinear stress-strain curves to model layer stress-strain behavior. Composite laminates are used for flywheels. The use of this computer code will help to develop data on the behavior of fiber composite materials which can be used by flywheel designers. In this program the stress-strain curves are modelled by assuming linear response in axial tension while using bilinear approximations (2 linear segments) for stress-strain response to axial compressive, transverse tensile, transverse compressive and axial shear loadings. It should be noted that the program attempts to empirically simulate the effects of the phenomena which cause nonlinear stress-strain behavior, instead of mathematically modelling the micromechanics involved. This code, therefore, performs a bilinear laminate analysis, and, in conjunction with several user-defined failure interaction criteria, is designed to provide sequential information on all layer failures up to and including the first fiber failure. The modus operandi is described. Code BILAM can be used to: predict the load-deformation/stress-strain behavior of a composite laminate subjected to a given combination of in-plane loads, and make analytical predictions of laminate strength.

  19. Stress-concentration factors for finite orthotropic laminates with a pin-loaded hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crews, J. H., Jr.; Hong, C. S.; Raju, I. S.

    1981-01-01

    Stresses were calculated for finite size orthotropic laminates loaded by a frictionless steel pin in a circular hole of the same diameter. The calculations were based on finite element analyses for six laminates. Stress concentration factors, based on nominal bearing stress, were determined for wide ranges of the ratios of width to diameter, w/d and edge distance to diameter, e/d. An infinite laminate case was analyzed for each laminate. Orthotropy had a significant influence on the tensile stress concentration at the hole. For example, the stress concentration factors for the infinite laminate cases ranged from 0.82 to 2.16, compared with 0.87 for the quasi-isotropic laminate. The finite widths and edge distances strongly influenced the tensile stress concentration. For the practical range w/d or = 3, the peak tensile stresses were as much as 80% larger than the infinite laminate reference value. For e/d or = 3, these stresses were amplified by as much as 50%. In contrast, the finite width and edge distance had little effect on shear-out and bearing stress concentrations.

  20. Multimaterial lamination as a means of retarding penetration and spallation failures in plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dibattista, J. D.; Humes, D. H.

    1972-01-01

    Experimental data are presented which show that hypervelocity impact spallation and penetration failures of a single solid aluminum plate and of a solid aluminum plate spaced a distance behind a Whipple meteor bumper may be retarded by replacing the solid aluminum plate with a laminated plate. Four sets of experiments were conducted. The first set of experiments was conducted with projectile mass and velocity held constant and with polycarbonate cylinders impacted into single plates of different construction. The second set of experiments was done with single plates of various construction and aluminum spherical projectiles of similar mass but different velocities. These two experiments showed that a laminated plate of aluminum and polycarbonate or aluminum and methyl methacrylate could prevent spallation and penetration failures with a lower areal density than either an all-aluminum laminated plate or a solid aluminum plate. The aluminum laminated plate was in turn superior to the solid aluminum plate in resisting spallation and penetration failures. In addition, through an example of 6061-T6 aluminum and methyl methacrylate, it is shown that a laminated structure ballistically superior to its parent materials may be built. The last two sets of experiments were conducted using bumper-protected main walls of solid aluminum and of laminated aluminum and polycarbonate. Again, under hypervelocity impact conditions, the laminated main walls were superior to the solid aluminum main walls in retarding spallation and penetration failures.