Science.gov

Sample records for corbicula fluminea influence

  1. Influence of the invasive Asian clam Corbicula fluminea (Bivalvia: Corbiculidae) on estuarine epibenthic assemblages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilarri, M. I.; Souza, A. T.; Antunes, C.; Guilhermino, L.; Sousa, R.

    2014-04-01

    One of the most widespread invasive alien species (IAS) in aquatic ecosystems is the Asian clam Corbicula fluminea. Several studies have shown that C. fluminea can cause large-scale changes in macrozoobenthic assemblages; however, very few attempted to investigate the effects of this IAS on mobile epibenthic species, such as fishes and crustaceans. In this context, the influence of C. fluminea on epibenthic species was investigated during one year by comparing the associated epibenthic fauna in three nearby sites of the Minho estuary (NW of the Iberian Peninsula), wherein the abiotic conditions are similar but the density of the Asian clam is highly different. From a total of 13 species, six were significantly influenced by C. fluminea; five responded positively, namely the brown shrimp Crangon crangon, the European eel Anguilla anguilla, the common goby Pomatoschistus microps, the brown trout Salmo trutta fario and the great pipefish Syngnathus acus, whereas the shore crab Carcinus maenas was negatively influenced. However, stomach contents analysis revealed that fish and crustacean species do not feed on C. fluminea, suggesting that this IAS is still not a large component of the diet of higher trophic levels in this estuarine ecosystem. Our results suggest that the structure provided by C. fluminea shells is likely to be one of the main factors responsible for the differences observed. C. fluminea physical structure seems to influence the epibenthic associated fauna, when found in densities higher than 1000 ind./m2, with sedentary small-bodied crustaceans and fishes being mainly attracted by the increasing in habitat complexity and consequent enhancement of heterogeneity and shelter availability.

  2. Distribution of Corbicula fluminea at nuclear facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Counts, C.L. III

    1985-11-01

    A review of the zoogeographic records for the exotic Asian clam, Corbicula fluminea (Muller, 1774), reveals its presence in 27 states where nuclear powered electric generating plants are either operating or under construction. Nineteen plant sites reported infestation of varying severity in facilities, or source water bodies immediately adjacent to the facility, by C. fluminea. Thirteen plant sites are located within the zoogeographic limits of C. fluminea but have a low risk of infestation due to either salt water cooling systems or locations a great distance from known populations. Eighteen plant sites are located wholly outside of the known zoogeographic range of C. fluminea. Thirty plant sites are located in close proximity to known populations of C. fluminea and therefore should maintain surveillance of the source water body and within plant water systems for possible infestations by these bivalves. 27 figs.

  3. Mechanisms of cadmium accumulation (adsorption and absorption) by the freshwater bivalve Corbicula fluminea under hydrodynamic conditions.

    PubMed

    Nan, Geng; Peifang, Wang; Chao, Wang; Jun, Hou; Jin, Qian; Lingzhan, Miao

    2016-05-01

    Many heavy metals in sediments and water have potential adverse effects on aquatic organisms such as Corbicula fluminea (O.F. Müller, 1774), a bivalve species frequently used as a biomonitor for metal pollution. Studies over the past decades examining the heavy metal uptake by C. fluminea, very few has investigated the effect of hydrodynamic conditions on accumulation of heavy metal by C. fluminea. Therefore, in this study, to investigate the mechanism of intracellular and extracellular accumulation of metal, individuals of C. fluminea were exposed to cadmium (Cd)-treated water under three different hydrodynamic conditions. These included exposures in two set ups: three rates of rotation (500, 350, 200 r/min) in beakers for 10 days, and then exposure to Cd-treated sediment under two naturally turbulent water conditions (14 cm/s and 3.2 cm/s) in experimental flumes for 23 days. Hydrodynamic force increased the burrowing rate but decreased the activity of C. fluminea. After 10 days of exposure, the extracellular concentrations of Cd in the tissues of C. fluminea in the sand group were significantly higher than that in the gravel groups. The intracellular and extracellular concentrations of Cd in the tissues of C. fluminea dramatically increased in the Cd-treated sediment test. Moreover, the concentration of the extracellular Cd adsorbed on the tissues of C. fluminea in the 14 cm/s and 3.2 cm/s groups was significantly higher than that in the control group, whereas the effect of hydrodynamic force on absorption of Cd by C. fluminea was not obvious. These results suggest that hydrodynamic condition plays an important role in extracellular accumulation of Cd by C. fluminea. In future study, when using C. fluminea to assess Cd pollution in aquatic environment, extracellular Cd adsorbed on the tissue should be removed to avoid the influence of hydrodynamics. PMID:26975005

  4. Comparison of Selenium bioaccumulation in the clams Corbicula fluminea and Potamocorbula amurensis: a bioenergetic modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byong-Gweon; Lee, Jung-Suk; Luoma, Samuel N

    2006-07-01

    Selenium uptake from food (assimilation efficiency) and dissolved phase (influx rate) as well as loss kinetics (efflux rate) were compared between two bivalves, Corbicula fluminea and Potamocorbula amurensis. The effects of salinity and temperature on these kinetic parameters for both clam species also were evaluated. The Asiatic clam, C. fluminea, more efficiently assimilated Se associated with algae (66-87%) than Se associated with oxic sediments (20-37%). However, no consistent difference was found between Se assimilation efficiencies from both food types (19-60%) for P. amurensis. The temperature and salinity had a minor influence on the Se assimilation from ingested food. However, the effects of temperature and salinity were more evident in the uptake from dissolved sources. The influx rate of Se(IV) increased by threefold with the increase of temperature from 5 to 21 degrees C for C. fluminea. The increase of salinity from 4 to 20 psu decreased the uptake rate constant (ku) of Se in P. amurensis from 0.011 to 0.005 L/g/h, whereas salinity change (0-8 psu) had a negligible effect on the Se influx rate of C. fluminea. The Se influx rate of P. amurensis decreased by half with the 3.5-fold increase in tissue dry weight. The rate constant of loss was greater for P. amurensis (0.029/d at 8 psu) than for C. fluminea (0.014/d at 0 psu and 0.01/d at 8 psu). A bioenergetic model suggests that dietary uptake is the dominant pathway for Se bioaccumulation in the two clams in San Francisco Bay and that interspecies differences in Se bioaccumulation can be explained by differences in food ingestion rates. PMID:16833157

  5. Comparison of selenium bioaccumulation in the clams Corbicula fluminea and Potamocorbula amurensis: A bioenergetic modeling approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, B.-G.; Lee, J.-S.; Luoma, S.N.

    2006-01-01

    Selenium uptake from food (assimilation efficiency) and dissolved phase (influx rate) as well as loss kinetics (efflux rate) were compared between two bivalves, Corbicula fluminea and Potamocorbula amurensis. The effects of salinity and temperature on these kinetic parameters for both clam species also were evaluated. The Asiatic clam, C. fluminea, more efficiently assimilated Se associated with algae (66-87%) than Se associated with oxic sediments (20-37%). However, no consistent difference was found between Se assimilation efficiencies from both food types (19-60%) for P. amurensis. The temperature and salinity had a minor influence on the Se assimilation from ingested food. However, the effects of temperature and salinity were more evident in the uptake from dissolved sources. The influx rate of Se(IV) increased by threefold with the increase of temperature from 5 to 21??C for C. fluminea. The increase of salinity from 4 to 20 psu decreased the uptake rate constant (ku) of Se in P. amurensis from 0.011 to 0.005 L/g/h, whereas salinity change (0-8 psu) had a negligible effect on the Se influx rate of C. fluminea. The Se influx rate of P. amurensis decreased by half with the 3.5-fold increase in tissue dry weight. The rate constant of loss was greater for P. amurensis (0.029/d at 8 psu) than for C. fluminea (0.014/d at 0 psu and 0.01/d at 8 psu). A bioenergetic model suggests that dietary uptake is the dominant pathway for Se bioaccumulation in the two clams in San Francisco Bay and that interspecies differences in Se bioaccumulation can be explained by differences in food ingestion rates. ?? 2006 SETAC.

  6. When gourmet is not enough: Organic matter sources supporting the production of Corbicula fluminea in an invaded estuary

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Asian clam Corbicula fluminea is one of the most pervasive species in freshwater ecosystems. Our objective was to characterize the food sources fuelling C. fluminea in the Minho river estuary (NW-Iberian Peninsula, Europe), an estuarine ecosystem in which C. fluminea presentl...

  7. Effects of Upper-Limit Water Temperatures on the Dispersal of the Asian Clam Corbicula fluminea

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Inês Correia; Pereira, Joana Luísa; Costa, Raquel; Gonçalves, Fernando; Prezant, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Temperature is a determinant environmental variable in metabolic rates of organisms ultimately influencing important physiological and behavioural features. Stressful conditions such as increasing temperature, particularly within high ranges occurring in the summer, have been suggested to induce flotation behaviour in Corbicula fluminea which may be important in dispersal of this invasive species. However, there has been no experimental evidence supporting this hypothesis. It was already proven that C. fluminea drift is supported by a mucilaginous drogue line produced by mucocytes present in the ctenidia. Detailed microscopic examination of changes in these cells and quantification of clam flotation following one, two and three weeks of exposure to 22, 25 and 30°C was carried out so that the effects of increasing water temperatures in dispersal patterns could be discussed. Results show that changes in temperature triggered an acceleration of the mucocytes production and stimulated flotation behaviour, especially following one week of exposure. Dilution of these effects occurred following longer exposure periods. It is possible that these bivalves perceive changing temperature as a stress and respond accordingly in the short-term, and then acclimate to the new environmental conditions. The response patterns suggest that increasing water temperatures could stimulate C. fluminea population expansion. PMID:23056377

  8. Purification and Characterization of Hemagglutinating Proteins from Poker-Chip Venus (Meretrix lusoria) and Corbicula Clam (Corbicula fluminea)

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chin-Fu; Hung, Shao-Wen; Chang, Yung-Chung; Chen, Ming-Hui; Chang, Chen-Hsuan; Tsou, Li-Tse; Tu, Ching-Yu; Lin, Yu-Hsing; Liu, Pan-Chen; Lin, Shiun-Long; Wang, Way-Shyan

    2012-01-01

    Hemagglutinating proteins (HAPs) were purified from Poker-chip Venus (Meretrix lusoria) and Corbicula clam (Corbicula fluminea) using gel-filtration chromatography on a Sephacryl S-300 column. The molecular weights of the HAPs obtained from Poker-chip Venus and Corbicula clam were 358 kDa and 380 kDa, respectively. Purified HAP from Poker-chip Venus yielded two subunits with molecular weights of 26 kDa and 29 kDa. However, only one HAP subunit was purified from Corbicula clam, and its molecular weight was 32 kDa. The two Poker-chip Venus HAPs possessed hemagglutinating ability (HAA) for erythrocytes of some vertebrate animal species, especially tilapia. Moreover, HAA of the HAP purified from Poker-chip Venus was higher than that of the HAP of Corbicula clam. Furthermore, Poker-chip Venus HAPs possessed better HAA at a pH higher than 7.0. When the temperature was at 4°C–10°C or the salinity was less than 0.5‰, the two Poker-chip Venus HAPs possessed better HAA compared with that of Corbicula clam. PMID:22666167

  9. Bioavailability and oxidative stress of cadmium to Corbicula fluminea.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jinghua; Luo, Jun; Ma, Hongrui; Wang, Xiaorong; Ma, Lena Q

    2013-04-01

    This work set out to study the effects of cadmium (Cd) in sediments on the antioxidant enzyme activities in the digestive gland of Asian clam Corbicula fluminea and to explore the potential for applying these responses to evaluate the Cd-contaminated sediment. Additionally, diffusive gradients in thin-films (DGT) technique was used to predict the response of its antioxidant defense system. The sediments, collected from Taihu Lake, were spiked with Cd at different concentrations (0.72, 0.91, 1.62, 2.59, 11.2, 20.4 and 40.6 mg kg(-1), dry weight). Asian clam was cultivated for 28 days. Concentrations of Cd in the body of Asian clam had a good relationship with concentrations of Cd in overlying water and sediments, as measured by DGT. Cd affected these biochemical parameters significantly, especially for superoxide (SOD), peroxidase (POD) and glutathione (GSH), which began to show higher sensitivity and have a significant difference in low dosage (0.91 mg Cd kg(-1)) compared with blank. Contents of MDA and MT, which were induced by Cd, increased with the increasing Cd concentration in sediments and reached peak values at 11.2 and 20.4 mg kg(-1), respectively, after 28 days exposure. All of these results suggested that biochemical responses cooperated in detoxifying and maintaining cellular metabolic homeostasis. The R(2) of regression analysis between the contents of MT and the concentrations of Cd measured by DGT, in sediments and soft body were 0.71, 0.94 and 0.88 after 28 days exposure. This suggested that DGT measurement could predict the response of MT. Cd accumulation, GSH and MT were indispensable biomarkers and the MDA content and DGT appeared to be promising biomarkers. The results clearly indicated that Cd could induce oxidative stress in the digestive gland of Asian clam. The combination of biomonitors with DGT can obtain different information about Cd bioavailability and confirm the significance of applying a suite of biomarkers rather than a selective

  10. In Vitro Interactions of Asian Freshwater Clam (Corbicula fluminea) Hemocytes and Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts

    PubMed Central

    Graczyk, T. K.; Fayer, R.; Cranfield, M. R.; Conn, D. B.

    1997-01-01

    Corbicula fluminea hemocytes phagocytosed infectious oocysts of Cryptosporidium parvum in vitro. After 15, 30, 60, 90, and 120 min of incubation, averages of 35.8, 58.0, 69.7, 77.7, and 81.6% of the oocysts were phagocytosed by 24.3, 70.0, 78.5, 87.3, and 93.0% of the hemocytes, respectively. A single clam can retain by phagocytosis an average of 1.84 x 10(sup6) oocysts per ml of hemolymph. C. fluminea bivalves can serve as biological indicators of contamination of wastewaters and agricultural drainages with Cryptosporidium. PMID:16535656

  11. Effects of the invasive clam Corbicula fluminea (Müller, 1774) on an estuarine microbial community.

    PubMed

    Novais, Adriana; Souza, Allan T; Ilarri, Martina; Pascoal, Cláudia; Sousa, Ronaldo

    2016-10-01

    The Asian clam Corbicula fluminea (Müller, 1774) is well recognized for its invasive behavior and high ecological and economic impacts, being classified as one of the 100 worst invasive alien species (IAS) in Europe. In this study, we performed a manipulative experiment under natural conditions to assess the effects of C. fluminea on sediments biochemistry and on the structure of an estuarine microbial (fungi and bacteria) community. We placed 5 treatments (control, rock, closed, live and open) for 2months in the Minho estuary (NW Iberian Peninsula). No differences were detected between treatments regarding the values of carbon (C), nitrite (NO2(-)), ammonium (NH4(+)), phosphate (PO4(3-)) and calcium (Ca) in the sediments; however, potassium (K) had higher values in the open treatment. Furthermore, we found that the presence of live C. fluminea stimulated fungal biomass (but not diversity) and bacterial diversity. Bioturbation activities by C. fluminea are possibly the main mechanism explaining these results; however, other factors such as the presence of other macroinvertebrate species and/or production of feces and pseudofeces by C. fluminea cannot be excluded. To our knowledge, this is the first manipulative experiment under natural conditions that clearly shows the effects of C. fluminea on an estuarine microbial community. Given the widespread distribution of this IAS and the paucity of quantitative assessments of invasive bivalves' effects on microbial communities, it will be important that future studies further investigate these processes. PMID:27265734

  12. Online detection of waterborne bioavailable copper by valve daily rhythms in freshwater clam Corbicula fluminea.

    PubMed

    Jou, L J; Chen, W Y; Liao, C M

    2009-08-01

    Freshwater clam Corbicula fluminea, a surrogate species in metal toxicity testing, is a promising bioindicator of impairment in aquatic ecosystems. Little is known, however, about the relationship between clam valve daily rhythmic response and metal bioavailability related to a metal biological early warning system (BEWS) design. The purpose of this study was to link biotic ligand model (BLM)-based bioavailability and valve daily rhythm in C. fluminea to design a biomonitoring system for online in situ detection of waterborne copper (Cu). We integrated the Hill-based dose-time-response function and the fitted daily rhythm function of valve closure into a constructed programmatic mechanism. The functional presentation of the present dynamic system was completely demonstrated by employing a LabVIEW graphic control program in a personal computer. We used site-specific effect concentration causing 10% of total valve closure response (EC10) as the detection threshold to implement the proposed C. fluminea-based Cu BEWS. Here our results show that the proposed C. fluminea-based BEWS could be deliberately synthesized to online in situ transmit rapidly the information on waterborne bioavailable Cu levels under various aquatic environmental conditions through monitoring the valve daily rhythmic changes. We suggested that the developed C. fluminea-based dynamic biomonitoring system could assist in developing technically defensible site-specific water quality criteria to promote more efficient uses in water resources for protection of species health in aquatic environments. PMID:18607762

  13. Stable oxygen and carbon isotope profiles in an invasive bivalve ( Corbicula fluminea) in North Carolina watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucci, John P.; Showers, William J.; Genna, Bernie; Levine, Jay F.

    2009-06-01

    The modern invasive bivalve Corbicula fluminea was collected in 2006 from three sites with different land uses located in a North Carolina River Basin. The primary objective was to describe the δ 18O and δ 13C profiles of C. fluminea shells under various land use conditions. An additional aim was to evaluate whether growth patterns of C. fluminea form seasonally. Annual shell growth patterns were measured from the umbo to the margin and co-varied with estimates of ambient water temperature, corresponding to seasonal variation. The C. fluminea growth patterns as translucent bands (slower growth) appeared to form during winter months and opaque bands (rapid growth) formed during summer. A mixed model analysis (ANOVA) showed a significant site level effect of δ 18O and δ 13C profiles examined among sites ( F = 17.1; p = 0.003). A second model showed a borderline significant site effect among profiles with variability more pronounced at the urban site, Crabtree Creek ( p = 0.085). Previous habitat assessment ratings and water chemistry measurements suggested that the urban site was more impacted by storm water runoff. Understanding δ 18O and δ 13C SHELL profiles and shell growth patterns of the invasive bivalve ( C. fluminea) may help establish a framework for using these animals as biomonitors to record water temperature and nutrient pollution.

  14. The impact of paracetamol on selected biomarkers of the mollusc species Corbicula fluminea.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Fátima Pinto; Pereira, Joana Luísa; Gonçalves, Fernando; Nunes, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    The Asian clam Corbicula fluminea is an invasive bivalve that has recently spread in Europe and currently represents a large portion of the aquatic biomass in specific areas. Because of the impacts that the species may have in invaded ecosystems, increased knowledge on the physiologic features of the species life-cycle under different environmental scenarios (e.g., contamination events) is critical to understand the dynamics of the invasion and resulting ecosystem imbalance. The presence of pharmaceutical residues in the aquatic environment has recently received great attention since high levels of contamination have been found, not only in sewage treatment plant effluents, but also in open waters. The present article reports toxicological biochemical effects of paracetamol to Corbicula fluminea following short- and long-term exposures. Oxidative stress parameters were specially focused namely catalase (CAT), glutathione S-transferases (GSTs), and glutathione reductase (GRed). The effect of tested substances on lipid peroxidation was also investigated. Paracetamol did not induce alterations on CAT activity, caused a significant decrease of GSTs activity following short- and long-term exposure (LOEC values of 532.78 mg L(-1) and 30.98 μg L(-1) , respectively), and was responsible for a significant and dose-dependent decrease of GRed activity in short- and long-term exposures. These results indicate that exposure to paracetamol can provoke significant alterations on the cellular redox status of C. fluminea. PMID:21956867

  15. The asiatic clam, Corbicula fluminea (Müller), in the tidal Potomac River, Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dresler, Paul V.; Cory, Robert L.

    1980-01-01

    The Asiatic clam,Corbicula fluminea (Müller), has extended its range to include the tidal fresh-water portion of the Potomac River, Maryland. Though patchily distributed, the clams have attained densities of 665 m−2. Size-class distributions indicate that the clams first appeared in 1975. About 90% of the population belong to year-class I and were less than 12 mm in length. Elsewhere, this species has created severe water quality problems; it should be closely watched in the Potomac.

  16. Distribution and winter survival health of Asian clams, Corbicula fluminea, in the St. Clair River, Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    French, John R. P., III; Schloesser, Don W.

    1996-01-01

    We studied the distribution and winter survival of the Asian clam, Corbicula fluminea, in the St. Clair River from the fall of 1988 to the spring of 1990. Between fall of 1988 and spring of 1989, distribution of Corbicula was extended from 5.5 to 11.5 km downstream from an electric power plant. However, total abundance of clams decreased during the winter. By fall of 1989, Corbicula was found 14.5 km from the power plant, and the mean density of clams was 27 individuals/m2. Between fall of 1989 and spring of 1990, distribution was reduced to 7.5 km from the power plant and abundance decreased 97%. During the winter of 1988-1989, we collected clams monthly from one station 2.2 km from the power plant, and we observed that clams survived the harsh winter for two months after the water temperature dropped about 1.5°C below the reported lethal level for Corbicula in midwinter. During the winer of 1989-1990, we held clams at the sediment-water interface in enclosures, and we observed that condition indices (dry body weight; dry shell weight) of clams remained stable (mean = 0.05 ± 0.01) in December and January and then declined significantly (p < 0.05) to 0.04 ± 0.01 in February. All clams perished by late March. The deteriorating physiological state of clams, as indicated by declining condition index, seemingly is a factor in late winter mortalities of Corbicula in the St. Clair River. In contrast to the rapid geographic spread and population increases in the southern United States, Corbicula likely will not spread rapidly throughout the Great Lakes beyond shoreline thermal refugia of heated-water discharge plumes from power plants.

  17. Allochthonous Organic Matter Subsidize the High Secondary Production of the Invasive Bivalve Corbicula fluminea in Minho Estuary (N-Portugal)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Asian clam Corbicula fluminea is one of the most invasive species in freshwater ecosystems. In Minho estuary, this species colonize all the middle and upper part of the estuary, dominating the abundance, biomass and secondary production in River Minho tidal freshwater area (T...

  18. Detection and analysis of the microdistribution of uranium in the gills of freshwater Corbicula fluminea by SIMS technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tessier, C.; Suhard, D.; Simon, O.; Floriani, M.; Rebière, F.; Jourdain, J.-R.

    2009-06-01

    The microdistribution of uranium in the gills of freshwater bivalve Corbicula fluminea following chronic direct exposure to this radioelement has been investigated using the SIMS technique. Different exposure levels and exposure durations have been studied. The SIMS mass spectra and 238U + ion images produced with a SIMS CAMECA 4F-E7 show an U accumulation with the lower aqueous U concentration (20 μg/L) and the influence of the exposure levels on the bioaccumulation capacities. Furthermore, the ionic images display a heterogeneous distribution of uranium within the gill structure whatever the exposure conditions are. This study, in keeping with the ENVIRHOM French research program, was led to the conclusion that ion microscopy is an appropriate analytical method for trace elements and can give elemental cartography in a biological tissue section.

  19. Low Genetic Diversity and High Invasion Success of Corbicula fluminea (Bivalvia, Corbiculidae) (Müller, 1774) in Portugal

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Cidália; Sousa, Ronaldo; Mendes, Tito; Borges, Rui; Vilares, Pedro; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Guilhermino, Lúcia; Antunes, Agostinho

    2016-01-01

    The Asian clam, Corbicula fluminea, is an invasive alien species (IAS) originally from Asia that has spread worldwide causing major ecological and economic impacts in aquatic ecosystems. Here, we evaluated C. fluminea genetic (using COI mtDNA, CYTb mtDNA and 18S rDNA gene markers), morphometric and sperm morphology variation in Portuguese freshwater ecosystems. The COI marker revealed a single haplotype, which belongs to the Asian FW5 invasive lineage, suggesting a common origin for all the 13 Portuguese C. fluminea populations analysed. Morphometric analyses showed differences between the populations colonizing the North (with the exception of the Lima River) and the Centre/South ecosystems. The sperm morphology examination revealed the presence of biflagellate sperm, a distinctive character of the invasive androgenetic lineages. The low genetic variability of the Portuguese C. fluminea populations and the pattern of sperm morphology have been illuminating for understanding the demographic history of this invasive species. We hypothesize that these populations were derived from a unique introductory event of a Corbicula fluminea FW5 invasive androgenic lineage in the Tejo River, which subsequently dispersed to other Portuguese freshwater ecosystems. The C. fluminea asexual reproductive mode may have assisted these populations to become highly invasive despite the low genetic diversity. PMID:27391333

  20. Low Genetic Diversity and High Invasion Success of Corbicula fluminea (Bivalvia, Corbiculidae) (Müller, 1774) in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Cidália; Sousa, Ronaldo; Mendes, Tito; Borges, Rui; Vilares, Pedro; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Guilhermino, Lúcia; Antunes, Agostinho

    2016-01-01

    The Asian clam, Corbicula fluminea, is an invasive alien species (IAS) originally from Asia that has spread worldwide causing major ecological and economic impacts in aquatic ecosystems. Here, we evaluated C. fluminea genetic (using COI mtDNA, CYTb mtDNA and 18S rDNA gene markers), morphometric and sperm morphology variation in Portuguese freshwater ecosystems. The COI marker revealed a single haplotype, which belongs to the Asian FW5 invasive lineage, suggesting a common origin for all the 13 Portuguese C. fluminea populations analysed. Morphometric analyses showed differences between the populations colonizing the North (with the exception of the Lima River) and the Centre/South ecosystems. The sperm morphology examination revealed the presence of biflagellate sperm, a distinctive character of the invasive androgenetic lineages. The low genetic variability of the Portuguese C. fluminea populations and the pattern of sperm morphology have been illuminating for understanding the demographic history of this invasive species. We hypothesize that these populations were derived from a unique introductory event of a Corbicula fluminea FW5 invasive androgenic lineage in the Tejo River, which subsequently dispersed to other Portuguese freshwater ecosystems. The C. fluminea asexual reproductive mode may have assisted these populations to become highly invasive despite the low genetic diversity. PMID:27391333

  1. The unusual mineral vaterite in shells of the freshwater bivalve Corbicula fluminea from the UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spann, Nicole; Harper, Elizabeth M.; Aldridge, David C.

    2010-08-01

    Asian clams ( Corbicula fluminea) with abnormally thickened shell valves were found in four rivers in the UK (Rivers Yare, Waveney, Thames and New Bedford River). The material making up these malformations was the rare calcium carbonate polymorph vaterite. Vaterite is seldom found in the natural environment because it is less stable than the other calcium carbonate polymorphs (aragonite and calcite). In the few reported cases of vaterite formation in molluscs, it is usually related to unusual biomineralisation events such as shell regeneration, pearls and initial stages of shell formation. We compared two populations from the Rivers Yare and Waveney in the Norfolk Broads, UK, one (River Waveney) displaying dominantly the normal Corbicula shell form with aragonitic shells. In the River Yare population, all individuals sampled had shell deformations to different extents. These deformations were apparent as bulges on the inside of the ventral shell margin. X-ray diffraction confirmed that the shell material in the bulges of recently collected clams was vaterite. Other parts of the deformed shells were aragonitic. The shell deformations alter the shell morphology, leading to higher and wider shells. The shell microstructure is fibrous in the vateritic parts and crossed-lamellar in the aragonitic parts of deformed or non-deformed shells. The cause for the malformations is probably a disrupted biomineralisation process in the bivalves. Fossil Corbicula specimens from the late Pleistocene had similar deformations, suggesting that this is not a response to anthropogenic causes, such as pollution.

  2. The unusual mineral vaterite in shells of the freshwater bivalve Corbicula fluminea from the UK.

    PubMed

    Spann, Nicole; Harper, Elizabeth M; Aldridge, David C

    2010-08-01

    Asian clams (Corbicula fluminea) with abnormally thickened shell valves were found in four rivers in the UK (Rivers Yare, Waveney, Thames and New Bedford River). The material making up these malformations was the rare calcium carbonate polymorph vaterite. Vaterite is seldom found in the natural environment because it is less stable than the other calcium carbonate polymorphs (aragonite and calcite). In the few reported cases of vaterite formation in molluscs, it is usually related to unusual biomineralisation events such as shell regeneration, pearls and initial stages of shell formation. We compared two populations from the Rivers Yare and Waveney in the Norfolk Broads, UK, one (River Waveney) displaying dominantly the normal Corbicula shell form with aragonitic shells. In the River Yare population, all individuals sampled had shell deformations to different extents. These deformations were apparent as bulges on the inside of the ventral shell margin. X-ray diffraction confirmed that the shell material in the bulges of recently collected clams was vaterite. Other parts of the deformed shells were aragonitic. The shell deformations alter the shell morphology, leading to higher and wider shells. The shell microstructure is fibrous in the vateritic parts and crossed-lamellar in the aragonitic parts of deformed or non-deformed shells. The cause for the malformations is probably a disrupted biomineralisation process in the bivalves. Fossil Corbicula specimens from the late Pleistocene had similar deformations, suggesting that this is not a response to anthropogenic causes, such as pollution. PMID:20567799

  3. Growth and overwinter survival of the Asiatic clam, Corbicula fluminea, in the St. Clair River, Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    French, John R. P., III; Schloesser, Donald W.

    1991-01-01

    We report the discovery in April 1986 of the first population of Asiatic clam, Corbicula fluminea, known to occupy a lotic environment in the Laurentian Great Lakes system. This population occupied a 3.8 km long sandy shoal in the discharge plume of a steam-electric power plant on the St. Clair River (Michigan), the outflow of Lake Huron. Samples collected April 1986 to April 1987 revealed the growth of one-year-old Corbicula (1985 cohort) began after mid-May and ended by mid-November, while water temperatures were higher than 9°C. Maximum growth (0.78 mm wk-1) occurred between mid-August and mid-September, while water temperatures were about 16-23°C. We recorded a substantial overwinter mortality of the 1986 cohort, but not the 1985 cohort; this was particularly evident at sampling locations more remote from the heated discharge of the power plant, suggesting low water temperature wast the major mortality agent. The available information suggests low water temperature in the St. Clair River may limit the success of Corbicula in the river, including portions of populations inhabiting thermal plumes, by reducing growth, delaying the onset of sexual maturity and reproduction, and causing heavy overwinter mortality in the first year of life.

  4. Dynamic behaviour of Cd2+ adsorption in equilibrium batch studies by CaCO3(-)-rich Corbicula fluminea shell.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Farhah Amalya; Aris, Ahmad Zaharin; Latif, Puziah Abdul

    2014-01-01

    This work presents the structural and adsorption properties of the CaCO3(-)-rich Corbicula fluminea shell as a natural and economic adsorbent to remove Cd ions from aqueous solutions under batch studies. Experiments were conducted with different contact times, various initial concentrations, initial solution pH and serial biosorbent dosage to examine the dynamic characterization of the adsorption and its influence on Cd uptake capacity. The characterization of the C. fluminea shell using SEM/EDX revealed that the adsorbent surface is mostly impregnated by small particles of potentially calcium salts. The dominant Cd adsorption mechanism is strongly pH and concentration dependent. A maximum Cd removal efficiency of 96.20% was obtained at pH 7 while the optimum adsorbent dosage was observed as 5 g/L. The Langmuir isotherm was discovered to be more suitable to represent the experimental equilibrium isotherm results with higher correlation coefficients (R(2) > 0.98) than Freundlich (R(2) < 0.97).The correlation coefficient values (p < 0.01) indicated the superiority of the Langmuir isotherm over the Freundlich isotherm. PMID:23771443

  5. [Effects of Corbicula fluminea bioturbation on the community composition and abundance of ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria in surface sediments].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue; Zhao, Da-Yong; Zeng, Jin; Yu, Duo-Wei; Wu, Qing-Long

    2014-06-01

    To better understand the effects of Corbicula fluminea bioturbation on the ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms in the surface sediment, sediment-water microcosms with different densities of Corbicula fluminea were constructed. Clone libraries and real-time qPCR were applied to analyze the community composition and abundance of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB) in the surface sediments. The results obtained indicated that the bioturbation of Corbicula fluminea accelerated the release of nitrogen from the surface sediment. In the amoA gene clone libraries, the identified AOA amoA gene sequences affiliated with the two known clusters (marine and soil clusters). The identified AOB amoA gene sequences mostly belonged to the Nitrosomonas of beta-Proteobacteria. The abundance of the bacterial amoA gene was higher than that of the archaeal amoA gene in all treatments. With increasing density of Corbicula fluminea, decreased abundances of the bacterial amoA gene were observed. At the same time, the diversity of AOA and AOB reduced in the Corbicula fluminea containing microcosms. In conclusion, the bioturbation of Corbicula fluminea could affected the community composition and abundance of ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms in surface sediments. PMID:25158512

  6. NA{sup +}, K{sup +}-ATPase, histopathological, and genetic responses of Corbicula fluminea to sediment-associated copper

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, S.

    1995-12-31

    Time-dependent responses to sediment-associated copper were studies at hierarchical levels of biological organization along an extreme concentration gradient (40 to 40,000 mg/kg total Cu). Laboratory and in situ estimates of molecular to tissue-level responses (Na/K-ATPase activity, DNA content, histopathology) were monitored in Corbicula fluminea (Asiatic clam), and compared with laboratory and field based survival of Corbicula and Elimia teres (an indigenous Gastropoda). Mollusc survival was, in turn, compared with effects on macrobenthic community composition along the stream/[Cu] gradient. Relationships between selected sediment characteristics and the bioavailability and toxicity of sediment associated copper were also investigated. Sediment-associated copper depressed Na/K-ATPase activity and led to histopathological damage of renal and gill epithelia (vacuolization, degeneration), indicating that impaired ion regulation was an important mechanism of toxicity. Concurrent reductions in DNA content were believed to be secondary effects due to cell death, not an indication of genotoxicity. Sublethal responses were significantly correlated with survival in both species; however, while survival in situ was indicative of differences in community structure, laboratory-based survival was not. Copper levels in tissues were indicative of exposure, but were not significantly correlated with adverse effects. Copper levels in sediments, interstitial water, and overlying water varied independently of sediment characteristics except pH. Cu/AVS ratios were predictive of Corbicula and Elimia survival, but were not significantly related to differences in community structure. Instead, macrobenthic community structure was influenced by other sediment factors (grain size, Eh, pH).

  7. Multiple Biomarker Responses in Corbicula fluminea Exposed to Copper in Laboratory Toxicity Tests.

    PubMed

    Bonnail, Estefanía; Buruaem, Lucas M; Araujo, Giuliana S; Abessa, Denis M S; DelValls, T Ángel

    2016-08-01

    This study evaluated the alteration of the enzymatic system of the freshwater Asian clam exposed to different copper concentrations. Individuals of Corbicula fluminea were exposed to different concentrations of dissolved Cu (0.5, 1, and 2 mg L(-1)) for 7 days, then, biomarkers of oxidative stress (GST, GPx, GR), exposure (MTs), effect (AChE), and damage (LPO, DNA strand breaks) were quantified. Results showed positive correlations between dissolved metal concentrations and GPx, MTs, and DNA damage, and negative correlation with GST and AChE. In contrast, no clear trend was found for GR and LPO. In general, the established mechanisms of protection might have a beneficial effect on the decreasing ROS attack on membrane and the activation of the metallothioneins. Integrated biomarker analysis revealed that the measured alterations are well correlated with the levels of increasing dissolved copper concentrations in water, demonstrating the effectiveness of this organism for biomonitoring approach purposes. PMID:27090524

  8. Comparative sensitivity of European native (Anodonta anatina) and exotic (Corbicula fluminea) bivalves to mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Patrícia; Lopes-Lima, Manuel; Machado, Jorge; Guilhermino, Lúcia

    2015-12-01

    Pollution is believed to be an important factor modulating the competition between exotic invasive bivalves and their native competitors. Thus, the objective of the present study was to compare the sensitivity of the European native Anodonta anatina and the exotic invasive species Corbicula fluminea to mercury, a ubiquitous environmental contaminant of high concern. In laboratory acute bioassays, adult organisms of both species were exposed independently to mercury for 96 h (31-500 μg/L). The criteria indicative of toxicity were mortality and biomarkers of oxidative stress and damage, neurotoxicity, and energy production changes. Mercury induced mortality in A. anatina (72 h-LC10 and 72 h-LC50 of 14.0 μg/L and 49.6 μg/L, respectively) but not in C. fluminea. The ability of C. fluminea to maintaining the shell closed for considerable periods of time when exposed to high concentrations of mercury and the effective activation (up to 63 μg/L) of mechanisms against the oxidative stress caused by mercury may have contributed to its relatively low sensitivity. In the range of concentrations tested, mercury had no significant effects on the other parameters analysed in C. fluminea. Overall, the findings of the present study, suggest that in real scenarios of competition between C. fluminea and A. anatina populations, the presence of mercury may modulate the process, acting in favour of the exotic species because it is less sensitive to this environmental contaminant than the native bivalve. The results of the present study highlight the need of further investigation on the effects of mercury on the competition between exotic invasive species and their native competitors, especially the effects potentially induced by long-term exposure to low concentrations of this metal, the mechanisms involved in the tolerance to mercury-induced stress, and the potential post-exposure recovery of both exotic invasive and native bivalves. This knowledge is most important for

  9. Proteomic changes in Corbicula fluminea exposed to wastewater from a psychiatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Bebianno, M J; Sroda, S; Gomes, T; Chan, P; Bonnafe, E; Budzinski, H; Geret, F

    2016-03-01

    The increase use of pharmaceutical compounds in veterinary practice and human population results in the ubiquitous presence of these compounds in aquatic ecosystems. Because pharmaceuticals are highly bioactive, there is concern about their toxicological effects in aquatic organisms. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the effects of an effluent from a psychiatric hospital (containing a complex mixture of 25 pharmaceutical compounds from eleven therapeutic classes) on the freshwater clam Corbicula fluminea using a proteomic approach. The exposure of C. fluminea to this complex effluent containing anxiolytics, analgesics, lipid regulators, beta blockers, antidepressants, antiepileptics, antihistamines, antihypertensives, antiplatelets and antiarrhythmics induced protein changes after 1 day of exposure in clam gills and digestive gland more evident in the digestive gland. These changes included increase in the abundance of proteins associated with structural (actin and tubulin), cellular functions (calreticulin, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), T complex protein 1 (TCP1)) and metabolism (aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), alcohol dehydrogenase, 6 phosphogluconate dehydrogenase). Results from this study indicate that calreticulin, PCNA, ALDH and alcohol dehydrogenase in the digestive gland and T complex protein 1 (TCP1)) and 6 phosphogluconate dehydrogenase in the gills represent useful biomarkers for the ecotoxicological characterization of psychiatric hospital effluents in this species. PMID:26423280

  10. A dynamic artificial clam (Corbicula fluminea) allows parsimony on-line measurement of waterborne metals.

    PubMed

    Jou, Li-John; Liao, Chung-Min

    2006-11-01

    We introduce a novel on-line biomonitoring system based on a valvometric conversion technique for clam Corbicula fluminea, allowing for rapid, continuous, and ecological relevant water quality control. Our model builds upon the basic principles of biological early warning system model in two ways. We first adopted a risk-based methodology to build a dynamic artificial clam for simulating how the bivalve closure rhythm in response to waterborne copper (Cu) and cadmium (Cd). Secondly, we integrated a probabilistic model associated with the time-varying dose-response relationships of valve closing behavior into the mechanisms of a dynamic artificial clam, allowing estimation of the time-varying waterborne Cu/Cd concentrations for on-line providing the outcomes of the toxicity detection technique. Measurements with Cu/Cd were performed and the calculated EC50 values were compared with published data for the valve movement test with C. fluminea. This proposed dynamic artificial clam provides a better quantitative understanding of on-line biomonitoring measurements of waterborne metals and may foster applications in clam farm management strategy and ecotoxicological risk assessment. PMID:16515830

  11. Sodium sulfate impacts feeding, specific dynamic action, and growth rate in the freshwater bivalve Corbicula fluminea.

    PubMed

    Soucek, David John

    2007-08-01

    Sodium sulfate is a ubiquitous salt that reaches toxic concentrations due to mining and other industrial activities, yet is currently unregulated at the Federal level in the United States. Previous studies have documented reduced growth of clams downstream of sulfate-dominated effluents, altered bioenergetics in filter-feeding invertebrates, and interactions between sulfate and other toxicants. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine if sodium sulfate affects the bioenergetics of the filter-feeding, freshwater bivalve, Corbicula fluminea, and the mechanism by which the effects are elicited. In addition to measuring effects on feeding, respiration and growth rates, I evaluated the relative sensitivity of a green algae consumed by clams to determine if top-down or bottom-up effects might be exhibited under field conditions. This study demonstrated that sodium sulfate had no effect on basal metabolic rates, but significantly reduced the feeding, post-feeding metabolic, and growth rates of C. fluminea. The proposed mechanism for these impacts is that filtering rates are reduced upon exposure, resulting in reduced food consumption and therefore, preventing increased metabolic rates normally associated with post-feeding specific dynamic action (SDA). In the field, these effects may cause changes in whole stream respiration rates and organic matter dynamics, as well as alter uptake rates of other food-associated contaminants like selenium, the toxicity of which is known to be antagonized by sulfate, in filter-feeding bivalves. PMID:17590452

  12. Abortive second meiosis detected in cytochalasin-treated eggs in androgenetic diploid Corbicula fluminea.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Ryo; Komaru, Akira

    2006-05-01

    The hermaphroditic diploid clam Corbicula fluminea reproduces by androgenesis. In the control (androgenetic development), all maternal chromosomes and maternal centrosomes at the meiotic poles were extruded as two first polar bodies and subsequently second meiosis did not occur. In eggs treated with cytochalasin D (CD) to inhibit the polar body extrusion, the second meiosis was abortive. After the first meiosis, two centrosomes at the spindle poles remained in the cytoplasm because of the effect of CD. The chromosomes divided into two groups at anaphase-I as observed in the control eggs. Two centrosomes divided into four just after the first meiosis but did not separate completely. The microtubules from the centrosomes were rather short. So at the second meiosis, two monoasters or tetrapolar spindles were formed. The fluorescence signal from microtubules of the monoaster or tetrapolar spindle was weak compared with the spindle at the first meiosis. The maternal chromosomes on the monoaster or tetrapolar spindle did not move, and became large female pronuclei. The pronuclei became the metaphase chromosomes on the spindle for the first cleavage. The present study suggests that second meiosis regulating factors may be abortive in androgenetic diploid C. fluminea. PMID:16681653

  13. Laboratory and field evaluation of a biological monitoring system using Corbicula fluminea and Mulinia lateralis

    SciTech Connect

    Waller, W.T.; Allen, H.J.; Schwalm, F.U.; Acevedo, M.F.; Ammann, L.P.; Dickson, K.L.; Kennedy, J.H.; Morgan, E.L.

    1995-12-31

    Laboratory and field experiments have been performed to evaluate a non-invasive biomonitoring system using the Asiatic clam Corbicula fluminea and Mulinia lateralis. C. fluminea was exposed to simulated episodic toxicity events in the laboratory using copper, diazinon, and regulated flow rates. Group behavior during these simulated events was compared to behavior during unstressed periods to develop a statistical model and an alarm criteria. Bayou Chico, Pensacola Bay, FL, was the site for field experiments in which M. lateralis was placed in situ to evaluate the performance of the biomonitoring system. The biomonitoring system consists of proximity sensors which detect an aluminum foil target attached to the valve of an organism. Valve movements of the clams are then digitally recorded using a personal computer. Data collected from remote sites are telemetered to the lab using short wave radio. In its final form, the authors envision an in situ biological monitoring system using bivalves deployed in aquatic systems in conjunction with automated monitoring systems like those found at USGS gauging stations. A tool such as this could be used as a warning system to increase the probability of detecting toxic events as they occur.

  14. Biomarkers in the freshwater bivalve Corbicula fluminea confined downstream a domestic landfill leachate discharge.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Luciana Fernandes; Santos, Caroline; Dos Reis Martinez, Claudia Bueno

    2016-07-01

    Landfills represent a severe environmental problem mainly due to the generation of leachates, and this study aimed to evaluate sublethal effects of a domestic landfill leachate in the freshwater bivalve Corbicula fluminea. Clams were submitted to in situ tests along a stream, at three sites, representing increasing distances from the leachate discharge (Pq1, Pq2, and Pq3), for 1, 5, and 15 days. The following biomarkers were analyzed in the gills and digestive glands: 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) activities, multixenobiotic resistance mechanism (MXR), total antioxidant capacity (TAC), reactive oxygen species (ROS), and lipid peroxidation (LPO). Metallothionein (MT) content was determined in the gills and DNA damage in hemocytes. The mortality rate of animals during in situ tests was reduced as the distance from the leachate discharge source increased. On the other hand, biomarker results showed sublethal effects on C. fluminea confined at all sites of PqS. GST, TAC, ROS, and DNA damage were the most significant biomarkers for this species and should be considered for future monitoring and assessment of freshwater environments located in landfill areas. PMID:27040540

  15. Modeling habitat suitability of the invasive clam Corbicula fluminea in a Neotropical shallow lagoon, southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Silveira, T C L; Gama, A M S; Alves, T P; Fontoura, N F

    2016-04-19

    This study aimed to model the habitat suitability for an invasive clam Corbicula fluminea in a coastal shallow lagoon in the southern Neotropical region (-30.22, -50.55). The lagoon (19km2, maximum deep 2.5m) was sampled with an Ekman dredge in an orthogonal matrix comprising 84 points. At each sampling point, were obtained environmental descriptors as depth, organic matter content (OMC), average granulometry (Avgran), and the percentage of sand (Pcsand). Prediction performance of Generalized Linear Models (GLM), Generalized Additive Models (GAM) and Boosted Regression Tree (BRT) were compared. Also, niche overlapping with other native clam species (Castalia martensi, Neocorbicula limosa and Anodontites trapesialis) was examined. A BRT model with 1400 trees was selected as the best model, with cross-validated correlation of 0.82. The relative contributions of predictors were Pcsand-42.6%, OMC-35.8%, Avgran-10.9% and Depth-10.8%. Were identified that C. fluminea occur mainly in sandy sediments with few organic matter, in shallow areas nor by the shore. The PCA showed a wide niche overlap with the native clam species C. martensi, N. limosa and A. trapesialis. PMID:27097092

  16. Accumulation and risk assessment of heavy metals in sediments and zoobenthos (Bellamya aeruginosa and Corbicula fluminea) from Lake Taihu.

    PubMed

    Kong, Ming; Hang, Xiaoshuai; Wang, Longmian; Yin, Hongbin; Zhang, Yimin

    2016-01-01

    Accumulation and risk assessment of metals in sediments and zoobenthos (Bellamya aeruginosa and Corbicula fluminea) from Lake Taihu were studied. Results showed that metal (Cr, Cd, Cu, Zn, Pb and Ni) concentrations in Lake Taihu varied greatly, and Cd in the Zhushan Bay showed higher bioavailability compared to the other metals studied. The spatial distribution of metals in B. aeruginosa and C. fluminea was similar to that in sediments. Zn and Cu exhibited the higher mean concentration in B. aeruginosa and C. fluminea, which was in good accordance with its higher content in surrounding sediment. Labile fractions (i.e., acid-soluble (F1), reducible (F2) and F1+F2) of Cu and Zn in sediments showed a significant positive correlation with them in B. aeruginosa (P<0.01); no correlation relationship was found for metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Zn, Pb and Ni) between in the tissue of C. fluminea and in sediments. The results of ecological risk assessment showed that Zhushan Bay was seriously contaminated by metal Cd, as it made the main contribution of all the metals. Total target hazard quotients indicated that adults and children both had potential health risk through consuming C. fluminea. Hazard index values suggested that adults and children might experience adverse health effects through consuming B. aeruginosa and C. fluminea. PMID:26744952

  17. The control of an invasive bivalve, Corbicula fluminea, using gas impermeable benthic barriers in a large natural lake.

    PubMed

    Wittmann, Marion E; Chandra, Sudeep; Reuter, John E; Schladow, S Geoffrey; Allen, Brant C; Webb, Katie J

    2012-06-01

    Anoxia can restrict species establishment in aquatic systems and the artificial promotion of these conditions can provide an effective control strategy for invasive molluscs. Low abundances (2-20 m(-2)) of the nonnative bivalve, Asian clam (Corbicula fluminea), were first recorded in Lake Tahoe, CA-NV in 2002 and by 2010 nuisance-level population densities (>10,000 m(-2)) were observed. A non-chemical control method using gas impermeable benthic barriers to reduce dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations available to C. fluminea was tested in this ultra-oligotrophic natural lake. In 2009, the impact of ethylene propylene diene monomer (EPDM) sheets (9 m(2), n = 6) on C. fluminea beds was tested on 1-7 day intervals over a 56 day period (August-September). At an average water temperature of 18 °C, DO concentrations under these small barriers were reduced to zero after 72 h resulting in 100 % C. fluminea mortality after 28 days. In 2010, a large EPDM barrier (1,950 m(2)) was applied to C. fluminea populations for 120 days (July-November). C. fluminea abundances were reduced over 98 % after barrier removal, and remained significantly reduced (>90 %) 1 year later. Non-target benthic macroinvertebrate abundances were also reduced, with variable taxon-specific recolonization rates. High C. fluminea abundance under anoxic conditions increased the release of ammonium and soluble reactive phosphorus from the sediment substrate; but levels of unionized ammonia were low at 0.004-0.005 mg L(-1). Prolonged exposure to anoxia using benthic barriers can provide an effective short term control strategy for C. fluminea. PMID:22476670

  18. The Control of an Invasive Bivalve, Corbicula fluminea, Using Gas Impermeable Benthic Barriers in a Large Natural Lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmann, Marion E.; Chandra, Sudeep; Reuter, John E.; Schladow, S. Geoffrey; Allen, Brant C.; Webb, Katie J.

    2012-06-01

    Anoxia can restrict species establishment in aquatic systems and the artificial promotion of these conditions can provide an effective control strategy for invasive molluscs. Low abundances (2-20 m-2) of the nonnative bivalve, Asian clam ( Corbicula fluminea), were first recorded in Lake Tahoe, CA-NV in 2002 and by 2010 nuisance-level population densities (>10,000 m-2) were observed. A non-chemical control method using gas impermeable benthic barriers to reduce dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations available to C. fluminea was tested in this ultra-oligotrophic natural lake. In 2009, the impact of ethylene propylene diene monomer (EPDM) sheets (9 m2, n = 6) on C. fluminea beds was tested on 1-7 day intervals over a 56 day period (August-September). At an average water temperature of 18 °C, DO concentrations under these small barriers were reduced to zero after 72 h resulting in 100 % C. fluminea mortality after 28 days. In 2010, a large EPDM barrier (1,950 m2) was applied to C. fluminea populations for 120 days (July-November). C. fluminea abundances were reduced over 98 % after barrier removal, and remained significantly reduced (>90 %) 1 year later. Non-target benthic macroinvertebrate abundances were also reduced, with variable taxon-specific recolonization rates. High C. fluminea abundance under anoxic conditions increased the release of ammonium and soluble reactive phosphorus from the sediment substrate; but levels of unionized ammonia were low at 0.004-0.005 mg L-1. Prolonged exposure to anoxia using benthic barriers can provide an effective short term control strategy for C. fluminea.

  19. Genetic damage in the bivalve mollusk Corbicula fluminea induced by the water-soluble fraction of gasoline.

    PubMed

    Fedato, R P; Simonato, J D; Martinez, C B R; Sofia, S H

    2010-07-19

    Although gasoline is an important contaminant of aquatic ecosystems, information concerning the potential effects of this petroleum derivative on the DNA of aquatic biota is lacking. The present study aimed to evaluate the genotoxic and mutagenic effects of acute exposures (6, 24, and 96h) to gasoline water-soluble fraction (GWSF), diluted to 5%, on the Asian clam Corbicula fluminea. The comet assay and the micronucleus (MN) test were performed on hemocytes and gill cells of C. fluminea. For the three different times tested, the comet assay indicated DNA damage in hemocytes and gill cells of C. fluminea exposed to GWSF. The MN test detected significant damage in the genetic material of the hemocytes only after 96h of exposure to GWSF. The recovery capacity of organisms previously exposed for 6h to GWSF was also evaluated with the comet assay. The results revealed a great capacity of this species to repair DNA damage; following 6h of recovery, the comet score returned to that of the control groups. Overall, our findings indicate that GWSF has genotoxic and mutagenic effects on C. fluminea. In addition, the present results confirm the sensitivity of C. fluminea to damage caused by exposure to environmental contaminants, and, therefore, its suitability for use in environmental monitoring studies. PMID:20510386

  20. Experimental research on the impact of Corbicula fluminea on DIN exchange at a tidal flat sediment-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jie; Chen, Zhenlou; Xu, Shiyuan; Zheng, Xiangmin

    2007-10-01

    Based on a simulative experiment and a comparison analysis, the effect of bivalve Corbicula fluminea activity on sediment-water exchange of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) is studied. The areas included three intertidal flat sites of the Changjiang (Yangtze) River estuary in China. The interface exchange flux of ammonium, nitrate and nitrite in the short experiment (6 h) was -46.4-40, -74.8-929.1 and 2.5-14.6 µmol/(m2·h), respectively. It was found that the burrowing activities of C. fluminea increased NH{4/+} and NO{3/-} release from sediments to overlying water in the short-term experiment. During long-term incubation, NH{4/+} and NO{3/-} released in turn from the sediments. At the beginning of incubation, bioturbation by C. fluminea could accelerate NH{4/+} release from sediments 2-17 times in different sites, resulting in stronger nitrification and increased NO{3/-} concentrations in the overlying water. Sediment profile analysis post-incubation shows that organic matter mineralization and sediment-water NH{4/+} exchange had been stimulated by C. fluminea bioturbation and bioirrigation during the experiment. Therefore, C. fluminea activities such as excretion, burrowing, irrigation and turbation can effectively alter nitrogen dynamics and accelerate and stimulate nitrogen exchange and cycling at the sediment-water interface.

  1. Recovery of Waterborne Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts by Freshwater Benthic Clams (Corbicula fluminea)

    PubMed Central

    Graczyk, Thaddeus K.; Fayer, Ronald; Cranfield, Michael R.; Conn, David Bruce

    1998-01-01

    Asian freshwater clams, Corbicula fluminea, exposed for 24 h to 38 liters of water contaminated with infectious Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts (1.00 × 106 oocysts/liter; approximately 1.9 × 105 oocysts/clam) were examined (hemolymph, gills, gastrointestinal [GI] tract, and feces) on days 1, 2, 3, 7, and 14 postexposure (PE). No oocysts were detected in the water 24 h after the contamination event. The percentage of oocyst-containing clams varied from 20 to 100%, depending on the type of tissue examined and the technique used—acid-fast stain (AFS) or immunofluorescent antibody (IFA). The oocysts were found in clam tissues and feces on days 1 through 14 PE; the oocysts extracted from the tissues on day 7 PE were infectious for neonatal BALB/c mice. Overall, the highest number of positive samples was obtained when gills and GI tracts were processed with IFA (prevalence, 97.5%). A comparison of the relative oocyst numbers indicated that overall, 58.3% of the oocysts were found in clam tissues and 41.7% were found in feces when IFA was used; when AFS was used, the values were 51.9 and 48.1%, respectively. Clam-released oocysts were always surrounded by feces; no free oocysts or oocysts disassociated from fecal matter were observed. The results indicate that these benthic freshwater clams are capable of recovery and sedimentation of waterborne C. parvum oocysts. To optimize the detection of C. parvum oocysts in C. fluminea tissue, it is recommended that gill and GI tract samples be screened with IFA (such as that in the commercially available MERIFLUOR test kit). PMID:9464376

  2. Biomonitoring of tin and arsenic in different compartments of a limnic ecosystem with emphasis on Corbicula fluminea and Dikerogammarus villosus.

    PubMed

    Sebesvari, Zita; Ettwig, Katharina Friederike; Emons, Hendrik

    2005-03-01

    Asian clam Corbicula fluminea, the amphipod Dikerogammarus villosus and the macrophyte Nuphar lutea were tested for investigating spatial and temporal variability in the bioavailability of tin and arsenic in the River Lippe, Germany. Samples were collected from September 2002 to May 2003 at a tin polluted site (source pollution) and a reference site. Additional screening sampling was carried out twice in April 2003 to test the extent of As and Sn concentration in periphyton (aufwuchs) samples. Accumulated Sn and As concentrations were measured with ICP-MS after sample processing (dissection, cryo-milling) and digestion. Quality control was performed by parallel analysis of three certified reference materials. Measurable As and Sn contents in plant tissues were only detectable in roots (below 30 microg kg(-1) and 20 microg kg(-1) for As and Sn, respectively). Homogenates from C. fluminea and D. villosus tissues showed site-dependent trace metal contents. Elevated bioavailability of Sn is present downstream of the sewage discharge of the world's biggest producer of tributyltin (TBT) at Luenen (northern Ruhr region). In comparison to C. fluminea, D. villosus shows higher concentrations of tin in samples from both sites. Arsenic concentrations in C. fluminea remain constant with increasing shell size, whereas tin shows a size-dependent accumulation. The results indicate that Corbicula fluminea and Dikerogammarus villosus are suitable passive biomonitoring organisms for Sn, but As levels might be actively regulated. The concentration of tin in the periphyton (aufwuchs) samples was found to be much higher in samples from a contaminated site (428 +/- 63 vs. 1949 +/- 226 microg kg(-1)). PMID:15735779

  3. Filter-feeding, food utilization, and nutrient remineralization by Corbicula fluminea (bivalvia) and its contribution to nutrient cycling in a North Carolina River

    SciTech Connect

    Lauritsen, D.D.

    1985-01-01

    The introduced Asiatic clam Corbicula fluminea is quite prolific, and since it is a filter-feeder, it can be expected to influence the cycling of nutrients within its habitat as a result of its feeding and excretory activities. Factors affecting filtration rates, food utilization, and excretion of metabolic wastes (ammonia and phosphate) were determined by laboratory experiments, and these physiological processes were then extrapolated to field estimates of Corbicula found in the upper Chowan River, N.C., to obtain an estimate of the potential impact the clams can have on nutrient cycling in the river. Clam filtration rates of four different /sup 14/C-labeled algae species (two greens, a blue-green, and a diatom) were similar, although partitioning of the ingested isotope showed significant differences between the algal foods. The diatom species was the most efficiently utilized by the clams, with more than 80% of the isotope ingested recovered in clam tissues. Corbicula freshly collected from the Chowan River excreted substantially more ammonia than phosphate, and rates of excretion of both nutrients were highest in summer. Clam excretion rates were much higher than sediment fluxes, and as a source of recycled nutrients, these clams could provide about one third of the nitrogen and phosphate requirements of the phytoplankton in the upper Chowan.

  4. Evaluating sublethal indicators of stress in Asiatic clams (Corbicula fluminea) caged in an urban stream

    SciTech Connect

    Black, M.C.; Belin, J.I.

    1998-12-31

    Freshwater bivalves have been used extensively to monitor chemical accumulation in field exposures, although little information is available on the use of biomarker measurements in field exposures with bivalves. DNA strand breakage, growth rate, condition index and percentage tissue water were measured in freshwater Asiatic clams (Corbicula fluminea) exposed in-situ in a stream that receives urban and industrial stormwater runoff and in a non-impacted reference stream. After 4 weeks exposure, DNA strand lengths in foot tissue from Trail Creek-exposed clams were significantly shorter than DNA from reference clams. These results suggest a reduction in DNA integrity in Trail Creek-exposed clams, possibly indicating exposure to genotoxic chemicals. No significant differences were observed in the growth rates of clams. However, a significant inverse relationship was detected between condition index and % tissue water for all clams. Furthermore, site-specific differences in percentage tissue water and condition indices were observed after 2 and 10 weeks exposure. For this study DNA strand breakage, condition indices, and tissue hydration appear to be more sensitive indicators of sublethal toxicity than growth.

  5. Uptake of contaminants of emerging concern by the bivalves Anodonta californiensis and Corbicula fluminea.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Niveen S; Müller, Claudia E; Morgan, Rachel R; Luthy, Richard G

    2014-08-19

    Uptake of seven contaminants regularly detected in surface waters and spanning a range of hydrophobicities (log D(ow) -1 to 5) was studied for two species of freshwater bivalves, the native mussel Anodonta californiensis and the invasive clam Corbicula fluminea. Batch systems were utilized to determine compound partitioning, and flow-through systems, comparable to environmental conditions in effluent dominated surface waters, were used to determine uptake and depuration kinetics. Uptake of compounds was independent of bivalve type. Log bioconcentration factor (BCF) values were correlated with log D(ow) for nonionized compounds with the highest BCF value obtained for triclocarban (TCC). TCC concentrations were reduced in the water column due to bivalve activity. Anionic compounds with low D(ow) values, i.e., clofibric acid and ibuprofen, were not removed from water, while the organic cation propranolol showed biouptake similar to that of TCC. Batch experiments supported compound uptake patterns observed in flow-through experiments. Contaminant removal from water was observed through accumulation in tissue or settling as excreted pseudofeces or feces. The outcomes of this study indicate the potential utility of bivalve augmentation to improve water quality by removing hydrophobic trace organic compounds found in natural systems. PMID:25017714

  6. Population density, biomass, and age-class structure of the invasive clam Corbicula fluminea in rivers of the lower San Joaquin River watershed, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, L.R.; Thompson, J.K.; Higgins, K.; Lucas, L.V.

    2007-01-01

    Corbicula fluminea is well known as an invasive filter-feeding freshwater bivalve with a variety of effects on ecosystem processes. However. C. fluminea has been relatively unstudied in the rivers of the western United States. In June 2003, we sampled C. fluminea at 16 sites in the San Joaquin River watershed of California, which was invaded by C. fluminea in the 1940s. Corbicula fluminea was common in 2 tributaries to the San Joaquin River, reaching densities of 200 clams??m-2, but was rare in the San Joaquin River. Biomass followed a similar pattern. Clams of the same age were shorter in the San Joaquin River than in the tributaries. Distribution of clams was different in the 2 tributaries, but the causes of the difference are unknown. The low density and biomass of clams in the San Joaquin River was likely due to stressful habitat or to water quality, because food was abundant. The success of C. fluminea invasions and subsequent effects on trophic processes likely depends on multiple factors. As C. fluminea continues to expand its range around the world, questions regarding invasion success and effects on ecosystems will become important in a wide array of environmental settings.

  7. Sequencing and De Novo Assembly of the Asian Clam (Corbicula fluminea) Transcriptome Using the Illumina GAIIx Method

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huihui; Zha, Jinmiao; Liang, Xuefang; Bu, Jihong; Wang, Miao; Wang, Zijian

    2013-01-01

    Background The Asian clam (Corbicula fluminea) is currently one of the most economically important aquatic species in China and has been used as a test organism in many environmental studies. However, the lack of genomic resources, such as sequenced genome, expressed sequence tags (ESTs) and transcriptome sequences has hindered the research on C. fluminea. Recent advances in large-scale RNA-Seq enable generation of genomic resources in a short time, and provide large expression datasets for functional genomic analysis. Methodology/Principal Findings We used a next-generation high-throughput DNA sequencing technique with an Illumina GAIIx method to analyze the transcriptome from the whole bodies of C. fluminea. More than 62,250,336 high-quality reads were generated based on the raw data, and 134,684 unigenes with a mean length of 791 bp were assembled using the Velvet and Oases software. All of the assembly unigenes were annotated by running BLASTx and BLASTn similarity searches on the Nt, Nr, Swiss-Prot, COG and KEGG databases. In addition, the Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COGs), Gene Ontology (GO) terms and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Gene and Genome (KEGG) annotations were also assigned to each unigene transcript. To provide a preliminary verification of the assembly and annotation results, and search for potential environmental pollution biomarkers, 15 functional genes (five antioxidase genes, two cytochrome P450 genes, three GABA receptor-related genes and five heat shock protein genes) were cloned and identified. Expressions of the 15 selected genes following fluoxetine exposure confirmed that the genes are indeed linked to environmental stress. Conclusions/Significance The C. fluminea transcriptome advances the underlying molecular understanding of this freshwater clam, provides a basis for further exploration of C. fluminea as an environmental test organism and promotes further studies on other bivalve organisms. PMID:24244519

  8. Biodynamic modeling of PCB uptake by Macoma balthica and Corbicula fluminea from sediment amended with activated carbon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLeod, Pamela B.; Luoma, S.N.; Luthy, R.G.

    2008-01-01

    Activated carbon amendment was assessed in the laboratory as a remediation strategy for freshwater sediment contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from the Grasse River (near Massena, NY). Three end points were evaluated: aqueous equilibrium PCB concentration, uptake into semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs), and 28-day bioaccumulation in the clam Corbicula fluminea. PCB uptake by water, SPMDs, and clams followed similar trends, with reductions increasing as a function of carbon dose. Average percent reductions in clam tissue PCBs were 67, 86, and 95% for activated carbon doses of 0.7, 1.3, and 2.5% dry wt, respectively. A biodynamic model that incorporates sediment geochemistry and dietary and aqueous uptake routes was found to agree well with observed uptake by C. fluminea in our laboratory test systems. Results from this study were compared to 28-day bioaccumulation experiments involving PCB-contaminated sediment from Hunters Point Naval Shipyard (San Francisco Bay, CA) and the clam Macoma balthica. Due to differences in feeding strategy, M. balthica deposit-feeds whereas C. fluminea filter-feeds, the relative importance of the aqueous uptake route is predicted to be much higher for C. fluminea than for M. balthica. Whereas M. balthica takes up approximately 90% of its body burden through sediment ingestion, C. fluminea only accumulates approximately 45% via this route. In both cases, results strongly suggest that it is the mass transfer of PCBs from native sediment to added carbon particles, not merely reductions in aqueous PCB concentrations, that effectively reduces PCB bioavailability and uptake by sediment-dwelling organisms. ?? 2008 American Chemical Society.

  9. Biodynamic modeling of PCB uptake by Macoma balthica and Corbicula fluminea from sediment amended with activated carbon.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Pamela B; Luoma, Samuel N; Luthy, Richard G

    2008-01-15

    Activated carbon amendment was assessed in the laboratory as a remediation strategy for freshwater sediment contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from the Grasse River (near Massena, NY). Three end points were evaluated: aqueous equilibrium PCB concentration, uptake into semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs), and 28-day bioaccumulation in the clam Corbicula fluminea. PCB uptake by water, SPMDs, and clams followed similar trends, with reductions increasing as a function of carbon dose. Average percent reductions in clam tissue PCBs were 67, 86, and 95% for activated carbon doses of 0.7, 1.3, and 2.5% dry wt, respectively. A biodynamic model that incorporates sediment geochemistry and dietary and aqueous uptake routes was found to agree well with observed uptake by C. fluminea in our laboratory test systems. Results from this study were compared to 28-day bioaccumulation experiments involving PCB-contaminated sediment from Hunters Point Naval Shipyard (San Francisco Bay, CA) and the clam Macoma balthica. Due to differences in feeding strategy, M. balthica deposit-feeds whereas C. fluminea filter-feeds, the relative importance of the aqueous uptake route is predicted to be much higher for C. fluminea than for M. balthica. Whereas M. balthica takes up approximately 90% of its body burden through sediment ingestion, C. fluminea only accumulates approximately 45% via this route. In both cases, results strongly suggest that it is the mass transfer of PCBs from native sediment to added carbon particles, not merely reductions in aqueous PCB concentrations, that effectively reduces PCB bioavailability and uptake by sediment-dwelling organisms. PMID:18284151

  10. Corbicula fluminea (Bivalvia: Corbiculidae): a possible second molluscan intermediate host of Echinostoma cinetorchis (Trematoda: Echinostomatidae) in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Younghun; Park, Yun-Kyu; Hwang, Myung-Gi; Soh, Chin-Thack

    2001-01-01

    More than 1,500 clams of Corbicula fluminea, the most favorable food source of freshwater bivalves in Korea, were collected from 5 localities to examine cercarial and metacercarial infection with Echinostoma cinetorchis. Although 3 clams infected with suspicious E. cinetorchis metacercariae out of 200 specimens collected at Kangjin, Chollanam-do were detected, no cercarial and metacercarial infections with E. cinetorchis were observed in field-collected Corbicula specimens. In the susceptibility experiments with laboratory-reared clams, those infected with miracidia of E. cinetorchis did not release their cercariae up to 60 days after infection. To confirm the identity of second intermediate host of E. cinetorchis experimentally, a total of 30 clams were exposed to the cercariae from Segmentina hemisphaerula that had been infected with miracidia of E. cinetorchis. The clams were susceptible to cercariae of E. cinetorchis with an infection rate of 93.3%. Metacercariae from clams taken more than 7 days after cercarial exposure were fed to rats (S/D strain), and adult worms of E. cinetorchis, characterized by 37-38 collar spines on the head crown, were recovered from the ileocecal regions. This is the first report of C. fluminea as a possible second intermediate host of E. cinetorchis. PMID:11775336

  11. Size-dependent effects of low level cadmium and zinc exposure on the metabolome of the Asian clam, Corbicula fluminea.

    PubMed

    Spann, Nicole; Aldridge, David C; Griffin, Julian L; Jones, Oliver A H

    2011-10-01

    The toxic effects of low level metal contamination in sediments are currently poorly understood. We exposed different sized Asian clams, Corbicula fluminea, to sediment spiked with environmentally relevant concentrations of either zinc, cadmium or a zinc-cadmium mixture for one week. This freshwater bivalve is well suited for sediment toxicity tests as it lives partly buried in the sediment and utilises sediment particles as a food resource. After one week, the whole tissue composition of low molecular weight metabolites was analysed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The condition index (ratio of tissue dry weight to volume inside the shell valves) was also measured. Small and large clams were clearly differentiated by their metabolic composition and the two size classes showed opposite responses to the mixture spiked sediment. No effects of zinc alone on the metabolome were found and cadmium only influenced the smaller size class. The main perturbations were seen in amino acid and energy metabolism, with small clams using amino acids as an energy resource and larger clams primarily drawing on their larger storage reserves of carbohydrates. Our study demonstrates that metabolomics is a useful technique to test for low level toxicity which does not manifest in mortality or condition index changes. The differing effects between the two size classes stress that it is important to consider age/size when conducting metabolomic and ecotoxicology assessments, since testing for the effects on only one size class makes it more difficult to extrapolate laboratory results to the natural environment. PMID:21946168

  12. An experimental approach to assess Corbicula fluminea (Müller, 1774) resistance to osmotic stress in estuarine habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira-Rodríguez, Noé; Pardo, Isabel

    2016-07-01

    Corbicula fluminea arrived in the Miño Estuary in 1989 and, from there, colonized more than 150 km upstream. Our aim was to test the capacity of C. fluminea to cope with osmotic stress conditions previously to invade new freshwater habitats through estuaries. Based on previously collected information, the experiment aims to study the response of the species to marine osmotic stress, evaluated by survival and behaviour. Experiments determined the resistance by the species to various levels of osmotic stress, and recovery time after exposure to high salinity levels, representative of the temporal and spatial salinity variation existing in the estuary. Under osmotic stress the semi-maximum response was reached after 19 days exposure. The species tolerance range, measured by individual maintained activity, was at salinity ∼20 when exposed to winter temperatures, while when animals were exposed to summer ones its tolerance was reduced to salinity lower than 15. C. fluminea show a large physiological flexibility to cope with salinity variations in estuaries. In summer, the temperature increases the metabolic rate thus making the species more vulnerable to osmotic stress exposure. These findings are relevant to preventing new invasions through ship ballast waters ensuring complete mortality if individuals are retained for >26 days.

  13. Effects of salinity, temperature and food type on the uptake and elimination rates of cd, cr, and zn in the asiatic clam corbicula fluminea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jung-Suk; Lee, Byeong-Gweon

    2005-06-01

    Laboratory radiotracer experiments were conducted to determine assimilation efficiencies (AE) from ingested algal food and oxic sediment particles, uptake rates from the dissolved phase, and the efflux rates of Cd, Cr and Zn in the Asiatic clam Corbicula fluminea. Among three elements, AE from both algal and sediment food was greatest for Cd, followed by Zn and Cr. The AEs of tested elements from algal food (Phaeodactylum tricornutum) were consistently higher than those from sediments at a given salinity and temperature. The influence of salinity (0, 4 and 8 psu) and temperature (5, 13 and 21¼) on the metal AEs was not evident for most tested elements, except Cd AEs from sediment. The rate constant of metal uptake from the dissolved phase ( k u was greatest for Cd, followed by Zn and Cr in freshwater media. However, in saline water, the k u of Zn were greater than those of Cd. The influx rate of all tested metals increased with temperature. The efflux rate constant was greatest for Cr (0.02 d-1), followed by Zn (0.010~0.017 d-1) and Cd (0.006 d-1). The efflux rate constant for Zn in clam tissues depurated in 0 psu (0.017 d-1) was faster than that in 8 psu (0.010 d-1). Overall results showed that the variation of salinity and temperature in estuarine systems can considerably influence the metal bioaccumulation potential in the estuarine clam C. fluminea. The relatively high Cd accumulation capacity of C. fluminea characterized by the high AE, high dissolved influx rate and low efflux rate, suggested that this clam species can be used as an efficient biomonitor for the Cd contamination in freshwater and estuarine environments.

  14. Proteomic Profiling of Cytosolic Glutathione Transferases from Three Bivalve Species: Corbicula fluminea, Mytilus galloprovincialis and Anodonta cygnea

    PubMed Central

    Martins, José Carlos; Campos, Alexandre; Osório, Hugo; da Fonseca, Rute; Vasconcelos, Vítor

    2014-01-01

    Suspension-feeding bivalves are considered efficient toxin vectors with a relative insensitivity to toxicants compared to other aquatic organisms. This fact highlights the potential role of detoxification enzymes, such as glutathione transferases (GSTs), in this bivalve resistance. Nevertheless, the GST system has not been extensively described in these organisms. In the present study, cytosolic GSTs isoforms (cGST) were surveyed in three bivalves with different habitats and life strategies: Corbicula fluminea, Anodonta cygnea and Mytilus galloprovincialis. GSTs were purified by glutathione-agarose affinity chromatography, and the collection of expressed cGST classes of each bivalve were identified using a proteomic approach. All the purified extracts were also characterized kinetically. Results reveal variations in cGST subunits collection (diversity and properties) between the three tested bivalves. Using proteomics, four pi-class and two sigma-class GST subunits were identified in M. galloprovincialis. C. fluminea also yielded four pi-class and one sigma-class GST subunits. For A. cygnea, two mu-class and one pi-class GST subunits were identified, these being the first record of GSTs from these freshwater mussels. The affinity purified extracts also show differences regarding enzymatic behavior among species. The variations found in cGST collection and kinetics might justify diverse selective advantages for each bivalve organism. PMID:24473139

  15. Assessment of metal contamination, bioavailability, toxicity and bioaccumulation in extreme metallic environments (Iberian Pyrite Belt) using Corbicula fluminea.

    PubMed

    Bonnail, E; Sarmiento, A M; DelValls, T A; Nieto, J M; Riba, I

    2016-02-15

    The Iberian Pyrite Belt (SW Iberian Peninsula) has intense mining activity. Currently, its fluvial networks receive extremely acid lixiviate residue discharges that are rich in sulphates and metals in solution (acid mine drainage, AMD) from abandoned mines. In the current study, the sediment and water quality were analysed in three different areas of the Odiel River to assess the risk associated with the metal content and its speciation and bioavailability. Furthermore, sediment contact bioassays were performed using the freshwater clam Corbicula fluminea to determine its adequacy as a biomonitoring tool in relation to theoretical risk indexes and regulatory thresholds. Reburial activity and mortality were used as the toxic responses of clams when exposed to contaminated sediment. The results showed coherence between the water and sediment chemical contamination for most of the metals. The reburial activity was correlated with the metal toxicity, but no clam mortality was registered. The bioaccumulation of the studied metals in the clam did not have a significant correlation with the bioavailable fraction of the metal content in the environment, which could be related to a potential different speciation in this singular environment. The bioaccumulation responses were negative for As, Cd and Zn in highly contaminated environments and were characterized as severe, considerable and low potential environmental risks, respectively. The results show that C. fluminea is a good biomonitor of Cu and Pb. PMID:26774961

  16. Proteomic profiling of cytosolic glutathione transferases from three bivalve species: Corbicula fluminea, Mytilus galloprovincialis and Anodonta cygnea.

    PubMed

    Martins, José Carlos; Campos, Alexandre; Osório, Hugo; da Fonseca, Rute; Vasconcelos, Vítor

    2014-01-01

    Suspension-feeding bivalves are considered efficient toxin vectors with a relative insensitivity to toxicants compared to other aquatic organisms. This fact highlights the potential role of detoxification enzymes, such as glutathione transferases (GSTs), in this bivalve resistance. Nevertheless, the GST system has not been extensively described in these organisms. In the present study, cytosolic GSTs isoforms (cGST) were surveyed in three bivalves with different habitats and life strategies: Corbicula fluminea, Anodonta cygnea and Mytilus galloprovincialis. GSTs were purified by glutathione-agarose affinity chromatography, and the collection of expressed cGST classes of each bivalve were identified using a proteomic approach. All the purified extracts were also characterized kinetically. Results reveal variations in cGST subunits collection (diversity and properties) between the three tested bivalves. Using proteomics, four pi-class and two sigma-class GST subunits were identified in M. galloprovincialis. C. fluminea also yielded four pi-class and one sigma-class GST subunits. For A. cygnea, two mu-class and one pi-class GST subunits were identified, these being the first record of GSTs from these freshwater mussels. The affinity purified extracts also show differences regarding enzymatic behavior among species. The variations found in cGST collection and kinetics might justify diverse selective advantages for each bivalve organism. PMID:24473139

  17. Metallothionein response to cadmium and zinc exposures compared in two freshwater bivalves, Dreissena polymorpha and Corbicula fluminea.

    PubMed

    Marie, Véronique; Gonzalez, Patrice; Baudrimont, Magalie; Bourdineaud, Jean-Paul; Boudou, Alain

    2006-08-01

    Metallothionein (MT) response to cadmium (Cd) and zinc (Zn) bioaccumulation after single or combined direct exposure was compared in two freshwater bivalves, Dreissena polymorpha (zebra mussel) and Corbicula fluminea (Asiatic clam). Bivalves were exposed to 0.133 microM Cd and/or 15.3 microM Zn, with metal and MT concentrations analysed in the whole soft body after 1, 3, 10 and 24 days of exposure and compared with controls. Results showed significant increase in MT concentrations in both species exposed to Cd and Cd+Zn with a higher accumulation of the protein compared to the control in D. polymorpha for nevertheless similar Cd levels accumulated with time. Exposure to Zn alone led to a significant increase in MT concentrations only in C. fluminea, whereas there was a lack of MT gene induction in the zebra mussels which was confirmed by MT mRNA quantification in gills (RT-PCR). Mussel mortality after 10 days of exposure to Zn and Cd + Zn is discussed with regard to detoxification mechanisms, which include metallothioneins. PMID:16841249

  18. A real-time biomonitoring system to detect arsenic toxicity by valve movement in freshwater clam Corbicula fluminea.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Yu; Jou, Li-John; Chen, Suz-Hsin; Liao, Chung-Min

    2012-05-01

    Arsenic (As) is the element of greatest ecotoxicological concern in aquatic environments. Effective monitoring and diagnosis of As pollution via a biological early warning system is a great challenge for As-affected regions. The purpose of this study was to synthesize water chemistry-based bioavailability and valve daily rhythm in Corbicula fluminea to design a biomonitoring system for detecting waterborne As. We integrated valve daily rhythm dynamic patterns and water chemistry-based Hill dose-response model to build into a programmatic mechanism of inductance-based valvometry technique for providing a rapid and cost-effective dynamic detection system. A LabVIEW graphic control program in a personal computer was employed to demonstrate completely the functional presentation of the present dynamic system. We verified the simulated dissolved As concentrations based on the valve daily rhythm behavior with published experimental data. Generally, the performance of this proposed biomonitoring system demonstrates fairly good applicability to detect waterborne As concentrations when the field As concentrations are less than 1 mg L(-1). We also revealed that the detection times were dependent on As exposure concentrations. This biomonitoring system could particularly provide real-time transmitted information on the waterborne As activity under various aquatic environments. This parsimonious C. fluminea valve rhythm behavior-based real-time biomonitoring system presents a valuable effort to promote the automated biomonitoring and offers early warnings on potential ecotoxicological risks in regions with elevated As exposure concentrations. PMID:22359017

  19. Evaluation of short-term exposure to heated water and chlorine for control of the Asiatic clam (Corbicula fluminea)

    SciTech Connect

    Mattice, J.S.; McLean, R.B.; Burch, M.B.

    1982-01-01

    Based on the need for development of efficient procedures for prevention or control of fouling by the Asiatic clam, Corbicula fluminea, the response of these clams to chlorine in combination with rapid increases in water temperature was examined. Small clams were acclimated to 10 and 25/sup 0/C, and large clams were acclimated to 25/sup 0/C. Experiments with each of these acclimation groups consisted of variables of total residual chlorine concentration (0, 5, 7.5, and 10 mg/L) and test temperature (ambient and 3 test temperatures ranging from 35 to 46/sup 0/C). The periods of exposure to increased temperature and chlorine were 40 and 30 min respectively. Clam mortalities were related to water temperature but not to chlorine exposure. At high temperatures at least 50% of the clams remained open through the entire chlorine exposure period. At higher temperatures all of the clams remained open. Even when clams remained open for the entire 30-min chlorine exposure period, all clams were not killed. However, virtually all clams exposed to 41 to 43/sup 0/C water temperatures were killed whether open or closed during the exposure period. Death due to temperature shock is the logical conclusion from these data. Combined application of heated water and chlorine at the concentrations used is not more effective in killing Corbicula than is heated water alone. Current regulations on the concentration of chlorine in power plant effluents indicate that further studies of control of Corbicula using chlorine offer little likelihood for success. (ERB)

  20. Sources and accumulation of trace metals in sediments and the asiatic clam, corbicula fluminea in two South Carolina watersheds. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Pickett, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    A survey of trace element concentrations in the benthic bivalve, Corbicula fluminea, was conducted on the Santee-Cooper River Basin, S.C. from 1989-1991 as part of a nonpoint source water quality assessment. Trace metal concentrations in clam tissues were examined in relation to temporal and spatial variations in river water and sediment. It was found that C. fluminea was a suitable bio-indicator for monitoring trace metal inputs within the basin. Solute concentrations of Cd, Cu and Zn underwent appreciable accumulation as demonstrated by strong solute vs. tissue correlations and high bioconcentration factors. Conversely, the bioavailability of trace elements to C. fluminea was not necessarily related to sediment concentrations, as correlations were not observed between trace elements in sediment and clam tissue. The differences in the bioavailability of metals observed between the watersheds was likely a function of physicochemical factors affecting the partitioning of metals between the water and sediment compartments.

  1. How the fluctuations of water levels affect populations of invasive bivalve Corbicula fluminea (Müller, 1774) in a Neotropical reservoir?

    PubMed

    Paschoal, L R P; Andrade, D P; Darrigran, G

    2015-01-01

    Corbicula fluminea is an invasive bivalve responsible for several environmental and financial problems around the globe. Despite the invasive potential of this species, it suffers certain restrictions in lentic environments due to natural phenomena that significantly affect its population structure (e.g. water column fluctuation and sunlight exposure). The present study addresses how temporal decline of the water level in a Neotropical reservoir and exposure to sunlight affect the population structure of C. fluminea. Samplings were carried out twice in the reservoir of Furnas Hydroelectric Power Station (HPS) (Minas Gerais, Brazil), in 2011 and 2012. Population density, spatial distribution and mean shell length of C. fluminea were estimated for each year after sampling in 51 quadrats (0.0625m2) placed on three transects at different distances along the reservoir margins (0, 10 and 20 m from a fixed-point). We observed a predominance of C. fluminea in both years, with a simultaneous gradual decrease in density and richness of native species in the sampling area. Significant differences in density of C. fluminea were registered at different distances from the margin, and are related to the temporal variability of physical conditions of the sediment and water in these environments. We also registered a trend toward an increase in the density and aggregation of C. fluminea as we moved away from the margin, due to the greater stability of these areas (>10 m). The mean shell length of C. fluminea showed significant difference between the distinct distances from the margin and during the years, as well as the interaction of these factors (Distances vs.Years). These results were associated with the reproductive and invasive capacity of this species. This study reveals that these temporal events (especially water column fluctuation) may cause alterations in density, spatial distribution and mean shell length of C. fluminea and the composition of the native malacofauna in

  2. A freshwater bioprobe: Periostracum of the Asian Clam, Corbicula fluminea (Müller) combined with laser microprobe mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, P J; Rollins, H; Sharkey, A G; Prezant, R S; Kim, Y; Hercules, D M

    1993-01-01

    A freshwater bioprobe, combining the Asiatic Clam, Corbicula fluminea (Müller) and the laser microprobe mass spectrometer (LAMMA), can determine anthropogenic chemical contamination of freshwater systems. Laser generated mass spectra from the periostracal layers of clams contaminated with either a salt, potassium bromide, or an aromatic compound, phenol, produce distinctive mass spectral signatures that are different from uncontaminated clams. Uncontaminated clams have characteristic signatures with distinctive spectral peaks less than m/z 41; while exposed clams have many strong peaks well above this m/z. This freshwater bioprobe, using LAMMA to analyze the surface of clams, can be used as a screening tool for monitoring the water-treatment systems, for determining the source of contaminated baseflow and return flow discharge to streams, and for monitoring the water chemistry of a body of water. This system exploits the facility of using the shell instead of soft tissue with the LAMMA and has potential to detect anthropogenically-derived chemical stress. PMID:15091918

  3. Invasive zebra mussels (Driessena polymorpha) and Asian clams (Corbicula fluminea) survive gut passage of migratory fish species: implications for dispersal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gatlin, Michael R.; Shoup, Daniel E.; Long, James M.

    2013-01-01

    The introduction and spread of invasive species is of great concern to natural resource managers in the United States. To effectively control the spread of these species, managers must be aware of the multitude of dispersal methods used by the organisms. We investigated the potential for survival through the gut of a migrating fish (blue catfish, Ictalurus furcatus) as a dispersal mechanism for two invasive bivalves: zebra mussel (Driessena polymorpha) and Asian clam (Corbicula fluminea). Blue catfish (N = 62) were sampled over several months from Sooner Lake, Oklahoma, transported to a laboratory and held in individual tanks for 48 h. All fecal material was collected and inspected for live mussels. Survival was significantly related to water temperature in the lake at the time of collection, with no mussels surviving above 21.1 C°, whereas 12 % of zebra mussels (N = 939) and 39 % of Asian clams (N = 408) consumed in cooler water survived gut passage. This research demonstrates the potential for blue catfish to serve as a dispersal vector for invasive bivalves at low water temperatures.

  4. Sensitivity of the invasive bivalve Corbicula fluminea to candidate control chemicals: The role of dissolved oxygen conditions.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Inês C; Garrido, Rita; Ré, Ana; Gomes, João; Pereira, Joana L; Gonçalves, Fernando; Costa, Raquel

    2015-12-01

    The freshwater Corbicula fluminea is a major aquatic nuisance worldwide. Current pest control methods raise cost-effectiveness and environmental concerns, which motivate research into improved mitigation approaches. In this context, the susceptibility of the clams to chemicals under reduced oxygen conditions was examined. Biocides with different mechanisms of toxicity (niclosamide, polyDADMAC, ammonium nitrate, potassium chloride and dimethoate) were tested under normoxic (>7 mg L(-1) dissolved O2) and hypoxic (<2 mg L(-1) dissolved O2) conditions. Hypoxia was observed to potentiate chemical treatment, particularly when combined with non-overwhelming doses that would produce only intermediate responses by themselves. For niclosamide, ammonium nitrate and dimethoate, clam mortality enhancements up to 400% were observed under hypoxia as compared to dosing upon normal dissolved oxygen conditions. For polyDADMAC and potassium chloride, substantially lower mortality enhancements were found. The differences in the clams' sensitivity to the chemicals under hypoxia could be linked to the expected mechanisms of action. This suggests that judicious selection of the biocide is essential if optimized combined control treatments are to be designed and provides an insight into the interference of frequent hypoxia events in the response of natural clam populations to contaminant loads. PMID:26254082

  5. Accumulation of trace elements and growth responses in Corbicula fluminea downstream of a coal-fired power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Peltier, G.L.; Wright, M.S.; Hopkins, W.A.; Meyer, J.L.

    2009-07-15

    Lentic organisms exposed to coal-fired power plant (CFPP) discharges can have elevated trace element concentrations in their tissues, but this relationship and its potential consequences are unclear for lotic organisms. To explore these patterns in a lotic environment, we transplanted Corbicula fluminea from a reference stream to a stream receiving CFPP discharge. We assessed trace element accumulation and glutathione concentration in clam tissue, shell growth, and condition index at five sites along a contamination gradient. Clams at the most upstream and contaminated site had the highest growth rate, condition index, glutathione concentrations, and concentrations of arsenic (7.85 {+-} 0.25 {mu} g/g (dry mass)), selenium (17.75 {+-} 0.80 {mu} g/g), and cadmium (7.28 {+-} 0.34 {mu} g/g). Mercury concentrations declined from 4.33 {+-} 0.83 to 0.81 {+-} 0.11 {mu} g/g (dry mass) in clams transplanted into the selenium-rich environment nearest the power plant, but this effect was not as evident at less impacted, downstream sites. Even though dilution of trace elements within modest distances from the power plant reduced bioaccumulation potential in clams, long-term loading of trace elements to downstream depositional regions (e.g., slow moving, silty areas) is likely significant.

  6. Induction of a multixenobiotic resistance protein (MXR) in the Asiatic clam Corbicula fluminea after heavy metals exposure.

    PubMed

    Achard, M; Baudrimont, M; Boudou, A; Bourdineaud, J P

    2004-05-12

    Multixenobiotic resistance mechanisms (MXR) related to the mammalian P-glycoprotein multidrug transporter protein (P-gp) are known to occur in several marine invertebrates. In the present work, we report on the induction of an MXR protein by various heavy metals in the gills of the freshwater clam Corbicula fluminea. The evaluation of the MXR protein level was assessed by Western blot using a specific monoclonal antibody raised against the human P-gp (C219). A field transplantation experiment, where clams were caged in a gradient relative to an industrial site, demonstrated a positive relationship between MXR levels and (a) metal pollution (Cd and Zn) in the environment and (b) metal bioaccumulation in the gills. To establish this correlative relationship, clams were exposed to different levels of cadmium (15-60 microg l(-1)) for up to 15 days in a controlled laboratory experiment. MXR protein levels increased in time for all treatments (including the control). However, the highest levels of MXR protein titer were expressed in clams that had been exposed to the lowest dose of cadmium. The causes for this observed inverse relationship between the exposure dose and the MXR induction is discussed. MXR protein titer was also shown to be induced by other heavy metals (zinc, inorganic mercury, and copper). PMID:15084411

  7. A freshwater clam (Corbicula fluminea) extract improves cholesterol metabolism in rats fed on a high-cholesterol diet.

    PubMed

    Chijimatsu, Takeshi; Tatsuguchi, Iwao; Abe, Kazuaki; Oda, Hiroaki; Mochizuki, Satoshi

    2008-10-01

    The effect of a freshwater clam (Corbicula fluminea) extract (FCE) on cholesterol metabolism in rats fed on a high-cholesterol diet was investigated. When rats were fed various amounts of FCE in addition to the high-cholesterol diet for 2 wk, the serum and hepatic cholesterol levels were gradually reduced in a dose-dependent manner, as compared with the control group. The excretion of neutral sterols and bile acids into the feces was increased by feeding FCE. Several phytosterols were detected in the feces of rats fed on the FCE-containing diet. In addition, substantial amounts of phytosterols were found in FCE. Cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) mRNA in the liver of the rats fed on the FCE-containing diets was higher than that of rats fed on the high-cholesterol diets without FCE. These results may suggest that enhanced cholesterol degradation and the excretion of neutral sterols and bile acids contributed to the hypocholesterolemic effect of FCE observed in the hypercholesterolemic rats fed on the high-cholesterol diet. PMID:18838816

  8. Micro-structure and chemical composition of vateritic deformities occurring in the bivalve Corbicula fluminea (Müller, 1774).

    PubMed

    Frenzel, Max; Harper, Elizabeth M

    2011-05-01

    Vateritic deformities occurring in the invasive heterodont bivalve Corbicula fluminea from several locations in the UK were characterised in detail for the first time using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and different geochemical techniques (electron microprobe, ICP-AES, and mass spectrometry). Large volumes of vaterite are produced abnormally in the animals' shells in the form of yellow-green bulges. These are distinguished from the aragonitic parts of the shell by their characteristic micro-structures, content of organic material, trace elemental composition and carbon stable isotope signatures. The most commonly observed micro-structures include columnar vaterite, lamellar vaterite and different irregular structures occurring in all parts of the shell. There are indications that organic material is present largely as intracrystalline impurities or nano-scale phases and not as envelopes around microstructural units. These micro-structures are novel, nothing equivalent having yet been described for other vateritic systems. Euhedral vaterite crystals also occur occasionally. The vaterite has generally higher Mg/Ca and lower Na/Ca, K/Ca than the aragonite. In addition, δ¹³C is also always lower. Microstructural characteristics would suggest loss of biological control probably due to physiological stress(es) inducing the switch to vaterite production. The vaterite might be stabilised by its higher content of organic material and magnesium. PMID:21333740

  9. Identification of larvae: The zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha), quagga mussel (Dreissena rosteriformis bugensis), and Asian clam (Corbicula fluminea)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, S. Jerrine; Black, M.G.

    1994-01-01

    There are presently four freshwater bivalves in the United States that produce larvae or veligers commonly found in the water column: two forms of Asian clams and two species of dreissenids. Portions of the geographic range of three of these bivalves, one species of Asian clam (Corbicula fluminea), zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha), and quagga mussels (Dreissena rosteriformis bugensis), overlap, causing problems with larval identification. To determine which characteristics can be used to separate larval forms, adult Asian clams, quaggas, and zebra mussels were brought into the laboratory and induced to spawn, and the resulting larvae were reared. Hybrids between quaggas and zebra mussels were also produced, but not reared to maturity. Characteristics allowing for the most rapid and accurate separation of larvae were hinge length, shell length/height, shell shape, shell size, and the presence or absence of a foot and velum. These characteristics were observed in laboratory-reared larvae of known parentage and field-caught larvae of unknown parentage. In most cases, larvae of the Asian clam can be readily separated from those produced by either type of dreissenid on the basis of shell size and presence of a foot. Separating the gametes and embryos of the two types of dreissenids is not possible, but after shell formation, most of the larval stages can be distinguished. Hinge length, shell length/height, and the similarity in size of the shell valves can be used to separate straight-hinged, umbonal, pediveliger, and plantigrade larvae. Quagga × zebra mussel hybrids show characteristics of both parents and are difficult to identify.

  10. Effect of fluctuating low-level chlorine concentrations on valve-movement behavior of the asiatic clam (corbicula fluminea)

    SciTech Connect

    Ham, K.D. . Graduate Program in Ecology); Peterson, M.J. )

    1994-03-01

    Asiatic clams (Corbicula fluminea) exposed to water from the upstream section of East Fork Popular Creek (Oak Ridge, TN), a stream receiving chlorine-containing industrial discharges, were monitored for changes in valve movement patterns. Individual clams were attached to an automated valve-movement monitoring apparatus and suspended in flow-through tanks located streamside. Valve-closure behavior of two clams exposed to untreated water was compared to that of two clams exposed to dechlorinated water for two 18-d periods. Chlorine concentrations in untreated water exhibited a pronounced diurnal cycle, fluctuating between a mean daily minimum of 0.02 mg/L total residual chlorine (TRC) during the day and a mean daily maximum of 0.07 mg/L TRC at night during the second monitoring period. In over 2,300 fifteen-minute intervals, clams closed for 0.70 of the intervals while exposed to untreated water, but closed for only 0.22 of the intervals while exposed to dechlorinated water. Treatment differences in valve closure were tested by repeated-measures ANOVA. A significant treatment effect on valve closure was found in the first monitoring period. Graphical analysis of valve-closure records revealed duel cycles that differed between treatments. Clams in untreated water usually opened only near midday, when TRC concentrations were lowest. Clams in dechlorinated water opened more often, for longer periods, and appeared to respond to dawn and dusk changes in light. The valve-closure behavior of clams in untreated water effectively minimized tissue exposure to waterborne TRC, presumably reducing toxic effects. Valve-closure monitoring in conjunction with other studies may help estimate the effect of tissue isolation on the toxicity or bioaccumulation of waterborne chemicals. Such estimates could improve prediction of toxicological or ecological consequences of stressful conditions on bivalves.

  11. Bioaccumulation and metallothionein response in the Asiatic clam (Corbicula fluminea) after experimental exposure to cadmium and inorganic mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Baudrimont, M.; Metivaud, J.; Maury-Brachet, R.; Ribeyre, F.; Boudou, A.

    1997-10-01

    The involvement of metallothioneins (MTs) in cadmium (Cd) and inorganic mercury (Hg[II]) bioaccumulation by the freshwater bivalve Corbicula fluminea was experimentally investigated after 0, 15, 30 and 45 d of exposure from the water column source. Three levels of contamination were studied for each metal: 0, 5, and 35 {micro}g Cd/L and 0, 1.45, and 5 {micro}g Hg/L, with two replicates per condition. Forty eight experimental units (EUs) were conducted simultaneously. The mollusks were fed twice a week by additions of phytoplanktonic algae. Quantification of MTs was done by Hg-saturation assay, using cold Hg(II). A partial purification of these proteins was conducted by gel-filtration chromatography, followed by Cd determinations in the different eluted fractions. Results at the whole organism (soft tissues) and organ or tissue group (gills, mantle, foot, visceral mass) levels show high metal concentrations, with a fourfold greater accumulation of inorganic Hg than Cd after 30 d exposure at the same concentration of 5 {micro}g/L. Gills and visceral mass were the principal storage compartments. A significant increase in MT concentrations was revealed in these two organs after exposure to Cd: ratios between the MT concentrations in contaminated and control mollusks were 2.4 and 2.8, respectively, for 5 and 35 {micro}g Cd/L. Cd burdens in the cytosol and in {le}18-kDa protein fractions, similar to purified mammal MTs, correspond to 30 and 14% of the total Cd accumulated in the whole organisms. No significant increase in MT biosynthesis was observed after exposure to inorganic Hg, despite the high metal concentrations in the organs.

  12. Integrated biomarker responses of the invasive species Corbicula fluminea in relation to environmental abiotic conditions: a potential indicator of the likelihood of clam's summer mortality syndrome.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Cristiana; Vilares, Pedro; Guilhermino, Lúcia

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the variation of several biomarkers in wild populations of Corbicula fluminea in relation to abiotic condition changes to identify environmental factors associated with increased stress in this species potentially leading to massive mortality events. The study was carried out from July to October in the freshwater tidal areas of the estuaries of Minho and Lima Rivers (NW Iberian Peninsula). Monthly, 7 biomarkers (biotransformation, energy production, anti-oxidant defenses and lipid peroxidation damages) were determined in C. fluminea and 17 abiotic parameters were determined in water or sediments in 4 sampling sites: M1, M2 and M3 in Minho (up=> downstream); and L in Lima estuaries. The results of biomarkers were integrated using the Integrated Biomarker Response (IBR), Index and also analysed in relation to environmental parameters by Redundancy Analysis (RDA). Overall, the findings of the present study indicate that July and August are particularly stressful months for the studied C. fluminea populations, especially at downstream sites; the increase of nutrients and ammonium water concentrations, water temperature and conductivity are major contributors for this increased stress; the biomarkers indicated that in July/August C. fluminea is exposed to oxidative stress inducers, environmental chemical contaminants biotransformed by esterases and glutathione S-transferase enzymes, and that organisms need additional energy to cope with the chemical and/or thermally-induced stress. The findings of the present study stress the importance of biomonitoring the health condition of C. fluminea because it may allow determining the likelihood of summer/post summer mortality syndrome in this species. PMID:25499240

  13. Population dynamics of Corbicula fluminea (Müller, 1774) in mesohaline and oligohaline habitats: Invasion success in a Southern Europe estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franco, J.N.; Ceia, F.R.; Patricio, J.; Thompson, John; Marques, J.C.; Neto, J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Due to its range expansion and potential ecological effects, Corbicula fluminea is considered one of the most important non-indigenous species (NIS) in aquatic ecosystems. Its presence since 2003 in the upstream area of Mondego estuary (oligohaline and mesohaline sectors) was studied during thirteen months, from December 2007 to December 2008. Monthly mean abundance and biomass ranged from 542 to 11142 individuals m-2 and 13.1–20.4 g Ash Free Dry Weight m-2, respectively. Populations of C.fluminea were composed mostly of juveniles, always present in extremely high densities compared to other estuarine ecosystems (e.g. Minho estuary) suggesting a continuous recruitment pattern. The hydraulic regime of the River Mondego favours the downstream colonization of the upper Mondego estuary by recruits produced upstream. However, salinity in these sectors of the estuary apparently neither favours growth nor the establishment of structured populations of this species. Other factors like contaminants and predation, which were not studied, could also contribute to the community structure observed.

  14. Population dynamics of Corbicula fluminea (Müller, 1774) in mesohaline and oligohaline habitats: Invasion success in a Southern Europe estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, J. N.; Ceia, F. R.; Patrício, J.; Modesto, V.; Thompson, J.; Marques, J. C.; Neto, J. M.

    2012-10-01

    Due to its range expansion and potential ecological effects, Corbicula fluminea is considered one of the most important non-indigenous species (NIS) in aquatic ecosystems. Its presence since 2003 in the upstream area of Mondego estuary (oligohaline and mesohaline sectors) was studied during thirteen months, from December 2007 to December 2008. Monthly mean abundance and biomass ranged from 542 to 11142 individuals m-2 and 13.1-20.4 g Ash Free Dry Weight m-2, respectively. Populations of C. fluminea were composed mostly of juveniles, always present in extremely high densities compared to other estuarine ecosystems (e.g. Minho estuary) suggesting a continuous recruitment pattern. The hydraulic regime of the River Mondego favours the downstream colonization of the upper Mondego estuary by recruits produced upstream. However, salinity in these sectors of the estuary apparently neither favours growth nor the establishment of structured populations of this species. Other factors like contaminants and predation, which were not studied, could also contribute to the community structure observed.

  15. The Asian clam Corbicula fluminea as a biomonitor of trace element contamination: accounting for different sources of variation using an hierarchical linear model.

    PubMed

    Shoults-Wilson, W Aaron; Peterson, James T; Unrine, Jason M; Rickard, James; Black, Marsha C

    2009-10-01

    In the present study, specimens of the invasive clam, Corbicula fluminea, were collected above and below possible sources of potentially toxic trace elements (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Pb, and Zn) in the Altamaha River system (Georgia, U.S.A.). Bioaccumulation of these elements was quantified, along with environmental (water and sediment) concentrations. Hierarchical linear models were used to account for variability in tissue concentrations related to environmental (site water chemistry and sediment characteristics) and individual (growth metrics) variables while identifying the strongest relations between these variables and trace element accumulation. The present study found significantly elevated concentrations of Cd, Cu, and Hg downstream of the outfall of kaolin-processing facilities, Zn downstream of a tire cording facility, and Cr downstream of both a nuclear power plant and a paper pulp mill. Models of the present study indicated that variation in trace element accumulation was linked to distance upstream from the estuary, dissolved oxygen, percentage of silt and clay in the sediment, elemental concentrations in sediment, shell length, and bivalve condition index. By explicitly modeling environmental variability, the Hierarchical linear modeling procedure allowed the identification of sites showing increased accumulation of trace elements that may have been caused by human activity. Hierarchical linear modeling is a useful tool for accounting for environmental and individual sources of variation in bioaccumulation studies. PMID:19463028

  16. Oxidative stress and histological changes following exposure to diamond nanoparticles in the freshwater Asian clam Corbicula fluminea (Müller, 1774).

    PubMed

    Cid, Antonio; Picado, Ana; Correia, José Brito; Chaves, Rúben; Silva, Héber; Caldeira, Jorge; de Matos, António P Alves; Diniz, Mário S

    2015-03-01

    Recently, the scientific community became aware of the potential ability of nanoparticles to cause toxicity in living organisms. Therefore, many of the implications for aquatic ecosystems and its effects on living organisms are still to be evaluated and fully understood. In this study, the toxicity of nanodiamonds (NDs) was assessed in the freshwater bivalve (Corbicula fluminea) following exposure to different nominal concentrations of NDs (0.01, 0.1, 1, and 10 mg l(-1)) throughout 14 days. The NDs were characterized (gravimetry, pH, zeta potential, electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy) confirming manufacturer information and showing NDs with a size of 4-6 nm. Oxidative stress enzymes activities (glutathione-S-transferase, catalase) and lipid peroxidation were determined. The results show a trend to increase in GST activities after seven days of exposure in bivalves exposed to NDs concentrations (>0.1 mg l(-1)), while for catalase a significant increase was found in bivalves exposed from 0.01 to 1.0 mg l(-1) following an exposure of 14 days. The histological analysis revealed alterations in digestive gland cells, such as vacuolization and thickening. The lipid peroxidation showed a trend to increase for the different tested NDs concentrations which is compatible with the observed cellular damage. PMID:25463214

  17. The Asian clam Corbicula fluminea as a biomonitor of trace element contamination: Accounting for different sources of variation using an hierarchical linear model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shoults-Wilson, W. A.; Peterson, J.T.; Unrine, J.M.; Rickard, J.; Black, M.C.

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, specimens of the invasive clam, Corbicula fluminea, were collected above and below possible sources of potentially toxic trace elements (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Pb, and Zn) in the Altamaha River system (Georgia, USA). Bioaccumulation of these elements was quantified, along with environmental (water and sediment) concentrations. Hierarchical linear models were used to account for variability in tissue concentrations related to environmental (site water chemistry and sediment characteristics) and individual (growth metrics) variables while identifying the strongest relations between these variables and trace element accumulation. The present study found significantly elevated concentrations of Cd, Cu, and Hg downstream of the outfall of kaolin-processing facilities, Zn downstream of a tire cording facility, and Cr downstream of both a nuclear power plant and a paper pulp mill. Models of the present study indicated that variation in trace element accumulation was linked to distance upstream from the estuary, dissolved oxygen, percentage of silt and clay in the sediment, elemental concentrations in sediment, shell length, and bivalve condition index. By explicitly modeling environmental variability, the Hierarchical linear modeling procedure allowed the identification of sites showing increased accumulation of trace elements that may have been caused by human activity. Hierarchical linear modeling is a useful tool for accounting for environmental and individual sources of variation in bioaccumulation studies. ?? 2009 SETAC.

  18. Field transplantation of the freshwater bivalve Corbicula fluminea along a polymetallic contamination gradient (River Lot, France): 2. Metallothionein response to metal exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Baudrimont, M.; Andres, S.; Metivaud, J.; Lapaquellerie, Y.; Ribeyre, F.; Maillet, N.; Latouche, C.; Boudou, A.

    1999-11-01

    Specimens of the Asiatic clam Corbicula fluminea were transplanted from a clean lacustrine site to four stations along a polymetallic pollution gradient in the river Lot, France, downstream from an old Zn ore treatment facility (see Part 1). From April to September 1996, the authors studied Cd and Zn bioaccumulation and the metallothionein-like metal-binding protein (MT) concentrations by subsampling the ages at t = 0, 21, 49, 85, 120, and 150 d. Marked differences were observed among the four stations. At the most polluted station Riou-Mort, MT concentrations did not increase despite very rapid metal accumulation; all mollusks died between days 49 and 85, suggesting that the metal detoxification mechanisms were overwhelmed at this station. At the next station downstream, the final levels of bioaccumulated metal after 150 d were as high as those at the Riou-Mort station, but in this case the MT concentrations also increased progressively with positive correlations between MT and metal concentrations; no mortality was observed, but a significant growth inhibition was revealed in comparison to the reference site, with a lack of correlation between MT and reduced growth. Subcellular metal partitioning, as determined by size-exclusion chromatography, revealed that most of the Cd was sequestered by MT. In contrast, most of the Zn was bound to low molecular weight proteins, the MT fraction representing only 12% of cytosolic zn. These data show the marked role of MT toward Cd bioaccumulation and toxic effects on this freshwater bivalve species.

  19. What are the outcomes of an industrial remediation on a metal-impacted hydrosystem? A 2-year field biomonitoring of the filter-feeding bivalve Corbicula fluminea.

    PubMed

    Arini, A; Daffe, G; Gonzalez, P; Feurtet-Mazel, A; Baudrimont, M

    2014-08-01

    The Riou-Mort watershed (southwest France) exhibits high metal contaminations (Cd and Zn) related to an important mining past. In this context, a remediation process has been implemented in 2007 to reduce the watershed contamination. The aim of this study was to assess the early effectiveness of the remediation process on the hydrosystem contamination state. A biomonitoring was realized over two years (2008-2010) with the filter-feeding bivalve Corbicula fluminea, exposed along a contamination gradient. Several biological parameters were monitored: (1) Cd and Zn bioaccumulation, (2) Metallothionein (MT) production as detoxification mechanism, (3) differential gene expression (cat, sod, gst, 12S, cox1, mt). The physicochemical data highlighted strong metal contamination persistence in the river water and failed to demonstrate a significant decrease of metal contamination during the 2-year monitoring. The bioaccumulation results confirmed the persistence of a water contamination despite remediation works, with maximum values measured downstream from the industrial site (Joany). The bioaccumulation increased in 2010, reaching 69.3±5.3 μg Cd g(-1) DW at Joany in July 2010, whereas it did not exceed 1.4±0.2 μg Cd g(-1) DW at the reference site throughout the biomonitoring. MT concentrations were closely related to the contamination gradient, especially at Joany, demonstrating their strong involvement in the detoxification processes. The mt gene induction was strongly correlated to the MT and metal concentrations. The gene inductions of cat, sod, gst and 12S were correlated to both the metal concentrations and the seasonal variations, especially temperatures. This suggests that environmental factors require serious consideration for the interpretation of bioaccumulation kinetics and thus for the assessment of the remediation effectiveness. Consequently, the whole results did not yet highlight strong beneficial effects of remediation work on the hydrosystem

  20. Rare earth elements in the aragonitic shell of freshwater mussel Corbicula fluminea and the bioavailability of anthropogenic lanthanum, samarium and gadolinium in river water.

    PubMed

    Merschel, Gila; Bau, Michael

    2015-11-15

    High-technology metals - such as the rare earth elements (REE) - have become emerging contaminants in the hydrosphere, yet little is known about their bioavailability. The Rhine River and the Weser River in Germany are two prime examples of rivers that are subjected to anthropogenic REE input. While both rivers carry significant loads of anthropogenic Gd, originating from contrast agents used for magnetic resonance imaging, the Rhine River also carries large amounts of anthropogenic La and lately Sm which are discharged into the river from an industrial point source. Here, we assess the bioavailability of these anthropogenic microcontaminants in these rivers by analyzing the aragonitic shells of the freshwater bivalve Corbicula fluminea. Concentrations of purely geogenic REE in shells of comparable size cover a wide range of about one order of magnitude between different sampling sites. At a given sampling site, geogenic REE concentrations depend on shell size, i.e. mussel age. Although both rivers show large positive Gd anomalies in their dissolved loads, no anomalous enrichment of Gd relative to the geogenic REE can be observed in any of the analyzed shells. This indicates that the speciations of geogenic and anthropogenic Gd in the river water differ from each other and that the geogenic, but not the anthropogenic Gd is incorporated into the shells. In contrast, all shells sampled at sites downstream of the industrial point source of anthropogenic La and Sm in the Rhine River show positive La and Sm anomalies, revealing that these anthropogenic REE are bioavailable. Only little is known about the effects of long-term exposure to dissolved REE and their general ecotoxicity, but considering that anthropogenic Gd and even La have already been identified in German tap water and that anthropogenic La and Sm are bioavailable, this should be monitored and investigated further. PMID:26151653

  1. Water-quality assessment of the Albemarle-Pamlico Drainage Basin, North Carolina and Virginia; organochlorine compounds in Asiatic clam (Corbicula fluminea) soft tissues and whole redbrest sunfish (Lepomis auritus) 1992-93

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, K.E.; Ruhl, P.M.

    1996-01-01

    The analysis of potential contaminants in biological tissues is an important part of many water-quality assessment programs, including the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program. Tissue analyses often are used to provide information about (1) direct threats to ecosystem integrity, and (2) the occurrence and distribution of potential contaminants in the environment. During 1992-93, Asiatic clam (Corbicula fluminea) soft tissues and whole redbreast sunfish (Lepomis auritus) samples were collected and analyzed to obtain information about the occurrence and distribution of organochlorine compounds in the Albemarle-Pamlico drainage Basin of North Carolina and Virginia. The investigation was conducted as part of the NAWQA Program. Relatively few organochlorine compounds were detected and of the compounds detected, all were detected in relatively low concentrations. The organochlorine compounds detected were p,p'-DDD, p,p'-DDE, p,p'-DDT, dieldrin, trans-nonachlor, PCB's, and toxaphene. Multiple compounds were detected at 16 of 19 sites sampled. Compared to Asiatic clams, redbreast sunfish appear to be better bioindicators of organochlorine contamination in aquatic systems. Except for one detection of toxaphene, pesticide concentrations are well below the National Academy of Sciences and National Academy of Engineering (NAS/NAE) guidelines for the protection of fish-eating wildlife.

  2. Water-quality assessment of the Albemarle-Pamlico drainage basin, North Carolina and Virginia; trace elements in Asiatic clam (Corbicula fluminea) soft tissues and redbreast sunfish (Lepomis auritus) livers, 1992-93

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruhl, P.M.; Smith, K.E.

    1996-01-01

    The analysis of potential contaminants in biological tissues is an important part of many water-quality assessment programs, including the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program. Tissue analyses often are used to provide information about (1) direct threats to ecosystem integrity, and (2) the occurrence and distribution of potential contaminants in the environment. During 1992-93, trace elements in Asiatic clam (Corbicula fluminea) soft tissues and redbreast sunfish (Lepomis auritus) livers were analyzed to obtain information about the occurrence and distribution of trace element contaminants in the Albemarle-Pamlico Drainage Basin of North Carolina and Virginia. The investigation was conducted as part of the NAWQA Program. All but 3 of the 22 trace elements that were analyzed were detected. Although all 10 of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) priority pollutants were detected in the tissues sampled, they were present in relatively low concentrations. Concentrations of U.S. EPA priority pollutants in Asiatic clams collected in the Albemarle-Pamlico Drainage Basin are similar to concentrations observed in other NAWQA study units in the southeastern United States. Mercury (a U.S. EPA priority pollutant) was widely detected, being present in 29 of 30 tissue samples, but concentrations did not exceed the FDA action level for mercury of a risk-based screening value for the general public. Mercury concentrations in Asiatic clams were similar to concentrations in other NAWQA study areas in the Southeast.

  3. Field transplantation of the freshwater bivalve Corbicula fluminea along a polymetallic contamination gradient (River Lot, France): 1. Geochemical characteristics of the sampling sites and cadmium and zinc bioccumulation kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Andres, S.; Baudrimont, M.; Lapaquellerie, Y.; Ribeyre, F.; Maillet, N.; Latouche, C.; Boudou, A.

    1999-11-01

    Specimens of the Asiatic clam Corbicula fluminea were transplanted from a clean lacustrine site to four stations along a polymetallic gradient in the river Lot (France), downstream from an old Zn ore treatment facility. The bivalves were held in benthic cages for a 5-month exposure period, April to September 1996; mollusk growth and metal bioaccumulation kinetics (Cd, Zn) were followed by subsampling the cages at t = 0, 21, 49, 85, 120, and 150 d. Rates of Cd bioaccumulation in the whole soft bodies and in individual organs were greater at the upstream stations located close to the pollution source, but there was no direct proportionality between Cd in the bivalves and in the unfiltered or filtered river water samples. Unlike the case for Cd, rates of Zn bioaccumulation did not reflect the contamination gradient. Marked growth differences were measured among the four stations, reflecting both nutritional differences and changes in the degree of metal contamination; these growth differences produced markedly different trends when metal bioaccumulation was expressed in terms of burdens rather than concentrations.

  4. Delineating copper accumulation pathways for the freshwater bivalve Corbicula using stable copper isotopes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Croteau, M.-N.; Luoma, S.N.

    2005-01-01

    Delineation of metal uptake routes in aquatic invertebrates is critical for characterizing bioaccumulation dynamics and assessing risks associated with metal exposure. Here we demonstrate that Cu stable isotopic ratios can be manipulated in both exposure media and algae to determine the efflux rate constant (ke) and to estimate Cu assimilation efficiency (AE) from ingested food in a freshwater bivalve (Corbicula fluminea). The Cu AE in Corhicula fed 65Cu-spiked Cryptomonas ozolini was 38%. Copper uptake routes had no significant influence on efflux; ke, of 0.004 per day characterized the slowest component of efflux following short-term exposures to 65Cu in water or in both food and water. Incorporation of the physiological parameters for dietary and dissolved uptake as well as rate constants of loss into a bioaccumulation model allowed for assessing the relative contribution of water and food as Cu sources. At [65Cu 2+] of 6.7 ??g/L, Corbicula accumulated twice as much Cu from diet as from water. In most freshwater systems, the dietary pathway is likely to act as the major Cu uptake route for Corbicula. Extrapolation of our laboratory results to the San Francisco Bay-Delta (California, USA) indicated that our biodynamic model and the laboratory-derived parameters for dietary 65Cu uptake provided a realistic representation of the processes involved in Cu accumulation by the bivalve Corbicula. ?? 2005 SETAC.

  5. Phylogeny and androgenesis in the invasive Corbicula clams (Bivalvia, Corbiculidae) in Western Europe

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The genus Corbicula is one of the most invasive groups of molluscs. It includes both sexual and androgenetic lineages. The present study re-assessed the different morphotypes and haplotypes of West European Corbicula in order to clarify their taxonomic identification and phylogenetic relationships with American and Asian Corbicula clams. We studied several populations from West European river basins (Meuse, Seine, Rhine and Rhône) through an "integrative taxonomy" approach. We combined morphology, partial mitochondrial COI and cyt b sequences and eleven microsatellite loci. Furthermore, we looked for discrepancies between mtDNA and nrDNA/morphology, indicative of androgenesis between lineages. Results There are three Corbicula morphotypes in Western Europe associated to three mitochondrial lineages and three genotypes. Form R shares the same COI haplotype as the American form A and the Japanese C. leana. Form S and the American form C have the same haplotype, although their morphologies seem divergent. The European form Rlc belongs to the same mitochondrial lineage as both the American form B and the Asian C. fluminea. Interestingly, within each haplotype/genotype or lineage, no genetic diversity was found although their invasive success is high. Moreover, we detected rare mismatches between mtDNA and nrDNA/morphology, indicative of androgenesis and mitochondrial capture between form R and form S and therefore challenging the phylogenetic relatedness and the species status within this genus. The global phylogenetic analysis revealed that the sexual Corbicula lineages seem restricted to the native areas while their androgenetic relatives are widespread and highly invasive. Conclusions We clarified the discrepancies and incongruent results found in the literature about the European morphotypes of Corbicula and associated mitochondrial lineages. The three West European morphotypes belong to three distinct nuclear and mitochondrial lineages. However

  6. BEHAVIORAL AND PHYSIOLOGICAL RESPONSES OF DAPHNIA MAGNA, CHLORELLA VULGARIS, CORBICULA FLUMINEA, LEPOMIS MACROCHIRUS, AND VIBRO FISCHERI

    EPA Science Inventory

    The research presented here is a continuation of work designed to further the science of available and developing continuous, automated water quality monitors and how they may be most effectively deployed in a watershed management plan and/or water quality early warning system (W...

  7. Clams (Corbicula fluminea) as bioindicators of fecal contamination with Cryptosporidium and Giardia spp. in freshwater ecosystems in California.

    PubMed

    Miller, Woutrina A; Atwill, Edward R; Gardner, Ian A; Miller, Melissa A; Fritz, Heather M; Hedrick, Ronald P; Melli, Ann C; Barnes, Nicole M; Conrad, Patricia A

    2005-05-01

    This study evaluated clams as bioindicators of fecal protozoan contamination using three approaches: (i) clam tissue spiking experiments to compare several detection techniques; (ii) clam tank exposure experiments to evaluate clams that had filtered Cryptosporidium oocysts from inoculated water under a range of simulated environmental conditions; (iii) sentinel clam outplanting to assess the distribution and magnitude of fecal contamination in three riverine systems in California. Our spiking and tank experiments showed that direct fluorescent antibody (DFA), immunomagnetic separation (IMS) in combination with DFA, and PCR techniques could be used to detect Cryptosporidium in clam tissues. The most analytically sensitive technique was IMS concentration with DFA detection of oocysts in clam digestive gland tissues, which detected 10 oocysts spiked into a clam digestive gland 83% of the time. In the tank experiment, oocyst dose and clam collection time were significant predictors for detecting Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in clams. In the wild clam study, Cryptosporidium and Giardia were detected in clams from all three study regions by IMS-DFA analysis of clam digestive glands, with significant variation by sampling year and season. The presence of C. parvum DNA in clams from riverine ecosystems was confirmed with PCR and DNA sequence analysis. PMID:15862580

  8. BEHAVIORAL AND PHYSIOLOGICAL RESPONSES OF DAPHNIA MAGNA, CHLORELLA VULGARIS, CORBICULA FLUMINEA, AND LEPOMIS MACROCHIRUS TO COPPER AND CYANIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The research presented here was designed to further the science of available and developing continuous, automated water quality monitors and how they may be most effectively deployed in a watershed management plan and/or water quality early warning system (WQEWS). Source waters ...

  9. Effects of elevated carbon dioxide concentrations on survivorship in zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) and Asian clams (Corbicula fluminea)

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, R.F.; Matthews, M.A.; Shaffer, L.R.; Johnson, P.D.

    1995-06-01

    In order to determine their tolerance to elevated concentrations of carbon dioxide, Asian clams and zebra mussels were collected. Subsamples of both species were acclimated to 25{degrees}C>14 days and then exposed in water at 25{degrees}C to various concentrations of CO{sub 2} and survivorship recorded. Zebra mussels were allowed to byssally attach prior to testing. Media CO{sub 2} concentrations were maintained by continuous bubbling with appropriate gas mixtures. Gas treatment included: (1) anoxia; (2) hypercapnic anoxia; and (3) hypercapnic normoxia. Deaths were recorded in subsamples of both species every 12-24 h until 100% mortality was achieved. No significant mortality occurred among specimens of either species in air bubbled control media in any experiment. Mortality time of zebra mussels exposed to anoxia under 100% N{sub 2} was 103.7 h and of Asian clams, 349.7 h. Mortality was more rapid among samples of both species exposed to anoxia under 100% CO{sub 2}, mean time to death being 43.6 h for zebra mussels and 46.3 h for Asian clams. There was no difference in the survivorship of samples of either species under atmospheres of either 5% CO{sub 2} and 95% N{sub 2} or 100% N{sub 2}, however, Asian clams survived anoxia under either atmosphere 4 to 5 times longer than did zebra mussels. There was no significant mortality among Asian clam or zebra mussel samples after a 39 day exposure to hypercapnic normoxia. While exposure to hypercapnic normoxia under an atmosphere of 5% CO{sub 2}:19% O{sub 2}:76% N{sub 2} did not induce mortality in zebra mussel samples, it completely suppressed all byssal thread production after 7 days of exposure and induced all sampled individuals to release from their byssal attachments within 10 days of exposure. These results indicate that CO{sub 2} injection may be an easily applied, cost-effective, environmentally acceptable molluscicide for mitigation and control of raw water system macrofouling by Asian clams and zebra mussels.

  10. Active biomonitoring with Corbicula for USEPA priority pollutant and metal sources in the Anacostia River (DC, Maryland, USA).

    PubMed

    Phelps, Harriette L

    2016-07-01

    The freshwater Anacostia River watershed (Maryland, DC, USA) was surveyed for the sources of bioavailable US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) Priority Pollutants and toxic metals by active biomontoring (ABM) using the freshwater Asiatic clam Corbicula fluminea. The Anacostia River is a 456 km(2) tributary of the tidal freshwater Potomac River that includes the city of Washington, DC where edible fish are highly contaminated with PCBs and chlordane. From 1999 to 2011, Corbicula were collected for ABM from a Potomac reference site and translocated in cages placed at 45 sites in the tidal and nontidal Anacostia watershed. Minimum clam mortality and maximum contaminant bioaccumulation was with 2-week translocation. The clam tissues (28-50) were combined at sites and analyzed by TestAmerica for 66 USEPA Priority Pollutants plus technical chlordane, benz(e) pyrene, and 6 metals (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Pb). Tissue contaminants reflected water, not sediment, levels. To compare sites, all contaminant data above detection or reference were grouped as total metals (TMET), total polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (TPAH), total PCB congeners (TPCB), total pesticides (TPEST), and total technical chlordane (TCHL). Tidal Anacostia ABM found highest TPAH and TCHL upstream at Bladensburg Marina (MD) except for TCHL at site PP near the confluence. Five nontidal MD subtributaries (94% of flow) had 17 sites with bioavailable TPAH, TPCB, or TCHL 2 to 3 times higher than found at the toxic-sediment "hotspots" near Washington. The only TMET noted was Fe at 1 site. TPAH in MD subtributaries was highest near industrial parks and Metro stations. A naphthalene spill was detected in Watts Branch. TPCB (low molecular weight) originated upstream at 1 industrial park. Total technical chlordane (80% of TPEST) was 2 to 5 times the US Food and Drug Administration action in 4 nontidal tributaries where heptachlor indicated legacy chlordane dumpsites. Total technical chlordane fell to reference

  11. Androgenesis: a review through the study of the selfish shellfish Corbicula spp.

    PubMed Central

    Pigneur, L-M; Hedtke, S M; Etoundi, E; Van Doninck, K

    2012-01-01

    Among the asexual reproductive modes, androgenesis is probably one of the most astonishing and least studied mechanisms. In this ‘paternal monopolization', the maternal nuclear genome fails to participate in zygote development and offspring are paternal nuclear clones. Obligate androgenesis is known in only a few organisms, including multiple species of clam in the genus Corbicula. Corbicula is a good system to review the evolutionary consequences of this ‘all-male asexuality' because the cytological mechanisms of androgenetic reproduction have been described. In Corbicula, sperm are unreduced and, after fertilization, the maternal nuclear chromosomes are extruded as two polar bodies. Hermaphroditic lineages of Corbicula have a worldwide distribution and seem to reproduce through androgenesis, whereas their sexual relatives have restricted ranges. The invasive success of these androgenetic Corbicula lineages may be linked to their asexual mode of reproduction. We review the phenomenon of androgenesis, focusing on evolutionary perspectives, using the genus Corbicula as an exemplar system. PMID:22473310

  12. Dietary freshwater clam (Corbicula fluminea) extract suppresses accumulation of hepatic lipids and increases in serum cholesterol and aminotransferase activities induced by dietary chloretone in rats.

    PubMed

    Chijimatsu, Takeshi; Umeki, Miki; Kobayashi, Satoru; Kataoka, Yutaro; Yamada, Koji; Oda, Hiroaki; Mochizuki, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the ameliorative effect of freshwater clam extract (FCE) on fatty liver, hypercholesterolemia, and liver injury in rats exposed to chloretone. Furthermore, we examined the effects of major FCE components (fat and protein fractions) to determine the active components in FCE. Chloretone increased serum aminotransferase activities and led to hepatic lipid accumulation. Serum aminotransferase activities and hepatic lipid content were lower in rats fed total FCE or fat/protein fractions of FCE. Expression of fatty acid synthase and fatty acid desaturase genes was upregulated by chloretone. Total FCE and fat/protein fractions of FCE suppressed the increase in gene expression involved in fatty acid synthesis. Serum cholesterol levels increased twofold upon chloretone exposure. Total FCE or fat/protein fractions of FCE showed hypocholesterolemic effects in rats with hypercholesterolemia induced by chloretone. These suggest that FCE contains at least two active components against fatty liver, hypercholesterolemia, and liver injury in rats exposed to chloretone. PMID:25704646

  13. Toxicity of fishery chemicals to the asiatic clam, Corbicula manilensis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chandler, Jack H.; Marking, L.L.

    1979-01-01

    The Asiatic clam (Corbicula manilensis), a species introduced into U. S. waters, has spread rapidly, and its ability to survive, reproduce, and spread has caused concern. Aquatic biologists suspect that the clams may crowd out indigenous mollusks, and the animals sometimes plug water intakes and leave shell deposits that interfere with sand and gravel operations. The toxicity of 20 commonly used fishery chemicals to the Asiatic clam was determined to evaluate hazards to a nontarget aquatic invertebrate and to assess the potential of the chemicals for controlling clam populations. Among six piscicides and two lampricides tested, antimycin was most toxic to the clam; the 96-h LC50 was 0.065 mg/L. Among three therapeutants and two disinfectants tested, nifurpirinol was the most toxic; the 96-h LC50 was 7.60 mg/L. All of the compounds were less toxic to the clam than to fish. As a nontarget organism, this clam would be safe in water treated with any of the tested fishery chemicals at recommended use pattern concentrations. None of the chemicals have potential for controlling unwanted populations of these clams.

  14. Filter-feeding bivalves can remove avian influenza viruses from water and reduce infectivity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avian influenza (AI) viruses are transmitted within wild aquatic bird populations through an indirect fecal-oral route involving fecal-contaminated water. In this study, the influence of filter-feeding bivalves, Corbicula fluminea, on the infectivity of AI virus in water was examined. A single cla...

  15. Climate controls the distribution of a widespread invasive species: Implications for future range expansion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McDowell, W.G.; Benson, A.J.; Byers, J.E.

    2014-01-01

    1. Two dominant drivers of species distributions are climate and habitat, both of which are changing rapidly. Understanding the relative importance of variables that can control distributions is critical, especially for invasive species that may spread rapidly and have strong effects on ecosystems. 2. Here, we examine the relative importance of climate and habitat variables in controlling the distribution of the widespread invasive freshwater clam Corbicula fluminea, and we model its future distribution under a suite of climate scenarios using logistic regression and maximum entropy modelling (MaxEnt). 3. Logistic regression identified climate variables as more important than habitat variables in controlling Corbicula distribution. MaxEnt modelling predicted Corbicula's range expansion westward and northward to occupy half of the contiguous United States. By 2080, Corbicula's potential range will expand 25–32%, with more than half of the continental United States being climatically suitable. 4. Our combination of multiple approaches has revealed the importance of climate over habitat in controlling Corbicula's distribution and validates the climate-only MaxEnt model, which can readily examine the consequences of future climate projections. 5. Given the strong influence of climate variables on Corbicula's distribution, as well as Corbicula's ability to disperse quickly and over long distances, Corbicula is poised to expand into New England and the northern Midwest of the United States. Thus, the direct effects of climate change will probably be compounded by the addition of Corbicula and its own influences on ecosystem function.

  16. Asiatic clam (Corbicula manilensis) and other foods used by waterfowl in the James River, Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perry, M.C.; Uhler, F.M.

    1981-01-01

    Corbicula manilensis was found in the gizzards of 24 ducks of 5 species taken from the James River, Virginia, between 1973 and 1976. Percent average volume in these species ranged from trace to 6%. This is the first known occurrence of this exotic clam in the food of duck in Chesapeake Bay. A total of 135 other food items was identified from the 116 gizzards of 9 species that were examined. Food that predominated included Cyperus spp., Leersia oryzoides, Polygonum spp., and Zea mays. The great diversity of food consumed in this fresh tidal section of the James River indicates the high value of these wetlands to waterfowl.

  17. Annual harvests of Corbicula populations prevent clogging of nuclear reactor heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, R.S.

    1983-01-01

    An annual program for removal of millions of Corbicula from upstream cooling water basins has prevented reclogging of nuclear reactor heat exchanger distributor plates at the Savannah River Plant during the past seven years. There are nine 32-megaliter basins in the three operating reactor areas where some settling of particulates occurs before cooling water is passed through screens in route to heat exchangers. Annual cleanings keep silt/clam substrate levels low and clam sizes small. Data are presented on the size/age distribution for clams recolonizing basins between cleanings.

  18. Rapid evolution of sessility in an endemic species flock of the freshwater bivalve Corbicula from ancient lakes on Sulawesi, Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    von Rintelen, Thomas; Glaubrecht, Matthias

    2005-01-01

    The fauna of ancient lakes frequently contains taxa with highly derived morphologies that resulted from in situ radiation of lacustrine lineages with high antiquity. We employed a molecular mtDNA phylogeny to investigate this claim for corbiculid freshwater bivalves in two ancient lake systems on the Indonesian island Sulawesi. Among the otherwise mobile corbiculid species flock, only one taxon, Posostrea anomioides, in the ancient Lake Poso exhibits a unique habit, i.e. cementing one valve to the substrate. Our data show that Corbicula on Sulawesi is polyphyletic, with the endemic riverine taxa in terminal position, and the lacustrine species flock being paraphyletic. Surprisingly, Posostrea is not confirmed as a genus distinct from Corbicula and genetic distances suggest a rather recent origin from the only other corbiculid species endemic to Lake Poso, the non-cementing Corbicula possoensis. While the cementing anomioides, despite its unique behavioural and morphological characteristics, clusters together with non-sessile Corbicula species, the latter exhibit strong genetic distances in the absence of morphological disparity and fall into several genetically rather distinct clades. These findings suggest that developmental plasticity of animals in ancient lakes rather than the antiquity of lineages might account for the unique morphology of some species. PMID:17148330

  19. Linking terrestrial and estuarine ecosystems: Organic matter sources supporting the high secondary production of a non-indigenous bivalve

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Asian clam Corbicula fluminea is one of the most pervasive species in freshwater ecosystems. Our objective was to characterize the trophic interactions of C. fluminea in the Minho river estuary (NW-Iberian Peninsula, Europe), an estuarine ecosystem in which C. fluminea presen...

  20. Factors affecting growth and survival of the asiatic clam Corbicula sp. under controlled laboratory conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Double, D.D.; Daly, D.S.; Abernethy, C.S.

    1983-04-01

    Growth of Corbicula sp. was determined in relation to food supply, water temperature, and clam size as an aid to researchers conducting chronic effects toxicity studies. Water temperatures for the two 84-day test series were 10, 20, and 30/sup 0/C. Linear models provided good relationships (r/sup 2/ > 0.90) between clam shell length (SL), total weight (TW), and wet/dry tissue weights. Clam growth was minimal during low phytoplankton densities (approx. 300 cells/ml), and all three size groups lost weight at 20 and 30/sup 0/C. Mortality of small clams at 30/sup 0/C was 100% after 71 days. At phytoplankton densities > 1000 cells/ml, overall differences in growth with respect to clam size and temperature were detectable at p < 0.01; growth of all clam groups was greatest at 30/sup 0/C. Small clams exhibited the greatest absolute increase in mean shell length at all test temperatures, and weight gains were similar to those of medium and large clams.

  1. Effects of copper on adult and early life stages of the freshwater clam, Corbicula manilensis

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, F.L.; Knezovich, J.P.; Rice, D.W. Jr.

    1981-09-01

    The copper sensitivity of adult and larval stages of the freshwater clam Corbicula manilensis was evaluated. In addition, copper concentrations in adult clams exposed for 4 to 10 wks to copper in a high-volume, flow-through bioassay are determined. The response of these clams to copper depended on life stage. Copper sensitivity of larvae decreased markedly in successive developmental stages. The LC50/sub 24/s of veliger and juvenile larve were 28 and 600 ..mu..g Cu/L, respectively. The mortality of trochophore larvae exposed to 10 ..mu..g Cu/L for 1 h was 91.5%. The sensitivity to copper decreased with the amount of larval shell deposition. Adult clams were resistant to copper; the LC50/sub 96/ was greater than 2600 ..mu..g Cu/L. By comparison the incipient concentration (ILC) was low - less than 10 ..mu..g Cu/L. Adult clams accumulated more copper as copper concentrations in the water increased. Evidence for copper loss near or at death was obtained.

  2. Accumulation of trace elements, pesticides, and polychlorinated biphenyls in sediments and the clam Corbicula manilensis of the Apalachicola River, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elder, J.F.; Mattraw, H.C., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    A survey of trace element and synthetic organic compound concentrations in botton materials was conducted on the Apalachichola River in northwest Florida in 1979-80 as part of the Apalachicola River Quality Assessment. Substances analyzed included trace elements (predominantly heavy metals), organochlorine insecticides, organophosphorus insecticides, chlorinated phenoxy-acid herbicides, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Three kinds of materials were surveyed: fine-grained sediments, whole-body tissue of the Asiatic clam Corbicula manilensis, and bottom-load organic detritus. No hazardous levels of any of the substances were found. Concentrations in the fine-grained sediments and clams were generally at least ten times lower than maximum limits considered safe for biota of aquatic systems. A comparison of trace-substance data from the Apalachicola River with data from Lake Seminole (upstream) and Apalachicola Bay (downstream) showed lower concentrations in riverine clams. Sediment concentrations in all parts of the system were comparable. Most trace substances in the Apalachicola River enter the river from the upstream part of the basin (the Chattahoochee and Flint Rivers in Georgia and Alabama) and from nonpoint sources throughout the basin. There are no major point discharges along the Apalachicola. Trend analysis was limited by the scope of the study, but did not reveal any spatial or temporal trends in concentrations of any of the substances analyzed. Concentrations of organic compounds and most metals in Corbicula manilensis did not correlate with those in sediments.

  3. Accumulation and tissue distribution of radioiodine ( sup 131 I) from algal phytoplankton by the freshwater clam Corbicula manilensis

    SciTech Connect

    Cuvin-Aralar, Ma.L.A. ); Umaly, R.C. )

    1991-12-01

    Radioactive wastes discharged from establishments involved in the use of radioisotopes such as nuclear-powered industries, tracer research and nuclear medicine are a potential public health hazard. Such wastes contain radionuclides, particularly Iodine-131 ({sup 131}I), produced in fission with a yield of about 3%. Radionuclides in waste waters are known to be taken up by molluscs such as mussels, oysters, and clams. This study aims to determine the uptake of {sup 131}I from algal phytoplankton (Chroococcus dispersus) fed to the freshwater clam Corbicula manilensis as well as the organ/tissue distribution. The results will be compared with a previous study on {sup 131}I uptake from water by the same clams.

  4. Assimilation of terrigenous organic matter via bacterial biomass as a food source for a brackish clam, Corbicula japonica (Mollusca: Bivalva)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, Toshiro; Mizota, Chitoshi; Maki, Yonosuke; Matsumasa, Masatoshi

    2013-07-01

    Corbicula japonica collected from the Kitakami River estuary, northeastern Japan, showed lower δ34S values in soft-body parts (+1.7 to +11.0‰) than the ambient seawater sulfate sulfur (+21‰), and this value gradually decreased at successive sites up to 15.8 km upstream from the river mouth. Previous study using carbon and nitrogen isotopes suggests that the bivalve nonselectively assimilates particulate organic matter of marine and terrestrial origin by filter feeding. This pattern in δ34S values may indicate a considerable contribution of a food source derived from terrigenous organic matter, which has low δ34S values close to 0‰, and the bivalve has been reported to have cellulase and hemicellulase activities. Unique fatty acids (iso 17:0 and anteiso 17:0 acids), both characteristic of sulfate-reducing bacteria, were observed in the salt-free, soft-body parts of the bivalve. The concentration of monounsaturated fatty acids, possibly derived from bacteria, was also high. Trace amounts of a polyunsaturated fatty acid (20:5ω3) specific to dinoflagellates were detected. In Corbicula habitats, reductive sandy layers with ample sulfides that were sporadically intercalated into the oxidative sandy sediment were often observed. The stable isotopic signatures of sediment sulfides (acid-volatile sulfide) and associated pore-water sulfates were -8.9 to +8.6‰ and +22.4 to +26.3‰, respectively, indicating the existence of bacterial sulfate-reducing activity and thiobios biomass. These isotopic signatures of the sediment, with the fatty acid composition of the bivalve, confirm the importance of a food source derived from bacteria belonging to the thiobios in the substrate sediments via pedal feeding, rather than direct digestion of terrigenous organic matter, in this estuarine ecosystem.

  5. Dynamic changes in the accumulation of metabolites in brackish water clam Corbicula japonica associated with alternation of salinity.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Hiroki; Okamoto, Seiji; Watanabe, Naoki; Hoshino, Naoshige; Jimbo, Mitsuru; Yasumoto, Ko; Watabe, Shugo

    2015-03-01

    The brackish water clam Corbicula japonica inhabits rivers and brackish waters throughout Japan where the major fishing grounds in the Ibaraki Prefecture, Japan, are located at the Hinuma Lake and Hinuma River. Water salinity in the Lake Hinuma is low and stable due to the long distance from the Pacific Ocean, whereas that in the downstream of the river varies daily due to a strong effect of tidal waters. In the present study, we dissected the gill and foot muscle of brackish water clam collected from these areas, and subjected them to metabolome analysis by capillary electrophoresis-time-of-flight mass spectrometry. More than 200 metabolites including free amino acids, peptides and organic acids were identified, and their amounts from the foot muscle tend to be higher than those from the gill. The principal component analysis revealed that the amount of each metabolite was different among sampling areas and between the gill and foot muscle, whereas no apparent differences were observed between male and female specimens. When the metabolites in the female clam at high salinity were compared with those at low salinity, concentrations of β-alanine, choline, γ-aminobutyric acid, ornithine and glycine betaine were found to be changed in association with salinity. We also compared various metabolites in relation to metabolic pathways, suggesting that many enzymes were involved in their changes depending on salinity. PMID:25455471

  6. Closeout of IE Bulletin 81-03: flow blockage of cooling water to safety system components by Corbicula sp. (Asiatic clam) and Mytilus sp. (mussel)

    SciTech Connect

    Rains, J.H.; Foley, W.J.; Hennick, A.

    1984-06-01

    On April 10, 1981, the Office of Inspection and Enforcement (IE) of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued Bulletin 81-03 requiring all nuclear generating unit licensees to assess the potential for biofouling of safety-related system components as a result of Asiatic clams (Corbicula sp.) and marine mussels (Mytilus sp.). An assessment of the areal extent of Asiatic clam and marine mussel infestation has been made along with an evaluation of detection and control procedures currently in use by licensees. Recommendations are provided with regard to adequacy of detection, inspection and prevention practices currently in use, biocidal treatment programs, and additional areas of concern. Safety implications and licensee responsibilities are discussed. Of 79 facilities licensed to operate, 17 have reported biofouling problems, 21 are judged to have high biofouling potential, 17 are judged to have low or future potential, and 24 are judged to have little or no potential. For 49 facilities under construction, the number of units for matching conditions of biofouling are 3, 25, 15, and 6 in the same decreasing order of severity.

  7. Assessing the potential of the European Atlantic sturgeon Acipenser sturio to control bivalve invasions in Europe.

    PubMed

    Ferreira-Rodriguez, N; Gessner, J; Pardo, I

    2016-08-01

    This pilot study explored the potential of juvenile European Atlantic sturgeon Acipenser sturio to feed on two invasive bivalve species, the Asian clam Corbicula fluminea and the Eurasian zebra mussel Dreissena polymorpha. Preliminary results indicate that native A. sturio were feeding on D. polymorpha at a very limited rate and their potential to prevent the establishment of invasive bivalve species, in new and previously invaded areas, is considered limited. PMID:27238016

  8. Filter-feeding bivalves can remove avian influenza viruses from water and reduce infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Faust, Christina; Stallknecht, David; Swayne, David; Brown, Justin

    2009-01-01

    Avian influenza (AI) viruses are believed to be transmitted within wild aquatic bird populations through an indirect faecal–oral route involving contaminated water. This study examined the influence of filter-feeding bivalves, Corbicula fluminea, on the infectivity of AI virus in water. Clams were placed into individual flasks with distilled water inoculated 1:100 with a low pathogenic (LP) AI virus (A/Mallard/MN/190/99 (H3N8)). Viral titres in water with clams were significantly lower at 24 and 48 h post-inoculation compared to LPAI-infected water without clams. To determine whether clams affected the infectivity of AI viruses, 18 wood ducks (Aix sponsa) were divided into test groups and inoculated with a variety of treatments of clam supernatants, whole clams and water exposed to a high pathogenic (HP) AI (A/whooper swan/Mongolia/244/05 (H5N1)). None of the wood ducks inoculated with HPAI-infected water that was filtered by clams or that was inoculated with or fed tissue from these clams exhibited morbidity or mortality. All wood ducks exposed to either HPAI-infected water without clams or the original viral inoculum died. These results indicate that filter-feeding bivalves can remove and reduce the infectivity of AI viruses in water and demonstrate the need to examine biotic environmental factors that can influence AI virus transmission. PMID:19656788

  9. Tracing Cadmium in the Environment: an Evolving Stable Isotope Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullen, T. D.; Bouse, R. M.; Brown, C. L.; Croteau, M.; Luoma, S. N.; Topping, B. R.

    2005-05-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a trace constituent in rocks and waters, and like many transition metals is an essential dietary nutrient at low levels but highly toxic in elevated doses. In many respects, cadmium behaves chemically like calcium (Ca) and thus substitutes for Ca in liquid-solid partitioning reactions and generally follows Ca through biogeochemical cycles and metabolic processes. Cd is comprised of 8 stable isotopes, and given the isotopic systematics of environmental Ca it is likely that variations in the stable isotope composition of Cd in natural materials will result from both inorganic and biologic processes. In order to assess the potential of Cd isotope variations to reveal information about sources, metabolic and biogeochemical pathways and fates of environmental Cd, we have initiated a broad study of the stable isotope composition of Cd in a variety of natural and anthropogenically-influenced systems. As an example, here we report the results of the first systematic study of the stable isotope composition of Cd in biologic materials. We focused on the isotopic variability of Cd in tissues of two species of clam collected from the San Francisco Bay estuary, Potamocorbula amurensis which resides in brackish water and Corbicula fluminea which resides in fresh and slightly brackish water. Both clam species concentrate Cd in their soft and hard tissues. During both low-flow conditions in August and high-flow conditions in April, δ116Cd of soft tissues of Potamocorbula was consistently negative and increased down-estuary with increasing salinity (δ116Cd is defined as the per mil difference of the 116Cd/110Cd ratio between a sample and our standard, igneous rock BIR-1). Samples collected in August were systematically displaced to higher δ116Cd than those collected in April. Soft tissues of Corbicula collected in both August and April from upstream, fully fresh-water sampling sites had identical δ116Cd, while soft tissues of Corbicula collected from our site at

  10. Stable metal isotopes reveal copper accumulation and loss dynamics in the freshwater bivalve Corbucula

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Croteau, M.-N.; Luoma, S.N.; Topping, B.R.; Lopez, C.B.

    2004-01-01

    Characterization of uptake and loss dynamics is critical to understanding risks associated with contaminant exposure in aquatic animals. Dynamics are especially important in addressing questions such as why coexisting species in nature accumulate different levels of a contaminant. Here we manipulated copper (Cu) stable isotopic ratios (as an alternative to radioisotopes) to describe for the first time Cu dynamics in a freshwater invertebrate, the bivalve Corbicula fluminea. In the laboratory, Corbicula uptake and loss rate constants were determined from an environmentally realistic waterborne exposure to 65Cu (5.7 ??g L-1). That is, we spiked deionized water with Cu that was 99.4% 65Cu. Net tracer uptake was detectable after 1 day and strongly evident after 4 days. Thus, short-term exposures necessary to determine uptake dynamics are feasible with stable isotopes of Cu. In Corbicula, 65Cu depuration was biphasic. An unusually low rate constant of loss (0.0038 d-1) characterized the slow component of efflux, explaining why Corbicula strongly accumulates copper in nature. We incorporated our estimates of rate constants for dissolved 65Cu uptake and physiological efflux into a bioaccumulation model and showed that dietary exposure to Cu is likely an important bioaccumulation pathway for Corbicula.

  11. From water to land: How an invasive clam may function as a resource pulse to terrestrial invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Novais, Adriana; Souza, Allan T; Ilarri, Martina; Pascoal, Cláudia; Sousa, Ronaldo

    2015-12-15

    Resource pulses are episodes of low frequency, large magnitude and short duration that result in increased resource availability in space and time, with consequences for food web dynamics. Studies assessing the importance of resource pulses by invasive alien species in the interface between terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems are rare, especially those in the direction from water to land. This study assessed the importance of massive die-offs of the Asian clam Corbicula fluminea (Müller, 1774) as a resource pulse to the terrestrial invertebrate community after an extreme climatic event using a manipulative experiment. We used 5 levels of C. fluminea density (0, 100, 500, 1000 and 2000ind·m(-2)), with terrestrial invertebrates being censused 7, 30 and 90days after C. fluminea addition. We also assessed the possible effect of plots position, where plots that delimited the experiment were assigned as edge plots and the remaining as core plots. Clear differences were detected in abundance, biomass, richness and diversity of terrestrial invertebrates depending on the C. fluminea density, time and position. Interestingly, the highest abundance of adult Diptera was observed 7days after C. fluminea addition, whereas that of the other terrestrial invertebrates was on day 30, both with C. fluminea densities higher than 500ind·m(-2) located on the edge of the experimental design. This study highlights the importance of major resource pulses after massive die-offs of invasive bivalves, contributing with remarkable amounts of carrion for adjacent terrestrial systems. Part of this carrion can be consumed directly by a great number of invertebrate species while the remainder can enter the detrital food web. Given the high density and biomass attained by several invasive bivalves worldwide and the predicted increase in the number, intensity and magnitude of extreme climatic events, the ecological importance of this phenomenon should be further investigated. PMID:26327634

  12. Spatial and taxonomic variation in trace element bioaccumulation in two herbivores from a coal combustion waste contaminated stream.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Dean E; Lindell, Angela H; Stillings, Garrett K; Mills, Gary L; Blas, Susan A; Vaun McArthur, J

    2014-03-01

    Dissimilarities in habitat use, feeding habits, life histories, and physiology can result in syntopic aquatic taxa of similar trophic position bioaccumulating trace elements in vastly different patterns. We compared bioaccumulation in a clam, Corbicula fluminea and mayfly nymph Maccaffertium modestum from a coal combustion waste contaminated stream. Collection sites differed in distance to contaminant sources, incision, floodplain activity, and sources of flood event water and organic matter. Contaminants variably accumulated in both sediment and biofilm. Bioaccumulation differed between species and sites with C. fluminea accumulating higher concentrations of Hg, Cs, Sr, Se, As, Be, and Cu, but M. modestum higher Pb and V. Stable isotope analyses suggested both spatial and taxonomic differences in resource use with greater variability and overlap between species in the more physically disturbed site. The complex but essential interactions between organismal biology, divergence in resource use, and bioaccumulation as related to stream habitat requires further studies essential to understand impacts of metal pollution on stream systems. PMID:24507146

  13. Absence of sterols constrains food quality of cyanobacteria for an invasive freshwater bivalve.

    PubMed

    Basen, Timo; Rothhaupt, Karl-Otto; Martin-Creuzburg, Dominik

    2012-09-01

    The accumulation of cyanobacterial biomass may severely affect the performance of aquatic consumers. Here, we investigated the role of sterols in determining the food quality of cyanobacteria for the invasive clam Corbicula fluminea, which has become a common benthic invertebrate in many freshwater ecosystems throughout the world. In standardized growth experiments, juvenile clams were fed mixtures of different cyanobacteria (Anabaena variabilis, Aphanothece clathrata, Synechococcus elongatus) or sterol-containing eukaryotic algae (Cryptomonas sp., Nannochloropsis limnetica, Scenedesmus obliquus). In addition, the cyanobacterial food was supplemented with different sterols. We provide evidence that somatic growth of C. fluminea on cyanobacterial diets is constrained by the absence of sterols, as indicated by a growth-enhancing effect of sterol supplementation. Thus, our findings contribute to our understanding of the consequences of cyanobacterial mass developments for benthic consumers and highlight the importance of considering sterols as potentially limiting nutrients in aquatic food webs. PMID:22398861

  14. Bivalve fouling of nuclear power plant service-water systems. Volume 1. Correlation of bivalve biological characteristics and raw-water system design

    SciTech Connect

    Neitzel, D.A.; Johnson, K.I.; Page, T.L.; Young, J.S.; Daling, P.M.

    1984-12-01

    Fouling of raw-water systems in nuclear power plants in the US can affect the safe operation of a power plant. This report describes correlations between the biology of bivalve organisms and the design and operation of power plants that allow bivalves to enter and reside in nuclear power plants. Discussions are focused on safety-related raw-water systems subject to fouling by the Asiatic clam (Corbicula fluminea), the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis), and the American oyster (Crassostrea virginica). Score sheets to rate fouling potential of power plant systems and components are provided.

  15. Assessment of ametryn contamination in river water, river sediment, and mollusk bivalves in São Paulo state, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Jacomini, Analu Egydio; de Camargo, Plínio Barbosa; Avelar, Wagner Eustáquio Paiva; Bonato, Pierina Sueli

    2011-04-01

    São Paulo state, Brazil, is one of the main areas of sugar cane agriculture in the world. Herbicides, in particular, ametryn, are extensively used in this extensive area, which implies that this herbicide is present in the environment and can contaminate the surface water by running off. Thereby, residues of ametryn were analyzed in samples of river water an river sediment and in freshwater bivalves obtained from the rivers Sapucaí, Pardo and Mogi-Guaçu in São Paulo State, Brazil. Samples were taken in the winter of 2003 and 2004 in two locations in each river. The specimens of freshwater bivalves collected and analyzed were Corbicula fluminea, an exotic species, and Diplodon fontaineanus, a native species. Additionally, the evaluation of the ability of bioconcentration and depuration of ametryn by the freshwater bivalve Corbicula fluminea was also performed. Ametryn concentrations in the samples were measured by liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. Residues of ametryn in water (50 ng/L) and in freshwater bivalves (2-7 ng/g) were found in the Mogi-Guaçu River in 2004, and residues in river sediments were found in all rivers in 2003 and 2004 (0.5-2 ng/g). The observation of the aquatic environment through the analysis of these matrixes, water, sediment, and bivalves, revealed the importance of the river sediment in the accumulation of the herbicide ametryn, which can contaminate the biota. PMID:20567812

  16. Strontium and barium incorporation into freshwater bivalve shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Liqiang; Schöne, Bernd R.

    2015-04-01

    Despite strong vital control, trace elements of bivalve shells can potentially serve as proxies of environmental change. However, to reconstruct past environments with the geochemical properties of the shells and determine the degree to which the element levels are biologically influenced, it is essential to experimentally determine the relationship between environmental variables and the element composition of the shells. In particular, the trace element geochemistry of freshwater bivalve shells has so far received little attention. Here, we present a controlled laboratory experiment that aimed at providing a better understanding of the influence of changing environmental variables on the incorporation of trace elements into freshwater bivalve shells. Under controlled conditions, Asian clams Corbicula fluminea were reared for 5 weeks in three sets of experiments: (1) different water temperature (10, 16, and 22° C) and different food levels (an equally mixed Scenedesmu quadricanda and Chlorella vulgaris at rations of 0.4, 2, 4, and 8 × 104 cells ml-1 d-1); (2) different water temperature (10, 16, and 22° C) and different element levels (Sr, Ba); (3) five sediment types (sand, slightly muddy sand, muddy sand, slightly sandy mud and mud). In the first set of experiments, shell Sr/Ca showed a significantly negative correlation with temperature, where Sr/Ca decreased linearly by about 1.6 to 2.1% per 1° C, but responded far more weakly to food availability. On the other hand, temperature and food availability affected shell Ba/Ca ratios, which potentially confounds the interpretation of Ba/Ca variations. Moreover, shell Sr/Ca and Ba/Ca exhibited a clearly negative dependence on shells growth rate that varied significantly among combinations of temperature and food availability. In the second set of experiments, shell Sr/Ca and Ba/Ca were positively and linearly related to water Sr/Ca and Ba/Ca for all temperatures. However, significantly negative effects of

  17. Zooplankton variability and larval striped bass foraging: Evaluating potential match/mismatch regulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chick, J.H.; Van Den Avyle, M.J.

    1999-01-01

    We quantified temporal and spatial variability of zooplankton in three potential nursery sites (river, transition zone, lake) for larval striped bass (Morone saxatilis) in Lake Marion, South Carolina, during April and May 1993-1995. In two of three years, microzooplankton (rotifers and copepod nauplii) density was significantly greater in the lake site than in the river or transition zone. Macrozooplankton (>200 ??m) composition varied among the three sites in all years with adult copepods and cladocerans dominant at the lake, and juvenile Corbicula fluminea dominant at the river and transition zone. Laboratory feeding experiments, simulating both among-site (site treatments) and within-site (density treatments) variability, were conducted in 1995 to quantify the effects of the observed zooplankton variability on foraging success of larval striped bass. A greater proportion of larvae fed in the lake than in the river or transition-zone treatments across all density treatments: mean (x), 10x and 100x. Larvae also ingested significantly more dry mass of prey in the lake treatment in both the mean and 10x density treatments. Field zooplankton and laboratory feeding data suggest that both spatial and temporal variability of zooplankton influence larval striped bass foraging. Prey density levels that supported successful foraging in our feeding experiments occurred in the lake during late April and May in 1994 and 1995 but were never observed in the river or transition zone. Because the rivers flowing into Lake Marion are regulated, it may be possible to devise flow management schemes that facilitate larval transport to the lake and thereby increase the proportion of larvae matched to suitable prey resources.

  18. Sensory determinants of valve rhythm dynamics provide in situ biodetection of copper in aquatic environments.

    PubMed

    Jou, Li-John; Chen, Bo-Ching; Chen, Wei-Yu; Liao, Chung-Min

    2016-03-01

    This study successfully applied an improved valvometry technique to measure waterborne copper (Cu), based on valve activity dynamics of the freshwater clam Corbicula fluminea. The improved valvometry technique allows the use of free-range bivalves and avoids causing stresses from experimental artifacts. The proposed daily valve rhythm models and a toxicodynamics-based Hill model were linked to predict valve dynamic responses under different Cu exposures with a circadian valve rhythm endpoint. Cu-specific detection threshold was 5.6 (95 % CI 2.1-9.3) and 19.5 (14.6-24.3) μg L(-1) for C. fluminea, based on response times of 300 and 30 min, respectively. Upon exposure to Cu concentrations in excess of 50 μg L(-1), the alteration of valve rhythm behavior was correlated with Cu concentration within 30 min, indicating notable sensing ability. This study outlines the feasibility of an in situ early warning dynamic biomonitoring system for detection of waterborne Cu based on circadian valve activities of C. fluminea. PMID:26564192

  19. Predator prey interactions of Procambarus clarkii with aquatic macroinvertebrates in single and multiple prey systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correia, Alexandra Marçal; Bandeira, Nuno; Anastácio, Pedro Manuel

    2005-11-01

    Understanding the interspecific interactions of Procambarus clarkii with other aquatic macroinvertebrates will help to unveil the mechanisms and processes underlying biological invasiveness. The purpose of this study was to investigate predator-prey interactions of two ontogenic phases of P. clarkii with native and exotic species of aquatic macroinvertebrates at a single and multiple prey level. We performed laboratory experiments to determine the consumption and the behavioral responses of Chironomus riparius, Physa acuta and Corbicula fluminea to P. clarkii. The presence of P. clarkii significantly affected the abundance of C. riparius and P. acuta, but not of C. fluminea whether prey species were provided singly or simultaneously. The consumption of C. riparius by P. clarkii was higher than P. acuta for both crayfish sizes and situations (single/multiple prey systems) and C. fluminea was never consumed. Physa acuta was the only species that exhibited an anti-predator behavior to P. clarkii. Our results show that P. clarkii can have strong consumptive and trait effects on aquatic macroinvertebrate prey at a single and multiple prey level, resulting in differential impacts on different prey species. This study clarifies some aspects of the predator-prey interactions between P. clarkii and native as well as other exotic macroinvertebrate species that have invaded freshwater biocenosis worldwide.

  20. Suspended material availability and filtration-biodeposition processes performed by a native and invasive bivalve species in streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Atkinson, C.L.; First, M.R.; Covich, A.P.; Opsahl, S.P.; Golladay, S.W.

    2011-01-01

    Unionid mussels are among the most threatened group of freshwater organisms globally. They are known for their ability to filter food particles from flowing and standing waters. However, invasive bivalve species, such as the Asian clam (Corbicula fluminea) in North America, have the potential to overlap in feeding and potentially out-compete the native species. Yet, the feeding preferences of unionid mussels and C. fluminea are incompletely understood. We hypothesized that Elliptio crassidens (native) and C. fluminea (invasive) would select for specific organic components present within seston. We examined changes in seston (dry mass and ash-free dry mass) resulting from bivalve feeding activity for three size classes of material that were isolated using gravimetric filtration. The treatments were also sub-sampled for flow cytometry (FC) which separated the suspended materials in the stream water into five categories: detritus, heterotrophic bacteria, picoautotrophs, nanoautotrophs, and heterotrophic nanoeukaryotes. Our results indicated that both species of bivalve showed preferences for organic and living materials. E. crassidens preferentially filtered nanoeukaryotes, whose decreases were associated with an increase in bacteria. In contrast, C. fluminea preferred smaller materials through selective filtration of picoautotrophs. In addition, both species increased the concentration of large materials toward the end of the experiment because of the suspension of their pseudofeces biodeposits. To our knowledge, this study is the first to examine grazing by bivalve species on natural stream particulate matter using FC. Our results suggest that native and non-native mussels have different functional roles, which has important implications for organic matter processing and food webs in streams. ?? 2011 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  1. Accumulation of selenium in benthic bivalves and fine-grained sediments of San Francisco Bay, the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, and selected tributaries, 1984-1986

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johns, C.; Luoma, S.N.

    1987-01-01

    Fine-grained, oxidized, surface sediments and two benthic bivalves (Corbicula sp., a suspension-feeding freshwater clam, and Macoma balthica, a deposit-feeding brackish water clam) were used to examine spatial distributions of selenium within San Francisco Bay and the Sacramento/San Joaquin River Delta and to compare riverine with local inputs of biologically available selenium to this large, complex, urbanized estuary. Selenium concentrations in Corbicula were elevated in the western Delta and northern reach of San Francisco Bay compared to concentrations in Corbicula from river systems not enriched in selenium. Biologically available selenium did not appear to enter the southern Delta or northern reach of the Bay from the San Joaquin River, a possible source, in levels that could measurably influence bioaccumulation by Corbicula. Selenium concentrations in Macoma balthica also were elevated in southern South San Francisco Bay and near the western edge of Suisun Bay.

  2. A diagnostic molecular marker for zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) and potentially co-occurring bivalves: mitochondrial COI.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, B S; Black, M; Sanjur, O; Gustafson, R; Lutz, R A; Vrijenhoek, R C

    1996-03-01

    We report diagnostic differences in the nucleotide sequences of a 710-bp fragment of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene (COI) from the zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) and potentially co-occurring bivalves: the quagga mussel (Dreissena bugensis); the Asiatic clam (Corbicula fluminea), the dark false mussel (Mytilopsis leucophaeata), and the wedge clam (Rangia cuneata). The COI sequence of the deep-water "profunda" phenotype of the quagga mussel was nearly identical to that of shallow-water quagga mussels. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) in this portion of COI produced species-specific differences in fragment numbers and sizes that could be used as diagnostic markers to distinguish the free-living larvae produced by these bivalves. PMID:8869514

  3. Effects of cationic surfactant exposure to a bivalve mollusc in stream mesocosms

    SciTech Connect

    Belanger, S.E.; Davidson, D.H.; Cherry, D.S. . Environmental Science Dept.); Farris, J.L.; Reed, D. . Univ. Center for Environmental and Hazardous Materials Studies and Biology Dept.)

    1993-10-01

    Effects of the cationic surfactant lauryl trimethyl ammonium chloride (C[sub 12]-TMAC) on growth, reproduction, cellulolytic enzyme activity, and larval colonization of Asiatic clams (Corbicula fluminea) were investigated in experimental stream mesocosms. Clams from three different populations and of two known morphotypes were evaluated for growth in two 8-week experiments in fall 1989 and spring 1990. Growth was impaired at 185 [mu]g/L. It is not known at this time to what extent the effects on pediveligers would be manifested relative to recruitment to later life stages. These findings were compared to a published safety assessment for mono-alkyl quanternaries, of which TMAC is a member. The findings reported here do not substantially alter conclusions from previous studies; however, clams appear to be among the more sensitive taxa studied thus far.

  4. [Macrobenthic community structure and bioassessment for water quality of Banqiao Reservoir in Huaihe River basin].

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei-sheng; Gu, Qian-hong; Dong, Jing; Cheng, Qing-qing; Li, Xue-jun; Zhang, Man

    2015-09-01

    In order to demonstrate macrobenthic community structure dynamics and conduct a biological evaluation of water quality in Banqiao Reservoir, we collected seasonal samples from January to November 2014 across 15 sampling sites. A total of 17 species belonging to five families, four classes, and 3 phyla were identified, including 8 chironomidae, 4 oligochaeta and 5 mollusc. Bellamya aeruginosa, Corbicula fluminea, Branchiura sowerbyi, Pelopia sp. and Glyptotendipes sp. were the important species in Banqiao Reservoir. The total density, biomass and biodiversity of marobenthos showed significant spatial and temporal differences. ANOSIM analysis indicated that the macrobenthic community structure also differed significantly among regions and seasons, and the main contributing species were Glyptotendipes sp., Pelopia sp. and B. sowerbyi. The abundance-biomass comparison curves (ABC curves) indicated that the current macrobenthic community in Banqiao Reservoir was stable. Combined with the biodiversity index, biological pollution index (BPI) and Hilsenhoff biotic index (BI), it was suggested that Banqiao Reservoir suffered slight pollution. PMID:26785570

  5. Identifying major pesticides affecting bivalve species exposed to agricultural pollution using multi-biomarker and multivariate methods.

    PubMed

    Damásio, Joana; Navarro-Ortega, Alícia; Tauler, Romà; Lacorte, Silvia; Barceló, Damià; Soares, Amadeu M V M; López, Miguel Angel; Riva, Mari Carmen; Barata, Carlos

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this investigation was to identify major pesticides that may cause detrimental effects in bivalve species affected by agricultural pollution. Investigations were carried out using freshwater clams (Corbicula fluminea) transplanted in the main drainage channels that collect the effluents coming from agriculture fields in the Ebro Delta (NE Spain) during the main growing season of rice (from May to August). Environmental hazards were assessed by measuring simultaneous up 46 contaminant levels and 9 biomarker responses. Measured biological responses showed marked differences across sites and months. Antioxidant and esterase enzyme responses were in most cases inhibited. Lipid peroxidation levels increased steadily from May in upstream stations to August in drainage channels. Principal Component (PCA) and Partial Least Squares to Latent Structure regression (PLS) analyses allowed the identification of endosulfan, propanil, and phenylureas as being the chemical contaminants causing the most adverse effects in the studied species. PMID:20369380

  6. Evaluation of Using Caged Clams to Monitor Contaminated Groundwater Exposure in the Near-Shore Environment of the Hanford Site 300 Area

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, Kyle B.; Poston, Ted M.; Tiller, Brett L.

    2008-01-31

    The Asiatic clam (Corbicula fluminea) has been identified as an indicator species for locating and monitoring contaminated groundwater in the Columbia River. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted a field study to explore the use of caged Asiatic clams to monitor contaminated groundwater upwelling in the 300 Area near-shore environment and assess seasonal differences in uranium uptake in relation to seasonal flow regimes of the Columbia River. Additional objectives included examining the potential effects of uranium accumulation on growth, survival, and tissue condition of the clams. This report documents the field conditions and procedures, laboratory procedures, and statistical analyses used in collecting samples and processing the data. Detailed results are presented and illustrated, followed by a discussion comparing uranium concentrations in Asiatic clams collected at the 300 Area and describing the relationship between river discharge, groundwater indicators, and uranium in clams. Growth and survival, histology, and other sources of environmental variation also are discussed.

  7. Mercury in freshwater fish and clams from the Cerro Prieto geothermal field of Baja California, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Gutierrez-Galindo, E.A.; Munoz, G.F.; Flores, A.A.

    1988-08-01

    Several reports have expressed concern about the potential toxicity hazards and environmental contamination of mercury emissions from geothermal fields in Hawaii, New Zealand, Iceland, California and Mexico. Inorganic mercury discharged from the sources may accumulate in the sediments of rivers or lakes and, after microbiological methylation may become concentrated in the edible tissue of fish. This study involves assessment of geothermal mercury pollution arising from Cerro Prieto. For this purpose the fish Tilapia mossambica and the clam Corbicula fluminea were collected from the freshwater courses of the Mexicali Valley. Reports indicated that in 1982, 13 t of T. mossambica were destinated for human consumption. A further aim was to provide base line data and information relevant to the level of mercury contamination for the Mexicali Valley.

  8. Occurrence and concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in semipermeable membrane devices and clams in three urban streams of the Dallas-Fort Worth Metropolitan Area, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moring, J.B.; Rose, D.R.

    1997-01-01

    Semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) and Asiatic clams, Corbicula fluminea (MuLLER), were deployed at stream sites in the Dallas-Fort Worth Metropolitan Area to assess the presence of bioavailable, dissolved polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Twenty-four PAHs were detected in SPMDs, 20 of which occurred at all sites. Only three PAHs were detected in the co-deployed clams. Throughout all sites, non-alkylated PAHs were found at greater levels in SPMDs than alkylated forms. Nine of 16 Priority Pollutant PAHs were detected in SPMDs. Estimated concentrations of PAHs in water were generally two to three orders of magnitude less than standard minimum analytical reporting levels; however, for bent (a) anthracene, benzo (a) pyrene, and chrysene, estimated concentrations in water exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's human health criteria for these carcinogens in water and aquatic organisms.

  9. Mercury bioaccumulation and biomagnification in Ozarkstream ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmitt, C.J.; Stricker, C.A.; Brumbaugh, W.G.

    2011-01-01

    Crayfish (Orconectes spp.), Asian clam (Corbicula fluminea), northern hog sucker (hog sucker; Hypentelium nigricans), and smallmouth bass (smallmouth; Micropterus dolomieu) from streams in southeastern Missouri (USA) were analyzed for total mercury (HgT) and for stable isotopes of carbon (δ¹³C), nitrogen (δ¹⁵N), and sulfur (δ³⁴S) to discern Hg transfer pathways. HgT concentrations were generally lowest in crayfish (0.005-0.112 μg/g dw) and highest in smallmouth (0.093-4.041 μg/g dw), as was δ¹⁵N. HgT was also lower and δ¹⁵N was higher in all biota from a stream draining a more heavily populated historical lead-zinc mining area than from similar sites with mostly undeveloped forested watersheds. δ¹³C in biota was lowest at spring-influenced sites, reflecting CO₂ inputs and temperature influences, and δ³⁴S increased from south to north in all taxa. However, HgT was not strongly correlated with either δ¹³C or δ³⁴S in biota. Trophic position (TP) computed from crayfish δ¹⁵N was lower in hog suckers (mean=2.8) than in smallmouth (mean=3.2), but not at all sites. HgT, δ¹³C, δ³⁴,/sup>S, and TP in hog suckers increased with total length (length) at some sites, indicating site-specific ontogenetic diet shifts. Changes with length were less evident in smallmouth. Length-adjusted HgT site means in both species were strongly correlated with HgT in crayfish (r²=0.97, P²=0.02, P>0.05). ANCOVA and regression models incorporating only TP and, for hog suckers, length, accurately and precisely predicted HgT concentrations in both fish species from all locations. Although low compared to many areas of the USA, HgT (and therefore methylmercury) concentrations in smallmouth and hog suckers are sufficiently high to represent a threat to human health and wildlife. Our data indicate that in Ozark streams, Hg concentrations in crayfish are at least partly determined by their diet, with concentrations in hog suckers, smallmouth, and possibly

  10. Mercury bioaccumulation and biomagnification in Ozark stream ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmitt, Christopher J.; Stricker, Craig A.; Brumbaugh, William G.

    2011-01-01

    Crayfish (Orconectes spp.), Asian clam (Corbicula fluminea), northern hog sucker (hog sucker; Hypentelium nigricans), and smallmouth bass (smallmouth; Micropterus dolomieu) from streams in southeastern Missouri (USA) were analyzed for total mercury (HgT) and for stable isotopes of carbon (δ13C), nitrogen (δ15N), and sulfur (δ34S) to discern Hg transfer pathways. HgT concentrations were generally lowest in crayfish (0.005-0.112 μg/g dw) and highest in smallmouth (0.093-4.041 μg/g dw), as was δ15N. HgT was also lower and δ15N was higher in all biota from a stream draining a more heavily populated historical lead-zinc mining area than from similar sites with mostly undeveloped forested watersheds. δ13C in biota was lowest at spring-influenced sites, reflecting CO2 inputs and temperature influences, and δ34S increased from south to north in all taxa. However, HgT was not strongly correlated with either δ13C or δ34S in biota. Trophic position (TP) computed from crayfish δ15N was lower in hog suckers (mean=2.8) than in smallmouth (mean=3.2), but not at all sites. HgT, δ13C, δ34S, and TP in hog suckers increased with total length (length) at some sites, indicating site-specific ontogenetic diet shifts. Changes with length were less evident in smallmouth. Length-adjusted HgT site means in both species were strongly correlated with HgT in crayfish (r2=0.97, Pr2=0.02, P>0.05). NCOVA and regression models incorporating only TP and, for hog suckers, length, accurately and precisely predicted HgT concentrations in both fish species from all locations. Although low compared to many areas of the USA, HgT (and therefore methylmercury) concentrations in smallmouth and hog suckers are sufficiently high to represent a threat to human health and wildlife. Our data indicate that in Ozark streams, Hg concentrations in crayfish are at least partly determined by their diet, with concentrations in hog suckers, smallmouth, and possibly other higher-level consumers largely

  11. Effects of benthic macrofauna bioturbation on the bacterial community composition in lake sediments.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jin; Zhao, Da-Yong; Liu, Peng; Yu, Zhong-Bo; Huang, Rui; Wu, Qinglong L

    2014-08-01

    Benthic macrofauna are considered to be an important part of the lacustrine ecosystem, and bioturbation may greatly affect the biogeochemical processes and microbial activities in sediments. In the present study, the bacterial community composition in sediments inhabited by 3 different types of benthic macrofauna (Corbicula fluminea, Chironomidae larvae, and tubificid worms) in the shallow and eutrophic Lake Taihu was studied to investigate the different effects of bioturbation on the composition of these communities. Microcosms were constructed, and culture-independent methods, including terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and clone library analysis, were performed to evaluate the bacterial communities. Analysis of similarities (ANOSIM) and multidimensional scaling (MDS) analysis of T-RFLP patterns demonstrated that differences in the bacterial community composition between the control and the macrofauna-inhabited sediments were not as great as expected, although the chemical properties of the sediments changed remarkably. Nevertheless, the dominant bacterial group in each type of macrofauna-inhabited sediment was different. Acidobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, and Deltaproteobacteria were the dominant bacterial groups in sediments inhabited by C. fluminea, tubificid worms, and Chironomidae larvae, respectively. The data obtained in this study are helpful for understanding the effects of bioturbation in a shallow, eutrophic lake. PMID:25070418

  12. An Early Instance of Upper Palaeolithic Personal Ornamentation from China: The Freshwater Shell Bead from Shuidonggou 2

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yi; d’Errico, Francesco; Vanhaeren, Marian; Li, Feng; Gao, Xing

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery and present a detailed analysis of a freshwater bivalve from Shuidonggou Locality 2, layer CL3. This layer is located c. 40 cm below layer CL2, which has yielded numerous ostrich eggshell beads. The shell is identified as the valve of a Corbicula fluminea. Data on the occurrence of this species in the Shuidonggou region during Marine Isotope Stage 3 and taphonomic analysis, conducted in the framework of this study, of a modern biocoenosis and thanatocoenosis suggest that the archeological specimen was collected at one of the numerous fossil or sub-fossil outcrops where valves of this species were available at the time of occupation of level CL3. Experimental grinding and microscopic analysis of modern shells of the same species indicate that the Shuidonggou shell was most probably ground on coarse sandstone to open a hole on its umbo, attach a thread, and use the valve as a personal ornament. Experimental engraving of freshwater shells and microscopic analysis identify an incision crossing the archaeological valve outer surface as possible deliberate engraving. Reappraisal of the site chronology in the light of available radiocarbon evidence suggests an age of at least 34–33 cal kyr BP for layer CL3. Such estimate makes the C. fluminea recovered from CL3 one of the earliest instances of personal ornamentation and the earliest example of a shell bead from China. PMID:27227330

  13. An Early Instance of Upper Palaeolithic Personal Ornamentation from China: The Freshwater Shell Bead from Shuidonggou 2.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yi; d'Errico, Francesco; Vanhaeren, Marian; Li, Feng; Gao, Xing

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery and present a detailed analysis of a freshwater bivalve from Shuidonggou Locality 2, layer CL3. This layer is located c. 40 cm below layer CL2, which has yielded numerous ostrich eggshell beads. The shell is identified as the valve of a Corbicula fluminea. Data on the occurrence of this species in the Shuidonggou region during Marine Isotope Stage 3 and taphonomic analysis, conducted in the framework of this study, of a modern biocoenosis and thanatocoenosis suggest that the archeological specimen was collected at one of the numerous fossil or sub-fossil outcrops where valves of this species were available at the time of occupation of level CL3. Experimental grinding and microscopic analysis of modern shells of the same species indicate that the Shuidonggou shell was most probably ground on coarse sandstone to open a hole on its umbo, attach a thread, and use the valve as a personal ornament. Experimental engraving of freshwater shells and microscopic analysis identify an incision crossing the archaeological valve outer surface as possible deliberate engraving. Reappraisal of the site chronology in the light of available radiocarbon evidence suggests an age of at least 34-33 cal kyr BP for layer CL3. Such estimate makes the C. fluminea recovered from CL3 one of the earliest instances of personal ornamentation and the earliest example of a shell bead from China. PMID:27227330

  14. Indirect Selection for Antibiotic Resistance in Multiple Stream Microhabitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, M. S.; Peltier, G. L.; McArthur, J.

    2005-05-01

    One aspect challenging public health efforts to minimize the spread of antibiotic resistance (AR) is the prevalence of resistant bacteria in the environment. Anthropogenic-derived sources of selection are typically implicated as mechanisms for maintaining AR in the environment. Here we report an additional mechanism for maintaining AR in the environment through co- or cross-resistance to heavy metals. Using culture-independent techniques, bacteria isolated from heavy-metal contaminated sites were more tolerant of antibiotics and metals compared to those bacteria from a reference site. This evidence supports our hypothesis that metal contamination directly selects for metal tolerant bacteria while indirectly selecting for antibiotic tolerant bacteria. Additionally, to assess how antibiotic- and metal-tolerance may be transported through a stream network, we studied antibiotic and metal-tolerance patterns over four months in bacteria collected from multiple stream microhabitats including water column, biofilm, sediment, and Corbicula fluminea (Asiatic clam) digestive tracts. Sediment bacteria were the most tolerant to antibiotics and metals, while bacteria from Corbicula were the least tolerant. Differences between these microhabitats may be important for predicting antibiotic resistance transfer and transport in stream environments. Further, temporal dynamics suggest that tolerance patterns within microhabitats are linked to physico-chemical characteristics of the stream.

  15. Dynamics and control of the Asiatic clam in the New River, Virginia. Research report

    SciTech Connect

    Cherry, D.S.; Rodgers, J.H. Jr.; Graney, R.L.; Cairns, J. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The Asiatic clam, Corbicula fluminea, has invaded the New River at the rate of 9 miles a year from the Kanawha River, which enters downstream from the Glen Lyn coal-powered generating plant in Virginia. During the period of investigation, October 1976-September 1978, clams were more numerous in the vicinity of the thermal discharge of the plant than they were in unheated waters, and their population fell sharply during the winter months, when the water temperature dropped to approximately 2C. The temperature (35C) of the heated discharge water in late summer did not adversely affect the clam. High mortality occurred at temperatures greater or equal to 36C in laboratory thermal tolerance studies. The clam proved to be highly resistant to the conventional biocidal practice of intermittent chlorination and to exposure to heavy metals in both static and artificial stream bioassays. Copper was more toxic than either zinc or a combination of zinc and copper. Potassium was not an effective biocidal agent at low concentrations (less than 100 mg/l). Measurements of 42 elements in water, sediment, clam shell, and visceral tissue revealed that Corbicula was an efficient accumulator of many elements.

  16. Occurrence and accumulation of pesticides and organic contaminants in river sediment, water and clam tissues from the San Joaquin River and tributaries, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pereira, W.E.; Domagalski, J.L.; Hostettler, F.D.; Brown, L.R.; Rapp, J.B.

    1996-01-01

    A study was conducted in 1992 to assess the effects of anthropogenic activities and land use on the water quality of the San Joaquin River and its major tributaries. This study focused on pesticides and organic contaminants, looking at distributions of contaminants in water, bed and suspended sediment, and the bivalve Corbicula fluminea. Results indicated that this river system is affected by agricultural practices and urban runoff. Sediments from Dry Creek contained elevated concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), possibly derived from urban runoff from the city of Modesto; suspended sediments contained elevated amounts of chlordane. Trace levels of triazine herbicides atrazine and simazine were present in water at most sites. Sediments, water, and bivalves from Orestimba Creek, a westside tributary draining agricultural areas, contained the greatest levels of DDT (1,1,1-trichloro-2-2-bis[p-chlorophenyl]ethane), and its degradates DDD (1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis[p-chlorophenyl]ethane), and DDE (1,1-dichloro-2,2- bis[p-chlorophenyl]ethylene). Sediment adsorption co efficients (K(oc)), and bioconcentration factors (BCF) in Corbicula of DDT, DDD, and DDE at Orestimba Creek were greater than predicted values. Streams of the western San Joaquin Valley can potentially transport significant amounts of chlorinated pesticides to the San Joaquin River, the delta, and San Francisco Bay. Organochlorine compounds accumulate in bivalves and sediment and may pose a problem to other biotic species in this watershed.

  17. Stress detection in bivalve mollusk using non-invasive bioelectric monitoring of myoneural behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, E.L.; Hardison, B.S.; Dawson, V.K.; Waller, D.; Waller, W.T.; Dickson, K.L.; Allen, H.J.

    1995-12-31

    Few studies have demonstrated cause-and-effect linkages between extrinsic environmental factors and intrinsic bioelectric action potentials of bivalve mollusk using non-invasive, non-destructive approaches. A non-invasive, external probe configuration and detection system, similar to one used previously with native unionids, was developed for continuously monitoring bioelectric activities of clams and mussels. Using remote probes and differential amplifiers, bioelectric activities were recorded for cardiac, adductor, siphon and foot responses using a computer equipped with integrating software. To test if remote, non-invasive probes would detect similar information to that recorded by invasive needle electrodes, two individuals of zebra mussel (Dreissenia polymorpha), and Asiatic clam (Corbicula fluminea) were each configured with two sets of probes. One set was inserted between the valves and along the inside surface of the shelf; the other set was positioned remotely about the outside margins of the valves. Signal validation was made by simultaneously recording bioelectric responses for the same animal from both sets of probes. In preliminary stress tests monitored bivalves were subjected to changes in temperatures over 2 to 3 hr intervals from ambient to potentially lethal levels (20 to 30 C for zebra, 25 C to 40 C for corbicula). Dramatic increases resulted in both number and amplitude of cardiac events as temperature increased. Planned studies will use this approach to evaluate bivalve myoneural behavior patterns in response to chemical and non-chemical stimuli.

  18. Phytoplankton dynamics of the fresh, tidal Potomac River, Maryland, for the summers of 1979 to 1981

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cohen, Ronald R.H.

    1988-01-01

    The distribution and abundance of phytoplankton in the fresh, tidal Potomac River, Md., was different during 1979-81 from that observed in the 1960's and 1970's. Concentrations of phytoplankton in the 1960's and 1970's reached maximum attainable levels that were limited only by self-shading. A sag in phytoplankton abundance, apparent during the summers of 1980 and 1981 between Rosier Bluff and Marshall Hall, appears to have been caused by the Asiatic clam, Corbicula fluminea. Reduced abundance of phytoplankton throughout the entire fresh, tidal river during the summers of 1980 and 1981 may have been due to grazing by Corbicula, high discharge, and perhaps phosphorus limitation in late August at and downstream of Hallowing Point. Phytoplankton growth rates and chlorophyll-to-cell ratios were highest at Hatton Point and Marshall Hall (the sag reach). A model was constructed that predicted phytoplankton growth rates by varying only chlorophyll a concentration and light penetration. Nutrient concentrations were not required to make the model fit the data. Primary productivity was highest for the year during August 1980 and August 1981. Productivity-per-unit chlorophyll was highest at Hatton Point, where reduced concentrations of phytoplankton permitted the deepest light penetration in the fresh, tidal river.

  19. Field and laboratory assessment of a coal processing effluent in the Leading Creek Watershed, Meigs County, Ohio.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, A J; Cherry, D S; Currie, R J

    2003-04-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has not recommended water quality criteria (WQC) to protect aquatic life from elevated sodium and sulfate concentrations, such as those associated with the coal-processing effluent of Meigs County Mine #31. This discharge, received by a tributary of the Leading Creek Watershed (SE Ohio), had a mean specific conductivity (SC) of 8,109 (7,750-8,750) microS/cm and total metal concentrations below acute WQC. The mean 48-h LC(50) for Ceriodaphnia dubia in the effluent was 6,713 +/- 99 microS/cm; mean 48-h survival was 44% for study sites downstream of the effluent. The best indicators of impairment used in this study were Ceriodaphnia fecundity, in situ Corbicula fluminea growth, EPT minus Hydropsychidae (richness and relative abundance), and relative Ephemeroptera abundance. Mayflies, reduced by more than 99% below the effluent, were absent from all but the furthest downstream study site. SC was strongly correlated with Corbicula growth (r = -0.9755, p = 0.0009) and EPT minus Hydropsychidae richness (r = -0.8756, p < 0.0001), suggesting the effluent was primarily responsible for biotic impairment. Our results indicated that SC levels, a measure of dissolved solids, in the Leading Creek Watershed that exceeded approximately 3,700 microS/cm impaired sensitive aquatic fauna. PMID:12712291

  20. Field Validation of Toxicity Tests to Evaluate the Potential for Beneficial Use of Produced Water

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph Bidwell; Jonathan Fisher; Naomi Cooper

    2008-03-31

    This study investigated potential biological effects of produced water contamination derived from occasional surface overflow and possible subsurface intrusion at an oil production site along the shore of Skiatook Lake, Oklahoma. We monitored basic chemistry and acute toxicity to a suite of standard aquatic test species (fathead minnow-Pimephales promelas, Daphnia pulex, Daphnia magna, and Ceriodaphnia dubia) in produced water and in samples taken from shallow groundwater wells on the site. Toxicity identification evaluations and ion toxicity modeling were used to identify toxic constituents in the samples. Lake sediment at the oil production site and at a reference site were also analyzed for brine intrusion chemically and by testing sediment toxicity using the benthic invertebrates, Chironomus dilutus, and Hyallela azteca. Sediment quality was also assessed with in situ survival and growth studies with H. azteca and the Asian clam, Corbicula fluminea, and by benthic macroinvertebrate community sampling. The produced water was acutely toxic to the aquatic test organisms at concentrations ranging from 1% to 10% of the whole produced water sample. Toxicity identification evaluation and ion toxicity modeling indicated major ion salts and hydrocarbons were the primary mixture toxicants. The standardized test species used in the laboratory bioassays exhibited differences in sensitivity to these two general classes of contaminants, which underscores the importance of using multiple species when evaluating produced water toxicity. Toxicity of groundwater was greater in samples from wells near a produced water injection well and an evaporation pond. Principle component analyses (PCA) of chemical data derived from the groundwater wells indicated dilution by lake water and possible biogeochemical reactions as factors that ameliorated groundwater toxicity. Elevated concentrations of major ions were found in pore water from lake sediments, but toxicity from these ions was

  1. Peer Influence and Recovery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collier, Crystal; Simpson, Shelly; Najera, John; Weiner, Lauren

    2012-01-01

    Research has shown that peer influence can be negative, by increasing the likelihood that a youth will engage in high-risk behaviors and make risky decisions. However, peer influence can also be positive and protect a youth from these same high-risk activities. This article examines the extent of peer influence and then describes the Alternative…

  2. Can Television Influence People?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comstock, George

    1985-01-01

    Discusses simultaneous airing by three commercial networks and influence on viewers' attitudes of The Great American Values Test, a 30-minute informational program designed to affect viewers' values about environmental issues, racial equality, and sexual equality. The program's effectiveness at influencing behavior was proven by a field…

  3. Motivational Influences on Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pugh, Kevin J.; Bergin, David A.

    2006-01-01

    Both transfer and motivation are important constructs accompanied by extensive bodies of literature. However, there is a lack of integration of the 2 constructs. This article analyzes the potential indirect influence of motivational factors on transfer by reviewing studies that examine the influence of motivation on cognitive processes related to…

  4. Influencing Your Colleagues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Alice D.

    1993-01-01

    This fifteenth article in a series on the principles of the AECT (Association for Educational Communications and Technology) Code of Professional Ethics focuses on members using coercive means to influence decisions of colleagues, using an example of a professor trying to influence a colleague to include his name on a research proposal. (LRW)

  5. Influencing choice without awareness.

    PubMed

    Olson, Jay A; Amlani, Alym A; Raz, Amir; Rensink, Ronald A

    2015-12-01

    Forcing occurs when a magician influences the audience's decisions without their awareness. To investigate the mechanisms behind this effect, we examined several stimulus and personality predictors. In Study 1, a magician flipped through a deck of playing cards while participants were asked to choose one. Although the magician could influence the choice almost every time (98%), relatively few (9%) noticed this influence. In Study 2, participants observed rapid series of cards on a computer, with one target card shown longer than the rest. We expected people would tend to choose this card without noticing that it was shown longest. Both stimulus and personality factors predicted the choice of card, depending on whether the influence was noticed. These results show that combining real-world and laboratory research can be a powerful way to study magic and can provide new methods to study the feeling of free will. PMID:25666736

  6. Influences in Curriculum Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unruh, Glenys G., Ed.; Leeper, Robert R., Ed.

    This report contains conference addresses that (1) deal with social and psychological forces influencing curriculum change and (2) discuss actual changes now taking place in a number of subject fields. Insights into the forces acting on the curriculum are presented by the authors of Part I. Arthur W. Foshay challenges educators to recognize the…

  7. Status, Numbers and Influence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melamed, David; Savage, Scott V.

    2013-01-01

    We develop a theoretical model of social influence in n-person groups. We argue that disagreement between group members introduces uncertainty into the social situation, and this uncertainty motivates people to use status characteristics to evaluate the merits of a particular opinion. Our model takes the numerical distribution of opinions and the…

  8. Are native naiads more tolerant to pollution than exotic freshwater bivalve species? An hypothesis tested using physiological responses of three species transplanted to mercury contaminated sites in the Ebro River (NE, Spain).

    PubMed

    Faria, Melissa; López, Miguel Angel; Díez, Sergi; Barata, Carlos

    2010-11-01

    In the lower Ebro River exist the paradoxical convergence of relatively well preserved river dynamics with the historical presence of a chloralkali plant with a long history of mercury discharges and the recent invasion of foreign bivalves species. Here we performed a comparative study on two alien bivalves, the Zebra mussel and the Asian clam (Dreissena polymorpha and Corbicula fluminea), and one protected species of naiads (Psilunio littoralis), which is the most common species of the freshwater mussel assemblages in this river. Individuals of the three species were transplanted to three sites that included a clean unpolluted upstream site, a contaminated location next to the mercury source and a downstream one. The study focused on digestive gland antioxidant and oxidative stress responses such as antioxidant enzymes, glutathione S transferase, glutathione levels, metallothionein proteins, DNA strand breaks and lipid peroxidation levels. Results evidenced interspecies differences on accumulation levels of mercury, antioxidant defensive systems and oxidative tissue damage. The naiad species, despite of accumulating more mercury showed the greatest antioxidant defensive potential, which was characterized by having high constitutive activities of glutathione S transferase and inducible activities and levels of key antioxidant enzymes and glutathione. Exposed individuals of C. fluminea had moderate levels of metal accumulation, the highest activities of antioxidant enzymes but also high levels of lipid peroxidation. D. polymorpha mussels showed the lowest levels of mercury but the lowest antioxidant responses and consequently the highest levels of oxidative injuries in the DNA and of mortality. Our results support the hypothesis that naiad species might be more tolerant to pollution than exotic species. PMID:20952043

  9. Age-Related Changes in Antioxidant and Glutathione S-Transferase Enzyme Activities in the Asian Clam.

    PubMed

    Vranković, J

    2016-03-01

    Aging is accompanied by increased production of free oxygen radicals and impairment of normal cellular functions. The aim of this work was to provide preliminary data on age-related differences in the activities of antioxidant enzymes and phase II biotransformation enzyme glutathione S-transferase (GST) in a wild population of the Asian clam Corbicula fluminea. The antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), glutathione reductase (GR), and GST were assessed in visceral mass of four age classes (0+-, 1+-, 2+-, and 3+-year-old) of C. fluminea clams. Age-related changes were seen in antioxidant enzyme status: levels of total SOD (totSOD) (P < 0.05), MnSOD, and CuZnSOD (P < 0.05) activities increased progressively during aging from younger to older clams. Changes in CAT and GR activities with advancing age were found, the levels being the highest in age class II, then being lower in age classes III and IV (P < 0.05). Activities of GPX and GST were lower in the senescent individuals (2+- and 3+-year-old clams) compared with young individuals (0+- and 1+-year-old clams). Overall, the decline of glutathione-dependent enzyme activities, coupled with higher and lower activities of totSOD and CAT, respectively, as the individual grows older, may render the older animals more susceptible to oxidative stress. Data reported here are not intended to be exhaustive since they concern only age/size structure of the population at one locality, so more detailed studies on both the developmental stages and levels of antioxidant enzymes of this new alien species in Serbian rivers are required. PMID:27262191

  10. Multiple detectors "Influence Method".

    PubMed

    Rios, I J; Mayer, R E

    2016-05-01

    The "Influence Method" is conceived for the absolute determination of a nuclear particle flux in the absence of known detector efficiency and without the need to register coincidences of any kind. This method exploits the influence of the presence of one detector in the count rate of another detector, when they are placed one behind the other and define statistical estimators for the absolute number of incident particles and for the efficiency (Rios and Mayer, 2015a). Its detailed mathematical description was recently published (Rios and Mayer, 2015b) and its practical implementation in the measurement of a moderated neutron flux arising from an isotopic neutron source was exemplified in (Rios and Mayer, 2016). With the objective of further reducing the measurement uncertainties, in this article we extend the method for the case of multiple detectors placed one behind the other. The new estimators for the number of particles and the detection efficiency are herein derived. PMID:26943904

  11. Amendments for the in situ remediation of contaminated sediments: evaluation of potential environmental impacts.

    PubMed

    Paller, Michael H; Knox, Anna S

    2010-09-15

    Active sediment caps represent a comparatively new technology for remediating contaminated sediments. They are made by applying chemically active amendments that reduce contaminant mobility and bioavailability to the sediment surface. The objective of this study was to determine if active cap amendments including organoclay, apatite, and biopolymers have the potential to harm benthic organisms. Methods included laboratory bioassays of amendment toxicity and field evaluations of amendment impacts on organisms held in cages placed within pilot-scale active caps located in Steel Creek, a South Carolina (USA) stream. Test organisms included Hyalella azteca, Leptocheirus plumulosus, Lumbriculus variegatus, and Corbicula fluminea to represent a range of feeding modes, burrowing behaviors, and both fresh and saltwater organisms. In addition to the laboratory and field assays, chemical extractions were performed to determine if the amendments contained harmful impurities that could leach into the ambient environment. Laboratory bioassays indicated that 100% apatite had minimal effects on Hyalella in freshwater and up to 25% organoclay was nontoxic to Leptocheirus in brackish water. Field evaluations indicated that pilot-scale caps composed of up to 50% apatite and 25% organoclay did not harm Hyalella, Lumbriculus, or Corbicula. In contrast, organisms in caps containing biopolymers died because of physical entrapment and/or suffocation by the viscous biopolymers. The extractions showed that the amendments did not release harmful concentrations of metals. These studies indicated that apatite and organoclay are nontoxic at concentrations (up to 50% and 25% by weight, respectively) needed for the construction of active caps that are useful for the remediation of metals and organic contaminants in sediments. PMID:20655093

  12. Water and sediment toxicity of freshwater mussels from population crashes of Asiatic clams

    SciTech Connect

    Scheller, J.L.; Cherry, D.S.; Yeager, M.M.; Lynde, S.R.; Shepard, N.D.

    1994-12-31

    The Clinch River watershed in Virginia contains one of the most diverse communities of freshwater bivalves or unionids in North America. These communities are becoming depleted over the past few decades due to various point (industrial, municipal) and nonpoint (roadside and agricultural runoff) discharges. By the latter 1980`s, the Asiatic clam (Corbicula fluminea) had invaded most reaches of this system and may be becoming a contributing factor to the demise of native mussels by the natural release of toxic ammonia from dense population crashes during late summer, low flow conditions. When densities surpassed 1,500 clams/m{sup 2}, crashes resulting in >99% mortality have been observed in various areas of the river. Total ammonia release from dying clams reached and sustained 70 mg/L for several days in laboratory artificial stream experiments. These ammonia levels resulted in acute toxicity and reproductive chronic impairment to Daphnia magna in 10-day sediment toxicity tests. Pediveliger larvae of Corbicula were acutely sensitive (48 hr LC{sub 50}) to 1.72 mg/L total ammonia (O.05 mg/L unionized), mortality was 100% to juvenile and adult clams in 9 to 13 days at 16.1 mg/L total (0.74 mg/L unionized ammonia). Mussel glochidia were sensitive to 24-hr ammonia exposures (LC{sub 50} = 3.29 and 0.11 mg/L as total and unionized ammonia, respectively). Juvenile and adult mussels are predicted to be less sensitive members of the unionid life cycle as observed from earlier studies involving copper toxicity in the Clinch River.

  13. Family Influences and Unconscious Drives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English, Fanita

    2001-01-01

    Drives for survival, expression, and quiescence influence early human development and continue to influence career development throughout life. Turmoil may arise when a drive conflicts with others or is suppressed by other drives. (SK)

  14. Nutritional influences on folliculogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Medrano, J H; Campbell, B K; Webb, R

    2012-08-01

    Folliculogenesis is an intricate process that involves the proliferation and differentiation of both somatic and germ cells. This process depends on complex interactions between systemic factors such as both pituitary gonadotrophins and metabolic hormones and/or local factors produced by the ovarian somatic and germ cells, such as the IGF system and TGF-β superfamily members. In domestic ruminants, follicular development begins during foetal life with formation of primordial follicles from the association of germ cells and pre-granulosa cells. After follicular formation, folliculogenesis begins with a primordial follicle progressing into more developed stages (i.e. primary, secondary, pre-antral and antral) in a continuous, progressive process to either ovulation or, as in most cases, to atresia. Even early stages of follicular formation and subsequent development are influenced by both internal (e.g. genotype) and/or external environmental (e.g. nutrition and season) factors. Among these external factors, nutrition is one of the most important affecting reproductive function, and this is the focus of this review, because other reviews in this issue discuss other environmental factors. A number of studies have now shown that nutrition can have both positive and negative effects on follicular growth, oestrous activity, oocyte quality, blastocyst development and pregnancy outcome. Therefore, understanding the intricate processes involved during folliculogenesis and the ways in which factors, such as nutrition, affect them is leading to new opportunities to improve pregnancy rates by influencing follicle development and oocyte quality. This review will focus on follicular development from foetal to adult stages and the influences that nutrition has during some of these developmental stages. PMID:22827381

  15. Microbiologically influenced corrosion testing

    SciTech Connect

    Kearns, J.R.; Little, B.J.

    1994-01-01

    This symposium was held November 16--17, 1992 in Miami, Florida. The purpose of the symposium was to provide a forum for state-of-the-art information on the effects of microorganisms on the corrosion of metals. Many industrial needs in the area of microbial influenced corrosion testing are identified in the presentations along with latest laboratory and field testing techniques. Strategies to monitor and control corrosion and biofouling in water distribution systems, underground pipelines, buildings, and marine vessels are discussed. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

  16. Superintendents: The Key Influence Agents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Randy

    1990-01-01

    By the nature of their positions in schools, administrators are either influence agents or targets. Based on personal interviews with 140 Oregon administrators and a survey of 319 administrators around the state, this article highlights administrators' comments about their administrative influence and about constraints on their influence.…

  17. Influencing the legislative process

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, H.

    1994-12-31

    This basic premise--that environmental policy results from a multitude of responses to a variety of problems--explains to some extent the general lack of coordination between major environmental protection programs. It also suggests why there has been so much new legislation and regulation in the last decade and a half. Solutions have been proposed and adopted to address a myriad of problems, from leaking underground storage tanks to catastrophic releases of toxic materials. In the absence of broader environmental goals or policy, these individual solutions often gain a life of their own and their passage becomes a high priority for their sponsors. Given this situation, the best way an individual can influence environmental policy is to become involved in solving a problem--in making one`s voice heard in the decision-making process. But influencing the outcome of a decision-making process can be difficult at best, and is impossible without an understanding of the process itself.In addition to knowing the process, it is also important to understand the role played by the professionals involved in the process, the way in which decision makers view the world, and the ways in which a position or opinion on a particular issue can be best brought to the attention of decision makers.

  18. The levers of influence.

    PubMed

    Martin, W

    1999-01-01

    Physicians often determine the demand for health care services, as well as control the clinical processes aimed at improving health outcomes at the individual and population level. Given their important role in enhancing health status and improving the health care delivery system, it is critical that physician executives master the tools necessary to positively influence physician behavior. But changing behavior is far more complex than "doing it or not doing it." The Nike slogan "just do it" is motivating, but over-simplified. The roots of human change include: consciousness-raising, emotional arousal, commitment, helping relationships, self-reevaluation, reward, and environmental control. A model to effectively influence behavior is presented and includes setting clear expectations, measuring and monitoring performance, providing feedback, and rewarding and recognizing improvement. If all else fails, try discipline. This five-step approach is based on the science of human behavior and working with physicians in diverse settings, ranging from academic medical centers to small practices. PMID:10788108

  19. Orientation on understanding interpersonal influence.

    PubMed

    Strickland, B; Arnn, J

    1977-09-01

    Everyone influences and is influenced by others. Are you satisfied with the impact your influence has on others? If not, it can be changed by examining and working on the dimensions of your "style of influence," such as activity, visibility, involvement, and productivity. The author analyzes some of the opposites on a spectrum or "wheel of influence," showing how they may be melded by moderation to achieve the kind of impact you may wish. For instance, there is the analyzer vs. the performer, the leader vs. the follower, the experimenter vs. the organizer, and the asserter vs. the listener. As modes of influence, extremes in any dimension are self-defeating, but by balancing aspects of both sides, desirable "compromises" can be developed. Should you wish to change your style of influence, helfpful procedures to follow are suggested, which, hopefully, will result in satisfying interpersonal relationships and understanding. PMID:886127

  20. Corporate influences on epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Neil

    2008-02-01

    Corporate influences on epidemiology have become stronger and more pervasive in the last few decades, particularly in the contentious fields of pharmacoepidemiology and occupational epidemiology. For every independent epidemiologist studying the side effects of medicines and the hazardous effects of industrial chemicals, there are several other epidemiologists hired by industry to attack the research and to debunk it as 'junk science'. In some instances these activities have gone as far as efforts to block publication. In many instances, academics have accepted industry funding which has not been acknowledged, and only the academic affiliations of the company-funded consultants have been listed. These activities are major threats to the integrity of the field, and its survival as a scientific discipline. There is no simple solution to these problems. However, for the last two decades there has been substantial discussion on ethics in epidemiology, partly in response to the unethical conduct of many industry-funded consultants. Professional organizations, such as the International Epidemiological Association, can play a major role in encouraging and supporting epidemiologists to assert positive principles of how science should work, and how it should be applied to public policy decisions, rather than simply having a list of what not to do. PMID:18245050

  1. How experts gain influence.

    PubMed

    Mikes, Anette; Hall, Matthew; Millo, Yuval

    2013-01-01

    In theory, the risk management groups of two British banks--Saxon and Anglo--had the same influence in their organizations. But in practice, they did not: Saxon's was engaged in critical work throughout the bank, while Anglo's had little visibility outside its areas of expertise. In their study of these two financial institutions, the authors identified four competencies--trailblazing, toolmaking, teamwork, and translation--that help functional leaders or groups compete for top management's limited attention and increase their impact. Anglo's risk managers were strong in only some of the competencies, but Saxon's were strong in all four. They consistently scanned the internal and external environment for important issues to which they could apply a risk management perspective (trailblazing) and then developed tools--such as quarterly risk reports--that spread their expertise (toolmaking). While controlling the tools' design and implementation, the risk managers incorporated business managers' insights (teamwork) and made sure everyone could understand the findings (translation). Ultimately, experts' roles must fit the organization's strategy and structural needs. In some situations, functional experts can raise their profile by cultivating just two of the competencies. But those who are strong in all four are likely to be the most influential. PMID:24730171

  2. Power, Influence Tactics, and Influence Processes in Virtual Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boughton, Marla

    2011-01-01

    Current studies of power, influence tactics, and influence processes in virtual teams assume that these constructs operate in a similar manner as they do in the face-to-face (FtF) environment. However, the virtual context differs from the FtF environment on a variety of dimensions, such as the availability of status cues. The differences between…

  3. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in bivalves from the San Francisco estuary: Spatial distributions, temporal trends, and sources (1993-2001).

    PubMed

    Oros, Daniel R; Ross, John R M

    2005-10-01

    Bivalve tissue samples were examined over a range of spatial and temporal scales (1993-2001) to determine PAH distributions, trends, and possible sources. Mussels (Mytilus californianus), oysters (Crassostrea gigas), and clams (Corbicula fluminea) were deployed for three months in the estuary at stations remote from known point source discharges. The range of summation operatorPAH detected in bivalves was oysters 184-6899 microg/kg dry wt (mean 678 microg/kg dry wt), mussels 21-1093 microg/kg dry wt (mean 175 microg/kg dry wt), and clams 78-720 microg/kg dry wt (mean 323 microg/kg dry wt). Linear regression analysis showed no statistically significant (p>0.05) temporal trends in clam and mussel summation operatorPAH at any of the deployment stations or estuary segments. On the other hand, a statistically significant (p<0.05) decreasing trend was found in summation operatorPAH in oysters at the Petaluma River station, and in the North Estuary segment. PAH isomer pair ratios applied as diagnostic indicators suggested that the bioaccumulated PAH were derived primarily from petroleum combustion, with lesser amounts derived from biomass and coal combustion, and unburned petroleum. PMID:15924995

  4. Occurrence and Distribution of Organochlorine Compounds in Biological Tissue and Bed Sediment From Streams in the Trinity River Basin, Texas, 1992-93

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moring, J. Bruce

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the occurrence and distribution of organochlorine compounds in biological tissue and bed sediment from the Trinity River Basin study area of the National Water-Quality Assessment Program. Concentrations of organochlorine pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and other organochlorine compounds were determined in biological tissue and surficial bed sediment from 16 stream sites in the Trinity River Basin of east-central Texas. Asiatic clams (Corbicula fluminea) were collected at 10 sites, and fish, including blue catfish (Ictalurus furcatus), common carp (Cyprinus carpio), bluegill (Lepomis cyanellus), and yellow bullhead (Ameiurus natalis) were collected at all mainstem and two tributary sites. Thirty of the 36 compounds analyzed in biological tissue or surficial bed sediment were detected in one or both media. Overall, more organochlorine compounds were detected in bed sediment than in biological tissue; however, various chlordane isomers, DDT metabolites, and PCBs were detected more frequently in tissue than in sediment. The chlordane isomers and PCBs that were detected more frequently in biological tissue also were detected more frequently at urban sites than at agricultural sites. Organochlorine compound concentrations generally were highest in fish tissue from Trinity River mainstem sites. Fish tissue from the mainstem sites contained a higher percentage of lipids than did fish- and clam-tissue samples from the tributary sites.

  5. Protocol for Monitoring Metals in Ozark National Scenic Riverways, Missouri: Version 1.0

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmitt, Christopher J.; Brumbaugh, William G.; Besser, John M.; Hinck, Jo Ellen; Bowles, David E.; Morrison, Lloyd W.; Williams, Michael H.

    2008-01-01

    The National Park Service is developing a monitoring plan for the Ozark National Scenic Riverways in southeastern Missouri. Because of concerns about the release of lead, zinc, and other metals from lead-zinc mining to streams, the monitoring plan will include mining-related metals. After considering a variety of alternatives, the plan will consist of measuring the concentrations of cadmium, cobalt, lead, nickel, and zinc in composite samples of crayfish (Orconectes luteus or alternate species) and Asian clam (Corbicula fluminea) collected periodically from selected sites. This document, which comprises a protocol narrative and supporting standard operating procedures, describes the methods to be employed prior to, during, and after collection of the organisms, along with procedures for their chemical analysis and quality assurance; statistical analysis, interpretation, and reporting of the data; and for modifying the protocol narrative and supporting standard operating procedures. A list of supplies and equipment, data forms, and sample labels are also included. An example based on data from a pilot study is presented.

  6. Effects of flow reduction and spillways on the composition and structure of benthic macroinvertebrate communities in a Brazilian river reach.

    PubMed

    Maroneze, D M; Tupinambás, T H; França, J S; Callisto, M

    2011-08-01

    Dams are a major threat to aquatic biological diversity. By altering the natural flow of rivers, dams modify fluvial habitats, making them unsuitable for the growth and reproduction of many aquatic species. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a reduced flow reach (RFR) on benthic macroinvertebrate communities. Benthic macroinvertebrates were collected at six sites downstream of the Amador Aguiar Power Plant I before (lotic phase) and after (semi-lentic phase) Araguari River mean flow was reduced from 346 to 7 m³.s⁻¹. Changes in macroinvertebrates richness, diversity and total biomass were not observed. Ablabesmyia, Tanytarsus (Chironomidae, Diptera), Leptoceridae and Polycentropodidae (Trichoptera) densities significantly increased the first year after flow reduction and the construction of spillways (t-test; p < 0.05). An analysis of similarity (ANOSIM) showed statistical differences in taxonomical composition despite considerable overlap in communities between the lotic and semi-lentic phases (R = 0.3; p < 0.01). In both phases, the macroinvertebrates were characterised by the dominance of groups tolerant to human disturbance (e.g., Chironomidae, Ceratopogonidae and Oligochaeta) and by the presence of the alien bivalve species Corbicula fluminea (Veneroidae), suggesting that the river was already degraded before the hydraulic modifications. Since the 1980s, the Araguari River has been continuously subjected to human pressures (e.g., cascade dams, urbanization and replacement of native vegetation by pasture and crops). These activities have led to impoverishment of biological communities and have consequently altered the ecosystem. PMID:21881787

  7. Development of biological indices for identifying and evaluating impacts of pollutants on freshwater ecosystems. Final report, June 1975-October 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Cairns, J. Jr.; Cherry, D.S.

    1980-09-30

    The ten Research Areas reported included: (1) the development of functional indices for identifying and evaluating impacts of pollutants on Aufwuchs communities, (2) relationship of protozoan colonization rates to the eutrophication process, (3) testing of methods to determine the functioning of zooplankton communities subjected to entrainment stress, (4) the use of the first steps of detritus processing (microbial decomposition) as a technique for assessing pollutional stress on aquatic communities in a river system, (5) relationship of protozoan invasion and extinction rate to the eutrophication process, (6) extension of present early colonization studies to the simultaneous evaluation of natural environmental parameters and power plant effluents and application of the early colonization approach to microbial communities in streams of the New River drainage, (7) testing of single species-community responses of protozoans from selected heavy metals, (8) the effects of selected power plant pollutants on grazer utilization of Aufwuchs, (9) investigation of bioconcentration and bioaccumulation mechanisms of the Asiatic clam (Corbicula fluminea) populations in field artificial streams and laboratory microcosms with reference to physical chemistry and diet alterations, and (10) investigation of the homeostatic regulation in bluegill sunfish following acute hypothermal shock and to other power plant related effluents.

  8. Diet and population metrics of the introduced blue catfish population in the Altamaha, River, GA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bonvechio, Timothy F.; Jennings, Cecil A.

    2011-01-01

    Blue catfish (Ictalurus furcatus) were first detected in the Altamaha River, Georgia, during an access creel survey in 2005 and subsequently in 2006 during annual ictalurid sampling. Introduction of this species in the Altamaha River is believed to have occurred via escape from normal upstream reservoir releases from Lake Sinclair and Lake Oconee. Relative abundance, as indexed by electrofishing catch rate (fish per hour), has increased from 2.9±1.0 SE in 2006 to 38.8±8.2 SE in 2011. The size of blue catfish captured ranged from 56 to 820 mm total length and 0.001 to 7.7 kg. Using otoliths obtained in 2010 (n=214), age of fish ranged from 0 to 6 yrs, which indicated a relatively young population. The catch-curve analysis resulted in an instantaneous mortality rate (Z) of 0.75. Despite concerns of blue catfish predation on native fishes and mussels, a diet analysis of blue catfish (n=257) obtained in 2010 revealed that diets of fish in all size groups were dominated by the introduced Asiatic clam (Corbicula fluminea). This study describes a recently introduced blue catfish population in an Atlantic coastal plain river and provides insight on possible ecological effects during the early phases of establishment. These results offer an early status assessment of the invasion dynamics before the system has had time to reach a new equilibrium state.

  9. [Macrobenthos community structure and its relations with environmental factors in Taihu River basin].

    PubMed

    Gao, Xin; Niu, Cui-Juan; Hu, Zhong-Jun

    2011-12-01

    An investigation was conducted on the macrobenthos at 37 sampling sites in the Taihu River basin in August 2009 and May 2010. A total of 69 macrobenthos species were collected, of which, 15 species (21.7% of the total) were oligochaetas, 16 species (23.2%) were mollusks, 5 species (7.2%) were crustaceans, 27 species (39.1%) were aquatic insects, and 6 species (8.7%) were polychaetes. Based on the species composition and relative abundance, and by using two-way indicators species analysis (TWINSPAN) and detrended correspondence analysis (DCA), the 37 sampling sites were divided into four groups. In the first group, polychaetes and mollusks such as Nephthys sp. and Corbicula fluminea were the indicator species; in the second group, polychaetes and mollusks such as Grandidierella aihuensis and Semisulcospira libertina were the indicator species; in the third and fourth groups, the indicator species were the annelids such as Limnodrilus hoffmeisteri and the Tubifex tubifex and chironomidae larvae, respectively. The canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) indicated that water conductivity and total nitrogen were the main environmental factors affecting the distribution of macrobenthos, and the factors water depth, diaphaneity, COD(Cr), ammonium nitrogen, nitrate nitrogen, and chlorophyll a also had definite effects. PMID:22384605

  10. Effect of cage design on growth of transplanted Asian clams: implications for assessing bivalve responses in streams.

    PubMed

    Hull, Matthew S; Cherry, Donald S; Merricks, Timothy C

    2004-01-01

    This study was designed to determine whether survivorship and growth of Asian clams (Corbicula fluminea [Müller]) differed significantly between two types of field enclosures. Enclosures were either flexible mesh bags or rigid cages (hereto after referred as bioboxes) designed to homogenize substrate among study sites and accommodate Asian clam feeding mechanisms. For 96d, cages remained at 12 Clinch River (CR), Hurricane Fork (HF), and Dump's Creek (DC) sites upstream and downstream of a coal-fired power plant discharge, coal mining effluent, and coal combustion-related disposal facilities in Carbo, Virginia. Although survivorship was not significantly different between cage types, mean growth of clams in bioboxes was significantly greater overall (p = 0.0157). Despite the difference in growth between the two cage types, both confirmed significant reductions of survivorship and growth directly below the power plant discharge. Additionally, coefficient of variance values for biobox growth data were reduced at most study sites (averages of 16% for bioboxes versus 19% for mesh bags). Our results have implications toward strengthening weight-of-evidence approaches used to link impairment of transplanted bivalves to environmental contaminants. More importantly, these results suggest that ecotoxicological impairment of bivalves transplanted downstream of the coal-fired power plant discharge functioned independently of site-specific substrate provisions. PMID:15327146

  11. Effects of freshwater clam extract supplementation on time to exhaustion, muscle damage, pro/anti-inflammatory cytokines, and liver injury in rats after exhaustive exercise.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kuo-Chin; Wu, Wen-Tien; Yang, Fwu-Lin; Chiu, Yi-Han; Peng, Tai-Chu; Hsu, Bang-Gee; Liao, Kuang-Wen; Lee, Ru-Ping

    2013-01-01

    The potent anti-inflammatory activities and tissue-protective effects of freshwater clams (Corbicula fluminea) have been well reported. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of freshwater clam extract (FCE) supplementation on time to exhaustion, muscle damage, pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, and liver injury in rats after exhaustive exercise. Thirty-two rats were divided into four groups: sedentary control (SC); SC group with FCE supplementation (SC+FCE); exhaustive exercise (E); and E group with FCE supplementation (E+FCE). The SC+FCE and E+FCE groups were treated with gavage administration of 20 mg/kg for seven consecutive days. Blood samples were collected for the evaluation of biochemical parameters. The cytokine levels of TNF-α and IL-10 were also examined. Twenty-four hours after exhaustive exercise, the rat livers were removed for H & E staining. The FCE supplementation could extend the time to exhaustion in exercised rats. The levels of CPK, LDH, AST, ALT, lactate, TNF-α and H & E stains of the liver injury were significantly decreased in the E+FCE group, but the blood glucose and IL-10 were significantly higher in comparison with the E group. This study suggests that FCE supplementation may improve endurance performance and reduce exercise-induced muscle damage, inflammatory stress and liver injury. PMID:23531600

  12. Comparison of streambed sediment and aquatic biota as media for characterizing trace elements and organochlorine compounds in the Willamette Basin, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wentz, D.A.; Waite, I.R.; Rinella, F.A.

    1998-01-01

    During 1992-93, 27 organochlorine compounds (pesticides plus total PCB) and 17 trace elements were analyzed in bed sediment and aquatic biota from 20 stream sites in the Willamette Basin as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program. Data from each medium were compared to evaluate their relative effectiveness for assessing occurrence (broadly defined as documentation of important concentrations) of these constituents. Except for Cd, Hg, Se, and Ag, trace element concentrations generally were higher in bed sediment than in biota. Conversely, although frequencies of detection for organochlorine compounds in biota were only slightly greater than in bed sediment, actual concentrations in biota (normalized to lipid) were as much as 19 times those in sediment (normalized to organic carbon). Sculpin (Cottus spp.) and Asiatic clams (Corbicula fluminea), found at 14 and 7 sites, respectively, were the most widespread taxa collected during the study. Concentrations of trace elements, particularly As and Cu, were typically greater in Asiatic clams than in sculpin. In contrast, almost half of the organochlorine compounds analyzed were found in sculpin, but only DDT and its degradation products were detected in Asiatic clams; this may be related to the lipid content of sculpin, which was about three times higher than for clams. Thus, the medium of choice for assessing occurrence depends largely on the constituent(s) of interest.

  13. Survival, growth and condition of freshwater mussels: effects of municipal wastewater effluent.

    PubMed

    Nobles, Trey; Zhang, Yixin

    2015-01-01

    Freshwater mussels (Family Unionidae) are among the most imperiled group of organisms in the world, with nearly 65% of North American species considered endangered. Anthropogenic disturbances, including altered flow regimes, habitat alteration, and pollution, are the major driver of this group's decline. We investigated the effects of tertiary treated municipal wastewater effluent on survivorship, growth, and condition of freshwater mussels in experimental cages in a small Central Texas stream. We tested the effluent effects by measuring basic physical parameters of native three ridge mussels (Amblema plicata) and of non-native Asian clams (Corbicula fluminea), before and after 72-day exposure at four sites above and below a municipal wastewater treatment plant outfall. Survivorship and growth of the non-native Asian clams and growth and condition indices of the native three ridge mussels were significantly higher at the reference site above the outfall than in downstream sites. We attribute this reduction in fitness below the outfall to elevated nutrient and heavy metal concentrations, and the potential presence of other untested-for compounds commonly found in municipal effluent. These results, along with an absence of native mussels below the discharge, indicate a significant negative impact of wastewater effluent on both native and non-native mussels in the stream. PMID:26042840

  14. A 3D individual-based aquatic transport model for the assessment of the potential dispersal of planktonic larvae of an invasive bivalve.

    PubMed

    Hoyer, Andrea B; Wittmann, Marion E; Chandra, Sudeep; Schladow, S Geoffrey; Rueda, Francisco J

    2014-12-01

    The unwanted impacts of non-indigenous species have become one of the major ecological and economic threats to aquatic ecosystems worldwide. Assessing the potential dispersal and colonization of non-indigenous species is necessary to prevent or reduce deleterious effects that may lead to ecosystem degradation and a range of economic impacts. A three dimensional (3D) numerical model has been developed to evaluate the local dispersal of the planktonic larvae of an invasive bivalve, Asian clam (Corbicula fluminea), by passive hydraulic transport in Lake Tahoe, USA. The probability of dispersal of Asian clam larvae from the existing high density populations to novel habitats is determined by the magnitude and timing of strong wind events. The probability of colonization of new near-shore areas outside the existing beds is low, but sensitive to the larvae settling velocity ws. High larvae mortality was observed due to settling in unsuitable deep habitats. The impact of UV-radiation during the pelagic stages, on the Asian clam mortality was low. This work provides a quantification of the number of propagules that may be successfully transported as a result of natural processes and in function of population size. The knowledge and understanding of the relative contribution of different dispersal pathways, may directly inform decision-making and resource allocation associated with invasive species management. PMID:25108183

  15. Survival, Growth and Condition of Freshwater Mussels: Effects of Municipal Wastewater Effluent

    PubMed Central

    Nobles, Trey; Zhang, Yixin

    2015-01-01

    Freshwater mussels (Family Unionidae) are among the most imperiled group of organisms in the world, with nearly 65% of North American species considered endangered. Anthropogenic disturbances, including altered flow regimes, habitat alteration, and pollution, are the major driver of this group's decline. We investigated the effects of tertiary treated municipal wastewater effluent on survivorship, growth, and condition of freshwater mussels in experimental cages in a small Central Texas stream. We tested the effluent effects by measuring basic physical parameters of native three ridge mussels (Amblema plicata) and of non-native Asian clams (Corbicula fluminea), before and after 72-day exposure at four sites above and below a municipal wastewater treatment plant outfall. Survivorship and growth of the non-native Asian clams and growth and condition indices of the native three ridge mussels were significantly higher at the reference site above the outfall than in downstream sites. We attribute this reduction in fitness below the outfall to elevated nutrient and heavy metal concentrations, and the potential presence of other untested-for compounds commonly found in municipal effluent. These results, along with an absence of native mussels below the discharge, indicate a significant negative impact of wastewater effluent on both native and non-native mussels in the stream. PMID:26042840

  16. Residues of organochlorine insecticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, and heavy metals in biota from Apalachicola River, Florida, 1978.

    PubMed

    Winger, P V; Sieckman, C; May, T W; Johnson, W W

    1984-01-01

    Seventy-seven composite samples composed of largemouth bass ( Micropterus salmoides ), channel catfish ( Ictaluras punctatus), threadfin shad ( Dorosoma petenense ), Asiatic clam (Corbicula fluminea ), burrowing mayfly ( Hexagenia sp.), water snake ( Natrix spp.), and little green heron ( Butorides virescens ) were collected from upper and lower reaches of the Apalachicola River, Florida, in 1978 for residue analysis of organochlorine insecticides, PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls), and metals. Compared with data from the National Pesticide Monitoring Program and criteria recommended for the protection of aquatic life, residue concentrations were moderately high in the Apalachicola River. Biota from the upper river generally had higher organic and lower metal residues than those from the lower river. Highest residues in the biota were total DDT, total PCBs, and toxaphene. Although individual mean concentrations were below 2 micrograms/g and total organic contaminant residues never exceeded 5 micrograms/g, residue concentrations of DDT, PCBs, and toxaphene (particularly from the upper river) exceeded recommended permissible levels for the protection of aquatic life. Metal residues were generally below 1 microgram/g. Exceptions were arsenic residues in threadfin shad (1.07 micrograms/g) and Asiatic clams (1.75 micrograms/g), and selenium in eggs of channel catfish (1.39 micrograms/g). The residues observed in the biota, particularly from the upper station, indicated moderate contamination of the Apalachicola River system at the time samples were collected. PMID:6427177

  17. Toxicity of a traditional molluscicide to asian clam veligers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Layhee, Megan J.; Miho Yoshioka; Miho Yoshioka; Bahram Farokhkish; Bahram Farokhkish; Gross, Jackson A.; Sepulveda, Adam J.

    2014-01-01

    Aquaculture and hatchery industries are in need of effective control methods to reduce the risk of spreading aquatic invasive species, such as the Asian clam Corbicula fluminea, through aquaculture and hatchery activities. The planktonic nature of Asian clam veligers enables this life stage to enter water-based infrastructure undetected, including hatchery trucks used to stock fish. Once in hatchery trucks, veligers can disperse overland and establish in previously uninvaded habitats. As a result, there is a need to develop techniques that result in veliger mortality but do not harm fish. In September 2012, we conducted laboratory trials to determine if a molluscicide (750 mg/L potassium chloride and 25 mg/L formalin) commonly used to kill zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) veligers in hatchery trucks can also effectively kill Asian clam veligers. We exposed Asian clam veligers to this molluscicide for 1, 3, and 5 h in each of two water types: deionized water and filtered lake water. We found ,20% mortality at the 1-h exposure period and 100% mortality at both the 3-h and 5-h exposure periods, regardless of water type. This laboratory study represents an important step toward reducing the spread of Asian clams by aquaculture facilities.

  18. Macrofouling control in nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Ekis, E.W. Jr.; Keoplin-Gall, S.M.; McCarthy, R.E.

    1991-11-01

    Macrofouling of cooling-water systems is one of the more significant and costly problems encountered in the nuclear power industry. Both marine and freshwater macroinvertebrates can be responsible for losses in plant availability because of plugged intakes and heat transfer equipment. There is a greater diversity of macrofouling organisms in marine waters than in fresh waters. Marine macrofouling organisms include barnacles, mollusks, bryozoans, and hydroids. Barnacles are crustaceans with feathery appendages, which allow them to attach to a variety of surfaces. They are a major cause of severe macrofouling because they can remain attached even after death. The major freshwater macrofouling organisms include the Asiatic Clam (Corbicula fluminea) and the newest freshwater macrofouler, the Zebra Mussel (Dreissena polymorpha). The introduction of the Zebra Mussel into the Great Lakes has created economic and ecological problems that will not easily be solved. The threat of intercontinental dispersal of the Zebra Mussel in America is serious. Research programs have been initiated around the country to develop control methods for this macrofouling problem. The various control methodologies can be classified in the following categories: biological, chemical, physical, and mechanical. Laboratory experiments were performed to evaluate the efficacy of Actibrom against mature Zebra Mussels.

  19. Ecological values of shallow-water habitats: Implications for the restoration of disturbed ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lopez, C.B.; Cloern, J.E.; Schraga, T.S.; Little, A.J.; Lucas, L.V.; Thompson, J.K.; Burau, J.R.

    2006-01-01

    A presumed value of shallow-habitat enhanced pelagic productivity derives from the principle that in nutrient-rich aquatic systems phytoplankton growth rate is controlled by light availability, which varies inversely with habitat depth. We measured a set of biological indicators across the gradient of habitat depth within the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta (California) to test the hypothesis that plankton biomass, production, and pelagic energy flow also vary systematically with habitat depth. Results showed that phytoplankton biomass and production were only weakly related to phytoplankton growth rates whereas other processes (transport, consumption) were important controls. Distribution of the invasive clam Corbicula fluminea was patchy, and heavily colonized habitats all supported low phytoplankton biomass and production and functioned as food sinks. Surplus primary production in shallow, uncolonized habitats provided potential subsidies to neighboring recipient habitats. Zooplankton in deeper habitats, where grazing exceeded phytoplankton production, were likely supported by significant fluxes of phytoplankton biomass from connected donor habitats. Our results provide three important lessons for ecosystem science: (a) in the absence of process measurements, derived indices provide valuable information to improve our mechanistic understanding of ecosystem function and to benefit adaptive management strategies; (b) the benefits of some ecosystem functions are displaced by water movements, so the value of individual habitat types can only be revealed through a regional perspective that includes connectedness among habitats; and (c) invasive species can act as overriding controls of habitat function, adding to the uncertainty of management outcomes. ?? 2006 Springer Science+Business Media, Inc.

  20. Using watershed characteristics, sediment, and tissue of resident mollusks to identify potential sources of trace elements to streams in a complex agricultural landscape.

    PubMed

    Ciparis, Serena; Schreiber, Madeline E; Voshell, J Reese

    2012-05-01

    Trace elements used in animal feed additives can be introduced to aquatic environments through application of manures from animal feeding operations to agricultural land as fertilizer. The use of poultry feed additives containing arsenic (As) is of particular concern in the Shenandoah River watershed (Virginia, USA), an agricultural landscape with a high density of poultry operations. This study investigated the relationship between watershed characteristics of Shenandoah River tributaries and trace element concentrations in streambed sediment and tissue of resident mollusks, including: Asian clams (Corbicula fluminea), which are commonly used biomonitors, and pleurocerid snails (Leptoxis carinata), which are generally understudied. Results failed to support the primary hypothesis of a predictive relationship between watershed densities of poultry operations and As concentrations in sediment and mollusk tissue. However, there were statistical relationships between land use in tributary watersheds and other trace elements in sediment (Cu, Mn, Pb, Zn) and tissue (Cd, Hg, Pb). Principal components analysis of the sediment data suggested a possible geologic source of As at some sites. Tissue concentrations of As were significantly higher in snails than in clams, but clams accumulated higher concentrations of other trace elements (Cd, Cr, Hg, Pb, Se). Snails may be useful biomonitors of environmental As, but appear to be less suitable than clams for studies of landscape sources of other trace elements. PMID:21713480

  1. Fauna Europaea: Mollusca – Bivalvia

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Fauna Europaea provides a public web-service with an index of scientific names (including important synonyms) of all living European land and freshwater animals, their geographical distribution at country level (up to the Urals, excluding the Caucasus region), and some additional information. The Fauna Europaea project covers about 230,000 taxonomic names, including 130,000 accepted species and 14,000 accepted subspecies, which is much more than the originally projected number of 100,000 species. This represents a huge effort by more than 400 contributing specialists throughout Europe and is a unique (standard) reference suitable for many users in science, government, industry, nature conservation and education. For the Mollusca-Bivalvia, data from 5 families (Margaritiferidae, Unionidae, Sphaeriidae, Cyrenidae, Dreissenidae) containing 55 species are included in this paper. European freshwater bivalves belong to the Orders Unionoida and Cardiida. All the European unionoids are included in the superfamily Unionoidea, the freshwater mussels or naiads. The European cardiids belong to the following three superfamilies: Cardioidea, Cyrenoidea and Dreissenoidea. Among the Unionoidea there are the most imperilled animal groups on the planet while the Cardioidea includes the cosmopolitan genus Pisidium, the Cyrenoidea the Asiatic clam (Corbicula fluminea) and the Dreissenoidea the famous invasive zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha). Basic information is summarized on their taxonomy and biology. Tabulations include a complete list of the current estimated families, genera and species. PMID:26311403

  2. Bioaccumulation and trophic dilution of human pharmaceuticals across trophic positions of an effluent-dependent wadeable stream

    PubMed Central

    Du, Bowen; Haddad, Samuel P.; Luek, Andreas; Scott, W. Casan; Saari, Gavin N.; Kristofco, Lauren A.; Connors, Kristin A.; Rash, Christopher; Rasmussen, Joseph B.; Chambliss, C. Kevin; Brooks, Bryan W.

    2014-01-01

    Though pharmaceuticals are increasingly observed in a variety of organisms from coastal and inland aquatic systems, trophic transfer of pharmaceuticals in aquatic food webs have not been reported. In this study, bioaccumulation of select pharmaceuticals was investigated in a lower order effluent-dependent stream in central Texas, USA, using isotope dilution liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (MS). A fish plasma model, initially developed from laboratory studies, was tested to examine observed versus predicted internal dose of select pharmaceuticals. Pharmaceuticals accumulated to higher concentrations in invertebrates relative to fish; elevated concentrations of the antidepressant sertraline and its primary metabolite desmethylsertraline were observed in the Asian clam, Corbicula fluminea, and two unionid mussel species. Trophic positions were determined from stable isotopes (δ15N and δ13C) collected by isotope ratio-MS; a Bayesian mixing model was then used to estimate diet contributions towards top fish predators. Because diphenhydramine and carbamazepine were the only target compounds detected in all species examined, trophic magnification factors (TMFs) were derived to evaluate potential trophic transfer of both compounds. TMFs for diphenhydramine (0.38) and carbamazepine (1.17) indicated neither compound experienced trophic magnification, which suggests that inhalational and not dietary exposure represented the primary route of uptake by fish in this effluent-dependent stream. PMID:25313153

  3. Text Signals Influence Team Artifacts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clariana, Roy B.; Rysavy, Monica D.; Taricani, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    This exploratory quasi-experimental investigation describes the influence of text signals on team visual map artifacts. In two course sections, four-member teams were given one of two print-based text passage versions on the course-related topic "Social influence in groups" downloaded from Wikipedia; this text had two paragraphs, each…

  4. Lunar Influences on Human Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Gordon W.; Dua, Manjula

    1983-01-01

    Used league records of all Canadian hockey games (N=426) played during a season to test a lunar-aggression hypothesis. Despite the use of multiple measures of lunar phase and interpersonal aggression, support for lunar influence was not forthcoming. Supplemental data revealed that beliefs in lunar influence are fairly common. (JAC)

  5. Family Structure and Social Influence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Dawn R.

    Regardless of family form, there is a universal belief that one's family is the most powerful agent of socialization. A sample of 38 junior high school students from single parent and nuclear families completed a questionnaire in order to examine the relative effects of peer influence and family influence in single parent and nuclear families.…

  6. Student Influence and Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juola, Arvo E.

    Since 1965, student views and feelings have influenced great changes in higher education, sometimes to the detriment of long-term interests in academic institutions and colleges. One conspicuous recent trend is the desire of college students for more influence, impact, or power. Other prevalent attitudes may be characterized as a desire to be…

  7. Wetland Research Can Influence Policy

    EPA Science Inventory

    An objective of ecological research is to have a positive influence on the way natural resources are managed. The ability to influence policy with science depends on collaboration with the appropriate audience, identification of a relevant question, and awareness of the framewor...

  8. Conceptual Dimensions of Interpersonal Influence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCallum, Debra Moehle; And Others

    Interpersonal power has been defined as the ability of an agent to alter the behavior of a target through means-control, attractiveness, and credibility. To identify and delineate situations of influence in personal relationships, undergraduate students either wrote influence descriptions (N=96), made similarity judgments on the original 96…

  9. Influence Analysis of Ranking Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poon, Wai-Yin; Chan, Wai

    2002-01-01

    Developed diagnostic measures to identify observations in Thurstonian models for ranking data that unduly influence parameter estimates obtained by the partition maximum likelihood approach of W. Chan and P. Bender (1998). (SLD)

  10. Influence of Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tackley, P. J.; Aurnou, J. M.; Aubert, J.

    2009-04-01

    Due to the absence of an atmosphere and proximity to the Sun, Mercury's surface temperature varies laterally by several 100s K, even when averaged over long time periods. The dominant variation in time-averaged surface T occurs from pole to equator (~225 K) [1]. The resonant relationship between Mercury's orbit and rotation results in a smaller longitudinal variation (~100 K) [1]. Here we demonstrate, using models of mantle convection in a 3-D spherical shell, that this stationary lateral variation in surface temperature has a small but significant influence on mantle convection and on the lateral variation of heat flux across the core-mantle boundary (CMB). We evaluate the possible observational signature of this laterally-varying convection in terms of boundary topography, stress distribution, gravity and moment of inertia tensor. We furthermore test whether the lateral variation in CMB flux is capable of driving a thermal wind dynamo, i.e., weak dynamo action with no internally-driven core convective motions. For Mercury's mantle we assume a dry olivine rheology including both diffusion creep and disclocation creep with rheological parameters such as activation energy and volume taken from the synthesis of [2]. We assume decaying radiogenic heat sources with the same concentration as in the bulk silicate Earth, and a parameterised model of core cooling. The models are run for 4.5 Ga from a relatively hot initial state with random initial perturbations. We use the code StagYY, which uses a finite-volume discretization on a spherical yin-yang grid and a multigrid solver [3]. Results in spherical axisymmetric geometry, compare a case with constant surface temperature to one with a latitude-dependent surface temperature. The system forms about 3 convection cells from pole to equator. Although the results look similar to first order, in the latitude-dependent case the convection is noticably more sluggish and colder towards the pole. In CMB flux, both cases display

  11. Language may indeed influence thought.

    PubMed

    Zlatev, Jordan; Blomberg, Johan

    2015-01-01

    We discuss four interconnected issues that we believe have hindered investigations into how language may affect thinking. These have had a tendency to reappear in the debate concerning linguistic relativity over the past decades, despite numerous empirical findings. The first is the claim that it is impossible to disentangle language from thought, making the question concerning "influence" pointless. The second is the argument that it is impossible to disentangle language from culture in general, and from social interaction in particular, so it is impossible to attribute any differences in the thought patterns of the members of different cultures to language per se. The third issue is the objection that methodological and empirical problems defeat all but the most trivial version of the thesis of linguistic influence: that language gives new factual information. The fourth is the assumption that since language can potentially influence thought from "not at all" to "completely," the possible forms of linguistic influence can be placed on a cline, and competing theories can be seen as debating the actual position on this cline. We analyze these claims and show that the first three do not constitute in-principle objections against the validity of the project of investigating linguistic influence on thought, and that the last one is not the best way to frame the empirical challenges at hand. While we do not argue for any specific theory or mechanism for linguistic influence on thought, our discussion and the reviewed literature show that such influence is clearly possible, and hence in need of further investigations. PMID:26582997

  12. Greek influence on Babylonian astronomy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, J. M.

    Astronomy in Babylonia during the first millennium BC developed out of a long tradition of observing and interpreting the sky into a science that was both observational and theoretical. It is well established that these developments influenced the practice of astronomy in neighbouring cultures in the Indus valley, Egypt and the Greco-Roman world. However, it is less clear whether there was any significant input from foreign cultures into the development of Babylonian astronomy. In this paper I examine the evidence for possible traces of Greek influence on Babylonian astronomy during the late first millennium BC. In particular, I discuss two possible cases of Greek influence that have been proposed in recent years: the naming of certain zodiacal signs and a value for the length of the year found on a Babylonian text that may be based upon Greek observations of summer solstices.

  13. Antecedent influences on behavior disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, R G; Iwata, B A

    1997-01-01

    The influence of antecedent events on behavior disorders has been relatively understudied by applied behavior analysts. This lack of research may be due to a focus on consequences as determinants of behavior and a historical disagreement on a conceptual framework for describing and interpreting antecedent variables. We suggest that antecedent influences can be described using terms derived from basic behavioral principles and that their functional properties can be adequately interpreted as discriminative and establishing operations. A set of studies on assessment and treatment of behavior disorders was selected for review based on their relevance to the topic of antecedent events. These studies were categorized as focusing on assessment of antecedent events, antecedent treatments for behavior disorders maintained by either positive or negative reinforcement, and special cases of antecedent events in behavior disorders. Some directions for future research on antecedent influences in the analysis and treatment of behavior disorders are discussed. PMID:9210312

  14. Influence analysis of Github repositories.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yan; Zhang, Jun; Bai, Xiaomei; Yu, Shuo; Yang, Zhuo

    2016-01-01

    With the support of cloud computing techniques, social coding platforms have changed the style of software development. Github is now the most popular social coding platform and project hosting service. Software developers of various levels keep entering Github, and use Github to save their public and private software projects. The large amounts of software developers and software repositories on Github are posing new challenges to the world of software engineering. This paper tries to tackle one of the important problems: analyzing the importance and influence of Github repositories. We proposed a HITS based influence analysis on graphs that represent the star relationship between Github users and repositories. A weighted version of HITS is applied to the overall star graph, and generates a different set of top influential repositories other than the results from standard version of HITS algorithm. We also conduct the influential analysis on per-month star graph, and study the monthly influence ranking of top repositories. PMID:27540501

  15. Language may indeed influence thought

    PubMed Central

    Zlatev, Jordan; Blomberg, Johan

    2015-01-01

    We discuss four interconnected issues that we believe have hindered investigations into how language may affect thinking. These have had a tendency to reappear in the debate concerning linguistic relativity over the past decades, despite numerous empirical findings. The first is the claim that it is impossible to disentangle language from thought, making the question concerning “influence” pointless. The second is the argument that it is impossible to disentangle language from culture in general, and from social interaction in particular, so it is impossible to attribute any differences in the thought patterns of the members of different cultures to language per se. The third issue is the objection that methodological and empirical problems defeat all but the most trivial version of the thesis of linguistic influence: that language gives new factual information. The fourth is the assumption that since language can potentially influence thought from “not at all” to “completely,” the possible forms of linguistic influence can be placed on a cline, and competing theories can be seen as debating the actual position on this cline. We analyze these claims and show that the first three do not constitute in-principle objections against the validity of the project of investigating linguistic influence on thought, and that the last one is not the best way to frame the empirical challenges at hand. While we do not argue for any specific theory or mechanism for linguistic influence on thought, our discussion and the reviewed literature show that such influence is clearly possible, and hence in need of further investigations. PMID:26582997

  16. The Anxiety of Influence and the Influence of Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kountz, Carol

    A composition researcher collected stories from students with writing anxiety, using qualitative research tools of interview and interpretation. In literary theory it is not unusual to speak of anxiety of influence when referring to the torment of proving one is equal to a revered author. The critic Harold Bloom presented it as his theory of the…

  17. Influencing the future of AGU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhaden, Michael; Finn, Carol; McEntee, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Steve Jobs, visionary cofounder of Apple, Inc., once said, “Everyone here has the sense that right now is one of those moments when we are influencing the future.” This statement aptly describes AGU at this time as the Board of Directors and the Council continue to influence the future in exciting ways by advancing our strategic plan (http://www.agu.org/about/mission.shtml). Both governing bodies held meetings in San Francisco immediately preceding the 2011 AGU Fall Meeting. The agendas for both meetings, along with the key outcomes, are posted on AGU's Web site (http://www.agu.org/about/governance/).

  18. Gender Influences in Classroom Interaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, Louise Cherry, Ed.; Marrett, Cora B., Ed.

    The 11 chapters comprising this work focus on the interactional influences that may be related to differential classroom experiences for males and females. The effects of contextual factors, teacher characteristics, and student characteristics are investigated. Addressed primarily to researchers, this information should prove useful to teachers,…

  19. Influence of convection on microstructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, William R.; Caram, Rubens; Mohanty, A. P.; Seth, Jayshree

    1990-01-01

    The mechanism responsible for the difference in microstructure caused by solidifying the MnBi-Bi eutectic in space is sought. The objectives for the three year period are as follows: (1) completion of the following theoretical analyses - determination of the influence of the Soret effect on the average solid composition versus distance of off-eutectic mixtures directionally solidified in the absence of convection, determination of the influence of convection on the microstructure of off-eutectic mixtures using a linear velocity profile in the adjacent melt, determination of the influence of volumetric changes during solidification on microconvection near the freezing interface and on microstructure, and determination of the influence of convection on microstructure when the MnBi fibers project out in front of the bismuth matrix; (2) search for patterns in the effect of microgravity on different eutectics (for example, eutectic composition, eutectic temperature, usual microstructure, densities of pure constituents, and density changes upon solidification); and (3) determination of the Soret coefficient and the diffusion coefficient for Mn-Bi melts near the eutectic composition, both through laboratory experiements to be performed here and from data from Shuttle experiments.

  20. Influences on Adolescents' Vocational Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mortimer, Jeylan T.; And Others

    A study charted family, school, workplace, and community experiences that are relevant to the vocational development of high school students, focusing on five areas of influence: allowance practices within the family, economic status, paid work experience, volunteerism, and gender differences. The data were from the "Youth Development Study," a…

  1. Community Influences on Cognitive Ability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coon, Hilary; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Associations between community environment and cognitive ability were studied in 167 adoptive and 175 nonadoptive Colorado families. Seven families were omitted. A proposed model, tested by census measures, finds several aspects of communities showing environmental relationships with child IQ over parental influences. Rural communities have a…

  2. Phonological Awareness: Factors of Influence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frohlich, Linda Paulina; Petermann, Franz; Metz, Dorothee

    2013-01-01

    Early child development is influenced by various genetic and environmental factors. This study aims to identify factors that affect the phonological awareness of preschool and first grade children. Based on a sample of 330 German-speaking children (mean age = 6.2 years) the following domains were evaluated: Parent factors, birth and pregnancy,…

  3. Surface Organization Influences Bistable Vision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graf, Erich W.; Adams, Wendy J.

    2008-01-01

    A priority for the visual system is to construct 3-dimensional surfaces from visual primitives. Information is combined across individual cues to form a robust representation of the external world. Here, it is shown that surface completion relying on multiple visual cues influences relative dominance during binocular rivalry. The shape of a…

  4. Intelligence: Genetic and Environmental Influences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cancro, Robert, Ed.

    This book on the genetic and environmental influences on intelligence is comprised of the following papers: "The Structure of Intelligence in Relation to the Nature-Nurture Controversy," R. B. Cattell; "Theory of Intelligence," L. G. Humphreys; "Using Measured Intelligence Intelligently," P. R. Merrifield; "Intelligence: Definition, Theory, and…

  5. Factors influencing dental decision making.

    PubMed

    Grembowski, D; Milgrom, P; Fiset, L

    1988-01-01

    In clinical decision making, dentists routinely choose between alternative treatments such as crown vs amalgam/composite buildup, root canal vs extraction, fixed bridge vs removable partial denture, and prophylaxis vs subgingival curettage or periodontal scaling. A number of technical and patient factors can influence dentists' choice of treatment in these situations; however, little is known about their relative importance. To address this issue, a list of technical (e.g., periodontal status and caries rate) and patient (e.g., cost and patient preference) factors possibly influencing choice of treatment was developed for each pair of services. Responding to a mail questionnaire, 156 general dentists in Washington State listed the top three factors influencing their choice of service in each pair. Results revealed that dentists took different factors into account in choosing among alternative treatments. Technical factors dominated over patient concerns; only about 33 percent of the dentists considered patient factors important in choosing alternative therapies. The latter group was less preventively oriented, were solo practitioners, worked longer hours, and had lower prices. Results suggest patients may have little influence on prescriptions of therapy among experienced general dentists. PMID:3045303

  6. Factors That Influence Teacher Attrition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Patricia

    1995-01-01

    External, employment, and personal factors which influence teacher decisions to stay, leave, or transfer from teaching assignments are discussed, with emphasis on special education teachers. Factors attributed to teacher attrition in urban and rural environments also are briefly reviewed, along with attrition of related services professionals.…

  7. FORCES INFLUENCING THE COUNSELOR'S ROLE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MOLER, DONALD

    DEFINING THE ROLE OF A COUNSELOR IS A TASK WHICH IS COMPLICATED BY THE CHANGING WORLD, THE CHANGING SOCIAL STRUCTURE, AND THE INFLUENCES OF GOVERNMENT. THE ROLE IS FURTHER COMPLICATED BY THE FACT THAT COUNSELING HAS ORIGINATED FROM A VARIETY OF DISCIPLINES, BORROWING FROM THE JOB OF THE TEACHER, THE ADMINISTRATOR, THE SOCIAL WORKER, AND THE…

  8. Factors Influencing College Science Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tai, Robert H.; Sadler, Philip M.; Mintzes, Joel J.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, the authors report some of the salient findings of a large-scale, four-year national study, conducted at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, entitled "Factors Influencing College Science Success" (FICSS), which surveyed college students who enrolled in first-year biology, chemistry, and physics courses throughout the…

  9. The Influences of Rudolf Laban.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, John

    Rudolf Laban has influenced the introduction and development of modern educational dance as well as general education. Much of the available material concerning Laban is arts oriented; it is concerned with dance as an art form and is not focused towards the educational uses of Laban's ideas. This volume attempts to present materials relevant to…

  10. Soft Factors Influence College Enrollment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fogg, Neeta P.; Harrington, Paul E.

    2010-01-01

    Evidence about the role that "soft factors" like student engagement and school environment play in influencing whether high school students go on to enroll in college is hard to come by. Over the past two years, the Center for Labor Market Studies (CLMS) of Northeastern University, with support from the Nellie Mae Education Foundation and the…

  11. Attractiveness and Influence in Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Lyle D.; Strong, Stanley R.

    1971-01-01

    The results showed that in spite of violently different feelings about (or descriptions of) the roles, the subjects were equally influenced by them. This suggests that social attractiveness may not be important when the client's problems require expert opinion and knowledge. (Author/CG(

  12. Physical Attractiveness and Interpersonal Influence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dion, Karen K.; Stein, Steven

    1978-01-01

    Examines the hypothesis that attractive individuals should be more successful with opposite-sex peers but less successful with same-sex peers than unattractive individuals. Also investigates the influence strategies employed by persons differing in attractiveness since nothing is currently known about the actual behavior exhibited by attractive…

  13. Individual Influence on Model Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sterba, Sonya K.; Pek, Jolynn

    2012-01-01

    Researchers in psychology are increasingly using model selection strategies to decide among competing models, rather than evaluating the fit of a given model in isolation. However, such interest in model selection outpaces an awareness that one or a few cases can have disproportionate impact on the model ranking. Though case influence on the fit…

  14. Genetic factors influencing alcohol dependence

    PubMed Central

    Mayfield, R D; Harris, R A; Schuckit, M A

    2008-01-01

    Plentiful data from both animal and human studies support the importance of genetic influences in substance abuse and dependence (Bierut et al., 1998; Tsuang et al., 1998; Kendler et al., 2003). This review summarizes the evidence supporting such genetic influences, places them into perspective regarding animal and human studies, discusses the importance of both genes and environment, and highlights some specific genes of interest regarding the vulnerabilities for problems associated with alcohol use disorders. A long history of repetitive heavy use of alcohol exists across generations as well as the high prevalence of alcohol-related problems in Western societies. Moreover, the information offered here addresses the importance of more general issues regarding genetics and gene expression related to alcohol abuse and dependence. PMID:18362899

  15. Vestibular influence on tongue activity.

    PubMed

    Elmund, J; Bowman, J P; Morgan, R J

    1983-07-01

    The vestibular system was electrically stimulated in cats anesthetized with ketamine. Peripheral stimulation by an electrode positioned in the vestibule evoked torsional contralateral eye deviations and an electromyogram (EMG) response in a contralateral dorsal neck extensor. Consistently associated with this well documented vestibular pattern was an EMG response in tongue protrusive muscles, at a latency of 13 +/- 5 (means +/- SD) ms. Stimulation in a specific part of the rostroventral lateral vestibular nucleus elicited the same combination of responses: torsional contralateral eye deviations, dorsal neck EMG, and tongue EMG at a latency of 14 +/- 3 ms. Possible tongue activation by current spread to peripheral and central neural structures was examined in detail. Cerebellar, V, VII, cochlear, IX, X, and XII nerve influences were considered. On the basis of combined evidence, it was concluded that the vestibular system does influence tongue activity. PMID:6602714

  16. Influence of confinement on thermodiffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannaoui, Rachid; Galliero, Guillaume; Hoang, Hai; Boned, Christian

    2013-09-01

    This work focuses on a possible influence of a nanoporous medium on the thermodiffusion of a fluid "isotopic" mixture. To do so, we performed molecular dynamics simulations of confined Lennard-Jones binary equimolar mixtures using grand-canonical like and non-equilibrium approaches in sub- and super-critical conditions. The study was conducted in atomistic slit pore of three adsorbent natures for various widths (from 5 to 35 times the size of a molecule). The simulation results indicate that for all thermodynamic conditions and whatever the pore characteristics, the confinement has a negligible effect on the thermal diffusion factor/Soret coefficient. However, when considered separately, the mass diffusion and thermodiffusion coefficients have been found to be largely influenced by the pore characteristics. These two coefficients decrease noticeably when adsorption is stronger and pore width smaller, a behavior that is consistent with a simple hydrodynamic explanation.

  17. Factors influencing pacing in triathlon

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Sam SX; Peiffer, Jeremiah J; Brisswalter, Jeanick; Nosaka, Kazunori; Abbiss, Chris R

    2014-01-01

    Triathlon is a multisport event consisting of sequential swim, cycle, and run disciplines performed over a variety of distances. This complex and unique sport requires athletes to appropriately distribute their speed or energy expenditure (ie, pacing) within each discipline as well as over the entire event. As with most physical activity, the regulation of pacing in triathlon may be influenced by a multitude of intrinsic and extrinsic factors. The majority of current research focuses mainly on the Olympic distance, whilst much less literature is available on other triathlon distances such as the sprint, half-Ironman, and Ironman distances. Furthermore, little is understood regarding the specific physiological, environmental, and interdisciplinary effects on pacing. Therefore, this article discusses the pacing strategies observed in triathlon across different distances, and elucidates the possible factors influencing pacing within the three specific disciplines of a triathlon. PMID:25258562

  18. Genetic influences on brain structure.

    PubMed

    Thompson, P M; Cannon, T D; Narr, K L; van Erp, T; Poutanen, V P; Huttunen, M; Lönnqvist, J; Standertskjöld-Nordenstam, C G; Kaprio, J; Khaledy, M; Dail, R; Zoumalan, C I; Toga, A W

    2001-12-01

    Here we report on detailed three-dimensional maps revealing how brain structure is influenced by individual genetic differences. A genetic continuum was detected in which brain structure was increasingly similar in subjects with increasing genetic affinity. Genetic factors significantly influenced cortical structure in Broca's and Wernicke's language areas, as well as frontal brain regions (r2(MZ) > 0.8, p < 0.05). Preliminary correlations were performed suggesting that frontal gray matter differences may be linked to Spearman's g, which measures successful test performance across multiple cognitive domains (p < 0.05). These genetic brain maps reveal how genes determine individual differences, and may shed light on the heritability of cognitive and linguistic skills, as well as genetic liability for diseases that affect the human cortex. PMID:11694885

  19. Reynolds number influences in aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, Dennis M.; Yip, Long P.; Yao, Chung-Sheng; Lin, John C.; Lawing, Pierce L.; Batina, John T.; Hardin, Jay C.; Horvath, Thomas J.; Fenbert, James W.; Domack, Christopher S.

    1993-01-01

    Reynolds number, a measure of the ratio of inertia to viscous forces, is a fundamental similarity parameter for fluid flows and therefore, would be expected to have a major influence in aerodynamics and aeronautics. Reynolds number influences are generally large, but monatomic, for attached laminar (continuum) flow; however, laminar flows are easily separated, inducing even stronger, non-monatomic, Reynolds number sensitivities. Probably the strongest Reynolds number influences occur in connection with transitional flow behavior. Transition can take place over a tremendous Reynolds number range, from the order of 20 x 10(exp 3) for 2-D free shear layers up to the order of 100 x 10(exp 6) for hypersonic boundary layers. This variability in transition behavior is especially important for complex configurations where various vehicle and flow field elements can undergo transition at various Reynolds numbers, causing often surprising changes in aerodynamics characteristics over wide ranges in Reynolds number. This is further compounded by the vast parameterization associated with transition, in that any parameter which influences mean viscous flow development (e.g., pressure gradient, flow curvature, wall temperature, Mach number, sweep, roughness, flow chemistry, shock interactions, etc.), and incident disturbance fields (acoustics, vorticity, particulates, temperature spottiness, even electro static discharges) can alter transition locations to first order. The usual method of dealing with the transition problem is to trip the flow in the generally lower Reynolds number wind tunnel to simulate the flight turbulent behavior. However, this is not wholly satisfactory as it results in incorrectly scaled viscous region thicknesses and cannot be utilized at all for applications such as turbine blades and helicopter rotors, nacelles, leading edge and nose regions, and High Altitude Long Endurance and hypersonic airbreathers where the transitional flow is an innately critical

  20. Genetic influences on social cognition.

    PubMed

    Skuse, David H; Gallagher, Louise

    2011-05-01

    Human social behavior develops under the influence of genetic, environmental, and cultural factors. Social cognition comprises our ability to understand and respond appropriately to other people's social approaches or responses. The concept embraces self-knowledge and theory of mind, or the ability to think about emotions and behavior from the perspective of another person. The neuropeptides oxytocin (OT) and vasopressin (AVP) are now known to play an important role, affecting individual differences in parenting behavior, social recognition, and affiliative behaviors. The processes of social cognition are also supported by reward circuitry, underpinned by the dopaminergic neurotransmitter system. Reward processes build social relationships, in parenting and pair-bonding, and influence social interactions that require trust, or display altruism. The impact of emotional regulation upon social behavior, including mood and anxiety, is also mediated through the serotonergic system. Variation in activity of serotonergic networks in the brain influences emotional responsivity, including subjective feelings, physiological responses, emotional expressions, and the tendency to become engaged in action as a consequence of a feeling state. Genetic variation in the receptors associated with OT, AVP, dopamine, and serotonin has been intensively studied in humans and animal models. Recent findings are building an increasingly coherent picture of regulatory mechanisms. PMID:21289535

  1. Solar influences on global change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Monitoring of the Sun and the Earth has yielded new knowledge essential to this debate. There is now no doubt that the total radiative energy from the Sun that heats the Earth's surface changes over decadal time scales as a consequence of solar activity. Observations indicate as well that changes in ultraviolet radiation and energetic particles from the Sun, also connected with the solar activity, modulate the layer of ozone that protects the biosphere from the solar ultraviolet radiation. This report reassesses solar influences on global change in the light of this new knowledge of solar and atmospheric variability. Moreover, the report considers climate change to be encompassed within the broader concept of global change; thus the biosphere is recognized to be part of a larger, coupled Earth system. Implementing a program to continuously monitor solar irradiance over the next several decades will provide the opportunity to estimate solar influences on global change, assuming continued maintenance of observations of climate and other potential forcing mechanisms. In the lower atmosphere, an increase in solar radiation is expected to cause global warming. In the stratosphere, however, the two effects produce temperature changes of opposite sign. A monitoring program that would augment long term observations of tropospheric parameters with similar observations of stratospheric parameters could separate these diverse climate perturbations and perhaps isolate a greenhouse footprint of climate change. Monitoring global change in the troposphere is a key element of all facets of the United States Global Change Research Program (USGCRP), not just of the study of solar influences on global change. The need for monitoring the stratosphere is also important for global change research in its own right because of the stratospheric ozone layer.

  2. Saltwater upconing zone of influence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakovovic, Danica; Werner, Adrian D.; de Louw, Perry G. B.; Post, Vincent E. A.; Morgan, Leanne K.

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we define and characterize the saltwater upconing zone of influence (SUZI). The SUZI is the region around a pumping well within which significant rise in the saltwater-freshwater interface occurs. While the zone of influence of a pumping well can be clearly defined in terms of hydraulics (e.g., drawdown), the SUZI has not been recognised and characterised, despite its importance for groundwater decision-making in coastal regions. We explore the SUZI under various conditions and compare common methods of investigation using both axisymmetric (1D and 2D vertical cross-section) and 3D simulations of saltwater upconing at the field scale, based on a combination of numerical and analytical approaches. The SUZI was found to be dependent on the relative magnitudes of pumping, regional flow, distance of the well from the coast, and position of the well above the interface, as expected. The three-dimensional coastal setting simulations revealed an asymmetric shape of the lateral extent of the SUZI, which is largest in the direction parallel to the coast. This occurs because the ocean and the inland extent of the seawater wedge limit the propagation of the SUZI perpendicular to the coast. Predictions of the SUZI using the Ghyben-Herzberg approximation, including cases where sloping interfaces occur (i.e., in contrast to the artificiality of horizontal interfaces used in axisymmetric approaches), provide reasonable first approximations of the SUZI. Numerical modelling of dispersive upconing in the 3D inclined interface case is influenced by practical limits to the model domain size and grid resolution. For example, the no-flow boundary condition at 1500 m from the pumping well elongates the SUZI in the direction parallel to the coast. This study extends previous concepts of well interference, which have previously been based on hydraulics only, by introducing the SUZI and characterising its extent, with consideration given to differences in commonly adopted

  3. "Influence Method". Detailed mathematical description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rios, I. J.; Mayer, R. E.

    2015-07-01

    A new method for the absolute determination of nuclear particle flux in the absence of known detector efficiency, the "Influence Method", was recently published (I.J. Rios and R.E. Mayer, Nuclear Instruments & Methods in Physics Research A 775 (2015) 99-104). The method defines an estimator for the population and another estimator for the efficiency. In this article we present a detailed mathematical description which yields the conditions for its application, the probability distributions of the estimators and their characteristic parameters. An analysis of the different cases leads to expressions of the estimators and their uncertainties.

  4. Gravitational influence on eutectic solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokolowski, Robert S.; Glicksman, Martin E.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of gravity on eutectic solidification was investigated experimentally for Pb-Sn binary eutectic alloys. It is found that the separation of the primary crystals of the binary system from the coupled eutectic occurs over a wide range of cooling rates and gravitational fields (100-100,000 g). The separation is strongly influenced by the nucleation behavior of the particular alloy system. A mechanism for the strong phase separation is postulated on the basis of cloud convection models in atmospheric convection.

  5. Peptides that influence membrane topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Gerard C. L.

    2014-03-01

    We examine the mechanism of a range of polypeptides that influence membrane topology, including antimicrobial peptides, cell penetrating peptides, viral fusion peptides, and apoptosis proteins, and show how a combination of geometry, coordination chemistry, and soft matter physics can be used to approach a unified understanding. We will also show how such peptides can impact biomedical problems such as auto-immune diseases (psoriasis, lupus), infectious diseases (viral and bacterial infections), and mitochondrial pathologies (under-regulated apoptosis leads to neurodegenerative diseases whereas over-regulated apoptosis leads to cancer.)

  6. Culture and Influence in Multisite Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkhart, Karen E.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the influence of multisite evaluation requires careful consideration of cultural context. The author illustrates dimensions of influence and culture with excerpts from four National Science Foundation evaluation case studies and summarizes what influence teaches everyone about culture and what culture teaches everyone about…

  7. Pesticides' influence on wine fermentation.

    PubMed

    Caboni, Pierluigi; Cabras, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Wine quality strongly depends on the grape quality. To obtain high-quality wines, it is necessary to process healthy grapes at the correct ripeness stage and for this reason the farmer has to be especially careful in the prevention of parasite attacks on the grapevine. The most common fungal diseases affecting grape quality are downy and powdery mildew (Plasmopara viticola and Uncinula necator), and gray mold (Botrytis cinerea). On the other hand, the most dangerous insects are the grape moth (Lobesia botrana), vine mealybug (Planococcus ficus), and the citrus mealybug (Planococcus citri). Farmers fight grape diseases and insects applying pesticides that can be found at harvest time on grapes. The persistence of pesticides depends on the chemical characteristic of the active ingredients as well as on photodegradation, thermodegradation, codistillation, and enzymatic degradation. The pesticide residues on grapes can be transferred to the must and this can influence the selection and development of yeast strains. Moreover, yeasts can also influence the levels of the pesticides in the wine by reducing or adsorbing them on lees. During the fermentative process, yeasts can cause the disappearance of pesticide residues by degradation or absorption at the end of the fermentation when yeasts are deposited as lees. In this chapter, we reviewed the effect of commonly used herbicides, insecticides, and fungicides on yeasts. We also studied the effect of alcoholic and malolactic fermentation on pesticide residues. PMID:20610173

  8. Influence of convection on microstructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, William R.; Eisa, Gaber Faheem; Chandrasekhar, S.; Larrousse, Mark; Banan, Mohsen

    1988-01-01

    The influence was studied of convection during directional solidification on the resulting microstructure of eutectics, specifically lead/tin and manganese/bismuth. A theory was developed for the influence of convection on the microstructure of lamellar and fibrous eutectics, through the effect of convection on the concentration field in the melt in front of the growing eutectic. While the theory agrees with the experimental spin-up spin-down results, it predicts that the weak convection expected due to buoyancy will not produce a measurable change in eutectic microstructure. Thus, this theory does not explain the two fold decrease in MnBi fiber size and spacing observed when MnBi-Bi is solidified in space or on Earth with a magnetic field applied. Attention was turned to the morphology of the MnBi-Bi interface and to the generation of freezing rate fluctuations by convection. Decanting the melt during solidification of MnBi-Bi eutectic showed that the MnBi phase projects into the melt ahead of the Bi matrix. Temperature measurements in a Bi melt in the vertical Bridgman-Stockbarger configuration showed temperature variations of up to 25 C. Conclusions are drawn and discussed.

  9. Circadian influences on myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Virag, Jitka A I; Lust, Robert M

    2014-01-01

    Components of circadian rhythm maintenance, or "clock genes," are endogenous entrainable oscillations of about 24 h that regulate biological processes and are found in the suprachaismatic nucleus (SCN) and many peripheral tissues, including the heart. They are influenced by external cues, or Zeitgebers, such as light and heat, and can influence such diverse phenomena as cytokine expression immune cells, metabolic activity of cardiac myocytes, and vasodilator regulation by vascular endothelial cells. While it is known that the central master clock in the SCN synchronizes peripheral physiologic rhythms, the mechanisms by which the information is transmitted are complex and may include hormonal, metabolic, and neuronal inputs. Whether circadian patterns are causally related to the observed periodicity of events, or whether they are simply epi-phenomena is not well established, but a few studies suggest that the circadian effects likely are real in their impact on myocardial infarct incidence. Cycle disturbances may be harbingers of predisposition and subsequent response to acute and chronic cardiac injury, and identifying the complex interactions of circadian rhythms and myocardial infarction may provide insights into possible preventative and therapeutic strategies for susceptible populations. PMID:25400588

  10. Circadian influences on myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Virag, Jitka A. I.; Lust, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Components of circadian rhythm maintenance, or “clock genes,” are endogenous entrainable oscillations of about 24 h that regulate biological processes and are found in the suprachaismatic nucleus (SCN) and many peripheral tissues, including the heart. They are influenced by external cues, or Zeitgebers, such as light and heat, and can influence such diverse phenomena as cytokine expression immune cells, metabolic activity of cardiac myocytes, and vasodilator regulation by vascular endothelial cells. While it is known that the central master clock in the SCN synchronizes peripheral physiologic rhythms, the mechanisms by which the information is transmitted are complex and may include hormonal, metabolic, and neuronal inputs. Whether circadian patterns are causally related to the observed periodicity of events, or whether they are simply epi-phenomena is not well established, but a few studies suggest that the circadian effects likely are real in their impact on myocardial infarct incidence. Cycle disturbances may be harbingers of predisposition and subsequent response to acute and chronic cardiac injury, and identifying the complex interactions of circadian rhythms and myocardial infarction may provide insights into possible preventative and therapeutic strategies for susceptible populations. PMID:25400588

  11. [Latin American malacology. Freshwater mollusks from Argentina].

    PubMed

    Rumi, Alejandra; Gregoric, Diego E Gutiérrez; Núñez, Verónica; Darrigran, Gustavo A

    2008-03-01

    . Species of sanitary interest are the propagators of: schistosomiasis -Biomphalaria peregrina, B. straminea y B. tenagophila, Planorbidae-, fasciolasis -Lymnaea viatrix and L. columnella, Lymnaeidae- and dermatitis -Chilina gibbosa and C. fluminea, Chilinidae. Invasive species are: Corbicula fluminea (Corbiculidae) and Limnoperna fortunei (Mytilidae). The construction of new areas for the protection and conservation of the high risk endemic species of freshwater molluscs is a priority. It is necessary to give special attention to the species of the patagonic mountain range and of the mesopotamic area of the Del Plata Basin. PMID:18624229

  12. Environmental Influences on Genomic Imprinting

    PubMed Central

    Kappil, Maya; Lambertini, Luca; Chen, Jia

    2015-01-01

    Genomic imprinting refers to the epigenetic mechanism that results in the mono-allelic expression of a subset of genes in a parent-of-origin manner. These haploid genes are highly active in the placenta and are functionally implicated in the appropriate development of the fetus. Furthermore, the epigenetic marks regulating imprinted expression patterns are established early in development. These characteristics make genomic imprinting a potentially useful biomarker for environmental insults, especially during the in utero or early development stages, and for health outcomes later in life. Herein, we critically review the current literature regarding environmental influences on imprinted genes and summarize findings that suggest that imprinted loci are sensitive to known teratogenic agents, such as alcohol and tobacco, as well as less established factors with the potential to manipulate the in utero environment, including assisted reproductive technology. Finally, we discuss the potential of genomic imprinting to serve as an environmental sensor during early development. PMID:26029493

  13. Atmospheric composition - Influence of biology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcelroy, M. B.

    1983-01-01

    The variability of atmospheric constituents influenced by biological organisms over various time scales is examined, together with the human contribution to atmospheric sulfur. The biogeochemistry of nitrogen is discussed, with an emphasis on N2O, NO, and microbially mediated reactions in soil and water. Carbon species are bound up mainly in sediments and the deep ocean, but human activities involving combustion may cause a doubling of the atmospheric levels of CO2 in the near future, which could produce a general low-level atmospheric warming. Longer term measurements are required to assess the effects of CH4 augmentation in the atmosphere through fuel combustion. Coal burning effectively doubles the amount of SO2 produced by natural sources, and reduces the pH of rainwater, thus posing hazards to fish, plankton, and mollusc life.

  14. How do stereotypes influence choice?

    PubMed

    Chaxel, Anne-Sophie

    2015-05-01

    In the study reported here, I tracked one process through which stereotypes affect choice. The Implicit Association Test (IAT) and a measurement of predecisional information distortion were used to assess the influence of the association between male gender and career on the evaluation of information related to the job performance of stereotypical targets (male) and nonstereotypical targets (female). When the IAT revealed a strong association between male gender and career and the installed leader in the choice process was a stereotypical target, decision makers supported the leader with more proleader distortion; when the IAT revealed a strong association between male gender and career and the installed leader in the choice process was a nonstereotypical target, decision makers supported the trailer with less antitrailer distortion. A stronger association between male gender and career therefore resulted in an upward shift of the evaluation related to the stereotypical target (both as a trailer and a leader), which subsequently biased choice. PMID:25749702

  15. Human diffusion and city influence.

    PubMed

    Lenormand, Maxime; Gonçalves, Bruno; Tugores, Antònia; Ramasco, José J

    2015-08-01

    Cities are characterized by concentrating population, economic activity and services. However, not all cities are equal and a natural hierarchy at local, regional or global scales spontaneously emerges. In this work, we introduce a method to quantify city influence using geolocated tweets to characterize human mobility. Rome and Paris appear consistently as the cities attracting most diverse visitors. The ratio between locals and non-local visitors turns out to be fundamental for a city to truly be global. Focusing only on urban residents' mobility flows, a city-to-city network can be constructed. This network allows us to analyse centrality measures at different scales. New York and London play a central role on the global scale, while urban rankings suffer substantial changes if the focus is set at a regional level. PMID:26179991

  16. Predator identity influences metacommunity assembly.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Nicole K; Pu, Zhichao; Jiang, Lin

    2016-09-01

    Predation is among the most important biotic factors influencing natural communities, yet we have a rather rudimentary understanding of its role in modulating metacommunity assembly. We experimentally examined the effects of two different predators (a generalist and a specialist) on metacommunity assembly, using protist microcosm metacommunities that varied in predator identity, dispersal among local communities and the history of species colonization into local communities. Generalist predation resulted in reduced α diversity and increased β diversity irrespective of dispersal, likely due to predation-induced stochastic extinction of different prey species in different local communities. Dispersal, however, induced source-sink dynamics in the presence of specialist predators, resulting in higher α diversity and marginally lower β diversity. These results demonstrate the distinct effects of different predators on prey metacommunity assembly, emphasizing the need to explore the role of predator diet breadth in structuring metacommunities. PMID:27349796

  17. Target animacy influences gorilla handedness.

    PubMed

    Forrester, Gillian S; Leavens, David A; Quaresmini, Caterina; Vallortigara, Giorgio

    2011-11-01

    We investigated the unimanual actions of a biological family group of twelve western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) using a methodological approach designed to assess behavior within social context from a bottom-up perspective. Measures of both the lateralization of unimanual actions (left, right) and the target of the action (animate, inanimate) were assessed during dual, synchronized video observations of naturalistic behavior. This paper demonstrates a corelationship between handedness and the animate quality of the target object. Analyses demonstrated a significant interaction between lateralized unimanual actions and target animacy and a right-hand bias for actions directed toward inanimate targets. We suggest that lateralized motor preference reflects the different processing capabilities of the left and right hemispheres, as influenced by the emotive (animate) and/or functional (inanimate) characteristics of the target, respectively. PMID:21562817

  18. Human diffusion and city influence

    PubMed Central

    Lenormand, Maxime; Gonçalves, Bruno; Tugores, Antònia; Ramasco, José J.

    2015-01-01

    Cities are characterized by concentrating population, economic activity and services. However, not all cities are equal and a natural hierarchy at local, regional or global scales spontaneously emerges. In this work, we introduce a method to quantify city influence using geolocated tweets to characterize human mobility. Rome and Paris appear consistently as the cities attracting most diverse visitors. The ratio between locals and non-local visitors turns out to be fundamental for a city to truly be global. Focusing only on urban residents' mobility flows, a city-to-city network can be constructed. This network allows us to analyse centrality measures at different scales. New York and London play a central role on the global scale, while urban rankings suffer substantial changes if the focus is set at a regional level. PMID:26179991

  19. Plasma Influence on Tungsten Powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, A.; Begrambekova, S.; Grunin, A.

    Modifications of tungsten powder comprised of micro particles with dimensions: 1 ± 0.2 μm and 5 ± 1.5 μm ("small" and «large" particles) under the influence of heating, electric field and hydrogen- and argon ion irradiation are investigated in this work. The processes in irradiated powder are described and discussed. Among them there are powder outgassing, particle emission from the powder surface in the electric field, pasting of small particles all over the large ones, integration of the adhered small particles and formation of the uniform layer around the groups of large particles, cone growth on uniform layers, formation of volumetric chains of sticking together tungsten particles and their transformations. Driving forces and processes providing different types of powder modifications and the role of each of them in the specific phenomena are discussed.

  20. Neural mechanisms of social influence in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Welborn, B Locke; Lieberman, Matthew D; Goldenberg, Diane; Fuligni, Andrew J; Galván, Adriana; Telzer, Eva H

    2016-01-01

    During the transformative period of adolescence, social influence plays a prominent role in shaping young people's emerging social identities, and can impact their propensity to engage in prosocial or risky behaviors. In this study, we examine the neural correlates of social influence from both parents and peers, two important sources of influence. Nineteen adolescents (age 16-18 years) completed a social influence task during a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scan. Social influence from both sources evoked activity in brain regions implicated in mentalizing (medial prefrontal cortex, left temporoparietal junction, right temporoparietal junction), reward (ventromedial prefrontal cortex), and self-control (right ventrolateral prefrontal cortex). These results suggest that mental state reasoning, social reward and self-control processes may help adolescents to evaluate others' perspectives and overcome the prepotent force of their own antecedent attitudes to shift their attitudes toward those of others. Findings suggest common neural networks involved in social influence from both parents and peers. PMID:26203050

  1. Trends in the Genetic Influences on Smoking

    PubMed Central

    Boardman, Jason D.; Blalock, Casey L.; Pampel, Fred C.

    2011-01-01

    Using twin pairs from the National Survey of Midlife Development in the United States, we estimate that 35 percent of the variance in regular smoking is due to additive genetic influences. When we disaggregate the sample by birth cohort we witness strong genetic influences on smoking for those born in the 1920s, 1930s, and 1950s, but negligible influences for those born in the 1940s and 1960s. We show that the timing of the first Surgeon General’s Report coincides with an increase in the genetic influences on regular smoking, but subsequent legislation prohibiting smoking in public places has significantly reduced these influences. These results are in line with existing gene-environment interaction theory, and we argue that variation in genetic influences across cohorts makes it difficult and potentially misleading to estimate genetic effects on health behaviors from data obtained from a single point in time. PMID:20420298

  2. Information-based physics, influence, and forces

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, James Lyons; Knuth, Kevin H.

    2015-01-13

    In recent works, Knuth and Bahreyni have demonstrated that the concepts of space and time are emergent in a coarse-grained model of direct particle-particle influence. In addition, Knuth demonstrated that observer-made inferences regarding the free particle, which is defined as a particle that influences others, but is not itself influenced, result in a situation identical to the Feynman checkerboard model of the Dirac equation. This suggests that the same theoretical framework that gives rise to an emergent spacetime is consistent with quantum mechanics. In this paper, we begin to explore the effect of influence on the emergent properties of a particle. This initial study suggests that when a particle is influenced, it is interpreted as accelerating in a manner consistent with special relativity implying that, at least in this situation, influence can be conceived of as a force.

  3. Factors influencing boar sperm cryosurvival.

    PubMed

    Roca, J; Hernández, M; Carvajal, G; Vázquez, J M; Martínez, E A

    2006-10-01

    Optimal sperm cryopreservation is a prerequisite for the sustainable commercial application of frozen-thawed boar semen for AI. Three experiments were performed to identify factors influencing variability of postthaw sperm survival among 464 boar ejaculates. Sperm-rich ejaculate fractions were cryopre-served using a standard freezing-thawing procedure for 0.5-mL plastic straws and computer-controlled freezing equipment. Postthaw sperm motility (assessed with a computer-assisted semen analysis system) and viability (simultaneously probed by flow cytometry analysis after triple-fluorescent stain), evaluated 30 and 150 min postthaw, were used to estimate the success of cryopreservation. In the first experiment, 168 unselected ejaculates (1 ejaculate/boar), from boars of 6 breeds with a wide age range (8 to 48 mo), were cryopreserved over a 12-mo period to evaluate the predictive value of boar (breed and age), semen collection, transport variables (season of ejaculate collection, interval between collections, and ejaculate temperature exposure), initial semen traits, and sperm quality before freezing on sperm survival after freezing-thawing. In Exp. 2, 4 ejaculates from each of 29 boars, preselected according to their initial semen traits and sperm quality before freezing, were collected and frozen over a 6-mo period to evaluate the influence of interboar and intraboar ejaculate variability in the survival of sperm after cryopreservation. In Exp. 3, 12 ejaculates preselected as for Exp. 2, from each of 15 boars with known good sperm cryosurvival, were collected and frozen over a 12-mo period to estimate the sustainability of sperm cryosurvival between ejaculates over time. Boar and semen collection and transport variables were not predictive of sperm cryosurvival among ejaculates. Initial semen traits and sperm quality variables observed before freezing explained 23.2 and 10.9%, respectively, of the variation in postthaw sperm motility and viability. However, more that

  4. [Endocrine factors influencing melanoma progression].

    PubMed

    Dobos, Judit

    2009-03-01

    According to recent findings that beside cancers traditionally considered as hormone-dependent, several other tumor types show different behavior in the two sexes, indicating the possible role of endocrine factors in the course of these diseases. The possibility that endocrine factors may influence the clinical course of human malignant melanoma is suggested by the higher survival rate in premenopausal vs. postmenopausal women or men of any ages. However, investigations on the sex hormone receptor status of human cutaneous melanomas and experiments attempting to support the epidemiological results yielded conflicting results. In our human melanoma cell lines we failed to detect steroid receptors at protein level, while quantitative PCR demonstrated that their mRNA expression level was orders of magnitude lower compared to the positive control cell lines. Sex hormones did not influence the in vitro features of the human melanoma cells considerably. On the other hand, glucocorticoid receptor was present both at mRNA and protein level, although dexamethasone was effective in vitro only at high doses. Our previous experiments showed that intrasplenic injection of human melanoma cells resulted in a significantly higher number of liver colonies in male than in female SCID mice. We now show that this difference evolves during the first day. After injection into the tail vein we did not observe gender-dependent difference in the efficiency of pulmonary colonization. Examining the pattern of metastasis formation after intracardiac injection, we have found differences between the two sexes in the incidence or number of colonies only in the case of the liver but not in other organs. We concluded that the observed phenomenon is specific to the liver; therefore we investigated the effects of 2-methoxyestradiol, an endogenous metabolite of estradiol produced mainly in the liver, with an estrogen receptor-independent antitumor activity. 2ME2 effectively inhibited melanoma cell

  5. Drift of dislocation tripoles under ultrasound influence.

    PubMed

    Murzaev, R T; Bachurin, D V; Nazarov, A A

    2016-01-01

    Numerical simulations of dynamics of different stable dislocation tripoles under influence of monochromatic standing sound wave were performed. The basic conditions necessary for the drift and mutual rearrangements between dislocation structures were investigated. The dependence of the drift velocity of the dislocation tripoles as a function of the frequency and amplitude of the external influence was obtained. The results of the work can be useful in analysis of motion and self-organization of dislocation structure under ultrasound influence. PMID:26278625

  6. Bioimpedance in medicine: Measuring hydration influence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlubik, J.; Hlubik, P.; Lhotska, L.

    2010-04-01

    The aim of the paper is to present results of our ongoing research focused on the influence of body hydration on the body impedance measurements and also on the influence of the frequency used for the measurement. The question is why to measure human body composition and if these values have beneficial results. First goal of the work deals with a question of measuring human body composition. The performed measurements showed certain influence which must be verified by repeated experiments.

  7. Social Influence on Risk Perception During Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Magis-Weinberg, Lucía; Speekenbrink, Maarten; Blakemore, Sarah-Jayne

    2015-01-01

    Adolescence is a period of life in which peer relationships become increasingly important. Adolescents have a greater likelihood of taking risks when they are with peers rather than alone. In this study, we investigated the development of social influence on risk perception from late childhood through adulthood. Five hundred and sixty-three participants rated the riskiness of everyday situations and were then informed about the ratings of a social-influence group (teenagers or adults) before rating each situation again. All age groups showed a significant social-influence effect, changing their risk ratings in the direction of the provided ratings; this social-influence effect decreased with age. Most age groups adjusted their ratings more to conform to the ratings of the adult social-influence group than to the ratings of the teenager social-influence group. Only young adolescents were more strongly influenced by the teenager social-influence group than they were by the adult social-influence group, which suggests that to early adolescents, the opinions of other teenagers about risk matter more than the opinions of adults. PMID:25810453

  8. Structural influences on intensity interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maji, Arup; Harris, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Intensity interferometry (II) is an alternate form of creating images of distant objects. It is significantly less sensitive to atmospheric distortions and aberrations of telescope surfaces than conventional amplitude-based imaging. The deficiencies of II can be overcome as photodetectors' read-out rates are becoming faster and computers more powerful. In recognition of the possibility of very large space-based imaging systems, this paper investigates how the deformation of a large, thin optical surface would influence the accuracy of II. Based on the theoretical foundation of II, an optical ray-tracing algorithm was used to examine how the statistics of a photon stream changes from the source to the detector. Ray-tracing and finite element analyses of the structure were thereafter integrated to quantify how the correlation of the intensity field changes as the reflective structure deforms. Varying the positions of the detector from the focal plane and the surface profile of the mirror provided an understanding and quantification of how the various scenarios affect the statistics of the detected light and the correlation measurement. This research and analysis provide the means to quantify how structural perturbations of focal mirrors affect the statistics of photon stream detections inherent in II instrumentation.

  9. Solar Influence on Future Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsenovic, Pavle; Stenke, Andrea; Rozanov, Eugene; Peter, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Global warming is one of the main threats to mankind. There is growing evidence that anthropogenic greenhouse gases have become the dominant factor, however natural factors such as solar variability cannot be neglected. Sun is a variable star; its activity varies in regular 11-years solar cycles. Longer periods of decreased solar activity are called Grand Solar Minima, which have stronger impact on terrestrial climate. Another natural factor related with solar activity are energetic particles. They can ionize neutral molecules in upper atmosphere and produce NOx and HOx which deplete ozone. We investigate the effect of proposed Grand Solar Minimum in 21st and 22nd century on terrestrial climate and ozone layer. The simulations are performed with different solar forcing scenarios for period of 200 years (2000-2200) using global chemistry-climate model coupled with ocean model (SOCOL-MPIOM). We also deal with problem of representation of middle range energy electrons (30-300 keV) in the model and investigation of their influence on climate.

  10. Environmental factors influencing blackfly populations

    PubMed Central

    Carlsson, G.

    1967-01-01

    Much more information is required on the distribution of blackflies in various parts of the world, and in many cases an adequate methodology for obtaining such information still has to be worked out. A detailed methodology for the collection of information about blackflies is given, which was developed for investigations mainly in the Holarctic regions but is basically applicable to other parts of the world. A brief survey of the population dynamics of various species of blackflies in various parts of the Holarctic regions is given, and the main factors influencing the population dynamics are discussed. Interspecific and intraspecific fluctuations in natural blackfly populations are attributed chiefly to abiotic environmental factors rather than to competition. Larval competition in a given microhabitat is mainly individual, though specimens belonging to a given species may have a slightly more favourable position than others. The use of parasites and in particular the replacement of one species by another are promising methods of blackfly control. Predators are not generally likely to prove useful for this purpose. PMID:5300046